WorldWideScience

Sample records for situ fiberoptic mass

  1. Fiber-optic pH sensor for in-situ applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michels, M.H.; Dureault, B.

    1992-01-01

    An evaluation of the feasibility of a fiber-optic pH sensor was carried out. The pH sensor is composed of an optode connected to the transmitter-receiver apparatus (Optolec H) through a 100 m-long fiber. Three diodes of carefully chosen wavelengths are located in the Optolec H and emit through a bundle of nine fibers to the end of the optode where the oncoming light is reflected on an immobilized pH-indicator-based spherical bead of resin and sent back for analysis to the Optolec H through a central fiber. The influence of ionic strength as well as precision, response time, and lifetime have been determined. This device is to be used for routine in-situ measurements in an underground laboratory devoted to studies in connection with nuclear waste repositories where harsh conditions are encountered for direct collection of waters and traditional post-determination with a pH-meter

  2. High-resolution fiber-optic microendoscopy for in situ cellular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Mark; Yu, Dihua; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2011-01-11

    Many biological and clinical studies require the longitudinal study and analysis of morphology and function with cellular level resolution. Traditionally, multiple experiments are run in parallel, with individual samples removed from the study at sequential time points for evaluation by light microscopy. Several intravital techniques have been developed, with confocal, multiphoton, and second harmonic microscopy all demonstrating their ability to be used for imaging in situ. With these systems, however, the required infrastructure is complex and expensive, involving scanning laser systems and complex light sources. Here we present a protocol for the design and assembly of a high-resolution microendoscope which can be built in a day using off-the-shelf components for under US$5,000. The platform offers flexibility in terms of image resolution, field-of-view, and operating wavelength, and we describe how these parameters can be easily modified to meet the specific needs of the end user. We and others have explored the use of the high-resolution microendoscope (HRME) in in vitro cell culture, in excised and living animal tissues, and in human tissues in vivo. Users have reported the use of several different fluorescent contrast agents, including proflavine, benzoporphyrin-derivative monoacid ring A (BPD-MA), and fluoroscein, all of which have received full, or investigational approval from the FDA for use in human subjects. High-resolution microendoscopy, in the form described here, may appeal to a wide range of researchers working in the basic and clinical sciences. The technique offers an effective and economical approach which complements traditional benchtop microscopy, by enabling the user to perform high-resolution, longitudinal imaging in situ.

  3. Quantitative in situ monitoring of an elevated temperature reaction using a water-cooled mid-infrared fiber-optic probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclaurin, P; Crabb, N C; Wells, I; Worsfold, P J; Coombs, D

    1996-04-01

    A novel water-cooled mid-infrared fiber-optic probe is described which is heatable to 230 °C. The probe has chalcogenide fibers and a ZnSe internal reflection element and is compact and fully flexible, allowing access to a wide range of standard laboratory reaction vessels and fume cupboard arrangements. Performance is demonstrated via the in situ analysis of an acid-catalyzed esterification reaction in toluene at 110 °C, and the results are compared with those from a conventional extractive sampling loop flow cell arrangement. Particular emphasis is given to the quantitative interpretation of the spectroscopic data, using gas chromatographic reference data. Calibration data are presented for univariate and partial least squares models, with an emphasis on procedures for improving the quality of interpreparation calibration and prediction through the use of focused reference analysis regimes. Subset univariate procedures are presented that yield relative errors of spectroscopy combined with bias correction partial least squares procedures for the efficient in situ quantitative analysis of laboratory scale reactions.

  4. Application of fiber-optic attenuated total reflection-FT-IR methods for in situ characterization of protein delivery systems in real time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFearin, Cathryn L; Sankaranarayanan, Jagadis; Almutairi, Adah

    2011-05-15

    A fiber-optic coupled attenuated total reflection (ATR)-FT-IR spectroscopy technique was applied to the study of two different therapeutic delivery systems, acid degradable hydrogels and nanoparticles. Real time exponential release of a model protein, human serum albumin (HSA), was observed from two different polymeric hydrogels formulated with a pH sensitive cross-linker. Spectroscopic examination of nanoparticles formulated with an acid degradable polymer shell and encapsulated HSA exhibited vibrational signatures characteristic of both particle and payload when exposed to lowered pH conditions, demonstrating the ability of this methodology to simultaneously measure phenomena arising from a system with a mixture of components. In addition, thorough characterization of these pH sensitive delivery vehicles without encapsulated protein was also accomplished in order to separate the effects of the payload during degradation. When in situ, real time detection in combination with the ability to specifically identify different components in a mixture without involved sample preparation and minimal sample disturbance is provided, the versatility and suitability of this type of experiment for research in the pharmaceutical field is demonstrated.

  5. Practical in-situ determination of ortho-para hydrogen ratios via fiber-optic based Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, Liese-Marie; Knudson, James N.; Mocko, Michal; Renneke, Richard M.

    2016-02-21

    An experiment was designed and developed to prototype a fiber-optic-based laser system, which measures the ratio of ortho-hydrogen to para-hydrogen in an operating neutron moderator system at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) spallation neutron source. Preliminary measurements resulted in an ortho to para ratio of 3.06:1, which is within acceptable agreement with the previously published ratio. The successful demonstration of Raman Spectroscopy for this measurement is expected to lead to a practical method that can be applied for similar in-situ measurements at operating neutron spallation sources.

  6. In situ calibration of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission and mass spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braymen, Steven D.

    1996-06-11

    A method and apparatus for in situ addition calibration of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer or mass spectrometer using a precision gas metering valve to introduce a volatile calibration gas of an element of interest directly into an aerosol particle stream. The present situ calibration technique is suitable for various remote, on-site sampling systems such as laser ablation or nebulization.

  7. Fiber-Optic Sensor Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Constructs and evaluates fiber-optic sensors for a variety of measurands. These measurands include acoustic, pressure, magnetic, and electric field as well...

  8. Microseism Induced by Transient Release of In Situ Stress During Deep Rock Mass Excavation by Blasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianhua; Lu, Wenbo; Chen, Ming; Yan, Peng; Zhou, Chuangbing

    2013-07-01

    During deep rock mass excavation with the method of drill and blast, accompanying the secession of rock fragments and the formation of a new free surface, in situ stress on this boundary is suddenly released within several milliseconds, which is termed the transient release of in situ stress. In this process, enormous strain energy around the excavation face is instantly released in the form of kinetic energy and it inevitably induces microseismic events in surrounding rock masses. Thus, blasting excavation-induced microseismic vibrations in high-stress rock masses are attributed to the combined action of explosion and the transient release of in situ stress. The intensity of stress release-induced microseisms, which depends mainly on the magnitude of the in situ stress and the dimension of the excavation face, is comparable to that of explosion-induced vibrations. With the methods of time-energy density analysis, amplitude spectrum analysis, and finite impulse response (FIR) digital filter, microseismic vibrations induced by the transient release of in situ stress were identified and separated from recorded microseismic signals during a blast of deep rock masses in the Pubugou Hydropower Station. The results show that the low-frequency component in the microseismic records results mainly from the transient release of in situ stress, while the high-frequency component originates primarily from explosion. In addition, a numerical simulation was conducted to demonstrate the occurrence of microseismic events by the transient release of in situ stress, and the results seem to have confirmed fairly well the separated vibrations from microseismic records.

  9. Multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometry for in situ applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickel, T.; Plaß, W.R.; Lang, J.; Ebert, J.; Geissel, H.; Haettner, E.; Jesch, C.; Lippert, W.; Petrick, M.; Scheidenberger, C.; Yavor, M.I.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • MR-TOF-MS: huge potential in chemistry, medicine, space science, homeland security. • Compact MR-TOF-MS (length ∼30 cm) with very high mass resolving powers (10 5 ). • Combination of high resolving power (>10 5 ), mobility, API for in situ measurements. • Envisaged applications of mobile MR-TOF-MS. -- Abstract: Multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometers (MR-TOF-MS) have recently been installed at different low-energy radioactive ion beam facilities. They are used as isobar separators with high ion capacity and as mass spectrometers with high mass resolving power and accuracy for short-lived nuclei. Furthermore, MR-TOF-MS have a huge potential for applications in other fields, such as chemistry, biology, medicine, space science, and homeland security. The development, commissioning and results of an MR-TOF-MS is presented, which serves as proof-of-principle to show that very high mass resolving powers (∼10 5 ) can be achieved in a compact device (length ∼30 cm). Based on this work, an MR-TOF-MS for in situ application has been designed. For the first time, this device combines very high mass resolving power (>10 5 ), mobility, and an atmospheric pressure inlet in one instrument. It will enable in situ measurements without sample preparation at very high mass accuracy. Envisaged applications of this mobile MR-TOF-MS are discussed

  10. Multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometry for in situ applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickel, T., E-mail: t.dickel@gsi.de [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, 35392 Gießen (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Plaß, W.R. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, 35392 Gießen (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Lang, J.; Ebert, J. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, 35392 Gießen (Germany); Geissel, H.; Haettner, E. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, 35392 Gießen (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Jesch, C.; Lippert, W.; Petrick, M. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, 35392 Gießen (Germany); Scheidenberger, C. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, 35392 Gießen (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Yavor, M.I. [Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Russian Academy of Sciences, 190103 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • MR-TOF-MS: huge potential in chemistry, medicine, space science, homeland security. • Compact MR-TOF-MS (length ∼30 cm) with very high mass resolving powers (10{sup 5}). • Combination of high resolving power (>10{sup 5}), mobility, API for in situ measurements. • Envisaged applications of mobile MR-TOF-MS. -- Abstract: Multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometers (MR-TOF-MS) have recently been installed at different low-energy radioactive ion beam facilities. They are used as isobar separators with high ion capacity and as mass spectrometers with high mass resolving power and accuracy for short-lived nuclei. Furthermore, MR-TOF-MS have a huge potential for applications in other fields, such as chemistry, biology, medicine, space science, and homeland security. The development, commissioning and results of an MR-TOF-MS is presented, which serves as proof-of-principle to show that very high mass resolving powers (∼10{sup 5}) can be achieved in a compact device (length ∼30 cm). Based on this work, an MR-TOF-MS for in situ application has been designed. For the first time, this device combines very high mass resolving power (>10{sup 5}), mobility, and an atmospheric pressure inlet in one instrument. It will enable in situ measurements without sample preparation at very high mass accuracy. Envisaged applications of this mobile MR-TOF-MS are discussed.

  11. Review of in situ derivatization techniques for enhanced bioanalysis using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghdady, Yehia Z; Schug, Kevin A

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and specific analysis of target molecules in complex biological matrices remains a significant challenge, especially when ultra-trace detection limits are required. Liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry is often the method of choice for bioanalysis. Conventional sample preparation and clean-up methods prior to the analysis of biological fluids such as liquid-liquid extraction, solid-phase extraction, or protein precipitation are time-consuming, tedious, and can negatively affect target recovery and detection sensitivity. An alternative or complementary strategy is the use of an off-line or on-line in situ derivatization technique. In situ derivatization can be incorporated to directly derivatize target analytes in their native biological matrices, without any prior sample clean-up methods, to substitute or even enhance the extraction and preconcentration efficiency of these traditional sample preparation methods. Designed appropriately, it can reduce the number of sample preparation steps necessary prior to analysis. Moreover, in situ derivatization can be used to enhance the performance of the developed liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry-based bioanalysis methods regarding stability, chromatographic separation, selectivity, and ionization efficiency. This review presents an overview of the commonly used in situ derivatization techniques coupled to liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry-based bioanalysis to guide and to stimulate future research. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Orbitrap mass analyser for in situ characterisation of planetary environments: Performance evaluation of a laboratory prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briois, Christelle; Thissen, Roland; Thirkell, Laurent; Aradj, Kenzi; Bouabdellah, Abdel; Boukrara, Amirouche; Carrasco, Nathalie; Chalumeau, Gilles; Chapelon, Olivier; Colin, Fabrice; Coll, Patrice; Cottin, Hervé; Engrand, Cécile; Grand, Noel; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Orthous-Daunay, François-Régis; Pennanech, Cyril; Szopa, Cyril; Vuitton, Véronique; Zapf, Pascal; Makarov, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    For decades of space exploration, mass spectrometry has proven to be a reliable instrumentation for the characterisation of the nature and energy of ionic and neutral, atomic and molecular species in the interplanetary medium and upper planetary atmospheres. It has been used as well to analyse the chemical composition of planetary and small bodies environments. The chemical complexity of these environments calls for the need to develop a new generation of mass spectrometers with significantly increased mass resolving power. The recently developed OrbitrapTM mass analyser at ultra-high resolution shows promising adaptability to space instrumentation, offering improved performances for in situ measurements. In this article, we report on our project named ;Cosmorbitrap; aiming at demonstrating the adaptability of the Orbitrap technology for in situ space exploration. We present the prototype that was developed in the laboratory for demonstration of both technical feasibility and analytical capabilities. A set of samples containing elements with masses ranging from 9 to 208 u has been used to evaluate the performance of the analyser, in terms of mass resolving power (reaching 474,000 at m/z 9) and ability to discriminate between isobaric interferences, accuracy of mass measurement (below 15 ppm) and determination of relative isotopic abundances (below 5%) of various samples. We observe a good agreement between the results obtained with the prototype and those of a commercial instrument. As the background pressure is a key parameter for in situ exploration of atmosphere planetary bodies, we study the effect of background gas on the performance of the Cosmorbitrap prototype, showing an upper limit for N2 in our set-up at 10-8 mbar. The results demonstrate the strong potential to adapt this technology to space exploration.

  13. Multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometry for in situ applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickel, T.; Plaß, W. R.; Lang, J.; Ebert, J.; Geissel, H.; Haettner, E.; Jesch, C.; Lippert, W.; Petrick, M.; Scheidenberger, C.; Yavor, M. I.

    2013-12-01

    Multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometers (MR-TOF-MS) have recently been installed at different low-energy radioactive ion beam facilities. They are used as isobar separators with high ion capacity and as mass spectrometers with high mass resolving power and accuracy for short-lived nuclei. Furthermore, MR-TOF-MS have a huge potential for applications in other fields, such as chemistry, biology, medicine, space science, and homeland security. The development, commissioning and results of an MR-TOF-MS is presented, which serves as proof-of-principle to show that very high mass resolving powers (∼105) can be achieved in a compact device (length ∼30 cm). Based on this work, an MR-TOF-MS for in situ application has been designed. For the first time, this device combines very high mass resolving power (>105), mobility, and an atmospheric pressure inlet in one instrument. It will enable in situ measurements without sample preparation at very high mass accuracy. Envisaged applications of this mobile MR-TOF-MS are discussed.

  14. A fiberoptic reflection oximeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsman, M L; Knop, N; Kwant, G; Mook, G A; Zijlstra, W G

    1978-03-20

    A catheter tip oximeter is described consisting of a cardiac catheter containing optical fibers, and incandescent light source, a light detection unit and a processing unit. Half of the optical fibers guide the light to the blood at the tip of the catheter, the other half the backscattered (reflected) light to the detection unit. The detection unit contains a dichroic mirror, transmitting most of the light with lambda less than 800 nm and reflecting most of the light with lambda greater than 900 nm, thus splitting the light into two beams. These pass through interference filters with nominal wavelengths of 640 and 920 nm respectively, and are focused on silicium barrier layer photocells. The photocell signals are amplified and fed into a divider giving the ratio of measuring (R640) and compensating (R920) photocell output. The relationship between log R640/R920 and oxygen saturation is represented by a slightly curved line. The relation may be linearized by subtracting a constant voltage from the divided output before taking the logarithm. The slope of the calibration line is dependent on the total haemoglobin concentration. Nonetheless an average calibration line can be used between 70 and 100% oxygen saturation. For 78 measurements of pig blood samples in this range (haemoglobin concentration between 96 and 161 g.1(-1)), the standard deviation of the difference between the fiberoptic oximeter and a Radiometer OSM1 oxygen saturation meter was 1.9% saturation, for 152 samples over the entire saturation range the standard deviation of the difference was 3.1% saturation. The influence of the flow velocity of blood on the light reflection depends on wavelength as well as on oxygen saturation. Therefore, complete compensation for the flow effect is not possible by simple means.

  15. The Laser Ablation Ion Funnel: Sampling for in situ Mass Spectrometry on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Paul V.; Hodyss, Robert; Tang, Keqi; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    A considerable investment has been made by NASA and other space agencies to develop instrumentation suitable for in situ analytical investigation of extra terrestrial bodies including various mass spectrometers (time-of-flight, quadrupole ion trap, quadrupole mass filters, etc.). However, the front-end sample handling that is needed to collect and prepare samples for interrogation by such instrumentation remains underdeveloped. Here we describe a novel approach tailored to the exploration of Mars where ions are created in the ambient atmosphere via laser ablation and then efficiently transported into a mass spectrometer for in situ analysis using an electrodynamic ion funnel. This concept would enable elemental and isotopic analysis of geological samples with the analysis of desorbed organic material a possibility as well. Such an instrument would be suitable for inclusion on all potential missions currently being considered such as the Mid-Range Rover, the Astrobiology Field Laboratory, and Mars Sample Return (i.e., as a sample pre-selection triage instrument), among others.

  16. Time-Dependent Damage Investigation of Rock Mass in an In Situ Experimental Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Quan; Cui, Jie; Chen, Jing

    2012-01-01

    In underground tunnels or caverns, time-dependent deformation or failure of rock mass, such as extending cracks, gradual rock falls, etc., are a costly irritant and a major safety concern if the time-dependent damage of surrounding rock is serious. To understand the damage evolution of rock mass in underground engineering, an in situ experimental testing was carried out in a large belowground tunnel with a scale of 28.5 m in width, 21 m in height and 352 m in length. The time-dependent damage of rock mass was detected in succession by an ultrasonic wave test after excavation. The testing results showed that the time-dependent damage of rock mass could last a long time, i.e., nearly 30 days. Regression analysis of damage factors defined by wave velocity, resulted in the time-dependent evolutional damage equation of rock mass, which corresponded with logarithmic format. A damage viscoelastic-plastic model was developed to describe the exposed time-dependent deterioration of rock mass by field test, such as convergence of time-dependent damage, deterioration of elastic modules and logarithmic format of damage factor. Furthermore, the remedial measures for damaged surrounding rock were discussed based on the measured results and the conception of damage compensation, which provides new clues for underground engineering design.

  17. In situ determination of a rock mass modulus using a high resolution tiltmeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleh, B.; Husein Malkawi, A.I. [University of Jordan, Amman (Jordan); Blum, P.A. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 75 - Paris (France)

    1996-04-01

    A very sensitive, compact tiltmeter made of melted silica, developed for the measurement of small deformations of various civil engineering structures, was described. The instrument is capable of giving a continuous record and was used to establish a new approach to directly evaluating the in situ average elastic rock mass modulus. Such information is important in decision making during the design stages of large civil engineering works, such as dams, nuclear plant facilities, and underground structures. Five tiltmeters were installed on the facades of the Louvre in Paris to study the deformation induced by internal structural work and by the impact of the Paris metro traffic movement. The data was used to determine displacement using the Boussinesq equation. Results were consistent with typical elastic rock-mass modulus for the rock found in the museum`s foundations. 13 refs., 1 tab., 10 figs.

  18. Laser Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry for Future In Situ Planetary Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getty, S. A.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Cornish, T.; Ecelberger, S. A.; Li, X.; Floyd, M. A. Merrill; Chanover, N.; Uckert, K.; Voelz, D.; Xiao, X.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LD-TOF-MS) is a versatile, low-complexity instrument class that holds significant promise for future landed in situ planetary missions that emphasize compositional analysis of surface materials. Here we describe a 5kg-class instrument that is capable of detecting and analyzing a variety of analytes directly from rock or ice samples. Through laboratory studies of a suite of representative samples, we show that detection and analysis of key mineral composition, small organics, and particularly, higher molecular weight organics are well suited to this instrument design. A mass range exceeding 100,000 Da has recently been demonstrated. We describe recent efforts in instrument prototype development and future directions that will enhance our analytical capabilities targeting organic mixtures on primitive and icy bodies. We present results on a series of standards, simulated mixtures, and meteoritic samples.

  19. Rapid characterization of agglomerate aerosols by in situ mass-mobility measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheckman, Jacob H; McMurry, Peter H; Pratsinis, Sotiris E

    2009-07-21

    Transport and physical/chemical properties of nanoparticle agglomerates depend on primary particle size and agglomerate structure (size, fractal dimension, and dynamic shape factor). This research reports on in situ techniques for measuring such properties. Nanoparticle agglomerates of silica were generated by oxidizing hexamethyldisiloxane in a methane/oxygen diffusion flame. Upon leaving the flame, agglomerates of known electrical mobility size were selected with a differential mobility analyzer (DMA), and their mass was measured with an aerosol particle mass analyzer (APM), resulting in their mass fractal dimension, D(f), and dynamic shape factor, chi. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM/TEM) images were used to determine primary particle diameter and to qualitatively investigate agglomerate morphology. The DMA-APM measurements were reproducible within 5%, as determined by multiple measurements on different days under the same flame conditions. The effects of flame process variables (oxygen flow rate and mass production rate) on particle characteristics (D(f), and chi) were determined. All generated particles were fractal-like agglomerates with average primary particle diameters of 12-93 nm and D(f) = 1.7-2.4. Increasing the oxygen flow rate decreased primary particle size and D(f), while it increased chi. Increasing the production rate increased the agglomerate and primary particle sizes, and decreased chi without affecting D(f). The effects of oxygen flow rate and particle production rate on primary particle size reported here are in agreement with ex situ measurements in the literature, while the effect of process variables on agglomerate shape (chi) is demonstrated for the first time to our knowledge.

  20. Fiber-optic seismic sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, G. W.; Udd, E.

    1985-01-01

    A vibration sensor is constructed by providing two preferably matched coils of fiber-optic material. When the sensor experiences vibration, a differential pressure is exerted on the two fiber coils. The differential pressure results in a variation in the relative optical path lengths between the two fibers so that light beams transmitted through the two fibers are differently delayed, the phase difference therebetween being a detectable indication of the vibration applied to the sensor

  1. Fiber-optic based instrumentation for water and air monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacCraith, B.D.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper real-time in-situ water and air monitoring capabilities based on fiber-optic sensing technology are described. This relatively new technology combines advances in fiber optic and optoelectronics with chemical spectorscopic techniques to enable field environmental monitoring of sub ppm quantities of specific pollutants. The advantages of this technology over conventional sampling methods are outlined. As it is the more developed area the emphasis is on water quality monitoring rather than air. Examples of commercially available, soon-to be available and laboratory systems are presented. One such example is a system used to detect hydrocarbon spills and leaking of underground hydrocarbon storage tanks

  2. MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging for Visualizing In Situ Metabolism of Endogenous Metabolites and Dietary Phytochemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Yoshinori; Miura, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the spatial distribution of bioactive small molecules is indispensable for elucidating their biological or pharmaceutical roles. Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) enables determination of the distribution of ionizable molecules present in tissue sections of whole-body or single heterogeneous organ samples by direct ionization and detection. This emerging technique is now widely used for in situ label-free molecular imaging of endogenous or exogenous small molecules. MSI allows the simultaneous visualization of many types of molecules including a parent molecule and its metabolites. Thus, MSI has received much attention as a potential tool for pathological analysis, understanding pharmaceutical mechanisms, and biomarker discovery. On the other hand, several issues regarding the technical limitations of MSI are as of yet still unresolved. In this review, we describe the capabilities of the latest matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-MSI technology for visualizing in situ metabolism of endogenous metabolites or dietary phytochemicals (food factors), and also discuss the technical problems and new challenges, including MALDI matrix selection and metabolite identification, that need to be addressed for effective and widespread application of MSI in the diverse fields of biological, biomedical, and nutraceutical (food functionality) research. PMID:24957029

  3. A fiber-optic polarimetric demonstration kit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eftimov, T; Dimitrova, T L; Ivanov, G

    2012-01-01

    A simple and multifunctional fiber-optic polarimetric kit on the basis of highly birefringent single-mode fibers is presented. The fiber-optic polarimetric kit allows us to perform the following laboratory exercises: (i) fiber excitation and the measurement of numerical aperture, (ii) polarization preservation and (iii) obtain polarization-sensitive fiberized interferometers.

  4. Fiber-optic communication systems

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Govind P

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive account of fiber-optic communication systems. The 3rd edition of this book is used worldwide as a textbook in many universities. This 4th edition incorporates recent advances that have occurred, in particular two new chapters. One deals with the advanced modulation formats (such as DPSK, QPSK, and QAM) that are increasingly being used for improving spectral efficiency of WDM lightwave systems. The second chapter focuses on new techniques such as all-optical regeneration that are under development and likely to be used in future communication systems. All othe

  5. Laser Ablation Electrodynamic Ion Funnel for In Situ Mass Spectrometry on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Paul V.; Hodyss, Robert P.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    A front-end instrument, the laser ablation ion funnel, was developed, which would ionize rock and soil samples in the ambient Martian atmosphere, and efficiently transport the product ions into a mass spectrometer for in situ analysis. Laser ablation creates elemental ions from a solid with a high-power pulse within ambient Mars atmospheric conditions. Ions are captured and focused with an ion funnel into a mass spectrometer for analysis. The electrodynamic ion funnel consists of a series of axially concentric ring-shaped electrodes whose inside diameters (IDs) decrease over the length of the funnel. DC potentials are applied to each electrode, producing a smooth potential slope along the axial direction. Two radio-frequency (RF) AC potentials, equal in amplitude and 180 out of phase, are applied alternately to the ring electrodes. This creates an effective potential barrier along the inner surface of the electrode stack. Ions entering the funnel drift axially under the influence of the DC potential while being restricted radially by the effective potential barrier created by the applied RF. The net result is to effectively focus the ions as they traverse the length of the funnel.

  6. Measuring Mass-Based Hygroscopicity of Atmospheric Particles through in situ Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piens, Dominique` Y.; Kelly, Stephen T.; Harder, Tristan; Petters, Markus D.; O' Brien, Rachel; Wang, Bingbing; Teske, Ken; Dowell, Pat; Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, Mary K.

    2016-04-18

    Quantifying how atmospheric particles interact with water vapor is critical for understanding the effects of aerosols on climate. We present a novel method to measure the mass-based hygroscopicity of particles while characterizing their elemental and carbon functional group compositions. Since mass-based hygroscopicity is insensitive to particle geometry, it is advantageous for probing the hygroscopic behavior of atmospheric particles, which can have irregular morphologies. Combining scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDX), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) analysis, and in situ STXM humidification experiments, this method was validated using laboratory-generated, atmospherically relevant particles. Then, the hygroscopicity and elemental composition of 15 complex atmospheric particles were analyzed by leveraging quantification of C, N, and O from STXM, and complementary elemental quantification from SEM/EDX. We found three types of hygroscopic responses, and correlated high hygroscopicity with Na and Cl content. The mixing state determined for 158 particles broadly agreed with those of the humidified particles, indicating the potential to infer the atmospheric hygroscopic behavior from a selected subset of particles. These methods offer unique quantitative capabilities to characterize and correlate the hygroscopicity and chemistry of individual submicron atmospheric particles.

  7. Analysis of displacement and strain data for the determination of the in-situ deformability of rock masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de la Cruz, R.V.; Karfakis, M.; Kim, K.

    1981-01-01

    The in-situ deformability of a highly jointed basalt rock mass was determined by two distinctly different methods: one, by the NX-borehole jack method where the displacements of opposing curved platens were related to the applied hydraulic pressures, and; two, by the modified Goodman jack method where the tangential strains on the borehole walls were related to the induced tangential stresses. The modulus obtained by the modified Goodman jack method were much higher than those obtained by the NX-borehole jack method. To explain the discrepancy, the influence of fractures and test variables such as depth, orientation, hole number and applied pressure on the calculated modulus of the rock mass were analyzed by factorial analysis and it was found that the orientations and depths of measurement has statistically significant effects. The in-situ deformability values obtained by non-linear regression analysis were also found comparable with other measurements and empirically predicted values for the basalt rock mass

  8. In Situ SIMS and IR Spectroscopy of Well-Defined Surfaces Prepared by Soft Landing of Mass-Selected Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Grant E.; Gunaratne, Kalupathirannehelage Don D.; Laskin, Julia

    2014-06-16

    Soft landing of mass-selected ions onto surfaces is a powerful approach for the highly-controlled preparation of materials that are inaccessible using conventional synthesis techniques. Coupling soft landing with in situ characterization using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) enables analysis of well-defined surfaces under clean vacuum conditions. The capabilities of three soft-landing instruments constructed in our laboratory are illustrated for the representative system of surface-bound organometallics prepared by soft landing of mass-selected ruthenium tris(bipyridine) dications, [Ru(bpy)3]2+, onto carboxylic acid terminated self-assembled monolayer surfaces on gold (COOH-SAMs). In situ time-of-flight (TOF)-SIMS provides insight into the reactivity of the soft-landed ions. In addition, the kinetics of charge reduction, neutralization and desorption occurring on the COOH-SAM both during and after ion soft landing are studied using in situ Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR)-SIMS measurements. In situ IRRAS experiments provide insight into how the structure of organic ligands surrounding metal centers is perturbed through immobilization of organometallic ions on COOH-SAM surfaces by soft landing. Collectively, the three instruments provide complementary information about the chemical composition, reactivity and structure of well-defined species supported on surfaces.

  9. Fiberoptic laryngoscopy under general anesthesia in neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J. Hoeve (Hans); R.H.M. van Poppelen

    1990-01-01

    textabstractAbstract In the Sophia Children's Hospital we perform fiberoptic laryngoscopy in neonates under general anesthesia without the use of muscle relaxants in the diagnostics of functional laryngeal disorders. The necessary diagnostic and anesthetic equipment is described. Special attention

  10. Model test study on propagation law of plane stress wave in jointed rock mass under different in-situ stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qian

    2017-12-01

    The study of propagation law of plane stress wave in jointed rock mass under in-situ stress has important significance for safety excavation of underground rock mass engineering. A model test of the blasting stress waves propagating in the intact rock and jointed rock mass under different in-situ stresses was carried out, and the influencing factors on the propagation law, such as the scale of static loads and the number of joints were studied respectively. The results show that the transmission coefficient of intact rock is larger than that of jointed rock mass under the same loading condition. With the increase of confining pressure, the transmission coefficients of intact rock and jointed rock mass both show an trend of increasing first and then decreasing, and the variation of transmission coefficients in intact rock is smaller than that of jointed rock mass. Transmission coefficient of jointed rock mass decreases with the increase of the number of joints under the same loading condition, when the confining pressure is relatively small, the reduction of transmission coefficients decreases with the increasing of the number of joints, and the variation law of the reduction of transmission coefficients is contrary when the confining pressure is large.

  11. Miniature Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer for In-Situ Resource Utilization, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In situ resource utilization (ISRU) is essential for several of NASA's future flagship missions. Currently envisioned ISRU plants include production of oxygen from...

  12. [The recent development of fiber-optic chemical sensor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Wei, Jian-ping; Yang, Bo; Gao, Zhi-yang; Zhang, Li-wei; Yang, Xue-feng

    2014-08-01

    The present article provides a brief review of recent research on fiber-optic chemical sensor technology and the future development trends. Especially, fiber-optic pH chemical sensor, fiber-optic ion chemicl sensor, and fiber-optic gas chemical sensor are introduced respectively. Sensing film preparation methods such as chemical bonding method and sol-gel method were briefly reviewed. The emergence of new type fiber-microstructured optical fiber opened up a new development direction for fiber-optic chemical sensor. Because of its large inner surface area, flexible design of structure, having internal sensing places in fibers, it has rapidly become an important development direction and research focus of the fiber-optic chemical sensors. The fiber-optic chemical sensor derived from microstructured optical fiber is also discussed in detail. Finally, we look to the future of the fiber-optic chemical sensor.

  13. 21 CFR 876.4530 - Gastroenterology-urology fiberoptic retractor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gastroenterology-urology fiberoptic retractor. 876... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4530 Gastroenterology-urology fiberoptic retractor. (a) Identification. A gastroenterology-urology fiberoptic retractor...

  14. Flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy in respiratory care: Diagnostic yield ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy (FOB) is a key diagnostic and therapeutic procedure in pulmonology. Experience with fiberoptic bronchoscopy is scanty in most developing countries. Objectives: The goal of this study was to report our experience and clinical utility of fiberoptic bronchoscopy. Methods: A review ...

  15. Vertical profiles of aerosol mass concentration derived by unmanned airborne in situ and remote sensing instruments during dust events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamali, Dimitra; Marinou, Eleni; Sciare, Jean; Pikridas, Michael; Kokkalis, Panagiotis; Kottas, Michael; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Tsekeri, Alexandra; Keleshis, Christos; Engelmann, Ronny; Baars, Holger; Ansmann, Albert; Amiridis, Vassilis; Russchenberg, Herman; Biskos, George

    2018-05-01

    In situ measurements using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and remote sensing observations can independently provide dense vertically resolved measurements of atmospheric aerosols, information which is strongly required in climate models. In both cases, inverting the recorded signals to useful information requires assumptions and constraints, and this can make the comparison of the results difficult. Here we compare, for the first time, vertical profiles of the aerosol mass concentration derived from light detection and ranging (lidar) observations and in situ measurements using an optical particle counter on board a UAV during moderate and weak Saharan dust episodes. Agreement between the two measurement methods was within experimental uncertainty for the coarse mode (i.e. particles having radii > 0.5 µm), where the properties of dust particles can be assumed with good accuracy. This result proves that the two techniques can be used interchangeably for determining the vertical profiles of aerosol concentrations, bringing them a step closer towards their systematic exploitation in climate models.

  16. Performance results of a mobile high-resolution MR-TOF mass spectrometer for in-situ analytical mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lippert, Wayne; Lang, Johannes [Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen (Germany); Ayet San Andres, Samuel [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Dickel, Timo; Geissel, Hans; Plass, Wolfgang; Scheidenberger, Christoph [Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen (Germany); GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Yavor, Mikhail [RAS St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    A mobile multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MR-TOF-MS) has been developed which provides a mass resolving power exceeding 250,000 and sub-ppm mass accuracy in a transportable format. Thus it allows resolving isobars and enables accurate determination of the composition and structure of biomolecules. Furthermore the device offers high mass resolving MS/MS capability via selective ion re-trapping and collisional-induced dissociation (CID). An atmospheric pressure interface (API) provides for routine measurements with various atmospheric ion sources. All supply electronics, DAQ and control system are mounted with the spectrometer into a single frame with a total volume of only 0.8 m{sup 3}. With the current system many applications like waste water monitoring at hot spots, mass-based classification of biomolecules and breath analysis are possible. In addition the mass spectrometer is readily scalable and can be adopted and simplified for even more specific use like in space science for instance. A characterization and first performance results are shown, and the implementation of MS/MS in combination with CID is discussed.

  17. DOTS: A High Resolution Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer for In Situ Analysis of the surface samples of Airless Planetary Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briois, Christelle; Thissen, Roland; Engrand, Cécile; Altwegg, Kathrin; Bouabdellah, Abdel; Boukrara, Amirouche; Carrasco, Nathalie; Chapuis, Claude; Cottin, Hervé; Grün, Eberhard; Grand, Noel; Henkel, Hartmut; Kempf, Sascha; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Makarov, Alexander A.; Postber, Frank; Srama, Ralf; Schmidt, Jürgen; Szopa, Cyril; Thirkell, Laurent; Tobie, Gabriel; Wurz, Peter; Zolotov, Mikhail Yu

    2013-04-01

    The dust detectors on board the Ulysses and Galileo spacecraft have shown that the Galilean satellites are surrounded by clouds of sub-micrometer size grains generated by impacts of interplanetary (micro-) meteoroids [1, 2]. In situ chemical analysis from orbit of these ballistic grains ejected from the surface of airless bodies provides a unique opportunity to remotely access the chemical composition of the Jovian moons' surface and subsurface. For Saturn, in situ identification by the Cassini Dust Analyzer (CDA) of sodium in icy grains in the E-Ring and in Enceladus plumes have proven a subsurface liquid water reservoir inside Enceladus [3, 4]. Noticeably, this was not accessible to other in situ or traditional remote sensing techniques. In situ measurements, either during a flyby or from orbit, of grains ejected from the surface, or emerging from the subsurface, of an airless body is a powerful tool to remotely study its surface composition and the nature of its geological activity. Crucial constraints on habitability can thus be determined. Our consortium of laboratories, in collaboration with Thermo Fischer Scientific [5, 6], is currently developing a high mass resolution Fourier Transform (FT) Orbitrap-based mass spectrometer optimized for in situ analysis of dust and icy grains in the environment of Solar System airless bodies. This new generation of dust mass spectrometer was studied in the framework of the Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) instrument study in 2010-2012 and proposed in response to ESA's AO for the JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE) mission [7]. This mass analyser can provide very high mass resolution analysis (M/ΔM reaching 50 000 at m/z 50 Da). DOTS would allow identification of elemental and molecular species with excellent accuracy, in the 20-1000 Da mass range. In the context of the JUICE mission, DOTS would provide decisive information on the surface composition and on the putative liquid oceans in the subsurface of Ganymede

  18. Combined Multipoint Remote and In Situ Observations of the Asymmetric Evolution of a Fast Solar Coronal Mass Ejection

    OpenAIRE

    Rollett, T.; Moestl, C.; Temmer, M.; Frahm, R. A.; Davies, J. A.; Veronig, A. M.; Vrsnak, B.; Amerstorfer, U. V.; Farrugia, C. J.; Zic, T.; Zhang, T. L.

    2014-01-01

    We present an analysis of the fast coronal mass ejection (CME) of 2012 March 7, which was imaged by both STEREO spacecraft and observed in situ by MESSENGER, Venus Express, Wind and Mars Express. Based on detected arrivals at four different positions in interplanetary space, it was possible to strongly constrain the kinematics and the shape of the ejection. Using the white-light heliospheric imagery from STEREO-A and B, we derived two different kinematical profiles for the CME by applying the...

  19. Orbitrap-based mass analyser for in-situ characterization of asteroids: ILMA, Ion Laser Mass Analyser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briois, C.; Cotti, H.; Thirkell, L.; Space Orbitrap Consortium[K. Aradj, French; Bouabdellah, A.; Boukrara, A.; Carrasco, N.; Chalumeau, G.; Chapelon, O.; Colin, F.; Coll, P.; Engrand, C.; Grand, N.; Kukui, A.; Lebreton, J.-P.; Pennanech, C.; Szopa, C.; Thissen, R.; Vuitton, V.; Zapf], P.; Makarov, A.

    2014-07-01

    Since about a decade the boundaries between comets and carbonaceous asteroids are fading [1,2]. No doubt that the Rosetta mission should bring a new wealth of data on the composition of comets. But as promising as it may look, the mass resolving power of the mass spectrometers onboard (so far the best on a space mission) will only be able to partially account for the diversity of chemical structures present. ILMA (Ion-Laser Mass Analyser) is a new generation high mass resolution LDI-MS (Laser Desorption-Ionization Mass Spectrometer) instrument concept using the Orbitrap technique, which has been developed in the frame of the two Marco Polo & Marco Polo-R proposals to the ESA Cosmic Vision program. Flagged by ESA as an instrument concept of interest for the mission in 2012, it has been under study for a few years in the frame of a Research and Technology (R&T) development programme between 5 French laboratories (LPC2E, IPAG, LATMOS, LISA, CSNSM) [3,4], partly funded by the French Space Agency (CNES). The work is undertaken in close collaboration with the Thermo Fisher Scientific Company, which commercialises Orbitrap-based laboratory instruments. The R&T activities are currently concentrating on the core elements of the Orbitrap analyser that are required to reach a sufficient maturity level for allowing design studies of future space instruments. A prototype is under development at LPC2E and a mass resolution (m/Δm FWHM) of 100,000 as been obtained at m/z = 150 for a background pressure of 10^{-8} mbar. ILMA would be a key instrument to measure the molecular, elemental and isotopic composition of objects such as carbonaceous asteroids, comets, or other bodies devoid of atmosphere such as the surface of an icy satellite, the Moon, or Mercury.

  20. Fiber-optic coupled pressure transducer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallman, C.R.; Wingate, F.P.; Ballard, E.O.

    1979-01-01

    A fiber-optic coupled pressure transducer was developed for measurement of pressure transients produced by fast electrical discharges in laser cavities. A detailed description of the design and performance will be given. Shock tube performance and measurements in direct electrical discharge regions will be presented

  1. Overview of Fiber-Optical Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaula, Ramon P.; Moore, Emery L.

    1987-01-01

    Design, development, and sensitivity of sensors using fiber optics reviewed. State-of-the-art and probable future developments of sensors using fiber optics described in report including references to work in field. Serves to update previously published surveys. Systems incorporating fiber-optic sensors used in medical diagnosis, navigation, robotics, sonar, power industry, and industrial controls.

  2. Standing waves in fiber-optic interferometers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Haan, V.; Santbergen, R.; Tijssen, M.; Zeman, M.

    2011-01-01

    A study is presented giving the response of three types of fiber-optic interferometers by which a standing wave through an object is investigated. The three types are a Sagnac, Mach–Zehnder and Michelson–Morley interferometer. The response of the Mach–Zehnder interferometer is similar to the Sagnac

  3. Towards Molecular Characterization of Mineral-Organic Matter Interface Using In Situ Liquid Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Z.; Yu, X. Y.

    2017-12-01

    Organo-Mineral-Microbe interactions in terrestrial ecosystems are of great interest. Quite a few models have been developed through extensive efforts in this field. However, predictions from current models are far from being accurate, and many debates still exist. One of the major reasons is that most experimental data generated from bulk analysis, and the information of molecular dynamics occurring at mineral-organic matter interface is rare. Such information has been difficult to obtain, due to lack of suitable in situ analysis tools. Recently, we have developed in situ liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory1, and it has shown promise to provide both elemental and molecular information at vacuum-liquid and solid-liquid interfaces.2 In this presentation, we demonstrate that in situ liquid SIMS can provide critical molecular information at solid substrate-live biofilm interface.3 Shewanella oneidensis is used as a model micro-organism and silicon nitride as a model mineral surface. Of particular interest, biologically relevant water clusters have been first observed in the living biofilms. Characteristic fragments of biofilm matrix components such as proteins, polysaccharides, and lipids can be molecularly examined. Furthermore, characteristic fatty acids (e.g., palmitic acid), quinolone signal, and riboflavin fragments were found to respond after the biofilm is treated with Cr(VI), leading to biofilm dispersal. Significant changes in water clusters and quorum sensing signals indicative of intercellular communication in the aqueous environment were observed, suggesting that they might result in fatty acid synthesis and inhibition of riboflavin production. The Cr(VI) reduction seems to follow the Mtr pathway leading to Cr(III) formation. Our approach potentially opens a new avenue for in-situ understanding of mineral-organo or mineral-microbe interfaces using in situ liquid SIMS and super resolution fluorescence

  4. Study of water masses variability in the Mediterranean Sea using in-situ data / NEMO-Med12 model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margirier, Félix; Testor, Pierre; Mortier, Laurent; Arsouze, Thomas; Bosse, Anthony; Houpert, Loic; Hayes, Dan

    2016-04-01

    In the past 10 years, numerous observation programs in the Mediterranean deployed autonomous platforms (moorings, argo floats, gliders) and thus considerably increased the number of in-situ observations and the data coverage. In this study, we analyse time series built with profile data on interannual scales. Sorting data in regional boxes, we follow the evolution of different water masses in the basin and generate indexes to characterize their evolution. We then put those indexes in relation with external (atmospheric) forcings and present an intercomparison with the NEMO-Med12 model to estimate both the skill of the model and the relevance of the data-sampling in reproducing the evolution of water masses properties.

  5. Ice particle mass-dimensional parameter retrieval and uncertainty analysis using an Optimal Estimation framework applied to in situ data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhuocan; Mace, Jay; Avalone, Linnea; Wang, Zhien

    2015-04-01

    The extreme variability of ice particle habits in precipitating clouds affects our understanding of these cloud systems in every aspect (i.e. radiation transfer, dynamics, precipitation rate, etc) and largely contributes to the uncertainties in the model representation of related processes. Ice particle mass-dimensional power law relationships, M=a*(D ^ b), are commonly assumed in models and retrieval algorithms, while very little knowledge exists regarding the uncertainties of these M-D parameters in real-world situations. In this study, we apply Optimal Estimation (OE) methodology to infer ice particle mass-dimensional relationship from ice particle size distributions and bulk water contents independently measured on board the University of Wyoming King Air during the Colorado Airborne Multi-Phase Cloud Study (CAMPS). We also utilize W-band radar reflectivity obtained on the same platform (King Air) offering a further constraint to this ill-posed problem (Heymsfield et al. 2010). In addition to the values of retrieved M-D parameters, the associated uncertainties are conveniently acquired in the OE framework, within the limitations of assumed Gaussian statistics. We find, given the constraints provided by the bulk water measurement and in situ radar reflectivity, that the relative uncertainty of mass-dimensional power law prefactor (a) is approximately 80% and the relative uncertainty of exponent (b) is 10-15%. With this level of uncertainty, the forward model uncertainty in radar reflectivity would be on the order of 4 dB or a factor of approximately 2.5 in ice water content. The implications of this finding are that inferences of bulk water from either remote or in situ measurements of particle spectra cannot be more certain than this when the mass-dimensional relationships are not known a priori which is almost never the case.

  6. In situ stresses in rock masses: methodology for its study in tunnel projects in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madirolas Perez, G.; Perucho Martinez, A.

    2014-01-01

    In situ stress is one of the main factors to be taken into account in the design of tunnels, as it can cause inadmissible stresses and strains leading to high deviations in the budgets. For that reason, the stress state is directly introduced into the numerical models used for the design of tunnels. In Spain, although several tunnels have been carried out with an important overburden in tectonically relevant zones, a quantitative determination of the stresses has not been usually included in civil work projects. Therefore, it is considered necessary to implement a routine procedure of study of civil work projects involving tunnels excavated in rock, and a new detailed methodology is proposed. The challenge is that project managers, who face works in which stresses may play a determinant role, may have a practical reference enabling them to optimize available resources and to include the real stress information in the design of underground works. (Author)

  7. In situ analysis of corrosion inhibitors using a portable mass spectrometer with paper spray ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jjunju, Fred P M; Li, Anyin; Badu-Tawiah, Abraham; Wei, Pu; Li, Linfan; Ouyang, Zheng; Roqan, Iman S; Cooks, R Graham

    2013-07-07

    Paper spray (PS) ambient ionization is implemented using a portable mass spectrometer and applied to the detection of alkyl quaternary ammonium salts in a complex oil matrix. These salts are commonly used as active components in the formulation of corrosion inhibitors. They were identified in oil and confirmed by their fragmentation patterns recorded using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The cations of alkyl and benzyl-substituted quaternary ammonium salts showed characteristic neutral losses of CnH2n (n carbon number of the longest chain) and C7H8, respectively. Individual quaternary ammonium compounds were detected at low concentrations (oil samples without prior sample preparation or pre-concentration was also demonstrated using a home-built miniature mass spectrometer at levels below 1 ng μL(-1).

  8. A miniaturized laser-ablation mass spectrometer for in-situ measurements of isotope composition on solar body surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedo, A.; Meyer, S.; Tulej, M.; Neuland, M.; Bieler, A.; Iakovleva, M.; Wurz, P.

    2012-04-01

    The in-situ analysis of extraterrestrial material onboard planetary rovers and landers is of considerable interest for future planetary space missions. Due to the low detection sensitivity of spectroscopic instruments, e.g. α-particle X-ray, γ-ray or neutron spectrometers, it is frequently possible to measure only major/minor elements in extraterrestrial materials. Nevertheless, the knowledge of minor/trace elements is of considerable interest to cosmochemistry. Chemistry puts constraints on the origin of solar system and its evolution enabling also a deeper inside to planetary transformation processes (e.g. volcanic surface alteration, space weathering). The isotopes play special role in analysis of the origin and transformation of planetary matter. They are robust tracers of the early events because their abundances are less disturbed as the elemental once. Nevertheless, if the isotope abundance ratios are fractionated, the underlying chemical and physical processes can be then encoded from the variations of abundance ratios. A detailed analysis of isotopic patterns of radiogenic elements can allow age dating of minerals and temporal evolution of planetary matter. High accuracy and sensitive measurements of isotopic pattern of bio-relevant elements, i.e., sulfur, found on planetary surfaces can be helpful for the identification of possible past and present extraterrestrial life in terms of biomarker identification. Our group has designed a self-optimizing miniaturized laser ablation time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LMS) for in situ planetary measurements (Wurz et al., 2012; Rohner et al., 2003). Initial studies utilizing IR laser radiation for ablation, atomization and ionization of solid materials indicated a high instrumental performance in terms of sensitivity and mass resolution (Tulej et al., 2011). Current studies are conducted with a UV radiation and a high spatial resolution is achieved by focussing the laser beam to 20µm spots onto the sample. The

  9. In-situ Mass Distribution Quotient (iMDQ) - A New Factor to Compare Bioavailability of Pesticides in Soils?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroll, R.; Folberth, C.; Scherb, H.; Suhadolc, M.; Munch, J. C.

    2009-04-01

    Aim of this work was the development of a new non-biological factor to determine microbial in-situ bioavailability of chemicals in soils. Pesticide residues were extracted from ten highly different agricultural soils that had been incubated with the 14C-herbicide isoproturon (IPU) under comparable soil conditions (water tension - 15 kPa; soil density 1.3 g cm 3). Two different pesticide extraction approaches were compared: (i) 14C-Pesticide residues were measured in the pore water (PW) which was extracted from soil by centrifugation; (ii) 14C-Pesticide residues were extracted from soil samples with an excess of water (EEW). We introduce the pesticide's in-situ mass distribution quotient (iMDQ) as a measure for pesticide bioavailability, which is calculated as a quotient of adsorbed and dissolved chemical amounts for both approaches (iMDQPW, iMDQEEW). Pesticide mineralization in soils served as a reference for real microbial availability. A highly significant correlation between iMDQPW and mineralization showed that pore water extraction is adequate to assess IPU bioavailability. In contrast, no correlation exists between IPU mineralization and its extractability from soil with an excess of water. Therefore, it can be concluded that soil equilibration at comparable conditions and subsequent pore water extraction is vital for a isoproturon bioavailability ranking of soils.

  10. Remote in-situ laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, Brian James

    The following dissertation describes the development of methods for performing remote Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) using optical fibers. Studies were performed to determine the optimal excitation and collection parameters for remote LIBS measurements of glasses, soils and paint. A number of fiber-optic LIBS probes were developed and used to characterize various samples by plasma emission spectroscopy. A novel method for launching high-power laser pulses into optical fibers without causing catastrophic failure is introduced. A systematic study of a number of commercially available optical fibers was performed to determine which optical fibers were best suited for delivering high-power laser pulses. The general design of an all fiber-optic LIBS probe is described and applied to the determination of Pb in soil. A fiber-optic probe was developed for the microanalysis of solid samples remotely by LIBS, Raman spectroscopy and Raman imaging. The design of the probe allows for real-time sample imaging in-situ using coherent imaging fibers. This allows for precise atomic emission and Raman measurements to be performed remotely on samples in hostile or inaccessible environments. A novel technique was developed for collecting spectral plasma images using an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF). The spatial and temporal characteristics of the plasma were studied as a function of delay time. From the plasma images the distribution of Pb emission could be determined and fiber-optic designs could be optimized for signal collection. The performance of a two fiber LIBS probe is demonstrated for the determination of the amount of lead in samples of dry paint. It is shown that dry paint samples can be analyzed for their Pb content in-situ using a fiber-optic LIBS probe with detection limits well below the levels currently regulated by the Consumer Products Safety Commission. It is also shown that these measurements can be performed on both latex and enamel paints, and

  11. In situ measurement of the mass concentration of flame-synthesized nanoparticles using quartz-crystal microbalance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hevroni, A; Golan, H; Fialkov, A; Tsionsky, V; Markovich, G; Cheskis, S; Rahinov, I

    2011-01-01

    A novel in situ method for measurement of mass concentration of nanoparticles (NPs) formed in flames is proposed. In this method, the deposition rate of NPs collected by a molecular beam sampling system is measured by quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM). It is the only existing method which allows direct measurement of NP mass concentration profiles in flames. The feasibility of the method was demonstrated by studying iron oxide NP formation in low-pressure methane/oxygen/nitrogen flames doped with iron pentacarbonyl. The system was tested under fuel-lean and fuel-rich flame conditions. Good agreement between measured QCM deposition rates and their estimations obtained by the transmission electron microscopy analysis of samples collected from the molecular beam has been demonstrated. The sensitivity of the method is comparable to that of particle mass spectrometry (PMS). Combination of the QCM technique with PMS and/or optical measurements can provide new qualitative information which is important for elucidation of the mechanisms governing the NP flame synthesis

  12. Concept on groundwater flow and mass transport through heterogeneous porous media and application to in-situ test analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatanaka, Koichiro; Umeki, Hiroyuki.

    1995-01-01

    Generally, geological media is modelled as porous or fractured media depending on their characteristics. Since the channels of groundwater flow and the transport paths are determined by the heterogeneity of the geological media, quantitative understanding of the heterogeneity is an important issue for modelling flow and transport processes through them. Therefore, it becomes popular way to develop statistical identification approaches of the heterogeneous field by using data from in-situ test and conduct validation studies of flow and transport models through the field by comparing with observed data. In this report, the theories of the identification approach and the concept on groundwater flow and mass transport are explained briefly and the application to tracer tests conducted at Grimsel test site, Switzerland, are described. (author)

  13. In situ measurement of the thermal conductivity in propylite rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimooka, Kenji; Araki, Kunio; Suda, Shintaro.

    1982-11-01

    The safety evaluation for the geological disposal of the high level waste becomes an urgent problem to establish the backend of nuclear fuel cycle. The stability of the original host rock and the flow of groundwater will be perturbed by the thermal disturbances from the waste. So the heater experiment at a depth of 90 m below the surface was carried out to study the conduction of decay heat. For measuring the thermal conductivity of propylite rock mass, a cylindrical heater and 13 thermocouples were inserted in 6 boreholes. The power output of the heater was kept at 880 W constant during the experimental periods of 61 days. From the observed temperature rise around the heater, the thermal conductivity 2.1 W/m 0 C was calculated by steady-state calculation. The value of the rock mass was found to be slightly bigger compared with 1.5 - 1.6 W/m 0 C of core samples. (author)

  14. Two-Step Resonance-Enhanced Desorption Laser Mass Spectrometry for In Situ Analysis of Organic-Rich Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getty, S. A.; Grubisic, A.; Uckert, K.; Li, X.; Cornish, T.; Cook, J. E.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.

    2016-01-01

    A wide diversity of planetary surfaces in the solar system represent high priority targets for in situ compositional and contextual analysis as part of future missions. The planned mission portfolio will inform our knowledge of the chemistry at play on Mars, icy moons, comets, and primitive asteroids, which can lead to advances in our understanding of the interplay between inorganic and organic building blocks that led to the evolution of habitable environments on Earth and beyond. In many of these environments, the presence of water or aqueously altered mineralogy is an important indicator of habitable environments that are present or may have been present in the past. As a result, the search for complex organic chemistry that may imply the presence of a feedstock, if not an inventory of biosignatures, is naturally aligned with targeted analyses of water-rich surface materials. Here we describe the two-step laser mass spectrometry (L2MS) analytical technique that has seen broad application in the study of organics in meteoritic samples, now demonstrated to be compatible with an in situ investigation with technique improvements to target high priority planetary environments as part of a future scientific payload. An ultraviolet (UV) pulsed laser is used in previous and current embodiments of laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDMS) to produce ionized species traceable to the mineral and organic composition of a planetary surface sample. L2MS, an advanced technique in laser mass spectrometry, is selective to the aromatic organic fraction of a complex sample, which can provide additional sensitivity and confidence in the detection of specific compound structures. Use of a compact two-step laser mass spectrometer prototype has been previously reported to provide specificity to key aromatic species, such as PAHs, nucleobases, and certain amino acids. Recent improvements in this technique have focused on the interaction between the mineral matrix and the

  15. In situ analysis of corrosion inhibitors using a portable mass spectrometer with paper spray ionization

    KAUST Repository

    Jjunju, Fred Paul Mark; Li, Anyin; Badu-Tawiah, Abraham K.; Wei, Pu; Li, Linfan; Ouyang, Zheng; Roqan, Iman S.; Cooks, Robert Graham

    2013-01-01

    Paper spray (PS) ambient ionization is implemented using a portable mass spectrometer and applied to the detection of alkyl quaternary ammonium salts in a complex oil matrix. These salts are commonly used as active components in the formulation of corrosion inhibitors. They were identified in oil and confirmed by their fragmentation patterns recorded using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The cations of alkyl and benzyl-substituted quaternary ammonium salts showed characteristic neutral losses of CnH2n (n carbon number of the longest chain) and C7H8, respectively. Individual quaternary ammonium compounds were detected at low concentrations (<1 ng μL-1) and over a dynamic range of ∼5 pg μL-1 to 500 pg μL-1 (ppb). Direct detection of these compounds in complex oil samples without prior sample preparation or pre-concentration was also demonstrated using a home-built miniature mass spectrometer at levels below 1 ng μL-1.© 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  16. Development of in-situ monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Bong Soo; Cho, Dong Hyun; Yoo, Wook Jae; Heo, Ji Yeon

    2010-03-01

    Development of in-situ monitoring system using an optical fiber to measure the real time temperature variation of subsurface water for the evaluation of flow characteristics. We describe the feasibility of developing a fiber-optic temperature sensor using a thermochromic material. A sensor-tip is fabricated by mixing of a thermochromic material powder. The relationships between the temperatures and the output voltages of detectors are determined to measure the temperature of water. It is expected that the fiber-optic temperature monitoring sensor using thermochromic material can be used to measure the real time temperature variation of subsurface water

  17. The Interplay of In Situ Stress Ratio and Transverse Isotropy in the Rock Mass on Prestressed Concrete-Lined Pressure Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanjuntak, T. D. Y. F.; Marence, M.; Schleiss, A. J.; Mynett, A. E.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the mechanical and hydraulic behaviour of passively prestressed concrete-lined pressure tunnels embedded in elastic transversely isotropic rocks subjected to non-uniform in situ stresses. Two cases are distinguished based on whether the in situ vertical stress in the rock mass is higher, or lower than the in situ horizontal stress. A two-dimensional finite element model was used to study the influence of dip angle, α, and horizontal-to-vertical stress ratio, k, on the bearing capacity of prestressed concrete-lined pressure tunnels. The study reveals that the in situ stress ratio and the orientation of stratifications in the rock mass significantly affect the load sharing between the rock mass and the lining. The distribution of stresses and deformations as a result of tunnel construction processes exhibits a symmetrical pattern for tunnels embedded in a rock mass with either horizontal or vertical stratification planes, whereas it demonstrates an unsymmetrical pattern for tunnels embedded in a rock mass with inclined stratification planes. The results obtained for a specific value α with coefficient k are identical to that for α + 90° with coefficient 1/ k by rotating the tunnel axis by 90°. The maximum internal water pressure was determined by offsetting the prestress-induced hoop strains at the final lining intrados against the seepage-induced hoop strains. As well as assessing the internal water pressure, this approach is capable of identifying potential locations where longitudinal cracks may occur in the final lining.

  18. A combined model of heat and mass transfer for the in situ extraction of volatile water from lunar regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, P.

    2018-05-01

    Chemical analysis of lunar soil samples often involves thermal processing to extract their volatile constituents, such as loosely adsorbed water. For the characterization of volatiles and their bonding mechanisms it is important to determine their desorption temperature. However, due to the low thermal diffusivity of lunar regolith, it might be difficult to reach a uniform heat distribution in a sample that is larger than only a few particles. Furthermore, the mass transport through such a sample is restricted, which might lead to a significant delay between actual desorption and measurable outgassing of volatiles from the sample. The entire volatiles extraction process depends on the dynamically changing heat and mass transfer within the sample, and is influenced by physical parameters such as porosity, tortuosity, gas density, temperature and pressure. To correctly interpret measurements of the extracted volatiles, it is important to understand the interaction between heat transfer, sorption, and gas transfer through the sample. The present paper discusses the molecular kinetics and mechanisms that are involved in the thermal extraction process and presents a combined parametrical computation model to simulate this process. The influence of water content on the gas diffusivity and thermal diffusivity is discussed and the issue of possible resorption of desorbed molecules within the sample is addressed. Based on the multi-physical computation model, a case study for the ProSPA instrument for in situ analysis of lunar volatiles is presented, which predicts relevant dynamic process parameters, such as gas pressure and process duration.

  19. Fiber-Optic Chemical Sensors and Fiber-Optic Bio-Sensors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospíšilová, M.; Kuncová, Gabriela; Trögl, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 10 (2015), s. 25208-25259 ISSN 1424-8220 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : fiber-optic sensor * chemical sensors * enzymatic sensor Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 2.033, year: 2015

  20. Novel Fiber-Optic Ring Acoustic Emission Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Peng; Han, Xiaole; Xia, Dong; Liu, Taolin; Lang, Hao

    2018-01-13

    Acoustic emission technology has been applied to many fields for many years. However, the conventional piezoelectric acoustic emission sensors cannot be used in extreme environments, such as those with heavy electromagnetic interference, high pressure, or strong corrosion. In this paper, a novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor is proposed. The sensor exhibits high sensitivity, anti-electromagnetic interference, and corrosion resistance. First, the principle of a novel fiber-optic ring sensor is introduced. Different from piezoelectric and other fiber acoustic emission sensors, this novel sensor includes both a sensing skeleton and a sensing fiber. Second, a heterodyne interferometric demodulating method is presented. In addition, a fiber-optic ring sensor acoustic emission system is built based on this method. Finally, fiber-optic ring acoustic emission experiments are performed. The novel fiber-optic ring sensor is glued onto the surface of an aluminum plate. The 150 kHz standard continuous sinusoidal signals and broken lead signals are successfully detected by the novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor. In addition, comparison to the piezoelectric acoustic emission sensor is performed, which shows the availability and reliability of the novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor. In the future, this novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor will provide a new route to acoustic emission detection in harsh environments.

  1. Novel Fiber-Optic Ring Acoustic Emission Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wei

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emission technology has been applied to many fields for many years. However, the conventional piezoelectric acoustic emission sensors cannot be used in extreme environments, such as those with heavy electromagnetic interference, high pressure, or strong corrosion. In this paper, a novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor is proposed. The sensor exhibits high sensitivity, anti-electromagnetic interference, and corrosion resistance. First, the principle of a novel fiber-optic ring sensor is introduced. Different from piezoelectric and other fiber acoustic emission sensors, this novel sensor includes both a sensing skeleton and a sensing fiber. Second, a heterodyne interferometric demodulating method is presented. In addition, a fiber-optic ring sensor acoustic emission system is built based on this method. Finally, fiber-optic ring acoustic emission experiments are performed. The novel fiber-optic ring sensor is glued onto the surface of an aluminum plate. The 150 kHz standard continuous sinusoidal signals and broken lead signals are successfully detected by the novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor. In addition, comparison to the piezoelectric acoustic emission sensor is performed, which shows the availability and reliability of the novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor. In the future, this novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor will provide a new route to acoustic emission detection in harsh environments.

  2. Distributed fiber?optic temperature sensing for hydrologic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Selker, J.S.; Thévenaz, L.; Huwald, H.; Mallet, A.; Luxemburg, W.M.J.; Van de Giesen, N.; Stejskal, M.; Zeman, J.; Westhoff, M.; Parlange, M.B.

    2006-01-01

    Instruments for distributed fiber-optic measurement of temperature are now available with temperature resolution of 0.01°C and spatial resolution of 1 m with temporal resolution of fractions of a minute along standard fiber-optic cables used for communication with lengths of up to 30,000 m. We

  3. Distributed fiber-optic temperature sensing for hydrologic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Selker, John S.; Thévenaz, Luc; Huwald, Hendrik; Mallet, Alfred; Luxemburg, Wim; van de Giesen, Nick C.; Stejskal, Martin; Zeman, Josef; Westhoff, Martijn; Parlange, Marc B.

    2006-01-01

    Instruments for distributed fiber-optic measurement of temperature are now available with temperature resolution of 0.01°C and spatial resolution of 1 m with temporal resolution of fractions of a minute along standard fiber-optic cables used for communication with lengths of up to 30,000 m. We

  4. Molecular beam mass spectrometer equipped with a catalytic wall reactor for in situ studies in high temperature catalysis research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, R.; Ihmann, K.; Ihmann, J.; Jentoft, F.C.; Geske, M.; Taha, A.; Pelzer, K.; Schloegl, R.

    2006-01-01

    A newly developed apparatus combining a molecular beam mass spectrometer and a catalytic wall reactor is described. The setup has been developed for in situ studies of high temperature catalytic reactions (>1000 deg. C), which involve besides surface reactions also gas phase reactions in their mechanism. The goal is to identify gas phase radicals by threshold ionization. A tubular reactor, made from the catalytic material, is positioned in a vacuum chamber. Expansion of the gas through a 100 μm sampling orifice in the reactor wall into differentially pumped nozzle, skimmer, and collimator chambers leads to the formation of a molecular beam. A quadrupole mass spectrometer with electron impact ion source designed for molecular beam inlet and threshold ionization measurements is used as the analyzer. The sampling time from nozzle to detector is estimated to be less than 10 ms. A detection time resolution of up to 20 ms can be reached. The temperature of the reactor is measured by pyrometry. Besides a detailed description of the setup components and the physical background of the method, this article presents measurements showing the performance of the apparatus. After deriving the shape and width of the energy spread of the ionizing electrons from measurements on N 2 and He we estimated the detection limit in threshold ionization measurements using binary mixtures of CO in N 2 to be in the range of several hundreds of ppm. Mass spectra and threshold ionization measurements recorded during catalytic partial oxidation of methane at 1250 deg. C on a Pt catalyst are presented. The detection of CH 3 · radicals is successfully demonstrated

  5. Molecular beam mass spectrometer equipped with a catalytic wall reactor for in situ studies in high temperature catalysis research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, R.; Ihmann, K.; Ihmann, J.; Jentoft, F. C.; Geske, M.; Taha, A.; Pelzer, K.; Schlögl, R.

    2006-05-01

    A newly developed apparatus combining a molecular beam mass spectrometer and a catalytic wall reactor is described. The setup has been developed for in situ studies of high temperature catalytic reactions (>1000°C), which involve besides surface reactions also gas phase reactions in their mechanism. The goal is to identify gas phase radicals by threshold ionization. A tubular reactor, made from the catalytic material, is positioned in a vacuum chamber. Expansion of the gas through a 100μm sampling orifice in the reactor wall into differentially pumped nozzle, skimmer, and collimator chambers leads to the formation of a molecular beam. A quadrupole mass spectrometer with electron impact ion source designed for molecular beam inlet and threshold ionization measurements is used as the analyzer. The sampling time from nozzle to detector is estimated to be less than 10ms. A detection time resolution of up to 20ms can be reached. The temperature of the reactor is measured by pyrometry. Besides a detailed description of the setup components and the physical background of the method, this article presents measurements showing the performance of the apparatus. After deriving the shape and width of the energy spread of the ionizing electrons from measurements on N2 and He we estimated the detection limit in threshold ionization measurements using binary mixtures of CO in N2 to be in the range of several hundreds of ppm. Mass spectra and threshold ionization measurements recorded during catalytic partial oxidation of methane at 1250°C on a Pt catalyst are presented. The detection of CH3• radicals is successfully demonstrated.

  6. Preparing to perform an awake fiberoptic intubation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, M E

    2012-02-03

    Fiberoptically guided tracheal intubation represents one of the most important advances in airway management to occur in the past thirty years. Perhaps its most important role is in management of the anticipated difficult airway. This is a situation in which the dangers of encountering the life-threatening "can\\'t intubate, can\\'t ventilate" situation can be avoided by placement of an endotracheal tube while the patient is awake. Although skill at the procedure of endoscopy is obviously necessary in this setting, these authors hold that success or failure of the technique frequently depends on the adequacy of preparation. These measures include 1) pre-operative assessment of the patient; 2) careful explanation of what lies in store; 3) "setting the stage"; 4) preparing the equipment to be used; and 5) preparing the patient (antisialogue, sedation, application of topical anesthesia to the upper airway). If these preparatory measures are carried out meticulously, the likelihood of performing a successful and comfortable awake fiberoptic tracheal intubation is greatly increased.

  7. Fiber-optic couplers as displacement sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruch, Martin C.; Gerdt, David W.; Adkins, Charles M.

    2003-04-01

    We introduce the novel concept of using a fiber-optic coupler as a versatile displacement sensor. Comparatively long fiber-optic couplers, with a coupling region of approximately 10 mm, are manufactured using standard communication SM fiber and placed in a looped-back configuration. The result is a displacement sensor, which is robust and highly sensitive over a wide dynamic range. This displacement sensor resolves 1-2 μm over distances of 1-1.5 mm and is characterized by the essential absence of a 'spring constant' plaguing other strain gauge-type sensors. Consequently, it is possible to couple to extremely weak vibrations, such as the skin displacement affected by arterial heart beat pulsations. Used as a wrist-worn heartbeat monitor, the fidelity of the arterial pulse signal has been shown to be so high that it is possible to not only determine heartbeat and breathing rates, but to implement a new single-point blood pressure measurement scheme which does not squeeze the arm. In an application as a floor vibration sensor for the non-intrusive monitoring of independently living elderly, the sensor has been shown to resolve the distinct vibration spectra of different persons and different events.

  8. In-situ Mass Spectrometric Determination of Molecular Structural Evolution at the Solid Electrolyte Interphase in Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Zihua; Zhou, Yufan; Yan, Pengfei; Vemuri, Venkata Rama Ses; Xu, Wu; Zhao, Rui; Wang, Xuelin; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Baer, Donald R.; Wang, Chong M.

    2015-08-19

    Dynamic molecular evolution at solid/liquid electrolyte interface is always a mystery for a rechargeable battery due to the challenge to directly probe/observe the solid/liquid interface under reaction conditions, which in essence appears to be similarly true for all the fields involving solid/liquid phases, such as electrocatalysis, electrodeposition, biofuel conversion, biofilm, and biomineralization, We use in-situ liquid secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) for the first time to directly observe the molecular structural evolution at the solid electrode/liquid electrolyte interface for a lithium (Li)-ion battery under dynamic operating conditions. We have discovered that the deposition of Li metal on copper electrode leads to the condensation of solvent molecules around the electrode. Chemically, this layer of solvent condensate tends to deplete the salt anion and with low concentration of Li+ ions, which essentially leads to the formation of a lean electrolyte layer adjacent to the electrode and therefore contributes to the overpotential of the cell. This unprecedented molecular level dynamic observation at the solid electrode/liquid electrolyte interface provides vital chemical information that is needed for designing of better battery chemistry for enhanced performance, and ultimately opens new avenues for using liquid SIMS to probe molecular evolution at solid/liquid interface in general.

  9. In-situ biogas upgrading in thermophilic granular UASB reactor: key factors affecting the hydrogen mass transfer rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassani, Ilaria; Kougias, Panagiotis G; Angelidaki, Irini

    2016-12-01

    Biological biogas upgrading coupling CO 2 with external H 2 to form biomethane opens new avenues for sustainable biofuel production. For developing this technology, efficient H 2 to liquid transfer is fundamental. This study proposes an innovative setup for in-situ biogas upgrading converting the CO 2 in the biogas into CH 4 , via hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. The setup consisted of a granular reactor connected to a separate chamber, where H 2 was injected. Different packing materials (rashig rings and alumina ceramic sponge) were tested to increase gas-liquid mass transfer. This aspect was optimized by liquid and gas recirculation and chamber configuration. It was shown that by distributing H 2 through a metallic diffuser followed by ceramic sponge in a separate chamber, having a volume of 25% of the reactor, and by applying a mild gas recirculation, CO 2 content in the biogas dropped from 42 to 10% and the final biogas was upgraded from 58 to 82% CH 4 content. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Fiber-optic coupling based on nonimaging expanded-beam optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslehi, B; Ng, J; Kasimoff, I; Jannson, T

    1989-12-01

    We have fabricated and experimentally tested low-cost and mass-producible multimode fiber-optic couplers and connectors based on nonimaging beam-expanding optics and Liouville's theorem. Analysis indicates that a pair coupling loss of -0.25 dB can be achieved. Experimentally, we measured insertion losses as low as -0.38 dB. The beam expanders can be mass produced owing to the use of plastic injection-molding fabrication techniques and packaged in standard connector housings. This design is compatible with the fiber geometry and can yield highly stable coupling owing to its high tolerance for misalignments.

  11. Phototype design and testing of two fiber-optic spectrochemical emission sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, K.B.; Nelson, D.A.; Griffin, J.W.; Matson, B.S.; Eschbach, P.A.

    1988-09-01

    A unique radio frequency-induced helium plasma (RFIHP) sensor and a spark discharge (SD) sensor were designed, and prototype units were developed and tested. Both sensors use an atomic excitation source coupled to a fiber-optic cable and optical spectrometer to monitor in situ the emission intensity of selected elements of interest in the ambient air. Potential applications include vadose zone monitoring of volatile species. The RFIHP sensor was designed to measure the total chlorine concentration from carbon tetrachloride (and other volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons), and the SD sensor was designed to measure in situ concentrations of chlorine-containing compounds. The results of this research demonstrate proof of concept of the theory, but suggest further refinements are necessary to achieve detection sensitivities sufficiently low to be useful for monitoring concentrations of selected elements in vadose zone air. 9 refs., 10 figs

  12. Fiber-Optic Chemical Sensors and Fiber-Optic Bio-Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospíšilová, Marie; Kuncová, Gabriela; Trögl, Josef

    2015-09-30

    This review summarizes principles and current stage of development of fiber-optic chemical sensors (FOCS) and biosensors (FOBS). Fiber optic sensor (FOS) systems use the ability of optical fibers (OF) to guide the light in the spectral range from ultraviolet (UV) (180 nm) up to middle infrared (IR) (10 μm) and modulation of guided light by the parameters of the surrounding environment of the OF core. The introduction of OF in the sensor systems has brought advantages such as measurement in flammable and explosive environments, immunity to electrical noises, miniaturization, geometrical flexibility, measurement of small sample volumes, remote sensing in inaccessible sites or harsh environments and multi-sensing. The review comprises briefly the theory of OF elaborated for sensors, techniques of fabrications and analytical results reached with fiber-optic chemical and biological sensors.

  13. Fiber-Optic Chemical Sensors and Fiber-Optic Bio-Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospíšilová, Marie; Kuncová, Gabriela; Trögl, Josef

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes principles and current stage of development of fiber-optic chemical sensors (FOCS) and biosensors (FOBS). Fiber optic sensor (FOS) systems use the ability of optical fibers (OF) to guide the light in the spectral range from ultraviolet (UV) (180 nm) up to middle infrared (IR) (10 µm) and modulation of guided light by the parameters of the surrounding environment of the OF core. The introduction of OF in the sensor systems has brought advantages such as measurement in flammable and explosive environments, immunity to electrical noises, miniaturization, geometrical flexibility, measurement of small sample volumes, remote sensing in inaccessible sites or harsh environments and multi-sensing. The review comprises briefly the theory of OF elaborated for sensors, techniques of fabrications and analytical results reached with fiber-optic chemical and biological sensors. PMID:26437407

  14. Fiber-Optic Chemical Sensors and Fiber-Optic Bio-Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Pospíšilová

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes principles and current stage of development of fiber-optic chemical sensors (FOCS and biosensors (FOBS. Fiber optic sensor (FOS systems use the ability of optical fibers (OF to guide the light in the spectral range from ultraviolet (UV (180 nm up to middle infrared (IR (10 μm and modulation of guided light by the parameters of the surrounding environment of the OF core. The introduction of OF in the sensor systems has brought advantages such as measurement in flammable and explosive environments, immunity to electrical noises, miniaturization, geometrical flexibility, measurement of small sample volumes, remote sensing in inaccessible sites or harsh environments and multi-sensing. The review comprises briefly the theory of OF elaborated for sensors, techniques of fabrications and analytical results reached with fiber-optic chemical and biological sensors.

  15. Mass-induced sea level variations in the Red Sea from GRACE, steric-corrected altimetry, in situ bottom pressure records, and hydrographic observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, W.; Lemoine, J.-M.; Zhong, M.; Hsu, H. T.

    2014-08-01

    An annual amplitude of ∼18 cm mass-induced sea level variations (SLV) in the Red Sea is detected from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites and steric-corrected altimetry from 2003 to 2011. The annual mass variations in the region dominate the mean SLV, and generally reach maximum in late January/early February. The annual steric component of the mean SLV is relatively small (mass-induced SLV. In situ bottom pressure records at the eastern coast of the Red Sea validate the high mass variability observed by steric-corrected altimetry and GRACE. In addition, the horizontal water mass flux of the Red Sea estimated from GRACE and steric-corrected altimetry is validated by hydrographic observations.

  16. COMBINED MULTIPOINT REMOTE AND IN SITU OBSERVATIONS OF THE ASYMMETRIC EVOLUTION OF A FAST SOLAR CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rollett, T.; Möstl, C.; Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.; Amerstorfer, U. V. [IGAM-Kanzelhöhe Observatory, Institute of Physics, University of Graz, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Frahm, R. A. [Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78238 (United States); Davies, J. A. [RAL Space, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Vršnak, B.; Žic, T. [Hvar Observatory, Faculty of Geodesy, University of Zagreb, 1000 Zagreb (Croatia); Farrugia, C. J. [Space Science Center and Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Zhang, T. L., E-mail: tanja.rollett@gmx.at [Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, A-8042 Graz (Austria)

    2014-07-20

    We present an analysis of the fast coronal mass ejection (CME) of 2012  March 7, which was imaged by both STEREO spacecraft and observed in situ by MESSENGER, Venus Express, Wind, and Mars Express. Based on detected arrivals at four different positions in interplanetary space, it was possible to strongly constrain the kinematics and the shape of the ejection. Using the white-light heliospheric imagery from STEREO-A and B, we derived two different kinematical profiles for the CME by applying the novel constrained self-similar expansion method. In addition, we used a drag-based model to investigate the influence of the ambient solar wind on the CME's propagation. We found that two preceding CMEs heading in different directions disturbed the overall shape of the CME and influenced its propagation behavior. While the Venus-directed segment underwent a gradual deceleration (from ∼2700 km s{sup –1} at 15 R {sub ☉} to ∼1500 km s{sup –1} at 154 R {sub ☉}), the Earth-directed part showed an abrupt retardation below 35 R {sub ☉} (from ∼1700 to ∼900 km s{sup –1}). After that, it was propagating with a quasi-constant speed in the wake of a preceding event. Our results highlight the importance of studies concerning the unequal evolution of CMEs. Forecasting can only be improved if conditions in the solar wind are properly taken into account and if attention is also paid to large events preceding the one being studied.

  17. Fiber-optic dosimeters for radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Enbang; Archer, James

    2017-10-01

    According to the figures provided by the World Health Organization, cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide, accounting for 8.8 million deaths in 2015. Radiation therapy, which uses x-rays to destroy or injure cancer cells, has become one of the most important modalities to treat the primary cancer or advanced cancer. The newly developed microbeam radiation therapy (MRT), which uses highly collimated, quasi-parallel arrays of x-ray microbeams (typically 50 μm wide and separated by 400 μm) produced by synchrotron sources, represents a new paradigm in radiotherapy and has shown great promise in pre-clinical studies on different animal models. Measurements of the absorbed dose distribution of microbeams are vitally important for clinical acceptance of MRT and for developing quality assurance systems for MRT, hence are a challenging and important task for radiation dosimetry. On the other hand, during the traditional LINAC based radiotherapy and breast cancer brachytherapy, skin dose measurements and treatment planning also require a high spatial resolution, tissue equivalent, on-line dosimeter that is both economical and highly reliable. Such a dosimeter currently does not exist and remains a challenge in the development of radiation dosimetry. High resolution, water equivalent, optical and passive x-ray dosimeters have been developed and constructed by using plastic scintillators and optical fibers. The dosimeters have peak edge-on spatial resolutions ranging from 50 to 500 microns in one dimension, with a 10 micron resolution dosimeter under development. The developed fiber-optic dosimeters have been test with both LINAC and synchrotron x-ray beams. This work demonstrates that water-equivalent and high spatial resolution radiation detection can be achieved with scintillators and optical fiber systems. Among other advantages, the developed fiber-optic probes are also passive, energy independent, and radiation hard.

  18. [A new age of mass casuality education? : The InSitu project: realistic training in virtual reality environments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, D; Armbruster, W; Vogelgesang, C; Hoffmann, H; Pattar, A; Schmidt, D; Volk, T; Kubulus, D

    2016-09-01

    Chief emergency physicians are regarded as an important element in the care of the injured and sick following mass casualty accidents. Their education is very theoretical; practical content in contrast often falls short. Limitations are usually the very high costs of realistic (large-scale) exercises, poor reproducibility of the scenarios, and poor corresponding results. To substantially improve the educational level because of the complexity of mass casualty accidents, modified training concepts are required that teach the not only the theoretical but above all the practical skills considerably more intensively than at present. Modern training concepts should make it possible for the learner to realistically simulate decision processes. This article examines how interactive virtual environments are applicable for the education of emergency personnel and how they could be designed. Virtual simulation and training environments offer the possibility of simulating complex situations in an adequately realistic manner. The so-called virtual reality (VR) used in this context is an interface technology that enables free interaction in addition to a stereoscopic and spatial representation of virtual large-scale emergencies in a virtual environment. Variables in scenarios such as the weather, the number wounded, and the availability of resources, can be changed at any time. The trainees are able to practice the procedures in many virtual accident scenes and act them out repeatedly, thereby testing the different variants. With the aid of the "InSitu" project, it is possible to train in a virtual reality with realistically reproduced accident situations. These integrated, interactive training environments can depict very complex situations on a scale of 1:1. Because of the highly developed interactivity, the trainees can feel as if they are a direct part of the accident scene and therefore identify much more with the virtual world than is possible with desktop systems

  19. Online analysis by a fiber-optic diode array spectrophotometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Hare, D.R.; Prather, W.S.; O'Rourke, P.E.

    1987-01-01

    An online photometric analyzer has been developed which can make remote measurements over the 350 to 900 nm region at distances of up to 100 feet. The analyzer consists of a commercially available diode array spectrophotometer interfaced to a fiber-optic multiplexer to allow online monitoring of up to ten locations sequentially. The development of the fiber-optic interface is discussed and data from several online applications are presented to demonstrate the capabilities of the measurement system

  20. Impact of In Situ Stress Distribution Characteristics on Jointed Surrounding Rock Mass Stability of an Underground Cavern near a Hillslope Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bangxiang Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a series of numerical simulations are performed to analyze the in situ stress distribution characteristics of the rock mass near different slope angles hillslope surfaces, which are subjected to the vertical gravity stress and different horizontal lateral stresses and the influence which the in situ stress distribution characteristics of 45° hillslope to the integral stability of surrounding rock mass when an underground cavern is excavated considering three different horizontal distances from the underground cavern to the slope surface. It can be concluded from the numerical results that different slope angles and horizontal lateral stresses have a strong impact on the in situ stress distribution and the integral surrounding rock mass stability of the underground cavern when the horizontal distance from the underground cavern to the slope surface is approximately 100 m to 200 m. The relevant results would provide some important constructive suggestions to the engineering site selection and optimization of large-scale underground caverns in hydropower stations.

  1. Co-Registered In Situ Secondary Electron and Mass Spectral Imaging on the Helium Ion Microscope Demonstrated Using Lithium Titanate and Magnesium Oxide Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowsett, D; Wirtz, T

    2017-09-05

    The development of a high resolution elemental imaging platform combining coregistered secondary ion mass spectrometry and high resolution secondary electron imaging is reported. The basic instrument setup and operation are discussed and in situ image correlation is demonstrated on a lithium titanate and magnesium oxide nanoparticle mixture. The instrument uses both helium and neon ion beams generated by a gas field ion source to irradiate the sample. Both secondary electrons and secondary ions may be detected. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is performed using an in-house developed double focusing magnetic sector spectrometer with parallel detection. Spatial resolutions of 10 nm have been obtained in SIMS mode. Both the secondary electron and SIMS image data are very surface sensitive and have approximately the same information depth. While the spatial resolutions are approximately a factor of 10 different, switching between the different images modes may be done in situ and extremely rapidly, allowing for simple imaging of the same region of interest and excellent coregistration of data sets. The ability to correlate mass spectral images on the 10 nm scale with secondary electron images on the nanometer scale in situ has the potential to provide a step change in our understanding of nanoscale phenomena in fields from materials science to life science.

  2. Measurement of the top quark mass using the template method in the lepton plus jets channel with in situ W → jj calibration at CDF-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelman, J.; Brubaker, E.; Kim, Y.K.

    2005-01-01

    We report on a measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton plus jets channel of tt bar events from pp bar collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV. This measurement uses an integrated luminosity of 318 pb -1 data, which brings 138 tt bar candidates separated into four subsamples. A top quark mass is reconstructed for each event by using energy and momentum constraints on the top-quark pair decay products. We also employ the reconstructed mass of hadronic W boson decays W→jj to constrain in situ the largest systematic uncertainty of the top quark mass measurement: the jet energy scale. Monte Carlo templates of the reconstructed top quark and W boson masses are produced as a function of the true top quark mass and the jet energy scale. The distribution of reconstructed top quark and W boson masses in the data are compared to the Monte Carlo templates using a likelihood fit to obtain: M top =173.5 - 3 .8 +3.9 GeV/c 2 . This constitutes the most precise measurement of the top quark mass up to date

  3. Characterization of TiAlN thin film annealed under O2 by in situ time of flight direct recoil spectroscopy/mass spectroscopy of recoiled ions and ex situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tempez, A.; Bensaoula, A.; Schultz, A.

    2002-01-01

    The oxidation of an amorphous TiAlN coating has been studied by in situ direct recoil spectroscopy (DRS) and mass spectroscopy of recoiled ions (MSRI) and ex situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). DRS and MSRI monitored the changes in surface composition as the sample was heated to 460 deg. C under an 18 O 2 pressure of 10 -6 Torr. Angular resolved XPS data were acquired for thickness-dependence information. The initial surface was partially oxidized from air exposure. Both DRS and XPS showed the Al-rich near surface and the presence of N in the subsurface. As shown by DRS and MSRI, oxidation at elevated temperatures yielded surface nitrogen loss and Ti enrichment. XPS confirmed the preferential formation of TiO 2 on the surface. This study also provides a comparison between the direct recoil (neutrals and ions) and the ionic recoil signals. In our conditions, the negative ionic fraction of all elements except H tracks their true surface content variations given by DRS. The results were compared with early work performed on identical samples. In this case the TiAlN film was oxidized with an O 2 pressure in the mTorr range and the surface changes are followed in situ by positive MSRI and XPS. This experiment also indicates that Al and N are buried under TiO 2 but from 600 deg. C

  4. Comparison of laboratory, in situ, and rock mass measurements of the hydraulic conductivity of metamorphic rock at the Savannah River Plant near Aiken, South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marine, I.W.

    1980-01-01

    In situ testing of exploratory wells in metamorphic rock indicates that two types of fracturing occur in the rock mass. Rock containing small openings that permit only extremely slow movement of water is termed virtually impermeable rock. Rock containing openings of sufficient size to permit transmission of water at a significantly faster rate is termed hydraulically transmissive rock. Laboratory methods are unsuitable for measuring hydraulic conductivity in hydraulically transmissive rock; however, for the virtually impermeable rock, values comparable to the in situ tests are obtained. The hydraulic conductivity of the rock mass over a large region is calculated by using the hydraulic gradient, porosity, and regional velocity. This velocity is determined by dividing the inferred travel distance by the age of water which is determined by the helium content of the water. This rock mass hydraulic conductivity value is between the values measured for the two types of fractures, but is closer to the measured value for the virtually impermeable rock. This relationship is attributed to the control of the regional flow rate by the virtually impermeable rock where the discrete fractures do not form a continuous open connection through the entire rock mass. Thus, laboratory methods of measuring permeability in metamorphic rock are of value if they are properly applied

  5. Recent advances in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) for in situ analysis of endogenous molecules in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Liang; Zhang, Yawen; Liu, Yaqin; He, Huixin; Han, Manman; Li, Yanyan; Zeng, Maomao; Wang, Xiaodong

    2018-04-17

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) as a label-free and powerful imaging technique enables in situ evaluation of a tissue metabolome and/or proteome, becoming increasingly popular in the detection of plant endogenous molecules. The characterization of structure and spatial information of endogenous molecules in plants are both very important aspects to better understand the physiological mechanism of plant organism. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) is a commonly-used tissue imaging technique, which requires matrix to assist in situ detection of a variety of molecules on the surface of a tissue section. In previous studies, MALDI-MSI was mostly used for the detection of molecules from animal tissue sections, compared to plant samples due to cell structural limitations, such as plant cuticles, epicuticular waxes, and cell walls. Despite the enormous progress that has been made in tissue imaging, there is still a challenge for MALDI-MSI suitable for the imaging of endogenous compounds in plants. This review summarises the recent advances in MALDI-MSI, focusing on the application of in situ detection of endogenous molecules in different plant organs, i.e. root, stem, leaf, flower, fruit, and seed. Further improvements on instrumentation sensitivity, matrix selection, image processing and sample preparation will expand the application of MALDI-MSI in plant research. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Multivariate reference technique for quantitative analysis of fiber-optic tissue Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergholt, Mads Sylvest; Duraipandian, Shiyamala; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2013-12-03

    We report a novel method making use of multivariate reference signals of fused silica and sapphire Raman signals generated from a ball-lens fiber-optic Raman probe for quantitative analysis of in vivo tissue Raman measurements in real time. Partial least-squares (PLS) regression modeling is applied to extract the characteristic internal reference Raman signals (e.g., shoulder of the prominent fused silica boson peak (~130 cm(-1)); distinct sapphire ball-lens peaks (380, 417, 646, and 751 cm(-1))) from the ball-lens fiber-optic Raman probe for quantitative analysis of fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy. To evaluate the analytical value of this novel multivariate reference technique, a rapid Raman spectroscopy system coupled with a ball-lens fiber-optic Raman probe is used for in vivo oral tissue Raman measurements (n = 25 subjects) under 785 nm laser excitation powers ranging from 5 to 65 mW. An accurate linear relationship (R(2) = 0.981) with a root-mean-square error of cross validation (RMSECV) of 2.5 mW can be obtained for predicting the laser excitation power changes based on a leave-one-subject-out cross-validation, which is superior to the normal univariate reference method (RMSE = 6.2 mW). A root-mean-square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 2.4 mW (R(2) = 0.985) can also be achieved for laser power prediction in real time when we applied the multivariate method independently on the five new subjects (n = 166 spectra). We further apply the multivariate reference technique for quantitative analysis of gelatin tissue phantoms that gives rise to an RMSEP of ~2.0% (R(2) = 0.998) independent of laser excitation power variations. This work demonstrates that multivariate reference technique can be advantageously used to monitor and correct the variations of laser excitation power and fiber coupling efficiency in situ for standardizing the tissue Raman intensity to realize quantitative analysis of tissue Raman measurements in vivo, which is particularly appealing in

  7. Mass-induced sea level variations in the Red Sea from steric-corrected altimetry, GRACE, in-situ bottom pressure records, and hydrographic observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wei; Lemoine, Jean-Michel; Zhong, Min; Xu, Houze

    2014-05-01

    An annual amplitude of ~18 cm mass-induced sea level variations (SLV) in the Red Sea is detected from steric-corrected altimetry and the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites from 2003 to 2011, which dominates the mean sea level in the region. Seawater mass variations here generally reach maximum in late January/early February. The steric component of SLV calculated from oceanographic temperature and salinity data is relatively small and peaks about seven months later than mass variations. The phase difference between the steric SLV and the mass-induced SLV indicates that when the Red Sea gains the mass from inflow water in winter, the steric SLV fall, and vice versa in summer. In-situ bottom pressure records in the eastern coast of the Red Sea validate the high mass variability observed by steric-corrected altimetry and GRACE. Furthermore, we compare the horizontal water mass flux in the Red Sea from steric-corrected altimetry and GRACE with that estimated from hydrographic observations.

  8. The chemical composition and mineralogy of meteorites measured with very high spatial resolution by a laser mass spectrometer for in situ planetary research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigitte Neuland, Maike; Mezger, Klaus; Tulej, Marek; Frey, Samira; Riedo, Andreas; Wurz, Peter; Wiesendanger, Reto

    2017-04-01

    The knowledge of the chemical composition of moons, comets, asteroids or other planetary bodies is of particular importance for the investigation of the origin and evolution of the Solar System. High resolution in situ studies on planetary surfaces can yield important information on surface heterogeneity, basic grain mineralogy and chemical composition of surface and subsurface. In turn, these data are the basis for our understanding of the physical and chemical processes which led to the formation and alteration of planetary material [1]. We investigated samples of Allende and Sayh al Uhaymir with a highly miniaturised laser mass spectrometer (LMS), which has been designed and built for in situ space research [2,3]. Both meteorite samples were investigated with a spatial resolution of about 10μm in lateral direction. The high sensitivity and high dynamic range of the LMS allow for quantitative measurements of the abundances of the rock-forming and minor and trace elements with high accuracy [4]. From the data, the modal mineralogy of micrometre-sized chondrules can be inferred [5], conclusions about the condensation sequence of the material are possible and the sensitivity for radiogenic elements allows for dating analyses of the investigated material. We measured the composition of various chondrules in Allende, offering valuable clues about the condensation sequence of the different components of the meteorite. We explicitly investigated the chemical composition and heterogeneity of the Allende matrix with an accuracy that cannot be reached by the mechanical analysis methods that were and are widely used in meteoritic research. We demonstrate the capabilities for dating analyses with the LMS. By applying the U-Th-dating method, the age of the SaU169 sample could be determined. Our analyses show that the LMS would be a suitable instrument for high-quality quantitative chemical composition measurements on the surface of a celestial body like a planet, moon or

  9. Determination of tributyltin in environmental water matrices using stir bar sorptive extraction with in-situ derivatisation and large volume injection-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neng, N R; Santalla, R P; Nogueira, J M F

    2014-08-01

    Stir bar sorptive extraction with in-situ derivatization using sodium tetrahydridoborate (NaBH4) followed by liquid desorption and large volume injection-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detection under the selected ion monitoring mode (SBSE(NaBH4)in-situ-LD/LVI-GC-MS(SIM)) was successfully developed for the determination of tributyltin (TBT) in environmental water matrices. NaBH4 proved to be an effective and easy in-situ speciation agent for TBT in aqueous media, allowing the formation of adducts with enough stability and suitable polarity for SBSE analysis. Assays performed on water samples spiked at the 10.0μg/L, yielded convenient recoveries (68.2±3.0%), showed good accuracy, suitable precision (RSD<9.0%), low detection limits (23ng/L) and excellent linear dynamic range (r(2)=0.9999) from 0.1 to 170.0µg/L, under optimized experimental conditions. By using the standard addition method, the application of the present methodology to real surface water samples allowed very good performance at the trace level. The proposed methodology proved to be a feasible alternative for routine quality control analysis, easy to implement, reliable and sensitive to monitor TBT in environmental water matrices. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Fiber-Optic Continuous Liquid Sensor for Cryogenic Propellant Gauging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu. Wei

    2010-01-01

    An innovative fiber-optic sensor has been developed for low-thrust-level settled mass gauging with measurement uncertainty optical fiber to measure liquid level and liquid distribution of cryogenic propellants. Every point of the sensing fiber is a point sensor that not only distinguishes liquid and vapor, but also measures temperature. This sensor is able to determine the physical location of each point sensor with 1-mm spatial resolution. Acting as a continuous array of numerous liquid/vapor point sensors, the truly distributed optical sensing fiber can be installed in a propellant tank in the same manner as silicon diode point sensor stripes using only a single feedthrough to connect to an optical signal interrogation unit outside the tank. Either water or liquid nitrogen levels can be measured within 1-mm spatial resolution up to a distance of 70 meters from the optical interrogation unit. This liquid-level sensing technique was also compared to the pressure gauge measurement technique in water and liquid nitrogen contained in a vertical copper pipe with a reasonable degree of accuracy. It has been demonstrated that the sensor can measure liquid levels in multiple containers containing water or liquid nitrogen with one signal interrogation unit. The liquid levels measured by the multiple fiber sensors were consistent with those virtually measured by a ruler. The sensing performance of various optical fibers has been measured, and has demonstrated that they can survive after immersion at cryogenic temperatures. The fiber strength in liquid nitrogen has also been measured. Multiple water level tests were also conducted under various actual and theoretical vibration conditions, and demonstrated that the signal-to-noise ratio under these vibration conditions, insofar as it affects measurement accuracy, is manageable and robust enough for a wide variety of spacecraft applications. A simple solution has been developed to absorb optical energy at the termination of

  11. Mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quigg, Chris

    2007-01-01

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  12. Modeling of coronal mass ejections with the STEREO heliospheric imagers verified with in situ observations by the Heliophysics System Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möstl, Christian; Isavnin, Alexey; Kilpua, Emilia; Bothmer, Volker; Mrotzek, Nicolas; Boakes, Peter; Rodriguez, Luciano; Krupar, Vratislav; Eastwood, Jonathan; Davies, Jackie; Harrison, Richard; Barnes, David; Winslow, Reka; Helcats Team

    2017-04-01

    We present the first study to verify modeling of CMEs as observed by the heliospheric imagers on the two STEREO spacecraft with a large scale dataset of in situ plasma and magnetic field observations from the Heliophysics System Observatory, including MESSENGER, VEX, Wind, and the in situ measurements on the two STEREO spacecraft. To this end, we have established a new interplanetary CME catalog (ICMECAT) for these spacecraft by gathering and updating individual ICME lists. In addition, we have re-calculated the in situ parameters in a consistent way, resulting in 668 events observed between 2007-2015. We then calculated the efficacy of the STEREO/HI instruments for predicting (in hindsight) with the SSEF30 model the arrival time and speed of CMEs as well as hit/miss ratios. We also show how ICMECAT gives decent statistics concerning CME impacts on all of the terrestrial planets, including Mars. The results show some major implications for future heliospheric imagers which may be used for space weather forecasting. Our effort should also serve as a baseline for the upcoming new era in heliospheric science with Solar Orbiter, Solar Probe Plus, BepiColombo returning partly comparable observations in the next decade. The presented work has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/ 2007-2013) under grant agreement No. 606692 [HELCATS].

  13. Detection of polyaromatic compounds using antibody-based fiberoptics fluoroimmunosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vo-Dinh, T.; Tromberg, B.J.; Griffin, G.D.; Ambrose, K.R.; Sepaniak, M.J.; Alarie, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    In this work we have investigated the performance of an antibody-based fiberoptics sensor for the detection of the carcinogen benzo(a)pyrene and its DNA-adduct product BP-tetrol. The excellent sensitivity of this device - femtomole limits of detection for BP - illustrates that it has considerable potential to perform analyses of chemical and biological samples at trace levels in complex matrices. The results indicate that fiberoptics-based fluoroimmunosensors can be useful in a wide spectrum of biochemical and clinical analyses. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  14. Detection of polyaromatic compounds using antibody-based fiberoptics fluoroimmunosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vo-Dinh, T.; Tromberg, B.J.; Griffin, G.D.; Ambrose, K.R.; Sepaniak, M.J.; Alarie, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    In this work we have investigated the performance of an antibody-based fiberoptics sensor for the detection of the carcinogen benzo(a)pyrene and its DNA-adduct product BP-tetrol. The excellent sensitivity of this device - femtomole limits of detection for BP - illustrates that it has considerable potential to perform analyses of chemical and biological samples at trace levels in complex matrices. The results indicate that fiberoptics-based fluoroimmunosensors can be useful in a wide spectrum of biochemical and clinical analyses. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. In-situ nitrite analysis in high level waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Rourke, P.E.; Prather, W.S.; Livingston, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    The Savannah River Site produces special nuclear materials used in the defense of the United States. Most of the processes at SRS are primarily chemical separations and purifications. In-situ chemical analyses help improve the safety, efficiency and quality of these operations. One area where in situ fiberoptic spectroscopy can have a great impact is the management of high level radioactive waste. High level radioactive waste at SRS is stored in more than 50 large waste tanks. The waste exists as a slurry of nitrate salts and metal hydroxides at pH's higher than 10. Sodium Nitrite is added to the tanks as a corrosion inhibitor. In-situ fiberoptic probes are being developed to measure the nitrate, nitrite and hydroxide concentrations in both liquid and solid fractions. Nitrite levels can be measured between 0.01M and 1M in a 1mm pathlength optical cell

  16. X-231A demonstration of in-situ remediation of DNAPL compounds in low permeability media by soil fracturing with thermally enhanced mass recovery or reactive barrier destruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegrist, R.L.; Slack, W.W.; Houk, T.C.

    1998-03-01

    The overall goal of the program of activities is to demonstrate robust and cost-effective technologies for in situ remediation of DNAPL compounds in low permeability media (LPM), including adaptations and enhancements of conventional technologies to achieve improved performance for DNAPLs in LPM. The technologies sought should be potential for application at simple, small sites (e.g., gasoline underground storage tanks) as well as at complex, larger sites (e.g., DOE land treatment units). The technologies involved in the X-231A demonstration at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) utilized subsurface manipulation of the LPM through soil fracturing with thermally enhanced mass recovery or horizontal barrier in place destruction. To enable field evaluation of these approaches, a set of four test cells was established at the X-231A land treatment unit at the DOE PORTS plant in August 1996 and a series of demonstration field activities occurred through December 1997. The principal objectives of the PORTS X-231A demonstration were to: determine and compare the operational features of hydraulic fractures as an enabling technology for steam and hot air enhanced soil vapor extraction and mass recovery, in situ interception and reductive destruction by zero valent iron, and in situ interception and oxidative destruction by potassium permanganate; determine the interaction of the delivered agents with the LPM matrix adjacent to the fracture and within the fractured zone and assess the beneficial modifications to the transport and/or reaction properties of the LPM deposit; and determine the remediation efficiency achieved by each of the technology strategies

  17. Kansas Communication and Instruction System through Fiber-Optic Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansas State Dept. of Education, Topeka.

    Schools and communities will restructure as they move into the next decade. The success of this restructuring will be dependent upon access to and sharing of quality teaching and information through an expanded communication system. One of the major two-way interactive technologies is the fiber-optic cable: a delivery system that will provide…

  18. Distributed Fiber-Optic Sensors for Vibration Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Jin, Baoquan; Bai, Qing; Wang, Yu; Wang, Dong; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-07-26

    Distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors receive extensive investigation and play a significant role in the sensor panorama. Optical parameters such as light intensity, phase, polarization state, or light frequency will change when external vibration is applied on the sensing fiber. In this paper, various technologies of distributed fiber-optic vibration sensing are reviewed, from interferometric sensing technology, such as Sagnac, Mach-Zehnder, and Michelson, to backscattering-based sensing technology, such as phase-sensitive optical time domain reflectometer, polarization-optical time domain reflectometer, optical frequency domain reflectometer, as well as some combinations of interferometric and backscattering-based techniques. Their operation principles are presented and recent research efforts are also included. Finally, the applications of distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors are summarized, which mainly include structural health monitoring and perimeter security, etc. Overall, distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors possess the advantages of large-scale monitoring, good concealment, excellent flexibility, and immunity to electromagnetic interference, and thus show considerable potential for a variety of practical applications.

  19. End-tidal carbon dioxide monitoring during flexible fiberoptic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In recent years, flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy (FFB) has been applied for diagnostic and some therapeutic purposes. During FFB and even in the presence of supplemental oxygen, hypoventilation leading to hypoxia and desaturation may occur; this is aggravated by the use of suction. Arterial oxygen saturation is usually ...

  20. Dustbuster: a New Generation Impact-ionization Time-of-flight Mass Spectrometer for in situ Analysis of Cosmic Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, D. E.; Ahrens, T. J.; Beauchamp, J. L.

    2000-10-01

    We have developed and tested a small impact-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer for analysis of cosmic dust, suitable for use on deep space missions. This mass spectrometer, named Dustbuster, incorporates a large target area and a reflectron, simultaneously optimizing mass resolution, sensitivity, and collection efficiency. Dust particles hitting the 65-cm2 target plate are partially ionized. The resulting ions are accelerated through a modified reflectron that focuses the ions in space and time to produce high-resolution spectra. The instrument, shown below, measures 10 x 10 x 20 cm, has a mass of 500 g, and consumes little power. Laser desorption ionization of metal and mineral samples (embedded in the impact plate) simulates particle impacts for instrument performance tests. Mass resolution in these experiments is near 200, permitting resolution of isotopes. The mass spectrometer can be combined with other instrument components to determine dust particle trajectories and sizes. This project was funded by NASA's Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program.

  1. Development of routines for simultaneous in situ chemical composition and stable Si isotope ratio analysis by femtosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frick, Daniel A., E-mail: dfrick@gfz-potsdam.de [GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Schuessler, Jan A. [GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Blanckenburg, Friedhelm von [GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Institute of Geological Science, Freie Universität Berlin, 12249 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-09-28

    Stable metal (e.g. Li, Mg, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Mo) and metalloid (B, Si, Ge) isotope ratio systems have emerged as geochemical tracers to fingerprint distinct physicochemical reactions. These systems are relevant to many Earth Science questions. The benefit of in situ microscale analysis using laser ablation (LA) over bulk sample analysis is to use the spatial context of different phases in the solid sample to disclose the processes that govern their chemical and isotopic compositions. However, there is a lack of in situ analytical routines to obtain a samples' stable isotope ratio together with its chemical composition. Here, we evaluate two novel analytical routines for the simultaneous determination of the chemical and Si stable isotope composition (δ{sup 30}Si) on the micrometre scale in geological samples. In both routines, multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) is combined with femtosecond-LA, where stable isotope ratios are corrected for mass bias using standard-sample-bracketing with matrix-independent calibration. The first method is based on laser ablation split stream (LASS), where the laser aerosol is split and introduced simultaneously into both the MC-ICP-MS and a quadrupole ICP-MS. The second method is based on optical emission spectroscopy using direct observation of the MC-ICP-MS plasma (LA-MC-ICP-MS|OES). Both methods are evaluated using international geological reference materials. Accurate and precise Si isotope ratios were obtained with an uncertainty typically better than 0.23‰, 2SD, δ{sup 30}Si. With both methods major element concentrations (e.g., Na, Al, Si, Mg, Ca) can be simultaneously determined. However, LASS-ICP-MS is superior over LA-MC-ICP-MS|OES, which is limited by its lower sensitivity. Moreover, LASS-ICP-MS offers trace element analysis down to the μg g{sup −1}-range for more than 28 elements due to lower limits of detection, and with typical uncertainties better than 15%. For in situ

  2. Development of routines for simultaneous in situ chemical composition and stable Si isotope ratio analysis by femtosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frick, Daniel A.; Schuessler, Jan A.; Blanckenburg, Friedhelm von

    2016-01-01

    Stable metal (e.g. Li, Mg, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Mo) and metalloid (B, Si, Ge) isotope ratio systems have emerged as geochemical tracers to fingerprint distinct physicochemical reactions. These systems are relevant to many Earth Science questions. The benefit of in situ microscale analysis using laser ablation (LA) over bulk sample analysis is to use the spatial context of different phases in the solid sample to disclose the processes that govern their chemical and isotopic compositions. However, there is a lack of in situ analytical routines to obtain a samples' stable isotope ratio together with its chemical composition. Here, we evaluate two novel analytical routines for the simultaneous determination of the chemical and Si stable isotope composition (δ 30 Si) on the micrometre scale in geological samples. In both routines, multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) is combined with femtosecond-LA, where stable isotope ratios are corrected for mass bias using standard-sample-bracketing with matrix-independent calibration. The first method is based on laser ablation split stream (LASS), where the laser aerosol is split and introduced simultaneously into both the MC-ICP-MS and a quadrupole ICP-MS. The second method is based on optical emission spectroscopy using direct observation of the MC-ICP-MS plasma (LA-MC-ICP-MS|OES). Both methods are evaluated using international geological reference materials. Accurate and precise Si isotope ratios were obtained with an uncertainty typically better than 0.23‰, 2SD, δ 30 Si. With both methods major element concentrations (e.g., Na, Al, Si, Mg, Ca) can be simultaneously determined. However, LASS-ICP-MS is superior over LA-MC-ICP-MS|OES, which is limited by its lower sensitivity. Moreover, LASS-ICP-MS offers trace element analysis down to the μg g −1 -range for more than 28 elements due to lower limits of detection, and with typical uncertainties better than 15%. For in situ

  3. Dating the Martian meteorite Zagami by the ⁸⁷Rb-⁸⁷Sr isochron method with a prototype in situ resonance ionization mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, F Scott; Levine, Jonathan; Whitaker, Tom J

    2015-01-30

    The geologic history of the Solar System builds on an extensive record of impact flux models, crater counts, and ~270 kg of lunar samples analyzed in terrestrial laboratories. However, estimates of impactor flux may be biased by the fact that most of the dated Apollo samples were only tenuously connected to an assumed geologic context. Moreover, uncertainties in the modeled cratering rates are significant enough to lead to estimated errors for dates on Mars and the Moon of ~1 Ga. Given the great cost of sample return missions, combined with the need to sample multiple terrains on multiple planets, we have developed a prototype instrument that can be used for in situ dating to better constrain the age of planetary samples. We demonstrate the first use of laser ablation resonance ionization mass spectrometry for (87)Rb-(87)Sr isochron dating of geological specimens. The demands of accuracy and precision have required us to meet challenges including regulation of the ambient temperature, measurement of appropriate backgrounds, sufficient ablation laser intensity, avoidance of the defocusing effect of the plasma created by ablation pulses, and shielding of our detector from atoms and ions of other elements. To test whether we could meaningfully date planetary materials, we have analyzed a piece of the Martian meteorite Zagami. In each of four separate measurements we obtained (87)Rb-(87)Sr isochron ages for Zagami consistent with its published age, and, in both of two measurements that reached completion, we obtained better than 200 Ma precision. Combining all our data into a single isochron with 581 spot analyses gives an (87)Rb-(87)Sr age for this specimen of 360 ±90 Ma. Our analyses of the Zagami meteorite represent the first successful application of resonance ionization mass spectrometry to isochron geochronology. Furthermore, the technique is miniaturizable for spaceflight and in situ dating on other planetary bodies. © 2014 The Authors. Rapid Communications in

  4. Online quantitative monitoring of live cell engineered cartilage growth using diffuse fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergholt, Mads S; Albro, Michael B; Stevens, Molly M

    2017-09-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) has the potential to improve the outcome for patients with osteoarthritis (OA). The successful clinical translation of this technique as part of a therapy requires the ability to measure extracellular matrix (ECM) production of engineered tissues in vitro, in order to ensure quality control and improve the likelihood of tissue survival upon implantation. Conventional techniques for assessing the ECM content of engineered cartilage, such as biochemical assays and histological staining are inherently destructive. Raman spectroscopy, on the other hand, represents a non-invasive technique for in situ biochemical characterization. Here, we outline current roadblocks in translational Raman spectroscopy in TE and introduce a comprehensive workflow designed to non-destructively monitor and quantify ECM biomolecules in large (>3 mm), live cell TE constructs online. Diffuse near-infrared fiber-optic Raman spectra were measured from live cell cartilaginous TE constructs over a 56-day culturing period. We developed a multivariate curve resolution model that enabled quantitative biochemical analysis of the TE constructs. Raman spectroscopy was able to non-invasively quantify the ECM components and showed an excellent correlation with biochemical assays for measurement of collagen (R 2  = 0.84) and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) (R 2  = 0.86). We further demonstrated the robustness of this technique for online prospective analysis of live cell TE constructs. The fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy strategy developed in this work offers the ability to non-destructively monitor construct growth online and can be adapted to a broad range of TE applications in regenerative medicine toward controlled clinical translation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Chlorine activation by N2O5: simultaneous, in situ detection of ClNO2 and N2O5 by chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Thornton

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a new method for the simultaneous in situ detection of nitryl chloride (ClNO2 and dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5 using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS. The technique relies on the formation and detection of iodide ion-molecule clusters, I(ClNO2− and I(N2O5−. The novel N2O5 detection scheme is direct. It does not suffer from high and variable chemical interferences, which are associated with the typical method of nitrate anion detection. We address the role of water vapor, CDC electric field strength, and instrument zero determinations, which influence the overall sensitivity and detection limit of this method. For both species, the method demonstrates high sensitivity (>1 Hz/pptv, precision (~10% for 100 pptv in 1 s, and accuracy (~20%, the latter ultimately determined by the nitrogen dioxide (NO2 cylinder calibration standard and characterization of inlet effects. For the typically low background signals (S/N ratios of 2 for 1 pptv in 60 s averages, but uncertainty associated with the instrumental zero currently leads to an ultimate detection limit of ~5 pptv for both species. We validate our approach for the simultaneous in situ measurement of ClNO2 and N2O5 while on board the R/V Knorr as part of the ICEALOT 2008 Field Campaign.

  6. In situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and on-line differential electrochemical mass spectrometry study of the NH3BH3 oxidation reaction on gold electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belén Molina Concha, M.; Chatenet, Marian; Lima, Fabio H.B.; Ticianelli, Edson A.

    2013-01-01

    The ammonia borane (NH 3 BH 3 ) oxidation reaction (ABOR) was studied on gold electrodes using the rotating disk electrode (RDE) setup and coupled physical techniques: on-line differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS) and in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Non-negligible heterogeneous hydrolysis in the low-potential region was asserted via molecular H 2 detection. As a consequence, the number of electron exchanged per BH 3 OH − species is ca. 3 at low potential, and only reaches ca. 6 above 0.6 V vs. RHE. These figures were confirmed by Levich and Koutecki–Levich calculations using the RDE experiments data. The nature of the ABOR intermediates and products was determined using in situ FTIR. While BH 2 species were detected during the ABOR, it seems that its adsorption onto the Au electrode proceeds via the O atom, in opposition to what happens during the borohydride oxidation reaction (BOR). Therefore, it is likely that the mechanism of the ABOR differs from that of the BOR. From the whole set of data (RDE, DEMS, FTIR), a relevant reaction pathway was proposed, including competition between the BH 3 OH − heterogeneous hydrolysis and oxidation at low potential, and preponderant oxidation at higher potential. Finally, a simplified kinetic modeling accounting with this reaction pathway was proposed, which nicely fits the stationary (i vs. E) ABOR plot

  7. Hollow-fiber-supported liquid phase microextraction with in situ derivatization and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for determination of chlorophenols in human urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Rie; Kawaguchi, Migaku; Honda, Hidehiro; Koganei, Youji; Okanouchi, Noriya; Sakui, Norihiro; Saito, Koichi; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki

    2008-09-01

    A simple and highly sensitive method that involves hollow-fiber-supported liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME) with in situ derivatization and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed for the determination of chlorophenols (CPs) such as 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP), 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TrCP), 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol (TeCP) and pentachlorophenol (PCP) in human urine samples. Human urine samples were enzymatically de-conjugated with beta-glucuronidase and sulfatase. After de-conjugation, HF-LPME with in situ derivatization was performed. After extraction, 2 microl of extract was carefully withdrawn into a syringe and injected into the GC-MS system. The limits of detection (S/N=3) and quantification (S/N>10) of CPs in the human urine samples are 0.1-0.2 ng ml(-1) and 0.5-1 ng ml(-1), respectively. The calibration curve for CPs is linear with a correlation coefficient of >0.99 in the range of 0.5-500 ng ml(-1) for DCP and TrCP, and of 1-500 ng ml(-1) for TeCP and PCP, respectively. The average recoveries of CPs (n=6) in human urine samples are 81.0-104.0% (R.S.D.: 1.9-6.6%) with correction using added surrogate standards. When the proposed method was applied to human urine samples, CPs were detected at sub-ng ml(-1) level.

  8. Discrimination of Bacillus anthracis Spores by Direct in-situ Analysis of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Youngsu; Lee, Jonghee; Kim, Seongsoo

    2013-01-01

    The rapid and accurate identification of biological agents is a critical step in the case of bio-terror and biological warfare attacks. Recently, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry has been widely used for the identification of microorganisms. In this study, we describe a method for the rapid and accurate discrimination of Bacillus anthracis spores using MALDI-TOF MS. Our direct in-situ analysis of MALDI-TOF MS does not involve subsequent high-resolution mass analyses and sample preparation steps. This method allowed the detection of species-specific biomarkers from each Bacillus spores. Especially, B. anthracis spores had specific biomarker peaks at 2503, 3089, 3376, 6684, 6698, 6753, and 6840 m/z. Cluster and PCA analyses of the mass spectra of Bacillus spores revealed distinctively separated clusters and within-groups similarity. Therefore, we believe that this method is effective in the real-time identification of biological warfare agents such as B. anthracis as well as other microorganisms in the field

  9. Discrimination of Bacillus anthracis Spores by Direct in-situ Analysis of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Youngsu; Lee, Jonghee; Kim, Seongsoo [Agency for Defense Development, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    The rapid and accurate identification of biological agents is a critical step in the case of bio-terror and biological warfare attacks. Recently, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry has been widely used for the identification of microorganisms. In this study, we describe a method for the rapid and accurate discrimination of Bacillus anthracis spores using MALDI-TOF MS. Our direct in-situ analysis of MALDI-TOF MS does not involve subsequent high-resolution mass analyses and sample preparation steps. This method allowed the detection of species-specific biomarkers from each Bacillus spores. Especially, B. anthracis spores had specific biomarker peaks at 2503, 3089, 3376, 6684, 6698, 6753, and 6840 m/z. Cluster and PCA analyses of the mass spectra of Bacillus spores revealed distinctively separated clusters and within-groups similarity. Therefore, we believe that this method is effective in the real-time identification of biological warfare agents such as B. anthracis as well as other microorganisms in the field.

  10. In-situ biogas upgrading in thermophilic granular UASB reactor: key factors affecting the hydrogen mass transfer rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassani, Ilaria; Kougias, Panagiotis; Angelidaki, Irini

    2016-01-01

    in the biogas into CH4, via hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. The setup consisted of a granular reactor connected to a separate chamber, where H2 was injected. Different packing materials (rashig rings and alumina ceramic sponge) were tested to increase gas-liquid mass transfer. This aspect was optimized...

  11. Mass Spectrometric Determination of the Effect of Surface Deactivation on Membranes Used for In-Situ Sampling of Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torgny Undin

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a strategy for structured monitoring of surface modifications to control protein adsorption to membrane structures is presented. The already established on-surface enzymatic digestion (oSED method combined with nano-liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS analysis was employed for the analysis of proteins in ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (vCSF from neurointensive care patients. Protein adsorption was studied by in-situ sampling in a temporally resolved manner on both immobilized native and Pluronic-deactivated membranes. Deactivation was significantly reducing the protein adsorption but it also induced novel selective properties of the surface. The proposed versatile strategy will facilitate protein-biomaterial, protein-polymer, protein-protein interaction studies in the future.

  12. First in situ measurement of the vertical distribution of ice volume in a mesospheric ice cloud during the ECOMA/MASS rocket-campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, M.; Strelnikova, I.; Strelnikov, B. [Leibniz-Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Kuehlungsborn (DE)] (and others)

    2009-07-01

    We present in situ observations of mesospheric ice particles with a new particle detector which combines a classical Faraday cup with the active photoionization of particles and subsequent detection of photoelectrons. Our observations of charged particles and free electrons within a decaying PMSE-layer reveal that the presence of charged particles is a necessary but not sufficient condition for the presence of PMSE. That is, additional requirements like a sufficiently large electron density - which we here estimate to be on the order of {proportional_to}100 cm{sup -3} - and the presence of small scale structures (commonly assumed to be caused by turbulence) need to be satisfied. Our photoelectron measurements reveal a very strong horizontal structuring of the investigated ice layer, i.e., a very broad layer (82-88 km) seen on the upleg is replaced by a narrow layer from 84.5-86 km only 50 km apart on the downleg of the rocket flight. Importantly, the qualitative structure of these photoelectron profiles is in remarkable qualitative agreement with photometer measurements on the same rocket thus demonstrating the reliability of this new technique. We then show that the photoelectron currents are a unique function of the ice particle volume density (and hence ice mass) within an uncertainty of only 15% and we derive corresponding altitude profiles of ice volume densities. Derived values are in the range {proportional_to}2-8 x 10{sup -14} cm{sup 3}/cm{sup 3} (corresponding to mass densities of {proportional_to}20-80 ng/m{sup 3}, and water vapor mixing ratios of 3-12 ppm) and are the first such estimates with the unique spatial resolution of an in situ measurement. (orig.)

  13. First in situ measurement of the vertical distribution of ice volume in a mesospheric ice cloud during the ECOMA/MASS rocket-campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rapp

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We present in situ observations of mesospheric ice particles with a new particle detector which combines a classical Faraday cup with the active photoionization of particles and subsequent detection of photoelectrons. Our observations of charged particles and free electrons within a decaying PMSE-layer reveal that the presence of charged particles is a necessary but not sufficient condition for the presence of PMSE. That is, additional requirements like a sufficiently large electron density – which we here estimate to be on the order of ~100 cm−3 – and the presence of small scale structures (commonly assumed to be caused by turbulence need to be satisfied. Our photoelectron measurements reveal a very strong horizontal structuring of the investigated ice layer, i.e., a very broad layer (82–88 km seen on the upleg is replaced by a narrow layer from 84.5–86 km only 50 km apart on the downleg of the rocket flight. Importantly, the qualitative structure of these photoelectron profiles is in remarkable qualitative agreement with photometer measurements on the same rocket thus demonstrating the reliability of this new technique. We then show that the photoelectron currents are a unique function of the ice particle volume density (and hence ice mass within an uncertainty of only 15% and we derive corresponding altitude profiles of ice volume densities. Derived values are in the range ~2–8×10−14 cm3/cm3 (corresponding to mass densities of ~20–80 ng/m3, and water vapor mixing ratios of 3–12 ppm and are the first such estimates with the unique spatial resolution of an in situ measurement.

  14. First in situ measurement of the vertical distribution of ice volume in a mesospheric ice cloud during the ECOMA/MASS rocket-campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rapp

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We present in situ observations of mesospheric ice particles with a new particle detector which combines a classical Faraday cup with the active photoionization of particles and subsequent detection of photoelectrons. Our observations of charged particles and free electrons within a decaying PMSE-layer reveal that the presence of charged particles is a necessary but not sufficient condition for the presence of PMSE. That is, additional requirements like a sufficiently large electron density – which we here estimate to be on the order of ~100 cm−3 – and the presence of small scale structures (commonly assumed to be caused by turbulence need to be satisfied. Our photoelectron measurements reveal a very strong horizontal structuring of the investigated ice layer, i.e., a very broad layer (82–88 km seen on the upleg is replaced by a narrow layer from 84.5–86 km only 50 km apart on the downleg of the rocket flight. Importantly, the qualitative structure of these photoelectron profiles is in remarkable qualitative agreement with photometer measurements on the same rocket thus demonstrating the reliability of this new technique. We then show that the photoelectron currents are a unique function of the ice particle volume density (and hence ice mass within an uncertainty of only 15% and we derive corresponding altitude profiles of ice volume densities. Derived values are in the range ~2–8×10−14 cm3/cm3 (corresponding to mass densities of ~20–80 ng/m3, and water vapor mixing ratios of 3–12 ppm and are the first such estimates with the unique spatial resolution of an in situ measurement.

  15. Tracing phenolic biosynthesis in Vitis vinifera via in situ C-13 labeling and liquid chromatography–diode-array detector–mass spectrometer/mass spectrometer detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chassy, Alexander W.; Adams, Douglas O.; Laurie, V. Felipe; Waterhouse, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► L-Phenyl- 13 C 6 -alanine was incorporated into grape berries, intact on the vine, at two stages of maturity. ► Labeled anthocyanins were synthesized by the berry and quantified by LC–UV/Vis–MS/MS. ► Extremely tight regulation of phenylpropanoid pathways was observed. - Abstract: Phenolic compounds in Vitis vinifera contribute important flavor, functionality, and health qualities to both table and wine grapes. The plant phenolic metabolic pathway has been well characterized, however many important questions remain regarding the influence of environmental conditions on pathway regulation. As a diagnostic for this pathway's regulation, we present a technique to incorporate a stable-isotopic tracer, L-phenyl- 13 C 6 -alanine (Phe 13 ), into grape berries in situ and the accompanying high throughput analytical method based on LC–DAD–MS/MS to quantify and track the label into phenylalanine metabolites. Clusters of V. vinifera cv. Cabernet Sauvignon, either near the onset of ripening or 4 weeks later, were exposed to Phe 13 in the vineyard. Phe 13 was present in berries 9 days afterwards as well as labeled flavonols and anthocyanins, all of which possessed a molecular ion shift of 6 amu. However, nearly all the label was found in anthocyanins, indicating tight regulation of phenolic biosynthesis at this stage of maturity. This method provides a framework for examining the regulation of phenolic metabolism at different stages of maturity or under different environmental conditions. Additionally, this technique could serve as a tool to further probe the metabolism/catabolism of grape phenolics.

  16. Tracing phenolic biosynthesis in Vitis vinifera via in situ C-13 labeling and liquid chromatography-diode-array detector-mass spectrometer/mass spectrometer detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chassy, Alexander W.; Adams, Douglas O. [Department of Viticulture and Enology, One Shields Avenue, University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Laurie, V. Felipe [School of Agricultural Sciences, Universidad de Talca, Talca (Chile); Waterhouse, Andrew L., E-mail: alwaterhouse@ucdavis.edu [Department of Viticulture and Enology, One Shields Avenue, University of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2012-10-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer L-Phenyl-{sup 13}C{sub 6}-alanine was incorporated into grape berries, intact on the vine, at two stages of maturity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Labeled anthocyanins were synthesized by the berry and quantified by LC-UV/Vis-MS/MS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extremely tight regulation of phenylpropanoid pathways was observed. - Abstract: Phenolic compounds in Vitis vinifera contribute important flavor, functionality, and health qualities to both table and wine grapes. The plant phenolic metabolic pathway has been well characterized, however many important questions remain regarding the influence of environmental conditions on pathway regulation. As a diagnostic for this pathway's regulation, we present a technique to incorporate a stable-isotopic tracer, L-phenyl-{sup 13}C{sub 6}-alanine (Phe{sup 13}), into grape berries in situ and the accompanying high throughput analytical method based on LC-DAD-MS/MS to quantify and track the label into phenylalanine metabolites. Clusters of V. vinifera cv. Cabernet Sauvignon, either near the onset of ripening or 4 weeks later, were exposed to Phe{sup 13} in the vineyard. Phe{sup 13} was present in berries 9 days afterwards as well as labeled flavonols and anthocyanins, all of which possessed a molecular ion shift of 6 amu. However, nearly all the label was found in anthocyanins, indicating tight regulation of phenolic biosynthesis at this stage of maturity. This method provides a framework for examining the regulation of phenolic metabolism at different stages of maturity or under different environmental conditions. Additionally, this technique could serve as a tool to further probe the metabolism/catabolism of grape phenolics.

  17. In situ electrochemical-mass spectroscopic investigation of solid electrolyte interphase formation on the surface of a carbon electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourdin, Gerald; Zheng, Dong; Smith, Patricia H.; Qu, Deyang

    2013-01-01

    The energy density of an electrochemical capacitor can be significantly improved by utilizing a lithiated negative electrode and a high surface area positive electrode. During lithiation of the negative carbon electrode, the electrolyte reacts with the electrode surface and undergoes decomposition to form a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer that passivates the surface of the carbon electrode from further reactions between Li and the electrolyte. The reduction reactions that the solvent undergoes also form insoluble and gaseous by-products. In this work, those gaseous by-products generated by reductive decomposition of a carbonate-based electrolyte, 1.2 M LiPF 6 in EC/PC/DEC (3:1:4), were analyzed at different stages during the lithiation process of an amorphous carbon electrode. The stages in the generation of gaseous by-products were determined to come as a result of two, 1-electron reduction steps of the cyclic carbonate components of the electrolyte. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was also used to investigate the two distinct electrochemical processes and the development of the two phases of the SEI structure. This is the first time that the state of an electrochemical cell during the formation of the SEI layer has been systematically correlated with theoretical reaction mechanisms through the use of in situ electrochemical-MS and impedance spectroscopy analyses

  18. In Situ Measurements of Aerosol Mass Concentration and Spectral Absorption at Three Location in and Around Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Z.; Martins, V.; Li, Z.

    2006-12-01

    As a result of population growth and increasing industrialization, air pollution in heavily populated urban areas is one of the central environmental problems of the century. As a part of the MILAGRO (Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations) study, Nuclepore filters were collected in two size ranges (PM10 and PM2.5) at 12 hour intervals at three location in Mexico during March, 2006. Sampling stations were located at the Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo (T0), at the Rancho La Bisnago in the State of Hidalgo (T2) and along the Gulf Coast in Tampico (Tam). Each filter was analyzed for mass concentration, aerosol scattering and absorption efficiencies. Mass concentrations at T0 ranged from 47 to 179 μg/m3 for PM10 with an average concentration of 96 μg/m3, and from 20 to 93 μg/m3 for PM2.5 with an average concentration of 41 μg/m3. Mass concentrations at T2 ranged from 12 to 154 μg/m3 for PM10 with an average concentration of 51 μg/m3, and from 7 to 50 μg/m3 for PM2.5 with an average concentration of 25 μg/m3. Mass concentrations at Tam ranged from 34 to 80 μg/m3 for PM10 with an average concentration of 52 μg/m3, and from 8 to 23 μg/m3 for PM2.5 with an average concentration of 13 μg/m3. While some of the extreme values are likely linked to local emissions, regional air pollution episodes also played important roles. Each of the sampling stations experienced a unique atmospheric condition. The site at T0 was influenced by urban air pollution and dust storms, the site at T2 was significantly less affected by air pollution but more affected by regional dust storms and local dust devils while Tam was influenced by air pollution, dust storms and the natural marine environment. The spectral mass absorption efficiency was measured from 350 to 2500 nm and shows large differences between the absorption properties of soil dust, black carbon, and organic aerosols. The strong spectral differences observed can be related to differences in

  19. Development of a method for in situ measurement of denitrification in aquifers using 15N tracer tests and membrane inlet mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschenbach, W.; Well, R.; Flessa, H.; Walther, W.; Duijnisveld, W. H. M.

    2009-04-01

    In NO3- contaminated aquifers containing reduced compounds like organic carbon or sulfides, denitrification is an intense process. Its characterization is of interest because NO3- consump-tion improves water quality and N2O production can cause emission of this greenhouse gas to the atmosphere. Spatial distribution of NO3- and N2 produced by denitrification in groundwa-ter (excess N2) reflects the NO3- input as well as cumulative denitrification during aquifer pas-sage. Reaction progress (RP) at a given location, i.e. the relative consumption by denitrifica-tion of the NO3- that had been leached to the aquifers, characterizes the stage of the denitrifi-cation process. RP can be derived from the ratio between accumulated gaseous denitrification products and initial NO3- concentrations. The amount and spatial distribution of reduced com-pounds within denitrifying aquifers is not well known. Recent findings from parallel investi-gations on in situ denitrification and reactive compounds suggests that single-well 15N tracer tests might be suitable to characterize the stock of reduced compounds in aquifers (Konrad 2007). The overall objective of our studies is measure the spatial dynamics of denitrification within two sandy aquifers in northern Germany. This includes measurement of the actually occurring denitrification process. Moreover we want to determine the long-term denitrification potential which is governed by the stock of reactive material. Here we present a new approach for in situ-measurement of denitrification at monitoring wells using a combination of 15N-tracer push-pull experiments with in situ analysis of 15N-labled N2 and N2O using membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS). We will present first results from a laboratory test with aquifer mesocosms using the MIMS method. In this test we supplemented aquifer material of two depths (2 and 7 m below surface) of a drinking water catchment in Northwest Germany with K15NO3 solution. After tracer application we

  20. In-Situ Sampling Analysis of a Jupiter Trojan Asteroid by High Resolution Mass Spectrometry in the Solar Power Sail Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebukawa, Y.; Aoki, J.; Ito, M.; Kawai, Y.; Okada, T.; Matsumoto, J.; Yano, H.; Yurimoto, H.; Terada, K.; Toyoda, M.; Yabuta, H.; Nakamura, R.; Cottin, H.; Grand, N.; Mori, O.

    2017-12-01

    The Solar Power Sail (SPS) mission is one of candidates for the upcoming strategic middle-class space exploration to demonstrate the first outer Solar System journey of Japan. The mission concept includes in-situ sampling analysis of the surface and subsurface (up to 1 m) materials of a Jupiter Trojan asteroid using high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The candidates for the HRMS are multi-turn time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MULTUM) type and Cosmorbitrap type. We plan to analyze isotopic and elemental compositions of volatile materials from organic matter, hydrated minerals, and ice (if any), in order to understand origin and evolution of the Jupiter Trojan asteroids. It will provide insights into planet formation/migration theories, evolution and distribution of volatiles in the Solar System, and missing link between asteroids and comets on evolutional. The HRMS system allows to measure H, N, C, O isotopic compositions and elemental compositions of molecules prepared by various pre-MS procedures including stepwise heating up to 600ºC, gas chromatography (GC), and high-temperature pyrolysis with catalyst to decompose the samples into simple gaseous molecules (e.g., H2, CO, and N2) for isotopic ratio analysis. The required mass resolution should be at least 30,000 for analyzing isotopic ratios for simple gaseous molecules. For elemental compositions, mass accuracy of 10 ppm is required to determine elemental compositions for molecules with m/z up to 300 (as well as compound specific isotopic compositions for smaller molecules). Our planned analytical sequences consist of three runs for both surface and subsurface samples. In addition, `sniff mode' which simply introduces environmental gaseous molecules into a HRMS will be done by the system.

  1. Fiber-optic evanescent-field sensor for attitude measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Chen, Shimeng; Liu, Zigeng; Guang, Jianye; Peng, Wei

    2017-11-01

    We proposed a new approach to attitude measurement by an evanescent field-based optical fiber sensing device and demonstrated a liquid pendulum. The device consisted of three fiber-optic evanescent-filed sensors which were fabricated by tapered single mode fibers and immersed in liquid. Three fiber Bragg gratings were used to measure the changes in evanescent field. And their reflection peaks were monitored in real time as measurement signals. Because every set of reflection responses corresponded to a unique attitude, the attitude of the device could be measured by the three fiber-optic evanescent-filed sensors. After theoretical analysis, computerized simulation and experimental verification, regular responses were obtained using this device for attitude measurement. The measurement ranges of dihedral angle and direction angle were 0°-50° and 0°-360°. The device is based on cost-effective power-referenced scheme. It can be used in electromagnetic or nuclear radiation environment.

  2. In situ monitoring of molecular changes during cell differentiation processes in marine macroalgae through mass spectrometric imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Ralf W; Crecelius, Anna C; Schubert, Ulrich S; Wichard, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging (MALDI-MSI) was employed to discriminate between cell differentiation processes in macroalgae. One of the key developmental processes in the algal life cycle is the production of germ cells (gametes and zoids). The gametogenesis of the marine green macroalga Ulva mutabilis (Chlorophyta) was monitored by metabolomic snapshots of the surface, when blade cells differentiate synchronously into gametangia and giving rise to gametes. To establish MSI for macroalgae, dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), a known algal osmolyte, was determined. MSI of the surface of U. mutabilis followed by chemometric data analysis revealed dynamic metabolomic changes during cell differentiation. DMSP and a total of 55 specific molecular biomarkers, which could be assigned to important stages of the gametogenesis, were detected. Our research contributes to the understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying macroalgal cell differentiation. Graphical abstract Molecular changes during cell differentiation of the marine macroalga Ulva were visualized by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging (MALDI-MSI).

  3. In Situ Analysis of Bacterial Lipopeptide Antibiotics by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debois, Delphine; Ongena, Marc; Cawoy, Hélène; De Pauw, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) is a technique developed in the late 1990s enabling the two-dimensional mapping of a broad variety of biomolecules present at the surface of a sample. In many applications including pharmaceutical studies or biomarker discovery, the distribution of proteins, lipids or drugs, and metabolites may be visualized within tissue sections. More recently, MALDI MSI has become increasingly applied in microbiology where the versatility of the technique is perfectly suited to monitor the metabolic dynamics of bacterial colonies. The work described here is focused on the application of MALDI MSI to map secondary metabolites produced by Bacilli, especially lipopeptides, produced by bacterial cells during their interaction with their environment (bacteria, fungi, plant roots, etc.). This chapter addresses the advantages and challenges that the implementation of MALDI MSI to microbiological samples entails, including detailed protocols on sample preparation (from both microbiologist and mass spectrometrist points of view), matrix deposition, and data acquisition and interpretation. Lipopeptide images recorded from confrontation plates are also presented.

  4. Fiber-Optic Pressure Sensor With Dynamic Demodulation Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekki, John D.

    2002-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center developed in-house a method to detect pressure fluctuations using a fiber-optic sensor and dynamic signal processing. This work was in support of the Intelligent Systems Controls and Operations project under NASA's Information Technology Base Research Program. We constructed an optical pressure sensor by attaching a fiber-optic Bragg grating to a flexible membrane and then adhering the membrane to one end of a small cylinder. The other end of the cylinder was left open and exposed to pressure variations from a pulsed air jet. These pressure variations flexed the membrane, inducing a strain in the fiber-optic grating. This strain was read out optically with a dynamic spectrometer to record changes in the wavelength of light reflected from the grating. The dynamic spectrometer was built in-house to detect very small wavelength shifts induced by the pressure fluctuations. The spectrometer is an unbalanced interferometer specifically designed for maximum sensitivity to wavelength shifts. An optimum pathlength difference, which was determined empirically, resulted in a 14-percent sensitivity improvement over theoretically predicted path-length differences. This difference is suspected to be from uncertainty about the spectral power difference of the signal reflected from the Bragg grating. The figure shows the output of the dynamic spectrometer as the sensor was exposed to a nominally 2-kPa peak-to-peak square-wave pressure fluctuation. Good tracking, sensitivity, and signal-to-noise ratios are evident even though the sensor was constructed as a proof-of-concept and was not optimized in any way. Therefore the fiber-optic Bragg grating, which is normally considered a good candidate as a strain or temperature sensor, also has been shown to be a good candidate for a dynamic pressure sensor.

  5. Fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES): proposal for informed consent

    OpenAIRE

    Nacci, A; Ursino, F; La Vela, R; Matteucci, F; Mallardi, V; Fattori, B

    2008-01-01

    Fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) is now a first choice method for studying swallowing disorders on account of the various advantages it offers: easy to use, very well tolerated, allows bedside examination and is economic. Nevertheless, this diagnostic procedure is not without risks, the most probable consequences of which include discomfort, gagging and/or vomiting, vasovagal syncope, epistaxis, mucosal perforation, adverse reactions to topical anaesthetics and laryngospa...

  6. Transbronchial Catheter Drainage via Fiberoptic Bronchoscope in Intractable Lung Abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Man Pyo; Kim, Woo Sung; Han, Sung Koo; Shim, Young Soo; Kim, Keun Youl; Han, Yong Chol

    1989-01-01

    The use of the fiberoptic bronchoscope as a drainage procedure for lung abscess has become more and more widespread. We have recently adopted the technique of inserting a simple polyethylene catheter through the flexible fiberoptic bronchoscope into the abscess cavity of 11 patients with lung absess. All cases had not responded to aggressive postural drainage and adequate antibiotic therapy for at least a week. The results were as follows: Among 11 patients, the therapeutic response was dramatic in 6 patients.In the successful group, the abscess sizes were greater than 8cm in diameter and the air-fluid levels were higher than two-thirds of the cavity.Additional diagnoses, other than bacterial lung abscess, could be made in 2 cases when otherwise the diagnosis would have remained in doubt. The authors suggest that catheter drainage via fiberoptic bronchoscpope is an effective treatment modality in the large lung abscess with a high air-fluid level which is intractable to other medical approaches, and it is also a safe procedure. PMID:2487405

  7. Fiber-Optic Micrometeoroid/Orbital Debris Impact Detector System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Tennyson, R. C.; Morison, W. D.

    2012-01-01

    A document describes a reliable, lightweight micrometeoroid/orbital debris (MMOD) detection system that can be located at strategic positions of "high consequence" to provide real-time warning of a penetration, its location, and the extent of the damage to a spacecraft. The concept is to employ fiber-optic sensors to detect impact damage and penetration of spacecraft structures. The fibers are non-electrical, employ light waves, and are immune to electromagnetic interference. The fiber-optic sensor array can be made as a stand-alone product, being bonded to a flexible membrane material or a structure that is employed as a MMOD shield material. The optical sensors can also be woven into hybrid MMOD shielding fabrics. The glass fibers of the fiber-optic sensor provide a dual purpose in contributing to the breakup of MMOD projectiles. The grid arrays can be made in a modular configuration to provide coverage over any area desired. Each module can be connected to a central scanner instrument and be interrogated in a continuous or periodic mode.

  8. Fiber-optic laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of zirconium metal in air: Special features of the plasma produced by a long-pulse laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Ayumu; Ohba, Hironori; Toshimitsu, Masaaki; Akaoka, Katsuaki; Ruas, Alexandre; Sakka, Tetsuo; Wakaida, Ikuo

    2018-04-01

    The decommissioning of the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant is an essential issue in nuclear R&D. Fiber-optic laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (Fiber-optic LIBS) could be used for in-situ elemental analysis of the inside of the damaged reactors. To improve the performances under difficult conditions, using a long-pulse laser can be an efficient alternative. In this work, the emission spectra of zirconium metal in air obtained for a normal-pulse laser (6 ns) and a long-pulse laser (100 ns) (wavelength: 1064 nm, pulse energy: 12.5 mJ, spot diameter: 0.35 mm) are compared to investigate the fundamental aspects of fiber-optic LIBS with the long-pulse laser. The spectral features are considerably different: when the long-pulse laser is used, the atomic and molecular emission is remarkably enhanced. The enhancement of the atomic emission at the near infrared (NIR) region would lead to the observation of emission lines with minimum overlapping. To understand the differences in the spectra induced respectively from the normal-pulse laser and the long-pulse laser, photodiode signals, time-resolved spectra, plasma parameters, emission from the ambient air, and emission regions are investigated, showing the particular characteristics of the plasma produced by the long-pulse laser.

  9. Quantitative measurement of the chemical composition of geological standards with a miniature laser ablation/ionization mass spectrometer designed for in situ application in space research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuland, M B; Riedo, A; Tulej, M; Wurz, P; Grimaudo, V; Moreno-García, P; Mezger, K

    2016-01-01

    A key interest of planetary space missions is the quantitative determination of the chemical composition of the planetary surface material. The chemical composition of surface material (minerals, rocks, soils) yields fundamental information that can be used to answer key scientific questions about the formation and evolution of the planetary body in particular and the Solar System in general. We present a miniature time-of-flight type laser ablation/ionization mass spectrometer (LMS) and demonstrate its capability in measuring the elemental and mineralogical composition of planetary surface samples quantitatively by using a femtosecond laser for ablation/ionization. The small size and weight of the LMS make it a remarkable tool for in situ chemical composition measurements in space research, convenient for operation on a lander or rover exploring a planetary surface. In the laboratory, we measured the chemical composition of four geological standard reference samples USGS AGV-2 Andesite, USGS SCo-l Cody Shale, NIST 97b Flint Clay and USGS QLO-1 Quartz Latite with LMS. These standard samples are used to determine the sensitivity factors of the instrument. One important result is that all sensitivity factors are close to 1. Additionally, it is observed that the sensitivity factor of an element depends on its electron configuration, hence on the electron work function and the elemental group in agreement with existing theory. Furthermore, the conformity of the sensitivity factors is supported by mineralogical analyses of the USGS SCo-l and the NIST 97b samples. With the four different reference samples, the consistency of the calibration factors can be demonstrated, which constitutes the fundamental basis for a standard-less measurement-technique for in situ quantitative chemical composition measurements on planetary surface. (paper)

  10. Auto-identification fiberoptical seal verifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yoichi; Mukaiyama, Takehiro

    1998-08-01

    An auto COBRA seal verifier was developed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) to provide more efficient and simpler inspection measures for IAEA safeguards. The verifier is designed to provide means of a simple, quantitative and objective judgment on in-situ verification for the COBRA seal. The equipment is a portable unit with hand-held weight and size. It can be operated by battery or AC power. The verifier reads a COBRA seal signature by using a built-in CCD camera and carries out the signature comparison procedure automatically on digital basis. The result of signature comparison is given as a YES/NO answer. The production model of the verifier was completed in July 1996. The development was carried out in collaboration with Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. This report describes the design and functions of the COBRA seal verifier and the results of environmental and functional tests. The development of the COBRA seal verifier was carried out in the framework of Japan Support Programme for Agency Safeguards (JASPAS) as a project, JD-4 since 1981. (author)

  11. Study of the oxide reduction and interstitial contents during sintering of different plain carbon steels by in situ mass spectrometry in nitrogen atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momeni, Mohammad; Gierl, Christian; Danninger, Herbert

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Degassing phenomenon was studied in plain steels with different iron base powders. → The integrated area below the MS m12 graph can be used as an indicator of formed CO. → The integrated area is an indicator for in situ carbon loss in the specimen. → Carbon loss and area below the m12 graph can be correlated. - Abstract: Reduction of oxides covering powder particles is an important process during sintering and a prerequisite to form sintering contacts in PM parts. In the present research, degassing and reduction phenomena during sintering of plain carbon steels prepared from different atomised and sponge iron powders were studied by mass spectrometry (MS) in the dilatometer under protective N 2 atmosphere. Interstitial constituents were measured by carbon and oxygen analysis. According to the results, the major part of CO 2 is formed during carbothermic reduction of surface oxides in the low to moderate temperature range ( 600 deg. C, the main product of carbothermic reduction is CO and not CO 2 , but the former cannot be detected by MS in N 2 atmosphere. Signals m44 (CO 2 ) and m12 (C) were however found to be reliable indicators for CO. Similar intensity of mass 12 signals for both ASC and SC up to 1000 deg. C is consistent with equal carbon loss through carbothermic reaction. The integrated areas below the MS signal graphs, and thus the areas of the different degassing peaks obtained in the MS, were used as at least semi-quantitative estimation of the amount of gases formed, bearing in mind that MS is not really a quantitative analytical tool. Although a clearly defined relationship is not visible between oxygen loss and area below the m16 graph, the area for m12 can be used as an indicator for in situ carbon loss in the specimen. Increasing integrated areas for m12 and 16 between 800 and 1300 deg. C with only marginal enhancement of m44 indicates that the major part of oxides are removed as CO, in agreement with Boudouard equilibrium, at

  12. Assessment of bioavailability of pesticides in soils and identification of pesticide degradation drivers using the in-situ Mass Distribution Quotient (iMDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folberth, Christian

    2010-05-01

    The in-situ Mass Distribution Quotient (iMDQ) has recently been shown to reliably describe the bioavailability and mineralization of the widely applied pesticide isoproturon in agricultural soils. It is determined by pore water extraction from previously incubated soil samples and subsequent assessment of the mass distribution between solid and liquid phase. The method was verified by comparing the bioavailability with co-metabolic mineralization in soils under optimum microbial soil conditions (water tension -15 kPa and bulk density 1.3 g cm-3). A comparison of the results with the chemical partitioning assessed by the Kd method has shown a higher accuracy of the new method. By combining the iMDQ/pore water extraction method with mineralization of the pesticide under optimum microbial conditions in the soils, further information about mineralization and degradation processes could be obtained or confirmed: a) Metabolically outstanding soils could be identified due to inconsistency between bioavailability and mineralization when compared to the co-metabolic soils. In a metabolically hampered soil, the mineralization was very low compared to the bioavailability and in a soil with metabolically IPU degrading microorganisms the mineralization was extremely high despite low bioavailability. b) Analysis of metabolite patterns in soil water fractions of a degradation experiment allowed for an additional identification of the metabolic status of the soil. In co-metabolic soils, the diversity of metabolites increased proportionally with the degree of mineralization of the parent compound, whereas in a metabolically hampered soil the metabolite pattern was very diverse despite low mineralization. c) A quite stable fractioning between total mineralization of the parent compound to CO2 and build-up of non-extractable bound residues was found. This is a hint that also during co-metabolic degradation that can up to now not be attributed to a certain group of microorganisms

  13. The influence of reactive side products on the electrooxidation of methanol--a combined in situ infrared spectroscopy and online mass spectrometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, R; Schnaidt, J; Jusys, Z; Behm, R J

    2014-07-21

    Aiming at a better understanding of the impact of reaction intermediates and reactive side products on electrocatalytic reactions under conditions characteristic for technical applications, i.e., at high reactant conversions, we have investigated the electrooxidation of methanol on a Pt film electrode in mixtures containing defined concentrations of the reaction intermediates formaldehyde or formic acid. Employing simultaneous in situ infrared spectroscopy and online mass spectrometry in parallel to voltammetric measurements, we examined the effects of the latter molecules on the adlayer build-up and composition and on the formation of volatile reaction products CO2 and methylformate, as well as on the overall reaction rate. To assess the individual contributions of each component, we used isotope labeling techniques, where one of the two C1 components in the mixtures of methanol with either formaldehyde or formic acid was (13)C-labeled. The data reveal pronounced effects of the additional components formaldehyde and formic acid on the reaction, although their concentration was much lower (10%) than that of the main reactant methanol. Most important, the overall Faradaic current responses and the amounts of CO2 formed upon oxidation of the mixtures are always lower than the sums of the contributions from the individual components, indicative of a non-additive behavior of both Faradaic current and CO2 formation in the mixtures. Mechanistic reasons and consequences for reactions in a technical reactor, with high reactant conversion, are discussed.

  14. Spatially and time-resolved element-specific in situ corrosion investigations with an online hyphenated microcapillary flow injection inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry set-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homazava, N.; Ulrich, A.; Kraehenbuehl, U.

    2008-01-01

    A novel technique for in situ spatial, time-resolved element-specific investigations of corrosion processes is developed. The technique is based on an online hyphenation of a specially designed microflow-capillary set-up to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) using flow injection sample introduction. Detailed aspects of the method development, optimization of the sample microflow introduction and flow injection characteristics for the localized corrosion analysis are described. Moreover, specific challenges of the ICP-MS analysis as applied to the analysis of corrosion sample probes, e.g. high matrix load and limited sample volume, are discussed. The efficiency of the developed technique is proved by corrosion susceptibility analysis of a commercial Al alloy. Results of the corrosion experiments of the aluminum alloy AA 6111 are presented to demonstrate the influence of various factors such as exposure time and pH value of the corrosive medium on the element-specific dissolution rates of the alloy. This novel technique provides new aspects in corrosion science and sheds new light on corrosion mechanisms

  15. In situ magnetic resonance measurement of conversion, hydrodynamics and mass transfer during single- and two-phase flow in fixed-bed reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladden, L F; Alexander, P; Britton, M M; Mantle, M D; Sederman, A J; Yuen, E H L

    2003-01-01

    In recent years there has been increasing interest in applying magnetic resonance (MR) techniques in areas of engineering and chemical technology. The science that underpins many of these applications is the physics and chemistry of transport and reaction processes in porous materials. Key to the exploitation of MR methods will be our ability to demonstrate that MR yields information that cannot be obtained using conventional measurement techniques in engineering research. This article describes two case studies that highlight the power of MR to give new insights to chemical engineers. First, we demonstrate the application of MR techniques to explore both mass transfer and chemical conversion in situ within a fixed bed of catalyst, and we then use these data to identify the rate-controlling step of the chemical conversion. Second, we implement a rapid imaging technique to study the stability of the gas-liquid distribution in the low- and high-interaction two-phase flow regimes in a trickle-bed reactor.

  16. Combining in situ chemical oxidation, stabilization, and anaerobic bioremediation in a single application to reduce contaminant mass and leachability in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Daniel P; Srivastava, Vipul J; Dombrowski, Frank J; Lingle, James W

    2015-10-30

    Laboratory batch reactors were maintained for 32 weeks to test the potential for an in situ remedy that combines chemical oxidation, stabilization, and anaerobic bioremediation in a single application to treat soil from a manufactured gas plant, contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Portland cement and slaked lime were used to activate the persulfate and to stabilize/encapsulate the contaminants that were not chemically oxidized. Native sulfate-reducing bacteria degraded residual contaminants using the sulfate left after persulfate activation. The ability of the combined remedy to reduce contaminant mass and leachability was compared with NaOH-activated persulfate, stabilization, and sulfate-reducing bioremediation as stand-alone technologies. The stabilization amendments increased pH and temperature sufficiently to activate the persulfate within 1 week. Activation with both stabilization amendments and NaOH removed between 55% and 70% of PAH and BTEX. However, combined persulfate and stabilization significantly reduced the leachability of residual BTEX and PAH compared with NaOH activation. Sulfide, 2-naphthoic acid, and the abundance of subunit A of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene (dsrA) were used to monitor native sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were negatively impacted by activated persulfate, but recovered completely within weeks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Water-equivalent one-dimensional scintillating fiber-optic dosimeter for measuring therapeutic photon beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Jinsoo; Won Jang, Kyoung; Jae Yoo, Wook; Han, Ki-Tek; Park, Jang-Yeon; Lee, Bongsoo

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we fabricated a one-dimensional scintillating fiber-optic dosimeter, which consists of 9 scintillating fiber-optic dosimeters, septa, and PMMA blocks for measuring surface and percentage depth doses of a therapeutic photon beam. Each dosimeter embedded in the 1-D scintillating fiber-optic dosimeter is composed of square type organic scintillators and plastic optical fibers. Also black PVC films are used as septa to minimize cross-talk between the scintillating fiber-optic dosimeters. To construct a dosimeter system, a 1-D scintillating fiber-optic dosimeter and a CMOS image sensor were combined with 20 m-length plastic optical fibers. Using the dosimeter system, we measured surface and percentage depth doses of 6 and 15 MV photon beams and compared the results with those of EBT films and an ionization chamber. - Highlights: ► Fabrication of a one-dimensional scintillating fiber-optic dosimeter. ► The one-dimensional scintillating fiber-optic dosimeter has 9 scintillating fiber-optic dosimeters. ► Measurements of surface and percentage depth doses of a therapeutic photon beam. ► The results were compared with those of EBT films and an ionization chamber.

  18. CATV Fiberoptic Cable Markets In The U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, John N.

    1984-03-01

    "Bandwidth on a metropolitan CATV cable plant is a resource that may be compared today with the crude oil beneath the Arabian desert at the turn of the century. It will provide a radically new two-way communications medium for homes and businesses, and it will change not only the way we communicate but possibly even the way we live." This prediction was made last year by William Zachman, vice president of research for International Data Corp. If Zachman is right, and our research tends to indicate he is, then fiberoptics will become the transmission medium that will facilitate two-way broadband communication. However, many of the multiple system CATV operators in the U.S. as well as many of the manufacturers of fiberoptic waveguide and cable believe that interactive video systems are not really very important. They are wrong. Broadband fiberoptic systems have just begun to impact the U.S. communications market. And within 5 years, tremendous changes will occur not only with regard to growth, but with regard to the supplier industry structure. Interactive, switched, video systems in the U.S. go back to the early 1960s, and the experiments at Bell Laboratories with what was then called Picturephone. This was com-pressed video transmission via telephone lines from one subscriber to another. Field trials were conducted in several U.S. cities for a period of years. But the commercial response to Picturephone at that time was so lacking that AT&T discontinued the trials and the work. But that is changing. Part of the reason for the change is due to the changing communication needs of the U.S. and of the world: the increase in the amount of information used by large numbers of people, the concurrent rise in the use of computers, the digitization of communications media, the rise in the level of experience with electronic communications, and perhaps most importantly the convergence of audio, data, image and video communications. There are technological reasons for the slow

  19. Feasibility of Ultra-Thin Fiber-Optic Dosimeters for Radiotherapy Dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bongsoo; Kwon, Guwon; Shin, Sang Hun; Kim, Jaeseok; Yoo, Wook Jae; Ji, Young Hoon; Jang, Kyoung Won

    2015-11-17

    In this study, prototype ultra-thin fiber-optic dosimeters were fabricated using organic scintillators, wavelength shifting fibers, and plastic optical fibers. The sensor probes of the ultra-thin fiber-optic dosimeters consisted of very thin organic scintillators with thicknesses of 100, 150 and 200 μm. These types of sensors cannot only be used to measure skin or surface doses but also provide depth dose measurements with high spatial resolution. With the ultra-thin fiber-optic dosimeters, surface doses for gamma rays generated from a Co-60 therapy machine were measured. Additionally, percentage depth doses in the build-up regions were obtained by using the ultra-thin fiber-optic dosimeters, and the results were compared with those of external beam therapy films and a conventional fiber-optic dosimeter.

  20. Fiber-Optic Monitoring System of Particle Counters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Titov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers development of a fiber-optic system to monitor the counters of particles. Presently, optical counters of particles, which are often arranged at considerable distance from each other, are used to study the saltation phenomenon. For monitoring the counters, can be used electric communication lines.However, it complicates and raises the price of system Therefore, we offered a fiber-optic system and the counter of particles, free from these shortcomings. The difference between the offered counter of particles and the known one is that the input of radiation to the counter and the output of radiation scattering on particles are made by the optical fibers, and direct radiation is entered the optical fiber rather than is delayed by a light trap and can be used for lighting the other counters thereby allowing to use their connection in series.The work involved a choice of the quartz multimode optical fiber for communication, defining the optical fiber and lenses parameters of the counter of particles, and a selection of the radiation source and the photo-detector.Using the theory of light diffraction on a particle, a measuring range of the particle sizes has been determined. The system speed has been estimated, and it has been shown that a range of communication can reach 200km.It should be noted that modulation noise of counters of particles connected in series have the impact on the useful signal. To assess the extent of this influence we have developed a calculation procedure to illustrate that with ten counters connected in series this influence on the signal-to-noise ratio will be insignificant.Thus, it has been shown that the offered fiber-optic system can be used for monitoring the counters of particles across the desertified territories. 

  1. Development of plasma bolometers using fiber-optic temperature sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinke, M. L., E-mail: reinkeml@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Han, M.; Liu, G. [University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Eden, G. G. van [Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, De Zaale 20, 5612 AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Evenblij, R.; Haverdings, M. [Technobis, Pyrietstraat 2, 1812 SC Alkmaar (Netherlands); Stratton, B. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Measurements of radiated power in magnetically confined plasmas are important for exhaust studies in present experiments and expected to be a critical diagnostic for future fusion reactors. Resistive bolometer sensors have long been utilized in tokamaks and helical devices but suffer from electromagnetic interference (EMI). Results are shown from initial testing of a new bolometer concept based on fiber-optic temperature sensor technology. A small, 80 μm diameter, 200 μm long silicon pillar attached to the end of a single mode fiber-optic cable acts as a Fabry–Pérot cavity when broadband light, λ{sub o} ∼ 1550 nm, is transmitted along the fiber. Changes in temperature alter the optical path length of the cavity primarily through the thermo-optic effect, resulting in a shift of fringes reflected from the pillar detected using an I-MON 512 OEM spectrometer. While initially designed for use in liquids, this sensor has ideal properties for use as a plasma bolometer: a time constant, in air, of ∼150 ms, strong absorption in the spectral range of plasma emission, immunity to local EMI, and the ability to measure changes in temperature remotely. Its compact design offers unique opportunities for integration into the vacuum environment in places unsuitable for a resistive bolometer. Using a variable focus 5 mW, 405 nm, modulating laser, the signal to noise ratio versus power density of various bolometer technologies are directly compared, estimating the noise equivalent power density (NEPD). Present tests show the fiber-optic bolometer to have NEPD of 5-10 W/m{sup 2} when compared to those of the resistive bolometer which can achieve <0.5 W/m{sup 2} in the laboratory, but this can degrade to 1-2 W/m{sup 2} or worse when installed on a tokamak. Concepts are discussed to improve the signal to noise ratio of this new fiber-optic bolometer by reducing the pillar height and adding thin metallic coatings, along with improving the spectral resolution of the interrogator.

  2. Preliminary field demonstration of a fiber-optic TCE sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angel, S.M.; Langry, K.; Roe, J.; Colston, B.W. Jr.; Daley, P.F.; Milanovich, F.P.

    1991-02-01

    We have developed a differential-absorption fiber-optic sensor for use in groundwater and vadose zone monitoring of certain volatile organochlorines. The principle of detection is a quantitative, irreversible chemical reaction that forms visible light-absorbing products. The sensor has been evaluated against gas chromatographic (GC) standard measurements and has demonstrated accuracy and sensitivity sufficient for the environmental monitoring of trace levels of trichloroethylene (TCE) and chloroform. This sensor is currently under evaluation in monitoring well and vadose zone applications. In this paper, we describe the principles of the existing single measurement sensor technology and show preliminary field-test results. 3 refs., 8 figs

  3. Simultaneous Determination of Food-Related Biogenic Amines and Precursor Amino Acids Using in Situ Derivatization Ultrasound-Assisted Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction by Ultra-High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yongrui; Zhao, Xian-En; Wang, Renjun; Wei, Na; Sun, Jing; Dang, Jun; Chen, Guang; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Shuyun; You, Jinmao

    2016-11-02

    A simple, rapid, sensitive, selective, and environmentally friendly method, based on in situ derivatization ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (in situ DUADLLME) coupled with ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode has been developed for the simultaneous determination of food-related biogenic amines and amino acids. A new mass-spectrometry-sensitive derivatization reagent 4'-carbonyl chloride rosamine (CCR) was designed, synthesized, and first reported. Parameters and conditions of in situ DUADLLME and UHPLC-MS/MS were optimized in detail. Under the optimized conditions, the in situ DUADLLME was completed speedily (within 1 min) with high derivatization efficiencies (≥98.5%). With the cleanup and concentration of microextraction step, good analytical performance was obtained for the analytes. The results showed that this method was accurate and practical for quantification of biogenic amines and amino acids in common food samples (red wine, beer, wine, cheese, sausage, and fish).

  4. Halo-coronal mass ejections near the 23rd solar minimum: lift-off, inner heliosphere, and in situ (1 AU signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Berdichevsky

    Full Text Available The extreme ultraviolet (EUV signatures of a solar lift-off, decametric and kilometric radio burst emissions and energetic particle (EP inner heliospheric signatures of an interplanetary shock, and in situ identification of its driver through solar wind observations are discussed for 12 isolated halo coronal mass ejections (H-CMEs occurring between December 1996 and 1997. For the aforementioned twelve and the one event added in the discussion, it is found that ten passed several necessary conditions for being a "Sun-Earth connection". It is found that low corona EUV and Ha chromospheric signatures indicate filament eruption as the cause of H-CME. These signatures indicate that the 12 events can be divided into two major subsets, 7 related to active regions (ARs and 5 unrelated or related to decayed AR. In the case of events related to AR, there is indication of a faster lift-off, while a more gradual lift-off appears to characterize the second set. Inner heliospheric signatures – the presence of long lasting enhanced energetic particle flux and/or kilometric type II radio bursts – of a driven shock were identified in half of the 12 events. The in situ (1 AU analyses using five different solar wind ejecta signatures and comparisons with the bidirectional flow of suprathermal particles and Forbush decreases result in indications of a strong solar wind ejecta signatures for 11 out of 12 cases. From the discussion of these results, combined with work by other authors for overlapping events, we conclude that good Sun-Earth connection candidates originate most likely from solar filament eruptions with at least one of its extremities located closer to the central meridian than ~ 30° E or ~ 35° W with a larger extension in latitudinal location possible. In seven of the twelve cases it appears that the encountered ejecta was driving a shock at 1 AU. Support for this interpretation is found on the approximately equal

  5. Halo-coronal mass ejections near the 23rd solar minimum: lift-off, inner heliosphere, and in situ (1 AU signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Berdichevsky

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The extreme ultraviolet (EUV signatures of a solar lift-off, decametric and kilometric radio burst emissions and energetic particle (EP inner heliospheric signatures of an interplanetary shock, and in situ identification of its driver through solar wind observations are discussed for 12 isolated halo coronal mass ejections (H-CMEs occurring between December 1996 and 1997. For the aforementioned twelve and the one event added in the discussion, it is found that ten passed several necessary conditions for being a "Sun-Earth connection". It is found that low corona EUV and Ha chromospheric signatures indicate filament eruption as the cause of H-CME. These signatures indicate that the 12 events can be divided into two major subsets, 7 related to active regions (ARs and 5 unrelated or related to decayed AR. In the case of events related to AR, there is indication of a faster lift-off, while a more gradual lift-off appears to characterize the second set. Inner heliospheric signatures – the presence of long lasting enhanced energetic particle flux and/or kilometric type II radio bursts – of a driven shock were identified in half of the 12 events. The in situ (1 AU analyses using five different solar wind ejecta signatures and comparisons with the bidirectional flow of suprathermal particles and Forbush decreases result in indications of a strong solar wind ejecta signatures for 11 out of 12 cases. From the discussion of these results, combined with work by other authors for overlapping events, we conclude that good Sun-Earth connection candidates originate most likely from solar filament eruptions with at least one of its extremities located closer to the central meridian than ~ 30° E or ~ 35° W with a larger extension in latitudinal location possible. In seven of the twelve cases it appears that the encountered ejecta was driving a shock at 1 AU. Support for this interpretation is found on the approximately equal velocity of the shock and the

  6. Computational imaging through a fiber-optic bundle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodhi, Muhammad A.; Dumas, John Paul; Pierce, Mark C.; Bajwa, Waheed U.

    2017-05-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) has proven to be a viable method for reconstructing high-resolution signals using low-resolution measurements. Integrating CS principles into an optical system allows for higher-resolution imaging using lower-resolution sensor arrays. In contrast to prior works on CS-based imaging, our focus in this paper is on imaging through fiber-optic bundles, in which manufacturing constraints limit individual fiber spacing to around 2 μm. This limitation essentially renders fiber-optic bundles as low-resolution sensors with relatively few resolvable points per unit area. These fiber bundles are often used in minimally invasive medical instruments for viewing tissue at macro and microscopic levels. While the compact nature and flexibility of fiber bundles allow for excellent tissue access in-vivo, imaging through fiber bundles does not provide the fine details of tissue features that is demanded in some medical situations. Our hypothesis is that adapting existing CS principles to fiber bundle-based optical systems will overcome the resolution limitation inherent in fiber-bundle imaging. In a previous paper we examined the practical challenges involved in implementing a highly parallel version of the single-pixel camera while focusing on synthetic objects. This paper extends the same architecture for fiber-bundle imaging under incoherent illumination and addresses some practical issues associated with imaging physical objects. Additionally, we model the optical non-idealities in the system to get lower modelling errors.

  7. Fiber-optic control of the ZT-P experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caudill, L.D.; Chandler, G.I.; Hall, C.R.; Trujillo, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    The computer control system for the ZT-P experiment has been implemented using a fiber-optic link in all 161 control signal paths. Four classes of control signals are used in this design. These are (a) digital-out, an on--off signal from computer to machine actuator, (b) digital-in, an on--off signal from machine sensor to computer, (c) analog-out, a 0--10-V analog signal from computer to machine actuator, (d) analog-in, a 0--1-mA analog signal from machine sensor to computer. The digital-in and the digital-out class of signals require no control power at the machine. The analog-out and the analog-in class of signals use available machine power for control. This unique power arrangement and the use of fiber-optic links totally isolate the electrically noisy machine areas from the sensitive electronics in the computer control. Advantages of this system including low cost, small size, personnel safety, and ease of maintenance and modification are discussed

  8. Fiber-optic control of the ZT-P experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caudill, L.D.; Chandler, G.I.; Hall, C.R.; Trujillo, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    The computer control system for the ZT-P experiment has been implemented using a fiber-optic link in all 161 control signal paths. Four classes of control signals are used in this design. These are: (a) digital-out, an on-off signal from computer to machine actuator, (b) digital-in, an on-off signal from machine sensor to computer, (c) analog-out, a 0 to 10 volt analog signal from computer to machine actuator, (d) analog-in, a 0 to +1 milliampere analog signal from machine sensor to computer. The digital-in and the digital-out class of signals require no control power at the machine. The analog-out and the analog-in class of signals use available machine power for control. This unique power arrangement and the use of fiber-optic links totally isolate the electrically noisy machine areas from the sensitive electronics in the computer control. Advantages of this system including low cost, small size, personnel safety, and ease of maintenance and modification are discussed

  9. Fiber-optic control of the ZT-P experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caudill, L.D.; Chandler, G.I.; Hall, C.R.; Trujillo, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    The computer control system for the ZT-P experiment has been implemented using a fiber-optic link in all 161 control signal paths. Four classes of control signals are used in this design. These are: digital-out; an on-off signal from computer to machine actuator, digital-in, and on-off signal from machine sensor to computer, analog-out, a 0 - 10 volt analog signal from computer to machine actuator, analog-in, 0 to +1 milliampere analog signal from machine sensor to computer. The digital-in and the digital-out class of signals require no control power at the machine end. The analog-out and the analog-in class of signals use available machine power for control. This unique power arrangement and the use of fiber-optic links serve to totally isolate electrically noisy machine areas from the sensitive electronics in the computer control. Advantages, including low cost, small size, personnel safety, and ease of maintenance and modification are discussed

  10. Combining in situ chemical oxidation, stabilization, and anaerobic bioremediation in a single application to reduce contaminant mass and leachability in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassidy, Daniel P., E-mail: daniel.cassidy@wmich.edu [Department of Geosciences, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States); Srivastava, Vipul J., E-mail: vipul.srivastava@ch2m.com [CH2M HILL, 125S Wacker, Ste 3000, Chicago, IL 60606 (United States); Dombrowski, Frank J., E-mail: frank.dombrowski@we-energies.com [We Energies, 333W Everett St., A231, Milwaukee, WI 53203 (United States); Lingle, James W., E-mail: jlingle@epri.com [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), 4927W Willow Road, Brown Deer, WI 53223 (United States)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • Portland cement and lime activated persulfate by increasing pH and temperature. • Chemical oxidation achieved BTEX and PAH removal ranging from 55% to 75%. • Activating persulfate with ISS amendments reduced leachability more than NaOH. • Native sulfate-reducing bacteria degraded PAHs within weeks after ISCO finished. • ISCO, ISS, and anaerobic bioremediation were combined in a single application. - Abstract: Laboratory batch reactors were maintained for 32 weeks to test the potential for an in situ remedy that combines chemical oxidation, stabilization, and anaerobic bioremediation in a single application to treat soil from a manufactured gas plant, contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Portland cement and slaked lime were used to activate the persulfate and to stabilize/encapsulate the contaminants that were not chemically oxidized. Native sulfate-reducing bacteria degraded residual contaminants using the sulfate left after persulfate activation. The ability of the combined remedy to reduce contaminant mass and leachability was compared with NaOH-activated persulfate, stabilization, and sulfate-reducing bioremediation as stand-alone technologies. The stabilization amendments increased pH and temperature sufficiently to activate the persulfate within 1 week. Activation with both stabilization amendments and NaOH removed between 55% and 70% of PAH and BTEX. However, combined persulfate and stabilization significantly reduced the leachability of residual BTEX and PAH compared with NaOH activation. Sulfide, 2-naphthoic acid, and the abundance of subunit A of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene (dsrA) were used to monitor native sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were negatively impacted by activated persulfate, but recovered completely within weeks.

  11. Combining in situ chemical oxidation, stabilization, and anaerobic bioremediation in a single application to reduce contaminant mass and leachability in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassidy, Daniel P.; Srivastava, Vipul J.; Dombrowski, Frank J.; Lingle, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Portland cement and lime activated persulfate by increasing pH and temperature. • Chemical oxidation achieved BTEX and PAH removal ranging from 55% to 75%. • Activating persulfate with ISS amendments reduced leachability more than NaOH. • Native sulfate-reducing bacteria degraded PAHs within weeks after ISCO finished. • ISCO, ISS, and anaerobic bioremediation were combined in a single application. - Abstract: Laboratory batch reactors were maintained for 32 weeks to test the potential for an in situ remedy that combines chemical oxidation, stabilization, and anaerobic bioremediation in a single application to treat soil from a manufactured gas plant, contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Portland cement and slaked lime were used to activate the persulfate and to stabilize/encapsulate the contaminants that were not chemically oxidized. Native sulfate-reducing bacteria degraded residual contaminants using the sulfate left after persulfate activation. The ability of the combined remedy to reduce contaminant mass and leachability was compared with NaOH-activated persulfate, stabilization, and sulfate-reducing bioremediation as stand-alone technologies. The stabilization amendments increased pH and temperature sufficiently to activate the persulfate within 1 week. Activation with both stabilization amendments and NaOH removed between 55% and 70% of PAH and BTEX. However, combined persulfate and stabilization significantly reduced the leachability of residual BTEX and PAH compared with NaOH activation. Sulfide, 2-naphthoic acid, and the abundance of subunit A of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene (dsrA) were used to monitor native sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were negatively impacted by activated persulfate, but recovered completely within weeks

  12. Quantitative cognitive-test characterization of reconnectable implantable fiber-optic neurointerfaces for optogenetic neurostimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedotov, I V; Ivashkina, O I; Pochechuev, M S; Roshchina, M A; Toropova, K A; Fedotov, A B; Anokhin, K V; Zheltikov, A M

    2017-11-01

    Cognitive tests on representative groups of freely behaving transgenic mice are shown to enable a quantitative characterization of reconnectable implantable fiber-optic neurointerfaces for optogenetic neurostimulation. A systematic analysis of such tests provides a robust quantitative measure for the cognitive effects induced by fiber-optic neurostimulation, validating the performance of fiber-optic neurointerfaces for long-term optogenetic brain stimulations and showing no statistically significant artifacts in the behavior of transgenic mice due to interface implantation. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Structural changes and thermal stability of charged LiNixMnyCozO₂ cathode materials studied by combined in situ time-resolved XRD and mass spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Seong-Min; Hu, Enyuan; Zhou, Yongning; Yu, Xiqian; Senanayake, Sanjaya D; Cho, Sung-Jin; Kim, Kwang-Bum; Chung, Kyung Yoon; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Nam, Kyung-Wan

    2014-12-24

    Thermal stability of charged LiNixMnyCozO2 (NMC, with x + y + z = 1, x:y:z = 4:3:3 (NMC433), 5:3:2 (NMC532), 6:2:2 (NMC622), and 8:1:1 (NMC811)) cathode materials is systematically studied using combined in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction and mass spectroscopy (TR-XRD/MS) techniques upon heating up to 600 °C. The TR-XRD/MS results indicate that the content of Ni, Co, and Mn significantly affects both the structural changes and the oxygen release features during heating: the more Ni and less Co and Mn, the lower the onset temperature of the phase transition (i.e., thermal decomposition) and the larger amount of oxygen release. Interestingly, the NMC532 seems to be the optimized composition to maintain a reasonably good thermal stability, comparable to the low-nickel-content materials (e.g., NMC333 and NMC433), while having a high capacity close to the high-nickel-content materials (e.g., NMC811 and NMC622). The origin of the thermal decomposition of NMC cathode materials was elucidated by the changes in the oxidation states of each transition metal (TM) cations (i.e., Ni, Co, and Mn) and their site preferences during thermal decomposition. It is revealed that Mn ions mainly occupy the 3a octahedral sites of a layered structure (R3̅m) but Co ions prefer to migrate to the 8a tetrahedral sites of a spinel structure (Fd3̅m) during the thermal decomposition. Such element-dependent cation migration plays a very important role in the thermal stability of NMC cathode materials. The reasonably good thermal stability and high capacity characteristics of the NMC532 composition is originated from the well-balanced ratio of nickel content to manganese and cobalt contents. This systematic study provides insight into the rational design of NMC-based cathode materials with a desired balance between thermal stability and high energy density.

  14. Passive (self-powered) fiber-optic sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElhaney, S.A.; Falter, D.D.; Todd, R.A.; Simpson, M.L.; Mihalczo, J.T.

    1992-01-01

    ORNL is developing new group of fiber-optic sensors for characterizing physical aspects such as ambient temperature. These sensors exploit the inherent property of thermographic materials that the lifetime and/or intensity of the emitted fluorescence decreases with increasing temperature. Unlike current fluorescent temperature sensors that use a light source for excitation, these sensors are totally passive (self-powered) and use either an embedded or external radiation source. A proof-of-principle temperature sensor was developed, based on this concept, using a well-known thermographic material, magnesium fluorogermanate. Experimental results showed that the radiation-induced fluorescence resulted in an intensity change but no significant decay rate change with increasing temperature

  15. Fiber-Optic Vibration Sensor Based on Multimode Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Lujo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present a fiberoptic vibration sensor based on the monitoring of the mode distribution in a multimode optical fiber. Detection of vibrations and their parameters is possible through observation of the output speckle pattern from the multimode optical fiber. A working experimental model has been built in which all used components are widely available and cheap: a CCD camera (a simple web-cam, a multimode laser in visible range as a light source, a length of multimode optical fiber, and a computer for signal processing. Measurements have shown good agreement with the actual frequency of vibrations, and promising results were achieved with the amplitude measurements although they require some adaptation of the experimental model. Proposed sensor is cheap and lightweight and therefore presents an interesting alternative for monitoring large smart structures.

  16. Maximum-performance fiber-optic irradiation with nonimaging designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Y; Feuermann, D; Gordon, J M

    1997-10-01

    A range of practical nonimaging designs for optical fiber applications is presented. Rays emerging from a fiber over a restricted angular range (small numerical aperture) are needed to illuminate a small near-field detector at maximum radiative efficiency. These designs range from pure reflector (all-mirror), to pure dielectric (refractive and based on total internal reflection) to lens-mirror combinations. Sample designs are shown for a specific infrared fiber-optic irradiation problem of practical interest. Optical performance is checked with computer three-dimensional ray tracing. Compared with conventional imaging solutions, nonimaging units offer considerable practical advantages in compactness and ease of alignment as well as noticeably superior radiative efficiency.

  17. Transoral tracheal intubation of rodents using a fiberoptic laryngoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, D L; Lehmann, J R; Harold, W M; Drew, R T

    1986-06-01

    A fiberoptic laryngoscope which allows direct visualization of the deep pharynx and epiglottis has been developed for transoral tracheal intubation of small laboratory mammals. The device has been employed in the intubation and instillation of a variety of substances into the lungs of rats, and with minor modification, has had similar application in mice, hamsters, and guinea pigs. The simplicity and ease of handling of the laryngoscope permits one person to intubate large numbers of enflurane anesthetized animals either on an open counter top or in a glove-box, as may be required for administration of carcinogenic materials. Instillation of 7Be-labeled carbon particles into the lungs of mice, hamsters, rats, and guinea pigs resulted in reasonably consistent interlobal distribution of particles for each test animal species with minimal tracheal deposition. However, actual lung tissue doses of carbon exhibited some species dependence.

  18. Engineering surface plasmon based fiber-optic sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhawan, Anuj; Muth, John F.

    2008-01-01

    Ordered arrays of nanoholes with subwavelength diameters, and submicron array periodicity were fabricated on the tips of gold-coated optical fibers using focused ion beam (FIB) milling. This provided a convenient platform for evaluating extraordinary transmission of light through subwavelength apertures and allowed the implementation of nanostructures for surface plasmon engineered sensors. The fabrication procedure was straightforward and implemented on single mode and multimode optical fibers as well as etched and tapered fiber tips. Control of the periodicity and spacing of the nanoholes allowed the wavelength of operation to be tailored. Large changes in optical transmission were observed at the designed wavelengths, depending on the surrounding refractive index, allowing the devices to be used as fiber-optic sensors

  19. Engineering surface plasmon based fiber-optic sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhawan, Anuj [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, NC State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States); Muth, John F. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, NC State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States)], E-mail: muth@unity.ncsu.edu

    2008-04-15

    Ordered arrays of nanoholes with subwavelength diameters, and submicron array periodicity were fabricated on the tips of gold-coated optical fibers using focused ion beam (FIB) milling. This provided a convenient platform for evaluating extraordinary transmission of light through subwavelength apertures and allowed the implementation of nanostructures for surface plasmon engineered sensors. The fabrication procedure was straightforward and implemented on single mode and multimode optical fibers as well as etched and tapered fiber tips. Control of the periodicity and spacing of the nanoholes allowed the wavelength of operation to be tailored. Large changes in optical transmission were observed at the designed wavelengths, depending on the surrounding refractive index, allowing the devices to be used as fiber-optic sensors.

  20. FIBER-OPTIC BIOSENSOR FOR DIRECT DETERMINATION OF ORGANOPHOSPHATE NERVE AGENTS. (R823663)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A fiber-optic enzyme biosensor for the direct measurement of organophosphate nerveagents was developed. The basic element of this biosensor is organophosphorus hydrolaseimmobilized on a nylon membrane and attached to the common end of a bifurcated optical fiberbundle....

  1. A fiber-optic tiltmeter system based on the moiré-fringe effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae-Hyun

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a novel fiber-optic tiltmeter system for the health monitoring of large-size structures. The system is composed of a sensor head, a light control unit and a signal processing unit. The sensing mechanism of the sensor head is based on an integration of the moiré-fringe phenomenon with fiber optics to achieve a robust performance in addition to its immunity to EM interference, easy cabling and low cost. In this paper, a prototype of the fiber-optic tiltmeter system has been developed successfully. From an experimental test, the fiber-optic tiltmeter was proven to be a prospective sensor for the monitoring of the tilt angle of a civil structure with good stability and linearity. Finally, the test also successfully demonstrates the performance and the potential of the novel fiber-optic tiltmeter system to monitor the health of civil structures

  2. Frequency-Shifted Interferometry — A Versatile Fiber-Optic Sensing Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Ye

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Fiber-optic sensing is a field that is developing at a fast pace. Novel fiber-optic sensor designs and sensing principles constantly open doors for new opportunities. In this paper, we review a fiber-optic sensing technique developed in our research group called frequency-shifted interferometry (FSI. This technique uses a continuous-wave light source, an optical frequency shifter, and a slow detector. We discuss the operation principles of several FSI implementations and show their applications in fiber length and dispersion measurement, locating weak reflections along a fiber link, fiber-optic sensor multiplexing, and high-sensitivity cavity ring-down measurement. Detailed analysis of FSI system parameters is also presented.

  3. High-Frequency Flush Mounted Miniature LOX Fiber-Optic Pressure Sensor II, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations has teamed with the University of Alabama, Huntsville, to develop a miniature flush-mounted fiber-optic pressure sensor that will allow accurate,...

  4. High-Frequency Flush Mounted Miniature LOX Fiber-Optic Pressure Sensor, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations is teaming with the University of Alabama, Huntsville, to develop a miniature flush-mounted fiber-optic pressure sensor that will allow accurate,...

  5. Fiber-Optic Shape Sensing for Intelligent Solar Sail Deployment, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations proposes to develop a distributed fiber-optic shape sensor to provide a control system for the deployment of ultra-lightweight inflatable support...

  6. Prevalence of Visible and Occult Blood on the Surfaces of Fiberoptic Bronchoscopes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McKamey, Jeffrey

    2000-01-01

    .... This study was conducted to determine if current cleaning, disinfection and sterilization procedures used at one medical center was adequate to remove visible and occult blood from fiberoptic bronchoscopes...

  7. Development and application of compact denuder sampling techniques with in situ derivatization followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for halogen speciation in volcanic plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüdiger, Julian; Bobrowski, Nicole; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2015-04-01

    spectrometry gives a limit of detection below 1 ng of bromine. The method was applied on volcanic gas plumes at Mt. Etna and Mt. Stromboli in Italy in July 2014 and on fumarolic gas emissions at Mt. Lastarria in Chile in November 2014. The results show significant amounts of the concerning bromine species (lower ppb range). Comprehensive data evaluation and comparison with results of impinger extraction with NaOH solution as well as chamber experiments are still in progress. References Bobrowski, N. and G. Giuffrida: Bromine monoxide / sulphur dioxide ratios in relation to volcanological observations at Mt. Etna 2006-2009. Solid Earth, 3, 433-445, 2012 Bobrowski, N., R. von Glasow, A. Aiuppa, S. Inguaggiato, I. Louban, O. W. Ibrahim and U. Platt: Reactive halogen chemistry in volcanic plumes. J. Geophys. Res., 112, 2007 Donovan A., V. Tsanev, C. Oppenheimer and M. Edmonds: Reactive halogens (BrO and OClO) detected in the plume of Soufrière Hills Volcano during an eruption hiatus. Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 15, 3346-3363, 2014 Huang, R.-J. and T. Hoffmann: A denuder-impinger system with in situ derivatization followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of gaseous iodine-containing halogen species. Journal of Chromatography A, 1210, 135-141, 2008

  8. Fiber-optic fluorometer for microscale mapping of photosynthetic pigments in microbial communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thar, Roland Matthias; Kühl, Michael; Holst, Gerhard

    2001-01-01

    Microscale fluorescence measurements were performed in photosynthetic biofilms at a spatial resolution of 100 to 200 µm with a new fiber-optic fluorometer which allowed four different excitation and emission wavelengths and was configured for measuring phycobiliproteins, chlorophylls, and bacteri......Microscale fluorescence measurements were performed in photosynthetic biofilms at a spatial resolution of 100 to 200 µm with a new fiber-optic fluorometer which allowed four different excitation and emission wavelengths and was configured for measuring phycobiliproteins, chlorophylls...

  9. Indication for fiberoptic bronchoscopy in HIV-infected patients suspected for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orholm, M; Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Nielsen, T L

    1990-01-01

    During a six-month period, 40 consecutive fiberoptic bronchoscopic procedures including bronchoalveolar lavage, bronchial brushing and forceps biopsy were performed in local anaesthesia on 34 HIV-infected males presenting symptoms compatible with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. In 23 examinations...... did not differ with regard to history, clinical examination, immunology, serology or chest radiograph. We conclude that fiberoptic bronchoscopy should be performed on wide indications in HIV-infected patients with symptoms compatible with P. carinii pneumonia. The procedure is easily performed...

  10. Fiber-optic displacement sensors on the Hunters Trophy UGT impulse gauge experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, R.E.L.; Poutiatine, A.I.

    1995-03-01

    As part of a program to develop gauges for measurement of various mechanical properties in hostile environments, the authors fielded purely optical displacement sensors at the ends of long fiber-optic cables as supplements to the regular displacement sensors of four impulse gauges fielded as part of a materials study on the Hunters Trophy underground effects test at the Nevada Test Site. These fiber-optic sensor systems and their performance on the Hunters Trophy test are described in this report.

  11. Feasibility Study on Fiber-optic Radiation Sensor for Remote Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Hyesu; Jang, Kyoung Won; Shin, Sang Hun and others

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we fabricated a fiber-optic radiation sensor using an optical fiber and various scintillators. To select an adequate inorganic scintillator for the sensing probe of fiber-optic radiation sensor, 5 types of scintillators were evaluated. The spectra of gamma-rays emitted from a Na-22 radiation source were measured by using the manufactured sensors. As a result, the BGO was suitable for the sensing probe of fiber-optic radiation sensor due to its high scintillation output and exact photoelectric peak for the gamma-ray energy. The basic principle of radiation detection is to detect the signals caused by interactions between radiations and materials. There are various types of radiation detectors depending on types of radiation to be detected and physical quantities to be measured. As one of the radiation detectors, a fiber-optic radiation sensor using a scintillator and an optical fiber has two advantages such as no space restraint and remote sensing. Moreover, in nuclear environments, this kind of sensor has immunities for electromagnetic field, temperature, and pressure. Thus, the fiber-optic radiation sensor can be used in various fields including nondestructive inspection, radioactive waste management, nuclear safety, radiodiagnosis and radiation therapy. As a fundamental study of the fiber-optic radiation sensor for remote gamma-ray spectroscopy, in this study, we fabricated a fiber-optic radiation sensor using an optical fiber and various scintillators. To select an adequate inorganic scintillator for the sensing probe of fiber-optic radiation sensor, 5 types of scintillators were evaluated. The spectra of gamma-rays emitted from a Na-22 radiation source were measured by using the manufactured sensors

  12. A novel fiber-optic measurement system for the evaluation of performances of neonatal pulmonary ventilators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battista, L; Scorza, A; Botta, F; Sciuto, S A

    2016-01-01

    Published standards for the performance evaluation of pulmonary ventilators are mainly directed to manufacturers rather than to end-users and often considered inadequate or not comprehensive. In order to contribute to overcome the problems above, a novel measurement system was proposed and tested with waveforms of mechanical ventilation by means of experimental trials carried out with infant ventilators typically used in neonatal intensive care units: the main quantities of mechanical ventilation in newborns are monitored, i.e. air flow rate, differential pressure and volume from infant ventilator are measured by means of two novel fiber-optic sensors (OFSs) developed and characterized by the authors, while temperature and relative humidity of air mass are obtained by two commercial transducers. The proposed fiber-optic sensors (flow sensor Q-OFS, pressure sensor P-OFS) showed measurement ranges of air flow and pressure typically encountered in neonatal mechanical ventilation, i.e. the air flow rate Q ranged from 3 l min −1 to 18 l min −1 (inspiratory) and from  −3 l min −1 to  −18 l min −1 (expiratory), the differential pressure ΔP ranged from  −15 cmH 2 O to 15 cmH2O. In each experimental trial carried out with different settings of the ventilator, outputs of the OFSs are compared with data from two reference sensors (reference flow sensor RF, reference pressure sensor RP) and results are found consistent: flow rate Q showed a maximum error between Q-OFS and RF up to 13 percent, with an output ratio Q RF /Q OFS of not more than 1.06  ±  0.09 (least square estimation, 95 percent confidence level, R 2 between 0.9822 and 0.9931). On the other hand the maximum error between P-OFS and RP on differential pressure ΔP was lower than 10 percent, with an output ratio ΔP RP /ΔP OFS between 0.977  ±  0.022 and 1.0  ±  0.8 (least square estimation, 95 percent confidence level, R 2 between 0.9864 and 0.9876). Despite the

  13. A novel fiber-optic measurement system for the evaluation of performances of neonatal pulmonary ventilators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battista, L.; Scorza, A.; Botta, F.; Sciuto, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    Published standards for the performance evaluation of pulmonary ventilators are mainly directed to manufacturers rather than to end-users and often considered inadequate or not comprehensive. In order to contribute to overcome the problems above, a novel measurement system was proposed and tested with waveforms of mechanical ventilation by means of experimental trials carried out with infant ventilators typically used in neonatal intensive care units: the main quantities of mechanical ventilation in newborns are monitored, i.e. air flow rate, differential pressure and volume from infant ventilator are measured by means of two novel fiber-optic sensors (OFSs) developed and characterized by the authors, while temperature and relative humidity of air mass are obtained by two commercial transducers. The proposed fiber-optic sensors (flow sensor Q-OFS, pressure sensor P-OFS) showed measurement ranges of air flow and pressure typically encountered in neonatal mechanical ventilation, i.e. the air flow rate Q ranged from 3 l min-1 to 18 l min-1 (inspiratory) and from  -3 l min-1 to  -18 l min-1 (expiratory), the differential pressure ΔP ranged from  -15 cmH2O to 15 cmH2O. In each experimental trial carried out with different settings of the ventilator, outputs of the OFSs are compared with data from two reference sensors (reference flow sensor RF, reference pressure sensor RP) and results are found consistent: flow rate Q showed a maximum error between Q-OFS and RF up to 13 percent, with an output ratio Q RF/Q OFS of not more than 1.06  ±  0.09 (least square estimation, 95 percent confidence level, R 2 between 0.9822 and 0.9931). On the other hand the maximum error between P-OFS and RP on differential pressure ΔP was lower than 10 percent, with an output ratio ΔP RP/ΔP OFS between 0.977  ±  0.022 and 1.0  ±  0.8 (least square estimation, 95 percent confidence level, R 2 between 0.9864 and 0.9876). Despite the possible improvements

  14. Dexmedetomidine premedication for fiberoptic intubation in patients of temporomandibular joint ankylosis: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumkum Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Fiberoptic intubation is the gold standard technique for difficult airway management in patients of temporomandibular joint. This study was aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of dexmedetomidine as premedication with propofol infusion for fiberoptic intubation. Methods: Consent was obtained from 46 adult patients of temporomandibular joint ankylosis, scheduled for gap arthroplasty. They were enrolled for thisdouble-blind, randomized, prospective clinical trial with two treatment groups - Group D and Group P, of 23 patients each. Group D patients had received premedication of dexmedetomidine 1 μg/kg infused over 10 min followed by sedative propofol infusion and the control Group P patients were given only propofol infusion to achieve sedation. Condition achieved at endoscopy, intubating conditions, hemodynamic changes and postoperative events were evaluated as primary outcome. Results : The fiberoptic intubation was successful with satisfactory endoscopic and intubating condition in all patients. Dexmedetomidine premedication has provided satisfactory conditions for fiberoptic intubation and attenuated the hemodynamic response of fiberoptic intubation than the propofol group. Conclusion : Fiberoptic intubation was found to be easier with dexmedetomidine premedication along with sedative infusion of propofol with complete amnesia of the procedure, hemodynamic stability and preservation of patent airway.

  15. Characterizing shock waves in hydrogel using high speed imaging and a fiber-optic probe hydrophone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Phillip A.; Betney, M. R.; Doyle, H. W.; Tully, B.; Ventikos, Y.; Hawker, N. A.; Roy, Ronald A.

    2017-05-01

    The impact of a stainless steel disk-shaped projectile launched by a single-stage light gas gun is used to generate planar shock waves with amplitudes on the order of 102MPa in a hydrogel target material. These shock waves are characterized using ultra-high-speed imaging as well as a fiber-optic probe hydrophone. Although the hydrogel equation of state (EOS) is unknown, the combination of these measurements with conservation of mass and momentum allows us to calculate pressure. It is also shown that although the hydrogel behaves similarly to water, the use of a water EOS underpredicts pressure amplitudes in the hydrogel by ˜10 % at the shock front. Further, the water EOS predicts pressures approximately 2% higher than those determined by conservation laws for a given value of the shock velocity. Shot to shot repeatability is controlled to within 10%, with the shock speed and pressure increasing as a function of the velocity of the projectile at impact. Thus the projectile velocity may be used as an adequate predictor of shock conditions in future work with a restricted suite of diagnostics.

  16. Local Delivery of Fluorescent Dye For Fiber-Optics Confocal Microscopy of the Living Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao eHuang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fiber-optics confocal microscopy (FCM is an emerging imaging technology with various applications in basic research and clinical diagnosis. FCM allows for real-time in situ microscopy of tissue at sub-cellular scale. Recently FCM has been investigated for cardiac imaging, in particular, for discrimination of cardiac tissue during pediatric open-heart surgery. FCM relies on fluorescent dyes. The current clinical approach of dye delivery is based on systemic injection, which is associated with high dye consumption and adverse clinical events. In this study, we investigated approaches for local dye delivery during FCM imaging based on dye carriers attached to the imaging probe. Using three-dimensional confocal microscopy, automated bench tests, and FCM imaging we quantitatively characterized dye release of carriers composed of open-pore foam only and foam loaded with agarose hydrogel. In addition, we compared local dye delivery with a model of systemic dye delivery in the isolated perfused rodent heart. We measured the signal-to-noise ratio of images acquired in various regions of the heart. Our evaluations showed that foam-agarose dye carriers exhibited a prolonged dye release versus foam-only carriers. Foam-agarose dye carriers allowed reliable imaging of 5-9 lines, which is comparable to 4-8 min of continuous dye release. Our study in the living heart revealed that the SNR of FCM images using local and systemic dye delivery is not different. However, we observed differences in the imaged tissue microstructure with the two approaches. Structural features characteristic of microvasculature were solely observed for systemic dye delivery. Our findings suggest that local dye delivery approach for FCM imaging constitutes an important alternative to systemic dye delivery. We suggest that the approach for local dye delivery will facilitate clinical translation of FCM, for instance, for FCM imaging during pediatric heart surgery.

  17. Local delivery of fluorescent dye for fiber-optics confocal microscopy of the living heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Kaza, Aditya K; Hitchcock, Robert W; Sachse, Frank B

    2014-01-01

    Fiber-optics confocal microscopy (FCM) is an emerging imaging technology with various applications in basic research and clinical diagnosis. FCM allows for real-time in situ microscopy of tissue at sub-cellular scale. Recently FCM has been investigated for cardiac imaging, in particular, for discrimination of cardiac tissue during pediatric open-heart surgery. FCM relies on fluorescent dyes. The current clinical approach of dye delivery is based on systemic injection, which is associated with high dye consumption, and adverse clinical events. In this study, we investigated approaches for local dye delivery during FCM imaging based on dye carriers attached to the imaging probe. Using three-dimensional confocal microscopy, automated bench tests, and FCM imaging we quantitatively characterized dye release of carriers composed of open-pore foam only and foam loaded with agarose hydrogel. In addition, we compared local dye delivery with a model of systemic dye delivery in the isolated perfused rodent heart. We measured the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of images acquired in various regions of the heart. Our evaluations showed that foam-agarose dye carriers exhibited a prolonged dye release vs. foam-only carriers. Foam-agarose dye carriers allowed reliable imaging of 5-9 lines, which is comparable to 4-8 min of continuous dye release. Our study in the living heart revealed that the SNR of FCM images using local and systemic dye delivery is not different. However, we observed differences in the imaged tissue microstructure with the two approaches. Structural features characteristic of microvasculature were solely observed for systemic dye delivery. Our findings suggest that local dye delivery approach for FCM imaging constitutes an important alternative to systemic dye delivery. We suggest that the approach for local dye delivery will facilitate clinical translation of FCM, for instance, for FCM imaging during pediatric heart surgery.

  18. Development of novel sol-gel indicators (SGI's) for in-situ environmental measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livingston, R.R.; Wicks, G.G.; Baylor, L.C.; Whitaker, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    Organic indicator molecules have been incorporated in a porous sol- gel matrix coated on the end of a fiber-optic lens assembly to create sensors for in situ environmental measurements. Probes have been made that are sensitive to pH and uranyl concentration. The use of fiber optics allows the probe to be lowered into a well or bore hole, while support equipment such as a spectrophotometer and computer may be situated hundreds of meters away

  19. In-situ strain monitoring in liquid containers of LNG transporting carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Min-Cheol; Seo, Jun-Kyu; Kim, Kyung-Jo; Lee, Sang-Min; Kim, Myung-Hyun

    2008-08-01

    Liquefied natural gas (LNG) transport carriers are exposed to a risk by the repeated bump in the LNG container during the vessel traveling over the wave in ocean. The liquid inside the container, especially when it was not fully contained, make a strong bump onto the insulation panel of the tank wall. The insulation panel consists of several layers of thick polyurethane foam (PUF) to maintain the LNG below the cryogenic temperature, -162°C. Due to the repeated shock on the PUF, a crack could be developed on the tank wall causing a tremendous disaster for LNG carriers. To prevent the accidental crack on the tank, a continuous monitoring of the strain imposed on the PUF is recommended. In this work, a fiber-optic Bragg grating was imbedded inside the PUF for monitoring the strain parallel to the impact direction. The optical fiber sensor with a small diameter of 125 μm was suitable to be inserted in the PUF through a small hole drilled after the PUF was cured. In-situ monitoring of the strain producing the change of Bragg reflection wavelength, a high speed wavelength interrogation method was employed by using an arrayed waveguide grating. By dropping a heavy mass on the PUF, we measured the strain imposed on the insulation panel.

  20. In situ stresses in rock masses: methodology for its study in tunnel projects in Spain; Metodologia de estudio y obtencion de las tensiones in situ en los proyectos de obra subterranea realizados en Espana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madirolas Perez, G.; Perucho Martinez, A.

    2014-07-01

    In situ stress is one of the main factors to be taken into account in the design of tunnels, as it can cause inadmissible stresses and strains leading to high deviations in the budgets. For that reason, the stress state is directly introduced into the numerical models used for the design of tunnels. In Spain, although several tunnels have been carried out with an important overburden in tectonically relevant zones, a quantitative determination of the stresses has not been usually included in civil work projects. Therefore, it is considered necessary to implement a routine procedure of study of civil work projects involving tunnels excavated in rock, and a new detailed methodology is proposed. The challenge is that project managers, who face works in which stresses may play a determinant role, may have a practical reference enabling them to optimize available resources and to include the real stress information in the design of underground works. (Author)

  1. Single-particle measurements of bouncing particles and in situ collection efficiency from an airborne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) with light-scattering detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jin; Brock, Charles A.; Murphy, Daniel M.; Sueper, Donna T.; Welti, André; Middlebrook, Ann M.

    2017-10-01

    A light-scattering module was coupled to an airborne, compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (LS-AMS) to investigate collection efficiency (CE) while obtaining nonrefractory aerosol chemical composition measurements during the Southeast Nexus (SENEX) campaign. In this instrument, particles scatter light from an internal laser beam and trigger saving individual particle mass spectra. Nearly all of the single-particle data with mass spectra that were triggered by scattered light signals were from particles larger than ˜ 280 nm in vacuum aerodynamic diameter. Over 33 000 particles are characterized as either prompt (27 %), delayed (15 %), or null (58 %), according to the time and intensity of their total mass spectral signals. The particle mass from single-particle spectra is proportional to that derived from the light-scattering diameter (dva-LS) but not to that from the particle time-of-flight (PToF) diameter (dva-MS) from the time of the maximum mass spectral signal. The total mass spectral signal from delayed particles was about 80 % of that from prompt ones for the same dva-LS. Both field and laboratory data indicate that the relative intensities of various ions in the prompt spectra show more fragmentation compared to the delayed spectra. The particles with a delayed mass spectral signal likely bounced off the vaporizer and vaporized later on another surface within the confines of the ionization source. Because delayed particles are detected by the mass spectrometer later than expected from their dva-LS size, they can affect the interpretation of particle size (PToF) mass distributions, especially at larger sizes. The CE, measured by the average number or mass fractions of particles optically detected that had measurable mass spectra, varied significantly (0.2-0.9) in different air masses. The measured CE agreed well with a previous parameterization when CE > 0.5 for acidic particles but was sometimes lower than the minimum parameterized CE of 0.5.

  2. In situ derivatization-ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of neurotransmitters in Parkinson's rat brain microdialysates by ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yongrui; Zhao, Xian-En; Zhu, Shuyun; Wei, Na; Sun, Jing; Zhou, Yubi; Liu, Shu; Liu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Guang; Suo, Yourui; You, Jinmao

    2016-08-05

    Simultaneous monitoring of several neurotransmitters (NTs) linked to Parkinson's disease (PD) has important scientific significance for PD related pathology, pharmacology and drug screening. A new simple, fast and sensitive analytical method, based on in situ derivatization-ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (in situ DUADLLME) in a single step, has been proposed for the quantitative determination of catecholamines and their biosynthesis precursors and metabolites in rat brain microdialysates. The method involved the rapid injection of the mixture of low toxic bromobenzene (extractant) and acetonitrile (dispersant), which containing commercial Lissamine rhodamine B sulfonyl chloride (LRSC) as derivatization reagent, into the aqueous phase of sample and buffer, and the following in situ DUADLLME procedure. After centrifugation, 50μL of the sedimented phase (bromobenzene) was directly injected for ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) detection in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. This interesting combination brought the advantages of speediness, simpleness, low matrix effects and high sensitivity in an effective way. Parameters of in situ DUADLLME and UHPLC-MS/MS conditions were all optimized in detail. The optimum conditions of in situ DUADLLME were found to be 30μL of microdialysates, 150μL of acetonitrile containing LRSC, 50μL of bromobenzene and 800μL of NaHCO3-Na2CO3 buffer (pH 10.5) for 3.0min at 37°C. Under the optimized conditions, good linearity was observed with LODs (S/N>3) and LOQs (S/N>10) of LRSC derivatized-NTs in the range of 0.002-0.004 and 0.007-0.015 nmol/L, respectively. It also brought good precision (3.2-12.8%, peak area CVs%), accuracy (94.2-108.6%), recovery (94.5-105.5%) and stability (3.8-8.1%, peak area CVs%) results. Moreover, LRSC derivatization significantly improved chromatographic resolution and MS detection sensitivity of NTs when compared with the

  3. Fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES): proposal for informed consent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacci, A; Ursino, F; La Vela, R; Matteucci, F; Mallardi, V; Fattori, B

    2008-08-01

    Fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) is now a first choice method for studying swallowing disorders on account of the various advantages it offers: easy to use, very well tolerated, allows bedside examination and is economic. Nevertheless, this diagnostic procedure is not without risks, the most probable consequences of which include discomfort, gagging and/or vomiting, vasovagal syncope, epistaxis, mucosal perforation, adverse reactions to topical anaesthetics and laryngospasm. The risks involved with FEES stress the importance of informing the patient of these; this is an important aspect in medicine that necessarily and immediately implies receiving the patient's so-called "informed consent". Informed consent should be obtained not only by means of specific printed forms but also after the patient has had an interview with the physician who will be performing the procedure and who will offer information according to the personal clinical, psychological, cultural and linguistic situation of the patient and in keeping with the type of procedure proposed. In the case of FEES, as with other invasive or non-invasive diagnostic procedures, therefore, routine written and signed consent, together with a patient/physician interview should fulfil what is known as "complete information". In this report, a specific form for informed consent to FEES procedures, is proposed.

  4. Fiber-optic multipoint radiation sensing system using waveguide scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, Tatsuyuki; Yoda, Masaki; Tanaka, Koutarou; Masumaru, Tarou; Morimoto, Souichirou.

    1996-01-01

    Novel fiber-optic radiation sensors and a multipoint measurement method that takes advantage of them have been developed. The new sensor design, which we call a 'waveguide scintillator', consists of a scintillating material and a wavelength-shifting fiber (WLSF). The WLSF is embedded in the scintillating material, and each end is connected to a transparent optical fiber. These waveguide scintillators can be connected in series along an optical fiber loop to form a radiation monitoring system, and each end of the fiber loop is terminated with a photodetector. This new radiation monitoring arrangement dispenses with the need for electronic apparatus at each measuring point and consequently improves resistance to noise. Furthermore, it offers the advantages of multipoint monitoring - meaning that radiation intensity can be measured at multiple sensors - using only two photodetectors. We have examined the light output characteristics and time resolution of a prototype arrangement of these new waveguide scintillators, thus confirming the feasibility of multipoint measurements using a system of multiple waveguide scintillators connected in series in an optical fiber loop. (author)

  5. Novel adaptive fiber-optics collimator for coherent beam combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Dong; Ma, Pengfei; Ma, Yanxing; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu; Si, Lei

    2014-12-15

    In this manuscript, we experimentally validate a novel design of adaptive fiber-optics collimator (AFOC), which utilizes two levers to enlarge the movable range of the fiber end cap. The enlargement of the range makes the new AFOC possible to compensate the end-cap/tilt aberration in fiber laser beam combining system. The new AFOC based on flexible hinges and levers was fabricated and the performance of the new AFOC was tested carefully, including its control range, frequency response and control accuracy. Coherent beam combination (CBC) of two 5-W fiber amplifiers array with simultaneously end-cap/tilt control and phase-locking control was implemented successfully with the novel AFOC. Experimental results show that the average normalized power in the bucket (PIB) value increases from 0.311 to 0.934 with active phasing and tilt aberration compensation simultaneously, and with both controls on, the fringe contrast improves to more than 82% from 0% for the case with both control off. This work presents a promising structure for tilt aberration control in high power CBC system.

  6. Lightning Current Measurement with Fiber-Optic Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Ely, Jay J.; Szatkowski, George N.; Mata, Carlos T.; Mata, Angel G.; Snyder, Gary P.

    2014-01-01

    A fiber-optic current sensor is successfully developed with many potential applications for electric current measurement. Originally developed for in-flight lightning measurement, the sensor utilizes Faraday Effect in an optical fiber. The Faraday Effect causes linear light polarization in a fiber to rotate when the fiber is exposed to a magnetic field. The polarization change is detected using a reflective polarimetric scheme. Forming fiber loops and applying Ampere's law, measuring the total light rotation results in the determination of the total current enclosed. The sensor is conformable to complex structure geometry. It is also non-conductive and immune to electromagnetic interference, saturation or hysteresis. Installation is non-intrusive, and the sensor can be safely routed through flammable areas. Two similar sensor systems are described in this paper. The first system operates at 1310nm laser wavelength and is capable of measuring approximately 300 A - 300 kA, a 60 dB range. Laboratory validation results of aircraft lighting direct and in-direct effect current amplitudes are reported for this sensor. The second system operates at 1550nm wavelength and can measure about 400 A - 400 kA. Triggered-lightning measurement data are presented for this system. Good results are achieved in all cases.

  7. A Fiber-Optic Aircraft Lightning Current Measurement Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Ely, Jay J.; Szatkowski, George N.

    2013-01-01

    A fiber-optic current sensor based on the Faraday Effect is developed for aircraft installations. It can measure total lightning current amplitudes and waveforms, including continuing current. Additional benefits include being small, lightweight, non-conducting, safe from electromagnetic interference, and free of hysteresis and saturation. The Faraday Effect causes light polarization to rotate in presence of magnetic field in the direction of light propagation. Measuring the total induced light polarization change yields the total current enclosed. The system operates at 1310nm laser wavelength and can measure approximately 300 A - 300 kA, a 60 dB range. A reflective polarimetric scheme is used, where the light polarization change is measured after a round-trip propagation through the fiber. A two-detector setup measures the two orthogonal polarizations for noise subtraction and improved dynamic range. The current response curve is non-linear and requires a simple spline-fit correction. Effects of high current were achieved in laboratory using combinations of multiple fiber and wire loops. Good result comparisons against reference sensors were achieved up to 300 kA. Accurate measurements on a simulated aircraft fuselage and an internal structure illustrate capabilities that maybe difficult with traditional sensors. Also tested at a commercial lightning test facility from 20 kA to 200 kA, accuracy within 3-10% was achieved even with non-optimum setups.

  8. Fiber-Optic Surface Temperature Sensor Based on Modal Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Musin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Spatially-integrated surface temperature sensing is highly useful when it comes to controlling processes, detecting hazardous conditions or monitoring the health and safety of equipment and people. Fiber-optic sensing based on modal interference has shown great sensitivity to temperature variation, by means of cost-effective image-processing of few-mode interference patterns. New developments in the field of sensor configuration, as described in this paper, include an innovative cooling and heating phase discrimination functionality and more precise measurements, based entirely on the image processing of interference patterns. The proposed technique was applied to the measurement of the integrated surface temperature of a hollow cylinder and compared with a conventional measurement system, consisting of an infrared camera and precision temperature probe. As a result, the optical technique is in line with the reference system. Compared with conventional surface temperature probes, the optical technique has the following advantages: low heat capacity temperature measurement errors, easier spatial deployment, and replacement of multiple angle infrared camera shooting and the continuous monitoring of surfaces that are not visually accessible.

  9. Assessing carotid atherosclerosis by fiber-optic multispectral photoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Jie; Li, Rui; Wang, Pu; Phillips, Evan; Bruning, Rebecca; Liao, Chien-Sheng; Sturek, Michael; Goergen, Craig J.; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2015-03-01

    Atherosclerotic plaque at the carotid bifurcation is the underlying cause of the majority of ischemic strokes. Noninvasive imaging and quantification of the compositional changes preceding gross anatomic changes within the arterial wall is essential for diagnosis of disease. Current imaging modalities such as duplex ultrasound, computed tomography, positron emission tomography are limited by the lack of compositional contrast and the detection of flow-limiting lesions. Although high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging has been developed to characterize atherosclerotic plaque composition, its accessibility for wide clinical use is limited. Here, we demonstrate a fiber-based multispectral photoacoustic tomography system for excitation of lipids and external acoustic detection of the generated ultrasound. Using sequential ultrasound imaging of ex vivo preparations we achieved ~2 cm imaging depth and chemical selectivity for assessment of human arterial plaques. A multivariate curve resolution alternating least squares analysis method was applied to resolve the major chemical components, including intravascular lipid, intramuscular fat, and blood. These results show the promise of detecting carotid plaque in vivo through esophageal fiber-optic excitation of lipids and external acoustic detection of the generated ultrasound. This imaging system has great potential for serving as a point-ofcare device for early diagnosis of carotid artery disease in the clinic.

  10. Flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy service; an aid to patient management

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Marathe, N

    2016-02-01

    The study illustrates advantages of Fiberoptic Bronchoscopy, a new service started at St. Luke’s General Hospital in patient care since April 2014. Retrospective review of Bronchoscopies and referrals to Tertiary care unit for Bronchoscopy, prior and after initiation of service at St. Luke’s Hospital were studied. In total, 106 procedures were performed out of which 103(98%) were for diagnostic purpose. Common indications for bronchoscopy were functional airway assessment in 38 cases (35%) of chronic cough, 26 cases (24.8%) of suspected malignancy. The average time taken for procedure was 15 + 1 minute with overall rate of complication recorded in 1 case (0.95%). 32(30%) inpatients were referred before bronchoscopy services were started locally. Fifteen (14%) patients were referred for Endobronchial Ultrasound (EBUS) after diagnostic procedure performed at St. Luke’s Hospital. To conclude, Bronchoscopy is a safe procedure used for diagnosis of various Lung conditions. The services offered locally reduced the time and cost involved in referrals. The diagnostic bronchoscopies performed for malignancy at St. Luke’s Hospital have rightly increased references for EBUS at Tertiary care Unit

  11. Dexmedetomidine versus Remifentanil for Sedation during Awake Fiberoptic Intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Cattano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compared remifentanil and dexmedetomidine as awake fiberoptic intubation (AFOI anesthetics. Thirty-four adult ASA I-III patients were enrolled in a double-blinded randomized pilot study to receive remifentanil (REM or dexmedetomidine (DEX for sedation during AFOI (nasal and oral. Thirty patients completed the study and received 2 mg midazolam IV and topical anesthesia. The REM group received a loading dose of 0.75 mcg/kg followed by an infusion of 0.075 mcg/kg/min. The DEX group received a loading dose of 0.4 mcg/kg followed by an infusion of 0.7 mcg/kg/hr. Time to sedation, number of intubation attempts, Ramsay sedation scale (RSS score, bispectral index (BIS, and memory recall were recorded. All thirty patients were successfully intubated by AFOI (22 oral intubations/8 nasal. First attempt success rate with AFOI was higher in the REM group than the DEX group, 72% and 38% (P=0.02, respectively. The DEX group took longer to attain RSS of ≥3 and to achieve BIS <80, as compared to the REM group. Postloading dose verbal recall was poorer in the DEX group. Dexmedetomidine seems a useful adjunct for patients undergoing AFOI but is dependent on dosage and time. Further studies in the use of dexmedetomidine for AFOI are warranted.

  12. Portable fiber-optic taper coupled optical microscopy platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiming; Yu, Yan; Huang, Hui; Ou, Jinping

    2017-04-01

    The optical fiber taper coupled with CMOS has advantages of high sensitivity, compact structure and low distortion in the imaging platform. So it is widely used in low light, high speed and X-ray imaging systems. In the meanwhile, the peculiarity of the coupled structure can meet the needs of the demand in microscopy imaging. Toward this end, we developed a microscopic imaging platform based on the coupling of cellphone camera module and fiber optic taper for the measurement of the human blood samples and ascaris lumbricoides. The platform, weighing 70 grams, is based on the existing camera module of the smartphone and a fiber-optic array which providing a magnification factor of 6x.The top facet of the taper, on which samples are placed, serves as an irregular sampling grid for contact imaging. The magnified images of the sample, located on the bottom facet of the fiber, are then projected onto the CMOS sensor. This paper introduces the portable medical imaging system based on the optical fiber coupling with CMOS, and theoretically analyzes the feasibility of the system. The image data and process results either can be stored on the memory or transmitted to the remote medical institutions for the telemedicine. We validate the performance of this cell-phone based microscopy platform using human blood samples and test target, achieving comparable results to a standard bench-top microscope.

  13. 1st International Conference on Fiber-Optic Rotation Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Arditty, Hervé

    1982-01-01

    Currently there is considerable interest in the application of optical meth­ ods for the measurement of absolute rotation. Active approaches, so-called ring laser gyros, have been under serious development for at least 15 years. More recently, passive approaches using ring resonators or multi turn fiber interferometers have also demonstrated much pro~ise. The only previous conference devoted exclusively to optical rotation sensors, held in 1978 in San Diego, California, was organized by the Society of Photo-optical Instru­ mentation Engineers(S.P.I.E.J. Although the main emphasis at that conference was on ring laser gyros, a number of papers were also included that described the early development of fiber gyroscopes. Since then the field of fiber optic rotation sensors has grown so rapidly that a conference devoted primarily to this subject was needed. The First International Conference on Fiber-Optic Rotation Sensors was held at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, Nove~­ b...

  14. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy in the diagnosis and therapeutic decision for respiratory infections in hematological febrile neutropenic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza Bento

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Febrile neutropenia is a common complication in patients undergoing chemotherapy or hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT. Flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy has been used to aid in the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases. However, there is no consensus regarding the benefit of the exam in establishing diagnosis and in changing the treatment of lung disease in this context. Previous retrospective studies, quite heterogeneous and with non-HIV immunocompromised patients, showed that the yield of fiberoptic bronchoscopy in establishing etiology ranges from 13% to 81%, and in changing therapy, from 5% to 51%. Aim: To evaluate the efficiency of Fiberoptic bronchoscopy and the procedure-related risk for neutropenic patients with hematologic malignancy. Methods: This retrospective cross-sectional study analyzed the medical records of patients with hematologic malignancy with febrile neutropenia who had undergone diagnostic fiberoptic bronchoscopy between January 2011 and December 2012 at the Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre. Results: A total of 45 patients were included: 18 (36% tested positive for bronchoalveolar lavage, with change in therapeutic management occurring for 95% of them. The procedure-related risk was 2.2%, with one patient showing desaturation immediately after the procedure. Conclusion:  Despite the limited number of patients, our findings indicate that fiberoptic bronchoscopy in neutropenic patients is safe, and the results are similar to those previously reported.

  15. Monitoring the hydrolyzation of aspirin during the dissolution testing for aspirin delayed-release tablets with a fiber-optic dissolution system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the hydrolyzation of aspirin during the process of dissolution testing for aspirin delayed-release tablets. Hydrolysis product of salicylic acid can result in adverse effects and affect the determination of dissolution rate assaying. In this study, the technique of differential spectra was employed, which made it possible to monitor the dissolution testing in situ. The results showed that the hydrolyzation of aspirin made the percentage of salicylic acid exceed the limit of free salicylic acid (4.0, and the hydrolyzation may affect the quality detection of aspirin delayed-release tablets. Keywords: Aspirin delayed-release tablets, Drug dissolution test, Fiber-optic dissolution system, UV–vis spectrum

  16. Fiber-optical sensor with intensity compensation model in college teaching of physics experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Liping; Zhang, Yang; Li, Kun; Zhang, Yu

    2017-08-01

    Optical fiber sensor technology is one of the main contents of modern information technology, which has a very important position in modern science and technology. Fiber optic sensor experiment can improve students' enthusiasm and broaden their horizons in college physics experiment. In this paper the main structure and working principle of fiberoptical sensor with intensity compensation model are introduced. And thus fiber-optical sensor with intensity compensation model is applied to measure micro displacement of Young's modulus measurement experiment and metal linear expansion coefficient measurement experiment in the college physics experiment. Results indicate that the measurement accuracy of micro displacement is higher than that of the traditional methods using fiber-optical sensor with intensity compensation model. Meanwhile this measurement method makes the students understand on the optical fiber, sensor and nature of micro displacement measurement method and makes each experiment strengthen relationship and compatibility, which provides a new idea for the reform of experimental teaching.

  17. Multi-dimensional fiber-optic radiation sensor for ocular proton therapy dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, K.W.; Yoo, W.J.; Moon, J.; Han, K.T.; Park, B.G.; Shin, D.; Park, S-Y.; Lee, B.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we fabricated a multi-dimensional fiber-optic radiation sensor, which consists of organic scintillators, plastic optical fibers and a water phantom with a polymethyl methacrylate structure for the ocular proton therapy dosimetry. For the purpose of sensor characterization, we measured the spread out Bragg-peak of 120 MeV proton beam using a one-dimensional sensor array, which has 30 fiber-optic radiation sensors with a 1.5 mm interval. A uniform region of spread out Bragg-peak using the one-dimensional fiber-optic radiation sensor was obtained from 20 to 25 mm depth of a phantom. In addition, the Bragg-peak of 109 MeV proton beam was measured at the depth of 11.5 mm of a phantom using a two-dimensional sensor array, which has 10×3 sensor array with a 0.5 mm interval.

  18. Architecture for fiber-optic sensors and actuators in aircraft propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glomb, W. L., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a design for fiber-optic sensing and control in advanced aircraft Electronic Engine Control (EEC). The recommended architecture is an on-engine EEC which contains electro-optic interface circuits for fiber-optic sensors. Size and weight are reduced by multiplexing arrays of functionally similar sensors on a pairs of optical fibers to common electro-optical interfaces. The architecture contains interfaces to seven sensor groups. Nine distinct fiber-optic sensor types were found to provide the sensing functions. Analysis revealed no strong discriminator (except reliability of laser diodes and remote electronics) on which to base a selection of preferred common interface type. A hardware test program is recommended to assess the relative maturity of the technologies and to determine real performance in the engine environment.

  19. In situ growth of NiCo2S4 nanotube arrays on Ni foam for supercapacitors: Maximizing utilization efficiency at high mass loading to achieve ultrahigh areal pseudocapacitance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haichao; Jiang, Jianjun; Zhang, Li; Xia, Dandan; Zhao, Yuandong; Guo, Danqing; Qi, Tong; Wan, Houzhao

    2014-05-01

    Self-standing NiCo2S4 nanotube arrays have been in situ grown on Ni foam by the anion-exchange reaction and directly used as the electrode for supercapacitors. The NiCo2S4 nanotube in the arrays effectively reduces the inactive material and increases the electroactive surface area because of the ultrathin wall, which is quite competent to achieve high utilization efficiency at high electroactive materials mass loading. The NiCo2S4 nanotube arrays hybrid electrode exhibits an ultrahigh specific capacitance of 14.39 F cm-2 at 5 mA cm-2 with excellent rate performance (67.7% retention for current increases 30 times) and cycling stability (92% retention after 5000 cycles) at a high mass loading of 6 mg cm-2. High areal capacitance (4.68 F cm-2 at 10 mA cm-2), high energy density (31.5 Wh kg-1 at 156.6 W kg-1) and high power density (2348.5 W kg-1 at 16.6 Wh kg-1) can be achieved by assembling asymmetric supercapacitor with reduced graphene oxide at a total active material mass loading as high as 49.5 mg. This work demonstrates that NiCo2S4 nanotube arrays structure is a superior electroactive material for high-performance supercapacitors even at a mass loading of potential application-specific scale.

  20. Compact Two-step Laser Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer for in Situ Analyses of Aromatic Organics on Planetary Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getty, Stephanie; Brickerhoff, William; Cornish, Timothy; Ecelberger, Scott; Floyd, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    RATIONALE A miniature time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been adapted to demonstrate two-step laser desorption-ionization (LOI) in a compact instrument package for enhanced organics detection. Two-step LDI decouples the desorption and ionization processes, relative to traditional laser ionization-desorption, in order to produce low-fragmentation conditions for complex organic analytes. Tuning UV ionization laser energy allowed control ofthe degree of fragmentation, which may enable better identification of constituent species. METHODS A reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer prototype measuring 20 cm in length was adapted to a two-laser configuration, with IR (1064 nm) desorption followed by UV (266 nm) postionization. A relatively low ion extraction voltage of 5 kV was applied at the sample inlet. Instrument capabilities and performance were demonstrated with analysis of a model polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, representing a class of compounds important to the fields of Earth and planetary science. RESULTS L2MS analysis of a model PAH standard, pyrene, has been demonstrated, including parent mass identification and the onset o(tunable fragmentation as a function of ionizing laser energy. Mass resolution m/llm = 380 at full width at half-maximum was achieved which is notable for gas-phase ionization of desorbed neutrals in a highly-compact mass analyzer. CONCLUSIONS Achieving two-step laser mass spectrometry (L2MS) in a highly-miniature instrument enables a powerful approach to the detection and characterization of aromatic organics in remote terrestrial and planetary applications. Tunable detection of parent and fragment ions with high mass resolution, diagnostic of molecular structure, is possible on such a compact L2MS instrument. Selectivity of L2MS against low-mass inorganic salt interferences is a key advantage when working with unprocessed, natural samples, and a mechanism for the observed selectivity is presented.

  1. Thermal injury secondary to laparoscopic fiber-optic cables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, A Katharine; Brody, Fred; Hopkins, Vernon; Rosales, Greg; Gonzalez, Florencia; Schwartz, Arnold

    2009-08-01

    Laparoscopy requires a reliable light source to provide adequate visualization. However, thermal energy is produced as a by-product from the optical cable. This study attempts to quantify the degree of possible thermal damage secondary to the fiber-optic light source. Using a digital thermometer, temperature measurements were recorded at the tip of optical cables from five different light sources (Karl Storz, Inc., Tuttlingen, Germany). Temperature measurements were recorded with new and old bulbs. The tip of the cable was applied to surgical drapes and the time to charring was recorded. Subsequently, the tip of the optical cable was applied to a porcine model and tissue samples were obtained after varying amounts of time (5, 15, 30, 60, and 90 s). Sections of the damaged tissue were prepared for microscopic evaluation. Parameters for thermal injury included extent of epidermal, dermal, and subcutaneous fat damage and necrosis. The lateral extent and depth of injury were measured. The maximum temperature at the tip of the optical cable varied between 119.5 degrees C and 268.6 degrees C. When surgical drapes were exposed to the tip of the light source, the time to char was 3-6 s. The degree and volume of injury increased with longer exposure times, and significant injury was recorded with the optical cable 3 mm from the skin. This study demonstrates that the temperature at the tip of the optical light cord can induce extensive damage. The by-product of light, heat, can produce immediate superficial tissue necrosis that can extend into the subcutaneous fat even when the optical tip is not in direct contact with the skin. In addition, our study shows the variation in temperature that exists between light sources and bulb status. Overall, surgeons must realize and respect the potential complications associated with optical technology.

  2. Development of a Meso-Scale Fiberoptic Rotation Sensor for a Torsion Actuator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jun; Desai, Jaydev P

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a meso-scale fiberoptic rotation sensor for a shape memory alloy (SMA) torsion actuator for neurosurgical applications. Within the sensor, a rotary head with a reflecting surface is capable of modulating the light intensity collected by optical fibers when the rotary head is coupled to the torsion actuator. The mechanism of light intensity modulation is modeled, followed by experimental model verification. Meanwhile, working performances for different rotary head designs, optical fibers, and fabrication materials are compared. After the calibration of the fiberoptic rotation sensor, the sensor is capable of precisely measuring rotary motion and controlling the SMA torsion actuator with feedback control.

  3. Modeling of Thermal Phase Noise in a Solid Core Photonic Crystal Fiber-Optic Gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ningfang; Ma, Kun; Jin, Jing; Teng, Fei; Cai, Wei

    2017-10-26

    A theoretical model of the thermal phase noise in a square-wave modulated solid core photonic crystal fiber-optic gyroscope has been established, and then verified by measurements. The results demonstrate a good agreement between theory and experiment. The contribution of the thermal phase noise to the random walk coefficient of the gyroscope is derived. A fiber coil with 2.8 km length is used in the experimental solid core photonic crystal fiber-optic gyroscope, showing a random walk coefficient of 9.25 × 10 -5 deg/√h.

  4. Distributed fiber-optic temperature sensing: recent improvements and Nagra's applications in the Mont Terri URL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, Tobias; Mueller, Herwig R.; Vietor, Tim; Frieg, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The application of fiber-optic sensors in large experiments in underground rock laboratories (URL) and for monitoring of pilot repositories offers several advantages in contrast to conventional sensors. By means of optical fibers distributed temperature and deformation measurements can be performed without electric or mechanical components at the measurement location reducing the risk of corrosion and sensor failure. As fiber-optic strain sensors are to some extend still in a prototype stage, we focus here on Raman spectra distributed fiber-optic temperature sensing (DTS). In DTS a fiber-optic cable, which is the temperature sensor, is connected to a light reading unit that sends laser-pulses into the fiber. The backscattered light is detected with high temporal resolution. From the two-way-light-travel-time the location of backscattering is determined. For the temperature information the amplitude ratio of the Stokes and anti-Stokes signals is analyzed. The Stokes and anti- Stokes signals are the result of the Raman effect. The ratio of these signals provides a quantity that depends only on the temperature of the fiber at the location of backscatter. With commercial DTS setups it is possible to measure the temperature distribution along several kilometer long cables with a temperature resolution of 0.01 C and a spatial resolution of 1 m. Recent developments in DTS focus on better temperature precision and resolution. This advancement can be achieved by experiment-specific calibration techniques and sensor-layout as well as improved instruments. To realize high spatial resolution (cm range) wrapped fiber-optic cables can be applied. Another promising approach to monitor moisture along a fiber-optic cable installed in unconsolidated material are heatable cables. We will present a selection of the most recent advancements which may improve temperature monitoring in natural and

  5. In situ analysis of plant tissue underivatized carbohydrates and on-probe enzymatic degraded starch by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry by using carbon nanotubes as matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholipour, Yousef; Nonami, Hiroshi; Erra-Balsells, Rosa

    2008-12-15

    Underivatized carbohydrates of tulip bulb and leaf tissues were characterized in situ by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) by using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as matrix. Two sample preparation methods--(i) depositing CNTs on the fresh tissue slices placed on the probe and (ii) locating semitransparent tissues on a dried layer of CNTs on the probe--were examined. Furthermore, practicability of in situ starch analysis by MALDI-TOF MS was examined by detection of glucose originated from on-probe amyloglucosidase-catalyzed degradation of starch on the tissue surface. Besides, CNTs could efficiently desorb/ionize natural mono-, di-, and oligosaccharides extracted from tulip bulb tissues as well as glucose resulting from starch enzymatic degradation in vitro. These results were compared with those obtained by in situ MALDI-TOF MS analysis of similar tissues. Positive ion mode showed superior signal reproducibility. CNTs deposited under semitransparent tissue could also desorb/ionize neutral carbohydrates, leading to nearly complete elimination of matrix cluster signals but with an increase in tissue-originated signals. Furthermore, several experiments were carried out to compare the efficiency of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, nor-harmane, alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, and CNTs as matrices for MALDI of neutral carbohydrates from the intact plant tissue surface and for enzymatic tissue starch degradation; these results are discussed in brief. Among matrices studied, the lowest laser power was needed to acquire carbohydrate signals with high signal-to-noise ratio and resolution when CNTs were used.

  6. A Compact Tandem Two-Step Laser Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer for In Situ Analysis of Non-Volatile Organics on Planetary Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getty, Stephanie A.; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Li, Xiang; Elsila, Jamie; Cornish, Timothy; Ecelberger, Scott; Wu, Qinghao; Zare, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Two-step laser desorption mass spectrometry is a well suited technique to the analysis of high priority classes of organics, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, present in complex samples. The use of decoupled desorption and ionization laser pulses allows for sensitive and selective detection of structurally intact organic species. We have recently demonstrated the implementation of this advancement in laser mass spectrometry in a compact, flight-compatible instrument that could feasibly be the centerpiece of an analytical science payload as part of a future spaceflight mission to a small body or icy moon.

  7. Rapid qualitative analysis of 2 flavonoids, rutin and silybin, in medical pills by direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry (DART-MS) combined with in situ derivatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Tibor; Kuki, Ákos; Nagy, Lajos; Zsuga, Miklós; Kéki, Sándor

    2018-03-01

    Direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry (DART-MS) with in situ silylation was used for the rapid analysis of the flavonoids silybin ((2R,3R)-3,5,7-trihydroxy-2-[3-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-2-hydroxymethyl-2,3-dihydrobenzo[1,4]dioxin-6-yl]chroman-4-one) and rutin (quercetin-3-O-rutinoside). Three different derivatization reagents, hexamethyldisilazane/trimethylchlorosilane/pyridine (HMDS/TMCS/pyridine), N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)acetamide/trimethylchlorosilane/N-trimethylsilyimidazole (BSA/TMCS/TMSI), and N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide/trimethylchlorosilane (BSTFA/TMCS), were applied. Silybin and rutin were detected with various degrees of silylation, and the formation of dimers with pyridine and imidazole was also observed. HMDS/TMCS/pyridine was the best choice for the DART-MS analysis of silybin, and BSA/TMCS/TMSI was the most effective for the detection of rutin. The effects of the DART source temperature on desorption, ionization, in-source fragmentation, dimer formation, and hydrolysis of the trimethylsilyl groups were also studied. In addition, the collision-induced dissociation properties of the derivatized silybin and rutin were explored. With our in situ silylation method, the derivatized bioactive compounds in intact medical pills could also be detected by DART-MS. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Highly Sensitive Temperature Sensors Based on Fiber-Optic PWM and Capacitance Variation Using Thermochromic Sensing Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Rajibur Rahaman Khan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a temperature/thermal sensor that contains a Rhodamine-B sensing membrane. We applied two different sensing methods, namely, fiber-optic pulse width modulation (PWM and an interdigitated capacitor (IDC-based temperature sensor to measure the temperature from 5 °C to 100 °C. To the best of our knowledge, the fiber-optic PWM-based temperature sensor is reported for the first time in this study. The proposed fiber-optic PWM temperature sensor has good sensing ability; its sensitivity is ~3.733 mV/°C. The designed temperature-sensing system offers stable sensing responses over a wide dynamic range, good reproducibility properties with a relative standard deviation (RSD of ~0.021, and the capacity for a linear sensing response with a correlation coefficient of R2 ≈ 0.992 over a wide sensing range. In our study, we also developed an IDC temperature sensor that is based on the capacitance variation principle as the IDC sensing element is heated. We compared the performance of the proposed temperature-sensing systems with different fiber-optic temperature sensors (which are based on the fiber-optic wavelength shift method, the long grating fiber-optic Sagnac loop, and probe type fiber-optics in terms of sensitivity, dynamic range, and linearity. We observed that the proposed sensing systems have better sensing performance than the above-mentioned sensing system.

  9. Using Distributed Fiber-Optic Sensing Systems to Estimate Inflow and Reservoir Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farshbaf Zinati, F.

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in the deployment of distributed fiber-optic sensing systems in horizontal wells carry the promise to lead to a new, cheap and reliable way of monitoring production and reservoir performance. Practical applicability of distributed pressure sensing for quantitative inflow

  10. A fiber-optic setup for quantification of root surface demineralization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanderVeen, MH; tenBosch, JJ

    A fiber-optic fluorescence observation (FOFO) technique has been developed for the quantification of demineralized root dentin, The method was tested on 40 specimens of in vitro demineralized parts of human root dentin, Fluorescein sodium salt was used as a penetrating dye, The fluorescein sodium

  11. Assessment of detection limits of fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing for detection of illicit connections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nienhuis, J.; De Haan, C.; Langeveld, J.G.; Klootwijk, M.; Clemens, F.H.L.R.

    2012-01-01

    Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) with fiber-optic cables is a powerful tool to detect illicit connections in storm sewer systems. High frequency temperature measurements along the in-sewer cable create a detailed representation of temperature anomalies due to illicit discharges. The detection

  12. Awake fiberoptic or awake video laryngoscopic tracheal intubation in patients with anticipated difficult airway management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstock, Charlotte Vallentin; Thøgersen, Bente; Afshari, Arash

    2012-01-01

    Awake flexible fiberoptic intubation (FFI) is the gold standard for management of anticipated difficult tracheal intubation. The purpose of this study was to compare awake FFI to awake McGrath® video laryngoscope, (MVL), (Aircraft Medical, Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom) intubation in patients...... with an anticipated difficult intubation. The authors examined the hypothesis that MVL intubation would be faster than FFI....

  13. Nonlinear fiber-optic strain sensor based on four-wave mixing in microstructured optical fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gu, Bobo; Yuan, Scott Wu; Frosz, Michael H.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a nonlinear fiber-optic strain sensor, which uses the shifts of four-wave mixing Stokes and anti-Stokes peaks caused by the strain-induced changes in the structure and refractive index of a microstructured optical fiber. The sensor thus uses the inherent nonlinearity of the fiber a...

  14. A wideband connection to sperm whales: A fiber-optic, deep-sea hydrophone array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heerfordt, Anders; Møhl, Bertel; Wahlberg, Magnus

    2007-01-01

    A 10-element, 950 m long, vertical hydrophone array based on fiber-optic data transmission has been developed primarily for studying the beam pattern from deep diving cetaceans emitting sonar pulses. The array elements have a configurable sampling rate and resolution with a maximum signal bandwidth...

  15. Mobile fiber-optic sensor for detection of oral and cervical cancer in the developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bing; Nagarajan, Vivek Krishna; Ferris, Daron G

    2015-01-01

    Oral and cervical cancers are a growing global health problem that disproportionately impacts women and men living in the developing world. The high death rate in developing countries is largely due to the fact that these countries do not have the appropriate medical infrastructure and resources to support the organized screening and diagnostic programs that are available in the developed world. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) with a fiber-optic probe can noninvasively quantify the optical properties of epithelial tissues and has shown the potential as a cost-effective, easy-to-use, and sensitive tool for diagnosis of early precancerous changes in the cervix and oral cavity. However, current fiber-optic DRS systems have not been designed to be robust and reliable for use in developing countries. They are subject to various sources of systematic or random errors, arising from the uncontrolled probe-tissue interface and lack of real-time calibration, use bulky and expensive optical components, and require extensive training. This chapter describes a portable DRS device that is specifically designed for detection of oral and cervical cancers in resource-poor settings. The device uses an innovative smart fiber-optic probe to eliminate operator bias, state-of-the-art photonics components to reduce size and power consumption, and automated software to reduce the need of operator training. The size and cost of the smart fiber-optic DRS system may be further reduced by incorporating a smartphone based spectrometer.

  16. The fiber-optic imaging and manipulation of neural activity during animal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Daisuke; Murayama, Masanori

    2016-02-01

    Recent progress with optogenetic probes for imaging and manipulating neural activity has further increased the relevance of fiber-optic systems for neural circuitry research. Optical fibers, which bi-directionally transmit light between separate sites (even at a distance of several meters), can be used for either optical imaging or manipulating neural activity relevant to behavioral circuitry mechanisms. The method's flexibility and the specifications of the light structure are well suited for following the behavior of freely moving animals. Furthermore, thin optical fibers allow researchers to monitor neural activity from not only the cortical surface but also deep brain regions, including the hippocampus and amygdala. Such regions are difficult to target with two-photon microscopes. Optogenetic manipulation of neural activity with an optical fiber has the advantage of being selective for both cell-types and projections as compared to conventional electrophysiological brain tissue stimulation. It is difficult to extract any data regarding changes in neural activity solely from a fiber-optic manipulation device; however, the readout of data is made possible by combining manipulation with electrophysiological recording, or the simultaneous application of optical imaging and manipulation using a bundle-fiber. The present review introduces recent progress in fiber-optic imaging and manipulation methods, while also discussing fiber-optic system designs that are suitable for a given experimental protocol. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Mercury speciation and analysis in drinking water by stir bar sorptive extraction with in situ propyl derivatization and thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Rie; Kawaguchi, Migaku; Sakui, Norihiro; Honda, Hidehiro; Okanouchi, Noriya; Saito, Koichi; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki

    2008-10-31

    A method for mercury analysis and speciation in drinking water was developed, which involved stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) with in situ propyl derivatization and thermal desorption (TD)-GC-MS. Ten millilitre of tap water or bottled water was used. After a stir bar, pH adjustment agent and derivatization reagent were added, SBSE was performed. Then, the stir bar was subjected to TD-GC-MS. The detection limits were 0.01 ng mL(-1) (ethylmercury; EtHg), 0.02 ng mL(-1) (methylmercury; MeHg), and 0.2 ng mL(-1) (Hg(II) and diethylmercury (DiEtHg)). The method showed good linearity and correlation coefficients. The average recoveries of mercury species (n=5) in water samples spiked with 0.5, 2.0, and 6.0 ng mL(-1) mercury species were 93.1-131.1% (RSDmercury species in water samples.

  18. In situ probing of cholesterol in astrocytes at the single-cell level using laser desorption ionization mass spectrometric imaging with colloidal silver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdian, D C; Cha, Sangwon; Oh, Jisun; Sakaguchi, Donald S; Yeung, Edward S; Lee, Young Jin

    2010-04-30

    Mass spectrometric imaging has been utilized to localize individual astrocytes and to obtain cholesterol populations at the single-cell level in laser desorption ionization (LDI) with colloidal silver. The silver ion adduct of membrane-bound cholesterol was monitored to detect individual cells. Good correlation between mass spectrometric and optical images at different cell densities indicates the ability to perform single-cell studies of cholesterol abundance. The feasibility of quantification is confirmed by the agreement between the LDI-MS ion signals and the results from a traditional enzymatic fluorometric assay. We propose that this approach could be an effective tool to study chemical populations at the cellular level. Published in 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Thermohaline structure and water masses in the north of Antarctic Peninsula from data collected in situ by southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana E. K. C. Wainer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Western Antarctic Peninsula is rapidly warming and exhibits high indices of biodiversity concentrated mostly along its continental shelf. This region has great importance due to the the mixing caused by the interaction of waters from Weddell Sea (MW, Bransfield Strait (EB and the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (CCA transmits thermohaline characteristics and nutrients of different sites and finally connects with all the world’s oceans. However, studies focusing on the temporal variability of the region’s oceanographic conditions that finally determine the water mass formation are sparse due to the logistical difficulties of conducting oceanographic surveys and traditional monitoring during the winter. For this study, variations of the thermohaline structure and water masses in the vicinity and below the sea ice in the North of the Antarctic Peninsula (AP and Scotia Sea (SS were recorded between February and November 2008 by two female southern elephant seals (SES, Mirounga leonina tagged with Conductivity–Temperature–Depth/Satellite-Relay Data Logger (CTD–SRDL. One thousand three hundred and thirty vertical profiles of temperature and salinity were collected by seals which were tagged by the MEOP-BR Project team at the Elephant Island, South Shetlands. These profiles, together with spread state diagrams allowed the identification of water masses and their variances in the ocean’s vertical structure. Among the set of identified water masses we cite: Antarctic Surface Water (AASW, Winter Water (WW, Warm Deep Water (WDW, Modified Warm Deep Water (MWDW, Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW, Upper Circumpolar Deep Water (UCDW, Lower Circumpolar Deep Water (LCDW and Ice Shelf Water (ISW. Our results show that the oceanic vertical structure undergoes changes that cannot be traditionally monitored, particularly during the Austral winter and that SES are important and modern oceanographic data collection platforms allowing for the improvement of our

  20. Detection and Mapping of the September 2017 Mexico Earthquakes Using DAS Fiber-Optic Infrastructure Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karrenbach, M. H.; Cole, S.; Williams, J. J.; Biondi, B. C.; McMurtry, T.; Martin, E. R.; Yuan, S.

    2017-12-01

    Fiber-optic distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) uses conventional telecom fibers for a wide variety of monitoring purposes. Fiber-optic arrays can be located along pipelines for leak detection; along borders and perimeters to detect and locate intruders, or along railways and roadways to monitor traffic and identify and manage incidents. DAS can also be used to monitor oil and gas reservoirs and to detect earthquakes. Because thousands of such arrays are deployed worldwide and acquiring data continuously, they can be a valuable source of data for earthquake detection and location, and could potentially provide important information to earthquake early-warning systems. In this presentation, we show that DAS arrays in Mexico and the United States detected the M8.1 and M7.2 Mexico earthquakes in September 2017. At Stanford University, we have deployed a 2.4 km fiber-optic DAS array in a figure-eight pattern, with 600 channels spaced 4 meters apart. Data have been recorded continuously since September 2016. Over 800 earthquakes from across California have been detected and catalogued. Distant teleseismic events have also been recorded, including the two Mexican earthquakes. In Mexico, fiber-optic arrays attached to pipelines also detected these two events. Because of the length of these arrays and their proximity to the event locations, we can not only detect the earthquakes but also make location estimates, potentially in near real time. In this presentation, we review the data recorded for these two events recorded at Stanford and in Mexico. We compare the waveforms recorded by the DAS arrays to those recorded by traditional earthquake sensor networks. Using the wide coverage provided by the pipeline arrays, we estimate the event locations. Such fiber-optic DAS networks can potentially play a role in earthquake early-warning systems, allowing actions to be taken to minimize the impact of an earthquake on critical infrastructure components. While many such fiber-optic

  1. Surface-enhanced Raman fiberoptic sensors for remote monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokes, D.L.; Alarie, J.P.; Vo-Dinh, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Health Sciences Research Div.

    1995-09-01

    A new sensor design for remote surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) measurements has been developed for environmental applications. The design features the modification of an optical fiber using layers of alumina microparticles and silver coatings for inducing the SERS effect at the sensing probe. A single fiber carries both the laser excitation and the SERS signal radiation, keeping optical parameters at the remote tip simple and consistent. The small tip size achievable with this configuration also demonstrates potential of this new design as a microsensor for in-situ measurement in microenvironments. Details of sensor tip fabrication and optical system design are described. SERS spectra of aqueous environmental samples acquired in-situ using the SERS sensor are also presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the SERS sensor.

  2. Design of a fiber-optic interrogator module for telecommunication satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzer, Philipp; Koch, Alexander W.; Plattner, Markus; Hurni, Andreas; Manhart, Markus

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we present the results of the radiation tests performed on the optical components of the fiber-optic interrogator module as a part of the Hybrid Sensor Bus (HSB) system. The HSB-system is developed in the frame of an ESAARTES program and will be verified as flight demonstrator onboard the German Heinrich Hertz satellite in 2016. The HSB system is based on a modular concept which includes sensor interrogation modules based on I2C electrical and fiber Bragg grating (FBG) fiber-optical sensor elements. Onboard fiber-optic sensing allows the implementation of novel control and monitoring methods. For read-out of multiple FBG sensors, a design based on a tunable laser diode as well as a design based on a spectrometer is considered. The expected and tested total ionizing dose (TID) applicable to the HSB system is in the range between 100 krad and 300 krad inside the satellite in the geostationary orbit over a life time of 15 years. We present radiation test results carried out on critical optical components to be used in the fiber-optic interrogation module. These components are a modulated grating Y-branch (MGY) tunable laser diode acting as light source for the tuning laser approach, the line detector of a spectrometer, photodetectors and the FBG sensors acting as sensor elements. A detailed literature inquiry of radiation effects on optical fibers and FBG sensors, is also included in the paper. The fiber-optic interrogator module implemented in the HSB system is based on the most suitable technology, which sustains the harsh environment in the geostationary orbit.

  3. IN-SITU PROBING OF RADIATION-INDUCED PROCESSING OF ORGANICS IN ASTROPHYSICAL ICE ANALOGS—NOVEL LASER DESORPTION LASER IONIZATION TIME-OF-FLIGHT MASS SPECTROSCOPIC STUDIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudipati, Murthy S.; Yang Rui

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of organic molecules in ice grains in the interstellar medium (ISM) under cosmic rays, stellar radiation, and local electrons and ions is critical to our understanding of the connection between ISM and solar systems. Our study is aimed at reaching this goal of looking directly into radiation-induced processing in these ice grains. We developed a two-color laser-desorption laser-ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopic method (2C-MALDI-TOF), similar to matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectroscopy. Results presented here with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) probe molecules embedded in water-ice at 5 K show for the first time that hydrogenation and oxygenation are the primary chemical reactions that occur in astrophysical ice analogs when subjected to Lyα radiation. We found that hydrogenation can occur over several unsaturated bonds and the product distribution corresponds to their stabilities. Multiple hydrogenation efficiency is found to be higher at higher temperatures (100 K) compared to 5 K—close to the interstellar ice temperatures. Hydroxylation is shown to have similar efficiencies at 5 K or 100 K, indicating that addition of O atoms or OH radicals to pre-ionized PAHs is a barrierless process. These studies—the first glimpses into interstellar ice chemistry through analog studies—show that once accreted onto ice grains PAHs lose their PAH spectroscopic signatures through radiation chemistry, which could be one of the reason for the lack of PAH detection in interstellar ice grains, particularly the outer regions of cold, dense clouds or the upper molecular layers of protoplanetary disks.

  4. Fiber-optic transmission system information for the testing of active phased antenna arrays in an anechoic chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saveleiv, I. K.; Sharova, N. V.; Tarasenko, M. Yu; Yalunina, T. R.; Davydov, V. V.; Rud', V. Yu

    2017-11-01

    The results of the research of the developed fiber-optic transmission systems for analog high frequency signal are represented. On its basis, a new method to identify various structural defects in the active phased antenna arrays is elaborated.

  5. Multi-Stress Monitoring System with Fiber-Optic Mandrels and Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors in a Sagnac Loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunjin; Sampath, Umesh; Song, Minho

    2015-07-29

    Fiber Bragg grating sensors are placed in a fiber-optic Sagnac loop to combine the grating temperature sensors and the fiber-optic mandrel acoustic emission sensors in single optical circuit. A wavelength-scanning fiber-optic laser is used as a common light source for both sensors. A fiber-optic attenuator is placed at a specific position in the Sagnac loop in order to separate buried Bragg wavelengths from the Sagnac interferometer output. The Bragg wavelength shifts are measured with scanning band-pass filter demodulation and the mandrel output is analyzed by applying a fast Fourier transform to the interference signal. This hybrid-scheme could greatly reduce the size and the complexity of optical circuitry and signal processing unit, making it suitable for low cost multi-stress monitoring of large scale power systems.

  6. An Effective Method to Detect Volatile Intermediates Generated in the Bioconversion of Coal to Methane by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry after In-Situ Extraction Using Headspace Solid-Phase Micro-Extraction under Strict Anaerobic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianmin; Wang, Baoyu; Tai, Chao; Wu, Li; Zhao, Han; Guan, Jiadong; Chen, Linyong

    2016-01-01

    Bioconversion of coal to methane has gained increased attention in recent decades because of its economic and environmental advantages. However, the mechanism of this process is difficult to study in depth, partly because of difficulties associated with the analysis of intermediates generated in coal bioconversion. In this investigation, we report on an effective method to analyze volatile intermediates generated in the bioconversion of coal under strict anaerobic conditions. We conduct in-situ extraction of intermediates using headspace solid-phase micro-extraction followed by detection by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Bioconversion simulation equipment was modified and combined with a solid-phase micro-extraction device. In-situ extraction could be achieved by using the combined units, to avoid a breakdown in anaerobic conditions and to maintain the experiment continuity. More than 30 intermediates were identified qualitatively in the conversion process, and the variation in trends of some typical intermediates has been discussed. Volatile organic acids (C2-C7) were chosen for a quantitative study of the intermediates because of their importance during coal bioconversion to methane. Fiber coating, extraction time, and solution acidity were optimized in the solid-phase micro-extraction procedure. The pressure was enhanced during the bioconversion process to investigate the influence of headspace pressure on analyte extraction. The detection limits of the method ranged from 0.0006 to 0.02 mmol/L for the volatile organic acids and the relative standard deviations were between 4.6% and 11.5%. The volatile organic acids (C2-C7) generated in the bioconversion process were 0.01-1.15 mmol/L with a recovery range from 80% to 105%. The developed method is useful for further in-depth research on the bioconversion of coal to methane.

  7. An in vivo investigation of photoplethysmographic signals and preliminary pulse oximetry estimation from the bowel using a new fiberoptic sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Michelle; Samuels, Neal; Randive, Nilesh; Langford, Richard M; Kyriacou, Panayiotis A

    2011-05-01

    The continuous monitoring of splanchnic organ oxygen saturation could make the early detection of inadequate tissue oxygenation feasible, reducing the risk of hypoperfusion, severe ischemia, multiple organ failure, and, ultimately, death. Current methods for assessing splanchnic perfusion have not been widely accepted for use in the clinical care environment. In an attempt to overcome the limitations of the current techniques, a new fiberoptic photoplethysmographic (PPG)/pulse oximetry sensor was developed as a means of assessing splanchnic organ perfusion during surgery in humans. A new fiberoptic splanchnic pulse oximeter and an optically identical fiberoptic finger pulse oximeter have been developed. Simultaneous PPG signals and preliminary estimates of arterial oxygen saturation from the bowel (small and large) and finger were obtained in 17 patients (3 men and 14 women) undergoing open laparotomy. Good quality PPG signals were obtained from the small and large bowel and from the finger in all patients (lower 95% confidence limit for the proportion was 0.64). Comparisons of blood oxygen saturation values acquired when using the splanchnic and the finger fiberoptic sensors and a commercial finger pulse oximeter indicated that there was no statistically significant difference between them (all P>0.454). A Bland and Altman plot of the difference between blood oxygen saturation values from the bowel fiberoptic pulse oximeter and the fiberoptic finger pulse oximeter against their mean showed that the limits of agreement between the 2 pulse oximeters were -3.8% and 4.2% for small bowel measurements, and -3.4% and 4.3% for large bowel measurements. The 95% prediction interval for the difference between the 2 devices was between -4.2% and 4.7%. This study demonstrated that good quality PPG signals can be obtained from the bowel using a new fiberoptic sensor. Further evaluation is required to determine whether fiberoptic pulse oximetry of the bowel may provide a

  8. Lingual traction to facilitate fiber-optic intubation of difficult airways: a single-anesthesiologist randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Yiu-Hei; Karlnoski, Rachel A; Chen, Henian; Camporesi, Enrico M; Shah, Vimal V; Padhya, Tapan A; Mangar, Devanand

    2015-04-01

    Flexible fiber-optic bronchoscope-guided orotracheal intubation is a valuable technique with demonstrated benefits in the management of difficult airways. Despite its popularity with anesthesia providers, the technique is not fail-safe and airway-related complications secondary to failed intubation attempts remain an important problem. We sought to determine the effect of incorporating lingual traction on the success rate of fiber-optic bronchoscope-guided intubation in patients with anticipated difficult airways. In this prospective, randomized, cohort study, we enrolled 91 adult patients with anticipated difficult airways scheduled for elective surgery to undergo fiber-optic bronchoscope-guided orotracheal intubation alone or with lingual traction by an individual anesthesiologist after induction of general anesthesia and neuromuscular blockade. A total of 78 patients were randomized: 39 patients to the fiber-optic bronchoscope-guided intubation with lingual traction group and 39 patients to the fiber-optic bronchoscope-guided intubation alone group. The primary endpoint was the rate of successful first attempt intubations. The secondary outcome was sore throat grade on post-operative day 1. Fiber-optic intubation with lingual traction compared to fiber-optic intubation alone resulted in a higher success rate (92.3 vs. 74.4 %, χ (2) = 4.523, p = 0.033) and greater odds for successful first attempt intubation (OR 4.138, 95 % CI 1.041-16.444, p = 0.044). Sore throat severity on post-operative day 1 was not significantly different but trended towards worsening grades with lingual traction. In this study, lingual traction was shown to be a valuable maneuver for facilitating fiber-optic bronchoscope-guided intubation in the management of patients with anticipated difficult airways.

  9. Improved constraints on in situ rates and on quantification of complete chloroethene degradation from stable carbon isotope mass balances in groundwater plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhener, Patrick; Elsner, Martin; Eisenmann, Heinrich; Atteia, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    Spills of chloroethenes (CEs) at industrial and urban sites can create groundwater plumes in which tetrachloro- and trichloroethene sequentially degrade to dichloroethenes, vinyl chloride (VC) and ethene, or ethane under reducing conditions. For detoxification, degradation must go beyond VC. Assessments based on ethene and ethane, however, are difficult because these products are volatile, may stem from alternative sources, can be further transformed and are not always monitored. To alternatively quantify degradation beyond VC, stable carbon isotope mass balances have been proposed where concentration-weighted CE isotope ratios are summed up and compared to the original source isotope ratio. Reported assessments, however, have provided not satisfactorily quantified results entailing greatly differing upper and lower estimates. This work proposes an integrative approach to better constrain the extent of total chloroethene degradation in groundwater samples. It is based on fitting of measured concentration and compound-specific stable carbon isotope data to an analytical reactive transport equation simulating steady-state plumes in two dimensions using an EXCEL spreadsheet. The fitting also yields estimates of degradation rates, of source width and of dispersivities. The approach is validated using two synthetic benchmark cases where the true extent of degradation is well known, and using data from two real field cases from literature.

  10. Optimization of a single-drop microextraction method for multielemental determination by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry following in situ vapor generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, Sandra; Loos-Vollebregt, Margaretha T.C. de; Bendicho, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    A headspace single-drop microextraction (HS-SDME) method has been developed in combination with electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS) for the simultaneous determination of As, Sb, Bi, Pb, Sn and Hg in aqueous solutions. Vapor generation is carried out in a 40 mL volume closed-vial containing a solution with the target analytes in hydrochloric acid and potassium ferricyanide medium. Hydrides (As, Sb, Bi, Pb, Sn) and Hg vapor are trapped onto an aqueous single drop (3 μL volume) containing Pd(II), followed by the subsequent injection in the ETV. Experimental variables such as medium composition, sodium tetrahydroborate (III) volume and concentration, stirring rate, extraction time, sample volume, ascorbic acid concentration and palladium amount in the drop were fully optimized. The limits of detection (LOD) (3σ criterion) of the proposed method for As, Sb, Bi, Pb, Sn and Hg were 0.2, 0.04, 0.01, 0.07, 0.09 and 0.8 μg/L, respectively. Enrichment factors of 9, 85, 138, 130, 37 and 72 for As, Sb, Bi, Pb, Sn and Hg, respectively, were achieved in 210 s. The relative standard deviations (N = 5) ranged from 4 to 8%. The proposed HS-SDME-ETV-ICP-MS method has been applied for the determination of As, Sb, Bi, Pb, Sn and Hg in NWRI TM-28.3 certified reference material.

  11. An air flow sensor for neonatal mechanical ventilation applications based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battista, L; Sciuto, S A; Scorza, A

    2013-03-01

    In this work, a simple and low-cost air flow sensor, based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique has been developed for monitoring air flows rates supplied by a neonatal ventilator to support infants in intensive care units. The device is based on a fiber optic sensing technique allowing (a) the immunity to light intensity variations independent by measurand and (b) the reduction of typical shortcomings affecting all biomedical fields (electromagnetic interference and patient electrical safety). The sensing principle is based on the measurement of transversal displacement of an emitting fiber-optic cantilever due to action of air flow acting on it; the fiber tip displacement is measured by means of a photodiode linear array, placed in front of the entrance face of the emitting optical fiber in order to detect its light intensity profile. As the measurement system is based on a detection of the illumination pattern, and not on an intensity modulation technique, it results less sensitive to light intensity fluctuation independent by measurand than intensity-based sensors. The considered technique is here adopted in order to develop two different configurations for an air flow sensor suitable for the measurement of air flow rates typically occurring during mechanical ventilation of newborns: a mono-directional and a bi-directional transducer have been proposed. A mathematical model for the air flow sensor is here proposed and a static calibration of two different arrangements has been performed: a measurement range up to 3.00 × 10(-4) m(3)∕s (18.0 l∕min) for the mono-directional sensor and a measurement range of ±3.00 × 10(-4) m(3)∕s (±18.0 l∕min) for the bi-directional sensor are experimentally evaluated, according to the air flow rates normally encountered during tidal breathing of infants with a mass lower than 10 kg. Experimental data of static calibration result in accordance with the proposed theoretical model: for the mono

  12. A Study on the Response Characteristics of a Fiber-Optic Radiation Sensor Model Based on Cerenkov Principle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Hwa Jeong; Kim, Beom Kyu; Park, Byung Gi [Soonchunhyang Univ., Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In recent year, various fiber-optic radiation sensors using Cerenkov principle have been developed without employing any scintillators for measuring high-energy photon, electron, etc. The main advantages of the optical fibers are the remote transmission of the light signal and immunity to pressure and electromagnetic waves. Therefore, the sensors utilizing the optical fibers can be used in hazardous radiation environments, such as the high-level radiation areas of a nuclear facility. The study to be simulated a fiber-optic radiation sensor based on Cerenkov principle and to be analyzed the response characteristics of the sensor. For the aforementioned study, the GEANT simulation toolkit was used. It is able to take into all the optical properties of fibers and is found to be appropriate to realistically describe the response of fiber-optic radiation sensor. In the recently, the fiber-optic radiation sensor have been developed in nuclear industry. Because sensor can detect gamma ray in harsh nuclear environments. In this study, we analyzed response characteristics of the fiber-optic radiation sensor. We have simulated the Monte Carlo model, for detecting the Cerenkov radiation using the fiber-optic radiation sensor. And the y-axis distribution of Cerenkov photons was obtained using output file. Simulation is performed with reference to the method of the previous research, and then the simulation results exhibited a good agreement with the previous research.

  13. Combined pulsed dye laser and fiberoptic Nd-YAG laser for the treatment of hypertrophic port wine stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radmanesh, Mohammed; Radmanesh, Ramin

    2017-10-01

    The hypertrophic Port Wine Stain (PWS) is only partially and superficially treated with the Pulsed dye laser (PDL) because of its limited depth of penetration. We used combined PDL and fiberoptic 1444-nm Nd-YAG laser to treat a case with hypertrophic PWS. After tumescent anesthesia, few holes were made by a 16-gauge needle on different sides of the lesion. The fiberoptic tip of 1444-nm Nd-YAG laser was inserted within the holes and was pushed forward while triggering. In a fan pattern and by a back and forth movement, the subcutaneous and deep dermal areas were coagulated. The skin and outer mucosal surfaces were then treated by PDL. The fiberoptic system used was Accusculpt 1444-nm Nd-YAG laser (Lutronic lasers, South Korea), and the PDL used was 585 nm Nlite system (Chromogenex UK). The parameters used for PDL were fluence = 9 Joules/cm 2 and the spot size was 5 mm. The parameters used for fiberoptic 1444-nm Nd-YAG laser were: Pulse rate = 30 Hz, pulse energy = 300 mJ, power = 6 W, and the total energy = 4000 J for the whole face and mucosa. Little sign of regression and moderate purpura were detected immediately after combined fiberoptic Nd-YAG and PDL therapy. The lesion gradually regressed within 4 months with satisfactory color and volume change. Combined fiberoptic Nd-YAG laser and PDL can be used for the treatment of deeper and superficial layers of hypertrophic PWS.

  14. A Study on the Response Characteristics of a Fiber-Optic Radiation Sensor Model Based on Cerenkov Principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Hwa Jeong; Kim, Beom Kyu; Park, Byung Gi

    2016-01-01

    In recent year, various fiber-optic radiation sensors using Cerenkov principle have been developed without employing any scintillators for measuring high-energy photon, electron, etc. The main advantages of the optical fibers are the remote transmission of the light signal and immunity to pressure and electromagnetic waves. Therefore, the sensors utilizing the optical fibers can be used in hazardous radiation environments, such as the high-level radiation areas of a nuclear facility. The study to be simulated a fiber-optic radiation sensor based on Cerenkov principle and to be analyzed the response characteristics of the sensor. For the aforementioned study, the GEANT simulation toolkit was used. It is able to take into all the optical properties of fibers and is found to be appropriate to realistically describe the response of fiber-optic radiation sensor. In the recently, the fiber-optic radiation sensor have been developed in nuclear industry. Because sensor can detect gamma ray in harsh nuclear environments. In this study, we analyzed response characteristics of the fiber-optic radiation sensor. We have simulated the Monte Carlo model, for detecting the Cerenkov radiation using the fiber-optic radiation sensor. And the y-axis distribution of Cerenkov photons was obtained using output file. Simulation is performed with reference to the method of the previous research, and then the simulation results exhibited a good agreement with the previous research

  15. Demonstration of a Rocket-Borne Fiber-Optic Measurement System: The FOVS Experiment of REXUS 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossner, M. R.; Benes, N.; Grubler, T.; Plamauer, S.; Koch, A. W.

    2015-09-01

    As an in-flight experiment in the REXUS 15 programme, the “Fiber-Optic Vibration Sensing Experiment (FOVS)” aimed at the application of so-called fiber Bragg grating sensors. Fiber Bragg gratings are optical gratings inscribed into the core of an optical fiber. They allow for entirely optical measurements of temperatures, mechanical strain and of deduced quantities, such as vibration. Due to their properties - mechanical robustness, high dynamic range etc. - fiber Bragg gratings are particularly suited for withstanding the harsh environmental conditions in a rocket vehicle (very high and very low temperatures, intense vibrations, presence of flammable propellants, etc.). Measurement systems based on fiber Bragg gratings have the potential to contribute to emerging technologies in the commercial launcher segment. Particularly, large sets of measurement data can be acquired with minor mass contribution. This can be applied to techniques such as structural health monitoring, active vibration damping, and actuator monitoring, enabling lighter structures without compromising on reliability. The FOVS experiment demonstrated a fiber-optic vibration and temperature measurement system in an actual flight, and evaluated its benefits compared to conventional electrical sensing in the challenging launcher environment. As a side product, measurements regarding the environmental conditions on the REXUS platform have been acquired.

  16. A denuder-impinger system with in situ derivatization followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of gaseous iodine-containing halogen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ru-Jin; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2008-11-14

    Reactive iodine species have been suggested to play an important role in the atmosphere (e.g. tropospheric ozone depletion, coastal new particle formation). However, there still exist major uncertainties about their atmospheric chemistry, mostly due to the lack of analytical approaches for the accurate speciation of certain key compounds. In this study, 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene (1,3,5-TMB)-coated denuder proved to be suitable for the differentiation between gaseous interhalogens (iodine monochloride (ICl), iodine monobromide (IBr)) and molecular iodine (I2) based on a selective collection/derivatization method. The results of the denuder sampling were compared with the results of impinger sampling in water, methanol and carbon tetrachloride solutions of 1,3,5-TMB. ICl and IBr are converted into 1-iodo-2,4,6-trimethoxybenzene (1-iodo-2,4,6-TMB) and 1-bromo-2,4,6-trimethoxybenzene (1-bromo-2,4,6-TMB), respectively, in the denuder systems. The respective collection efficiency is 99.2% for ICl and 92.6% for IBr, at 500mLmin(-1) gas flow rate. The collection efficiency for I2 is lower than 1% in the same denuder system, but significantly increases to about 90% in the aqueous 1,3,5-TMB loaded impinger. The denuder-impinger coupled system was then used to differentiate and to collect the ICl, IBr and I2 gas mixtures, followed by gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry (GC-MS) determination. The precision of the method is in general better than 9.1%. The parameters affecting denuder operation including sampling flow rate, sampling duration, and relative humidity have been evaluated. The presented method provides an attractive protocol for iodine species analysis for atmospheric chemistry research.

  17. Alpha-fetoprotein detection by using a localized surface plasmon coupled fluorescence fiber-optic biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ying-Feng; Chen, Ran-Chou; Li, Ying-Chang; Yu, Chih-Jen; Hsieh, Bao-Yu; Chou, Chien

    2007-11-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) detection by using a localized surface plasmon coupled fluorescence (LSPCF) fiber-optic biosensor is setup and experimentally demonstrated. It is based on gold nanoparticle (GNP) and coupled with localized surface plasmon wave on the surface of GNP. In this experiment, the fluorophores are labeled on anti-AFP which are bound to protein A conjugated GNP. Thus, LSPCF is excited with high efficiency in the near field of localized surface plasmon wave. Therefore, not only the sensitivity of LSPCF biosensor is enhanced but also the specific selectivity of AFP is improved. Experimentally, the ability of real time measurement in the range of AFP concentration from 0.1ng/ml to 100ng/ml was detected. To compare with conventional methods such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or radioimmunoassay (RIA), the LSPCF fiber-optic biosensor performs higher or comparable detection sensitivity, respectively.

  18. A tilted fiber-optic plate coupled CCD detector for high resolution neutron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jongyul; Cho, Gyuseong [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jongyul; Hwy, Limchang; Kim, Taejoo; Lee, Kyehong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seungwook [Pusan National Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    One of these efforts is that a tilted scintillator geometry and lens coupled CCD detector for neutron imaging system were used to improve spatial resolution in one dimension. The increased spatial resolution in one dimension was applied to fuel cell study. However, a lens coupled CCD detector has lower sensitivity than a fiber-optic plate coupled CCD detector due to light loss. In this research, a tilted detector using fiber-optic plate coupled CCD detector was developed to improve resolution and sensitivity. In addition, a tilted detector can prevent an image sensor from direct radiation damage. Neutron imaging has been used for fuel cell study, lithium ion battery study, and many scientific applications. High quality neutron imaging is demanded for more detailed studies of applications, and spatial resolution should be considered to get high quality neutron imaging. Therefore, there were many efforts to improve spatial resolution.

  19. Fiber-optic sensor demonstrator (FSD) for the monitoring of spacecraft subsystems on ESA's PROBA-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruzelecky, Roman V.; Zou, Jing; Mohammed, Najeeb; Haddad, Emile; Jamroz, Wes; Ricci, Francesco; Lamorie, Joshua; Edwards, Eric; McKenzie, Iain; Vuilleumier, Pierrik

    2017-11-01

    MPB Communications (MPBC) is developing solutions to the monitoring requirements of spacecraft based on its fiber-laser and Fiber Bragg Grating expertise. This is cumulating in the Fiber Sensor Demonstrator for ESA's Proba-2 that is scheduled for launch in 2007. The advantages of the MPBC approach include a central interrogation system that can be used to control a variety of different fiber-optic sensors including temperature, pressure, actuator status, and propellant leakage. This paper reviews the design and ground qualification of the FSD system in preparation for integration with Proba-2. The FSD will provide monitoring for various Proba-2 subsystems, including a hybrid propulsion system. Some of the challenges associated with using fiber-optics in space are discussed.

  20. Dynamics analysis of microsphere in a dual-beam fiber-optic trap with transverse offset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinlin; Xiao, Guangzong; Luo, Hui; Xiong, Wei; Yang, Kaiyong

    2016-04-04

    A comprehensive dynamics analysis of microsphere has been presented in a dual-beam fiber-optic trap with transverse offset. As the offset distance between two counterpropagating beams increases, the motion type of the microsphere starts with capture, then spiral motion, then orbital rotation, and ends with escape. We analyze the transformation process and mechanism of the four motion types based on ray optics approximation. Dynamic simulations show that the existence of critical offset distances at which different motion types transform. The result is an important step toward explaining physical phenomena in a dual-beam fiber-optic trap with transverse offset, and is generally applicable to achieving controllable motions of microspheres in integrated systems, such as microfluidic systems and lab-on-a-chip systems.

  1. Multipoint fiber-optic laser-ultrasonic actuator based on fiber core-opened tapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jiajun; Dong, Xiaolong; Gao, Shimin; Yao, Yong

    2017-11-27

    In this study, a novel fiber-optic, multipoint, laser-ultrasonic actuator based on fiber core-opened tapers (COTs) is proposed and demonstrated. The COTs were fabricated by splicing single-mode fibers using a standard fiber splicer. A COT can effectively couple part of a core mode into cladding modes, and the coupling ratio can be controlled by adjusting the taper length. Such characteristics are used to obtain a multipoint, laser-ultrasonic actuator with balanced signal strength by reasonably controlling the taper lengths of the COTs. As a prototype, we constructed an actuator that generated ultrasound at four points with a balanced ultrasonic strength by connecting four COTs with coupling ratios of 24.5%, 33.01%, 49.51%, and 87.8% in a fiber link. This simple-to-fabricate, multipoint, laser-ultrasonic actuator with balanced ultrasound signal strength has potential applications in fiber-optic ultrasound testing technology.

  2. Evaluation of fiberoptic dermofluorometry as a means of clinically assessing tissue perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, P W; Chang, B B; Shah, D M; Corson, J D; Shandall, A A; Young, H L; Leather, R P; Karmody, A M

    1987-01-01

    Fiberoptic dermofluorometry (FDF) transcutaneously measures fluorescence, following an intravenous injection of sodium fluorescein (NaFl), which is transmitted along a fiberoptic bundle to a photomultiplier tube and converted into dermofluorescence units (DFU). In five normal subjects studied, the plasma concentration of NaFl peaked at 5-15 minutes before decaying with first order kinetics and corresponding dermofluorescence (DF) rose to a peak between 10-20 minutes before decaying. Peak DF in the head and neck was significantly higher (P less than .001) compared to other skin sites which were similar. Application to patients (n = 16) undergoing successful lower limb revascularization showed a significant (P less than 0.01) improvement in perfusion at the foot level only. The reproducibility of FDF was poor when studied on the control limbs. We conclude that FDF does not, at present, constitute a valid measure of skin perfusion.

  3. Fiber-optic laser sensor for mine detection and verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohling, Christian; Scheel, Dirk; Hohmann, Konrad; Schade, Wolfgang; Reuter, Matthias; Holl, Gerhard

    2006-01-01

    What we believe to be a new optical approach for the identification of mines and explosives by analyzing the surface materials and not only bulk is developed. A conventional manually operated mine prodder is upgraded by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). In situ and real-time information of materials that are in front of the prodder are obtained during the demining process in order to optimize the security aspects and the speed of demining. A Cr4+:Nd3+:YAG microchip laser is used as a seed laser for an ytterbium-fiber amplifier to generate high-power laser pulses at 1064 nm with pulse powers up to Ep=1 mJ, a repetition rate of frep.=2-20 kHz and a pulse duration of tp=620 ps. The recorded LIBS signals are analyzed by applying neural networks for the data analysis

  4. Fiber-optical accelerometers based on polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Stefani, Alessio; Bang, Ole

    2010-01-01

    Fiber-optical accelerometers based on polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are reported. We have written 3mm FBGs for 1550nm operation, characterized their temperature and strain response, and tested their performance in a prototype accelerometer.......Fiber-optical accelerometers based on polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are reported. We have written 3mm FBGs for 1550nm operation, characterized their temperature and strain response, and tested their performance in a prototype accelerometer....

  5. Fiber-optic intra-aortic balloon therapy and its role within cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarham, G; Clements, A; Morris, C; Cumberland, T; Bryan, M; Oliver, M; Burrows, H; Mulholland, J

    2013-03-01

    The patient population has changed and the cardiothoracic team are now operating on patients with more co-morbidity. One of the significant aspects of this increased co-morbidity, which affects both short- and long-term outcomes, is compromised left ventricular function. Intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) technology offers these patients and the cardiac team an easily accessible, cost-effective, mechanical assist device. Arterial pressure monitoring for IABP therapy: Fluid-filled transducers used to measure the aortic waveform can be unreliable and inconsistent. Fiber-optic manometers located in the very tip of the IAB catheters provide accurate and fast, high quality measurements. This, in turn, presents the opportunity for the hardware and algorithm to measure key markers on the arterial waveform and optimise left ventricular support. It also provides the potential for automatic in vivo calibration, further increasing the accuracy and quality of the IAB support. The effect of fiber-optic IABP therapy on clinical management: A dual centre prospective audit comparing fluid-filled versus fiber-optic arterial pressure monitoring showed a 96% reduction in IAB-related perfusion on-site call-outs (17 vs. 1, respectively) and a 94% reduction in sub-optimal timing (55/98 vs. 2/94, respectively). The improved timing algorithms utilise the pressure information received 50 msecs faster than with fluid-filled transducers, measuring key markers on the pressure waveform and adjusting inflation and deflation accurately on a beat per beat basis. Fiber-optic IAB technology and, specifically, these improved algorithms provide better beat per beat mechanical support. Given our evolving patient population, this technology will not only play an increased role, but will have a significant impact on cardiac surgery.

  6. Fiberoptic endoscopic-assisted diverticulotomy: a novel technique for the management of Zenker's diverticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Jason I; Genden, Eric M; Moche, Jason

    2005-05-01

    Endoscopic diverticulotomy is rapidly becoming the procedure of choice for treatment of Zenker's diverticulum. The endoscopic approach has resulted in significant decreases in patient morbidity, time to resumption of oral intake, and overall cost as compared with open treatment. However, a small but significant patient population is unable to accommodate the rigid laryngoscope and therefore requires open treatment. We present a novel technique, flexible fiberoptic endoscopic-assisted diverticulotomy, for the management of patients who are unable to undergo rigid endoscopy.

  7. Rad-Tolerant, Thermally Stable, High-Speed Fiber-Optic Network for Harsh Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leftwich, Matt; Hull, Tony; Leary, Michael; Leftwich, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Future NASA destinations will be challenging to get to, have extreme environmental conditions, and may present difficulty in retrieving a spacecraft or its data. Space Photonics is developing a radiation-tolerant (rad-tolerant), high-speed, multi-channel fiber-optic transceiver, associated reconfigurable intelligent node communications architecture, and supporting hardware for intravehicular and ground-based optical networking applications. Data rates approaching 3.2 Gbps per channel will be achieved.

  8. Apparatus and Method for Elimination of Polarization-Induced Fading in Fiber-optic Sensor System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Hon Man (Inventor); Parker, Jr., Allen R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The invention is an apparatus and method of eliminating polarization-induced fading in interferometric fiber-optic sensor system having a wavelength-swept laser optical signal. The interferometric return signal from the sensor arms are combined and provided to a multi-optical path detector assembly and ultimately to a data acquisition and processing unit by way of a switch that is time synchronized with the laser scan sweep cycle.

  9. Fiber-Optic Sensing System: Overview, Development and Deployment in Flight at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Hon Man; Parker, Allen R.; Piazza, Anthony; Richards, W. Lance

    2015-01-01

    An overview of the research and technological development of the fiber-optic sensing system (FOSS) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Armstrong Flight Research Center (NASA AFRC) is presented. Theory behind fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors, as well as interrogation technique based on optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR) is discussed. Assessment and validation of FOSS as an accurate measurement tool for structural health monitoring is realized in the laboratory environment as well as large-scale flight deployment.

  10. Fiberoptic microneedles: novel optical diffusers for interstitial delivery of therapeutic light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosoglu, Mehmet A; Hood, Robert L; Rossmeisl, John H; Grant, David C; Xu, Yong; Robertson, John L; Rylander, Marissa Nichole; Rylander, Christopher G

    2011-11-01

    Photothermal therapies have limited efficacy and application due to the poor penetration depth of light inside tissue. In earlier work, we described the development of novel fiberoptic microneedles to provide a means to mechanically penetrate dermal tissue and deliver light directly into a localized target area.This paper presents an alternate fiberoptic microneedle design with the capability of delivering more diffuse, but therapeutically useful photothermal energy. Laser lipolysis is envisioned as a future clinical application for this design. A novel fiberoptic microneedle was developed using hydrofluoric acid etching of optical fiber to permit diffuse optical delivery. Microneedles etched for 10, 30, and 50 minutes, and an optical fiber control were compared with three techniques. First, red light delivery from the microneedles was evaluated by imaging the reflectance of the light from a white paper.Second, spatial temperature distribution of the paper in response to near-IR light (1,064 nm, 1 W CW) was recorded using infrared thermography. Third, ex vivo adipose tissue response during 1,064 nm, (5 W CW)irradiation was recorded with bright field microscopy. Acid etching exposed a 3 mm length of the fiber core, allowing circumferential delivery of light along this length. Increasing etching time decreased microneedle diameter, resulting in increased uniformity of red and 1,064 nm light delivery along the microneedle axis. For equivalent total energy delivery, thinner microneedles reduced carbonization in the adipose tissue experiments. We developed novel microscale optical diffusers that provided a more homogeneous light distribution from their surfaces, and compared performance to a flat-cleaved fiber, a device currently utilized in clinical practice. These fiberoptic microneedles can potentially enhance clinical laser procedures by providing direct delivery of diffuse light to target chromophores, while minimizing undesirable photothermal damage in adjacent

  11. Comparison of Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) from Fiber-Optic Cable to Three Component Geophones in an Underground Mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speece, M. A.; Nesladek, N. J.; Kammerer, C.; Maclaughlin, M.; Wang, H. F.; Lord, N. E.

    2017-12-01

    We conducted experiments in the Underground Education Mining Center on the Montana Tech campus, Butte, Montana, to make a direct comparison between Digital Acoustic Sensing (DAS) and three-component geophones in a mining setting. The sources used for this project where a vertical sledgehammer, oriented shear sledgehammer, and blasting caps set off in both unstemmed and stemmed drillholes. Three-component Geospace 20DM geophones were compared with three different types of fiber-optic cable: (1) Brugg strain, (2) Brugg temperature, and (3) Optical Cable Corporation strain. We attached geophones to the underground mine walls and on the ground surface above the mine. We attached fiber-optic cables to the mine walls and placed fiber-optic cable in boreholes drilled through an underground pillar. In addition, we placed fiber-optic cables in a shallow trench at the surface of the mine. We converted the DAS recordings from strain rate to strain prior to comparison with the geophone data. The setup of the DAS system for this project led to a previously unknown triggering problem that compromised the early samples of the DAS traces often including the first-break times on the DAS records. Geophones clearly recorded the explosives; however, the large amount of energy and its close distance from the fiber-optic cables seemed to compromise the entire fiber loop. The underground hammer sources produced a rough match between the DAS records and the geophone records. However, the sources on the surface of the mine, specifically the sources oriented inline with the fiber-optic cables, produced a close match between the fiber-optic traces and the geophone traces. All three types of fiber-optic cable that were in the mine produced similar results, and one type did not clearly outperform the others. Instead, the coupling of the cable to rock appears to be the most important factor determining DAS data quality. Moreover, we observed the importance of coupling in the boreholes, where

  12. Theoretical Analysis of the Optical Propagation Characteristics in a Fiber-Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Zheng

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensor is widely used for its high precision and real-time analysis. Fiber-optic SPR sensor is easy for miniaturization, so it is commonly used in the development of portable detection equipment. It can also be used for remote, real-time, and online detection. In this study, a wavelength modulation fiber-optic SPR sensor is designed, and theoretical analysis of optical propagation in the optical fiber is also done. Compared with existing methods, both the transmission of a skew ray and the influence of the chromatic dispersion are discussed. The resonance wavelength is calculated at two different cases, in which the chromatic dispersion in the fiber core is considered. According to the simulation results, a novel multi-channel fiber-optic SPR sensor is likewise designed to avoid defaults aroused by the complicated computation of the skew ray as well as the chromatic dispersion. Avoiding the impact of skew ray can do much to improve the precision of this kind of sensor.

  13. Numerical Investigations on a Distributed Fiber-Optic Lighting System with an End Reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shuhua; Gong Huaping; Tu Yumeng; Meng Ying

    2011-01-01

    A novel distributed fiber-optic decorative lighting system with the reflection coating on the extremity of fiber-optic is designed, which used the multi-mold optical fiber made up of large core diameter(Diameter of core and cladding is 105μm and 125μm, respectly). After introducing the distributional optical fiber decorative lighting system briefly, the ralationship between corrosion depth of the optical fiber core and the leakage of fiber-optic has been analyzed with the Rsoft, and then the relationship of the lighting power and the uniformity of lighting power with the leakage rate of optical fiber lamp, the reflective of reflection coating has been discussed.The simulation analysis shows that, when the core diameter is corroded to 80∼85 μm, the leakage rate of optical fiber may achieve 5.0%, which suits the optical fiber decorative lighting. Considering all kinds of factors, when optical fiber lamp's quantity is 20, the coating index of reflection is 95%, optical fiber lamp's leakage of light rate is 5.0%, and the optical fiber lamp's distance is 1 meter, the quite high illuminating power may be achieved, as well as the good lighting uniformity.Finally the experimental study of decorative lighting system is given. And the experimental result is in keeping well with the theory simulation conclusion.

  14. Development and Testing of a Post-Installable Deepwater Monitoring System Using Fiber-Optic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Calvin H.; Brower, David V.; Le, Suy Q.; Tang, Henry H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the design and development of a fiber-optic monitoring system that can be deployed on existing deepwater risers and flowlines; and provides a summary of test article fabrication and the subsequent laboratory testing performed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Johnson Space Center (NASA-JSC). A major challenge of a post-installed instrumentation system is to ensure adequate coupling between the instruments and the riser or flowline of interest. This work investigates the sensor coupling for pipelines that are suspended in a water column (from topside platform to seabed) using a fiber-optic sensor clamp and subsea bonding adhesive. The study involved the design, fabrication, and test of several prototype clamps that contained fiber-optic sensors. A mold was produced by NASA using 3-D printing methods that allowed the casting of polyurethane clamp test articles to accommodate 4-inch and 8-inch diameter pipes. The prototype clamps were installed with a subsea adhesive in a "wet" environment and then tested in the NASA Structures Test Laboratory (STL). The tension, compression, and bending test data showed that the prototype sensor clamps achieved good structural coupling, and could provide high quality strain measurement for active monitoring.

  15. THERMAL PROTECTION AND THERMAL STABILIZATION OF FIBER-OPTICAL GYROSCOPE INCLUDED IN STRAPDOWN INERTIAL NAVIGATION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Gromov

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It is known, that temperature perturbations and thermal modes have significant influence on the accuracy of a fiber-optical gyroscope. Nowadays, thermal perturbations are among the main problems in the field of navigation accuracy. Review of existing methods for decrease of temperature influences on the accuracy of a strapdown inertial navigation system with fiberoptical gyros showed, that the usage of constructive and compensation methods only is insufficient and, therefore, thermostabilization is required. Reversible thermostabilization system is offered, its main executive elements are thermoelectric modules (Peltier’s modules, heat transfer from which is provided by heatsinks at work surfaces of modules. This variant of thermostabilization maintenance is considered; Peltier’s modules and temperature sensors for the system are chosen. Parameters of heatsinks for heat transfer intensification are calculated. Fans for necessary air circulation in the device are chosen and thickness of thermal isolation is calculated. Calculations of thermal modes of navigation system with thermostabilization are made in modern software Autodesk Simulation CFD. Comparison of results for present and previous researches and calculations shows essential decrease in gradients of temperature on gyro surfaces and better uniformity of temperature field in the whole device. Conclusions about efficiency of the given method usage in view of accuracy improvement of navigation system are made. Thermostabilization provision of a strapdown inertial navigation system with fiberoptical gyros is proved. Thermostabilization application in combination with compensational methods can reach a necessary accuracy of navigation system.

  16. Constellation Shaping for Fiber-optic Channels with QAM and High Spectral Efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yankov, Metodi Plamenov; Zibar, Darko; Larsen, Knud J.

    2014-01-01

    In this letter the fiber-optic communication channel with Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM) input constella- tion is treated. Using probabilistic shaping, we show that high order QAM constellations can achieve and slightly exceed the lower bound on the channel capacity, set by ring constellat......In this letter the fiber-optic communication channel with Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM) input constella- tion is treated. Using probabilistic shaping, we show that high order QAM constellations can achieve and slightly exceed the lower bound on the channel capacity, set by ring...... constellations in [1]. We then propose a mapping function for turbo coded bit interleaved coded modulation based on optimization of the mu- tual information between the channel input and output. Using this mapping, spectral efficiency as high as 6.5 bits/s/Hz/polarization is achieved on a simulated single...... channel long-haul fiber-optical link excluding the pilot overhead, used for synchronization, and taking into account frequency and phase mismatch impairments, as well as laser phase noise and analog-to-digital conversion quantization impairments. The simulations suggest that major improvements can...

  17. Multiplexed fluorescent microarray for human salivary protein analysis using polymer microspheres and fiber-optic bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Shuai; Benito-Peña, Elena; Zhang, Huaibin; Wu, Yue; Walt, David R

    2013-10-10

    Herein, we describe a protocol for simultaneously measuring six proteins in saliva using a fiber-optic microsphere-based antibody array. The immuno-array technology employed combines the advantages of microsphere-based suspension array fabrication with the use of fluorescence microscopy. As described in the video protocol, commercially available 4.5 μm polymer microspheres were encoded into seven different types, differentiated by the concentration of two fluorescent dyes physically trapped inside the microspheres. The encoded microspheres containing surface carboxyl groups were modified with monoclonal capture antibodies through EDC/NHS coupling chemistry. To assemble the protein microarray, the different types of encoded and functionalized microspheres were mixed and randomly deposited in 4.5 μm microwells, which were chemically etched at the proximal end of a fiber-optic bundle. The fiber-optic bundle was used as both a carrier and for imaging the microspheres. Once assembled, the microarray was used to capture proteins in the saliva supernatant collected from the clinic. The detection was based on a sandwich immunoassay using a mixture of biotinylated detection antibodies for different analytes with a streptavidin-conjugated fluorescent probe, R-phycoerythrin. The microarray was imaged by fluorescence microscopy in three different channels, two for microsphere registration and one for the assay signal. The fluorescence micrographs were then decoded and analyzed using a homemade algorithm in MATLAB.

  18. Optical Coupling Structures of Fiber-Optic Mach-Zehnder Interferometers Using CO2 Laser Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Hsing Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI can be used to test changes in the refractive index of sucrose solutions at different concentrations. However, the popularity of this measurement tool is limited by its substantial size and portability. Therefore, the MZI was integrated with a small fiber-optic waveguide component to develop an interferometer with fiber-optic characteristics, specifically a fiber-optic Mach-Zehnder interferometer (FO-MZI. Optical fiber must be processed to fabricate two optical coupling structures. The two optical coupling structures are a duplicate of the beam splitter, an optical component of the interferometer. Therefore, when the sensor length and the two optical coupling structures vary, the time or path for optical transmission in the sensor changes, thereby influencing the back-end interference signals. The researchers successfully developed an asymmetrical FO-MZI with sensing abilities. The spacing value between the troughs of the sensor length and interference signal exhibited an inverse relationship. In addition, image analysis was employed to examine the size-matching relationship between various sensor lengths and the coupling and decoupling structure. Furthermore, the spectral wavelength shift results measured using a refractive index sensor indicate that FO-MZIs with a sensor length of 38 mm exhibited excellent sensitivity, measuring 59.7 nm/RIU.

  19. Evaluation of the Detection Efficiency of LYSO Scintillator in the Fiber-Optic Radiation Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Hee Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate fiber-optic sensors for the remote detection of gamma rays in areas that are difficult to access, such as a spent fuel pool. The fiber-optic sensor consists of a light-generating probe, such as scintillators for radiation detection, plastic optical fibers, and light-measuring devices, such as PMT. The (Lu,Y2SiO5:Ce(LYSO:Ce scintillator was chosen as the light-generating probe. The (Lu,Y2SiO5:Ce(LYSO:Ce scintillator has higher scintillation efficiency than the others and transmits light well through an optical fiber because its refraction index is similar to the refractive index of the optical fiber. The fiber-optic radiation sensor using the (Lu,Y2SiO5:Ce(LYSO:Ce scintillator was evaluated in terms of the detection efficiency and reproducibility for examining its applicability as a radiation sensor.

  20. Linearization of Positional Response Curve of a Fiber-optic Displacement Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaev, O. G.; Matyunin, S. A.; Paranin, V. D.

    2018-01-01

    Currently, the creation of optical measuring instruments and sensors for measuring linear displacement is one of the most relevant problems in the area of instrumentation. Fiber-optic contactless sensors based on the magneto-optical effect are of special interest. They are essentially contactless, non-electrical and have a closed optical channel not subject to contamination. The main problem of this type of sensors is the non-linearity of their positional response curve due to the hyperbolic nature of the magnetic field intensity variation induced by moving the magnetic source mounted on the controlled object relative to the sensing element. This paper discusses an algorithmic method of linearizing the positional response curve of fiber-optic displacement sensors in any selected range of the displacements to be measured. The method is divided into two stages: 1 - definition of the calibration function, 2 - measurement and linearization of the positional response curve (including its temperature stabilization). The algorithm under consideration significantly reduces the number of points of the calibration function, which is essential for the calibration of temperature dependence, due to the use of the points that randomly deviate from the grid points with uniform spacing. Subsequent interpolation of the deviating points and piecewise linear-plane approximation of the calibration function reduces the microcontroller storage capacity for storing the calibration function and the time required to process the measurement results. The paper also presents experimental results of testing real samples of fiber-optic displacement sensors.

  1. Partially reduced graphene oxide based FRET on fiber-optic interferometer for biochemical detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, B C; Wu, Y; Yu, C B; He, J R; Rao, Y J; Gong, Y; Fu, F; Chen, Y F; Li, Y R

    2016-03-24

    Fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) with naturally exceptional selectivity is a powerful technique and widely used in chemical and biomedical analysis. However, it is still challenging for conventional FRET to perform as a high sensitivity compact sensor. Here we propose a novel 'FRET on Fiber' concept, in which a partially reduced graphene oxide (prGO) film is deposited on a fiber-optic modal interferometer, acting as both the fluorescent quencher for the FRET and the sensitive cladding for optical phase measurement due to refractive index changes in biochemical detection. The target analytes induced fluorescence recovery with good selectivity and optical phase shift with high sensitivity are measured simultaneously. The functionalized prGO film coated on the fiber-optic interferometer shows high sensitivities for the detections of metal ion, dopamine and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), with detection limits of 1.2 nM, 1.3 μM and 1 pM, respectively. Such a prGO based 'FRET on fiber' configuration, bridging the FRET and the fiber-optic sensing technology, may serve as a platform for the realization of series of integrated 'FRET on Fiber' sensors for on-line environmental, chemical, and biomedical detection, with excellent compactness, high sensitivity, good selectivity and fast response.

  2. A novel headspace solid-phase microextraction method using in situ derivatization and a diethoxydiphenylsilane fibre for the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of urinary hydroxy polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattarozzi, M; Musci, M; Careri, M; Mangia, A; Fustinoni, S; Campo, L; Bianchi, F

    2009-07-24

    An innovative and simple headspace solid-phase microextraction method using a novel diethoxydiphenylsilane fibre based on in situ derivatization with acetic anhydride was optimized and validated for the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of some monohydroxy metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, namely 1-hydroxynaphthalene, 2-hydroxynaphtalene, 9-hydroxyfluorene, 2-hydroxyfluorene and 1-hydroxypyrene at trace levels in human urine. Enzymatic hydrolysis was applied before derivatization, whereas extraction conditions, i.e. the effects of time and temperature of extraction and salt addition were investigated by experimental design. Regression models and desirability functions were applied to find the experimental conditions providing the highest global extraction response. These conditions were found in correspondence of an extraction temperature of 90 degrees C, an extraction time of 90 min and 25% NaCl added to urine samples. The capabilities of the developed method were proved obtaining limit of quantitations in the 0.1-2 microg/l range, thus allowing the bio-monitoring of these compounds in human urine. A good precision was observed both in terms of intra-batch and inter-batch repeatability with RSD always lower than 14%. Recoveries ranging from 98(+/-3) to 121(+/-1)% and extraction yields higher than 72% were also obtained. Finally, the analysis of urine specimens of coke-oven workers revealed analytes' concentrations in the 2.2-164 microg/l range, proving the exposure to PAHs of the involved workers.

  3. Fiber-optic Sensor Demonstrator (FSD) integration with PROBA-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutlinger, Arnd; Glier, Markus; Zuknik, Karl-Heinz; Hoffmann, Lars; Müller, Mathias; Rapp, Stephan; Kurvin, Charles; Ernst, Thomas; McKenzie, Iain; Karafolas, Nikos

    2017-11-01

    Modern telecommunication satellites can benefit from the features of fiber optic sensing wrt to mass savings, improved performance and lower costs. Within the course of a technology study, launched by the European Space Agency, a fiber optic sensing system has been designed and is to be tested on representative mockups of satellite sectors and environment.

  4. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric analysis of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) in solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells: comparison of in situ photoelectrochemical polymerization in aqueous micellar and organic media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinbao; Ellis, Hanna; Yang, Lei; Johansson, Erik M J; Boschloo, Gerrit; Vlachopoulos, Nick; Hagfeldt, Anders; Bergquist, Jonas; Shevchenko, Denys

    2015-04-07

    Solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (sDSCs) are devoid of such issues as electrolyte evaporation or leakage and electrode corrosion, which are typical for traditional liquid electrolyte-based DSCs. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) is one of the most popular and efficient p-type conducting polymers that are used in sDSCs as a solid-state hole-transporting material. The most convenient way to deposit this insoluble polymer into the dye-sensitized mesoporous working electrode is in situ photoelectrochemical polymerization. Apparently, the structure and the physicochemical properties of the generated conducting polymer, which determine the photovoltaic performance of the corresponding solar cell, can be significantly affected by the preparation conditions. Therefore, a simple and fast analytical method that can reveal information on polymer chain length, possible chemical modifications, and impurities is strongly required for the rapid development of efficient solar energy-converting devices. In this contribution, we applied matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) for the analysis of PEDOT directly on sDSCs. It was found that the PEDOT generated in aqueous micellar medium possesses relatively shorter polymeric chains than the PEDOT deposited from an organic medium. Furthermore, the micellar electrolyte promotes a transformation of one of the thiophene terminal units to thiophenone. The introduction of a carbonyl group into the PEDOT molecule impedes the growth of the polymer chain and reduces the conductivity of the final polymer film. Both the simplicity of sample preparation (only application of the organic matrix onto the solar cell is needed) and the rapidity of analysis hold the promise of making MALDI MS an essential tool for the physicochemical characterization of conducting polymer-based sDSCs.

  5. Study of distributed fiber-optic laser-ultrasound generation based on ghost-mode of tilted fiber Bragg gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jiajun; Zhang, Qi; Han, Ming

    2013-05-01

    Fiber-optic ultrasonic transducers are an important component of an active ultrasonic testing system for structural health monitoring. Fiber-optic transducers have several advantages such as small size, light weight, and immunity to electromagnetic interference that make them much more attractive than the current available piezoelectric transducers, especially as embedded and permanent transducers in active ultrasonic testing for structural health monitoring. In this paper, a distributed fiber-optic laser-ultrasound generation based on the ghost-mode of tilted fiber Bragg gratings is studied. The influences of the laser power and laser pulse duration on the laser-ultrasound generation are investigated. The results of this paper are helpful to understand the working principle of this laser-ultrasound method and improve the ultrasonic generation efficiency.

  6. Sensitivity and Specificity of Cardiac Tissue Discrimination Using Fiber-Optics Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Sachse, Frank B; Hitchcock, Robert W; Kaza, Aditya K

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances of the cardiac conduction system constitute a major risk after surgical repair of complex cases of congenital heart disease. Intraoperative identification of the conduction system may reduce the incidence of these disturbances. We previously developed an approach to identify cardiac tissue types using fiber-optics confocal microscopy and extracellular fluorophores. Here, we applied this approach to investigate sensitivity and specificity of human and automated classification in discriminating images of atrial working myocardium and specialized tissue of the conduction system. Two-dimensional image sequences from atrial working myocardium and nodal tissue of isolated perfused rodent hearts were acquired using a fiber-optics confocal microscope (Leica FCM1000). We compared two methods for local application of extracellular fluorophores: topical via pipette and with a dye carrier. Eight blinded examiners evaluated 162 randomly selected images of atrial working myocardium (n = 81) and nodal tissue (n = 81). In addition, we evaluated the images using automated classification. Blinded examiners achieved a sensitivity and specificity of 99.2 ± 0.3% and 98.0 ± 0.7%, respectively, with the dye carrier method of dye application. Sensitivity and specificity was similar for dye application via a pipette (99.2 ± 0.3% and 94.0 ± 2.4%, respectively). Sensitivity and specificity for automated methods of tissue discrimination were similarly high. Human and automated classification achieved high sensitivity and specificity in discriminating atrial working myocardium and nodal tissue. We suggest that our findings facilitate clinical translation of fiber-optics confocal microscopy as an intraoperative imaging modality to reduce the incidence of conduction disturbances during surgical correction of congenital heart disease.

  7. Use of fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) in the management of psychogenic dysphagia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thottam, Prasad John; Silva, Rodrigo C; McLevy, Jennifer D; Simons, Jeffrey P; Mehta, Deepak K

    2015-02-01

    To describe the use of fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) as an adjunct in the management of children presenting with psychogenic dysphagia, defined as food avoidance and excessive fear of eating without identifiable anatomic or functional swallowing abnormalities. Case series of patients presenting to the otolaryngology clinic of a tertiary pediatric teaching hospital between 2007 and 2008 that were evaluated and managed with the utilization of FEES. The outcomes measured were age, gender, duration of symptoms, findings of FEES, additional work-up and resolution of symptoms at follow-up. Five patients (4 males, 1 female) with ages ranging from 5 to 13 years old (mean=8.6). The median duration of symptoms before presentation was 3 weeks. Four families described refusal of solids starting after choking episode and variable estimated weight loss (mean 2.8kg). One child presented with vague complaints of intermittent odynophagia and food refusal. Fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing was performed on all patients. No abnormalities of the oropharyngeal swallow were appreciated. Additional management included different combinations of modified barium swallow study, esophagastroduodenoscopy (EGD), upper GI series, antibiotics, and psychotherapy. Mean follow-up with clinic visit was 4.2 months. Three of the five children reported complete resolution of symptoms after FEES at follow-up visit. Fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing can be a useful management tool in children with psychogenic dysphagia as it provides direct visualization of the oropharyngeal swallowing mechanism. This can be used to provide visual reassure and biofeedback to patients and parents. Additional workup should be decided on an individual basis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fiber-optic triggered release of liposome in vivo: implication of personalized chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huei-Ling; Lu, Pei-Hsuan; Yang, Hung-Chih; Lee, Gi-Da; Li, Han-Ru; Liao, Kuo-Chih

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to provide proof of principle by applying the fiber-optic triggered release of photo-thermally responsive liposomes embedded with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using a 200 μm fiber with 65 mW and 532 nm excitation for topical release in vivo. The tunable delivery function can be paired with an apoptosis biosensor based on the same fiber-optic configuration for providing real-time evaluation of chemotherapy efficacy in vivo to perform as a personalized chemotherapy system. The pattern of topical release triggered by laser excitation conveyed through optical fibers was monitored by the increase in fluorescence resulting from the dilution of self-quenching (75 mM) fluorescein encapsulated in liposomes. In in vitro studies (in 37°C phosphate buffer saline), the AuNP-embedded liposomes showed a more efficient triggered release (74.53%±1.63% in 40 minutes) than traditional temperature-responsive liposomes without AuNPs (14.53%±3.17%) or AuNP-liposomes without excitation (21.92%±2.08%) by spectroscopic measurements. Using the mouse xenograft studies, we first demonstrated that the encapsulation of fluorescein in liposomes resulted in a more substantial content retention (81%) in the tumor than for free fluorophores (14%) at 120 minutes after administration from in vivo fluorescence imaging. Furthermore, the preliminary results also suggested the tunable release capability of the system by demonstrating consecutive triggered releases with fiber-optic guided laser excitation.

  9. Fiber-optic sensors for rapid, inexpensive characterization of soil and ground water contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milanovich, F.P.; Yow, J.L. Jr.

    1994-08-01

    The extent and complexity of worldwide environmental contamination are great enough that characterization, remediation, and performance monitoring will be extremely costly and lengthy. Characterization techniques that are rapid, inexpensive, and simple and that do not generate waste are urgently needed. Towards this end LLNL is developing a fiber-optic chemical sensor technology for use in groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring. We use a colorimetric detection technique, based on an irreversible chemical reaction between a specific reagent and the target compound. The accuracy and sensitivity of the sensor (<5 ppb by weight in water, determined by comparison with gas chromatographic standard measurements) are sufficient for environmental monitoring of trichloroethylene (TCE) and chloroform

  10. Fiber-Optic Magnetic-Field-Strength Measurement System for Lightning Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurecki, Jay; Scully, Robert; Davis, Allen; Kirkendall, Clay; Bucholtz, Frank

    2011-01-01

    A fiber-optic sensor system is designed to measure magnetic fields associated with a lightning stroke. Field vector magnitudes are detected and processed for multiple locations. Since physical limitations prevent the sensor elements from being located in close proximity to highly conductive materials such as aluminum, the copper wire sensor elements (3) are located inside a 4-cubic-in. (.66-cubic-cm) plastic housing sensor head and connected to a fiber-optic conversion module by shielded cabling, which is limited to the shortest length feasible. The signal path between the conversion module and the avionics unit which processes the signals are fiber optic, providing enhanced immunity from electromagnetic radiation incident in the vicinity of the measurements. The sensors are passive, lightweight, and much smaller than commercial B-dot sensors in the configuration which measures a three-dimensional magnetic field. The system is expandable, and provides a standard-format output signal for downstream processing. Inside of the sensor head, three small search coils, each having a few turns on a circular form, are mounted orthogonally inside the non-metallic housing. The fiber-optic conversion module comprises three interferometers, one for each search coil. Each interferometer has a high bandwidth optical phase modulator that impresses the signal received from its search coil onto its output. The output of each interferometer travels by fiber optic cable to the avionics unit, and the search coil signal is recovered by an optical phase demodulator. The output of each demodulator is fed to an analog-to-digital converter, whose sampling rate is determined by the maximum expected rate of rise and peak signal magnitude. The output of the digital processor is a faithful reproduction of the coil response to the incident magnetic field. This information is provided in a standard output format on a 50-ohm port that can be connected to any number of data collection and processing

  11. Fiber-Optic Sensors for Measurements of Torsion, Twist and Rotation: A Review †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinski, Vedran; Donlagic, Denis

    2017-01-01

    Optical measurement of mechanical parameters is gaining significant commercial interest in different industry sectors. Torsion, twist and rotation are among the very frequently measured mechanical parameters. Recently, twist/torsion/rotation sensors have become a topic of intense fiber-optic sensor research. Various sensing concepts have been reported. Many of those have different properties and performances, and many of them still need to be proven in out-of-the laboratory use. This paper provides an overview of basic approaches and a review of current state-of-the-art in fiber optic sensors for measurements of torsion, twist and/or rotation. PMID:28241510

  12. PMD compensation in fiber-optic communication systems with direct detection using LDPC-coded OFDM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, Ivan B

    2007-04-02

    The possibility of polarization-mode dispersion (PMD) compensation in fiber-optic communication systems with direct detection using a simple channel estimation technique and low-density parity-check (LDPC)-coded orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) is demonstrated. It is shown that even for differential group delay (DGD) of 4/BW (BW is the OFDM signal bandwidth), the degradation due to the first-order PMD can be completely compensated for. Two classes of LDPC codes designed based on two different combinatorial objects (difference systems and product of combinatorial designs) suitable for use in PMD compensation are introduced.

  13. High Resolution Sub-MM Fiberoptic Endoscope Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1447-97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, Gary F. [Univ. of California, Livermore, CA (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, John [CML Fiberoptics, Inc., Auburn, NY (United States)

    2018-01-22

    At the time of the CRADA, LLNL needed to develop a sub-mm outer diameter fiberoptic endoscope with 25pm or better resolution at 3-lOmm working distance to support the Enhanced Surveillance Program (ESP) and the Core Surveillance Program for DOE. The commercially available systems did not meet the image resolution requirements and development work was needed to reach three goals. We also needed to perform preliminary investigations into the production of such an endoscope with a steerable-articulated distal end. The goal of such an endoscope was to allow for a 45 degree inspection cone including the lens field of view.

  14. Hawking spectrum for a fiber-optical analog of the event horizon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, David; Leonhardt, Ulf

    2016-05-01

    Hawking radiation has been regarded as a more general phenomenon than in gravitational physics, in particular in laboratory analogs of the event horizon. Here we consider the fiber-optical analog of the event horizon, where intense light pulses in fibers establish horizons for probe light. Then, we calculate the Hawking spectrum in an experimentally realizable system. We found that the Hawking radiation is peaked around group-velocity horizons in which the speed of the pulse matches the group velocity of the probe light. The radiation nearly vanishes at the phase horizon where the speed of the pulse matches the phase velocity of light.

  15. Fiber-optical switch using cam-micromotor driven by scratch drive actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Y.; Aoki, Y.; Sasaki, M.; Hosoya, H.; Wada, A.; Hane, K.

    2005-01-01

    We fabricated a 1 × 1 fiber-optic switch using a cam-micromotor driven by scratch drive actuators (SDAs). Using the cam-micromotor, mechanical translation and precise positioning of an optical fiber were performed. An optical fiber of diameter 50 µm was bent and pushed out with a cam-mechanism driven by the SDAs fabricated by surface micromachining. The maximum rotation speed of the cam-micromotor was 7.5 rpm at a driving frequency of 1.5 kHz. The transient time of the switch to attenuate coupling efficiency less than -40 dB was around 10 ms.

  16. Multifunctional fiber-optic microwave links based on remote heterodyne detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gliese, Ulrik Bo; Nielsen, Torben Nørskov; Nielsen, Søren Nørskov

    1998-01-01

    The multifunctionality of microwave links based on remote heterodyne detection (RHD) of signals from a dual-frequency laser transmitter is discussed and experimentally demonstrated in this paper. Typically, direct detection (DD) in conjunction with optical intensity modulation is used to implement...... fiber-optic microwave links. The resulting links are inherently transparent. As opposed to DD links, RHD links can perform radio-system functionalities such as modulation and frequency conversion in addition to transparency. All of these three functionalities are presented and experimentally...

  17. A family of fiber-optic based pressure sensors for intracochlear measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Elizabeth S.; Nakajima, Hideko H.

    2015-02-01

    Fiber-optic pressure sensors have been developed for measurements of intracochlear pressure. The present family of transducers includes an 81 μm diameter sensor employing a SLED light source and single-mode optic fiber, and LED/multi-mode sensors with 126 and 202 μm diameter. The 126 μm diameter pressure sensor also has been constructed with an electrode adhered to its side, for coincident pressure and voltage measurements. These sensors have been used for quantifying cochlear mechanical impedances, informing our understanding of conductive hearing loss and its remediation, and probing the operation of the cochlear amplifier.

  18. Fly-By-Light/Power-By-Wire Fault-Tolerant Fiber-Optic Backplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekpour, Mahyar R.

    2002-01-01

    The design and development of a fault-tolerant fiber-optic backplane to demonstrate feasibility of such architecture is presented. The simulation results of test cases on the backplane in the advent of induced faults are presented, and the fault recovery capability of the architecture is demonstrated. The architecture was designed, developed, and implemented using the Very High Speed Integrated Circuits (VHSIC) Hardware Description Language (VHDL). The architecture was synthesized and implemented in hardware using Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) on multiple prototype boards.

  19. Fiber-Optic Sensors for Measurements of Torsion, Twist and Rotation: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedran Budinski

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Optical measurement of mechanical parameters is gaining significant commercial interest in different industry sectors. Torsion, twist and rotation are among the very frequently measured mechanical parameters. Recently, twist/torsion/rotation sensors have become a topic of intense fiber-optic sensor research. Various sensing concepts have been reported. Many of those have different properties and performances, and many of them still need to be proven in out-of-the laboratory use. This paper provides an overview of basic approaches and a review of current state-of-the-art in fiber optic sensors for measurements of torsion, twist and/or rotation.Invited Paper

  20. Fiber-Optic Sensors for Measurements of Torsion, Twist and Rotation: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinski, Vedran; Donlagic, Denis

    2017-02-23

    Optical measurement of mechanical parameters is gaining significant commercial interest in different industry sectors. Torsion, twist and rotation are among the very frequently measured mechanical parameters. Recently, twist/torsion/rotation sensors have become a topic of intense fiber-optic sensor research. Various sensing concepts have been reported. Many of those have different properties and performances, and many of them still need to be proven in out-of-the laboratory use. This paper provides an overview of basic approaches and a review of current state-of-the-art in fiber optic sensors for measurements of torsion, twist and/or rotation.Invited Paper.

  1. Extrinsic fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometer sensor for refractive index measurement of optical glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jihuan; Zhao Jiarong; Huang Xuguang; Huang Zhenjian

    2010-01-01

    A simple fiber-optic sensor based on Fabry-Perot interference for refractive index measurement of optical glass is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. A broadband light source is coupled into an extrinsic fiber Fabry-Perot cavity formed by the surfaces of a sensing fiber end and the measured sample. The interference signals from the cavity are reflected back into the same fiber. The refractive index of the sample can be obtained by measuring the contrast of the interference fringes. The experimental data meet with the theoretical values very well. The proposed technique is a new method for glass refractive index measurement with a simple, solid, and compact structure.

  2. A fiber-optic ice detection system for large-scale wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-gil; Sampath, Umesh; Kim, Hyunjin; Song, Minho

    2017-09-01

    Icing causes substantial problems in the integrity of large-scale wind turbines. In this work, a fiber-optic sensor system for detection of icing with an arrayed waveguide grating is presented. The sensor system detects Fresnel reflections from the ends of the fibers. The transition in Fresnel reflection due to icing gives peculiar intensity variations, which categorizes the ice, the water, and the air medium on the wind turbine blades. From the experimental results, with the proposed sensor system, the formation of icing conditions and thickness of ice were identified successfully in real time.

  3. Fiber-optic triggered release of liposome in vivo: implication of personalized chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang HL

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Huei-Ling Huang,1 Pei-Hsuan Lu,1 Hung-Chih Yang,1 Gi-Da Lee,1,2 Han-Ru Li,1 Kuo-Chih Liao1 1Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, 2Department of Radiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan Abstract: The aim of this research is to provide proof of principle by applying the fiber-optic triggered release of photo-thermally responsive liposomes embedded with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs using a 200 µm fiber with 65 mW and 532 nm excitation for topical release in vivo. The tunable delivery function can be paired with an apoptosis biosensor based on the same fiber-optic configuration for providing real-time evaluation of chemotherapy efficacy in vivo to perform as a personalized chemotherapy system. The pattern of topical release triggered by laser excitation conveyed through optical fibers was monitored by the increase in fluorescence resulting from the dilution of self-quenching (75 mM fluorescein encapsulated in liposomes. In in vitro studies (in 37°C phosphate buffer saline, the AuNP-embedded liposomes showed a more efficient triggered release (74.53%±1.63% in 40 minutes than traditional temperature-responsive liposomes without AuNPs (14.53%±3.17% or AuNP-liposomes without excitation (21.92%±2.08% by spectroscopic measurements. Using the mouse xenograft studies, we first demonstrated that the encapsulation of fluorescein in liposomes resulted in a more substantial content retention (81% in the tumor than for free fluorophores (14% at 120 minutes after administration from in vivo fluorescence imaging. Furthermore, the preliminary results also suggested the tunable release capability of the system by demonstrating consecutive triggered releases with fiber-optic guided laser excitation. Keywords: fiber-optic guided excitation, light excitation triggered release, photo-thermal responsive liposome, gold nanoparticles, tunable release in vivo

  4. Fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy for in vivo diagnosis of gastric dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianfeng; Lin, Kan; Zheng, Wei; Ho, Khek Yu; Teh, Ming; Yeoh, Khay Guan; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-06-23

    This study aims to assess the clinical utility of a rapid fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy technique developed for enhancing in vivo diagnosis of gastric precancer during endoscopic examination. We have developed a real-time fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy system capable of simultaneously acquiring both fingerprint (FP) (i.e., 800-1800 cm(-1)) and high-wavenumber (HW) (i.e., 2800-3600 cm(-1)) Raman spectra from gastric tissue in vivo at endoscopy. A total of 5792 high-quality in vivo FP/HW Raman spectra (normal (n = 5160); dysplasia (n = 155), and adenocarcinoma (n = 477)) were acquired in real-time from 441 tissue sites (normal (n = 396); dysplasia (n = 11), and adenocarcinoma (n = 34)) of 191 gastric patients (normal (n = 172); dysplasia (n = 6), and adenocarcinoma (n = 13)) undergoing routine endoscopic examinations. Partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) together with leave-one-patient-out cross validation (LOPCV) were implemented to develop robust spectral diagnostic models. The FP/HW Raman spectra differ significantly between normal, dysplasia and adenocarcinoma of the stomach, which can be attributed to changes in proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, and the bound water content. PLS-DA and LOPCV show that the fiber-optic FP/HW Raman spectroscopy provides diagnostic sensitivities of 96.0%, 81.8% and 88.2%, and specificities of 86.7%, 95.3% and 95.6%, respectively, for the classification of normal, dysplastic and cancerous gastric tissue, superior to either the FP or HW Raman techniques alone. Further dichotomous PLS-DA analysis yields a sensitivity of 90.9% (10/11) and specificity of 95.9% (380/396) for the detection of gastric dysplasia using FP/HW Raman spectroscopy, substantiating its clinical advantages over white light reflectance endoscopy (sensitivity: 90.9% (10/11), and specificity: 51.0% (202/396)). This work demonstrates that the fiber-optic FP/HW Raman spectroscopy technique has great promise for enhancing in vivo diagnosis of gastric

  5. The utility of the fiberoptic bronchoscopy in the esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes O, Leonardo; Garcia-Herreros, Plutarco; Rivas P, Pilar; Posso, Hector; Sandoval Rafael L

    1998-01-01

    The paper establishes the utility of the fiber- optic bronchoscopy (FOB) studies performed in patients with esophageal cancer (EC) and confirm the possibility of tracheo-bronchial compromise. We carry out a descriptive study in 226 patients with esophageal cancer during 1991 to 1996 in the Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia of Colombia (INC). We excluded the patients with previous treatments: radiotherapy or surgery, and others primary cancers with metastases on the esophagus. We analyzed gastric, intestinal and general symptoms, smoking habits, primary cancer location, histological types, radiologic findings, fob findings, micro and macroscopes, and results of the samples: transbronchial, endobronchial biopsies, bronchi alveolar lavage and brush. We included 158 patients, 110 male and 48 female, with age between 32 and 83 years, symptoms duration average of 5,2 months. The most significant were cough, dysphonia and sputum. The location of EC was statistics significance only in the upper third escamocelular type. The significant radiological findings were: parenchymal nodules and interstitial infiltrates, the significant fob findings were: fistula endobronchial infiltration endobronchial mass and vocal cords palsy. The zones with more compromise were trachea, principal bronchi and vocal cords. Only 17 patients were positives in the samples; comparing the histopathologic findings (biopsies) as the gold standard with fob findings the sensitivity was 100%, specificity 35%, positive predictive value 15.6% and negative predictive value 100%

  6. Aspiration in children and adolescents with neurogenic dysphagia: comparison of clinical judgment and fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Sabrina; Hartlieb, Till; Müller, Arnd; Granel, Michael; Staudt, Martin

    2014-12-01

    A total of 30 children and adolescents with dysphagia due to various chronic neurological disorders were assessed for their risk of aspiration. This assessment was performed clinically by experienced speech and swallowing therapists, and verified thereafter by fiberoptic endoscopy. We found the clinical judgment to be correct in only 70% (for aspiration of saliva), 55% (of puree), and 67% (of thin liquids). We conclude that, because of this unacceptably high error rate of clinical assessment, a fiberoptic evaluation of swallowing is a necessary diagnostic step both for the planning of therapy and for the development of feeding strategies in children and adolescents with neurogenic dysphagia. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Spatial Frequency Multiplexing of Fiber-Optic Interferometric Refractive Index Sensors Based on Graded-Index Multimode Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Gong, Yuan; Wu, Yu; Zhao, Tian; Wu, Hui-Juan; Rao, Yun-Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Fiber-optic interferometric sensors based on graded-index multimode fibers have very high refractive-index sensitivity, as we previously demonstrated. In this paper, spatial-frequency multiplexing of this type of fiber-optic refractive index sensors is investigated. It is estimated that multiplexing of more than 10 such sensors is possible. In the multiplexing scheme, one of the sensors is used to investigate the refractive index and temperature responses. The fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the combined reflective spectra is analyzed. The intensity of the FFT spectra is linearly related with the refractive index and is not sensitive to the temperature.

  8. Monitoring of railway embankment settlement with fiber-optic pulsed time-of-flight radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpelä, Ari; Lyöri, Veijo; Duan, Guoyong

    2012-12-01

    This paper deals with a fiber-optic pulsed time-of-flight (PTOF) laser radar used for monitoring the settlement of a railway embankment. The operating principle is based on evaluating the changes in the lengths of the fiber-optic cables embedded in the embankment by measuring the time separation of the optical pulses reflected from both ends of the sensor fiber. The advantage of this method is that it integrates the elongation of the whole sensor, and many sensor fibers can be connected in series. In a field test, seven polyurethane-coated optical cables were installed in a railway embankment and used as 20-m long sensors. The optical timing pulses were created using specially polished optical connectors. The measured precision was 0.28 ps, which corresponds 1.8 μstrain elongation using a 20 m long sensor fiber, using an averaged value of 10,000 pulses for a single measurement value. The averaged elongation value of all sensors was used for cancelling out the effect of temperature variation on the elongation value of each individual sensor. The functionality of the method was tested by digging away a 7.5 m long and approximately 18 mm high section of sand below one sensor. It was measured as a +3 mm change in the length of the sensor fiber, which matched well with the theoretically calculated elongation value, 2.9 mm. The sensor type proved to be strong but flexible enough for this type of use.

  9. Ultrafast Fabry-Perot fiber-optic pressure sensors for multimedia blast event measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xiaotian; Wu, Nan; Tian, Ye; Zhang, Yang; Fitek, John; Maffeo, Michael; Niezrecki, Christopher; Chen, Julie; Wang, Xingwei

    2013-02-20

    A shock wave (SW) is characterized as a large pressure fluctuation that typically lasts only a few milliseconds. On the battlefield, SWs pose a serious threat to soldiers who are exposed to explosions, which may lead to blast-induced traumatic brain injuries. SWs can also be used beneficially and have been applied to a variety of medical treatments due to their unique interaction with tissues and cells. Consequently, it is important to have sensors that can quantify SW dynamics in order to better understand the physical interaction between body tissue and the incident acoustic wave. In this paper, the ultrafast fiber-optic sensor based on the Fabry-Perot interferometric principle was designed and four such sensors were fabricated to quantify a blast event within different media, simultaneously. The compact design of the fiber-optic sensor allows for a high degree of spatial resolution when capturing the wavefront of the traveling SW. Several blast event experiments were conducted within different media (e.g., air, rubber membrane, and water) to evaluate the sensor's performance. This research revealed valuable knowledge for further study of SW behavior and SW-related applications.

  10. Fiberoptic Applications in Sensors and Telemetry for the Electric Power Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werneck, M. M.; Silva, A. V.; Souza, N. C. C.; Miguel, M. A. L.; Beres, C.; Yugue, E. S.; Carvalho, C. C.; Maciel, F. L.; Silva-Neto, J.; Guimarães, C. R. F.; Allil, R. C. S. B.; Baliosian, J. A. G.

    2008-10-01

    This presentation features the origin and the work of the Photonics and Instrumentation Laboratory (LIF) in instrumentation, fiberoptic sensors and POF technology. LIF started its work in 1986, twenty and two years ago, with only one lecturer and a few students. The first project was the development of the first Brazilian plotter with the purpose, at the time, to substitute expensive imported technology. LIF has today 25 people between students, technicians, scientists, engineers and teachers. We present here several successful projects of fiberoptic sensors using both silica and POF fibers, most of them applied on the field mainly for the electric power industry. Described are: a oil leakage sensor in petroleum hoses, PMMA evanescent sensors, temperature by the ruby fluorescence phenomenon, a current sensor calibrator for 500 kV current transformers, a leakage sensor to measure 500 kV insulators in extra-high voltage transmission line, etc. Many of the sensors presented here have been tested in the field, patented and transferred to the industry. We have also technical collaboration with several industries in Brazil, one of them a spin-off from LIF. Our objective is to become a reference centre in POF technology in Latin America and for this we are intended to keep producing "out of the shelves" POF technology and innovative industry solutions for many areas.

  11. Characterizing Thermal Augmentation of Convection-Enhanced Drug Delivery with the Fiberoptic Microneedle Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Lyle Hood

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Convection-enhanced delivery (CED is a promising technique leveraging pressure-driven flow to increase penetration of infused drugs into interstitial spaces. We have developed a fiberoptic microneedle device for inducing local sub-lethal hyperthermia to further improve CED drug distribution volumes, and this study seeks to quantitatively characterize this approach in agarose tissue phantoms. Infusions of dye were conducted in 0.6% (w/w agarose tissue phantoms with isothermal conditions at 15 °C, 20 °C, 25 °C, and 30 °C. Infusion metrics were quantified using a custom shadowgraphy setup and image-processing algorithm. These data were used to build an empirical predictive temporal model of distribution volume as a function of phantom temperature. A second set of proof-of-concept experiments was conducted to evaluate a novel fiberoptic device capable of generating local photothermal heating during fluid infusion. The isothermal infusions showed a positive correlation between temperature and distribution volume, with the volume at 30 °C showing a 7-fold increase at 100 min over the 15 °C isothermal case. Infusions during photothermal heating (1064 nm at 500 mW showed a similar effect with a 3.5-fold increase at 4 h over the control (0 mW. These results and analyses serve to provide insight into and characterization of heat-mediated enhancement of volumetric dispersal.

  12. The influence of airway supporting maneuvers on glottis view in pediatric fiberoptic bronchoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarik Umutoglu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTINTRODUCTION:Flexible fiber optic bronchoscopy is a valuable intervention for evaluation and management of respiratory diseases in both infants, pediatric and adult patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of the airway supporting maneuvers on glottis view during pediatric flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy.MATERIALS AND METHODS:In this randomized, controlled, crossover study; patients aged between 0 and 15 years who underwent flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy procedure having American Society of Anesthesiologists I---II risk score were included. Patients having risk of difficult intubation, intubated or patients with tracheostomy, and patients with reduced neck mobility or having cautions for neck mobility were excluded from this study. After obtaining best glottic view at the neutral position, patients were positioned jaw trust with open mouth, jaw trust with teeth prottution, head tilt chin lift and triple airway maneuvers and best glottis scores were recorded.RESULTS:Total of 121 pediatric patients, 57 girls and 64 boys, were included in this study. Both jaw trust with open mouth and jaw trust with teeth prottution maneuvers improved the glottis view compared with neutral position (p 0.05. Head tilt chin lift and triple airway maneuvers improved glottis view when compared with both jaw trust with open mouth and jaw trust with teeth prottution maneuvers and neutral position (p 0.05.

  13. Fiberoptic bronchoscopic treatment of blood aspiration and use of sugammadex in a patient with epistaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Taeha; Kim, Dong Hyuck; Byun, Sung Hye

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: In patients with oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal bleeding, blood aspiration can make airway management difficult and lead to severe pulmonary complications. Patient concerns: A 44-year-old male patient with recurrent epistaxis underwent surgery for hemostasis. The patient aspirated blood through the endotracheal tube when he hiccupped during the surgery. Diagnosis: The patient was diagnosed with blood aspiration after intraoperative fiberoptic bronchoscopy revealed a blood clot and viscous mucus in the airways, but no sign of active bleeding. Interventions: Tracheobronchial suctioning and irrigation with normal saline was performed through the bronchoscope to remove the aspirated blood clot. Prior to emergence from anesthesia, sugammadex was administered to induce complete neuromuscular recovery and enable the patient to cough up any blood remaining in the airways. Outcomes: The patient was successfully extubated and fully recovered with no complications. Lessons: Blood aspiration due to oropharyngeal or nasopharyngeal bleeding can be diagnosed and treated by tracheobronchial suctioning via fiberoptic bronchoscopy. In addition, sugammadex can enable patients to recover spontaneous breathing, facilitate extubation, and enable patients to cough up any blood remaining in the airways. PMID:29642212

  14. EXPERIMENTAL COMPARISON OF HOMODYNE DEMODULATION ALGORITHMS FOR PHASE FIBER-OPTIC SENSOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Belikin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. The paper presents the results of experimental comparative analysis of homodyne demodulation algorithms based on differential cross multiplying method and on arctangent method under the same conditions. The dependencies of parameters for the output signals on the optical radiation intensity are studied for the considered demodulation algorithms. Method. The prototype of single fiber optic phase interferometric sensor has been used for experimental comparison of signal demodulation algorithms. Main Results. We have found that homodyne demodulation based on arctangent method provides greater (by 7 dB at average signal-to-noise ratio of output signals over the frequency band of acoustic impact from 100 Hz to 500 Hz as compared to differential cross multiplying algorithms. We have demonstrated that no change in the output signal amplitude occurs for the studied range of values of the optical pulses amplitudes. Obtained results indicate that the homodyne demodulation based on arctangent method is most suitable for application in the phase fiber-optic sensors. It provides higher repeatability of their characteristics than the differential cross multiplying algorithm. Practical Significance. Algorithms of interferometric signals demodulation are widely used in phase fiber-optic sensors. Improvement of their characteristics has a positive effect on the performance of such sensors.

  15. Broadband light source for fiber-optic measurement system in spaceborne applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rößner, Max R.; Müller, Mathias S.; Buck, Thorbjörn C.; Koch, Alexander W.

    2012-01-01

    Measuring temperatures, mechanical loads and derived quantities precisely and reliably play an important role in spaceflight. With spacecraft becoming increasingly complex, upscaling of present telemetry techniques can become cumbersome. Additionally, there are entirely new sensory requirements, resulting from emerging technologies such as smart structures, active vibration damping and composite material health monitoring. It has been demonstrated in preceding studies that these measurements can be advantageously and efficiently carried out by means of fiber-optic systems. The most prominent fiber-optic strain and temperature sensor is the fiber Bragg grating. Typically, multiple fiber Bragg gratings are used to translate entire temperature and strain fields into an optical wavelength information. For the interrogation of these sensors, a broadband or scanning light source is required. Additional requirements with respect to the light source are high intensity and unpolarized illumination of the gratings. These constraints can be met by a light source that is based on amplified spontaneous emission in a rare-earth-doped fiber. In the presented work, a compact light source, adapted for measurement applications and targeted towards space applications, has been developed. The design of this light source is presented, as well as its implementation. The light source has been designed and tested for selected core aspects of space robustness and the results of these tests are summarized.

  16. Fiber-optic annular detector array for large depth of field photoacoustic macroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Bauer-Marschallinger

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on a novel imaging system for large depth of field photoacoustic scanning macroscopy. Instead of commonly used piezoelectric transducers, fiber-optic based ultrasound detection is applied. The optical fibers are shaped into rings and mainly receive ultrasonic signals stemming from the ring symmetry axes. Four concentric fiber-optic rings with varying diameters are used in order to increase the image quality. Imaging artifacts, originating from the off-axis sensitivity of the rings, are reduced by coherence weighting. We discuss the working principle of the system and present experimental results on tissue mimicking phantoms. The lateral resolution is estimated to be below 200 μm at a depth of 1.5 cm and below 230 μm at a depth of 4.5 cm. The minimum detectable pressure is in the order of 3 Pa. The introduced method has the potential to provide larger imaging depths than acoustic resolution photoacoustic microscopy and an imaging resolution similar to that of photoacoustic computed tomography.

  17. Fiber-optic annular detector array for large depth of field photoacoustic macroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer-Marschallinger, Johannes; Höllinger, Astrid; Jakoby, Bernhard; Burgholzer, Peter; Berer, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    We report on a novel imaging system for large depth of field photoacoustic scanning macroscopy. Instead of commonly used piezoelectric transducers, fiber-optic based ultrasound detection is applied. The optical fibers are shaped into rings and mainly receive ultrasonic signals stemming from the ring symmetry axes. Four concentric fiber-optic rings with varying diameters are used in order to increase the image quality. Imaging artifacts, originating from the off-axis sensitivity of the rings, are reduced by coherence weighting. We discuss the working principle of the system and present experimental results on tissue mimicking phantoms. The lateral resolution is estimated to be below 200 μm at a depth of 1.5 cm and below 230 μm at a depth of 4.5 cm. The minimum detectable pressure is in the order of 3 Pa. The introduced method has the potential to provide larger imaging depths than acoustic resolution photoacoustic microscopy and an imaging resolution similar to that of photoacoustic computed tomography.

  18. Effect of midazolam on memory during fiberoptic gastroscopy under conscious sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yun Jeong; Jang, Eun Hye; Hwang, Jihye; Roh, Jee Hoon; Kwon, Miseon; Lee, Don; Lee, Jae-Hong

    2015-01-01

    As the fiberoptic gastroscopy using midazolam is being in widespread use, the exact nature of midazolam on memory should be clarified. We intended to examine whether midazolam causes selective anterograde amnesia and what impact it has on other aspects of memory and general cognitive function. We recruited healthy subjects undergoing fiberoptic gastroscopy under conscious sedation. At baseline, history taking for retrograde amnesia and the Korean version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment were performed. A man's name and address were given immediately after intravenous midazolam administration. After gastroscopy, the subjects were asked to recall those items. By the time they had fully recovered consciousness, the same test was repeated along with the Korean version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment and a test for retrograde amnesia. A total of 30 subjects were enrolled in this study. Subjects with high-dose midazolam showed lower scores in the immediate and delayed recall of "a man's name and address" compared with those with low-dose midazolam. The midazolam dose was inversely correlated with the delayed recall scores of "a man's name and address." On full recovery of consciousness, the subjects did not exhibit any of anterograde or retrograde amnesia. These findings suggest that midazolam causes transient selective anterograde amnesia in a dose-dependent manner.

  19. 下组煤底板岩层阻渗性实测研究%In-situ Test on Reduction Infiltration Characteristics of Rock Mass under the Lower Coal Group Floor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭德春; 张蕊; 邵明喜; 黄震

    2017-01-01

    The information which shows the impermeability of rock mass can be obtained by the in situ water injection tests.The experimental resuhs of three test periods with different lithologies and structures under the lower coal group floor in Yangcun Coal Mine were introduced.The initial water pressures,fractured water pressure and their corresponding permeability coefficients were discussed,as well as the relevance between flow rate,seepage resistance and pressureinfiltration state.The results show that the resistance ability of structural disturbance floor is weak,and those positions exhibit the behaviour of low resistance and high permeability.The floor with better integrity and original state structure shows strong resistance ability with higher initial infiltration pressure,and it still has strong resistance ability in the pressure-infiltration state.The impermeability of rock mass is mainly controlled by its structure and fracture,but not by its lithology.The result also shows the thick sandstone under the lower coal group floor in Yangcun Coal Mine is an effective impermeable layer with a good preservation effect.%底板原位压渗试验能够获得丰富的反映底板岩层阻渗性的信息,本文介绍了杨村矿下组煤底板3个不同岩性结构测试段的原位压渗试验成果,基于压渗过程曲线分析讨论了测试岩层起始导渗的水压力和渗透系数、压裂导通状态的水压力和渗透系数、压渗过程的压渗流量和渗流阻力的变化与导渗状态的关联性,得到如下认识:构造扰动部位底板阻渗能力薄弱,具有低阻强渗特点;完整性较好的原状结构底板岩层阻渗性较强,不但起始导渗的水压条件较高,而且导渗状态表现为高阻弱渗特点;底板岩层的阻渗性与岩性的关联性不明显,主要受制于岩层的原始结构条件和裂隙性状;杨村煤矿下组煤底板厚层砂岩是很好的隔水层,具有良好的隔水效果.

  20. Highly sensitive fiber-optic oxygen sensor based on palladium tetrakis (4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin doped in ormosil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Cheng-Shane; Chuang, Chih-Yung

    2014-01-01

    A simple, low-cost technique for fabrication of highly sensitive fiber-optic oxygen sensor is described. An organically modified silicate (ORMOSIL) as a matrix for the fabrication of oxygen sensing film was produced. The technique is based on coating the end of a plastic optical fiber with ormosil composite xerogel film sequestered with luminophore palladium (II) meso-tetra(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin (PdTCPP) prepared by a sol–gel process. The composite xerogel studied is tetraethylorthosilane (TEOS)/n-octyltriethoxysilane (Octyl-triEOS). Result shows that, expect for PdTCPP-doped TEOS/Octyl-triEOS composite xerogel show the high sensitivity and linear Stern–Volmer relationship which indicate the homogenous environment of the luminophore. The sensitivity of the optical oxygen sensor is quantified in terms of the ratio I N2 /I O2 , where I N2 and I O2 represent the detected fluorescence intensities in pure nitrogen and pure oxygen environments, respectively. The experimental result reveals that the PdTCPP-doped TEOS/Octyl-triEOS oxygen sensor has sensitivity of 153. - Highlights: • A simple, low-cost technique for fabrication of highly sensitive fiber-optic oxygen sensor is described. • ORMOSIL was produced to serve as a matrix for the fabrication of oxygen sensing film. • The fiber-optic oxygen sensor has sensitivity of I N2 /I 100O2 =153. • The stable and reproducible signals were obtained with the fiber-optic oxygen sensor

  1. A fiber-optic strain measurement and quench localization system for use in superconducting accelerator dipole magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oort, J.M.; Scanlan, Ronald M.; ten Kate, Herman H.J.

    1995-01-01

    A novel fiber-optic measurement system for superconducting accelerator magnets is described. The principal component is an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer to determine localized strain and stress in coil windings. The system can be used either as a sensitive relative strain measurement system

  2. Fiber-Optic Temperature and Pressure Sensors Applied to Radiofrequency Thermal Ablation in Liver Phantom: Methodology and Experimental Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Tosi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFA is a procedure aimed at interventional cancer care and is applied to the treatment of small- and midsize tumors in lung, kidney, liver, and other tissues. RFA generates a selective high-temperature field in the tissue; temperature values and their persistency are directly related to the mortality rate of tumor cells. Temperature measurement in up to 3–5 points, using electrical thermocouples, belongs to the present clinical practice of RFA and is the foundation of a physical model of the ablation process. Fiber-optic sensors allow extending the detection of biophysical parameters to a vast plurality of sensing points, using miniature and noninvasive technologies that do not alter the RFA pattern. This work addresses the methodology for optical measurement of temperature distribution and pressure using four different fiber-optic technologies: fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs, linearly chirped FBGs (LCFBGs, Rayleigh scattering-based distributed temperature system (DTS, and extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometry (EFPI. For each instrument, methodology for ex vivo sensing, as well as experimental results, is reported, leading to the application of fiber-optic technologies in vivo. The possibility of using a fiber-optic sensor network, in conjunction with a suitable ablation device, can enable smart ablation procedure whereas ablation parameters are dynamically changed.

  3. Miniature fiber-optic multiphoton microscopy system using frequency-doubled femtosecond Er-doped fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lin; Mills, Arthur K; Zhao, Yuan; Jones, David J; Tang, Shuo

    2016-05-01

    We report on a miniature fiber-optic multiphoton microscopy (MPM) system based on a frequency-doubled femtosecond Er-doped fiber laser. The femtosecond pulses from the laser source are delivered to the miniature fiber-optic probe at 1.58 µm wavelength, where a standard single mode fiber is used for delivery without the need of free-space dispersion compensation components. The beam is frequency-doubled inside the probe by a periodically poled MgO:LiNbO3 crystal. Frequency-doubled pulses at 786 nm with a maximum power of 80 mW and a pulsewidth of 150 fs are obtained and applied to excite intrinsic signals from tissues. A MEMS scanner, a miniature objective, and a multimode collection fiber are further used to make the probe compact. The miniature fiber-optic MPM system is highly portable and robust. Ex vivo multiphoton imaging of mammalian skins demonstrates the capability of the system in imaging biological tissues. The results show that the miniature fiber-optic MPM system using frequency-doubled femtosecond fiber laser can potentially bring the MPM imaging for clinical applications.

  4. Highly sensitive rotation sensing based on orthogonal fiber-optic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Wang, Zi-nan; Xu, Lian-yu; Wang, Cui-yun; Jia, Lei; Yu, Xiao-qi; Shao, Shan; Li, Zheng-bin

    2011-08-01

    In traditional fiber-optic gyroscopes (FOG), the polarization state of counter propagating waves is critically controlled, and only the mode polarized along one particular direction survives. This is important for a traditional single mode fiber gyroscope as the requirement of reciprocity. However, there are some fatal defects such as low accuracy and poor bias stability in traditional structures. In this paper, based on the idea of polarization multiplexing, a double-polarization structure is put forward and experimentally studied. In highly birefringent fibers or standard single mode fibers with induced anisotropy, two orthogonal polarization modes can be used at the same time. Therefore, in polarization maintaining fibers (PMF), each pair of counter propagating beams preserve reciprocity within their own polarization state. Two series of sensing results are gotten in the fast and slow axes in PMF. The two sensing results have their own systematic drifts and the correlation of random noise in them is approximately zero. So, beams in fast and slow axes work as two independent and orthogonal gyroscopes. In this way, amount of information is doubled, providing opportunity to eliminate noise and improve sensitivity. Theoretically, this double-polarization structure can achieve a sensitivity of 10-18 deg/h. Computer simulation demonstrates that random noise and systematic drifts are largely reduced in this novel structure. In experiment, a forty-hour stability test targeting the earth's rotation velocity is carried out. Experiment result shows that the orthogonal fiber-optic structure has two big advantages compared with traditional ones. Firstly, the structure gets true value without any bias correction in any axis and even time-varying bias does not affect the acquisition of true value. The unbiasedness makes the structure very attractive when sudden disturbances or temperature drifts existing in working environment. Secondly, the structure lowers bias for more than

  5. Fiberoptic spectrophotometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tans, Petrus P.; Lashof, Daniel A.

    1986-01-01

    A device for determining the relative composition of a sample of a gas by comparison of the Raman-scattered light of the sample with that of a known gas comprising: a means for passing a single light source through the unknown and the known gases, choppers to alternate the Raman-scattered light into a common light detection and measuring system, optical fiber networks for spatially mixing the resulting Raman scattered light from each sample and directing the mixed light to selective detectors, and a compiler to record the light intensity of each wavelength of Raman-scattered light as a function of the sample from which it originated.

  6. A radiation tolerant fiber-optic readout system for the LHCb Silicon Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Agari, M; Blouw, J; Hofmann, W; Knöpfle, K T; Löchner, S; Schmelling, M; Schwingenheuer, B; Pugatch, V; Pylypchenko, Y; Bay, A; Carron, B; Fauland, P; Frei, R; Jiménez-Otero, S; Perrin, A; Tran, M T; Van Hunen, J J; Vervink, K; Vollhardt, A; Voss, H; Adeva, B; Esperante-Pereira, D; Lois, C; Vázquez, P; Bernhard, R P; Bernet, R; Gassner, J; Köstner, S; Lehner, F; Needham, M; Steinkamp, O; Straumann, U; Volyanskyy, D; Wenger, A

    2005-01-01

    A fiber-optic readout system has been designed for the LHCb Silicon Tracker to transmit the detector data to the counting room at a distance of 120 m from the detectors. In total, data from over 272000 detector channels have to be transmitted at an average trigger frequency of 1.1 MHz. In the design of the system, special attention was given to its radiation tolerance, as the transmitting section is located close to the beamline and therefore is exposed to moderate particle fluences and ionizing dose during the expected operational life of 10 years. We give a general overview of the readout link scheme and present performance data on its reliability and radiation tolerance obtained from first preseries elements of the system. Poster presented on the 10th European Symposium on Semiconductor Detectors, June 12th â€" June 16th 2005, Wildbad Kreuth, Germany.

  7. Fabrication of All-SiC Fiber-Optic Pressure Sensors for High-Temperature Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yonggang; Li, Jian; Zhou, Zhiwen; Jiang, Xinggang; Zhang, Deyuan

    2016-10-17

    Single-crystal silicon carbide (SiC)-based pressure sensors can be used in harsh environments, as they exhibit stable mechanical and electrical properties at elevated temperatures. A fiber-optic pressure sensor with an all-SiC sensor head was fabricated and is herein proposed. SiC sensor diaphragms were fabricated via an ultrasonic vibration mill-grinding (UVMG) method, which resulted in a small grinding force and low surface roughness. The sensor head was formed by hermetically bonding two layers of SiC using a nickel diffusion bonding method. The pressure sensor illustrated a good linearity in the range of 0.1-0.9 MPa, with a resolution of 0.27% F.S. (full scale) at room temperature.

  8. A new fiber-optic sensor technology for rapid and inexpensive characterization of soil contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milanovich, F.P.; Brown, S.B.; Colston, B.W. Jr.; Daley, P.F.; Rossabi, J.

    1993-04-01

    The extent and complexity of worldwide environmental contamination are great enough that remediation will be extremely costly and lengthy. There is an urgent need for characterization techniques that are rapid, inexpensive, and simple and that do not generate waste. Towards this end LLNL is developing a fiber-optic chemical sensor technology for use in groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring. We use a colorimetric detection technique, based on an irreversible chemical reaction between a specific reagent and the target compound. The accuracy and sensitivity of the sensor (<5 ppb by weight in water, determined by comparison with gas chromatographic standard measurements) are sufficient for environmental monitoring of at least trichloroethylene (TCE) and chloroform

  9. Noncontact ballistic motion measurement using a fiber-optic confocal sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafir, E.; Berkovic, G.; Horovitz, Y.; Appelbaum, G.; Moshe, E.; Horovitz, E.; Skutelski, A.; Werdiger, M.; Perelmutter, L.; Sudai, M.

    2007-01-01

    A fiber-optic confocal sensor for noncontact ballistic measurements is described. Determination of motion at velocities of 1.7 km/s with an uncertainty as small as ±0.3% is demonstrated for both a projectile and a free-surface target. The fibers detect the passage of the object at their conjugate image points created by low F/ optics. This results in an output signal comprising a train of sharp pulses each precisely identifying when the ballistic object traverses an image point. Since the ballistic object does not contact the sensor at the time of imaging, the measurements do not perturb the motion, enabling multi-fragment measurement, as well as repetitive measurements of the same object point

  10. Fabrication of All-SiC Fiber-Optic Pressure Sensors for High-Temperature Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonggang Jiang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Single-crystal silicon carbide (SiC-based pressure sensors can be used in harsh environments, as they exhibit stable mechanical and electrical properties at elevated temperatures. A fiber-optic pressure sensor with an all-SiC sensor head was fabricated and is herein proposed. SiC sensor diaphragms were fabricated via an ultrasonic vibration mill-grinding (UVMG method, which resulted in a small grinding force and low surface roughness. The sensor head was formed by hermetically bonding two layers of SiC using a nickel diffusion bonding method. The pressure sensor illustrated a good linearity in the range of 0.1–0.9 MPa, with a resolution of 0.27% F.S. (full scale at room temperature.

  11. Fabrication and optimization of a fiber-optic radiation sensor for proton beam dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, K.W.; Yoo, W.J.; Seo, J.K.; Heo, J.Y.; Moon, J.; Park, J.-Y.; Hwang, E.J.; Shin, D.; Park, S.-Y.; Cho, H.-S.; Lee, B.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we fabricated a fiber-optic radiation sensor for proton therapy dosimetry and measured the output and the peak-to-plateau ratio of scintillation light with various kinds of organic scintillators in order to select an organic scintillator appropriate for measuring the dose of a proton beam. For the optimization of an organic scintillator, the linearity between the light output and the stopping power of a proton beam was evaluated for two different diameters of the scintillator, and the angular dependency and standard deviation of the light pulses were investigated for four different scintillator lengths. We also evaluated the linearity between the light output and the dose rate and monitor units of a proton generator, respectively. The relative depth-dose curve of the proton beam was obtained and corrected using Birk's theory.

  12. Modeling of Distributed Sensing of Elastic Waves by Fiber-Optic Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Just Agbodjan Prince

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the transduction of strain accompanying elastic waves in solids by firmly attached optical fibers. Stretching sections of optical fibers changes the time required by guided light to pass such sections. Exploiting interferometric techniques, highly sensitive fiber-optic strain transducers are feasible based on this fiber-intrinsic effect. The impact on the actual strain conversion of the fiber segment’s shape and size, as well as its inclination to the elastic wavefront is studied. FEM analyses show that severe distortions of the interferometric response occur when the attached fiber length spans a noticeable fraction of the elastic wavelength. Analytical models of strain transduction are presented for typical transducer shapes. They are used to compute input-output relationships for the transduction of narrow-band strain pulses as a function of the mechanical wavelength. The described approach applies to many transducers depending on the distributed interaction with the investigated object.

  13. A novel fiber-optical vibration defending system with on-line intelligent identification function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huijuan; Xie, Xin; Li, Hanyu; Li, Xiaoyu; Wu, Yu; Gong, Yuan; Rao, Yunjiang

    2013-09-01

    Capacity of the sensor network is always a bottleneck problem for the novel FBG-based quasi-distributed fiberoptical defending system. In this paper, a highly sensitive sensing network with FBG vibration sensors is presented to relieve stress of the capacity and the system cost. However, higher sensitivity may cause higher Nuisance Alarm Rates (NARs) in practical uses. It is necessary to further classify the intrusion pattern or threat level and determine the validity of an unexpected event. Then an intelligent identification method is proposed by extracting the statistical features of the vibration signals in the time domain, and inputting them into a 3-layer Back-Propagation(BP) Artificial Neural Network to classify the events of interest. Experiments of both simulation and field tests are carried out to validate its effectiveness. The results show the recognition rate can be achieved up to 100% for the simulation signals and as high as 96.03% in the real tests.

  14. A Fiber-Optic System Generating Pulses of High Spectral Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, A. S.; Zolotovskii, I. O.; Korobko, D. A.; Fotiadi, A. A.

    2018-03-01

    A cascade fiber-optic system that generates pulses of high spectral density by using the effect of nonlinear spectral compression is proposed. It is demonstrated that the shape of the pulse envelope substantially influences the degree of compression of its spectrum. In so doing, maximum compression is achieved for parabolic pulses. The cascade system includes an optical fiber exhibiting normal dispersion that decreases along the fiber length, thereby ensuring that the pulse envelope evolves toward a parabolic shape, along with diffraction gratings and a fiber spectral compressor. Based on computer simulation, we determined parameters of cascade elements leading to maximum spectral density of radiation originating from a subpicosecond laser pulse of medium energy.

  15. Common-path low-coherence interferometry fiber-optic sensor guided microincision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kang; Kang, Jin U.

    2011-09-01

    We propose and demonstrate a common-path low-coherence interferometry (CP-LCI) fiber-optic sensor guided precise microincision. The method tracks the target surface and compensates the tool-to-surface relative motion with better than +/-5 μm resolution using a precision micromotor connected to the tool tip. A single-fiber distance probe integrated microdissector was used to perform an accurate 100 μm incision into the surface of an Intralipid phantom. The CP-LCI guided incision quality in terms of depth was evaluated afterwards using three-dimensional Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography imaging, which showed significant improvement of incision accuracy compared to free-hand-only operations.

  16. Improving fiber-optic laser beam delivery by incorporating GRADIUM optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, B.V.; Leong, K.H.

    1997-01-01

    The performance of a fiber-optic laser beam delivery system strongly depends on the fiber and the optics used to image the fiber face on the workpiece. We have compared off-the-shelf homogenous (BK7) and GRADIUM (axial-gradient) singlets to determine what improvement the GRADIUM offers in practice to the typical laser user. The realized benefit for this application, although significant, is much smaller than would be realized by a conventional imaging application. The figure of merit for laser-based materials processing is the 86% energy-enclosure radius, which is not directly supported by commerical ray-tracing software. Therefore empirical rules of thumb are presented to understand when GRADIUM (or any other well-corrected optics) will yield meaningful improvement to the beam delivery system. copyright 1997 Optical Society of America

  17. High-Performance BiCMOS Transimpedance Amplifiers for Fiber-Optic Receivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Touati

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available High gain, wide bandwidth, low noise, and low-power transimpedance amplifiers based on new BiCMOS common- base topologies have been designed for fiber-optic receivers. In particular a design approach, hereafter called "A more- FET approach", added a new dimension to effectively optimize performance tradeoffs inherent in such circuits. Using conventional silicon 0.8 μm process parameters, simulated performance features of a total-FET transimpedance amplifier operating at 7.2 GHz, which is close to the technology fT of 12 GHz, are presented. The results are superior to those of similar recent designs and comparable to IC designs using GaAs technology. A detailed analysis of the design architecture, including a discussion on the effects of moving toward more FET-based designs is presented.

  18. Fiber-Optic Pyrometer with Optically Powered Switch for Temperature Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Carmen; Pérez-Prieto, Sandra; López-Cardona, Juan D; Tapetado, Alberto; Blanco, Enrique; Moreno-López, Jorge; Montero, David S; Lallana, Pedro C

    2018-02-06

    We report the experimental results on a new infrared fiber-optic pyrometer for very localized and high-speed temperature measurements ranging from 170 to 530 °C using low-noise photodetectors and high-gain transimpedance amplifiers with a single gain mode in the whole temperature range. We also report a shutter based on an optical fiber switch which is optically powered to provide a reference signal in an optical fiber pyrometer measuring from 200 to 550 °C. The tests show the potential of remotely powering via optical means a 300 mW power-hungry optical switch at a distance of 100 m, avoiding any electromagnetic interference close to the measuring point.

  19. Fiber-Optic Pyrometer with Optically Powered Switch for Temperature Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Vázquez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We report the experimental results on a new infrared fiber-optic pyrometer for very localized and high-speed temperature measurements ranging from 170 to 530 °C using low-noise photodetectors and high-gain transimpedance amplifiers with a single gain mode in the whole temperature range. We also report a shutter based on an optical fiber switch which is optically powered to provide a reference signal in an optical fiber pyrometer measuring from 200 to 550 °C. The tests show the potential of remotely powering via optical means a 300 mW power-hungry optical switch at a distance of 100 m, avoiding any electromagnetic interference close to the measuring point.

  20. A review of fiber-optic corrosion sensor in civil engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Dong; Li, Junnan; Li, Yuanyuan

    2018-05-01

    Fiber-optical corrosion sensor (FOCS) is the research hotspot of corrosion monitoring sensor in recent years. It has the advantages of lightness, simplicity, anti-electromagnetic interference and distributed measurement, so it has an attractive application prospect. In this paper, the mechanism of metal corrosion is introduced. Several common methods for detecting optical fiber corrosion sensors are presented, and the latest progress of optical fiber corrosion sensors in recent years is described. We need to design a set of sensor devices that can directly monitor the corrosion of reinforcing steel bars directly, and propose a method of time dependent reliability assessment based on monitoring data, so as to form a complete research path.

  1. Radioactivity measurement of radioactive contaminated soil by using a fiber-optic radiation sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Hanyoung; Kim, Rinah; Moon, Joo Hyun

    2016-06-01

    A fiber-optic radiation sensor (FORS) was developed to measure the gamma radiation from radioactive contaminated soil. The FORS was fabricated using an inorganic scintillator (Lu,Y)2SiO5:Ce (LYSO:Ce), a mixture of epoxy resin and hardener, aluminum foil, and a plastic optical fiber. Before its real application, the FORS was tested to determine if it performed adequately. The test result showed that the measurements by the FORS adequately followed the theoretically estimated values. Then, the FORS was applied to measure the gamma radiation from radioactive contaminated soil. For comparison, a commercial radiation detector was also applied to measure the same soil samples. The measurement data were analyzed by using a statistical parameter, the critical level to determine if net radioactivity statistically different from background was present in the soil sample. The analysis showed that the soil sample had radioactivity distinguishable from background.

  2. Temperature-independent refractometer based on fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiacheng; Qiao, Xueguang; Wang, Ruohui; Rong, Qiangzhou; Bao, Weijia; Shao, Zhihua; Yang, Tingting

    2016-04-01

    A miniature fiber-optic refractometer based on Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The sensing head consists of a short section of photonics crystal fiber (PCF) spliced to a single mode fiber (SMF), in which the end-face of the PCF is etched to remove holey structure with hydrofluoric (HF) acid. A Fabry-Perot interference spectrum is achieved based on the reflections from the fusion splicing interface and the end-face of the core of PCF. The interference fringe is sensitive to the external refractive index (RI) with an intensity-referenced sensitivity of 358.27 dB/RIU ranging from 1.33 to 1.38. The sensor has also been implemented for the concentration measurement of λ-phage DNA solution. In addition, the dip intensity is insensitive to the ambient temperature variation, making it a good candidate for temperature-independent bio-sensing area.

  3. Fiber-optic Michelson interferometer fixed in a tilted tube for direction-dependent ultrasonic detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Tingting; Hu, Manli; Qiao, Xueguang; Li, JiaCheng; Shao, Zhihua; Tong, Rongxin; Rong, Qiangzhou

    2017-01-01

    A fiber-optic interferometer is proposed and demonstrated experimentally for ultrasonic detection. The sensor consists of a compact Michelson interferometer (MI), which is fixed in a tilted-tube end-face (45°). Thin gold films are used for the reflective coatings of two arms and one of the interference arms is etched serving as the sensing arm. The spectral sideband filter technique is used to interrogate the continuous and pulse ultrasonic signals (with frequency of 300 KHz). Furthermore, because of the asymmetrical structure of the sensor, it presents strong direction-dependent ultrasonic sensitivity, such that the sensor can be considered a vector detector. The experimental results show that the sensor is highly sensitive to ultrasonic signals, and thus it can be a candidate for ultrasonic imaging of seismic physical models.

  4. Mach-Zehnder Fiber-Optic Links for Reaction History Measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, E. Kirk; Herrmann, H.W.; Stoeffl, W.; Horsfield, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    We present the details of the analog fiber-optic data link that will be used in the chamber-mounted Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) located at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory in Livermore, California. The system is based on Mach-Zehnder (MZ) modulators integrated into the diagnostic, with the source lasers and bias control electronics located remotely to protect the active electronics. A complete recording system for a single GRH channel comprises two MZ modulators, with the fiber signals split onto four channels on a single digitizer. By carefully selecting the attenuation, the photoreceiver, and the digitizer settings, the dynamic range achievable is greater than 1000:1 at the full system bandwidth of greater than 10 GHz. The system is designed to minimize electrical reflections and mitigate the effects of transient radiation darkening on the fibers.

  5. Fiber-optic dipping liquid analyzer: theoretical and experimental study of light transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Ai; Liu Zhihai; Yuan Libo

    2009-01-01

    A fiber-optic dipping liquid analyzer (FDLA) is developed for measuring liquid properties such as concentration, refractive index, surface tension, and viscosity. An important feature of the FDLA is that a liquid drop is introduced on the end face of a fiber probe, and the drop can be regarded as a planar-convex lens. The light transmitting path and receiving power are affected by the refractive index of the liquid drop. We present a theoretical and experimental analysis of the light transmission. A mathematical model of receiving power is established based on paraxial refraction imaging and fiber reflective intensity modulation methods. Sucrose-water solutions were tested with the FDLA. The experimental results agree well with the theoretical analysis.

  6. Photonic Beamformer Model Based on Analog Fiber-Optic Links’ Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, V A; Gordeev, D A; Ivanov, S I; Lavrov, A P; Saenko, I I

    2016-01-01

    The model of photonic beamformer for wideband microwave phased array antenna is investigated. The main features of the photonic beamformer model based on true-time-delay technique, DWDM technology and fiber chromatic dispersion are briefly analyzed. The performance characteristics of the key components of photonic beamformer for phased array antenna in the receive mode are examined. The beamformer model composed of the components available on the market of fiber-optic analog communication links is designed and tentatively investigated. Experimental demonstration of the designed model beamforming features includes actual measurement of 5-element microwave linear array antenna far-field patterns in 6-16 GHz frequency range for antenna pattern steering up to 40°. The results of experimental testing show good accordance with the calculation estimates. (paper)

  7. Fast-adaptive fiber-optic sensor for ultra-small vibration and deformation measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romashko, R V; Girolamo, S Di; Kulchin, Y N; Launay, J C; Kamshilin, A A

    2007-01-01

    Adaptive fiber-optic interferometer measuring system based on a dynamic hologram recorded in photorefractive CdTe crystal without applying an external electric field is developed. Vectorial mixing of two waves with different polarizations in the anisotropic diffraction geometry allows for the realization of linear regime of phase demodulation at the diffusion hologram. High sensitivity of the interferometer is achieved due to recording of the hologram in reflection geometry at high spatial frequencies in a crystal with sufficient concentration of photorefractive centers. The sensitivity obtained makes possible a broadband detection of ultra-small vibrations with amplitude of less then 0.1 nm. High cut-off frequency of the interferometer achieved using low-power light sources due to fast response of CdTe crystal allows one to eliminate temperature fluctuations and other industrial noises

  8. Highly stable families of soliton molecules in fiber-optic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moubissi, A.-B.; Tchofo Dinda, P.; Nse Biyoghe, S.

    2018-04-01

    We develop an efficient approach to the design of families of single solitons and soliton molecules most suited to a given fiber system. The obtained solitonic entities exhibit very high stability, with a robustness which allows them to propagate over thousands of kilometers and to survive collisions with other solitonic entities. Our approach enables the generation of a large number of solitonic entities, including families of single solitons and two-soliton molecules, which can be distinguished sufficiently by their respective profiles or energy levels, and so can be easily identifiable and detectable without ambiguity. We discuss the possible use of such solitonic entities as symbols of a multi-level modulation format in fiber-optic communication systems.

  9. Investigation of aquifer-estuary interaction using wavelet analysis of fiber-optic temperature data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, R.D.; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Harvey, Charles F.

    2009-01-01

    Fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FODTS) provides sub-minute temporal and meter-scale spatial resolution over kilometer-long cables. Compared to conventional thermistor or thermocouple-based technologies, which measure temperature at discrete (and commonly sparse) locations, FODTS offers nearly continuous spatial coverage, thus providing hydrologic information at spatiotemporal scales previously impossible. Large and information-rich FODTS datasets, however, pose challenges for data exploration and analysis. To date, FODTS analyses have focused on time-series variance as the means to discriminate between hydrologic phenomena. Here, we demonstrate the continuous wavelet transform (CWT) and cross-wavelet transform (XWT) to analyze FODTS in the context of related hydrologic time series. We apply the CWT and XWT to data from Waquoit Bay, Massachusetts to identify the location and timing of tidal pumping of submarine groundwater.

  10. In situ investigation of catalysts for alcohol synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duchstein, Linus Daniel Leonhard; Sharafutdinov, Irek; Wu, Qiongxiao

    consists of three complimentary in situ techniques: (1) Activity measurements based on a reactor connected to a gas chromatograph (GC), (2) In situ x-ray diffractometer (XRD) measurements based on a reactor cell connected to a mass spectrometer (MS), and (3) environmental TEM (ETEM) that allows...... distribution, measured both macroscopically (XRD) and microscopically (ETEM), with the catalytic activity....

  11. Achievable Information Rates for Coded Modulation With Hard Decision Decoding for Coherent Fiber-Optic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Alireza; Amat, Alexandre Graell i.; Liva, Gianluigi

    2017-12-01

    We analyze the achievable information rates (AIRs) for coded modulation schemes with QAM constellations with both bit-wise and symbol-wise decoders, corresponding to the case where a binary code is used in combination with a higher-order modulation using the bit-interleaved coded modulation (BICM) paradigm and to the case where a nonbinary code over a field matched to the constellation size is used, respectively. In particular, we consider hard decision decoding, which is the preferable option for fiber-optic communication systems where decoding complexity is a concern. Recently, Liga \\emph{et al.} analyzed the AIRs for bit-wise and symbol-wise decoders considering what the authors called \\emph{hard decision decoder} which, however, exploits \\emph{soft information} of the transition probabilities of discrete-input discrete-output channel resulting from the hard detection. As such, the complexity of the decoder is essentially the same as the complexity of a soft decision decoder. In this paper, we analyze instead the AIRs for the standard hard decision decoder, commonly used in practice, where the decoding is based on the Hamming distance metric. We show that if standard hard decision decoding is used, bit-wise decoders yield significantly higher AIRs than symbol-wise decoders. As a result, contrary to the conclusion by Liga \\emph{et al.}, binary decoders together with the BICM paradigm are preferable for spectrally-efficient fiber-optic systems. We also design binary and nonbinary staircase codes and show that, in agreement with the AIRs, binary codes yield better performance.

  12. Raman fiber-optical method for colon cancer detection: Cross-validation and outlier identification approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, D.; Naveed, P.; Ragheb, A.; Niedieker, D.; El-Mashtoly, S. F.; Brechmann, T.; Kötting, C.; Schmiegel, W. H.; Freier, E.; Pox, C.; Gerwert, K.

    2017-06-01

    Endoscopy plays a major role in early recognition of cancer which is not externally accessible and therewith in increasing the survival rate. Raman spectroscopic fiber-optical approaches can help to decrease the impact on the patient, increase objectivity in tissue characterization, reduce expenses and provide a significant time advantage in endoscopy. In gastroenterology an early recognition of malign and precursor lesions is relevant. Instantaneous and precise differentiation between adenomas as precursor lesions for cancer and hyperplastic polyps on the one hand and between high and low-risk alterations on the other hand is important. Raman fiber-optical measurements of colon biopsy samples taken during colonoscopy were carried out during a clinical study, and samples of adenocarcinoma (22), tubular adenomas (141), hyperplastic polyps (79) and normal tissue (101) from 151 patients were analyzed. This allows us to focus on the bioinformatic analysis and to set stage for Raman endoscopic measurements. Since spectral differences between normal and cancerous biopsy samples are small, special care has to be taken in data analysis. Using a leave-one-patient-out cross-validation scheme, three different outlier identification methods were investigated to decrease the influence of systematic errors, like a residual risk in misplacement of the sample and spectral dilution of marker bands (esp. cancerous tissue) and therewith optimize the experimental design. Furthermore other validations methods like leave-one-sample-out and leave-one-spectrum-out cross-validation schemes were compared with leave-one-patient-out cross-validation. High-risk lesions were differentiated from low-risk lesions with a sensitivity of 79%, specificity of 74% and an accuracy of 77%, cancer and normal tissue with a sensitivity of 79%, specificity of 83% and an accuracy of 81%. Additionally applied outlier identification enabled us to improve the recognition of neoplastic biopsy samples.

  13. Pharyngeal Residue Severity Rating Scales Based on Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Paul D; Hersey, Denise P; Leder, Steven B

    2016-06-01

    Identification of pharyngeal residue severity located in the valleculae and pyriform sinuses has always been a primary goal during fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES). Pharyngeal residue is a clinical sign of potential prandial aspiration making an accurate description of its severity an important but difficult challenge. A reliable, validated, and generalizable pharyngeal residue severity rating scale for FEES would be beneficial. A systematic review of the published English language literature since 1995 was conducted to determine the quality of existing pharyngeal residue severity rating scales based on FEES. Databases were searched using controlled vocabulary words and synonymous free text words for topics of interest (deglutition disorders, pharyngeal residue, endoscopy, videofluoroscopy, fiberoptic technology, aspiration, etc.) and outcomes of interest (scores, scales, grades, tests, FEES, etc.). Search strategies were adjusted for syntax appropriate for each database/platform. Data sources included MEDLINE (OvidSP 1946-April Week 3 2015), Embase (OvidSP 1974-2015 April 20), Scopus (Elsevier), and the unindexed material in PubMed (NLM/NIH) were searched for relevant articles. Supplementary efforts to identify studies included checking reference lists of articles retrieved. Scales were compared using qualitative properties (sample size, severity definitions, number of raters, and raters' experience and training) and psychometric analyses (randomization, intra- and inter-rater reliability, and construct validity). Seven articles describing pharyngeal residue severity rating scales met inclusion criteria. Six of seven scales had insufficient data to support their use as evidenced by methodological weaknesses with both qualitative properties and psychometric analyses. There is a need for qualitative and psychometrically reliable, validated, and generalizable pharyngeal residue severity rating scales that are anatomically specific, image

  14. Focus scanning with feedback control for fiber-optic nonlinear endomicroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ang; Liang, Wenxuan; Li, Xingde

    2017-02-01

    Fiber-optic nonlinear endomicroscopy represents a strong promise to enable translation of nonlinear microscopy technologies to in vivo applications, particularly imaging of internal organs. Two-dimensional imaging beam scanning has been accomplished by using fiber-optic scanners or MEMS scanners. Yet nonlinear endomicroscopy still cannot perform rapid and reliable depth or focus scanning while maintaining a small form factor. Shape memory alloy (SMA) wire had shown promise in extending 2D endoscopic imaging to the third dimension. By Joule heating, the SMA wire would contract and move the endomicroscope optics to change beam focus. However, this method suffered from hysteresis, and was susceptible to change in ambient temperature, making it difficult to achieve accurate and reliable depth scanning. Here we present a feedback-controlled SMA actuator which addressed these challenges. The core of the feedback loop was a Hall effect sensor. By measuring the magnetic flux density from a tiny magnet attached to the SMA wire, contraction distance of the SMA wire could be tracked in real time. The distance was then fed to the PID algorithm running in a microprocessor, which computed the error between the command position and the current position of the actuator. The current running through the SMA wire was adjusted accordingly. Our feedback-controlled SMA actuator had a tube-like shape with outer diameter of 5.5 mm and length of 25 mm, and was designed to house the endomicroscope inside. Initial test showed that it allowed more than 300 microns of travel distance, with an average positioning error of less than 2 microns. 3D imaging experiments with the endomicroscope is underway, and its imaging performance will be assessed and discussed.

  15. In-vivo fluorescence detection of breast cancer growth factor receptors by fiber-optic probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Gilbert; Wang, Bingzhi; DeLuna, Frank; Sun, LuZhe; Ye, Jing Yong

    2018-02-01

    Breast cancer treatment options often include medications that target the overexpression of growth factor receptors, such as the proto-oncogene human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to suppress the abnormal growth of cancerous cells and induce cancer regression. Although effective, certain treatments are toxic to vital organs, and demand assurance that the pursued receptor is present at the tumor before administration of the drug. This requires diagnostic tools to provide tumor molecular signatures, as well as locational information. In this study, we utilized a fiber-optic probe to characterize in vivo HER2 and EGFR overexpressed tumors through the fluorescence of targeted dyes. HER2 and EGFR antibodies were conjugated with ICG-Sulfo-OSu and Alexa Fluor 680, respectively, to tag BT474 (HER2+) and MDA-MB-468 (EGFR+) tumors. The fiber was inserted into the samples via a 30-gauge needle. Different wavelengths of a supercontinuum laser were selected to couple into the fiber and excite the corresponding fluorophores in the samples. The fluorescence from the dyes was collected through the same fiber and quantified by a time-correlated single photon counter. Fluorescence at different antibody-dye concentrations was measured for calibration. Mice with subcutaneous HER2+ and/or EGFR+ tumors received intravenous injections of the conjugates and were later probed at the tumor sites. The measured fluorescence was used to distinguish between tumor types and to calculate the concentration of the antibody-dye conjugates, which were detectable at levels as low as 40 nM. The fiber-optic probe presents a minimally invasive instrument to characterize the molecular signatures of breast cancer in vivo.

  16. Raman fiber-optical method for colon cancer detection: Cross-validation and outlier identification approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, D; Naveed, P; Ragheb, A; Niedieker, D; El-Mashtoly, S F; Brechmann, T; Kötting, C; Schmiegel, W H; Freier, E; Pox, C; Gerwert, K

    2017-06-15

    Endoscopy plays a major role in early recognition of cancer which is not externally accessible and therewith in increasing the survival rate. Raman spectroscopic fiber-optical approaches can help to decrease the impact on the patient, increase objectivity in tissue characterization, reduce expenses and provide a significant time advantage in endoscopy. In gastroenterology an early recognition of malign and precursor lesions is relevant. Instantaneous and precise differentiation between adenomas as precursor lesions for cancer and hyperplastic polyps on the one hand and between high and low-risk alterations on the other hand is important. Raman fiber-optical measurements of colon biopsy samples taken during colonoscopy were carried out during a clinical study, and samples of adenocarcinoma (22), tubular adenomas (141), hyperplastic polyps (79) and normal tissue (101) from 151 patients were analyzed. This allows us to focus on the bioinformatic analysis and to set stage for Raman endoscopic measurements. Since spectral differences between normal and cancerous biopsy samples are small, special care has to be taken in data analysis. Using a leave-one-patient-out cross-validation scheme, three different outlier identification methods were investigated to decrease the influence of systematic errors, like a residual risk in misplacement of the sample and spectral dilution of marker bands (esp. cancerous tissue) and therewith optimize the experimental design. Furthermore other validations methods like leave-one-sample-out and leave-one-spectrum-out cross-validation schemes were compared with leave-one-patient-out cross-validation. High-risk lesions were differentiated from low-risk lesions with a sensitivity of 79%, specificity of 74% and an accuracy of 77%, cancer and normal tissue with a sensitivity of 79%, specificity of 83% and an accuracy of 81%. Additionally applied outlier identification enabled us to improve the recognition of neoplastic biopsy samples. Copyright

  17. Inspection of the nasopharynx prior to fiberoptic-guided nasotracheal intubation reduces the risk epistaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Min A; Song, Jaegyok; Kim, Seokkon; Ji, Seong-Mi; Bae, Jeongho

    2016-08-01

    Various complications may occur during nasotracheal intubation. This may include epistaxis and damage to the nasopharyngeal airway. We tested the hypothesis that the use of fiberoptic bronchoscopy (FOB)-guided intubation is superior to endotracheal tube (ETT) obturated with an inflated esophageal stethoscope. Patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups (n=22 each): either an FOB-guided intubation group or ETT obturated with an inflated esophageal stethoscope group. After the induction of general anesthesia, patients in the FOB group received an FOB inspection through the nostril without advancement of ETT. Then, after confirming the placement of the bronchoscope tip in the trachea, the lubricated ETT was advanced via the nostril to the trachea along the bronchoscope. In the obturated ETT insertion group, the proximal opening of the ETT was blunted with an inflated esophageal stethoscope. The ETT was inserted into the selected nostril and advanced blindly into the posterior oropharynx. Then, the esophageal stethoscope was removed and tracheal intubation was performed with the bronchoscope. The number of attempts for successful tracheal intubation, the degree of difficulty during insertion, and bleeding during bronchoscopy were recorded. Another anesthesiologist, blinded to the intubation method, estimated the severity of epistaxis 5minutes after the intubation and postoperative complications. The FOB group had significantly less epistaxis during bronchoscopy, better navigability, and fewer intubation attempts and redirections. Fiberoptic-guided nasotracheal intubation was associated with less epistaxis. It also showed better navigability and less redirection rate. Therefore, FOB as an intubation guide is superior to ETT with an inflated esophageal stethoscope when intubating a patient via the nasotracheal route. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Solar radiative heating of fiber-optic cables used to monitor temperatures in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, Bethany T.; Hatch, Christine E.; Ban, Heng; Tyler, Scott W.

    2010-08-01

    In recent years, applications of distributed temperature sensing (DTS) have increased in number and diversity. Because fiber-optic cables used for DTS are typically sheathed in dark UV-resistant materials, the question arises as to how shortwave solar radiation penetrating a water column influences the accuracy of absolute DTS-derived temperatures in aquatic applications. To quantify these effects, we completed a modeling effort that accounts for the effects of radiation and convection on a submersed cable to predict when solar heating may be important. Results indicate that for cables installed at shallow depths in clear, low-velocity water bodies, measurable heating of the cable is likely during peak solar radiation. However, at higher velocities, increased turbidity and/or greater depths, the effects of solar heating are immeasurable. A field study illustrated the effects of solar radiation by installing two types of fiber-optic cable at multiple water depths (from 0.05 to 0.8 m) in the center and along the sidewall of a trapezoidal canal. Thermistors were installed at similar depths and shielded from solar radiation to record absolute water temperatures. During peak radiation, thermistor data showed small temperature differences (˜0.003°C-0.04°C) between depths suggesting minor thermal stratification in the canal center. DTS data from cables at these same depths show differences of 0.01°C-0.17°C. The DTS differences cannot be explained by stratification alone and are likely evidence of additional heating from solar radiation. Sidewall thermistor strings also recorded stratification. However, corresponding DTS data suggested that bed conduction overwhelmed the effects of solar radiation.

  19. Videolaryngoscopy versus Fiber-optic Intubation through a Supraglottic Airway in Children with a Difficult Airway: An Analysis from the Multicenter Pediatric Difficult Intubation Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burjek, Nicholas E; Nishisaki, Akira; Fiadjoe, John E; Adams, H Daniel; Peeples, Kenneth N; Raman, Vidya T; Olomu, Patrick N; Kovatsis, Pete G; Jagannathan, Narasimhan; Hunyady, Agnes; Bosenberg, Adrian; Tham, See; Low, Daniel; Hopkins, Paul; Glover, Chris; Olutoye, Olutoyin; Szmuk, Peter; McCloskey, John; Dalesio, Nicholas; Koka, Rahul; Greenberg, Robert; Watkins, Scott; Patel, Vikram; Reynolds, Paul; Matuszczak, Maria; Jain, Ranu; Khalil, Samia; Polaner, David; Zieg, Jennifer; Szolnoki, Judit; Sathyamoorthy, Kumar; Taicher, Brad; Riveros Perez, N Ricardo; Bhattacharya, Solmaletha; Bhalla, Tarun; Stricker, Paul; Lockman, Justin; Galvez, Jorge; Rehman, Mohamed; Von Ungern-Sternberg, Britta; Sommerfield, David; Soneru, Codruta; Chiao, Franklin; Richtsfeld, Martina; Belani, Kumar; Sarmiento, Lina; Mireles, Sam; Bilen Rosas, Guelay; Park, Raymond; Peyton, James

    2017-09-01

    The success rates and related complications of various techniques for intubation in children with difficult airways remain unknown. The primary aim of this study is to compare the success rates of fiber-optic intubation via supraglottic airway to videolaryngoscopy in children with difficult airways. Our secondary aim is to compare the complication rates of these techniques. Observational data were collected from 14 sites after management of difficult pediatric airways. Patient age, intubation technique, success per attempt, use of continuous ventilation, and complications were recorded for each case. First-attempt success and complications were compared in subjects managed with fiber-optic intubation via supraglottic airway and videolaryngoscopy. Fiber-optic intubation via supraglottic airway and videolaryngoscopy had similar first-attempt success rates (67 of 114, 59% vs. 404 of 786, 51%; odds ratio 1.35; 95% CI, 0.91 to 2.00; P = 0.16). In subjects less than 1 yr old, fiber-optic intubation via supraglottic airway was more successful on the first attempt than videolaryngoscopy (19 of 35, 54% vs. 79 of 220, 36%; odds ratio, 2.12; 95% CI, 1.04 to 4.31; P = 0.042). Complication rates were similar in the two groups (20 vs. 13%; P = 0.096). The incidence of hypoxemia was lower when continuous ventilation through the supraglottic airway was used throughout the fiber-optic intubation attempt. In this nonrandomized study, first-attempt success rates were similar for fiber-optic intubation via supraglottic airway and videolaryngoscopy. Fiber-optic intubation via supraglottic airway is associated with higher first-attempt success than videolaryngoscopy in infants with difficult airways. Continuous ventilation through the supraglottic airway during fiber-optic intubation attempts may lower the incidence of hypoxemia.

  20. Halogen speciation in volcanic plumes - Development of compact denuder sampling techniques with in-situ derivatization followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and their application at Mt. Etna, Mt. Nyiragongo and Mt. Nyamulagira in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüdiger, Julian; Bobrowski, Nicole; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    products. The diffusion denuder technique allows sampling of gaseous compounds exclusively without collecting particulate matter. Solvent elution of the derivatized analytes and subsequent analysis with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry gives a limit of detection below 1 ng of bromine. The method was applied in 2015 on volcanic gas plumes at Mt. Etna (Italy), Mt. Nyiragongo and Mt. Nyamulagira (DR Congo) giving reactive bromine mixing ratios from 0.3 ppb (Nyiragongo) up to 22 ppb (Etna, NEC). Compared with total halogen data derived by alkaline trap sampling (Raschig-tube) and ion-chromatography analysis the reactive bromine mixing ratios allow the investigation of the conversion of HBr into reactive species due to plume chemistry with progressing plume age. The new method will be described in detail and the first results on the reactive halogen to total halogen output will be discussed (for bromine and chlorine) and compared to earlier volcanic plume chemistry model studies. References Bobrowski, N. and G. Giuffrida: Bromine monoxide / sulphur dioxide ratios in relation to volcanological observations at Mt. Etna 2006-2009. Solid Earth, 3, 433-445, 2012 Bobrowski, N., R. von Glasow, A. Aiuppa, S. Inguaggiato, I. Louban, O. W. Ibrahim and U. Platt: Reactive halogen chemistry in volcanic plumes. J. Geophys. Res., 112, 2007 Donovan A., V. Tsanev, C. Oppenheimer and M. Edmonds: Reactive halogens (BrO and OClO) detected in the plume of Soufrière Hills Volcano during an eruption hiatus. Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 15, 3346-3363, 2014 Rüdiger, J., N. Bobrowski, T. Hoffmann (2015), Development and application of compact denuder sampling techniques with in situ derivatization followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for halogen speciation in volcanic plumes (EGU2015-2392-2), EGU General Assembly 2015

  1. A 15-meter Multi-Gigabit W-band Bidirectional Wireless Bridge in Fiber-Optic Access Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pang, Xiaodan; Vegas Olmos, Juan José; Lebedev, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    . The down-converted signal is re-modulated on to the lightwave and transmit further through the fiber-optic system. In the uplink, both up-and down-conversion are performed by electrical means. Furthermore, we investigate both passive and active wireless transmitters in this work for both downlink......We present a bidirectional wireless bridge in the W-band enabling the seamless convergence between the wireless and fiber-optic access networks. In the downlink, a 16 Gbit/s QPSK signal is photonically up-converted at the wireless transmitter and electrically down-converted at the wireless receiver...... and uplink transmissions. With an active wireless transmitter, up to 15 meters wireless transmission is successfully achieved with a BER below the 7% FEC limit in the downlink....

  2. Analysis and Design of a Fiber-optic Probe for DNA Sensors Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1147-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molau, Nicole [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vail, Curtis [Accu.Photonics, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2018-01-24

    In 1995, a challenge in the field of genetics dealt with the acquisition of efficient DNA sequencing techniques for reading the 3 billion base-pairs that comprised the human genome. AccuPhotonics, Inc. proposed to develop and manufacture a state-of-the-art near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) fiber-optic probe that was expected to increase probe efficiency by two orders of magnitude over the existing state-of-the-art and to improve resolution to 10Å. The detailed design calculation and optimization of electrical properties of the fiber-optic probe tip geometry would be performed at LLNL, using existing finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) electromagnetic (EM) codes.

  3. Robotic arm design for a remotely-deployed, in situ waste characterization probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kress, R.L.; Jansen, J.F.; Haas, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes some design considerations for a system which will combine robotics and laser spectroscopy to produce an in situ monitoring system for heterogeneous waste materials. The new system will provide faster, cheaper, safer, and more complete characterization of mixed solids and liquids stored in tanks and drums or buried in pits. A small, fiberoptic multiprobe that performs Raman and fluorescence measurements of wastes composed of a variety of organic and inorganic compounds will be described. Design considerations for a novel sensor platform that positions and stabilizes the multiprobe relative to the sampling point in order to make accurate spectroscopic measurements and deploys the sensor in hazardous environments with minimal risk to workers will be presented. The core of the platform will be a 3-Degrees-Of-Freedom (3-DOF), spherical coordinate end effector equipped with a proximity sensor that compensates for errors introduced by the flexible nature of the support arm. The platform can be adapted to operate the most robotic deployment systems used in hazardous environments. The multisensor probe will be coupled to remote, portable laser spectrometer systems by a fiber-optic bundle. 5 refs

  4. Robotic arm design for a remotely-deployed, in situ waste characterization probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kress, Reid; Haas, John; Jansen, John

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes some design considerations for a system which will combine robotics and laser spectroscopy to produce an in situ monitoring system for heterogeneous waste materials. The new system will provide faster, cheaper) safer, and more complete characterization of mixed solids and liquids stored in tanks and drums or buried in pits. A small, fiberoptic multiprobe that performs Raman and fluorescence measurements of wastes composed of a variety of organic and inorganic compounds will be described. Design considerations for a novel sensor platform that positions and stabilizes the multiprobe relative to the sampling point in order to male accurate spectroscopic measurements and deploys the sensor in hazardous environments with minimal risk to workers will be presented. The core of (he platform will be a 3-Degrees-Of-Freedom (3-DOF), spherical coordinate end effector equipped with a proximity sensor that compensates for errors introduced by the flexible nature of the support arm. The platform can be adapted to operate with most robotic deployment systems used in hazardous environments. The multisensor probe will be coupled to remote, portable laser spectrometer systems by a fiber-optic bundle. (author)

  5. Follow-up after stent insertion in the tracheobronchial tree: role of helical computed tomography in comparison with fiberoptic bronchoscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferretti, G.R.; Kocier, M.; Calaque, O.; Coulomb, M. [Service Central de Radiologie et Imagerie Medicale, INSERM EMI 9924, CHU, BP 217, 38043, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Arbib, F.; Pison, C. [Departement de Medecine Aigue Specialisee (DMAS), CHU Grenoble, CHU, BP 217, 38043, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Righini, C. [Service d' Oto Rhino Laryngologie, CHU Grenoble, BP 217, 38043, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2003-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare helical CT with fiberoptic bronchoscopy findings to appraise the medium-term results of proximal-airways stenting. Twenty-five patients with 28 endobronchial metallic stents inserted for local advanced malignancy (n=13) or benign diseases (n=12) underwent follow-up CT from 3 days to 50 months (mean 8 months). All studies were obtained using helical CT with subsequent multiplanar reformation and three-dimensional reconstruction including virtual bronchoscopy. The location, shape, and patency of stents and adjacent airway were assessed. The results of CT were compared with the results of fiberoptic bronchoscopy obtained with a mean delay of 2.5 days (SD 9 days) after CT scan. Twelve stents (43%) remained in their original position, patent and without deformity. Sixteen stents were associated with local complications: migration (n=6); external compression with persistent stenosis (n=4); local recurrence of malignancy (n=4); fracture (n=1); and non-congruence between the airway and the stent (n=1). The CT demonstrated all the significant abnormalities demonstrated at fiberoptic bronchoscopy except two moderate stenoses (20%) related to granulomata at the origin of the stent. Ten of 14 stents inserted for benign conditions were without complications as compared with 2 of 14 in malignant conditions (p=0.008). Computed tomography is an accurate noninvasive method for evaluating endobronchial stents. The CT is a useful technique for follow-up of patients who have undergone endobronchial stenting. (orig.)

  6. Follow-up after stent insertion in the tracheobronchial tree: role of helical computed tomography in comparison with fiberoptic bronchoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferretti, G.R.; Kocier, M.; Calaque, O.; Coulomb, M.; Arbib, F.; Pison, C.; Righini, C.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare helical CT with fiberoptic bronchoscopy findings to appraise the medium-term results of proximal-airways stenting. Twenty-five patients with 28 endobronchial metallic stents inserted for local advanced malignancy (n=13) or benign diseases (n=12) underwent follow-up CT from 3 days to 50 months (mean 8 months). All studies were obtained using helical CT with subsequent multiplanar reformation and three-dimensional reconstruction including virtual bronchoscopy. The location, shape, and patency of stents and adjacent airway were assessed. The results of CT were compared with the results of fiberoptic bronchoscopy obtained with a mean delay of 2.5 days (SD 9 days) after CT scan. Twelve stents (43%) remained in their original position, patent and without deformity. Sixteen stents were associated with local complications: migration (n=6); external compression with persistent stenosis (n=4); local recurrence of malignancy (n=4); fracture (n=1); and non-congruence between the airway and the stent (n=1). The CT demonstrated all the significant abnormalities demonstrated at fiberoptic bronchoscopy except two moderate stenoses (20%) related to granulomata at the origin of the stent. Ten of 14 stents inserted for benign conditions were without complications as compared with 2 of 14 in malignant conditions (p=0.008). Computed tomography is an accurate noninvasive method for evaluating endobronchial stents. The CT is a useful technique for follow-up of patients who have undergone endobronchial stenting. (orig.)

  7. Identification of nodal tissue in the living heart using rapid scanning fiber-optics confocal microscopy and extracellular fluorophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Kaza, Aditya K; Hitchcock, Robert W; Sachse, Frank B

    2013-09-01

    Risks associated with pediatric reconstructive heart surgery include injury of the sinoatrial node (SAN) and atrioventricular node (AVN), requiring cardiac rhythm management using implantable pacemakers. These injuries are the result of difficulties in identifying nodal tissues intraoperatively. Here we describe an approach based on confocal microscopy and extracellular fluorophores to quantify tissue microstructure and identify nodal tissue. Using conventional 3-dimensional confocal microscopy we investigated the microstructural arrangement of SAN, AVN, and atrial working myocardium (AWM) in fixed rat heart. AWM exhibited a regular striated arrangement of the extracellular space. In contrast, SAN and AVN had an irregular, reticulated arrangement. AWM, SAN, and AVN tissues were beneath a thin surface layer of tissue that did not obstruct confocal microscopic imaging. Subsequently, we imaged tissues in living rat hearts with real-time fiber-optics confocal microscopy. Fiber-optics confocal microscopy images resembled images acquired with conventional confocal microscopy. We investigated spatial regularity of tissue microstructure from Fourier analysis and second-order image moments. Fourier analysis of fiber-optics confocal microscopy images showed that the spatial regularity of AWM was greater than that of nodal tissues (37.5 ± 5.0% versus 24.3 ± 3.9% for SAN and 23.8 ± 3.7% for AVN; Pfiber-optics confocal microscopy. Application of the approach in pediatric reconstructive heart surgery may reduce risks of injuring nodal tissues.

  8. Implantable fiber-optic interface for parallel multisite long-term optical dynamic brain interrogation in freely moving mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronina-Amitonova, L. V.; Fedotov, I. V.; Ivashkina, O. I.; Zots, M. A.; Fedotov, A. B.; Anokhin, K. V.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Seeing the big picture of functional responses within large neural networks in a freely functioning brain is crucial for understanding the cellular mechanisms behind the higher nervous activity, including the most complex brain functions, such as cognition and memory. As a breakthrough toward meeting this challenge, implantable fiber-optic interfaces integrating advanced optogenetic technologies and cutting-edge fiber-optic solutions have been demonstrated, enabling a long-term optogenetic manipulation of neural circuits in freely moving mice. Here, we show that a specifically designed implantable fiber-optic interface provides a powerful tool for parallel long-term optical interrogation of distinctly separate, functionally different sites in the brain of freely moving mice. This interface allows the same groups of neurons lying deeply in the brain of a freely behaving mouse to be reproducibly accessed and optically interrogated over many weeks, providing a long-term dynamic detection of genome activity in response to a broad variety of pharmacological and physiological stimuli. PMID:24253232

  9. Fiberoptic intubation through laryngeal mask airway for management of difficult airway in a child with Klippel-Feil syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Bhat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ideal airway management modality in pediatric patients with syndromes like Klippel-Feil syndrome is a great challenge and is technically difficult for an anesthesiologist. Half of the patients present with the classic triad of short neck, low hairline, and fusion of cervical vertebra. Numerous associated anomalies like scoliosis or kyphosis, cleft palate, respiratory problems, deafness, genitourinary abnormalities, Sprengel′s deformity (wherein the scapulae ride high on the back, synkinesia, cervical ribs, and congenital heart diseases may further add to the difficulty. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy alone can be technically difficult and patient cooperation also becomes very important, which is difficult in pediatric patients. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy with the aid of supraglottic airway devices is a viable alternative in the management of difficult airway in children. We report a case of Klippel-Feil syndrome in an 18-month-old girl posted for cleft palate surgery. Imaging of spine revealed complete fusion of the cervical vertebrae with hypoplastic C3 and C6 vertebrae and thoracic kyphosis. We successfully managed airway in this patient by fiberoptic intubation through classic laryngeal mask airway (LMA. After intubation, we used second smaller endotracheal tube (ETT to stabilize and elongate the first ETT while removing the LMA.

  10. Measuring a Fiber-Optic Delay Line Using a Mode-Locked Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Meirong; McKee, Michael R.; Pak, Kyung S.; Yu, Nan

    2010-01-01

    The figure schematically depicts a laboratory setup for determining the optical length of a fiber-optic delay line at a precision greater than that obtainable by use of optical time-domain reflectometry or of mechanical measurement of length during the delay-line-winding process. In this setup, the delay line becomes part of the resonant optical cavity that governs the frequency of oscillation of a mode-locked laser. The length can then be determined from frequency-domain measurements, as described below. The laboratory setup is basically an all-fiber ring laser in which the delay line constitutes part of the ring. Another part of the ring - the laser gain medium - is an erbium-doped fiber amplifier pumped by a diode laser at a wavelength of 980 nm. The loop also includes an optical isolator, two polarization controllers, and a polarizing beam splitter. The optical isolator enforces unidirectional lasing. The polarization beam splitter allows light in only one polarization mode to pass through the ring; light in the orthogonal polarization mode is rejected from the ring and utilized as a diagnostic output, which is fed to an optical spectrum analyzer and a photodetector. The photodetector output is fed to a radio-frequency spectrum analyzer and an oscilloscope. The fiber ring laser can generate continuous-wave radiation in non-mode-locked operation or ultrashort optical pulses in mode-locked operation. The mode-locked operation exhibited by this ring is said to be passive in the sense that no electro-optical modulator or other active optical component is used to achieve it. Passive mode locking is achieved by exploiting optical nonlinearity of passive components in such a manner as to obtain ultra-short optical pulses. In this setup, the particular nonlinear optical property exploited to achieve passive mode locking is nonlinear polarization rotation. This or any ring laser can support oscillation in multiple modes as long as sufficient gain is present to overcome

  11. In-plane ultrasonic needle tracking using a fiber-optic hydrophone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Wenfeng, E-mail: wenfeng.xia@ucl.ac.uk; Desjardins, Adrien E. [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Mari, Jean Martial [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom and GePaSud, University of French Polynesia, Faa’a 98702, French Polynesia (France); West, Simeon J. [Department of Anaesthesia, University College Hospital, Main Theatres, Maple Bridge Link Corridor, Podium 3, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Ginsberg, Yuval; David, Anna L. [Institute for Women’s Health, University College London, 86-96 Chenies Mews, London WC1E 6HX (United Kingdom); Ourselin, Sebastien [Center for Medical Imaging Computing, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Accurate and efficient guidance of needles to procedural targets is critically important during percutaneous interventional procedures. Ultrasound imaging is widely used for real-time image guidance in a variety of clinical contexts, but with this modality, uncertainties about the location of the needle tip within the image plane lead to significant complications. Whilst several methods have been proposed to improve the visibility of the needle, achieving accuracy and compatibility with current clinical practice is an ongoing challenge. In this paper, the authors present a method for directly visualizing the needle tip using an integrated fiber-optic ultrasound receiver in conjunction with the imaging probe used to acquire B-mode ultrasound images. Methods: Needle visualization and ultrasound imaging were performed with a clinical ultrasound imaging system. A miniature fiber-optic ultrasound hydrophone was integrated into a 20 gauge injection needle tip to receive transmissions from individual transducer elements of the ultrasound imaging probe. The received signals were reconstructed to create an image of the needle tip. Ultrasound B-mode imaging was interleaved with needle tip imaging. A first set of measurements was acquired in water and tissue ex vivo with a wide range of insertion angles (15°–68°) to study the accuracy and sensitivity of the tracking method. A second set was acquired in an in vivo swine model, with needle insertions to the brachial plexus. A third set was acquired in an in vivo ovine model for fetal interventions, with insertions to different locations within the uterine cavity. Two linear ultrasound imaging probes were used: a 14–5 MHz probe for the first and second sets, and a 9–4 MHz probe for the third. Results: During insertions in tissue ex vivo and in vivo, the imaged needle tip had submillimeter axial and lateral dimensions. The signal-to-noise (SNR) of the needle tip was found to depend on the insertion angle. With

  12. WE-AB-BRB-12: Nanoscintillator Fiber-Optic Detector System for Microbeam Radiation Therapy Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, J [University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Dooley, J; Chang, S [University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Belley, M; Yoshizumi, T [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Stanton, I; Langloss, B; Therien, M [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) is an experimental radiation therapy that has demonstrated a higher therapeutic ratio than conventional radiation therapy in animal studies. There are several roadblocks in translating the promising treatment technology to clinical application, one of which is the lack of a real-time, high-resolution dosimeter. Current clinical radiation detectors have poor spatial resolution and, as such, are unsuitable for measuring microbeams with submillimeter-scale widths. Although GafChromic film has high spatial resolution, it lacks the real-time dosimetry capability necessary for MRT preclinical research and potential clinical use. In this work we have demonstrated the feasibility of using a nanoscintillator fiber-optic detector (nanoFOD) system for real-time MRT dosimetry. Methods: A microplanar beam array is generated using a x-ray research irradiator and a custom-made, microbeam-forming collimator. The newest generation nanoFOD has an effective size of 70 µm in the measurement direction and was calibrated against a kV ion chamber (RadCal Accu-Pro) in open field geometry. We have written a computer script that performs automatic data collection with immediate background subtraction. A computer-controlled detector positioning stage is used to precisely measure the microbeam peak dose and beam profile by translating the stage during data collection. We test the new generation nanoFOD system, with increased active scintillation volume, against the previous generation system. Both raw and processed data are time-stamped and recorded to enable future post-processing. Results: The real-time microbeam dosimetry system worked as expected. The new generation dosimeter has approximately double the active volume compared to the previous generation resulting in over 900% increase in signal. The active volume of the dosimeter still provided the spatial resolution that meets the Nyquist criterion for our microbeam widths. Conclusion: We have

  13. Accuracy of Analog Fiber-Optic Links in Pulsed Radiation Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E K Miller; G S Macrum; I J McKenna

    2007-01-01

    Interferometric fiber-optic links used in pulsed-power experiments are evaluated for accuracy in the presence of radiation fields which alter fiber transmission. Amplitude-modulated format (e.g., Mach-Zehnder) and phase-modulated formats are compared. Historically, studies of radiation effects on optical fibers have focused on degradation and recovery of the fibers transmission properties; such work is either in the context of survivability of fibers in catastrophic conditions or suitability of fibers installed for command and control systems within an experimental facility [1], [2]. In this work, we consider links used to transmit realtime diagnostic data, and we analyze the error introduced by radiation effects during the drive pulse. The result is increased uncertainties in key parameters required to unfold the sinusoidal transfer function. Two types of modulation are considered: amplitude modulation typical of a Mach-Zehnder (M-Z) modulator [3], and phase modulation, which offers more flexible demodulation options but relies on the spatiotemporal coherence of the light in the fiber. The M-Z link is shown schematically in Fig. 1, and the phase-modulated link is shown in Fig. 2. We present data from two experimental environments: one with intense, controlled radiation fields to simulate conditions expected at the next generation of pulsed-power facilities, and the second with radiation effects below the noise level of the recording system. In the first case, we intentionally expose three types of single-mode fiber (SMF) to ionizing radiation and study the response by simultaneously monitoring phase and amplitude of the transmitted light. The phase and amplitude effects are evidently dominated by different physical phenomena, as their recovery dynamics are markedly different; both effects, though, show similar short-term behavior during exposure, integrating the dose at the dose levels studied, from 1 to 300 kRad, over the exposure times of 50 ps and 30 ns. In the

  14. Measurements of spectral responses for developing fiber-optic pH sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Wook Jae; Heo, Ji Yeon; Jang, Kyoung Won; Seo, Jeong Ki; Moon, Jin Soo; Park, Jang-Yeon; Park, Byung Gi; Cho, Seunghyun; Lee, Bongsoo

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we have fabricated a fiber-optic pH sensor, which is composed of a light source, a pH-sensing probe, plastic optical fibers and a spectrometer, for determining the degree of infection by Helicobacter pylori in the stomach. As pH indicators, phenol red and m-cresol purple are used, and pH liquid solutions are prepared by mixing phenol red or m-cresol purple solutions and various kinds of pH buffer solutions. The light emitted by a light source is guided by plastic optical fibers to the pH liquid solution, and the optical characteristic of a reflected light is changed according to the color variations of the pH indicator in the pH-sensing probe. Therefore, we have measured the intensities and wavelength shifts of the reflected lights, which change according to the color variations of indicators at different pH values, by using a spectrometer for spectral analysis. Also, the relationships between the pH values of liquid solutions and the optical properties of the modulated lights are obtained on the basis of the changes of the colors of indicators.

  15. Laboratory sensor design for fiber-optic detection of 85Kr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geelhood, B.D.; Knopf, M.A.

    1994-06-01

    The goal of the fiber-optic detection of 85 Kr project is to produce a sensor to detect 85 Kr in real-time from either an airborne or ground-based platform. The 85 Kr gas is a fission product which is released in large quantities during fuel reprocessing and in minor quantities during nuclear reactor operations. Thus an airborne plume of 85 Kr is a radioactive signature of proliferation. Since 85 Kr has a 10.72 year half life, it is difficult for a proliferator to contain the gas for several half lives to avoid releasing the radioactive signature of proliferation. The long half life also results in a plume that can extend several kilometers from the source, which allows initial proliferation monitoring from large distances. The sensor can be used to make stand-alone, real-time measurements of 85 Kr that can be used as direct evidence for proliferation and/or as a screening sensor to determine when to collect air samples for further laboratory analysis. This report provides a summary of the 85 Kr beta sensor design that PNL will use in the laboratory to: (1) demonstrate the measurement technique, (2) establish minimum detection limits, and (3) optimize the sensor design for the final airborne sensor package. The goal of the final airborne sensor package will be to measure 85 Kr at activity levels as low as or as close to ambient background levels as possible with a reasonably sized sensor

  16. Fiber-optical microphones and accelerometers based on polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Stefani, Alessio; Bang, Ole

    2010-01-01

    Polymer optical fibers (POFs) are ideal for applications as the sensing element in fiber-optical microphones and accelerometers based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) due to their reduced Young’s Modulus of 3.2GPa, compared to 72GPa of Silica. To maximize the sensitivity and the dynamic range...... of the device the outer diameter and the length of the sensing fiber segment should be as small as possible. To this end we have fabricated 3mm FBGs in single-mode step-index POFs of diameter 115 micron, using 325nm UV writing and a phase-mask technique. 6mm POF sections with FBGs in the center have been glued...... to standard Silica SMF28 fibers. These POF FBGs have been characterized in terms of temperature and strain to find operating regimes with no hysteresis. Commercial fast wavelength interrogators (KHz) are shown to be able to track the thin POF FBGs and they are finally applied in a prototype accelerometer...

  17. A liquid lens switching-based motionless variable fiber-optic delay line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khwaja, Tariq Shamim; Reza, Syed Azer; Sheikh, Mumtaz

    2018-05-01

    We present a Variable Fiber-Optic Delay Line (VFODL) module capable of imparting long variable delays by switching an input optical/RF signal between Single Mode Fiber (SMF) patch cords of different lengths through a pair of Electronically Controlled Tunable Lenses (ECTLs) resulting in a polarization-independent operation. Depending on intended application, the lengths of the SMFs can be chosen accordingly to achieve the desired VFODL operation dynamic range. If so desired, the state of the input signal polarization can be preserved with the use of commercially available polarization-independent ECTLs along with polarization-maintaining SMFs (PM-SMFs), resulting in an output polarization that is identical to the input. An ECTL-based design also improves power consumption and repeatability. The delay switching mechanism is electronically-controlled, involves no bulk moving parts, and can be fully-automated. The VFODL module is compact due to the use of small optical components and SMFs that can be packaged compactly.

  18. Non-Invasive Fiber-Optic Biomedical Sensor for Basic Vital Sign Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Nedoma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the functionality verification of a novel non-invasive fibre-optic sensor monitoring basic vital signs such as Respiratory Rate (RR, Heart Rate (HR and Body Temperature (BT. The integration of three sensors in one unit is a unique solution patented by our research team. The integrated sensor is based on two Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBGs encapsulated inside an inert polymer (non-reactive to human skin called PolyDiMethylSiloxane (PDMS. The PDMS is beginning to find widespread applications in the biomedical field due to its desirable properties, especially its immunity to ElectroMagnetic Interference (EMI. The integrated sensor's functionality was verified by carrying out a series of laboratory experiments in 10 volunteer subjects after giving them a written informed consent. The Bland-Altman statistical analysis produced satisfactory accuracy for the respiratory and heart rate measurements and their respective reference signals in all test subjects. A total relative error of 0.31% was determined for body temperature measurements. The main contribution of this article is a proof-of-concept of a novel noninvasive fiber-optic sensor which could be used for basic vital sign monitoring. This sensor offers a potential to enhance and improve the comfort level of patients in hospitals and clinics and can even be considered for use in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI environments.

  19. Microbubble-based fiber-optic Fabry-Perot pressure sensor for high-temperature application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhe; Jia, Pinggang; Fang, Guocheng; Liang, Hao; Liang, Ting; Liu, Wenyi; Xiong, Jijun

    2018-03-10

    Using arc discharge technology, we fabricated a fiber-optic Fabry-Perot (FP) pressure sensor with a very low temperature coefficient based on a microbubble that can be applied in a high-temperature environment. The thin-walled microbubble can be fabricated by heating the gas-pressurized hollow silica tube (HST) using a commercial fusion splicer. Then, the well-cut single-mode fiber (SMF) was inserted into the microbubble, and they were fused together. Thus, the FP cavity can be formed between the end of the SMF and the inner surface of the microbubble. The diameter of the microbubble can be up to 360 μm with the thickness of the wall being approximately 0.5 μm. Experimental results show that such a sensor has a linear sensitivity of approximately -6.382  nm/MPa, -5.912  nm/MPa at 20°C, and 600°C within the pressure range of 1 MPa. Due to the thermal expansion coefficient of the SMF being slightly larger than that of silica, we can fuse the SMF and the HST with different lengths; thus, the sensor has a very low temperature coefficient of approximately 0.17 pm/°C.

  20. Theoretical and experimental study on fiber-optic displacement sensor with bowknot bending modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yong; Huang, Da; Zhu, Zheng-Wei

    2018-03-01

    A novel and simple fiber-optic sensor for measuring a large displacement range in civil engineering has been developed. The sensor incorporates an extremely simple bowknot bending modulation that increases its sensitivity in bending, light source and detector. In this paper, to better understand the working principle and improve the performance of the sensor, the transduction of displacement to light loss is described analytically by using the geometry of sensor and principle of optical fiber loss. Results of the calibration tests show a logarithmic function relationship between light loss and displacement with two calibrated parameters. The sensor has a response over a wide displacement range of 44.7 mm with an initial accuracy of 2.65 mm, while for a small displacement range of 34 mm it shows a more excellent accuracy of 0.98 mm. The direct shear tests for the six models with the same dimensions were conducted to investigate the application of the sensor for warning the shear and sliding failure in civil engineering materials or geo-materials. Results address that the sliding displacement of sliding body can be relatively accurately captured by the theory logarithmic relation between sliding distance and optical loss in a definite structure, having a large dynamic range of 22.32 mm with an accuracy of 0.99 mm, which suggests that the sensor has a promising prospect in monitoring civil engineering, especially for landslides.

  1. Radioluminescence of red-emitting Eu-doped phosphors for fiberoptic dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, P.; Santiago, M.; Marcazzo, J.; Caselli, E. [Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Instituto de Fisica Arroyo Seco, Pinto 399, 7000 Tandil (Argentina); Spano, F. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Av. del Libertador 8250, 1429 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Henniger, J. [Institut fur Kern-und Teilchenphysik, Zellescher Weg 19, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Cravero, W., E-mail: pmolina@exa.unicen.edu.ar [Universidad Nacional del Sur, Departamento de Fisica, Av. Colon 80, 8000FTN Bahia Blanca, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-10-15

    The fiberoptic dosimetry technique (FOD) has become an attractive method for in-vivo real-time dosimetry in radiotherapy. It is based on the use of a tiny piece of scintillator coupled to the end of an optical fiber, which collects the light emitted by the scintillator during irradiation (radioluminescence). Carbon-doped aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C) is one of the most radioluminescence materials for FOD due to its high efficiency but it presents the drawback of emitting in the spectral region, where spurious luminescence is also important. Spurious luminescence from optical fiber, termed stem effect, is the main problem afflicting FOD. Several techniques have been applied to remove the stem effect. Optical filtering, which consists in using long-pass filters, is the simplest one. This technique is useful when red-emitting scintillators are employed. In this work, the feasibility of using red-emitting Eu-doped phosphors as FOD scintillators has been investigated. (Author)

  2. An evaluation of in-office flexible fiber-optic biopsies for laryngopharyngeal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Francisco; Smith, Kristine A; Chandarana, Shamir; Matthews, T Wayne; Bosch, J Douglas; Nakoneshny, Steven C; Dort, Joseph C

    2018-05-09

    Operative endoscopy and flexible fiber-optic in-office tissue biopsy are common techniques to assess suspicious laryngopharyngeal lesions. The primary outcome was the delay to the initiation of treatment. Secondary outcomes were delay to biopsy, histopathological diagnosis, and assessment at a multidisciplinary oncology clinic. A retrospective analysis was performed to assess the relative delays between these approaches to biopsy of laryngopharyngeal lesions. There were 114 patients in the study cohort; 44 in-office and 70 operative endoscopic biopsies). The mean delay from consultation to biopsy was 17.4 days for the operative endoscopy group and 1.3 days for the in-office group. The mean delay from initial otolaryngology consultation to initiation of treatment was 51.7 days and 44.6 days for the operative endoscopy and in-office groups, respectively. In-office biopsy reduced the time from initial consultation to biopsy. The temporal gains via in-office biopsy did not translate into faster access to treatment. This outcome highlights the opportunity to improve access to treatment for patients with early diagnosis.

  3. Comparison between videofluoroscopy, fiberoptic endoscopy and scintigraphy for diagnosis of oro-pharyngeal dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattori, B; Giusti, P; Mancini, V; Grosso, M; Barillari, M R; Bastiani, L; Molinaro, S; Nacci, A

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare videofluoroscopy (VFS), fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) and oro-pharyngo- oesophageal scintigraphy (OPES) with regards to premature spillage, post-swallowing residue and aspiration to assess the reliability of these tests for detection of oro-pharyngeal dysphagia. Sixty patients affected with dysphagia of various origin were enrolled in the study and submitted to VFS, FEES and OPES using a liquid and semi-solid bolus. As a reference, we used VFS. Both the FEES and the OPES showed good sensitivity with high overall values (≥ 80% and ≥ 90% respectively). The comparison between FEES vs VFS concerning drop before swallowing showed good specificity (84.4% for semi-solids and 86.7% for liquids). In the case of post-swallowing residue, FEES vs VFS revealed good overall validity (75% for semi-solids) with specificity and sensitivity well balanced for the semi-solids. OPES vs. VFS demonstrated good sensitivity (88.6%) and overall validity (76.7%) for liquids. The analysis of FEES vs. VFS for aspiration showed that the overall validity was low (≤ 65%). On the other hand, OPES demonstrated appreciable overall validity (71.7%). VFS, FEES and OPES are capable of detecting oro-pharyngeal dysphagia. FEES gave significant results in the evaluation of post-swallowing residues. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale, Rome, Italy.

  4. A Fiber-Optic Sensor for Leak Detection in a Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinko, John E.; Korman, Valentin; Hendrickson, Adam; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2009-01-01

    A miniature fiber-optic, laser-based, interferometric leak detector is presented for application as a means to detect on-orbit gas leaks. The sensor employs a fiber-coupled modified Michelson interferometer to detect gas leaks by measuring an increase in gas density in the sensing region. Monitoring changes in the fringe pattern output by the interferometer allows for direct measurement of the gas density in the sensing region and, under the assumption of an equation of state, this can be used to obtain a pressure measurement. Measurements obtained over a pressure range from 20 mtorr to 760 torr using a prototypical interferometer on working gases of air, nitrogen, argon, and helium generally exhibit agreement with a theoretical prediction of the pressure increase required before an interference fringe completely moves over the detector. Additional measurements performed on various gases demonstrate the range of detectable species, measuring sub-torr pressure changes in the process. A high-fidelity measurement places the ultimate pressure resolution for this particular sensor configuration in the 10 mtorr range. Time-resolved data prove the capability of this sensor to detect fast gas flow phenomena associated with transients and pressure waves.

  5. Research on fiber-optic cantilever-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy for trace gas detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ke; Zhou, Xinlei; Gong, Zhenfeng; Yu, Shaochen; Qu, Chao; Guo, Min; Yu, Qingxu

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate a new scheme of cantilever-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy, combining a sensitivity-improved fiber-optic cantilever acoustic sensor with a tunable high-power fiber laser, for trace gas detection. The Fabry-Perot interferometer based cantilever acoustic sensor has advantages such as high sensitivity, small size, easy to install and immune to electromagnetic. Tunable erbium-doped fiber ring laser with an erbium-doped fiber amplifier is used as the light source for acoustic excitation. In order to improve the sensitivity for photoacoustic signal detection, a first-order longitudinal resonant photoacoustic cell with the resonant frequency of 1624 Hz and a large size cantilever with the first resonant frequency of 1687 Hz are designed. The size of the cantilever is 2.1 mm×1 mm, and the thickness is 10 μm. With the wavelength modulation spectrum and second-harmonic detection methods, trace ammonia (NH3) has been measured. The gas detection limits (signal-to-noise ratio = 1) near the wavelength of 1522.5 nm is achieved to be 3 ppb.

  6. A Newly Designed Fiber-Optic Based Earth Pressure Transducer with Adjustable Measurement Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou-Zhen Wei

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel fiber-optic based earth pressure sensor (FPS with an adjustable measurement range and high sensitivity is developed to measure earth pressures for civil infrastructures. The new FPS combines a cantilever beam with fiber Bragg grating (FBG sensors and a flexible membrane. Compared with a traditional pressure transducer with a dual diaphragm design, the proposed FPS has a larger measurement range and shows high accuracy. The working principles, parameter design, fabrication methods, and laboratory calibration tests are explained in this paper. A theoretical solution is derived to obtain the relationship between the applied pressure and strain of the FBG sensors. In addition, a finite element model is established to analyze the mechanical behavior of the membrane and the cantilever beam and thereby obtain optimal parameters. The cantilever beam is 40 mm long, 15 mm wide, and 1 mm thick. The whole FPS has a diameter of 100 mm and a thickness of 30 mm. The sensitivity of the FPS is 0.104 kPa/με. In addition, automatic temperature compensation can be achieved. The FPS’s sensitivity, physical properties, and response to applied pressure are extensively examined through modeling and experiments. The results show that the proposed FPS has numerous potential applications in soil pressure measurement.

  7. Bio-analytical applications of mid-infrared spectroscopy using silver halide fiber-optic probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heise, H.M.; Kuepper, L.; Butvina, L.N.

    2002-01-01

    Infrared-spectroscopy has proved to be a powerful method for the study of various biomedical samples, in particular for in-vitro analysis in the clinical laboratory and for non-invasive diagnostics. In general, the analysis of biofluids such as whole blood, urine, microdialysates and bioreactor broth media takes advantage of the fact that a multitude of analytes can be quantified simultaneously and rapidly without the need for reagents. Progress in the quality of infrared silver halide fibers enabled us to construct several flexible fiber-optic probes of different geometries, which are particularly suitable for the measurement of small biosamples. Recent trends show that dry film measurements by mid-infrared spectroscopy could revolutionize analytical tools in the clinical chemistry laboratory, and an example is given. Infrared diagnostic tools show a promising potential for patients, and minimal-invasive blood glucose assays or skin tissue pathology in particular cannot be left out using mid-infrared fiber-based probes. Other applications include the measurement of skin samples including penetration studies of vitamins and constituents of cosmetic cream formulations. A further field is the micro-domain analysis of biopsy samples from bog mummified corpses, and recent results on the chemistry of dermis and hair samples are reported. Another field of application, for which results are reported, is food analysis and bio-reactor monitoring

  8. A fiber-optic interferometer with subpicometer resolution for dc and low-frequency displacement measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D. T.; Pratt, J. R.; Howard, L. P.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a fiber-optic interferometer optimized for best performance in the frequency range from dc to 1 kHz, with displacement linearity of 1% over a range of ± 25 nm, and noise-limited resolution of 2 pm. The interferometer uses a tunable infrared laser source (nominal 1550 nm wavelength) with high amplitude and wavelength stability, low spontaneous self-emission noise, high sideband suppression, and a coherence control feature that broadens the laser linewidth and dramatically lowers the low-frequency noise in the system. The amplitude stability of the source, combined with the use of specially manufactured ''bend-insensitive'' fiber and all-spliced fiber construction, results in a robust homodyne interferometer system, which achieves resolution of 40 fm Hz -1/2 above 20 Hz and approaches the shot-noise-limit of 20 fm Hz -1/2 at 1 kHz for an optical power of 10 μW, without the need for differential detection. Here we describe the design and construction of the interferometer, as well as modes of operation, and demonstrate its performance.

  9. MEMS fiber-optic Fabry-Perot pressure sensor for high temperature application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, G. C.; Jia, P. G.; Cao, Q.; Xiong, J. J.

    2016-10-01

    We design and demonstrate a fiber-optic Fabry-Perot pressure sensor (FOFPPS) for high-temperature sensing by employing micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) technology. The FOFPPS is fabricated by anodically bonding the silicon wafer and the Pyrex glass together and fixing the facet of the optical fiber in parallel with the silicon surface by glass frit and organic adhesive. The silicon wafer can be reduced through dry etching technology to construct the sensitive diaphragm. The length of the cavity changes with the deformation of the diaphragm due to the loaded pressure, which leads to a wavelength shift of the interference spectrum. The pressure can be gauged by measuring the wavelength shift. The pressure experimental results show that the sensor has linear pressure sensitivities ranging from 0 kPa to 600 kPa at temperature range between 20°C to 300°C. The pressure sensitivity at 300°C is approximately 27.63 pm/kPa. The pressure sensitivities gradually decrease with increasing the temperature. The sensor also has a linear thermal drift when temperature changes from 20°C - 300°C.

  10. Method for transmitting analog data over a fiber-optic link

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyer, G.R.

    1981-01-01

    The transmission of high-speed analog dat across an insulating break is a common requirement for present fusion experiments, and it will be a necessity for a reactor-like device. Presently available systems tend to be complex, slow, and expensive. A method is described for implementing a fiber-optic link with analog data input and output. Two realizations of the method are given. A medium-speed system using monolithic circuitry is capable of a dc to 20-KHz bandwidth with excellent linearity and a dynamic range of at least 60 dB. A higher-speed system uses some discrete circuitry to attain a 500-KHz bandwidth with at least a 40-dB dynamic range. Both systems use a relatively inexpensive digital optical link kit combined with a duty cycle modulation scheme for data tramsmission. This method achieves accurate reproduction of complex waveforms without introducing the quantization errors inherent in analog-to-digital conversion, offers bipolar response with low offset and drift, and maintains a constant bandwidth regardless of signal level

  11. A fiber-optic sensor based on no-core fiber and Faraday rotator mirror structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Heng; Wang, Xu; Zhang, Songling; Wang, Fang; Liu, Yufang

    2018-05-01

    An optical fiber sensor based on the single-mode/no-core/single-mode (SNS) core-offset technology along with a Faraday rotator mirror structure has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated. A transverse optical field distribution of self-imaging has been simulated and experimental parameters have been selected under theoretical guidance. Results of the experiments demonstrate that the temperature sensitivity of the sensor is 0.0551 nm/°C for temperatures between 25 and 80 °C, and the correlation coefficient is 0.99582. The concentration sensitivity of the device for sucrose and glucose solutions was found to be as high as 12.5416 and 6.02248 nm/(g/ml), respectively. Curves demonstrating a linear fit between wavelength shift and solution concentration for three different heavy metal solutions have also been derived on the basis of experimental results. The proposed fiber-optic sensor design provides valuable guidance for the measurement of concentration and temperature.

  12. New Mexico Fiber-Optic Link Marks Giant Leap Toward Future of Radio Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-12-01

    SOCORRO, NM -- Scientists and engineers at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) have made a giant leap toward the future of radio astronomy by successfully utilizing the Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope in conjunction with an antenna of the continent-wide Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) using the longest fiber-optic data link ever demonstrated in radio astronomy. The 65-mile fiber link will allow scientists to use the two National Science Foundation (NSF) facilities together in real time, and is the first step toward expanding the VLA to include eight proposed new radio-telescope antennas throughout New Mexico. LEFT: Miller Goss, NRAO's director of VLA/VLBA Operations, unveils graphic showing success of the Pie Town-VLA fiber link. The project, funded by the NSF and Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), which operates NRAO for the NSF, links the VLA and the VLBA antenna in Pie Town, NM, using a Western New Mexico Telephone Co. fiber-optic cable. The successful hookup was announced at a ceremony that also marked the 10th anniversary of NRAO's Operations Center in Socorro. "Linking the Pie Town antenna to the VLA quadruples the VLA's ability to make detailed images of astronomical objects," said Paul Vanden Bout, NRAO's Director. "This alone makes the link an advance for science, but its greater importance is that it clearly demonstrates the technology for improving the VLA's capabilities even more in the future." "Clearly, the big skies and wide open spaces in New Mexico create near perfect conditions for the incredible astronomical assets located in our state. This new fiber-optic link paves the way for multiplying the already breathtaking scientific capabilities of the VLA," Senator Pete Domenici (R-NM) said. The VLA is a system of 27 radio-telescope antennas distributed over the high desert west of Socorro, NM, in the shape of a giant "Y." Made famous in movies, commercials and numerous published photos, the VLA has been one of the most productive

  13. In-situ investigation of protein and DNA structure using UVRRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greek, L. Shane; Schulze, H. Georg; Blades, Michael W.; Haynes, Charles A.; Turner, Robin F. B.

    1997-05-01

    Ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy (UVRRS) has the potential to become a sensitive, specific, versatile bioanalytical and biophysical technique for routine investigations of proteins, DNA, and their monomeric components, as well as a variety smaller, physiologically important aromatic molecules. The transition of UVRRS from a complex, specialized spectroscopic method to a common laboratory assay depends upon several developments, including a robust sample introduction method permitting routine, in situ analysis in standard laboratory environments. To this end, we recently reported the first fiber-optic probes suitable for deep-UV pulsed laser UVRRS. In this paper, we extend this work by demonstrating the applicability of such probes to studies of biochemical relevance, including investigations of the resonance enhancement of phosphotyrosine, thermal denaturation of RNase T1, and specific and non-specific protein binding. The advantages and disadvantages of the probes are discussed with reference to sample conditions and probe design considerations.

  14. Miniature mass analyzer

    CERN Document Server

    Cuna, C; Lupsa, N; Cuna, S; Tuzson, B

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents the concept of different mass analyzers that were specifically designed as small dimension instruments able to detect with great sensitivity and accuracy the main environmental pollutants. The mass spectrometers are very suited instrument for chemical and isotopic analysis, needed in environmental surveillance. Usually, this is done by sampling the soil, air or water followed by laboratory analysis. To avoid drawbacks caused by sample alteration during the sampling process and transport, the 'in situ' analysis is preferred. Theoretically, any type of mass analyzer can be miniaturized, but some are more appropriate than others. Quadrupole mass filter and trap, magnetic sector, time-of-flight and ion cyclotron mass analyzers can be successfully shrunk, for each of them some performances being sacrificed but we must know which parameters are necessary to be kept unchanged. To satisfy the miniaturization criteria of the analyzer, it is necessary to use asymmetrical geometries, with ion beam obl...

  15. Miniature robotic sample analysis lab for planetary in situ mineralogy and microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruzelecky, Roman; Wong, Brian; Haddad, Emile; Jamroz, Wes; Cloutis, Edward; Strong, Kimberly; Ghafoor, Nadeem; Jessen, Sean

    The current Martian surface conditions are relatively inhospitable, with average diurnal temperature ranges from 170 K to 268 K, a low air pressure of about 7 to 10 mbar consisting mainly of CO2 and negligible ozone to moderate the UV portion of the incident solar radiation. The intense UV effectively sterilizes the surface, and in combination with the low air pressure, makes any unbound surface liquid water unstable. However, there is mounting evidence to support the notion that the near subsurface of Mars may differ dramatically from the uppermost surface. The Inukshuk landed Mars mission, as initially developed under a pre-Phase A study for the Canadian Space Agency, focuses on the search for hydrated mineralogy and subsurface water sites that can provide evidence of past or present life. The mission will be achieved using a miniature suite of complementary spectral instruments operating in collaboration with a robotic tethered mole drill system for the systematic in situ subsurface exploration of the planetary mineralogy, water content and microbiology. The Inukshuk mission will, for the first time, study variations in the Mars subsurface characteristics and composition in detail at different locations. These will be correlated with the current planetary boundary layer conditions using an elevating Skycam platform and surface stand-off measurement capabilities. The subsurface analysis will be provided using a miniature bore-hole probe integrated within the mole driller and interfaced to the rover-based instrument suite using an IR fiber-optic link. This will allow subsurface mapping of the stratigraphy and composition in steps of a few mm to depths beyond 1 m. During the drilling, the bore-hole probe will be shielded using a wiper/shutter system. The in situ bore-hole analysis has an advantage for detecting biomarkers for astrobiology on Mars in that the alteration of the sample by surface radiation can be minimized. The bore-hole sample analysis will employ

  16. In-Situ Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Anders Thais; Slot, Susanne; Paltved, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    , and organisational characteristic. Therefore, it might fail to fully mimic real clinical team processes. Though research on in situ simulation in healthcare is in its infancy, literature is abundant on patient safety and team training1. Patient safety reporting systems that identify risks to patients can improve......Introduction: In situ simulation offers on-site training to healthcare professionals. It refers to a training strategy where simulation technology is integrated into the clinical encounter. Training in the simulation laboratory does not easily tap into situational resources, e.g. individual, team...... patient safety if coupled with training and organisational support. This study explored the use of critical incidents and adverse events reports for in situ simulation and short-term observations were used to create learning objectives and training scenarios. Method: This study used an interventional case...

  17. Selection of fiber-optical components for temperature measurement for satellite applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzer, P.; Kuhenuri Chami, N.; Koch, A. W.; Hurni, A.; Roner, M.; Obermaier, J.; Lemke, N. M. K.

    2017-11-01

    The Hybrid Sensor Bus (HSB) is a modular system for housekeeping measurements for space applications. The focus here is the fiber-optical module and the used fiber-Bragg gratings (FBGs) for temperature measurements at up to 100 measuring points. The fiber-optial module uses a tunable diode laser to scan through the wavelength spectrum and a passive optical network for reading back the reflections from the FBG sensors. The sensors are based on FBGs which show a temperature dependent shift in wavelength, allowing a high accuracy of measurement. The temperature at each sensor is derivated from the sensors Bragg wavelength shift by evaluating the measured spectrum with an FBG peak detection algorithm and by computing the corresponding temperature difference with regard to the calibration value. It is crucial to eliminate unwanted influence on the measurement accuracy through FBG wavelength shifts caused by other reasons than the temperature change. The paper presents gamma radiation test results up to 25 Mrad for standard UV-written FBGs in a bare fiber and in a mechanically housed version. This high total ionizing dose (TID) load comes from a possible location of the fiber outside the satellite's housing, like e.g. on the panels or directly embedded into the satellites structure. Due to the high shift in wavelength of the standard written gratings also the femto-second infrared (fs- IR) writing technique is investigated in more detail. Special focus is given to the deployed fibers for the external sensor network. These fibers have to be mechanically robust and the radiation induced attenuation must be low in order not to influence the system's performance. For this reason different fiber types have been considered and tested to high dose gamma radiation. Dedicated tests proved the absence of enhanced low dose rate sensitivity (ELDRS). Once the fiber has been finally selected, the fs-IR grating will be written to these fibers and the FBGs will be tested in order to

  18. INTEGRATION OF DISTRIBUTED INERTIAL NAVIGATION SYSTEMS BUILT AROUND FIBER-OPTIC AND MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SENSORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Chernodarov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The current state of airborne measuring-and-computing complexes (MCCs is characterized by the inclusion of distributed strapdown inertial navigation systems (SINSs as components of these complexes. This is associated with the necessity of the provision of navigational support not only for aircraft (Acft, but also for airborne Earth surface surveillance systems in which the SINSs are included as components. Among such systems are radar systems, video monitors, laser scanners (lidars, and other surveillance devices. At the same time, when the DSINSs are united into a single structure, new functional possibilities for such integrated navigation systems appear, namely: redundancy and mutual support of SINSs, and also an increase in MCC information reliability on this basis; mutual monitoring and mutual diagnosis of SINSs; optimization of DSINS structure for providing the required accuracy of navigation and attitude control under severe conditions of Acft operation. Such conditions are connected with Acft maneuvering, with a loss of the signals of satellite navigation systems (SNSs. The purpose of this paper is to study the capabilities of DSINS which are built around fiberoptic and micromechanical sensors when they are united into a closely connected information-measuring structure. In the solution of the problem formulated above, an object-oriented modular technology for the creation of integrated navigation systems was taken as a basis. The use of such a technology has permitted us to realize the new functional possibilities of the DSINSs, and also to take into account the following features of the construction and functioning of DSINSs as components of MCCs: need for mutual information exchange among DSINS modules via an MCC airborne top-level computing system; synchronization of measuring-and-computing procedures that are realized in the DSINS. In addition, due to restrictions on overall dimensions and weight, SINSs of surveillance systems are

  19. In situ groundwater bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2009-02-01

    In situ groundwater bioremediation of hydrocarbons has been used for more than 40 years. Most strategies involve biostimulation; however, recently bioaugmentation have been used for dehalorespiration. Aquifer and contaminant profiles are critical to determining the feasibility and strategy for in situ groundwater bioremediation. Hydraulic conductivity and redox conditions, including concentrations of terminal electron acceptors are critical to determine the feasibility and strategy for potential bioremediation applications. Conceptual models followed by characterization and subsequent numerical models are critical for efficient and cost effective bioremediation. Critical research needs in this area include better modeling and integration of remediation strategies with natural attenuation.

  20. Smart-phone based computational microscopy using multi-frame contact imaging on a fiber-optic array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navruz, Isa; Coskun, Ahmet F; Wong, Justin; Mohammad, Saqib; Tseng, Derek; Nagi, Richie; Phillips, Stephen; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-10-21

    We demonstrate a cellphone based contact microscopy platform, termed Contact Scope, which can image highly dense or connected samples in transmission mode. Weighing approximately 76 grams, this portable and compact microscope is installed on the existing camera unit of a cellphone using an opto-mechanical add-on, where planar samples of interest are placed in contact with the top facet of a tapered fiber-optic array. This glass-based tapered fiber array has ~9 fold higher density of fiber optic cables on its top facet compared to the bottom one and is illuminated by an incoherent light source, e.g., a simple light-emitting-diode (LED). The transmitted light pattern through the object is then sampled by this array of fiber optic cables, delivering a transmission image of the sample onto the other side of the taper, with ~3× magnification in each direction. This magnified image of the object, located at the bottom facet of the fiber array, is then projected onto the CMOS image sensor of the cellphone using two lenses. While keeping the sample and the cellphone camera at a fixed position, the fiber-optic array is then manually rotated with discrete angular increments of e.g., 1-2 degrees. At each angular position of the fiber-optic array, contact images are captured using the cellphone camera, creating a sequence of transmission images for the same sample. These multi-frame images are digitally fused together based on a shift-and-add algorithm through a custom-developed Android application running on the smart-phone, providing the final microscopic image of the sample, visualized through the screen of the phone. This final computation step improves the resolution and also removes spatial artefacts that arise due to non-uniform sampling of the transmission intensity at the fiber optic array surface. We validated the performance of this cellphone based Contact Scope by imaging resolution test charts and blood smears.

  1. Multidimensional gray-wavelet processing in interferometric fiber-optic gyroscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yi; Wang, Zinan; Peng, Chao; Li, Zhengbin

    2013-01-01

    A multidimensional signal processing method for a single interferometric fiber-optic gyroscope (IFOG) is proposed, to the best of our knowledge, for the first time. The proposed method, based on a novel IFOG structure with quadrature demodulation, combines a multidimensional gray model (GM) and a wavelet compression technique for noise suppression and sensitivity enhancement. In the IFOG, two series of measured rotation rates are obtained simultaneously: an in-phase component and a quadrature component. Together with the traditionally measured rate, the three measured rates are processed by the combined gray-wavelet method. Simulations show that the intensity noise and non-reciprocal phase fluctuations are effectively suppressed by this method. Experimental comparisons with a one-dimensional GM(1, 1) model show that the proposed three-dimensional method achieves much better denoising performance. This advantage is validated by the Allan variance analysis: in a low-SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) experiment, our method reduces the angle random walk (ARW) and the bias instability (BI) from 1 × 10 −2  deg h −1/2 and 3 × 10 −2  deg h −1 to 1 × 10 −3  deg h −1/2 and 3 × 10 −3  deg h −1 , respectively; in a high-SNR experiment, our method reduces the ARW and the BI from 9 × 10 −4  deg h −1/2 and 5 × 10 −3  deg h −1 to 4 × 10 −4  deg h −1/2 and 3 × 10 −3  deg h −1 , respectively. Further, our method increases the dimension of the state-of-the-art IFOG technique from one to three, thus obtaining higher IFOG sensitivity and stability by exploiting the increase in available information. (paper)

  2. Multidimensional gray-wavelet processing in interferometric fiber-optic gyroscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Wang, Zinan; Peng, Chao; Li, Zhengbin

    2013-11-01

    A multidimensional signal processing method for a single interferometric fiber-optic gyroscope (IFOG) is proposed, to the best of our knowledge, for the first time. The proposed method, based on a novel IFOG structure with quadrature demodulation, combines a multidimensional gray model (GM) and a wavelet compression technique for noise suppression and sensitivity enhancement. In the IFOG, two series of measured rotation rates are obtained simultaneously: an in-phase component and a quadrature component. Together with the traditionally measured rate, the three measured rates are processed by the combined gray-wavelet method. Simulations show that the intensity noise and non-reciprocal phase fluctuations are effectively suppressed by this method. Experimental comparisons with a one-dimensional GM(1, 1) model show that the proposed three-dimensional method achieves much better denoising performance. This advantage is validated by the Allan variance analysis: in a low-SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) experiment, our method reduces the angle random walk (ARW) and the bias instability (BI) from 1 × 10-2 deg h-1/2 and 3 × 10-2 deg h-1 to 1 × 10-3 deg h-1/2 and 3 × 10-3 deg h-1, respectively; in a high-SNR experiment, our method reduces the ARW and the BI from 9 × 10-4 deg h-1/2 and 5 × 10-3 deg h-1 to 4 × 10-4 deg h-1/2 and 3 × 10-3 deg h-1, respectively. Further, our method increases the dimension of the state-of-the-art IFOG technique from one to three, thus obtaining higher IFOG sensitivity and stability by exploiting the increase in available information.

  3. A label-free fiber-optic Turbidity Affinity Sensor (TAS) for continuous glucose monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt-Ballerstadt, Ralph; Evans, Colton; Pillai, Arun P; Gowda, Ashok

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, we describe the concept of a novel implantable fiber-optic Turbidity Affinity Sensor (TAS) and report on the findings of its in-vitro performance for continuous glucose monitoring. The sensing mechanism of the TAS is based on glucose-specific changes in light scattering (turbidity) of a hydrogel suspension consisting of small particles made of crosslinked dextran (Sephadex G100), and a glucose- and mannose-specific binding protein - Concanavalin A (ConA). The binding of ConA to Sephadex particles results in a significant turbidity increase that is much greater than the turbidity contribution by the individual components. The turbidity of the TAS was measured by determining the intensity of light passing through the suspension enclosed within a small semi-permeable hollow fiber (OD: 220 μm, membrane thickness: 20 μm, molecular weight cut-off: 10 kDa) using fiber optics. The intensity of measured light of the TAS was proportional to the glucose concentration over the concentration range from 50mg/dL to 400mg/dL in PBS and whole blood at 37°C (R>0.96). The response time was approximately 4 min. The stability of the glucose response of the TAS decreased only slightly (by 20%) over an 8-day study period at 37°C. In conclusion, this study demonstrated proof-of-concept of the TAS for interstitial glucose monitoring. Due to the large signal amplitude of the turbidity change, and the lack of need for wavelength-specific emission and excitation filters, a very small, robust and compact TAS device with an extremely short optical pathlength could be feasibly designed and implemented for in-vivo glucose monitoring in people with diabetes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Real-time in vivo diagnosis of laryngeal carcinoma with rapid fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kan; Zheng, Wei; Lim, Chwee Ming; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    We assess the clinical utility of a unique simultaneous fingerprint (FP) (i.e., 800-1800 cm−1) and high-wavenumber (HW) (i.e., 2800-3600 cm−1) fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy for in vivo diagnosis of laryngeal cancer at endoscopy. A total of 2124 high-quality in vivo FP/HW Raman spectra (normal = 1321; cancer = 581) were acquired from 101 tissue sites (normal = 71; cancer = 30) of 60 patients (normal = 44; cancer = 16) undergoing routine endoscopic examination. FP/HW Raman spectra differ significantly between normal and cancerous laryngeal tissue that could be attributed to changes of proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, and the bound water content in the larynx. Partial least squares-discriminant analysis and leave-one tissue site-out, cross-validation were employed on the in vivo FP/HW tissue Raman spectra acquired, yielding a diagnostic accuracy of 91.1% (sensitivity: 93.3% (28/30); specificity: 90.1% (64/71)) for laryngeal cancer identification, which is superior to using either FP (accuracy: 86.1%; sensitivity: 86.7% (26/30); specificity: 85.9% (61/71)) or HW (accuracy: 84.2%; sensitivity: 76.7% (23/30); specificity: 87.3% (62/71)) Raman technique alone. Further receiver operating characteristic analysis reconfirms the best performance of the simultaneous FP/HW Raman technique for laryngeal cancer diagnosis. We demonstrate for the first time that the simultaneous FP/HW Raman spectroscopy technique can be used for improving real-time in vivo diagnosis of laryngeal carcinoma during endoscopic examination. PMID:27699131

  5. Monolithic, High-Speed Fiber-Optic Switching Array for Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckow, Will; Roberts, Tony; Switzer, Gregg; Terwilliger, Chelle

    2011-01-01

    Current fiber switch technologies use mechanical means to redirect light beams, resulting in slow switch time, as well as poor reliability due to moving parts wearing out quickly at high speeds. A non-mechanical ability to switch laser output into one of multiple fibers within a fiber array can provide significant power, weight, and costs savings to an all-fiber system. This invention uses an array of crystals that act as miniature prisms to redirect light as an electric voltage changes the prism s properties. At the heart of the electro-optic fiber-optic switch is an electro- optic crystal patterned with tiny prisms that can deflect the beam from the input fiber into any one of the receiving fibers arranged in a linear array when a voltage is applied across the crystal. Prism boundaries are defined by a net dipole moment in the crystal lattice that has been poled opposite to the surrounding lattice fabricated using patterned, removable microelectrodes. When a voltage is applied across the crystal, the resulting electric field changes the index of refraction within the prism boundaries relative to the surrounding substrate, causing light to deflect slightly according to Snell s Law. There are several materials that can host the necessary monolithic poled pattern (including, but not limited to, SLT, KTP, LiNbO3, and Mg:LiNbO3). Be cause this is a solid-state system without moving parts, it is very fast, and does not wear down easily. This invention is applicable to all fiber networks, as well as industries that use such networks. The unit comes in a compact package, can handle both low and high voltages, and has a high reliability (100,000 hours without maintenance).

  6. Fiber-optic array using molecularly imprinted microspheres for antibiotic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Sergio; Benito-Peña, Elena; Walt, David R; Moreno-Bondi, María C

    2015-05-01

    In this article we describe a new class of high-density optical microarrays based on molecularly imprinted microsphere sensors that directly incorporate specific recognition capabilities to detect enrofloxacin (ENRO), an antibiotic widely used for both human and veterinary applications. This approach involves the preparation of highly cross-linked polymer microspheres by thermal precipitation-polymerization in the presence and absence of the target analyte ENRO to generate either molecularly imprinted (MIP) or non-imprinted polymer (NIP) microspheres, respectively. Each polymer type of tailor-made microsphere is fluorescently encoded with either coumarin-30 or tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline)ruthenium(ii) dichloride [Ru(dip) 3 ]Cl 2 to enable the microspheres to be distinguished. The new MIP-based sensing platform utilizes an optical fiber bundle containing approximately 50 000 individual 3.1 μm diameter fibers that are chemically etched to create microwells in which MIP and NIP microspheres can be deposited and imaged using an epi-fluorescence microscope. The method enables multiplexed detection by independently addressing both types of beads through their separate light channels. The unique response to the presence of ENRO is manifested on the basis of a competitive immunoassay. A red-fluorescent dye-tagged ENRO, labeled with BODIPY® TR Cadaverine, competes with ENRO for specific binding sites. The developed immuno-like assay displayed a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.04 μM (10% binding inhibition) and a dynamic range of 0.29-21.54 μM (20-80% binding inhibition). The selectivity of the assay was evaluated by measuring the cross-reactivity of other fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, danofloxacin, and flumequine) and non-related antibiotics (penicillin G and doxycycline). This work demonstrates, for the first time, the applicability of MIPs, as an alternative to biomolecule receptors, for the development of multiplexed detection fiber-optic

  7. In vivo detection of plutonium in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes with a fiber-optic coupled scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swinth, K.L.; Park, J.F.; Voelz, G.L.; Ewins, J.H.

    1976-01-01

    An intraesophageal probe was developed for measuring plutonium in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes. The probe uses a fiber-optic coupled NaI(Tl) scintillator as a detector and has a detection limit one-tenth that of a solid-state probe previously used for this measurement. The probe, with a projected sensitivity of 1 cpm/nCi, was used to detect plutonium in the lymph nodes of 11 experimentally exposed dogs. Tests on an accidentally exposed human volunteer yielded positive counts from the lymph nodes from an amount estimated at 7 nCi in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes

  8. A Noninvasive Miniaturized-Wireless Laser-Doppler Fiber-Optic Sensor for Understanding Distal Fingertip Injuries in Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Pollonini, Luca; Rodriquez, Mikael; Opperman, Roedolph; Hochstein, Jason

    2009-01-01

    During extra-vehicular activities (EVAs) or spacewalks astronauts over use their fingertips under pressure inside the confined spaces of gloves/space suits. The repetitive hand motion is a probable cause for discomfort and injuries to the fingertips. We describe a new wireless fiber-optic probe that can be integrated inside the astronaut glove for noninvasive blood perfusion measurements in distal fingertips. In this preliminary study, we present blood perfusion measurements while performing hand-grip exercises simulating the use of space tools.

  9. Fiber-Optic Refractometer Based on an Etched High-Q ?-Phase-Shifted Fiber-Bragg-Grating

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qi; Ianno, Natale J.; Han, Ming

    2013-01-01

    We present a compact and highly-sensitive fiber-optic refractometer based on a high-Q p-phase-shifted fiber-Bragg-grating (pFBG) that is chemically etched to the core of the fiber. Due to the p phase-shift, a strong pFBG forms a high-Q optical resonator and the reflection spectrum features an extremely narrow notch that can be used for highly sensitivity refractive index measurement. The etched pFBG demonstrated here has a diameter of ~9.3 μm and a length of only 7 mm, leading to a refractive...

  10. Ignition technique for an in situ oil shale retort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Chang Y.

    1983-01-01

    A generally flat combustion zone is formed across the entire horizontal cross-section of a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles formed in an in situ oil shale retort. The flat combustion zone is formed by either sequentially igniting regions of the surface of the fragmented permeable mass at successively lower elevations or by igniting the entire surface of the fragmented permeable mass and controlling the rate of advance of various portions of the combustion zone.

  11. Sex in situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøgholt, Ida

    2017-01-01

    Sex er en del af vores sociale praksis og centralt for det, vi hver især er. Men bortset fra pornoindustrien, har vi ikke mange muligheder for at få adgang til billeder af sex. Teater Nordkrafts forestilling Sex in situ vil gøre seksuelle billeder til noget, der kan deles, udveksles og tales om, og...

  12. Influences of optical-spectrum errors on excess relative intensity noise in a fiber-optic gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yue; Zhang, Chunxi; Li, Lijing

    2018-03-01

    The excess relative intensity noise (RIN) generated from broadband sources degrades the angular-random-walk performance of a fiber-optic gyroscope dramatically. Many methods have been proposed and managed to suppress the excess RIN. However, the properties of the excess RIN under the influences of different optical errors in the fiber-optic gyroscope have not been systematically investigated. Therefore, it is difficult for the existing RIN-suppression methods to achieve the optimal results in practice. In this work, the influences of different optical-spectrum errors on the power spectral density of the excess RIN are theoretically analyzed. In particular, the properties of the excess RIN affected by the raised-cosine-type ripples in the optical spectrum are elaborately investigated. Experimental measurements of the excess RIN corresponding to different optical-spectrum errors are in good agreement with our theoretical analysis, demonstrating its validity. This work provides a comprehensive understanding of the properties of the excess RIN under the influences of different optical-spectrum errors. Potentially, it can be utilized to optimize the configurations of the existing RIN-suppression methods by accurately evaluating the power spectral density of the excess RIN.

  13. DAQ application of PC oscilloscope for chaos fiber-optic fence system based on LabVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Manman; Fang, Nian; Wang, Lutang; Huang, Zhaoming; Sun, Xiaofei

    2011-12-01

    In order to obtain simultaneously high sample rate and large buffer in data acquisition (DAQ) for a chaos fiber-optic fence system, we developed a double-channel high-speed DAQ application of a digital oscilloscope of PicoScope 5203 based on LabVIEW. We accomplished it by creating call library function (CLF) nodes to call the DAQ functions in the two dynamic link libraries (DLLs) of PS5000.dll and PS5000wrap.dll provided by Pico Technology Company. The maximum real-time sample rate of the DAQ application can reach 1GS/s. We can control the resolutions of the application at the sample time and data amplitudes by changing their units in the block diagram, and also control the start and end times of the sampling operations. The experimental results show that the application has enough high sample rate and large buffer to meet the demanding DAQ requirements of the chaos fiber-optic fence system.

  14. A Piezoelectroluminescent Fiber-Optical Sensor for Diagnostics of the 3D Stress State in Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan'kov, A. A.

    2018-05-01

    The mathematical model of a piezoelectroluminescent fiber-optical sensor is developed for diagnostics of the 3D stress state of composite structures. The sensor model is a coaxial sector-compound layered cylinder consisting of a central optical fiber with electroluminescent and piezoelectric layers and an external uniform elastic buffer layer. The electroluminescent and piezoelectric layers are separated by radial-longitudinal boundaries, common for both layers, into geometrically equal six "measuring elements" — cylindrical two-layered sectors. The directions of 3D polarization of the piezoelectric phases and the frequencies of luminous efficacy of the electroluminescent phases are different in each sector. In the sensor, a thin translucent "internal" controlling electrode is located between the optical fiber and the electroluminescent layer, and the piezoelectric layer is coated by a thin "external" controlling electrode. The results of numerical modeling of the nonuniform coupled electroelastic fields of the piezoelectroluminescent fiber-optical sensor in the loaded "representative volume" of a composite, taking into account the action of the controlling voltage on the internal and external electrodes, of a numerical calculation of "informative and controlling coefficients" of the sensor, and of testing of an arbitrary 3D stress of state of a unidirectional glass-fiber plastic by the finite-element method are presented.

  15. Fiber-optic thermometer application of thermal radiation from rare-earth end-doped SiO2 fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsumata, Toru; Morita, Kentaro; Komuro, Shuji; Aizawa, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Visible light thermal radiation from SiO 2 glass doped with Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu were studied for the fiber-optic thermometer application based on the temperature dependence of thermal radiation. Thermal radiations according to Planck's law of radiation are observed from the SiO 2 fibers doped with Y, La, Ce, Pr, Eu, Tb, and Lu at the temperature above 1100 K. Thermal radiations due to f-f transitions of rare-earth ions are observed from the SiO 2 fibers doped with Nd, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Yb at the temperature above 900 K. Peak intensities of thermal radiations from rare-earth doped SiO 2 fibers increase sensitively with temperature. Thermal activation energies of thermal radiations by f-f transitions seen in Nd, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Yb doped SiO 2 fibers are smaller than those from SiO 2 fibers doped with Y, La, Ce, Pr, Eu, Tb, and Lu. Thermal radiation due to highly efficient f-f transitions in Nd, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Yb ions emits more easily than usual thermal radiation process. Thermal radiations from rare-earth doped SiO 2 are potentially applicable for the fiber-optic thermometry above 900 K

  16. Monitoring of itaconic acid hydrogenation in a trickle bed reactor using fiber-optic coupled near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Joseph; Turner, Paul H

    2003-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has been applied to determine the conversion of itaconic acid in the effluent stream of a trickle bed reactor. Hydrogenation of itaconic to methyl succinic acid was carried out, with the trickle bed operating in recycle mode. For the first time, NIR spectra of itaconic and methyl succinic acids in aqueous solution, and aqueous mixtures withdrawn from the reactor over a range of reaction times, have been recorded using a fiberoptic sampling probe. The infrared spectra displayed a clear isolated absorption band at a wavenumber of 6186 cm(-1) (wavelength 1.617 microm) resulting from the =C-H bonds of itaconic acid, which was found to decrease in intensity with increasing reaction time. The feature could be more clearly observed from plots of the first derivatives of the spectra. A partial least-squares (PLS) model was developed from the spectra of 13 reference samples and was used successfully to calculate the concentration of the two acids in the reactor effluent solution. Itaconic acid conversions of 23-29% were calculated after 360 min of reaction time. The potential of FT-NIR with fiber-optic sampling for remote monitoring of three-phase catalytic reactors and validation of catalytic reactor models is highlighted in the paper.

  17. [INVITED] Porphyrin-nanoassembled fiber-optic gas sensor fabrication: Optimization of parameters for sensitive ammonia gas detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korposh, Sergiy; Kodaira, Suguru; Selyanchyn, Roman; Ledezma, Francisco H.; James, Stephen W.; Lee, Seung-Woo

    2018-05-01

    Highly sensitive fiber-optic ammonia gas sensors were fabricated via layer-by-layer deposition of poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) and tetrakis(4-sulfophenyl)porphine (TSPP) onto the surface of the core of a hard-clad multimode fiber that was stripped of its polymer cladding. The effects of film thickness, length of sensing area, and depth of evanescent wave penetration were investigated to clearly understand the sensor performance. The sensitivity of the fiber-optic sensor to ammonia was linear in the concentration range of 0.5-50 ppm and the response and recovery times were less than 3 min, with a limit of detection of 0.5 ppm, when a ten-cycle PDDA/TSPP film was assembled on the surface of the core along a 1 cm-long stripped section of the fiber. The sensor's response towards ammonia was also checked under different relative humidity conditions and a simple statistical data treatment approach, principal component analysis, demonstrated the feasibility of ammonia sensing in environmental relative humidity ranging from dry 7% to highly saturated 80%. Penetration depths of the evanescent wave for the optimal sensor configuration were estimated to be 30 and 33 nm at wavelengths of 420 and 706 nm, which are in a good agreement with the thickness of the 10-cycle deposited film (ca. 30 nm).

  18. Comparison of two fiber-optical temperature measurement systems in magnetic fields up to 9.4 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchenberg, Waltraud B; Dadakova, Tetiana; Groebner, Jens; Bock, Michael; Jung, Bernd

    2015-05-01

    Precise temperature measurements in the magnetic field are indispensable for MR safety studies and for temperature calibration during MR-guided thermotherapy. In this work, the interference of two commonly used fiber-optical temperature measurement systems with the static magnetic field B0 was determined. Two fiber-optical temperature measurement systems, a GaAs-semiconductor and a phosphorescent phosphor ceramic, were compared for temperature measurements in B0 . The probes and a glass thermometer for reference were placed in an MR-compatible tube phantom within a water bath. Temperature measurements were carried out at three different MR systems covering static magnetic fields up to B0  = 9.4T, and water temperatures were changed between 25°C and 65°C. The GaAs-probe significantly underestimated absolute temperatures by an amount related to the square of B0 . A maximum difference of ΔT = -4.6°C was seen at 9.4T. No systematic temperature difference was found with the phosphor ceramic probe. For both systems, the measurements were not dependent on the orientation of the sensor to B0 . Temperature measurements with the phosphor ceramic probe are immune to magnetic fields up to 9.4T, whereas the GaAs-probes either require a recalibration inside the MR system or a correction based on the square of B0. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Augmenting convection-enhanced delivery through simultaneous co-delivery of fluids and laser energy with a fiberoptic microneedle device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, R. Lyle; Ecker, Tobias; Andriani, Rudy; Robertson, John; Rossmeisl, John; Rylander, Christopher G.

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes a new infusion catheter, based on our fiberoptic microneedle device (FMD), designed with the objective of photothermally augmenting the volumetric dispersal of infused therapeutics. We hypothesize that concurrent delivery of laser energy, causing mild localized photothermal heating (4-5 °C), will increase the spatial dispersal of infused chemotherapy over a long infusion period. Agarose brain phantoms, which mimic the brain's mechanical and fluid conduction properties, were constructed from 0.6 wt% Agarose in aqueous solution. FMDs were fabricated by adhering a multimode fiberoptic to a silica capillary tube, such that their flat-polished tips co-terminated. Continuous wave 1064 nm light was delivered simultaneously with FD&C Blue #2 (5%) dye into phantoms. Preliminary experiments, where co-delivery was tested against fluid delivery alone (through symmetrical infusions into in vivo rodent models), were also conducted. In the Agarose phantoms, volumetric dispersal was demonstrated to increase by more than 3-fold over a four-hour infusion time frame for co-delivery relative to infusion-only controls. Both forward and backward (reflux) infusions were also observed to increase slightly. Increased volumetric dispersal was demonstrated with co-delivery in an in vivo rodent model. Photothermal augmentation of infusion was demonstrated to influence the directionality and increase the volume of dye dispersal in Agarose brain phantoms. With further development, FMDs may enable a greater distribution of chemotherapeutic agents during CED therapy of brain tumors.

  20. Assessment of quality parameters in grapes during ripening using a miniature fiber-optic near-infrared spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Novales, Juan; López, María-Isabel; Sánchez, María-Teresa; García-Mesa, José-Antonio; González-Caballero, Virginia

    2009-01-01

    Changes in the chemical properties of wine grapes during ripening were studied using near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. A miniature fiber-optic NIR spectrometer system working in transmission mode in the spectral region (700 - 1,060 nm) was evaluated for this purpose. Spectra and analytical data were used to develop partial least square calibration models to quantify changes in the major parameters used to chart ripening in this fruit. NIR spectroscopy provided excellent precision for soluble solid content and for reducing sugars, and good precision for maturity index, while for pH and titratable acidity the miniature NIR spectroscopy instrument proved less accurate. The performance of the instrument in classifying wine grapes by grape type and by irrigation regime was also studied. Percentages of correctly classified samples ranged from 82.7% to 96.2%. The results show that the monitoring of soluble solid content and reducing sugars' changes in wine grape quality parameters during ripening, as well as the classification of grapes, can be performed non-destructively using a miniature fiber-optic NIR spectrometer.

  1. Photonic layer security in fiber-optic networks and optical OFDM transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenxing

    Currently the Internet is experiencing an explosive growth in the world. Such growth leads to an increased data transmission rate demand in fiber-optical networks. Optical orthogonal frequency multiplexing (OFDM) is considered as a promising solution to achieve data rate beyond 100Gb/s per wavelength channel. In the meanwhile, because of extensive data transmission and sharing, data security has become an important problem and receives considerable attention in current research literature. This thesis focuses on data security issues at the physical layer of optical networks involving code-division multiple access (CDMA) systems and steganography methods. The thesis also covers several implementation issues in optical OFDM transmission. Optical CDMA is regarded as a good candidate to provide photonic layer security in multi-access channels. In this thesis we provide a systematic analysis of the security performance of incoherent optical CDMA codes. Based on the analysis, we proposed and experimentally demonstrated several methods to improve the security performance of the optical CDMA systems, such as applying all-optical encryption, and code hopping using nonlinear wavelength conversion. Moreover, we demonstrate that the use of wireless CDMA codes in optical systems can enhance the security in one single-user end-to-end optical channel. Optical steganography is another method to provide photonic data security and involves hiding the existence of data transmissions. In the thesis, we demonstrate that an optical steganography channel can exist in phase modulated public channels as well as traditional on-off-keying (OOK) modulated channels, without data synchronization. We also demonstrate an optical steganography system with enhanced security by utilizing temporal phase modulation techniques. Additionally, as one type of an overlay channel, the optical steganography technology can carry the sensor data collected by wireless sensor network on top of public optical

  2. Sleeping dendrites: fiber-optic measurements of dendritic calcium activity in freely moving and sleeping animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Seibt

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dendrites are the post-synaptic sites of most excitatory and inhibitory synapses in the brain, making them the main location of cortical information processing and synaptic plasticity. Although current hypotheses suggest a central role for sleep in proper cognitive function and brain plasticity, virtually nothing is known about changes in dendritic activity across the sleep-wake cycle and how waking experience modifies this activity. To start addressing these questions, we developed a method that allows long-term recordings of EEGs/EMG combined with in vivo cortical calcium (Ca2+ activity in freely moving and sleeping rats. We measured Ca2+ activity from populations of dendrites of layer (L 5 pyramidal neurons (n = 13 rats that we compared with Ca2+ activity from populations of neurons in L2/3 (n = 11 rats. L5 and L2/3 neurons were labelled using bolus injection of OGB1-AM or GCaMP6 (1. Ca2+ signals were detected using a fiber-optic system (cannula diameter = 400µm, transmitting the changes in fluorescence to a photodiode. Ca2+ fluctuations could then be correlated with ongoing changes in brain oscillatory activity during 5 major brain states: active wake [AW], quiet wake [QW], NREM, REM and NREM-REM transition (or intermediate state, [IS]. Our Ca2+ recordings show large transients in L5 dendrites and L2/3 neurons that oscillate predominantly at frequencies In summary, we show that this technique is successful in monitoring fluctuations in ongoing dendritic Ca2+ activity during natural brain states and allows, in principle, to combine behavioral measurement with imaging from various brain regions (e.g. deep structures in freely behaving animals. Using this method, we show that Ca2+ transients from populations of L2/3 neurons and L5 dendrites are deferentially regulated across the sleep/wake cycle, with dendritic activity being the highest during the IS sleep. Our correlation analysis suggests that specific sleep EEG activity during NREM and IS

  3. Churg–Strauss Syndrome Presenting with Endobronchial Masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veli Çetinsu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Churg–Strauss syndrome is a condition with unknown etiology and asthma, allergic rhinitis, eosinophilic infiltration of blood and tissues, and transient infiltration of the lungs. It occurs mostly in the 3rd–4th decades of life with an incidence of 2.4/1000000. Presentation frequently involves nodular lung infiltrations, infiltrations with cavity, ground-glass appearance, and alveolar opacity. However, endobronchial mass is an unexpected presentation. In the current case report, we present a 45-year-old male patient who was receiving asthma therapy for 5 years. In the last follow-up visit, we identified a mass in the right hilum on X-ray radiography and performed fiberoptic bronchoscopy. Pathologic examination of biopsy material verified the diagnosis of Churg–Strauss syndrome. Bronchial mass is an unexpected presentation of Churg–Strauss syndrome and pathologic examination is essential to distinguish it from pulmonary malignancies

  4. In situ reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Corey William; Blackwelder, David Bradley

    2004-01-27

    An in situ reactor for use in a geological strata, is described and which includes a liner defining a centrally disposed passageway and which is placed in a borehole formed in the geological strata; and a sampling conduit is received within the passageway defined by the liner and which receives a geological specimen which is derived from the geological strata, and wherein the sampling conduit is in fluid communication with the passageway defined by the liner.

  5. Malignant mesothelioma in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churg, Andrew; Hwang, Harry; Tan, Larry; Qing, Gefei; Taher, Altaf; Tong, Amy; Bilawich, Ana M; Dacic, Sanja

    2018-05-01

    The existence of malignant mesothelioma in situ (MIS) is often postulated, but there are no accepted morphological criteria for making such a diagnosis. Here we report two cases that appear to be true MIS on the basis of in-situ genomic analysis. In one case the patient had repeated unexplained pleural unilateral effusions. Two thoracoscopies 9 months apart revealed only visually normal pleura. Biopsies from both thoracoscopies showed only a single layer of mildly reactive mesothelial cells. However, these cells had lost BRCA1-associated protein 1 (BAP1) and showed loss of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2 (CDKN2A) (p16) by fluorescence in-situ hybridisation (FISH). NF2 was not deleted by FISH but 28% of the mesothelial cells showed hyperploidy. Six months after the second biopsy the patient has persisting effusions but no evidence of pleural malignancy on imaging. The second patient presented with ascites and minimal omental thickening on imaging, but no visual evidence of tumour at laparoscopy. Omental biopsy showed a single layer of minimally atypical mesothelial cells with rare tiny foci of superficial invasion of fat. BAP1 immunostain showed loss of nuclear BAP1 in all the surface mesothelial cells and the invasive cells. There was CDKN2A deletion, but no deletion of NF2 by FISH. These cases show that morphologically bland single-layered surface mesothelial proliferations with molecular alterations seen previously only in invasive malignant mesotheliomas exist, and presumably represent malignant MIS. More cases are need to understand the frequency of such changes and the time-course over which invasive tumour develops. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. In situ breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, Luis

    2004-01-01

    In situ breast cancer, particularly the ductal type, is increasing in frequency in the developed countries as well as in Ecuador, most probably. These lesions carry a higher risk of developing a subsequent invasive cancer. Treatment has changed recently due to results of randomized studies, from classical mastectomy to conservative surgery associated to radiotherapy. The Van Nuys Prognostic Index is currently the most usual instrument to guide diagnosis and treatment. Tamoxifen seems to decrease significantly the risk of tumor recurrence after initial treatment. (The author)

  7. Launch and capture of a single particle in a pulse-laser-assisted dual-beam fiber-optic trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zhenhai; She, Xuan; Li, Nan; Hu, Huizhu

    2018-06-01

    The rapid loading and manipulation of microspheres in optical trap is important for its applications in optomechanics and precision force sensing. We investigate the microsphere behavior under coaction of a dual-beam fiber-optic trap and a pulse laser beam, which reveals a launched microsphere can be effectively captured in a spatial region. A suitable order of pulse duration for launch is derived according to the calculated detachment energy threshold of pulse laser. Furthermore, we illustrate the effect of structural parameters on the launching process, including the spot size of pulse laser, the vertical displacement of beam waist and the initial position of microsphere. Our result will be instructive in the optimal design of the pulse-laser-assisted optical tweezers for controllable loading mechanism of optical trap.

  8. UW Imaging of Seismic-Physical-Models in Air Using Fiber-Optic Fabry-Perot Interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Qiangzhou; Hao, Yongxin; Zhou, Ruixiang; Yin, Xunli; Shao, Zhihua; Liang, Lei; Qiao, Xueguang

    2017-02-17

    A fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) has been proposed and demonstrated for the ultrasound wave (UW) imaging of seismic-physical models. The sensor probe comprises a single mode fiber (SMF) that is inserted into a ceramic tube terminated by an ultra-thin gold film. The probe performs with an excellent UW sensitivity thanks to the nanolayer gold film, and thus is capable of detecting a weak UW in air medium. Furthermore, the compact sensor is a symmetrical structure so that it presents a good directionality in the UW detection. The spectral band-side filter technique is used for UW interrogation. After scanning the models using the sensing probe in air, the two-dimensional (2D) images of four physical models are reconstructed.

  9. Statistical mapping of zones of focused groundwater/surface-water exchange using fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwakanyamale, Kisa; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Slater, Lee D.

    2013-01-01

    Fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS) increasingly is used to map zones of focused groundwater/surface-water exchange (GWSWE). Previous studies of GWSWE using FO-DTS involved identification of zones of focused GWSWE based on arbitrary cutoffs of FO-DTS time-series statistics (e.g., variance, cross-correlation between temperature and stage, or spectral power). New approaches are needed to extract more quantitative information from large, complex FO-DTS data sets while concurrently providing an assessment of uncertainty associated with mapping zones of focused GSWSE. Toward this end, we present a strategy combining discriminant analysis (DA) and spectral analysis (SA). We demonstrate the approach using field experimental data from a reach of the Columbia River adjacent to the Hanford 300 Area site. Results of the combined SA/DA approach are shown to be superior to previous results from qualitative interpretation of FO-DTS spectra alone.

  10. Time-resolved laser-excited Shpol'skii spectrometry with a fiber-optic probe and ICCD camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystol, Adam J.; Campiglia, Andres D.; Gillispie, Gregory D.

    2000-01-01

    Improved methodology for chemical analysis via laser-excited Shpol'skii spectrometry is reported. The complications of traditional methodology for measurements at liquid nitrogen temperature are avoided by freezing the distal end of a bifurcated fiber-optic probe directly into the sample matrix. Emission wavelength-time matrices were rapidly collected by automatically incrementing the gate delay of an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera relative to the laser excitation pulse. The excitation source is a compact frequency-doubled tunable dye laser whose bandwidth (<0.03 nm) is well matched for Shpol'skii spectroscopy. Data reproducibility for quantitative analysis purposes and analytical figures of merit are demonstrated for several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at 77 K. Although not attempted in this study, time-resolved excitation-emission matrices could easily be collected with this instrumental system. (c) 2000 Society for Applied Spectroscopy

  11. Physiological pH fiber-optic chemical sensor based on energy transfer. [Eosin and phenol red

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, D.M.; Walt, D.R.; Milanovich, F.P.

    1987-02-01

    A fiber-optic sensor has been developed containing a fluorophore, eosin, and an absorber, phenol red, coimmobilized on the distal end of an optical fiber. When an argon laser is used to excite eosin with light of lambda 488 nm, a region of the spectrum where phenol red does not absorb, eosin emits light in a spectral region that overlaps significantly with the absorption spectru of the basic form of phenol red. Consequently, nonradiative energy transfer occurs from eosin (donor) to phenol red (acceptor). The amount of energy transfer increases as the pH increases resulting in a diminished fluorescence intensity. Thus, changes in the absorption of phenol red as a function of pH are detected as changes in the fluorescent signal. In this manner a pH sensor optimized for physiological pH measurement has been prepared. The fiber exhibits a precision of at least 0.01 pH units.

  12. Amplification of the Signal Intensity of Fluorescence-Based Fiber-Optic Biosensors Using a Fabry-Perot Resonator Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Chang Hsieh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent biosensors have been widely used in biomedical applications. To amplify the intensity of fluorescence signals, this study developed a novel structure for an evanescent wave fiber-optic biosensor by using a Fabry-Perot resonator structure. An excitation light was coupled into the optical fiber through a laser-drilled hole on the proximal end of the resonator. After entering the resonator, the excitation light was reflected back and forth inside the resonator, thereby amplifying the intensity of the light in the fiber. Subsequently, the light was used to excite the fluorescent molecules in the reactive region of the sensor. The experimental results showed that the biosensor signal was amplified eight-fold when the resonator reflector was formed using a 92% reflective coating. Furthermore, in a simulation, the biosensor signal could be amplified 20-fold by using a 99% reflector.

  13. Design, analysis, and initial testing of a fiber-optic shear gage for three-dimensional, high-temperature flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Matthew W.

    This investigation concerns the design, analysis, and initial testing of a new, two-component wall shear gage for 3D, high-temperature flows. This gage is a direct-measuring, non-nulling design with a round head surrounded by a small gap. Two flexure wheels are used to allow small motions of the floating head. Fiber-optic displacement sensors measure how far the polished faces of counterweights on the wheels move in relation to a fixed housing as the primary measurement system. No viscous damping was required. The gage has both fiber-optic instrumentation and strain gages mounted on the flexures for validation of the newer fiber optics. The sensor is constructed of Haynes RTM 230RTM, a high-temperature nickel alloy. The gage housing is made of 316 stainless steel. All components of the gage in pure fiber-optic form can survive to a temperature of 1073 K. The bonding methods of the backup strain gages limit their maximum temperature to 473 K. The dynamic range of the gage is from 0--500 Pa (0--10g) and higher shears can be measured by changing the floating head size. Extensive use of finite element modeling was critical to the design and analysis of the gage. Static structural, modal, and thermal analyses were performed on the flexures using the ANSYS finite element package. Static finite element analysis predicted the response of the flexures to a given load, and static calibrations using a direct force method confirmed these results. Finite element modal analysis results were within 16.4% for the first mode and within 30% for the second mode when compared with the experimentally determined modes. Vibration characteristics of the gage were determined from experimental free vibration data after the gage was subjected to an impulse. Uncertainties in the finished geometry make this level of error acceptable. A transient thermal analysis examined the effects of a very high heat flux on the exposed head of the gage. The 100,000 W/m2 heat flux used in this analysis is

  14. Fiber-Optic Magnetometry and Thermometry Using Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance With Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakley, Sean Michael

    Nitrogen--vacancy diamond (NVD) quantum sensors are an emerging technology that has shown great promise in areas like high-resolution thermometry and magnetometry. Optical fibers provide attractive new application paradigms for NVD technology. A detailed description of the fabrication processes associated with the development of novel fiber-optic NVD probes are presented in this work. The demonstrated probes are tested on paradigmatic model systems designed to ascertain their suitability for use in challenging biological environments. Methods employing optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) are used to accurately measure and map temperature distributions of small objects and to demonstrate emergent temperature-dependent phenomena in genetically modified living organisms. These methods are also used to create detailed high resolution spatial maps of both magnetic scalar and magnetic vector field distributions of spatially localized weak field features in the presence of a noisy, high-field background.

  15. Fiber-optic combined FPI/FBG sensors for monitoring of radiofrequency thermal ablation of liver tumors: ex vivo experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Daniele; Macchi, Edoardo Gino; Braschi, Giovanni; Cigada, Alfredo; Gallati, Mario; Rossi, Sandro; Poeggel, Sven; Leen, Gabriel; Lewis, Elfed

    2014-04-01

    We present a biocompatible, all-glass, 0.2 mm diameter, fiber-optic probe that combines an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometry and a proximal fiber Bragg grating sensor; the probe enables dual pressure and temperature measurement on an active 4 mm length, with 40 Pa and 0.2°C nominal accuracy. The sensing system has been applied to monitor online the radiofrequency thermal ablation of tumors in liver tissue. Preliminary experiments have been performed in a reference chamber with uniform heating; further experiments have been carried out on ex vivo porcine liver, which allowed the measurement of a steep temperature gradient and monitoring of the local pressure increase during the ablation procedure.

  16. Interferometric fiber-optic sensor embedded in a spark plug for in-cylinder pressure measurement in engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Taehan; Atkins, Robert A; Taylor, Henry F; Gibler, William N

    2003-02-20

    Pressure sensing in an internal combustion engine with an intrinsic fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FFPI) integrated with a spark plug is demonstrated for the first time. The spark plug was used for the ignition of the cylinder in which it was mounted. The FFPI element, protected with a copper/gold coating, was embedded in a groove in the spark-plug housing. Gas pressure inthe engine induced longitudinal strain in this housing, which was also experienced by the fiber-optic sensing element. The sensor was monitored with a signal conditioning unit containing a chirped distributed-feedback laser. Pressure sensitivities as high as 0.00339 radians round-trip phase shift per pounds per square inch of pressure were observed. Measured pressure versus time traces showed good agreement with those from a piezoelectric reference sensor mounted in the same engine cylinder.

  17. Calculated trends and the atmospheric abundance of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane, 1,1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane, and 1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane using automated in-situ gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurements recorded at Mace Head, Ireland, from October 1994 to March 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds, P. G.; O'Doherty, S.; Huang, J.; Prinn, R.; Derwent, R. G.; Ryall, D.; Nickless, G.; Cunnold, D.

    1998-01-01

    The first in-situ measurements by automated gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer are reported for 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a), 1,1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane, (HCFC-141b), and 1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane, (HCFC-142b). These compounds are steadily replacing the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) as refrigerants, foam-blowing agents, and solvents. The concentrations of all three compounds are shown to be rapidly increasing in the atmosphere, with 134a increasing at a rate of 2.05±0.02 ppt yr-1 over the 30 months of observations. Similarly, 141b and 142b increased at rates of 2.49±0.03 and 1.24±0.02 ppt yr-1, respectively, over the same period. The concentrations recorded at the atmospheric research station at Mace Head, Ireland, on January 1, 1996, the midpoint of the time series, were 3.67 ppt (134a), 7.38 ppt (141b), and 8.78 ppt (142b). From these observations we optimally estimate the HCFC and HFC emissions using a 12-box global model and OH concentrations derived from global 1,1,1-trichloroethane (CCl3CH3) measurements. Comparing two methods of estimating emissions with independent industry estimates shows satisfactory agreement for 134a and 141b, while for 142b, industry estimates are less than half those required to explain our observations.

  18. Very little in situ produced radiocarbon retained in accumulating Antarctic ice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemp, W.J.M. van der; Alderliesten, C.; Borg, K. van der; Holmlund, P.; Jong, A.F.M. de; Karlöf, L.; Lamers, R.A.N.; Oerlemans, J.; Thomassen, M.; Wal, R.S.W. van de

    2000-01-01

    Ice samples from Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica, were analyzed for 14CO2 and 14CO by accelerator mass spectrometry. Only a small amount (~2%) of in situ produced radiocarbon was detected. The calibrated radiocarbon ages, corrected for in situ produced 14C, are in fair agreement with age estimates

  19. Characterization of subcritical water oxidation with in situ monitoring and self-modeling curve resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemperline, Paul J.; Yang Yu; Bian Zhihui

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, a subcritical water oxidation (SBWO) process was monitored using self-modeling curve resolution (SMCR) of in situ UV-Vis measurements to estimate time-dependant composition profiles of reactants, intermediates and products. A small laboratory scale reactor with UV-Vis fiber-optic probes and a flow cell was used to demonstrate the usefulness of SMCR for monitoring the destruction of model compounds phenol, benzoic acid, and aniline in a dilute aqueous solutions. Hydrogen peroxide was used as the oxidizing reagent at moderate temperature (150-250 deg. C) and pressure (60-90 atm) in a single phase. By use of in situ monitoring, reaction times were easily determined and conditions for efficient oxidations were easily diagnosed without the need for time consuming off-line reference measurements. For selected runs, the destruction of the model compound was confirmed by gas chromatography and chemical oxygen demand (COD) measurements. Suspected intermediate oxidation products were easily detected by the use of UV-Vis spectrometry and self-modeling curve resolution, but could not be detected by gas chromatography

  20. In situ applications of a new diver-operated motorized microsensor profiler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Miriam; Faerber, Paul; Meyer, Volker; Lott, Christian; Eickert, Gabriele; Fabricius, Katharina E; De Beer, Dirk

    2007-09-01

    Microsensors are powerful tools for microenvironment studies, however their use has often been restricted to laboratory applications due to the lack of adequate equipment for in situ deployments. Here we report on new features, construction details, and examples of applications of an improved diver-operated motorized microsensor profiler for underwater field operation to a water depth of 25 m. The new motorized profiler has a final precision of 5 microm, and can accommodate amperometric Clark-type microsensors for oxygen and hydrogen sulfide, potentiometric microsensors (e.g., for pH, Ca2+), and fiber-optic irradiance microsensors. The profiler is interfaced by a logger with a signal display, and has pushbuttons for underwater operation. The system can be pre-programmed to autonomous operation or interactively operated by divers. Internal batteries supply power for up to 24 h of measurements and 36 h of data storage (max. 64 million data points). Two flexible stands were developed for deployment on uneven or fragile surfaces, such as coral reefs. Three experimental pilot studies are presented, where (1) the oxygen distribution in a sand ripple was 3-D-mapped, (2) the microenvironment of sediment accumulated on a stony coral was studied, and (3) oxygen dynamics during an experimental sedimentation were investigated. This system allows SCUBA divers to perform a wide array of in situ measurements, with deployment precision and duration similar to those possible in the laboratory.

  1. Reaction and Transport Processes Controlling In Situ Chemical Oxidation of DNAPLs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Siegrist, Robert L; Crimi, Michelle; Munakata-Marr, Junko; Illangasekare, Tissa; Dugan, Pamela; Heiderscheidt, Jeff; Jackson, Shannon; Petri, Ben; Sahl, Jason; Seitz, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    In situ chemical oxidation involves the introduction of chemical oxidants into the subsurface to destroy organic contaminants in soil and ground water, with the goal being to reduce the mass, mobility...

  2. In situ zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sarah J; Johnson, Jason L

    2010-01-01

    In situ zymography is a unique laboratory technique that enables the localisation of matrix-degrading metalloproteinase (MMP) activity in histological sections. Frozen sections are placed on glass slides coated with fluorescently labelled matrix proteins. After incubation MMP activity can be observed as black holes in the fluorescent background due to proteolysis of the matrix protein. Alternatively frozen sections can be incubated with matrix proteins conjugated to quenched fluorescein. Proteolysis of the substrate by MMPs leads to the release of fluorescence. This technique can be combined with immunohistochemistry to enable co-location of proteins such as cell type markers or other proteins of interest. Additionally, this technique can be adapted for use with cell cultures, permitting precise location of MMP activity within cells, time-lapse analysis of MMP activity and analysis of MMP activity in migrating cells.

  3. Type I anaphylactic reaction due to contrast induced angioedema causing neck swelling: the role of sitting fiberoptic bronchoscopy in emergent intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Dabbagh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Contrast induced angioedema is a rapidly progressive state involving a number of organ systems including the upper airway tract; which is usually a type I anaphylactic reaction also known as immediate hypersensitivity reaction. Prompt preservation of the respiratory tract is the cornerstone of this situation. The use of fiberoptic bronchoscope for tracheal intubation though very helpful, has some special considerations due to the anatomic distortions created by edema.This manuscript describes a patient with contrast induced angioedema managed successfully. Serum levels of IgE were highly increased during the first hours after the event; while serum levels of complement were normal. However, rapid airway management and prophylactic intubation saved the patient and prevented the possible aftermath of airway obstruction.Keywords: airway management; type I anaphylactic reaction, angioedema; fiberoptic bronchoscope.Conflict of interest: none of the authors has any conflict of interest.

  4. Beveled fiber-optic probe couples a ball lens for improving depth-resolved fluorescence measurements of layered tissue: Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaillon, Franck; Zheng Wei; Huang Zhiwei

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we evaluate the feasibility of designing a beveled fiber-optic probe coupled with a ball lens for improving depth-resolved fluorescence measurements of epithelial tissue using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The results show that by using the probe configuration with a beveled tip collection fiber and a flat tip excitation fiber associated with a ball lens, discrimination of fluorescence signals generated in different tissue depths is achievable. In comparison with a flat-tip collection fiber, the use of a large bevel angled collection fiber enables a better differentiation between the shallow and deep tissue layers by changing the excitation-collection fiber separations. This work suggests that the beveled fiber-optic probe coupled with a ball lens has the potential to facilitate depth-resolved fluorescence measurements of epithelial tissues

  5. A novel fiber-optic temperature sensor based on high temperature-dependent optical properties of ZnO film on sapphire fiber-ending

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Pinggen; Zhen Dong; Xu Xiaojun; Liu Yulin; Chen Naibo; Wei Gaorao; Sui Chenghua

    2010-01-01

    We report the growth of high-quality thin films of ZnO via an electron-beam evaporation technique. Studies of the transmittance spectra have revealed a sharp optical absorption edge and a significant redshift. After annealing at 673 K, the ZnO films again demonstrated a sharp absorption edge in a manner similar to the as-deposited samples. This illustrates the excellent thermal stability of the thin films and, as such, demonstrates their potential as fiber-optic temperature sensors. Utilizing the influence of optical absorption spectra at different temperatures, a novel fiber-optic temperature sensor based on this material has been designed and tested. This technique could offer a simple, robust and cost-effective method to be used in high temperature sensing applications.

  6. Feasibility Study on the Development of 2-channel Embedded Infrared Fiber-optic Sensor for Thermometry of Secondary Water System in Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, W. J.; Jang, K. W.; Seo, J. K.; Moon, J.; Han, K. T.; Lee, B.; Park, B. G.

    2011-01-01

    Any warm object by measuring the emitted infrared (IR) radiation. The radiometers using infrared optical fibers are based on the relationship between the temperature of a heat source and the quality and the quantity of an IR radiation. To measure physical properties including a temperature, optical fiber-based sensor has many advantages, such as small size, low cost, high resolution, remote sensing and immunity to electromagnetic radiation over conventional electrical sensors. In this study, we carried out the feasibility study on the development of an embedded IR fiber-optic sensor for thermometry of the secondary water system in a nuclear power plant. The 2-channel embedded fiberoptic temperature sensor was fabricated using two identical IR optical fibers for accurate thermometry without complicated calibration processes. To decide accurate temperature of the water, we measured the difference between the IR radiations emitted from the two temperature sensing probes according to the temperature variation of the water

  7. Penetrometer compatible, fiber-optic sensor for continuous monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbons -- field test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milanovich, F.P.; Brown, S.B.; Colston, B.W. Jr.

    1993-04-01

    We have developed and field tested a fiber optic chemical sensor for use in environmental monitoring and remediation. The principle of detection is colorimetric and is based on an irreversible chemical reaction between a specific reagent and the target compound. The formation of reaction products are monitored remotely with optical fibers. Successive or on-demand measurements are made possible with a reagent reservoir and a miniature pumping system. The sensor has been evaluated against gas chromatography standards and has demonstrated accuracy and sensitivity (>5ppb w/w) sufficient for the environmental monitoring of the contaminants triceoroethlyene (TCE) and chloroform. The sensor system can be used for bench-top analyses or for in-situ measurements such as groundwater and vadose monitoring wells or in Penetrometry mediated placements

  8. Fiber-Optic Defect and Damage Locator System for Wind Turbine Blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Vahid Sotoudeh; Dr. Richard J. Black; Dr. Behzad Moslehi; Mr. Aleks Plavsic

    2010-10-30

    IFOS in collaboration with Auburn University demonstrated the feasibility of a Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) integrated sensor system capable of providing real time in-situ defect detection, localization and quantification of damage. In addition, the system is capable of validating wind turbine blade structural models, using recent advances in non-contact, non-destructive dynamic testing of composite structures. This new generation method makes it possible to analyze wind turbine blades not only non-destructively, but also without physically contacting or implanting intrusive electrical elements and transducers into the structure. Phase I successfully demonstrated the feasibility of the technology with the construction of a 1.5 kHz sensor interrogator and preliminary instrumentation and testing of both composite material coupons and a wind turbine blade.

  9. Portable Mass Spectrometer Applications for In Situ Environmental Gas Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Timothy P.; Diaz, J. Andres; Arkin, C. Richard; Conejo, Elian

    2005-01-01

    Primary Goal of this project is to (1) Design/build a flexible system to monitor air contamination (2) Learn requirements for operating system in low pressure and low temperature environments (3) Design/build system for integration into aircraft and automobiles Secondary Goals/Offshoots are (1) Fly aboard different aircraft (2)Hand-carry unit (3) Drive unit in automobiles.

  10. Comparative study of the endoscope-based bevelled and volume fiber-optic Raman probes for optical diagnosis of gastric dysplasia in vivo at endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianfeng; Lin, Kan; Zheng, Wei; Ho, Khek Yu; Teh, Ming; Yeoh, Khay Guan; Huang, Zhiwei

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to compare the diagnostic performance of the two different endoscope-based fiber-optic Raman probe designs (i.e., bevelled and volume Raman probes) for real-time, in vivo detection of gastric dysplasia at endoscopy. To conduct the clinical comparison, a total of 1,050 in vivo tissue Raman spectra (normal: n = 864; dysplasia: n = 186) were acquired from 66 gastric patients (normal: n = 48; dysplasia: n = 18) by using bevelled Raman probe, while a total of 1,913 in vivo tissue Raman spectra (normal: n = 1,786; dysplasia: n = 127) were acquired from 98 gastric patients (normal: n = 87; dysplasia: n = 11) by using volume Raman probe. The bevelled Raman probe provides approximately twofold improvements in tissue Raman-to-autofluorescence intensity ratios as compared to the use of volume Raman probe. Partial least squares discriminant analysis together with leave-one patient-out cross-validation on in vivo tissue Raman spectra acquired yields a diagnostic accuracy of 93.0 % (sensitivity of 92.5 %; specificity of 93.1 %) for differentiating gastric dysplasia from normal gastric tissue by using the bevelled fiber-optic Raman probe, which is superior to the diagnostic performance (accuracy of 88.4 %; sensitivity of 85.8 %; specificity of 88.6 %) by using the volume Raman probe. This work demonstrates that the Raman spectroscopic technique coupled with bevelled fiber-optic Raman probe has great potential to enhance in vivo diagnosis of gastric precancer and early cancer at endoscopy. Graphical Abstract Comparison of in vivo gastric tissue Raman spectra acquired by using bevelled and volume fiber-optic Raman probes.

  11. An introduction to in-situ produced cosmogenic nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norton, K.P.

    2012-01-01

    Cosmogenic nuclides are produced through interactions between cosmic rays and target nuclei in Earth's atmosphere and surface materials. Those which are produced in Earth's atmosphere are termed 'meteoric' while the nuclides produced in surface material are known as in-situ cosmogenic nuclides. The past two decades have seen a proliferation of applications for cosmogenic nuclides. This is primarily due to a revolution in accelerator mass spectrometry, AMS, measurement techniques which has allowed the measurement of very small amounts of nuclides. The following is a brief introduction to the theory and application of in-situ produced cosmogenic nuclide methods. (author). 17 refs., figs., 1 tab.

  12. In situ monitoring of the electrochemical dissolution of tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krebsz, Melinda [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Combinatorial Oxide Chemistry at ICTAS, Johannes Kepler University Linz (Austria); Kollender, Jan Philipp [Institute for Chemical Technology of Inorganic Materials (ICTAS), Johannes Kepler University Linz (Austria); Hassel, Achim Walter [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Combinatorial Oxide Chemistry at ICTAS, Johannes Kepler University Linz (Austria); Institute for Chemical Technology of Inorganic Materials (ICTAS), Johannes Kepler University Linz (Austria)

    2017-09-15

    In the present work, which is aimed to monitor in situ the electrochemical dissolution of tungsten by using a Flow-Type Scanning Droplet Cell Microscope (FT-SDCM) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), novel results are reported. The anodic oxide growth and its dissolution on the surface of W have been monitored in situ. The results of this current study show the importance of coupling electrochemical experiments to ICP-MS. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Simultaneous fingerprint and high-wavenumber fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy improves in vivo diagnosis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma at endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianfeng; Lin, Kan; Zheng, Wei; Yu Ho, Khek; Teh, Ming; Guan Yeoh, Khay; Huang, Zhiwei

    2015-08-01

    This work aims to evaluate clinical value of a fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy technique developed for in vivo diagnosis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) during clinical endoscopy. We have developed a rapid fiber-optic Raman endoscopic system capable of simultaneously acquiring both fingerprint (FP)(800-1800 cm-1) and high-wavenumber (HW)(2800-3600 cm-1) Raman spectra from esophageal tissue in vivo. A total of 1172 in vivo FP/HW Raman spectra were acquired from 48 esophageal patients undergoing endoscopic examination. The total Raman dataset was split into two parts: 80% for training; while 20% for testing. Partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and leave-one patient-out, cross validation (LOPCV) were implemented on training dataset to develop diagnostic algorithms for tissue classification. PLS-DA-LOPCV shows that simultaneous FP/HW Raman spectroscopy on training dataset provides a diagnostic sensitivity of 97.0% and specificity of 97.4% for ESCC classification. Further, the diagnostic algorithm applied to the independent testing dataset based on simultaneous FP/HW Raman technique gives a predictive diagnostic sensitivity of 92.7% and specificity of 93.6% for ESCC identification, which is superior to either FP or HW Raman technique alone. This work demonstrates that the simultaneous FP/HW fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy technique improves real-time in vivo diagnosis of esophageal neoplasia at endoscopy.

  14. Measuring centimeter-resolution air temperature profiles above land and water using fiber-optic Distributed Temperature Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmund, Armin; Pfister, Lena; Olesch, Johannes; Thomas, Christoph K.

    2016-04-01

    The precise determination of near-surface air temperature profiles is of special importance for the characterization of airflows (e.g. cold air) and the quantification of sensible heat fluxes according to the flux-gradient similarity approach. In contrast to conventional multi-sensor techniques, measuring temperature profiles using fiber-optic Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) provides thousands of measurements referenced to a single calibration standard at much reduced costs. The aim of this work was to enhance the vertical resolution of Raman scatter DTS measurements up to the centimeter-scale using a novel approach for atmospheric applications: the optical fiber was helically coiled around a meshed fabric. In addition to testing the new fiber geometry, we quantified the measurement uncertainty and demonstrated the benefits of the enhanced-resolution profiles. The fiber-optic cable was coiled around a hollow column consisting of white reinforcing fabric supported by plexiglass rings every meter. Data from two columns of this type were collected for 47 days to measure air temperature vertically over 3.0 and 5.1 m over a gently inclined meadow and over and in a small lake, respectively. Both profiles had a vertical resolution of 1 cm in the lower section near the surface and 5 cm in the upper section with an along-fiber instrument-specific averaging of 1.0 m and a temporal resolution of 30 s. Measurement uncertainties, especially from conduction between reinforcing fabric and fiber-optic cable, were estimated by modeling the fiber temperature via a detailed energy balance approach. Air temperature, wind velocity and radiation components were needed as input data and measured separately. The temperature profiles revealed valuable details, especially in the lowest 1 m above surface. This was best demonstrated for nighttime observations when artefacts due to solar heating did not occur. For example, the dynamics of a cold air layer was detected in a clear night

  15. Modeling in situ vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mecham, D.C.; MacKinnon, R.J.; Murray, P.E.; Johnson, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    In Situ Vitrification (ISV) process is being assessed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to determine its applicability to transuranic and mixed wastes buried at INEL'S Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). This process uses electrical resistance heating to melt waste and contaminated soil in place to produce a durable glasslike material that encapsulates and immobilizes buried wastes. This paper outlines the requirements for the model being developed at the INEL which will provide analytical support for the ISV technology assessment program. The model includes representations of the electric potential field, thermal transport with melting, gas and particulate release, vapor migration, off-gas combustion and process chemistry. The modeling objectives are to help determine the safety of the process by assessing the air and surrounding soil radionuclides and chemical pollution hazards, the nuclear criticality hazard, and the explosion and fire hazards, help determine the suitability of the ISV process for stabilizing the buried wastes involved, and help design laboratory and field tests and interpret results. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  16. In-situ uranium leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dotson, B.J.

    1986-01-01

    This invention provides a method for improving the recovery of mineral values from ore bodies subjected to in-situ leaching by controlling the flow behaviour of the leaching solution. In particular, the invention relates to an in-situ leaching operation employing a foam for mobility control of the leaching solution. A foam bank is either introduced into the ore bed or developed in-situ in the ore bed. The foam then becomes a diverting agent forcing the leaching fluid through the previously non-contacted regions of the deposit

  17. Development and Testing of a Friction-Based Post-Installable Sensor for Subsea Fiber-Optic Monitoring Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Nicole; Brower, David; Le, Suy Q.; Seaman, Calvin; Tang, Henry

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the design and development of a friction-based coupling device for a fiber-optic monitoring system that can be deployed on existing subsea structures. This paper provides a summary of the design concept, prototype development, prototype performance testing, and design refinements of the device. The results of the laboratory testing of the first prototype performed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) are included in this paper. Limitations of the initial design were identified and future design improvements were proposed. These new features will enhance the coupling of the device and improve the monitoring system measurement capabilities. A major challenge of a post-installed instrumentation monitoring system is to ensure adequate coupling between the instruments and the structure of interest for reliable measurements. Friction-based coupling devices have the potential to overcome coupling limitations caused by marine growth and soil contamination on subsea structures, flowlines or risers. The work described in this paper investigates the design of a friction-based coupling device (friction clamp), which is applicable for pipelines and structures that are suspended in the water column and those that are resting on the seabed. The monitoring elements consist of fiber-optic sensors that are bonded to a metal clamshell with a high-friction coating. The friction clamp has a single hinge design to facilitate the operation of the clamp and dual rows of opposing fasteners to distribute the clamping force on the structure. The friction clamp can be installed by divers in shallow depths or by remotely operated vehicles in deep-water applications. NASA-JSC was involved in the selection and testing of the friction coating, and in the design and testing of the prototype clamp device. Four-inch diameter and eight-inch diameter sub-scale friction clamp prototypes were built and tested to evaluate the strain

  18. Development and Testing of a Friction-Based Post-Installable Fiber-Optic Monitoring System for Subsea Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Nicole L.; Brower, David V.; Le, Suy Q.; Seaman, Calvin H.; Tang, Henry H.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the design and development of a friction-based coupling device for a fiber-optic monitoring system capable of measuring pressure, strain, and temperature that can be deployed on existing subsea structures. A summary is provided of the design concept, prototype development, prototype performance testing, and subsequent design refinements of the device. The results of laboratory testing of the first prototype performed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) are also included. Limitations of the initial concept were identified during testing and future design improvements were proposed and later implemented. These new features enhance the coupling of the sensor device and improve the monitoring system measurement capabilities. A major challenge of a post-installed instrumentation monitoring system is to ensure adequate coupling between the instruments and the structure of interest for reliable measurements. Friction-based devices have the potential to overcome coupling limitations caused by marine growth and soil contamination on flowlines, risers, and other subsea structures. The work described in this paper investigates the design and test of a friction-based coupling device (herein referred to as a friction clamp) which is suitable for pipelines and structures that are suspended in the water column as well as for those that are resting on the seabed. The monitoring elements consist of fiberoptic sensors that are bonded to a stainless steel clamshell assembly with a high-friction surface coating. The friction clamp incorporates a single hinge design to facilitate installation of the clamp and dual rows of opposing fasteners to distribute the clamping force along the structure. The friction clamp can be modified to be installed by commercial divers in shallow depths or by remotely operated vehicles in deep-water applications. NASA-JSC was involved in the selection and testing of the friction coating

  19. Development and Testing of a Friction-Based Post-Installable Sensor for Subsea Fiber-Optic Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Nicole L.; Brower, David V.; Le, Suy Q.; Seaman, Calvin H.; Tang, Henry H.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the design and development of a friction-based coupling device for a fiber-optic monitoring system that can be deployed on existing subsea structures. This paper provides a summary of the design concept, prototype development, prototype performance testing, and design refinements of the device. The results of the laboratory testing of the first prototype performed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) are included in this paper. Limitations of the initial design were identified and future design improvements were proposed. These new features will enhance the coupling of the device and improve the monitoring system measurement capabilities. A major challenge of a post-installed instrumentation monitoring system is to ensure adequate coupling between the instruments and the structure of interest for reliable measurements. Friction-based coupling devices have the potential to overcome coupling limitations caused by marine growth and soil contamination on subsea structures, flowlines or risers. The work described in this paper investigates the design of a friction-based coupling device (friction clamp), which is applicable for pipelines and structures that are suspended in the water column and those that are resting on the seabed. The monitoring elements consist of fiber-optic sensors that are bonded to a metal clamshell with a high-friction coating. The friction clamp has a single hinge design to facilitate the operation of the clamp and dual rows of opposing fasteners to distribute the clamping force on the structure. The friction clamp can be installed by divers in shallow depths or by remotely operated vehicles in deep-water applications. NASA-JSC was involved in the selection and testing of the friction coating, and in the design and testing of the prototype clamp device. Four-inch diameter and eight-inch diameter sub-scale friction clamp prototypes were built and tested to evaluate the strain

  20. Mass discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broeckman, A. [Rijksuniversiteit Utrecht (Netherlands)

    1978-12-15

    In thermal ionization mass spectrometry the phenomenon of mass discrimination has led to the use of a correction factor for isotope ratio-measurements. The correction factor is defined as the measured ratio divided by the true or accepted value of this ratio. In fact this factor corrects for systematic errors of the whole procedure; however mass discrimination is often associated just with the mass spectrometer.

  1. Negative mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammond, Richard T

    2015-01-01

    Some physical aspects of negative mass are examined. Several unusual properties, such as the ability of negative mass to penetrate any armor, are analysed. Other surprising effects include the bizarre system of negative mass chasing positive mass, naked singularities and the violation of cosmic censorship, wormholes, and quantum mechanical results as well. In addition, a brief look into the implications for strings is given. (paper)

  2. Nominal Mass?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attygalle, Athula B; Pavlov, Julius

    2017-08-01

    The current IUPAC-recommended definition of the term "nominal mass," based on the most abundant naturally occurring stable isotope of an element, is flawed. We propose that Nominal mass should be defined as the sum of integer masses of protons and neutrons in any chemical species. In this way, all isotopes and isotopologues can be assigned a definitive identifier. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  3. High resolution imaging of impacted CFRP composites with a fiber-optic laser-ultrasound scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Pelivanov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Damage induced in polymer composites by various impacts must be evaluated to predict a component’s post-impact strength and residual lifetime, especially when impacts occur in structures related to human safety (in aircraft, for example. X-ray tomography is the conventional standard to study an internal structure with high resolution. However, it is of little use when the impacted area cannot be extracted from a structure. In addition, X-ray tomography is expensive and time-consuming. Recently, we have demonstrated that a kHz-rate laser-ultrasound (LU scanner is very efficient both for locating large defects and evaluating the material structure. Here, we show that high-quality images of damage produced by the LU scanner in impacted carbon-fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP composites are similar to those produced by X-ray tomograms; but they can be obtained with only single-sided access to the object under study. Potentially, the LU method can be applied to large components in-situ.

  4. High resolution imaging of impacted CFRP composites with a fiber-optic laser-ultrasound scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelivanov, Ivan; Ambroziński, Łukasz; Khomenko, Anton; Koricho, Ermias G; Cloud, Gary L; Haq, Mahmoodul; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    Damage induced in polymer composites by various impacts must be evaluated to predict a component's post-impact strength and residual lifetime, especially when impacts occur in structures related to human safety (in aircraft, for example). X-ray tomography is the conventional standard to study an internal structure with high resolution. However, it is of little use when the impacted area cannot be extracted from a structure. In addition, X-ray tomography is expensive and time-consuming. Recently, we have demonstrated that a kHz-rate laser-ultrasound (LU) scanner is very efficient both for locating large defects and evaluating the material structure. Here, we show that high-quality images of damage produced by the LU scanner in impacted carbon-fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites are similar to those produced by X-ray tomograms; but they can be obtained with only single-sided access to the object under study. Potentially, the LU method can be applied to large components in-situ.

  5. A Fiber-Optic Sensor for Acoustic Emission Detection in a High Voltage Cable System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tongzhi; Pang, Fufei; Liu, Huanhuan; Cheng, Jiajing; Lv, Longbao; Zhang, Xiaobei; Chen, Na; Wang, Tingyun

    2016-01-01

    We have proposed and demonstrated a Michelson interferometer-based fiber sensor for detecting acoustic emission generated from the partial discharge (PD) of the accessories of a high-voltage cable system. The developed sensor head is integrated with a compact and relatively high sensitivity cylindrical elastomer. Such a sensor has a broadband frequency response and a relatively high sensitivity in a harsh environment under a high-voltage electric field. The design and fabrication of the sensor head integrated with the cylindrical elastomer is described, and a series of experiments was conducted to evaluate the sensing performance. The experimental results demonstrate that the sensitivity of our developed sensor for acoustic detection of partial discharges is 1.7 rad/(m⋅Pa). A high frequency response up to 150 kHz is achieved. Moreover, the relatively high sensitivity for the detection of PD is verified in both the laboratory environment and gas insulated switchgear. The obtained results show the great potential application of a Michelson interferometer-based fiber sensor integrated with a cylindrical elastomer for in-situ monitoring high-voltage cable accessories for safety work. PMID:27916900

  6. Development of an enzymatic fiber-optic biosensor for detection of halogenated hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidmanova, Sarka; Chaloupkova, Radka; Damborsky, Jiri; Prokop, Zbynek [Masaryk University, Loschmidt Laboratories, Department of Experimental Biology and Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Faculty of Science, Brno (Czech Republic)

    2010-11-15

    An enzyme-based biosensor was developed by co-immobilization of purified enzyme haloalkane dehalogenase (EC 3.8.1.5) and a fluorescence pH indicator on the tip of an optical fiber. Haloalkane dehalogenase catalyzes hydrolytic dehalogenation of halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons, which is accompanied by a pH change influencing the fluorescence of the indicator. The pH sensitivity of several fluorescent dyes was evaluated. The selected indicator 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein was conjugated with bovine serum albumin and its reaction was tested under different immobilization conditions. The biosensor was prepared by cross-linking of the conjugate in tandem with haloalkane dehalogenase using glutaraldehyde vapor. The biosensor, stored for 24 h in 50 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.5) prior to measurement, was used after 15 min of equilibration, the halogenated compound was added, and the response was monitored for 30 min. Calibration of the biosensor with 1,2-dibromoethane and 3-chloro-2-(chloromethyl)-1-propene showed an excellent linear dependence, with detection limits of 0.133 and 0.014 mM, respectively. This biosensor provides a new tool for continuous in situ monitoring of halogenated environmental pollutants. (orig.)

  7. Fiber-optic sensor design for chemical process and environmental monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahendran, R. S.; Wang, L.; Machavaram, V. R.; Pandita, S. D.; Chen, R.; Kukureka, S. N.; Fernando, G. F.

    2009-10-01

    "Curing" is a term that is used to describe the cross-linking reactions in a thermosetting resin system. Advanced fiber-reinforced composites are being used increasingly in a number of industrial sectors including aerospace, marine, sport, automotive and civil engineering. There is a general realization that the processing conditions that are used to manufacture the composite can have a major influence on its hot-wet mechanical properties. This paper is concerned with the design and demonstration of a number of sensor designs for in situ monitoring of the cross-linking reactions of a commercially available thermosetting resin system. Simple fixtures were constructed to enable a pair of cleaved optical fibers with a defined gap between the end-faces to be held in position. The resin system was introduced into this gap and the cure kinetics were followed by transmission infrared spectroscopy. A semi-empirical model was used to describe the cure process using the data obtained at different cure temperatures. The same sensor system was used to detect the ingress of moisture into the cured resin system.

  8. A Fiber-Optic Sensor for Acoustic Emission Detection in a High Voltage Cable System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongzhi Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We have proposed and demonstrated a Michelson interferometer-based fiber sensor for detecting acoustic emission generated from the partial discharge (PD of the accessories of a high-voltage cable system. The developed sensor head is integrated with a compact and relatively high sensitivity cylindrical elastomer. Such a sensor has a broadband frequency response and a relatively high sensitivity in a harsh environment under a high-voltage electric field. The design and fabrication of the sensor head integrated with the cylindrical elastomer is described, and a series of experiments was conducted to evaluate the sensing performance. The experimental results demonstrate that the sensitivity of our developed sensor for acoustic detection of partial discharges is 1.7 rad / ( m ⋅ Pa . A high frequency response up to 150 kHz is achieved. Moreover, the relatively high sensitivity for the detection of PD is verified in both the laboratory environment and gas insulated switchgear. The obtained results show the great potential application of a Michelson interferometer-based fiber sensor integrated with a cylindrical elastomer for in-situ monitoring high-voltage cable accessories for safety work.

  9. In situ leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, B.

    1980-01-01

    A process is described for the in-situ leaching of uranium-containing ores employing an acidic leach liquor containing peroxymonosulphuric acid. Preferably, additionally, sulphuric acid is present in the leach liquor. (author)

  10. Electrochemical studies, in-situ and ex-situ characterizations of different manganese compounds electrodeposited in aerated solutions; Etudes electrochimiques, suivis in-situ et caracterisations ex-situ de divers composes de manganese electrodeposes dans des solutions aerees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peulon, S.; Lacroix, A.; Chausse, A. [Univ. d' Evry-val-d' Essonne, Laboratoire Analyse et Modelisation pour la Biologie et l' Environnement (LAMBE CNRS UMR 8587), 91 - Evry (France); Larabi-Gruet, N. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Physico-Chimie (DEN/DPC/SECR/L3MR), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2007-07-01

    This work deals with the electrodeposition of manganese compounds. A systematic study of the synthesis experimental conditions has been carried out, and the obtained depositions have been characterized by different ex-situ analyses methods (XRD, FTIR, SEM). The in-situ measurements of mass increase with a quartz microbalance during the syntheses have allowed to estimate the growth mechanisms which are in agreement with the ex-situ characterizations. The cation has an important role in the nature of the electrodeposited compounds. In presence of sodium, a mixed lamellar compound Mn(III)/Mn(IV), the birnessite, is deposited, whereas in presence of potassium, bixbyite is formed (Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}), these two compounds having a main role in the environment. The substrate can also influence the nature of the formed intermediary compounds. Little studied compounds such as feitkneichtite ({beta}-MnOOH) and groutite ({alpha}-MnOOH) have been revealed. (O.M.)

  11. A short baseline strainmeter using fiber-optic Bragg-Grating (FBG) sensor and a nano-optic interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutant, O.; Demengin, M.; Le Coarer, E.; Gaffet, S.

    2013-12-01

    Strain recordings from tiltmeters or borehole volumetric strainmeters on volcanoes reveal extremely rich signal of deformation associated with eruptive processes. The ability to detect and record signals of the order of few tens of nanostrain is complementary to other monitoring techniques, and of great interest to monitor and model the volcanic processes. Strain recording remains however a challenge, for both the instrumental and the installation point of view. We present in this study the first results of strain recordings, using a new fiber-optic Bragg-Grating (FBG) sensor. FBG sensors are known for many years and used as strain gauges in civil engineering. They are however limited in this case to microstrain capability. We use here a newly developped interferometer named SWIFTS whose main characteristics are i) an extremely high optical wavelength precision and ii) a small design and low power requirements allowing an easy field deployment. Our FBG sensor uses a short baseline, 3cm long Bragg network. We show preliminary results obtained from a several months recordings in the low noise underground laboratory at Rustrel (LSBB), south of France.

  12. A fiber-optic technique for the measurement of contact angle in a clearance-fit pin-loaded hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, R.; Naik, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    A fiber-optic technique for measuring contact angle during pin loading of a specimen is proposed. The experimental design and procedures for loading a 49.8-mm-diameter instrumented pin into an quasi-isotropic graphite-epoxy specimen are described. The optical fiber was located just above the surface of the pin outer diameter in order to obtain accurate pin-hole contact-angle measurements at increasing load levels. The movement of the optical fiber through the no-contact, contact, and no-contact regions is discussed; the photodiode output decreased monotonically as the fiber moved from the no-contact to the contact region and then decreased monotonically as the fiber moved from the contact region to the no-contact region. Variations in the contact angle measurements are examined as function of applied load level. The measurements are compared to contact angle values obtained using a finite element analysis and an electrical technique; it is determined that the data correlate well.

  13. Using Monoclonal Antibody to Determine Lead Ions with a Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance Fiber-optic Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mon-Fu Chung

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel reflection-based localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR fiber-optic probe has been developed to determine the heavy metal lead ion concentration. Monoclonal antibody as the detecting probe containing massive amino groups to capture Pb(II-chelate complexes was immobilized onto gold nanoparticle-modified optical fiber (NMAuOF. The optimal immobilizing conditions of monoclonal antibody on to the NMAuOF are 189 μg/mL in pH7.4 PBS for 2 h at 25°C. The absorbability of the functionalized NMAuOF sensor increases to 12.2 % upon changing the Pb(II-EDTA level from 10 to 100 ppb with a detection limit of 0.27 ppb. The sensor retains 92.7 % of its original activity and gives reproducible results after storage in 5% D-( -Trehalose dehydrate solution at 4°C for 35 days. In conclusion, the monoclonal antibody-functionalized NMAuOF sensor shows a promising result for determining the concentration of Pb(II with high sensitivity.

  14. A Review of Hybrid Fiber-Optic Distributed Simultaneous Vibration and Temperature Sensing Technology and Its Geophysical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Khalid; Potter, David K

    2017-11-01

    Distributed sensing systems can transform an optical fiber cable into an array of sensors, allowing users to detect and monitor multiple physical parameters such as temperature, vibration and strain with fine spatial and temporal resolution over a long distance. Fiber-optic distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) and distributed temperature sensing (DTS) systems have been developed for various applications with varied spatial resolution, and spectral and sensing range. Rayleigh scattering-based phase optical time domain reflectometry (OTDR) for vibration and Raman/Brillouin scattering-based OTDR for temperature and strain measurements have been developed over the past two decades. The key challenge has been to find a methodology that would enable the physical parameters to be determined at any point along the sensing fiber with high sensitivity and spatial resolution, yet within acceptable frequency range for dynamic vibration, and temperature detection. There are many applications, especially in geophysical and mining engineering where simultaneous measurements of vibration and temperature are essential. In this article, recent developments of different hybrid systems for simultaneous vibration, temperature and strain measurements are analyzed based on their operation principles and performance. Then, challenges and limitations of the systems are highlighted for geophysical applications.

  15. Measurement of entrance surface dose on an anthropomorphic thorax phantom using a miniature fiber-optic dosimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Wook Jae; Shin, Sang Hun; Jeon, Dayeong; Hong, Seunghan; Sim, Hyeok In; Kim, Seon Geun; Jang, Kyoung Won; Cho, Seunghyun; Youn, Won Sik; Lee, Bongsoo

    2014-04-01

    A miniature fiber-optic dosimeter (FOD) system was fabricated using a plastic scintillating fiber, a plastic optical fiber, and a multi-pixel photon counter to measure real-time entrance surface dose (ESD) during radiation diagnosis. Under varying exposure parameters of a digital radiography (DR) system, we measured the scintillating light related to the ESD using the sensing probe of the FOD, which was placed at the center of the beam field on an anthropomorphic thorax phantom. Also, we obtained DR images using a flat panel detector of the DR system to evaluate the effects of the dosimeter on image artifacts during posteroanterior (PA) chest radiography. From the experimental results, the scintillation output signals of the FOD were similar to the ESDs including backscatter simultaneously obtained using a semiconductor dosimeter. We demonstrated that the proposed miniature FOD can be used to measure real-time ESDs with minimization of DR image artifacts in the X-ray energy range of diagnostic radiology.

  16. Application of Thin ZnO ALD Layers in Fiber-Optic Fabry-Pérot Sensing Interferometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Majchrowicz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigated the response of a fiber-optic Fabry-Pérot sensing interferometer with thin ZnO layers deposited on the end faces of the optical fibers forming the cavity. Standard telecommunication single-mode optical fiber (SMF-28 segments were used with the thin ZnO layers deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD. Measurements were performed with the interferometer illuminated by two broadband sources operating at 1300 nm and 1550 nm. Reflected interference signal was acquired by an optical spectrum analyzer while the length of the air cavity was varied. Thickness of the ZnO layers used in the experiments was 50 nm, 100 nm, and 200 nm. Uncoated SMF-28 fiber was also used as a reference. Based on the results of measurements, the thickness of the ZnO layers and the length of the cavity were selected in order to achieve good visibility. Following, the interferometer was used to determine the refractive index of selected liquids.

  17. Detection of thermal gradients through fiber-optic Chirped Fiber Bragg Grating (CFBG): Medical thermal ablation scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korganbayev, Sanzhar; Orazayev, Yerzhan; Sovetov, Sultan; Bazyl, Ali; Schena, Emiliano; Massaroni, Carlo; Gassino, Riccardo; Vallan, Alberto; Perrone, Guido; Saccomandi, Paola; Arturo Caponero, Michele; Palumbo, Giovanna; Campopiano, Stefania; Iadicicco, Agostino; Tosi, Daniele

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we describe a novel method for spatially distributed temperature measurement with Chirped Fiber Bragg Grating (CFBG) fiber-optic sensors. The proposed method determines the thermal profile in the CFBG region from demodulation of the CFBG optical spectrum. The method is based on an iterative optimization that aims at minimizing the mismatch between the measured CFBG spectrum and a CFBG model based on coupled-mode theory (CMT), perturbed by a temperature gradient. In the demodulation part, we simulate different temperature distribution patterns with Monte-Carlo approach on simulated CFBG spectra. Afterwards, we obtain cost function that minimizes difference between measured and simulated spectra, and results in final temperature profile. Experiments and simulations have been carried out first with a linear gradient, demonstrating a correct operation (error 2.9 °C); then, a setup has been arranged to measure the temperature pattern on a 5-cm long section exposed to medical laser thermal ablation. Overall, the proposed method can operate as a real-time detection technique for thermal gradients over 1.5-5 cm regions, and turns as a key asset for the estimation of thermal gradients at the micro-scale in biomedical applications.

  18. Non-scanning fiber-optic near-infrared beam led to two-photon optogenetic stimulation in-vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal R Dhakal

    Full Text Available Stimulation of specific neurons expressing opsins in a targeted region to manipulate brain function has proved to be a powerful tool in neuroscience. However, the use of visible light for optogenetic stimulation is invasive due to low penetration depth and tissue damage owing to larger absorption and scattering. Here, we report, for the first time, in-depth non-scanning fiber-optic two-photon optogenetic stimulation (FO-TPOS of neurons in-vivo in transgenic mouse models. In order to optimize the deep-brain stimulation strategy, we characterized two-photon activation efficacy at different near-infrared laser parameters. The significantly-enhanced in-depth stimulation efficiency of FO-TPOS as compared to conventional single-photon beam was demonstrated both by experiments and Monte Carlo simulation. The non-scanning FO-TPOS technology will lead to better understanding of the in-vivo neural circuitry because this technology permits more precise and less invasive anatomical delivery of stimulation.

  19. Fiber-optic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy for remote label-free sensing of medical device surface contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Moinuddin; Tan, Xin; Welle, Elissa; Ilev, Ilko

    2013-05-01

    As a potential major source of biochemical contamination, medical device surfaces are of critical safety concerns in the clinical practice and public health. The development of innovative sensing methods for accurate and real-time detection of medical device surface contamination is essential to protect patients from high risk infection. In this paper, we demonstrate an alternative fiber-optic Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy based sensing approach for remote, non-contact, and label-free detection of biochemical contaminants in the mid-infrared (mid-IR) region. The sensing probe is designed using mid-IR hollow fibers and FTIR measurements are carried out in reflection mode. Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) and bacterial endotoxin of different concentrations under thoroughly dry condition are used to evaluate the detection sensitivity. The devised system can identify ≤0.0025% (≤4 × 1011 molecules) BSA and 0.5% (0.5 EU/ml) endotoxin concentration. The developed sensing approach may be applied to detect various pathogens that pose public health threats.

  20. Testing Time and Frequency Fiber-Optic Link Transfer by Hardware Emulation of Acoustic-Band Optical Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipiński Marcin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The low-frequency optical-signal phase noise induced by mechanical vibration of the base occurs in field-deployed fibers. Typical telecommunication data transfer is insensitive to this type of noise but the phenomenon may influence links dedicated to precise Time and Frequency (T&F fiber-optic transfer that exploit the idea of stabilization of phase or propagation delay of the link. To measure effectiveness of suppression of acoustic noise in such a link, a dedicated measurement setup is necessary. The setup should enable to introduce a low-frequency phase corruption to the optical signal in a controllable way. In the paper, a concept of a setup in which the mechanically induced acoustic-band optical signal phase corruption is described and its own features and measured parameters are presented. Next, the experimental measurement results of the T&F transfer TFTS-2 system’s immunity as a function of the fibre-optic length vs. the acoustic-band noise are presented. Then, the dependency of the system immunity on the location of a noise source along the link is also pointed out.

  1. Hardware-efficient signal generation of layered/enhanced ACO-OFDM for short-haul fiber-optic links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qibing; Song, Binhuang; Corcoran, Bill; Boland, David; Zhu, Chen; Zhuang, Leimeng; Lowery, Arthur J

    2017-06-12

    Layered/enhanced ACO-OFDM is a promising candidate for intensity modulation and direct-detection based short-haul fiber-optic links due to its both power and spectral efficiency. In this paper, we firstly demonstrate a hardware-efficient real-time 9.375 Gb/s QPSK-encoded layered/enhanced asymmetrical clipped optical OFDM (L/E-ACO-OFDM) transmitter using a Virtex-6 FPGA. This L/E-ACO-OFDM signal is successfully transmitted over 20-km uncompensated standard single-mode fiber (S-SMF) using a directly modulated laser. Several methods are explored to reduce the FPGA's logic resource utilization by taking advantage of the L/E-ACO-OFDM's signal characteristics. We show that the logic resource occupation of L/E-ACO-OFDM transmitter is almost the same as that of DC-biased OFDM transmitter when they achieve the same spectral efficiency, proving its great potential to be used in a real-time short-haul optical transmission link.

  2. A Review of Hybrid Fiber-Optic Distributed Simultaneous Vibration and Temperature Sensing Technology and Its Geophysical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Miah

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Distributed sensing systems can transform an optical fiber cable into an array of sensors, allowing users to detect and monitor multiple physical parameters such as temperature, vibration and strain with fine spatial and temporal resolution over a long distance. Fiber-optic distributed acoustic sensing (DAS and distributed temperature sensing (DTS systems have been developed for various applications with varied spatial resolution, and spectral and sensing range. Rayleigh scattering-based phase optical time domain reflectometry (OTDR for vibration and Raman/Brillouin scattering-based OTDR for temperature and strain measurements have been developed over the past two decades. The key challenge has been to find a methodology that would enable the physical parameters to be determined at any point along the sensing fiber with high sensitivity and spatial resolution, yet within acceptable frequency range for dynamic vibration, and temperature detection. There are many applications, especially in geophysical and mining engineering where simultaneous measurements of vibration and temperature are essential. In this article, recent developments of different hybrid systems for simultaneous vibration, temperature and strain measurements are analyzed based on their operation principles and performance. Then, challenges and limitations of the systems are highlighted for geophysical applications.

  3. Enhancing thermal reliability of fiber-optic sensors for bio-inspired applications at ultra-high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Donghoon; Kim, Heon-Young; Kim, Dae-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    The rapid growth of bio-(inspired) sensors has led to an improvement in modern healthcare and human–robot systems in recent years. Higher levels of reliability and better flexibility, essential features of these sensors, are very much required in many application fields (e.g. applications at ultra-high temperatures). Fiber-optic sensors, and fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors in particular, are being widely studied as suitable sensors for improved structural health monitoring (SHM) due to their many merits. To enhance the thermal reliability of FBG sensors, thermal sensitivity, generally expressed as α f + ξ f and considered a constant, should be investigated more precisely. For this purpose, the governing equation of FBG sensors is modified using differential derivatives between the wavelength shift and the temperature change in this study. Through a thermal test ranging from RT to 900 °C, the thermal sensitivity of FBG sensors is successfully examined and this guarantees thermal reliability of FBG sensors at ultra-high temperatures. In detail, α f + ξ f has a non-linear dependence on temperature and varies from 6.0 × 10 −6  °C −1 (20 °C) to 10.6 × 10 −6  °C −1 (650 °C). Also, FBGs should be carefully used for applications at ultra-high temperatures due to signal disappearance near 900 °C. (paper)

  4. Enhancing thermal reliability of fiber-optic sensors for bio-inspired applications at ultra-high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Donghoon; Kim, Heon-Young; Kim, Dae-Hyun

    2014-07-01

    The rapid growth of bio-(inspired) sensors has led to an improvement in modern healthcare and human-robot systems in recent years. Higher levels of reliability and better flexibility, essential features of these sensors, are very much required in many application fields (e.g. applications at ultra-high temperatures). Fiber-optic sensors, and fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors in particular, are being widely studied as suitable sensors for improved structural health monitoring (SHM) due to their many merits. To enhance the thermal reliability of FBG sensors, thermal sensitivity, generally expressed as αf + ξf and considered a constant, should be investigated more precisely. For this purpose, the governing equation of FBG sensors is modified using differential derivatives between the wavelength shift and the temperature change in this study. Through a thermal test ranging from RT to 900 °C, the thermal sensitivity of FBG sensors is successfully examined and this guarantees thermal reliability of FBG sensors at ultra-high temperatures. In detail, αf + ξf has a non-linear dependence on temperature and varies from 6.0 × 10-6 °C-1 (20 °C) to 10.6 × 10-6 °C-1 (650 °C). Also, FBGs should be carefully used for applications at ultra-high temperatures due to signal disappearance near 900 °C.

  5. A fiber-optic sorbitol biosensor based on NADH fluorescence detection toward rapid diagnosis of diabetic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessei, Tomoko; Arakawa, Takahiro; Kudo, Hiroyuki; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2015-09-21

    Accumulation of sorbitol in the tissue is known to cause microvascular diabetic complications. In this paper, a fiber-optic biosensor for sorbitol which is used as a biomarker of diabetic complications was developed and tested. The biosensor used a sorbitol dehydrogenase from microorganisms of the genus Flavimonas with high substrate specificity and detected the fluorescence of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) by the enzymatic reaction. An ultraviolet light emitting diode (UV-LED) was used as the excitation light source of NADH. The fluorescence of NADH was detected using a spectrometer or a photomultiplier tube (PMT). The UV-LED and the photodetector were coupled using a Y-shaped optical fiber. In the experiment, an optical fiber probe with a sorbitol dehydrogenase immobilized membrane was placed in a cuvette filled with a phosphate buffer containing the oxidized form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)). The changes in NADH fluorescence intensity were measured after adding a standard sorbitol solution. According to the experimental assessment, the calibration range of the sorbitol biosensor systems using a spectrometer and a PMT was 5.0-1000 μmol L(-1) and 1.0-1000 μmol L(-1), respectively. The sorbitol biosensor system using the sorbitol dehydrogenase from microorganisms of the genus Flavimonas has high selectivity and sensitivity compared with that from sheep liver. The sorbitol biosensor allows for point-of-care testing applications or daily health care tests for diabetes patients.

  6. An in-line fiber-optic modal interferometer for simultaneous measurement of twist and ambient temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqin Yu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel and simple sensor based on fiber-optic modal interferometer fabricated by a segment of low elliptical hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber for simultaneous temperature and twist measurements is demonstrated. Meanwhile the sensor can also measure the twist angle and determine the twist direction simultaneously. The mode distribution of EHC-PBGF is demonstrated both in theory and experiments. There is an obvious difference of two transmission dips on the temperature and twist. The twist sensitivities of Dip 1 and Dip 2 are obtained to be −31.95 and −585.8 pm/(rad/m, respectively. The temperature sensitivities are 12.99 pm/°C for Dip 1 and 5.09 pm/°C for Dip 2, respectively. Two parameters of twist and temperature can be distinguished and measured simultaneously by using a sensing matrix. Meanwhile the structure is found to be weakly sensitive to the axial strain. It has the advantage of avoiding the crosstalk of strain in the applications.

  7. Eat-by-light fiber-optic and micro-optic devices for food quality and safety assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignani, A. G.; Ciaccheri, L.; Cucci, C.; Mencaglia, A. A.; Cimato, A.; Attilio, C.; Thienpont, H.; Ottevaere, H.; Paolesse, R.; Mastroianni, M.; Monti, D.; Buonocore, G.; Del Nobile, A.; Mentana, A.; Grimaldi, M. F.; Dall'Asta, C.; Faccini, A.; Galaverna, G.; Dossena, A.

    2007-06-01

    A selection is presented of fiber-optic and micro-optic devices that have been designed and tested for guaranteeing the quality and safety of typical foods, such as extra virgin olive oil, beer, and milk. Scattered colorimetry is used to authenticate various types of extra virgin olive oil and beer, while a fiber-optic-based device for UV-VIS-NIR absorption spectroscopy is exploited in order to obtain the hyperspectral optical signature of olive oil. This is done not only for authentication purposes, but also so as to correlate the spectral data with the content of fatty acids, which are important nutritional factors. A micro-optic sensor for the detection of olive oil aroma that is capable of distinguishing different ageing levels of extra virgin olive oil is also presented. It shows effective potential for acting as a smart cap of bottled olive oil in order to achieve a non-destructive olfactory perception of oil ageing. Lastly, a compact portable fluorometer for the rapid monitoring of the carcinogenic M1 aflatoxin in milk, is experimented.

  8. Eat-by-light: fiber-optic and micro-optic devices for food safety and quality assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignani, A. G.; Ciaccheri, L.; Cucci, C.; Mencaglia, A. A.; Cimato, A.; Attilio, C.; Thienpont, H.; Ottevaere, H.; Paolesse, R.; Mastroianni, M.; Monti, D.; Buonocore, G.; Del Nobile, A.; Mentana, A.; Dall'Asta, C.; Faccini, A.; Galaverna, G.; Dossena, A.

    2007-07-01

    A selection of fiber-optic and micro-optic devices is presented designed and tested for monitoring the quality and safety of typical foods, namely the extra virgin olive oil, the beer, and the milk. Scattered colorimetry is used for the authentication of various types of extra virgin olive oil and beer, while a fiber-optic-based device for UV-VIS-NIR absorption spectroscopy is exploited in order to obtain the hyperspectral optical signature of olive oil. This is done not only for authentication purposes, but also so as to correlate the spectral data with the content of fatty acids that are important nutritional factors. A micro-optic sensor for the detection of olive oil aroma is presented. It is capable of distinguishing different ageing levels of extra virgin olive oil. It shows effective potential for acting as a smart cap of bottled olive oil in order to achieve a non-destructive olfactory perception of oil ageing. Lastly, a compact portable fluorometer is experimented for the rapid monitoring of the carcinogenic M1 aflatoxin in milk.

  9. Measurement of Entrance Surface Dose on an Anthropomorphic Thorax Phantom Using a Miniature Fiber-Optic Dosimeter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wook Jae Yoo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A miniature fiber-optic dosimeter (FOD system was fabricated using a plastic scintillating fiber, a plastic optical fiber, and a multi-pixel photon counter to measure real-time entrance surface dose (ESD during radiation diagnosis. Under varying exposure parameters of a digital radiography (DR system, we measured the scintillating light related to the ESD using the sensing probe of the FOD, which was placed at the center of the beam field on an anthropomorphic thorax phantom. Also, we obtained DR images using a flat panel detector of the DR system to evaluate the effects of the dosimeter on image artifacts during posteroanterior (PA chest radiography. From the experimental results, the scintillation output signals of the FOD were similar to the ESDs including backscatter simultaneously obtained using a semiconductor dosimeter. We demonstrated that the proposed miniature FOD can be used to measure real-time ESDs with minimization of DR image artifacts in the X-ray energy range of diagnostic radiology.

  10. Multiplexed salivary protein profiling for patients with respiratory diseases using fiber-optic bundles and fluorescent antibody-based microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Shuai; Benito-Peña, Elena; Zhang, Huaibin; Wu, Yue; Walt, David R

    2013-10-01

    Over the past 40 years, the incidence and prevalence of respiratory diseases have increased significantly throughout the world, damaging economic productivity and challenging health care systems. Current diagnoses of different respiratory diseases generally involve invasive sampling methods such as induced sputum or bronchoalveolar lavage that are uncomfortable, or even painful, for the patient. In this paper, we present a platform incorporating fiber-optic bundles and antibody-based microarrays to perform multiplexed protein profiling of a panel of six salivary biomarkers for asthma and cystic fibrosis (CF) diagnosis. The platform utilizes an optical fiber bundle containing approximately 50,000 individual 4.5 μm diameter fibers that are chemically etched to create microwells in which modified microspheres decorated with monoclonal capture antibodies can be deposited. On the basis of a sandwich immunoassay format, the array quantifies human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), interferon gamma-induced protein 10 (IP-10), interleukin-8 (IL-8), epidermal growth factor (EGF), matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) salivary biomarkers in the subpicomolar range. Saliva supernatants collected from 291 individuals (164 asthmatics, 71 CF patients, and 56 healthy controls (HC)) were analyzed on the platform to profile each group of patients using this six-analyte suite. It was found that four of the six proteins were observed to be significantly elevated (p < 0.01) in asthma and CF patients compared with HC. These results demonstrate the potential to use the multiplexed protein array platform for respiratory disease diagnosis.

  11. Fiber-optic refractometer based on an etched high-Q π-phase-shifted fiber-Bragg-grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Ianno, Natale J; Han, Ming

    2013-07-10

    We present a compact and highly-sensitive fiber-optic refractometer based on a high-Q π-phase-shifted fiber-Bragg-grating (πFBG) that is chemically etched to the core of the fiber. Due to the p phase-shift, a strong πFBG forms a high-Q optical resonator and the reflection spectrum features an extremely narrow notch that can be used for highly sensitivity refractive index measurement. The etched πFBG demonstrated here has a diameter of ~9.3 μm and a length of only 7 mm, leading to a refractive index responsivity of 2.9 nm/RIU (RIU: refractive index unit) at an ambient refractive index of 1.318. The reflection spectrum of the etched πFBG features an extremely narrow notch with a linewidth of only 2.1 pm in water centered at ~1,550 nm, corresponding to a Q-factor of 7.4 × 10(5), which allows for potentially significantly improved sensitivity over refractometers based on regular fiber Bragg gratings.

  12. Fiber-Optic Refractometer Based on an Etched High-Q π-Phase-Shifted Fiber-Bragg-Grating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Han

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a compact and highly-sensitive fiber-optic refractometer based on a high-Q p-phase-shifted fiber-Bragg-grating (pFBG that is chemically etched to the core of the fiber. Due to the p phase-shift, a strong pFBG forms a high-Q optical resonator and the reflection spectrum features an extremely narrow notch that can be used for highly sensitivity refractive index measurement. The etched pFBG demonstrated here has a diameter of ~9.3 μm and a length of only 7 mm, leading to a refractive index responsivity of 2.9 nm/RIU (RIU: refractive index unit at an ambient refractive index of 1.318. The reflection spectrum of the etched pFBG features an extremely narrow notch with a linewidth of only 2.1 pm in water centered at ~1,550 nm, corresponding to a Q-factor of 7.4 ´ 105, which allows for potentially significantly improved sensitivity over refractometers based on regular fiber Bragg gratings.

  13. Enhancement of fiber-optic low-coherence Fabry-Pérot interferometer with ZnO ALD films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Marzena; Listewnik, Paulina; Jedrzejewska-Szczerska, Małgorzata

    2018-04-01

    In this paper investigation of the enhanced fiber-optic low coherence Fabry-Pérot interferometer with zinc oxide (ZnO) film deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) was presented. Model of the interferometer, which was constructed of single-mode optical fiber with applied ZnO ALD films, was built. The interferometer was also examined by means of experiment. Measurements were performed for both reflective and transmission modes, using wavelengths of 1300 nm and 1500 nm. The measurements with the air cavity showed the best performance in terms of a visibility of the interference signal can be achieved for small cavity lengths ( 50μm) in both configurations. Combined with the enhancement of reflectance of the interferometer mirrors due to the ALD film, proposed construction could be successfully applied in refractive index (RI) sensor that can operate with improved visibility of the signal even in 1.3-1.5 RI range as well as with small volume samples, as shown by the modeling.

  14. Tests of a prototype multiplexed fiber-optic ultra-fast FADC data acquisition system for the MAGIC telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartko, H.; Goebel, F.; Mirzoyan, R.; Pimpl, W.; Teshima, M.

    2005-01-01

    Ground-based Atmospheric Air Cherenkov Telescopes (ACTs) are successfully used to observe very high energy (VHE) gamma rays from celestial objects. The light of the night sky (LONS) is a strong background for these telescopes. The gamma ray pulses being very short, an ultra-fast read-out of an ACT can minimize the influence of the LONS. This allows one to lower the so-called tail cuts of the shower image and the analysis energy threshold. It could also help to suppress other unwanted backgrounds. Fast 'flash' analog-to-digital converters (FADCs) with GSamples/s are available commercially; they are, however, very expensive and power consuming. Here we present a novel technique of Fiber-Optic Multiplexing which uses a single 2 GSamples/s FADC to digitize 16 read-out channels consecutively. The analog signals are delayed by using optical fibers. The multiplexed (MUX) FADC read-out reduces the cost by about 85% compared to using one ultra-fast FADC per read-out channel. Two prototype multiplexers, each digitizing data from 16 channels, were built and tested. The ultra-fast read-out system will be described and the test results will be reported. The new system will be implemented for the read-out of the 17 m diameter MAGIC telescope camera

  15. Development of Embedded Fiber-Optic Evanescent Wave Sensors for Optical Characterization of Graphite Anodes in Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghannoum, AbdulRahman; Nieva, Patricia; Yu, Aiping; Khajepour, Amir

    2017-11-29

    The development, fabrication, and embedment of fiber-optic evanescent wave sensors (FOEWSs) to monitor the state of charge (SOC) and the state of health (SOH) of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) are presented. Etching of FOEWSs is performed using a solution of 40 wt % ammonium fluoride (NH 4 F) and 49 wt % hydrofluoric acid (HF) (6:1), which is found to be superior to an etching solution containing just 49 wt % HF. FOEWSs were characterized using glycerol and found to have the highest sensitivity in a lithium-ion battery when they lose 92% of their transmittance in the presence of glycerol on their sensing region. The physical effect that the FOEWS has on the graphite anode is also investigated and is found to be much more significant in Swagelok cells compared to that in in-house-fabricated pouch cells, mainly due to pressure variation. The FOEWS was found to be most sensitive to the changes in the LIB when it was completely embedded using a slurry of graphite anode material within a pouch cell. The optimized fabrication process of the embedded FOEWS demonstrates the potential of using such sensors commercially for real-time monitoring of the SOC and SOH of LIBs while in operation.

  16. OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE WITH FAST FIBER-OPTIC BEAM LOSS MONITORS FOR THE ADVANCED PHOTON SOURCE STORAGE RING SUPERCONDUCTING UNDULATORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooling, J.; Harkay, K.; Sajaev, V.; Shang, H.

    2017-06-25

    Fast fiber-optic (FFO) beam loss monitors (BLMs) installed with the first two superconducting undulators (SCUs) in the Advanced Photon Source storage ring have proven to be a useful diagnostic for measuring deposited charge (energy) during rapid beam loss events. The first set of FFOBLMs were installed outside the cryostat of the short SCU, a 0.33-m long device, above and below the beam centerline. The second set are mounted with the first 1.1-mlong SCU within the cryostat, on the outboard and inboard sides of the vacuum chamber. The next 1.1-m-long SCU is scheduled to replace the short SCU later in 2016 and will be fitted with FFOBLMs in a manner similar to original 1.1-m device. The FFOBLMs were employed to set timing and voltage for the abort kicker (AK) system. The AK helps to prevent quenching of the SCUs during beam dumps [1] by directing the beam away from the SC magnet windings. The AK is triggered by the Machine Protection System (MPS). In cases when the AK fails to prevent quenching, the FFOBLMs show that losses often begin before detection by the MPS.

  17. Electrochemical studies, in-situ and ex-situ characterizations of different manganese compounds electrodeposited in aerated solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peulon, S.; Lacroix, A.; Chausse, A.; Larabi-Gruet, N.

    2007-01-01

    This work deals with the electrodeposition of manganese compounds. A systematic study of the synthesis experimental conditions has been carried out, and the obtained depositions have been characterized by different ex-situ analyses methods (XRD, FTIR, SEM). The in-situ measurements of mass increase with a quartz microbalance during the syntheses have allowed to estimate the growth mechanisms which are in agreement with the ex-situ characterizations. The cation has an important role in the nature of the electrodeposited compounds. In presence of sodium, a mixed lamellar compound Mn(III)/Mn(IV), the birnessite, is deposited, whereas in presence of potassium, bixbyite is formed (Mn 2 O 3 ), these two compounds having a main role in the environment. The substrate can also influence the nature of the formed intermediary compounds. Little studied compounds such as feitkneichtite (β-MnOOH) and groutite (α-MnOOH) have been revealed. (O.M.)

  18. Airway management of a rare huge-size supraglottic mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou-Zeid, Haitham A.; Al-Ghamdi, Abdel Mohsin A.; Al-Qurain, Abdel-Aziz A.; Mokhazy, Khalid M.

    2006-01-01

    Laser excision of a huge-sized supraglottic mass nearly obstructing the airway passage is a real challenge to anesthesiologists. Upper airway obstruction due to neoplasm in supraglottic region, is traditionally managed by preoperative tracheostomy, however, such a common procedure can potentially have an impact on long-term outcome. A 26-year-old patient presented with dysphagia caused by left cystic vallecular synovial sarcoma. The airway was successfully secured via fiberoptic bronchoscopy, followed by excision of the supraglottic tumor with CO2 laser surgery. Tracheostomy was not required. The patient was discharged from the hospital on the 4th day of surgery. This case, highlights the possibility to secure the airway passage without performing preoperative tracheostomy resulting in good outcome and short hospital stay. (author)

  19. NEUTRINO MASS

    OpenAIRE

    Kayser, Boris

    1988-01-01

    This is a review article about the most recent developments on the field of neutrino mass. The first part of the review introduces the idea of neutrino masses and mixing angles, summarizes the most recent experimental data then discusses the experimental prospects and challenges in this area. The second part of the review discusses the implications of these results for particle physics and cosmology, including the origin of neutrino mass, the see-saw mechanism and sequential dominance, and la...

  20. Neutrino mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.G.H.

    1992-01-01

    Despite intensive experimental work since the neutrino's existence was proposed by Pauli 60 years ago, and its first observation by Reines and Cowan almost 40 years ago, the neutrino's fundamental properties remain elusive. Among those properties are the masses of the three known flavors, properties under charge conjugation, parity and time-reversal, and static and dynamic electromagnetic moments. Mass is perhaps the most fundamental, as it constrains the other properties. The present status of the search for neutrino mass is briefly reviewed

  1. Mass Spectrometry in the Home and Garden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulliam, Christopher J.; Bain, Ryan M.; Wiley, Joshua S.; Ouyang, Zheng; Cooks, R. Graham

    2015-02-01

    Identification of active components in a variety of chemical products used directly by consumers is described at both trace and bulk levels using mass spectrometry. The combination of external ambient ionization with a portable mass spectrometer capable of tandem mass spectrometry provides high chemical specificity and sensitivity as well as allowing on-site monitoring. These experiments were done using a custom-built portable ion trap mass spectrometer in combination with the ambient ionization methods of paper spray, leaf spray, and low temperature plasma ionization. Bactericides, garden chemicals, air fresheners, and other products were examined. Herbicide applied to suburban lawns was detected in situ on single leaves 5 d after application.

  2. Mass Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Christian

    2017-01-01

    the negative features usually ascribed by late nineteenth-century crowd psychology to spontaneous crowds, and attributes these to the entire social fabric. However, in contrast to crowd psychology, theorists of mass society often place greater emphasis on how capitalism, technological advances, or demographic......Mass society is a societal diagnosis that emphasizes – usually in a pejorative, modernity critical manner – a series of traits allegedly associated with modern society, such as the leveling of individuality, moral decay, alienation, and isolation. As such, the notion of mass society generalizes...... developments condition such negative features, and some theorists argue that mass society produces a propensity to totalitarianism. Discussions of mass society culminated in the early and mid-twentieth century....

  3. In Situ TEM Electrical Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canepa, Silvia; Alam, Sardar Bilal; Ngo, Duc-The

    2016-01-01

    understanding of complex physical and chemical interactions in the pursuit to optimize nanostructure function and device performance. Recent developments of sample holder technology for TEM have enabled a new field of research in the study of functional nanomaterials and devices via electrical stimulation...... influence the sample by external stimuli, e.g. through electrical connections, the TEM becomes a powerful laboratory for performing quantitative real time in situ experiments. Such TEM setups enable the characterization of nanostructures and nanodevices under working conditions, thereby providing a deeper...... and measurement of the specimen. Recognizing the benefits of electrical measurements for in situ TEM, many research groups have focused their effort in this field and some of these methods have transferred to ETEM. This chapter will describe recent advances in the in situ TEM investigation of nanostructured...

  4. Fiber optic chemical sensors: The evolution of high- density fiber-optic DNA microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Jane A.

    2001-06-01

    Sensors were developed for multianalyte monitoring, fermentation monitoring, lactate analysis, remote oxygen detection for use in bioremediation monitoring and in a fuel spill clean-up project, heavy metal analysis, and high density DNA microarrays. The major focus of this thesis involved creating and improving high-density DNA gene arrays. Fiber optic sensors are created using fluorescent indicators, polymeric supports, and optical fiber substrates. The fluorescent indicator is entrapped in a polymer layer and attached to the tip of the optical fiber. The tip of the fiber bearing the sensing layer (the distal end) is placed in the sample of interest while the other end of the fiber (the proximal end) is connected to an analysis system. Any length of fiber can be used without compromising the integrity or sensitivity of the system. A fiber optic oxygen sensor was designed incorporating an oxygen sensitive fluorescent dye and a gas permeable polymer attached to an optical fiber. The construction simplicity and ruggedness of the sensor enabled its deployment for in situ chemical oxidation and bioremediation studies. Optical fibers were also used as the substrate to detect biomolecules in solution. To monitor bioprocesses, the production of the analyte of interest must be coupled with a species that is optically measurable. For example, oxygen is consumed in many metabolic functions. The fiber optic oxygen sensor is equipped with an additional sensing layer. Upon contact with a specific biochemical in the sample, a reaction occurs in the additional sensing layer that either consumes or produces oxygen. This dual layer system was used to monitor the presence of lactate, an important metabolite for clinical and bioprocess analysis. In many biological and environmental systems, the generation of one species occurs coincidentally with the generation or consumption of another species. A multianalyte sensor was prepared that can monitor the simultaneous activity of pH, CO2

  5. Triplex in-situ hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresco, Jacques R.; Johnson, Marion D.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are methods for detecting in situ the presence of a target sequence in a substantially double-stranded nucleic acid segment, which comprises: a) contacting in situ under conditions suitable for hybridization a substantially double-stranded nucleic acid segment with a detectable third strand, said third strand being capable of hybridizing to at least a portion of the target sequence to form a triple-stranded structure, if said target sequence is present; and b) detecting whether hybridization between the third strand and the target sequence has occured.

  6. CENTRAL WAVELENGTH ADJUSTMENT OF LIGHT EMITTING SOURCE IN INTERFEROMETRIC SENSORS BASED ON FIBER-OPTIC BRAGG GRATINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Aleynik

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on the investigation of fiber-optic interferometric sensor based on the array of fiber Bragg gratings. Reflection spectra displacement mechanism of the fiber Bragg gratings under the external temperature effects and the static pressure is described. The experiment has shown that reflection spectra displacement of Bragg gratings reduces the visibility of the interference pattern. A method of center wavelength adjustment is proposed for the optical radiation source in accord ance with the current Bragg gratings reflection spectra based on the impulse relative modulation of control signal for the Peltier element controller. The semiconductor vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser controlled by a pump driver is used as a light source. The method is implemented by the Peltier element controller regulating and stabilizing the light source temperature, and a programmable logic-integrated circuit monitoring the Peltier element controller. The experiment has proved that the proposed method rendered possible to regulate the light source temperature at a pitch of 0.05 K and adjust the optical radiation source center wavelength at a pitch of 0.05 nm. Experimental results have revealed that the central wavelength of the radiation adjustment at a pitch of 0.005 nm gives the possibility for the capacity of the array consisting of four opticalfiber sensors based on the fiber Bragg gratings. They are formed in one optical fiber under the Bragg grating temperature change from 0° C to 300° C and by the optical fiber mechanical stretching by the force up to 2 N.

  7. Fiber Bragg grating interrogation using wavelength modulated tunable distributed feedback lasers and a fiber-optic Mach-Zehnder interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Anirban; Chakraborty, Arup Lal; Jha, Chandan Kumar

    2017-04-20

    This paper demonstrates a technique of high-resolution interrogation of two fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) with flat-topped reflection spectra centered on 1649.55 nm and 1530.182 nm with narrow line width tunable semiconductor lasers emitting at 1651.93 nm and 1531.52 nm, respectively. The spectral shift of the reflection spectrum in response to temperature and strain is accurately measured with a fiber-optic Mach-Zehnder interferometer that has a free spectral range of 0.0523 GHz and a broadband photodetector. Laser wavelength modulation and harmonic detection techniques are used to transform the gentle edges of the flat-topped FBG into prominent leading and trailing peaks that are up to five times narrower than the FBG spectrum. Either of these peaks can be used to accurately measure spectral shifts of the FBG reflection spectrum with a resolution down to a value of 0.47 pm. A digital signal processing board is used to measure the temperature-induced spectral shifts over the range of 30°C-80°C and strain-induced spectral shifts from 0  μϵ to 12,000  μϵ. The shift is linear in both cases with a temperature sensitivity of 12.8 pm/°C and strain sensitivity of 0.12  pm/μϵ. The distinctive feature of this technique is that it does not use an optical spectrum analyzer at any stage of its design or operation. It can be readily extended to all types of tunable diode lasers and is ideally suited for compact field instruments and for biomedical applications in stroke rehabilitation monitoring.

  8. Active-Source Seismic Tomography at Bradys Geothermal Field, Nevada, with Dense Nodal and Fiber-Optic Seismic Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, C. H.; Parker, L.; Li, P.; Fratta, D.; Zeng, X.; Feigl, K. L.; Ak, E.; Lord, N.

    2017-12-01

    We deployed a dense seismic array to image the shallow structure in the injection area of the Brady Hot Springs geothermal site in Nevada. The array was composed of 238 5 Hz, three-component nodal instruments and 8,700 m of distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) fiber-optic cable installed in surface trenches plus about 400 m installed in a borehole. The geophone array had about 60 m instrument spacing in the target zone, whereas DAS channel separations were about 1 m. The acquisition systems provided 15 days of continuous records including active source and ambient noise signals. A large vibroseis truck (T-Rex) was operated at 196 locations, exciting a swept-frequency signal from 5 to 80 Hz over 20 seconds using three vibration modes. Sweeps were repeated up to four times during different modes of geothermal plant operation: normal operation, shut-down, high and oscillatory injection and production, and normal operation again. The cross-correlation method was utilized to remove the sweep signal from the geophone records. The first P arrivals were automatically picked from the cross-correlation functions using a combination of methods, and the travel times were used to invert for the 3D P-wave velocity structure. Models with 100 m and 50 m horizontal node spacing were obtained, with vertical node spacing of 10 to 50 m. The travel time data were fit to about 30 ms, close to our estimated picking uncertainty. We will present our 3D Vp model and the result of our search for measurable temporal changes, along with preliminary results for a 3D Vs model. The work presented herein was funded in part by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), U.S. Department of Energy, under Award Number DE-EE0006760.

  9. Origin and characterization of retrograde labeled neurons supplying the rat urethra using fiberoptic confocal fluorescent microscopy in vivo and immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keon-Cheol; Sharma, Seema; Tuttle, Jeremy B; Steers, William D

    2010-10-01

    Autonomic innervation of urethral smooth muscle may influence urinary continence after prostatectomy. It is unclear whether the cavernous nerves carry fibers that influence continence. Using a retrograde axonal tracer combined with real-time in vivo imaging and ex vivo immunohistochemistry we determined the course and type of neurons supplying urethral smooth muscle distal to the prostate in the rat. We injected the retrograde axonal tracers cholera toxin B fragment-Alexa Fluor 488 and Fast Blue in the distal urethral smooth muscle in 10 rats each. Five days later the cavernous nerves and pelvic ganglion were imaged using fiberoptic confocal fluorescence microscopy (cholera toxin B fragment-Alexa Fluor 488) or harvested for immunohistochemistry (Fast Blue). Dual immunofluorescence of Fast Blue neurons with tyrosine hydroxylase or neuronal nitric oxide synthase was done to characterize neurons as noradrenergic or nitrergic. To ascertain whether the cavernous nerves contain fibers to the urethra that originate in the pelvic ganglia we cut the cavernous nerves with their ancillary branches in 3 rats and imaged them for Fast Blue. Fluorescent neurons and axons were detected in cavernous nerves and the pelvic ganglion. Few neurons were seen in rats with cavernous nerve section. Of urethral neurons 53.1% showed neuronal nitric oxide synthase positivity while 40.6% were immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase. About 6.2% of urethral neurons failed to show tyrosine hydroxylase or neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity. Most of the autonomic innervation to the urethra beyond the prostatic apex travels in the cavernous nerves. Many nerves may be parasympathetic based on neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity. Nerves supplying the urethra outside the cavernous nerves may course posterior to the prostate. Along with afferent fibers, tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity expressing neuron fibers, ie noradrenergic nerves, traveling in the cavernous nerves may

  10. Surface plasmon resonance-based fiber-optic hydrogen gas sensor utilizing palladium supported zinc oxide multilayers and their nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Rana; Gupta, Banshi D

    2015-02-10

    We analyze surface plasmon resonance-based fiber-optic sensor for sensing of small concentrations of hydrogen gas in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum. One of the two probes considered has multilayers of zinc oxide (ZnO) and palladium (Pd) while the other has layer of their composite over a silver coated unclad core of the fiber. The analysis is carried out for different volume fractions of palladium nanoparticles dispersed in zinc oxide host material in the nanocomposite layer. For the analysis, a Maxwell-Garnett model is adopted for calculating the dielectric function of a ZnO:Pd nanocomposite having nanoparticles of dimensions smaller than the wavelength of radiation used. The effects of the volume fraction of the nanoparticles in the nanocomposite and the thickness of the nanocomposite layer on the figure of merit of the sensor have been studied. The film thickness of the layer and the volume fraction of nanoparticles in the ZnO:Pd nanocomposite layer have been optimized to achieve the maximum value of the figure of merit of the sensor. It has been found that the figure of merit of the sensing probe coated with ZnO:Pd nanocomposite is more than twofold of the sensing probe coated with multilayers of Pd and ZnO over a silver coated unclad core of the fiber; hence, the sensor with a nanocomposite layer works better than that with multilayers of zinc oxide and palladium. The sensor can be used for online monitoring and remote sensing of hydrogen gas.

  11. SU-E-T-111: Development of Proton Dosimetry System Using Fiber-Optic Cerenkov Radiation Sensor Array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, J [National Cancer Center, Ilsan, Gyeonggi-do, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, M; Shin, D; Lim, Y; Lee, S; Kim, J; Kim, J [National Cancer Center, Goyangsi, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, U [National Medical Center in Korea, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, M [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We had developed and evaluated a new dosimetric system for proton therapy using array of fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor (FOCRS) which can measure a percent depth dose (PDD) instantly. In this study, the Bragg peaks and spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) of the proton beams measured by FOCRS array were compared with those measured by an ion chamber. Methods and Method: We fabricated an optical fiber array of FOCRS in a handmade phantom which is composed of poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA). There are 75 holes of 1mm diameter inside the phantom which is designed to be exposed in direction of beam when it is emerged in water phantom. The proton beam irradiation was carried out using IBA cyclotron PROTEUS 235 at national cancer center in Korea and a commercial data acquisition system was used to digitize the analog signal. Results: The measured Bragg peak and SOBP for the proton ranges of 7∼ 20 cm were well matched with the result from ion chamber. The comparison results show that the depth of proton beam ranges and the width of SOBP measured by array of FOCRS are comparable with the measurement from multi-layer ion chamber (MLIC) although there are some uncertainty in the measurement of FOCRS array for some specific beam ranges. Conclusion: The newly developed FOCRS array based dosimetric system for proton therapy can efficiently reduce the time and effort needed for proton beam range measurement compared to the conventional method and has the potential to be used for the proton pencil beam application.

  12. Temperature Response of a Small Mountain Stream to Thunderstorm Cloud-Cover: Application of DTS Fiber-Optic Temperature Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, D.; Klatt, A. L.; Miller, S. N.; Ohara, N.

    2014-12-01

    From a hydrologic point of view, the critical zone in alpine areas contains the first interaction of living systems with water which will flow to streams and rivers that sustain lowland biomes and human civilization. A key to understanding critical zone functions is understanding the flow of energy, and we can measure temperature as a way of looking at energy transfer between related systems. In this study we installed a Distributed Temperature Sensor (DTS) and fiber-optic cable in a zero-order stream at 9,000 ft in the Medicine Bow National Forest in southern Wyoming. We measured the temperature of the stream for 17 days from June 29 to July 16; the first 12 days were mostly sunny with occasional afternoon storms, and the last 5 experienced powerful, long-lasting storms for much of the day. The DTS measurements show a seasonal warming trend of both minimum and maximum stream temperature for the first 12 days, followed by a distinct cooling trend for the five days that experienced heavy storm activity. To gain insights into the timing and mechanisms of energy flow through the critical zone systems, we analyzed the timing of stream temperature change relative to solar short-wave radiation, and compared the stream temperature temporal response to the temporal response of soil temperature adjacent to the stream. Since convective thunderstorms are a dominant summer weather pattern in sub-alpine regions in the Rocky Mountains, this study gives us further insight into interactions of critical zone processes and weather in mountain ecosystems.

  13. In vitro and in vivo comparison of optics and performance of a distal sensor ureteroscope versus a standard fiberoptic ureteroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusch, Achim; Abdelshehid, Corollos; Hidas, Guy; Osann, Kathryn E; Okhunov, Zhamshid; McDougall, Elspeth; Landman, Jaime

    2013-07-01

    Recent advances in distal sensor technologies have made distal sensor ureteroscopes both commercially and technically feasible. We evaluated performance characteristics and optics of a new generation distal sensor Flex-X(C) (X(C)) and a standard flexible fiberoptic ureteroscope Flex-X(2) (X(2)), both from Karl Storz, Tuttlingen, Germany. The ureteroscopes were compared for active deflection, irrigation flow, and optical characteristics. Each ureteroscope was evaluated with an empty working channel and with various accessories. Optical characteristics (resolution, grayscale imaging, and color representation) were measured using United States Air Force test targets. We digitally recorded a renal porcine ureteroscopy and laser ablation of a stone with the X(2) and with the X(C). Edited footage of the recorded procedure was shown to different expert surgeons (n=8) on a high-definition monitor for evaluation by questionnaire for image quality and performance. The X(C) had a higher resolution than the X(2) at 20 and 10 mm 3.17 lines/mm vs 1.41 lines/mm, 10.1 vs 3.56, respectively (P=0.003, P=0.002). Color representation was better in the X(C). There was no difference in contrast quality between the two ureteroscopes. For each individual ureteroscope, the upward deflection was greater than the downward deflection both with and without accessories. When compared with the X(2), the X(C) manifested superior deflection and flow (PX(C), and deflection as well as flow rate was less impaired by the various accessories.

  14. Fiber-optic system for dual-modality imaging of glucose probes 18F-FDG and 6-NBDG in atherosclerotic plaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raiyan T Zaman

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a progressive inflammatory condition that underlies coronary artery disease (CAD-the leading cause of death in the United States. Thus, the ultimate goal of this research is to advance our understanding of human CAD by improving the characterization of metabolically active vulnerable plaques within the coronary arteries using a novel catheter-based imaging system. The aims of this study include (1 developing a novel fiber-optic imaging system with a scintillator to detect both 18F and fluorescent glucose probes, and (2 validating the system on ex vivo murine plaques.A novel design implements a flexible fiber-optic catheter consisting of both a radio-luminescence and a fluorescence imaging system to detect radionuclide 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG and the fluorescent analog 6-(N-(7-Nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-ylamino-6-Deoxyglucose (6-NBDG, respectively. Murine macrophage-rich atherosclerotic carotid plaques were imaged ex vivo after intravenous delivery of 18F-FDG or 6-NBDG. Confirmatory optical imaging by IVIS-200 and autoradiography were also performed.Our fiber-optic imaging system successfully visualized both 18F-FDG and 6-NBDG probes in atherosclerotic plaques. For 18F-FDG, the ligated left carotid arteries (LCs exhibited 4.9-fold higher radioluminescence signal intensity compared to the non-ligated right carotid arteries (RCs (2.6 × 10(4 ± 1.4 × 10(3 vs. 5.4 × 10(3 ± 1.3 × 10(3 A.U., P = 0.008. Similarly, for 6-NBDG, the ligated LCs emitted 4.3-fold brighter fluorescent signals than the control RCs (1.6 × 10(2 ± 2.7 × 10(1 vs. 3.8 × 10(1 ± 5.9 A.U., P = 0.002. The higher uptake of both 18F-FDG and 6-NBDG in ligated LCs were confirmed with the IVIS-200 system. Autoradiography further verified the higher uptake of 18F-FDG by the LCs.This novel fiber-optic imaging system was sensitive to both radionuclide and fluorescent glucose probes taken up by murine atherosclerotic plaques. In addition, 6-NBDG is a

  15. Mass hysteria

    CERN Document Server

    Hellemans, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    Considerable research is being undertaken to identify the Higgs particle that is believed to give things their mass. According to the standard model, what we call mass is really an indication of how strongly particles interact with an invisible syrupy substance called the Higgs field. Quantum mechanics say that the mass-giving field can also be thought of as a sea of electrically neutral Higgs particles that should be dislodged in collisions between subatomic particles with high enough energies. Particle physicists expect the Higgs to exist only for a fleeting moment before decaying into other particles, which are caught in a detector. (Edited abstract).

  16. Very little in situ produced radiocarbon retained in accumulating Antarctic ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemp, W.J.M. van der; Alderliesten, C.; Borg, K. van der; Holmlund, P.; Jong, A.F.M. de; Karloef, L.; Lamers, R.A.N.; Oerlemans, J.; Thomassen, M.; Wal, R.S.W. van de

    2000-01-01

    Ice samples from Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica, were analyzed for 14 CO 2 and 14 CO by accelerator mass spectrometry. Only a small amount (∼2%) of in situ produced radiocarbon was detected. The calibrated radiocarbon ages, corrected for in situ produced 14 C, are in fair agreement with age estimates obtained from stratigraphical methods added to a gas inclusion model. The ages of the entrapped air range from recent to ca. 1200 AD

  17. In situ solution mining technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Learmont, R.P.

    1978-01-01

    A method of in situ solution mining is disclosed in which a primary leaching process employing an array of 5-spot leaching patterns of production and injection wells is converted to a different pattern by converting to injection wells all the production wells in alternate rows

  18. 'In situ' expanded graphite extinguishant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Qixin; Shou Yuemei; He Bangrong

    1987-01-01

    This report is concerning the development of the extinguishant for sodium fire and the investigation of its extinguishing property. The experiment result shows that 'in situ' expanded graphite developed by the authors is a kind of extinguishant which extinguishes sodium fire quickly and effectively and has no environment pollution during use and the amount of usage is little

  19. In Situ Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talacua, H

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, the feasibility of in situ TE for vascular and valvular purposes were tested with the use of different materials, and animal models. First, the feasibility of a decellularized biological scaffold (pSIS-ECM) as pulmonary heart valve prosthesis is examined in sheep (Chapter 2). Next,

  20. Ex situ Flora of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwen Huang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of living collections-based research and discovery has been a prominent feature throughout the history of evolution and advance of botanical science: such research is the core and soul of the botanical gardens. Currently, there are c. 162 Chinese botanical gardens, harboring c. 20,000 species in China. As an example of initiatives to utilize the garden cultivated flora to address plant diversity conservation and germplasm discovery for sustainable agriculture and the bio-industries, the Ex situ Flora of China project aims to catalog and document this mega-diversity of plants that are cultivated in the Chinese botanical gardens. The concept of Ex situ Flora of China is a complete new formulation of species, based on garden cultivated individuals and populations, to obtain better morphological descriptions, provide multi-purpose applicability and a fundamental data service that will support national bio-strategies and bio-industries. It emphasises integrative information, accurately collected from living collections across different Chinese botanical gardens, on biology, phenology, cultivation requirements and uses of plant resources, which are normally not available from traditional Floras based on herbarium specimens. The ex situ flora should provide better information coverage for taxonomy, biological and introduction and collection data and color photos of stems, leaves, flowers, fruits and seed, as well as useful information of cultivation key points and main use of each plant. In general, the Ex situ Flora of China provides more useful information than the traditional Flora Reipublicae Popularis Sinicae. The project of Ex situ Flora of China is planned to be one of the most important initiatives of the plant diversity research platform for sustainable economic and social development in China.