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Sample records for site decontamination experience

  1. Site decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bicker, A.E.

    1981-01-01

    Among the several DOE sites that have been radiologically decontaminated under the auspices of the Nevada Operations Office are three whose physical characteristics are unique. These are the Tatum Dome Test Site (TDTS) near Hattiesburg, Mississippi; a location of mountainous terrain (Pahute Mesa) on the Nevada Test Site; and the GNOME site near Carlsbad, New Mexico. In each case the contamination, the terrain, and the climate conditions were different. This presentation includes a brief description of each site, the methods used to perform radiological surveys, the logistics required to support the decontamination (including health physics and sample analysis), and the specific techniques used to reduce or remove the contamination

  2. Ontario Hydro decontamination experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacy, C S; Patterson, R W; Upton, M S [Chemistry and Metallurgy Department, Central Production Services, Ontario Hydro, ON (Canada)

    1991-04-01

    Ontario Hydro currently operates 18 nuclear electric generating units of the CANDU design with a net capacity of 12,402 MW(e). An additional 1,762 MW(e) is under construction. The operation of these facilities has underlined the need to have decontamination capability both to reduce radiation fields, as well as to control and reduce contamination during component maintenance. This paper presents Ontario Hydro decontamination experience in two key areas - full heat transport decontamination to reduce system radiation fields, and component decontamination to reduce loose contamination particularly as practised in maintenance and decontamination centres. (author)

  3. Ontario Hydro decontamination experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacy, C.S.; Patterson, R.W.; Upton, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    Ontario Hydro currently operates 18 nuclear electric generating units of the CANDU design with a net capacity of 12,402 MW(e). An additional 1,762 MW(e) is under construction. The operation of these facilities has underlined the need to have decontamination capability both to reduce radiation fields, as well as to control and reduce contamination during component maintenance. This paper presents Ontario Hydro decontamination experience in two key areas - full heat transport decontamination to reduce system radiation fields, and component decontamination to reduce loose contamination particularly as practised in maintenance and decontamination centres. (author)

  4. Gross decontamination experiment report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, R.; Kinney, K.; Dettorre, J.; Gilbert, V.

    1983-07-01

    A Gross Decontamination Experiment was conducted on various levels and surfaces of the TMI - Unit 2 reactor building in March 1982. The polar crane, D-rings, missile shields, refueling canals, refueling bridges, equipment, and elevations 305' and 347'-6'' were flushed with low pressure water. Additionally, floor surfaces on elevation 305' and floor surfaces and major pieces of equipment on elevation 347'-6'' were sprayed with high pressure water. Selective surfaces were decontaminated with a mechanical scrubber and chemicals. Strippable coating was tested and evaluated on equipment and floor surfaces. The effectiveness, efficiency, and safety of several decontamination techniques were established for the large, complex decontamination effort. Various decontamination equipment was evaluated and its effectiveness was documented. Decontamination training and procedures were documented and evaluated, as were the support system and organization for the experiment

  5. Gross decontamination experiment report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, R.; Kinney, K.; Dettorre, J.; Gilbert, V.

    1983-07-01

    A Gross Decontamination Experiment was conducted on various levels and surfaces of the TMI - Unit 2 reactor building in March 1982. The polar crane, D-rings, missile shields, refueling canals, refueling bridges, equipment, and elevations 305' and 347'-6'' were flushed with low pressure water. Additionally, floor surfaces on elevation 305' and floor surfaces and major pieces of equipment on elevation 347'-6'' were sprayed with high pressure water. Selective surfaces were decontaminated with a mechanical scrubber and chemicals. Strippable coating was tested and evaluated on equipment and floor surfaces. The effectiveness, efficiency, and safety of several decontamination techniques were established for the large, complex decontamination effort. Various decontamination equipment was evaluated and its effectiveness was documented. Decontamination training and procedures were documented and evaluated, as were the support system and organization for the experiment.

  6. Lessons Learned from Decontamination Experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, JH

    2000-11-16

    This interim report describes a DOE project currently underway to establish what is known about decontamination of buildings and people and the procedures and protocols used to determine when and how people or buildings are considered ''clean'' following decontamination. To fulfill this objective, the study systematically examined reported decontamination experiences to determine what procedures and protocols are currently employed for decontamination, the timeframe involved to initiate and complete the decontamination process, how the contaminants were identified, the problems encountered during the decontamination process, how response efforts of agencies were coordinated, and the perceived social psychological effects on people who were decontaminated or who participated in the decontamination process. Findings and recommendations from the study are intended to aid decision-making and to improve the basis for determining appropriate decontamination protocols for recovery planners and policy makers for responding to chemical and biological events.

  7. Decontamination around the site of Chernobylsk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manesse, D.; Rzepka, J.P.; Maubert, H.

    1990-12-01

    This report describes the decontamination of the site around the nuclear plant of Chernobylsk after the reactor accident of 1986. The work of decontamination in urban areas, buildings, fields and vegetation are detailed. The interventions to reduce the contamination of surface waters and to protect ground waters are also given. (N.C.)

  8. Decontamination around the site of Chernobylsk; Decontamination autour du site de Tchernobyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manesse, D; Rzepka, J P; Maubert, H

    1990-12-01

    This report describes the decontamination of the site around the nuclear plant of Chernobylsk after the reactor accident of 1986. The work of decontamination in urban areas, buildings, fields and vegetation are detailed. The interventions to reduce the contamination of surface waters and to protect ground waters are also given. (N.C.).

  9. Decontamination analysis of a radiologically contaminated site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawil, J.J.; Strenge, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents a post-exercise analysis of decontamination options for the NUWAX-83 exercise site. Held in May 1983, the purpose of NUWAX-83 was to evaluate the ability of federal, state and local officials to respond to an accident involving nuclear weapons. A computer program, called DECON, was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and used to conduct the decontamination analysis in November 1983. DECON was designed to assist personnel engaged in the planning of decontamination activities. The many features of DECON that are demonstrated in this paper contribute to its potential usefulness as a planning tool for site restoration. Strategies that are analyzed with DECON include: 1) using a Quick-Vac option, under which exterior surfaces are vacuumed before it rains; 2) protecting surfaces against precipitation; 3) prohibiting specific operations on selected surfaces; 4) requiring that specific methods be used on selected surfaces; 5) evaluating the trade-off between cleanup standards and decontamination costs; and 6) varying clean-up standards according to expected human exposure to the surface

  10. Decontamination analysis of a radiologically contaminated site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawil, J.J.; Strenge, D.L.

    1984-02-01

    This paper presents an analysis of decontamination options at the NUWAZX-83 exercise site. Held in May 1983, the purpose of the exercise was to evaluate the ability of federal, state and local officials to respond to a radiological accident involving nuclear weapons. A computer program developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory was used to conduct the decontamination analysis. The program, called DECON, was designed to assist personnel engaged in the planning of decontamination activities. The many features of DECON that are demonstrated in this paper contribute to its potential usefulness as a planning tool for site restoration. Strategies that are analyzed with DECON include: (1) using a Quick-Vac option, under which exterior surfaces are vacuumed before it rains; (2) protecting surfaces against precipitation; (3) prohibiting specific operations on selected surfaces; (4) requiring that specific methods be used on selected surfaces; (5) evaluating the trade-off between cleanup standards and decontamination costs; and (6) varying clean-up standards according to expected human exposure to the surface

  11. Experience Practices on Decontamination Activity in NPP Decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Suk Bon; Kim, Jeongju; Sohn, Wook [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Decommissioning of a nuclear power plant (NPP) involves various technical and administrative activities for a utility to terminate its license, which allows the plant site to be released from the regulatory control (site release). Decontamination activity in NPP decommissioning is one of the main technical activities to be performed during the decommissioning. The decontamination at decommissioning sites is usually performed due to several reasons such as reducing personnel dose and disposal costs, and cleanup to meet license termination requirements by using physical or chemical removal techniques proven through the previous experience practices. This paper introduces the best and worst practices for the decontamination activities collected from the decommissioning operational experiences through the implementation of nuclear decommissioning projects around the world. Review of the experiences of decontamination shows that it is important to conduct an advanced planning for optimized implementation of decontamination taking into considering site specific conditions such as operating time, reactor type, system, and so on. Also, a review of newer decontamination methods is necessary to safely and economically decommission the nuclear facility.

  12. LASL experience in decontamination of the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlquist, A.J.

    1981-01-01

    This discussion represents one part of a major effort in soil decontamination at the Los Alamos site. A contaminated industrial waste line in the Los Alamos townsite was removed, and a plutonium incineration facility, and a filter building contaminated with actinium-227 were dismantled. The former plutonium handling facility has been decontaminated, and canyons and an old firing site contaminated with strontium-90 have been surveyed

  13. Decontamination of the site of an army gasoline service station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, J.; Katzer, W.; Scheidt, M.; Roll, S.

    1994-01-01

    This is a report on the decontamination of the site of a gasoline service station at the Fuchsberg barracks at Salzwedel. Albeit that the accident is not spectacular for its magnitude, this case is interesting and exemplary because of the combined use of the most diverse decontamination methods. Soi air removal by suction, ground water decontamination, and microbiological soil decontamination were successfully used in conjunction. (orig.) [de

  14. Urban Decontamination Experience at Pripyat Ukraine - 13526

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paskevych, Sergiy [Institute for Safety Problems of Nuclear Power Plants, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 36 a Kirova str. Chornobyl, Kiev region, 07200 (Ukraine); Voropay, Dmitry [Federal State Unitary Enterprise ' Russian State Center of Inventory and Registration and Real Estate - Federal Bureau of Technical Inventory' , 37-2 Bernadsky Prospekt, Moscow Russia 119415 (Russian Federation); Schmieman, Eric [Battelle Memorial Institute, PO Box 999 MSIN K6-90, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the efficiency of radioactive decontamination activities of the urban landscape in the town of Pripyat, Ukraine. Different methods of treatment for various urban infrastructure and different radioactive contaminants are assessed. Long term changes in the radiation condition of decontaminated urban landscapes are evaluated: 1. Decontamination of the urban system requires the simultaneous application of multiple methods including mechanical, chemical, and biological. 2. If a large area has been contaminated, decontamination of local areas of a temporary nature. Over time, there is a repeated contamination of these sites due to wind transport from neighboring areas. 3. Involvement of earth-moving equipment and removal of top soil by industrial method achieves 20-fold reduction in the level of contamination by radioactive substances, but it leads to large amounts of waste (up to 1500 tons per hectare), and leads to the re-contamination of treated areas due to scatter when loading, transport pollutants on the wheels of vehicles, etc.. (authors)

  15. Radiological survey following decontamination activities near the TA-45 site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunderson, T.; Buhl, T.; Romero, R.; Salazar, J.

    1983-07-01

    Three areas at the site of a former radioactive liquid waste treatment plant at Los Alamos National Laboratory were decontaminated during 1982 by Bechtel Corporation, with health physics support provided by Eberline Instrument Corporation, under the Department of Energy's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Before decontamination, there were above-background concentrations of gross alpha, gross beta, 238 Pu, 239 240 Pu, 241 Am, 90 Sr, and 137 Cs in the surface soils. These combined concentrations were above operational decontamination guidelines for surface soil contamination. After cleanup operations, radionuclide concentrations in surface soils at all three sites were within decontamination guidelines

  16. LASL experience in decontamination of the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlquist, A.J.

    1979-01-01

    Since 1972 the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has been actively involved in land area surveys for radioactive contamination and has gained considerable experience in cleanup of lands considered to have unacceptable levels of radioactive contamination. Experience and means of arriving at recommendations for decontamination at levels as low as reasonably achievable

  17. Full system decontamination. AREVAs experience in decontamination prior to decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topf, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Minimizing collective radiation exposure and producing free-release material are two of the highest priorities in the decommissioning of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Full System Decontamination (FSD) is the most effective measure to reduce source term and remove oxide layer contamination within the plant systems. FSD is typically a decontamination of the primary coolant circuit and the auxiliary systems. In recent years AREVA NP has performed several FSDs in PWRs and BWRs prior to decommissioning by applying the proprietary CORD copyright family and AMDA copyright technology. Chemical Oxidation Reduction Decontamination or CORD represents the chemical decontamination process while AMDA stands for Automated Mobile Decontamination Appliance, AREVA NPs decontamination equipment. Described herein are the excellent results achieved for the FSDs applied at the German PWRs Stade in 2004 and Obrigheim in 2007 and for the FSDs performed at the Swedish BWRs, Barsebaeck Unit 1 in 2007 and Barsebaeck Unit 2 in 2008. All four FSDs were performed using the AREVA NP CORD family decontamination technology in combination with the AREVA NP decontamination equipment, AMDA. (orig.)

  18. Decontamination and decorporation: the clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poda, G.A.

    1979-01-01

    Decontamination and decorporation are quite interrelated when dealing with a contaminated person. Some clinical experiences from a transuranium production facility are offered. Skin decontamination is accomplished by washing with detergent and water. Stubborn cases are treated with sodium hypochlorite followed by rinsing, and emery cloth is used on more stubborn nail or finger pad contamination. If inhaled, the usual skin cleansing followed by nasal douche with normal saline decontaminates reachable areas and one of the DTPA salts given via aerosol both decontaminates and decorporates the inner recesses. Saline laxative reduces the time inhaled, and ingested particles remain in the gastro-intestinal tract. Conservatism prevails in general, but most persons found to have inhaled contamination are given a single chelation within the hour of discovery and if subsequently found to have over 10% M.P.P.B. of a soluble actinide are offered further chelation. Single dose chelation has been found to be relatively innocuous and usually sufficient. The longest case of chelation therapy spanned 2-1/4 years and encompassed 123 doses of CaNa-DTPA

  19. Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montford, B.

    1975-01-01

    Development of special techniques has permitted the use of mild decontamination processes for the CANDU type reactor primary coolant circuit, overcoming many of the problems associated with conventional decontamination processes, which use strong, acidic reagents. (Author)

  20. Summary of decontamination cover manufacturing experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrich, G.B.; Berry, H.W.

    1995-02-01

    Decontamination cover forming cracks and vent cup assembly leaks through the decontamination covers were early manufacturing problems. The decontamination cover total manufacturing process yield was as low as 55%. Applicable tooling and procedures were examined. All manufacturing steps from foil fabrication to final assembly leak testing were considered as possible causes or contributing factors to these problems. The following principal changes were made to correct these problems: (1) the foil annealing temperature was reduced from 1375 degrees to 1250 degrees C, (2) the decontamination cover fabrication procedure (including visual inspection for surface imperfections and elimination of superfluous operations) was improved, (3) the postforming dye penetrant inspection procedure was revised for increased sensitivity, (4) a postforming (prewelding) 1250 degrees C/1 h vacuum stress-relief operation was added, (5) a poststress relief (prewelding) decontamination cover piece-part leak test was implemented, (6) the hold-down fixture used during the decontamination cover-to-cup weld was modified, and concomitantly, and (7) the foil fabrication process was changed from the extruding and rolling of 63-mm-diam vacuum arc-remelted ingots (extrusion process) to the rolling of 19-mm-square arc-melted drop castings (drop cast process). Since these changes were incorporated, the decontamination cover total manufacturing process yield has been 91 %. Most importantly, more than 99% of the decontamination covers welded onto vent cup assemblies were acceptable. The drastic yield improvement is attributed primarily to the change in the foil annealing temperature from 1375 degrees to 1250 degrees C and secondarily to the improvements in the decontamination cover fabrication procedure

  1. Decontamination analysis of the NUWAX-83 accident site using DECON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawil, J.J.

    1983-11-01

    This report presents an analysis of the site restoration options for the NUWAX-83 site, at which an exercise was conducted involving a simulated nuclear weapons accident. This analysis was performed using a computer program deveoped by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The computer program, called DECON, was designed to assist personnel engaged in the planning of decontamination activities. The many features of DECON that are used in this report demonstrate its potential usefulness as a site restoration planning tool. Strategies that are analyzed with DECON include: (1) employing a Quick-Vac option, under which selected surfaces are vacuumed before they can be rained on; (2) protecting surfaces against precipitation; (3) prohibiting specific operations on selected surfaces; (4) requiring specific methods to be used on selected surfaces; (5) evaluating the trade-off between cleanup standards and decontamination costs; and (6) varying of the cleanup standards according to expected exposure to surface

  2. Decontamination experiments for stainless steel decommissioned components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanescu, D.; Radulescu, M.; Dragomir, M.; Velciu, L.; Dinu, A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the factors which influence the decontamination conditions using the steps of CONAP process. This four phases process (alkaline pre-treatment , an oxidation phase with potassium permanganate in acid environment, a dissolution phase using a complexing agent, a rinsing phase) has been used for decontamination to recycle the stainless steel 304 L and 403 m. The attraction of this process results from the following reasons: - the volume of radioactive sludge is low comparatively with the original volume of the solutions; - the separation of the activity from the solution is very effective; - time of exposure is reduced; - it is not necessary to process the solution through evaporators. During decommissioning decontamination is used to reduce radiation field by removing some of the fission and activation products contained in deposits and oxide films to minimize the radiation exposure of the personnel and public. In this context, this hard decontamination yields the materials at a radioactivity level fulfilling the repository requirements. (authors)

  3. Report on the Decontamination Site Tour in Fukushima Prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knezevic, Z.; Miljanic, S.; Ranogajec-Komor, M.; Milkovic, D; Osvay, M.

    2013-01-01

    In the frame of Japanese-Croatian scientific-technical cooperation, our team visited Minamisoma city in Fukushima prefecture, Japan on Dec 3, 2012. The visit was organized for the foreign participants at the 8th International Workshop on Ionizing Radiation Monitoring held in Oarai, Japan. Minamisoma city is about 25 kilometres north from Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant. The city belonged to the evacuation zone and most of the residents were forced to leave immediately after the accident in 2011. In spring 2012 most of the people were able to return to their homes since dose rates were less than 20 mSv/y, the standard that Japanese government set as a temporary maximum radiation limit. Recently, a project of 'Decontaminating the Living Areas in Minamisoma City' was established. Enormous job has been carried out at the decontamination site (washing the houses, collection of soil, cutting trees, collecting the waste, etc). However, according to some experts, the cost-benefit effect of applied radiation protection principle is questionable. Our team with other participants visited one decontamination site and one temporary waste disposal site. After that a Satellite Meeting entitled 'What can be done for the reconstruction of Fukushima' was organized. In the discussion special attention was given to the public information and communication considering well known fear from radiation and its influence to the future of nuclear power program.(author)

  4. Consequence estimation for decontaminated sites and facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemczyk, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    To aid the US EPA's selection of decommissioning criteria for unrestricted release of cleaned up sites and facilities, a new approach has been developed for estimating the potential hazard from residual radioactivity. That approach, intended to provide conservatively realistic estimates of radiation doses to individual residents from such radioactivity in the environment and in buildings, uses a comprehensive yet relatively simple set of physically-based risk-level environmental transport and exposure pathway models. Doses are estimated for up to 10,000 years. Radioactive decay and ingrowth are explicitly accounted for. Compared to some other approaches, the new approach has several outstanding features. First, some of its models are less conservative than the comparable models in other approaches. Second, the new approach includes models for estimating certain doses in multi-room buildings. Third, the approach's integrated set of transport and behavior models permits straightforward consideration of situations with significant movement of radioactivity within the environment and/or significant radioactive ingrowth. Fourth, the approach's efficient solution techniques, combined with its comprehensive set of transport and behavior models, make consideration of many situations practical. And fifth, the associated computer code runs on a personal computer. The new approach constitutes a significant first step toward a set of comprehensive relationships for providing dose and health risk estimates for residual radioactivity at a variety of sites and facilities

  5. Experiences with decontaminating tritium-handling apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maienschein, J.L.; Garcia, F.; Garza, R.G.; Kanna, R.L.; Mayhugh, S.R.; Taylor, D.T.

    1992-01-01

    Tritium-handling apparatus has been decontaminated as part of the downsizing of the LLNL Tritium Facility. Two stainless-steel glove boxes that had been used to process lithium deuteride-tritide (LiDT) slat were decontaminated using the Portable Cleanup System so that they could be flushed with room air through the facility ventilation system. In this paper the details on the decontamination operation are provided. A series of metal (palladium and vanadium) hydride storage beds have been drained of tritium and flushed with deuterium, in order to remove as much tritium as possible. The bed draining and flushing procedure is described, and a calculational method is presented which allows estimation of the tritium remaining in a bed after it has been drained and flushed. Data on specific bed draining and flushing are given

  6. Experiences with decontaminating tritium-handling apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maienschein, J.L.; Garcia, F.; Garza, R.G.; Kanna, R.L.; Mayhugh, S.R.; Taylor, D.T.

    1991-07-01

    Tritium-handling apparatus has been decontaminated as part of the shutdown of the LLNL Tritium Facility. Two stainless-steel gloveboxes that had been used to process lithium deuteride-tritide (LiDT) salt were decontaminated using the Portable Cleanup System so that they could be flushed with room air through the facility ventilation system. Further surface decontamination was performed by scrubbing the interior with paper towels and ethyl alcohol or Swish trademark. The surface contamination, as shown by swipe surveys, was reduced from 4x10 4 --10 6 disintegrations per minute (dpm)/cm 2 to 2x10 2 --4x10 4 dpm/cm 2 . Details on the decontamination operation are provided. A series of metal (palladium and vanadium) hydride storage beds have been drained of tritium and flushed with deuterium in order to remove as much tritium as possible. The bed draining and flushing procedure is described, and a calculational method is presented which allows estimation of the tritium remaining in a bed after it has been drained and flushed. Data on specific bed draining and flushing are given

  7. Decontamination of abandoned sites. An introduction into the problems of land decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundt, K.

    1991-01-01

    Starting from a brief overview of the history of origin of soil and ground water pollution in Berlin and its surroundings by gas, chemical, and petroleum works, old landfills, manufactories of arms and ammunition as well as gasoline depots or sites of gasoline depots, the brochure describes the legal situation and procedure (list of 'intervention' values) and goes on to outline the situation regarding the ground under Berlin, existing pollutants, and methods for dealing with land contamination. In five abandoned sites (waste oil refinery, copper refinery, waste solvent treatment plant, asphalt factory and drugs factory), different methods for eliminating soil and ground water contamination were used. Their efficacy is assessed on the basis of their soil and pollutant-specific suitability; the decontamination achieved is indicated. (BBR) [de

  8. Decontamination of soil from the research reactor site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, H. Z.; Kim, K. N.; Choi, W. K.; Jeong, J. H.; Oh, W. J.

    2002-01-01

    The two research reactors (TRIGA MARK II and III) in Korea are to be decommissioned in the near future. When the reactors are completely dismantled, the site may remain contaminated due to the long period of operation. We assume that the site is radioactively contaminated by Co-60. Soils gathered from the research reactor site were artificially contaminated with Co 2+ ion. The desorption characteristics of Co 2+ ion from the soil surface by citric acid solution were investigated. Decontamination performances of citric acid and EDTA on soil stored in the radioactive waste drums was examined. The feasibility test of recycling the citric acid was also performed. We concluded that the radioactive waste volume could be reduced significantly by soil washing with a citric acid solution

  9. Road surface washing system for decontaminating radioactive substances. Experiment of radioactive decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Mitsuru; Endo, Mai; Kakizaki, Takao

    2015-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake that occurred on March 11, 2011 resulted in the explosion of the TEPCO Fukushima 1st Nuclear Power Plant and the global dispersion of a large quantity of radioactive substances. A high radiation dose was particularly recorded in Fukushima prefecture several weeks after the accident, although the level is presently sufficiently low. However, considering that the adverse effects of low but extended exposure to radiation are yet to be negated, there is the urgent need for further decontamination. In our study, we focused on the efficient decontamination of radioactive substances in residential areas, for which we propose a high-pressure water jet system for washing road surfaces. The system differs from conventional systems of its type that were initially designed for use in the immediate environment of the nuclear reactors of the TEPCO Fukushima 1st Nuclear Power Plant. The proposed system consists of multiple washing, transporter, and server robots. The washing robots decontaminate the road surface using high-pressure water jets and are transported between washed and unwashed areas by the transporter robots. The server robots supply the water used for washing and absorb the polluted water together with ground dust. In this paper, we describe the concept of the system and present the results of decontamination experiments. Particular attention is given to the washing robot and its mechanism and control method. The results of the integration of the washing robot in an experimental system confirmed the feasibility of the proposed system. (author)

  10. Results of preliminary experiments on tritium decontamination by UV irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oya, Yasuhisa; Shu, Wataru; O'hira, Shigeru; Hayashi, Takumi; Nishi, Masataka

    2000-03-01

    In the point of view of protection of workers from the radiation exposure and the limitation of the contamination with radioactive materials, it is important to decontaminate mobile tritium from plasma facing components of a nuclear fusion reactor at the beginning of their maintenance work. It is considered that the heating is the most effective method for decontamination. However, it is important to develop new decontamination method of adsorbed hydro-carbon based substances from the materials that cannot be heated or the inner pipe of double pipes. This report presents results of preliminary experiments performed for the development of the effective tritium decontamination technique pursuing under US/Japan collaborative program on technology for fusion-fuel processing (Annex IV). In the experiments, the effects of Ultra Violet (UV) irradiation on tritium removal from some kinds of materials, such as poly vinyl chloride -(CH 2 CHCl) n - film, polyethylene film and graphite samples coated by C 2 H 2 plasma were examined. As the result of UV irradiation, it was confined that hydrogen and carbon based compounds could be released from the specimen during UV irradiation. It is concluded that UV irradiation is one of the hopeful candidates for effective tritium decontamination. (author)

  11. Experiences during the decontamination process of areas surrounding to Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, G.

    2014-10-01

    In this work the experience gained during the decontamination of areas surrounding to Fukushima NPP, rugged during the earthquake and tsunami in 2011 and caused the contamination with fission products in these areas is described. Actions taken by the Japanese government are reported and some of the techniques used, the intervention levels and the progress made and disposal techniques considered are presented. (Author)

  12. LASL experience in decontamination of the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlquist, A.J.

    1979-01-01

    Since 1972 the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has been actively involved in land area surveys for radioactive contamination and has gained considerable experience in cleanup of lands considered to have unacceptable levels of radioactive contamination. This paper describes our experience and means of arriving at recommendations for ALARA

  13. Plasma decontamination during ergodic divertor experiments in TORE SUPRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monier-Garbet, P.; DeMichelis, C.; Fall, T.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Goniche, M.; Grosman, A.; Hess, W.; Mattioli, M.

    1991-01-01

    In Tore Supra an ergodic divertor (ED) has been integrated in the machine design and successfully operated, as already reported. This paper analyses the decontamination effect resulting from the creation of an ergodic boundary zone. Two plasma geometrical configurations (outboard and inboard) are studied, the plasma being limited respectively either, on the low field side (lfs), by an outboard limiter (3 to 5 cm ahead of the ED modules) or, on the high field side (hfs), by the graphite inner wall. Strong decontamination effects have already been reported for the first configuration by observing line emission of the intrinsic (carbon and oxygen) and purposely injected (nitrogen) impurities. When limited by the inner wall, the plasma is several centimeters farther from the ED modules than in the lfs configuration. The magnetic perturbation is then greatly reduced, and much smaller decontamination effects should be expected. In this paper, the hfs configuration data is compared with that from the lfs configuration. Preliminary experiments combining lower hybrid current drive and ED operation in the hfs configuration are also reported. (author) 5 refs., 4 figs

  14. EBR-II experience with sodium cleaning and radioactivity decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruther, W.E.; Smith, C.R.F.

    1978-01-01

    The EBR-II is now in Its 13th year of operation. During that period more than 2400 subassemblies have been cleaned of sodium without a serious incident of any kind by a two-step process developed at Argonne. Sodium cleaning and decontamination of other reactor components has been performed only on the relatively few occasions in which a repair or replacement has been required. A summary of the EBR-II experience will be presented. A new facility will be described for the improved cleaning and maintenance of sodium-wetted primary components

  15. EBR-II experience with sodium cleaning and radioactivity decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruther, W E; Smith, C R.F. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne (United States)

    1978-08-01

    The EBR-II is now in Its 13th year of operation. During that period more than 2400 subassemblies have been cleaned of sodium without a serious incident of any kind by a two-step process developed at Argonne. Sodium cleaning and decontamination of other reactor components has been performed only on the relatively few occasions in which a repair or replacement has been required. A summary of the EBR-II experience will be presented. A new facility will be described for the improved cleaning and maintenance of sodium-wetted primary components.

  16. Spent fuel storage and transport cask decontamination and modification. An overview of management requirements and applications based on practical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-04-01

    A large increase in the number of casks required for transport and/or storage of spent fuel is forecast into the next century. The principal requirement will be for increased number of storage and dual purpose (transport/storage) casks for interim storage of spent fuel prior to reprocessing or permanent disposal in both on-site and off-site storage facilities. Through contact with radioactive materials spent fuel casks will be contaminated on both internal and external surfaces. In broad terms, cask contamination management can be defined by three components: minimisation, prevention and decontamination. This publication is a compilation of international experience with cask contamination problems and decontamination practices. The objective is to present current knowledge and experience as well as developments, trends and potential for new applications in this field. Furthermore, the report may assist in new design or modification of existing casks, cask handling systems and decontamination equipment

  17. Off-site consequences of radiological accidents: methods, costs and schedules for decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawil, J.J.; Bold, F.C.; Harrer, B.J.; Currie, J.W.

    1985-08-01

    This report documents a data base and a computer program for conducting a decontamination analysis of a large, radiologically contaminated area. The data base, which was compiled largely through interviews with knowledgeable persons both in the public and private sectors, consists of the costs, physical inputs, rates and contaminant removal efficiencies of a large number of decontamination procedures. The computer program utilizes this data base along with information specific to the contaminated site to provide detailed information that includes the least costly method for effectively decontaminating each surface at the site, various types of property losses associated with the contamination, the time at which each subarea within the site should be decontaminated to minimize these property losses, the quantity of various types of labor and equipment necessary to complete the decontamination, dose to radiation workers, the costs for surveying and monitoring activities, and the disposal costs associated with radiological waste generated during cleanup. The program and data base are demonstrated with a decontamination analysis of a hypothetical site. 39 refs., 24 figs., 155 tabs

  18. Off-site consequences of radiological accidents: methods, costs and schedules for decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tawil, J.J.; Bold, F.C.; Harrer, B.J.; Currie, J.W.

    1985-08-01

    This report documents a data base and a computer program for conducting a decontamination analysis of a large, radiologically contaminated area. The data base, which was compiled largely through interviews with knowledgeable persons both in the public and private sectors, consists of the costs, physical inputs, rates and contaminant removal efficiencies of a large number of decontamination procedures. The computer program utilizes this data base along with information specific to the contaminated site to provide detailed information that includes the least costly method for effectively decontaminating each surface at the site, various types of property losses associated with the contamination, the time at which each subarea within the site should be decontaminated to minimize these property losses, the quantity of various types of labor and equipment necessary to complete the decontamination, dose to radiation workers, the costs for surveying and monitoring activities, and the disposal costs associated with radiological waste generated during cleanup. The program and data base are demonstrated with a decontamination analysis of a hypothetical site. 39 refs., 24 figs., 155 tabs.

  19. Decontamination of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Thirty-seven papers were presented at this conference in five sessions. Topics covered include regulation, control and consequences of decontamination; decontamination of components and facilities; chemical and non-chemical methods of decontamination; and TMI decontamination experience

  20. Surface deposition measurements of the TMI-2 gross decontamination experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIssac, C.V.; Hetzer, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    In order to measure the effectiveness of the gross decontamination experiment (principally a water spray technique) performed in the TMI-2 reactor building, the Technical Information and Examination Program's Radiation and Environment personnel made surface activity measurements before and after the experiment. In conjunction with surface sampling, thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) and gamma spectrometry measurements were also performed to distinguish between radiation fields and contamination. The surface sampler used to collect samples from external surfaces within the reactor building is a milling tool having four major components: a 1.27-cm constant-speed drill; a drill support assembly that allows setting sample penetration depth; filter cartridges for intake air purification and sample collection; and an air pump that forces air across the surface being sampled and through the sample filter cartridge

  1. Monitoring the decontamination of a site polluted by DNAPLs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audí-Miró, C.; Espinola, R.; Torrentó, C.; Otero, N.; Rossi, A.; Palau, J.; Soler, A.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study is to monitor the decontamination of a site polluted by DNAPLs coming from an automotive industry. The contamination was caused by the poor management of the waste generated by the industrial activity, which was discharged into a seepage pit. As a result, soil contamination was produced in the seepage pit area and a plume of DNAPLs-contaminated groundwater was generated. To recover the original environmental quality, a dual action was proposed: in the first place, the removal of the source of contamination and in the second one, the treatment of the DNAPLs plume. The elimination of the source of contamination consisted on a selective excavation of the seepage pit and an offsite management of the contaminated land. To restore the groundwater quality, a passive treatment system using a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) of zero valent iron (ZVI) was implemented. In order to determine the efficiency of the remediation actions, a chemical, isotopic and hydrogeological control of the main solvents detected in groundwater (perchloroethylene -PCE-, trichloroethene -TCE- and cis-dichloroethylene -cis-DCE-) has been established. Results show a decrease in PCE concentration that has been attributed to the removal of the source more than to a degradation process. However, the presence of PCE by-products, TCE and cis-DCE, might indicate a possible PCE biotic degradation. δ13CPCE values analyzed upstream and downstream of the barrier don't show isotopic changes associated to the PRB (values are around -20‰ in all the sampling points). TCE might have experienced a natural advanced degradation process according to the high concentration of cis-DCE found prior the installation of the PRB and the isotopic enrichment in δ13CTCE in some specific areas of the plume (-19.9‰ in the source and -16‰ before the barrier). Slight isotopic changes have been observed in the water flow in a far distance after the barrier (-15.4‰). δ13Ccis-DCE experienced an

  2. Experiment of decontamination of radioactive liquid by a biological method; Experience de decontamination de liquides radioactifs far voie biologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wormser, G.

    1962-07-01

    The author reports experiments of treatment of radioactive liquid effluents by percolation on a bacterial bed like the one used for the treatment of sewer wastewaters. He also reports results obtained in other countries in terms of reduction of effluent radioactivity for various radioactive ions. The installation is described and results are presented in terms of variation of contamination of an effluent with respect to its recycling on a bacterial bed [French] Dans le monde entier, on se preoccupe des moyens de decontamination pour des liquides radioactifs. Les experiences de l'auteur ont confirme qu'un lit bacterien neuf peut donner de bons resultats: il est a noter que ce procede biologique se montre selectif a l'egard des divers ions radioactifs. (auteur)

  3. AREVA NP decontamination concept for decommissioning. A comprehensive approach based on over 30 years experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiepani, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    Decontamination prior to Decommissioning and Dismantlement is imperative. Not only does it provide for minimization of personnel dose exposure but also maximization of the material volume available for free release. Since easier dismantling techniques in lower dose areas can be applied, the licensing process is facilitated and the scheduling and budgeting effort is more reliable. The most internationally accepted approach for Decontamination prior to Decommissioning projects is the Full System Decontamination (FSD). FSD is defined as the chemical decontamination of the primary cooling circuit, in conjunction with the main auxiliary systems. AREVA NP has long-term experience with Full System Decontamination for return to service of operating nuclear power plants as well as for decommissioning after shutdown. Since 1976, AREVA NP has performed over 500 decontamination applications and, from 1986, Decontaminations prior to Decommissioning projects which comprise virtually all NPP designs and plant conditions were performed: NPP designs: HPWR, PWR, and BWR by AREVA, Westinghouse, ABB and GE. Decontaminations performed shortly after final shutdown or several years later, and even after re-opening Safe Enclosure. High Alpha inventory and or low gamma/alpha ratio. Main Coolant chemistry (e.g., with and without Zn injection during operation). Fifteen Decontaminations prior to Decommissioning Projects have been performed successfully to date and the sixteenth FSD is now in the detailed engineering phase and is scheduled to commence late 2010. AREVA NP has developed a fully comprehensive approach for decontamination based on the CORD® (Chemical Oxidation Reduction Decontamination) Family, applied using the in-house designed decontamination equipment AMDA TM (Automatic Modular Decontamination Appliance). Based on the vast experience of AREVA NP in the field of decontamination, the Decontamination Concept for Decommissioning was developed. This concept ensures that the

  4. Indian experience with radionuclide transport, deposition and decontamination in water-cooled nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narasimhan, S.V.; Das, P.C.; Lawrence, D.A.; Mathur, P.K.; Venkateswarlu, K.S.

    1983-01-01

    The present generation of water-cooled nuclear reactors uses construction materials chosen with utmost care so that minimum corrosion occurs during the life of the reactor. As interaction between the primary coolant and the construction materials is unavoidable, the coolant is chemically treated to achieve maximum compatibility. First measurements of the chemical and radiochemical composition of the crud present on the in-core and out-of-core primary heat transport system surfaces of a pressurized heavy-water-moderated and cooled reactor (PHWR) are given; then experience in India in the development of a low temperature, one-stage decontaminating formulation for chemical decontamination of the radioactive deposits formed on stainless steel surfaces under BWR conditions is discussed. The effect of the magnitude of the transients in parameters such as reactor power, system temperature, dissolved oxygen content in the coolant, etc. on the nature and migration behaviour of primary heat transport system crud in a PHWR is described. Contributions to radioactive sources and insoluble crud from different primary heat transport system materials are identified and correlated with reactor operations in a PHWR. Man-rem problems faced by nuclear reactors, especially during off-line maintenance, stress the need for reducing the deposited radioactive sources from system surfaces which would otherwise be accessible. Laboratory and on-site experimentation was carried out to effect chemical decontamination on the radioactive deposits formed on the stainless steel surfaces under BWR conditions. Both the reducing and oxidizing formulations were subsequently used in a small-scale, in-plant trial in the clean-up system of a BWR. More than 85% of the deposited 60 Co activity was found to have been removed by the oxidizing formulation. Efforts to develop a decontaminating mixture containing a reducing agent with the help of a circulating loop are in progress in the laboratory. (author)

  5. Experiment on electrolysis decontamination of stainless steel pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dongwen; Dou Tianjun; Zhao Yujie

    2004-01-01

    A new electrolytic decontamination method used metal balls as conducting anode was investigated. The influences of current density, solution property and diameter of pipes on efficiency of electrolytic decontamination were examined and the efficiency of this method was compared with that of common electrolytic method under the same experimental conditions. Decontamination of samples of stainless steel pipes contaminated by plutonium was performed. Experimental results indicate that decontamination of stainless steel pipes contaminated by plutonium can be achieved at the optimum conditions of greater than 0.2 A·cm -2 current density, 5% sulfuric acid electrolyte and 5 min electrolysis. This method can be used in the decontamination of a wide variety of decommissioned metal materials. (author)

  6. Radiological experience on decontamination of moderator and associated system at NAPS-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, C.L.R.; Mitra, S.R.; Pawar, S.K.; Lal Chand

    2000-01-01

    Narora Atomic Power Station, the first of Indian standardized Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor, is faced with a problem of 60 Co contamination in moderator and its associated system. This contamination has resulted in increase of collective dose contribution. As a part of ALARA campaign in NAPS it was decided to decontaminate the moderator and associated systems and also incorporate modification which will further control the 60 Co contamination. As a part of decontamination program several experiments to determine the effectiveness of the chemical formulation on SS and cupro-nickel surfaces were carried out on various moderator system equipment before finalizing the formulation for full scale decontamination of moderator system. This paper gives an overview of various modifications in system and decontamination efficiency of various chemical formulation which were used for decontamination of moderator system (excluding calandria) and associated equipment. (author)

  7. Decontamination and decommissioning of the Organic Moderated Reactor Experiment facility (OMRE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hine, R.E.

    1980-09-01

    This report describes the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Organic Moderated Reactor Experiment (OMRE) facility performed from October 1977 through September 1979. This D and D project included removal of all the facilities and as much contaminated soil and rock as practical. Removal of the reactor pressure vessel was an unusually difficult problem, and an extraordinary, unexpected amount of activated rock and soil was removed. After removal of all significantly contaminated material, the site consisted of a 20-ft deep excavation surrounded by backfill material. Before this excavation was backfilled, it and the backfill material were radiologically surveyed and detailed records made of these surveys. After the excavation was backfilled and graded, the site surface was surveyed again and found to be essentially uncontaminated

  8. Environmental biotechnology for the eco-efficient decontamination of petroleum hydrocarbon polluted sites in the NIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerstin, S.; Andreas, P. L.; Hildegard, A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text : Pollution of soil and ground water with petroleum hydrocarbons is a major environmental problem in many oil producing regions of the New Independent States. Decontamination of these areas using conventional technologies based on physical, chemical and / or thermal pollutant removal would require major financial resources and represent a great economical burden for these regions. Thus, contaminated land management (CLM) has to focus on efficient yet low-cost strategies yielding the optimum ecological outcome. Approaching such eco-efficient, i.e ecologically sound and economically feasible solutions includes the consideration of technical, scientific and socio-economic aspects. A comprehensive risk assessment states the basis for these CLM strategies, which considers both technical (e.g. soil type, groundwater characteristics) and regional aspects (e.g. demographic and socio-economic details). This requires a holistic understanding of these capacious problems and its communication to and the involvement of the stakeholders. Such eco-efficient technologies that are suitable for the clean-up of soils and aquifers polluted with organic chemicals (e.g. crude oil and its derivatives) are offered by environmental biotechnology. Decontamination techniques such as bioremediation, based on the engineered promotion of the soil's intrinsic microbiological capability to recover from environmental stresses, are fit to re-establish acceptable environmental conditions on a reasonable time-scale while requiring comparably little resources. Bioremediation techniques may be applied after excavation of the polluted soil (ex situ) or on the site as is, leaving contaminated material in place (in situ). Surface, ex situ, treatment (biopiles, landfarming) facilitates the homogenous addition of additives such as surfactants, nutrients or pollutant degrading microorganisms. By contrast, in situ technologies (e.g. bioventing, biosparging) are, as they do not require soil

  9. Summary review of Mound Facility's experience in decontamination of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, A.B.; Davis, W.P.; Garner, J.M.; Geichman, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    Most of the current concrete decontamination work at Mound Facility involves surfaces that are contaminated with plutonium-238. Approximately 60,000 sq. ft. of concrete floors will have to be decontaminated in Mound's current Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Project. Although most of these surfaces are partially protected by a barrier (tile or paint), contaminated water and acid have penetrated these barriers. The technique for decontaminating these floors is desribed. The initial cleaning of the floor involes standard water and detergent. Acids are not used in cleaning as they tend to drive the contamination deeper into the concrete surface. Next, the floor tile is manually removed inside a temporary enclosure under negative and filtered ventilation. Finally, layers of contaminated concrete are mechanically removed inside the ventilated enclosure. The suspected depth and surface area of contamination determines the type of mechanical tool used. In summary, several generic methods of concrete decontamination can be utilized: chemical, such as water, detergent, acids, paint remover, strippable paints, etc.; rotary using sanders, grinders, scarifiers, etc.; impact such as pressure washers (hydrolasers), particle blasters, scabblers, needlers, spallers, paving and rock breakers, ram hoes, etc. The particular method used depends on several factors: surface and area involved; depth of contamination; cost and availability of equipment; usage safety and radiological control; and waste generated

  10. Decontamination Experiments on Intact Pig Skin Contaminated with Beta-Gamma- Emitting Nuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edvardsson, K A; Hagsgaard, S [AB Atomenergi, Nykoeping (Sweden); Swensson, A [Dept. of Occupational Medicine, Karolinska Sjukhuset, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1966-11-15

    A number of decontamination experiments have been performed on intact pig skin. In most of the experiments NaI-131 in water solution has been utilized because this nuclide is widely used within the Studsvik research establishment, is easy to detect and relatively harmless, and is practical to use in these experiments. Among the {beta} {gamma}-nuclides studied 1-131 has furthermore proved to be the one most difficult to remove from the skin. The following conclusions and recommendations regarding the decontamination of skin are therefore valid primarily for iodine in the form of Nal, but are probably also applicable to many other {beta} {gamma}-nuclides. a) A prolonged interval between contamination and decontamination has a negative effect on the result of the decontamination. Therefore start decontamination as soon as possible after the contamination. b) Soap and water has proved to be the most suitable decontamination agent. A number of other agents have appeared to be harmful to the skin. Therefore, first of all use only soap and water in connection with gentle rubbing. c) No clear connection between the temperature of the water for washing and the result of the decontamination has been demonstrated. d) Skin not degreased before the contamination seems to be somewhat easier to decontaminate than degreased skin, particularly if the activity has been on the skin for a long time. Therefore do not remove the sebum of the skin when engaged on radioactive work involving contamination risks. e) Irrigation of the contaminated surface with a solution containing the corresponding inactive ions or ordinary water in large quantities may considerably decrease the skin contamination. f) In radioactive work of long duration involving high risks of contamination prophylactic measures in the form of a protective substance ('invisible glove'), type Kerodex, may make decontamination easier.

  11. Decontamination Experiments on Intact Pig Skin Contaminated with Beta-Gamma- Emitting Nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edvardsson, K.A.; Hagsgaard, S.; Swensson, A.

    1966-11-01

    A number of decontamination experiments have been performed on intact pig skin. In most of the experiments NaI-131 in water solution has been utilized because this nuclide is widely used within the Studsvik research establishment, is easy to detect and relatively harmless, and is practical to use in these experiments. Among the β γ-nuclides studied 1-131 has furthermore proved to be the one most difficult to remove from the skin. The following conclusions and recommendations regarding the decontamination of skin are therefore valid primarily for iodine in the form of Nal, but are probably also applicable to many other β γ-nuclides. a) A prolonged interval between contamination and decontamination has a negative effect on the result of the decontamination. Therefore start decontamination as soon as possible after the contamination. b) Soap and water has proved to be the most suitable decontamination agent. A number of other agents have appeared to be harmful to the skin. Therefore, first of all use only soap and water in connection with gentle rubbing. c) No clear connection between the temperature of the water for washing and the result of the decontamination has been demonstrated. d) Skin not degreased before the contamination seems to be somewhat easier to decontaminate than degreased skin, particularly if the activity has been on the skin for a long time. Therefore do not remove the sebum of the skin when engaged on radioactive work involving contamination risks. e) Irrigation of the contaminated surface with a solution containing the corresponding inactive ions or ordinary water in large quantities may considerably decrease the skin contamination. f) In radioactive work of long duration involving high risks of contamination prophylactic measures in the form of a protective substance ('invisible glove'), type Kerodex, may make decontamination easier

  12. Decommissioning and decontamination activity, Gnome Site, Eddy County, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-10-01

    The purpose of this assessment is to present a brief description of the proposed activity and its potential impacts on the environment. This assessment will constitute an evaluation as to whether or not a formal Environmental Statement need be prepared. As background to the proposed activity, Project Gnome was an underground nuclear test conducted in December 1961 as part of the PLOWSHARE Program. The project site is located about 25 miles southeast of Carlsbad, New Mexico. By means of an excavated shaft and tunnel, a 3-kiloton nuclear explosive was emplaced and detonated in a salt bed about 1200 feet below the surface. The uncontaminated rock and salt muck from the original excavation and subsequent contaminated muck and minor construction debris from reentry activities into the nuclear cavity is commingled and stored in a pile near the Gnome/Coach Shaft. Other areas on the site are known to have been contaminated. In 1969, a program was conducted to cleanup and dispose of all surface contamination to whatever depth it occurred in excess of 0.1 mR/hr. Contaminated materials and soil were collected and disposed into the Gnome shaft, which was filled and sealed. Since then, NV has proposed to DOE/HQ much lower criteria for residual radioactive contamination for the Gnome Site. These proposed criteria were to collect and dispose of surficial materials which contain more than 2 x 10 -5 microcuries per gram of soil for beta/gamma emitters and 3 x 10 -2 microcuries per milliliter of tritium in soil moisture. According to the latest reconnaissance in 1972, low concentrations of Cs-137, Sr-90 and tritium were present at various locations on the site in excess of these proposed guidelines. Other operational areas within the site are suspected of containing radioactive contamination in much lesser volume, which are to be determined by careful probing and monitoring, as described in the next section

  13. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25, R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. N. Doyle

    2002-02-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254 is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), approximately 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The site is located within the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly and Disassembly (R-MAD) compound and consists of Building 3126, two outdoor decontamination pads, and surrounding areas within an existing fenced area measuring approximately 50 x 37 meters (160 x 120 feet). The site was used from the early 1960s to the early 1970s as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station program to decontaminate test-car hardware and tooling. The site was reactivated in the early 1980s to decontaminate a radiologically contaminated military tank. This Closure Report (CR) describes the closure activities performed to allow un-restricted release of the R-MAD Decontamination Facility.

  14. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25 R-MAD Decontamination Facility Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obi, C.M.

    2000-01-01

    The Area 25 Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Decontamination Facility is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254. CAU 254 is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site and consists of a single Corrective Action Site CAS 25-23-06. CAU 254 will be closed, in accordance with the FFACO of 1996. CAU 254 was used primarily to perform radiological decontamination and consists of Building 3126, two outdoor decontamination pads, and surrounding soil within an existing perimeter fence. The site was used to decontaminate nuclear rocket test-car hardware and tooling from the early 1960s through the early 1970s, and to decontaminate a military tank in the early 1980s. The site characterization results indicate that, in places, the surficial soil and building materials exceed clean-up criteria for organic compounds, metals, and radionuclides. Closure activities are expected to generate waste streams consisting of nonhazardous construction waste. petroleum hydrocarbon waste, hazardous waste, low-level radioactive waste, and mixed waste. Some of the wastes exceed land disposal restriction limits and will require off-site treatment before disposal. The recommended corrective action was revised to Alternative 3- ''Unrestricted Release Decontamination, Verification Survey, and Dismantle Building 3126,'' in an addendum to the Correction Action Decision Document

  15. Experience with cleaning of sodium-wetted components and decontamination at Nuclear Research Centre Karlsruhe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzenhauer, P; Borgstedt, U; Stamm, H H; Dippel, Th; Kunze, S; Hentschel, D [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1978-08-01

    Within the framework of the Fast Breeder Project various institutes of the KarIsruhe Nuclear Research Center operate sodium loops for corrosion studies and component tests under sodium. The operation of these loops has led to extensive experience in cleaning sodium-wetted components. This experience relates to the alcohol method, the removal of sodium by melting, storage in air, and to cleaning by means of steam. Deposition samples from radioactive sodium loops were used for decontamination experiments employing various decontaminating agents. The department concerned with the treatment of radioactive waste studied the use of molten salts and paste type cleansers for components unsuitable for mechanical decontamination, primarily with the objective to reduce the amount of radioactive waste. (author)

  16. Experience with cleaning of sodium-wetted components and decontamination at Nuclear Research Centre Karlsruhe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menzenhauer, P.; Borgstedt, U.; Stamm, H.H.; Dippel, Th.; Kunze, S.; Hentschel, D.

    1978-01-01

    Within the framework of the Fast Breeder Project various institutes of the KarIsruhe Nuclear Research Center operate sodium loops for corrosion studies and component tests under sodium. The operation of these loops has led to extensive experience in cleaning sodium-wetted components. This experience relates to the alcohol method, the removal of sodium by melting, storage in air, and to cleaning by means of steam. Deposition samples from radioactive sodium loops were used for decontamination experiments employing various decontaminating agents. The department concerned with the treatment of radioactive waste studied the use of molten salts and paste type cleansers for components unsuitable for mechanical decontamination, primarily with the objective to reduce the amount of radioactive waste. (author)

  17. Decontamination and Decommissioning Experience at a Sellafield Uranium Purification Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosser, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    Built in the 1950's, this plant was originally designed to purify depleted uranyl nitrate solution arising from reprocessing operations at the Primary Separation and Head End Plant (Fig. 1). The facility was used for various purposes throughout its life cycle such as research, development and trial based processes. Test rigs were operated in the building from the 1970's until 1984 to support development of the process and equipment now used at Sellafield's Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP). The extensive decommissioning program for this facility began over 15 years ago. Many challenges have been overcome throughout this program such as decommissioning the four main process cells, which were very highly alpha contaminated. The cells contained vessels and pipeline systems that were contaminated to such levels that workers had to use pressurized suits to enter the cells. Since decommissioning at Sellafield was in its infancy, this project has trialed various decontamination/decommissioning methods and techniques in order to progress the project, and this has provided valuable learning for other decommissioning projects. The project has included characterization, decontamination, dismantling, waste handling, and is now ready for demolition during late 2005, early 2006. This will be the first major facility within the historic Separation Area at Sellafield to be demolished down to base slab level. The lessons learnt from this project will directly benefit numerous decommissioning projects as the cleanup at Sellafield continues. (authors)

  18. On-Site Decontamination System for Liquid Low Level Radioactive Waste - 13010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OSMANLIOGLU, Ahmet Erdal [Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center, Kucukcekmece Istanbul (Turkey)

    2013-07-01

    This study is based on an evaluation of purification methods for liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW) by using natural zeolite. Generally the volume of liquid low-level waste is relatively large and the specific activity is rather low when compared to other radioactive waste types. In this study, a pilot scale column was used with natural zeolite as an ion exchanger media. Decontamination and minimization of LLLW especially at the generation site decrease operational cost in waste management operations. Portable pilot scale column was constructed for decontamination of LLW on site. Effect of temperature on the radionuclide adsorption of the zeolite was determined to optimize the waste solution temperature for the plant scale operations. In addition, effect of pH on the radionuclide uptake of the zeolite column was determined to optimize the waste solution pH for the plant scale operations. The advantages of this method used for the processing of LLLW are discussed in this paper. (authors)

  19. A study on the applicability for primary system decontamination through analysis on NPP decommission technology and international experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jong Soon; Jung, Min Young; Lee, Sang Heon [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    Decontamination is one of the most important technologies for the decommissioning of NPP. The purpose of decontamination is to reduce the Risk of exposure of the decommissioning workers, and to recycle parts of the plant components. Currently, there is a lack of data on the efficiency of the decontamination technologies for decommissioning. In most cases, the local radiation level can be lowered below a regulatory limitation by decontamination. Therefore, more efficient decontamination technology must be continuously developed. This work describes the practical experiences in the United States and the European countries for NPP decommissioning using these decontamination technologies. When the decommissioning of domestic nuclear power plant is planned and implemented, this work will be helpful as a reference of previous cases.

  20. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act industrial site environmental restoration site characterization plan. Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    This plan presents the strategy for the characterization of the Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility at the Nevada Test Site which will be conducted for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, Environmental Restoration Division. The objectives of the planned activities are to: obtain sufficient, sample analytical data from which further assessment, remediation, and/or closure strategies may be developed for the site; obtain sufficient, sample analytical data for management of investigation-derived waste. The scope of the characterization may include surface radiation survey(s), surface soil sampling, subsurface soil boring (i.e., drilling), and sampling of soil in and around the pond; in situ sampling of the soil within subsurface soil borings; and sample analysis for both site characterization and waste management purposes

  1. Organic decontamination by ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, T.R.

    1994-01-01

    This study has successfully identified ion exchanger media suitable for decontaminating the 5500-gallon organic layer in Tank 241-C-103. Decontamination of radionuclides is necessary to meet shipping, incinerator site storage, and incineration feed requirements. The exchanger media were identified through a literature search and experiments at the Russian Institute for Physical Chemistry. The principal radionuclides addressed are Cs-137 and Sr-90. Recommendations for an experimental program plan conclude the discussion. The experimental program would provide the data necessary for plant design specifications for a column and for ion exchange media to be used in decontaminating the organic layer

  2. Decontamination and decommissioning assessment for the Waste Incineration Facility (Building 232-Z) Hanford Site, [Hanford], WA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, L.N.

    1994-02-01

    Building 232-Z is an element of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. From 1961 until 1972, plutonium-bearing combustible materials were incinerated in the building. Between 1972 and 1983, following shutdown of the incinerator, the facility was used for waste segregation activities. The facility was placed in retired inactive status in 1984 and classified as a Limited Control Facility pursuant to DOE Order 5480.5, Safety of Nuclear Facilities, and 6430.1A, General Design Criteria. The current plutonium inventory within the building is estimated to be approximately 848 grams, the majority of which is retained within the process hood ventilation system. As a contaminated retired facility, Building 232-Z is included in the DOE Surplus Facility Management Program. The objective of this Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) assessment is to remove Building 232-Z, thereby elmininating the radiological and environmental hazards associated with the plutonium inventory within the structure. The steps to accomplish the plan objectives are: (1) identifying the locations of the most significant amounts of plutonium, (2) removing residual plutonium, (3) removing and decontaminating remaining building equipment, (4) dismantling the remaining structure, and (5) closing out the project

  3. Decontamination and decommissioning assessment for the Waste Incineration Facility (Building 232-Z) Hanford Site, [Hanford], WA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dean, L.N. [Advanced Sciences, Inc., (United States)

    1994-02-01

    Building 232-Z is an element of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. From 1961 until 1972, plutonium-bearing combustible materials were incinerated in the building. Between 1972 and 1983, following shutdown of the incinerator, the facility was used for waste segregation activities. The facility was placed in retired inactive status in 1984 and classified as a Limited Control Facility pursuant to DOE Order 5480.5, Safety of Nuclear Facilities, and 6430.1A, General Design Criteria. The current plutonium inventory within the building is estimated to be approximately 848 grams, the majority of which is retained within the process hood ventilation system. As a contaminated retired facility, Building 232-Z is included in the DOE Surplus Facility Management Program. The objective of this Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) assessment is to remove Building 232-Z, thereby elmininating the radiological and environmental hazards associated with the plutonium inventory within the structure. The steps to accomplish the plan objectives are: (1) identifying the locations of the most significant amounts of plutonium, (2) removing residual plutonium, (3) removing and decontaminating remaining building equipment, (4) dismantling the remaining structure, and (5) closing out the project.

  4. Phase I decontamination of the J.C. Haynes site, Newark, Ohio. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emswiler, T.R.

    1985-11-01

    Phase I consisted of the primary decontamination, packaging, and shipment of all 241 Am-contaminated gloveboxes, vent system, and miscellaneous waste items located in the laboratory restricted area in the J.C. Haynes house. The primary goals of Phase I were to locate and account for a major quantity of 241 Am which was unaccounted for and to remove all radioactive materials and contamination posing an imminent hazard to public health and safety. All Phase I operations were conducted under a Quality Assurance (QA) Program Plan and QA procedures written specifically for this program. In addition, certain generic Battelle QA procedures were used for routine tasks. All operations were conducted under strict health physics supervision and procedures. Cognizant ORAU and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) personnel were on site during the entire Phase I operation and provided support and approval in the daily operations. All staff members had participated in previous decontamination and decommissioning programs involving transuranic waste and completed Phase I in a well controlled, timely, and safe manner

  5. Decontamination and decommissioning techniques for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Won, H. J.; Jung, C. H.; Choi, W. K.; Kim, G. N.; Lee, K. W.

    2002-05-01

    Evaluation of soil decontamination process and the liquid decontamination waste treatment technology are investigation of organic acid as a decontamination agent, investigation of the liquid waste purification process and identification of recycling the decontamination agents. Participation on IAEA CRP meeting are preparation of IAEA technical report on 'studies on decommissioning of TRIGA reactors and site restoration technologies' and exchange the research result, technology, experience and safety regulation of the research reactor D and D of USA, Great Britain, Canada, Belgium, Italy, India and so forth

  6. Post-decontamination and dismantlement (D ampersand D) characterization report for CFA-669 site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents results of post-decontamination and dismantling (D ampersand D) characterization surveys performed by EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc. (EG ampersand G Idaho), at Central Facilities Area (CFA)-669, which was the Hot Laundry Facility. The site was characterized to determine and document the radiological and chemical conditions of the site following D ampersand D and to determine if the site satisfies the release criteria. Constructed in 1950, CFA-669 served as the ''hot'' and ''cold'' laundry for Idaho National Engineering Laboratory site contractors until the boiler exploded in 1981. The building was shut down at that time. Before D ampersand D activities began in 1992, the facility was characterized and the results documented. D ampersand D activities were completed in July 1994. The post-D ampersand D radiological characterization consisted of radiation measurements and analyses of soil samples to identify man-made radionuclides and determine the specific activity of each sample. The chemical characterization consisted of toxicity characterization leaching procedure (TCLP) analysis for metals and for volatile and semivolatile organic contamination

  7. Summary of the Hanford Site decontamination, decommissioning, and cleanup, FY 1974--FY 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlen, R.K.

    1991-08-01

    At the end of World War II, the demand for more production along with process and military surveillance changes at the Hanford Site caused a continuing cycle of building and obsolescence. This trend continued until 1964, when the cutback in plutonium production began. The cutback caused the shutdown of excess production facilities. The last of eight reactors was shut down in 1971. Since that time, N Reactor has been the only production reactor that has operated. In addition, changes in the method of separating plutonium caused a number of excess facilities in the 200 Areas. Before 1973, no structured program existed for the disposal of unusable facilities or for general cleanup. Following a plant-wide safety and housekeeping inspection in 1973, a program was developed for the disposal of all surplus facilities. Since the start of FY 1974, a total of 46 radioactively contaminated sites have been demolished and disposed of. In addition, 28 buildings have been decontaminated for in situ disposal or for reuse, 21 contaminated sites have been stabilized, 131 clean structures have been removed, and 93 clean sites have received special remedial action to eliminate potential safety and/or environmental hazards. This report summarizes these activities. 3 refs, 1 fig., 18 tabs

  8. Gnome site decontamination and decommissioning project radiation contamination clearance report, March 28, 1979-September 23, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, H.A.

    1981-08-01

    This report describes the operations and radiological activities conducted during Phase II and Phase III of the Gnome site decontamination and decommissioning (D/D) project in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The onsite radiological monitoring and documentation activities were performed for the Department of Energy, Nevada Operations (DOE/NV) by Reynolds Electrical and Engineering Co., Inc. (REECo) and EG and G, Inc., from March 28, 1979 to September 23, 1979. The monitoring program included soil sampling and analyses, portable instrument area surveys, thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements and a post-operational aerial survey to document the final site status and to insure public and occupational health and safety. Although the analysis of data gathered during the final stages of the D/D project will provide the information necessary for DOE to return the Gnome site to the Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) for unrestricted use of the land surface, there are permanent restrictions on excavation and/or drilling on the site at any depth between the surface and 1500 feet

  9. Experience with dilute chemical decontamination in Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velmurugan, S.; Rufus, A.L.; Sathyaseelan, V.S.; Subramanian, Veena; Mittal, V.K.; Narasimhan, S.V.

    2010-01-01

    Dilute Chemical Decontamination (DCD) process has been used in several full system and components of nuclear coolant systems to effectively remove the radioactive contaminants that causes radiation field and consequent MANREM problem. The DCD process uses chemicals in very low concentrations (millimolar) and dissolves the oxide film along with the activity incorporated in the oxide film. In DCD process operated under the regenerative mode, the chemical formulation spent in the process of oxide dissolution is replenished by passing through cation exchange columns. Finally, after achieving sufficient decontamination of the system/component, the added decontamination chemicals along with the activities and metal ions released during the process are removed by mixed bed ion exchange columns and the system is restored to normal operating condition in few days time. In PHWRs, the regenerative DCD process is applied for full primary coolant system decontamination. The chemicals are added directly to the heavy water coolant with the fuel in the core. In Indian PHWRs (MAPS-1 and 2, RAPS-1 and 2, NAPS-1 and 2 and KAPS-1), the process has been applied eleven times. A chemical formulation based on NTA, Citric acid and Ascorbic acid has been applied seven times with good results. Decontamination factors in the range 2-30 have been obtained in different components with good MANREM savings in the subsequent maintenance works. Efforts are on to modify the process to take care of the challenges posed by antimony isotope. An inhibitor (Rodine-92B) based process was successfully tested in NAPS-2 for removing antimony isotopes ( 122 Sb and 124 Sb). Further refining of the antimony removal process is being worked out. Similarly, the process is being modified to effectively remove the hotspot causing stellite particles in the moderator system of PHWRs. A permanganate based process has been developed and tested in several adjustor rod drive mechanisms in KAPS and NAPS. The experience of

  10. Technology development and demonstration for TRIGA research reactor decontamination, decommissioning and site restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Jung, Ki Jung; Lee, Byung Jik

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the introduction to research reactor decommissioning plan at KAERI, the background of technology development and demonstration, and the current status of the system decontamination technology for TRIGA reactors, concrete decontamination and dust treatment technologies, wall ranging robot and graphic simulation of dismantling processes, soil decontamination and restoration technology, recycling or reuse technologies for radioactive metallic wastes, and incineration technology demonstration for combustible wastes. 9 figs

  11. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25 R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254, R-MAD Decontamination Facility, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Area 25 at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada, CAU 254 is comprised of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-23-06, Decontamination Facility. A corrective action investigation for this CAS as conducted in January 2000 as set forth in the related Corrective Action Investigation Plan. Samples were collected from various media throughout the CAS and sent to an off-site laboratory for analysis. The laboratory results indicated the following: radiation dose rates inside the Decontamination Facility, Building 3126, and in the storage yard exceeded the average general dose rate; scanning and static total surface contamination surveys indicated that portions of the locker and shower room floor, decontamination bay floor, loft floor, east and west decon pads, north and south decontamination bay interior walls, exterior west and south walls, and loft walls were above preliminary action levels (PALs). The investigation-derived contaminants of concern (COCs) included: polychlorinated biphenyls, radionuclides (strontium-90, niobium-94, cesium-137, uranium-234 and -235), total volatile and semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (Metals). During the investigation, two corrective action objectives (CAOs) were identified to prevent or mitigate human exposure to COCs. Based on these CAOs, a review of existing data, future use, and current operations at the Nevada Test Site, three CAAs were developed for consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action; Alternative 2 - Unrestricted Release Decontamination and Verification Survey; and Alternative 3 - Unrestricted

  12. Experience in the decontamination and dismantling of alpha facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charamathieu, A.

    1988-01-01

    Experience in dismantling alpha-containing radiochemical installations in France is described. The dismantling programme undertaken by the Societe des Techniques en Milieu Ionisant since 1977 is tabulated. This includes the dismantling of CALCIO and FLUO (plutonium metal), the dismantling of a slag processing plant, the dismantling of part of a medium activity plutonium mine and the dismantling of rooms 82-100 at Marcoule, France. (author)

  13. Experiment of decontamination of radioactive liquid by a biological method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wormser, G.

    1962-01-01

    The author reports experiments of treatment of radioactive liquid effluents by percolation on a bacterial bed like the one used for the treatment of sewer wastewaters. He also reports results obtained in other countries in terms of reduction of effluent radioactivity for various radioactive ions. The installation is described and results are presented in terms of variation of contamination of an effluent with respect to its recycling on a bacterial bed [fr

  14. Experience in decontamination of the equipment of NPP's with the WWER-440 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaban-Irmenin, Yu.V.

    1981-01-01

    Different methods of decontamination at NPPs are briefly characterized. Decontamination of the removable part of the main circulation pump (MCP) of the WWER-440 reactor is considered as an example of removable equipment decontamination. A design of the decontamination bath of the removable MCP elements and the applied chemical agents are described. A decontamination flowsheet of the Novovoronezh NPP steam generator (SG) is considered as an example of the autonomic decontamination system. The SG decontamination modes, principal flowsheets of a hydromonitor, steam-ejection sprayer and steam-emulsion device are described [ru

  15. Stationary low power reactor No. 1 (SL-1) accident site decontamination ampersand dismantlement project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, E.F.

    1995-01-01

    The Army Reactor Area (ARA) II was constructed in the late 1950s as a test site for the Stationary Low Power Reactor No. 1 (SL-1). The SL-1 was a prototype power and heat source developed for use at remote military bases using a direct cycle, boiling water, natural circulation reactor designed to operate at a thermal power of 3,000 kW. The ARA II compound encompassed 3 acres and was comprised of (a) the SL-1 Reactor Building, (b) eight support facilities, (c) 50,000-gallon raw water storage tank, (d) electrical substation, (e) aboveground 1,400-gallon heating oil tank, (f) underground 1,000-gallon hazardous waste storage tank, and (g) belowground power, sewer, and water systems. The reactor building was a cylindrical, aboveground facility, 39 ft in diameter and 48 ft high. The lower portion of the building contained the reactor pressure vessel surrounded by gravel shielding. Above the pressure vessel, in the center portion of the building, was a turbine generator and plant support equipment. The upper section of the building contained an air cooled condenser and its circulation fan. The major support facilities included a 2,500 ft 2 two story, cinder block administrative building; two 4,000 ft 2 single story, steel frame office buildings; a 850 ft 2 steel framed, metal sided PL condenser building, and a 550 ft 2 steel framed decontamination and laydown building

  16. Oak Ridge K-25 Site Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets; Part A, Characterization, decontamination, dismantlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellows, R.L. [ed.

    1993-02-26

    The Oak Ridge K-25 Technology Logic Diagram (TLD), a decision support tool for the K-25 Site, was developed to provide a planning document that relates environmental restoration and waste management problems at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD technique identifies the research necessary to develop these technologies to a state that allows for technology transfer and application to waste management, remedial action, and decontamination and decommissioning activities. The TLD consists of four separate volumes-Vol. 1, Vol. 2, Vol. 3A, and Vol. 3B. Volume 1 provides introductory and overview information about the TLD. Volume 2 contains logic diagrams. Volume 3 has been divided into two separate volumes to facilitate handling and use. This report is part A of Volume 3 concerning characterization, decontamination, and dismantlement.

  17. Radioactive decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-07-01

    This Code of Practice covers: (a) the decontamination of plant items, buildings and associated equipment; (b) decontamination of protective clothing; (c) simple personal decontamination; and (d) the basic mechanisms of contamination and their influence on decontaminability. (author)

  18. Site Characterization Plan for decontamination and decommissioning of Buildings 3506 and 3515 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    Buildings 3506, the Waste Evaporator Facility, and 3515, the Fission Product Pilot Plant, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), are scheduled for decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). This Site Characterization Plan (SCP) presents the strategy and techniques to be used to characterize Buildings 3506/3515 for the purpose of planning D and D activities. The elements of the site characterization for Buildings 3506/3515 are planning and preparation, field investigation, and characterization reporting. Other level of effort activities will include management and oversight, project controls, meetings, and progress reporting. The objective of the site characterization is to determine the nature and extent of radioactive and hazardous materials and other industrial hazards in and around the buildings. This information will be used in subsequent planning to develop a detailed approach for final decommissioning of the facilities: (1) to evaluate decommissioning alternatives and design the most cost-effective D and D approach; (2) to determine the level and type of protection necessary for D and D workers; and (3) to estimate the types and volumes of wastes generated during D and D activities. The current D and D characterization scope includes the entire building, including the foundation and equipment or materials within the building. To estimate potential worker exposure from the soil during D and D, some subfoundation soil sample collection is planned. Buildings 3506/3515 are located in the ORNL main plant area, to the west and east, respectively, of the South Tank Farm. Building 3506 was built in 1949 to house a liquid waste evaporator and was subsequently used for an incinerator experiment. Partial D and D was done prior to abandonment, and most equipment has been removed. Building 3515 was built in 1948 to house fission product separation equipment. In about 1960, all entrances were sealed with concrete block and mortar. Building 3515 is expected to be

  19. Soil decontamination at the Montevecchio-Levante mine site with experimental washing and leaching techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dessi, R. [Progemisa SpA, Cagliari (Italy); Fadda, S.; Peretti, R.; Zucca, A. [CSGM, Centro Studi Germinerari e Mineralurgici del CNR, Cagliari (Italy); Serci, A. [Digita, Dipt. di Geoingegneria e Tecnologie Ambientali, Cagliari (Italy)

    2000-12-01

    The soils in the neighbourhood of the Rio Montevecchio-Sitzerri, a stream that flows in the valley below the tailings pond of the Montevecchio-Levante mineral processing plant (SW Sardinia, Italy) are severely contaminated by heavy metals, to the extent that traditional land uses are compromised. Consequently urgent measures are needed both to abate the pollution at source and rehabilitate the contaminated land. This paper is concerned with the problem of soil decontamination using washing and leaching techniques. Laboratory experiments have been conducted in mechanically agitated reactors, using citric acid and acetic acid solutions and brine of hydrochloric acid and calcium chloride. The influence of both reagent concentration and solid-to-liquid ratio has been assessed, and in the most significant cases, the attack kinetics has been determined. The tests showed the brine to be the most effective for removing metals from the soils. Based on the findings of the investigations, the possibility of decontamination by heap leaching has been simulated in the laboratory using the column technique. [Italian] I suoi circostanti il Rio Montevecchio-Sitzerri, che scorre a valle del bacino di decantazione degli sterili dell'impianto di trattamento dei minerali di Montevecchio-Levante (Sardegna Centro-Occidentale), sono caratterizzati da un elevato contenuto di metalli pesanti, che ne pregiudicano gli usi tradizionali. Si rende percio' improrogabile sia la necessita' di intervenire sulle cause all'origine della contaminazione, sia di bonificare i suoli in questione al fine di recuperarli a nuovi usi. La memoria intende portare un contributo alle relative problematiche affrontando la possibilita' di decontaminazione mediante tecniche di lavaggio e lisciviazione. La sperimentazione di laboratorio e' stata condotta in reattori ad agitazione meccanica, utilizzando soluzioni con acido citrico, acido acetico ed una salamoia costituita da acido

  20. Effect of a preoperative decontamination protocol on surgical site infections in patients undergoing elective orthopedic surgery with hardware implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebko, Serge P; Green, David M; Awad, Samir S

    2015-05-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs), commonly caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, specifically when hardware is implanted in the patient. Previously, we have demonstrated that a preoperative decontamination protocol using chlorhexidine gluconate washcloths and intranasal antiseptic ointment is effective in eradicating MRSA in the nose and on the skin of patients. To examine the effect of a decontamination protocol on SSIs in patients undergoing elective orthopedic surgery with hardware implantation. A prospective database of patients undergoing elective orthopedic surgery with hardware implantation at the Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Houston, Texas, was analyzed from October 1, 2012, to December 31, 2013. Cohort groups before and after the intervention were compared. Starting in May 2013, during their preoperative visit, all of the patients watched an educational video about MRSA decontamination and were given chlorhexidine washcloths and oral rinse and nasal povidone-iodine solution to be used the night before and the morning of scheduled surgery. Thirty-day SSI rates were collected according to the definitions of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance. Data on demographics, comorbidities such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and coronary artery disease, tobacco use, alcohol use, and body mass index were also collected. Univariate analysis was performed between the 2 groups of patients. Multivariate analysis was used to identify independent predictors of SSI. A total of 709 patients were analyzed (344 controls and 365 patients who were decolonized). Both groups were well matched with no significant differences in age, body mass index, sex, or comorbidities. All of the patients (100%) completed the MRSA decontamination protocol. The SSI rate in the intervention group was significantly lower (1.1%; 4 of

  1. Experiments to determine the efficiency of two standard decontamination procedures for radiocarbon samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, D.R.

    1980-02-01

    Laboratory tests were made to decontaminate radiocarbon samples containing known amounts of contamination. Results for both acid-alkali treatment and acid hydrolysis indicate that decontamination is not 100% efficient

  2. Clinical aspects of percutaneous poisoning by the chemical warfare agent VX: effects of application site and decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Murray G; Hill, Ira; Conley, John; Sawyer, Thomas W; Caneva, Duane C; Lundy, Paul M

    2004-11-01

    O-ethyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothioate (VX) is an extremely toxic organophosphate nerve agent that has been weaponized and stockpiled in a number of different countries, and it has been used in recent terrorist events. It differs from other well-known organophosphate nerve agents in that its primary use is as a contact poison rather than as an inhalation hazard. For this reason, we examined the effects of application site and skin decontamination on VX toxicity in anesthetized domestic swine after topical application. VX applied to the surface of the ear rapidly resulted in signs of toxicity consistent with the development of cholinergic crisis, including apnea and death. VX on the epigastrium resulted in a marked delayed development of toxic signs, reduced toxicity, and reduction in the rate of cholinesterase depression compared with animals exposed on the ear. Skin decontamination (15 minutes post-VX on the ear) arrested the development of clinical signs and prevented further cholinesterase inhibition and death. These results confirm earlier work that demonstrates the importance of exposure site on the resultant toxicity of this agent and they also show that decontamination postexposure has the potential to be an integral and extremely important component of medical countermeasures against this agent.

  3. On-site disposal of decontaminated and dismantled (D and D) materials: A management approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, J.S.; Davis, M.J.; Picel, K.C.

    1995-01-01

    The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) is a federal facility located near Cincinnati, Ohio that is being remediated. Operable Unit 3 (OU3) of the FEMP consists of 232 buildings and other structures that formerly housed various uranium and thorium metallurgical and chemical processes. The buildings are constructed primarily of steel and concrete, with transite siding. The structures are being decontaminated and dismantled using an interim remedial action approach. The disposition of the debris and other waste materials generated by the interim action is being addressed by the final remedial action for the operable unit. The preferred alternative is disposal of most of the material in an engineered disposal cell located on the FEMP property. This is complicated by the fact that the FEMP is located in an environmentally sensitive area and by the complex nature of the materials. The principal aquifer located beneath the site, the Great Miami Aquifer, is designated as a sole-source aquifer under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Disposal of any wastes at the FEMP must be protective of the aquifer. Dismantlement of OU3 structures will result in a very heterogeneous waste stream, both in terms of types of materials and levels of contamination. Wastes to be managed also include contaminated production equipment and drummed materials associated with former production activities, as well as structural materials. All of these factors complicate the management of OU3 materials. This paper discusses the approach proposed by the FEMP for the management of materials resulting from the interim remedial action. The components of the management approach being used to address disposal of the heterogeneous wastes from OU3 in an environmentally sensitive manner are discussed, followed by some conclusions

  4. Development of criteria for release of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sites following decontamination and decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirol, L.

    1986-08-01

    Criteria have been developed for release of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) facilities and land areas following decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). Although these facilities and land areas are not currently being returned to the public domain, and no plans exist for doing so, criteria suitable for unrestricted release to the public were desired. Midway through this study, the implementation of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2, Radioactive Waste Management, required development of site specific release criteria for use on D and D projects. These criteria will help prevent remedial actions from being required if INEL reuse considerations change in the future. Development of criteria for release of INEL facilities following D and D comprised four study areas: pathways analysis, dose and concentration guidelines, sampling and instrumentation, and implementation procedures. Because of the complex and sensitive nature of the first three categories, a thorough review by experts in those respective fields was desired. Input and support in preparing or reviewing each part of the criteria development task was solicited from several DOE field offices. Experts were identified and contracted to assist in preparing portions of the release criteria, or to serve on a peer-review committee. Thus, the entire release criteria development task was thoroughly reviewed by recognized experts from contractors at several DOE field offices, to validate technical content of the document. Each of the above four study areas was developed originally as an individual task, and a report was generated from each. These reports are combined here to form this document. This release criteria document includes INEL-specific pathways analysis, instrumentation requirements, sampling procedures, the basis for selection of dose and concentration guidelines, and cost-risk-benefit procedures

  5. Lessons learned from commercial experience with nuclear plant decontamination to safe storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, S.R.; Partain, W.L.; Sype, T.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has successfully performed decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) on many production reactors it. DOE now has the challenge of performing D ampersand D on a wide variety of other nuclear facilities. Because so many facilities are being closed, it is necessary to place many of them into a safe-storage status before conducting D ampersand D-for perhaps as much as 20 yr. The challenge is to achieve this safe-storage condition in a cost-effective manner while remaining in compliance with applicable regulations. The DOE Office of Environmental Management, Office of Transition and Management, commissioned a lessons learned study of commercial experience with safe storage and transition to D ampersand D. Although the majority of the commercial experience has been with reactors, many of the lessons learned presented in this paper are directly applicable to transitioning the DOE Weapons Complex

  6. Automated nuclear material recovery and decontamination of large steel dynamic experiment containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennison, D.K.; Gallant, D.A.; Nelson, D.C.; Stovall, L.A.; Wedman, D.E.

    1999-01-01

    A key mission of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is to reduce the global nuclear danger through stockpile stewardship efforts that ensure the safety and reliability of nuclear weapons. In support of this mission LANL performs dynamic experiments on special nuclear materials (SNM) within large steel containers. Once these experiments are complete, these containers must be processed to recover residual SNM and to decontaminate the containers to below low level waste (LLW) disposal limits which are much less restrictive for disposal purposes than transuranic (TRU) waste limits. The purpose of this paper is to describe automation efforts being developed by LANL for improving the efficiency, increasing worker safety, and reducing worker exposure during the material cleanout and recovery activities performed on these containers

  7. Decontamination and decommissioning of the JANUS reactor at the Argonne National Laboratory-East site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellhauer, C.R.; Garlock, G.A.

    1997-05-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has begun the decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) of the JANUS Reactor Facility. The project is managed by the Technology Development Division's D ampersand D Program personnel. D ampersand D procedures are performed by sub-contractor personnel. Specific activities involving the removal, size reduction, and packaging of radioactive components and facilities are discussed

  8. Fiscal year 1996 decontamination and decommissioning activities photobriefing book for the Argonne National Laboratory-East Site, Technology Development Division, Waste Management Program, Decontamination and Decommissioning Projects Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Photobriefing Book describes the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Program at the Argonne National Laboratory-East Site (ANL-E) near Lemont, Illinois. This book summarizes current D and D projects, reviews fiscal year (FY) 1996 accomplishments, and outlines FY 1997 goals. A section on D and D Technology Development provides insight on new technologies for D and D developed or demonstrated at ANL-E. Past projects are recapped and upcoming projects are described as Argonne works to accomplish its commitment to, ''Close the Circle on the Splitting of the Atom.'' Finally, a comprehensive review of the status and goals of the D and D Program is provided to give a snap-shot view of the program and the direction it's taking as it moves into FY 1997. The D and D projects completed to date include: Plutonium Fuel Fabrication Facility; East Area Surplus Facilities; Experimental Boiling Water Reactor; M-Wing Hot Cell Facilities; Plutonium Gloveboxes; and Fast Neutron Generator

  9. DEMONSTRATION AND EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL HIGH LEVEL WASTE MELTER DECONTAMINATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weger, Hans; Kodanda, Raja Tilek Meruva; Mazumdar, Anindra; Srivastava, Rajiv Ph.D.; Ebadian, M.A. Ph.D.

    2003-01-01

    Four hand-held tools were tested for failed high-level waste melter decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). The forces felt by the tools during operation were measured using a tri-axial accelerometer since they will be operated by a remote manipulator. The efficiency of the tools was also recorded. Melter D and D consists of three parts: (1) glass fracturing: removing from the furnace the melted glass that can not be poured out through normal means, (2) glass cleaning: removing the thin layer of glass that has formed over the surface of the refractory material, and (3) K-3 refractory breakup: removing the K-3 refractory material. Surrogate glass, from a formula provided by the Savannah River Site, was melted in a furnace and poured into steel containers. K-3 refractory material, the same material used in the Defense Waste Processing Facility, was utilized for the demonstrations. Four K-3 blocks were heated at 1150 C for two weeks with a glass layer on top to simulate the hardened glass layer on the refractory surface in the melter. Tools chosen for the demonstrations were commonly used D and D tools, which have not been tested specifically for the different aspects of melter D and D. A jackhammer and a needle gun were tested for glass fracturing; a needle gun and a rotary grinder with a diamond face wheel (diamond grinder) were tested for glass cleaning; and a jackhammer, diamond grinder, and a circular saw with a diamond blade were tested for refractory breakup. The needle gun was not capable of removing or fracturing the surrogate glass. The diamond grinder only had a removal rate of 3.0 x 10-4 kg/s for K-3 refractory breakup and needed to be held firmly against the material. However, the diamond grinder was effective for glass cleaning, with a removal rate of 3.9 cm2/s. The jackhammer was successful in fracturing glass and breaking up the K-3 refractory block. The jackhammer had a glass-fracturing rate of 0.40 kg/s. The jackhammer split the K-3 refractory

  10. Environmental decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristy, G.A.; Jernigan, H.C. (eds.)

    1981-02-01

    The record of the proceedings of the workshop on environmental decontamination contains twenty-seven presentations. Emphasis is placed upon soil and surface decontamination, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, and assessments of instrumentation and equipment used in decontamination. (DLS)

  11. Environmental decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristy, G.A.; Jernigan, H.C.

    1981-02-01

    The record of the proceedings of the workshop on environmental decontamination contains twenty-seven presentations. Emphasis is placed upon soil and surface decontamination, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, and assessments of instrumentation and equipment used in decontamination

  12. Decontamination Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, W. K.; Jung, C. H.; Oh, W. Z.

    2007-06-01

    The originative CO 2 pellet blasting equipment was developed by improving additional components such as feed screw, idle roller and air-lock feeder to clear up the problems of freezing and discontinuity of blasting and by adopting pneumatically operated vacuum suction head and vacuum cup to prevent recontamination by collecting contaminant particulates simultaneously with the decontamination. The optimum decontamination process was established according to the kind of materials such as metal, concrete and plastic and the type of contaminants such as particulate, fixed chemical compound and oil. An excellent decontamination performances were verified by means of the lab-scale hot test with radioactive specimen and the technology demonstration in IMEF hot cell. The PFC dry decontamination equipment applicable to the surface contaminated with high radioactive particulate was developed. This equipment consists of the unit processes such as spray, collection, filtration and dry distillation designed originatively applicable to inside of dry hot cell. Through the demonstration of PFC spray decontamination process in IMEF hot cell, we secured on-site applicability and the decontamination efficiency more than 90 %. We investigated the characteristics of dismantled metal waste melting and the radionuclide(Co, Cs, U) distribution into ingot and slag by melting decontamination experiments using electric arc melter. We obtained the decontamination factors greater than 100 for Cs and of 10∼100 for uranium. The pilot scale(200 kg/batch) demonstration for melting decontamination was carried out successfully using high temperature melting facility at KAERI. The volume reduction factor of 1/7 and the economical feasibility of the melting decontamination were verified.

  13. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 252: Area 25 Engine Test Stand 1 Decontamination Pad, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    1999-08-20

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit 252 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 252 consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-07-02, Engine Test Stand-1 (ETS-1) Decontamination Pad. Located in Area 25 at the intersection of Road H and Road K at the Nevada Test Site, ETS-1 was designed for use as a mobile radiation checkpoint and for vehicle decontamination. The CAS consists of a concrete decontamination pad with a drain, a gravel-filled sump, two concrete trailer pads, and utility boxes. Constructed in 1966, the ETS-1 facility was part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station (NRDS) complex and used to test nuclear rockets. The ETS-1 Decontamination Pad and mobile radiation check point was built in 1968. The NRDS complex ceased primary operations in 1973. Based on site history, the focus of the field investigation activities will be to determine if any primary contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) (including radionuclides, total volatile organic compounds, total semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons as diesel-range organics, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls) are present at this site. Vertical extent of migration of suspected vehicle decontamination effluent COPCs is expected to be less than 12 feet below ground surface. Lateral extent of migration of COPCs is expected to be limited to the sump area or near the northeast corner of the decontamination pad. Using a biased sampling approach, near-surface and subsurface sampling will be conducted at the suspected worst-case areas including the sump and soil near the northeast corner of the decontamination pad. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible e

  14. A decontamination technique for decommissioning waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heki, H.; Hosaka, K.; Kuribayashi, N.; Ishikura, T.

    1993-01-01

    A large amount of radioactive metallic waste is generated from decommissioned commercial nuclear reactors. It is necessary from the point of environmental protection and resource utilization to decontaminate the contaminated metallic waste. A decommissioning waste processing system has been previously proposed considering such decommissioning waste characteristics as its large quantity, large radioactivity range, and various shapes and materials. The decontamination process in this system was carried out by abrasive blasting as pretreatment, electrochemical decontamination as the main process, and ultrasonic cleaning in water as post-treatment. For electrochemical decontamination, electrolytic decontamination for simple shaped waste and REDOX decontamination for complicated shaped waste were used as effective decontamination processing. This time, various kinds of actual radioactive contaminated samples were taken from operating power plants to simulate the decontamination of decommissioning waste. After analyzing the composition, morphogenesis and surface observation, electrolytic decontamination, REDOX decontamination, and ultrasonic cleaning experiments were carried out by using these samples. As a result, all the samples were decontaminated below the assumed exemption level(=4 x 10 -2 Bq/g). A maximum decontamination factor of over 104 was obtained by both electrolytic and REDOX decontamination. The stainless steel sample was easy to decontaminate in both electrochemical decontaminations because of its thin oxidized layer. The ultrasonic cleaning process after electrochemical decontamination worked effectively for removing adhesive sludge and the contaminated liquid. It has been concluded from the results mentioned above that electrolytic decontamination and REDOX decontamination are effective decontamination process for decontaminating decommissioning waste

  15. Effective Responder Communication Improves Efficiency and Psychological Outcomes in a Mass Decontamination Field Experiment: Implications for Public Behaviour in the Event of a Chemical Incident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Holly; Drury, John; Amlôt, Richard; Rubin, G. James; Williams, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The risk of incidents involving mass decontamination in response to a chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear release has increased in recent years, due to technological advances, and the willingness of terrorists to use unconventional weapons. Planning for such incidents has focused on the technical issues involved, rather than on psychosocial concerns. This paper presents a novel experimental study, examining the effect of three different responder communication strategies on public experiences and behaviour during a mass decontamination field experiment. Specifically, the research examined the impact of social identity processes on the relationship between effective responder communication, and relevant outcome variables (e.g. public compliance, public anxiety, and co-operative public behaviour). All participants (n = 111) were asked to visualise that they had been involved in an incident involving mass decontamination, before undergoing the decontamination process, and receiving one of three different communication strategies: 1) ‘Theory-based communication’: Health-focused explanations about decontamination, and sufficient practical information; 2) ‘Standard practice communication’: No health-focused explanations about decontamination, sufficient practical information; 3) ‘Brief communication’: No health-focused explanations about decontamination, insufficient practical information. Four types of data were collected: timings of the decontamination process; observational data; and quantitative and qualitative self-report data. The communication strategy which resulted in the most efficient progression of participants through the decontamination process, as well as the fewest observations of non-compliance and confusion, was that which included both health-focused explanations about decontamination and sufficient practical information. Further, this strategy resulted in increased perceptions of responder legitimacy and increased

  16. Effective responder communication improves efficiency and psychological outcomes in a mass decontamination field experiment: implications for public behaviour in the event of a chemical incident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Holly; Drury, John; Amlôt, Richard; Rubin, G James; Williams, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The risk of incidents involving mass decontamination in response to a chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear release has increased in recent years, due to technological advances, and the willingness of terrorists to use unconventional weapons. Planning for such incidents has focused on the technical issues involved, rather than on psychosocial concerns. This paper presents a novel experimental study, examining the effect of three different responder communication strategies on public experiences and behaviour during a mass decontamination field experiment. Specifically, the research examined the impact of social identity processes on the relationship between effective responder communication, and relevant outcome variables (e.g. public compliance, public anxiety, and co-operative public behaviour). All participants (n = 111) were asked to visualise that they had been involved in an incident involving mass decontamination, before undergoing the decontamination process, and receiving one of three different communication strategies: 1) 'Theory-based communication': Health-focused explanations about decontamination, and sufficient practical information; 2) 'Standard practice communication': No health-focused explanations about decontamination, sufficient practical information; 3) 'Brief communication': No health-focused explanations about decontamination, insufficient practical information. Four types of data were collected: timings of the decontamination process; observational data; and quantitative and qualitative self-report data. The communication strategy which resulted in the most efficient progression of participants through the decontamination process, as well as the fewest observations of non-compliance and confusion, was that which included both health-focused explanations about decontamination and sufficient practical information. Further, this strategy resulted in increased perceptions of responder legitimacy and increased identification with

  17. Effective responder communication improves efficiency and psychological outcomes in a mass decontamination field experiment: implications for public behaviour in the event of a chemical incident.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly Carter

    Full Text Available The risk of incidents involving mass decontamination in response to a chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear release has increased in recent years, due to technological advances, and the willingness of terrorists to use unconventional weapons. Planning for such incidents has focused on the technical issues involved, rather than on psychosocial concerns. This paper presents a novel experimental study, examining the effect of three different responder communication strategies on public experiences and behaviour during a mass decontamination field experiment. Specifically, the research examined the impact of social identity processes on the relationship between effective responder communication, and relevant outcome variables (e.g. public compliance, public anxiety, and co-operative public behaviour. All participants (n = 111 were asked to visualise that they had been involved in an incident involving mass decontamination, before undergoing the decontamination process, and receiving one of three different communication strategies: 1 'Theory-based communication': Health-focused explanations about decontamination, and sufficient practical information; 2 'Standard practice communication': No health-focused explanations about decontamination, sufficient practical information; 3 'Brief communication': No health-focused explanations about decontamination, insufficient practical information. Four types of data were collected: timings of the decontamination process; observational data; and quantitative and qualitative self-report data. The communication strategy which resulted in the most efficient progression of participants through the decontamination process, as well as the fewest observations of non-compliance and confusion, was that which included both health-focused explanations about decontamination and sufficient practical information. Further, this strategy resulted in increased perceptions of responder legitimacy and increased

  18. Decontamination experience using the EMMAC process in EDF nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noel, D.; Spychala, H. B.; Dupin, M.; Lantes, B.; Goulain, F.; Gregoire, J.; Jeandrot, S.

    1997-01-01

    The EMMA, EMMAC and EMMAC-PLUS decontamination processes, nondestructive tests and waste treatment are presented. The various applications of the new EMMAC soft decontamination process, used by EDF since 1995 have shown that it is a very effective tool and at the same time, is a very low corrosive process for the materials that have been treated . The improved efficiency, compared to the previous EMMA process allowed us to obtain good decontamination factors with only one cycle instead of two. At the same time, changes in chemical composition and waste treatment produced large reduction in the amount of radioactive wastes generated. Further improvements are still being sought. (authors)

  19. An experience of cleaning and decontamination of the BN-350 reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilenko, K.T.; Kochetkov, L.A.; Arkhipov, V.M.; Baklushin, R.P.; Gorlov, A.I.; Kiselev, G.V.; Rezinkin, P.S.; Samarkin, A.A.; Tverdovsky, N.D.

    1978-01-01

    In the course of start-up, adjustment and operation of the BN-350 reactor there arose a need for cleaning from sodium and decontamination of primary and secondary equipment components. Design schemes of the systems provided for this purpose as well as those specially designed for cleaning of steam generator evaporators are considered. Technological processes of cleaning and decontamination for some reactor components (removable parts of circulating pumps, evaporators, valves) are described, the results are presented. (author)

  20. Radiological dose assessment for the decontaminated concrete removed from 183-H solar evaporation basins at the Hanford site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamboj, S.; Faillace, E.; Yu, C.

    1997-01-01

    Potential maximum radiation dose rates over a 1,000-year time horizon were calculated for exposure to the decontaminated concrete removed from the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The RESRAD computer code, Version 5.62, which implements the methodology described in the US Department of Energy's manual for developing residual radioactive material guidelines, was used in this evaluation. Currently, the concrete is not being used. Four potential exposure scenarios were developed for the land area where the decontaminated concrete will be stored. In Scenario A industrial use of the land is assumed; in Scenario B recreational use of the land is assumed; in Scenario C residential use of the land is assumed; and in Scenario D (a plausible but unlikely land-use scenario), the presence of a subsistence farmer in the immediate vicinity of the land is assumed. For Scenarios A and B, water used for drinking is assumed to be surface water from the Columbia River; for Scenarios C and D, groundwater drawn from a well located at the downgradient edge of the storage area is the only source of water for drinking, irrigation, and raising livestock. Conservative parameters values were used to estimate the radiation doses. The results of the evaluation indicate that the US Department of Energy's dose limit of 100 mrem/yr would not be exceeded for any of the scenarios analyzed. The potential maximum dose rates for Scenarios A, B, C, and D are 0.75, 0.022, 29, 29 mrem/yr, respectively. An uncertainty analysis was performed to determine which parameters have the greatest impact on the estimated doses. The doses in Scenarios C and D were found to be very sensitive to the magnitude of the irrigation rate

  1. Experiences from Loviisa Nuclear Power Station concerning the decontamination of steam generators and primary system components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaernstroem, R.

    1989-01-01

    Loviisa 1 and 2 are 465 MWe PWR units of the Soviet type VVER-440. Loviisa 1 has been in commercial operation since spring 1977 and Loviisa 2 from the beginning of 1980. Decontamination of primary circuit components - even big ones as steam generators - can be performed in an efficient and quick way with good results and resonable expences. Total costs for decontamination of the two steam generators including planning, construction, documentation, operation, chemicals etc. did not rise above 100,000.00 dollars. (author) 6 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Subcontracting strategy for the decontamination and decommissioning of Savannah River Site's First Tritium Extraction Facility, 232-F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.W. Jr.; Dowd, A.S. Jr.; Hinds, S.S.; Johnson, S.V.

    1994-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been actively proceeding with the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of various facilities and structures which were instrumental in the success of past missions at the site. The most ambitious of these efforts involves the subcontracting of the complete D and D of the first SRS Tritium Extraction Facility, identified as building 232-F. This facility operated in the mid 1950's and discontinued operations permanently in 1958. The approach utilized for this effort attempts to invoke the novel principle of open-quotes As Commercial As Reasonably Achievableclose quotes or open-quotes ACARAclose quotes. This concept of ACARA applies only the minimum essential requirements necessary to successfully perform the D and D task. Integral to this approach is the subcontractor provision for maximum flexibility in the identification of and adherence to the requirements of applicable DOE Orders, federal, state and local laws and regulations, as well as site specific procedures without violating the site contractual requirements. The technical specification prepared for this effort provides the basis for a competitively bid contract to perform the entire D and D evolution, including initial facility characterization, waste stream characterization and certification, D and D and waste disposal. Preparation and development of this specification and the subsequent Request For Proposal (RFP) was a successful team oriented endeavor. The schedule for this fast-track undertaking took three months to complete. Successful initiation of this task will be the first D and D of a facility containing both radioactive and hazardous material at an operating site within the DOE Weapons Complex. The strategy for preparing the D and D subcontract for the 232-F structure was facilitated by applying the ACARA principle. This approach resulted in the accelerated development of the specification and RFP documents, as well as minimized the complexities of

  3. Special zone territory decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samojlenko, Yu.N.; Golubev, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    Special zone is the Chernobyl' NPP operating site (OS). OS decontamination is described including reactor ruins from the accident moment. The process was begun from reactor bombardment with absorbing and filtering materials (sand, clay, lead, boron compounds). Then were produced soil shovelling, territory filling by dry concrete and laying concrete layer with thickness up to 300 mm. NPP room and equipment decontamination is described. 3 figs.; 3 tabs

  4. Russian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trabalka, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    Soviet research in terrestrial decontamination appears to have paralleled that of the US in many respects. However, the probability exists that long-term evaluations of decontamination techniques (over 10 to 20 years) have been carried out at one nuclear accident site (a marked divergence from US experience). The area of aquatic decontamination seems to offer the most intriguing possibilities for new information acquisition from the USSR; at this point only its potential importance can be speculated upon

  5. Monitoring work at decontamination in Fukushima city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    The author has been working at the decontamination site of Fukushima residences as a radiation monitor since Feb. 2012 for about 1 year, of which experiences are reported here. The decontamination conducted was legally based on the Act on Special Measures concerning the contamination by Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Accident in Mar. 2011, and on other national, municipal related laws and guidelines. Fukushima city planned to conduct the decontamination for coming 5 years from Oct. 2011 to reduce its ambient dose rate to 9 sites within a residence. The work was managed with monitoring result cards and photographs. The definition of contamination to be cleared was against the dose rate of garden ground surface >30 Bq/cm 2 and of ambient at 1 m height 0.5-2 mc-Sv/h, the latter of which was aimed at reducing to <1 mc-Sv/h and the ambient at 1 cm height, to <0.4 mc-Sv. The ambient dose rate after decontamination of 717 residences has been found decreased to about a half (36-73% of doses before the work). Radiation hazard protection of workers was managed with the health examination defined by the law, education and pocket dosimeter: the exposure dose of the decontamination workers has been found to be about 5 mc-Sv/day. Finally, the report presents comments of thoughts and resolves of the city, executing trader, executer and monitoring staff. (T.T.)

  6. Evaluation of gas-phase technetium decontamination and safety related experiments during FY 1994. A report of work in progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, D.W.; Munday, E.B.

    1995-05-01

    Laboratory activities for FY94 included: evaluation of decontamination of Tc by gas-phase techniques, evaluation of diluted ClF{sub 3} for removing U deposits, evaluation of potential hazard of wet air inlekage into a vessel containing ClF{sub 3}, planning and preparation for experiments to assess hazard of rapid reaction of ClF{sub 3} and hydrated UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} or powdered Al, and preliminary evaluation of compatibility of Tenic valve seat material.

  7. Preparations for decontamination and disposition of the Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE) and other ERDA facilities at AI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heine, W.F.; Graves, A.W.

    1975-01-01

    The program plan for the decontamination and disposition of facilities at the Sodium Reactor Experiment and other ERDA-owned, AI-operated, radioactive facilities is described. The program objective along with a description of each of the subject facilities is presented. A description of the organizational structure within supporting the program is given. The elements of planning required to prepare for the task are detailed, including the requirements for cost and schedule control. Progress to date and the future plans are presented. The available technology utilized in the program is described

  8. Demonstration experience with an abrasive blasting technique for decontaminating concrete pads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devgun, J.S.; Land, R.R.; Doane, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    A demonstration was performed for decontaminating a radioactivity contaminated concrete pad with a portable abrasive blasting system. The system utilizes a rotating blast wheel that scours the concrete surface with metal abrasive. The metal abrasive, pulverized concrete dust, and contaminants rebound into a separator chamber. The reusable metal abrasive is recycled, and the pulverized media are removed to an integral dust collection system. The exhaust is HEPA filtered to minimize release of airborne contaminants. However, the technique had limited success in reducing contamination around the cracks and seams in the concrete where the higher activity levels of contamination were detected during the radiological survey before the cleanup. The technique can be successful and cost-effective in decontaminating large areas of low contamination; however, careful characterization and planning are necessary. 3 refs., 3 figs., 1 tabs

  9. Surface decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, S. da; Teixeira, M.V.

    1986-06-01

    The general methods of surface decontamination used in laboratory and others nuclear installations areas, as well as the procedures for handling radioactive materials and surfaces of work are presented. Some methods for decontamination of body external parts are mentioned. The medical supervision and assistance are required for internal or external contamination involving or not lesion in persons. From this medical radiation protection decontamination procedures are determined. (M.C.K.) [pt

  10. Operational experience with CMS Tier-2 sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Caballero, I

    2010-01-01

    In the CMS computing model, more than one third of the computing resources are located at Tier-2 sites, which are distributed across the countries in the collaboration. These sites are the primary platform for user analyses; they host datasets that are created at Tier-1 sites, and users from all CMS institutes submit analysis jobs that run on those data through grid interfaces. They are also the primary resource for the production of large simulation samples for general use in the experiment. As a result, Tier-2 sites have an interesting mix of organized experiment-controlled activities and chaotic user-controlled activities. CMS currently operates about 40 Tier-2 sites in 22 countries, making the sites a far-flung computational and social network. We describe our operational experience with the sites, touching on our achievements, the lessons learned, and the challenges for the future.

  11. Facility decontamination technology workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-10-01

    Purpose of the meeting was to provide a record of experience at nuclear facilities, other than TMI-2, of events and incidents which have required decontamination and dose reduction activities, and to furnish GPU and others involved in the TMI-2 cleanup with the results of that decontamination and dose reduction technology. Separate abstracts were prepared for 24 of the 25 papers; the remaining paper had been previously abstracted

  12. Facility decontamination technology workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-10-01

    Purpose of the meeting was to provide a record of experience at nuclear facilities, other than TMI-2, of events and incidents which have required decontamination and dose reduction activities, and to furnish GPU and others involved in the TMI-2 cleanup with the results of that decontamination and dose reduction technology. Separate abstracts were prepared for 24 of the 25 papers; the remaining paper had been previously abstracted. (DLC)

  13. Surface activity and radiation field measurements of the TMI-2 reactor building gross decontamination experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIsaac, C.V.

    1983-10-01

    Surface samples were collected from concrete and metal surfaces within the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building on December 15 and 17, 1981 and again on March 25 and 26, 1982. The Reactor Building was decontaminated by hydrolasing during the period between these dates. The collected samples were analyzed for radionuclide concentration at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The sampling equipment and procedures, and the analysis methods and results are discussed. The measured mean surface concentrations of 137 Cs and 90 Sr on the 305-ft elevation floor before decontamination were, respectively, 3.6 +- 0.9 and 0.17 +- 0.04 μCi/cm 2 . Their mean concentrations on the 347-ft elevation floor were about the same. On both elevations, walls were found to be considerably less contaminated than floors. The fractions of the core inventories of 137 Cs, 90 Sr, and 129 I deposited on Reactor Building surfaces prior to decontamination were calculated using their mean concentrations on various types of surfaces. The calculated values for these three nuclides are 3.5 +- 0.4 E-4, 2.4 +- 0.8 E-5, and 5.7 +- 0.5 E-4, respectively. The decontamination operations reduced the 137 Cs surface activity on the 305- and 347-ft elevations by factors of 20 and 13, respectively. The 90 Sr surface activity reduction was the same for both floors, that being a factor of 30. On the whole, decontamination of vertical surfaces was not achieved. Beta and gamma exposure rates that were measured during surface sampling were examined to determine the degree to which they correlated with measured surface activities. The data were fit with power functions of the form y = ax/sup b/. As might be expected, the beta exposure rates showed the best correlation. Of the data sets fit with the power function, the set of December 1981 beta exposure exhibited the least scatter. The coefficient of determination for this set was calculated to be 0.915

  14. Contaminated sites: memory loss experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sieber, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Over a period of 50 years, the district of Zurich has financed four projects to catalogue contaminated sites. One lesson is that as soon as there is a new register, the older one fades, so any data that did not get transferred is lost. Several concrete case studies were also presented: - The Glattbrug case, where heavy contamination was discovered to be caused by a carbolineum plant that had been registered at the wrong place and was completely forgotten only 40 years after its closure. - A case where contaminated municipal waste slag was used as compost by wine-growers, and where it was impossible afterwards to find any reliable data concerning the amount or location of compost deliveries. - The Toessegg remediation case, where a number of steel barrels filled with acidic tar were buried above an important aquifer and below grassland. It took the combination of the local level delivering knowledge and the higher political level delivering power to come to action. - The Harwald case, which shows a gap between risk assessment on the one hand and the implementation of results of such risk assessments on the other hand. All of these cases reveal power game between state officials, representatives of the industry, technical experts, politics and the common man. Information may be out there, but not in the right place or not with the right people. It was thus pointed out that RK and M preservation is not only a scientific or a technical problem, but at least as much a social, political, economic, issue. Differences in institutional interests, rivalry, politics and power imbalances play a major role. An important lesson was thus that one may improve the process of archiving, but one also needs to improve the distribution of information and its correct use. The principle of subsidiarity, which delegates power to the lowest competent authority, was judged to be helpful in potentially solving some of these problems, since the international and national level may be too

  15. Site-Specific Health and Safety Plan, 233-S Decontamination and Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbs, B.J.

    1998-01-01

    The 233-S Facility operated from January 1952 until July 1967, at which time the building entered the U.S. Department of Energy's Surplus Facility Management Program as a retired facility. The facility has since undergone severe degradation due to exposure to extreme weather conditions. A freeze and thaw cycle occurred at the Hanford Site during February 1996, which caused cracking failure of portions of the building roof. This resulted in significant infiltration of water into the facility, which creates a pathway for potential release of radioactive material into the environment (air and/or ground). Additionally, the weather caused existing cracks in concrete structures of the building to lengthen, thereby increasing the potential for failed confinement of the building's radioactive material. Differential settlement has also occurred, causing portions of the facility to separate from the main building structure, increasing the potential for release of radioactive material to the environment. An expedited response is proposed to remove this threat and ensure protection of human health and the environment

  16. Site specific health and safety plan, 233-S decontamination and decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. E. Fasso

    1997-12-31

    The deactivated 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility, located in the 200 Area at the Hanford Site, is the subject of this Health and Safety Plan.The 233-S Facility operated from January 1952 until July 1967 at which time the building entered the U.S. Department of Energy`s Surplus Facility Management Program as a retired facility. The facility has since undergone severe degradation due to exposure to extreme weather conditions. Additionally, the weather caused existing cracks in concrete structures of the building to lengthen, thereby increasing the potential for failed confinement of the radioactive material in the building. Differential settlement has also occurred causing portions of the facility to separate from the main building structure, increasing the potential for release of radioactive material to the environment. An expedited response is proposed to remove this threat and ensure protection of human health and the environment. On this premise it is intended that the 233-S Facility removal action be performed as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 Time-Critical Project being conducted under the Pilot Hanford Environmental Restoration (ER) Initiative

  17. THE DEACTIVATION, DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING OF THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT, A FORMER PLUTONIUM PROCESSING FACILITY AT DOE'S HANFORD SITE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CHARBONEAU, S.L.

    2006-01-01

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) was constructed as part of the Manhattan Project during World War II. The Manhattan Project was developed to usher in the use of nuclear weapons to end the war. The primary mission of the PFP was to provide plutonium used as special nuclear material (SNM) for fabrication of nuclear devices for the war effort. Subsequent to the end of World War II, the PFP's mission expanded to support the Cold War effort through plutonium production during the nuclear arms race and later the processing of fuel grade mixed plutonium-uranium oxide to support DOE's breeder reactor program. In October 1990, at the close of the production mission for PFP, a shutdown order was prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) in Washington,; DC--and issued to the Richland DOE field office. Subsequent to the shutdown order, a team from the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) analyzed the hazards at PFP associated with the continued storage of certain forms of plutonium solutions and solids. The assessment identified many discrete actions that were required to stabilize the different plutonium forms into stable form and repackage the material in high integrity containers. These actions were technically complicated and completed as part of the PFP nuclear material stabilization project between 1995 and early 2005. The completion of the stabilization project was a necessary first step in deactivating PFP. During stabilization, DOE entered into negotiations with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the State of Washington and established milestones for the Deactivation and Decommissioning (DandD) of the PFP. The DOE and its contractor, Fluor Hanford (Fluor), have made great progress in deactivating, decontaminating and decommissioning the PFP at the Hanford Site as detailed in this paper. Background information covering the PFP DandD effort includes descriptions of negotiations with the State of Washington concerning consent

  18. Decontamination sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Emiko; Kanesaki, Ken.

    1995-01-01

    The decontamination sheet of the present invention is formed by applying an adhesive on one surface of a polymer sheet and releasably appending a plurality of curing sheets. In addition, perforated lines are formed on the sheet, and a decontaminating agent is incorporated in the adhesive. This can reduce the number of curing operation steps when a plurality steps of operations for radiation decontamination equipments are performed, and further, the amount of wastes of the cured sheets, and operator's exposure are reduced, as well as an efficiency of the curing operation can be improved, and propagation of contamination can be prevented. (T.M.)

  19. Study on LOMI decontamination technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Fuduan; Yu Degui; Lu Jingju; Xie Yinyan

    1993-10-01

    The results of decontamination technique of Low-Oxidation-State Metal-Ion (LOMI) reagents developed from 1986 to 1991 in the laboratory are introduced. The experiments included preparation of LOMI reagents, de-filming efficiency, corrosion behavior of typical alloys, decontamination factors of reagents for contaminated materials and components have proved that the NP/LOMI decontamination method and treatment technique of waste water are feasible and have some advantages. The preparation of LOMI reagent with low concentration of formic acid by reduced pressure distilling technique and the utilization ratio of vanadium reached to 95% by second electrolysis are the main contributions of the study to the decontamination technique

  20. Decontamination method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimura, Hiroshi; Ono, Shigeki; Tada, Nobuo; Tamai, Yasumasa; Okada, Masaya; Kurihara, Masayuki; Onuki, Toyomitsu; Toyota, Seiichi

    1998-01-01

    Before contamination of materials to be decontaminated, a surface of a region where a strippable paint is to be coated is smoothed by an epoxy resin previously. Then, a waterproof sheet is extended to the material to be decontaminated, and the strippable paint is applied to the periphery or the entire surface of the sheet. In order to facilitate peeling, the strippable paint is not applied to a portion of the outer circumference of the sheet. Even if the contaminating circumstance is an air atmosphere or a liquid such as reactor water, since the sheet itself has waterproofness and the strippable paint excellent in gas and water tightness is applied to the periphery, contamination is eliminated. When decontaminating the material to be decontaminated having contaminated surfaces, if the sheet for the start of peeling is picked up and the sheet is peeled, the strippable paint at the periphery thereof can be peeled off together with the sheet. (N.H.)

  1. Decontamination method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujimura, Hiroshi; Ono, Shigeki; Tada, Nobuo; Tamai, Yasumasa; Okada, Masaya; Kurihara, Masayuki [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Onuki, Toyomitsu; Toyota, Seiichi

    1998-10-27

    Before contamination of materials to be decontaminated, a surface of a region where a strippable paint is to be coated is smoothed by an epoxy resin previously. Then, a waterproof sheet is extended to the material to be decontaminated, and the strippable paint is applied to the periphery or the entire surface of the sheet. In order to facilitate peeling, the strippable paint is not applied to a portion of the outer circumference of the sheet. Even if the contaminating circumstance is an air atmosphere or a liquid such as reactor water, since the sheet itself has waterproofness and the strippable paint excellent in gas and water tightness is applied to the periphery, contamination is eliminated. When decontaminating the material to be decontaminated having contaminated surfaces, if the sheet for the start of peeling is picked up and the sheet is peeled, the strippable paint at the periphery thereof can be peeled off together with the sheet. (N.H.)

  2. Skin decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moehrle, G.

    1975-01-01

    A general survey of skin decontamination is given. The success of every decontamination treatments depends mainly on the speed, but also on the care, with which the action is taken. The best way to remove the skin contaminants is thorough washing under lukewarm running water with mild soap and a soft brush. This washing is to be repeated several times for a period of several minutes. If results are not satisfactory, light duty detergents and wetting agents available commercially may also be used. Some solutions which have proved useful are mentioned. The decontamination solutions are best used in the order given. When one has no satisfactory decontamination effect, the next one is to be used. If necessary, these agents must be used several times in the stated order as long as this does not involve too much strain for the skin. All the decontamination measures mentioned refer, of course, to intact healthy skin. After decontamination has been completed, the skin should be treated with a protective cream

  3. Experiences during the decontamination process of areas surrounding to Fukushima; Experiencias durante el proceso de descontaminacion de areas aledanas a Fukushima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, G., E-mail: gustavo.molina@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    In this work the experience gained during the decontamination of areas surrounding to Fukushima NPP, rugged during the earthquake and tsunami in 2011 and caused the contamination with fission products in these areas is described. Actions taken by the Japanese government are reported and some of the techniques used, the intervention levels and the progress made and disposal techniques considered are presented. (Author)

  4. Decontamination of radioisotope production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daryoko, M.; Yatim, S.; Suseno, H.; Wiratmo, M.

    1998-01-01

    The strippable coating method use phosphoric glycerol and irradiated latex as supporting agents have been investigated. The investigation used some decontaminating agents: EDTA, citric acid, oxalic acid and potassium permanganate were combined with phosphoric glycerol supporting agent, then EDTA Na 2 , sodium citric, sodium oxalic and potassium permanganate were combined with irradiated latex supporting agent. The study was needed to obtain the representative operating data, will be implemented to decontamination the Hot Cell for radioisotope production. The experiment used 50x50x1 mm stainless steel samples and contaminated by Cs-137 about 1.1x10 -3 μCi/cm 2 . This samples according to inner cover of Hot Cell material, and Hot Cell activities. The decontamination factor results of the investigation were: phosphoric glycerol as supporting agent, about 20 (EDTA as decontaminating agent) to 47 (oxalic acid as decontaminating agent), and irradiated latex as supporting agent, about 11.5 (without decontamination agent) to 27 (KMnO 4 as decontaminating agent). All composition of the investigation have been obtained the good results, and can be implemented for decontamination of Hot Cell for radioisotope production. The irradiated latex could be recommended as supporting agent without decontaminating agent, because it is very easy to operate and very cheap cost. (author)

  5. Gentilly 1: decontamination program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, H.; Denault, P.

    1985-01-01

    The Gentilly 1 station, a 250-MW(e) light-water-cooled and heavy-water-moderated nuclear reactor, is being decommissioned to a static state (variant of stage 1) condition by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). The scope of the decontamination program at the Gentilly 1 site includes the fuel pool and associated systems, the decontamination center, the laundry, the feedwater pumps and piping systems, the service building ventilation and drainage systems, and miscellaneous floor and wall areas. After an extensive literature review for acceptable decontamination methods, it was decided that the decontamination equipment used at Gentilly 1 during the program would include a hydrolaser, a scarifier, chipping hammers, a steam cleaner, an ultrasonic bath, and cutting tools. In addition, various foams, acids, detergents, surfactants, and abrasives are used alone and in tandem with the above equipment. This paper highlights the result of these decontaminations, their effectiveness, and the recommendation for future application. The methodology in performing these operations are also presented

  6. Formerly Utilized MED/AEC Sites Remedial Action Program. Project management plan for the decontamination of Jones Laboratory, Ryerson Physical Laboratory, and Eckhart Hall, the University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, K.F.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has in place a plan for the decontamination and decommissioning of contaminated sites that had been formerly utilized by the Manhattan Engineering District (MED) and/or the Atomic Energy Commission. This plan is referred to as the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Among these sites are Jones Laboratory, Ryerson Physical Laboratory and Eckhart Hall of The University of Chicago at Chicago, Illinois. This document represents the Project Management Plan for the decontamination of these facilities. 13 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  7. Formerly Utilized MED/AEC Sites Remedial Action Program. Project management plan for the decontamination of Jones Laboratory, Ryerson Physical Laboratory, and Eckhart Hall, the University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, K.F.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has in place a plan for the decontamination and decommissioning of contaminated sites that had been formerly utilized by the Manhattan Engineering District (MED) and/or the Atomic Energy Commission. This plan is referred to as the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Among these sites are Jones Laboratory, Ryerson Physical Laboratory and Eckhart Hall of The University of Chicago at Chicago, Illinois. This document represents the Project Management Plan for the decontamination of these facilities. 13 references, 3 figures, 1 table

  8. Optimization of the decontamination in EDF PWR power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosset, P.; Dupin, M.; Buisine, D.; Buet, J.F.; Brunel, V.

    2002-01-01

    The optimisation of decontamination in EDF PWR power plants is the result of a permanent collaborative work between the plant operators, the subcontractors, central services of nuclear power division of EDF. This collaborative work enables the saving of all the feedback experience. The main operations carried out on nuclear sites like mechanical decontamination of valves, use of the ''EMMAC'' process on big components (replacement of steam generator, hydraulic parts of the reactor coolant pumps), use of foam on pools walls and divers in highly contaminated pools have been discussed. This paper shows that the choice of decontamination processes is very dependant on the components, on the dose rate reduction to be aimed and on the possibility to treat the waste on site. (authors)

  9. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites Remedial Action Program. Report of the decontamination of Jones Chemical Laboratory, Ryerson Physical Laboratory, and Eckhart Hall, the University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynuveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Flynn, K.F.

    1984-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has implemented a program to decontaminate radioactively contaminated sites that were formerly utilized by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and/or the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) for activities that included handling of radioactive material. This program is referred to as the ''Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program'' (FUSRAP). Among these sites are Jones Chemical Laboratory, Ryerson Physical Laboratory, Kent Chemical Laboratory, and Eckhart Hall of The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. Since 1977, the University of Chicago decontaminated Kent Chemical Laboratory as part of a facilities renovation program. All areas of Eckhart Hall, Ryerson Physical Laboratory, and Jones Chemical Laboratory that had been identified as contaminated in excess of current guidelines in the 1976-1977 surveys were decontaminated to levels where no contamination could be detected relative to natural backgrounds. All areas that required defacing to achieve this goal were restored to their original condition. The radiological evaluation of the sewer system, based primarily on the radiochemical analyses of sludge and water samples, indicated that the entire sewer system is potentially contaminated. While this evaluation was defined as part of this project, the decontamination of the sewer system was not included in the purview of this effort. The documentation included in this report substantiates the judgment that all contaminated areas identified in the earlier reports in the three structures included in the decontamination effort (Eckhart Hall, Ryerson Physical Laboratory, and Jones Chemical Laboratory) were cleaned to levels commensurate with release for unrestricted use

  10. Project gnome decontamination and decommissioning plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-04-01

    The document presents the operational plan for conducting the final decontamination and decommissioning work at the site of the first U.S. nuclear detonation designed specifically for peaceful purposes and the first underground event on the Plowshare Program to take place outside the Nevada Test Site. The plan includes decontamination and decommissioning procedures, radiological guidelines, and the NV concept of operations

  11. Proceedings of the concrete decontamination workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halter, J.M.; Sullivan, R.G.; Currier, A.J.

    1980-09-01

    Fourteen papers were presented. These papers describe concrete surface removal methods and equipment, as well as experiences in decontaminating and removing both power and experimental nuclear reactors

  12. Gas phase decontamination of gaseous diffusion process equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundy, R.D.; Munday, E.B.; Simmons, D.W.; Neiswander, D.W.

    1994-01-01

    D ampersand D of the process facilities at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) will be an enormous task. The EBASCO estimate places the cost of D ampersand D of the GDP at the K-25 Site at approximately $7.5 billion. Of this sum, nearly $4 billion is associated with the construction and operation of decontamination facilities and the dismantlement and transport of contaminated process equipment to these facilities. In situ long-term low-temperature (LTLT) gas phase decontamination is being developed and demonstrated at the K-25 site as a technology that has the potential to substantially lower these costs while reducing criticality and safeguards concerns and worker exposure to hazardous and radioactive materials. The objective of gas phase decontamination is to employ a gaseous reagent to fluorinate nonvolatile uranium deposits to form volatile LJF6, which can be recovered by chemical trapping or freezing. The LTLT process permits the decontamination of the inside of gas-tight GDP process equipment at room temperature by substituting a long exposure to subatmospheric C1F for higher reaction rates at higher temperatures. This paper outlines the concept for applying LTLT gas phase decontamination, reports encouraging laboratory experiments, and presents the status of the design of a prototype mobile system. Plans for demonstrating the LTLT process on full-size gaseous diffusion equipment are also outlined briefly

  13. Decontamination in the Republic of Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antsipov, G.V.; Matveenko, S.A.; Mirkhaidarov, A.Kh.

    2002-01-01

    To continue the decontamination work in the Republic of Belarus, which was carried out by the military troops, the state specialized enterprises were formed in Gomel and Mogilev in 1991. The organization and regulations were developed inside the country: instructions, rules, radiological and hygienic criteria and norms. The enterprises concentrated on decontamination of the most socially significant facilities: kindergartens, schools, medical institutions and industrial enterprises. During 9 years Gomel State Specialized Enterprise 'Polessje' decontaminated 130 kindergartens, schools and hospitals. The total decontaminated area was 450 000 m 2 . The ventilation systems and equipment at 27 industrial enterprises in Gomel were decontaminated. The practical decontamination methods for areas, buildings, roofs, industrial equipment, ventilation systems were developed and tested. The special rules for handling wastes contaminated with Cs were elaborated. The paper analyzes and sums up the acquired experience which is important for implementation of rehabilitation programs and improvement of decontamination methods. (author)

  14. Nuclear decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeSurf, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    Decontamination may be accomplished by chemical, electrical, or mechanical means. Recently there have been significant developments in all three categories as well as an increased tendency to combine techniques, either simultaneously (e.g. by adding chemicals to water jets) or sequentially (e.g. by using a mechanical method to remove loose contamination, followed by a chemical method for more tightly bound activity). Some developments in the different techniques are discussed, together with typical applications of each. (author)

  15. Statistics and the statistician in nuclear site decontamination and decommissioning: lecture notes for a 4-day short course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.G.

    1981-04-01

    This course provides information on statistical aspects of radiological surveys and the remedial action (RA) process to enable statisticians to serve effectively in Decommissioning and Decontamination (D and D) projects. The material covered is pertinent both to a statistician working onsite and handling day-to-day data analysis and to a statistical member of project planning and management teams. Participants will learn the types of statistical problems that can arise and the kinds of questions that must be answered to enable efficient statistical designs and analyses to be developed. The ultimate goal is to help extract the maximum benefit from statistical contributions to D and D projects. Among the topics covered are: Nature of the D and D Problem: Measuring Devices and Sampling Methods; Estimating Activity in or on Soil, Buildings, Equipment and Other Materials; Estimating Isotope Ratios and Error Variances; Acceptance Sampling as a General Method; Special Estimation Problems; Non-Statistical Consdierations; Challenge Problems

  16. Decontaminating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Toshiharu; Shibuya, Kiichiro.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a method of eliminating radioactive contaminations capable of ease treatment for decontaminated liquid wastes and grinding materials. Method: Those organic grinding materials such as fine wall nuts shell pieces cause no secondary contaminations since they are softer as compared with inorganic grinding materials, less pulverizable upon collision against the surface to be treated, being capable of reusing and producing no fine scattering powder. In addition, they can be treated by burning. The organic grinding material and water are sprayed by a nozzle to the surface to be treated, and decontaminated liquid wastes are separated into solid components mainly composed of organic grinding materials and liquid components mainly composed of water by filtering. The thus separated solid components are recovered in a storage tank for reuse as the grinding material and, after repeating use, subjected to burning treatment. While on the other hand, water is recovered into a storage tank and, after repeating use, purified by passing through an ion exchange resin-packed column and decontaminated to discharge. (Horiuchi, T.)

  17. Developments in Decontamination Technologies of Military Personnel and Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sata, Utkarsh R.; Ramkumar, Seshadri S.

    Individual protection is important for warfighters, first responders and civilians to meet the current threat of toxic chemicals and chemical warfare (CW) agents. Within the realm of individual protection, decontamination of warfare agents is not only required on the battlefield but also in laboratory, pilot plants, production and agent destruction sites. It is of high importance to evaluate various decontaminants and decontamination techniques for implementing the best practices in varying scenarios such as decontamination of personnel, sites and sensitive equipment.

  18. EDF/CIDEN - ONECTRA: PWR decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayolle, P.; Orcel, H.; Wertz, L.

    2010-01-01

    In the context of PWR circuit renewal (expected in 2011) and their decontamination, an analysis of data coming from cartography and on site decontamination measurements as well as from premise modelling by means of the PANTHERE radioprotection code, is presented. Several French PWRs have been studied. After a presentation of code principles and operation, the authors discuss the radiological context of a workstation, and give an assessment of the annual dose associated with maintenance operations with or without decontamination

  19. The experience of utilization of electro-migration technology for soil decontamination from cesium-137 under field conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobolev, I.A.; Prozorov, L.B.; Martyanov, V.V.

    1995-01-01

    The essence of methods for soil decontamination based on electrokinetic processes is that, in the field of constant current, contaminated particles-ions, depending on their charge mark, move to anode or cathode sides. If such a field is created in the soil containing ions of radionuclides or heavy metals, those ions-contaminants will begin to concentrated in the cathode or anode zone, i.e. soil decontamination with ion electric migration process takes place. During the recent tour years specialists from Mos RPA (Moscow Research-and-Production Association) Radon (Russia) have been conducting an extensive investigation on the utilization of electrokinetic processes for decontamination of soils from radionuclides and heavy metals

  20. Decontamination Data - Blister Agents

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Decontamination efficacy data for blister agents on various building materials using various decontamination solutions. This dataset is associated with the following...

  1. Sunflowers to decontaminate water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    Sunflowers offer a new method of decontamination. 55 kilograms (dry weight) of sunflowers are able to decontaminate all the cesium 137 and the strontium 90 polluting a pond situated at one kilometer from Tchernobyl. These flowers are able to decrease 95% in 24 hours the uranium concentration in the american site of Ashtabula in Ohio getting this water from 350 parts by milliards to less than 5 parts by milliards. The radioactivity should stocked in the roots at concentrations 5 000 to 10 000 times higher than water concentration. The cost is cheaper than micro filtration and precipitation (2-6 dollars for 4 000 liters of water against 80 dollars for others technologies). when sunflowers are radioactive they can be reduced in dust and vitrified and stocked as solid radioactive wastes. (N.C.)

  2. The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor decontamination and decommissioning project and the Tokamak Physics Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-05-27

    If the US is to meet the energy needs of the future, it is essential that new technologies emerge to compensate for dwindling supplies of fossil fuels and the eventual depletion of fissionable uranium used in present-day nuclear reactors. Fusion energy has the potential to become a major source of energy for the future. Power from fusion energy would provide a substantially reduced environmental impact as compared with other forms of energy generation. Since fusion utilizes no fossil fuels, there would be no release of chemical combustion products to the atmosphere. Additionally, there are no fission products formed to present handling and disposal problems, and runaway fuel reactions are impossible due to the small amounts of deuterium and tritium present. The purpose of the TPX Project is to support the development of the physics and technology to extend tokamak operation into the continuously operating (steady-state) regime, and to demonstrate advances in fundamental tokamak performance. The purpose of TFTR D&D is to ensure compliance with DOE Order 5820.2A ``Radioactive Waste Management`` and to remove environmental and health hazards posed by the TFTR in a non-operational mode. There are two proposed actions evaluated in this environmental assessment (EA). The actions are related because one must take place before the other can proceed. The proposed actions assessed in this EA are: the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR); to be followed by the construction and operation of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Both of these proposed actions would take place primarily within the TFTR Test Cell Complex at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The TFTR is located on ``D-site`` at the James Forrestal Campus of Princeton University in Plainsboro Township, Middlesex County, New Jersey, and is operated by PPPL under contract with the United States Department of Energy (DOE).

  3. Construction experience at the Canonsburg UMTRA site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiers, G.R.; Farnes, L.L.; Wathen, T.R.

    1985-01-01

    Construction of on-site stabilization for over 225,000 cubic yards of abandoned uranium mill tailings in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, began in October 1983, and is scheduled to be completed in December 1985. This paper describes selected construction experience through October 1984. The following selected events and construction items are discussed in this paper: 1. Construction and operation of a 36,000-square foot, fabric-lined sedimentation basin, including difficulties associated with installation of the liner; 2. Assembly and start-up of the contaminated water treatment plant; 3. Construction of the encapsulation cell test fills, to confirm the performance specification governing the compaction; 4. Excavation, relocation, and placement of contaminated materials, including moisture control and density testing of the radioactive materials; 5. Construction difficulties, including disposition of local leachate from the abandoned industrial complex and an increase in the volume of contaminated material to be encapsulated

  4. Specific decontamination methods: water nozzle, cavitation erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulitrop, D.; Gauchon, J.P.; Lecoffre, Y.

    1984-05-01

    The erosion and decontamination tests carried out in the framework of this study, allowed to specify the fields favourable to the use of the high pressure jet taking into account the determinant parameters that are the pressure and the target-nozzle distance. The previous spraying of gels with chemical reagents (sulfuric acid anf hydrazine) allows to get better decontamination factors. Then, the feasibility study of a decontamination method by cavitation erosion is presented. Gelled compounds for decontamination have been developed; their decontamination quality has been evaluated by comparative contamination tests in laboratory and decontamination tests of samples of materials used in nuclear industry; this last method is adapted to remote handling devices and produces a low quantity of secondary effluents, so it allows to clean high contaminated installation on the site without additional exposure of the personnel [fr

  5. Local strategies for decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, P [Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France); Ramzaev, V [Branch of Institute of Radiation Hygiene, Novozybkov, Bryansk region (Russian Federation); Antsypov, G [Chernnobyl State Committee of the Republic of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus); Sobotovich, E [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Ore formation, Kiev (Ukraine); Anisimova, L [EMERCOM, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-07-01

    The efficiencies of a great number of techniques for decontamination or dose reduction in contaminated areas have been investigated by several teams of E.C. and CIS scientists (ECP4 project). Modelling, laboratory and field experiments, t and return from experience allowed to assess radiological efficiencies (e.g. 'decontamination factor') and requirements for the operation of numerous practical solutions. Then, those data were supplemented with data on cost and waste generation in order to elaborate all the information for the optimization of decontamination strategies. Results will be presented for about 70 techniques. However, a technique cannot be compared to another from a generic point of view. Rather it is designed for a specific target and the best technology depends on the objectives. It has been decided to implement decision analyses on case studies, and the local conditions and objectives have been investigated. Individual doses ranged from 1 to 5 mSv, with contrasted contributions of internal and external doses. The desire to restore a normal activity in a partially depopulated settlement, and concerns about the recent increase in internal doses were typical incentives for action. The decision aiding analysis illustrated that actions can be usually recommended. Results are outlined here.

  6. Local strategies for decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, P.; Ramzaev, V.; Antsypov, G.; Sobotovich, E.; Anisimova, L.

    1996-01-01

    The efficiencies of a great number of techniques for decontamination or dose reduction in contaminated areas have been investigated by several teams of E.C. and CIS scientists (ECP4 project). Modelling, laboratory and field experiments, t and return from experience allowed to assess radiological efficiencies (e.g. 'decontamination factor') and requirements for the operation of numerous practical solutions. Then, those data were supplemented with data on cost and waste generation in order to elaborate all the information for the optimization of decontamination strategies. Results will be presented for about 70 techniques. However, a technique cannot be compared to another from a generic point of view. Rather it is designed for a specific target and the best technology depends on the objectives. It has been decided to implement decision analyses on case studies, and the local conditions and objectives have been investigated. Individual doses ranged from 1 to 5 mSv, with contrasted contributions of internal and external doses. The desire to restore a normal activity in a partially depopulated settlement, and concerns about the recent increase in internal doses were typical incentives for action. The decision aiding analysis illustrated that actions can be usually recommended. Results are outlined here

  7. Decontamination and management of human remains following incidents of hazardous chemical release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauschild, Veronique D; Watson, Annetta; Bock, Robert

    2012-01-01

    To provide specific guidance and resources for systematic and orderly decontamination of human remains resulting from a chemical terrorist attack or accidental chemical release. A detailed review and health-based decision criteria protocol is summarized. Protocol basis and logic are derived from analyses of compound-specific toxicological data and chemical/physical characteristics. Guidance is suitable for civilian or military settings where human remains potentially contaminated with hazardous chemicals may be present, such as sites of transportation accidents, terrorist operations, or medical examiner processing points. Guidance is developed from data-characterizing controlled experiments with laboratory animals, fabrics, and materiel. Logic and specific procedures for decontamination and management of remains, protection of mortuary affairs personnel, and decision criteria to determine when remains are sufficiently decontaminated are presented. Established procedures as well as existing materiel and available equipment for decontamination and verification provide reasonable means to mitigate chemical hazards from chemically exposed remains. Unique scenarios such as those involving supralethal concentrations of certain liquid chemical warfare agents may prove difficult to decontaminate but can be resolved in a timely manner by application of the characterized systematic approaches. Decision criteria and protocols to "clear" decontaminated remains for transport and processing are also provided. Once appropriate decontamination and verification have been accomplished, normal procedures for management of remains and release can be followed.

  8. Decontamination impacts on solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piciulo, P.L.; Davis, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    The increased occupational exposure resulting from the accumulation of activated corrosion products in the primary system of LWRs has led to the development of chemical methods to remove the contamination. In the past, the problem of enhanced migration of radionuclides away from trenches used to dispose of low-level radioactive waste, has been linked to the presence, at the disposal unit, of chelating or complexing agents such as those used in decontamination processes. These agents have further been found to reduce the normal sorptive capacity of soils for radionuclides. The degree to which these agents inhibit the normal sorptive processes is dependent on the type of complexing agent, the radionuclide of concern, the soil properties and whether the nuclide is present as a complex or is already sorbed to the soil. Since the quantity of reagent employed in a full system decontamination is large (200 to 25,000 kg), the potential for enhanced migration of radionuclides from a site used to dispose of the decontamination wastes should be addressed and guidelines established for the safe disposal of these wastes

  9. Nuclear disaster. Fukushima, hundred years of decontamination; Catastrophe nucleaire: Fukushima, cent ans de decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupin, L.

    2011-04-15

    This article gives an overview of what will have to be done on the site of Fukushima to decontaminate and to dismantle it. Based on the experience gained in Three Mile Island and in Chernobyl, experts foresee ten years of work within the reactor cores, thirty years around the plant, sixty years of decontamination within the no man's land area around the plant; and centuries as far as scattered spots are concerned more than hundred kilometres away from the plant. Three radionuclides must be surveyed, but with different half lives: iodine 131 (8 days), caesium 137 (30 years), and plutonium 239 (24000 years). The expertise of French companies (Areva, Assystem, Bouygues and Vinci) in reactor dismantling, dismantling procedure design, and public works (protection arch like in Chernobyl) is briefly evoked, as well as the French approach for post-accident management

  10. Decontamination of burns contaminated with radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vykouril, L.

    1986-01-01

    The suitability of various solutions for the decontamination of burnt skin and their efficiency were tested by experiments on rats. Tested was the decontamination of undisturbed skin, second degree skin burns and third degree skin burns. Decontamination solutions used included: distilled water, jodonal (an aqueous solution of iodine, ethoxylated nonylphenols, the copolymer of ethylene oxide with propylene oxide, and phosphoric acid) and a decontamination mixture of Sapon, Komplexon (trade names of detergents) and sodium hexametaphosphate. Decontamination efficiency was 68.4% for second degree burns and 47.1% for third degree burns. Most effective was the decontamination solution with an efficiency of 72%; the efficiency of jodonal was 67% and of water - 54%. Jodonal is the most suitable: in addition, it acts as a disinfectant and antiseptic. (M.D.)

  11. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites Remedial Action Program. Report of the decontamination of Jones Chemical Laboratory, Ryerson Physical Laboratory, and Eckhart Hall, the University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wynuveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Flynn, K.F.

    1984-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has implemented a program to decontaminate radioactively contaminated sites that were formerly utilized by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and/or the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) for activities that included handling of radioactive material. This program is referred to as the ''Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program'' (FUSRAP). Among these sites are Jones Chemical Laboratory, Ryerson Physical Laboratory, Kent Chemical Laboratory, and Eckhart Hall of The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. Since 1977, the University of Chicago decontaminated Kent Chemical Laboratory as part of a facilities renovation program. All areas of Eckhart Hall, Ryerson Physical Laboratory, and Jones Chemical Laboratory that had been identified as contaminated in excess of current guidelines in the 1976-1977 surveys were decontaminated to levels where no contamination could be detected relative to natural backgrounds. All areas that required defacing to achieve this goal were restored to their original condition. The radiological evaluation of the sewer system, based primarily on the radiochemical analyses of sludge and water samples, indicated that the entire sewer system is potentially contaminated. While this evaluation was defined as part of this project, the decontamination of the sewer system was not included in the purview of this effort. The documentation included in this report substantiates the judgment that all contaminated areas identified in the earlier reports in the three structures included in the decontamination effort (Eckhart Hall, Ryerson Physical Laboratory, and Jones Chemical Laboratory) were cleaned to levels commensurate with release for unrestricted use.

  12. Water chemistry control and decontamination experience with TEPCO BWR`s and the measures planned for the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, N.; Miyamaru, K. [Tokyo Electric Power Co. (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    The new TEPCO BWR`s are capable of having the occupational radiation exposure controlled successfully at a low level by selecting low cobalt steel, using corrosion-resistant steel, employing dual condensate polishing systems, and controlling Ni/Fe ratio during operation. The occupational radiation exposure of the old BWR`s, on the other hand, remains high though reduced substantially through the use of low cobalt replacement steel and the partial addition of a filter in the condensate polishing system. Currently under review is the overall decontamination procedure for the old BWR`s to find out to measures needed to reduce the amount of crud that is and has been carried over into the nuclear reactor. The current status of decontamination is reported below.

  13. Properties and solidification of decontamination wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, M.S.; Piciulo, P.L.; Bowerman, B.S.; Adams, J.W.; Milian, L.

    1983-01-01

    LWRs will require one or more chemical decontaminations to achieve their designed lifetimes. Primary system decontamination is designed to lower radiation fields in areas where plant maintenance personnel must work. Chemical decontamination methods are either hard (concentrated chemicals, approximately 5 to 25 weight percent) or soft (dilute chemicals less than 1 percent by weight). These methods may have different chemical reagents, some tailor-made to the crud composition and many methods are and will be proprietary. One factor common to most commercially available processes is the presence of organic acids and chelates. These types of organic reagents are known to enhance the migration of radionuclides after disposal in a shallow land burial site. The NRC sponsors two programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory that are concerned with the management of decontamination wastes which will be generated by the full system decontamination of LWRs. These two programs focus on potential methods for degrading or converting decontamination wastes to more acceptable forms prior to disposal and the impact of disposing of solidified decontamination wastes. The results of the solidification of simulated decontamination resin wastes will be presented. Recent results on combustion of simulated decontamintion wastes will be described and procedures for evaluating the release of decontamination reagents from solidified wastes will be summarized

  14. Experience of decontaminating of the ventilation system electric motors and main circulation and waterside pump drive electric motors in conditions of the Chernobyl' NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisov, V.I.; Karataev, B.A.; Platonov, A.I.; Potekhin, V.B.; Ryumin, G.V.; Sorokin, N.M.; Fenogenov, V.A.; Cheremshin, P.I.

    1989-01-01

    The ventilation system electric motor decontamination is described. In decontaminating waterside pump rotors and stators with high level of contamination was developed a procedure, eliminating corrosion action and damage of electric isolation coatings

  15. Cost effectiveness of dilute chemical decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeSurf, J.E.; Weyman, G.D.

    The basic principles of dilute chemical decontamination are described, as well as the method of application. Methods of computing savings in radiation dose and costs are presented, with results from actual experience and illustrative examples. It is concluded that dilute chemical decontamination is beneficial in many cases. It reduces radiation exposure of workers, saves money, and simplifies maintenance work

  16. The restoration project : decontamination of facilities from chemical, biological and radiological contamination after terrorist action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fingas, M.; Volchek, K.; Thouin, G.; Harrison, S.; Kuang, W. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Emergencies Science Div; Velicogna, D.; Hornof, M.; Punt, M. [SAIC Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Payette, P.; Duncan, L.; Best, M.; Krishnan; Wagener, S.; Bernard, K.; Majcher, M. [Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Cousins, T.; Jones, T. [Defence Research and Development Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    Bioterrorism poses a real threat to the public health and national security, and the restoration of affected facilities after a chemical, biological or radiological attack is a major concern. This paper reviewed aspects of a project conducted to collect information, test and validate procedures for site restoration after a terrorist attack. The project began with a review of existing technology and then examined new technologies. Restoration included pickup, neutralization, decontamination, removal and final destruction and deposition of contaminants as well as cleaning and neutralization of material and contaminated waste from decontamination. The project was also intended to test existing concepts and develop new ideas. Laboratory scale experiments consisted of testing, using standard laboratory techniques. Radiation decontamination consisted of removal and concentration of the radioisotopes from removal fluid. General restoration guidelines were provided, as well as details of factors considered important in specific applications, including growth conditions and phases of microorganisms in biological decontamination, or the presence of inhibitors or scavengers in chemical decontamination. Various agents were proposed that were considered to have broad spectrum capability. Test surrogates for anthrax were discussed. The feasibility of enhanced oxidation processes was examined in relation to the destruction of organophosphorus, organochlorine and carbamate pesticides. The goal was to identify a process for the treatment of surfaces contaminated with pesticides. Tests included removal from carpet, porous ceiling tile, steel plates, and floor tiles. General radiation contamination procedures and techniques were reviewed, as well as radiological decontamination waste treatment. It was concluded that there is no single decontamination technique applicable for all contaminants, and decontamination methods depend on economic, social and health factors. The amount of

  17. Soil decontamination criteria report, November 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riordan, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    A program to access the extent of transuranic soil contamination at DOE sites and to develop methods for their decontamination is underway at Rocky Flats. As part of this program, acceptable soil contamination levels for plutonium proposed by a number of authorities over the past couple of decades were reviewed. From this review, goals for soil decontamination work are proposed. These goals, which relate to the disposition of the products of a decontamination process, are summarized as follows (dpm/g will refer to disintegrations per minute of transuranic nuclides per gram of soil): soil fractions having less than 30 dpm can be disposed of as surface soil with unrestricted usage. Fine soil fractions (less than 100 μm) that have less than 500 dpm and coarse soil fractions that have less than 1000 dpm can be disposed of as subsurface soil as long as usage is controlled to ensure compliance with EPA dosage guidance. Soil concentrates that have an activity greater than the above values but less than 22,000 dpm should be interred in an approved, low level waste burial site. Soil concentrates that are greater than 22,000 dpm should be stored as retrievable waste. Changes in the technical and legal areas of soil decontamination are rapid. Permissible soil decontamination levels will change as will decontamination technology and the ability to monitor the effectiveness of the decontamination processes. As a result, annual updates of decontamination criteria, goals, and monitoring are expected

  18. Corrective Action Plan for CAU No. 95: Area 15 EPA Farm Laboratory Building, Decontamination and Demolition Closure Activities - Nevada Test Site. Rev. 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, A.L.; Nacht, S.J.

    1997-11-01

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides the selected corrective action alternative and proposes the closure implementation methodology for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Farm Laboratory Building 15-06 located in Area 15 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. The facility is part of the Environmental Restoration Project managed by the U.S. Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) under the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) Subproject which serves to manage and dispose of surplus facilities at the NTS in a manner that will protect personnel, the public, and the environment. It is identified as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 95 in Appendix III of the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). In July 1997, the DOE/NV verbally requested approval from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for the closure schedule to be accelerated. Currently, field activities are anticipated to be completed by September 30, 1997. In order to meet this new schedule NDEP has agreed to review this document as expeditiously as possible. Comments will be addressed in the Closure Report after field activities have been completed, unless significant issues require resolution during closure activities

  19. Corrective Action Plan for CAU No. 95: Area 15 EPA Farm Laboratory Building, Decontamination and Demolition Closure Activities - Nevada Test Site. Rev. 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, A.L.; Nacht, S.J.

    1997-11-01

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides the selected corrective action alternative and proposes the closure implementation methodology for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Farm Laboratory Building 15-06 located in Area 15 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. The facility is part of the Environmental Restoration Project managed by the U.S. Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) under the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Subproject which serves to manage and dispose of surplus facilities at the NTS in a manner that will protect personnel, the public, and the environment. It is identified as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 95 in Appendix III of the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). In July 1997, the DOE/NV verbally requested approval from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for the closure schedule to be accelerated. Currently, field activities are anticipated to be completed by September 30, 1997. In order to meet this new schedule NDEP has agreed to review this document as expeditiously as possible. Comments will be addressed in the Closure Report after field activities have been completed, unless significant issues require resolution during closure activities.

  20. Responsiveness summary for the engineering evaluation/cost analysis for decontamination at the St. Louis Downtown Site, St. Louis, Missouri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picel, M.H.; Peterson, J.M.; Williams, M.J.

    1991-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for conducting remedial actions at the Mallinckrodt Chemical Plant, also referred to as the St. Louis Downtown Site (SLDS), located in the city of St. Louis, Missouri. Remedial activities at the SLDS are being carried out under DOE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) as part of the overall cleanup planned for three noncontiguous areas in St. Louis, which are collectively referred to as the St. Louis Site. Potential response action alternatives for managing the contaminated material generated at the SLDS have been evaluated in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidance for conducting interim actions under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. An engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) report was prepared to document this process. On the basis of the analysis presented in the EE/CA, the preferred alternative for the management of contaminated wastes generated by DOE-supported plant activities is the provision of temporary storage capacity, which can be made available by modifying an existing building (i.e., Building 116) at SLDS. This alternative would enable DOE and Mallinckrodt to coordinate efforts to prevent the uncontrolled relocation of contamination and ensure that ultimate site cleanup objectives are not complicated by plant activities implemented by Mallinckrodt. The EE/CA, dated May 1991, was issued to the general public on June 7, 1991, and a public comment period was held from June 7 through July 10, 1991, in accordance with the public participation process identified in CERCLA. Comments on the proposed action were received in writing from the Missouri Department of Health, private citizen Kay Drey, and the EPA Region 7. This responsiveness summary has been prepared to respond to issues identified in these comment letters on the proposed action

  1. CB decontamination for first responders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, M.D.G.; Purdon, J.G.; Burczyk, A. [Defence Research and Development Canada Suffield, Ralston, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    The Universal Containment System (UCS) is designed to contain, mitigate and decontaminate chemical, biological and radiological warfare agents. The UCS consists of a lightweight, tent-like enclosure filled with a water-based surface decontaminating foam (SDF). The Canadian government funded a project to advance the understanding of the behaviour of the UCS. This paper described the success of the project as well as the technological advances in the UCS formulation and equipment. Vapour desorption experiments were conducted in which SDF was applied onto 12 surfaces found in a typical office environment. Both mustard and nerve agent were studied on the test surfaces. Both scrubbing and non-scrubbing decontamination methods were tested. SDF effectively decontaminated the non-porous substances, particularly when the scrubbing procedure was used. Results were more complicated for the non-porous samples. A dye added to the agent was useful for determining the fate of the agent. Liquid phase studies were conducted in which the reaction between SDF and various agents were studied in the liquid phase in order to estimate the rate of reaction, the stoichiometry and the reaction products formed. Both SDF and the commercial decontamination agent CASCAD were found to effectively kill 100 per cent of anthrax spores. The significance of this project to first responders was considerable. Changes to the formulation and equipment of UCS will increase its usefulness and safety. Users will also have a better knowledge of the amount of decontamination needed for complete effectiveness in specific situations. Recommendations have been made for use of the product on a range of indoor surfaces. Field trials have shown the blast mitigation and agent decontamination ability of the foam under explosive situations. 15 refs., 4 tabs.

  2. History of critical experiments at Pajarito Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paxton, H.C.

    1983-03-01

    This account describes critical and subcritical assemblies operated remotely at the Pajarito Canyon Site at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Earliest assemblies, directed exclusively toward the nuclear weapons program, were for safety tests. Other weapon-related assemblies provided neutronic information to check detailed weapon calculations. Topsy, the first of these critical assemblies, was followed by Lady Godiva, Jezebel, Flattop, and ultimately Big Ten. As reactor programs came to Los Alamos, design studies and mockups were tested at Pajarito Site. For example, nearly all 16 Rover reactors intended for Nevada tests were preceded by zero-power mockups and proof tests at Pajarito Site. Expanded interest and capability led to fast-pulse assemblies, culminating in Godiva IV and Skua, and to the Kinglet and Sheba solution assemblies.

  3. History of critical experiments at Pajarito Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paxton, H.C.

    1983-03-01

    This account describes critical and subcritical assemblies operated remotely at the Pajarito Canyon Site at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Earliest assemblies, directed exclusively toward the nuclear weapons program, were for safety tests. Other weapon-related assemblies provided neutronic information to check detailed weapon calculations. Topsy, the first of these critical assemblies, was followed by Lady Godiva, Jezebel, Flattop, and ultimately Big Ten. As reactor programs came to Los Alamos, design studies and mockups were tested at Pajarito Site. For example, nearly all 16 Rover reactors intended for Nevada tests were preceded by zero-power mockups and proof tests at Pajarito Site. Expanded interest and capability led to fast-pulse assemblies, culminating in Godiva IV and Skua, and to the Kinglet and Sheba solution assemblies

  4. [Decontamination of chemical and biological warfare agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Yasuo

    2009-01-01

    Chemical and biological warfare agents (CBWA's) are diverse in nature; volatile acute low-molecular-weight toxic compounds, chemical warfare agents (CWA's, gaseous choking and blood agents, volatile nerve gases and blister agents, nonvolatile vomit agents and lacrymators), biological toxins (nonvolatile low-molecular-weight toxins, proteinous toxins) and microbes (bacteria, viruses, rickettsiae). In the consequence management against chemical and biological terrorism, speedy decontamination of victims, facilities and equipment is required for the minimization of the damage. In the present situation, washing victims and contaminated materials with large volumes of water is the basic way, and additionally hypochlorite salt solution is used for decomposition of CWA's. However, it still remains unsolved how to dispose large volumes of waste water, and the decontamination reagents have serious limitation of high toxicity, despoiling nature against the environments, long finishing time and non-durability in effective decontamination. Namely, the existing decontamination system is not effective, nonspecifically affecting the surrounding non-target materials. Therefore, it is the urgent matter to build up the usable decontamination system surpassing the present technologies. The symposiast presents the on-going joint project of research and development of the novel decontamination system against CBWA's, in the purpose of realizing nontoxic, fast, specific, effective and economical terrorism on-site decontamination. The projects consists of (1) establishment of the decontamination evaluation methods and verification of the existing technologies and adaptation of bacterial organophosphorus hydrolase, (2) development of adsorptive elimination technologies using molecular recognition tools, and (4) development of deactivation technologies using photocatalysis.

  5. European Diversity : A Building Site Experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chao-Duivis, M.A.B.; Lang, M.; Garcés, J.; Dekker, E.; Ruben, P.A.

    2016-01-01

    Dutch and French construction law show fundamentally different approaches. This internship report aims to illustrate the impact which legislation has on building site interactions. Part of the research was a 5 week internship for Garcés-de Seta-Bonet, the Catalan architect office awarded with the

  6. Decontamination manual of RI handling laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadachi, Yoshiki

    2004-01-01

    Based on experiences in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), the essential and practical knowledge of radioactive contamination and its decontamination, and the method and procedure of floor decontamination are described for researcher and managing person in charge of handling radioisotopes (RI) in RI handling laboratories. Essential knowledge concerns the uniqueness of solid surface contamination derived from RI half lives and quantities, surface contamination density limit, and mode/mechanism of contamination. The principle of decontamination is a single conduct with recognition of chemical form of the RI under use. As the practical knowledge, there are physical and chemical methods of solid surface decontamination. The latter involves use of inorganic acids, chelaters and surfactants. Removal and replacement of contaminated solid like floor material are often effective. Distribution mapping of surface contamination can be done by measuring the radioactivity in possibly contaminated areas, and is useful for planning of effective decontamination. Floor surface decontamination is for the partial and spread areas of the floor. It is essential to conduct the decontamination with reagent from the highly to less contaminated areas. Skin decontamination with either neutral detergent or titanium oxide is also described. (N.I.)

  7. Reactive decontamination formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giletto, Anthony [College Station, TX; White, William [College Station, TX; Cisar, Alan J [Cypress, TX; Hitchens, G Duncan [Bryan, TX; Fyffe, James [Bryan, TX

    2003-05-27

    The present invention provides a universal decontamination formulation and method for detoxifying chemical warfare agents (CWA's) and biological warfare agents (BWA's) without producing any toxic by-products, as well as, decontaminating surfaces that have come into contact with these agents. The formulation includes a sorbent material or gel, a peroxide source, a peroxide activator, and a compound containing a mixture of KHSO.sub.5, KHSO.sub.4 and K.sub.2 SO.sub.4. The formulation is self-decontaminating and once dried can easily be wiped from the surface being decontaminated. A method for decontaminating a surface exposed to chemical or biological agents is also disclosed.

  8. Summary report of the experiences from TVO's site investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oehberg, A.; Saksa, P.; Ahokas, H.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Snellman, M.

    1994-09-01

    In 1992 Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) completed preliminary site investigations for radioactive waste disposal at five sites in Finland. The aim of this report was the compilation of the experiences from TVO's site investigations. The main interest was focused on investigation strategies and the most important investigation methods for the conceptual modelling. The objective of the preliminary site investigations was to obtain data on the bedrock properties in order to evaluate the areas. The programme was divided into four stages, each stage having its own subobjective. The site-specific investigation programme for each site included a large common part and a small site-specific part. The strategies (objectives) and experiences from different disciplines, geology, hydrogeochemistry, geophysics and geohydrology, are presented in the report. The conceptual modelling work procedure including both bedrock and groundwater modelling is described briefly using the Olkiluoto site as an example. Each of the other areas has undergone similar phases of work. (52 refs., 45 figs., 5 tabs.)

  9. Deactivation, Decontamination and Decommissioning Project Summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, David Shane; Webber, Frank Laverne

    2001-07-01

    This report is a compilation of summary descriptions of Deactivation, Decontamination and Decommissioning, and Surveillance and Maintenance projects planned for inactive facilities and sites at the INEEL from FY-2002 through FY-2010. Deactivations of contaminated facilities will produce safe and stable facilities requiring minimal surveillance and maintenance pending further decontamination and decommissioning. Decontamination and decommissioning actions remove contaminated facilities, thus eliminating long-term surveillance and maintenance. The projects are prioritized based on risk to DOE-ID, the public, and the environment, and the reduction of DOE-ID mortgage costs and liability at the INEEL.

  10. The channeling experiment - instrumentation and site preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abelin, H.; Birgersson, L.; Aagren, T.

    1990-01-01

    Physical properties of in situ single fractures have been investigated by drilling large diameter holes (200 mm) 2.5 to 3 m into and along prominent single fractures. Photo logs as well as hydraulic- tracer tests have been performed. The experiment is divided into two parts, (1) the single hole experiments and (2) the double hole experiment. In the single hole experiment water was injected into the fracture and the injection flowrates over 50 mm sections along the fracture plane were monitored. In the double hole test two parallel large diameter holes, in the same fracture, 1.75 m apart, have been used for pressure pulse tests and a tracer test where 5 different nonsorbing tracers were injected. Equipment has been designed for water injection into single fractures where injection flowrates and pressure responses are simultaneously monitored in twenty 50 mm sections along the intersection of the fracture with the bore hole. The Multipede injection packer designed to be used in diameter 200 mm bore hole with a maximum depth of 2.5 m. Injection is done with constant pressure which is stable within ±0.0025 bar, and can be separately adjusted for each of the 20 injection zones. Injection flowrates can be monitored with a resolution of 1/100 ml/h, which equals one drop of water every five hours. The injection and pressure pulse tests are run by a computer and all data are stored on magnetic disks. A fracture survey at the 360 m level and adjacent levels has been done. The survey focused on prominent planar fractures with extension of more than 2 m. Approximately 100 fractures were found. (authors)

  11. Experiences of Supervision at Practice Placement Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley Diack

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Whilst placement supervision and clinical education programmes are of significant value in shaping the behaviours of undergraduate healthcare students, appropriate provisions which are efficacious to the learner are somewhat lacking, particularly for students studying on UK MPharm programmes. Objectives. To explore and explain the value of placement supervision to the personal development and employability of undergraduate pharmacy students. Methods. Students participated in a week long community pharmacy pilot programme, a result of a collaborative effort between the School of Pharmacy and Life Sciences and a small consortium of community pharmacies. Students and stakeholders were asked to evaluate their experiences via separate questionnaires which had been developed to elicit views and attitudes. Key Findings. Feedback from students and stakeholders towards the experience was overwhelmingly positive with multiple benefits being reported. Of particular prominence was the emphasis in student feedback on the value of placement supervision to their professional and personal development. Findings were indicative of a development in clinical practice proficiencies, core skills, and improvement in decision-making practice. Conclusions. The benefits of clinical supervision to the professional and personal development of MPharm students are well documented, although attracting professional pharmacy supervisors is proving a problematic task for educational providers in the UK.

  12. Soil surface decontamination and revegetation progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, A.W.

    1981-01-01

    A review is given of work by Rockwell Hanford Operations related to large-area decontamination efforts. Rockwell has a Program Office which manages the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) efforts. Part of the program is involved with large-surface area cleanup in conjunction with surveillance and maintenance of retired sites and facilities. The other part is the decontamination and decommissioning of structures. There are 322 surplus contaminated sites and facilities for which Rockwell has responsibility on the Hanford Site. A Program Office was established for a disciplined approach to cleanup of these retired sites. There are three major projects: the first is surveillance and maintenance of the sites prior to D and D, the project under which the radiation area cleanup is contained. Another project is for contaminated-equipment volume reduction; size reduction with arc saw cut-up and volume reduction with a vacuum furnace meltdown are being used. The third major project is structural D and D

  13. USA - Paper provided by the US delegation to the RWMC. Site Decontamination and Clean-up Under the U.S. EPA 'Superfund'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    capability, permanence, and cost may be considered to select between or modify alternatives. The ultimate disposal destination and disposal method for decontamination waste may be specified as part of the clean-up agreement. Release from Liability: Once clean-up goals have been met, a site may undergo 'close-out' and be removed from the National Priorities List. Due to the nature of liability under the Superfund law, however, a potentially responsible party remains potentially liable indefinitely. New information revealing additional hazards can provide grounds for re-opening a site. Current Issues: Some nuclear facilities have the potential to be regulated by both the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the EPA upon decommissioning. To avoid uncertainty and duplication of effort in these situations, EPA and NRC signed a Memorandum of Understanding in 2002. The agreement clarifies how EPA and NRC will cooperate regarding sites that operate and are decommissioned under an NRC license. In accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), the costs for disposal of commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a potential repository are to be funded by $0.001 per kWh fee levied on electricity generated and sold. For SNF generated prior to enactment of the NWPA, utilities were required to pay a one-time fee equivalent to an average charge of $0.001 per kWh. These fees are deposited in a Nuclear Waste Fund (NWF) held by the U.S treasury and managed by DOE The NWF is to be used for development and implementation of a radioactive waste management system in accordance with the NWPA, including a potential geologic repository. DOE is required to pay its fair share of cost for disposal of defence-related materials. DOE is currently in the process of developing a license application to be submitted to the NRC in December 2004 for the construction of a geologic repository at the Yucca Mountain site (Nevada). It is planned that, after waste emplacement and performance confirmation

  14. Chemical decontamination method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiwaki, Hitoshi.

    1996-01-01

    Metal wastes contaminated by radioactive materials are contained in a rotational decontamination vessel, and the metal wastes are rotated therein while being in contact with a slight amount of a decontamination liquid comprising a mineral acid. As the mineral acid, a mixed acid of nitric acid, hydrochloric acid and fluoric acid is preferably used. Alternatively, chemical decontamination can also be conducted by charging an acid resistant stirring medium in the rotational decontamination vessel. The surface of the metal wastes is uniformly covered by the slight amount of decontamination liquid to dissolve the surface layer. In addition, heat of dissolution generated in this case is accumulated in the inside of the rotational decontamination vessel, the temperature is elevated with no particular heating, thereby enabling to obtain an excellent decontamination effect substantially at the same level as in the case of heating the liquid to 70degC in a conventional immersion decontamination method. Further, although contact areas between the metal wastes and the immersion vessel are difficult to be decontaminated in the immersion decontamination method, all of areas can be dissolved uniformly in the present invention. (T.M.)

  15. Study of Soil Decontamination Method Using Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and TBP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jihye; Park, Kwangheon; Jung, Wonyoung

    2014-01-01

    The result of this study means that we have a possible new method for cheap and less wasteful nuclear waste decontamination. When severe accidents such as the incident at the Fukushima nuclear site occur, the soil near the power plant is contaminated with fission products or the activation metal structure of the power plant. The soil pollution form depends on the environment and soil characteristics of the contaminated areas. Thus, a- single-decontamination method is not effective for site cleanup. In addition, some soil decontamination methods are expensive and large amounts of secondary waste are generated. Therefore, we need new soil decontamination methods. In this study, instead of using a conventional solvent method that generates secondary waste, supercritical carbon dioxide was used to remove metal ions from the soil. Supercritical carbon dioxide is known for good permeation characteristics. We expect that we will reduce the cost of soil pollution management. Supercritical carbon dioxide can decontaminate soil easily, as it has the ability to penetrate even narrow gaps with very good moisture permeability. We used TBP, which is a known for extractant of actinium metal. TBP is usually used for uranium and strontium extraction. Using TBP-HNO 3 complex and supercritical carbon dioxide, we did extraction experiments for several heavy metals in contaminated soil

  16. Study of Soil Decontamination Method Using Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and TBP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jihye; Park, Kwangheon; Jung, Wonyoung [Kyunghee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The result of this study means that we have a possible new method for cheap and less wasteful nuclear waste decontamination. When severe accidents such as the incident at the Fukushima nuclear site occur, the soil near the power plant is contaminated with fission products or the activation metal structure of the power plant. The soil pollution form depends on the environment and soil characteristics of the contaminated areas. Thus, a- single-decontamination method is not effective for site cleanup. In addition, some soil decontamination methods are expensive and large amounts of secondary waste are generated. Therefore, we need new soil decontamination methods. In this study, instead of using a conventional solvent method that generates secondary waste, supercritical carbon dioxide was used to remove metal ions from the soil. Supercritical carbon dioxide is known for good permeation characteristics. We expect that we will reduce the cost of soil pollution management. Supercritical carbon dioxide can decontaminate soil easily, as it has the ability to penetrate even narrow gaps with very good moisture permeability. We used TBP, which is a known for extractant of actinium metal. TBP is usually used for uranium and strontium extraction. Using TBP-HNO{sub 3} complex and supercritical carbon dioxide, we did extraction experiments for several heavy metals in contaminated soil.

  17. Decontamination and free release of reactor pond furniture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, S.P.; Sanders, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    As part of the Stage 1 decommissioning project for the Steam Generating Heavy Water Reactor (SGHWR) at AEA Technology's Winfrith site in the UK, the 20 fuel racks in the fuel pond are to be removed. At Winfrith, considerable experience of waste disposal via the free release (below regulatory concern) route has been built up. Using a redundant rack, a trial was carried out to assess the technical and economic feasibility of the decontamination/free release route. An electrochemical process was employed. The trial successfully demonstrated technical feasibility, and an economic assessment concluded that the route can be justified financially. Therefore a decision was taken to dispose of all the racks by decontamination and free release. (Author)

  18. ORO scrap metal decontamination program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jugan, M.

    1987-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has approximately 80,000 tons of contaminated scrap metal at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Piketon, Ohio; and the Feed Materials Production Center in Fernald, Ohio. After unsuccessful in-house attempts to eliminate/recycle the contaminated metal, DOE is allowing private enterprise the opportunity to participate in this program. DOE is making this opportunity available under a two-phase approach, which is being supported by two separate and corresponding Request for Proposals. Phase I, which is nearing completion, is a demonstration phase to establish a group of companies that the DOE will consider qualified to eliminate the scrap at one or more sites. In Phase I, the companies decontaminated 25-50 tons of scrap to demonstrate capabilities to DOE and to gain the knowledge required to plan/bid on elimination of the scrap at one or more sites. Phase II will request proposals for elimination of the total scrap at one or more of the above noted sites. Multiple awards for Phase II are also anticipated. Companies participating in Phase II will be required to take title to the contaminated scrap and decontaminate/process the scrap for beneficial reuse. Radioactive wastes and metal that cannot be successfully decontaminated/processed will be returned to DOE

  19. Summary report of the experiences from TVO's site investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oehberg, A.; Saksa, P.; Ahokas, H.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Snellman, M.

    1994-05-01

    Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) has completed preliminary site investigations at five sites in Finland. At the end of 1992 TVO presented the final report to the authorities. The preliminary site investigation phase 1986-1992 was conducted according to the investigation programme compiled by TVO. The aim of this report was to compile a report on experiences from TVOs site investigations. The main interest was focused on investigation strategies and the most important investigation methods for the conceptual modelling. The objective of the preliminary site investigations was to obtain data on the bedrock properties in order to evaluate the areas. The programme was divided into four stages, each stage having its own sub-objective. The site-specific investigation programme for each site included a large common part and a small site-specific part. The strategies (objectives) and experiences from different disciplines, geology, hydrogeochemistry, geophysics and geohydrology, are presented in the report. The conceptual modelling work procedure including both bedrock and groundwater modelling is described briefly using the Olkiluoto site as an example. Each of the other areas has undergone similar phases of work. The uncertainties associated with conceptual modelling are also discussed. The usefulness of the investigation strategy and the investigation methods for conceptual modelling is discussed in the report. Some new equipment, methods or enhancements that have not yet been used in TVOs site investigations have become new tools in site characterisation and are briefly presented in the report. 52 refs, 35 figs, 1 tab

  20. Decontamination device for pipeline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harashina, Heihachi.

    1994-01-01

    Pipelines to be decontaminated are parts of pipelines contaminated with radioactive materials, and they are connected to a fluid transfer means (for example, a bladeless pump) and a ball collector by way of a connector. The fluid of a mixture of chemical decontaminating liquid and spheres is sent into pipelines to be decontaminated. The spheres are, for example, heat resistant porous hard or soft rubber spheres. The fluid discharged from the pipelines to be decontaminated are circulated by way of bypassing means. The inner surface of the pipelines is decontaminated by the circulation of the fluid. When the bypass means is closed, the fluid discharged from the pipelines to be decontaminated is sent to the ball collector, and the spheres are captured by a hopper. Further, the liquid is sent to the filtrating means to filter the chemical contaminating liquid, and sludges contained in the liquid are captured. (I.N.)

  1. Decontamination of radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despotovic, R.; Music, S.; Subotic, B.; Wolf, R.H.H.

    1979-01-01

    Removal of radioactive isotopes under controlled conditions is determined by a number of physical and chemical properties considered radiocontaminating and by the characteristics of the contaminated object. Determination of quantitative and qualitative factors for equilibrium in a contamination-decontamination system provides the basis for rational and successful decontamination. The decontamination of various ''solid/liquid'' systems is interesting from the scientific and technological point of view. These systems are of great importance in radiation protection (decontamination of various surfaces, liquids, drinking water, fixation or collection of radiocontaminants). Different types of decontamination systems are discussed. The dependence of rate and efficiency of the preparation conditions and on the ageing of the scavenger is described. The influence of coagulating electrolyte on radioactive isotope fixation efficiency was also determined. The fixation of fission radionuclide on oxide scavengers has been studied. The connection between fundamental investigations and practical decontamination of the ''solid/liquid'' systems is discussed. (author)

  2. Predictors of site choice and eventual learning experiences in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To assess the effect of students' gender, race, place of birth and place of high school completion on their choice of training site location and to assess the extent to which the training programme enhanced students' learning experiences relevant to primary care across training sites. Methods. A survey design involving six ...

  3. A Comparison of Electrokinetic Method and Electrokinetic-electrodialytic Method for Soil Decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gyenam; Kim, Seungsoo; Park, Ukrang; Han, Gyuseong; Moon, Jeikwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The electrokinetic decontamination equipment and electrokinetic-elctrodialytic decontamination equipment were manufactured to decontaminate the contaminated soil. The removal efficiency according to the lapsed time by the electrokinetic decontamination equipment and the electrokinetic-elctrodialytic decontamination equipment was investigated through several experiments. The difference between the removal efficiency of the electrokinetic-elctrodialytic decontamination without anion exchange membrane and that of with anion exchange membrane was investigated through several experiments. In addition, the removal efficiency trend according to different cesium radioactivity of soil was drawn out through several experiments.

  4. A Comparison of Electrokinetic Method and Electrokinetic-electrodialytic Method for Soil Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gyenam; Kim, Seungsoo; Park, Ukrang; Han, Gyuseong; Moon, Jeikwon

    2014-01-01

    The electrokinetic decontamination equipment and electrokinetic-elctrodialytic decontamination equipment were manufactured to decontaminate the contaminated soil. The removal efficiency according to the lapsed time by the electrokinetic decontamination equipment and the electrokinetic-elctrodialytic decontamination equipment was investigated through several experiments. The difference between the removal efficiency of the electrokinetic-elctrodialytic decontamination without anion exchange membrane and that of with anion exchange membrane was investigated through several experiments. In addition, the removal efficiency trend according to different cesium radioactivity of soil was drawn out through several experiments

  5. Decontamination of body surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harase, Chieko.

    1989-01-01

    There are two important points for an effective application of decontamination procedures. One is the organizing method of responsible decontamination teams. The team should be directed by medical doctor with the knowledge of decontamination of radionuclides. The other point is the place of application of the decontamination. Hospitals and clinics, especially with a department of nuclear medicine, or specialized units such as an emergency medical center are preferable. Before decontamination procedures are initiated, adequate monitoring of the body surface should be undertaken by a competent person in order to demarcate the areas which are contaminated. There are fundamental principles which are applicable to all decontamination procedures. (1) Precautions must always be taken to prevent further spread of contamination during decontamination operations. (2) Mild decontamination methods should be tried before resorting to treatment which can damage the body surface. The specific feature of each contamination varies widely in radionuclides involved, place and area of the contamination, condition of the contaminated skin such as whether the skin is wounded or not, and others. Soap and water are usually good detergents in most cases. If they fail, orange oil cream (SUPERDECONCREAM, available from Tokyo Engineering Co.) specially prepared for decontamination of radionuclides of most fission and corrosion products may be used. Contaminated hair should be washed several times with an efficient shampoo. (author)

  6. Development of decontamination methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunze, S.; Dippel, T.; Hentschel, D.

    1976-01-01

    PVC floorings, fabricated by mixing of the basic components, showed no relation between content of fillers and decontamination results. Decontamination results are partly poorer, if the flooring contains a high concentration of the filler, especially if the latter consists mainly of hydrophilic materials. The coloring of the floorings seems to have no influence on the decontamination. Rubber floorings, fabricated by chemical reactions between polymers, vulcanization materials and fillers, show decontamination results depending definitely from the proper choice of the filler. Flooring types, containing lampblack, graphite, kaoline, barium sulfate and titanium oxide are easy to decontaminate. Increasing contents of hydrophilic filler cause a fall off in the decontamination results. The decontamination effectiveness and the homogenity of cleaning pastes based on hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, titanium oxide and polyethylene powders is strongly depended on the content of hydrochloric acid. Reduction of the content of this component to less than 2 w/O remains the effectiveness unchanged only if the titanium oxide-polyethylene powder mixture is substituted by a high density, highly surface active powder material. This type of paste containing no hydrochloric acid shows nearly the same decontamination effectiveness as standard pickling pastes containing about 30% hydrochlorid acid. Properly prepared salt powder turn out to be easily and successfully applied to metal surfaces by a flame spray technique. The thin layer of molten salts is a very effective decontamination to samples contaminated in the primary loop of a PWR. (orig.) [de

  7. Chemical Decontamination at Browns Ferry Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartwig, Ed; Reid, Richard

    2003-01-01

    In May, 2002, the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Board of Directors approved the recovery and restart of Unit 1 at Browns Ferry Nuclear Station. As an initial step in the site characterization and restart feasibility review, a majority of the primary reactor circuit was chemically decontaminated. Close cooperation between TVA and vendor personnel resulted in project completion ahead of schedule with outstanding results. The final average decontamination factors were excellent, and the final dose rates were very low, with contact readings on most points between one and three mRem/hr. In addition to allowing TVA to do a complete and thorough job of determining the feasibility of the Unit 1 restart, the decontamination effort will greatly reduce personnel exposure during plant recovery, both whole body exposure to gamma radiation and airborne exposure during pipe replacement efforts. The implementation of lessons learned from previous decontamination work performed at Browns Ferry, as well as decontamination efforts at other plants aided greatly in the success. Specific items of note are: (1) The initial leak check of the temporary decontamination system should include ancillary systems such as the spent resin system, as well as the main circulation loop. This could save time and dose exposure if leaks are discovered before the use of such systems is required. (2) Due to the quick turnaround time from the award of contract, a vendor representative was onsite early in the project to help with engineering efforts and procedures. This aided greatly in completing preparations for the decontamination. (3) The work was performed under a single maintenance activity. This resulted in great craft and plant support. (4) The constant coverage by the site's decontamination flush directors provided timely plant support and interface. (5) The FPC system isolation and back flushing to prevent residual chemicals from being left in the FPC system should have been addressed in more

  8. Remote methods for decontamination and decommissioning operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVore, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    Three methods for the decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities are described along with operational experience associated with each method. Each method described in some way reduces radiation exposure to the operating personnel involved. Electrochemical decontamination of process tanks is described using an in-situ method. Descriptions of two processes, electropolishing and cerium redox decontamination, are listed. A method of essentially smokeless cutting of process piping using a plasma-arc cutting torch is described. In one technique, piping is cut remotely from a distance using a specially modified torch holder. In another technique, cutting is done with master-slave manipulators inside a hot cell. Finally, a method for remote cutting and scarification of contaminated concrete is described. This system, which utilizes high-pressure water jets, is coupled to a cutting head or rotating scarification head. The system is suited for cutting contaminated concrete for removal or removing a thin layer in a controlled manner for decontamination

  9. Decontamination of floor surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirous, F.

    1983-01-01

    Requirements are presented put on the surfaces of floors of radiochemical workplaces. The mechanism is described of retaining the contaminant in the surface of the flooring, ways of reducing the hazards of floor surface contamination, decontamination techniques and used decontamination agents. (J.P.)

  10. EDF guide book for decontamination at power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glorennec, C.; Bemer, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plant components or equipment often need to be more or less decontaminated before undergoing maintenance. In order to coordinate the activities of the different maintenance specialists belonging to the corporate or site organizations, the management of EDF/Nuclear and Fossil Division has created a decontamination task force. One of the objectives of this task force was to elaborate the present Guide Book for Decontamination at Power Plants. This paper provides assistance to nuclear plants operators in the very specific field of decontamination

  11. Lessons learned from international siting experiences of LLW Disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, G.H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that the United States can gain insight into successfully siting low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facilities by studying the process in other nations. Siting experiences in France and Sweden are compared to experiences in the United States. Three factors appear to making siting of LLW disposal facilities easier in France and Sweden than in the United States. First, the level of public trust in the government and the entities responsible for siting, developing, and operating a LLW disposal facility is much greater in France and Sweden than in the United States. Second, France and Sweden are much more dependent on nuclear power than is the United States. Third, French and Swedish citizens do not have the same access to the siting process (i.e., legal means to intervene) as do U.S. citizens. To compensate for these three factors, public officials responsible for siting a facility may need to better listen to the concerns of public interest groups and citizen advisory committees and amend their siting process accordingly and better share power and control with the public. If these two techniques are implemented earnestly by the states, siting efforts may be increasingly more successful in the United States

  12. Impact of decontamination on LWR radioactive waste treatment systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoenes, G.R.; Perrigo, L.D.; Divine, J.R.; Faust, L.G.

    1979-01-01

    Only at N-Reactor is there a means to accommodate radwaste produced during decontamination. The Dresden system is expected to be ready to accommodate such solutions by the summer of 1979. Solidification of the processed decontamination waste may be a significant problem. There is doubt that the materials in current radwaste treatment systems can handle chemicals from a concentrated process. The total storage volume, for concentrated decontamination, is not sufficient in existing radwaste treatment systems. Greater attention should be placed on designing reactors and radwaste treatment systems for decontamination. A means of handling waste material resulting from leaks in the primary system during the decontamination must be developed. On-site storage of solidified decontamination wastes may be a viable option, but license amendments will be necessary

  13. Equipment decontamination: A brief survey of the DOE complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conner, C.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Chen, L.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1995-03-01

    Deactivation at DOE facilities has left a tremendous amount of contaminated equipment behind. In-situ methods are needed to decontaminate the interiors of the equipment sufficiently to allow either free release or land disposal. A brief survey was completed of the DOE complex on their needs for equipment decontamination with in-situ technology to determine (1) the types of contamination problems within the DOE complex, (2) decontamination processes that are being used or are being developed within the DOE, and (3) the methods that are available to dispose of spent decontamination solutions. In addition, potential sites for testing decontamination methods were located. Based on the information obtained from these surveys, the Rocky Flats Plant and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory appear to be best suited to complete the initial testing of the decontamination processes

  14. Separations canyon decontamination facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershey, J.H.

    1975-01-01

    Highly radioactive process equipment is decontaminated at the Savannah River Plant in specially equipped areas of the separations canyon building so that direct mechanical repairs or alterations can be made. Using these facilities it is possible to decontaminate and repair equipment such as 10- x 11-ft storage tanks, 8- x 8-ft batch evaporator pots and columns, 40-in. Bird centrifuges, canyon pumps and agitators, and various canyon piping systems or ''jumpers.'' For example, centrifuge or evaporator pots can be decontaminated and rebuilt for about 60 percent of the 1974 replacement cost. The combined facilities can decontaminate and repair 6 to 10 pieces of major equipment per year. Decontamination time varies with type of equipment and radioactivity levels encountered

  15. Separations canyon decontamination facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershey, J.H.

    1975-05-01

    Highly radioactive process equipment is decontaminated at the Savannah River Plant in specially equipped areas of the separations canyon buildings so that direct mechanical repairs or alterations can be made. Using these facilities it is possible to decontaminate and repair equipment such as 10- x 11-ft storage tanks, 8- x 8-ft batch evaporator pots and columns, 40-in. Bird centrifuges, canyon pumps and agitators, and various canyon piping systems or ''jumpers.'' For example, centrifuge or evaporator pots can be decontaminated and rebuilt for about 60 percent of the 1974 replacement cost. The combined facilities can decontaminate and repair 6 to 10 pieces of major equipment per year. Decontamination time varies with type of equipment and radioactivity levels encountered. (U.S.)

  16. Influence of Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knaack, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the influence of several decontamination techniques on the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. There are different kinds of decontamination methods like mechanical and chemical processes. The techniques specified, and their potential to change measured characteristics like the isotope vector of the contamination is demonstrated. It is common for all these processes, that the contamination is removed from the surface. Slightly adhered nuclides can be removed more effectively than strongly sticking nuclides. Usually a mixture of these nuclides forms the contamination. Problematically any kind of decontamination will influence the nuclide distribution and the isotope vector. On the one hand it is helpful to know the nuclide distribution and the isotope vector for the radiological characterization of the nuclear facility and on the other hand this information will be changed in the decontamination process. This is important especially for free release procedures, radiation protection and waste management. Some questions on the need of decontamination have been discussed. (authors)

  17. Contribution to the study of external decontamination procedure. Experiments on a new product in the case of radioactive contamination of the teguments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toulet, J.; Tabernat, J.

    1959-01-01

    General principles of external decontamination with elements of practical organisation in a centre of nuclear studies. Reprint of a paper published in 'Archives des Maladies Professionnelles', Tome 20, n. 3, 1959, p. 272-282

  18. Decontamination Study for Mixed Waste Storage Tanks RCRA Closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaphart, D.M.; Reed, S.R.; Rankin, W.N.

    1995-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) plans to close six underground tanks storing mixed waste under RCRA regulations. In support of this closure effort, a study was performed to determine the optimal method of decontaminating these tanks to meet the closure requirements. Items consaidered in the evaluation of the decontamination methods included effectiveness, compatibility with existing waste residues, possible cleaning solution disposal methods, and cost

  19. Argentinian experience in selecting sites for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csik, B.J.

    1975-01-01

    One nuclear power station is in operation in the Republic of Argentina, a second is under construction, and the decision to build a third has been taken. According to existing plans, about ten nuclear power stations should go into operation during the next decade. The present paper analyses the experience acquired in selecting sites for the first units, commenting on the criteria and methods applied, the studies that were carried out, the specific problems encountered and the solutions adopted, as well as on the question of acceptance of the chosen sites by the public. It goes on to describe the current programme of selection and study of sites for future nuclear power stations

  20. Dashboard applications to monitor experiment activities at sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreeva, Julia; Gaidioz, Benjamin; Grigoras, Costin; Kokoszkiewicz, Lukasz; Lanciotti, Elisa; Rocha, Ricardo; Saiz, Pablo; Santinelli, Roberto; Sidorova, Irina; Sciaba, Andrea [CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research (Switzerland); Belforte, Stefano [INFN Trieste (Italy); Boehm, Max [EDS, an HP Company, Plano, TX (United States); Casajus, Adrian [Universitat de Barcelona (Spain); Flix, Josep [PIC, Port d' Informacio CientIfica, Bellaterra (Spain); Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei, E-mail: Elisa.Lanciotti@cern.c, E-mail: Pablo.Saiz@cern.c [CPPM Marseille (France)

    2010-04-01

    In the framework of a distributed computing environment, such as WLCG, monitoring has a key role in order to keep under control activities going on in sites located in different countries and involving people based in many different sites. To be able to cope with such a large scale heterogeneous infrastructure, it is necessary to have monitoring tools providing a complete and reliable view of the overall performance of the sites. Moreover, the structure of a monitoring system critically depends on the object to monitor and on the users it is addressed to. In this article we will describe two different monitoring systems both aimed to monitor activities and services provided in the WLCG framework, but designed in order to meet the requirements of different users: Site Status Board has an overall view of the services available in all the sites supporting an experiment, whereas Siteview provides a complete view of all the activities going on at a site, for all the experiments supported by the site.

  1. Dashboard applications to monitor experiment activities at sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeva, Julia; Gaidioz, Benjamin; Grigoras, Costin; Kokoszkiewicz, Lukasz; Lanciotti, Elisa; Rocha, Ricardo; Saiz, Pablo; Santinelli, Roberto; Sidorova, Irina; Sciaba, Andrea; Belforte, Stefano; Boehm, Max; Casajus, Adrian; Flix, Josep; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of a distributed computing environment, such as WLCG, monitoring has a key role in order to keep under control activities going on in sites located in different countries and involving people based in many different sites. To be able to cope with such a large scale heterogeneous infrastructure, it is necessary to have monitoring tools providing a complete and reliable view of the overall performance of the sites. Moreover, the structure of a monitoring system critically depends on the object to monitor and on the users it is addressed to. In this article we will describe two different monitoring systems both aimed to monitor activities and services provided in the WLCG framework, but designed in order to meet the requirements of different users: Site Status Board has an overall view of the services available in all the sites supporting an experiment, whereas Siteview provides a complete view of all the activities going on at a site, for all the experiments supported by the site.

  2. Decontamination and winter conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quenild, C.; Tveten, U.

    1984-12-01

    The report deals with two decontamonation experiments under winter conditions. A snow-covered parking lot was contaminated, and the snow was subsequently removed using standard snow-moving equipment. The snow left behind was collected and the content of contaminant was determined. A non-radioactive contaminant was used. A decontamination factor exceeding 100 was obtained. Although the eksperimental conditions were close to ideal, it is reason to believe that extremely efficient removal of deposited materials on a snow surface is achivable. In another investigation, run-off from agricultural surface, contaminated while covered with snow, was measured A lycimeter was used in this experiment. A stable layer of ice and snow was allowed to form before contamination. The run-off water was collected at each thaw period until all snow and ice was gone. Cs-134 was used as contaminant. Roughly 30% of the Cs-134 with which the area was contaminated ran off with the melt water. Following a reactor accident situation, this would have given a corresponding reduction in the long term doses. Both of these experiments show that consequence calculation assumptions, as they are currently applied to large accident assessment, tend to overestimate the consequences resulting from accidents taking place under winter conditions

  3. New techniques available for decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costes, J.R.; Cochaux, C.

    1996-01-01

    As nuclear industry dismantling operations become more widespread, one naturally sees the growth of specific needs in decontamination techniques. In this paper, the authors present two applications involving the decategorization of wastes from dismantling. Decategorization means using decontamination to transform the wastes into a lower, and thus cheaper, category. The first application is in decategorizing large mild steel pipes, which come from the stage decommissioning of the G2/G3 graphite gas reactors at Marcoule. A large number of these pipes (4000 t) have been contaminated by deposits and encrustations of 60 Co (95%) and 137 Cs (5%) to the extent of 200 Bq/cm 2 . The objective was to avoid having to store them on surface sites for 300 yr. This is achieved by decontaminating them to a level that enables the metal to be reused. The other application involves stainless steel waste cut into small sections, which comes from the stage decommissioning of a radiometallurgy laboratory (RM2) at Fontenay aux Roses. This waste was not acceptable to the surface storage center due to high levels of alpha contamination. A decategorization technique has been developed for part of the 13 tonnes of waste concerned, which avoids the need for it to be disposed of in extremely costly geologic repositories

  4. Dry decontamination for tritiated wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Zhengkun; Wu Tao; Dan Guiping; Xie Yun

    2009-01-01

    To aim at decontamination of tritiated wastes, we have developed and fabricated a dry tritium decontamination system, which is designed to reduce tritium surface contamination of various alloy by UV, ozone and heating. The result indicates that the elevation of temperature can obviously improve decontamination effect. With 3 h irradiation by 365 nm UV at 220 degree C, it has a decontamination rate of 99% to stainless steel surface. Ozone can more obviously improve decontamination effect when metal was heated. Ozone has a decontamination effect beyond 95% to stainless steel, aluminum and brass at 220 degree C. Tritium surface concentration of metal has a little increase after decontamination. (authors)

  5. Decontamination of skin in emergency situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harase, Chieko

    1988-01-01

    The report briefly discusses the organization of decontamination personnel and facilities to be used for decontamination in the event of an emergency, and outlines the author's experience in carrying out decontamination of the skin of tourists who came back to Japan after staying in Kiev at the time of the accident at Chernobyl (about 150 km away from Kiev). In Japan at present, no nuclear facilities seem to have sufficient personnel who are in charge of skin decontamination activities required in the event of an emergency, and emergency measures are generally limited to the development of emergency plans and implementation of drills. It is necessary to establish training courses for medical doctors and other medical personnel. Each plant has plans for skin decontamination procedures designed for professional workers in the plant. Plans should also be established for general people who might suffer skin decontamination in the event of an accident. What is the most important is to ease their anxiety about the contamination of their skin. The procedures, including washing and shampooing, used for the tourist returning from Kiev are described, and some problems encountered or expected to occur in similar cases are outlined and discussed. (Nogami, K.)

  6. PWR decontamination feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silliman, P.L.

    1978-12-18

    The decontamination work which has been accomplished is reviewed and it is concluded that it is worthwhile to investigate further four methods for decontamination for future demonstration. These are: dilute chemical; single stage strong chemical; redox processes; and redox/chemical in combination. Laboratory work is recommended to define the agents and processes for demonstration and to determine the effect of the solvents on PWR materials. The feasibility of Indian Point 1 for decontamination demonstrations is discussed, and it is shown that the system components of Indian Point 1 are well suited for use in demonstrations.

  7. Long lasting decontamination foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmer, Ricky L.; Peterman, Dean R.; Tripp, Julia L.; Cooper, David C.; Wright, Karen E.

    2010-12-07

    Compositions and methods for decontaminating surfaces are disclosed. More specifically, compositions and methods for decontamination using a composition capable of generating a long lasting foam are disclosed. Compositions may include a surfactant and gelatin and have a pH of less than about 6. Such compositions may further include affinity-shifting chemicals. Methods may include decontaminating a contaminated surface with a composition or a foam that may include a surfactant and gelatin and have a pH of less than about 6.

  8. PWR decontamination feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silliman, P.L.

    1978-01-01

    The decontamination work which has been accomplished is reviewed and it is concluded that it is worthwhile to investigate further four methods for decontamination for future demonstration. These are: dilute chemical; single stage strong chemical; redox processes; and redox/chemical in combination. Laboratory work is recommended to define the agents and processes for demonstration and to determine the effect of the solvents on PWR materials. The feasibility of Indian Point 1 for decontamination demonstrations is discussed, and it is shown that the system components of Indian Point 1 are well suited for use in demonstrations

  9. Technical specifications for the Pajarito Site Critical Experiments Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malenfant, R.E.; Paxton, H.C.

    1980-12-01

    This document is to satisfy the requirement for technical specifications spelled out in DOE Manual Chapter 0540, Safety of DOE-Owned Reactors. Technical specifications are defined in Sec. 0540-048, and the requirement for them appears in Sec. 0540-015. The following technical specifications update the document, Technical Specifications for the Pajarito Site Critical Experiments Facility

  10. EXPERIENCE IN INCINERATION APPLICABLE TO SUPERFUND SITE REMEDIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document can be used as a reference tool for hazardous waste site remediation where incineration is used as a treatment alternative. It provides the user with information garnered from the experiences of others who use incineration. The document presents useful lessons in ev...

  11. Feasibility and alternate procedures for decontamination and post-treatment management of Pu-contaminated areas in Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, A.; Romney, E.M.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility and environmental impact of cleaning up Pu-contaminated areas in Nevada are discussed. Findings from pertinent land area decontamination and postmanagement experiences which can be applied to solving Pu problems at the Nevada Test Site and the Tonopah Test Range are reviewed. Previous experiences from accidental and planned releases of Pu in the environment are discussed along with those gained from nuclear fallout decontamination studies. Problems concerning revegetation of arid lands are discussed. It is pointed out that the fragile nature of the desert is such that any drastic alteration will result in a seriously damaged ecosystem. Revegetation by natural means is difficult, if not impossible, from a practical point of view. Post-treatment management of disturbed areas is almost always necessary to ensure recovery. Correction of the damage may require greater efforts than the decontamination, and may have more far-reaching consequences than those concerned with the present status of the land. (CH)

  12. Decontamination of radionuclides in food

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohmomo, Yoichiro [Institute for Environmental Sciences, Aomori (Japan)

    1994-03-01

    The release of radionuclides arising from the Chernobyle accident led to widespread contamination of the northern hemisphere through fallout. This accident provided again an opportunity to investigate how and to what extent the radionuclides contamination in crops and animal derived foods could be reduced. The following topics are included in this paper. (1) How to reduce the transfer of radiostrontium and/or cesium from soil to crops: A pH increase of soil is effective for reducing their plant uptake. (2) How to reduce the transfer of radiocesium to animal derived foods: Ammonium-ferric-cyanoferrate (AFCF) should be the most effective compound for radiocesium excretion in the feces. Experiments with lactating cows and/or poultry gave extremely good results with respect to low radiocesium concentrations in milk, meat and eggs. (3) Removal coefficients of radiostrontium, cesium and iodine from contaminated leaf vegetables and cereals during food processing and culinary preparation: Though different by species, more than 80% of cesium and about 50% of strontium and iodine can be removed during culinary preparation of washing and boiling. (4) Simultaneous decontamination of radiocesium and iodine from drinking water and liquid milk: Metal ferrocyanide-anion exchange resin, specifically Fe ferrocyanide one, was successfully used for a rapid and simple decontamination of radiocesium and iodine in the liquid samples arising from the Chernobyle accident. (5) Removal of radiocesium from meat: The meat structurally contaminated with radiocesium is easily and very successfully decontaminated by pickling in NaCl solution and the decontamination is much speeded up by freezing meat before pickling. (author).

  13. Decontamination of radionuclides in food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmomo, Yoichiro

    1994-01-01

    The release of radionuclides arising from the Chernobyle accident led to widespread contamination of the northern hemisphere through fallout. This accident provided again an opportunity to investigate how and to what extent the radionuclides contamination in crops and animal derived foods could be reduced. The following topics are included in this paper. (1) How to reduce the transfer of radiostrontium and/or cesium from soil to crops: A pH increase of soil is effective for reducing their plant uptake. (2) How to reduce the transfer of radiocesium to animal derived foods: Ammonium-ferric-cyanoferrate (AFCF) should be the most effective compound for radiocesium excretion in the feces. Experiments with lactating cows and/or poultry gave extremely good results with respect to low radiocesium concentrations in milk, meat and eggs. (3) Removal coefficients of radiostrontium, cesium and iodine from contaminated leaf vegetables and cereals during food processing and culinary preparation: Though different by species, more than 80% of cesium and about 50% of strontium and iodine can be removed during culinary preparation of washing and boiling. (4) Simultaneous decontamination of radiocesium and iodine from drinking water and liquid milk: Metal ferrocyanide-anion exchange resin, specifically Fe ferrocyanide one, was successfully used for a rapid and simple decontamination of radiocesium and iodine in the liquid samples arising from the Chernobyle accident. (5) Removal of radiocesium from meat: The meat structurally contaminated with radiocesium is easily and very successfully decontaminated by pickling in NaCl solution and the decontamination is much speeded up by freezing meat before pickling. (author)

  14. Advance in radioactive decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basteris M, J. A.; Farrera V, R.

    2010-09-01

    The objective of the present work was to determine if the application of the Na hypochlorite has some utility in the radioactive decontamination, in comparison with the water, detergent and alcohol. Several methods were compared for decontaminate the iodine 131 and technetium 99, the work table and the skin it was carried out an initial count with the Geiger Muller. Later on, in a single occasion, the areas were washed with abundant water, alcohol, clothes detergent and sodium hypochlorite (used commercially as domestic bleacher) without diluting. Observing that the percentage in the decrease of the counted radioactivity by the Geiger Muller, decreased in the following way: It was demonstrated that the Na hypochlorite presents the highest index of radioactive decontamination with 100% of effectiveness. The Na hypochlorite is an excellent substance that can be used with effectiveness and efficiency like decontamination element in the accident cases of radioactive contamination in the clinical laboratories of nuclear medicine. (Author)

  15. Concrete decontamination scoping tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archibald, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    This report details the research efforts and scoping tests performed at the Idaho Chemical Process Plant using scabbling, chemical, and electro-osmotic decontamination techniques on radiologically contaminated concrete

  16. Recommendations for skin decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Further to the reecommendations for determining the surface contamination of the skin and estimating the radiation exposure of the skin after contamination (SAAS-Mitt--89-16), measures for skin decontamination are recommended. They are necessary if (1) after simple decontamination by means of water, soap and brush without damaging the skin the surface contamination limits are exceeded and the radiation exposure to be expected for the undamaged healthy skin is estimated as to high, and if (2) a wound is contaminated. To remove skin contaminations, in general universally applicable, non-aggressive decontamination means and methods are sufficient. In special cases, nuclide-specific decontamination is required taking into account the properties of the radioactive substance

  17. Some remarks about decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertini, A.

    1990-01-01

    Decontamination in itself is not the elimination of a problem, but corresponds to move that problem from one place to another. It is beneficial only if the contamination is less of a nuisance when moved to the ''other place''. Therefore any prospective decontamination process is to be considered essentially in terms of cost-benefit, and in particular in terms of reducing the burden on the waste management systems. The paper is not intended to deal with and to review critically the technical aspects of the various decontamination processes which are currently available. Its aim is to call the attention of those who may be faced with the problem of large-scale decontamination, so that this operation is carried out after all practical aspects have been examined. (author)

  18. Chemical decontamination: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, R.A.; Wood, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    The source of radioactive contamination in various types of power reactors is discussed. The methods of chemical decontamination vary with the manner in which the radioactive contaminants are deposited on the surface. Two types of dilute decontamination systems are available. One system uses organic acids and chelating agents, which are mildly reducing in nature. In this process, the oxide contaminants are removed by simple acidic dissolution and reductive dissolution. The second type of decontamination process is based on low oxidation state metal ions, which are more strongly reducing and do not require a corrosion inhibitor. All processes commercially available for decontamination of power reactors are not detailed here, but a few key issues to be considered in the selection of a process are highlighted. 2 figures, 2 tables

  19. Food decontamination using nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    The research indicates that nanomaterials including nanoemulsions are promising decontamination media for the reduction of food contaminating pathogens. The inhibitory effect of nanoparticles for pathogens could be due to deactivate cellular enzymes and DNA; disrupting of membrane permeability; and/...

  20. Decommissioning and Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massaut, V.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's decommissioning and decontamination programme are (1) to develop, test and optimise the technologies and procedures for decommissioning and decontamination of nuclear installations in order to minimise the waste arising and the distributed dose; (2) to optimise the environmental impact; (3) to reduce the cost of the end-of-life of the installation; (4) to make these new techniques available to the industry; (5) to share skills and competences. The programme and achievements in 1999 are summarised

  1. Mangling the models: Real-life experiences in voluntary siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, C.S.

    1993-01-01

    Social scientists are accumulating a growing body of research to guide the development of communications models for siting controversial facilities. The models emphasize building consensus by involving all stakeholders, including opponents, in the decision-making process from its earliest stages. Communications should focus on issues and concerns that are most relevant to the people in the involved community. Finally, trust must be built through local control of the decision-making process. This paper presents experiences in the voluntary siting process for the Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility for spent nuclear fuel in three locations: Grant County, North Dakota, Fremont County, Wyoming, and the Mescalero Apache nation in New Mexico

  2. Experiences with on-site power sources at KCB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijnen, B. M.A. [Borssele Nuclear Power Station, N.V. P.Z.E.M., Postbus 48, 4330 AA Middleburg (Netherlands)

    1986-02-15

    The design of the nuclear power station is of the late sixties. The experiences with the on-site power sources, signal processing and some of the resulting modifications of the design of the power plant are mentioned. In order to let the design satisfy as much as possible present ideas about safety, it was decided to realize a total new and Independent decay heat removal System. With this system a second independent on-site power System is at disposal in case of accident situations. (author)

  3. Coolant system decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anstine, L.D.; James, D.B.; Melaika, E.A.; Peterson, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    An improved method for decontaminating the coolant system of water cooled nuclear power reactors and for regenerating the decontamination solution is described. A small amount of one or more weak-acid organic complexing agents is added to the reactor coolant, and the pH is adjusted to form a decontamination solution which is circulated throughout the coolant system to dissolve metal oxides from the interior surfaces and complex the resulting metal ions and radionuclide ions. The coolant containing the complexed metal ions and radionuclide ions is passed through a strong-base anion exchange resin bed which has been presaturated with a solution containing the complexing agents in the same ratio and having the same pH as the decontamination solution. As the decontamination solution passes through the resin bed, metal-complexed anions are exchanged for the metal-ion-free anions on the bed, while metal-ion-free anions in the solution pass through the bed, thus removing the metal ions and regenerating the decontamination solution. (author)

  4. Fate of the chemical warfare agent O-ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX) on soil following accelerant-based fire and liquid decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravett, M R; Hopkins, F B; Self, A J; Webb, A J; Timperley, C M; Riches, J R

    2014-08-01

    In the event of alleged use of organophosphorus nerve agents, all kinds of environmental samples can be received for analysis. These might include decontaminated and charred matter collected from the site of a suspected chemical attack. In other scenarios, such matter might be sampled to confirm the site of a chemical weapon test or clandestine laboratory decontaminated and burned to prevent discovery. To provide an analytical capability for these contingencies, we present a preliminary investigation of the effect of accelerant-based fire and liquid decontamination on soil contaminated with the nerve agent O-ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX). The objectives were (a) to determine if VX or its degradation products were detectable in soil after an accelerant-based fire promoted by aviation fuel, including following decontamination with Decontamination Solution 2 (DS2) or aqueous sodium hypochlorite, (b) to develop analytical methods to support forensic analysis of accelerant-soaked, decontaminated and charred soil and (c) to inform the design of future experiments of this type to improve analytical fidelity. Our results show for the first time that modern analytical techniques can be used to identify residual VX and its degradation products in contaminated soil after an accelerant-based fire and after chemical decontamination and then fire. Comparison of the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) profiles of VX and its impurities/degradation products from contaminated burnt soil, and burnt soil spiked with VX, indicated that the fire resulted in the production of diethyl methylphosphonate and O,S-diethyl methylphosphonothiolate (by an unknown mechanism). Other products identified were indicative of chemical decontamination, and some of these provided evidence of the decontaminant used, for example, ethyl 2-methoxyethyl methylphosphonate and bis(2-methoxyethyl) methylphosphonate following decontamination with DS2. Sample preparation

  5. Lessons learned from decontaminating and decommissioning fuel cycle facilities in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordier, Jean-Claude; Dalcorso, J. P.; Nokhamzon, Jean-Guy

    2000-01-01

    This paper draws on 20 years of experience and lessons learned by COGEMA and the CEA during the decontamination and decommissioning (DandD) of its nuclear fuel cycle facilities. COGEMA and the CEA have developed a wealth of knowledge on issues such as assessing decommissioning alternatives, selecting appropriate technical procedures on the basis of thorough site characterization, and developing waste management and disposal procedures. (author)

  6. High pressure freon decontamination of remote equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    A series of decontamination tests using high pressure FREON 113 was conducted in the 200 Area of the Hanford site. The intent of these tests was to evaluate the effectiveness of FREON 113 in decontamination of manipulator components, tools, and equipment items contaminated with mixed fission products. The test results indicated that high pressure FREON 113 is very effective in removing fissile material from a variety of objects and can reduce both the quantity and the volume of the radioactive waste material presently being buried

  7. Long-term decontamination engineering study. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geuther, W.J.

    1995-04-03

    This report was prepared by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) with technical and cost estimating support from Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) and Parsons Environmental Services, Inc. (Parsons). This engineering study evaluates the requirements and alternatives for decontamination/treatment of contaminated equipment at the Hanford Site. The purpose of this study is to determine the decontamination/treatment strategy that best supports the Hanford Site environmental restoration mission. It describes the potential waste streams requiring treatment or decontamination, develops the alternatives under consideration establishes the criteria for comparison, evaluates the alternatives, and draws conclusions (i.e., the optimum strategy for decontamination). Although two primary alternatives are discussed, this study does identify other alternatives that may warrant additional study. hanford Site solid waste management program activities include storage, special processing, decontamination/treatment, and disposal facilities. This study focuses on the decontamination/treatment processes (e.g., waste decontamination, size reduction, immobilization, and packaging) that support the environmental restoration mission at the Hanford Site.

  8. Long-term decontamination engineering study. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geuther, W.J.

    1995-01-01

    This report was prepared by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) with technical and cost estimating support from Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) and Parsons Environmental Services, Inc. (Parsons). This engineering study evaluates the requirements and alternatives for decontamination/treatment of contaminated equipment at the Hanford Site. The purpose of this study is to determine the decontamination/treatment strategy that best supports the Hanford Site environmental restoration mission. It describes the potential waste streams requiring treatment or decontamination, develops the alternatives under consideration establishes the criteria for comparison, evaluates the alternatives, and draws conclusions (i.e., the optimum strategy for decontamination). Although two primary alternatives are discussed, this study does identify other alternatives that may warrant additional study. hanford Site solid waste management program activities include storage, special processing, decontamination/treatment, and disposal facilities. This study focuses on the decontamination/treatment processes (e.g., waste decontamination, size reduction, immobilization, and packaging) that support the environmental restoration mission at the Hanford Site

  9. Predicting ion exchange resins decontamination factors. Experiments on synthetic primary coolant containing Ni, Co and Ag and modeling results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachet, Martin; Schneider, Hélène; Jauberty, Loïc; Windt, Laurent De; Dieuleveult, Caroline de; Tevissen, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    Experiments performed under chemical and flow conditions representative of pressurized water reactors (PWR) primary fluid purification by ion exchange resins (Amberlite IRN9882) are modeled with the OPTIPUR code, considering 1D reactive transport in the mixed-bed column with convective/dispersive transport between beads and electro-diffusive transport within the boundary film around the beads. The effectiveness of the purification in these dilute conditions is highly related to film mass transfer restrictions, which are accounted for by adjustment of a common mass transfer coefficient (MTC) on the experimental initial leakage or modeling of species diffusion through the bead film by the Nernst-Planck equation. A detailed analysis of the modeling against experimental data shows that the Nernst-Planck approach with no adjustable parameters performs as well as, or better, than the MTC approach, particularly to simulate the chromatographic elution of silver by nickel and the subsequent enrichment of the solution in the former metal. (author)

  10. Effluent treatment plant and decontamination centre, Trombay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, C.P.; Agarwal, K.

    2017-01-01

    The Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, has a number of plants and laboratories, which generate Radioactive Liquid Waste and Protective Wears. Two facilities have been established in late 1960s to cater to this requirement. The Centre, on the average generates about 50,000 m"3 of active liquid effluents of varying specific activities. The Effluent Treatment Plant was setup to receive and process radioactive liquids generated by various facilities of BARC in Trombay. It also serves a single-point discharge facility to enable monitoring of radioactive effluents discharged from the Trombay site. About 120-150 Te of protective wears and inactive apparel are generated annually from various radioactive facilities and laboratories of BARC. In addition, contaminated fuel assembly components are generated by DHRUVA and formerly by CIRUS. These components require decontamination before its recycle to the fuel assembly process. The Decontamination Centre, setup in late 1960s, is mandated to carry out the above mentioned decontamination activities

  11. Statistical sampling method for releasing decontaminated vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lively, J.W.; Ware, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Earth moving vehicles (e.g., dump trucks, belly dumps) commonly haul radiologically contaminated materials from a site being remediated to a disposal site. Traditionally, each vehicle must be surveyed before being released. The logistical difficulties of implementing the traditional approach on a large scale demand that an alternative be devised. A statistical method (MIL-STD-105E, open-quotes Sampling Procedures and Tables for Inspection by Attributesclose quotes) for assessing product quality from a continuous process was adapted to the vehicle decontamination process. This method produced a sampling scheme that automatically compensates and accommodates fluctuating batch sizes and changing conditions without the need to modify or rectify the sampling scheme in the field. Vehicles are randomly selected (sampled) upon completion of the decontamination process to be surveyed for residual radioactive surface contamination. The frequency of sampling is based on the expected number of vehicles passing through the decontamination process in a given period and the confidence level desired. This process has been successfully used for 1 year at the former uranium mill site in Monticello, Utah (a CERCLA regulated clean-up site). The method forces improvement in the quality of the decontamination process and results in a lower likelihood that vehicles exceeding the surface contamination standards are offered for survey. Implementation of this statistical sampling method on Monticello Projects has resulted in more efficient processing of vehicles through decontamination and radiological release, saved hundreds of hours of processing time, provided a high level of confidence that release limits are met, and improved the radiological cleanliness of vehicles leaving the controlled site

  12. Experience gained in the management of radioactive waste from maintenance, decontamination and partial decommissioning of a reprocessing plant and conclusions resulting for the management of radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hild, W.

    1983-01-01

    After a short description of the historical background of Eurochemic, its main tasks and the various operational phases, a detailed description of the waste management principles applied is presented. The practical experience in the waste treatment is reported for both the operational phase of the reprocessing plant and its decontamination and partial decommissioning after shutdown. Based on this experience and the presented data, an assessment of the practical operations is made and conclusions are drawn. Finally, recommendations are formulated both for the general waste management policy and the practical waste treatment processes in nuclear power reactors. (author)

  13. Tourist experiences of genocide sites: The case of Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharpley Richard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dark tourism is not a new phenomenon. As long as people have been able to travel they have visited places associated with death, disaster and suffering. However, not only has the provision and consumption of dark tourism experiences become increasingly evident in recent years; so too has the academic study of the phenomenon. Nevertheless, despite the increasing attention paid to the subject, understanding of dark tourism remains relatively limited and theoretically fragile whilst, specifically, the significance of the consumption of or demand for dark tourism has enjoyed limited academic scrutiny. This is particularly the case with socalled 'genocide tourism' (visiting places of, or associated with, genocide, a form of dark tourism that is increasingly in evidence but the consumption of which is often misunderstood and, typically, considered to display voyeuristic tendencies on the part of tourists. Focusing on the Rwandan genocide, this paper addresses this issue. Locating genocide tourism within the context of dark tourism more generally, it reviews briefly how the Rwandan genocide is presented / memorialised before considering research into how tourists experience genocide memorial sites in Rwanda. Specifically, build­ing on an earlier study that explored visitor experiences of genocide sites in Rwanda as described in travel blogs, it considers the results of an exploratory survey into tourists' experiences of the Kigali Genocide Memorial, the country's principal memorial site. The results indicate unequivocally that tourists undertake their visits with positive, meaningful intent (albeit with trepidation and that, almost without exception, find it a challenging, powerfully emotional yet, ultimately, rewarding experience in that they begin to grasp the horror and suffering of the genocide and, indeed, leave with the desire to learn more about it.

  14. Research and development activities of the Institut fuer Nukleare Entsorgungstechnik on the decontamination of surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dippel, T.; Hentschel, D.; Kunze, S.

    1983-06-01

    After developing a procedure for the ''Testing of Surface Coating Materials for the Decontamination'' about 900 different surface coating materials had been tested and evaluated for the domestic and foreign industry. The results prove the following basic facts: Surface coatings, low in porosity, forming a smooth surface and containing limited amounts of filler are in the majority very effectively decontaminated if they are prepared of chemically stable, water repellent materials; Decontamination results are drastically poorer if the degree of filling of the materials is high especially if hygroscopic fillers and/or hygroscopic colouring matters are used. Currently available cleansers and washing powders used for decontamination did not fulfill the three basic demands for a decontamination agent: high efficiency, small foam generation and sufficient thermal stability. Therefore for the decontamination of walls, floors, etc. a water delutable, liquid cleanser was developed. In the same context a washing powder was optimized for the decontamination of contaminated clothing. The experiments on the decontamination of stainless steels ended up with the formulation of a pickling paste. Furthermore all investigations were aimed at a minimization of the waste generation by the decontamination process. This resulted in decontamination techniques, in which the decontaminating agents were applied in thin layers. A comparison of the currently practiced dipping technique with the coating technique showed that the latter one gave the better decontamination results and that the amount of decontamination waste was reduced. (orig./HP) [de

  15. General recommendations for decontamination procedures to individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohlenschlaeger, L.; Messerschmidt, J.P.

    1989-04-01

    The fundamental criteria in handling radioactive contaminated persons are discussed and methods of monitoring, including monitoring of contaminated wounds, as well as decontamination measures with reference to particularly exposed regions of the body are described. Each decontamination procedure has to be carried out cautiously and has to be stopped as soon as skin lesion would be ensured from too strong mechanical cleansing, in order to avoid any additional incorporation by an injured skin. As a rule, any residual radioactivity still adherent to the skin surface can be neglected as soon as avoidance of spreading of the contamination to surrounding areas is assured. Experience showed that contaminations with radioactive dust can be removed from the skin surface quite easily by such simple means like water and soap. Radioisotopes, however, as used in nuclear medicine, usually are having a higher adhesive effect to the skin surface, thus making conditions for decontamination more difficult. Measures related to the decontamination procedure such as monitoring, mode of sampling for bioassay in case of incidents, handling of waste resulting from decontamination, as well as self-protective aspects are discussed in the annex. (orig.) [de

  16. TMI-2 containment decontamination plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDougall, F.

    1980-01-01

    Because of other priorities such as reentry, purging, and recovery, containment decontamination is only in the preliminary planning stages. This paper summarizes the study with emphasis on the remote decontamination techniques

  17. Development of waste minimization and decontamination technologies at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, R.L.; Archibald, K.E.; Demmer, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    Emphasis on the minimization of decontamination secondary waste has increased because of restrictions on the use of hazardous chemicals and Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) waste handling issues. The Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co. (LITCO) Decontamination Development Subunit has worked to evaluate and introduce new performed testing, evaluations, development and on-site demonstrations for a number of novel decontamination techniques that have not yet previously been used at the ICPP. This report will include information on decontamination techniques that have recently been evaluated by the Decontamination Development Subunit

  18. Results of chemical decontamination of DOE`s uranium-enrichment scrap metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levesque, R.G.

    1997-02-01

    The CORPEX{reg_sign} Nuclear Decontamination Processes were used to decontaminate representative scrap metal specimens obtained from the existing scrap metal piles located at the Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio. In September 1995, under contract to Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, MELE Associates, Inc. performed the on-site decontamination demonstration. The decontamination demonstration proved that significant amounts of the existing DOE scrap metal can be decontaminated to levels where the scrap metal could be economically released by DOE for beneficial reuse. This simple and environmentally friendly process can be used as an alternative, or in addition to, smelting radiologically contaminated scrap metal.

  19. Radioactive decontamination of equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    After a recall of some definitions relating to decontamination techniques and of the regulation into effect, the principles to be respected to arrange rationally work zones are quoted while insisting more particularly on the types of coatings which facilitate maintenance operations and the dismantling of these installations. Then, the processes and equipments to use in decontamination units for routine or particular operations are described; the list of recommended chemical products to decontaminate the equipment is given. The influence of these treatments on the state and the duration of life of equipments is studied, and some perfectible methods are quoted. In the appendix, are given: the limits of surface contamination accepted in the centers; a standard project which defines the criteria of admissible residual contamination in wastes considered as cold wastes; some remarks on the interest that certain special ventilation and air curtain devices for the protection of operators working on apparatus generating contaminated dusts [fr

  20. Decontamination of latex gloves; Decontamination de gants en latex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutot, P; Schipfer, P; Blachere, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Chusclan (France). Centre de Production de Plutonium de Marcoule

    1969-07-01

    Initially the latex gloves used in controlled zones were processed after use as radioactive waste. In view of the continually increasing number used, however, the persons in charge of the SPRAR have considered the possibility of decontaminating the gloves and using them again after control. The recovery installations which have been developed were initially designed rather crudely and operated irregularly; they have been progressively improved as a result of the experience acquired; today they are more really an industrial concern, equipped with automatic machinery. In 1967 it has been possible with this set-up to recover 247000 pairs of gloves, representing nearly 70 per cent of the number treated. (author) [French] Initialement, les gants de latex utilises dans les zones controlees etaient conditionnes apres emploi comme dechets radioactifs. Mais, devant l'augmentation sans cesse croissante des quantites employees, les responsables du SPRAR ont envisage leur decontamination et leur recyclage apres controles. Les installations de recuperation mises au point, de conception artisanale et fonctionnant de maniere episodique au depart, se sont progressivement ameliorees au fur et a mesure de l'experience acquise; elles revetent aujourd'hui le caractere d'une exploitation industrielle equipee de machines automatiques. En 1967, ces nouvelles installations ont permis de recuperer 247000 paires de gants, ce qui represente pres de 70 pour cent des quantites traitees. (auteur)

  1. Decontamination of main coolant pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roofthooft, R.

    1988-01-01

    Last year a number of main coolant pumps in Belgian nuclear power plants were decontaminated. A new method has been developed to reduce the time taken for decontamination and the volume of waste to be treated. The method comprises two phases: Oxidation with permanganate in nitric acid and dissolution in oxalic acid. The decontamination of main coolant pumps can now be achieved in less than one day. The decontamination factors attained range between 15 and 150. (orig.) [de

  2. Municipalities' opinions about decontamination in special decontamination area. Records from four and a half years after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Kota

    2016-01-01

    This study discusses opinions of 11 municipalities in Fukushima Prefecture designated as Special Decontamination Area as of the end of September 2015, about four and a half years afters the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. This study shows that (1) more than half of the municipalities recognize that decontamination activities of the national government which is responsible for decontamination in Special Decontamination Area are inadequate, (2) most municipalities recognize that residents cannot live their lives with a sense of safety and security unless air radiation dose is reduced to the level before the accident or less than 0.23 μSv/h, (3) many municipalities recognize that residents will not be able to live their lives with a sense of safety and security even if the national government implements decontamination, (4) municipalities points out 'decontamination of forests or rivers and reconsideration of decontamination methods of forests or rivers', 'securement and maintenance of temporary storage site' and 'setting forth a numeric target concerning decontamination and implementation of additional decontamination after the first decontamination' as issues for the promotion of decontamination, and (5) all the municipalities recognize that that there are a lot of problems concerning the installation of interim storage facilities by the national government. (author)

  3. Situations of decontamination promotion activities. Efforts by Tokyo Electric Power Company, Fukushima Revitalization Headquarters, Decontamination Promotion Office

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Takahiko; Ito, Kei; Takizawa, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    As for the decontamination of the soil contaminated with radioactive materials, decontamination is on the way in compliance with the 'Act on Special Measures Concerning the Handling of Environmental Pollution by Radioactive Materials by the NPS Accident Associated with the Tohoku District - Off the Pacific Ocean' (hereinafter, the Act on Special Measures). Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), as the party concerned to the accident, is cooperating with decontamination activities conducted by countries and municipalities under the Act on Special Measures. Total number of people cooperated by the Decontamination Promotion Office amounts to about 120,000 people. The cooperation to the decontamination by countries and municipalities covers the following fields: provision of knowledge of radiation, training of site management and supervisors, and proposal such as the decontamination method suitable for the site. As cooperation to various monitoring, there is a traveling monitoring that performs radiation measurement from the vehicles. As cooperation in the farming and industrial resumption toward the reconstruction, the group has implemented support for the distribution promotion of the holdup that was stuck in distribution due to contamination with radioactive substances. As decontamination related technology, the following are performed: (1) preparation of radiation understanding promotion tool, (2) development of precise individual dose measurement technology, and (3) development and utilization of decontamination effect analysis program. In the future, this group will perform the follow-up for decontamination, and measures toward the lifting of evacuation order. It will install the basis to perform various technical analyses on decontamination, and will further intensify technical cooperation. (A.O.)

  4. Control of radiation exposures by decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeSurf, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    The radiation exposures of workers at light water and heavy water cooled reactors can be reduced by dilute chemical decontamination as exemplified by the CAN-DECON process. The cost effectiveness of the CAN-DECON process is illustrated by actual service experience and by hypothetical cases

  5. Electrokinetic decontamination of concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomasney, H. [ISOTRON Corp., New Orleans, LA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has assigned a priority to the advancement of technology for decontaminating concrete surfaces which have become contaminated with radionuclides, heavy metals, and toxic organics. This agency is responsible for decontamination and decommissioning of thousands of buildings. Electrokinetic extraction is one of the several innovative technologies which emerged in response to this initiative. This technique utilizes an electropotential gradient and the subsequent electrical transport mechanism to cause the controlled movement of ionics species, whereby the contaminants exit the recesses deep within the concrete. This report discusses the technology and use at the Oak Ridge k-25 plant.

  6. Radiation decontamination of spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan, M.; Sattar, A.; Ahmad, W.A.; Khan, I.

    1990-06-01

    In this report radiation decontamination was initiated to investigate the red pepper, which is widely consumed in all parts of Pakistan. The samples were collected from local market and prepared for gamma radiation at dose level of 0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, and 10.0 kGy. The measurement of total fungal count was carried out immediately after irradiation and the at two months storage interval. It was reported that radiation dose 10.0 kGy is suitable for complete decontamination of red pepper. (A.B.)

  7. Chemical decontamination solutions: Effects on PWR equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pezze, C.M.; Colvin, E.R.; Aspden, R.G.

    1992-01-01

    A critical objective for the nuclear industry is the reduction of personnel exposure to radiation. Reductions have been achieved through industry's radiation management programs including training and radiation awareness concepts. Increased plant maintenance and higher radiation fields at many sites continue to raise concerns. To alleviate the radiation exposure problem, the sources of radiation which contribute to personnel exposure must be removed from the plant. A feasible was of significantly reducing these sources from a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) is to chemically decontaminate the entire reactor coolant system (RCS). A program was conducted to determine the technical acceptability of using certain dilute chemical solvent processes for full RCS chemical decontamination. The two processes evaluated were CAN-DEREM and LOMI. The purpose of the program was to define and complete a systematic evaluation of the major issues that need to be addressed for the successful decontamination of the entire RCS and affected portions of the auxiliary systems of a four-loop PWR system. A test program was designed to evaluate the corrosion effects of the two decontamination processes under expected plant conditions. Materials and sample configurations dictated by generic PWR components were evaluated. The testing also included many standard corrosion coupons. The test data were then used to assess the impact of chemical decontamination on the physical condition and operability of the components, equipment and mechanical systems that make up the RCS. An overview of the test program, sample configurations, data and engineering evaluations is presented. The data demonstrate that through detailed engineering evaluations of corrosion data and equipment function, the impact of full RCS chemical decontamination on plant equipment is established

  8. OSI Passive Seismic Experiment at the Former Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweeney, J J; Harben, P

    2010-11-11

    resonance seismology really works and its effectiveness for OSI purposes has yet to be determined. For this experiment, we took a broad approach to the definition of ''resonance seismometry''; stretching it to include any means that employs passive seismic methods to infer the character of underground materials. In recent years there have been a number of advances in the use of correlation and noise analysis methods in seismology to obtain information about the subsurface. Our objective in this experiment was to use noise analysis and correlation analysis to evaluate these techniques for detecting and characterizing the underground damage zone from a nuclear explosion. The site that was chosen for the experiment was the Mackerel test in Area 4 of the former Nevada Test Site (now named the Nevada National Security Site, or NNSS). Mackerel was an underground nuclear test of less than 20 kT conducted in February of 1964 (DOENV-209-REV 15). The reason we chose this site is because there was a known apical cavity occurring at about 50 m depth above a rubble zone, and that the site had been investigated by the US Geological Survey with active seismic methods in 1965 (Watkins et al., 1967). Note that the time delay between detonation of the explosion (1964) and the time of the present survey (2010) is nearly 46 years - this would not be typical of an expected OSI under the CTBT.

  9. Decontamination of radiological agents from drinking water infrastructure: a literature review and summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Jeff; Minamyer, Scott

    2014-11-01

    This report summarizes the current state of knowledge on the persistence of radiological agents on drinking water infrastructure (such as pipes) along with information on decontamination should persistence occur. Decontamination options for drinking water infrastructure have been explored for some important radiological agents (cesium, strontium and cobalt), but important data gaps remain. Although some targeted experiments have been published on cesium, strontium and cobalt persistence on drinking water infrastructure, most of the data comes from nuclear clean-up sites. Furthermore, the studies focused on drinking water systems use non-radioactive surrogates. Non-radioactive cobalt was shown to be persistent on iron due to oxidation with free chlorine in drinking water and precipitation on the iron surface. Decontamination with acidification was an effective removal method. Strontium persistence on iron was transient in tap water, but adherence to cement-mortar has been demonstrated and should be further explored. Cesium persistence on iron water infrastructure was observed when flow was stagnant, but not with water flow present. Future research suggestions focus on expanding the available cesium, strontium and cobalt persistence data to other common infrastructure materials, specifically cement-mortar. Further exploration chelating agents and low pH treatment is recommended for future decontamination studies. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Effect of decontamination on nuclear power plant primary circuit materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brezina, M.; Kupca, L.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of repeated decontamination on the properties of structural materials of the WWER-440 primary coolant circuit was examined. Three kinds of specimens of 08Kh18Ni10T steel were used for radioactivity-free laboratory experiments; they included material obtained from assembly additions to the V-2 nuclear power plant primary piping, and a sheet of the CSN 17247 steel. Various chemical, electrochemical and semi-dry electrochemical decontamination procedures were tested. Chemical decontamination was based on the conventional AP(20/5)-CITROX(20/20) procedure and its variants; NP-CITROX type procedures with various compositions were also employed. Solutions based on oxalic acid were tested for the electrochemical and semi-dry electrochemical decontamination. The results of measurements of mass losses of the surfaces, of changes in the corrosion resistance and in the mechanical properties of the materials due to repeated decontamination are summarized. (Z.S.). 12 figs., 1 tab., 8 refs

  11. Model decontamination of PVC flooring specimens by wet method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severa, J.; Knajfl, J.; Bar, J.

    1981-01-01

    PVC flooring samples of 29 mm in diameter were used in experiments. The samples were degreased. Tested were the dependence of the degree of contamination on the duration of contact with the contaminant and the efficacy of decontamination by wiping with tampons and immersing in solutions. A mixture of fission products of 80 kBq/ml in specific activity was used for contamination. Higher decontamination efficacy was achieved by immersing the samples in decontamination solutions. Water was found to be the least efficacious medium; a high degree was only attained in the case when decontamination was effected within 1 minute after contamination. The highest decontamination values were achieved using solutions containing a chelating agent and a surfactant. The most efficacious solutions contained 0.5% of citric acid and 0.5% of detergents which are very potent at a concentration as low as 2 g/l. (J.P.)

  12. Development of Decontamination and Decommissioning Technologies for Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Jei Kwon; Lee, Kune Woo; Won, Hui Jun

    2010-04-01

    A laser ablation decontamination technology which is reportedly effective for a removal of fixed contaminants has been developed for three years as the first stage of the development. Lab scale experimental equipment was fabricated and the process variables have been assessed for determination of appropriate decontamination conditions at the laser wave lengths of 1,064 nm and 532 nm, respectively. The decontamination tests using radioactive specimens showed that the decontamination efficiency was about 100 which is quite a high value. An electrokinetic-flushing, an agglomeration leaching and a supercritical CO 2 soil decontamination technology were development for a decontamination of radioactive soil wastes from the decommissioned sites of the TRIGA research reactor and the uranium conversion facilities. An electrokinetic-flushing process was found to be effective for soil wastes aged for a long time and an agglomeration leaching process was effective for soil wastes of surface contamination. On the other hand, a supercritical CO 2 soil decontamination technology was found to be applicable for U or TRU bearing soil wastes. The remediation monitoring key technologies such as a representative sample taking and a measurement concept for the vertical distribution of radionuclides were developed for an assessment of the site remediation. Also an One-Dimensional Water Flow and Contaminant Transport in Unsaturated Zone (FTUNS) code was developed to interpretate the radionuclide migration in the unsaturated zone

  13. Grimsel Test Site: modelling radionuclide migration field experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heer, W.; Hadermann, J.

    1994-09-01

    In the migration field experiments at Nagra's Grimsel Test Site, the processes of nuclide transport through a well defined fractured shear-zone in crystalline rock are being investigated. For these experiments, model calculations have been performed to obtain indications on validity and limitation of the model applied and the data deduced under field conditions. The model consists of a hydrological part, where the dipole flow fields of the experiments are determined, and a nuclide transport part, where the flow field driven nuclide propagation through the shear-zone is calculated. In addition to the description of the model, analytical expressions are given to guide the interpretation of experimental results. From the analysis of experimental breakthrough curves for conservative uranine, weakly sorbing sodium and more stronger sorbing strontium tracers, the following main results can be derived: i) The model is able to represent the breakthrough curves of the migration field experiments to a high degree of accuracy, ii) The process of matrix diffusion is manifest through the tails of the breakthrough curves decreasing with time as t -3/2 and through the special shape of the tail ends, both confirmed by the experiments, iii) For nuclide sorbing rapidly, not too strongly, linearly, and exhibiting a reversible cation exchange process on fault gouge, the laboratory sorption coefficient can reasonably well be extrapolated to field conditions. Adequate care in selecting and preparing the rock samples is, of course, a necessary requirement. Using the parameters determined in the previous analysis, predictions are made for experiments in a smaller an faster flow field. For conservative uranine and weakly sorbing sodium, the agreement of predicted and measured breakthrough curves is good, for the more stronger sorbing strontium reasonable, confirming that the model describes the main nuclide transport processes adequately. (author) figs., tabs., 29 refs

  14. Decision Analysis System for Selection of Appropriate Decontamination Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebadian, M.A.; Boudreaux, J.F.; Chinta, S.; Zanakis, S.H.

    1998-01-01

    The principal objective for designing Decision Analysis System for Decontamination (DASD) is to support DOE-EM's endeavor to employ the most efficient and effective technologies for treating radiologically contaminated surfaces while minimizing personnel and environmental risks. DASD will provide a tool for environmental decision makers to improve the quality, consistency, and efficacy of their technology selection decisions. The system will facilitate methodical comparisons between innovative and baseline decontamination technologies and aid in identifying the most suitable technologies for performing surface decontamination at DOE environmental restoration sites

  15. Decontamination and decommissioning project for the nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. H.; Paik, S. T.; Park, S. W. (and others)

    2007-02-15

    The final goal of this project is to complete the decommissioning of the Korean Research Reactor no.1 and no. 2(KRR-1 and 2) and uranium conversion plant safely and successfully. The goal of this project in 2006 is to complete the decontamination of the inside reactor hall of the KRR-2 which will be operating as a temporary storage for the radioactive waste until the construction and operation of the national repository site. Also the decommissioning work of the KRR-1 and auxiliary facilities is being progress. As the compaction of decommissioning project is near at hand, a computer information system was developed for a systematically control and preserve a technical experience and decommissioning data for the future reuse. The nuclear facility decommissioning, which is the first challenge in Korea, is being closed to the final stages. We completed the decommissioning of all the bio-shielding concrete for KRR-2 in 2005 and carried out the decontamination and waste material grouping of the roof, wall and bottom of the reactor hall of the KRR-2. The decommissioning for nuclear facility were demanded the high technology, remote control equipment and radioactivity analysis. So developed equipment and experience will be applied at the decommissioning for new nuclear facility in the future.

  16. Particle Separation of Non-Decontamination Soil using Attrition and Washing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Daeseo; Sung, Hyun-Hee; Kim, Seung-Soo; Hong, Sang Bum; Seo, Bum Kyoung; Choi, Jong-Won

    2017-01-01

    In this study, to improve the decontamination efficiency of uranium soil, a preliminary experiment on the particle separation of non-decontamination soil was carried out using attrition and washing. The characteristics of the attrition and washing system are investigated. A conditional experiment on particle separation of non-decontamination soil will be performed. A preliminary experiment on the particle separation of non-decontamination soil was carried out to improve the decontamination efficiency of uranium soil. This experiment was performed with the ratio of soil to water (1:4) for the particle separation of non-decontamination soil. The operations of all equipment such as attrition scrubber, ultrasonic reaction, vibrating screen, and hydro-cyclone were conducted and confirmed. In the future, the additional experiments will be conducted for optimal experimental condition.

  17. Decontamination measures for Fukushima prefecture. Fukushima prefecture measures for promoting decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Kouzou

    2013-01-01

    For Fukushima prefecture having suffered from significant damage associated with the Great East Japan Earthquake and the nuclear power plant accident, the decontamination work is the most urgent issue. The paper reports the present situation of the remediation acts of Fukushima Government done since the accident, particular emphasis on the removal of radioactive substances due to cesium 137 in the residential area. Government supports to promote the decontamination work and its operators, and encourages employers and employees in their efforts, to set up temporary storages of the produced radioactive wastes, to cultivate and improve technical supports for decontamination work and strengthen understanding and support of the local resident, thus providing the training course for the site supervisors, the person engaged in the work and management. (S. Ohno)

  18. Ultrasonic decontamination of nuclear fuel. Feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, A.; Libal, A.; Norbaeck, J.; Wegemar, B.

    1995-05-01

    Ultrasonic decontamination of nuclear fuel is an expeditious way to reduce radiation exposures resulting in a minimal volume of waste. The fuel assemblies are set up in the fuel preparation machine one at a time and treated without prior disassemblage. By decontaminating 20% of the BWR fuel assemblies annually, there is a potential to reduce the collective dose by approximately 40-50%. Including also improved reactivity of the fuel, this amounts to an economic benefit of about 4 MSEK per reactor and year. The costs for performing the decontamination can be economically justified if the plants do not plan for short outages each year. The decontamination method could also be used for the purpose of removing tramp Uranium following a fuel failure or minor core accident. An additional benefit is removal of loosely adherent crud. The waste produced will be handled in a closed filtering circuit. The method is suggested to be verified in a test on discharged burnt-up fuel at site. The next step will be to develop the method further in order to be able to remove also tenacious crud. 12 refs, 4 tabs

  19. Test site experiments with a reconfigurable stepped frequency GPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persico, Raffaele; Matera, Loredana; Piro, Salvatore; Rizzo, Enzo; Capozzoli, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    the fact that the integration time of the harmonic components of the signal can be prolonged in a programmable way, so that (in particular) there is the possibility to reject undesired narrow band interferences without filtering the signal, namely without loosing part of the information contained in the signal. The third property is that the power can be modulated frequency by frequency. Indeed, we don't know if this third property is a real advantage, but the first two have been already exploited showing some encouraging results. At the conference, we will show the results achieved from two measurement campaign performed in two controlled site, namely the the test site of Hydrogeosite Laboratory, in Marsico Nuovo (Southern Italy), belonging to the Institute of Methodologies for Environmental Analysis of the Italian National Research Council [3] and the test site of Montelibretti, in central Italy, belonging to the Institute of Technologies Applied to Cultural Heritage of the National Research Council [4]. In both test sites, among other things, anomalies resembling features of archaeological or near surface interest have been predisposed, as a tomb, a paved road, an amphora, a statue, a buried chamber, a cylinder, a structure in opus coementicium. The test site of Montelibretti is outdoor, in an area of archaeological interest were the ancient population of the Sabini has left relevant testimonies. The test site of Hydrogeosite Laboratory is indoor, in a hat were a large pool (240m3) has been filled up with sand after burying the test targets. This test site is equipped also for hydrogeophysical experiments by means of a controlled hydraulic system for the progressive immission of water in the sand. Depth slices will be shown for both sites, as well as some tests for the mitigation of intereferences by means of the modulation of the integration time of the harmonic components of the signal. Some of the interferences have been artificially introduced by means of a

  20. 1995 Phase 1 concrete sampling at the decontaminated 183-H basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, C.D.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides a consolidated reference for 1995 concrete sampling data associated with the Hanford Site's 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins (located at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington). In 1995, the basins were decontaminated and dismantled. Sampling efforts began after completion of concrete decontamination efforts. Soil and water samples were collected and are described in chronological order in this report

  1. Savannah River Site Operating Experience with Transuranic (TRU) Waste Retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, K.A.; Milner, T.N.

    2006-01-01

    Drums of TRU Waste have been stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) on concrete pads from the 1970's through the 1980's. These drums were subsequently covered with tarpaulins and then mounded over with dirt. Between 1996 and 2000 SRS ran a successful retrieval campaign and removed some 8,800 drums, which were then available for venting and characterization for WIPP disposal. Additionally, a number of TRU Waste drums, which were higher in activity, were stored in concrete culverts, as required by the Safety Analysis for the Facility. Retrieval of drums from these culverts has been ongoing since 2002. This paper will describe the operating experience and lessons learned from the SRS retrieval activities. (authors)

  2. Heater experiments in the Climax Stock, Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramspott, L.; Ballou, L.

    1977-01-01

    The Climax Stock is a composite granitic intrusive at the Nevada Test Site, with an existing shaft and an open drift about 1400 ft. below the surface. In September 1977, the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory plans to operate three in-situ heater experiments in this area. The first experiment consists of a single heater surrounded by thermocouples at distances of from 1/10 to 5 meters. The close spacing will scale down the time required for useful thermal measurements. The heater, which is 3 meters long and capable of about 3 kW, will be energized for a month, turned off for a month, and the cycle repeated. The rock surface temperature in the heater hole is not expected to exceed 500 to 600 0 C, and the temperature beyond 0.1 m into the rock is not expected to exceed 400 0 C. Measurements will be taken during all four months. These measurements will be compared with numerical simulations to determine the thermal properties of the medium. The second experiment, also involving only a single heater, will be more completely instrumented to include the measurement of permeability, rock displacement, stress/strain, and possibly acoustic emission measurements. The scale of the experiment will be larger, and the heater will be energized continuously for about 4 months. The third test in the series is envisioned to be a scale-up of the second, except that multiple heaters will be used. These heaters will be energized for about a year. They will be arranged around a pillar structure left in the room to obtain information on mine stability in the presence of multiple heaters

  3. Unique Construction and Social Experiences in Residential Remediation Sites - 13423

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Paul; Scarborough, Rebecca [Sevenson Environmental Services, Inc. 2749 Lockport Road, Niagara Falls, NY 14305 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Sevenson Environmental Services, Inc., (Sevenson) has performed several radiological remediation projects located in residential urban areas. Over the course of these projects, there has been a wide variety of experiences encountered from construction related issues to unique social situations. Some of the construction related issues included the remediation of interior basements where contaminated material was located under the footers of the structure or was used in the mortar between cinder block or field stone foundations. Other issues included site security, maintaining furnaces or other utilities, underpinning, backfilling and restoration. In addition to the radiological hazards associated with this work there were occupational safety and industrial hygiene issues that had to be addressed to ensure the safety and health of neighboring properties and residents. The unique social situations at these job sites have included arson, theft/stolen property, assault/battery, prostitution, execution of arrest warrants for residents, discovery of drugs and paraphernalia, blood borne pathogens, and unexploded ordnance. Some of these situations have become a sort of comical urban legend throughout the organization. One situation had historical significance, involving the demolition of a house to save a tree older than the Declaration of Independence. All of these projects typically involve the excavation of early 20. century items such as advertisement signs, various old bottles (milk, Listerine, perfume, whisky) and other miscellaneous common trash items. (authors)

  4. Unique Construction and Social Experiences in Residential Remediation Sites - 13423

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Paul; Scarborough, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Sevenson Environmental Services, Inc., (Sevenson) has performed several radiological remediation projects located in residential urban areas. Over the course of these projects, there has been a wide variety of experiences encountered from construction related issues to unique social situations. Some of the construction related issues included the remediation of interior basements where contaminated material was located under the footers of the structure or was used in the mortar between cinder block or field stone foundations. Other issues included site security, maintaining furnaces or other utilities, underpinning, backfilling and restoration. In addition to the radiological hazards associated with this work there were occupational safety and industrial hygiene issues that had to be addressed to ensure the safety and health of neighboring properties and residents. The unique social situations at these job sites have included arson, theft/stolen property, assault/battery, prostitution, execution of arrest warrants for residents, discovery of drugs and paraphernalia, blood borne pathogens, and unexploded ordnance. Some of these situations have become a sort of comical urban legend throughout the organization. One situation had historical significance, involving the demolition of a house to save a tree older than the Declaration of Independence. All of these projects typically involve the excavation of early 20. century items such as advertisement signs, various old bottles (milk, Listerine, perfume, whisky) and other miscellaneous common trash items. (authors)

  5. Development of calculation system for decontamination effect, CDE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Daiki; Kojima, Kensuke; Oizumi, Akito; Matsuda, Norihiro; Kugo, Teruhiko; Sakamoto, Yukio; Endo, Akira; Okajima, Shigeaki

    2012-08-01

    Large amount of radionuclides had been discharged to environment in the accident of the Tokyo Electric Power Company Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant caused by the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake. The radionuclides deposited on the ground elevate dose rates in large area around the Fukushima site. For the reduction of the dose rate and recovery of the environment, decontamination based on a rational plan is an important and urgent subject. A computer software, named CDE (Calculation system for Decontamination Effect), has been developed to support planning the decontamination. CDE calculates the dose rates before the decontamination by using a database of dose contributions by radioactive cesium. The decontamination factor is utilized in the prediction of the dose rates after the decontamination, and dose rate reduction factor is evaluated to express the decontamination effect. The results are visualized on the image of a target zone with color map. In this paper, the overview of the software and the dose calculation method are reported. The comparison with the calculation results by a three-dimensional radiation transport code PHITS is also presented. In addition, the source code of the dose calculation program and user's manual of CDE are attached as appendices. (author)

  6. Preconceptual design of the gas-phase decontamination demonstration cart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munday, E.B.

    1993-12-01

    Removal of uranium deposits from the interior surfaces of gaseous diffusion equipment will be a major portion of the overall multibillion dollar effort to decontaminate and decommission the gaseous diffusion plants. Long-term low-temperature (LTLT) gas-phase decontamination is being developed at the K-25 Site as an in situ decontamination process that is expected to significantly lower the decontamination costs, reduce worker exposure to radioactive materials, and reduce safeguard concerns. This report documents the preconceptual design of the process equipment that is necessary to conduct a full-scale demonstration of the LTLT method in accordance with the process steps listed above. The process equipment and method proposed in this report are not intended to represent a full-scale production campaign design and operation, since the gas evacuation, gas charging, and off-gas handling systems that would be cost effective in a production campaign are not cost effective for a first-time demonstration. However, the design presented here is expected to be applicable to special decontamination projects beyond the demonstration, which could include the Deposit Recovery Program. The equipment will therefore be sized to a 200 ft size 1 converter (plus a substantial conservative design margin), which is the largest item of interest for gas phase decontamination in the Deposit Recovery Program. The decontamination equipment will allow recovery of the UF 6 , which is generated from the reaction of ClF 3 with the uranium deposits, by use of NaF traps

  7. Decommissioning and decontamination (burial ground stabilization) studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    The decommissioning and decontamination of retired Hanford facilities and the future use of surrounding landscapes require isolation of contaminated wastes from the biosphere. Burial ground stabilization studies were conducted to determine the effectiveness of physical barriers for isolating contaminated wastes in shallow-land burial sites from plants and animals. This study was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of using a layer of loose rock between the waste and the surface soil covering to prevent both plant root and animal penetrations

  8. Full system decontamination (FSD) for sustainable dose reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiepani, Christoph; Sempere-Belda, Luis; Topf, Christian; Basu, Ashim

    2012-09-01

    Nuclear power plants experience an increase in dose rates during operation due to the build-up of the activity inventory. The activity build-up is influenced by the construction materials, past and present water chemistries, and the individual operating history of the plant. Depending on these factors the dose levels in an operating plant may reach a point in which concrete actions to reduce the overall radiation exposure become necessary. In the past dose reduction plans were performed, based on - Modification in coolant water chemistry - Substitution of Cobalt containing materials - Outage optimization program - Installation of permanent shielding - Decontamination The dose rate reduction took several years and today a stagnation of further dose rate reduction can be seen. Therefore AREVA has developed the Concept for Sustainable Dose Reduction in Operating BWRs and PWRs. This is a program of joint corrective measures to minimize dose levels rapidly and keep them low for continued operation. It can be applied in plants from all constructors and designs. The concept is based fully on the application of proven technologies, including: - Full System Decontamination with AREVA's decontamination process HP/CORD UV to minimize the activity inventory - The formation of new, very stable protective oxides on the system surfaces including injection of depleted zinc - Introduction of advanced water chemistry for maintaining the low dose levels achieved during ongoing operation The implementation of this program is particularly interesting for plants with a long operation history, especially when considering life extension. The latest application was performed successfully at the German PWR Grafenrheinfeld in 2010. In this paper the concept for sustainable dose reduction will be outlined and the site application detailed and the achieved results at PWR Grafenrheinfeld will be described. The recontamination after one cycle will be outlined in a second paper. (authors)

  9. Soil decontamination with Extraksol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paquin, J.; Mourato, D.

    1989-01-01

    The Extraksol process is a mobile decontamination technology which treats unconsolidated materials by solvent extraction. Treatment with Extraksol involves material washing, drying and solvent regeneration. Contaminant removal is achieved through desorption/dissolution mechanisms. The treated material is dry and acceptable to be reinstalled in its original location. The process provides a fast, efficient and versatile alternative for decontamination of soil and sludge. The organic contaminants extracted from the matrix are transferred to the extraction fluids. These are thereafter concentrated in the residues of distillation after solvent regeneration. Removal and concentration of the contaminants ensures an important waste volume reduction. This paper presents the process is operational principles and the steps involved in Extraksol's development with results of the pilot tests and full-scale demonstrations

  10. Decontamination for free release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, K A; Elder, G R [Bradtec Ltd., Bristol (United Kingdom)

    1997-02-01

    Many countries are seeking to treat radioactive waste in ways which meet the local regulatory requirements, but yet are cost effective when all contributing factors are assessed. In some countries there are increasing amounts of waste, arising from nuclear plant decommissioning, which are categorized as low level waste: however with suitable treatment a large part of such wastes might become beyond regulatory control and be able to be released as non-radioactive. The benefits and disadvantages of additional treatment before disposal need to be considered. Several processes falling within the overall description of decontamination for free release have been developed and applied, and these are outlined. In one instance the process seeks to take advantage of techniques and equipment used for decontaminating water reactor circuits intermittently through reactor life. (author). 9 refs, 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  11. OPO fabric decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severa, J.; Bar, J.; Grujbar, V.

    1978-01-01

    Samples of five polypropylene-based man-made fabrics were studied with regard to the degree of contamination and possibilities of decontamination in order to assess their suitability as material for protective clothing in the nuclear industry. The contamination degree of the fabrics in an aqueous solution of a fission product mixture was found to be low. Soaking in a mixture of the Sapon detergent and sodium hexametaphosphate at a concentration of both materials of 1 g/l with subsequent washing in a solution of the Zenit detergent at a concentration of 3 g/l was suggested as the most suitable decontamination procedure. It reduces the initial contamination by almost 99%. (Z.M.)

  12. Sensitive Equipment Decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    a ceramic-like material Polonium - 210 Metallic foil Radium-226 Radium bromide or radium chloride Strontium-90 Metallic strontium, strontium...extremely toxic toxins. 3.1.1.5 Routes of Infection Pathogenic microorganisms are transferred to human beings largely via air and food (including...regularly in the pharmaceutical industry to decontaminate manufacturing clean rooms. It is also used to sterilize packages used to store foods . It has

  13. Decommissioning and decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dadoumont, J.; Cantrel, E.; Valenduc, P.; Noynaert, L.

    2009-01-01

    The SCK-CEN has built a large know-how in decommissioning and decontamination, thanks to its BR3 decommissioning project. In 2007, the decommissioning activities at BR3 have been continued according to the strategy. This article discusses main realisations the following domains: decommissioning of the neutron shield tank and installation of new ventilation for the controlled area, dismantling of the former one and characterization of the stack

  14. Laser decontamination device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michishita, Shizuo; Akagawa, Katsuhiko.

    1997-01-01

    One end of an optical fiber inserted into an inner cylinder is opposed to a wall surface to be decontaminated, and an opened top end of an intermediate cylinder circumferentially surrounding the inner cylinder is tightly in contact with the wall surface to be decontaminated, an open end of an outer cylinder circumferentially surrounding the intermediate cylinder is tightly in contact with the wall surface to be decontaminated. Dust removing holes are perforated in the vicinity of the top end of the intermediate cylinder while being in communication with the inside and the outside of the intermediate cylinder, and one end of an air supply tube is in communication with the space between the outer circumferential surface of the inner cylinder and the inner circumferential surface of the intermediate cylinder. The other end of the air supply tube is connected to an air supply device, one end of a sucking tube is in communication with the space between the outer circumferential surface of the intermediate cylinder and the inner circumferential surface of the outer cylinder, the other end of the sucking tube is connected to a sucking device, and the other end of the optical fiber is connected to a laser generation device. The laser generation device is operated while determining the air sucking amount increased than the air supply amount, the materials deposited on the wall surface are crushed and peeled off, and the peeled off materials are transferred by air flow to a filter and collected. (N.H.)

  15. Excimer laser decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentis, Marc L.; Delaporte, Philippe C.; Marine, Wladimir; Uteza, Olivier P.

    2000-04-01

    The application of excimer laser ablation process to the decontamination of radioactive surfaces is discussed. This technology is very attractive because it allows to efficiently remove the contaminated particles without secondary waste production. To demonstrate the capability of such technology to efficiently decontaminate large area, we studied and developed a prototype which include a XeCl laser, an optical fiber delivery system and an ablated particles collection cell. The main physical processes taking place during UV laser ablation will be explained. The influence of laser wavelength, pulse duration and absorption coefficient of material will be discussed. Special studies have been performed to understand the processes which limit the transmission of high average power excimer laser through optical fiber, and to determine the laser conditions to optimize the value of this transmission. An in-situ spectroscopic analysis of laser ablation plasma allows the real time control of the decontamination. The results obtained for painting or metallic oxides removal from stainless steel surfaces will be presented.

  16. Remote methods for decontamination and decommissioning operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVore, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    Three methods for the decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities are described along with operational experience associated with each method. Each method described in some way reduces radiation exposure to the operating personnel involved. Electrochemical decontamination of process tanks is described using an in-situ method. Descriptions of two processes, electropolishing and cerium redox decontamination, are listed. A method of essentially smokeless cutting of process piping using a plasma-arc cutting torch is described. In one technique, piping is cut remotely from a distance using a specially modified torch holder. In another technique, cutting is done with master-slave manipulators inside a hot cell. Finally, a method for remote cutting and scarification of contaminated concrete is described. This system, which utilizes high-pressure water jets, is coupled to a cutting head or rotating scarification head. The system is suited for cutting contaminated concrete for removal or removing a thin layer in a controlled manner for decontamination. 4 refs., 6 figs

  17. Thermal decontamination of transformers: A new technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colak, P.Z.

    1992-01-01

    After evaluating a number of methods for decontaminating or disposing of transformers that contained polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), it was concluded that no entirely satisfactory procedure or technology was yet available which was permanent, effective, safe, relatively simple, and based on proven technology or conventional practice. The most desirable compromise appears to be thermal decontamination. It is proposed to decontaminate transformers by controlled incineration in a specially designed, indirect-fired furnace which resembles the conventional bell-type, vertical elevator, metal heat treating type of furnace. The design differs in the incorporation of those essential features required to achieve oxidation of the organic components, to provide internal air circulation needed to ensure efficient heat and mass transfer, and other factors. The most appropriate decontamination facility would provide for implementation of the following procedures: draining of PCB-containing liquids from the transformer; limited disassembly of the transformer, which in most instances would imply only removal of the top cover to expose the insides; and controlled incineration with any vapors generated being conducted to a secondary combustion chamber. Experiments were conducted in a kiln to simulate the proposed transformer incinerator. Results show that exposure of the transformer segments to a temperature in the 950-1,000 degree C range for over 90 min is generally sufficient to reduce the PCB content to under 1 ppM. Based on the work conducted, a suitable bell furnace was constructed and added to the Swan Hills (Alberta) waste treatment facility. 2 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Overview of nonchemical decontamination techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.P.

    1984-09-01

    The decontamination techniques summarized in this paper represent a variety of surface cleaning methods developed or adapted for component and facility-type decontamination applications ranging from small hand tools to reactor cavities and other large surface areas. The major conclusion is that decontamination is a complex, demanding technical discipline. It requires knowledgeable, experienced and well-trained personnel to select proper techniques and combinations of techniques for the varied plant applications and to realize their full performance potential. Unfortunately, decontamination in many plants has the lowest priority of almost any activity. Operators are unskilled and turnover is so frequent that expensive decontamination capabilities remain unused while decontamination operations revert to the most rudimentary type of hand scrubbing and water spray cleaning

  19. Chemical hazards from decontamination solutions in low level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leventhal, L.; Miller, A.; Turney, J.; Naughton, M.; IMPELL Corp., Walnut Creek, CA; Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA)

    1985-01-01

    Recent regulations are focussing more attention on the non-radioactive matrix materials associated with radioactive wastes. Decontamination of operating facilities is becoming a more significant source of low-level waste. This study reviewed the chemical and biological hazards of over 50 decontamination processes. Seventeen of the most prominent hard and soft decontamination processes were examined in detail. The chemical and biological hazards of these seventeen are presented in this paper. These hazards influence the choice of radwaste processing and packaging operations and methods. Federal, state and local regulations further impact on operations and waste disposal. Hazards to personnel, in plant and off-site, resulting from the decontamination cycle are evaluated. 1 fig., 5 tabs

  20. Guide for decontamination in P.W.R. power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herisson, J.; Glorennec, C.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear power plant components or equipment often need to be more ore less decontaminated before maintenance. In order to coordinate the activities of the various maintenance specialists belonging to the corporate or Site Organizations, the Management of EDF/Nuclear and Fossil Division has created a 'Decontamination Task Force'. The first objective of this Task Force was to prepare this 'Decontamination Guide for Nuclear Power Plants'. This document is the result of a close collaboration, within a specific working group, between representatives of Nuclear Fossil Division (from Nuclear Power Plants and Corporate Departments) and EDF Project and Construction Group. It will provide assistance to Nuclear Plants Operators in the very specific field of decontamination. (author)

  1. Dismantlement and decontamination of a plutonium-238 facility at SRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.H. Jr.; Hootman, H.E.

    1994-01-01

    There has been very little, documented decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) experience on which to project cleanup costs and schedules for plutonium facilities at SRS and other DOE sites. A portion of the HB-Line, a plutonium-238 processing facility at SRS, has been undergoing D ampersand D intermittently since 1984. Although this cleanup effort was not originally intended to quantify results, some key data have been project has demonstrated effective methods of accumulated, and the performing D ampersand D work, and has demonstrated cleanup equipment and techniques under conditions of high contamination. Plutonium facilities where D ampersand D is already underway provide an opportunity for' timely field testing of characterization, size reduction, and decontamination techniques. Some data are presented here; however, more specific tests and data may be obtained during the remainder of this project. This project has been recommended as a candidate test facility for a DOE planned ''Integrated D ampersand D Demonstration'' managed by EM-50 to develop and demonstrate technology for D ampersand D and surplus facilities deactivation. Both the remainder of this project and the Integrated D ampersand D Demonstration Program can benefit from a joint effort, and the, overall costs should be reduced

  2. Decontamination and decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, G.R.; Perry, E.D.; Commander, J.C.; Spampinato, P.T.

    1994-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is scheduled to complete its end-of-life deuterium-tritium (D-T) experiments in September 1994. The D-T operation will result in the TFTR machine structure becoming activated, and plasma facing and vacuum components will be contaminated with tritium. The resulting machine activation levels after a two year cooldown period will allow hands on dismantling for external structures, but require remote dismantling for the vacuum vessel. The primary objective of the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) Project is to provide a facility for construction of a new Department of Energy (DOE) experimental fusion reactor by March 1998. The project schedule calls for a two year shutdown period when tritium decontamination of the vacuum vessel, neutral beam injectors and other components will occur. Shutdown will be followed by an 18 month period of D ampersand D operations. The technical objectives of the project are to: safely dismantle and remove components from the test cell complex; package disassembled components in accordance with applicable regulations; ship packages to a DOE approved disposal or material recycling site; and develop expertise using remote disassembly techniques on a large scale fusion facility. This paper discusses the D ampersand D objectives, the facility to be decommissioned, and the technical plan that will be implemented

  3. Manual on decontamination of surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The manual is intended for those who are responsible for the organization and implementation of decontamination programmes for facilities where radioactive materials are handled mainly on a laboratory scale. It contains information and guidelines on practical methods for decontaminating working spaces, equipment, laboratory benches and protective clothing. Useful information is also provided on the removal of loose skin contamination from personnel by mild, non-medical processes. Methods of removing skin contamination needing medical supervision, or of internal decontamination, which is entirely a medical process, are not covered in this manual. Large-scale decontamination of big nuclear facilities is also considered as outside its scope

  4. Decontamination of TRU glove boxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, J.H.

    1978-03-01

    Two glove boxes that had been used for work with transuranic nuclides (TRU) for about 12 years were decontaminated in a test program to collect data for developing a decontamination facility for large equipment highly contaminated with alpha emitters. A simple chemical technique consisting of a cycle of water flushes and alkaline permanganate and oxalic acid washes was used for both boxes. The test showed that glove boxes and similar equipment that are grossly contaminated with transuranic nuclides can be decontaminated to the current DIE nonretrievable disposal guide of <10 nCi TRU/g with a moderate amount of decontamination solution and manpower. Decontamination of the first box from an estimated 1.3 Ci to about 5 mCi (6 nCi/g) required 1.3 gallons of decontamination solution and 0.03 man-hour of work for each square foot of surface area. The second box was decontaminated from an estimated 3.4 Ci to about 2.8 mCi (4.2 nCi/g) using 0.9 gallon of decontamination solution and 0.02 man-hour for each square foot of surface area. Further reductions in contamination were achieved by repetitive decontamination cycles, but the effectiveness of the technique decreased sharply after the initial cycle

  5. Decontamination and decommissioning technology tree and the current status of the technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Won Zin; Won, H.J.; Kim, G.N.; Lee, K.W.; Chol, W.K.; Jung, C.H.; Kim, C.J.; Kim, S.H.; Kwon, S.O.; Chung, C.M

    2001-03-01

    A technology tree diagram was developed on the basis of the necessary technologies applicable to the decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The technology tree diagram is consist of 6 main areas such as characterization, decontamination, decommissioning and remote technology, radwaste management, site restoration, and decommissioning plan and engineering. Characterization is divided into 4 regions such as sampling and data collection, general characterization, chemical analysis and radiological analysis. Decontamination is also divided into 4 regions such as chemical decontamination, mechanical decontamination, the other decontamination technologies and new decontamination technologies. Decommissioning and remote technology area is divided into 4 regions such as cutting techniques, decommissioning technologies, new developing technologies and remote technologies. Radwaste management area is divided into 5 regions such as solid waste treatment, sludge treatment, liquid waste treatment, gas waste treatment and thermal treatment. Site restoration area is divided into 3 regions such as the evaluation of site contamination, soil decontamination and ground water decontamination. Finally, permission, decommissioning process, cost evaluation, quality assurance and the estimation of radionuclide inventory were mentioned in the decommissioning plan and engineering area. The estimated items for each technology are applicable domestic D and D facilities, D and D problem area and contamination/requirement, classification of D and D technology, similar technology, principle and overview of technology, status, science technology needs, implementation needs, reference and contact point.

  6. Decontamination and decommissioning technology tree and the current status of the technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Won, H. J.; Kim, G. N.; Lee, K. W.; Chol, W. K.; Jung, C. H.; Kim, C. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kwon, S. O.; Chung, C. M.

    2001-03-01

    A technology tree diagram was developed on the basis of the necessary technologies applicable to the decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The technology tree diagram is consist of 6 main areas such as characterization, decontamination, decommissioning and remote technology, radwaste management, site restoration, and decommissioning plan and engineering. Characterization is divided into 4 regions such as sampling and data collection, general characterization, chemical analysis and radiological analysis. Decontamination is also divided into 4 regions such as chemical decontamination, mechanical decontamination, the other decontamination technologies and new decontamination technologies. Decommissioning and remote technology area is divided into 4 regions such as cutting techniques, decommissioning technologies, new developing technologies and remote technologies. Radwaste management area is divided into 5 regions such as solid waste treatment, sludge treatment, liquid waste treatment, gas waste treatment and thermal treatment. Site restoration area is divided into 3 regions such as the evaluation of site contamination, soil decontamination and ground water decontamination. Finally, permission, decommissioning process, cost evaluation, quality assurance and the estimation of radionuclide inventory were mentioned in the decommissioning plan and engineering area. The estimated items for each technology are applicable domestic D and D facilities, D and D problem area and contamination/requirement, classification of D and D technology, similar technology, principle and overview of technology, status, science technology needs, implementation needs, reference and contact point

  7. Site selection for controversial projects: reflections on the MRS experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigmon, E.B.; Marland, G.

    1987-01-01

    Projects for waste management, power production, and a host of other socially useful functions frequently falter because of local opposition. Students of the siting dilemma have prescribed accommodation of local interests through negotiation and compensation, but they offer little advice on the site selection itself. The negotiated compensation approach to siting frequently fails because localities refuse to negotiate. The authors argue that methods of site selection and developers' initial stance toward local communities affect communities' propensity to negotiate. Site selection strategies and their influence on project acceptability are examined, using the Department of Energy's Monitored Retrievable Storage proposal as a point of departure. 14 refs

  8. Decontamination Technologies, Task 3, Urban Remediation and Response Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiser, J.; Sullivan, T.

    2009-01-01

    In the aftermath of a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD, also known as a dirty bomb) it will be necessary to remediate the site including building exteriors and interiors, equipment, pavement, vehicles, personal items etc. Remediation will remove or reduce radioactive contamination from the area using a combination of removing and disposing of many assets (including possible demolition of buildings), decontaminating and returning to service other assets, and fixing in place or leaving in place contamination that is deemed 'acceptable'. The later will require setting acceptable dose standards, which will require negotiation with all involved parties and a balance of risk and cost to benefit. To accomplish the first two, disposal or decontamination, a combination of technologies will be deployed that can be loosely classified as: Decontamination; Equipment removal and size reduction; and Demolition. This report will deal only with the decontamination technologies that will be used to return assets to service or to reduce waste disposal. It will not discuss demolition, size reduction or removal technologies or equipment (e.g., backhoe mounted rams, rock splitter, paving breakers and chipping hammers, etc.). As defined by the DOE (1994), decontamination is removal of radiological contamination from the surfaces of facilities and equipment. Expertise in this field comes primarily from the operation and decommissioning of DOE and commercial nuclear facilities as well as a small amount of ongoing research and development closely related to RDD decontamination. Information related to decontamination of fields, buildings, and public spaces resulting from the Goiania and Chernobyl incidents were also reviewed and provide some meaningful insight into decontamination at major urban areas. In order to proceed with decontamination, the item being processed needs to have an intrinsic value that exceeds the cost of the cleaning and justifies the exposure of any workers during the

  9. Decontamination Technologies, Task 3, Urban Remediation and Response Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiser,J.; Sullivan, T.

    2009-06-30

    In the aftermath of a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD, also known as a dirty bomb) it will be necessary to remediate the site including building exteriors and interiors, equipment, pavement, vehicles, personal items etc. Remediation will remove or reduce radioactive contamination from the area using a combination of removing and disposing of many assets (including possible demolition of buildings), decontaminating and returning to service other assets, and fixing in place or leaving in place contamination that is deemed 'acceptable'. The later will require setting acceptable dose standards, which will require negotiation with all involved parties and a balance of risk and cost to benefit. To accomplish the first two, disposal or decontamination, a combination of technologies will be deployed that can be loosely classified as: Decontamination; Equipment removal and size reduction; and Demolition. This report will deal only with the decontamination technologies that will be used to return assets to service or to reduce waste disposal. It will not discuss demolition, size reduction or removal technologies or equipment (e.g., backhoe mounted rams, rock splitter, paving breakers and chipping hammers, etc.). As defined by the DOE (1994), decontamination is removal of radiological contamination from the surfaces of facilities and equipment. Expertise in this field comes primarily from the operation and decommissioning of DOE and commercial nuclear facilities as well as a small amount of ongoing research and development closely related to RDD decontamination. Information related to decontamination of fields, buildings, and public spaces resulting from the Goiania and Chernobyl incidents were also reviewed and provide some meaningful insight into decontamination at major urban areas. In order to proceed with decontamination, the item being processed needs to have an intrinsic value that exceeds the cost of the cleaning and justifies the exposure of any workers

  10. Sustainable decontamination of an actual-site aged PCB-polluted soil through a biosurfactant-based washing followed by a photocatalytic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occulti, Fabio; Roda, Giovanni Camera; Berselli, Sara; Fava, Fabio

    2008-04-15

    A two phases process consisting of a soya lecithin (SL)-based soil washing process followed by the photocatalytic treatment of resulting effluents was developed and applied at the laboratory scale in the remediation of an actual-site soil historically contaminated by 0.65 g/kg of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Triton X-100 (TX) was employed in the same process as a control surfactant. SL and TX, both applied as 2.25 g/L aqueous solutions, displayed a comparable ability to remove PCBs from the soil. However, SL solution displayed a lower ecotoxicity, a lower ability to mobilize soil constituents and a higher soil detoxification capacity with respect to the TX one. The photocatalytic treatment resulted in marked depletions (from 50% to 70%) of total organic carbon (TOC) and PCBs initially occurring in the SL and TX contaminated effluents. Despite the ability of SL to adversely affect the rate of TOC and PCB photodegradation, higher PCB depletion and dechlorination yields along with lower increases of ecotoxicity were observed in SL-containing effluents with respect to the TX ones at the end of 15 days of treatment. The two phases process developed and tested for the first time in this study seems to have the required features to become, after a proper optimization and scale up, a challenging procedure for the sustainable remediation of actual site, poorly biotreatable PCB-contaminated soils. Copyright 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Radiological decontamination, survey, and statistical release method for vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwill, M.E.; Lively, J.W.; Morris, R.L.

    1996-06-01

    Earth-moving vehicles (e.g., dump trucks, belly dumps) commonly haul radiologically contaminated materials from a site being remediated to a disposal site. Traditionally, each vehicle must be surveyed before being released. The logistical difficulties of implementing the traditional approach on a large scale demand that an alternative be devised. A statistical method for assessing product quality from a continuous process was adapted to the vehicle decontamination process. This method produced a sampling scheme that automatically compensates and accommodates fluctuating batch sizes and changing conditions without the need to modify or rectify the sampling scheme in the field. Vehicles are randomly selected (sampled) upon completion of the decontamination process to be surveyed for residual radioactive surface contamination. The frequency of sampling is based on the expected number of vehicles passing through the decontamination process in a given period and the confidence level desired. This process has been successfully used for 1 year at the former uranium millsite in Monticello, Utah (a cleanup site regulated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act). The method forces improvement in the quality of the decontamination process and results in a lower likelihood that vehicles exceeding the surface contamination standards are offered for survey. Implementation of this statistical sampling method on Monticello projects has resulted in more efficient processing of vehicles through decontamination and radiological release, saved hundreds of hours of processing time, provided a high level of confidence that release limits are met, and improved the radiological cleanliness of vehicles leaving the controlled site

  12. Decontamination of Soil Contaminated with Bacillus anthracis ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical Brief This technical summary will provide decontamination personnel rapid access to information on which decontamination approaches are most effective for soils contaminated with B anthracis.

  13. Decommissioning and Decontamination Program: Battelle Plutonium Facility, Environmental assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    This assessment describes the decontamination of Battelle-Columbus Plutonium Facility and removal from the site of all material contamination which was associated with or produced by the Plutonium Facility. Useable uncontaminated material will be disposed of by procedures normally employed in scrap declaration and transfer. Contaminated waste will be transported to approved radioactive waste storage sites. 5 refs., 1 fig

  14. Radiation decontamination unit for the community hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldron, R.L. II; Danielson, R.A.; Shultz, H.E.; Eckert, D.E.; Hendricks, K.O.

    1981-01-01

    Freestanding radiation decontamination units including surgical capability can be developed and made operational in small/medium sized community hospitals at relatively small cost and with minimal plant reconstrution. The Radiological Assistance Program of the United States Department of Energy and the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center Training Site of Oak Rige Associated Universities are ready to support individual hospitals and physicians in this endeavor. Adequate planning rather than luck, should be used in dealing with potential radiation accident victims. The radiation emergency team is headed by a physician on duty in the hospital. The senior administrative person on duty is responsible for intramural and extramural communications. Rapid mobilization of the radiation decontamination unit is important

  15. Russia: results and prospects of liquid solidification experiments at ROSATOM sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokhitonov, Y.; Babain, V.; Kamachev, V.; Kelley, D.

    2011-01-01

    oil, aqueous, acidic and basic solutions with heavy metals, oil sludge, spent extractants, decontamination solutions, salt sludge, TBP and other complex waste streams. Extensive irradiation evaluation (up to 270 million rad), stability and leach studies, evaporation and absorption capacity tests and gas generation experimentation on tri-butyl phosphate (TBP) waste have been examined. The extensive evaluation of the polymer technology by the lead group, V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, has resulted in significant discussion about its possible use within the ROSATOM network. At present the focus of work is with its application to legacy LLW and ILW waste streams that exist in a variety of sectors that include power plants, research institutes, weapons complex, site and submarine decommissioning and many others. As is the case in most countries, new waste treatment technologies first must be verified by the waste generator, and secondly, approved for use by the government regulators responsible for final storage. The polymer technology is the first foreign sorbent product to enter Russia for radioactive waste treatment so it must receive ROSATOM certification by undergoing irradiation, fire / safety and health / safety testing. Experimental work to date has validated the effectiveness of the polymer technology and today the project team is evaluating criteria for final acceptance of the waste form by ROSATOM. The paper will illustrate results of the various experiments that include irradiation of actual solidified samples, gas generation of irradiated samples, chemical stability (cesium leach rate) and thermal stability (Fig.2), oil and aqueous waste stream solidification examples, and volume reduction test data that will determine cost benefits to the waste generator. Throughout the course of this work, it is apparent that the polymer technology is selective in nature; however, it can have broad applicability to problematic waste streams. One such application is the

  16. Use of knowledge and experience gained from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident to establish the technical basis for strategic off-site response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Kaname; Saito, Kimiaki; Iijima, Kazuki; McKinley, Ian; Hardie, Susan

    2015-03-01

    This report provides a concise overview of knowledge and experience gained from the activities for environmental remediation after the Fukushima Daiichi (1F) accident. It is specifically tailored for international use, to establish or refine the technical basis for strategic, off-site response to nuclear incidents. It reflects JAEA's key role in the research associated with both remediation of contaminated areas and also the natural contamination migration processes in non-remediated areas, in collaboration with other Japanese and international organisations and research institutes. Environmental monitoring and mapping to define boundary conditions in terms of the distribution of radioactivity and resultant doses, guides the resultant response. Radiation protection considerations set constraints, with approaches developed to estimate doses to different critical groups and set appropriate dose reduction targets. Decontamination activities, with special emphasis on associated waste management, provide experience in evaluation of the effectiveness of decontamination and the pros and cons of different approaches / technologies. The assessment of the natural behaviour of contaminant radionuclides and their mobility in the environment is now focused almost entirely on radiocaesium. Here, the impact of natural mobility in terms of self-cleaning / re-concentration in cleaned areas is discussed, along with possible actions to modify such transport or manage potential areas of radiocaesium accumulation. Many of the conditions in Fukushima are similar to those following past contamination events in other countries, where natural self-cleaning alone has allowed recovery to such an extent that the original incident is now largely forgotten. Decontamination efforts in Japan will certainly accelerate this process. On-going remediation work is based on a good technical understanding of the movement of radiocaesium in the environment and this understanding is being translated into

  17. A Community Seismic Experiment in the ENAM Primary Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Avendonk, H. J.

    2012-12-01

    Eastern North America (ENAM) was chosen as a GeoPRISMS Rift Initiation and Evolution primary site because it represents a mature continental margin with onshore and offshore rift basins in which the record of extension and continental break-up is preserved. The degree to which syn-rift magmatism and preexisting lithospheric weaknesses controlled the evolution of the margin can be further investigated if we image its 3-D structure at small and large length scales with active-source and earthquake seismic imaging. In the Summer of 2012 we submitted a proposal to the US National Science Foundation for an ambitious plan for data acquisition on a 400 km wide section of the mid-Atlantic East Coast margin around Cape Hatteras, from unextended continental lithosphere onshore to mature oceanic lithosphere offshore. This area includes an important along-strike transition in the morphology of the margin from the Carolina Trough to the Baltimore Canyon Trough, and two major fracture zones that are associated with significant offsets at the modern Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The study area also covers several features representing the post-rift modification of the margin by slope instability and fluid flow. As the Earthscope Transportable Array reaches the East Coast of the US in 2013 and 2014, we will have an unprecedented opportunity to image the detailed structure of the rifted margin. To make effective use of the research infrastructure, including the seismic vessel R/V Marcus Langseth, the Earthscope seismic instrumentation, and US OBS Instrument Pool, we propose to collect a suite of seismic data at the mid-Atlantic margin in the context of a community-driven experiment with completely open data access. This multi-faceted seismic experiment offers an immense opportunity for education of young scientists. We propose an integrated education effort during and after acquisition. The science and field parties for data acquisition will largely consist of young scientists, who will be

  18. Remediation of contaminated areas in the aftermath of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. Overview, analysis and lessons learned. Part 1. A report on the ''decontamination pilot project''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Shinichi; Kawase, Keiichi; Iijima, Kazuki; Miyahara, Kaname; Hardie, Susan; McKinley, Ian; Klein, Liza; Yashio, Shoko

    2015-03-01

    In the wake of the Great Tohoku earthquake and tsunami, which resulted in significant damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station, considerable radioactive discharge and deposition occurred. Populations were evacuated from the zones that received the most deposition and overarching 'Special Measures' laws established the Ministry of the Environment (MOE) as the department responsible for decontamination to remediate the environment. Major challenges to implementing full-scale environmental decontamination were the absence of real-world examples and also lack of experience in planning and implementing decontamination technology appropriate to the physical and social boundary conditions in both Japan and Fukushima. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) was thus charged with conducting a range of 'Decontamination Pilot Project' to examine the applicability of decontamination technologies, with a special focus on reducing dose rates and thus allowing evacuees to return to re-establish their normal lifestyles as quickly as possible, whilst simultaneously maintaining worker safety. The Decontamination Pilot Project was implemented at 16 sites in 11 municipalities within the evacuated zone, including locations that received the highest deposition. Despite tight boundary conditions in terms of timescale and resources, the Decontamination Pilot Project provides a good basis for developing recommendations on how to assure decontamination efficiency and worker safety whilst additionally constraining costs, subsequent waste management and environmental impacts. The Decontamination Pilot Project has thus played a key role in the drafting of guidelines and manuals that are currently being used as a source of reference by the national government, local municipalities and the contractors performing regional decontamination. Part 1 of this report summarises the Decontamination Pilot Project, providing the background required to put this work in context for an

  19. Laparoendoscopic single site surgery in urology: A single centre experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind P Ganpule

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To analyze our experience of 87 cases with single port surgery, which is also known as laparoendoscopic single site surgery (LESS. Materials and Methods: Case records of all LESS procedures performed between December 2007 and June 2010 were analysed. The procedures performed were donor nephrectomy (n=45, simple nephrectomy (n=27, radical nephrectomy (n=5, pyeloplasty (n=9, and ureteroneocystostomy (n=1. Parameters analysed were operating room (OR time, estimated blood loss (EBL, visual analogue score (VAS, and complications in all patients undergoing LESS procedure and additionally, warm ischaemia time (WIT and graft outcome in patients undergoing LESS donor nephrectomy. In reconstructive procedures, the functional assessment was performed with a diuretic renogram at 6 months. Results: In LESS donor nephrectomy, the mean WIT was 6.9 ± 1.9 min. Mean serum creatinine in recipients at 1 month was 0.96 ± 0.21 mg%. We encountered one instance each of renal artery injury, renal vein injury, large bowel injury, minor cortical laceration at the upper pole and two instances of diaphragmatic injury. In LESS simple nephrectomy, the average OR time was 148.7 ± 52.2 min and hospital stay was 3.7 ± 1.2 days. There was one instance of large bowel injury during specimen retrieval. In LESS radical nephrectomy, the average OR time was 202.5 ± 35.7 min and average hospital stay was 4.2 ± 1.3 days. 6 patients of LESS pyeloplasty completed follow up with a diuretic renogram showing a good drainage. LESS ureteroneocystostomy could also be performed successfully without any complications. Conclusion: LESS surgery can be accomplished safely in nephrectomy and reconstructive procedures such as pyeloplasty and ureteroneocystostomy with equivalent outcomes as standard laparoscopy and with added benefits of cosmesis and quicker convalescence. LESS donor nephrectomy is a technically feasible procedure; current status of procedure needs to be proved with

  20. Decontamination of Stainless Steel SS 304 Type with Pressurized CO2 Solid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutoto

    2007-01-01

    The abrasive decontamination of the stainless steel valve using 12 bar pressurized CO 2 solid has been done. Experiment activities was performed in the HOT CELL facility with variation of blasting time 15, 30, 45 and 60 seconds. The result of experiment shown that the operation of abrasive decontamination during 45 seconds gives the decreasing of the equipment radiation dose rate from 460 to 200 mRem/h and decontamination factor 1.35. The secondary waste from decontamination activities was treated by filtration method using HEPA filter and activated carbon filter. (author)

  1. Unit for air decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariano H, E.

    1991-02-01

    To fulfill the applicable requirements of safety to the ventilation systems in nuclear facilities, it is necessary to make a cleaning of the air that hurtles to the atmosphere. For that which was designed and it manufactured an unit for decontamination of the air for the Pilot plant of production of Nuclear Fuel that this built one with national parts, uses Hepa national filters and the design can adapt for different dimensions of filters, also can be added a lodging for a prefilter or to adopt two Hepa filters. (Author)

  2. Decontamination solution development studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.P.; Fetrow, L.K.; Kjarmo, H.E.; Pool, K.H.

    1993-09-01

    This study was conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of the Hanford Grout Technology Program (HGTP). The objective of this study was to identify decontamination solutions capable of removing radioactive contaminants and grout from the Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) process equipment and to determine the impact of these solutions on equipment components and disposal options. The reference grout used in this study was prepared with simulated double-shell slurry feed (DSSF) and a dry blend consisting of 40 wt % limestone flour, 28 wt % blast furnace slag, 28 wt % fly ash, and 4 wt % type I/II Portland cement

  3. An experimental study on decontamination by surface condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Hae

    1974-01-01

    Surface decontamination is one of the very important problem to be completely solved in the isotope laboratory where there is always the possibility of radioactive contamination, i.e., on the floors, walls, working tables and benches etc., Isotope laboratories require surface covering of material which can be easily and effectively decontaminated. These experiment were done to find an effective decontamination procedure for kind of surfaces which usually are found in radioisotope laboratories and the best type of surface material, that is, one which is easily decontaminated from the point of view of radiation health and safely. This study is presented to guide radioisotope laboratories in Korea which may need to renovate existing unsafe facilities. In some contaminated facilities entirely new installations may be required. Twelve types of surface material are used for study in this experiment. These include 10 cm square of stainless steel, aluminum, ceramic and mosaic tiles, glass, acrylic, formica board, asphalt tile and coated wood with 4 kinds of paints. Stepwise decontamination was performed with various decontamination procedures following a spill of I 1 31 on the center of the surface material being tested. Twelve different decontamination procedures were tested. These included wet wiping with water and detergent, or dry wiping, or removing with gummed paper. Additional chemical procedures used 10% solution of hydrochloric acid, or surface acid, or ammonium citrate, or potassium iodide, or acetone or carbon tetrachloride. The final testing method was abrasion of the test surfaces. Brief analysis of experimental results on the decontaminability on the tested surface showed: 1. Metallic surfaces such as stainless steel or aluminum, or glass, or a piece of ceramic tile or acrylic are recommended as the surface materials for isotope laboratories because these are easily decontaminated by wet wiping only. 2. Formica board, asphalt tile and wood are not easily

  4. Biocompatible metal decontamination from soil using Ageratum conyzoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Virbala; Pant, Deepak

    2018-05-28

    Metal pollution in soil is a serious problem among waste landfill sites and associated environment all over the globe. Amelioration of contaminated soil by plant bioaccumulation is an important strategy to protect the soil environment. Ageratum conyzoides is a common weed species that can grow easily in any contaminating site and bioaccumulate heavy metals present in the e-waste dumping/recycling sites as a natural scavenger. Soil selected for the study was contaminated with waste cathode ray tube (CRT) and printed circuit board (PCB) powder in the concentration range of 1-10 g/kg. Soil decontamination was achieved by using weed plants with ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA, 0.1 g/kg) and kinetin (100 μM) combination in pot experiments. Fe, Mn, Zn, and Cu accumulation was found to be highest in leaves (6.51-38.58; 0.14-73.12; 5.24-269.07; 9.38-116.59%); Pb and Cr in stem (22.83-113.41; 21.05-500%), respectively, as compared with blank. Ion chromatography was used as a tool for the measurement of essential ions present in plant under different conditions. Plants showed better growth in terms of shoot, root length, biomass weight, and chlorophyll content with the proposed combination. EDTA allows the metals available for the accumulation through possible complexation. Also, the compatibility of kinetin to manage stress in plant is found to be enhanced in the presence of EDTA due to possible π-π interaction. Metal stress condition causes the deficiency of essential ions in the plants thereby disturbing its biochemistry and results in its eventual death. EDTA-kinetin hybrid treatment was found to be compatible for metal decontamination from soil, its detoxification in plants by changing its environment and restoring the essential ions for the survival of plant.

  5. Anthrax Sampling and Decontamination: Technology Trade-Offs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Phillip N.; Hamachi, Kristina; McWilliams, Jennifer; Sohn, Michael D.

    2008-09-12

    The goal of this project was to answer the following questions concerning response to a future anthrax release (or suspected release) in a building: 1. Based on past experience, what rules of thumb can be determined concerning: (a) the amount of sampling that may be needed to determine the extent of contamination within a given building; (b) what portions of a building should be sampled; (c) the cost per square foot to decontaminate a given type of building using a given method; (d) the time required to prepare for, and perform, decontamination; (e) the effectiveness of a given decontamination method in a given type of building? 2. Based on past experience, what resources will be spent on evaluating the extent of contamination, performing decontamination, and assessing the effectiveness of the decontamination in abuilding of a given type and size? 3. What are the trade-offs between cost, time, and effectiveness for the various sampling plans, sampling methods, and decontamination methods that have been used in the past?

  6. Dilute chemical decontamination program review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anstine, L.D.; Blomgren, J.C.; Pettit, P.J.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of the Dilute Chemical Decontamination Program is to develop and evaluate a process which utilizes reagents in dilute concentrations for the decontamination of BWR primary systems and for the maintenance of dose rates on the out-of-core surfaces at acceptable levels. A discussion is presented of the process concept, solvent development, advantages and disadvantages of reagent systems, and VNC loop tests. Based on the work completed to date it is concluded that (1) rapid decontamination of BWRs using dilute reagents is feasible; (2) reasonable reagent conditions for rapid chemical decontamination are: 0.01M oxalic acid + 0.005M citric acid, pH3.0, 90/degree/C, 0.5 to 1.0 ppm dissolved oxygen; (3) control of dissolved oxygen concentration is important, since high levels suppress the rate of decontamination and low levels allow precipitation of ferrous oxalate. 4 refs

  7. Performance Art at the Campusphere: Pedagogical Experiments On-Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shaul, Daphna

    2018-01-01

    Following a unique practice and research laboratory entitled "Performance: Site/Self" that took place in 2013-2015, this article discusses the implementation of performance art at an academic site--the Tel Aviv University campus. This pedagogical and artistic initiative, characterised by the transgressive pedagogy of performance art…

  8. Chemical decontamination of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partridge, J.A.; Lerch, R.E.

    1979-10-01

    A metal decontamination process based upon removal of contamination by treatment with a cerium (IV)-nitric acid solution (or other redox agent in nitric acid) is feasible and highly promising. The technique is effective in dissolving the surface layer of stainless steel. Dissolution rates of approximately 1.5 mils/h were demonstrated with cerium (IV)-nitric acid solutions. Removal of plutonium contamination from stainless steel was demonstrated in laboratory tests, in which activity levels were reduced from greater than 5 x 10 5 counts per minute to nondetectable levels in approximately one hour at 90 0 C. Removal of paint from stainless steel surfaces was also demonstrated. Advantages of this process over other chemical solutions include: (1) The solutions are not high salt systems; therefore, there is potentially less waste generated. (2) Cerium(IV) in nitric acid is a good dissolution agent for plutonium oxide. (3) Regeneration of Ce(IV) during the decontamination is accomplished by electrolysis. (4) The process should be effective for irregularly shaped equipment. (5) It could be effective as a spray or a flow-through system. 13 figures

  9. Project Gasbuggy well plugging and site restoration plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-07-01

    The operational plan for conducting the final restoration work at the site of the first U.S. underground nuclear experiment for the stimulation of low-productivity natural gas reservoirs is given. The plan includes well plugging procedures, surface facilities decontamination and removal procedures, radiological guidelines, and environmental considerations

  10. UNESCO SITES AS PUBLIC GOODS: COMPARATIVE EXPERIENCES IN ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Cellini

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The inclusion of a site in the UNESCO World Heritage List is a "recognition" that can be interpreted as alocal public good. This paper analyzes the effectiveness of the UNESCO recognition in promoting tourism and, more generally, local economic development. We document relevant performance differences across Italian UNESCO sites. We argue that the relevant key factor is the ability of generating additional public goods, starting from the process of recognition. The most recent approach of UNESCO in selecting the sites to include in its list underlines the importance of the immaterial culture embedded in the sites, and the role of local communities in their relationships with the environment and heritage: this is interpreted as a sign of the importance which has to be due to the generation of common goods for making the UNESCO recognition an effective tool to preserve heritage and to use it to promote economic, social and cultural development.

  11. New technologies for PCB [polychlorinated biphenyl] decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webber, I.

    1993-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) were mixed with chlorobenzenes to reduce viscosity and provide for both electrical insulation and convective heat transfers. These mixtures were known as askarels, and ca 99.8% of PCBs used in electrical applications are contained in askarel-filled transformers and capacitors. It is estimated that there are ca 180 million gal of PCB-contaminated oil distributed through over 3 million transformers in the USA. Technology used for decontaminating these transformers depends on the concentration of the PCB contamination. At low PCB concentrations of up to ca 2,000 ppM, chemical methods can be used; at higher concentrations, alternative disposal options become more attractive. For chemical treatment, a small mobile unit using quick-reacting reagents has been developed for on-site decontamination. For highly contaminated transformers, retrofilling is very attractive since the owner's liability is minimized at minimum cost. Conventional flush/drain procedures have such drawbacks as the inability to remove oil trapped in windings and the leaching of trapped PCBs back into the uncontaminated retrofill oil over time. A new process has been developed to solve the leaching problem and to decontaminate the drained askarel at room temperature using a catalyst. An alternative disposal strategy involves dismantling the transformer carcass, incinerating non-recyclable materials, and cleaning the metals and wire with solvent. 8 figs

  12. Chemical decontamination method in nuclear facility system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Ryota; Sakai, Hitoshi; Oka, Shigehiro.

    1996-01-01

    Pumps and valves in a closed recycling loop system incorporating materials to be chemically decontaminated are decomposed, a guide plate having the decomposed parts as an exit/inlet of a decontaminating liquid is formed, and a decontaminating liquid recycling loop comprising a recycling pump and a heater is connected to the guide plate. Decontaminating liquid from a decontaminating liquid storage tank is supplied to the decontaminating liquid recycling loop. With such constitutions, the decontaminating liquid is filled in the recycling closed loop system incorporating materials to be decontaminated, and the materials to be decontaminated are chemically decontaminated. The decontaminating liquid after the decontamination is discharged and flows, if necessary, in a recycling system channel for repeating supply and discharge. After the decontamination, the guide plate is removed and returned to the original recycling loop. When pipelines of a reactor recycling system are decontaminated, the amount of decontaminations can be decreased, and reforming construction for assembling the recycling loop again, which requires cutting for pipelines in the system is no more necessary. Accordingly, the amount of wastes can be decreased, and therefore, the decontamination operation is facilitated and radiation dose can be reduced. (T.M.)

  13. Process for decontamination of surfaces in an facility of natural uranium hexafluoride production (UF6)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Claudio C. de; Silva, Teresinha M.; Rodrigues, Demerval L.; Carneiro, Janete C.G.G.

    2017-01-01

    The experience acquired in the actions taken during the decontamination process of an IPEN-CNEN / SP Nuclear and Energy Research Institute facility, for the purpose of making the site unrestricted, is reported. The steps of this operation involved: planning, training of facility operators, workplace analysis and radiometric measurements. The facility had several types of equipment from the natural uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) production tower and other facility materials. Rules for the transportation of radioactive materials were established, both inside and outside the facility and release of materials and installation

  14. Full system decontamination (FSD) at NPP Stade prior to dismantling activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christoph Stiepani; Karl Seidelmann

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Introduction: Minimization of personnel dose rates and generation of material free for release is of the highest priority and requires Full System Decontamination (FSD) as a first and important measure when decommissioning Nuclear Power Plants. Framatome ANP has many years experience with Full System Decontaminations for operating nuclear power plants in general and for decommissioning in particular. The latest decommissioning project was the FSD at the PWR Stade which was permanently shut down in November 2003 after 31 years of operation. FSD was scheduled within a short period after shutdown and prior to decommissioning activities. Full System Decontamination at Stade: The PWR Stade is a 4 loop design. FSD included the entire primary circuit with RPV and the auxiliary systems (RHR, VCS and RWCU). The decontamination circuit had a total volume of ∼310 m 3 and an overall surface of ∼17000 m 2 . The Framatome ANP decontamination process HP/CORD R UV was selected for application. The decontamination was performed by using NPP systems in combination with the Framatome mobile decontamination equipment AMDA R (Automated Mobile Decontamination Appliance). A total of 4 decontamination cycles were performed and excellent results were obtained. The average decontamination factor (DF) was 160 for the steam generators with an outstanding ambient dose reduction factor (DRF) of 75. Conclusions: FSD at the PWR Stade has shown that the HP/CORD UV process yields excellent results in primary and auxiliary systems. The significant ambient dose reduction factor of 75 is remarkable. This very high DRF, no other decontamination application came even close, will result in excellent cost-benefit ratios for additional decommissioning activities at Stade. The applied HP/CORD UV process is not a specific decontamination process for decommissioning. Therefore the obtained decontamination and dose reduction factors demonstrate the advantage/potential for

  15. CERCLA integration with site operations the Fernald experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coyle, S.W.; Shirley, R.S.; Varchol, B.D.

    1991-01-01

    A major transition in the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site mission has occurred over the past few years. The production capabilities formally provided by the FEMP are being transferred to private industry through a vendor qualification program. Environmental compliance and site cleanup are now the primary focus. In line with this program, the production of uranium products at the site was suspended in July 1989 in order to concentrate resources on the environmental mission. Formal termination of the FEMP production mission was accomplished on June 19, 1991. Environmental issues such as stored inventories of process residues materials and equipment are being addressed under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). The diversity of these hazards complicates the strategic planning for an integrated site cleanup program. The FEMP is one of the first Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to transition from an active production mission guided by Defense Programs (DP) to an environmental mission guided by Environmental Management (EM) under Leo Duffy. Westinghouse Environmental Management Company of Ohio (WEMCO) has been charged with integrating all site activities to carry out the cleanup. A new management structure has been formulated, and an integration approach initiated. Analyses are under way to evaluate all site activities such as waste management, safe shutdown, product material disposition and routine environmental monitoring in view of CERCLA requirements. Site activities are being broken down into three categories: (a) CERCLA driven - restoration work required under CERCLA, (b) CERCLA covered - other environmental requirements which must be integrated with CERCLA, and (c) CERCLA exempt (if any). The approach to comply with these categorized activities must be negotiated with state and federal regulatory agencies

  16. CERCLA integration with site operations the Fernald experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coyle, S.W.; Shirley, R.S.; Varchol, B.D.

    1991-01-01

    A major transition in the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site mission has occurred over the past few years. The production capabilities formally provided by the FEMP are being transferred to private industry through a vendor qualification program. Environmental compliance and site cleanup are now the primary focus. In line with this program, the production of uranium products at the site was suspended in July 1989 in order to concentrate resources on the environmental mission. Formal termination of the FEMP production mission was accomplished on June 19, 1991. Environmental issues such as stored inventories of process residues materials and equipment are being addressed under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). The diversity of these hazards complicates the strategic planning for an integrated site cleanup program. This paper will discuss the programmatic approach which is being implemented to ensure activities such as waste management, site utility and support services, health and safety programs, and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) programs are being integrated with CERCLA. 6 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Decontamination of some urban surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, E.W.

    1988-04-01

    The long-term consequences of external radiation dose to the public could be a cause for concern in the event of a severe accident at a nuclear power plant leading to the release of fission products to the atmosphere and subsequent contamination of buildings, roads and other components of the urban environment. This study has concentrated on the decontamination of building materials contaminated under wet conditions with soluble, ionic radiocaesium. Results are given on the decontamination of building materials contaminated without run-off, on the effects of waiting between contamination and decontamination and on the effect of pre-treatment with an ammonium salt solution. (author)

  18. Nova target chamber decontamination study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-05-01

    An engineering study was performed to determine the most effective method for decontamination of the Nova target chamber. Manual and remote decontamination methods currently being used were surveyed. In addition, a concept that may not require in-situ decontamination was investigated. Based on the presently available information concerning material and system compatibility and particle penetration, it is recommended that a system of removable aluminum shields be considered. It is also recommended that a series of tests be performed to more precisely determine the vacuum compatibility and penetrability of other materials discussed in this report

  19. Skin decontamination: principles and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Heidi P; Zhai, Hongbo; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard I

    2013-11-01

    Skin decontamination is the primary intervention needed in chemical, biological and radiological exposures, involving immediate removal of the contaminant from the skin performed in the most efficient way. The most readily available decontamination system on a practical basis is washing with soap and water or water only. Timely use of flushing with copious amounts of water may physically remove the contaminant. However, this traditional method may not be completely effective, and contaminants left on the skin after traditional washing procedures can have toxic consequences. This article focuses on the principles and practices of skin decontamination.

  20. Decontamination and coating of lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, W.N.; Bush, S.P.; Lyon, C.E.; Walker, V.

    1988-01-01

    Technology is being developed to decontaminate lead used in shielding applications in contaminated environments for recycle as shieldings. Technology is also being developed to coat either decontaminated lead or new lead before it is used in contaminated environments. The surface of the coating is expected to be much easier to decontaminate than the original lead surface. If contamination becomes severely embedded in the coating and cannot be removed, it can be easily cut with a knife and removed from the lead. The used coating can be disposed of as radioactive (hot hazardous) waste. The lead can then be recoated for further use as a shielding material

  1. Decontamination of surfaces (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestre, E.

    1961-01-01

    The continued expansion of atomic Energy has led the S.C.R.G.R. to extend simultaneously the recovery of materials contaminated by use in radio-active media. The importance of this aspect of atomic Energy was not immediately obvious to those concerned but is now fully recognized due to the cost of the materials and installations, and also to the time required for the construction of special equipment for the C.E.A. Another very important reason is the dangers associated with the handling of contaminated material. The S.C.R.G.R. attacked this problem from the point of view of these dangers. It later became apparent to the users, once the decontamination methods had proved their worth, that the process presented advantages from the material and cost-saving point of view. (author) [fr

  2. Ultrasonic decontamination robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patenaude, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    An ultrasonic decontamination robot removes radioactive contamination from the internal surface of the inlet and outlet headers, divider plate, tube sheet, and lower portions of tubes of a nuclear power plant steam generator. A programmable microprocessor controller guides the movement of a robotic arm mounted in the header manway. An ultrasonic transducer having a solvent delivery subsystem through which ultrasonic action is achieved is moved by the arm over the surfaces. A solvent recovery suction tube is positioned within the header to remove solvent therefrom while avoiding interference with the main robotic arm. The solvent composition, temperature, pressure, viscosity, and purity are controlled to optimize the ultrasonic scrubbing action. The ultrasonic transducer is controlled at a power density, frequency, and on-off mode cycle such as to optimize scrubbing action within the range of transducer-to-surface distance and solvent layer thickness selected for the particular conditions encountered. Both solvent and transducer control actions are optimized by the programmable microprocessor. (author)

  3. Stainless steel decontamination manipulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Three, large-volume coverage manipulator systems were designed and built for the Defense Water Processing Facility at the Savannah River Laboratory. These stainless steel systems will be used for high-pressure spray decontamination of waste containers and large process equipment modules. Each system has a manipulator arm, folding boom, and vertical drive and guide structure. Handling capacity is 45 kg, horizontal reach is 4.6 m with a 180-deg swing motion, and the vertical travel is 6 m. The system is remotely removable and replaceable in modules using an overhead crane and an impact wrench. The manipulator arm has seven motions: Shoulder rotation and pivot, elbow pivot, wrist pivot and rotation, and grip open-close. All motions are variable speed and are slip-clutch protected to prevent overloading from external forces (collisions)

  4. Decontamination technology assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.P.; Konzek, G.J.; Schneider, K.R.; Smith, R.I.

    1988-10-01

    This study identifies and technically assesses foreign decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) technology developments that may represent significant improvements over D and D technology currently available or under development in the United States. Technology need areas for nuclear power reactor decommissioning operations were identified and prioritized using the results of past light water reactor (LWR) decommissioning studies to quantitatively evaluate the potential for reducing cost and decommissioning worker radiation dose for each major decommissioning activity. Based on these identified needs, current foreign D and D technologies of potential interest to the US were identified through personal contacts and the collection and review of an extensive body of D and D literature. These technologies were then assessed qualitatively to evaluate their uniqueness, potential for a significant reduction in D and D costs and/or worker radiation dose, development status, and other factors affecting their value and applicability to US needs. 4 refs

  5. Granulated decontamination formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Mark D.

    2007-10-02

    A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a sorbent additive, and water. A highly adsorbent sorbent additive (e.g., amorphous silica, sorbitol, mannitol, etc.) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field.

  6. Decontamination & decommissioning focus area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

  7. Oxidative Tritium Decontamination System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, Charles A.; Parker, John J.; Guttadora, Gregory L.; Ciebiera, Lloyd P.

    2002-01-01

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Tritium Systems Group has developed and fabricated an Oxidative Tritium Decontamination System (OTDS), which is designed to reduce tritium surface contamination on various components and items. The system is configured to introduce gaseous ozone into a reaction chamber containing tritiated items that require a reduction in tritium surface contamination. Tritium surface contamination (on components and items in the reaction chamber) is removed by chemically reacting elemental tritium to tritium oxide via oxidation, while purging the reaction chamber effluent to a gas holding tank or negative pressure HVAC system. Implementing specific concentrations of ozone along with catalytic parameters, the system is able to significantly reduce surface tritium contamination on an assortment of expendable and non-expendable items. This paper will present the results of various experimentation involving employment of this system

  8. Decontamination of organic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, W.

    1977-01-01

    Decontamination stands for the sack collecting of wc-waste water of nuclear-medical tracts and especially the collecting of primary urine and primary faeces of patients after application of radio-isotopes (e.g. iodine 131). They are tied up in the sacks, treated with antiseptic and decomposition-preventing agents, and finally stored in a decupation depot over the time constant. The decupation depot can, for example, be a deep-freezor with separations and clocks, which is radiation-isolated. After the time constant a chemical and/or physical destruction (e.g. comminution) takes place, with simultaneous disinfection and thawing (vapour heating) and the transfer to the canalization. (DG) [de

  9. Glovebox decontamination technology comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintana, D.M.; Rodriguez, J.B.; Cournoyer, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    Reconfiguration of the CMR Building and TA-55 Plutonium Facility for mission requirements will require the disposal or recycle of 200--300 gloveboxes or open front hoods. These gloveboxes and open front hoods must be decontaminated to meet discharge limits for Low Level Waste. Gloveboxes and open front hoods at CMR have been painted. One of the deliverables on this project is to identify the best method for stripping the paint from large numbers of gloveboxes. Four methods being considered are the following: conventional paint stripping, dry ice pellets, strippable coatings, and high pressure water technology. The advantages of each technology will be discussed. Last, cost comparisons between the technologies will be presented

  10. Community-based conservation of critical sites: Uganda's experience

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of natural resources, first and foremost for their own good, and then for national and global benefit. Ecotourism and adding value to locally produced materials in communities can translate into support for conservation. This paper highlights the importance of community-based conservation for important biodiversity sites.

  11. Siting of the Swedish deep geological repository - experiences and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eng, T.; Backblom, G.; Thegerstrom, C.; Ahlbom, K.; Leijon, B.

    1996-01-01

    The paper provides a brief overview of the Swedish siting programme for a deep repository. A stepwise process is a key element in the planning and implementation of deep disposal of long-lived waste in Sweden. The local siting work is made in cooperation with the affected and concerned municipalities. The programs, decisions and results that so far have been reported and ongoing feasibility studies is a solid platform for the continuing siting work. It can be noted that the siting work in some cases has caused heavy opposition and negative opinions. Careful considerations on how to proceed to develop the necessary background material must therefore be made. The Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) process that has started in conjunction with feasibility studies are judged to play an important role in the future. In this process, with extensive local involvement, critical issues can be detected at an early stage and sound ideas on both the process itself and on technical issues can be incorporated. To facilitate information exchange and cooperation between the municipalities involved and to coordinate liaison between the municipalities and county administrative boards affected by the studies, the Swedish government has appointed a National Coordinator for nuclear waste disposal. The government also has decided to provide the concerned municipalities with funding for their participation in the process. (author)

  12. Decontamination of a canyon crane at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, D.A.; Moore, D.B.; Bowers, J.W.; Brown, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Decontamination of the crane is reviewed in terms of the health physics aspects, controls during decontamination efforts, and the resultant radiation exposure rates for decontamination efforts. 17 figs.,

  13. Decontamination strategies in contaminated settlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, P.; Jouve, A.; Tallec, V. Le

    1996-01-01

    Six years after the Chernobyl accident, decontamination actions had been completed in many places, the contamination could be considered as fixed, especially on urban surfaces and the social situation was felt to be stabilized. Under those conditions the efficiency of the 'classical' decontamination techniques was under question, it was worthwhile to look at new specific techniques. Besides it was necessary to discuss the interest of new decontamination actions in settlements. The European Union (EU) sponsored a project ECP 4 in order to look at the opportunities for further dose reduction actions in the contaminated territories of the three republics affected by the accident. The objective was to provide a local decision maker, faced with many alternatives for decontamination, with all the elements for determining what to do according to the various objectives he might pursue. The main results are presented here. (author)

  14. Contamination and decontamination of skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severa, J.; Knajfl, J.

    1983-01-01

    In external contamination the beta radiation dose is the prevalent component of the total dose absorbed by the skin. There exist four types of radionUclide bonds to the skin: mechanical retention of solid particles or solution on the surface and in the pores, physical adsorption of nondissociated molecules or colloids, the ion exchange effect, and chemisorption. Radionuclides then penetrate the skin by transfollicular transfer. The total amount of radioactive substances absorbed into the skin depends on the condition of the skin. Skin is decontaminated by washing with lukewarm water and soap or with special decontamination solutions. The most widely used components of decontamination solutions are detergents, chelaton, sodium hexametaphosphate, oxalic acid, citric acid. The main principles of the decontamination of persons are given. (M.D.)

  15. BR-5 primary circuit decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimov, I.A.; Nikulin, M.P.; Smirnov-Averin, A.P.; Tymosh, B.S.; Shereshkov, V.S.

    1976-01-01

    Results and methodology of steam-water and acid decontamination of the primary coolant circuit SBR-5 reactor in 1971 are discussed. Regeneration process in a cold trap of the primary coolant circuit is discussed

  16. Decontaminating method for radioactive contaminant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Ken-ichi.

    1994-01-01

    After decontamination of radioactive contaminates with d-limonene, a radioactive material separating agent not compatible with liquid wastes caused by decontamination is added to the liquid wastes. Then after stirring, they are stood still to be separated into two phases, and the radioactive materials in the liquid waste phase caused by decontamination are transferred to the phase of the radioactive material separating agent. With such procedures, they can satisfactorily be separated into two phases of d-limonene and the radioactive material separating agent. Further, d-limonene remaining after the separation can be used again as a decontaminating agent for radioactive contaminates. Therefore, the amount of d-limonene to be used can be reduced, to lower the cost for cleaning, thereby enabling to reduce the amount of radioactive wastes formed. (T.M.)

  17. Integrated planning for nuclear siting - The South African experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, J C.A.; Heidstra, N; Graupner, O F [Eskom, Johannesburg (South Africa); Hambleton-Jones, B [Atomic Energy Corporation of South Africa Ltd., Pellindaba, Pretoria (South Africa)

    1990-06-01

    This paper describes the process involved in the current national programme to identify potential sites for nuclear power development in South Africa. A description is given of the sensitivity studies - the evaluation of the potential perturbations to and opportunities for the biophysical and socioeconomic environments and the suitability studies - the evaluation of environmental influences on geotechnical, safety and financial considerations. This programme is divorced from any decision of whether or not to build further nuclear power station in South Africa. The programme described is a long range land-use planning exercise considered expedient in the face of competition for land that share similar requirements as those of nuclear power station sites. It is also designed to streamline nuclear power station lead times and to make national and regional planners aware of Eskom's requirements in the drafting of their policies and plans. (author)

  18. Integrated planning for nuclear siting - The South African experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbs, J.C.A.; Heidstra, N.; Graupner, O.F.; Hambleton-Jones, B.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the process involved in the current national programme to identify potential sites for nuclear power development in South Africa. A description is given of the sensitivity studies - the evaluation of the potential perturbations to and opportunities for the biophysical and socioeconomic environments and the suitability studies - the evaluation of environmental influences on geotechnical, safety and financial considerations. This programme is divorced from any decision of whether or not to build further nuclear power station in South Africa. The programme described is a long range land-use planning exercise considered expedient in the face of competition for land that share similar requirements as those of nuclear power station sites. It is also designed to streamline nuclear power station lead times and to make national and regional planners aware of Eskom's requirements in the drafting of their policies and plans. (author)

  19. KEWB facilities decontamination and disposition. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ureda, B.F.

    1976-01-01

    The decontamination and disposition of the KEWB facilities, Buildings 073, 643, 123, and 793, are complete. All of the facility equipment, including reactor enclosure, reactor vessel, fuel handling systems, controls, radioactive waste systems, exhaust systems, electrical services, and protective systems were removed from the site. Buildings 643, 123, and 793 were completely removed, including foundations. The floor and portions of the walls of Building 073 were covered over by final grading. Results of the radiological monitoring and the final survey are presented. 9 tables, 19 figures

  20. Exploring Young People's Experiences on Social Networking Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Rehim, Shrehan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract\\ud Online Social Networking Sites (SNS) are a ubiquitous platform for communication and have been considered as one of the most significant changes to how young people interact today. Whilst SNS bring many opportunities, they have also been used as a tool for harassment and abuse online. The term ‘cyberbullying’, is most widely used to describe this phenomenon. A growing body of research demonstrates that cyberbullying has the potential to detrimentally impact young people’s wellbein...

  1. Large-bore pipe decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    The decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of 1200 buildings within the US Department of Energy-Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Complex will require the disposition of miles of pipe. The disposition of large-bore pipe, in particular, presents difficulties in the area of decontamination and characterization. The pipe is potentially contaminated internally as well as externally. This situation requires a system capable of decontaminating and characterizing both the inside and outside of the pipe. Current decontamination and characterization systems are not designed for application to this geometry, making the direct disposal of piping systems necessary in many cases. The pipe often creates voids in the disposal cell, which requires the pipe to be cut in half or filled with a grout material. These methods are labor intensive and costly to perform on large volumes of pipe. Direct disposal does not take advantage of recycling, which could provide monetary dividends. To facilitate the decontamination and characterization of large-bore piping and thereby reduce the volume of piping required for disposal, a detailed analysis will be conducted to document the pipe remediation problem set; determine potential technologies to solve this remediation problem set; design and laboratory test potential decontamination and characterization technologies; fabricate a prototype system; provide a cost-benefit analysis of the proposed system; and transfer the technology to industry. This report summarizes the activities performed during fiscal year 1997 and describes the planned activities for fiscal year 1998. Accomplishments for FY97 include the development of the applicable and relevant and appropriate regulations, the screening of decontamination and characterization technologies, and the selection and initial design of the decontamination system

  2. Decontamination of radioactively contaminated surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    By this standard objective conditions to evaluate and test the ease of decontamination of surfaces under laboratory conditions are to be laid down. Ease of decontamination in this context denotes the summed-up effect of two material properties: a) the capacity of the material for retaining radioactive substances at its surface; b) the ease with which these substances are given off again in the course of cleaning processes. (orig./HP) [de

  3. Evaluation of a decontamination model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rippin, D.W.T.; Hanulik, J.; Schenker, E.; Ullrich, G.

    1981-02-01

    In the scale-up of a laboratory decontamination process difficulties arise due to the limited understanding of the mechanisms controlling the process. This paper contains some initial proposals which may contribute to the quantitative understanding of the chemical and physical factors which influence decontamination operations. General features required in a mathematical model to describe a fluid-solid reaction are discussed, and initial work is presented with a simple model which has had some success in describing the observed laboratory behaviour. (Auth.)

  4. Presolidification treatment of decontamination wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habayeb, M.A.

    1982-02-01

    Unsatisfactory leaching performance of several solidified decontamination solutions indicated a need for presolidification treatments to reduce the water sensitivity of the active chemicals. Chemical treatments examined in this work include pH adjustment, precipitation and oxidation-reduction reactions. The reactions involved in these treatments are discussed. The most suitable presolidification treatment for each decontamination solution has been identified. Further research is needed to test the effectivenss of these treatments

  5. Geology of the Source Physics Experiment Site, Climax Stock, Nevada National Security Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Townsend, M., Prothro, L. B., Obi, C.

    2012-03-15

    A test bed for a series of chemical explosives tests known as Source Physics Experiments (SPE) was constructed in granitic rock of the Climax stock, in northern Yucca Flat at the Nevada National Security Site in 2010-2011. These tests are sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration's National Center for Nuclear Security. The test series is designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves, and will provide data that will improve the predictive capability of calculational models for detecting and characterizing underground explosions. Abundant geologic data are available for the area, primarily as a result of studies performed in conjunction with the three underground nuclear tests conducted in the Climax granite in the 1960s and a few later studies of various types. The SPE test bed was constructed at an elevation of approximately 1,524 meters (m), and consists of a 91.4-centimeter (cm) diameter source hole at its center, surrounded by two rings of three 20.3-cm diameter instrument holes. The inner ring of holes is positioned 10 m away from the source hole, and the outer ring of holes is positioned 20 m from the source hole. An initial 160-m deep core hole was drilled at the location of the source hole that provided information on the geology of the site and rock samples for later laboratory testing. A suite of geophysical logs was run in the core hole and all six instruments holes to obtain matrix and fracture properties. Detailed information on the character and density of fractures encountered was obtained from the borehole image logs run in the holes. A total of 2,488 fractures were identified in the seven boreholes, and these were ranked into six categories (0 through 5) on the basis of their degree of openness and continuity. The analysis presented here considered only the higher-ranked fractures (ranks 2 through 5), of which there were 1,215 (approximately 49 percent of all fractures identified

  6. Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lussiez, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radioisotopes and is therefore a RCRA D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Laboratory decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 50 tons and likely to grow substantially because of planned decommissioning operations. This lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for decontaminating lead is removing the thin superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium trader pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 40 psig rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a sealed-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor grating and is collected in a sump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process. The process generates small volumes of contaminated lead slurry that can be solidified and, because it passes the TCLP, is not a mixed waste. The decontaminated lead can be released for recycling

  7. Chemical Gel for Surface Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Chong Hun; Moon, J. K.; Won, H. J.; Lee, K. W.; Kim, C. K.

    2010-01-01

    Many chemical decontamination processes operate by immersing components in aggressive chemical solutions. In these applications chemical decontamination technique produce large amounts of radioactive liquid waste. Therefore it is necessary to develop processes using chemical gels instead of chemical solutions, to avoid the well-known disadvantages of chemical decontamination techniques while retaining their high efficiency. Chemical gels decontamination process consists of applying the gel by spraying it onto the surface of large area components (floors, walls, etc) to be decontaminated. The gel adheres to any vertical or complex surface due to their thixotropic properties and operates by dissolving the radioactive deposit, along with a thin layer of the gel support, so that the radioactivity trapped at the surface can be removed. Important aspects of the gels are that small quantities can be used and they show thixitropic properties : liquid during spraying, and solid when stationary, allowing for strong adherence to surfaces. This work investigates the decontamination behaviors of organic-based chemical gel for SS 304 metallic surfaces contaminated with radioactive materials

  8. Random Vibration Analysis of the XM2l Decontaminant Pumper Module of the Modular Decontamination System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Colclough, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    The XM21 Decontaminant Pumper module of the Modular Decontamination System was analyzed using finite element analysis techniques to show why the first design iteration passed transportation vibration...

  9. Oxidation of Ce(III) in Foam Decontaminant by Ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Chong Hun; Yoon, I. H.; Choi, W. K.; Moon, J. K.; Yang, H. B.; Lee, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    A nanoparticle-based foam decontaminant is composed of a surfactant and nanoparticles for the generation and maintenance of foam, and a chemical decontamination agent made of Ce(IV) dissolved in nitric acid. Ce(IV) will be reduced to Ce(III) through the decontamination process. Oxidizing cerium(III) can be reused as a decontamination agent, Ce(IV). Oxidation treatment technology by ozone uses its strong oxidizing power. It can be regarded as an environmentally friendly process, because ozone cannot be stored and transported like other industrial gases (because it quickly decays into diatomic oxygen) and must therefore be produced on site, and used ozone can decompose immediately. The ozonation treatment of Ce(III) in foam decontaminant containing a surfactant is necessary for the effective regeneration of Ce(III). Thus, the present study was undertaken to determine the optimal conditions for ozonation treatment in the regeneration of Ce(III) into Ce(IV) in the nanoparticle-based foam decontaminant containing surfactant. This study was undertaken to determine the optimal conditions for ozonation treatment in the regeneration of Ce(III) to Ce(IV) in nanoparticle-based foam decontaminant containing a TBS surfactant. The oxidation conversion rate of Ce(III) was increased with an increase in the flow rate of the gas mixture and ozone injection amount. The oxidation time required for the 100% oxidation conversion of Ce(III) to Ce(IV) at a specific ozone injection amount can be predicted from these experimental data

  10. Oxidation of Ce(III) in Foam Decontaminant by Ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Chong Hun; Yoon, I. H.; Choi, W. K.; Moon, J. K.; Yang, H. B. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J. S. [Gachon University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    A nanoparticle-based foam decontaminant is composed of a surfactant and nanoparticles for the generation and maintenance of foam, and a chemical decontamination agent made of Ce(IV) dissolved in nitric acid. Ce(IV) will be reduced to Ce(III) through the decontamination process. Oxidizing cerium(III) can be reused as a decontamination agent, Ce(IV). Oxidation treatment technology by ozone uses its strong oxidizing power. It can be regarded as an environmentally friendly process, because ozone cannot be stored and transported like other industrial gases (because it quickly decays into diatomic oxygen) and must therefore be produced on site, and used ozone can decompose immediately. The ozonation treatment of Ce(III) in foam decontaminant containing a surfactant is necessary for the effective regeneration of Ce(III). Thus, the present study was undertaken to determine the optimal conditions for ozonation treatment in the regeneration of Ce(III) into Ce(IV) in the nanoparticle-based foam decontaminant containing surfactant. This study was undertaken to determine the optimal conditions for ozonation treatment in the regeneration of Ce(III) to Ce(IV) in nanoparticle-based foam decontaminant containing a TBS surfactant. The oxidation conversion rate of Ce(III) was increased with an increase in the flow rate of the gas mixture and ozone injection amount. The oxidation time required for the 100% oxidation conversion of Ce(III) to Ce(IV) at a specific ozone injection amount can be predicted from these experimental data.

  11. Safety assessment of the Area 6 Decontamination Pad and Laundry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chilton, M.W.; Orcutt, J.A.

    1984-10-01

    The Safety Assessment of the Area 6 Decontamination Pad and Laundry, prepared in accordance with DOE Order 5481.1A, identifies and evaluates potential radiation and chemical hazards to personnel, and impacts on the environment. Site and facility characteristics, as well as routine and nonroutine operations are discussed. Hypothetical incidents and accidents are described and evaluated. 3 figures, 1 table

  12. Siting Conflicts in Renewable Energy Projects in Sweden: Experiences From the Siting of a Biogas Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Jamil

    2001-05-01

    This paper seeks to contribute to an increased understanding of what characterises conflicts regarding the siting of renewable energy facilities. The paper starts out with a brief introduction to different types of renewable energy and the conflicts they might generate as well as a discussion about the differences and similarities in comparison with conflicts over more controversial issues, such as nuclear plants, chemical factories and the construction of roads. The main part of the paper discusses the results from a case study on a failed attempt to site a biogas plant in southern Sweden. The results show that there was a lack of public participation in the early stages of planning, and that peoples negative perceptions of the possibilities to influence the decision-making and of the attitude of the developer, contributed to the development of a public opposition and a polarisation of the conflict. There is also a discussion about the reasons for a shift in the political support for the project and about the role of the legislation in shaping planning processes that either handle conflicts or make them worse. The paper concludes with the observation that the biogas case, in many ways, resembled traditional siting conflicts and that further research is needed to explore the nature of different renewable energy siting conflicts.

  13. Final report for the 190-D complex decontamination and decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoren, S.D.

    1996-09-01

    This report documents the decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) of the 190-D complex. (located on the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington). D ampersand D of the 190-D complex included decontaminating and removing hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials; dismantling equipment piping and utility infrastructure; demolishing the structure; and restoring the site. The 100-D Area contains two of the nine inactive plutonium production reactors. The reactor sites are located along the south shore of the Columbia River where the sites cover the northern part of the Hanford Site. The 190-D complex is located in the 100-D Area and is composed of the following seven buildings: 185-D De-aeration Building, 189-D Refrigeration Building, 190-D Tank Room Highbay, 190-D Process Pump Room, 190-DA Process Pump Room Annex, 195-D Vertical Safety Rod Test Tower, 1724-D Underwater Test Facility

  14. Application of a modified electrochemical system for surface decontamination of radioactive metal waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.; Lim, Y.K.; Yang, H.Y.; Shin, S.W.; Song, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Conventional and modified electrolytic decontamination experiments were performed in a solution of sodium sulfate for the decontamination of carbon steel as the simulated metal wastes which are generated in large amounts from nuclear power plants. The effect of reaction time, current density and concentration of electrolytes in the modified electrolytic decontamination system were examined to remove the surface contamination of the simulated radioactive metal wastes. As for the results of this research, the modified electrochemical decontamination process can decontaminate more effectively than the conventional decontamination process by applying different anode material which causes higher induced electro-motive forces. When 0.5 M sodium sulfate, 0.4 A/cm 2 current density and 30 minutes reaction time were applied in the modified process, a 16 μm thickness change that is expected to remove most surface contamination in radioactive metal wastes was achieved on carbon steel which is the main material of radioactive metal waste in nuclear power plants. The decontamination efficiency of metal waste showed similar results with the small and large lab-scale modified electrochemical system. The application of this modified electrolytic decontamination system is expected to play a considerable role for decontamination of radioactive metal waste in nuclear power plants in the near future. (author)

  15. Safety aspects in decontamination operations: Lessons learned during the decommissioning of a small PWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, M.; Ponnet, M.; Emond, O.

    2002-01-01

    Decontamination operations are generally executed during the decommissioning of nuclear installations for different objectives: decontamination of loops or large pieces to reduce the dose rate inside a contaminated plant or decontamination to minimize the amount of radioactive waste. These decontamination operations raise safety issues such as radiological exposure, classical safety, environmental releases, production and management of secondary waste, management of primary resources, etc. This paper presents the return of experience from decontamination operations performed during the dismantling of the BR3 PWR reactor. The safety issues are discussed for 3 types of decontamination operations: full system decontamination of the primary loop with a chemical process to reduce the dose rate by a factor of 10; thorough decontamination with an aggressive chemical process of dismantled pieces to reach the unconditional clearance values; and thorough decontamination processes with physical processes of metals and of concrete to reach the unconditional clearance values. For the protection of the workers, we must consider the ALARA aspects and the classical safety issues. During the progress of our dismantling operations, the dose rate issue was becoming less important but the classical safety issues were becoming preponderant due to the use of very aggressive techniques. For the protection of the environment, we must take all the precautions to avoid any leakages from the plant and we must use processes which minimize the use of toxic products and which minimize the production of secondary wastes. We therefore promote the use of regenerative processes. (author)

  16. Practical choices for infobutton customization: experience from four sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimino, James J; Overby, Casey L; Devine, Emily B; Hulse, Nathan C; Jing, Xia; Maviglia, Saverio M; Del Fiol, Guilherme

    2013-01-01

    Context-aware links between electronic health records (EHRs) and online knowledge resources, commonly called "infobuttons" are being used increasingly as part of EHR "meaningful use" requirements. While an HL7 standard exists for specifying how the links should be constructed, there is no guidance on what links to construct. Collectively, the authors manage four infobutton systems that serve 16 institutions. The purpose of this paper is to publish our experience with linking various resources and specifying particular criteria that can be used by infobutton managers to select resources that are most relevant for a given situation. This experience can be used directly by those wishing to customize their own EHRs, for example by using the OpenInfobutton infobutton manager and its configuration tool, the Librarian Infobutton Tailoring Environment.

  17. Tourist experiences of genocide sites: The case of Rwanda

    OpenAIRE

    Sharpley Richard; Gahigana Innocent

    2014-01-01

    Dark tourism is not a new phenomenon. As long as people have been able to travel they have visited places associated with death, disaster and suffering. However, not only has the provision and consumption of dark tourism experiences become increasingly evident in recent years; so too has the academic study of the phenomenon. Nevertheless, despite the increasing attention paid to the subject, understanding of dark tourism remains relatively limited and theoretically fragile whilst, specificall...

  18. French and International experience on the dialogue around industrial sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Th.; Heriard Dubreuil, G.; Gadbois, S.; Oudiz, A.; Remond Gouilloud, M.

    2002-12-01

    This report presents the results of a research work about 'the stakes of the dialogue around the follow up of nuclear and non nuclear industrial installations'. It used the experience of the North Cotentin radioecology group where expertise has been implemented in order to evaluate the impact on health of the releases of the Cogema La Hague plant. This report is the fruit of an interdisciplinary group ( experts of activities with risks, radiation protection, regulation in environment). (N.C.)

  19. MERCURY CONTAMINATED MATERIAL DECONTAMINATION METHODS: INVESTIGATION AND ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    2001-01-01

    Over the years mercury has been recognized as having serious impacts on human health and the environment. This recognition has led to numerous studies that deal with the properties of various mercury forms, the development of methods to quantify and speciate the forms, fate and transport, toxicology studies, and the development of site remediation and decontamination technologies. This report reviews several critical areas that will be used in developing technologies for cleaning mercury from mercury-contaminated surfaces of metals and porous materials found in many DOE facilities. The technologies used for decontamination of water and mixed wastes (solid) are specifically discussed. Many technologies that have recently appeared in the literature are included in the report. Current surface decontamination processes have been reviewed, and the limitations of these technologies for mercury decontamination are discussed. Based on the currently available technologies and the processes published recently in the literature, several processes, including strippable coatings, chemical cleaning with iodine/iodide lixiviant, chemisorbing surface wipes with forager sponge and grafted cotton, and surface/pore fixation through amalgamation or stabilization, have been identified as potential techniques for decontamination of mercury-contaminated metal and porous surfaces. Their potential merits and applicability are discussed. Finally, two processes, strippable coatings and chemical cleaning with iodine/iodide lixiviant, were experimentally investigated in Phase II of this project.

  20. A Sandia National Laboratories decontamination and demolition success story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.R.; Barber, D.S.; Lipka, G.

    1994-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) has established a formal facility assessment, decontamination and demolition oversight process with the goal of ensuring that excess or contaminated facilities are managed in a cost-effective manner that is protective of human health and the environment. The decontamination and demolition process is designed so that all disciplines are consulted and have input from the initiation of a project. The committee consists of all essential Environmental, Safety and Health (ES and H) and Facilities disciplines. The interdisciplinary-team approach has provided a mechanism that verifies adequate building and site assessment activities are conducted. This approach ensures that wastes generated during decontamination and demolition activities are handled and disposed according to Department of Energy (DOE), Federal, state, and local requirements. Because of the comprehensive nature of the SNL decontamination and demolition process, the strategy can be followed for demolition, renovation and new construction projects, regardless of funding source. An overview of the SNL/NM decontamination and demolition process is presented through a case study which demonstrates the practical importance of the formal process

  1. MERCURY CONTAMINATED MATERIAL DECONTAMINATION METHODS: INVESTIGATION AND ASSESSMENT; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    2001-01-01

    Over the years mercury has been recognized as having serious impacts on human health and the environment. This recognition has led to numerous studies that deal with the properties of various mercury forms, the development of methods to quantify and speciate the forms, fate and transport, toxicology studies, and the development of site remediation and decontamination technologies. This report reviews several critical areas that will be used in developing technologies for cleaning mercury from mercury-contaminated surfaces of metals and porous materials found in many DOE facilities. The technologies used for decontamination of water and mixed wastes (solid) are specifically discussed. Many technologies that have recently appeared in the literature are included in the report. Current surface decontamination processes have been reviewed, and the limitations of these technologies for mercury decontamination are discussed. Based on the currently available technologies and the processes published recently in the literature, several processes, including strippable coatings, chemical cleaning with iodine/iodide lixiviant, chemisorbing surface wipes with forager sponge and grafted cotton, and surface/pore fixation through amalgamation or stabilization, have been identified as potential techniques for decontamination of mercury-contaminated metal and porous surfaces. Their potential merits and applicability are discussed. Finally, two processes, strippable coatings and chemical cleaning with iodine/iodide lixiviant, were experimentally investigated in Phase II of this project

  2. Solving decontaminable flooring problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Pennsylvania Power and Light wanted to cover deteriorating concrete in unit 2 of its Susquehanna BWR with a smooth, durable, decontaminable coating. Traditionally, floors in the plant had been coated with epoxy paint, but many of these floors suffered delamination, and failed in three to five years. Painting with epoxy would also interrupt operations for as much as three days while the floor dried, yet critical instruments in some areas had to be monitored at least once per shift. In addition, conventional floor surface preparation produced dust and vibration around sensitive equipment. The solution was a dustless scabbling system for surface preparation, followed by the installation of a high-strength acrylic industrial floor known as Silakal. The work was carried out by Pentek. Silikal bonds to the underlying concrete, so that delamination of the floor will not occur even under severe traffic conditions. Another advantage of this type of flooring is that it cures in one hour, so floor resurfacing has only minimal impact on plant operations. (author)

  3. Decontamination technology assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.P.; Konzek, G.J.; Schneider, K.J.; Smith, R.I.

    1988-01-01

    This study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to identify and technically assess foreign decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) technology developments that may represent significant improvements over D and D technology currently available or under development in the United States. Technology need areas for nuclear power reactor decommissioning operations were identified and prioritized using the results of past light water rector (LWR) decommissioning studies to quantitatively evaluate the potential for reducing cost and decommissioning worker radiation dose for each major decommissioning activity. Based on these identified needs, current foreign D and D technologies of potential interest to the U.S. were identified through personal contacts and the collection and review of an extensive body of D and D literature. These technologies were then assessed qualitatively to evaluate their uniqueness, potential for a significant reduction in D and D costs and/or worker radiation dose, development status, and other factors affecting their value and applicability to U.S. needs

  4. Electroosmotic decontamination of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostick, W.D.; Bush, S.A.; Marsh, G.C.; Henson, H.M.; Box, W.D.; Morgan, I.L.

    1993-03-01

    A method is described for the electroosmotic decontamination of concrete surfaces, in which an electrical field is used to induce migration of ionic contaminants from porous concrete into an electrolyte solution that may be disposed of as a low-level liquid radioactive waste (LLRW); alternately, the contaminants from the solution can be sorbed onto anion exchange media in order to prevent contaminant buildup in the solution and to minimize the amount of LLRW generated. We have confirmed the removal of uranium (and infer the removal of 99 Tc) from previously contaminated concrete surfaces. In a typical experimental configuration, a stainless steel mesh is placed in an electrolyte solution contained within a diked cell to serve as the negative electrode (cathode) and contaminant collection medium, respectively, and an existing metal penetration (e.g., piping, conduit, or rebar reinforcement within the concrete surface) serves as the positive electrode (anode) to complete the cell. Typically we have achieved 70 to >90% reductions in surface activity by applying 2 )

  5. New decontamination technologies for environmental applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.P.; Arrowsmith, H.W.; McCoy, M.W.

    1981-01-01

    The technologies discussed represent a versatile collection of tools and approaches for environmental decontamination applications. The fixatives provide a means for gaining and maintaining control of large contaminated areas, for decontaminating large surface areas, and for protecting equipment and supplies used in decontamination operations. The other decontamination techniques together provide a method for removing loose surface contamination from almost all classes of materials and surfaces. These techniques should have wide application both as direct decontamination processes and for the cleaning of tools and equipment used in the decontamination operations

  6. Options and strategies in decontamination for decommissioning: after safe enclosure or directly after shutdown. Experiences in 2012; Opciones y Estrategias en Descontaminacion para el Desmantelamiento: Desmantelamiento aplazado o inmediato. Experiencias en 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sempere Belda, L.; Topf, C.; Moreira do Amaral, J. P.

    2013-07-01

    During the last years AREVA has been performing numerous large scale chemical decontaminations, including the simultaneous decontamination of the complete primary circuit and auxiliary systems ('Full System Decontamination'). Three of them have were completed during the course of the last twelve months, in the nuclear power plants of Chooz A in France and of Unterweser and Neckarwestheim 1 in Germany. This paper compares the consequences for the performance of the decontamination derived from the different decommissioning philosophies adopted: Immediate decommissioning after ceasing operation in the case of Unterweser and Neckarwestheim 1, and delayed dismantlement after safe enclosure (SAFSTORE) in the case of Chooz A. The authors, responsible for the application and process control also from a technical point of view, comment on the results obtained and on the differences between these approaches.

  7. Environmental and occupational hazards associated with decontamination solutions (a)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levanthal, L.

    1985-01-01

    Some of the reagents employed in the decontamination of reactor coolant systems are potentially hazardous. Potential exposure to decontamination agents by operating personnel, or members of the general population, could occur during use, processing, transportation to, or disposal at a low-level waste site. Federal and state agencies have promulgated regulations relevant to the disposal of decontamination solution waste to prevent acute or chronic exposures. In particular, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Department of Transportation (DOT), Department of Labor - Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), State of South Carolina, State of Nevada, and the State of Washington have such regulations. These regulations may impact on the choice of decontamination solutions, operations procedures, processing methods, or disposal methods. Laws and regulations relate to both chemically hazardous, or toxic materials and to radioactive hazards. Laws which regulate the exposure of workers and the general public to effluents and emissions during processing, disposal and transport have been abstracted. As a result of these regulations, utilities are required to obtain permits to perform monitoring and sampling of personnel and the on-site and off-site environment, provide proper protective clothing and ventilation, make certain the solutions are properly contained during use, storage and processing, and destroy and/or properly immobilize the residues for disposal. Waste treatment processes such as neutralization, ion exchange, evaporation, incineration, etc., must not produce, nor result in hazardous emissions, effluents, residues, or hazards to workers. The laws also stipulate record keeping and documentation

  8. Sustainable siting procedure of small hydroelectric plants: The Greek experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsoutsos, Theocharis; Maria, Efpraxia; Mathioudakis, Vassilis

    2007-01-01

    This paper aims to present the procedure under which a sustainable plant, like a small hydroelectric plant (SHP), can be installed and deployed, especially in countries with complicated administrative and legislative systems. Those must be defined by the rules that characterize sustainable spatial planning, which aims at the environmental protection, the insurance of better living conditions and finally at the economic development within the frame of the principle of sustainability and its three basic dimensions: social, economical and environmental. The main principles of spatial planning are accepted from the jurisprudence of the Hellenic Council of State, either as an appropriate condition for the protection of important ecosystems or as specific expression of the principle of prevention of environmental damage. In this framework it is accepted that the development is experienced, initially to a total and general planning, whose essential part is the assessment and modification of distributed land uses. Besides, the main characteristics of the siting of SHPs and the criteria demanded for their smooth integration and operation are presented

  9. Hydrogen isotope separation experience at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.W.

    1993-01-01

    Savannah River Site (SRS) is a sole producer of tritium for US Weapons Program. SRS has built Facilities, developed the tritium handling processes, and operated safely for the last forty years. Tritium is extracted from the irradiated reactor target, purified, mixed with deuterium, and loaded to the booster gas bottle in the weapon system for limited lifetime. Tritium is recovered from the retired bottle and recycled. Newly produced tritium is branded into the recycled tritium. One of the key process is the hydrogen isotope separation that tritium is separated from deuterium and protium. Several processes have been used for the hydrogen isotope separation at SRS: Thermal Diffusion Column (TD), Batch Cryogenic Still (CS), and Batch Chromatography called Fractional Sorption (FS). TD and CS requires straight vertical columns. The overall system separation factor depends on the length of the column. These are three story building high and difficult to put in glove box. FS is a batch process and slow operation. An improved continuous chromatographic process called Thermal Cycling Absorption Process (TCAP) has been developed. It is small enough to be about to put in a glove box yet high capacity comparable to CS. The SRS tritium purification processes can be directly applicable to the Fusion Fuel Cycle System of the fusion reactor

  10. Y-12 Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant is part of the Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) Programs (ERWM). The objective of the ER Program is to provide Y-12 the capability to meet applicable environmental regulations through facility development activities and site remedial actions. The WM Program supports the ER program. The D and D Program provides collective management of sites within the Plant which are in need of decontamination and decommissioning efforts, prioritizes those areas in terms of health, safety, and environmental concerns, and implements the appropriate level of remedial action. The D and D Program provides support to identifiable facilities which formerly served one or more of the many Plant functions. Program activities include (1) surveillance and maintenance of facilities awaiting decommissioning; (2) planning safe and orderly facility decommissioning; and (3) implementing a program to accomplish facility disposition in a safe, cost effective, and timely manner. In order to achieve the first objective, a formal plan which documents the surveillance and maintenance needs for each facility has been prepared. This report provides this documentation for the Y-12 facilities currently included in the D and D Program, as well as those planned for future inclusion in the Program, and includes projected resource requirements for the planning period of FY 1993 through FY 2000

  11. Toshiba's decontamination technologies for the decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Yuki; Yaita, Yumi; Sakai, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    For the decommissioning, two types of decontamination process are necessary, 1) system decontamination before dismantling and 2) decontamination of dismantling waste. Toshiba has been developing the decontamination technologies for the both purposes from the viewpoint of minimizing the secondary waste. For the system decontamination before dismantling, chemical decontamination process, such as T-OZON, can be applicable for stainless steel or carbon steel piping. For the decontamination of dismantling waste, several types of process have been developed to apply variety of shapes and materials. For the simple shape materials, physical decontamination process, such as blast decontamination, is effective. We have developed new blast decontamination process with highly durable zirconia particle. It can be used repeatedly and secondary waste can be reduced compared with conventional blast particle. For the complex shape materials, chemical decontamination process can be applied that formic acid decontamination process for carbon steel and electrolytic reduction decontamination process with organic acid for stainless steel. These chemicals can be decomposed to carbon dioxide and water and amount of secondary waste can be small. (author)

  12. Decontaminating products for routine decontamination in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, K.

    2001-01-01

    Routine decontamination work that has to be carried out in practical operation includes the cleaning of all kinds of surfaces such as floors, walls and apparatus, the decontamination of professional clothes and of the personnel. In order to ensure a trouble-free functioning of plants for the treatment of waste water and concentrate in nuclear power plants, radioactive liquid wastes appearing in the controlled area should be compatible with the treatment methods in practice. Radioactive concentrates and resides obtained from the treatment methods are mixed with matrix materials like cement or bitumen or treated by roller frame drying and thus are conditioned for intermediate or final storage. Several requirements should be made on decontaminating agents used in the controlled area. Some of these physical-chemical criteria will be described in detail. (R.P.)

  13. Site in a box: Improving the Tier 3 experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dost, J. M.; Fajardo, E. M.; Jones, T. R.; Martin, T.; Tadel, A.; Tadel, M.; Würthwein, F.

    2017-10-01

    The Pacific Research Platform is an initiative to interconnect Science DMZs between campuses across the West Coast of the United States over a 100 gbps network. The LHC @ UC is a proof of concept pilot project that focuses on interconnecting 6 University of California campuses. It is spearheaded by computing specialists from the UCSD Tier 2 Center in collaboration with the San Diego Supercomputer Center. A machine has been shipped to each campus extending the concept of the Data Transfer Node to a cluster in a box that is fully integrated into the local compute, storage, and networking infrastructure. The node contains a full HTCondor batch system, and also an XRootD proxy cache. User jobs routed to the DTN can run on 40 additional slots provided by the machine, and can also flock to a common GlideinWMS pilot pool, which sends jobs out to any of the participating UCs, as well as to Comet, the new supercomputer at SDSC. In addition, a common XRootD federation has been created to interconnect the UCs and give the ability to arbitrarily export data from the home university, to make it available wherever the jobs run. The UC level federation also statically redirects to either the ATLAS FAX or CMS AAA federation respectively to make globally published datasets available, depending on end user VO membership credentials. XRootD read operations from the federation transfer through the nearest DTN proxy cache located at the site where the jobs run. This reduces wide area network overhead for subsequent accesses, and improves overall read performance. Details on the technical implementation, challenges faced and overcome in setting up the infrastructure, and an analysis of usage patterns and system scalability will be presented.

  14. The separation of particulate within PFC decontamination wastewater generated by PFC decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gye Nam; Lee, Sung Yeol; Won, Hui Jun; Jung, Chong Hun; Oh, Won Zin; Park, Jin Ho; Narayan, M.

    2005-01-01

    When PFC(Perfluoro carbonate) decontamination technology is applied to removal of radioactive contaminated particulate adhered at surface during the operation of nuclear research facilities, it is necessary to develop a filtration equipment to reuse of PFC solution due to high price, also to minimize the volume of second wastewater. Contaminated characteristics of hot particulate was investigated and a filtration process was presented to remove suspended radioactive particulate from PFC decontamination wastewater generated on PFC decontamination. The range of size of hot particulate adhered at the surface of research facilities measured by SEM was 0.1∼10μm. Hot particulate of more than 2μm in PFC contamination wastewater was removed by first filter and then hot particulate of more than 0.2μm was removed by second filter. Results of filter experiments showed that filtration efficiency of PVDF(Poly vinylidene fluoride), PP(Polypropylene), Ceramic filter was 95∼97%. A ceramic filter showed a higher filtration efficiency with a little low permeate volume. Also, a ceramic of inorganic compound could be broken easily on experiment and has a high price but was highly stable at radioactivity in comparison of PVDF and PP of a macromolecule which generate H 2 gas in alpha radioactivity environment

  15. Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lussiez, G.

    1994-01-01

    Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radioisotopes and is therefore a RCRA D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Laboratory decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 50 tons and likely to grow substantially of planned decommissioning operations. Thus lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for contaminated lead is removing the superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium under pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 40 psig rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a scaled-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor and is collected in a sump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process. The process generates small volumes of lead slurry that can be solidified and, because it passes the TCLP, is not a mixed waste. The decontaminated lead can be released for recycling

  16. Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lussiez, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radionuclides and is therefore a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Lab. decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 100 metric tons and likely to grow substantially because of planned decommissioning operations. This lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for decontaminating lead is removing the thin superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium under pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 280 kPa (40 psig) rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a sealed-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor grating and is collected in a pump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process

  17. Liquid decontaminants for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, Klaus; Gojowczyk, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Decontaminants used in the nuclear field must meet a variety of requirements. On the one hand, the washing process must remove radioactive contamination and conventional dirt from the items washed. On the other hand, subsequent disposal of the washing water arisings must be feasible by the usual waste disposal pathway. One aspect of particular importance is unproblematic treatment of the radioactively contaminated waste water, as a rule low to medium active, whose final storage must be ensured. Decontaminants must not impair waste treatment processes, such as evaporation, filtration, and centrifuging, as well as further treatment of the concentrates and residues arising which are worked into matrix materials (cementation, bituminization), in drum drying or roller mill drying. For reasons of safety at work and environmental quality, also aspects of human toxicology and ecotoxicology must be taken into account. In this way, handling decontaminants will not jeopardize the health of personnel or cause potential long-term environmental damage. Liquid decontaminants, compared to powders, offer the advantage of automatic dosage. The liquid product is dosed accurately as a function of the washing program used. Liquid decontaminants can be handled safely in hot laundries without causing skin and eye contacts. (orig.)

  18. Salt decontamination demonstration test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snell, E.B.; Heng, C.J.

    1983-06-01

    The Salt Decontamination Demonstration confirmed that the precipitation process could be used for large-scale decontamination of radioactive waste sale solution. Although a number of refinements are necessary to safely process the long-term requirement of 5 million gallons of waste salt solution per year, there were no observations to suggest that any fundamentals of the process require re-evaluation. Major accomplishments were: (1) 518,000 gallons of decontaminated filtrate were produced from 427,000 gallons of waste salt solution from tank 24H. The demonstration goal was to produce a minimum of 200,000 gallons of decontaminated salt solution; (2) cesium activity in the filtrate was reduced by a factor of 43,000 below the cesium activity in the tank 24 solution. This decontamination factor (DF) exceeded the demonstration goal of a DF greater than 10,000; (3) average strontium-90 activity in the filtrate was reduced by a factor of 26 to less than 10 3 d/m/ml versus a goal of less than 10 4 d/m/ml; and (4) the concentrated precipitate was washed to a final sodium ion concentration of 0.15 M, well below the 0.225 M upper limit for DWPF feed. These accomplishments were achieved on schedule and without incident. Total radiation exposure to personnel was less than 350 mrem and resulted primarily from sampling precipitate slurry inside tank 48. 3 references, 6 figures, 2 tables

  19. DECONTAMINATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR FACILITY REUSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossart, Steven J.; Blair, Danielle M.

    2003-01-01

    As nuclear research and production facilities across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons complex are slated for deactivation and decommissioning (D and D), there is a need to decontaminate some facilities for reuse for another mission or continued use for the same mission. Improved technologies available in the commercial sector and tested by the DOE can help solve the DOE's decontamination problems. Decontamination technologies include mechanical methods, such as shaving, scabbling, and blasting; application of chemicals; biological methods; and electrochemical techniques. Materials to be decontaminated are primarily concrete or metal. Concrete materials include walls, floors, ceilings, bio-shields, and fuel pools. Metallic materials include structural steel, valves, pipes, gloveboxes, reactors, and other equipment. Porous materials such as concrete can be contaminated throughout their structure, although contamination in concrete normally resides in the top quarter-inch below the surface. Metals are normally only contaminated on the surface. Contamination includes a variety of alpha, beta, and gamma-emitting radionuclides and can sometimes include heavy metals and organic contamination regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This paper describes several advanced mechanical, chemical, and other methods to decontaminate structures, equipment, and materials

  20. Full system decontamination feasibility studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denault, R.P.; LeSurf, J.E.; Walschot, F.W.

    1988-01-01

    Many chemical decontaminations have been performed on subsystems in light water reactors (BWRs and PWRs) but none on the full system (including the fuel) of large, (>500 MWe) investor owned reactors. Full system decontaminations on pressure-tubed reactors have been shown to facilitate maintenance, inspection, repair and replacement of reactor components. Further advantages are increased reactor availability and plant life extension. A conceptual study has been performed for EPRI (for PWRs) and Commonwealth Edison Co (for BWRs) into the applicability and cost benefit of full system decontaminations (FSD). The joint study showed that FSDs in both PWRs and BWRs, with or without the fuel included in the decontamination, are feasible and cost beneficial provided a large amount of work is to be done following the decontamination. The large amounts of radioactive waste generated can be managed using current technologies. Considerable improvements in waste handling, and consequent cost savings, can be obtained if new techniques which are now reaching commercial application are used. (author)

  1. Radioactive Decontamination by Strippable Paint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chantaraparprachoom, N.; Mishima, K.

    1998-01-01

    The strippable paint, one of the adhesion method, is to decontaminate solid surface of materials or/and a large area. Two kinds of specimen planchet, SUS 304 stainless steel and polycarbonate plastic, contaminated with radioactive 137 Cs were studied under various conditions. It included surface bottom types, the flat and convex concentric circle type, normal condition at room temperature and overheat condition (∼80 degree celsius). This method used coating paints which contains some elements to have a reaction with radioactive materials selectively. ALARA-Decon clear, Rempack-X200 clear, JD-P5-Mrs.Coat and Pro-Blue-color guard were selected to use as the coating paints. The contaminated surface was coated by the strippable paint under the optimum time, followed by peeling the paint seal. The Rempack-X200 showed the best result, the highest decontamination efficiency which are about 99-100% for all conditions of specimens. The JD-P5 and ALARA-Decon showed good results, which are 98-99% decontamination efficiency for the normal condition set of specimens and about 94-97% for the overheat set of specimens. They can decontaminate polycarbonate specimens better than stainless steel specimens. The Pro-Blue-color guard showed the lowest decontamination efficiency of which 60% for polycarbonate specimens at normal condition and 40%, 30% for stainless steel specimens at normal and overheat conditions respectively. There was no effects of surface bottom types significantly

  2. A State of the Art Report on the Case Study of Hot Cell Decontamination and Refurbishment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, H. J.; Jung, C. H.; Moon, J. K.; Park, G. I.; Song, K. C

    2008-08-15

    As the increase of the operation age of the domestic high radiation facilities such as IMEF, PIEF and DFDF, the necessity of decontamination and refurbishment of hot cells in these facilities is also increased. In the near future, the possibilities of refurbishment of hot cells in compliance with the new regulations, the reuse of hot cells for the other purposes and the decommissioning of the facilities also exist. To prepare against the decontamination and refurbishment of hot cells, the reports on the refurbishment, decommissioning and decontamination experiences of hot cells in USA, Japan, France, Belgium and Great Britain were investigated. ANL of USA performed the project on the decontamination of hot cells. The purpose of the project was to practically eliminate the radioactive emissions of Rn-220 to the environment and to restore the hot cells to an empty restricted use condition. The five hot cells were emptied and decontaminated for restricted use. Chemical processing facility in JAEA of Japan was used for the reprocessing study of spent fuels, hot cells in CPF were refurbished from 1995 for the tests of the newly developed reprocessing process. In a first stage, decommissioning and decontamination were fully performed by the remote operation Then, decommissioning and decontamination were performed manually. By the newly developed process, they reported that the radiation exposure of workers were satisfactorily reduced. In the other countries, they also make an effort for the refurbishment and decontamination of hot cells and it is inferred that they accumulate experiences in these fields.

  3. Experiences from site-specific landslide early warning systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michoud, C.; Bazin, S.; Blikra, L. H.; Derron, M.-H.; Jaboyedoff, M.

    2013-10-01

    Landslide early warning systems (EWSs) have to be implemented in areas with large risk for populations or infrastructures when classical structural remediation measures cannot be set up. This paper aims to gather experiences of existing landslide EWSs, with a special focus on practical requirements (e.g., alarm threshold values have to take into account the smallest detectable signal levels of deployed sensors before being established) and specific issues when dealing with system implementations. Within the framework of the SafeLand European project, a questionnaire was sent to about one-hundred institutions in charge of landslide management. Finally, we interpreted answers from experts belonging to 14 operational units related to 23 monitored landslides. Although no standard requirements exist for designing and operating EWSs, this review highlights some key elements, such as the importance of pre-investigation work, the redundancy and robustness of monitoring systems, the establishment of different scenarios adapted to gradual increasing of alert levels, and the necessity of confidence and trust between local populations and scientists. Moreover, it also confirms the need to improve our capabilities for failure forecasting, monitoring techniques and integration of water processes into landslide conceptual models.

  4. Collaborating on Facebook: Teachers Exchanging Experiences Through Social Networking Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da Cunha Júnior F.,

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the use of Facebook for educational purposes, as a collaborative online space for enabling communication among teachers from different schools. The article describes how a group of 43 teachers on Facebook, from various schools in the southeast region of Brazil used a group on Facebook as a collaborative space for communicating among each other. On the group, these teachers shared experiences about the use of digital technologies in their secondary education classes. This study is based on Cultural Historical Activity Theory, considering the group on Facebook as a tool for mediating communication . The objective of this study is to explore why and how teachers collaborated with each other on Facebook, and to study how communication among them evolved in the process. We examined the posts on that group from 2012 to 2014, and two questionnaires responded online by the teachers in June 2012 and in December 2013. Our findings suggest that teachers tend to critically collaborate in smaller groups and that further online communication evolved outside the group of teachers, with the creation of smaller groups on Facebook inside their schools.

  5. Decontamination process development for gravels contaminated with uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gye Nam; Park, Uk Ryang; Kim, Seung Su; Kim, Won Suk; Moon, Jei Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    It is impossible to scrub gravels in a washing tank, because gravels sinks to the bottom of the washing tank. In addition, when electrokinetic decontamination technology is applied to gravels larger than 10 cm, the removal efficiency of uranium from the gravels is reduced, because electro-osmotic flux at the surface of the gravel in electrokinetic cell reduces owing to a reduction of the particle surface area attributable to large-sized gravel. The volume ratio of gravel larger than10 cm in total volume of the soil in KAERI was about 20%. Therefore, it is necessary to study the decontamination process of gravels contaminated with radionuclides. The optimum number of washings for contaminated gravels is considered to be two. In addition, the removal efficiency of contaminated gravel was not related to its weight. For an electrokinetic-electrodialytic decontamination period of 5 days, 10 days, 15 days, and 20 days, {sup 238}U in gravel was removed by about 42%, 64%, 74%, and 80%, respectively. The more the decontamination time elapsed, the greater the reduction of the removal efficiency ratio of {sup 238}U. The decontamination process for gravels was generated on the basis of the results of washing and electrokinetic electrodialtic experiments.

  6. Alpha Decontamination and Disassembly Pilot Facility. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daugherty, B.A.; Clark, H.E.

    1985-04-01

    The Alpha Decontamination and Disassembly (AD and D) Pilot Facility was built to develop and demonstrate a reference process for the decontamination and size reduction of noncombustible transuranic (TRU) waste. The goals of the reference process were to remove >99% of the surface contamination to the high-level waste tanks, and to achieve volume reduction factors greater than 15:1. Preliminary bench-scale decontamination work was accomplished at Savannah River Laboratory (SRL), establishing a reference decontamination process. Initially, the pilot facility did not achieve the decontamination goals. As the program continued, and modifications to the process were made, coupon analysis idicated that 99% of the surface contamination was removed to the high-level drain system. Prior to the AD and D Pilot Facility, no size reduction work had been done at SRL. Several other Department of Energy (DOE) facilities were experimenting with plasma arc torches for size reduction work. Their methods were employed in the AD and D hot cell with moderate success. The experimental work concluded with recommendations for further testing of other size reduction techniques. 11 figs., 6 tabs

  7. Advanced technologies for decontamination and conversion of scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muth, T.R.; Shasteen, K.E.; Liby, A.L.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) accumulated large quantities of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) through historic maintenance activities. The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) of major sites formerly engaged in production of nuclear materials and manufacture of nuclear weapons will generate additional quantities of RSM, as much as 3 million tons of such metal according to a recent study. The recycling of RSM is quickly becoming appreciated as a key strategy in DOE's cleanup of contaminated sites and facilities

  8. Chemical decontaminating method for stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onuma, Tsutomu; Akimoto, Hidetoshi.

    1990-01-01

    Radioactive metal wastes comprising passivated stainless steels are chemically decontaminated to such a radioactivity level as that of usual wastes. The present invention for chemically decontaminating stainless steels comprises a first step of immersing decontaminates into a sulfuric acid solution and a second step of immersing them into an aqueous solution prepared by adding oxidative metal salts to sulfuric acid, in which a portion of the surface of stainless steels as decontaminates are chemically ground to partially expose substrate materials and then the above-mentioned decontamination steps are applied. More than 90% of radioactive materials are removed in this method by the dissolution of the exposed substrate materials and peeling of cruds secured to the surface of the materials upon dissolution. This method is applicable to decontamination of articles having complicate shapes, can reduce the amount of secondary wastes after decontamination and also remarkably shorten the time required for decontamination. (T.M.)

  9. Comparative scrub solution tests for decontamination of transuranic radionuclides from soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, J.R.; Kochen, R.L.; Rutherford, D.W.; Riordan, G.A.; Delaney, I.C.

    1982-08-01

    Soil decontamination tests were done using three scrubbing solutions on five different transuranic-contaminated soils from Department of Energy sites. The soils came from Rocky Flats, Colorado; Hanford, Washington; Mound Facility, Ohio; Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho; and Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico. Decontamination was effected by physical and chemical means. A pH 12.5 scrub effected decontamination by serving as a hydraulic grading and attrition scrub medium; this solution did not solubilize the actinide contamination. A 2% HNO 3 , 0.2% HF, 2% pine oil, and 5% Calgon solution effected decontamination by physical and chemical means; this solution solubilized particulate actinide and actinide dispersed on the surface of soil particles. A 2N HCl scrub was also used to effect decontamination by physical and chemical means; this reagent solubilized soil constituents, removing contamination that had migrated into mineral surfaces. Only Rocky Flats soil was effectively decontaminated by the high pH solution although all soils had an enrichment of the activity in the -150 mesh fraction. Attrition scrubbing with both acid solutions had a better decontamination ability for the +150 mesh fraction for Hanford, INEL, and LANL soils. In addition, the acid solutions solubilized some of the plutonium and had a decontamination effect on the fine fractions

  10. Mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposite for decontamination of sulfur mustard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praveen Kumar, J.; Prasad, G.K.; Ramacharyulu, P.V.R.K.; Garg, P.; Ganesan, K.

    2013-01-01

    Mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied as sorbent decontaminants against sulfur mustard, a well known chemical warfare agent. They were prepared by precipitation pyrolysis method and characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. Obtained data indicated the presence of mesopores with diameter ranging from 2 to 80 nm and the materials exhibited relatively high surface area 86 m 2 g −1 when compared to the individual metal oxide nanoparticles. Reactive sites of mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied by infrared spectroscopy technique using pyridine as a probe molecule. These materials demonstrated superior decontamination properties against sulfur mustard when compared to single component metal oxides and decontaminated it to divinyl sulfide, chloroethyl vinyl sulfide, hemisulfur mustard, etc. - Graphical abstract: Mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied as sorbent decontaminants against sulfur mustard, a well known chemical warfare agent. These materials demonstrated superior decontamination properties against sulfur mustard and decontaminated it to divinyl sulfide, chloroethyl vinyl sulfide, hemisulfur mustard, etc. - Highlights: • Preparation of mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposite. • CuO–ZnO with better surface area was synthesized by precipitation pyrolysis. • Decontamination of HD using mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposite. • HD decontaminated by elimination and hydrolysis reactions

  11. Mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposite for decontamination of sulfur mustard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Praveen Kumar, J.; Prasad, G.K., E-mail: gkprasad2001@yahoo.com; Ramacharyulu, P.V.R.K.; Garg, P.; Ganesan, K.

    2013-11-01

    Mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied as sorbent decontaminants against sulfur mustard, a well known chemical warfare agent. They were prepared by precipitation pyrolysis method and characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. Obtained data indicated the presence of mesopores with diameter ranging from 2 to 80 nm and the materials exhibited relatively high surface area 86 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} when compared to the individual metal oxide nanoparticles. Reactive sites of mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied by infrared spectroscopy technique using pyridine as a probe molecule. These materials demonstrated superior decontamination properties against sulfur mustard when compared to single component metal oxides and decontaminated it to divinyl sulfide, chloroethyl vinyl sulfide, hemisulfur mustard, etc. - Graphical abstract: Mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied as sorbent decontaminants against sulfur mustard, a well known chemical warfare agent. These materials demonstrated superior decontamination properties against sulfur mustard and decontaminated it to divinyl sulfide, chloroethyl vinyl sulfide, hemisulfur mustard, etc. - Highlights: • Preparation of mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposite. • CuO–ZnO with better surface area was synthesized by precipitation pyrolysis. • Decontamination of HD using mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposite. • HD decontaminated by elimination and hydrolysis reactions.

  12. Precipitation process for supernate decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, L.M.; Kilpatrick, L.L.

    1982-11-01

    A precipitation and adsorption process has been developed to remove cesium, strontium, and plutonium from water-soluble, high-level radioactive waste. An existing waste tank serves as the reaction vessel and the process begins with the addition of a solution of sodium tetraphenylborate and a slurry of sodium titanate to the contained waste salt solution. Sodium tetraphenylborate precipitates the cesium and sodium titanate adsorbs the strontium and plutonium. The precipitate/adsorbate is then separated from the decontaminated salt solution by crossflow filtration. This new process offers significant capital savings over an earlier ion exchange process for salt decontamination. Chemical and small-scale engineering studies with actual waste are reported. The effect of many variables on the decontamination factors and filter performance are defined

  13. A scaffold easy to decontaminate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourek, D.

    1992-01-01

    The conventional scaffold used in the assembling work and in revisions of technological facilities at nuclear power plants has many drawbacks. The most serious of them are a high amount of radioactive waste arising from the decontamination (planing) of the floor timber and from the discarding of damaged irreparable parts, and a considerable corrosion of the carbon steel supporting structure after the decontamination. A detailed description is given of a novel scaffold assembly which can be decontaminated and which exhibits many assets, in particular a good mechanical resistance (also to bad weather), a lower weight, and the use of prepreg floor girders for the construction of service platforms or scaffold bridges which can readily be assembled from the pressed pieces in a modular way. (Z.S.). 4 figs., 4 refs

  14. Chemical decontamination of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onuma, Tsutomu; Akimoto, Hidetoshi

    1991-01-01

    The present invention concerns a method for chemical decontamination of radioactive metal waste materials contaminated with radioactive materials on the surface, generated in radioactive materials-handling facilities. The invention is comprised of a method of chemical decontamination of stainless steel, characterized by comprising a first process of immersing a stainless steel-based metal waste material contaminated by radioactive materials on the surface in a sulfuric acid solution and second process of immersing in an aqueous solution of sulfuric acid and oxidizing metal salt, in which a portion of the surface of the stainless steel to be decontaminated is polished mechanically to expose a portion of the base material before the above first and second processes. 1 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Decontamination of polluted soils in the new Federal States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhardt, K.

    1993-01-01

    In the course of the privatisation of companies by the Treuhandanstalt (THA), there is a financial risk involved for the property user which is hard to estimate, should the suspicion arise that the property is contaminated with soil pollutants of older origin. Both the Federal Government and the States are prepared to meet some of the costs of the required decontamination treatment in the new Federal States if certain conditions are fulfilled. The necessary inspection and decontamination measures must, in many cases, be cleared with the Treuhandanstalt beforehand. The experiences of the Thuga AG in the inspection and decontamination of pollutants of older origin, especially in the new Federal States, is introduced here. (orig.) [de

  16. Attapulgite, a decontaminating medium, research tool in the radioprotection field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panciatici, G.; Belfiore, A.; Poggianti, M.

    1993-01-01

    Gels based on attapulgite, obtained by mixing attapulgite, a clay, with water or chemicals have been used as decontaminating agents. The method has been optimized through extensive scale laboratory experiments carried out under standard conditions. A wide variety of materials, used in nuclear technologies, and significant radionuclides have been tested. Gels obtained with water only in some cases allow full decontamination, when acids are added to clay, complete contamination removal, is possible except for extreme pHs radionuclides solution and on non-passivated or porous surfaces. The optimized decontaminating technique has successively been set up and applied on materials contaminated by routine or accident. Laboratory scale results have been confirmed through practical use. Process data are reported. This method is simple to perform and requires no special equipment. No liquid radioactive waste arises from the process and the resulting solid waste can be conditioned with cement

  17. Electrolytic decontamination of conductive materials for hazardous waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedman, D.E.; Martinez, H.E.; Nelson, T.O.

    1996-01-01

    Electrolytic removal of plutonium and americium from stainless steel and uranium surfaces has been demonstrated. Preliminary experiments were performed on the electrochemically based decontamination of type 304L stainless steel in sodium nitrate solutions to better understand the metal removal effects of varying cur-rent density, pH, and nitrate concentration parameters. Material removal rates and changes in surface morphology under these varying conditions are reported. Experimental results indicate that an electropolishing step before contamination removes surface roughness, thereby simplifying later electrolytic decontamination. Sodium nitrate based electrolytic decontamination produced the most uniform stripping of material at low to intermediate pH and at sodium nitrate concentrations of 200 g L -1 and higher. Stirring was also observed to increase the uniformity of the stripping process

  18. Decontamination of biological warfare agents by a microwave plasma torch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Wilson; Lai, Henry; Kuo, Spencer P.; Tarasenko, Olga; Levon, Kalle

    2005-01-01

    A portable arc-seeded microwave plasma torch running stably with airflow is described and applied for the decontamination of biological warfare agents. Emission spectroscopy of the plasma torch indicated that this torch produced an abundance of reactive atomic oxygen that could effectively oxidize biological agents. Bacillus cereus was chosen as a simulant of Bacillus anthracis spores for biological agent in the decontamination experiments. Decontamination was performed with the airflow rate of 0.393 l/s, corresponding to a maximum concentration of atomic oxygen produced by the torch. The experimental results showed that all spores were killed in less than 8 s at 3 cm distance, 12 s at 4 cm distance, and 16 s at 5 cm distance away from the nozzle of the torch

  19. Decontamination of radioactive metal surfaces by plasma arc gouging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osamu, K.; Makoto, K.; Takao, K.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out to develop a new decontamination method that applies plasma arc gouging for removal of a thin surface layer from radioactively contaminated metallic wastes. Plasma arc gouging has been carried out on stainless steel and carbon steel pipes. The torch nozzle and gouging angle have been optimized to increase the decontamination rate. A water film is formed on the pipe surface to reduce both dust concentration in the off-gas and prevent slag particles, which are splashed up by the plasma gas, from adhering to the gouged surface. Using chromium-electroplated carbon steel pipes as samples, a decontamination factor of >10 3 is obtained after gouging to a depth of about0.5 mm in combination with ultrasonic cleaning

  20. Municipalities' opinions about decontamination in special decontamination area. Records from three and a half years after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Kota

    2015-01-01

    This study discusses opinions of 11 municipalities in Fukushima Prefecture designated as Special Decontamination Area as of the end of September 2014, about three and a half years after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. This study shows that (1) more than half of the municipalities recognize that decontamination activities of the national government which is responsible for decontamination in Special Decontamination Area are inadequate, (2) more than half of the municipalities recognize that residents cannot live their lives with a sense of safety and security unless air radiation dose is reduced to the level before the accident or less than 0.23 μSv/h, and (3) many municipalities recognize that residents will not be able to live their lives with a sense of safety and security even if the national government implements decontamination, (4) many municipalities points out 'Inability to secure enough temporary storage sites' and 'Inappropriateness of the decontamination policy and methods for forests or reservoir' as problems for the promotion of decontamination, and (5) almost all the municipalities recognize the necessity of the installation of interim storage facilities to accelerate the reconstruction of towns. (author)

  1. Grimsel test site. Excavation disturbed zone experiment (EDZ)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frieg, B.; Blaser, P. C.; Adams, J.; Dollinger, H.; Kuhlmann, U.; Lanyon, G. W.

    2012-07-01

    The ‘Excavation Disturbed Zone (EDZ) Experiment’ was conducted at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in the framework of safety analysis of deep geological repositories for radioactive wastes. It concentrated on investigating the hydraulic regime of the near-field of drilled tunnel sections under fully saturated conditions, with the aim of contributing to the development of methods for measuring and modelling axial water flow along tunnels and caverns. The studies focused on the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the rock mass in the direct vicinity of the tunnel wall. The EDZ is defined as the zone around the tunnel where excavation has altered the rock properties. The selected test location was a tunnel section where mechanical stressing of the rock and some breakouts had been observed. In-situ stress measurements were performed in order to record the actual stress redistribution in the tunnel near-field induced by excavation of the tunnel. A small stress increase and microfissures could be identified in the tunnel near-field. The stress measurements and the results of the geological mapping formed the basis for the rock mechanical modelling of the EDZ. Two different models of the development and geometry of the EDZ were used: (a) the regional 3D stress field modelling indicated that the topography has a significant influence on the primary stress field; a good agreement between the measured and calculated stresses in the GTS was achieved by applying an additional far-field tectonic stress component; (b) with the local 2D numerical disturbed zone modelling of the tunnel section itself, stress redistributions, possible plastifications and joint behaviour were investigated; all displacements of the rock matrix and the shear displacements of the discontinuities seem to be the result of the tunnel excavation; maximum shear deformations of 2 - 5 mm occur at the tunnel wall. Prior to the hydraulic test phase, the test location was decoupled from the normal GTS tunnel

  2. Resurvey of site stability quadrilaterals, Otay Mountain and Quincy, California. [San Andreas fault experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, C. H.

    1977-01-01

    Trilateration quadrilaterals established across two faults near the San Andreas Fault Experiment laser/satellite ranging sites were resurveyed after four years. No evidence of significant tectonic motion was found.

  3. [Thermodynamic forecasting of reagents composition for soils decontamination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, V P; Nikolaevskiĭ, V B; Chirkina, I V; Shcheglov, M Iu

    2009-01-01

    Based on thermodynamic studies, the authors conducted laboratory experiments on searching optimal composition of leaching reagents solution for soils decontamination, when contaminated with Cs-137, of activity coefficient for caesium sulfate microquantities in macrocomponents solutions. The method could be used for modelling the radionuclides phase equillibrium and relocations in soils.

  4. Evaluation of the efficacy of decontamination methods examined at Japanese garden located in Chiba Prefectural Kashiwa-no-ha Park

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Yujiro; Inoue, Tomohiro; Naito, Suekazu; Takahashi, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of decontamination methods was evaluated with the measurement of 1cm dose equivalent rate and concentration of radioactive caesium in the soil, plants and water of the pond before and after decontamination at Japanese garden located in Chiba Prefectural Kashiwa-no-ha Park. Examined decontamination methods were: 1) The topsoil of walkway was stripped and removed to the depth of 10mm. 2) Washing the stone pavement walkway using high-pressure water jet washer. At the height of 50cm, we observed 45% and 36% of 1cm dose rate equivalent dose reduction rate (the natural dose rate derived from the ground was subtracted) for 1) and 2) decontamination methods respectively. Due to the decontamination process, the measurement value of 1cm equivalent dose rate decreased below 0.23μSv/h at most of the examined sites, which showed significant efficacy of decontamination methods performed at this Japanese garden. (author)

  5. New Reactor Siting, Licensing and Construction Experience. Proceedings of the 2. CNRA International Workshop on 'New Reactor Siting, Licensing and Construction Experience'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This report documents the proceedings from the 2. Workshop on New Reactor Siting, Licensing and Construction Experience. A total of 45 specialists from 16 countries and international organisations attended. The meeting was sponsored by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities and hosted by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (U.S.NRC). The objectives of the workshop were to provide a forum to exchange information on lessons learned from siting, licensing and constructing new nuclear power plants around the world. Key focus areas included siting practices and regulatory positions that have been enhanced as a result of the Fukushima accident; lessons learned from licensing and design review approaches and challenges, construction experience and recommendations for regulatory oversight; and regulatory cooperation on generic and design specific issues through the MDEP specific working groups. The workshop was structured in 4 technical sessions, each followed by ample time for panel discussions. The first technical session was devoted to regulatory cooperation on generic and design specific issues, MDEP working groups (EPR, AP1000), vendor inspection co-operation, digital I and C, and codes and standards. The second technical session was intended to discuss and share regulatory positions on siting practices and enhancements as a result of lessons learned from Fukushima accident. The third technical session addressed the construction experience and regulatory oversight of new reactor construction activities. And the fourth technical session included presentations on the lessons learned from regulatory licensing reviews of new reactor designs

  6. Evaluation of six decontamination processes on actinide and fission product contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conner, C.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Chen, L.

    1995-01-01

    In-situ decontamination technologies were evaluated for their ability to: (1) reduce equipment contamination levels to allow either free release of the equipment or land disposal, (2) minimize residues generated by decontamination, and (3) generate residues that are compatible with existing disposal technologies. Six decontamination processes were selected. tested and compared to 4M nitric acid, a traditional decontamination agent: fluoroboric acid (HBF 4 ), nitric plus hydrofluoric acid, alkaline persulfate followed by citric acid plus oxalic acid, silver(II) plus sodium persulfate plus nitric acid, oxalic acid plus hydrogen peroxide plus hydrofluoric acid, and electropolishing using nitric acid electrolyte. The effectiveness of these solutions was tested using prepared 304 stainless steel couponds contaminated with uranium, plutonium, americium, or fission products. The decontamination factor for each of the solutions and tests conditions were determined; the results of these experiments are presented

  7. Project n.4: local strategies for decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, Ph. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire; Ramzaev, V. [Branch of Institute of Radiation Hygiene, Karchovka, Bryandk (Russian Federation); Antsypov, G. [Chernobyl State Committee of the Republic of Belarus, (Belarus); Sobotovich, E. [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Ore formation, Kiev (Ukraine); Anisimova, L. [EMERCOM, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    The efficiencies of a great number of techniques for decontamination or dose reduction in contaminated areas have been investigated by several teams of E.C. and CIS scientists (ECP4 project). Modelling, laboratory and field experiments, and a return from experience from the area contaminated by the Chernobyl accident allowed to assess radiological efficiencies and requirements for the operation of numerous practical solutions. Then those data were supplemented with data on cost and waste generation in order to elaborate all the information for the optimisation of decontamination strategies. Results are presented for about 70 techniques. However, a technique cannot be compared to another from a generic point of view. Rather it is designed for a specific target and the best technology depends on the objectives. It has been decided to implement decision analyses on case studies and the local conditions and objectives have been investigated. Individual doses ranged from 1 to 5 mSv, with the contrasted contributions of internal and external doses. The desire to restore a normal activity in a partially depopulated settlement and concerns about the recent increase in internal doses were typical incentives for action. The decision aiding analysis illustrated that actions can be usually recommended. Results are outlined. (authors). 23 refs.

  8. Project n.4: local strategies for decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, Ph [CEA Centre d` Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire; Ramzaev, V [Branch of Institute of Radiation Hygiene, Karchovka, Bryandk (Russian Federation); Antsypov, G [Chernobyl State Committee of the Republic of Belarus, (Belarus); Sobotovich, E [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Ore formation, Kiev (Ukraine); Anisimova, L [EMERCOM, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-31

    The efficiencies of a great number of techniques for decontamination or dose reduction in contaminated areas have been investigated by several teams of E.C. and CIS scientists (ECP4 project). Modelling, laboratory and field experiments, and a return from experience from the area contaminated by the Chernobyl accident allowed to assess radiological efficiencies and requirements for the operation of numerous practical solutions. Then those data were supplemented with data on cost and waste generation in order to elaborate all the information for the optimisation of decontamination strategies. Results are presented for about 70 techniques. However, a technique cannot be compared to another from a generic point of view. Rather it is designed for a specific target and the best technology depends on the objectives. It has been decided to implement decision analyses on case studies and the local conditions and objectives have been investigated. Individual doses ranged from 1 to 5 mSv, with the contrasted contributions of internal and external doses. The desire to restore a normal activity in a partially depopulated settlement and concerns about the recent increase in internal doses were typical incentives for action. The decision aiding analysis illustrated that actions can be usually recommended. Results are outlined. (authors). 23 refs.

  9. Project n.4: local strategies for decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, Ph.; Antsypov, G.; Sobotovich, E.; Anisimova, L.

    1995-01-01

    The efficiencies of a great number of techniques for decontamination or dose reduction in contaminated areas have been investigated by several teams of E.C. and CIS scientists (ECP4 project). Modelling, laboratory and field experiments, and a return from experience from the area contaminated by the Chernobyl accident allowed to assess radiological efficiencies and requirements for the operation of numerous practical solutions. Then those data were supplemented with data on cost and waste generation in order to elaborate all the information for the optimisation of decontamination strategies. Results are presented for about 70 techniques. However, a technique cannot be compared to another from a generic point of view. Rather it is designed for a specific target and the best technology depends on the objectives. It has been decided to implement decision analyses on case studies and the local conditions and objectives have been investigated. Individual doses ranged from 1 to 5 mSv, with the contrasted contributions of internal and external doses. The desire to restore a normal activity in a partially depopulated settlement and concerns about the recent increase in internal doses were typical incentives for action. The decision aiding analysis illustrated that actions can be usually recommended. Results are outlined. (authors)

  10. Binding affinity and decontamination of dermal decontamination gel to model chemical warfare agent simulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yachao; Elmahdy, Akram; Zhu, Hanjiang; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard

    2018-05-01

    Six chemical warfare agent simulants (trimethyl phosphate, dimethyl adipate, 2-chloroethyl methyl sulfide, diethyl adipate, chloroethyl phenyl sulfide and diethyl sebacate) were studied in in vitro human skin to explore relationship between dermal penetration/absorption and the mechanisms of simulant partitioning between stratum corneum (SC) and water as well as between dermal decontamination gel (DDGel) and water. Both binding affinity to and decontamination of simulants using DDGel were studied. Partition coefficients of six simulants between SC and water (Log P SC/w ) and between DDGel and water (Log P DDGel/w ) were determined. Results showed that DDGel has a similar or higher binding affinity to each simulant compared to SC. The relationship between Log P octanol/water and Log P SC/w as well as between Log P octanol/water and Log P DDGel/w demonstrated that partition coefficient of simulants correlated to their lipophilicity or hydrophilicity. Decontamination efficiency results with DDGel for these simulants were consistent with binding affinity results. Amounts of percentage dose of chemicals in DDGel of trimethyl phosphate, dimethyl adipate, 2-chloroethyl methyl sulfide, diethyl adipate, chloroethyl phenyl sulfide and diethyl sebacate were determined to be 61.15, 85.67, 75.91, 53.53, 89.89 and 76.58, with corresponding amounts absorbed in skin of 0.96, 0.65, 1.68, 0.72, 0.57 and 1.38, respectively. In vitro skin decontamination experiments coupled with a dermal absorption study demonstrated that DDGel can efficiently remove chemicals from skin surface, back-extract from the SC, and significantly reduced chemical penetration into skin or systemic absorption for all six simulants tested. Therefore, DDGel offers a great potential as a NextGen skin Decon platform technology for both military and civilian use. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Radiation survey and management on the reconstructed radioactive work-site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Tao; Liang Shiqiang; Wang Youmei

    2004-12-01

    The experiences of radiation survey and administration in the prophase on reconstructed radioactive work-site are summarized. The advance works are to investigate the reconstructed work-site, settle working plans, devise inspecting flow charts, deal with something in time in the local and train the staffers. The works about prophasic decontaminating, removing and cleaning up the site have been finished, which have established the deep foundation to develop later task. (authors)

  12. Development of small size wall decontamination robot systems in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Tsuneaki; Takahashi, Tsuyosi

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the development of wall decontamination robot systems for nuclear power plants. In nuclear power plants, it is required to reduce maintenance costs, including annual inspection, repairs and so on. Most of such maintenance activities are actually performed after decontamination processes are completed. In particular, the decontamination process of reactor wells is very important for reducing the radiation exposure of human workers. In the past, decontamination of reactor wells used to be done by extra large machine and tools, which caused long working hours and tiresome works. It was one of the reasons maintenance costs couldn't have been easily reduced. There are narrow spaces in the reactor wells that have to be decontaminated by human workers. In order to minimize the radiation exposure to humans, wall decontamination robot systems have been developed. The decontamination robots have rolled brushes and suction mechanisms and are capable of removing contaminants attached to the wall surface of the reactor wells. By making the robots smaller, it is possible to work in narrower spaces. In this paper, the effectiveness of decontamination by the developed robots is shown through experiments in the actual nuclear power plants. (author)

  13. How Clean is Safe? Improving the Effectiveness of Decontamination of Structures and People Following Chemical and Biological Incidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt (Sorensen), B.M.

    2003-04-03

    This report describes a U.S. Department of Energy, (DOE) Chemical and Biological National Security Program project that sought to establish what is known about decontamination of structures, objects, and people following an exposure to chemical or biological materials. Specifically we sought to identify the procedures and protocols used to determine when and how people or buildings are considered ''clean'' following decontamination. To fulfill this objective, the study systematically examined reported decontamination experiences to determine what procedures and protocols are currently employed for decontamination, the timeframe involved to initiate and complete the decontamination process, how the contaminants were identified, the factors determining when people were (or were not) decontaminated, the problems encountered during the decontamination process, how response efforts of agencies were coordinated, and the perceived social psychological effects on people who were decontaminated or who participated in the decontamination process. Findings and recommendations from the study are intended to aid decision-making and to improve the basis for determining appropriate decontamination protocols for recovery planners and policy makers for responding to chemical and biological events.

  14. Radiation decontamination unit for the community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, R L; Danielson, R A; Shultz, H E; Eckert, D E; Hendricks, K O

    1981-05-01

    "Freestanding" radiation decontamination units including surgical capability can be developed and made operational in small/medium sized community hospitals at relatively small cost and with minimal plant reconstruction. Because of the development of nuclear power plants in relatively remote areas and widespread transportation of radioactive materials it is important for hospitals and physicians to be prepared to handle radiation accident victims. The Radiological Assistance Program of the United States Department of Energy and the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center Training Site of Oak Ridge Associated Universities are ready to support individual hospitals and physicians in this endeavor. Adequate planning rather than luck, should be used in dealing with potential radiation accident victims. The radiation emergency team is headed by a physician on duty in the hospital. It is important that the team leader be knowledgeable in radiation accident management and have personnel trained in radiation accident management as members of this team. The senior administrative person on duty is responsible for intramural and extramural communications. Rapid mobilization of the radiation decontamination unit is important. Periodic drills are necessary for this mobilization and the smooth operation of the unit.

  15. Soil decontamination at Rocky Flats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, R.L.; Hayden, J.A.; Alford, C.E.; Kochen, R.L.; Stevens, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    A soils decontamination project was initiated, to remove actinides from soils at Rocky Flats. Wet screening, attrition scrubbing with Calgon at high pH, attrition scrubbing at low pH, and cationic flotation were investigated. Pilot plant studies were carried out. Conceptual designs have been generated for mounting the process in semi-trailers

  16. ORNL decontamination and decommissioning program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    A program has been initiated at ORNL to decontaminate and decommission surplus or abandoned nuclear facilities. Program planning and technical studies have been performed by UCC-ND Engineering. A feasibility study for decommissioning the Metal Recovery Facility, a fuel reprocessing pilot plant, has been completed

  17. Decontamination in a Russian settlement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogh, C.L.; Andersson, Kasper Grann; Barkovsky, A.N.

    1999-01-01

    Decontamination was carried out in an area with three houses in Novo Bobovichi, Bryansk region, Russia, in the autumn of 1995. It was demonstrated that significant reductions in the dose rate both indoor (DRF = 0.34) and outdoor (DRF = 0.20) can be achieved when a controlled cleaning is undertake...

  18. Decontaminating reagents for radioactive systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seddon, W.A.

    1982-01-01

    A decontaminating reagent composition has been developed comprising EDTA, citric acid, oxalic acid, and formic acid. Formic acid inhibits the decomposition of both EDTA and citric acid, and yields oxalic acid as a result of its own radiolysis. The invention includes the improvement of initially incorporating formic acid in the mixture and maintaining the presence of formic acid by at least one further addition

  19. Nuclear reactor vessel decontamination systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    There is disclosed in the present application, a decontamination system for reactor vessels. The system is operatable without entry by personnel into the contaminated vessel before the decontamination operation is carried out and comprises an assembly which is introduced into the vertical cylindrical vessel of the typical boiling water reactor through the open top. The assembly includes a circular track which is centered by guideways permanently installed in the reactor vessel and the track guides opposed pairs of nozzles through which water under very high pressure is directed at the wall for progressively cutting and sweeping a tenacious radioactive coating as the nozzles are driven around the track in close proximity to the vessel wall. The whole assembly is hoisted to a level above the top of the vessel by a crane, outboard slides on the assembly brought into engagement with the permanent guideways and the assembly progressively lowered in the vessel as the decontamination operation progresses. The assembly also includes a low pressure nozzle which forms a spray umbrella above the high pressure nozzles to contain radioactive particles dislodged during the decontamination

  20. Radioactive decontamination through UV laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaporte, Ph.; Gastaud, M.; Sentis, M.; Uteza, O.; Marine, W.; Thouvenot, P.; Alcaraz, J.L.; Le Samedy, J.M.; Blin, D.

    2003-01-01

    A device allowing the radioactive decontamination of metal surfaces through the use of a pulsed UV laser has been designed and tested. This device is composed of a 1 kW excimer laser linked to a bundle of optic fibers and of a system to recover particles and can operate in active zones. Metal surfaces have the peculiarities to trap radio-elements in a superficial layer of oxide that can be eaten away by laser radiation. Different contaminated metals (stainless steels, INCONEL and aluminium) issued from the nuclear industry have been used for the testing. The most important contaminants were 60 Co, 137 Cs, 154-155 Eu and 125 Sb. The ratio of decontamination was generally of 10 and the volume of secondary wastes generating during the process was very low compared with other decontamination techniques. A decontamination speed of 1 m 2 /h has been reached for aluminium. The state of the surface is an important parameter because radio-elements trapped in micro-cracks are very difficult to remove. (A.C.)

  1. Pipe and hose decontamination apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    A pipe and hose decontamination apparatus is disclosed using freshly filtered high pressure Freon solvent in an integrated closed loop to remove radioactive particles or other contaminants from items having a long cylindrical geometry such as hoses, pipes, cables and the like. The pipe and hose decontamination apparatus comprises a chamber capable of accomodating a long cylindrical work piece to be decontaminated. The chamber has a downward sloped bottom draining to a solvent holding tank. An entrance zone, a cleaning zone and an exit drying zone are defined within the chamber by removable partitions having slotted rubber gaskets in their centers. The entrance and exit drying zones contain a horizontally mounted cylindrical housing which supports in combination a plurality of slotted rubber gaskets and circular brushes to initiate mechanical decontamination. Solvent is delivered at high pressure to a spray ring located in the cleaning zone having a plurality of nozzles surrounding the work piece. The solvent drains into a solvent holding tank located below the nozzles and means are provided for circulating the solvent to and from a solvent cleaning, distilling and filter unit

  2. Using the visitor experiences for mapping the possibilities of implementing a robotic guide in outdoor sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karreman, Daphne Eleonora; van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.; Evers, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    FROG (Fun Robotic Outdoor Guide) is a project that aims to develop an outdoor robotic guide that enriches the visitor experience in touristic sites. This paper is a first step toward a guide robot and presents a case study on how to analyze the visitors’ experience and examine opportunities for a

  3. Challenges in Obtaining Property Access: The FUSRAP Maywood Site Experience - 13433

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kollar, William [Shaw Environmental, Inc., 100 West Hunter Avenue, Maywood, NJ 07607 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) is the US government program started in 1974 to identify, investigate and clean up or control sites that became contaminated as a result of the nation's early atomic programs. Many of these sites are not owned by the federal government and therefore require owner permission to enter. The experience in pursuing such access at the FUSRAP Maywood Superfund Site (the Maywood Site or the Site) in Bergen County, New Jersey, is extensive. Since the US Army Corps of Engineers (the Corps) assumed responsibility for the Maywood Site from the US Department of Energy in 1997, at least 186 separate property access agreements (known in FUSRAP as a Real Estate Right-of- Entry or ROE) have been executed between the Corps and approximately 55 different land owners and tenant occupants at the Maywood Site (agreement renewals with the same owners over time account for the difference). Maywood's experience during the Corps' tenure, reflected here in three case studies of representative property access efforts, offers some lessons and best practices that may apply to other remedial programs. While the Site Community Relations Manager (the author of this paper) managed the property access task, multi-disciplinary support from across the project was also critical to success in this endeavor. (authors)

  4. Challenges in Obtaining Property Access: The FUSRAP Maywood Site Experience - 13433

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kollar, William

    2013-01-01

    The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) is the US government program started in 1974 to identify, investigate and clean up or control sites that became contaminated as a result of the nation's early atomic programs. Many of these sites are not owned by the federal government and therefore require owner permission to enter. The experience in pursuing such access at the FUSRAP Maywood Superfund Site (the Maywood Site or the Site) in Bergen County, New Jersey, is extensive. Since the US Army Corps of Engineers (the Corps) assumed responsibility for the Maywood Site from the US Department of Energy in 1997, at least 186 separate property access agreements (known in FUSRAP as a Real Estate Right-of- Entry or ROE) have been executed between the Corps and approximately 55 different land owners and tenant occupants at the Maywood Site (agreement renewals with the same owners over time account for the difference). Maywood's experience during the Corps' tenure, reflected here in three case studies of representative property access efforts, offers some lessons and best practices that may apply to other remedial programs. While the Site Community Relations Manager (the author of this paper) managed the property access task, multi-disciplinary support from across the project was also critical to success in this endeavor. (authors)

  5. Decontamination processes for waste glass canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, W.N.

    1981-06-01

    The process which will be used to decontaminate waste glass canisters at the Savannah River Plant consists of: decontamination (slurry blasting); rinse (high-pressure water); and spot decontamination (high-pressure water plus slurry). No additional waste will be produced by this process because glass frit used in decontamination will be mixed with the radioactive waste and fed into the glass melter. Decontamination of waste glass canisters with chemical and abrasive blasting techniques was investigated. The ability of a chemical technique with HNO 3 -HF and H 2 C 2 O 4 to remove baked-on contamination was demonstrated. A correlation between oxide removal and decontamination was observed. Oxide removal and, thus, decontamination by abrasive blasting techniques with glass frit as the abrasive was proposed and demonstrated

  6. Decontamination processes for waste glass canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, W.N.

    1981-01-01

    The process which will be used to decontaminate waste glass canisters at the Savannah River Plant consists of: decontamination (slurry blasting); rinse (high-pressure water); and spot decontamination (high-pressure water plus slurry). No additional waste will be produced by this process because glass frit used in decontamination will be mixed with the radioactive waste and fed into the glass melter. Decontamination of waste glass canisters with chemical and abrasive blasting techniques was investigated. The ability of a chemical technique with HNO 3 -HF and H 2 C 2 O 4 to remove baked-on contamination was demonstrated. A correlation between oxide removal and decontamination was observed. Oxide removal and, thus, decontamination by abrasive blasting techniques with glass frit as the abrasive was proposed and demonstrated

  7. Proposal of biostimulation for hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH)-decontamination and characterization of culturable bacterial community from high-dose point HCH-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadhwal, M; Singh, A; Prakash, O; Gupta, S K; Kumari, K; Sharma, P; Jit, S; Verma, M; Holliger, C; Lal, R

    2009-02-01

    To locate a high-dose point hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH)-contaminated site, to identify HCH-degrading bacteria in it and assay HCH-decontamination by biostimulation. Bacteria were isolated by serial dilution method from HCH-contaminated soil samples collected from areas near an HCH-manufacturing unit and its dumpsite in North India. After confirming the presence of indigenous HCH-degraders (seven of 24 strains), an ex situ biostimulation experiment was conducted. For this, residue levels in soil were diluted by mixing with pristine garden soil and aeration, moisture and nutrients were provided intermittently. This soil was monitored for reduction in Sigma-HCH (sum of alpha-, beta-, gamma- and delta-HCH) levels and stimulation of HCH-degraders. Experiments were conducted twice, in March-April (c. 75 microg Sigma-HCH g(-1) soil) and October-November 2006 (c. 280 microg Sigma-HCH g(-1) soil) at 26-30 degrees C. Sigma-HCH levels were reduced to decontamination via aeration, addition of nutrients and moisture, of the indigenous population. The study demonstrates that biostimulation of indigenous HCH-degrading microbial population can be used for decontamination of chronically HCH-contaminated sites.

  8. A study on decontamination and decommissioning of experimental DUPIC equipment at PIEF 9405 hot cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. H.; Park, J. J.; Shin, J. M.; Yang, M. S.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, E. P.

    2000-09-01

    The characterization experiment for powder and sintered fuel had been performed using about 1 kg-U spent PWR fuel at No. 9405 hot-cell in PIEF(Post Irradiated Experiment Facility) since early in 1999. Currently, The experiments in PIEF have been completed. It is supposed to dismantle and decontaminate the installed equipment by the end of year 2000. Since all of DUPIC equipment in hot-cell are contaminated by high radioactive material, the decontamination and dismantlement must br performed remotely by M/S manipulator. During the radioactive waste packing and transportation, the reduction method of radiation exposure has to be considered. Firstly, This report describes the basic plan for dismantlement/decontamination of the characterization equipment(power and sintered fuel). And methods of measurement/packing/ transportation, method of dismantlement/decontamination of the experimental apparatus and the reduction method of radiation dose exposure, etc. are explained in order

  9. Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, M.; Sack, W.A.; Gabr, M.

    1994-01-01

    The Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program at West Virginia University consists of research and development associated with hazardous waste remediation problems at the Department of Energy complex and elsewhere. This program seeks to facilitate expedited development and implementation of solutions to the nation's hazardous waste clean-up efforts. By a unique combination of university research and private technology development efforts, new paths toward implementing technology and speeding clean-ups are achievable. Mechanisms include aggressive industrial tie-ins to academic development programs, expedited support of small business technology development efforts, enhanced linkages to existing DOE programs, and facilitated access to hazardous waste sites. The program topically falls into an information component, which includes knowledge acquisition, technology evaluation and outreach activities and an R and D component, which develops and implements new and improved technologies. Projects began in February 1993 due to initiation of a Cooperative Agreement between West Virginia University and the Department of Energy

  10. Bioremediation of {sup 60}Co from simulated spent decontamination solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashmi, K.; Naga Sowjanya, T.; Maruthi Mohan, P.; Balaji, V.; Venkateswaran, G

    2004-07-26

    Bioremediation of {sup 60}Co from simulated spent decontamination solutions by utilizing different biomass of (Neurospora crassa, Trichoderma viridae, Mucor recemosus, Rhizopus chinensis, Penicillium citrinum, Aspergillus niger and, Aspergillus flavus) fungi is reported. Various fungal species were screened to evaluate their potential for removing cobalt from very low concentrations (0.03-0.16 {mu}M) in presence of a high background of iron (9.33 mM) and nickel (0.93 mM) complexed with EDTA (10.3 mM). The different fungal isolates employed in this study showed a pickup of cobalt in the range 8-500 ng/g of dry biomass. The [Fe]/[Co] and [Ni]/[Co] ratios in the solutions before and after exposure to the fungi were also determined. At micromolar level the cobalt pickup by many fungi especially the mutants of N. crassa is seen to be proportional to the initial cobalt concentration taken in the solution. However, R. chinensis exhibits a low but iron concentration dependent cobalt pickup. Prior saturating the fungi with excess of iron during their growth showed the presence of selective cobalt pickup sites. The existence of cobalt specific sorption sites is shown by a model experiment with R. chinensis wherein at a constant cobalt concentration (0.034 {mu}M) and varying iron concentrations so as to yield [Fe/Co]{sub initial} ratios in solution of 10, 100, 1000 and 287 000 have all yielded a definite Co pickup capacity in the range 8-47 ng/g. The presence of Cr(III)EDTA (3 mM) in solution along with complexed Fe and Ni has not influenced the cobalt removal. The significant feature of this study is that even when cobalt is present in trace level (sub-micromolar) in a matrix of high concentration (millimolar levels) of iron, nickel and chromium, a situation typically encountered in spent decontamination solutions arising from stainless steel based primary systems of nuclear reactors, a number of fungi studied in this work showed a good sensitivity for cobalt pickup.

  11. Bioremediation of 60Co from simulated spent decontamination solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashmi, K.; Naga Sowjanya, T.; Maruthi Mohan, P.; Balaji, V.; Venkateswaran, G.

    2004-01-01

    Bioremediation of 60 Co from simulated spent decontamination solutions by utilizing different biomass of (Neurospora crassa, Trichoderma viridae, Mucor recemosus, Rhizopus chinensis, Penicillium citrinum, Aspergillus niger and, Aspergillus flavus) fungi is reported. Various fungal species were screened to evaluate their potential for removing cobalt from very low concentrations (0.03-0.16 μM) in presence of a high background of iron (9.33 mM) and nickel (0.93 mM) complexed with EDTA (10.3 mM). The different fungal isolates employed in this study showed a pickup of cobalt in the range 8-500 ng/g of dry biomass. The [Fe]/[Co] and [Ni]/[Co] ratios in the solutions before and after exposure to the fungi were also determined. At micromolar level the cobalt pickup by many fungi especially the mutants of N. crassa is seen to be proportional to the initial cobalt concentration taken in the solution. However, R. chinensis exhibits a low but iron concentration dependent cobalt pickup. Prior saturating the fungi with excess of iron during their growth showed the presence of selective cobalt pickup sites. The existence of cobalt specific sorption sites is shown by a model experiment with R. chinensis wherein at a constant cobalt concentration (0.034 μM) and varying iron concentrations so as to yield [Fe/Co] initial ratios in solution of 10, 100, 1000 and 287 000 have all yielded a definite Co pickup capacity in the range 8-47 ng/g. The presence of Cr(III)EDTA (3 mM) in solution along with complexed Fe and Ni has not influenced the cobalt removal. The significant feature of this study is that even when cobalt is present in trace level (sub-micromolar) in a matrix of high concentration (millimolar levels) of iron, nickel and chromium, a situation typically encountered in spent decontamination solutions arising from stainless steel based primary systems of nuclear reactors, a number of fungi studied in this work showed a good sensitivity for cobalt pickup

  12. Verification of wet blasting decontamination technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubara, Sachito; Murayama, Kazunari; Yoshida, Hirohisa; Igei, Shigemitsu; Izumida, Tatsuo

    2013-01-01

    Macoho Co., Ltd. participated in the projects of 'Decontamination Verification Test FY 2011 by the Ministry of the Environment' and 'Decontamination Verification Test FY 2011 by the Cabinet Office.' And we tested verification to use a wet blasting technology for decontamination of rubble and roads contaminated by the accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant of the Tokyo Electric Power Company. As a results of the verification test, the wet blasting decontamination technology showed that a decontamination rate became 60-80% for concrete paving, interlocking, dense-grated asphalt pavement when applied to the decontamination of the road. When it was applied to rubble decontamination, a decontamination rate was 50-60% for gravel and approximately 90% for concrete and wood. It was thought that Cs-134 and Cs-137 attached to the fine sludge scraped off from a decontamination object and the sludge was found to be separated from abrasives by wet cyclene classification: the activity concentration of the abrasives is 1/30 or less than the sludge. The result shows that the abrasives can be reused without problems when the wet blasting decontamination technology is used. (author)

  13. Preliminary - discrete fracture network modelling of tracer migration experiments at the SCV site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dershowitz, W.S.; Wallmann, P.; Geier, J.E.; Lee, G.

    1991-09-01

    This report describes a numerical modelling study of solute transport within the Site Characterization and Validation (SCV) block at the Stripa site. The study was carried out with the FracMan/MAFIC package, utilizing statistics from stages 3 and 4 of the Stripa phase 3 Site Characterization and Validation project. Simulations were carried out to calibrate fracture solute transport properties against observations in the first stage of saline injection radar experiments. These results were then used to predict the performance of planned tracer experiments, using both particle tracking network solute transport, and pathways analysis approaches. Simulations were also carried out to predict results of the second stage of saline injection radar experiments. (au) (34 refs.)

  14. Non-destructive decontamination of building materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holecek, Josef; Otahal, Petr

    2015-11-01

    For nondestructive radiation decontamination of surfaces it is necessary to use varnishes, such as ARGONNE, DG1101, DG1108, etc. This text evaluates the use of manufactured strippable coatings for radiation decontamination. To evaluate decontamination capability of such coatings the following varnishes were selected and subsequently used: AZ 1-700 and AXAL 1807S. The varnishes were tested on different building materials surfaces contaminated by short-term radioisotopes of Na-24 or La-140, in water soluble or water insoluble forms. Decontamination quality was assessed by the decontamination efficiency value, defined as the proportion of removed activity to the applied activity. It was found that decontamination efficiency of both used varnishes depends not only on the form of contaminant, but in the case of application of AXAL 1807S varnish it also depends on the method of its application on the contaminated surface. The values of the decontamination efficiency for AZ1-700 varnish range from 46% for decontamination of a soluble form of the radioisotope from concrete surface to 98% for the decontamination of a soluble form of the radioisotope from ceramic tile surface. The decontamination efficiency values determined for AXAL 1807S varnish range from 48% for decontamination of a soluble form of the radioisotope from concrete surface to 96% for decontamination of an insoluble form of the radioisotope from ceramic tile surface. Comparing these values to the values given for the decontaminating varnishes we can conclude that AXAL 1807S varnish is possible to use on all materials, except highly porous materials, such as plasterboard or breeze blocks, or plastic materials. AZ 1-700 varnish can be used for all dry materials except plasterboard.

  15. Development and assessment of two decontamination processes: closed electropolishing system for decontamination of underwater surfaces -vibratory decontamination with abrasives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benavides, E.; Fajardo, M.

    1992-01-01

    Two decontamination processes have been developed to decontaminate the stainless steel components of nuclear power plants. The first process uses an underwater closed electropolishing system for the decontamination of large stainless steel surfaces in flooded systems without loss of electrolyte. Large underwater contaminated areas can be treated with an electropolishing head covering an area of 2 m 2 in one step. The decontamination factors achieved with this technique range between 100 and 1000. The second process consists in the decontamination of nuclear components using vibratory equipment with self-cleaning abrasives generating a minimum quantity of waste. This technique may reach contamination factors similar to those obtained with other abrasive methods (brush abrasion, abrasive blasting, etc...). The obtained decontamination factors range between 5 and 50. Only a small quantity of waste is generated, which is treated and reduced in volume by filtration and evaporation

  16. Geology, geophysics, and physical properties of the U12n.25 non-proliferation experiment site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, M.J.; Bradford, R.P.; Hopkins, S.P. [Raytheon Services Nevada, Mercury, NV (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Experiment was conducted in the U12n.25 drift in N-Tunnel at the Nevada Test Site. The geologic characterization of the site was performed by Raytheon Services Nevada geologists in the standard manner used for all underground nuclear weapons-effects tests executed by the Defense Nuclear Agency. The U12n.25 test bed was constructed in zeolitized ash-fall tuff of the Tunnel Beds Tuff, Subunit 4K, 389.0 m below the surface of Rainier Mesa. The structural geology of the site was simple, with the nearest fault plane projected to be 12 m below the mined cavity at closest approach, and an average bedding dip of seven degrees to the northwest. The cavity excavation revealed several small fractures, including one which produced minor amounts of free water during construction. The physical properties of the site were well within the range of experience for the zeolitized tuff of N-Tunnel and no geology-related problems were encountered during construction. The zeolitized tuff of N-Tunnel has been the site of twenty nuclear tests conducted by the Defense Nuclear Agency. The similarities of geologic setting, site geometry, and physical properties allow many comparisons of Non-Proliferation Experiment results with the large nuclear-test data base.

  17. Estimating decontamination efficiency of territory, adjoining to the Chernobyl' NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstantinov, E.A.; Sanitarov, V.A.; Stepanov, I.K.; Senin, E.V.; Filippov, E.M.; Shiraj, A.P.; Umanets, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    The NPP territory decontamination was fulfilled according to the next scheme: 1) removal of the soil upper layer and its moving avay for burial; 2) concrete plate laying; 3) concreting seams between plates and piling up polymer coatings. The conclusion is made that substantial improvement of radiation situation at the operating site is possible only after removal of radiation sources at the machine room roofing. 1 ref.; 5 figs.; 2 tabs

  18. Radiation survey and decontamination of cape Arza from depleted uranium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukotić Perko

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In the action of NATO A-10 airplanes in 1999, the cape Arza, Serbia and Montenegro was contaminated by depleted uranium. The clean-up operations were undertaken at the site, and 242 uranium projectiles and their 49 larger fragments were removed from the cape. That is about 85% of the total number of projectiles by which Arza was contaminated. Here are described details of the applied procedures and results of the soil radioactivity measurements after decontamination.

  19. Visitors’ Experience, Place Attachment and Sustainable Behaviour at Cultural Heritage Sites: A Conceptual Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piera Buonincontri

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable tourism research has attracted wide interest from scholars and practitioners. While several heritage sites are mandated to provide optimum visitor satisfaction with increasing competition in the market, managers of heritage sites face growing challenges in striking a balance between consumption and conservation. This calls for promoting more sustainable behaviours among consumers of heritage. This study proposes a conceptualization of sustainable behaviour for heritage consumers. Using the attitude–behaviour relationship underpinned by the Theory of Reasoned Action, it develops and proposes a conceptual framework that integrates visitors’ heritage experiences, their attachment to heritage sites, and their general and site-specific sustainable heritage behaviour and presents their interrelationships as proposed hypotheses. Theoretical contributions and practical implications for heritage site managers are discussed.

  20. New decontamination techniques generating a low volume of effluent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This document presents some decontamination techniques, their principles, characteristics and advantages and provides references on the subject. Techniques as foam and spray foam decontamination, dry steam decontamination, electro-decontamination and gel decontamination are presented. A presentation of TRIADE, cleanup dismantling servicing, is also provided. (A.L.B.)

  1. New decontamination techniques generating a low volume of effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This document presents some decontamination techniques, their principles, characteristics and advantages and provides references on the subject. Techniques as foam and spray foam decontamination, dry steam decontamination, electro-decontamination and gel decontamination are presented. A presentation of TRIADE, cleanup dismantling servicing, is also provided. (A.L.B.)

  2. Comparison of thorough decontamination techniques on dismantled pieces of a PWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, M.; Rahier, A.; Mandoki, R.; Ponnet, M.

    1998-01-01

    The decontamination experience gained during the BR3 dismantling project is developed. This started with the full system decontamination of the primary loop and was followed by R and D on thorough decontamination projects. First, a wet abrasive installation has been installed and is now in operation for the thorough cleaning of metallic pieces of simple geometry. Afterwards, the chemical cerium process has been developed. The results of the regeneration with ozone and with electrochemistry are presented in detail. The ozone regeneration process has been selected for the industrial installation of which the construction is foreseen in 1998. (author)

  3. Mesoporous binary metal oxide nanocomposites: Synthesis, characterization and decontamination of sulfur mustard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Praveen Kumar, J., E-mail: praveenjella10@gmail.com; Prasad, G.K.; Ramacharyulu, P.V.R.K.; Singh, Beer; Gopi, T.; Krishna, R.

    2016-04-15

    Mesoporous MnO{sub 2}–ZnO, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}–ZnO, NiO–ZnO, and CeO{sub 2}–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied as sorbent decontaminants against sulfur mustard. They were synthesized by precipitation pyrolysis method and characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive analysis of X rays, X ray diffraction, and nitrogen adsorption techniques. The transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption data indicated the presence of pores with diameter ranging from 10 to 70 nm in the binary metal oxide nanocomposites and these materials exhibited surface area values in the range of 76–134 m{sup 2}/g. These binary metal oxide nanocomposites demonstrated large decontamination efficiencies against sulfur mustard when compared to their single component metal oxide nanoparticles. The binary metal oxide nanocomposites effectively decontaminated sulfur mustard into relatively non toxic products such as chloro ethyl vinyl sulfide, divinyl sulfide, 1,4-oxathiane, etc. The promising decontamination properties of binary metal oxide nanocomposites against sulfur mustard were attributed to the basic sites, Lewis acid sites, and the presence of these sites was confirmed by CO{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} temperature programmed desorption. - Graphical abstract: Mesoporous MnO{sub 2}–ZnO, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}–ZnO, NiO–ZnO, and CeO{sub 2}–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied as sorbent decontaminants against sulfur mustard. - Highlights: • Binary metal oxide nanocomposites were synthesized by co-precipitation method. • They were studied as sorbent decontaminants against sulfur mustard. • They decontaminated sulfur mustard into non toxic products. • MnO{sub 2}–ZnO and CeO{sub 2}–ZnO nanocomposites showed greater decontamination efficiency.

  4. Development of CDE (calculation system for decontamination effect) for the support of decontamination to restore the environment. Software visually depicting the effect of decontamination Work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Daiki

    2012-01-01

    CDE in the title developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is explained for its use to support the cleaning work of the environment contaminated by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident (Mar. 11, 2011). With this CDE software (available at http://nsed.jaea.go.jp/josen, from Nov. 2, 2011), the effect of decontamination schedule/work can be evaluable rapidly and accurately by calculating the ambient dose rates before and after the work. Access number to the CDE site until Jan., 2012, amounts to 402, for the purposes of ambient dose assessment (20%), planning of decontamination (15%), study/investigation (15%), etc. The system software is operable in Microsoft Excel with Graphical User Interface (GUI) described by VBA (Visual Basic for Applications). To be inputted in CDE are the map of the region subjected to decontamination, data of surface contamination density and of decontamination coefficients for the area relief, all of which are available through the internet and actual measurement, which is then followed by output as tables and figures of distribution of the ambient dose rate before and after the work, and of the rate reduction coefficient. Radiation subjected to calculation is from radiocesium ( 134 Cs and 137 Cs). When the software is compared for its accuracy with those by previous software Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System (PHITS) and by actual measurement, their results all show a virtually satisfactory agreement, and the time necessary for calculation is over several-ten hours in PHITS, and within about 10 seconds, in CDE. Updated information of CDE is available at the above mentioned site and twitter.com/JAEA_nsed. (T.T.)

  5. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities: Decontamination, disassembly and waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The term 'decommissioning', as used within the nuclear industry, means the actions taken at the end of a facility's useful life to retire the facility from service in a manner that provides adequate protection for the health and safety of the decommissioning workers, the general public, and for the environment. These actions can range from merely closing down the facility and a minimal removal of radioactive material coupled with continuing maintenance and surveillance, to a complete removal of residual radioactivity in excess of levels acceptable for unrestricted use of the facility and its site. This latter condition, unrestricted use, is the ultimate goal of all decommissioning actions at retired nuclear facilities. The purpose of this report is to provide an information base on the considerations important to decommissioning, the methods available for decontamination and disassembly of a nuclear facility, the management of the resulting radioactive wastes, and the areas of decommissioning methodology where improvements might be made. Specific sections are devoted to each of these topics, and conclusions are presented concerning the present status of each topic. A summary of past decommissioning experience in Member States is presented in the Appendix. The report, with its discussions of necessary considerations, available operational methods, and waste management practices, together with supporting references, provides an appreciation of the activities that comprise decommissioning of nuclear facilities. It is anticipated that the information presented in the report should prove useful to persons concerned with the development of plans for the decommissioning of retired nuclear facilities

  6. Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, E.; Chrzanowski, J.; Rule, K.; Viola, M.; Williams, M.; Strykowsky, R.

    1999-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one-of-a-kind, tritium-fueled fusion research reactor that ceased operation in April 1997. The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of the TFTR is scheduled to occur over a period of three years beginning in October 1999. This is not a typical Department of Energy D and D Project where a facility is isolated and cleaned up by ''bulldozing'' all facility and hardware systems to a greenfield condition. The mission of TFTR D and D is to: (a) surgically remove items which can be re-used within the DOE complex, (b) remove tritium contaminated and activated systems for disposal, (c) clear the test cell of hardware for future reuse, (d) reclassify the D-site complex as a non-nuclear facility as defined in DOE Order 420.1 (Facility Safety) and (e) provide data on the D and D of a large magnetic fusion facility. The 100 cubic meter volume of the donut-shaped reactor makes it the second largest fusion reactor in the world. The record-breaking deuterium-tritium experiments performed on TFTR resulted in contaminating the vacuum vessel with tritium and activating the materials with 14 Mev neutrons. The total tritium content within the vessel is in excess of 7,000 Curies while dose rates approach 75 mRem/hr. These radiological hazards along with the size and shape of the Tokamak present a unique and challenging task for dismantling

  7. Microbial decontamination of uranium mine drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hard, B.C.; Babel, W.

    2001-01-01

    One of the problems one is faced with when uranium mines are closed is the decontamination of acid mine drainage (AMD) from tailings and flooding of the underground mines. The high concentrations of sulfates and metals in mining water make it impossible to dispose of the water into rivers without having to decontaminate it first. A bioremediation process is proposed in which sulfate-reducing bacteria are used to remove metals, neutralize the water and reduce the sulfate concentrations. Methylotrophic sulfate-reducing strains have been isolated which can be used in such a process. Lab scale experiments with different reactor types were carried out in order to find the optimum design for this bioremediation process. Comparisons were made between methanol and other electron donors with regards to their suitability as substrate for this process. Methanol was found to be most suited. Laboratory data suggest that immobilizing the bacteria on pumice particles increases the sulfate-reduction rate (SRR) up to three fold to 18 mg/l.h, compared to the rates of free flowing cells of between 3.7 and 6.8 mg/l.h. Preliminary experiments on a larger scale (15 l) using acid mine drainage pH 2.5 show SRR of 0.71 mg/l.h. In biosorption experiments up to 140 mg of aluminium per g biomass was removed from the water. One strain was found to reduce uranium VI, thus changing it from the soluble to the insoluble form. The application of the proposed process with regards to bioremediation of AMD are discussed. (orig.)

  8. Skin contamination - prevention and decontaminating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, K.

    2001-01-01

    A detailed examination is made of the structure of human skin. Measures were drawn up to prevent skin contamination in nuclear installations as well as contaminated skin was decontaminated from the personnel. By systematically applying these measures a significant level of success was achieved in preventing contamination in nuclear installations. Cases where more far-reaching chemical methods had to be used were kept to a minimum. (R.P.)

  9. Chemical decontamination of reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riess, R.; Berthold, H.O.

    1977-08-01

    A solution for the decontamination of reactor components of the primary system was developed. This solution is a modification of the APAC- (Alkaline Permanganate Ammonium Citrate) system described in the literature. The most important advantage of the present solution over the APAC-method is that it does not induce any selective corrosion attack on materials like stainless steel (austenitic), Inconel 600 and Incoloy 800. (orig.) [de

  10. Radiation decontamination of poultry viscera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamdar, S.N.; Harikumar, P.

    2008-01-01

    Application of gamma radiation for decontamination of poultry viscera was examined. Exposure to a dose of 20 kGy rendered the viscera sterile ( 10 cycles, respectively, eliminating the coliforms to o C) produced enhanced levels of TVBN and TCA soluble products accompanied by higher drip loss. Activities of proteolytic enzymes, except acid protease, did not show any significant change during post-irradiation storage at either temperature

  11. Aversive Peer Experiences on Social Networking Sites: Development of the Social Networking-Peer Experiences Questionnaire (SN-PEQ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landoll, Ryan R; La Greca, Annette M; Lai, Betty S

    2013-12-01

    Cyber victimization is an important research area; yet, little is known about aversive peer experiences on social networking sites (SNSs), which are used extensively by youth and host complex social exchanges. Across samples of adolescents ( n =216) and young adults ( n =214), we developed the Social Networking-Peer Experiences Questionnaire ( SN-PEQ ), and examined its psychometric properties, distinctiveness from traditional peer victimization, and associations with internalized distress. The SN-PEQ demonstrated strong factorial invariance and a single factor structure that was distinct from other forms of peer victimization. Negative SNS experiences were associated with youths' symptoms of social anxiety and depression, even when controlling for traditional peer victimization. Findings highlight the importance of examining the effects of aversive peer experiences that occur via social media.

  12. Aversive Peer Experiences on Social Networking Sites: Development of the Social Networking-Peer Experiences Questionnaire (SN-PEQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landoll, Ryan R.; La Greca, Annette M.; Lai, Betty S.

    2012-01-01

    Cyber victimization is an important research area; yet, little is known about aversive peer experiences on social networking sites (SNSs), which are used extensively by youth and host complex social exchanges. Across samples of adolescents (n=216) and young adults (n=214), we developed the Social Networking-Peer Experiences Questionnaire (SN-PEQ), and examined its psychometric properties, distinctiveness from traditional peer victimization, and associations with internalized distress. The SN-PEQ demonstrated strong factorial invariance and a single factor structure that was distinct from other forms of peer victimization. Negative SNS experiences were associated with youths’ symptoms of social anxiety and depression, even when controlling for traditional peer victimization. Findings highlight the importance of examining the effects of aversive peer experiences that occur via social media. PMID:24288449

  13. Bidens tripartite L.: A Cd-accumulator confirmed by pot culture and site sampling experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Shuhe; Niu Rongcheng; Srivastava, Mrittunjai; Zhou Qixing; Wu Zhijie; Sun Tieheng; Hu Yahu; Li Yunmeng

    2009-01-01

    Characteristics of accumulation and tolerance of cadmium (Cd) in Bidens tripartite L. were investigated to identify Cd-accumulating properties. In this study, pot culture experiment and site sampling experiments were conducted to assess whether this plant is a heavy metal hyperaccumulator or accumulator. The results indicated that the Cd enrichment factor (concentration in plant/soil) and Cd translocation factor (concentration in shoot/root) of B. tripartite was principally >1 in pot culture and concentration gradient experiments. Shoot biomass was not reduced significantly (p -1 , the threshold concentration for a Cd-hyperaccumulator. In the site sampling experiment, B. tripartite also showed Cd-accumulator properties. Based on these results, B. tripartite could be identified as a Cd-accumulator. Thus, B. tripartite should only be considered as a Cd-accumulator.

  14. Chemical decontamination and melt densification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillon, R.L.; Griggs, B.; Kemper, R.S.; Nelson, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Preliminary studies on the chemical decontamination and densification of Zircaloy, stainless steel, and Inconel undissolved residues remaining after dissolution of the UO 2 --PuO 2 spent fuel material from sheared fuel bundles are reported. The studies were made on cold or very small samples to demonstrate the feasibility of the processes developed before proceeding to hot cell demonstrations with kg level of the sources. A promising aqueous decontamination method for Zr alloy cladding was developed in which oxidized surfaces are conditioned with HF prior to leaching with ammonium oxalate, ammonium citrate, ammonium fluoride, and hydrogen peroxide. Feasibility of molten salt decontamination of oxidized Zircaloy was demonstrated. A low melting alloy of Zircaloy, stainless steel, and Inconel was obtained in induction heated graphite crucibles. Segregated Zircaloy cladding sections were directly melted by the inductoslag process to yield a metal ingot suitable for storage. Both Zircaloy and Zircaloy--stainless steel--Inconel alloys proved to be highly satisfactory getters and sinks for recovered tritium

  15. Pickering emulsions for skin decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Alicia; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine; Rolland, Pauline; Chevalier, Yves; Josse, Denis; Briançon, Stéphanie

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed at developing innovative systems for skin decontamination. Pickering emulsions, i.e. solid-stabilized emulsions, containing silica (S-PE) or Fuller's earth (FE-PE) were formulated. Their efficiency for skin decontamination was evaluated, in vitro, 45min after an exposure to VX, one of the most highly toxic chemical warfare agents. Pickering emulsions were compared to FE (FE-W) and silica (S-W) aqueous suspensions. PE containing an oil with a similar hydrophobicity to VX should promote its extraction. All the formulations reduced significantly the amount of VX quantified on and into the skin compared to the control. Wiping the skin surface with a pad already allowed removing more than half of VX. FE-W was the less efficient (85% of VX removed). The other formulations (FE-PE, S-PE and S-W) resulted in more than 90% of the quantity of VX removed. The charge of particles was the most influential factor. The low pH of formulations containing silica favored electrostatic interactions of VX with particles explaining the better elimination from the skin surface. Formulations containing FE had basic pH, and weak interactions with VX did not improve the skin decontamination. However, these low interactions between VX and FE promote the transfer of VX into the oil droplets in the FE-PE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Metal decontamination for waste minimization using liquid metal refining technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joyce, E.L. Jr.; Lally, B.; Ozturk, B.; Fruehan, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    The current Department of Energy Mixed Waste Treatment Project flowsheet indicates that no conventional technology, other than surface decontamination, exists for metal processing. Current Department of Energy guidelines require retrievable storage of all metallic wastes containing transuranic elements above a certain concentration. This project is in support of the National Mixed Low Level Waste Treatment Program. Because of the high cost of disposal, it is important to develop an effective decontamination and volume reduction method for low-level contaminated metals. It is important to be able to decontaminate complex shapes where surfaces are hidden or inaccessible to surface decontamination processes and destruction of organic contamination. These goals can be achieved by adapting commercial metal refining processes to handle radioactive and organic contaminated metal. The radioactive components are concentrated in the slag, which is subsequently vitrified; hazardous organics are destroyed by the intense heat of the bath. The metal, after having been melted and purified, could be recycled for use within the DOE complex. In this project, we evaluated current state-of-the-art technologies for metal refining, with special reference to the removal of radioactive contaminants and the destruction of hazardous organics. This evaluation was based on literature reports, industrial experience, plant visits, thermodynamic calculations, and engineering aspects of the various processes. The key issues addressed included radioactive partitioning between the metal and slag phases, minimization of secondary wastes, operability of the process subject to widely varying feed chemistry, and the ability to seal the candidate process to prevent the release of hazardous species

  17. UK fast reactor components. Sodium removal decontamination and requalification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, D.M.; Bray, J.A.; Newson, I.H.

    1978-01-01

    Extensive experience gained at the U.K.A.E.A. Dounreay Nuclear Power Development Establishment is being applied to form the basis of the plant to be provided for sodium removal, decontamination, and requalification of components in future commercial fast reactors. In the first part of a three part paper, the factors to be taken into account, showing the UK philosophy and approach to maintenance and repair operations are discussed. In the second part, PFR facilities for sodium removal and decontamination are described and some examples are given of cleaning components such as pumps, charge machine, cold trap baskets, and steam generator units. Similar facilities at DFR are briefly described. In the third part of the paper a short description is given of the Harwell mass transfer loop, currently used to study the deposition of activated stainless steel corrosion products. Decontamination method for pipework specimens cut from the loop are described and results of first screening tests of various chemical decontaminants are presented. (U.K.)

  18. Advanced technologies for decontamination and conversion of scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacNair, V.; Muth, T.; Shasteen, K.; Liby, A.; Hradil, G.; Mishra, B.

    1996-01-01

    In October 1993, Manufacturing Sciences Corporation was awarded DOE contract DE-AC21-93MC30170 to develop and test recycling of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) to high value and intermediate and final product forms. This work was conducted to help solve the problems associated with decontamination and reuse of the diffusion plant barrier nickel and other radioactively contaminated scrap metals present in the diffusion plants. Options available for disposition of the nickel include decontamination and subsequent release or recycled product manufacture for restricted end use. Both of these options are evaluated during the course of this research effort. work during phase I of this project successfully demonstrated the ability to make stainless steel from barrier nickel feed. This paved the way for restricted end use products made from stainless steel. Also, after repeated trials and studies, the inducto-slag nickel decontamination process was eliminated as a suitable alternative. Electro-refining appeared to be a promising technology for decontamination of the diffusion plant barrier material. Goals for phase II included conducting experiments to facilitate the development of an electro-refining process to separate technetium from nickel. In parallel with those activities, phase II efforts were to include the development of the necessary processes to make useful products from radioactive scrap metal. Nickel from the diffusion plants as well as stainless steel and carbon steel could be used as feed material for these products

  19. Decontamination of polyvinylchloride- and rubber type flooring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunze, S.

    1975-01-01

    These types, fabricated by mixing of the basic components, showed no relation between content of fillers and decontamination results. Decontamination results are partly poorer, if the flooring contains a high concentration of the filler, especially if the latter consists mainly of hydrophilic materials. The coloring of the floorings seems to have no influence on the decontamination but floorings with clearly separated patterns can not be recommended for nuclear facilities. Fabricated by chemical reactions between polymeres, vulcanization materials and fillers, the decontamination results depend definitely from the proper choice of the filler. Flooring types, containing lampblack, graphite, kaoline, barium sulfate and titanium oxide are easy to decontamine. Again, increasing contents of hydrophilic filler cause a fall off in the decontamination results. (orig.) [de

  20. Radiocesium decontamination of a riverside in Fukushima, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikiori, Tatsuhiro; Suzuki, Satoshi

    2017-10-01

    Extensive decontamination measures have been implemented in the area affected by the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear disaster. Typical decontamination measures, such as removing topsoil of several centimeters in depth, are not suitable for rivers where contaminated sediments have been deposited. A decontamination measure was tested that considered the spatial distribution of radiocesium at the lower part of a tributary of the Abukuma River in Fukushima. The radiocesium distribution in the flood channel was vertically and horizontally highly heterogeneous. In some parts, the activity concentration was high (>10 kBq/kg for 137 Cs) even at depths of 25 cm in the sediment. This may be due to plant growth in the flood channel favoring the deposition of sediment with high activity concentration. On the basis of the radiocesium distribution, the flood channel sediment was removed to a depth of 15-35 cm, which accumulated the most radiocesium (>3.0 kBq/kg for the sum of 134 Cs and 137 Cs). The upper 5 cm of soil was removed from the dike slopes. The river bed was not decontaminated because the activity concentration was low (decontamination measure reduced the air dose rate by a factor of approximately two, demonstrating the effectiveness of our measures. Annual external doses were calculated for when this part of the dike and the flood channel is used for commuting to school and outdoor education. The doses during the activities at the test site accounted for only 1-2% of the value during daily life in the surrounding area, indicating that radiation exposure during riverside activities is limited. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Contamination and decontamination of vehicles when driven in radioactive areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulvsand, T.; Nygren, U.

    1999-10-01

    There is reason to ask whether it is beneficial to decontaminate vehicles, in view of the great effort applied. If the level of contamination is low before the decontamination process, then the cost is not motivated, even if the decontamination is shown to be effective in relative terms. The report describes two trials at the National NBC Defence School in Umeaa and one trial at the French test site in Bourges. The aim is to investigate how vehicles are contaminated and at which ground deposition levels troublesome levels of contamination will arise. In the trials, a non-radioactive agent substituting real radioactivity was used. The trials in Sweden so far have used the oversnow vehicle BV 206, during both winter and summer conditions. The vehicles were driven a specific distance along a road on which a known amount of the test substance had been dispersed. Samples were taken on pre-determined areas on one side of the vehicles to measure the amount of test substance. Later, the vehicles continued along a 'clean' road where additional samples were taken, but on the other side of the vehicles. The largest amount of test substance was collected on the tracks and on the back of the vehicle. The tracks and mud-flaps were effectively decontaminated when the vehicles were driven along a clean road, while most of the contamination remained on the backside. The purpose of the trials in France was to compare the results from our non-radioactive and their radioactive method, based on the radioactive La-140. Due to ground conditions, the level of contamination on the vehicles was much less than in the trials in Umeaa, but the effect decontamination could be measured after all

  2. Contamination and decontamination of vehicles driven in radioactive areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulvsand, T.; Nygren, U.

    1999-03-01

    There is reason to ask whether it is beneficial to decontaminate vehicles, in view of the great effort applied. If the level of contamination is low before the decontamination process, then the cost is not motivated, even if the decontamination is shown to be effective in relative terms. The report describes two trials at the National NBC Defence School in Umeaa and one trial at the French test site in Bourges. The aim is to investigate how vehicles are contaminated and at which ground deposition levels troublesome levels of contamination will arise. In the trials, a non-radioactive agent substituting real radioactivity was used. The trials in Sweden so far have used the oversnow vehicle BV 206, during both winter and summer conditions. The vehicles were driven a specific distance along a road on which a known amount of the test substance had been dispersed. Samples were taken on pre-determined areas on one side of the vehicles to measure the amount of test substance. Later, the vehicles continued along a 'clean' road where additional samples were taken, but on the other side of the vehicles. The largest amount of test substance was collected on the tracks and on the back of the vehicle. The tracks and mud-flaps were effectively decontaminated when the vehicles were driven along a clean road, while most of the contamination remained on the backside. The purpose of the trials in France was to compare the results from our non-radioactive and their radioactive method, based on the radioactive La-140. Due to ground conditions, the level of contamination on the vehicles was much less than in the trials in Umeaa, but the effect decontamination could be measured after all

  3. Fighting Ebola through Novel Spore Decontamination Technologies for the Military

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Doona

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractRecently, global public health organizations such as Doctors without Borders (MSF, the World Health Organization (WHO, Public Health Canada, National Institutes of Health (NIH, and the U.S. government developed and deployed Field Decontamination Kits (FDKs, a novel, lightweight, compact, reusable decontamination technology to sterilize Ebola-contaminated medical devices at remote clinical sites lacking infra-structure in crisis-stricken regions of West Africa (medical waste materials are placed in bags and burned. The basis for effectuating sterilization with FDKs is chlorine dioxide (ClO2 produced from a patented invention developed by researchers at the US Army – Natick Soldier RD&E Center (NSRDEC and commercialized as a dry mixed-chemical for bacterial spore decontamination. In fact, the NSRDEC research scientists developed an ensemble of ClO2 technologies designed for different applications in decontaminating fresh produce; food contact and handling surfaces; personal protective equipment; textiles used in clothing, uniforms, tents, and shelters; graywater recycling; airplanes; surgical instruments; and hard surfaces in latrines, laundries, and deployable medical facilities. These examples demonstrate the far-reaching impact, adaptability, and versatility of these innovative technologies. We present herein the unique attributes of NSRDEC’s novel decontamination technologies and a Case Study of the development of FDKs that were deployed in West Africa by international public health organizations to sterilize Ebola-contaminated medical equipment. FDKs use bacterial spores as indicators of sterility. We review the properties and structures of spores and the mechanisms of bacterial spore inactivation by ClO2. We also review mechanisms of bacterial spore inactivation by novel, emerging, and established nonthermal technologies for food preservation, such as high pressure processing, irradiation, cold plasma, and chemical sanitizers

  4. Recent chemical engineering requirements as the result of TMI on-site experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooksbank, R.E. Sr.

    1980-01-01

    From the experiences gained from the on-site experience at TMI, it is apparent that the role of chemical engineers should increase in order for the nuclear option to proceed in a safe and efficient fashion. It is also obvious that as the results of the reports investigating the causes and effects of the accident come to light and attempts to backfit system designs to prevent a recurrence are studied, more technical demands will be placed on the profession

  5. Aespoe modelling task force - experiences of the site specific flow and transport modelling (in detailed and site scale)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafson, Gunnar [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Stroem, A.; Wikberg, P. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. , Stockholm (Sweden)

    1998-09-01

    The Aespoe Task Force on modelling of groundwater flow and transport of solutes was initiated in 1992. The Task Force shall be a forum for the organisations supporting the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory Project to interact in the area of conceptual and numerical modelling of groundwater flow and solute transport in fractured rock. Much emphasis is put on building of confidence in the approaches and methods in use for modelling of groundwater flow and nuclide migration in order to demonstrate their use for performance and safety assessment. The modelling work within the Task Force is linked to the experiments performed at the Aespoe Laboratory. As the first Modelling Task, a large scale pumping and tracer experiment called LPT2 was chosen. This was the final part of the characterisation work for the Aespoe site before the construction of the laboratory in 1990. The construction of the Aespoe HRL access tunnel caused an even larger hydraulic disturbance on a much larger scale than that caused by the LPT2 pumping test. This was regarded as an interesting test case for the conceptual and numerical models of the Aespoe site developed during Task No 1, and was chosen as the third Modelling Task. The aim of Task 3 can be seen from two different perspectives. The Aespoe HRL project saw it as a test of their ability to define a conceptual and structural model of the site that can be utilised by independent modelling groups and be transformed to a predictive groundwater flow model. The modelling groups saw it as a means of understanding groundwater flow in a large fractured rock volume and of testing their computational tools. A general conclusion is that Task 3 has served these purposes well. Non-sorbing tracers tests, made as a part of the TRUE-experiments were chosen as the next predictive modelling task. A preliminary comparison between model predictions made by the Aespoe Task Force and the experimental results, shows that most modelling teams predicted breakthrough from

  6. Geographic assistance of decontamination strategy elaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davydchuk, V.; Arapis, G.

    1996-01-01

    Those who elaborates the strategy of decontamination of vast territories is to take into consideration the heterogeneity of such elements of landscape as relief, lithology, humidity and types of soils and, vegetation, both on local and regional level. Geographic assistance includes evaluation of efficacy of decontamination technologies in different natural conditions, identification of areas of their effective application and definition of ecological damage, estimation of balances of the radionuclides in the landscapes to create background of the decontamination strategy

  7. Decontamination and demolition of concrete and metal structures during the decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this report is to give a concise technical description of the techniques and equipment being used or developed for the decontamination and demolition of nuclear facilities in sufficient detail to assist Member States to plan decommissioning operations and make preliminary evaluations of techniques and equipment. This report also reviews new and/or different aspects which have not been well covered previously in readily available review documents or IAEA publications. This report is an up to date review of techniques and equipment being used or developed for decontamination or dismantling work during the decommissioning of all types of nuclear facility except mining and milling sites. Although the information presented is aimed at countries initiating decommissioning programmes, it should also be useful to others who are responsible for or interested in the planning and implementation of decommissioning tasks. This report describes the relevant techniques and equipment, their areas of application and degree of development and the conditions in which they are used, when these details are known. However, this publication should be used in conjunction with other published technical information on these topics, experience gained as a result of previous decommissioning operations and the assistance of experts in the appropriate areas are required. 64 refs, 33 figs, 5 tabs

  8. Theory of soil decontamination in mixing liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, A.S.; Emets, E.P.; Poluehktov, P.P.; Rybakov, K.A.

    1997-01-01

    The theory of soil decontamination from radioactive pollution in mixing liquid flow is described. It is shown that there exists the threshold intensity of liquid mixing up to which there is no decontamination. Beyond the threshold and by increasing the mixing intensity the decontamination of large soil fractions is allowable whereby the higher is the mixing intensity and lower is the soil contamination, the laser is the characteristic decontamination time. The above theory is related to cases of uniform pollution of the particles surface

  9. Method for decontaminating radiation metal waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onuma, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Akio; Akimoto, Hidetoshi

    1991-01-01

    This report describes a method for decontaminating radiation metal waste characterized by the following properties: in order to decontaminate radiation metal waste of various shapes produced by facilities involved with radioactive substances, non-complex shapes are decontaminated by electropolishing the materials in a neutral saline solution. Complex shapes are chemically decontaminated by means of an acid solution containing permanganic acid or an alkaline solution and a mineral acid solution. After neutralizing the solutions used for chemical decontamination, the radioactive material is separated and removed. Further, in the decontamination method for radioactive metal waste, a supernatant liquid is reused as the electrolyte in electropolishing decontamination. Permanganic ions (MnO 4 - ) are reduced to manganese dioxide (MnO 2 ) and deposited prior to neutralizing the solution used for chemical decontamination. Once manganese dioxide (MnO 2 ) has been separated and removed, it is re-used as the electrolyte in electropolishing decontamination by means of a process identical to the separation process for radioactive substances. 3 figs

  10. 78 FR 73518 - Notice Inviting Suggestions for New Experiments for the Experimental Sites Initiative; Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-06

    ... postsecondary educational institutions participating in one or more of eight on- going experiments. Information... program accountability. Institutions and others, including businesses, philanthropies, and State agencies... Federal Regulations is available via the Federal Digital System at: www.gpo.gov/fdsys . At this site you...

  11. Choosing the best meteorological conditions for atmospheric diffusion experiments at the Angra site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolli, D.; Thomas, P.

    1983-01-01

    The most appropriate meteorological conditions and time of the day advisable for carrying out diffusion experiments at the Angra site are described. Two emission points were defined, and the sampling area was determined with easy access to the complex terrain taken into consideration. The onsite meteorological measuring system is briefly described. (Author) [pt

  12. Experiences of risk in connection with site selection for a repository for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biel, A.; Dahlstrand, U.

    1991-03-01

    Describes an investigation of the experiences of risks the the Swedish inhabitants have in connection with site selection for a repository for radioactive waste. The attitudes show a rather complicated picture. It is influenced by such factors as: sex, education and distance to the facility. (KAE)

  13. Choice of hunting site as a consequence of experience in late-instar crab spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Douglass H

    1999-08-01

    Earlier experiences may play an important role in the choice of hunting sites, but their effects on the foraging repertoire of most animals remain poorly understood. I tested the role of previous flower choices (hunting sites) by penultimate-instar female crab spiders Misumena vatia in making subsequent patch-choice decisions. M. vatia is a sit-and-wait predator, and the two flower species used, ox-eye daisy Chrysanthemum leucanthemum and common buttercup Ranunculus acris, are important hunting sites. Spiders with different immediate experience showed similar short-term (<1 day) giving-up times on the two flower species, independent of their previous substrate. However, four-fifths of the individuals that remained a day or longer tended to leave buttercups sooner than daisies, especially if they had previously occupied daisies. Thus they may directly assess the quality of a potential hunting site, perhaps in response to prey abundance, but previous experience may play a minor role as well. Of spiders that made several consecutive choices of hunting sites, those on daisies often confined these runs to daisies (one of two years); those on buttercups did not exhibit comparable fidelity. Spiders molting into the adult stage almost always subsequently chose the same flower species (either daisy or buttercup) as the one on which they molted. Thus, juvenile experiences may influence adults, the critical stage when virtually all of the spiders' reproductive resources are gathered, even if this resulted from imprinting on their molt sites rather than carrying information over the molt.

  14. Experience in selection and characterization of sites for geological disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-12-01

    An important matter in the development of a geological repository for disposal radioactive waste is the selection of a site that has characteristics that are favorable for isolation. A number of Member States have had national programmes under way for several decades to investigate sites to gather the geological information needed to design and construct a safe repository. The purpose of this report is to document this experience and to summarize what has been learned about the site selection and investigation process. It is hoped it will be of interest to scientists and engineers working in national disposal programmes by providing them information and key references regarding the disposal programmes in other countries. It may also be of interest to members of the public and to decision makers wanting an overview of the worldwide status of programmes to select and characterize geological disposal sites for radioactive waste

  15. Decontamination of surfaces (1961); La decontamination des surfaces (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mestre, E [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    The continued expansion of atomic Energy has led the S.C.R.G.R. to extend simultaneously the recovery of materials contaminated by use in radio-active media. The importance of this aspect of atomic Energy was not immediately obvious to those concerned but is now fully recognized due to the cost of the materials and installations, and also to the time required for the construction of special equipment for the C.E.A. Another very important reason is the dangers associated with the handling of contaminated material. The S.C.R.G.R. attacked this problem from the point of view of these dangers. It later became apparent to the users, once the decontamination methods had proved their worth, that the process presented advantages from the material and cost-saving point of view. (author) [French] Le developpement toujours croissant de l'Energie atomique a conduit le S.C.R.G.R. a developper parallelement la recuperation des materiels contamines par leur emploi en milieu radioactif. Cet aspect de l'Energie atomique n'est pas apparu des le debut aux utilisateurs mais s'est tres vite impose etant donne, d'une part, le cout des installations et du materiel, d'autre part le temps necessaire a la fabrication d'un materiel special aux travaux du C.E.A., enfin et surtout, les risques associes a la manipulation d'un materiel contamine. Les risques seuls ont ete pris comme point de depart a l'examen de ce probleme par le S.C.R.G.R. puis avec le temps, les methodes de decontamination ayant fait leur preuve, les utilisateurs ont alors apercu les aspects materiels et la rentabilite de la decontamination. (auteur)

  16. Creating Virtual Fieldwork Experiences of Geoheritage Sites as Educator Professional Development (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan-Haas, D.

    2013-12-01

    Geoheritage sites are identified as such because they include excellent examples of geologic features or processes, or they have played an important role in the development of geologic understandings. These characteristics also make them excellent sites for teaching in the field, for teaching educators about the nature of fieldwork, and for making Virtual Fieldwork Experiences (VFEs, multimedia representations of field sites). Through the NSF-funded Regional and Local Earth (ReaL) Earth Inquiry Project, we have engaged educators in these practices. The nature of geoheritage sites is anomalous -- if this were not the case, the sites would not gain recognition. Anomalous features or processes can be powerful learning tools when placed into comparison with the more mundane, and the Earth system science of sites local to schools is likely to be mundane. By comparing the mundane and the extraordinary, it is hoped we can learn more about both. The professional development (PD) in ReaL Earth Inquiry begins with a face-to-face workshop within the teachers' region at a site that is interesting from an Earth system science perspective. Though we recognize and emphasize that all sites are interesting from an ESS perspective if you know how to look, the sites typically have features worthy of geoheritage designation. PD does not end with the end of the workshop but continues with online study groups where teachers work together to complete the workshop site VFE, and transition to work on VFEs of sites local to their schools. Throughout the program, participants engage in: - mentored fieldwork that pays attention to the skills and knowledge needed to lead fieldwork; - instruction in and use of a wide range of technologies for making VFEs; - study of a coherent conceptual framework connected to the project's driving question: Why does this place look the way it does? - and, use of resources for supporting all of the above The resources include templates for making VFEs and a

  17. A FRAMEWORK FOR LOW-COST MULTI-PLATFORM VR AND AR SITE EXPERIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. O. Wallgrün

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Low-cost consumer-level immersive solutions have the potential to revolutionize education and research in many fields by providing virtual experiences of sites that are either inaccessible, too dangerous, or too expensive to visit, or by augmenting in-situ experiences using augmented and mixed reality methods. We present our approach for creating low-cost multi-platform virtual and augmented reality site experiences of real world places for education and research purposes, making extensive use of Structure-from-Motion methods as well as 360° photography and videography. We discuss several example projects, for the Mayan City of Cahal Pech, Iceland’s Thrihnukar volcano, the Santa Marta informal settlement in Rio, and for the Penn State Campus, and we propose a framework for creating and maintaining such applications by combining declarative content specification methods with a central linked-data based spatio-temporal information system.

  18. a Framework for Low-Cost Multi-Platform VR and AR Site Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallgrün, J. O.; Huang, J.; Zhao, J.; Masrur, A.; Oprean, D.; Klippel, A.

    2017-11-01

    Low-cost consumer-level immersive solutions have the potential to revolutionize education and research in many fields by providing virtual experiences of sites that are either inaccessible, too dangerous, or too expensive to visit, or by augmenting in-situ experiences using augmented and mixed reality methods. We present our approach for creating low-cost multi-platform virtual and augmented reality site experiences of real world places for education and research purposes, making extensive use of Structure-from-Motion methods as well as 360° photography and videography. We discuss several example projects, for the Mayan City of Cahal Pech, Iceland's Thrihnukar volcano, the Santa Marta informal settlement in Rio, and for the Penn State Campus, and we propose a framework for creating and maintaining such applications by combining declarative content specification methods with a central linked-data based spatio-temporal information system.

  19. Comprehensive investigation of the corrosion and surface chemical effects of the decontamination technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabo-Nagy, Andrea; Varga, Kalman; Deak-Horvath, Emese; Nemeth, Zoltan; Horvath, David; Schunk, Janos; Patek, Gabor

    2012-09-01

    Decontamination technologies are mainly developed to reduce the collective dose of the maintenance personnel at NPPs. The highest efficiency (i.e., the highest DF values) available without detrimental modification of the treated surface of structural material is the most important goal in the course of the application of a decontamination technology. A so-called 'soft' chemical decontamination technology has been developed - supported by the Paks Nuclear Power Plant - at the Institute of Radiochemistry and Radioecology of the University of Pannonia. The novel base technology can be effectively applied for the decontamination of the heat exchanger tubes of steam generators. In addition, by optimizing the main technological parameters (temperature, concentration of the liquid chemicals, flow rates, contact time, etc.) it can be utilized for specific applications such as decontamination of some dismountable devices and separable equipment or the total decontamination prior to plant dismantling (decommissioning) in the future. The aim of this work is to compare the efficiency, corrosion and surface chemical effects of some improved versions of the novel base-technology elaborated for decontamination of austenitic stainless steel surfaces. The experiments have been performed at laboratory conditions in decontamination model systems. The applied methods: γ-spectrometry, ICP-OES, voltammetry and SEM-EDX. The experimental results revealed that the efficiency of the base-technology mainly depends on the surface features of the stainless steel samples such as the chemical composition and thickness of the oxide layer, the nature (quantity, morphology and chemical composition) of the crystalline deposits. It has been documented that the improved version of the base-technology are suitable for the decontamination of both steel surfaces covered by chemically resistant large Cr-content crystals and that having compact oxide-layers (up to a thickness of 10

  20. Russia: results and prospects of liquid solidification experiments at Rosatom sites - 59112

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokhitonov, Yury; Babain, Vasiliy; Kamachev, Vladislav; Kelley, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    , acidic and basic solutions with heavy metals, oil sludge, spent extractants, decontamination solutions, salt sludge, TBP and other complex waste streams. Extensive irradiation evaluation (up to 270 million rad), stability and leach studies, evaporation and absorption capacity tests and gas generation experimentation on tri-butyl phosphate (TBP) waste have been examined. The extensive evaluation of the polymer technology by the lead group, V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, has resulted in significant discussion about its possible use within the ROSATOM network. At present the focus of work is with its application to legacy LLW and ILW waste streams that exist in a variety of sectors that include power plants, research institutes, weapons sites, submarine decommissioning and many others. As is the case in most countries, new waste treatment technologies first must be verified by the waste generator, and secondly, approved for use by the government regulators responsible for final storage. The polymer technology is the first foreign sorbent product to enter Russia for radioactive waste treatment so it must receive ROSATOM certification by undergoing irradiation, fire / safety and health / safety testing. Experimental work to date has validated the effectiveness of the polymer technology and today the project team is evaluating criteria for final acceptance of the waste form by ROSATOM. (authors)

  1. Solidification of metal oxide from electrokinetic-electrodialytic decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Daeseo; Park, Uk-Ryang; Kim, Gye-Nam; Kim, Seung-Soo; Moon, Jei-Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Electrokinectic-electrodialytic decontamination technology reduced 80% of the concentration of the uranium soil waste to below the concentration of self-disposal. After conducting electrokinectic-electrodialytic decontamination, more than 10% of the remainder of radioactive waste from the cathodes of electrokinectic-electrodialytic equipment were produced. To dispose of such waste, it is necessary to solidify second radioactive waste owing to the requirements of radioactive waste from public corporations. In this study, a solidification experiment was carried out using a polymer. At first, a sampling of second radioactive waste was conducted. Then, second radioactive waste and a polymer were mixed. Third, the solidified state between the second radioactive waste and polymer was checked. In our next study, an experiment for the requirements of a public radioactive waste corporation will be conducted.

  2. Decontamination Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Jung, Chong Hun; Choi, Wang Kyu; Won, Hui Jun; Kim, Gye Nam

    2004-02-01

    Technology development of surface decontamination in the uranium conversion facility before decommissioning, technology development of component decontamination in the uranium conversion facility after decommissioning, uranium sludge treatment technology development, radioactive waste soil decontamination technology development at the aim of the temporary storage soil of KAERI, Optimum fixation methodology derivation on the soil and uranium waste, and safety assessment methodology development of self disposal of the soil and uranium waste after decontamination have been performed in this study. The unique decontamination technology applicable to the component of the nuclear facility at room temperature was developed. Low concentration chemical decontamination technology which is very powerful so as to decrease the radioactivity of specimen surface under the self disposal level was developed. The component decontamination technology applicable to the nuclear facility after decommissioning by neutral salt electro-polishing was also developed. The volume of the sludge waste could be decreased over 80% by the sludge waste separation method by water. The electrosorption method on selective removal of U(VI) to 1 ppm of unrestricted release level using the uranium-containing lagoon sludge waste was tested and identified. Soil decontamination process and equipment which can reduce the soil volume over 90% were developed. A pilot size of soil decontamination equipment which will be used to development of real scale soil decontamination equipment was designed, fabricated and demonstrated. Optimized fixation methodology on soil and uranium sludge was derived from tests and evaluation of the results. Safety scenario and safety evaluation model were development on soil and uranium sludge aiming at self disposal after decontamination

  3. Ongoing research experiments at the former Soviet nuclear test site in eastern Kazakhstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leith, William S.; Kluchko, Luke J.; Konovalov, Vladimir; Vouille, Gerard

    2002-01-01

    Degelen mountain, located in EasternKazakhstan near the city of Semipalatinsk, was once the Soviets most active underground nuclear test site. Two hundred fifteen nuclear tests were conducted in 181 tunnels driven horizontally into its many ridges--almost twice the number of tests as at any other Soviet underground nuclear test site. It was also the site of the first Soviet underground nuclear test--a 1-kiloton device detonated on October 11, 1961. Until recently, the details of testing at Degelen were kept secret and have been the subject of considerable speculation. However, in 1991, the Semipalatinsk test site became part of the newly independent Republic of Kazakhstan; and in 1995, the Kazakhstani government concluded an agreement with the U.S. Department of Defense to eliminate the nuclear testing infrastructure in Kazakhstan. This agreement, which calls for the "demilitarization of the infrastructure directly associated with the nuclear weapons test tunnels," has been implemented as the "Degelen Mountain Tunnel Closure Program." The U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency, in partnership with the Department of Energy, has permitted the use of the tunnel closure project at the former nuclear test site as a foundation on which to support cost-effective, research-and-development-funded experiments. These experiments are principally designed to improve U.S. capabilities to monitor and verify the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), but have provided a new source of information on the effects of nuclear and chemical explosions on hard, fractured rock environments. These new data extends and confirms the results of recent Russian publications on the rock environment at the site and the mechanical effects of large-scale chemical and nuclear testing. In 1998, a large-scale tunnel closure experiment, Omega-1, was conducted in Tunnel 214 at Degelen mountain. In this experiment, a 100-ton chemical explosive blast was used to test technologies for monitoring the

  4. Decontaminating agents and decontamination processes for nuclear industry and for plant demolition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, Klaus; Gojowczyk, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Decontamination of surfaces of materials in nuclear facilities or in nuclear power plants under demolition can be carried out successfully if surface treatment is performed by dipping or in an ultrasonic bath by alternating between alkaline and acid baths with intermediate rinsing in demineralized water. Decontaminating aluminium surfaces sensitive to corrosion requires further treatment in an ultrasonic bath, after the first 2 ultrasonic baths, with a weak alkaline decontaminating agent. This applies alike to components to be decontaminated for re-use and parts of materials to be disposed of. The decontamination action depends on the surfaces either being free from corrosion or else showing pronounced corrosion. (orig.)

  5. Development of chemical decontamination for low level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Seigo; Omata, Kazuo; Obinata, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Yoshihiko; Kanamori, Osamu.

    1995-01-01

    During routine intermittent inspection and maintenance at nuclear power plants, a considerable quantity of low level radioactive waste is generated requiring release from the nuclear site or treating additionally. To decontaminate this waste for safe release from the nuclear power plant, the first step could be washing the waste in Methylene chloride, CH 2 Cl 2 , to remove most of the paint coating. However, CH 2 Cl 2 washing does not completely remove the paint coating from the waste, which in the next step is shot blasted with plastic bead media to loose and remove the remaining paint coating. Following in succession, in the third step, the waste is washed in a chelate solution, after which most waste is decontaminated and suitable to be released for recycling. The residual chelate solution may be decomposed into nontoxic carbon dioxide and water by an electrolysis process and then safely discharged into the environment. (author)

  6. First atmospheric diffusion experiment compaign at the Angra site. Analysis of the data measured

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolli, D.

    1986-07-01

    An analysis of the data measured during the first atmospheric diffusion experiment campaign at the Angra site is presented. Some time before the diffusion experiments, with tritiated water vapor used as a tracer (HTO) could be started, many preparatory studies had to be concluded due to the local complex terrain surrounded by steep hills on three sides and a bay in the southern direction. An introductory account of these previous steps is given. Tritiated water vapor was released from a 100m-high tower and air humidity sampled at 25 locations as far as 1Km downwind of the source. An elaborated isoconcentration analysis indicates the plume spread has a Gaussian distribution in the horizontal plane up to the edge of the site's area bordered by the hill's top (about 1Km far-off). Nevertheless the Gaussian model has a restricted applicability at some parts of the site because of the terrain unevenness. In general, the results are comparable to those obtained in other countries for complex terrain. Meanwhile, the Angra's experiments seem only to validate the Gaussian model for short range dispersion from an elevated source. For releases in the lowest layer, the Gaussian model might not be valid. The isoconcentration analysis strengthens the assumption of sea breeze recirculation on the site. (Author) [pt

  7. Utility experiences in redevelopment of formerly used sites -- Wisconsin Electric's risk management and economic development activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borofka, B.P.

    1999-01-01

    Wisconsin Electric Power Company, which recently celebrated its 100th anniversary, has actively promoted the redevelopment of its former sites as well as those of its customers. Serving Milwaukee and southeast Wisconsin, Wisconsin Electric's (WE) sites include former power plants, landfills, right-of-ways, and manufactured gas plant sites. In setting an example for others, as well as seeking to maximize the economic value of these sites, WE has either redeveloped or promoted the redevelopment of these sites by others. Examples include the East Wells Power Plant (now home of the Milwaukee Repertory Theater), the Lakeside Power Plant Site (now the home of Harnischfeger Corporation's headquarters), and the Commerce Street Power Plant located on the Milwaukee River near downtown Milwaukee. In each case the company evaluated the potential environmental liabilities against the unrealized asset value derived from facility location, site size, architectural uniqueness, or other characteristics. At the Commerce Street Power Plant, walking distance to the downtown Milwaukee business district combined with river frontage, were significant site values leveraged against a $5 million asbestos and lead-based paint removal project done to prepare the plant for marketing. More recently, WE has used its experience in promoting the redevelopment of the Menomonee River Valley, the original core of Milwaukee's industrial community, and in advancing a more practical regulatory approach to redeveloping older sites. Finally, the company is working with a non-profit community health clinic, community groups and local foundations in linking these redevelopment activities with the economic and physical health of inner city residents

  8. Electro-decontamination of cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Hadj-Hassine, S.

    2012-01-01

    The end of operations in nuclear facilities is followed by various decontamination and decommissioning operations. Similar to other electrochemical techniques such as re-alkalinisation and chloride extraction, an electrokinetic remediation process is being developed as a specific method for deeply contaminated concrete structures. Two cements, an ordinary Portland and a 30% slag cement, have been chosen for the conducted work.Mortars and concretes are contaminated by adding non-radioactive cesium in the batch water, cesium being a representative specie of deep encountered contaminants. The conducted experimental and numerical work have focused on three main aspects: characterizing and understanding the cesium transport mechanisms, assessing the electro-remediation process at lab-scale and evaluating the real scale constraints. Using existing knowledge of chloride transport mechanisms, experiments have been conducted to characterize the cesium interactions with cementitious phase and ionic transport in saturated materials. A numerical model have then been developed to describe the cesium transport, taking into account the ionic activity coefficients and interactions with solid phases. Indeed, lab-scale experiments have demonstrated that electro-remediation reduced to 20-50% the initially contained cesium after a three weeks treatment. Treated samples analysis confirmed that deeply diffused cesium is migrating to the surface. Moreover, conducted experiments showed the consistency between the different materials properties, applied currents and decontamination efficiency. A comparative analysis of experiments carried on samples with different shapes, formulations and contamination modes helped assessing and optimizing the process efficiency for various continuous and variable applied currents. Finally, electro-remediation experiments have also been carried on 1m 2 concrete slabs. Liquid catholyte and anolyte solutions are replaced by alumina gels and cellulose pastes

  9. IAEA experience in communicating radiation risks through the RPOP web site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehani, M.M.; Holmberg, O.

    2015-01-01

    The authors report here their successful experience of communicating information to health professionals, patients and the public on benefits and risks of ionising radiation in medical applications. The approaches used have been based on giving importance to clinical benefits against risks, as well as safety in use against risk of use. Communicating brief messages against catchy questions with positive and pragmatic approach resulted in making web site on radiation protection of patients (RPOP) as the top web site of the world in this area. Credibility of information has been maintained. The results show immense outreach in 213 countries/territories. (authors)

  10. DECONTAMINATION/DESTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION FOR ORGANICS IN TRANSURANIC WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chris Jones; Javier Del Campo; Patrick Nevins; Stuart Legg

    2002-08-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Savannah River Site has approximately 5000 55-gallon drums of {sup 238}Pu contaminated waste in interim storage. These may not be shipped to WIPP in TRUPACT-II containers due to the high rate of hydrogen production resulting from the radiolysis of the organic content of the drums. In order to circumvent this problem, the {sup 238}Pu needs to be separated from the organics--either by mineralization of the latter or by decontamination by a chemical separation. We have conducted ''cold'' optimization trials and surrogate tests in which a combination of a mediated electrochemical oxidation process (SILVER II{trademark}) and ultrasonic mixing have been used to decontaminate the surrogate waste materials. The surrogate wastes were impregnated with copper oxalate for plutonium dioxide. Our process combines both mineralization of reactive components (such cellulose, rubber, and oil) and surface decontamination of less reactive materials such as polyethylene, polystyrene and polyvinylchloride. By using this combination of SILVER II and ultrasonic mixing, we have achieved 100% current efficiency for the destruction of the reactive components. We have demonstrated that: The degree of decontamination achieved would be adequate to meet both WIPP waste acceptance criteria and TRUPACT II packaging and shipping requirements; The system can maintain near absolute containment of the surrogate radionuclides; Only minimal pre-treatment (coarse shredding) and minimal waste sorting are required; The system requires minimal off gas control processes and monitoring instrumentation; The laboratory trials have developed information that can be used for scale-up purposes; The process does not produce dioxins and furans; Disposal routes for secondary process arisings have already been demonstrated in other programs. Based on the results from Phase 1, the recommendation is to proceed to Phase 2 and use the equipment at Savannah

  11. Gamma exposure rate reduction and residual radium-226 concentrations resulting from decontamination activities conducted at the former uranium millsite in Shiprock, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hans, J.M. Jr.; Hurst, T.L.

    1981-01-01

    Gamma radiation surveys and residual radium 226 soil samples were taken as part of the decontamination activities of the former Shiprock uranium mill site in New Mexico. In order to facilitate the decontamination activities, the mill site and its contaminated environs were divided into 6 major areas. Extensive data are presented in 2 appendices of the pre- and post-decontamination gamma ray exposure rates made on mill site, and of radium 226 concentrations in surface soil samples. A training program established on the mill site by the Navajo Engineering and Construction Authority is described

  12. Advanced technologies for decontamination and conversion of scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muth, T.R.; Shasteen, K.E.; Liby, A.L.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) accumulated large quantities of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) through historic maintenance activities. The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) of major sites formerly engaged in production of nuclear materials and manufacture of nuclear weapons will generate additional quantities of RSM, as much as 3 million tons of such metal according to a recent study. The recycling of RSM is quickly becoming appreciated as a key strategy in DOE's cleanup of contaminated sites and facilities. The work described here has focused on recycle of the concentrated and high-value contaminated scrap metal resource that will arise from cleanup of DOE's gaseous diffusion plants

  13. Advanced technologies for decontamination and conversion of scrap metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muth, T.R.; Shasteen, K.E.; Liby, A.L. [Manufacturing Sciences Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) accumulated large quantities of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) through historic maintenance activities. The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of major sites formerly engaged in production of nuclear materials and manufacture of nuclear weapons will generate additional quantities of RSM, as much as 3 million tons of such metal according to a recent study. The recycling of RSM is quickly becoming appreciated as a key strategy in DOE`s cleanup of contaminated sites and facilities. The work described here has focused on recycle of the concentrated and high-value contaminated scrap metal resource that will arise from cleanup of DOE`s gaseous diffusion plants.

  14. Radiation decontamination of frozen chicks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.; Akhtar, T.; Sattar, A.; Khan, I.

    1992-07-01

    In this report decontamination of frozen chicken has been discussed. The pathogenic bacteria present in poultry meats causes food infectious diseases. The spoilage microorganisms in poultry meat quickly render the meat unacceptable due to decomposition of the products resulting in off-odour and development of slime. Irradiation (2-5 kGy) and freezing has been found effective in eliminating various pathogens. These combination treatments were tested in local environment. The results indicated that radiation followed by freezing greatly protected quality of poultry meat during storage for 6 months. (A.B.)

  15. Decontamination and decommissioning: a bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaren, L.H.

    1982-11-01

    This bibliography contain information on decontamination and decommissioning included in the Department of Energy's Data Base from January 1981 through October 1982. The abstracts are grouped by subject category. Within each category the arrangement is by report number for reports, followed by nonreports in reverse chronological order. These citations are to research reports journal articles, books, patents, theses, and conference papers from worldwide sources. Five indexes, each preceded by a brief description, are provided: corporate author, personal author, subject, contract number, and report umber. (468 abstracts)

  16. Magnetic separation for soil decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avens, L.R.; Worl, L.A.; deAguero, K.J.; Padilla, D.D.; Prenger, F.C.; Stewart, W.F.; Hill, D.D.; Tolt, T.L.

    1993-01-01

    High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) is a physical separation process that is used to extract magnetic particles from mixtures. The technology is used on a large scale in the kaolin clay industry to whiten or brighten kaolin clay and increase its value. Because all uranium and plutonium compounds are slightly magnetic, HGMS can be used to separate these contaminants from non-magnetic soils. A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was signed in 1992 between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies Company (LESAT) to develop HGMS for soil decontamination. This paper reports progress and describes the HGMS technology

  17. Phase 2 microwave concrete decontamination results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, T.L.; Foster, D. Jr.; Wilson, C.T.; Schaich, C.R.

    1995-01-01

    The authors report on the results of the second phase of a four-phase program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop a system to decontaminate concrete using microwave energy. The microwave energy is directed at the concrete surface through the use of an optimized wave guide antenna, or applicator, and this energy rapidly heats the free water present in the interstitial spaces of the concrete matrix. The resulting steam pressure causes the surface to burst in much the same way popcorn pops in a home microwave oven. Each steam explosion removes several square centimeters of concrete surface that are collected by a highly integrated wave guide and vacuum system. The authors call this process the microwave concrete decontamination, or MCD, process. In the first phase of the program the principle of microwaves concrete removal concrete surfaces was demonstrated. In these experiments, concrete slabs were placed on a translator and moved beneath a stationary microwave system. The second phase demonstrated the ability to mobilize the technology to remove the surfaces from concrete floors. Area and volume concrete removal rates of 10.4 cm 2 /s and 4.9 cm 3 /S, respectively, at 18 GHz were demonstrated. These rates are more than double those obtained in Phase 1 of the program. Deeper contamination can be removed by using a longer residence time under the applicator to create multiple explosions in the same area or by taking multiple passes over previously removed areas. Both techniques have been successfully demonstrated. Small test sections of painted and oil-soaked concrete have also been removed in a single pass. Concrete with embedded metal anchors on the surface has also been removed, although with some increased variability of removal depth. Microwave leakage should not pose any operational hazard to personnel, since the observed leakage was much less than the regulatory standard

  18. Chemical decontamination process and device therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Ryota; Sakai, Hitoshi

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a process and a device for chemical decontamination, which can suppress corrosion of low corrosion resistant materials, keep decontamination properties substantially as same as before and further, reduce the volume of secondary wastes. In a step of reductively melting oxide membranes on an objective material to be decontaminated, a mixture of oxalic acid and a salt thereof is used as a reducing agent, and the reductive melting is conducted while suppressing hydrogen ion concentration of an aqueous liquid system. In order to enhance the reducibility of the oxalic acid ions, it is desirable to add a cyclic hetero compound thereto. The device of the present invention comprises, a decontamination loop including a member to be decontaminated, a heater and a pH meter, a medical injection pump for injecting a reducing agent to the decontamination loop, a metal ion recovering loop including an ion exchange resin tower, a reducing agent decomposing loop including an electrolytic vessel and/or a UV ray irradiation cell, a circulation pump for circulating the decontamination liquid to each of the loops and a plurality of opening/closing valves for switching the loop in which the decontamination liquid is circulated. (T.M.)

  19. INTEGRATED VERTICAL AND OVERHEAD DECONTAMINATION SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities performed during FY98 and describes the planned activities for FY99. Accomplishments for FY98 include identifying and selecting decontamination, the screening of potential characterization technologies, development of minimum performance factors for the decontamination technology, and development and identification of Applicable, Relevant and Appropriate Regulations (ARARs).

  20. Electrochemical decontamination system for actinide processing gloveboxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedman, D.E.; Lugo, J.L.; Ford, D.K.; Nelson, T.O.; Trujillo, V.L.; Martinez, H.E.

    1998-03-01

    An electrolytic decontamination technology has been developed and successfully demonstrated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for the decontamination of actinide processing gloveboxes. The technique decontaminates the interior surfaces of stainless steel gloveboxes utilizing a process similar to electropolishing. The decontamination device is compact and transportable allowing it to be placed entirely within the glovebox line. In this way, decontamination does not require the operator to wear any additional personal protective equipment and there is no need for additional air handling or containment systems. Decontamination prior to glovebox decommissioning reduces the potential for worker exposure and environmental releases during the decommissioning, transport, and size reduction procedures which follow. The goal of this effort is to reduce contamination levels of alpha emitting nuclides for a resultant reduction in waste level category from High Level Transuranic (TRU) to low Specific Activity (LSA, less than or equal 100 nCi/g). This reduction in category results in a 95% reduction in disposal and disposition costs for the decontaminated gloveboxes. The resulting contamination levels following decontamination by this method are generally five orders of magnitude below the LSA specification. Additionally, the sodium sulfate based electrolyte utilized in the process is fully recyclable which results in the minimum of secondary waste. The process bas been implemented on seven gloveboxes within LANL's Plutonium Facility at Technical Area 55. Of these gloveboxes, two have been discarded as low level waste items and the remaining five have been reused