WorldWideScience

Sample records for sintered titanium nitride

  1. Xenon thermal behavior in sintered titanium nitride, foreseen inert matrix for GFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bes, R.

    2010-11-01

    This work concerns the generation IV future nuclear reactors such as gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) for which refractory materials as titanium nitride (TiN) are needed to surround fuel and act as a fission product diffusion barrier. This study is about Xe thermal behavior in sintered titanium nitride. Microstructure effects on Xe behavior have been studied. In this purpose, several syntheses have been performed using different sintering temperatures and initial powder compositions. Xenon species have been introduced into samples by ionic implantation. Then, samples were annealed in temperature range from 1300 C to 1600 C, these temperatures being the accidental awaited temperature. A transport of xenon towards sample surface has been observed. Transport rate seems to be slow down when increasing sintering temperature. The composition of initial powder and the crystallographic orientation of each considered grain also influence xenon thermal behavior. Xenon release has been correlated with material oxidation during annealing. Xenon bubbles were observed. Their size is proportional with xenon concentration and increases with annealing temperature. Several mechanisms which could explain Xe intragranular mobility in TiN are proposed. In addition with experiments, very low Xe solubility in TiN has been confirmed by ab initio calculations. So, bi-vacancies were found to be the most favoured Xe incorporation sites in this material. (author)

  2. Reactive Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) of Nitride Reinforced Titanium Alloy Composites (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-15

    other industrial applications [21–25]. Titanium is widely used in the medical field to replace heart valves , joints, and bones for dental prosthetics due...their wear and fatigue resistance, hard coatings for dental implants and dental surgery tools, tribological orthopedic devices, gears, valves , pumps...their inherent brittleness and inferior fracture toughness [6,10–13]. In contrast, metal matrix composites (MMCs) reinforced with hard precipitates

  3. Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanostructures via Nitridation of Nanopatterned Titanium Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Kim, Jongbum

    2017-01-01

    Plasmonic titanium nitride nanostructures are obtained via nitridation of titanium dioxide. Nanoparticles acquired a cubic shape with sharper edges following the rock-salt crystalline structure of TiN. Lattice constant of the resulting TiN nanoparticles matched well with the tabulated data. Energy...

  4. Process for the production of metal nitride sintered bodies and resultant silicon nitride and aluminum nitride sintered bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, S.; Omori, M.; Hayashi, J.; Kayano, H.; Hamano, M.

    1983-01-01

    A process for the manufacture of metal nitride sintered bodies, in particular, a process in which a mixture of metal nitrite powders is shaped and heated together with a binding agent is described. Of the metal nitrides Si3N4 and AIN were used especially frequently because of their excellent properties at high temperatures. The goal is to produce a process for metal nitride sintered bodies with high strength, high corrosion resistance, thermal shock resistance, thermal shock resistance, and avoidance of previously known faults.

  5. Colloidal Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles: Properties and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Suslov, Sergey; Kildishev, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    Optical properties of colloidal plasmonic titanium nitride nanoparticles are examined with an eye on their photothermal and photocatalytic applications via transmission electron microscopy and optical transmittance measurements. Single crystal titanium nitride cubic nanoparticles with an average ...

  6. Local heating with titanium nitride nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Ndukaife, Justus C.; Naik, Gururaj V.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of titanium nitride (TiN) nanoparticles as local heat sources in the near infrared region, focusing on biological window. Experiments and simulations provide promising results for TiN, which is known to be bio-compatible.......We investigate the feasibility of titanium nitride (TiN) nanoparticles as local heat sources in the near infrared region, focusing on biological window. Experiments and simulations provide promising results for TiN, which is known to be bio-compatible....

  7. Surface modification of titanium by plasma nitriding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapczinski Myriam Pereira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A systematic investigation was undertaken on commercially pure titanium submitted to plasma nitriding. Thirteen different sets of operational parameters (nitriding time, sample temperature and plasma atmosphere were used. Surface analyses were performed using X-ray diffraction, nuclear reaction and scanning electron microscopy. Wear tests were done with stainless steel Gracey scaler, sonic apparatus and pin-on-disc machine. The obtained results indicate that the tribological performance can be improved for samples treated with the following conditions: nitriding time of 3 h; plasma atmosphere consisting of 80%N2+20%H2 or 20%N2+80%H2; sample temperature during nitriding of 600 or 800 degreesC.

  8. Titanium Powder Sintering in a Graphite Furnace and Mechanical Properties of Sintered Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changzhou Yu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent accreditation of titanium powder products for commercial aircraft applications marks a milestone in titanium powder metallurgy. Currently, powder metallurgical titanium production primarily relies on vacuum sintering. This work reported on the feasibility of powder sintering in a non-vacuum furnace and the tensile properties of the as-sintered Ti. Specifically, we investigated atmospheric sintering of commercially pure (C.P. titanium in a graphite furnace backfilled with argon and studied the effects of common contaminants (C, O, N on sintering densification of titanium. It is found that on the surface of the as-sintered titanium, a severely contaminated porous scale was formed and identified as titanium oxycarbonitride. Despite the porous surface, the sintered density in the sample interiors increased with increasing sintering temperature and holding time. Tensile specimens cut from different positions within a large sintered cylinder reveal different tensile properties, strongly dependent on the impurity level mainly carbon and oxygen. Depending on where the specimen is taken from the sintered compact, ultimate tensile strength varied from 300 to 580 MPa. An average tensile elongation of 5% to 7% was observed. Largely depending on the interstitial contents, the fracture modes from typical brittle intergranular fracture to typical ductile fracture.

  9. Comparative sinterability of combustion synthesized and commercial titanium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manley, B.W.

    1984-11-01

    The influence of various parameters on the sinterability of combustion synthesized titanium carbide was investigaged. Titanium carbide powders, prepared by the combustion synthesis process, were sintered in the temperature range 1150 to 1600 0 C. Incomplete combustion and high oxygen contents were found to be the cause of reduced shrinkage during sintering of the combustion syntheized powders when compared to the shrinkage of commercial TiC. Free carbon was shown to inhibit shrinkage. The activation energy for sintering was found to depend on stoichiometry (C/Ti). With decreasing C/Ti, the rate of sintering increased. 29 references, 16 figures, 13 tables

  10. Spark plasma sintering of titanium aluminide intermetallics and its composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldoshan, Abdelhakim Ahmed

    Titanium aluminide intermetallics are a distinct class of engineering materials having unique properties over conventional titanium alloys. gamma-TiAl compound possesses competitive physical and mechanical properties at elevated temperature applications compared to Ni-based superalloys. gamma-TiAl composite materials exhibit high melting point, low density, high strength and excellent corrosion resistance. Spark plasma sintering (SPS) is one of the powder metallurgy techniques where powder mixture undergoes simultaneous application of uniaxial pressure and pulsed direct current. Unlike other sintering techniques such as hot iso-static pressing and hot pressing, SPS compacts the materials in shorter time (< 10 min) with a lower temperature and leads to highly dense products. Reactive synthesis of titanium aluminide intermetallics is carried out using SPS. Reactive sintering takes place between liquid aluminum and solid titanium. In this work, reactive sintering through SPS was used to fabricate fully densified gamma-TiAl and titanium aluminide composites starting from elemental powders at different sintering temperatures. It was observed that sintering temperature played significant role in the densification of titanium aluminide composites. gamma-TiAl was the predominate phase at different temperatures. The effect of increasing sintering temperature on microhardness, microstructure, yield strength and wear behavior of titanium aluminide was studied. Addition of graphene nanoplatelets to titanium aluminide matrix resulted in change in microhardness. In Ti-Al-graphene composites, a noticeable decrease in coefficient of friction was observed due to the influence of self-lubrication caused by graphene.

  11. Titanium nitride deposition in titanium implant alloys produced by powder metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriques, V.A.R.; Cairo, C.A.A.; Faria, J.; Lemos, T.G.; Galvani, E.T.

    2009-01-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) is an extremely hard material, often used as a coating on titanium alloy, steel, carbide, and aluminum components to improve wear resistance. Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition (EB-PVD) is a form of deposition in which a target anode is bombarded with an electron beam given off by a charged tungsten filament under high vacuum, producing a thin film in a substrate. In this work are presented results of TiN deposition in targets and substrates of Ti (C.P.) and Ti- 13 Nb- 13 Zr obtained by powder metallurgy. Samples were produced by mixing of hydride metallic powders followed by uniaxial and cold isostatic pressing with subsequent densification by sintering between 900°C up to 1400 °C, in vacuum. The deposition was carried out under nitrogen atmosphere. Sintered samples were characterized for phase composition, microstructure and microhardness by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Vickers indentation, respectively. It was shown that the samples were sintered to high densities and presented homogeneous microstructure, with ideal characteristics for an adequate deposition and adherence. The film layer presented a continuous structure with 15μm. (author)

  12. Corrosion stability of cermets on the base of titanium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajdash, O.N.; Marinich, M.A.; Kuzenkova, M.A.; Manzheleev, I.V.

    1991-01-01

    Corrosion resistance of titanium nitride and its cermets in 5% of HCl, 7% of HNO 3 , 10% of H 2 SO 4 is studied. It is established that alloys TiN-Ni-Mo alloyed with chromium (from 10 to 15%) possess the highest corrosion resistance. Cermet TiN-Cr has the higher stability than titanium nitride due to formation of binary nitride (Ti, Cr)N

  13. Characterization of plasma nitrided layers produced on sintered iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Alves Fontes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Plasma nitriding is a thermo-physical-chemical treatment process, which promotes surface hardening, caused by interstitial diffusion of atomic nitrogen into metallic alloys. In this work, this process was employed in the surface modification of a sintered ferrous alloy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD analyses, and wear and microhardness tests were performed on the samples submitted to ferrox treatment and plasma nitriding carried out under different conditions of time and temperature. The results showed that the nitride layer thickness is higher for all nitrided samples than for ferrox treated samples, and this layer thickness increases with nitriding time and temperature, and temperature is a more significant variable. The XRD analysis showed that the nitrided layer, for all samples, near the surface consists in a mixture of γ′-Fe4N and ɛ-Fe3N phases. Both wear resistance and microhardness increase with nitriding time and temperature, and temperature influences both the characteristics the most.

  14. Synthesis and Optimization of the Sintering Kinetics of Actinide Nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butt, Drryl P.; Jaques, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Research conducted for this NERI project has advanced the understanding and feasibility of nitride nuclear fuel processing. In order to perform this research, necessary laboratory infrastructure was developed; including basic facilities and experimental equipment. Notable accomplishments from this project include: the synthesis of uranium, dysprosium, and cerium nitrides using a novel, low-cost mechanical method at room temperature; the synthesis of phase pure UN, DyN, and CeN using thermal methods; and the sintering of UN and (U x , Dy 1-x )N (0.7 (le) X (le) 1) pellets from phase pure powder that was synthesized in the Advanced Materials Laboratory at Boise State University.

  15. Synthesis and Optimization of the Sintering Kinetics of Actinide Nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drryl P. Butt; Brian Jaques

    2009-03-31

    Research conducted for this NERI project has advanced the understanding and feasibility of nitride nuclear fuel processing. In order to perform this research, necessary laboratory infrastructure was developed; including basic facilities and experimental equipment. Notable accomplishments from this project include: the synthesis of uranium, dysprosium, and cerium nitrides using a novel, low-cost mechanical method at room temperature; the synthesis of phase pure UN, DyN, and CeN using thermal methods; and the sintering of UN and (Ux, Dy1-x)N (0.7 ≤ X ≤ 1) pellets from phase pure powder that was synthesized in the Advanced Materials Laboratory at Boise State University.

  16. Electrochemical capacitance performance of titanium nitride nanoarray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yibing, E-mail: ybxie@seu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Suzhou Research Institute of Southeast University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Wang, Yong [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Du, Hongxiu [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Suzhou Research Institute of Southeast University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2013-12-01

    Highlights: • TiN nanoarray is formed by a nitridation process of TiO{sub 2} in ammonia atmosphere. • TiN nanoarray exhibits much higher EDLC capacitance than TiO{sub 2} nanoarray. • The specific capacitance of TiN nanoarray achieves a high level of 99.7 mF cm{sup −2}. • A flexible solid-state supercapacitor is constructed by TiN nanoarray and PVA gel. -- Abstract: In this study, titanium nitride (TiN) nanoarrays with a short nanotube and long nanopore structure have been prepared by an anodization process of ultra thin titanium foil in ethylene glycol (EG) solution containing ammonium fluoride, subsequent calcination process in an air atmosphere, and final nitridation process in an ammonia atmosphere. The morphology and microstructure characterization has been conducted using field emission scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction. The electrochemical properties have been investigated through cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectrum measurements. The electrochemical capacitance performance has been investigated by galvanostatic charge–discharge measurements in the acidic, neural and alkali electrolyte solution. Well-defined TiN nanoarrays contribute a much higher capacitance performance than titania (TiO{sub 2}) in the supercapacitor application due to the extraordinarily improved electrical conductivity. Such an electrochemical capacitance can be further enhanced by increasing aspect ratio of TiN nanoarray from short nanotubes to long nanopores. A flexible supercapacitor has been constructed using two symmetrical TiN nanoarray electrodes and a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) gel electrolyte with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–KCl–H{sub 2}O–EG. Such a supercapacitor has a highly improved potential window and still keeps good electrochemical energy storage. TiN nanoarray with a high aspect ratio can act well as an ultra thin film electrode material of flexible supercapacitor to contribute a superior capacitance performance.

  17. Colloidal Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles: Properties and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guler Urcan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical properties of colloidal plasmonic titanium nitride nanoparticles are examined with an eye on their photothermal and photocatalytic applications via transmission electron microscopy and optical transmittance measurements. Single crystal titanium nitride cubic nanoparticles with an average size of 50 nm, which was found to be the optimum size for cellular uptake with gold nanoparticles [1], exhibit plasmon resonance in the biological transparency window and demonstrate a high absorption efficiency. A self-passivating native oxide at the surface of the nanoparticles provides an additional degree of freedom for surface functionalization. The titanium oxide shell surrounding the plasmonic core can create new opportunities for photocatalytic applications.

  18. Fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride nanoantennas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, Justin A., E-mail: jabriggs@stanford.edu [Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, 348 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, 496 Lomita Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Naik, Gururaj V.; Baum, Brian K.; Dionne, Jennifer A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, 496 Lomita Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Petach, Trevor A.; Goldhaber-Gordon, David [Department of Physics, Stanford University, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    CMOS-compatible fabrication of plasmonic materials and devices will accelerate the development of integrated nanophotonics for information processing applications. Using low-temperature plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD), we develop a recipe for fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride (TiN) that is plasmonic in the visible and near infrared. Films are grown on silicon, silicon dioxide, and epitaxially on magnesium oxide substrates. By optimizing the plasma exposure per growth cycle during PEALD, carbon and oxygen contamination are reduced, lowering undesirable loss. We use electron beam lithography to pattern TiN nanopillars with varying diameters on silicon in large-area arrays. In the first reported single-particle measurements on plasmonic TiN, we demonstrate size-tunable darkfield scattering spectroscopy in the visible and near infrared regimes. The optical properties of this CMOS-compatible material, combined with its high melting temperature and mechanical durability, comprise a step towards fully CMOS-integrated nanophotonic information processing.

  19. Sintering unalloyed titanium in DC electrical abnormal glow discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Seeber

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Powder metallurgy is widely used in the manufacture of components that have complex geometry. The good dimensional control, reduction in manufacturing steps and operating costs which has favored the use of this technique for manufacturing of titanium alloys components. However, the high affinity of this material with oxygen hinders strongly the sintering process. For this, the sintering associated with plasma technology can be considered an alternative technique for the processing of this material. The strict control of sintering atmosphere performed at low pressures and the reactive species present in the plasma environment can help to improve the sintering of this material. The results presented in this paper show a good correlation between the parameters used for the compaction of the samples and the microstructure develop during the plasma sintering of samples. The microstructure of the plasma assisted samples is also affected by the particular configuration used in the plasma reactor.

  20. Characterization and Sintering of Armstrong Process Titanium Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyan; Nash, Philip; Mangabhai, Damien

    2017-04-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys have a high strength to weight ratio and good corrosion resistance but also need longer time and have a higher cost on machining. Powder metallurgy offers a viable approach to produce near net-shape complex components with little or no machining. The Armstrong titanium powders are produced by direct reduction of TiCl4 vapor with liquid sodium, a process which has a relatively low cost. This paper presents a systematic research on powder characterization, mechanical properties, and sintering behavior and of Armstrong process powder metallurgy, and also discusses the sodium issue, and the advantages and disadvantages of Armstrong process powders.

  1. Surface modification of 17-4PH stainless steel by DC plasma nitriding and titanium nitride film duplex treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, F.; Leng, Y.X.; Huang, N.; Bai, B.; Zhang, P.Ch.

    2007-01-01

    17-4PH stainless steel was modified by direct current (DC) plasma nitriding and titanium nitride film duplex treatment in this study. The microstructure, wear resistance and corrosion resistance were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), pin-on-disk tribological test and polarization experiment. The results revealed that the DC plasma nitriding pretreatment was in favor of improving properties of titanium nitride film. The corrosion resistance and wear resistance of duplex treatment specimen was more superior to that of only coated titanium nitride film

  2. Electro sinter forging of titanium disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cannella, Emanuele; Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Bay, Niels Oluf

    by measuring the electrical resistance during the sintering process [5], since low electrical resistance corresponds to high density. It is, however, necessary to be aware that increased temperature, on the other hand, increases the resistance. SEM micrographs and Computed Tomography (CT) are carried out......Electro sinter forging (ESF) is a new sintering process based on the principle of electrical Joule heating. In the present work, middle frequency direct current (MFDC) was flowing through the powder compact, which was under mechanical pressure. The main parameters are the high electrical current......, up to 10 kA, and the low voltage, 1-2 V, resulting in heat generation in the powder. Figure 1 shows the experimental setup. The punches were made of a conductive material; namely a copper alloy. The die, which has to be electrically insulating, was made of alumina. The ESF process takes 3-4s...

  3. Grain growth in ultrafine titanium powders during sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panigrahi, B.B.; Godkhindi, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Grain growth behaviour of fine (∼3 μm) and attrition milled nanocrystalline (∼32 nm) titanium powers during sintering have been studied. The activation energies of grain growth (Q g ) in fine titanium were found to be 192.9 and 142.4 kJ/mol at lower and higher temperature ranges, respectively. The nanocrystalline titanium showed very low values of Q g (54.6 kJ/mol) at lower temperatures and it increased to 273.2 kJ/mol at higher temperatures. The constant (n) in nano Ti system was found to have unusually very high values of 6.5-8.2. The grain boundary rotation along with the diffusional processes could be the grain growth mechanism in nanocrystalline and in fine titanium powders

  4. Cellular growth and dislocation structures in laser-nitrided titanium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloosterman, A.B.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    1997-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopic observations were made of different dislocation structures in laser-nitrided titanium. Equidistant edge dislocations in the bulk and periodic surface structures exhibit a periodicity within the same order of magnitude. An analysis is presented in which both periodic

  5. The oxidation of titanium nitride- and silicon nitride-coated stainless steel in carbon dioxide environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, D.R.G.; Stott, F.H.

    1992-01-01

    A study has been undertaken into the effects of thin titanium nitride and silicon nitride coatings, deposited by physical vapour deposition and chemical vapour deposition processes, on the oxidation resistance of 321 stainless steel in a simulated advanced gas-cooled reactor carbon dioxide environment for long periods at 550 o C and 700 o C under thermal-cycling conditions. The uncoated steel contains sufficient chromium to develop a slow-growing chromium-rich oxide layer at these temperatures, particularly if the surfaces have been machine-abraded. Failure of this layer in service allows formation of less protective iron oxide-rich scales. The presence of a thin (3-4 μm) titanium nitride coating is not very effective in increasing the oxidation resistance since the ensuing titanium oxide scale is not a good barrier to diffusion. Even at 550 o C, iron oxide-rich nodules are able to develop following relatively rapid oxidation and breakdown of the coating. At 700 o C, the coated specimens oxidize at relatively similar rates to the uncoated steel. A thin silicon nitride coating gives improved oxidation resistance, with both the coating and its slow-growing oxide being relatively electrically insulating. The particular silicon nitride coating studied here was susceptible to spallation on thermal cycling, due to an inherently weak coating/substrate interface. (Author)

  6. High pressure sintering (HP-HT) of diamond powders with titanium and titanium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaworska, L.

    1999-01-01

    Polycrystalline diamond compacts for cutting tools are mostly manufactured using high pressure sintering (HP-HT). The standard diamond compacts are prepared by diamond powders sintering with metallic binding phase. The first group of metallic binder are metals able to solve carbon - Co, Ni. The second group of metal binders are carbide forming elements - Ti, Cr, W and others. The paper describes high pressure sintering of diamond powder with titanium and nonstoichiometry titanium carbide for cutting tool application. A type of binding phase has the significant influence on microstructure and mechanical properties of diamond compacts. Very homogeneous structure was achieved in case of compacts obtained from metalized diamond where diamond-TiC-diamond connection were predominant. In the case of compacts prepared by mechanical mixing of diamond with titanium powders the obtained structure was nonhomogeneous with titanium carbide clusters. They had more diamond to diamond connections. These compacts compared to the compact made of metallized diamond have greater wear resistance. In the case of the diamond and TiC 0.92 sintering the strong bonding of TiC diamond grains was obtained. The microstructure observations for diamond with 5% wt. Ti and diamond with 5% wt. TiC 0.92 (the initial composition) compacts were performed in transmission microscope. For two type of compacts the strong bonding phase TiC without defects is creating. (author)

  7. Some new aspects of microstructural development during sintering of silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feuer, H.; Woetting, G.; Gugel, E.

    1994-01-01

    The mechanical properties of silicon nitride ceramics strongly depend on their microstructure. However, there is still a lively discussion about the parameters controlling the microstructural development. The current research was stimulated by the observation that a bimodal grain-size distribution in dense silicon nitride has a very beneficial effect on the mechanical properties, especially on the fracture toughness. This paper is focused on the relationship between the α-β-transformation and the densification of silicon nitride powders with different characteristics and sintering additives. Effects of β-grains originally present in the silicon nitride powder, of added β-silicon nitride seeds and of β-crystals formed by the α/β-transformation on the resulting microstructure and on the properties are discussed. The results are summarised in a model describing prerequisites and processing conditions, which are necessary to achieve a bimodal microstructure, i. e. a self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic. (orig.)

  8. Thermochemical stability of zirconia-titanium nitride as mixed ionic-electronic composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, P. S. M.; Esposito, V.; Marani, D.

    2018-01-01

    Dense zirconia (8% molar yttria-stabilized ZrO2)-titanium nitride (TiN) composites are fabricated to obtain mixed ionic-electronic conducting ceramic systems with high degree of electronic and thermal conductivity. The composites are consolidated by spark plasma sintering (SPS), starting from pure...... the composites, high electrical conductivity is attained. Samples exhibit metallic behavior, showing an unexpected percolation of TiN in the YSZ matrix for volume fraction ≤ 25 wt% (27 vol%). Chemical degradation and electrical properties of the compounds were monitored under oxidative (air) and inert (Ar...... transport properties of the composite can be tuned by both the relative volume fraction of phases and controlled oxidative treatments. Adjusting such parameters different electric behaviors were observed ranging from predominant electronic conductors, to temperature-independent resistivity...

  9. The effect of lanthanum boride on the sintering, sintered microstructure and mechanical properties of titanium and titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Y.F.; Luo, S.D.; Qian, M.

    2014-01-01

    An addition of ≤0.5 wt% lanthanum boride (LaB 6 ) to powder metallurgy commercially pure Ti (CP-Ti), Ti–6Al–4V and Ti–10V–2Fe–3Al (all in wt%) resulted in improved sintered density, substantial microstructural refinement, and noticeably increased tensile elongation. The addition of LaB 6 led to scavenging of both oxygen (O) and chlorine (Cl) from the titanium powder during sintering, evidenced by the formation of La 2 O 3 and LaCl x O y . The pinning effect of La 2 O 3 , LaCl x O y and TiB inhibited prior-β grain growth and resulted in subsequent smaller α-laths. The formation of nearly equiaxed α-Ti phase is partially attributed to the nucleation effect of α-Ti on TiB. The improved sintered density was caused by B from LaB 6 rather than La, while excessive formation of La 2 O 3 and TiB with an addition of >0.5 wt% LaB 6 resulted in a noticeable decrease in sintered density. The improved tensile elongation with an addition of ≤0.5 wt% LaB 6 was mainly attributed to the scavenging of oxygen by LaB 6 , partially assisted by the improved sintered density. However, an addition of >0.5 wt% LaB 6 led to the formation of large La 2 O 3 aggregates and more brittle TiB whiskers and therefore decreased tensile elongation. Balanced scavenging of O is thus important. The optimal addition of LaB 6 was 0.5 wt% but this may change depending on the powder size of the LaB 6 to be used

  10. Formation of titanium nitride layers on titanium metal: Results of XPS and AES investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moers, H.; Pfennig, G.; Klewe-Nebenius, H.; Penzhorn, R.D.; Sirch, M.; Willin, E.

    1988-09-01

    The reaction of titanium metal with gaseous nitrogen and ammonia at temperatures of 890 0 C leads to the formation of nitridic overlayers on the metallic substrate. The thicknesses of the overlayers increase with increasing reaction time. Under comparable conditions ammonia reacts much slower than nitrogen. XPS and AES depth profile analyses show continuous changes of the in-depth compositions of the overlayers. This can be interpreted in terms of a very irregular thickness of the overlayers, an assumption which is substantiated by local AES analyses and by the observation of a pronounced crystalline structure of the substrate after annealing pretreatment, which can give rise to locally different reaction rates. The depth profile is also influenced by the broad ranges of stability of the titanium nitride phases formed during the reaction. The quantitative analysis of the titanium/nitrogen overlayers by AES is difficult because of the overlap of titanium and nitrogen Auger peaks. In quantitative XPS analysis problems arise due to difficulties in defining Ti 2p peak areas. This work presents practical procedures for the quantitative evaluation by XPS and AES of nitridic overlayers with sufficient accuracy. (orig.) [de

  11. Welding of titanium and nickel alloy by combination of explosive welding and spark plasma sintering technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malyutina, Yu. N., E-mail: iuliiamaliutina@gmail.com; Bataev, A. A., E-mail: bataev@adm.nstu.ru; Shevtsova, L. I., E-mail: edeliya2010@mail.ru [Novosibirsk State Technical University, Novosibirsk, 630073 (Russian Federation); Mali, V. I., E-mail: vmali@mail.ru; Anisimov, A. G., E-mail: anis@hydro.nsc.ru [Lavrentyev Institute of Hydrodynamics SB RAS, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    A possibility of titanium and nickel-based alloys composite materials formation using combination of explosive welding and spark plasma sintering technologies was demonstrated in the current research. An employment of interlayer consisting of copper and tantalum thin plates makes possible to eliminate a contact between metallurgical incompatible titanium and nickel that are susceptible to intermetallic compounds formation during their interaction. By the following spark plasma sintering process the bonding has been received between titanium and titanium alloy VT20 through the thin powder layer of pure titanium that is distinguished by low defectiveness and fine dispersive structure.

  12. A new method for production of titanium vapor and synthesis of titanium nitride coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, Sergey N.; Melnik, Yury A.; Metel, Alexander S.; Volosova, Marina A.

    2018-03-01

    It is proposed to synthesize on machine parts and cutting tools wear-resistant titanium nitride coatings with the help of the hollow-cathode glow discharge, a molybdenum crucible for titanium evaporation being used as the anode of the discharge and a process vacuum chamber being used as the hollow cathode. The research revealed that at the anode surface area less than a critical value S* = (2m/M)1/2S, where S is the area of the chamber walls, m is the mass of electrons and M is the mass of ions, the anode fall of potential is positive and grows from ˜50 V at argon pressure p = 0.2 Pa to ˜2 kV at p = 0.02 Pa. At the discharge current I = 0.6 A electrons accelerated by the anode fall of 0.9 kV transport into the crucible with the inner diameter of 12 mm the power of ˜0.54 kW, which allows the titanium evaporation and the coating deposition rate of 5 µm·h-1 on a substrate distanced from the crucible at 100 mm. After the argon is replaced with the nitrogen, titanium nitride coating without titanium droplets is synthesized the deposition rate amounting to about the same value.

  13. Elaboration of titanium nitride coatings by activated reactive evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granier, Jean

    1978-01-01

    As titanium nitride is a very interesting and promising material for the protection against wear and corrosion of metals and alloys with a low fusion point, and notably steels, this research thesis reports the study of the elaboration of a TiN coating by activated reactive evaporation. In a first part, the author describes deposition processes based on evaporation and their characteristics. He explains the choice of the studied process. He discusses published data and results related to the titanium-nitrogen system. He describes the apparatus and reports the operation mode adjustment, and reports the study of the influence of operating conditions (substrate temperature, nitrogen pressure, evaporation rate, possible use of a discharge) on growth kinetics and on coating properties. A reaction mechanism is then proposed to describe and explain the obtained results [fr

  14. Titanium nitride room-temperature ferromagnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morozov, Iu.G., E-mail: morozov@ism.ac.ru [Institute of Structural Macrokinetics and Materials Science, Russian Academy of Sciences, 8 Academician Osipyan Street, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region, 142432 (Russian Federation); Belousova, O.V. [Institute of Structural Macrokinetics and Materials Science, Russian Academy of Sciences, 8 Academician Osipyan Street, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region, 142432 (Russian Federation); Belyakov, O.A. [Ogarev Mordovia State University, Saransk, 68 Bol' shevistskaya Street, 430005 (Russian Federation); Parkin, I.P., E-mail: i.p.parkin@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, Materials Chemistry Research Centre, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London, WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Sathasivam, S. [Department of Chemistry, Materials Chemistry Research Centre, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London, WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Kuznetcov, M.V., E-mail: maxim1968@mail.ru [All-Russian Research Institute on Problems of Civil Defense and Emergencies of Emergency Control Ministry of Russia (EMERCOM), 7 Davidkovskaya Street, Moscow, 121352 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-05

    Cubic and near-spherical TiN nanoparticles ranging in average size from 20 to 125 nm were prepared by levitation-jet aerosol synthesis through condensation of titanium vapor in an inert gas flow with gaseous nitrogen injection. The nanoparticles were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), BET measurements, UV–Vis, FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy, XPS, and vibrating-sample magnetometry. Room-temperature ferromagnetism with maximum magnetization up to 2.5 emu/g was recorded for the nanoparticles. The results indicate that the observed ferromagnetic ordering was related to the defect Ti–N structures on the surface of nanoparticles. This suggestion is in good correlation with the measured spectroscopical data. - Highlights: • Levitation-jet aerosol synthesis of TiN nanoparticles (NPs). • SEM, XRD, BET, UV–vis, FT-IR, Raman, XPS and magnetic characterization of the NPs. • Correlation between optical and XPS measurements data and maximum magnetization of the NPs.

  15. Metallographic preparation of sintered oxides, carbides and nitrides of uranium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.; Arles, L.

    1967-12-01

    We describe the methods of polishing, attack and coloring used at the section of plutonium base ceramics studies. These methods have stood the test of experience on the uranium and plutonium carbides, nitrides and carbonitrides as well on the mixed uranium and plutonium oxides. These methods have been particularly adapted to fit to the low dense and sintered samples [fr

  16. Effect of sintering temperatures on titanium matrix composites reinforced by ceramic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, F.; Amigo, V.; Busquets, D.; Klyatskina, E. [Mechanical and Materials Engineering Department. Polytechnical University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    Titanium and titanium composites have a potential use in aerospace and biotechnology industries, and nowadays in others like sports and fashion ones. In this work composite materials, based on titanium matrix reinforced with ceramic particles, have been developed. PM route is used to obtain compact and sintered samples. TiN and TiAl powders, are milled with Ti powder in different volumetric percentages in a ball mill. These mixtures are pressed in a uniaxial press and sintered in a vacuum furnace at different temperatures between 1180 to 1220 deg. C. Porosity of samples is analysed, before and after the sintering process, by Archimedes technique and by image analysis. Mechanical properties and the reinforcement particles influence in the titanium matrix are studied by flexion test in green and sintered states, and by hardness and microhardness tests. Complimentarily, a microstructural analysis is carried out by optical and electron microscopy, and the reactivity between the reinforce particles and titanium matrix are studied. (authors)

  17. Titanium Nitride and Nitrogen Ion Implanted Coated Dental Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Berzins

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Titanium nitride and/or nitrogen ion implanted coated dental materials have been investigated since the mid-1980s and considered in various applications in dentistry such as implants, abutments, orthodontic wires, endodontic files, periodontal/oral hygiene instruments, and casting alloys for fixed restorations. Multiple methodologies have been employed to create the coatings, but detailed structural analysis of the coatings is generally lacking in the dental literature. Depending on application, the purpose of the coating is to provide increased surface hardness, abrasion/wear resistance, esthetics, and corrosion resistance, lower friction, as well as greater beneficial interaction with adjacent biological and material substrates. While many studies have reported on the achievement of these properties, a consensus is not always clear. Additionally, few studies have been conducted to assess the efficacy of the coatings in a clinical setting. Overall, titanium nitride and/or nitrogen ion implanted coated dental materials potentially offer advantages over uncoated counterparts, but more investigation is needed to document the structure of the coatings and their clinical effectiveness.

  18. The effect of lanthanum boride on the sintering, sintered microstructure and mechanical properties of titanium and titanium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Y.F. [RMIT University, Centre for Additive Manufacturing, School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, GPO Box 2476, Melbourne VIC 3001 (Australia); Luo, S.D. [The University of Queensland, School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); Qian, M., E-mail: ma.qian@rmit.edu.au [RMIT University, Centre for Additive Manufacturing, School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, GPO Box 2476, Melbourne VIC 3001 (Australia)

    2014-11-17

    An addition of ≤0.5 wt% lanthanum boride (LaB{sub 6}) to powder metallurgy commercially pure Ti (CP-Ti), Ti–6Al–4V and Ti–10V–2Fe–3Al (all in wt%) resulted in improved sintered density, substantial microstructural refinement, and noticeably increased tensile elongation. The addition of LaB{sub 6} led to scavenging of both oxygen (O) and chlorine (Cl) from the titanium powder during sintering, evidenced by the formation of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and LaCl{sub x}O{sub y}. The pinning effect of La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, LaCl{sub x}O{sub y} and TiB inhibited prior-β grain growth and resulted in subsequent smaller α-laths. The formation of nearly equiaxed α-Ti phase is partially attributed to the nucleation effect of α-Ti on TiB. The improved sintered density was caused by B from LaB{sub 6} rather than La, while excessive formation of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiB with an addition of >0.5 wt% LaB{sub 6} resulted in a noticeable decrease in sintered density. The improved tensile elongation with an addition of ≤0.5 wt% LaB{sub 6} was mainly attributed to the scavenging of oxygen by LaB{sub 6}, partially assisted by the improved sintered density. However, an addition of >0.5 wt% LaB{sub 6} led to the formation of large La{sub 2}O{sub 3} aggregates and more brittle TiB whiskers and therefore decreased tensile elongation. Balanced scavenging of O is thus important. The optimal addition of LaB{sub 6} was 0.5 wt% but this may change depending on the powder size of the LaB{sub 6} to be used.

  19. Effects of Admixed Titanium on Densification of 316L Stainless Steel Powder during Sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslam Muhammad

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Effects of admixed titanium on powder water atomized (PWA and powder gas atomized (PGA 316L stainless steel (SS have been investigated in terms of densification. PGA and PWA powders, having different shapes and sizes, were cold pressed and sintered in argon atmosphere at 1300°C. The admixed titanium compacts of PGA and PWA have shown significant effect on densification through formation of intermetallic compound and reducing porosity during sintering process. PWA, having particle size 8 μm, blended with 1wt% titanium has exhibited higher sintered density and shrinkage as compared to gas atomized powder compacts. Improved densification of titanium blended PGA and PWA 316L SS at sintering temperature 1300°C is probably due to enhanced diffusion kinetics resulting from stresses induced by concentration gradient in powder compacts.

  20. Effect of compacting pressure, powder degassing and thermobaric treatment on densification and properties of nanocrystalline titanium nitride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei V. Kapylou

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of compacting pressure, powder degassing and high pressure sintering temperature and time on the densification and properties of nanocrystalline titanium nitride have been investigated. For this reason, TiN powder with a mean particle size of 55 nm was pressed in the range of compacting pressure from 0.2 to 1.0 GPa and sintered under static pressure of 3.5 GPa in the temperature range of 900–1600°C for 45–120 s. Some of green bodies were degassed in vacuum before sintering. It was shown that samples compacted in the pressure range of 0.2–0.6 GPa have the highest density after the thermobaric treatment. The maximum density (about 97.3 %TD was obtained with degassed samples. Microhardness and microstructure investigations have shown that recrystallization of the TiN nanopowder begins at the sintering temperatures of 1100–1200°C and sintering time less than one minute. The maximum microhardness obtained was 23.2±1.0 GPa and themaximum Young modulus was 370 GPa.

  1. Process parameter influence on Electro-sinter-forging (ESF) of titanium discs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cannella, Emanuele; Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Bay, Niels

    Electro-sinter-forging (ESF) is an innovative sintering process based on the principle of electrical Joule heating. The electrical current is flowing through the powder compact, which is under mechanical pressure. As compared to conventional sintering [1] and spark plasma sintering [2], the main...... advantages are the decreased sintering time and high relative density [3]. Near net-shape components can be manufactured and post-removal processing is limited to surface polishing. The present work is focused on analysing the influence of the main process parameters, namely compacting pressure, sintering...... time and electrical current density, on the final density of a disc sample made from commercially pure titanium powder. The maximum achieved relative density was 94% of the bulk density of pure titanium. The density estimation was carried out by using both Archimedes’ and 3D scanning....

  2. [Study on physical properties of titanium alloy sample fabricated with vacuum-sintered powder metallurgy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, X; Liang, X; Chao, Y; Han, X

    2000-06-01

    To investigate the physical properties of titanium alloy fabricated with vacuum-sintered powder metallurgy. The titanium powders of three different particle sizes(-160mesh, -200 - +300mesh, -300mesh) were selected, and mixed with copper and aluminum powder in different proportions. Two other groups were made up of titanium powder(-200 - +300mesh) plated with copper and tin. The build-up and, condensation method and a double-direction press with a metal mold were used. The green compacts were sintered at 1000 degrees C for 15 minutes in a vacuum furnace at 0.025 Pa. In the double-direction press, the specimens were compacted at the pressure of 100 MPa, 200 MPa and 300 MPa respectively. Then the linear shrinkage ratio and the opening porosity of the sintered compacts were evaluated respectively. 1. The linear shrinkage ratio of specimens decreased with the increased compacted pressure(P powders at the same compacted pressure(P > 0.05), but that of titanium powder plated with copper and tin was higher than those of other specimens without plating(P powder did not affect the opening porosity at the same compacted pressure(P > 0.05). The composition of titanium-based metal powder mixtures and the compacted pressures affect the physical properties of sintered compacts. Titanium powder plated with copper and tin is compacted and sintered easily, and the physical properties of sintered compacts are greatly improved.

  3. Deposition of titanium nitride layers by electric arc – Reactive plasma spraying method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Şerban, Viorel-Aurel; Roşu, Radu Alexandru; Bucur, Alexandra Ioana; Pascu, Doru Romulus

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Titanium nitride layers deposited by electric arc – reactive plasma spraying method. ► Deposition of titanium nitride layers on C45 steel at different spraying distances. ► Characterization of the coatings hardness as function of the spraying distances. ► Determination of the corrosion behavior of titanium nitride layers obtained. - Abstract: Titanium nitride (TiN) is a ceramic material which possesses high mechanical properties, being often used in order to cover cutting tools, thus increasing their lifetime, and also for covering components which are working in corrosive environments. The paper presents the experimental results on deposition of titanium nitride coatings by a new combined method (reactive plasma spraying and electric arc thermal spraying). In this way the advantages of each method in part are combined, obtaining improved quality coatings in the same time achieving high productivity. Commercially pure titanium wire and C45 steel as substrate were used for experiments. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the deposited coatings are composed of titanium nitride (TiN, Ti 2 N) and small amounts of Ti 3 O. The microstructure of the deposited layers, investigated both by optical and scanning electron microscopy, shows that the coatings are dense, compact, without cracks and with low porosity. Vickers microhardness of the coatings presents maximum values of 912 HV0.1. The corrosion tests in 3%NaCl solution show that the deposited layers have a high corrosion resistance compared to unalloyed steel substrate.

  4. Formation and characterization of titanium nitride and titanium carbide films prepared by reactive sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundgren, J.-E.

    1982-01-01

    Titanium has been reactively r.f. sputtered in mixed Ar-N 2 and Ar-CH 4 discharges on to substrates held at 775 K. The films obtained have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and by measurements of hardness and electrical resistivity. The compositions of the films have been determined using Auger electron spectroscopy. The processes occurring both on substrates and target surfaces have been studied and it is shown that the latter is of great importance for the composition and structure of deposited films. Titanium nitride films of full density and with electrical resistivity and hardness values close to those of bulk TiN were only obtained in a narrow range close to the stoichiometric composition. Titanium carbide films grown on non-biased substrates were found to have an open structure and thus a low density. A bias applied to the substrate, however, improved the quality of the films. It is also shown that the heat of formation of the compounds plays an important role in the formation of carbides and nitrides. A large value promotes the development of large grains and dense structures. (Auth.)

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF TITANIUM NITRIDE COATING FOR SNS RING VACUUM CHAMBERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HE, P.; HSEUH, H.C.; MAPES, M.; TODD, R.; WEISS, D.

    2001-01-01

    The inner surface of the ring vacuum chambers of the US Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will be coated with ∼100 nm of Titanium Nitride (TiN). This is to minimize the secondary electron yield (SEY) from the chamber wall, and thus avoid the so-called e-p instability caused by electron multipacting as observed in a few high-intensity proton storage rings. Both DC sputtering and DC-magnetron sputtering were conducted in a test chamber of relevant geometry to SNS ring vacuum chambers. Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) and Rutherford Back Scattering (RBS) were used to analyze the coatings for thickness, stoichiometry and impurity. Excellent results were obtained with magnetron sputtering. The development of the parameters for the coating process and the surface analysis results are presented

  6. Theoretical study of the elastic properties of titanium nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingdong CHEN; Yinglu ZHAO; Benhai YU; Chunlei WANG; Deheng SHI

    2009-01-01

    The equilibrium lattice parameter, relative volume V/Vo, elastic constants Cij, and bulk modulus of titanium nitride are successfully obtained using the ab initio plane-wave pseudopotential (PW-PP) method within the framework of density functional theory. The quasi-harmonic Debye model, using a set of total energy vs molar volume obtained with the PW-PP method, is applied to the study of the elastic properties and vibrational effects. We analyze the relationship between the bulk modulus and temperature up to 2000 K and obtain the relationship between bulk modulus B and pressure at different temperatures. It is found that the bulk modulus B increases monotonously with increasing pressure and decreases with increasing temperature. Moreover, the Debye temperature is determined from the non-equilibrium Gibbs func-tions.

  7. Anomalous response of superconducting titanium nitride resonators to terahertz radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueno, J.; Baselmans, J. J. A; Coumou, P. C. J. J.; Zheng, G.; Visser, P. J. de; Klapwijk, T. M.; Driessen, E. F. C.; Doyle, S.

    2014-01-01

    We present an experimental study of kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs) fabricated of atomic layer deposited TiN films and characterized at radiation frequencies of 350 GHz. The responsivity to radiation is measured and found to increase with the increase in radiation powers, opposite to what is expected from theory and observed for hybrid niobium titanium nitride/aluminium (NbTiN/Al) and all-aluminium (all-Al) KIDs. The noise is found to be independent of the level of the radiation power. The noise equivalent power improves with higher radiation powers, also opposite to what is observed and well understood for hybrid NbTiN/Al and all-Al KIDs. We suggest that an inhomogeneous state of these disordered superconductors should be used to explain these observations

  8. Anomalous response of superconducting titanium nitride resonators to terahertz radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueno, J., E-mail: j.bueno@sron.nl; Baselmans, J. J. A [SRON, Netherlands Institute of Space Research, Utrecht (Netherlands); Coumou, P. C. J. J.; Zheng, G. [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Visser, P. J. de [SRON, Netherlands Institute of Space Research, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Klapwijk, T. M. [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Physics Department, Moscow State Pedagogical University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Driessen, E. F. C. [Université Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SPSMS, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC-SPSMS, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Doyle, S. [Cardiff University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queens Buildings, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-10

    We present an experimental study of kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs) fabricated of atomic layer deposited TiN films and characterized at radiation frequencies of 350 GHz. The responsivity to radiation is measured and found to increase with the increase in radiation powers, opposite to what is expected from theory and observed for hybrid niobium titanium nitride/aluminium (NbTiN/Al) and all-aluminium (all-Al) KIDs. The noise is found to be independent of the level of the radiation power. The noise equivalent power improves with higher radiation powers, also opposite to what is observed and well understood for hybrid NbTiN/Al and all-Al KIDs. We suggest that an inhomogeneous state of these disordered superconductors should be used to explain these observations.

  9. Study of titanium nitride elasticity characteristics in the homogeneity range by ultrasonic resonance method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khidirov, I.; Khajdarov, T.

    1995-01-01

    Elasticity characteristics of cubic and tetragonal phases of titanium nitride in the homogeneity range were studied for the first time by ultrasonic resonance method. It is established that the Young modulus, the shift and volume module of cubic titanium nitride elasticity in the homogeneity range change nonlinearly with decrease in nitrogen concentration and correlate with concentration dependences of other physical properties.15 refs., 2 figs

  10. Low-temperature plasma nitriding of sintered PIM 316L austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Aecio Fernando; Scheuer, Cristiano Jose; Joanidis, Ioanis Labhardt; Cardoso, Rodrigo Perito; Mafra, Marcio; Klein, Aloisio Nelmo; Brunatto, Silvio Francisco, E-mail: brunatto@ufpr.br [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. Grupo de Tecnologia de Fabricacao Assistida pro Plasma e Metalurgia do Po

    2014-08-15

    This work reports experimental results on sintered PIM 316L stainless steel low-temperature plasma nitriding. The effect of treatment temperature and time on process kinetics, microstructure and surface characteristics of the nitrided samples were investigated. Nitriding was carried out at temperatures of 350, 380, 410 and 440 °C , and times of 4, 8 and 16 h, using a gas mixture composed by 60% N2 + 20% H2 + 20% Ar, at a gas flow rate of 5.00 X 10{sup 6} Nm{sup 3-1}, and a pressure of 800 Pa. The treated samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry and microhardness measurements. Results indicate that low-temperature plasma nitriding is a diffusion controlled process. The calculated activation energy for nitrided layer growth was 111.4 kJmol{sup -1}. Apparently precipitation-free layers were produced in this study. It was also observed that the higher the treatment temperature and time the higher is the obtained surface hardness. Hardness up to 1343 HV{sub 0.025} was verified for samples nitrided at 440 °C. Finally, the characterization of the treated surface indicates the formation of cracks, which were observed in regions adjacent to the original pores after the treatment. (author)

  11. Strength evaluation test of pressureless-sintered silicon nitride at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsusue, K.; Takahara, K.; Hashimoto, R.

    1984-01-01

    In order to study strength characteristics at room temperature and the strength evaluating method of ceramic materials, the following tests were conducted on pressureless sintered silicon nitride specimens: bending tests, the three tensile tests of rectangular plates, holed plates, and notched plates, and spin tests of centrally holed disks. The relationship between the mean strength of specimens and the effective volume of specimens are examined using Weibull's theory. The effect of surface grinding on the strength of specimens is discussed.

  12. Titanium Matrix Composite Ti/TiN Produced by Diode Laser Gas Nitriding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Lisiecki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A high power direct diode laser, emitting in the range of near infrared radiation at wavelength 808–940 nm, was applied to produce a titanium matrix composite on a surface layer of titanium alloy Ti6Al4V by laser surface gas nitriding. The nitrided surface layers were produced as single stringer beads at different heat inputs, different scanning speeds, and different powers of laser beam. The influence of laser nitriding parameters on the quality, shape, and morphology of the surface layers was investigated. It was found that the nitrided surface layers consist of titanium nitride precipitations mainly in the form of dendrites embedded in the titanium alloy matrix. The titanium nitrides are produced as a result of the reaction between molten Ti and gaseous nitrogen. Solidification and subsequent growth of the TiN dendrites takes place to a large extent at the interface of the molten Ti and the nitrogen gas atmosphere. The direction of TiN dendrites growth is perpendicular to the surface of molten Ti. The roughness of the surface layers depends strongly on the heat input of laser nitriding and can be precisely controlled. In spite of high microhardness up to 2400 HV0.2, the surface layers are crack free.

  13. Spark plasma sintering and porosity studies of uranium nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Kyle D., E-mail: kylej@kth.se; Wallenius, Janne; Jolkkonen, Mikael; Claisse, Antoine

    2016-05-15

    In this study, a number of samples of UN sintered by the SPS method have been fabricated, and highly pure samples ranging in density from 68% to 99.8%TD – corresponding to an absolute density of 14.25 g/cm{sup 3} out of a theoretical density of 14.28 g/cm{sup 3} – have been fabricated. By careful adjustment of the sintering parameters of temperature and applied pressure, the production of pellets of specific porosity may now be achieved between these ranges. The pore closure behaviour of the material has also been documented and compared to previous studies of similar materials, which demonstrates that full pore closure using these methods occurs near 97.5% of relative density. - Highlights: • UN pellets are fabricated over a wide array of densities using the SPS method. • The sintereing parameters necessary to produce pellets over a wide array of density space are charted. • Pellets of extremely high density (99.9% of TD, absolute density of 14.25 g/cm{sup 3}) are fabricated. • Full-closure of the porosity in this material is obtained at around 2.5% of total porosity.

  14. [The cytotoxicity of N48 NdFeB magnets coated with titanium-nitride].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiao-Ming; Hou, Zhi-Ming; Chu, Ming

    2008-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of N48 NdFeB magnets coated with titanium-nitride on the growth and apoptosis of L929 mouse fibroblast cells, and to determine the material biocompatibility. The NdFeB magnets coated with titanium-nitride, bare NdFeB magnets and ordinary brackets were put into RPMI-1640 to prepare fusions. L929 mouse fibroblast cells were cultivated in the negative control liquid, positive control liquid, 100%, 50% and 25% sample fusions, respectively. The cell proliferation vitality was detected by MTT assay and the relative growth rate was calculated.Cell scatter diagrams of the negative control liquid, 100% titanium-nitride coated magnets fusion and bare magnets fusion were detected by flow cytometry Annexin V/PI double staining method. The ratios of normal cells, early apoptosis, advanced apoptosis and necrosis cells were calculated. The results were analyzed for paired t test using SPSS11.5 software package. The toxic levels of N48 NdFeB coated with titanium-nitride were ranked as 0-1. The toxic levels of bare magnets were ranked as 2. The cell scatter diagrams showed that there was no significant difference in living cell, early apoptosis and necrosis between magnets coated with titanium-nitride and control group. But there was significant difference between the bare magnets group and control group. The N48 NdFeB magnets coated with titanium-nitride have good biocompatibility.

  15. Review about laser nitriding of titanium alloys; Revision sobre nitruraciones laser de aleaciones de titanio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Artieda, M.G.; Fernandez-Carrasquilla, J.

    2010-07-01

    A common technique used to improve the wear response of titanium alloys is to nitride the surface, using chemical or physical vapour deposition, ion implantation or surface remelting in a nitrogen atmosphere. In this revision nitriding systems with laser technology are studied, used in titanium alloys surface treatments.For high temperature, high strength applications, titanium based alloys are an attractive light-weight alternative to steel, due to their high strength to weight ratio and corrosion resistance. In applications that require good wear resistance, titanium alloys pose a problem due to their poor tribological characteristics.Titanium alloys used with a suitable nitriding treatment could allow the replacement of steel in different applications, obtaining weight savings in fabricated components. (Author). 68 refs.

  16. Functional nanostructured titanium nitride films obtained by sputtering magnetron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, O.; Hernandez-Velez, M.; Navas, D.; Auger, M.A.; Baldonedo, J.L.; Sanz, R.; Pirota, K.R.; Vazquez, M.

    2006-01-01

    Development of new methods in the formation of hollow structures, in particular, nanotubes and nanocages are currently generating a great interest as a consequence of the growing relevance of these nanostructures on many technological fields, ranging from optoelectronics to biotechnology. In this work, we report the formation of titanium nitride (TiN) nanotubes and nanohills via reactive sputtering magnetron processes. Anodic Alumina Membranes (AAM) were used as template substrates to grow the TiN nanostructures. The AAM were obtained through electrochemical anodization processes by using oxalic acid solutions as electrolytes. The nanotubes were produced at temperatures below 100 deg. C, and using a pure titanium (99.995%) sputtering target and nitrogen as reactive gas. The obtained TiN thin films showed surface morphologies adjusted to pore diameter and interpore distance of the substrates, as well as ordered arrays of nanotubes or nanohills depending on the sputtering and template conditions. High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy (HRSEM) was used to elucidate both the surface order and morphology of the different grown nanostructures. The crystalline structure of the samples was examined using X-ray Diffraction (XRD) patterns and their qualitative chemical composition by using X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (XEDS) in a scanning electron microscopy

  17. Laser beam welding of titanium nitride coated titanium using pulse-shaping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Sergio Fernandes de Lima

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available A new welding method which allows the assembly of two titanium nitride coated titanium parts is proposed. The welding procedure utilizes the possibility for pulse-shaping in order to change the energy distribution profile during the laser pulse. The pulse-shaping is composed of three elements: a a short high power pulse for partial ablation at the surface; b a long pulse for thermal penetration; and c a quenching slope for enhanced weldability. The combination of these three elements produces crack-free welds. The weld microstructure is changed in comparison to normal welding, i.e. with a rectangular pulse, as the nitrogen and the microhardness are more homogenously distributed in the weld under pulse-shaping conditions. This laser pulse dissolves the TiN layer and allows nitrogen to diffuse into the melt pool, also contributing to an enhanced weldability by providing suitable thermal conditions.

  18. Improved reaction sintered silicon nitride. [protective coatings to improve oxidation resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, H. R.

    1978-01-01

    Processing treatments were applied to as-nitrided reaction sintered silicon nitride (RSSN) with the purposes of improving strength after processing to above 350 MN/m2 and improving strength after oxidation exposure. The experimental approaches are divided into three broad classifications: sintering of surface-applied powders; impregnation of solution followed by further thermal processing; and infiltration of molten silicon and subsequent carburization or nitridation of the silicon. The impregnation of RSSN with solutions of aluminum nitrate and zirconyl chloride, followed by heating at 1400-1500 C in a nitrogen atmosphere containing silicon monoxide, improved RSSN strength and oxidation resistance. The room temperature bend strength of RSSN was increased nearly fifty percent above the untreated strength with mean absolute strengths up to 420 MN/m2. Strengths of treated samples that were measured after a 12 hour oxidation exposure in air were up to 90 percent of the original as-nitrided strength, as compared to retained strengths in the range of 35 to 60 percent for untreated RSSN after the same oxidation exposure.

  19. Capacitive performance of molybdenum nitride/titanium nitride nanotube array for supercapacitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yibing, E-mail: ybxie@seu.edu.cn; Tian, Fang

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • MoN{sub x}/TiN NTA is fully converted from MoO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} NTA by one-step nitridation process. • MoN{sub x}/TiN NTA is used as feasible electrode material of high-performance supercapacitor. • MoN{sub x}/TiN NTA shows high capacitance, rate capability and cycling stability. - Abstract: Molybdenum nitride (MoN{sub x}) depositing on titanium nitride nanotube array (TiN NTA) was designed as MoN{sub x}/TiN NTA for supercapacitor electrode material. MoN{sub x}/TiN NTA was fabricated by electrodepositing molybdenum oxide onto titanium dioxide NTA and one-step nitridation treatment in ammonia. MoN{sub x}/TiN NTA involved top-surface layer of MoN{sub x} nanoparticles and underlying layer of TiN NTA, which contributed to electric double layer capacitance in aqueous lithium-ion electrolyte solution. The specific capacitance was increased from 69.05 mF cm{sup −2} for TiN NTA to 121.50 mF cm{sup −2} for MoN{sub x}/TiN NTA at 0.3 mA cm{sup −2}, presenting the improved capacitance performance. MoN{sub x} exhibited the capacitance of 174.83 F g{sup −1} at 1.5 A g{sup −1} and slightly declined to 109.13 F g{sup −1} at 30 A g{sup −1}, presenting high rate capability. MoN{sub x}/TiN NTA exhibited the capacitance retention ratio of 93.8% at 3.0 mA cm{sup −2} after 1000 cycles, presenting high cycling stability. MoN{sub x}/TiN NTA could act as a promising electrode material of supercapacitor.

  20. Process parameter influence on Electro-sinter-forging (ESF) of titanium discs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cannella, Emanuele; Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Bay, Niels

    Electro-sinter-forging (ESF) is a sintering process based on the resistance heating principle, which makes it faster than conventional sintering. The process is investigated as a function of the main process parameters, namely compacting pressure, electrical current density and sintering time....... The present work is focused on analysing the influence of these process parameters on the final density of a disc sample made from commercially pure titanium powder. Applying the design of experiments (DoE) approach, the electrical current was seen to be of largest influence. The maximum obtained density...

  1. A Modified Porous Titanium Sheet Prepared by Plasma-Activated Sintering for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukimichi Tamaki

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to develop a contamination-free porous titanium scaffold by a plasma-activated sintering within an originally developed TiN-coated graphite mold. The surface of porous titanium sheet with or without a coated graphite mold was characterized. The cell adhesion property of porous titanium sheet was also evaluated in this study. The peak of TiC was detected on the titanium sheet processed with the graphite mold without a TiN coating. Since the titanium fiber elements were directly in contact with the carbon graphite mold during processing, surface contamination was unavoidable event in this condition. The TiC peak was not detectable on the titanium sheet processed within the TiN-coated carbon graphite mold. This modified plasma-activated sintering with the TiN-coated graphite mold would be useful to fabricate a contamination-free titanium sheet. The number of adherent cells on the modified titanium sheet was greater than that of the bare titanium plate. Stress fiber formation and the extension of the cells were observed on the titanium sheets. This modified titanium sheet is expected to be a new tissue engineering material in orthopedic bone repair.

  2. Influence of Coke Ratio on the Sintering Behavior of High-Chromium Vanadium-Titanium Magnetite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songtao Yang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available High-chromium vanadium and titanium magnetite (HCVTM sinter has poor properties. The coke ratio has an important effect on the behavior of HCVTM sintering as it affects the mineral phases in the high-chromium vanadium and titanium sinter (HCVTS via changing the sintering temperature and atmosphere. In this work, the sintering behavior of HCVTM mixed with varying coke ratios was investigated through sintering pot tests, X-ray diffraction (XRD, gas chromatographic analysis, and mineral phase analysis. The results show that, with the increase of the coke ratio from 4.0% to 6.0%, leading to the increase of the combustion ratio of the flue gas, the vertical sintering rate and sinter productivity decrease. Meanwhile, with the change of the coke ratio, the content of magnetite, silicate, and perovskite increase, while the hematite and calcium ferrite decrease. In addition, the tumble strength and reduction ability of HCVTS decrease, and its degradation strength increase. It was found that the appropriate coke ratio for the sintering process was 5.0 wt %.

  3. Grain growth in uranium nitride prepared by spark plasma sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kyle D.; Lopes, Denise Adorno

    2018-05-01

    Uranium mononitride (UN) has long been considered a potential high density, high performance fuel candidate for light water reactor (LWR) and fast reactor (FR) applications. However, deployability of this fuel has been limited by the notable resistance to sintering and subsequent difficulty in producing a desirable microstructure, the high costs associated with 15N enrichment, as well as the known proclivity to oxidation and interaction with steam. In this study, the stimulation of grain growth in UN pellets sintered using SPS has been investigated. The results reveal that by using SPS and controlling temperature, time, and holding pressure, grain growth can be stimulated and controlled to produce a material featuring both a desired porosity and grain size, at least within the range of interest for nuclear fuel candidates. Grain sizes up to 31 μm were obtained using temperatures of 1650 °C and hold times of 15 min. Evaluation by EBSD reveal grain rotation and coalescence as the dominant mechanism in grain growth, which is suppressed by the application of higher external pressure. Moreover, complete closure of the porosity of the material was observed at relative densities of 96% TD, resulting in a material with sufficient porosity to accommodate LWR burnup. These results indicate that a method exists for the economic fabrication of an 15N-bearing uranium mononitride fuel with favorable microstructural characteristics compatible with use in a light water-cooled nuclear reactor.

  4. Titanium nitride plasma-chemical synthesis with titanium tetrachloride raw material in the DC plasma-arc reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirpichev, D. E.; Sinaiskiy, M. A.; Samokhin, A. V.; Alexeev, N. V.

    2017-04-01

    The possibility of plasmochemical synthesis of titanium nitride is demonstrated in the paper. Results of the thermodynamic analysis of TiCl4 - H2 - N2 system are presented; key parameters of TiN synthesis process are calculated. The influence of parameters of plasma-chemical titanium nitride synthesis process in the reactor with an arc plasmatron on characteristics on the produced powders is experimentally investigated. Structure, chemical composition and morphology dependencies on plasma jet enthalpy, stoichiometric excess of hydrogen and nitrogen in a plasma jet are determined.

  5. Corrosion-resistant titanium nitride coatings formed on stainless steel by ion-beam-assisted deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, K.; Hatada, R.

    1994-01-01

    Titanium films 70nm thick were deposited on austenitic type 316L stainless steel substrates, and these specimens were irradiated with titanium ions of energy 70kV at a fluence of 1x10 17 ioncm -2 , using a metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) IV metallic ion source at room temperature. After irradiation, titanium nitride (TiN) films were deposited by titanium evaporation and simultaneous irradiation by a nitrogen ion beam, with transport ratios of Ti to N atoms from 0.5 to 10.0 and an ion acceleration voltage of 2kV. The preferred orientation of the TiN films varied from left angle 200 right angle to left angle 111 right angle normal to the surface when the transport ratio was increased. With the help of Auger electron spectroscopy, interfacial mixing was verified. Nitrogen atoms were present in the state of titanium nitride for all transport ratios from 0.5 up to 10.0. However, the chemical bonding state of titanium changed from titanium nitride to the metallic state with increasing transport ratio Ti/N. The corrosion behavior was evaluated in an aqueous solution of sulfuric acid saturated with oxygen, using multisweep cyclic voltammetry measurements. Thin film deposition of pure titanium and titanium implantation prior to TiN deposition have beneficial effects on the suppression of transpassive chromium dissolution. ((orig.))

  6. High aspect ratio titanium nitride trench structures as plasmonic biosensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shkondin, Evgeniy; Repän, Taavi; Takayama, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    High aspect ratio titanium nitride (TiN) grating structures are fabricated by the combination of deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) and atomic layer deposition (ALD) techniques. TiN is deposited at 500 ◦C on a silicon trench template. Silicon between vertical TiN layers is selectively etched...... to fabricate the high aspect ratio TiN trenches with the pitch of 400 nm and height of around 2.7 µm. Dielectric functions of TiN films with different thicknesses of 18 - 105 nm and post-annealing temperatures of 700 - 900 ◦C are characterized by an ellipsometer. We found that the highest annealing temperature...... of 900 ◦C gives the most pronounced plasmonic behavior with the highest plasma frequency, ωp = 2.53 eV (λp = 490 nm). Such high aspect ratio trench structures function as a plasmonic grating sensor that supports the Rayleigh-Woods anomalies (RWAs), enabling the measurement of changes in the refractive...

  7. Laser sintered thin layer graphene and cubic boron nitride reinforced nickel matrix nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zengrong; Tong, Guoquan

    2015-10-01

    Laser sintered thin layer graphene (Gr)-cubic boron nitride (CBN)-Ni nanocomposites were fabricated on AISI 4140 plate substrate. The composites fabricating process, composites microstructure and mechanical properties were studied. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy were employed to study the micro structures and composition of the composites. XRD and Raman tests proved that graphene and CBN were dispersed in the nanocomposites. Nanoindentation test results indicate the significant improvements were achieved in the composites mechanical properties.

  8. Bacterial adhesion studies on titanium, titanium nitride and modified hydroxyapatite thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeyachandran, Y.L.; Venkatachalam, S.; Karunagaran, B.; Narayandass, Sa.K.; Mangalaraj, D.; Bao, C.Y.; Zhang, C.L.

    2007-01-01

    A qualitative study on adhesion of the oral bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis on titanium (Ti), titanium nitride (TiN), fluorine modified hydroxyapatite (FHA) and zinc modified FHA (Zn-FHA) thin films is investigated. Ti and TiN thin films were deposited by DC magnetron sputtering and hydroxyapatite-based films were prepared by solgel method. The crystalline structure, optical characteristics, chemical composition and surface topography of the films were studied by XRD, optical transmission, XPS, EDAX and AFM measurements. The predominant crystallite orientation in the Ti and TiN films was along (002) and (111) of hcp and cubic structures, respectively. The Ti : O : N composition ratio in the surface of the Ti and TiN films was found to be 7 : 21 : 1 and 3 : 8 : 2, respectively. The atomic concentration ratio (Zn + Ca) / P in Zn-FHA film was found to be 1.74 whereby the Zn replaced 3.2% of Ca. The rough surface feature in modified HA films was clearly observed in the SEM images and the surface roughness (rms) of Ti and TiN films was 2.49 and 3.5 nm, respectively, as observed using AFM. The film samples were sterilized, treated in the bacteria culture medium, processed and analyzed using SEM. Surface roughness of the films was found to have least influence on the bacterial adhesion. More bacteria were observed on the TiN film with oxide nitride surface layer and less number of adhered bacteria was noticed on the Ti film with native surface oxide layer and on Zn-FHA film

  9. Bacterial adhesion studies on titanium, titanium nitride and modified hydroxyapatite thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeyachandran, Y L [Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046, Tamil Nadu (India); Venkatachalam, S [Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046, Tamil Nadu (India); Karunagaran, B [Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046, Tamil Nadu (India); Narayandass, Sa K [Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046, Tamil Nadu (India); Mangalaraj, D [Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046, Tamil Nadu (India); Bao, C Y [West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Zhang, C L [West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2007-01-15

    A qualitative study on adhesion of the oral bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis on titanium (Ti), titanium nitride (TiN), fluorine modified hydroxyapatite (FHA) and zinc modified FHA (Zn-FHA) thin films is investigated. Ti and TiN thin films were deposited by DC magnetron sputtering and hydroxyapatite-based films were prepared by solgel method. The crystalline structure, optical characteristics, chemical composition and surface topography of the films were studied by XRD, optical transmission, XPS, EDAX and AFM measurements. The predominant crystallite orientation in the Ti and TiN films was along (002) and (111) of hcp and cubic structures, respectively. The Ti : O : N composition ratio in the surface of the Ti and TiN films was found to be 7 : 21 : 1 and 3 : 8 : 2, respectively. The atomic concentration ratio (Zn + Ca) / P in Zn-FHA film was found to be 1.74 whereby the Zn replaced 3.2% of Ca. The rough surface feature in modified HA films was clearly observed in the SEM images and the surface roughness (rms) of Ti and TiN films was 2.49 and 3.5 nm, respectively, as observed using AFM. The film samples were sterilized, treated in the bacteria culture medium, processed and analyzed using SEM. Surface roughness of the films was found to have least influence on the bacterial adhesion. More bacteria were observed on the TiN film with oxide nitride surface layer and less number of adhered bacteria was noticed on the Ti film with native surface oxide layer and on Zn-FHA film.

  10. The Balance of Titanium and Vanadium in the Blast Furnace with the Use of Sinter Containing a Titanium-Vanadium-Magnetite Concentrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budzik, R.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The investigation concerned the use of sinter containing a titanium-vanadium-magnetite concentrate for the production of pig iron. Sinter containing 0,46 to 0,51 % TiO2 and 0,056 to 0,060 % vanadium was used for pig iron production in the blast furnace. Introducing 200 kg of this concentrate to the1 Mg sinter mix did not cause any deterioration of sinter quality.

  11. Anti corrosion layer for stainless steel in molten carbonate fuel cell - comprises phase vapour deposition of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride layer then oxidising layer in molten carbonate electrolyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Forming an anticorrosion protective layer on a stainless steel surface used in a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) - comprises the phase vapour deposition (PVD) of a layer comprising at least one of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride and then forming a protective layer in situ...

  12. Non-pressurized sintered silicon carbide with titanium carbide reinforcement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, J.

    1992-01-01

    A non-pressurized compression of SiC-TiC composite materials can be achieved via liquid phase sintering by the application of oxidic additives. Materials with TiC proportions up to 40% by volume of TiC and densities of 97 to 98% TD were produced at sintering temperatures around 1875 C. With SiC sintered in the liquid phase an increase of toughness at fracture of 80% compared with conventionally non-pressurized sintered SiC was achieved with B/C additive. No further increase could be achieved by the addition of TiC particles. However, the oxidation resistance at 1200 C was worsened. (orig.) [de

  13. Mesoporous coaxial titanium nitride-vanadium nitride fibers of core-shell structures for high-performance supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinhong; Shang, Chaoqun; Gu, Lin; Dong, Shanmu; Chen, Xiao; Han, Pengxian; Li, Lanfeng; Yao, Jianhua; Liu, Zhihong; Xu, Hongxia; Zhu, Yuwei; Cui, Guanglei

    2011-08-01

    In this study, titanium nitride-vanadium nitride fibers of core-shell structures were prepared by the coaxial electrospinning, and subsequently annealed in the ammonia for supercapacitor applications. These core-shell (TiN-VN) fibers incorporated mesoporous structure into high electronic conducting transition nitride hybrids, which combined higher specific capacitance of VN and better rate capability of TiN. These hybrids exhibited higher specific capacitance (2 mV s(-1), 247.5 F g(-1)) and better rate capability (50 mV s(-1), 160.8 F g(-1)), which promise a good candidate for high-performance supercapacitors. It was also revealed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization that the minor capacitance fade originated from the surface oxidation of VN and TiN.

  14. An Investigation of Sintering Parameters on Titanium Powder for Electron Beam Melting Processing Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Drescher

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Selective electron beam melting (SEBM is a relatively new additive manufacturing technology for metallic materials. Specific to this technology is the sintering of the metal powder prior to the melting process. The sintering process has disadvantages for post-processing. The post-processing of parts produced by SEBM typically involves the removal of semi-sintered powder through the use of a powder blasting system. Furthermore, the sintering of large areas before melting decreases productivity. Current investigations are aimed at improving the sintering process in order to achieve better productivity, geometric accuracy, and resolution. In this study, the focus lies on the modification of the sintering process. In order to investigate and improve the sintering process, highly porous titanium test specimens with various scan speeds were built. The aim of this study was to decrease build time with comparable mechanical properties of the components and to remove the residual powder more easily after a build. By only sintering the area in which the melt pool for the components is created, an average productivity improvement of approx. 20% was achieved. Tensile tests were carried out, and the measured mechanical properties show comparatively or slightly improved values compared with the reference.

  15. An Investigation of Sintering Parameters on Titanium Powder for Electron Beam Melting Processing Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drescher, Philipp; Sarhan, Mohamed; Seitz, Hermann

    2016-12-01

    Selective electron beam melting (SEBM) is a relatively new additive manufacturing technology for metallic materials. Specific to this technology is the sintering of the metal powder prior to the melting process. The sintering process has disadvantages for post-processing. The post-processing of parts produced by SEBM typically involves the removal of semi-sintered powder through the use of a powder blasting system. Furthermore, the sintering of large areas before melting decreases productivity. Current investigations are aimed at improving the sintering process in order to achieve better productivity, geometric accuracy, and resolution. In this study, the focus lies on the modification of the sintering process. In order to investigate and improve the sintering process, highly porous titanium test specimens with various scan speeds were built. The aim of this study was to decrease build time with comparable mechanical properties of the components and to remove the residual powder more easily after a build. By only sintering the area in which the melt pool for the components is created, an average productivity improvement of approx. 20% was achieved. Tensile tests were carried out, and the measured mechanical properties show comparatively or slightly improved values compared with the reference.

  16. Effect of zirconium nitride physical vapor deposition coating on preosteoblast cell adhesion and proliferation onto titanium screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, Manuela; Gatti, Giorgio; Migliario, Mario; Marchese, Leonardo; Rocchetti, Vincenzo; Renò, Filippo

    2014-11-01

    Titanium has long been used to produce dental implants. Problems related to its manufacturing, casting, welding, and ceramic application for dental prostheses still limit its use, which highlights the need for technologic improvements. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the biologic performance of titanium dental implants coated with zirconium nitride in a murine preosteoblast cellular model. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the chemical and morphologic characteristics of titanium implants coated with zirconium nitride by means of physical vapor deposition. Chemical and morphologic characterizations were performed by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and the bioactivity of the implants was evaluated by cell-counting experiments. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis found that physical vapor deposition was effective in covering titanium surfaces with zirconium nitride. Murine MC-3T3 preosteoblasts were seeded onto titanium-coated and zirconium nitride-coated screws to evaluate their adhesion and proliferation. These experiments found a significantly higher number of cells adhering and spreading onto zirconium nitride-coated surfaces (Pzirconium nitride surfaces were completely covered with MC-3T3 cells. Analysis of these data indicates that the proposed zirconium nitride coating of titanium implants could make the surface of the titanium more bioactive than uncoated titanium surfaces. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Tribological Characteristic of Titanium Alloy Surface Layers Produced by Diode Laser Gas Nitriding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisiecki A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the tribological properties of titanium alloy Ti6Al4V composite surface layers Ti/TiN were produced during laser surface gas nitriding by means of a novel high power direct diode laser with unique characteristics of the laser beam and a rectangular beam spot. Microstructure, surface topography and microhardness distribution across the surface layers were analyzed. Ball-on-disk tests were performed to evaluate and compare the wear and friction characteristics of surface layers nitrided at different process parameters, base metal of titanium alloy Ti6Al4V and also the commercially pure titanium. Results showed that under dry sliding condition the commercially pure titanium samples have the highest coefficient of friction about 0.45, compared to 0.36 of titanium alloy Ti6Al4V and 0.1-0.13 in a case of the laser gas nitrided surface layers. The volume loss of Ti6Al4V samples under such conditions is twice lower than in a case of pure titanium. On the other hand the composite surface layer characterized by the highest wear resistance showed almost 21 times lower volume loss during the ball-on-disk test, compared to Ti6Al4V samples.

  18. Waste conversion into high-value ceramics: Carbothermal nitridation synthesis of titanium nitride nanoparticles using automotive shredder waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayyas, Mohannad; Pahlevani, Farshid; Maroufi, Samane; Liu, Zhao; Sahajwalla, Veena

    2017-03-01

    Environmental concern about automotive shredder residue (ASR) has increased in recent years due to its harmful content of heavy metals. Although several approaches of ASR management have been suggested, these approaches remain commercially unproven. This study presents an alternative approach for ASR management where advanced materials can be generated as a by-product. In this approach, titanium nitride (TiN) has been thermally synthesized by nitriding pressed mixture of automotive shredder residue (ASR) and titanium oxide (TiO 2 ). Interactions between TiO 2 and ASR at non-isothermal conditions were primarily investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry. Results indicated that TiO 2 influences and catalyses degradation reactions of ASR, and the temperature, at which reduction starts, was determined around 980 °C. The interaction between TiO 2 and ASR at isothermal conditions in the temperature range between 1200 and 1550 °C was also studied. The pressed mixture of both materials resulted in titanium nitride (TiN) ceramic at all given temperatures. Formation kinetics were extracted using several models for product layer diffusion-controlled solid-solid and solid-fluid reactions. The effect of reactants ratio and temperature on the degree of conversion and morphology was investigated. The effect of reactants ratio was found to have considerable effect on the morphology of the resulting material, while temperature had a lesser impact. Several unique structures of TiN (porous nanostructured, polycrystalline, micro-spherical and nano-sized structures) were obtained by simply tuning the ratio of TiO 2 to ASR, and a product with appreciable TiN content of around 85% was achieved after only one hour nitridation at 1550 °C. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. On the difference between optically and electrically determined resistivity of ultra-thin titanium nitride films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hao, B.; Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; Wolters, Robertus A.M.

    2013-01-01

    This work reports on the determination and comparison of the resistivity of ultra-thin atomic layer deposited titanium nitride films in the thickness range 0.65–20 nm using spectroscopic ellipsometry and electrical test structures. We found that for films thicker than 4 nm, the resistivity values

  20. No clinical benefit of titanium nitride coating in cementless mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hove, R.P.; Brohet, R.M.; van Royen, B.J.; Nolte, P.A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Titanium nitride (TiN) coating of cobalt–chromium–molybdenum (CoCrMo) implants has shown to improve the biomechanical properties of the implant surface and to reduce adhesive wear in vitro. It is yet unknown whether TiN coating of total knee prosthesis (TKP) affects the postoperative

  1. Enhancing the Hardness of Sintered SS 17-4PH Using Nitriding Process for Bracket Orthodontic Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suharno, B.; Supriadi, S.; Ayuningtyas, S. T.; Widjaya, T.; Baek, E. R.

    2018-01-01

    Brackets orthodontic create teeth movement by applying force from wire to bracket then transferred to teeth. However, emergence of friction between brackets and wires reduces load for teeth movement towards desired area. In order to overcome these problem, surface treatment like nitriding chosen as a process which could escalate efficiency of transferred force by improving material hardness since hard materials have low friction levels. This work investigated nitriding treatment to form nitride layer which affecting hardness of sintered SS 17-4PH. The nitride layers produced after nitriding process at various temperature i.e. 470°C, 500°C, 530°C with 8hr holding time under 50% NH3 atmosphere. Optical metallography was conducted to compare microstructure of base and surface metal while the increasing of surface hardness then observed using vickers microhardness tester. Hardened surface layer was obtained after gaseous nitriding process because of nitride layer that contains Fe4N, CrN and Fe-αN formed. Hardness layers can achieved value 1051 HV associated with varies thickness from 53 to 119 μm. The presence of a precipitation process occurring in conjunction with nitriding process can lead to a decrease in hardness due to nitrogen content diminishing in solid solution phase. This problem causes weakening of nitrogen expansion in martensite lattice.

  2. A study of nitride formation during the oxidation of titanium-tantalum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanrahan, R.J. Jr.; Lu, Y.C.; Kung, H.; Butt, D.P.

    1996-01-01

    The oxidation rates of Ti rich titanium-tantalum alloys are significantly lower in air than in oxygen. This nitrogen effect has been shown to be associated with the formation of a nitride layer at or near the scale-metal interface. In the present work the authors used transmission electron microscopy and microdiffraction to identify the nitrides formed on Ti5Ta and Ti40Ta (5 and 40 weight percent Ta alloys) during identical exposures. In both alloys the nitride develops in contact with the oxygen stabilized α-phase in the substrate. In Ti5Ta a continuous layer of TiN forms, while in Ti40Ta a discontinuous layer of Ti 2 N interspersed with Ta 2 O 5 (formed from the Ta rich β-phase) is formed. The nitride layer acts as an oxygen diffusion barrier, reducing the dissolution of oxygen in the substrate

  3. Tribological Properties of Surface-Textured and Plasma-Nitrided Pure Titanium Under Oil Lubrication Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baosen; Dong, Qiangsheng; Ba, Zhixin; Wang, Zhangzhong; Shi, Hancheng; Xue, Yanting

    2018-01-01

    Plasma nitriding was conducted as post-treatment for surface texture on pure titanium to obtain a continuous nitriding layer. Supersonic fine particles bombarding (SFPB) was carried out to prepare surface texture. The surface morphologies and chemical composition were analyzed using scanning electron microscope and energy disperse spectroscopy. The microstructures of modified layers were characterized by transmission electron microscope. The tribological properties of surface-textured and duplex-treated pure titanium under oil lubrication condition were systematically investigated in the ball-on-plate reciprocating mode. The effects of applied load and sliding velocity on the tribological behavior were analyzed. The results show that after duplex treatments, the grains size in modified layer becomes slightly larger, and hardness is obviously improved. Wear resistance of duplex-treated pure titanium is significantly improved referenced to untreated and surface-textured pure titanium, which is 3.22 times as much as untreated pure titanium and 2.15 times of that for surface-textured pure titanium, respectively.

  4. The influence of processing conditions on the microstructure and the mechanical properties of reaction sintered silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, J.

    1979-09-01

    The microstructure of reaction sintered silicon nitride (RBSN) was changed in a wide range of varying green density, grain size of the silicon starting powder, nitriding conditions, and by introducing artificial pores. The influence of single microstructural parameters on mechanical properties like room temperature strength, creep behaviour, and resistance to thermal shock has been investigated. The essential factors influencing these properties were found to be total porosity, pore size distribution, and the fractions of α- and β-Si 3 N 4 . In view of high temperature engineering applications of RBSN possibilities to optimize the material's properties by controlled processing are discussed. (orig.) [de

  5. Core-shell titanium dioxide-titanium nitride nanotube arrays with near-infrared plasmon resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsinezhad, Samira; Shanavas, Thariq; Mahdi, Najia; Askar, Abdelrahman M.; Kar, Piyush; Sharma, Himani; Shankar, Karthik

    2018-04-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) is a ceramic with high electrical conductivity which in nanoparticle form, exhibits localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) in the visible region of the solar spectrum. The ceramic nature of TiN coupled with its dielectric loss factor being comparable to that of gold, render it attractive for CMOS polarizers, refractory plasmonics, surface-enhanced Raman scattering and a whole host of sensing applications. We report core-shell TiO2-TiN nanotube arrays exhibiting LSPR peaks in the range 775-830 nm achieved by a simple, solution-based, low cost, large area-compatible fabrication route that does not involve laser-writing or lithography. Self-organized, highly ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays were grown by electrochemical anodization of Ti thin films on fluorine-doped tin oxide-coated glass substrates and then conformally coated with a thin layer of TiN using atomic layer deposition. The effects of varying the TiN layer thickness and thermal annealing on the LSPR profiles were also investigated. Modeling the TiO2-TiN core-shell nanotube structure using two different approaches, one employing effective medium approximations coupled with Fresnel coefficients, resulted in calculated optical spectra that closely matched the experimentally measured spectra. Modeling provided the insight that the observed near-infrared resonance was not collective in nature, and was mainly attributable to the longitudinal resonance of annular nanotube-like TiN particles redshifted due to the presence of the higher permittivity TiO2 matrix. The resulting TiO2-TiN core-shell nanotube structures also function as visible light responsive photocatalysts, as evidenced by their photoelectrochemical water-splitting performance under light emitting diode illumination using 400, 430 and 500 nm photons.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of nano silicon and titanium nitride ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The characterization techniques indicated ... Scalable synthesis; microwave plasma; chemical synthesis; nanoparticles. 1. Introduction ... used but very few methods are available to produce silicon and titanium ... current (A). (m3/h). 1. Si. 2.1.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of titanium-vanadium ternary nitride (Ti{sub x}V{sub 1}-xN).; Sintesis y caracterizacion del nitruro ternario de titanio y vanadio (Ti{sub x}V{sub 1}-xN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roldan, M. A.; Alcala, M. D.; Ortega, A.; Real, C.

    2011-07-01

    Titanium-Vanadium nitride (TiVN) has been prepared from carbothermal reduction of corresponding oxides and also by direct nitridation of a mix of two metals employing the ATVC method. The characterization of the final product by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, electron energy loss (EELS), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is presented. The synthesis of the ternary nitride has been possible in all range of composition and the final product is obtained with nano metric particle size and a high microhardness after sintering. (Author) 58 refs.

  8. Titanium nitride coatings synthesized by IPD method with eliminated current oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chodun Rafał

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the effects of elimination of current oscillations within the coaxial plasma accelerator during IPD deposition process on the morphology, phase structure and properties of synthesized TiN coatings. Current observations of waveforms have been made by use of an oscilloscope. As a test material for experiments, titanium nitride TiN coatings synthesized on silicon and high-speed steel substrates were used. The coatings morphology, phase composition and wear resistance properties were determined. The character of current waveforms in the plasma accelerator electric circuit plays a crucial role during the coatings synthesis process. Elimination of the current oscillations leads to obtaining an ultrafine grained structure of titanium nitride coatings and to disappearance of the tendency to structure columnarization. The coatings obtained during processes of a non-oscillating character are distinguished by better wear-resistance properties.

  9. Processing of pure titanium containing titanium-based reinforcing ceramics additives using spark plasma sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mondiu Olayinka DUROWOJU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The densification behaviour, microstructural changes and hardness characteristics during spark plasma sintering of CP-Ti reinforced with TiC, TiN, TiCN and TiB2 were investigated. Commercially pure Ti powders were dry mixed with varied amounts (2.5 and 5 wt. % of the ceramic additives using a T2F Turbula mixer for 5 h and at a speed of 49 rpm. The blended composite powders were then sintered using spark plasma sintering system (model HHPD-25 from FCT Germany at a heating rate of 100oC min-1, dwell time of 5 min and sintering temperature of 950ºC. The sintering of CP-Ti was used as a base study to select the proper spark plasma sintering temperature for full density. Densification was monitored through analysis of the recorded punch displacement and the measured density of the sintered samples using Archimedes method. High densities ranging from 97.8% for 5% TiB2 addition to 99.6% for 5% TiCN addition were achieved at a relatively low temperature of 950°C. Microstructural analyses show a uniform distribution of the additives and finer structure showing their inhibitive effect on grain growth. An improved hardness was observed in all the cases with highest values obtained with TiCN as a result of the combined effect of TiC and TiN. A change in the fracture mode from trans granular to intergranular was also observed.

  10. Transient Nonlinear Optical Properties of Thin Film Titanium Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-23

    13] • Chemical composition • Crystal structure and lattice parameters • Defect structure This tuneability will be useful in future engineering ...Nitride SarahKatie Thomas Follow this and additional works at: https://scholar.afit.edu/etd Part of the Materials Science and Engineering Commons This... Thesis is brought to you for free and open access by AFIT Scholar. It has been accepted for inclusion in Theses and Dissertations by an authorized

  11. Development of new ferritic alloys reinforced by nano titanium nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathon, M.H.; Perrut, M.; Poirier, L.; Ratti, M.; Hervé, N.; Carlan, Y. de

    2015-01-01

    Nano-reinforced steels are considered for future nuclear reactors or for application at high temperature like the heat exchangers tubes or plates. Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys are the most known of the nano-reinforced alloys. They exhibit high creep strength as well as high resistance to radiation damage. This article deals with the development of new nano reinforced alloys called Nitride Dispersed Strengthened (NDS). Those are also considered for nuclear applications and could exhibit higher ductility with a simplest fabrication way. Two main fabrication routes were studied: the co-milling of Fe–18Cr1W0.008N and TiH 2 powders and the plasma nitration at low temperature of a Fe–18Cr1W0.8Ti powder. The materials were studied mainly by Small Angle Neutron Scattering. The feasibility of the reinforcement by nano-nitride particles is demonstrated. The final size of the nitrides can be similar (few nanometers) to the nano-oxides observed in ODS alloys. The mechanical properties of the new NDS show an amazing ductility at high temperature for a nano-reinforced alloy

  12. Development of new ferritic alloys reinforced by nano titanium nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathon, M.H., E-mail: marie-helene.mathon@cea.fr [Laboratoire Léon Brillouin, CEA-CNRS, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Perrut, M., E-mail: mikael.perrut@onera.fr [Laboratoire Léon Brillouin, CEA-CNRS, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Poirier, L., E-mail: poirier@nitruvid.com [Bodycote France and Belgium, 9 r Jean Poulmarch, 95100 Argenteuil (France); Ratti, M., E-mail: mathieu.ratti@snecma.fr [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliquées, F91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hervé, N., E-mail: nicolas.herve@cea.fr [CEA, DRT, LITEN, F38054 Grenoble (France); Carlan, Y. de, E-mail: yann.decarlan@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliquées, F91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-01-15

    Nano-reinforced steels are considered for future nuclear reactors or for application at high temperature like the heat exchangers tubes or plates. Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys are the most known of the nano-reinforced alloys. They exhibit high creep strength as well as high resistance to radiation damage. This article deals with the development of new nano reinforced alloys called Nitride Dispersed Strengthened (NDS). Those are also considered for nuclear applications and could exhibit higher ductility with a simplest fabrication way. Two main fabrication routes were studied: the co-milling of Fe–18Cr1W0.008N and TiH{sub 2} powders and the plasma nitration at low temperature of a Fe–18Cr1W0.8Ti powder. The materials were studied mainly by Small Angle Neutron Scattering. The feasibility of the reinforcement by nano-nitride particles is demonstrated. The final size of the nitrides can be similar (few nanometers) to the nano-oxides observed in ODS alloys. The mechanical properties of the new NDS show an amazing ductility at high temperature for a nano-reinforced alloy.

  13. Characterization of the porous structures of the green body and sintered biomedical titanium scaffolds with micro-computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arifvianto, B., E-mail: b.arifvianto@tudelft.nl; Leeflang, M.A.; Zhou, J.

    2016-11-15

    The present research was aimed at gaining an understanding of the porous structure changes from the green body through water leaching and sintering to titanium scaffolds. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) was performed to generate 3D models of titanium scaffold preforms containing carbamide space-holding particles and sintered scaffolds containing macro- and micro-pores. The porosity values and structural parameters were determined by means of image analysis. The result showed that the porosity values, macro-pore sizes, connectivity densities and specific surface areas of the titanium scaffolds sintered at 1200 °C for 3 h did not significantly deviate from those of the green structures with various volume fractions of the space holder. Titanium scaffolds with a maximum specific surface area could be produced with an addition of 60–65 vol% carbamide particles to the matrix powder. The connectivity of pores inside the scaffold increased with rising volume fraction of the space holder. The shrinkage of the scaffolds prepared with > 50 vol% carbamide space holder, occurring during sintering, was caused by the reductions of macro-pore sizes and micro-pore sizes as well as the thickness of struts. In conclusion, the final porous structural characteristics of titanium scaffolds could be estimated from those of the green body. - Highlights: •Porous structures of green body and sintered titanium scaffolds was studied. •Porous structures of both samples were quantitatively characterized with micro-CT. •Porous structures of scaffolds could be controlled from the green body. •Shrinkage mechanisms of titanium scaffolds during sintering was established.

  14. Plasma synthesis of titanium nitride, carbide and carbonitride nanoparticles by means of reactive anodic arc evaporation from solid titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiesler, D.; Bastuck, T.; Theissmann, R.; Kruis, F. E.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma methods using the direct evaporation of a transition metal are well suited for the cost-efficient production of ceramic nanoparticles. In this paper, we report on the development of a simple setup for the production of titanium-ceramics by reactive anodic arc evaporation and the characterization of the aerosol as well as the nanopowder. It is the first report on TiC X N 1 − X synthesis in a simple anodic arc plasma. By means of extensive variations of the gas composition, it is shown that the composition of the particles can be tuned from titanium nitride over a titanium carbonitride phase (TiC X N 1 − X ) to titanium carbide as proven by XRD data. The composition of the plasma gas especially a very low concentration of hydrocarbons around 0.2 % of the total plasma gas is crucial to tune the composition and to avoid the formation of free carbon. Examination of the particles by HR-TEM shows that the material consists mostly of cubic single crystalline particles with mean sizes between 8 and 27 nm

  15. Corrosion resistance of a magnetic stainless steel ion-plated with titanium nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, K; Sawase, T; Matsumura, H; Atsuta, M; Baba, K; Hatada, R

    2000-04-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the corrosion resistance of a titanium nitride (TiN) ion-plated magnetic stainless steel (447J1) for the purpose of applying a magnetic attachment system to implant-supported prostheses made of titanium. The surface hardness of the TiN ion-plated 447J1 alloy with varying TiN thickness was determined prior to the corrosion testing, and 2 micrometers thickness was confirmed to be appropriate. Ions released from the 447J1 alloy, TiN ion-plated 447J1 alloy, and titanium into a 2% lactic acid aqueous solution and 0.1 mol/L phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were determined by means of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). Long-term corrosion behaviour was evaluated using a multisweep cyclic voltammetry. The ICP-AES results revealed that the 447J1 alloy released ferric ions into both media, and that the amount of released ions increased when the alloy was coupled with titanium. Although both titanium and the TiN-plated 447J1 alloy released titanium ions into lactic acid solution, ferric and chromium ions were not released from the alloy specimen for all conditions. Cyclic voltamograms indicated that the long-term corrosion resistance of the 447J1 alloy was considerably improved by ion-plating with TiN.

  16. Direct Metal Laser Sintering Titanium Dental Implants: A Review of the Current Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangano, F.; Chambrone, L.; van Noort, R.; Miller, C.; Hatton, P.; Mangano, C.

    2014-01-01

    Statement of Problem. Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) is a technology that allows fabrication of complex-shaped objects from powder-based materials, according to a three-dimensional (3D) computer model. With DMLS, it is possible to fabricate titanium dental implants with an inherently porous surface, a key property required of implantation devices. Objective. The aim of this review was to evaluate the evidence for the reliability of DMLS titanium dental implants and their clinical and histologic/histomorphometric outcomes, as well as their mechanical properties. Materials and Methods. Electronic database searches were performed. Inclusion criteria were clinical and radiographic studies, histologic/histomorphometric studies in humans and animals, mechanical evaluations, and in vitro cell culture studies on DMLS titanium implants. Meta-analysis could be performed only for randomized controlled trials (RCTs); to evaluate the methodological quality of observational human studies, the Newcastle-Ottawa scale (NOS) was used. Results. Twenty-seven studies were included in this review. No RCTs were found, and meta-analysis could not be performed. The outcomes of observational human studies were assessed using the NOS: these studies showed medium methodological quality. Conclusions. Several studies have demonstrated the potential for the use of DMLS titanium implants. However, further studies that demonstrate the benefits of DMLS implants over conventional implants are needed. PMID:25525434

  17. Direct metal laser sintering titanium dental implants: a review of the current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangano, F; Chambrone, L; van Noort, R; Miller, C; Hatton, P; Mangano, C

    2014-01-01

    Statement of Problem. Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) is a technology that allows fabrication of complex-shaped objects from powder-based materials, according to a three-dimensional (3D) computer model. With DMLS, it is possible to fabricate titanium dental implants with an inherently porous surface, a key property required of implantation devices. Objective. The aim of this review was to evaluate the evidence for the reliability of DMLS titanium dental implants and their clinical and histologic/histomorphometric outcomes, as well as their mechanical properties. Materials and Methods. Electronic database searches were performed. Inclusion criteria were clinical and radiographic studies, histologic/histomorphometric studies in humans and animals, mechanical evaluations, and in vitro cell culture studies on DMLS titanium implants. Meta-analysis could be performed only for randomized controlled trials (RCTs); to evaluate the methodological quality of observational human studies, the Newcastle-Ottawa scale (NOS) was used. Results. Twenty-seven studies were included in this review. No RCTs were found, and meta-analysis could not be performed. The outcomes of observational human studies were assessed using the NOS: these studies showed medium methodological quality. Conclusions. Several studies have demonstrated the potential for the use of DMLS titanium implants. However, further studies that demonstrate the benefits of DMLS implants over conventional implants are needed.

  18. Direct Metal Laser Sintering Titanium Dental Implants: A Review of the Current Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mangano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem. Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS is a technology that allows fabrication of complex-shaped objects from powder-based materials, according to a three-dimensional (3D computer model. With DMLS, it is possible to fabricate titanium dental implants with an inherently porous surface, a key property required of implantation devices. Objective. The aim of this review was to evaluate the evidence for the reliability of DMLS titanium dental implants and their clinical and histologic/histomorphometric outcomes, as well as their mechanical properties. Materials and Methods. Electronic database searches were performed. Inclusion criteria were clinical and radiographic studies, histologic/histomorphometric studies in humans and animals, mechanical evaluations, and in vitro cell culture studies on DMLS titanium implants. Meta-analysis could be performed only for randomized controlled trials (RCTs; to evaluate the methodological quality of observational human studies, the Newcastle-Ottawa scale (NOS was used. Results. Twenty-seven studies were included in this review. No RCTs were found, and meta-analysis could not be performed. The outcomes of observational human studies were assessed using the NOS: these studies showed medium methodological quality. Conclusions. Several studies have demonstrated the potential for the use of DMLS titanium implants. However, further studies that demonstrate the benefits of DMLS implants over conventional implants are needed.

  19. Development of microstructure during sintering and aluminium exposure of titanium diboride ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersen, Gunnar

    1997-12-31

    In the production of aluminium, much less energy need be consumed if an inert, wetted cathode is present in the electrolysis cell. Titanium diboride, TiB{sub 2}, is easily wetted and does not readily dissolve in liquid aluminium, but it degrades, probably because aluminium penetrates into it during electrolysis. This degradation is linked to impurities present in the TiB{sub 2} after sintering. This thesis studies the sintering process and how aluminium penetrates into the material. High-purity, high-density TiB{sub 2} compacts were made by hot pressing at 50 MPa in an argon atmosphere at 1790-1960 {sup o}C. Samples were made with different impurity additions. These samples were exposed to liquid aluminium at 980 {sup o}C for 24 hours. All samples were penetrated, but the amount and appearance depended on the sintering aid used. Unlike the other samples, pure TiB{sub 2} was easily penetrated by metallic aluminium because of the open porosity and microcracks of this material. Grain boundary penetration was common among the samples. Differences in penetration behaviour between grain boundaries are probably due to differences in grain boundary energy. But no relation to segregants or boundary misorientation was found. The orientation of grain boundary planes and de-wetting of thin films upon cooling may explain the observed microstructure development. The samples sintered with Ti addition suffered extensive penetration despite their high densities. The grain boundaries of these samples became faceted and contained thicker films of metallic aluminium, presumably because of increased solubility due to iron segregations. All secondary phases present in the grain junctions after sintering, except from the B{sub 4}C phase, reacted with the penetrated aluminium. This did not cause swelling and cracking, as has been suggested by other authors. 101 refs., 48 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Marangoni Convection during Free Electron Laser Nitriding of Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höche, Daniel; Müller, Sven; Rapin, Gerd; Shinn, Michelle; Remdt, Elvira; Gubisch, Maik; Schaaf, Peter

    2009-08-01

    Pure titanium was treated by free electron laser (FEL) radiation in a nitrogen atmosphere. As a result, nitrogen diffusion occurs and a TiN coating was synthesized. Local gradients of interfacial tension due to the local heating lead to a Marangoni convection, which determines the track properties. Because of the experimental inaccessibility of time-dependent occurrences, finite element calculations were performed, to determine the physical processes such as heat transfer, melt flow, and mass transport. In order to calculate the surface deformation of the gas-liquid interface, the level set approach was used. The equations were modified and coupled with heat-transfer and diffusion equations. The process was characterized by dimensionless numbers such as the Reynolds, Peclet, and capillary numbers, to obtain more information about the acting forces and the coating development. Moreover, the nitrogen distribution was calculated using the corresponding transport equation. The simulations were compared with cross-sectional micrographs of the treated titanium sheets and checked for their validity. Finally, the process presented is discussed and compared with similar laser treatments.

  1. Biocompatibility assessment of spark plasma-sintered alumina-titanium cermets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Rodrigo; Fernandez-García, Elisa; Gutierrez-Gonzalez, Carlos F; Fernandez, Adolfo; Lopez-Lacomba, Jose Luis; Lopez-Esteban, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Alumina-titanium materials (cermets) of enhanced mechanical properties have been lately developed. In this work, physical properties such as electrical conductivity and the crystalline phases in the bulk material are evaluated. As these new cermets manufactured by spark plasma sintering may have potential application for hard tissue replacements, their biocompatibility needs to be evaluated. Thus, this research aims to study the cytocompatibility of a novel alumina-titanium (25 vol. % Ti) cermet compared to its pure counterpart, the spark plasma sintered alumina. The influence of the particular surface properties (chemical composition, roughness and wettability) on the pre-osteoblastic cell response is also analyzed. The material electrical resistance revealed that this cermet may be machined to any shape by electroerosion. The investigated specimens had a slightly undulated topography, with a roughness pattern that had similar morphology in all orientations (isotropic roughness) and a sub-micrometric average roughness. Differences in skewness that implied valley-like structures in the cermet and predominance of peaks in alumina were found. The cermet presented a higher surface hydrophilicity than alumina. Any cytotoxicity risk associated with the new materials or with the innovative manufacturing methodology was rejected. Proliferation and early-differentiation stages of osteoblasts were statistically improved on the composite. Thus, our results suggest that this new multifunctional cermet could improve current alumina-based biomedical devices for applications such as hip joint replacements. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Carbon dioxide ion implantation in Titanium Nitride (Ti N)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torabi, Sh.; Sari, A. H.; Hojabri, A.; Ghoranneviss, M.

    2007-01-01

    Nitrogen ion implantation on titanium samples performed at 3x10 18 , 8x10 17 , 3x10 18 doses. In addition CO 2 ions were also implanted at doses in the range of 1x10 17 ,4 x10 17 ,8x10 17 . Atomic Force Microscopy, used to investigate the topographical changes of implanted samples. The structure of samples and phase composition were characterized using x-ray diffraction. The results show that by increasing of nitrogen ions, the roughness, grain sizes and hardness will increase. But by further increasing of dose, hardness will be decreased. The CO 2 implantation also enhance the roughness, grain size and hardness which could be caused by phase composition.

  3. Thermoelectric transport properties of polycrystalline titanium diselenide co-intercalated with nickel and titanium using spark plasma sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holgate, T.C. [Department of Energy Storage and Conversion, Technical University of Denmark, Riso Campus, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Zhu, S.; Zhou, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Bangarigadu-Sanasy, S.; Kleinke, H. [Department of Chemistry, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); He, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Tritt, T.M., E-mail: ttritt@clemson.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Polycrystalline samples of nickel intercalated (0-5%) TiSe{sub 2} were attempted via solid-state reaction in evacuated quartz tubes followed by densification using a spark plasma sintering process. X-ray diffraction data indicated that mixed NiSe{sub 2} and TiSe{sub 2} phases were present after initial synthesis by solid-state reaction, but a pure TiSe{sub 2} phase was present after the spark plasma sintering. While EPMA data reveals the stoichiometry to be near 1:1.8 (Ti:Se) for all samples, comparisons of the measured bulk densities to the theoretical densities suggest that the off stoichiometry is a result of the co-intercalation of both Ni and Ti rather than Se vacancies. Due to the presence of excess Ti (0.085-0.130 per formula) in the van der Waals gap of all the samples, the sensitive electron-hole balance is offset by the additional Ti-3d electrons, leading to an increase in the thermopower (n-type) over pristine, stoichiometric TiSe{sub 2}. The effects of the co-intercalation of both Ni and Ti in TiSe{sub 2} on the structural, thermal, and electrical properties are discussed herein. - Graphical abstract: Co-intercalation of nickel and excess titanium into the van der Waals gap of TiSe{sub 2} via solid state synthesis followed by spark plasma sintering results in a systematic shift in the ratio of hole and electron carrier concentration, which is close to unity for pristine TiSe{sub 2}. This directly affects the electrical transport properties, and as the structural disorder induced by intercalation suppresses the lattice thermal conductivity, co-intercalation is an effective route to enhance the thermoelectric properties of transition metal diselenides. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single phase bulk Ni and Ti co-intercalated TiSe{sub 2} samples prepared by spark plasma sintering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Density and X-ray diffraction suggest that the Ni and excess Ti are ordered in the Van der Waals gap. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co

  4. Diffusion, convection, and solidification in cw-mode free electron laser nitrided titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeche, Daniel; Mueller, Sven; Shinn, Michelle; Schaaf, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Titanium sheets were irradiated by free electron laser radiation in cw mode in pure nitrogen. Due to the interaction, nitrogen diffusion occurs and titanium nitride was synthesized in the tracks. Overlapping tracks have been utilized to create coatings in order to improve the tribological properties of the sheets. Caused by the local heating and the spatial dimension of the melt pool, convection effects were observed and related to the track properties. Stress, hardness, and nitrogen content were investigated with x-ray diffraction, nanoindention, and resonant nuclear reaction analysis. The measured results were correlated with the scan parameters, especially to the lateral track shift. Cross section micrographs were prepared and investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy. They show the solidification behavior, phase formation, and the nitrogen distribution. The experiments give an insight into the possibilities of materials processing using such a unique heat source.

  5. Diffusion, convection, and solidification in cw-mode free electron laser nitrided titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höche, Daniel; Shinn, Michelle; Müller, Sven; Schaaf, Peter

    2009-04-01

    Titanium sheets were irradiated by free electron laser radiation in cw mode in pure nitrogen. Due to the interaction, nitrogen diffusion occurs and titanium nitride was synthesized in the tracks. Overlapping tracks have been utilized to create coatings in order to improve the tribological properties of the sheets. Caused by the local heating and the spatial dimension of the melt pool, convection effects were observed and related to the track properties. Stress, hardness, and nitrogen content were investigated with x-ray diffraction, nanoindention, and resonant nuclear reaction analysis. The measured results were correlated with the scan parameters, especially to the lateral track shift. Cross section micrographs were prepared and investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy. They show the solidification behavior, phase formation, and the nitrogen distribution. The experiments give an insight into the possibilities of materials processing using such a unique heat source.

  6. Development of novel titanium nitride-based decorative coatings by calcium addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodroj, A. [Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS UMR 7198, Departement CP2S, Ecole des Mines, Parc de Saurupt, CS 14234, 54042 Nancy cedex (France); Pierson, J.F., E-mail: jean-francois.pierson@ijl.nancy-universite.fr [Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS UMR 7198, Departement CP2S, Ecole des Mines, Parc de Saurupt, CS 14234, 54042 Nancy cedex (France)

    2011-08-01

    Calcium was added into titanium nitride coatings deposited using a hybrid magnetron sputtering-arc evaporation process. The calcium content in the films was adjusted by the variation of the pulsed DC current applied to the Ca sputtering target. X-ray diffraction analyses suggested that the increase of the calcium content induced the partial substitution of titanium atoms by calcium ones in the TiN lattice and a refinement of the grain size. Optical reflectance investigations showed that the absorption band of TiN was shifted towards higher wavelengths and that (Ti,Ca)N coatings may be suitable for decorative applications. Finally, the decrease of the film reflectivity was interpreted as a consequence of a free electron concentration decrease as confirmed from electrical resistivity measurements.

  7. Development of novel titanium nitride-based decorative coatings by calcium addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodroj, A.; Pierson, J.F.

    2011-01-01

    Calcium was added into titanium nitride coatings deposited using a hybrid magnetron sputtering-arc evaporation process. The calcium content in the films was adjusted by the variation of the pulsed DC current applied to the Ca sputtering target. X-ray diffraction analyses suggested that the increase of the calcium content induced the partial substitution of titanium atoms by calcium ones in the TiN lattice and a refinement of the grain size. Optical reflectance investigations showed that the absorption band of TiN was shifted towards higher wavelengths and that (Ti,Ca)N coatings may be suitable for decorative applications. Finally, the decrease of the film reflectivity was interpreted as a consequence of a free electron concentration decrease as confirmed from electrical resistivity measurements.

  8. Bone response to a titanium aluminium nitride coating on metallic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, C O; Brook, I M

    2006-05-01

    The design, surface characteristics and strength of metallic implants are dependant on their intended use and clinical application. Surface modifications of materials may enable reduction of the time taken for osseointegration and improve the biological response of bio-mechanically favourable metals and alloys. The influence of a titanium aluminium nitride (TAN) coating on the response of bone to commercially pure titanium and austenitic 18/8 stainless steel wire is reported. TAN coated and plain rods of stainless steel and commercially pure titanium were implanted into the mid-shaft of the femur of Wistar rats. The femurs were harvested at four weeks and processed for scanning electron and light microscopy. All implants exhibited a favourable response in bone with no evidence of fibrous encapsulation. There was no significant difference in the amount of new bone formed around the different rods (osseoconduction), however, there was a greater degree of shrinkage separation of bone from the coated rods than from the plain rods (p = 0.017 stainless steel and p = 0.0085 titanium). TAN coating may result in reduced osseointegration between bone and implant.

  9. Preparation of Titanium nitride nanomaterials for electrode and application in energy storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun Tang

    Full Text Available The Titanium nitride was made by the carbamide and titanic chloride precursors. XRD results indicate that the precursor ratio N:Ti 3:1 leads to higher crystallinity. SEM and EDX demonstrated that Ti and N elements were distributed uniformly with the ratio of 1:1. The TiN used as the electrode material for supercapacitor was also studied. The specific capacities were changed from 407 F.g−1 to 385 F.g−1, 364 F.g−1 and 312 F.g−1, when the current densities were changed from 1 A.g−1 to 2 A.g−1, 5 A.g−1 and 10 A.g−1, respectively. Chronopotentiometry tests showed high coulombic efficiency. Cycling performance of the TiN electrode was evaluated by CV at a scanning rate of 50 mV.s−1 for 20,000 cycles and there was about 9.8% loss. These results indicate that TiN is a promising electrode material for the supercapacitors. Keywords: Energy storage, Nanomaterials, Anode, Titanium nitride, Supercapacitors

  10. Microstructural Evolution during Pressureless Sintering of Blended Elemental Ti-Al-V-Fe Titanium Alloys from Fine Hydrogenated-Dehydrogenated Titanium Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changzhou Yu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive study was conducted on microstructural evolution of sintered Ti-Al-V-Fe titanium alloys utilizing very fine hydrogenation-dehydrogenation (HDH titanium powder with a median particle size of 8.84 μm. Both micropores (5–15 μm and macropores (50–200 μm were identified in sintered titanium alloys. Spherical micropores were observed in Ti-6Al-4V sintered with fine Ti at the lowest temperature of 1150 °C. The addition of iron can help reduce microporosity and improve microstructural and compositional homogenization. A theoretical calculation of evaporation based on the Miedema model and Langmuir equation indicates that the evaporation of aluminum could be responsible for the formation of the macropores. Although reasonable densification was achieved at low sintering temperatures (93–96% relative density the samples had poor mechanical properties due mainly to the presence of the macroporosity and the high inherent oxygen content in the as-received fine powders.

  11. Study on Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Foam Titanium Carbide Ceramics Fabricated by Reaction Sintering Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yana; Bao, Chonggao; Chen, Jie; Song, Suocheng; Han, Longhao

    2018-05-01

    Foam titanium carbide (TiC) ceramics with a three-dimensional network structure were fabricated by the reaction sintering process, in which polyurethane foam was taken as the template, and TiO2 and phenolic resin were used as the reactants. Phase, microstructures and fracture morphologies of foam TiC ceramics were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The results show that when the mass ratios of phenolic resin and TiO2 (F/T) are (0.8-1.2): 1, foam TiC ceramics with pure TiC phase can be formed. As the F/T ratios increase, crystal lattice parameters of fabricated foam TiC ceramics become bigger. When the value of F/T decreases from 1.2 to 0.8, grain size of TiC grows larger and microstructures get denser; meanwhile, the compressive strength increases from 0.10 to 1.05 MPa. Additionally, either raising the sintering temperatures or extending holding time can facilitate the completion of the reaction process and increase the compressive strength.

  12. Increased charge storage capacity of titanium nitride electrodes by deposition of boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meijs, Suzan; McDonald, Matthew; Sørensen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of depositing a thin layer of boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (B-NCD) on titanium nitride (TiN) coated electrodes and the effect this has on charge injection properties. The charge storage capacity increased by applying the B-NCD film...

  13. Electron heating by photon-assisted tunneling in niobium terahertz mixers with integrated niobium titanium nitride striplines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leone, B; Gao, [No Value; Klapwijk, TM; Jackson, BD; Laauwen, WM; de Lange, G

    2001-01-01

    We describe the gap voltage depression and current-voltage (I-V) characteristics in pumped niobium superconductor-insulator-superconductor junction with niobium titanium nitride tuning stripline by introducing an electron heating power contribution resulting from the photon-assisted tunneling

  14. Aspects of the practical application of titanium alloys after low temperature nitriding glow discharge in hydrogen- free -gas media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashovets, N.S., E-mail: mashovets@rambler.ru [Khmelnickiy National University (Ukraine); Pastukh, I.M., E-mail: pastim@mail.ru [Khmelnickiy National University (Ukraine); Voloshko, S.M. [Khmelnickiy National University (Ukraine); National Technical University of Ukraine “Kyiv Polytechnic Institute” (Ukraine)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Surface modification of titanium alloys were carried out by low-temperature nitriding in a glow discharge in hydrogen-free environment. • Research into the phase composition was performed by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). • The above material shows the promise of the technology of low-temperature hydrogen-nitriding by glow discharge. This greatly expands the range of practical applications of titanium alloys. - Abstract: X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Electron Auger-spectroscopy investigation of phase transformation on the surface of the VT8 titanium alloy after a low temperature hydrogen-free nitriding in a glow discharge. Operational characteristics of titanium alloys defined physical-mechanical characteristics of the surface and their phase composition, which depend on the process parameters of nitriding. Surface modification of titanium alloys were carried out by low-temperature nitriding in a glow discharge in hydrogen-free environment. The main advantage of this method lies in the absence of hydrogen embrittlement and complete environmental safety process. Application of the glow discharge can not only speed up the process by the order of the diffusion surface saturation with nitrogen, but also significantly alters the kinetics of the process and quality of the nitrided layer, in particular its physio-mechanical properties and phase composition. For research purposes, the standards from an α + β alloy Ti-Al6-Cr2-Mo2,5 (VT8) were used. Research into the phase composition was performed by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Stratified analysis by AES was conducted by etching the surface of the samples’ argon ion beam with diameters of 1.5 mm with an energy of 3000 eV and a current density of 400 mA/cm{sup 2}. The above material shows the promise of the technology of low

  15. Aspects of the practical application of titanium alloys after low temperature nitriding glow discharge in hydrogen- free -gas media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashovets, N.S.; Pastukh, I.M.; Voloshko, S.M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Surface modification of titanium alloys were carried out by low-temperature nitriding in a glow discharge in hydrogen-free environment. • Research into the phase composition was performed by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). • The above material shows the promise of the technology of low-temperature hydrogen-nitriding by glow discharge. This greatly expands the range of practical applications of titanium alloys. - Abstract: X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Electron Auger-spectroscopy investigation of phase transformation on the surface of the VT8 titanium alloy after a low temperature hydrogen-free nitriding in a glow discharge. Operational characteristics of titanium alloys defined physical-mechanical characteristics of the surface and their phase composition, which depend on the process parameters of nitriding. Surface modification of titanium alloys were carried out by low-temperature nitriding in a glow discharge in hydrogen-free environment. The main advantage of this method lies in the absence of hydrogen embrittlement and complete environmental safety process. Application of the glow discharge can not only speed up the process by the order of the diffusion surface saturation with nitrogen, but also significantly alters the kinetics of the process and quality of the nitrided layer, in particular its physio-mechanical properties and phase composition. For research purposes, the standards from an α + β alloy Ti-Al6-Cr2-Mo2,5 (VT8) were used. Research into the phase composition was performed by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Stratified analysis by AES was conducted by etching the surface of the samples’ argon ion beam with diameters of 1.5 mm with an energy of 3000 eV and a current density of 400 mA/cm 2 . The above material shows the promise of the technology of low

  16. Influence of aluminum nitride interlayers on crystal orientation and piezoelectric property of aluminum nitride thin films prepared on titanium electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamohara, Toshihiro; Akiyama, Morito; Ueno, Naohiro; Nonaka, Kazuhiro; Kuwano, Noriyuki

    2007-01-01

    Highly c-axis-oriented aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films have been prepared on titanium (Ti) bottom electrodes by using AlN interlayers. The AlN interlayers were deposited between Ti electrodes and silicon (Si) substrates, such as AlN/Ti/AlN/Si. The crystallinity and crystal orientation of the AlN films and Ti electrodes strongly depended on the thickness of the AlN interlayers. Although the sputtering conditions were the same, the X-ray diffraction intensity of AlN (0002) and Ti (0002) planes drastically increased, and the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the X-ray rocking curves decreased from 5.1 o to 2.6 o and from 3.3 o to 2.0 o , respectively. Furthermore, the piezoelectric constant d 33 of the AlN films was significantly improved from - 0.2 to - 4.5 pC/N

  17. [Effect of sintering gold paste coating on the bonding strength of pure titanium and three low-fusing porcelains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ya-li; Luo, Xiao-ping; Zhou, Li

    2012-05-01

    To study the effect of sintering gold paste coating of pure titanium on the adhesion of three porcelains following the protocol ISO 9693, and to investigate the titanium-porcelains interfaces. Sixty machined pure titanium samples were prepared in a rectangular shape according to ISO 9693 and divided equally into six groups. Half of the strips were coated with gold paste (Deckgold) and sintered. Three ultra-low-fusing dental porcelains (I: Initial Ti, S: Super porcelain Ti-22, T: TitanKeramik) were fused onto the titanium surfaces. A thin layer of bonding agent was only applied on the surfaces of uncoated gold specimens. The interface of the porcelain and titanium was observed with a field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) after metallographic preparation and sputtered with a very thin carbon layer of the embedded titanium-porcelain interface. After three-point bending test was performed, optical stereomicroscope was used to characterize the titanium-porcelains adhesion and determine the mode of failure. FE-SEM illustrated intermetallic compounds of Au-Ti formed with some visible microcracks in the gold layer and the interface of gold layer and ceramic. All the uncoated gold titanium-porcelain system showed predominately adhesive fracture at the titanium oxidation, whereas the failure modes in all gold coated systems were cohesive and adhesive, mainly cohesive. The three-point-bending test showed that the bonding strength of GS and GI groups [(37.08 ± 4.32) and (36.20 ± 2.40) MPa] were higher than those in uncoated groups [(31.56 ± 3.74) and (30.88 ± 2.60) MPa, P 0.05). The gold paste intermediate coatings can improve bond strengths of Super porcelain Ti-22 system and Initial Ti system, which have potential applications in clinical fields.

  18. Conducting metal oxide and metal nitride nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSalvo, Jr., Francis J.; Subban, Chinmayee V.

    2017-12-26

    Conducting metal oxide and nitride nanoparticles that can be used in fuel cell applications. The metal oxide nanoparticles are comprised of for example, titanium, niobium, tantalum, tungsten and combinations thereof. The metal nitride nanoparticles are comprised of, for example, titanium, niobium, tantalum, tungsten, zirconium, and combinations thereof. The nanoparticles can be sintered to provide conducting porous agglomerates of the nanoparticles which can be used as a catalyst support in fuel cell applications. Further, platinum nanoparticles, for example, can be deposited on the agglomerates to provide a material that can be used as both an anode and a cathode catalyst support in a fuel cell.

  19. Toughening effect of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes and their influence on the sintering behaviour of 3Y-TZP zirconia ceramics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tatarko, Peter; Grasso, S.; Chlup, Zdeněk; Porwal, H.; Kasiarova, M.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Reece, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 7 (2014), s. 1829-1843 ISSN 0955-2219 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 264526 - GLACERCO Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Zirconia * Boron nitride nanotubes * Composite * Spark plasma sintering * Toughening mechanism Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 2.947, year: 2014

  20. Pulsed Laser Deposition Processing of Improved Titanium Nitride Coatings for Implant Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, Talisha M.

    Recently surface coating technology has attracted considerable attention of researchers to develop novel coatings with enhanced functional properties such as hardness, biocompatibility, wear and corrosion resistance for medical devices and surgical tools. The materials currently being used for surgical implants include predominantly stainless steel (316L), cobalt chromium (Co-Cr), titanium and its alloys. Some of the limitations of these implants include improper mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, cytotoxicity and bonding with bone. One of the ways to improve the performance and biocompatibility of these implants is to coat their surfaces with biocompatible materials. Among the various coating materials, titanium nitride (TiN) shows excellent mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and low cytotoxicity. In the present work, a systematic study of pulsed laser ablation processing of TiN coatings was conducted. TiN thin film coatings were grown on commercially pure titanium (Ti) and stainless steel (316L) substrates at different substrate temperatures and different nitrogen partial pressures using the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. Microstructural, surface, mechanical, chemical, corrosion and biological analysis techniques were applied to characterize the TiN thin film coatings. The PLD processed TiN thin film coatings showed improvements in mechanical strength, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility when compared to the bare substrates. The enhanced performance properties of the TiN thin film coatings were a result of the changing and varying of the deposition parameters.

  1. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition of the nitrides and oxynitrides of vanadium, titanium and chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elwin, G.S.

    1999-01-01

    A study has been made into the atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition of nitrides and oxynitrides of vanadium, titanium and chromium. Vanadium tetrachloride, vanadium oxychloride, chromyl chloride and titanium tetrachloride have been used as precursors with ammonia, at different flow conditions and temperatures. Vanadium nitride, vanadium oxynitride, chromium oxynitride, titanium/vanadium nitride and titanium/chromium oxynitride have been deposited as thin films on glass. The APCVD reaction of VCl 4 and ammonia leads to films with general composition VN x O y . By raising the ammonia concentration so that it is in excess (0.42 dm 3 min -1 VCl 4 with 1.0 dm 3 min -1 NH 3 at 500 deg. C) a film has been deposited with the composition VN 0.8 O 0.2 . Further investigation discovered similar elemental compositions could be reached by deposition at 350 deg. C (0.42 dm 3 min -1 VCl 4 with 0.5 dm 3 min -1 NH 3 ), followed by annealing at 650 deg. C, and cooled under a flow of ammonia. Only films formed below 400 deg. C were found to contain carbon or chlorine ( 3 and ammonia also lead to films of composition VN x O y the oxygen to nitrogen ratios depending on the deposition conditions. The reaction Of VOCl 3 (0.42 dm 3 min -1 ) and ammonia (0.2 dm 3 min -1 ) at 500 deg. C lead to a film of composition VN 0. 47O 1.06 . The reaction of VOCl 3 (0.42 dm 3 min -1 ) and ammonia (0.5 dm 3 min -1 ) at 650 deg. C lead to a film of composition VN 0.63 O 0.41 . The reaction of chromyl chloride with excess ammonia led to the formation of chromium oxide (Cr 2 O 3 ) films. Mixed metal films were prepared from the reactions of vanadium tetrachloride, titanium tetrachloride and ammonia to prepare V x Ti y N z and chromyl chloride, titanium tetrachloride and ammonia to form TiCr x O y N z . Both reactions produced the intended mixed coating but it was found that the vanadium / titanium nitride contained around 10 % vanadium whatever the conditions used. Oxygen contamination

  2. Titanium-hydroxyapatite composites sintered at low temperature for tissue engineering: in vitro cell support and biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comín, Romina; Cid, Mariana P; Grinschpun, Luciano; Oldani, Carlos; Salvatierra, Nancy A

    2017-04-26

    In clinical orthopedics, a critical problem is the bone tissue loss produced by a disease or injury. The use of composites from titanium and hydroxyapatite for biomedical applications has increased due to the resulting advantageous combination of hydroxyapatite bioactivity and favorable mechanical properties of titanium. Powder metallurgy is a simple and lower-cost method that uses powder from titanium and hydroxyapatite to obtain composites having hydroxyapatite phases in a metallic matrix. However, this method has certain limitations arising from thermal decomposition of hydroxyapatite in the titanium-hydroxyapatite system above 800°C. We obtained a composite from titanium and bovine hydroxyapatite powders sintered at 800°C and evaluated its bioactivity and cytocompatibility according to the ISO 10993 standard. Surface analysis and bioactivity of the composite was evaluated by X-ray diffraction and SEM. MTT assay was carried out to assess cytotoxicity on Vero and NIH3T3 cells. Cell morphology and cell adhesion on the composite surface were analyzed using fluorescence and SEM. We obtained a porous composite with hydroxyapatite particles well integrated in titanium matrix which presented excellent bioactivity. Our data did not reveal any toxicity of titanium-hydroxyapatite composite on Vero or NIH3T3 cells. Moreover, extracts from composite did not affect cell morphology or density. Finally, NIH3T3 cells were capable of adhering to and proliferating on the composite surface. The composite obtained displayed promising biomedical applications through the simple method of powder metallurgy. Additionally, these findings provide an in vitro proof for adequate biocompatibility of titanium-hydroxyapatite composite sintered at 800°C.

  3. Structural characterization of thin films of titanium nitride deposited by laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro C, M.A.; Escobar A, L.; Camps C, E.; Mejia H, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Thin films of titanium nitride were deposited using the technique of laser ablation. It was studied the effect of the density of laser energy used for ablation the target as well as of the pressure of the work gas about the structure and the hardness of the deposited thin films. Depending on the pressure of the work gas films was obtained with preferential orientation in the directions (200) and (111). At a pressure of 1 x 10 -2 Torr only the direction (200) was observed. On the other hand to the pressure of 5 x 10 -3 Torr the deposited material this formed by a mixture of the orientation (200) and (111), being the direction (111) the predominant one. Thin films of Ti N were obtained with hardness of up to 24.0 GPa that makes to these attractive materials for mechanical applications. The hardness showed an approximately linear dependence with the energy density. (Author)

  4. On the residual stress and picostructure of titanium nitride films. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, A.J.; Valvoda, V.; Rafaja, D.; Williamson, D.L.; Sartwell, B.D.

    1992-01-01

    Titanium nitride films, dual energy ion implanted with argon or krypton, have been studied with a Seemann-Bohlin fine focus goniometer at grazing angles in the range 2-10. The implantation of 1% of either gas has little effect on the lattice parameters or the residual stress. It is thought that the gas atoms are on substitutional lattice sites and are associated with vacancies created during the implantation process. At 4% of implanted gas, it precipitates out in the form of bubbles; in the case of argon these are crystalline and their lattice parameter is close to that for solid argon as recorded in the literature. The lattice parameters and the residual stresses are affected slightly by the implantation: argon reduces the former and makes the latter more tensile, whereas the krypton has the opposite effects. It is thought that the difference in behavior is due to a difference in size of the bubbles or to the greater compressibility of argon

  5. Structure and phase composition of titanium nitride coating on austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubovitskaya, N.V.; Kolenchenko, L.D.; Larikov, L.N.

    1989-01-01

    Structure and phase composition of titanium nitride coating deposited on 08Kh18N10T steel substrate using ''Bulat'' device are studied. Use of complex investigation methods permitted despite small coating thickness (1μm) to aquire information on hardness, porosity, to study phase composition in all coating thickness. The surface layer (∼0.1 μm) consists of ε-Ti 2 N, TiN 0.6 , TiC 0.35 , that is formed with carbon participation from oil vacuum. In more deeper layers beside ε-Ti 2 N TiC 0.14 N 0.77 is present. Effect of carbon diffusion from substrate to forming coating is stated. Gradient of element concentrations in the substrate-coating interface causes recrystallization of austenite

  6. Modification of the surfaces of stainless steel during titanium nitride deposition by a dynamic mixing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Katsuhiro; Tamura, Susumu; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Horiguchi, Motohiro; Nakaiwa, Hiroki; Sugimoto, Takashi; Akamatsu, Katsuya; Nakao, Kazuyoshi

    2000-05-01

    Surfaces of stainless steel SUS304 were coated with titanium nitride (TiN) at temperatures ranging from 400°C to 770°C using a dynamic mixing technique. The N+ ions were accelerated at energies of 0.5-2.0 keV, and were implanted into the stainless steel. The composition of the prepared TiN films was measured using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry with He ions at an energy of 2.0 MeV. Intermediate layers containing compounds such as FesNq, Cr2N, and CrFe were formed between the TiN films and substrates at substrate temperatures higher than 700°C. The thickness of the TiN films decreased significantly when the intermediate layers were formed.

  7. Single-Atom Catalyst of Platinum Supported on Titanium Nitride for Selective Electrochemical Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sungeun; Kim, Jiwhan; Tak, Young Joo; Soon, Aloysius; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2016-02-05

    As a catalyst, single-atom platinum may provide an ideal structure for platinum minimization. Herein, a single-atom catalyst of platinum supported on titanium nitride nanoparticles were successfully prepared with the aid of chlorine ligands. Unlike platinum nanoparticles, the single-atom active sites predominantly produced hydrogen peroxide in the electrochemical oxygen reduction with the highest mass activity reported so far. The electrocatalytic oxidation of small organic molecules, such as formic acid and methanol, also exhibited unique selectivity on the single-atom platinum catalyst. A lack of platinum ensemble sites changed the reaction pathway for the oxygen-reduction reaction toward a two-electron pathway and formic acid oxidation toward direct dehydrogenation, and also induced no activity for the methanol oxidation. This work demonstrates that single-atom platinum can be an efficient electrocatalyst with high mass activity and unique selectivity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Hardness and Elastic Modulus of Titanium Nitride Coatings Prepared by Pirac Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Siyuan; Wu, Shoujun; Zhang, Guoyun; Zhang, Weiguo

    In the present work, hardness and elastic modulus of a titanium nitride coatings prepared on Ti6Al4V by powder immersion reaction-assisted coating (PIRAC) are tested and comparatively studied with a physical vapor deposition (PVD) TiN coating. Surface hardness of the PIRAC coatings is about 11GPa, much lower than that of PVD coating of 22GPa. The hardness distribution profile from surface to substrate of the PVD coatings is steeply decreased from ˜22GPa to ˜4.5GPa of the Ti6Al4V substrate. The PIRAC coatings show a gradually decreasing hardness distribution profile. Elastic modulus of the PVD coating is about 426GPa. The PIRAC coatings show adjustable elastic modulus. Elastic modulus of the PIRAC coatings prepared at 750∘C for 24h and that at 800∘C for 8h is about 234 and 293GPa, respectively.

  9. The Importance Of Surface Topography For The Biological Properties Of Nitrided Diffusion Layers Produced On Ti6Al4V Titanium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wierzchoń T.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion nitrided layers produced on titanium and its alloys are widely studied in terms of their application for cardiac and bone implants. The influence of the structure, the phase composition, topography and surface morphology on their biological properties is being investigated. The article presents the results of a study of the topography (nanotopography of the surface of TiN+Ti2N+αTi(N nitrided layers produced in low-temperature plasma on Ti6Al4V titanium alloy and their influence on the adhesion of blood platelets and their aggregates. The TEM microstructure of the produced layers have been examined and it was demonstrated that the interaction between platelets and the surface of the titanium implants subjected to glow-discharge nitriding can be shaped via modification of the roughness parameters of the external layer of the TiN titanium nitride nanocrystalline zone.

  10. High quality superconducting titanium nitride thin film growth using infrared pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgovkin, A.; Chaudhuri, S.; Ruhtinas, A.; Lahtinen, M.; Sajavaara, T.; Maasilta, I. J.

    2018-05-01

    Superconducting titanium nitride (TiN) thin films were deposited on magnesium oxide, sapphire and silicon nitride substrates at 700 °C, using a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique, where infrared (1064 nm) pulses from a solid-state laser were used for the ablation from a titanium target in a nitrogen atmosphere. Structural studies performed with x-ray diffraction showed the best epitaxial crystallinity for films deposited on MgO. In the best films, superconducting transition temperatures, T C, as high as 4.8 K were observed, higher than in most previous superconducting TiN thin films deposited with reactive sputtering. A room temperature resistivity down to ∼17 μΩ cm and residual resistivity ratio up to 3 were observed in the best films, approaching reported single crystal film values, demonstrating that PLD is a good alternative to reactive sputtering for superconducting TiN film deposition. For less than ideal samples, the suppression of the film properties were correlated mostly with the unintended incorporation of oxygen (5–10 at%) in the film, and for high oxygen content films, vacuum annealing was also shown to increase the T C. On the other hand, superconducting properties were surprisingly insensitive to the nitrogen content, with high quality films achieved even in the highly nitrogen rich, Ti:N = 40/60 limit. Measures to limit oxygen exposure during deposition must be taken to guarantee the best superconducting film properties, a fact that needs to be taken into account with other deposition methods, as well.

  11. Structure and hemocompatibility of nanocrystalline titanium nitride produced under glow-discharge conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowińska, Agnieszka; Czarnowska, Elżbieta; Tarnowski, Michał; Witkowska, Justyna; Wierzchoń, Tadeusz

    2018-04-01

    Significant efforts are being made towards developing novel antithrombotic materials. The purpose of the presented study was to characterize two variants of nitrided surface layers produced on alloy Ti-6Al-4V in different areas of low-temperature plasma - at the plasma potential (TiNp) or at the cathode potential (TiNc). The layers were characterized in terms of their microstructure, surface topography and wettability, and platelet response to the environment of different pH. The produced layers were of the TiN + Ti2N + αTiN-type, but the layer produced at the plasma potential was thinner, smoother and had lower surface free energy compared with that produced at the cathode potential. Biological evaluation demonstrated more fibrinogen buildup, less platelet adhesion and aggregation, and fewer strongly activated platelets on the TiNp surface compared with those parameters on the TiNc surface and on the titanium alloy in its initial state. Interestingly, both surface types were significantly resistant to fibrinogen adsorption and platelet adhesion in the environment of lower pH. In conclusion, the nitrided surface layer produced at the plasma potential is a promising material and this basic information is critical for further development of hemocompatible materials.

  12. Comparative study of titanium carbide and nitride coatings grown by cathodic vacuum arc technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devia, D.M.; Restrepo-Parra, E.; Arango, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN), titanium carbide (TiC) thin films and TiC/TiN bilayers have been deposited on AISI 304 stainless steel substrates by plasma assisted physical vapor deposition technique - reactive pulsed vacuum arc method. The coatings were characterized in terms of crystalline structure, microstructure and chemical nature by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. Tribological behavior was investigated using ball on disc technique. The average coefficient of friction was measured, showing lower values for the TiN/TiC bilayer. Dynamic wear curves were performed for each coating, observing a better wear resistance for TiN/TiC bilayers, compared to TiN and TiC monolayers. On the other hand, the TiCN formation in the TiN/TiC bilayer was observed, being attributed to the interdiffusion between TiN and TiC at the interface. Moreover, the substrate temperature influence was analysing observing a good behavior at T S = 115 °C.

  13. Hidroxyapatite Coating on CoCrMo Alloy Titanium Nitride Coated Using Biomimetic Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlena; Sukaryo, S.G.; Fajar, M.

    2016-01-01

    Bone implants is a way to cure broken bones which is being developed. The implants can be made of metals, ceramics and polymers. Metallic materials commonly used are titanium (Ti), stainless steel, and metal alloys. This study used Co-based alloys, i.e. CoCrMo coated with titanium nitride (TiN) which was then coated on hidroxyapatite (HAp). The HAp coating on the surface of CoCrMo alloy was done by biomimetic methods, first by soaking the metal alloys in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution for 18, 24, and 36 hours. The immersion in the SBF solution produced white coat on the surface of the metal alloy. The layers formed were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and characterized by x-ray diffractometer (XRD). Based on the SEM results of 36 hours treatment, the morphology of apatite crystal formed fine grains. According to XRD result, there were HAp peaks at angles 2θ 31.86, 32.25, dan 39.48. However, there were also CaCO 3 peaks at angles 2θ 29.46, 36.04, and 46.79. It indicated the pure HAp is not yet formed. (paper)

  14. Hidroxyapatite Coating on CoCrMo Alloy Titanium Nitride Coated Using Biomimetic Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlena; Sukaryo, S. G.; Fajar, M.

    2016-11-01

    Bone implants is a way to cure broken bones which is being developed. The implants can be made of metals, ceramics and polymers. Metallic materials commonly used are titanium (Ti), stainless steel, and metal alloys. This study used Co-based alloys, i.e. CoCrMo coated with titanium nitride (TiN) which was then coated on hidroxyapatite (HAp). The HAp coating on the surface of CoCrMo alloy was done by biomimetic methods, first by soaking the metal alloys in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution for 18, 24, and 36 hours. The immersion in the SBF solution produced white coat on the surface of the metal alloy. The layers formed were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and characterized by x-ray diffractometer (XRD). Based on the SEM results of 36 hours treatment, the morphology of apatite crystal formed fine grains. According to XRD result, there were HAp peaks at angles 2θ 31.86, 32.25, dan 39.48. However, there were also CaCO3 peaks at angles 2θ 29.46, 36.04, and 46.79. It indicated the pure HAp is not yet formed.

  15. Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) of a customized titanium mesh for prosthetically guided bone regeneration of atrophic maxillary arches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciocca, L; Fantini, M; De Crescenzio, F; Corinaldesi, G; Scotti, R

    2011-11-01

    This study describes a protocol for the direct manufacturing of a customized titanium mesh using CAD-CAM procedures and rapid prototyping to augment maxillary bone and minimize surgery when severe atrophy or post-oncological deformities are present. Titanium mesh and particulate autogenous plus bovine demineralised bone were planned for patient rehabilitation. Bone augmentation planning was performed using the pre-op CT data set in relation to the prosthetic demands, minimizing the bone volume to augment at the minimum necessary for implants. The containment mesh design was used to prototype the 0.6 mm thickness customized titanium mesh, by direct metal laser sintering. The levels of regenerated bone were calculated using the post-op CT data set, through comparison with the pre-op CT data set. The mean vertical height difference of the crestal bone was 2.57 mm, while the mean buccal-palatal dimension of thickness difference was 3.41 mm. All planned implants were positioned after an 8 month healing period using two-step implant surgery, and finally restored with a partial fixed prosthesis. We present a viable and reproducible method to determine the correct bone augmentation prior to implant placement and CAD-CAM to produce a customized direct laser-sintered titanium mesh that can be used for bone regeneration.

  16. Coating of Titanium Nitride on Stainless Steel Targets by a 4 kJ Plasma Focus Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omrani, M.; Habibi, M.; Amrollahi, R.

    2012-08-01

    Titanium nitride thin films were deposited on stainless steel (SS316L) targets by using a 4 kJ plasma focus device. The corresponding energy flux delivered to SS316L surface is estimated to be 2.69 × 1013 kev cm-3 ns-1. X-ray diffraction analysis reveals the formation of a nanocrystalline titanium nitride coating on the surface of targets. Thickness of the elements found on the surface of treated samples which are obtained by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry analysis (RBS) were (×1015 at/cm2) .45% Ti, 50% N and 5% Fe. Scanning electron microscopy was used to indicate changes in surface morphology. Existence of grains in different size confirms the formation of TiN crystals on the surface of targets.

  17. Selective Laser Sintering And Melting Of Pristine Titanium And Titanium Ti6Al4V Alloy Powders And Selection Of Chemical Environment For Etching Of Such Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobrzański L.A.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigations described in this article is to present a selective laser sintering and melting technology to fabricate metallic scaffolds made of pristine titanium and titanium Ti6Al4V alloy powders. Titanium scaffolds with different properties and structure were manufactured with this technique using appropriate conditions, notably laser power and laser beam size. The purpose of such elements is to replace the missing pieces of bones, mainly cranial and facial bones in the implantation treatment process. All the samples for the investigations were designed in CAD/CAM (3D MARCARM ENGINEERING AutoFab (Software for Manufacturing Applications software suitably integrated with an SLS/SLM system. Cube-shaped test samples dimensioned 10×10×10 mm were designed for the investigations using a hexagon-shaped base cell. The so designed 3D models were transferred to the machine software and the actual rapid manufacturing process was commenced. The samples produced according to the laser sintering technology were subjected to chemical processing consisting of etching the scaffolds’ surface in different chemical mediums. Etching was carried out to remove the loosely bound powder from the surface of scaffolds, which might detach from their surface during implantation treatment and travel elsewhere in an organism. The scaffolds created were subjected to micro- and spectroscopic examinations

  18. Fabrication and Physical Properties of Titanium Nitride/Hydroxyapatite Composites on Polyether Ether Ketone by RF Magnetron Sputtering Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nupangtha, W.; Boonyawan, D.

    2017-09-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) coatings have been used very successfully in a variety of applications because of their excellent properties, such as the high hardness meaning good wear resistance and also used for covering medical implants. Hydroxyapatite is a bioactive ceramic that contributes to the restoration of bone tissue, which together with titanium nitride may contribute to obtaining a superior composite in terms of mechanical and bone tissue interaction matters. This paper aims to explain how to optimize deposition conditions for films synthesis on PEEK by varying sputtering parameters such as nitrogen flow rate and direction, deposition time, d-s (target-to-substrate distance) and 13.56 MHz RF power. The plasma conditions used to deposit films were monitored by the optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Titanium nitride/Hydroxyapatite composite films were performed by gas mixture with nitrogen and argon ratio of 1:3 and target-to-substrate distance at 8 cm. The gold colour, as-deposited film was found on PEEK with high hardness and higher surface energy than uncoated PEEK. X-ray diffraction characterization study was carried to study the crystal structural properties of these composites.

  19. Reaction sintering of a clay-containing silicon nitride bonded silicon carbide refractory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swenser, S.P.; Cheng, Y.B.

    1998-01-01

    Aspects of the reaction sequence for the reaction bonding of a cast refractory, which in the green state was composed of 79 wt-% SiC grit, 16 wt-% Si powder and 5 wt-% clay were established. As it was fired up to 1600 deg C in flowing N 2 (g), weight gains were noted and phase evolution was monitored by X-ray diffraction. However, details of the reaction sequence were not determined directly from this material because several reaction-bonding processes occurred simultaneously. Reaction features were ascertained by contrasting the weight changes and phase evolution in the refractory with those observed during reaction-bonding of (a) Si and clay without the SiC and (b) SiC and clay without the Si. In addition to silicon nitridation and the development of sialon phases by silicothermal and carbothermal reduction-nitridation processes, indirect evidence suggested that α-Si 3 N 4 formed by the carbothermal reduction-nitridation (CRN) of SiO(g). Copyright (1998) Australasian Ceramic Society

  20. High performance corrosion and wear resistant composite titanium nitride layers produced on the AZ91D magnesium alloy by a hybrid method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Tacikowski

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Composite, diffusive titanium nitride layers formed on a titanium and aluminum sub-layer were produced on the AZ91D magnesium alloy. The layers were obtained using a hybrid method which combined the PVD processes with the final sealing by a hydrothermal treatment. The microstructure, resistance to corrosion, mechanical damage, and frictional wear of the layers were examined. The properties of the AZ91D alloy covered with these layers were compared with those of the untreated alloy and of some engineering materials such as 316L stainless steel, 100Cr6 bearing steel, and the AZ91D alloy subjected to commercial anodizing. It has been found that the composite diffusive nitride layer produced on the AZ91D alloy and then sealed by the hydrothermal treatment ensures the corrosion resistance comparable with that of 316L stainless steel. The layers are characterized by higher electrochemical durability which is due to the surface being overbuilt with the titanium oxides formed, as shown by the XPS examinations, from titanium nitride during the hydrothermal treatment. The composite titanium nitride layers exhibit high resistance to mechanical damage and wear, including frictional wear which is comparable with that of 100Cr6 bearing steel. The performance properties of the AZ91D magnesium alloy covered with the composite titanium nitride coating are substantially superior to those of the alloy subjected to commercial anodizing which is the dominant technique employed in industrial practice.

  1. Methodological approach of load sintering of ceramics (superconductor, alumina, alumina-aluminium nitride-magnesia system)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, J.F.

    1993-05-01

    Sintering parameters knowledge of ceramic powders by improvements of a high temperature pressing (computer piloting and data acquiring) allow a better control of fabrication and of the desired properties (mechanical, electro-magnetic...). By using experiences plan, maximum of informations are obtained with a minimum of experimental tests. This is applied to the sintering of three compounds; for YBaCuO, the superconductive phase is obtained at 450 deg and without post heat treatment; for Al 2 O 3 , mechanical properties and a partial microstructure controls are obtained; for the Al 2 O 3 -AlN-MgO system, an optimization of the mechanical properties is obtained. (A.B.). 63 refs., figs., tabs

  2. Hot-pressed silicon nitride with various lanthanide oxides as sintering additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, K.; Toibana, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of addition of various lanthanide oxides and their mixture with Y2O3 on the sintering of Si3N4 were investigated. The addition of simple and mixed lanthanide oxides promoted the densification of Si3N4 in hot-pressing at 1800 C under 300-400kg/ centimeters squared for 60 min. The crystallization of yttrium and lanthanide-silicon oxynitrides which was observed inn the sintered body containing yttrium-lanthanide mixed oxides as additives led to the formation of a highly refractory Si3N4 ceramic having a bending strength of 82 and 84 kg/millimeters squared at room temperature and 1300 C respectively. In a Y2O3+La2O3 system, a higher molar ratio of La2O3 to Y2O3 gave a higher hardness and strength at high temperatures. It was found that 90 min was an optimum sintering time for the highest strength.

  3. Effect of titanium nitride coating on physical properties of three-dimensional graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabir, Fatemeh, E-mail: f.dabir@modares.ac.ir [Materials Eng. Department, Tarbiat Modares University, 1411713116, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sarraf-Mamoory, Rasoul, E-mail: rsarrafm@modares.ac.ir [Materials Eng. Department, Tarbiat Modares University, 1411713116, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Loeblein, Manuela, E-mail: manuela001@e.ntu.edu.sg [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 639798 (Singapore); CINTRA CNRS/NTU/THALES, UMI 3288, Research Techno Plaza, 50 Nanyang Drive, 637553 (Singapore); Tsang, Siu Hon, E-mail: shtsang@ntu.edu.sg [CINTRA CNRS/NTU/THALES, UMI 3288, Research Techno Plaza, 50 Nanyang Drive, 637553 (Singapore); Teo, Edwin Hang Tong, E-mail: htteo@ntu.edu.sg [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 639798 (Singapore)

    2015-11-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • TiN was coated on 3D graphene by chemical method, followed by annealing at NH{sub 3}. • Effect of TiN coating on physical properties of 3DG was investigated. • TiN coating modified surface properties of 3DG, while retaining its skeleton. • Average number of graphene layers increased after annealing of 3DG at NH{sub 3}. • Annealing of 3DG at NH{sub 3} resulted in locally nitrogen doping. - Abstract: In this paper, titanium nitride (TiN) was applied on the surface and into the porous structure of three-dimensional graphene (3DG) by chemical method. This method consists of immersing 3DG into a solution containing Ti ions and annealing under ammonia atmosphere at 850 °C. The effects of TiN coating and high temperature annealing under NH{sub 3} on the physical properties of 3DG were investigated. For this purpose, the 3DG samples, with and without TiN coating, were characterized via XRD, SEM, XPS, and Raman spectroscopy. Then, the electrical resistivity, work function, and wettability of samples were determined by Van der Pauw method, contact angle meter, and UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), respectively. The results showed that an almost pure and very crystalline TiN phase with titanium/nitrogen atomic ratio of 1.09 was formed on the 3DG network. Annealing of 3DG under NH{sub 3} resulted in locally doping of graphene with nitrogen and generation of defects in its structure. After TiN coating, the work function value of 3DG (5 eV) was reduced to 4.68 eV, while its initial water contact angle decreased from 127° to 83°.

  4. Influence of aluminium nitride as a foaming agent on the preparation of foam glass-ceramics from high-titanium blast furnace slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Huan; Feng, Ke-qin; Wang, Hai-bo; Chen, Chang-hong; Zhou, Hong-ling

    2016-05-01

    To effectively reuse high-titanium blast furnace slag (TS), foam glass-ceramics were successfully prepared by powder sintering at 1000°C. TS and waste glass were used as the main raw materials, aluminium nitride (AlN) as the foaming agent, and borax as the fluxing agent. The influence of the amount of AlN added (1wt%-5wt%) on the crystalline phases, microstructure, and properties of the produced foam glass-ceramics was studied. The results showed that the main crystal phases were perovskite, diopside, and augite. With increasing AlN content, a transformation from diopside to augite occurred and the crystallinity of the pyroxene phases slightly decreased. Initially, the average pore size and porosity of the foam glass-ceramics increased and subsequently decreased; similarly, their bulk density and compressive strength decreased and subsequently increased. The optimal properties were obtained when the foam glass-ceramics were prepared by adding 4wt% AlN.

  5. Chiro-plasmonic refractory metamaterial with titanium nitride (TiN) core–shell nanohelices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataramanababu, Sruthi; Nair, Greshma; Deshpande, Preeti; A, Jithin M.; Mohan, Sangeneni; Ghosh, Ambarish

    2018-06-01

    Chiral metamaterials are obtained by assembling plasmonic elements in geometries with broken mirror symmetry, which can have promising applications pertaining to generation, manipulation and detection of optical polarisation. The materials used to fabricate this promising nanosystem, especially in the visible–NIR regime, are limited to noble metals such as Au and Ag. However, they are not stable at elevated temperatures and in addition, incompatible with CMOS technologies. We demonstrate that it is possible to develop a chiro-plasmonic system based on a refractory material such as titanium nitride (TiN) which does not have these disadvantages. The building block of our metamaterial is a novel core–shell helix, obtained by coating TiN over silica nanohelices. These were arranged in a regular two-dimensional array over cm-scale areas, made possible by the use of scalable fabrication techniques such as laser interference lithography, glancing angle deposition and DC magnetron sputtering. The measured chiro-optical response was extremely broadband (1400 nm), and had contributions from individual, as well as collective plasmon modes of the interacting nanohelices, whose spectral characteristics could be easily controlled by varying the direction of the incident radiation.

  6. Selective ablation of a titanium nitride film on tungsten carbide substrate using ultrashort laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Eduardo Spinelli

    2017-01-01

    Surface coatings are applied to many cutting tools in the metallurgical industry in order to improve cutting efficiency and extend its useful life. In this work, tests were performed to remove the coating of titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN) on tungsten carbide (WC-Co) pellets, using an ultrashort laser pulses beam. After determination of the damage thresholds of the film and the substrate, were ablated on the surface of the coating lines using two ablation conditions, it was initially operated on the low fluence regime for the film, and later on the low fluence regime of the substrate, far below the threshold of the film, applying high overlapping pulses. A laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system was set up to monitor the materials present in the plasma generated by the laser, but the system did not present sufficient sensitivity to read the low intensity of the plasma generated in the process and was not used. After the analysis of the traces by electron microscopy, optical profilometer and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, it was not possible to determine a safe process to carry out the selective removal of the film in question, however, due to the data obtained and observations of the results in some traces, new possibilities were raised, opening the discussion for future work. (author)

  7. Preparation of Titanium nitride nanomaterials for electrode and application in energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shun; Cheng, Qi; Zhao, Jinxing; Liang, Jiyuan; Liu, Chang; Lan, Qian; Cao, Yuan-Cheng; Liu, Jiyan

    The Titanium nitride was made by the carbamide and titanic chloride precursors. XRD results indicate that the precursor ratio N:Ti 3:1 leads to higher crystallinity. SEM and EDX demonstrated that Ti and N elements were distributed uniformly with the ratio of 1:1. The TiN used as the electrode material for supercapacitor was also studied. The specific capacities were changed from 407 F.g-1 to 385 F.g-1, 364 F.g-1 and 312 F.g-1, when the current densities were changed from 1 A.g-1 to 2 A.g-1, 5 A.g-1 and 10 A.g-1, respectively. Chronopotentiometry tests showed high coulombic efficiency. Cycling performance of the TiN electrode was evaluated by CV at a scanning rate of 50 mV.s-1 for 20,000 cycles and there was about 9.8% loss. These results indicate that TiN is a promising electrode material for the supercapacitors.

  8. Low-loss and tunable near-zero-epsilon titanium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, M.; Novaković, M.; Schmidt, E.; Schöppe, P.; Bibić, N.; Ronning, C.; Rakočević, Z.

    2017-10-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) has emerged as alternative plasmonic material in the visible and near-infrared spectral range due to its metallic properties. We studied the influence of silver ion implantation (fluence range from 0.5 × 1016-6 × 1016 ions/cm2) on the structural and optical properties of reactively sputtered 260 nm thick TiN films. The columnar structure was partially destroyed by the irradiation and up to 5 at.% of Ag was incorporated into the films within the projected ion range. The formation of cubic Ag nanoparticles with size of 1-2 nm was observed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and subsequent fast Fourier transform analysis. This presence of Ag within the TiN matrix drastically changes both the real and imaginary component of the dielectric function and provides low optical losses. A Drude Lorentz dielectric analysis based on free electron and oscillator model are carried out to describe the silver influence on the optical behavior of TiN. With increasing ion fluence, the unscreened plasma frequency decreased and broadening increased. The energy, strength and broadening of the interband transitions were studied with respect to the silver ion fluence and correlated with the microstructural changes induced in TiN films.

  9. Deposition of titanium nitride on Si(1 0 0) wafers using plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, Tousif; Ahmad, R.; Khan, I.A.; Siddiqui, Jamil; Khalid, Nida; Bhatti, Arshad Saleem; Naseem, Shahzad

    2009-01-01

    Titanium nitride thin films were deposited on Si(1 0 0) substrates by using a low energy (2.3 KJ) Mather-type plasma focus device. The composition of the deposited films was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The crystallite size has strong dependence on the numbers of focus shots. The crystallinity of TiN thin films is found to increase with increasing the number of focus shots. The effect of different number of focus shots on micro structural changes of thin films was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). SEM results showed net-like structure for film deposited for 15 numbers of shots, which are elongated grains of Si 3 N 4 in amorphous form embedded into TiN crystals. The average surface roughness was calculated from AFM images of the thin films. These results indicated that the average surface roughness increased for films deposited with increased number of focus shots. The least crystallite size and roughness are observed for film deposited with 25 focus shots.

  10. Impedance study on the corrosion of PVD and CVD titanium nitride coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsener, B.; Rota, A.; Boehni, H.

    1989-01-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) coatings, produced by physical (PVD) or chemical (CVD) vapor deposition techniques are used routinely to improve the wear and corrosion resistance of a surface. The main problem in using TiN as a protective coating in aggressive environements are pores and pinholes in the coating where the substrate is exposed to the electrolyte. In this work, the electrochemical and corrosion behaviour of TiN films on quartz glass, carbon steel, 304 and 316 stainless steel is studied by polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in hydrochloric acid. It is shown that the TiN coating can be used successfully only on substrates that passivate easily. On mild steel rapid corrosion takes place at pores in the coating due to the very noble steady state potential of the TiN coating. The interaction of the metallic substrate with the TiN coating is discussed for the two limiting cases mild steel (active) and 316SS (passive). It is shown that the determination of the coating porosity is possible for the active substrate only. On the passive substrate the occurence of an additional time constant in the high frequency region of the spectrum qualitatively indicates the presence of pores. A quality control of the coatings based on this fact might be possible. (author) 15 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Simulated radiation effects in the superinsulating phase of titanium nitride films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujisić Miloš Lj.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates possible effects of alpha particle and ion beam irradiation on the properties of the superinsulating phase, recently observed in titanium nitride films, by using numerical simulation of particle transport. Unique physical properties of the superinsulating state are considered by relying on a two-dimensional Josephson junction array as a model of material structure. It is suggested that radiation-induced change of the Josephson junction charging energy would not affect the current-voltage characteristics of the superinsulating film significantly. However, it is theorized that a relapse to an insulating state with thermally activated resistance is possible, due to radiation-induced disruption of the fine-tuned granular structure. The breaking of Cooper pairs caused by incident and displaced ions may also destroy the conditions for a superinsulating phase to exist. Finally, even the energy loss to phonons can influence the superinsulating state, by increasing the effective temperature of the phonon thermostat, thereby reestablishing means for an energy exchange that can support Cooper pair tunneling.

  12. Production and characterization of a novel carbon nanotube/titanium nitride nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddour, Carole Emilie; Das, Kaushik; Vengallatore, Srikar; Meunier, Jean-Luc

    2016-12-01

    A novel titanium nitride (TiN)/carbon nanotube (CNT) nanocomposite is produced with the purpose to mechanically, structurally and chemically stabilize a ‘felt-like’ CNT growth structure. The CNTs are grown on stainless steel (SS) 304 by chemical vapor deposition using the direct growth method previously developed, which does not require the use of an additional catalyst precursor. The TiN coating is achieved by physical vapor deposition and is shown here to generate a nanocomposite with a porous three-dimensional architecture. The contact stiffness is evaluated using nanoindentation, and wetting properties of the TiN/CNT nanocomposites are determined from contact angle measurements. An increase in contact stiffness and effective elastic modulus with TiN coating time was observed. The TiN coating on the non-wetting CNT felt results in a wetting nanocomposite surface. The wetting property is found to be a function of the TiN coating thickness on the CNT structure.

  13. The effects of composition and firing cycle on sintering of aluminium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewett, C.; Trigg, M.B.

    1992-01-01

    A central composite design was used to evaluate the relative effects of temperature, time and Y 2 O 3 content on the densification behaviour of a commercial aluminium nitride (AIN). Over the range of the independent variables studied, temperature was found to exert the dominate influence. Low levels of Y 2 O 3 were found to be effective for the densification of AIN. After firing, cubic 3Y 2 O 3.5 Al 2O3 (YAG) was detected for the lower levels of Y 2 O 3 addition. At the higher levels both YAG and 2Y 2 O 3 .Al 2 O 3 were detected. For a dense sample the values obtained for hardness and fracture toughness were comparable to those reported in the literature. 11 refs., 1 tab

  14. Relative SHG measurements of metal thin films: Gold, silver, aluminum, cobalt, chromium, germanium, nickel, antimony, titanium, titanium nitride, tungsten, zinc, silicon and indium tin oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin Che

    Full Text Available We have experimentally measured the surface second-harmonic generation (SHG of sputtered gold, silver, aluminum, zinc, tungsten, copper, titanium, cobalt, nickel, chromium, germanium, antimony, titanium nitride, silicon and indium tin oxide thin films. The second-harmonic response was measured in reflection using a 150 fs p-polarized laser pulse at 1561 nm. We present a clear comparison of the SHG intensity of these films relative to each other. Our measured relative intensities compare favorably with the relative intensities of metals with published data. We also report for the first time to our knowledge the surface SHG intensity of tungsten and antimony relative to that of well known metallic thin films such as gold and silver. Keywords: Surface second-harmonic generation, Nonlinear optics, Metal thin films

  15. Ternary nanocomposite of polyaniline/manganese dioxide/titanium nitride nanowire array for supercapacitor electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Chi; Xie, Yibing; Du, Hongxiu; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The electroactive polyaniline (PANI) and manganese oxide (MnO 2 ) were integrated with titanium nitride (TiN) nanowire array (NWA) to form PANI/MnO 2 /TiN ternary nanocomposite for supercapacitor application. TiN NWA was prepared via a seed-assisted hydrothermal synthesis and ammonia nitridization process. The electroactive MnO 2 and PANI was layer-by-layer coated on TiN NWA to form heterogeneous coaxial structure through a stepwise electrodeposition process. Scanning electron micrographs revealed that the well-separated TiN NWA was composed of well-distributed nanowires with diameters in the range of 10–30 nm and a total length of 1.5 μm. A villiform MnO 2 layer with a thickness of 10–20 nm covered on TiN NWA to form MnO 2 /TiN NWA composite. The coral-like PANI layer with thicknesses in the range of 20–50 nm covered on the above MnO 2 /TiN NWA to form PANI/MnO 2 /TiN NWA. Electrochemical measurements showed that a high specific capacitance of 674 F g −1 at a current density of 1 A g −1 (based on total mass of PANI/MnO 2 ) was obtained for PANI/MnO 2 /TiN NWA ternary nanocomposite, which was much higher than that of PANI/MnO 2 /carbon-cloth composites reported previously. This ternary nanocomposite also showed a good rate and cycling stability. Moreover, in comparison with PANI/TiN NWA or MnO 2 /TiN NWA, the specific capacitance of PANI/MnO 2 /TiN NWA was obviously enhanced due to the extra pseudocapacitance contribution and the effective surface area of coral-like PANI layer, showing the advantage of manipulating the heterogeneous coaxial configuration between PANI and MnO 2 for fundamentally improved capacitive performance. These results demonstrated that PANI/MnO 2 /TiN NWA ternary nanocomposite was a promising candidate electrode material for supercapacitor application

  16. Ternary nanocomposite of polyaniline/manganese dioxide/titanium nitride nanowire array for supercapacitor electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Chi; Xie, Yibing, E-mail: ybxie@seu.edu.cn; Du, Hongxiu; Wang, Wei [Southeast University, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China)

    2015-01-15

    The electroactive polyaniline (PANI) and manganese oxide (MnO{sub 2}) were integrated with titanium nitride (TiN) nanowire array (NWA) to form PANI/MnO{sub 2}/TiN ternary nanocomposite for supercapacitor application. TiN NWA was prepared via a seed-assisted hydrothermal synthesis and ammonia nitridization process. The electroactive MnO{sub 2} and PANI was layer-by-layer coated on TiN NWA to form heterogeneous coaxial structure through a stepwise electrodeposition process. Scanning electron micrographs revealed that the well-separated TiN NWA was composed of well-distributed nanowires with diameters in the range of 10–30 nm and a total length of 1.5 μm. A villiform MnO{sub 2} layer with a thickness of 10–20 nm covered on TiN NWA to form MnO{sub 2}/TiN NWA composite. The coral-like PANI layer with thicknesses in the range of 20–50 nm covered on the above MnO{sub 2}/TiN NWA to form PANI/MnO{sub 2}/TiN NWA. Electrochemical measurements showed that a high specific capacitance of 674 F g{sup −1} at a current density of 1 A g{sup −1} (based on total mass of PANI/MnO{sub 2}) was obtained for PANI/MnO{sub 2}/TiN NWA ternary nanocomposite, which was much higher than that of PANI/MnO{sub 2}/carbon-cloth composites reported previously. This ternary nanocomposite also showed a good rate and cycling stability. Moreover, in comparison with PANI/TiN NWA or MnO{sub 2}/TiN NWA, the specific capacitance of PANI/MnO{sub 2}/TiN NWA was obviously enhanced due to the extra pseudocapacitance contribution and the effective surface area of coral-like PANI layer, showing the advantage of manipulating the heterogeneous coaxial configuration between PANI and MnO{sub 2} for fundamentally improved capacitive performance. These results demonstrated that PANI/MnO{sub 2}/TiN NWA ternary nanocomposite was a promising candidate electrode material for supercapacitor application.

  17. Establishing Antibacterial Multilayer Films on the Surface of Direct Metal Laser Sintered Titanium Primed with Phase-Transited Lysozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Binbin; Wang, Haorong; Xu, Ruiqing; Zheng, Guoying; Yang, Jie; Liu, Zihao; Cao, Man; Wu, Mingyao; Song, Jinhua; Li, Neng; Li, Ting; Cai, Qing; Yang, Xiaoping; Li, Yanqiu; Zhang, Xu

    2016-11-01

    Direct metal laser sintering is a technology that allows the fabrication of titanium (Ti) implants with a functional gradation of porosity and surface roughness according to three-dimensional (3D) computer data. The surface roughness of direct metal laser sintered titanium (DMLS-Ti) implants may provide abundant binding sites for bacteria. Bacterial colonization and subsequent biofilm formation can cause unsatisfactory cell adhesion and implant-related infections. To prevent such infections, a novel phase-transited lysozyme (PTL) was utilized as an initial functional layer to simply and effectively prime DMLS-Ti surfaces for subsequent coating with antibacterial multilayers. The purpose of the present study was to establish a surface with dual biological functionality. The minocycline-loaded polyelectrolyte multilayers of hyaluronic acid (HA) and chitosan (CS) formed via a layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly technique on PTL-functionalized DMLS-Ti were designed to inhibit pathogenic microbial infections while allowing the DMLS-Ti itself and the modified coatings to retain acceptable biocompatibility. The experimental results indicate that the DMLS-Ti and the hydrogel treated surfaces can inhibit early bacterial adhesion while completely preserving osteoblast functions. This design is expected to gain considerable interest in the medical field and to have good potential for applications in multifunctional DMLS-Ti implants.

  18. Electrical conductivity of titanium pyrophosphate between 100 and 400 °C: effect of sintering temperature and phosphorus content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lapina, Alberto; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Hallinder, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of titanium pyrophosphate is carried out, and the material is sintered at different temperatures between 370 and 970 °C. Yttrium is added during the synthesis to act as acceptor dopant, but it is mainly present in the material in secondary phases. The conductivity is studied systema...... at 300–390 °C. Slow loss of phosphorus by evaporation over time and changes in the distribution of the amorphous phase during testing are suggested as causes of conductivity degradation above 220 °C.......The synthesis of titanium pyrophosphate is carried out, and the material is sintered at different temperatures between 370 and 970 °C. Yttrium is added during the synthesis to act as acceptor dopant, but it is mainly present in the material in secondary phases. The conductivity is studied...... to an amorphous secondary phase at the grain boundaries, associated with the presence of excess phosphorus in the samples. A contribution to the conductivity by point defects in the bulk may explain the conductivity trend in dry air and the difference in conductivity between oxidizing and reducing atmospheres...

  19. Establishing Antibacterial Multilayer Films on the Surface of Direct Metal Laser Sintered Titanium Primed with Phase-Transited Lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Binbin; Wang, Haorong; Xu, Ruiqing; Zheng, Guoying; Yang, Jie; Liu, Zihao; Cao, Man; Wu, Mingyao; Song, Jinhua; Li, Neng; Li, Ting; Cai, Qing; Yang, Xiaoping; Li, Yanqiu; Zhang, Xu

    2016-11-08

    Direct metal laser sintering is a technology that allows the fabrication of titanium (Ti) implants with a functional gradation of porosity and surface roughness according to three-dimensional (3D) computer data. The surface roughness of direct metal laser sintered titanium (DMLS-Ti) implants may provide abundant binding sites for bacteria. Bacterial colonization and subsequent biofilm formation can cause unsatisfactory cell adhesion and implant-related infections. To prevent such infections, a novel phase-transited lysozyme (PTL) was utilized as an initial functional layer to simply and effectively prime DMLS-Ti surfaces for subsequent coating with antibacterial multilayers. The purpose of the present study was to establish a surface with dual biological functionality. The minocycline-loaded polyelectrolyte multilayers of hyaluronic acid (HA) and chitosan (CS) formed via a layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly technique on PTL-functionalized DMLS-Ti were designed to inhibit pathogenic microbial infections while allowing the DMLS-Ti itself and the modified coatings to retain acceptable biocompatibility. The experimental results indicate that the DMLS-Ti and the hydrogel treated surfaces can inhibit early bacterial adhesion while completely preserving osteoblast functions. This design is expected to gain considerable interest in the medical field and to have good potential for applications in multifunctional DMLS-Ti implants.

  20. Electronic and optical properties of titanium nitride bulk and surfaces from first principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmood, Faisal; Pachter, Ruth; Murphy, Neil R.; Johnson, Walter E.

    2015-11-01

    Prediction of the frequency-dependent dielectric function of thin films poses computational challenges, and at the same time experimental characterization by spectroscopic ellipsometry remains difficult to interpret because of changes in stoichiometry and surface morphology, temperature, thickness of the film, or substrate. In this work, we report calculations for titanium nitride (TiN), a promising material for plasmonic applications because of less loss and other practical advantages compared to noble metals. We investigated structural, electronic, and optical properties of stoichiometric bulk TiN, as well as of the TiN(100), TiN(110), and TiN(111) outermost surfaces. Density functional theory (DFT) and many-body GW methods (Green's (G) function-based approximation with screened Coulomb interaction (W)) were used, ranging from G0W0, GW0 to partially self-consistent sc-GW0, as well as the GW-BSE (Bethe-Salpeter equation) and time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) methods for prediction of the optical properties. Structural parameters and the band structure for bulk TiN were shown to be consistent with previous work. Calculated dielectric functions, plasma frequencies, reflectivity, and the electron energy loss spectrum demonstrated consistency with experiment at the GW0-BSE level. Deviations from experimental data are expected due to varying experimental conditions. Comparison of our results to spectroscopic ellipsometry data for realistic nanostructures has shown that although TDDFT may provide a computationally feasible level of theory in evaluation of the dielectric function, application is subject to validation with GW-BSE calculations.

  1. Electronic and optical properties of titanium nitride bulk and surfaces from first principles calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehmood, Faisal; Pachter, Ruth; Murphy, Neil R.; Johnson, Walter E.

    2015-01-01

    Prediction of the frequency-dependent dielectric function of thin films poses computational challenges, and at the same time experimental characterization by spectroscopic ellipsometry remains difficult to interpret because of changes in stoichiometry and surface morphology, temperature, thickness of the film, or substrate. In this work, we report calculations for titanium nitride (TiN), a promising material for plasmonic applications because of less loss and other practical advantages compared to noble metals. We investigated structural, electronic, and optical properties of stoichiometric bulk TiN, as well as of the TiN(100), TiN(110), and TiN(111) outermost surfaces. Density functional theory (DFT) and many-body GW methods (Green's (G) function-based approximation with screened Coulomb interaction (W)) were used, ranging from G 0 W 0 , GW 0 to partially self-consistent sc-GW 0 , as well as the GW-BSE (Bethe-Salpeter equation) and time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) methods for prediction of the optical properties. Structural parameters and the band structure for bulk TiN were shown to be consistent with previous work. Calculated dielectric functions, plasma frequencies, reflectivity, and the electron energy loss spectrum demonstrated consistency with experiment at the GW 0 -BSE level. Deviations from experimental data are expected due to varying experimental conditions. Comparison of our results to spectroscopic ellipsometry data for realistic nanostructures has shown that although TDDFT may provide a computationally feasible level of theory in evaluation of the dielectric function, application is subject to validation with GW-BSE calculations

  2. Erosion resistance of composite materials on titanium, zirconium and aluminium nitride base under the electron beam effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verkhoturov, A.D.; Kuzenkova, M.A.; Slutskin, M.G.; Kravchuk, L.A.

    1977-01-01

    Erosion resistance of composites based on nitrides of titanium, zirconium and aluminium to spark and electron beam processing has been studied. The erosion resistance in spark processing is shown to depend on specific electric resistance of the alloys. TiN-AlN and ZrN-AlN alloys containing more than 70% AlN (with specific electric resistance more than 10 6 -10 7 ohm/cm) caot be processed by spark method. It is shown that erosion of the composites by an electron beam depends primarily on the rate of evaporation of the components

  3. Residual stress in ion implanted titanium nitride studied by parallel beam glancing incidence x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geist, D.E.; Perry, A.J.; Treglio, J.R.; Valvoda, V.; Rafaja, D.

    1995-01-01

    Ion implantation is known to increase the lifetime of cutting tools. Current theories are the increase in lifetime is caused by an increase in the residual stress, or by work hardening of the surface associated with the implantation. In this work the effect of ion implantation on the residual stress in titanium nitride coatings made by the standard industrial methods of chemical and physical vapor deposition (CVD and PVD) is studied. It is found in the as-received condition (unimplanted), the residual stress levels are near zero for CVD materials and highly compressive, of the order of 6 GPa, for PVD materials. Ion implantation has no effect on the residual stress in the coatings made by CVD. Nitrogen does increase the compressive residual stress by some 10% in the near surface regions of PVD coatings, while nickel-titanium dual metal ion implantation does not have any effect. It appears that the lifetime increase is not associated with residual stress effects

  4. A novel anti-frictional multiphase layer produced by plasma nitriding of PVD titanium coated ZL205A aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, C.; Yao, J. W.; Wang, Y. X.; Zhu, Y. D.; Guo, J. H.; Wang, Y.; Fu, H. Y.; Chen, Z. B.; Yan, M. F.

    2018-02-01

    The heat treatment (consisting of solid solution and aging), is integrated with the nitriding process of titanium coated ZL205A aluminum alloy to improve the surface and matrix mechanical properties simultaneously. Two-step duplex treatment is adopted to prepare the gradient multiphase layer on a magnesium-free ZL205A aluminum-copper based alloy. Firstly, pure titanium film is deposited on the aluminum alloy substrate using magnetron sputtering. Secondly, the Ti-coated specimen is nitrided at the solid solution temperature of the substrate alloying elements in a gas mixture of N2 and H2 and aged at 175 °C. The microstructure evolution, microhardness as well as the wear resistance of obtained multiphase layers are investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS), microhardness tester and pin-on-disc tribometer. The multiphase layer, dominated by TiN0.3 or Al3Ti, is prepared with significantly increased layer depth after duplex treatment. The surface hardness of multiphase layer is remarkably improved from 23.7HV to 457HV. The core matrix hardness is also increased to 65HV after aging. The wear rate of the multiphase layer decreases about 55.22% and 49.28% in comparison with the aged and Ti coated specimens, respectively. The predominant wear mechanism for the multiphase layer is abrasive and oxidation, but severe adhesive wear for the aged and Ti coated specimens.

  5. Effects of hexagonal boron nitride and sintering temperature on mechanical and tribological properties of SS316L/h-BN composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahathanabodee, S.; Palathai, T.; Raadnui, S.; Tongsri, R.; Sombatsompop, N.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► 20 vol% h-BN in stainless steel gave the lowest friction coefficient. ► Sintering temperature of 1200 °C was recommended for optimum friction coefficient. ► h-BN in stainless steel transformed to a boride liquid phase at 1250 °C. - Abstract: In this work, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN)-embedded 316L stainless steel (SS316L/h-BN) composites were prepared using a conventional powder metallurgy process. In order to produce self-lubricating composites, various amounts of h-BN (10, 15 and 20 vol%) were incorporated. Effects of h-BN content and sintering temperature on the mechanical and tribological properties were of primary interest. The results suggested that an increase in h-BN content reduced the hardness of the composites, but that the hardness could be improved by increasing the sintering temperature. Addition of h-BN up to 20 vol% improved the friction coefficient of the composites. At a sintering temperature of 1250 °C, h-BN transformed into a boride liquid phase, which formed a eutectic during cooling and exhibited a deterioration effect on lubricating film formation of the h-BN, resulting in an increase in the friction coefficient of the composites. The specific wear rate was greatly reduced when the composites were sintered at 1200 °C. The lowest friction coefficient and specific wear rate in the composites could be found under the experimental conditions used in this work when using 20 vol% of h-BN at a sintering temperature of 1200 °C

  6. Non-carbon titanium cobalt nitride nanotubes supported platinum catalyst with high activity and durability for methanol oxidation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoxiang; Li, Wuyi; Pan, Zhanchang; Xu, Yanbin; Liu, Gen; Hu, Guanghui; Wu, Shoukun; Li, Jinghong; Chen, Chun; Lin, Yingsheng

    2018-05-01

    Titanium cobalt nitride nanotubes (Ti0.95Co0.05N NTs) hybrid support, a novel robust non-carbon support material prepared by solvothermal and post-nitriding processes, is further decorated with Pt nanoparticles for the electrooxidation of methanol. The catalyst is characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption/desorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrochemical measurements. The morphology, structure and composition of the synthesized Ti0.95Co0.05N NTs suggest that the nanotube wall is porous and consists of homogeneous cohesively attached nitrides nanocube particles. Notable, Ti0.95Co0.05N NTs supported Pt catalyst exhibits significantly improved catalytic activity and durability for methanol electrooxidation compared with the conventional JM Pt/C catalyst. The experimental data indicate that enhanced catalytic activity and stability of Pt/Ti0.95Co0.05N NTs towards methanol electrooxidation might be mainly attributed to the tubular nanostructures and synergistic effect introduced by the Co doping. Both of them are playing an important role in improving the activity and durability of the Ti0.95Co0.05N NTs catalyst.

  7. [Effect of niobium nitride on the bonding strength of titanium porcelain by magnetron sputtering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-shu; Zhang, La-bao; Guang, Han-bing; Zhou, Shu; Zhang, Fei-min

    2010-05-01

    To investigate the effect of magnetron sputtered niobium nitride (NbN) on the bonding strength of commercially pure cast titanium (Ti) and low-fusing porcelain (Ti/Vita titankeramik system). Sixty Ti specimens were randomly divided into four groups, group T1, T2, T3 and T4. All specimens of group T1 and T2 were first treated with 120 microm blasted Al2O3 particles, and then only specimens of group T2 were treated with magnetron sputtered NbN film. All specimens of group T3 and T4 were first treated with magnetron sputtered NbN film and then only specimens of group T4 were treated with 120 microm blasted Al2O3 particles. The composition of the deposits were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). A universal testing machine was used to perform the three-point bending test to evaluate the bonding strength of Ti and porcelain. The microstructure of NbN, the interface of Ti-porcelain and the fractured Ti surface were observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy depressive spectrum (EDS), and the results were compared. The XRD results showed that the NbN deposits were cubic crystalline phases. The bonding strength of Ti and porcelain in T1 to T4 group were (27.2+/-0.8), (43.1+/-0.6), (31.4+/-1.0) and (44.9+/-0.6) MPa. These results were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and differences between groups were compared using least significant difference test. Significant inter-group differences were found among all groups (Pporcelain, while samples treated with both Al2O3 and NbN had better bond. EDS of Ti-porcelain interface showed oxidation occurred in T1, T2 and T3, but was well controlled in T4. Magnetron sputtered NbN can prevent Ti from being oxidized, and can improve the bonding strength of Ti/Vita titankeramik system. Al2O3 blast can also improve the bonding strength of Ti/Vita titankeramik system.

  8. Differences in proliferation, differentiation, and cytokine production by bone cells seeded on titanium-nitride and cobalt-chromium-molybdenum surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hove, R.P.; Nolte, P.A.; Semeins, C.M.; Klein-Nulend, J.

    2013-01-01

    Titanium-nitride coating is used to improve cobalt-chromium-molybdenum implant survival in total knee arthroplasty, but its effect on osteoconduction is unknown. Chromium and cobalt ions negatively affect the growth and metabolism of cultured osteoblasts while enhancing osteoclastogenic cytokine

  9. [Experimental study on the corrosion behavior of a type of oral near β-type titanium alloys modified with double glow plasma nitriding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ke; Li, Fenglan

    2015-12-01

    To study the electrochemical corrosion performance of a type of biomedical materials near beta titanium alloy(Ti-3Zr-2Sn-3Mo-25Nb, TLM) in artificial saliva before and after nitride changing, and to provide clinical basis for clinical application of titanium alloy TLM. The double glow plasma alloying technology was used to nitride the surface of titanium alloy TLM. The surface properties of the modified layer were observed and tested by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, glow discharge spectrum analyzer, X-ray diffraction and micro hardness tester. Then, electrochemical measurement system was used to test and compare titanium alloy TLM's electrochemical corrosion in artificial saliva before and after its surface change. Finally, the surface morphology of the original titanium alloy and the modified layer was compared by scanning electron microscope. By the technology of double glow plasma nitriding, the surface of the titanium alloy TLM had been successfully nitrided with a modified layer of 4-5 µm in thickness, uniform and compact. Its main compositions were Ti and Ti(2)N. The Microhardness of modified layer also had been improved from (236.8 ± 5.4) to (871.8 ± 5.2) HV. The self-corrosion potential in electrochemical corrosion tests had been increased from -0.559 V to -0.540 V, while the self- corrosion current density had been reduced from 2.091 × 10(-7) A/cm(2) to 7.188 × 10(-8) A/cm(2). Besides, alternating-current impedance(AC Impedance) had also been increased. With the scanning electron microscope, it's obvious that the diameter of corrosion holes on modified layer were approximately 10 µm. As to the diameter and number of corrosion holes on modified layer, they had been decreased comparing with the original titanium alloy. The type of near beta titanium alloy TLM can construct a nitriding modified layer on its surface. Meanwhile, the performance of its anti- corrosion in artificial saliva has been improved, comparing to the original

  10. Effect of carbon and titanium carbide on sintering behaviour of zirconium diboride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, S.K.; Pathak, L.C.

    2008-01-01

    Systematic sintering studies on the ZrB 2 powder were carried out with the addition of carbon (C) in the range of 0 2 . The addition of C also found to inhibit the grain size and fine grained ZrB 2 -C composite could be obtained with high densification. The increased densification with the C addition was due to removal of oxygen impurities on the ZrB 2 powder surfaces that prevented the commonly observed exaggerated grain growth through evaporation condensation of oxide phases during sintering of boride ceramics. At higher percentages of C addition, the densification rates decreased due to increased volume fraction of second phase that acted as diffusion barrier

  11. Preparation of uranium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, R.A.; Tennery, V.J.

    1976-01-01

    A process is described for preparing actinide-nitrides from massive actinide metal which is suitable for sintering into low density fuel shapes by partially hydriding the massive metal and simultaneously dehydriding and nitriding the dehydrided portion. The process is repeated until all of the massive metal is converted to a nitride

  12. Titanium nitride films for micro-supercapacitors: Effect of surface chemistry and film morphology on the capacitance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Amine; Porto, Raul Lucio; Soussou, Mohamed-Akram; Islam, Mohammad; Boujtita, Mohammed; Aissa, Kaltouma Ait; Le Brizoual, Laurent; Djouadi, Abdou; Brousse, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Electrochemical capacitors (EC) in the form of packed films can be integrated in various electronic devices as power source. A fabrication process of EC electrodes, which is compatible with micro-fabrication, should be addressed for practical applications. Here, we show that titanium nitride films with controlled porosity can be deposited on flat silicon substrates by reactive DC-sputtering for use as high performance micro-supercapacitor electrodes. A superior volumetric capacitance as high as 146.4 F cm-3, with an outstanding cycling stability over 20,000 cycles, was measured in mild neutral electrolyte of potassium sulfate. The specific capacitance of the films as well as their capacitance retentions were found to depend on thickness, porosity and surface chemistry of electrodes. The one step process used to fabricate these TiN electrodes and the wide use of this material in the field of semiconductor technology make it promising for miniaturized energy storage systems.

  13. Characterization of hard nitride and carbide titanium and zirconium coatings on high-speed steel cutting tool inserts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, G.; Kaufherr, N.; Albertson, C.; Mapalo, G.; Nielsen, R.; Kaminsky, M.

    1986-01-01

    Hard nitride and carbide coatings of titanium and zirconium deposited by reactive evaporation and reactive sputtering techniques were characterized by electron microscopy and Auger spectroscopy to determine the effect of coating process on coating composition and microstructure. Analysis of the chemical composition by Auger spectroscopy revealed the coatings were of high purity with slight differences in stoichiometry depending on the coating technique. Both techniques produced coatings with a columnar microstructure. However, the reactive sputtering technique produced coarser (shorter and wider) columnar grains than the reactive evaporation technique. Furthermore, selected area diffraction analysis of reactively sputtered ZrN coatings showed a two-phased zone (hcp Zr and fcc ZrN) near the substrate/coating interface, while TiC coatings deposited by reactive sputtering and evaporation only showed a single-phase region of fcc TiC

  14. Effect of nitriding surface treatment on the corrosion resistance of dental nickel-titanium files in 5.25% sodium hypochlorite solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J.-F.; Lin, M.-C.; Hsu, M.-L.; Li, U.-M.; Lin, C.-P.; Tsai, W.-F.; Ai, C.-F.; Chen, L.-K.; Huang, H.-H.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of nitriding surface treatment on the corrosion resistance of commercial dental alloy, in the form of helical nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) files, when treated with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) solution. The surface of dental helical Ni-Ti files was modified using nitriding treatment at 200 deg. C, 250 deg. C and 300 deg. C in an NH 3 -containing environment. The surface morphology and chemical composition of the Ni-Ti files were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The corrosion resistance of the Ni-Ti files when treated with a clinical solution of 5.25% NaOCl was evaluated using the linear polarization method and by potentiodynamic polarization curve measurement. The nitriding treatments at different temperatures created titanium nitride (TiN) on the surface of the helical Ni-Ti files. The Ni-Ti files nitrided at 200 deg. C and 250 deg. C showed higher polarization resistance and higher passive film breakdown potential together with a lower passive current than untreated files. The presence of TiN on dental Ni-Ti files significantly increased the corrosion resistance of the files in the presence of 5.25% NaOCl solution.

  15. Effect of nitriding surface treatment on the corrosion resistance of dental nickel-titanium files in 5.25% sodium hypochlorite solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J.-F. [Department of Dentistry, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, M.-C. [Department of Dentistry, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Dental Laboratory Technology, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Hsu, M.-L. [Department of Dentistry, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Li, U.-M. [Dental Department, Cardinal Tien Hospital, Hsintien, Taiwan (China); Lin, C.-P. [Department of Dentistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tsai, W.-F.; Ai, C.-F. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chen, L.-K. [Department of Dentistry, Taipei City Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, H.-H. [Department of Dentistry, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Taipei City Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Institute of Oral Biology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: hhhuang@ym.edu.tw

    2009-05-05

    This study investigated the effect of nitriding surface treatment on the corrosion resistance of commercial dental alloy, in the form of helical nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) files, when treated with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) solution. The surface of dental helical Ni-Ti files was modified using nitriding treatment at 200 deg. C, 250 deg. C and 300 deg. C in an NH{sub 3}-containing environment. The surface morphology and chemical composition of the Ni-Ti files were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The corrosion resistance of the Ni-Ti files when treated with a clinical solution of 5.25% NaOCl was evaluated using the linear polarization method and by potentiodynamic polarization curve measurement. The nitriding treatments at different temperatures created titanium nitride (TiN) on the surface of the helical Ni-Ti files. The Ni-Ti files nitrided at 200 deg. C and 250 deg. C showed higher polarization resistance and higher passive film breakdown potential together with a lower passive current than untreated files. The presence of TiN on dental Ni-Ti files significantly increased the corrosion resistance of the files in the presence of 5.25% NaOCl solution.

  16. Electrophysiological performance of a bipolar membrane-coated titanium nitride electrode: a randomized comparison of steroid and nonsteroid lead designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, U K; Zhdanov, A; Stammwitz, E; Crozier, I; Claessens, R J; Meier, J; Bos, R J; Bode, F; Potratz, J

    1999-06-01

    The aim of this multicenter study was to investigate the performance of a new cardiac pacemaker lead with a titanium nitride cathode coated with a copolymer membrane. In particular, the electrophysiological effect of steroid dissolved in this ion-exchange membrane was evaluated by randomized comparison. Ninety-five patients were randomized either to the 1450 T (n = 51) or the 1451 T ventricular lead (n = 45) and received telemeteral VVI(R) pacemakers with identical diagnostic features. Both leads were bipolar, were passively affixed, and had a porous titanium nitride tip with a surface area of 3.5 mm2. The only difference between the two electrodes was 13 micrograms of dexamethasone added to the 1450 Ts membrane coating. Voltage thresholds (VTH) at pulse durations of 0.25, 0.37, and 0.5 ms, lead impedance, and sensing thresholds were measured at discharge, 2 weeks, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after implantation. Mean amplitude and the slew rate from three telemetered intracardiac electrograms, chronaxie-rheobase product, and minimum energy consumption were calculated. After a 6-month follow-up, mean voltage thresholds of 0.65 +/- 0.20 V and 0.63 +/- 0.34 were achieved for the 1450 T lead and 1451 T lead, respectively. As a result, a VTH < 1.0 V was obtained in all patients with 1450 T electrodes and in 97.7% of patients with 1451 T leads after 6 months follow-up. In both electrodes, stable VTH was reached 2 weeks after implantation, and no transient rise in threshold was observed. No differences were observed between the steroid and the nonsteroid group in respect to VTH, chronaxie-rheobase product, minimum energy consumption, and potential amplitude and slew rate. In conclusion, safe and efficient pacing at low pulse amplitudes were achieved with both leads. The tip design, independently of the steroid additive, prevented any energy-consuming increases in the voltage threshold.

  17. Characterisation of nano-structured titanium and aluminium nitride coatings by indentation, transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girleanu, M., E-mail: maria.girleanu@uha.fr [Mecanique, Materiaux et Procedes de Fabrication, LPMT (EA CNRS 4365), Universite de Haute Alsace, 61 rue Albert Camus, F-68093 Mulhouse (France); Pac, M.-J.; Louis, P. [Mecanique, Materiaux et Procedes de Fabrication, LPMT (EA CNRS 4365), Universite de Haute Alsace, 61 rue Albert Camus, F-68093 Mulhouse (France); Ersen, O.; Werckmann, J. [Departement Structures et Interfaces, IPCMS (UMR CNRS 7504), Universite de Strasbourg, 23 rue du Loess, F-67087 Strasbourg (France); Rousselot, C. [Departement Micro Nano Sciences et Systemes, FEMTO-ST (UMR CNRS 6174), Universite de Franche-Comte, BP 71427, F-25211 Montbeliard (France); Tuilier, M.-H. [Mecanique, Materiaux et Procedes de Fabrication, LPMT (EA CNRS 4365), Universite de Haute Alsace, 61 rue Albert Camus, F-68093 Mulhouse (France)

    2011-07-01

    Titanium and aluminium nitride Ti{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}N films deposited by radiofrequency magnetron reactive sputtering onto steel substrate are examined by transmission electron microscopy over all the range of composition (x = 0, 0.5, 0.68, 0.86, 1). The deposition parameters are optimised in order to grow nitride films with low stress over all the composition range. Transmission electron microscopy cross-section images of Vickers indentation prints performed on that set of coatings show the evolution of their damage behaviour as increasing x Al content. Cubic Ti-rich nitrides consist of small grains clustered in rather large columns sliding along each other during indentation. Hexagonal Al-rich films grow in thinner columns which can be bent under the Vickers tip. Indentation tests carried out on TiN and AlN films are simulated using finite element modelling. Particular aspects of shear stresses and displacements in the coating/substrate are investigated. The growth mode and the nanostructure of two typical films, TiN and Ti{sub 0.14}Al{sub 0.86}N, are studied in detail by combining transmission electron microscopy cross-sections and plan views. Electron energy loss spectrum taken across Ti{sub 0.14}Al{sub 0.86}N film suggests that a part of nitrogen atoms is in cubic-like local environment though the lattice symmetry of Al-rich coatings is hexagonal. The poorly crystallised domains containing Ti and N atoms in cubic-like environment are obviously located in grain boundaries and afford protection of the coating against cracking.

  18. Characterisation of nano-structured titanium and aluminium nitride coatings by indentation, transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girleanu, M.; Pac, M.-J.; Louis, P.; Ersen, O.; Werckmann, J.; Rousselot, C.; Tuilier, M.-H.

    2011-01-01

    Titanium and aluminium nitride Ti 1-x Al x N films deposited by radiofrequency magnetron reactive sputtering onto steel substrate are examined by transmission electron microscopy over all the range of composition (x = 0, 0.5, 0.68, 0.86, 1). The deposition parameters are optimised in order to grow nitride films with low stress over all the composition range. Transmission electron microscopy cross-section images of Vickers indentation prints performed on that set of coatings show the evolution of their damage behaviour as increasing x Al content. Cubic Ti-rich nitrides consist of small grains clustered in rather large columns sliding along each other during indentation. Hexagonal Al-rich films grow in thinner columns which can be bent under the Vickers tip. Indentation tests carried out on TiN and AlN films are simulated using finite element modelling. Particular aspects of shear stresses and displacements in the coating/substrate are investigated. The growth mode and the nanostructure of two typical films, TiN and Ti 0.14 Al 0.86 N, are studied in detail by combining transmission electron microscopy cross-sections and plan views. Electron energy loss spectrum taken across Ti 0.14 Al 0.86 N film suggests that a part of nitrogen atoms is in cubic-like local environment though the lattice symmetry of Al-rich coatings is hexagonal. The poorly crystallised domains containing Ti and N atoms in cubic-like environment are obviously located in grain boundaries and afford protection of the coating against cracking.

  19. Robust non-carbon titanium nitride nanotubes supported Pt catalyst with enhanced catalytic activity and durability for methanol oxidation reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Yonghao; Zhan, Guohe; Fu, Zhenggao; Pan, Zhanchang; Xiao, Chumin; Wu, Shoukun; Chen, Chun; Hu, Guanghui; Wei, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    By the combination of solvothermal alcoholysis and post-nitriding method, titanium nitride nanotubes (TiN NTs), with high surface area, hollow and interior porous structure are prepared successfully and used at a support for Pt nanoparticles. The TiN NTs supported Pt (Pt/TiN NTs) catalyst displays enhanced activity and durability towards methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) compared with the commercial Pt/C (E-TEK) catalyst. X ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption/desorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements are performed to investigate the physicochemical properties of the synthesized catalyst. SEM and TEM images reveal that the wall of the TiN NTs is porous and Pt nanoparticles supported on the dendritic TiN nanocrystals exhibit small size and good dispersion. Effects of inherent corrosion-resistant, tubular and porous nanostructures and electron transfer due to the strong metal–support interactions of TiN NTs contribute to the enhanced catalytic activity and stability of Pt/TiN NTs towards the MOR

  20. The effect of titanium nickel nitride decorated carbon nanotubes-reduced graphene oxide hybrid support for methanol oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gen; Pan, Zhanchang; Li, Wuyi; Yu, Ke; Xia, Guowei; Zhao, Qixiang; Shi, Shikun; Hu, Guanghui; Xiao, Chumin; Wei, Zhigang

    2017-07-01

    Titanium nickel nitride (TiNiN) decorated three-dimensional (3D) carbon nanotubes-reduced graphene oxide (CNT-rGO), a fancy 3D platinum (Pt)-based catalyst hybrid support, is prepared by a solvothermal process followed by a nitriding process, which is tested as anodic catalyst support for the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). The structure, morphology and composition of the synthesized TiNiN/CNT-rGO exhibits a uniform particle dispersion with high purity and interpenetrating 3D network structure. Notably, Pt/TiNiN/CNT-rGO catalyst exhibits significantly improved catalytic activity and durability for methanol oxidation in comparison with Pt/CNT-rGO and conventional Pt/C (JM). The outstanding electrochemical performance was attributed to structure and properties. That is, the 3D CNT-rGO provided a fast transport network for charge-transfer and mass-transfer as well as TiNiN NPs with good synergistic effect and the strong electronic coupling between different domains in TiNiN/CNT-rGO, thus the catalytic activity of the novel catalyst is greatly improved. These results evidences 3D TiNiN/CNT-rGO as a promising catalyst support for a wide range of applications in fuel cells.

  1. Highly catalytic and stabilized titanium nitride nanowire array-decorated graphite felt electrodes for all vanadium redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, L.; Zhao, T. S.; Zeng, L.; Zeng, Y. K.; Jiang, H. R.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we prepare a highly catalytic and stabilized titanium nitride (TiN) nanowire array-decorated graphite felt electrode for all vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs). Free-standing TiN nanowires are synthesized by a two-step process, in which TiO2 nanowires are first grown onto the surface of graphite felt via a seed-assisted hydrothermal method and then converted to TiN through nitridation reaction. When applied to VRFBs, the prepared electrode enables the electrolyte utilization and energy efficiency to be 73.9% and 77.4% at a high current density of 300 mA cm-2, which are correspondingly 43.3% and 15.4% higher than that of battery assembled with a pristine electrode. More impressively, the present battery exhibits good stability and high capacity retention during the cycle test. The superior performance is ascribed to the significant improvement in the electrochemical kinetics and enlarged active sites toward V3+/V2+ redox reaction.

  2. Optimization of process parameters for spark plasma sintering of nano structured SAF 2205 composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Ranti Oke

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This research optimized spark plasma sintering (SPS process parameters in terms of sintering temperature, holding time and heating rate for the development of a nano-structured duplex stainless steel (SAF 2205 grade reinforced with titanium nitride (TiN. The mixed powders were sintered using an automated spark plasma sintering machine (model HHPD-25, FCT GmbH, Germany. Characterization was performed using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Density and hardness of the composites were investigated. The XRD result showed the formation of FeN0.068. SEM/EDS revealed the presence of nano ranged particles of TiN segregated at the grain boundaries of the duplex matrix. A decrease in hardness and densification was observed when sintering temperature and heating rate were 1200 °C and 150 °C/min respectively. The optimum properties were obtained in composites sintered at 1150 °C for 15 min and 100 °C/min. The composite grades irrespective of the process parameters exhibited similar shrinkage behavior, which is characterized by three distinctive peaks, which is an indication of good densification phenomena. Keywords: Spark plasma sintering, Duplex stainless steel (SAF 2205, Titanium nitride (TiN, Microstructure, Density, Hardness

  3. Influence of the initial grain size of silicon on microstructure and mechanical properties of reaction-sintered silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, J.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of the initial grain size of the silicon powder on the microstructure and the resulting mechanical properties are studied. The smaller the grain size of the silicon powders used, the higher will be the degree of reaction at the beginning of the nitridation reaction and the higher the amount of α-modification in the fully nitridated samples. Moreover, the nitrification time can be considerably shortened when fine-grained silicon powders ( [de

  4. High energy X-ray diffraction study of a dental ceramics–titanium functional gradient material prepared by field assisted sintering technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witte, K.; Bodnar, W.; Schell, N.; Lang, H.; Burkel, E.

    2014-01-01

    A functional gradient material with eleven layers composed of a dental ceramics and titanium was successfully consolidated using field assisted sintering technique in a two-step sintering process. High energy X-ray diffraction studies on the gradient were performed at High Energy Material Science beamline at Desy in Hamburg. Phase composition, crystal unit edges and lattice mismatch along the gradient were determined applying Rietveld refinement procedure. Phase analysis revealed that the main crystalline phase present in the gradient is α-Ti. Crystallinity increases stepwisely along the gradient with a decreasing increment between every next layer, following rather the weight fraction of titanium. The crystal unit edge a of titanium remains approximately constant with a value of 2.9686(1) Å, while c is reduced with increasing amount of titanium. In the layer with pure titanium the crystal unit edge c is constant with a value of 4.7174(2) Å. The lattice mismatch leading to an internal stress was calculated over the whole gradient. It was found that the maximal internal stress in titanium embedded in the studied gradient is significantly smaller than its yield strength, which implies that the structure of titanium along the whole gradient is mechanically stable. - Highlights: • High energy XRD studies of dental ceramics–Ti gradient material consolidated by FAST. • Phase composition, crystallinity and lattice parameters are determined. • Crystallinity increases stepwisely along the gradient following weight fraction of Ti. • Lattice mismatch leading to internal stress is calculated over the whole gradient. • Internal stress in α-Ti embedded in the gradient is smaller than its yield strength

  5. Osteoblastic cell response to spark plasma-sintered zirconia/titanium cermets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Garcia, Elisa; Guillem-Marti, Jordi; Gutierrez-Gonzalez, Carlos F; Fernandez, Adolfo; Ginebra, Maria-Pau; Lopez-Esteban, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Ceramic/metal composites, cermets, arise from the idea to combine the dissimilar properties in the pure materials. This work aims to study the biocompatibility of new micro-nanostructured 3 Y-TZP/Ti materials with 25, 50 and 75 vol.% Ti, which have been successfully obtained by spark slasma sintering technology, as well as to correlate their surface properties (roughness, wettability and chemical composition) with the osteoblastic cell response. All samples had isotropic and slightly waved microstructure, with sub-micrometric average roughness. Composites with 75 vol.% Ti had the highest surface hydrophilicity. Surface chemical composition of the cermets correlated well with the relative amounts used for their fabrication. A cell viability rate over 80% dismissed any cytotoxicity risk due to manufacturing. Cell adhesion and early differentiation were significantly enhanced on materials containing the nanostructured 3 Y-TZP phase. Proliferation and differentiation of SaOS-2 were significantly improved in their late-stage on the composite with 75 vol.% Ti that, from the osseointegration standpoint, is presented as an excellent biomaterial for bone replacement. Thus, spark plasma sintering is consolidated as a suitable technology for manufacturing nanostructured biomaterials with enhanced bioactivity. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  6. Leachability of nitrided ilmenite in hydrochloric acid

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Swanepoel, JJ

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Titanium nitride in upgraded nitrided ilmenite (bulk of iron removed) can selectively be chlorinated to produce titanium tetrachloride. Except for iron, most other components present during this low temperature (ca. 200 °C) chlorination reaction...

  7. The Mechanical and Tribology Properties of Sputtered Titanium Aluminum Nitride Coating on the Tungsten Carbide Insert Tool in the Dry Turning of Tool Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmar Budi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the sputtering parameters on the mechanical tribology properties of Titanium Aluminum Nitride coating on the tungsten cabide insert tool in the dry turning of tool steel has been investigated. The coating was deposited using a Direct Current magnetron sputtering system with various substrate biases (-79 to -221 V and nitrogen flow rates (30 to 72 sccm. The dry turning test was carried out on a Computer Numeric Code machine using an optimum cutting parameter setting. The results show that the lowest flank wear (~0.4 mm was achieved using a Titanium Aluminum Nitride-coated tool that was deposited at a high substrate bias (-200 V and a high nitrogen flow rate (70 sccm. The lowest flank wear was attributed to high coating hardness.

  8. Spontaneous Formation of Titanium Nitride on the Surface of a Ti Rod Induced by Electro-Discharge-Heat-Treatment in an N2 Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee W.H.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A single pulse of 2.0 to 3.5 kJ of input energy from a 450 mF capacitor was applied to a commercially pure Ti rod in a N2 atmosphere. The surface of the Ti rod transformed from TiO2 into titanium nitride in times as short as 159 msec, providing a bimodal morphology of the cross-section. A much higher value of hardness that was observed at the edge of the cross-section was attributed to nitrogen-induced solid-solution hardening that occurred during the electrical discharge process. The activation energy (Ea for the diffusion process was estimated to be approximately 86.9 kJ/mol. Results show that the electrical discharge process is a possible potential method for the nitriding of Ti; advantages include a short processing time and control of the nitrided layer without dimensional changes.

  9. Effect of sintering temperature on the microstructure and properties of foamed glass-ceramics prepared from high-titanium blast furnace slag and waste glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang-hong; Feng, Ke-qin; Zhou, Yu; Zhou, Hong-ling

    2017-08-01

    Foamed glass-ceramics were prepared via a single-step sintering method using high-titanium blast furnace slag and waste glass as the main raw materials The influence of sintering temperature (900-1060°C) on the microstructure and properties of foamed glass-ceramics was studied. The results show that the crystal shape changed from grainy to rod-shaped and finally turned to multiple shapes as the sintering temperature was increased from 900 to 1060°C. With increasing sintering temperature, the average pore size of the foamed glass-ceramics increased and subsequently decreased. By contrast, the compressive strength and the bulk density decreased and subsequently increased. An excessively high temperature, however, induced the coalescence of pores and decreased the compressive strength. The optimal properties, including the highest compressive strength (16.64 MPa) among the investigated samples and a relatively low bulk density (0.83 g/cm3), were attained in the case of the foamed glass-ceramics sintered at 1000°C.

  10. Biomechanical properties of composite compact-porous titanium produced by electric discharge sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minko, D.; Belyavin, K.; Sheleg, V.

    2017-07-01

    The main disadvantage of currently used endosteal implants is their unsatisfactory biostable performance. Under action of functional stress caused by flaws of the design or lower mechanical characteristics the areas of stresses extreme concentration exceeding strength limits of bone tissue appears in the bone surrounding the implant that leads to the tearing away the implant. The problem of specific pressure lowering on the bone and uniform distribution of stress is solved by two ways: the increase of the implant area and the search of implant materials with optimum biomechanical properties. Porous materials of spherical titanium powders have adjustable pore size and large unit surface area, as well as possess high biologic compatibility with living tissue. This allows reduction of the rejection reaction due to a more even stress distribution around the functioning implant. Clinical results show that such implants have more stable physical and chemical properties.

  11. The effect of titanium nickel nitride decorated carbon nanotubes-reduced graphene oxide hybrid support for methanol oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Gen [School of Chemical Engineering and Light Industry, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006 (China); Pan, Zhanchang, E-mail: panzhanchang@163.com [School of Chemical Engineering and Light Industry, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006 (China); Li, Wuyi; Yu, Ke [School of Chemical Engineering and Light Industry, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006 (China); Xia, Guowei; Zhao, Qixiang; Shi, Shikun [Victory Giant Technology (Hui Zhou) Co., Ltd., Huizhou 516083 (China); Hu, Guanghui; Xiao, Chumin; Wei, Zhigang [School of Chemical Engineering and Light Industry, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006 (China)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • TiNiN/CNT-rGO support with an interactive three-dimensional structure and high surface area was synthesized. • Pt nanoparticles with small size were well dispersed on TiNiN/CNT-rGO support. • Pt/TiNiN/CNT-rGO shows remarkably enhanced methanol oxidation activity and durability. - Abstract: Titanium nickel nitride (TiNiN) decorated three-dimensional (3D) carbon nanotubes-reduced graphene oxide (CNT-rGO), a fancy 3D platinum (Pt)-based catalyst hybrid support, is prepared by a solvothermal process followed by a nitriding process, which is tested as anodic catalyst support for the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). The structure, morphology and composition of the synthesized TiNiN/CNT-rGO exhibits a uniform particle dispersion with high purity and interpenetrating 3D network structure. Notably, Pt/TiNiN/CNT-rGO catalyst exhibits significantly improved catalytic activity and durability for methanol oxidation in comparison with Pt/CNT-rGO and conventional Pt/C (JM). The outstanding electrochemical performance was attributed to structure and properties. That is, the 3D CNT-rGO provided a fast transport network for charge-transfer and mass-transfer as well as TiNiN NPs with good synergistic effect and the strong electronic coupling between different domains in TiNiN/CNT-rGO, thus the catalytic activity of the novel catalyst is greatly improved. These results evidences 3D TiNiN/CNT-rGO as a promising catalyst support for a wide range of applications in fuel cells.

  12. The effect of titanium nickel nitride decorated carbon nanotubes-reduced graphene oxide hybrid support for methanol oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Gen; Pan, Zhanchang; Li, Wuyi; Yu, Ke; Xia, Guowei; Zhao, Qixiang; Shi, Shikun; Hu, Guanghui; Xiao, Chumin; Wei, Zhigang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • TiNiN/CNT-rGO support with an interactive three-dimensional structure and high surface area was synthesized. • Pt nanoparticles with small size were well dispersed on TiNiN/CNT-rGO support. • Pt/TiNiN/CNT-rGO shows remarkably enhanced methanol oxidation activity and durability. - Abstract: Titanium nickel nitride (TiNiN) decorated three-dimensional (3D) carbon nanotubes-reduced graphene oxide (CNT-rGO), a fancy 3D platinum (Pt)-based catalyst hybrid support, is prepared by a solvothermal process followed by a nitriding process, which is tested as anodic catalyst support for the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). The structure, morphology and composition of the synthesized TiNiN/CNT-rGO exhibits a uniform particle dispersion with high purity and interpenetrating 3D network structure. Notably, Pt/TiNiN/CNT-rGO catalyst exhibits significantly improved catalytic activity and durability for methanol oxidation in comparison with Pt/CNT-rGO and conventional Pt/C (JM). The outstanding electrochemical performance was attributed to structure and properties. That is, the 3D CNT-rGO provided a fast transport network for charge-transfer and mass-transfer as well as TiNiN NPs with good synergistic effect and the strong electronic coupling between different domains in TiNiN/CNT-rGO, thus the catalytic activity of the novel catalyst is greatly improved. These results evidences 3D TiNiN/CNT-rGO as a promising catalyst support for a wide range of applications in fuel cells.

  13. Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Laurel G.; Bedinger, George M.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Titanium is a mineral commodity that is essential to the smooth functioning of modern industrial economies. Most of the titanium produced is refined into titanium dioxide, which has a high refractive index and is thus able to impart a durable white color to paint, paper, plastic, rubber, and wallboard. Because of their high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance, titanium metal and titanium metal alloys are used in the aerospace industry as well as for welding rod coatings, biological implants, and consumer goods.Ilmenite and rutile are currently the principal titanium-bearing ore minerals, although other minerals, including anatase, perovskite, and titanomagnetite, could have economic importance in the future. Ilmenite is currently being mined from two large magmatic deposits hosted in rocks of Proterozoic-age anorthosite plutonic suites. Most rutile and nearly one-half of the ilmenite produced are from heavy-mineral alluvial, fluvial, and eolian deposits. Titanium-bearing minerals occur in diverse geologic settings, but many of the known deposits are currently subeconomic for titanium because of complications related to the mineralogy or because of the presence of trace contaminants that can compromise the pigment production process.Global production of titanium minerals is currently dominated by Australia, Canada, Norway, and South Africa; additional amounts are produced in Brazil, India, Madagascar, Mozambique, Sierra Leone, and Sri Lanka. The United States accounts for about 4 percent of the total world production of titanium minerals and is heavily dependent on imports of titanium mineral concentrates to meet its domestic needs.Titanium occurs only in silicate or oxide minerals and never in sulfide minerals. Environmental considerations for titanium mining are related to waste rock disposal and the impact of trace constituents on water quality. Because titanium is generally inert in the environment, human health risks from titanium and titanium

  14. Low-temperature ({<=}200 Degree-Sign C) plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition of dense titanium nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samal, Nigamananda; Du Hui; Luberoff, Russell; Chetry, Krishna; Bubber, Randhir; Hayes, Alan; Devasahayam, Adrian [Veeco Instruments, 1 Terminal Drive, Plainview, New York 11803 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Titanium nitride (TiN) has been widely used in the semiconductor industry for its diffusion barrier and seed layer properties. However, it has seen limited adoption in other industries in which low temperature (<200 Degree-Sign C) deposition is a requirement. Examples of applications which require low temperature deposition are seed layers for magnetic materials in the data storage (DS) industry and seed and diffusion barrier layers for through-silicon-vias (TSV) in the MEMS industry. This paper describes a low temperature TiN process with appropriate electrical, chemical, and structural properties based on plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition method that is suitable for the DS and MEMS industries. It uses tetrakis-(dimethylamino)-titanium as an organometallic precursor and hydrogen (H{sub 2}) as co-reactant. This process was developed in a Veeco NEXUS Trade-Mark-Sign chemical vapor deposition tool. The tool uses a substrate rf-biased configuration with a grounded gas shower head. In this paper, the complimentary and self-limiting character of this process is demonstrated. The effects of key processing parameters including temperature, pulse time, and plasma power are investigated in terms of growth rate, stress, crystal morphology, chemical, electrical, and optical properties. Stoichiometric thin films with growth rates of 0.4-0.5 A/cycle were achieved. Low electrical resistivity (<300 {mu}{Omega} cm), high mass density (>4 g/cm{sup 3}), low stress (<250 MPa), and >85% step coverage for aspect ratio of 10:1 were realized. Wet chemical etch data show robust chemical stability of the film. The properties of the film have been optimized to satisfy industrial viability as a Ruthenium (Ru) preseed liner in potential data storage and TSV applications.

  15. Non-destructive study of the ion-implantation-affected zone (the long-range effect) in titanium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, A.J.; Treglio, J.R.; Schaffer, J.P.; Brunner, J.; Valvoda, V.; Rafaja, D.

    1994-01-01

    The depth to which metal ion implantation can change the structure of titanium nitride coatings is studied using two techniques - positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) and glancing-angle X-ray diffraction (GA-XRD) -which are normally applied to the study of bulk materials. The PAS results indicate that the depth to which vacancies are found greatly exceeds the depth at which the implanted material resides. In addition, the concentration of vacancies continues to increase with the dose of implanted ions. The GA-XRD data show that the implantation does not change the residual stress - it remains slightly tensile. Furthermore, there is an increase in the diffraction peak broadening, which is attributed to an increase in the local strain distribution resulting from the generation of a dislocation network at depths of up to several tenths of a micrometer below the implanted zone. The data support the view of a long-range effect, where metal ion implantation causes lattice defect generation within an implantation-affected zone (IAZ) to depths well beyond the implanted zone. The defective nature of the IAZ depends on the implanted dose and the acceleration voltage, as well as on the nature of the ions implanted. In the present work, there is no residual stress in the samples, so this cannot induce the IAZ. ((orig.))

  16. Visible light induced electron transfer process over nitrogen doped TiO2 nanocrystals prepared by oxidation of titanium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Zhongbiao; Dong Fan; Zhao Weirong; Guo Sen

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen doped TiO 2 nanocrystals with anatase and rutile mixed phases were prepared by incomplete oxidation of titanium nitride at different temperatures. The as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), core level X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (CL XPS), valence band X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (VB XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (UV-vis DRS), and visible light excited photoluminescence (PL). The photocatalytic activity was evaluated for photocatalytic degradation of toluene in gas phase under visible light irradiation. The visible light absorption and photoactivities of these nitrogen doped TiO 2 nanocrystals can be clearly attributed to the change of the additional electronic (N - ) states above the valence band of TiO 2 modified by N dopant as revealed by the VB XPS and visible light induced PL. A band gap structure model was established to explain the electron transfer process over nitrogen doped TiO 2 nanocrystals under visible light irradiation, which was consistent with the previous theoretical and experimental results. This model can also be applied to understand visible light induced photocatalysis over other nonmetal doped TiO 2

  17. Titanium nitride as an electrocatalyst for V(II)/V(III) redox couples in all-vanadium redox flow batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Chunmei; Wang, Haining; Lu, Shanfu; Wu, Chunxiao; Liu, Yiyang; Tan, Qinglong; Liang, Dawei; Xiang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Titanium nitride nanoparticles (TiN NPs) are proposed as a novel catalyst towards the V(II)/V(III) redox pair for the negative electrode in vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFB). Electrochemical properties of TiN NPs were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results show that TiN NPs demonstrate better electrochemical activity and reversibility for the processes of V(II)/V(III) redox couples as compared with the graphite NPs. TiN NPs facilitate the charge transfer in the V(II)/V(III) redox reaction. Performance of a VRFB using a TiN NPs coated carbon paper as a negative electrode is much higher than that of a VRFB with a raw carbon paper electrode. The columbic efficiency (CE), the voltage efficiency (VE) and the energy efficiency (EE) of the VRFB single cell at charge-discharge current density of 30 mA/cm 2 are 91.74%, 89.11% and 81.74%, respectively. During a 50 charge-discharge cycles test, the CE values of VRFB with TiN NPs consistently remain higher than 90%.

  18. Effect of substrate temperature on the microstructural properties of titanium nitride nanowires grown by pulsed laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gbordzoe, S.; Kotoka, R.; Craven, Eric; Kumar, D.; Wu, F.; Narayan, J.

    2014-01-01

    The current work reports on the growth and microstructural characterization of titanium nitride (TiN) nanowires on single crystal silicon substrates using a pulsed laser deposition method. The physical and microstructural properties of the nanowires were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The corrosion properties of the TiN nanowires compared to TiN thin film were evaluated using Direct Current potentiodynamic and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The nanowires corroded faster than the TiN thin film, because the nanowires have a larger surface area which makes them more reactive in a corrosive environment. It was observed from the FESEM image analyses that as the substrate temperature increases from 600 °C to 800 °C, there was an increase in both diameter (25 nm–50 nm) and length (150 nm–250 nm) of the nanowire growth. There was also an increase in spatial density with an increase of substrate temperature. The TEM results showed that the TiN nanowires grow epitaxially with the silicon substrate via domain matching epitaxy paradigm, despite a large misfit

  19. The role of titanium aluminide in n-gallium nitride ohmic contact technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelto, Christopher M.

    Ohmic contacts are essential to the realization of efficient and affordable nitride-based electronic and optoelectronic devices. Currently, the most successful ohmic contact schemes to n-GaN are based on the Al/Ti bilayer structure, although the mechanism responsible for the low resistance in these contacts is not sufficiently understood. In this work, the intermetallic TiAl3 has been employed both as a model ohmic contact system to help understand the essential features of the Al/Ti standard contact, as well as a thermally stable oxidation cap for the bilayer structure. A quaternary isotherm of the Al-Ti-Ga-N system was calculated at 600°C, which showed that a sufficient phase topology was present to apply the exchange mechanism to the TiAl 3/GaN couple. The exchange mechanism rationalized the selection of the TiAl3 intermetallic by predicting that an Al-rich AlGaN layer will form at the metal/semiconductor interface. As part of the investigation of these novel contact systems, a thorough characterization was undertaken on both a standard Al/Ti and Au/Ni/Al/Ti contact to n-GaN in which the essential processing parameters and metallurgical properties were identified. The TiAl 3 contact was found to exhibit inferior electrical behavior compared to the Al/Ti bilayer, requiring significantly higher annealing temperatures to achieve comparable specific contact resistance. It is conjectured that this is due to the early formation of a TiN layer at the metal/semiconductor interface of the bilayer contact, even though both contacts are suspected to form the Al-rich nitride layer at higher temperature. As an oxidation cap, the TiAl3 metallization was found to provide much improved performance characteristics compared to the four-layer Au/Al/Ni/Ti standard. The TiAl 3/Al/Ti contact proved to achieve optimal performance at a much lower temperature than the standard, and furthermore showed complete insensitivity to the oxidation content of the annealing ambient. Reaction

  20. Characterisation of titanium nitride films obtained by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD); Caracterizacao de filmes de nitreto de titanio obtidos por MOCVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillis, M.F., E-mail: mfpillis@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (CCTM/IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Materiais; Franco, A.C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Araujo, E.G. de [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Sacilotti, M. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (IF/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Fundacao de Amparo a Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (FACEPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Ceramic coatings have been widely used as protective coating to improve the life of cutting tools, for corrosion protection and in microelectronics, optical and medical areas. Transition metals nitrides are of special interest due to its high hardness and thermal stability. In this work thin films of titanium nitride were obtained by MOCVD (metalorganic chemical vapor deposition) process. The tests were carried out for 1h at 700 deg C under 80 and 100 mbar of pressure. The characterization was made by using scanning electron microscopy coupled with dispersive energy analysis, and X-ray diffraction. Preliminary results suggested that Ti{sub 2}N phase was formed and that the growth rate varied between 4 and 13 nm/min according to the process parameter considered. (author)

  1. Direct laser metal sintering as a new approach to fabrication of an isoelastic functionally graded material for manufacture of porous titanium dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traini, T; Mangano, C; Sammons, R L; Mangano, F; Macchi, A; Piattelli, A

    2008-11-01

    This work focuses on a titanium alloy implants incorporating a gradient of porosity, from the inner core to the outer surface, obtained by laser sintering of metal powder. Surface appearance, microstructure, composition, mechanical properties and fractography were evaluated. All the specimens were prepared by a selective laser sintering procedure using a Ti-6Al-4V alloy powder with a particle size of 1-10 microm. The morphological and chemical analyses were performed by SEM and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The flexure strength was determined by a three-point bend test using a universal testing machine. The surface roughness was investigated using a confocal scanning laser microscope. The surface roughness variation was statistically evaluated by use of a Chi square test. A p value of metal core consisted of columnar beta grains with alpha and beta laths within the grains. The alloy was composed of 90.08% Ti, 5.67% Al and 4.25% V. The Young's modulus of the inner core material was 104+/-7.7 GPa; while that of the outer porous material was 77+/-3.5 GPa. The fracture face showed a dimpled appearance typical of ductile fracture. In conclusion, laser metal sintering proved to be an efficient means of construction of dental implants with a functionally graded material which is better adapted to the elastic properties of the bone. Such implants should minimize stress shielding effects and improve long-term performance.

  2. Fibre laser nitriding of titanium and its alloy in open atmosphere for orthopaedic implant applications: Investigations on surface quality, microstructure and tribological properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Chi-Wai; Lee, Seunghwan; Smith, Graham C.

    2017-01-01

    surfaces, such as the tapered surfacein a femoral stemor the ball-shaped surface in a femoral head. To tackle this problem, a direct laser nitridingprocess in open atmosphere was performed on commercially pure titanium (grade 2, TiG2) and Ti6Al4V alloy(grade 5, TiG5) using a continuous-wave (CW) fibre...... distribution of wear debris, were carefully characterized and compared. The experimental resultsshowed that TiG2 and TiG5 reacted differently with the laser radiation at 1.06 μm wavelength in laser nitridingas evidenced by substantial differences in the microstructure, and surface colour and morphology....... Furthermore,both friction andwear properties were strongly affected by the hardness and microstructure of titaniumsamplesand direct laser nitriding led to substantial improvements in their wear resistant properties. Between the twotypes of titanium samples, bare TiG2 showed higher friction forces and wear...

  3. Different shape normal metal interlayers between niobium based SIS junctions and niobium titanium nitride leads and their influence on the electron temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selig, S; Westig, M P; Jacobs, K; Honingh, C E

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the reduction of heating in a niobium superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) junction with aluminum-oxide tunnel barrier embedded in a niobium-titanium-nitride circuit. Nonequilibrium quasiparticles which are created due to the Andreev trap at the interface between the niobium and the niobium-titanium-nitride layers are relaxed by inserting a normal-metal conductor of gold between these two layers. In an earlier work we explained the observed relaxation of nonequilibrium quasiparticles due to the geometrically assisted cooling effect. In this paper we investigate this cooling effect in dependence of the normal-metal layer shape and size. We expect that an adapted normal-metal layer is necessary for implementation in practical terahertz SIS heterodyne mixer circuits. We observe in DC-measurements of a large number of devices a clear relation between the volume of the gold layer and the effective electron temperature in the device. Our central finding is that the shape of the gold layer does not influence the cooling provided that the volume is sufficient.

  4. Mechanical properties of molybdenum-titanium alloys micro-structurally controlled by multi-step internal nitriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagae, M.; Yoshio, T.; Takemoto, Y.; Takada, J.; Hiraoka, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Internally nitrided dilute Mo-Ti alloys having a heavily deformed microstructure near the specimen surface were prepared by a novel two-step nitriding process at 1173 to 1773 K in N 2 gas. For the nitrided specimens three-point bend tests were performed at temperatures from 77 to 298 K in order to investigate the effect of microstructure control by internal nitriding on the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of the alloy Yield strength obtained at 243 K of the specimen maintaining the deformed microstructure by the two-step nitriding was about 1.7 times as much as recrystallized specimen. The specimen subjected to the two-step nitriding was bent more than 90 degree at 243 K, whereas recrystallized specimen was fractured after showing a slight ductility at 243 K. DBTT of the specimen subjected to the two-step nitriding and recrystallized specimen was about 153 K and 203 K, respectively. These results indicate that multi-step internal nitriding is very effective to the improvement in the embrittlement by the recrystallization of molybdenum alloys. (author)

  5. Topographical cues of direct metal laser sintering titanium surfaces facilitate osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells through epigenetic regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guoying; Guan, Binbin; Hu, Penghui; Qi, Xingying; Wang, Pingting; Kong, Yu; Liu, Zihao; Gao, Ping; Li, Rui; Zhang, Xu; Wu, Xudong; Sui, Lei

    2018-04-27

    To investigate the role of hierarchical micro/nanoscale topography of direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) titanium surfaces in osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), as well as the possible underlying epigenetic mechanism. Three groups of titanium specimens were prepared, including DMLS group, sandblasted, large-grit, acid-etched (SLA) group and smooth titanium (Ti) group. BMSCs were cultured on discs followed by surface characterization. Cell adhesion and proliferation were examined by SEM and CCK-8 assay, while osteogenic-related gene expression was detected by real-time RT-PCR. Immunofluorescence, western blotting and in vivo study were also performed to evaluate the potential for osteogenic induction of materials. In addition, to investigate the underlying epigenetic mechanisms, immunofluorescence and western blotting were performed to evaluate the global level of H3K4me3 during osteogenesis. The H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 levels at the promoter area of the osteogenic gene Runx2 were detected by ChIP assay. The DMLS surface exhibits greater protein adsorption ability and shows better cell adhesion performance than SLA and Ti surfaces. Moreover, both in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that the DMLS surface is more favourable for the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs than SLA and Ti surfaces. Accordingly, osteogenesis-associated gene expression in BMSCs is efficiently induced by a rapid H3K27 demethylation and increase in H3K4me3 levels at gene promoters upon osteogenic differentiation on DMLS titanium surface. Topographical cues of DMLS surfaces have greater potential for the induction of osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs than SLA and Ti surfaces both in vitro and in vivo. A potential epigenetic mechanism is that the appropriate topography allows rapid H3K27 demethylation and an increased H3K4me3 level at the promoter region of osteogenesis-associated genes during the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs. © 2018 John Wiley

  6. Work Function Tuning in Sub-20nm Titanium Nitride (TiN) Metal Gate: Mechanism and Engineering

    KAUST Repository

    Hasan, Mehdi

    2011-07-01

    Scaling of transistors (the building blocks of modern information age) provides faster computation at the expense of excessive power dissipation. Thus to address these challenges, high-k/metal gate stack has been introduced in commercially available microprocessors from 2007. Since then titanium nitride (TiN) metal gate’s work function (Wf) tunability with its thickness (thickness increases, work function increases) is a well known phenomenon. Many hypotheses have been made over the years which include but not limited to: trap charge and metal gate nucleation, nitrogen concentration, microstructure agglomeration and global stress, metal oxide formation, and interfacial oxide thickness. However, clear contradictions exist in these assumptions. Also, nearly all these reports skipped a comprehensive approach to explain this complex paradigm. Therefore, in this work we first show a comprehensive physical investigation using transmission electron microcopy/electron energy loss spectroscopy (TEM/EELS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) to show replacement of oxygen by nitrogen in the metal/dielectric interface, formation of TiONx, reduction of Ti/N concentration and grain size increment happen with TiN thickness increment and thus may increase the work function. Then, using these finding, we experimentally show 100meV of work function modulation in 10nm TiN Metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor by using low temperature oxygen annealing. A low thermal budget flow (replicating gate-last) shows similar work function boost up. Also, a work function modulation of 250meV has been possible using oxygen annealing and applying no thermal budget. On the other hand, etch-back of TiN layer can decrease the work function. Thus this study quantifies role of various factors in TiN work function tuning; it also reproduces the thickness varied TiN work function modulation in single thickness TiN thus reducing the

  7. Opportunities in the electrowinning of molten titanium from titanium dioxide

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Vuuren, DS

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available used, the following forms of titanium are produced: titanium sponge, sintered electrode sponge, powder, molten titanium, electroplated titanium, hydride powder, and vapor-phase depos- ited titanium. Comparing the economics of alter- native...-up for producing titanium via the Kroll process is approximately as follows: ilmenite ($0.27/kg titanium sponge); titanium slag ($0.75/kg titanium sponge); TiCl4 ($3.09/kg titanium sponge); titanium sponge raw materials costs ($5.50/kg titanium sponge); total...

  8. Characteristics of the epitaxy of InGaN-based light-emitting diodes grown by nanoscale epitaxial lateral overgrowth using a nitrided titanium buffer layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shieh, Chen-Yu; Li, Zhen-Yu; Chang, Jenq-Yang; Chi, Gou-Chung

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a buffer layer of nitrided titanium (Ti) achieved through the nitridation of a Ti metal layer on a sapphire substrate was used for the epitaxial growth of InGaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) achieved by low pressure metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The effect of in-situ Ti metal nitridation on the performance of these InGaN-based LEDs was then investigated. It was very clear that the use of the nitrided Ti buffer layer (NTBL) induced the formation of a nanoscale epitaxial lateral overgrowth layer during the epitaxial growth. When evaluated by Raman spectroscopy, this epi-layer exhibited large in-plane compressive stress releasing with a Raman shift value of 567.9 cm -1 . Cathodoluminescence spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy results indicated that the InGaN-based LEDs with an NTBL have improved crystal quality, with a low threading dislocations density being yielded via the strain relaxation in the InGaN-based LEDs. Based on the results mentioned above, the electroluminescence results indicate that the light performance of InGaN-based LEDs with an NTBL can be enhanced by 45% and 42% at 20 mA and 100 mA, respectively. These results suggest that the strain relaxation and quality improvement in the GaN epilayer could be responsible for the enhancement of emission power. - Highlights: • The crystal-quality of InGaN-based LEDs with NTBL by NELOG was improved. • The InGaN-based LEDs with NTBL have strain releases by NELOG. • The optical properties of InGaN-based LEDs were shown by CL and EL measurements

  9. Additive manufacturing technology (direct metal laser sintering) as a novel approach to fabricate functionally graded titanium implants: preliminary investigation of fabrication parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Shao; Starr, Thomas L; Harris, Bryan T; Zandinejad, Amirali; Morton, Dean

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the preliminary findings of the mechanical properties of functionally graded titanium with controlled distribution of porosity and a reduced Young's modulus on the basis of a computeraided design (CAD) file, using the rapid-prototyping, direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) technique. Sixty specimens of Ti-6Al-4V were created using a DMLS machine (M270) following the standard for tensile testing of metals. One group was fabricated with only 170 W of laser energy to create fully dense specimens (control group). The remaining specimens all featured an outer fully dense "skin" layer and a partially sintered porous inner "core" region. The outer "skin" of each specimen was scanned at 170 W and set at a thickness of 0.35, 1.00, or 1.50 mm for different specimen groups. The inner "core" of each specimen was scanned at a lower laser power (43 or 85 W). The partially sintered core was clearly visible in all specimens, with somewhat greater porosity with the lower laser power. However, the amount of porosity in the core region was not related to the laser power alone; thinner skin layers resulted in higher porosity for the same power values in the core structure. The lowest Young's modulus achieved, 35 GPa, is close to that of bone and was achieved with a laser power of 43 W and a skin thickness of 0.35 mm, producing a core that comprised 74% of the total volume. Additive manufacturing technology may provide an efficient alternative way to fabricate customized dental implants based on a CAD file with a functionally graded structure that may minimize stress shielding and improve the long-term performance of dental implants.

  10. Leachability of nitrided ilmenite in hydrochloric acid

    OpenAIRE

    Swanepoel, J.J.; van Vuuren, D.S.; Heydenrych, M.

    2011-01-01

    Titanium nitride in upgraded nitrided ilmenite (bulk of iron removed) can selectively be chlorinated to produce titanium tetrachloride. Except for iron, most other components present during this low temperature (ca. 200°C) chlorination reaction will not react with chlorine. It is therefore necessary to remove as much iron as possible from the nitrided ilmenite. Hydrochloric acid leaching is a possible process route to remove metallic iron from nitrided ilmenite without excessive dissolution o...

  11. Impacts of dissolved organic matter on aqueous behavior of nano/micron-titanium nitride and their induced enzymatic/non-enzymatic antioxidant activities in Scenedesmus obliquus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Wang, Zhuang; Wang, Se; Fang, Hao; Zhang, Fan; Wang, De-Gao

    2017-01-02

    Freshwater dispersion stability and ecotoxicological effects of titanium nitride (TiN) with particle size of 20 nm, 50 nm, and 2-10 μm in the presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) at various concentrations were studied. The TiN particles that had a more negative zeta potential and smaller hydrodynamic size showed more stable dispersion in an aqueous medium when DOM was present than when DOM was absent. Biochemical assays indicated that relative to the control, the TiN particles in the presence of DOM alleviated to some extent the antioxidative stress enzyme activity in Scenedesmus obliquus. In addition, it was found that the TiN with a primary size of 50 nm at a high concentration presented a significant impact on non-enzymatic antioxidant defense in algal cells.

  12. Structural characterization of thin films of titanium nitride deposited by laser ablation; Caracterizacion estructural de peliculas delgadas de nitruro de titanio depositadas por ablacion laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro C, M.A.; Escobar A, L.; Camps C, E.; Mejia H, J.A. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    Thin films of titanium nitride were deposited using the technique of laser ablation. It was studied the effect of the density of laser energy used for ablation the target as well as of the pressure of the work gas about the structure and the hardness of the deposited thin films. Depending on the pressure of the work gas films was obtained with preferential orientation in the directions (200) and (111). At a pressure of 1 x 10{sup -2} Torr only the direction (200) was observed. On the other hand to the pressure of 5 x 10{sup -3} Torr the deposited material this formed by a mixture of the orientation (200) and (111), being the direction (111) the predominant one. Thin films of Ti N were obtained with hardness of up to 24.0 GPa that makes to these attractive materials for mechanical applications. The hardness showed an approximately linear dependence with the energy density. (Author)

  13. Sintering of nano crystalline o silicon carbide doping with

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sinterable silicon carbide powders were prepared by attrition milling and chemical processing of an acheson type -SiC. Pressureless sintering of these powders was achieved by addition of aluminium nitride together with carbon. Nearly 99% sintered density was obtained. The mechanism of sintering was studied by ...

  14. Effects of bias voltage on the corrosion resistance of titanium nitride thin films fabricated by dynamic plasma immersion ion implantation-deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Xiubo; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K.

    2002-01-01

    Dynamic plasma-based thin-film deposition incorporating ion mixing and plasma immersion is an effective technique to synthesize nitride-based hard films. We have fabricated TiN films using a filtered titanium vacuum arc in a nitrogen plasma environment. A pulsed high voltage is applied to the target for a short time when the metallic arc is fired to attain simultaneous plasma deposition and ion mixing. We investigate the dependence of the corrosion resistance and interfacial structure of the treated samples on the applied voltage. Our Auger results reveal an oxygen-rich surface film due to the non-ultra-high-vacuum conditions and high affinity of oxygen to titanium. The corrosion current is reduced by two orders of magnitude comparing the sample processed at 8 kV to the untreated sample, but the 23 kV sample unexpectedly shows worse results. The pitting potential diminishes substantially although the corrosion current is similar to that observed in the 8 kV sample. The polarization test data are consistent with our scanning electron microscopy observation, corroborating the difference in the pitting distribution and appearance. This anomalous behavior is believed to be due to the change in the chemical composition as a result of high-energy ion bombardment

  15. Titanium nitride (TiN) precipitation in a maraging steel during the vacuum arc remelting (VAR) process - Inclusions characterization and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descotes, V.; Bellot, J.-P.; Perrin-Guérin, V.; Witzke, S.; Jardy, A.

    2016-07-01

    Titanium Nitride (TiN) inclusions are commonly observed in a Maraging steel containing Nitrogen and Titanium and remelted in a VAR furnace. They can be easily detected by optical microscopy. A nucleus is observed next to a large number of TiN inclusions. A TEM analysis was carried out on a biphasic nucleus composed of a calcium sulfide (CaS) and a spinel (MgAl2O4), surrounded by a TiN particle. An orientation relationship between these three phases was revealed, which suggests a heterogeneous germination of the TiN particle on the nucleus by epitaxial growth. Based on this observation, on thermodynamic considerations and on previous work, a model has been developed and coupled to a numerical simulation of the VAR process to study the formation and evolution of a TiN distribution in the VAR ingot. Microsegregation is modeled using the lever rule, while the kinetics of precipitation is mainly driven by the supersaturation of the liquid bath. This model highlights the influence of the melt rate on the final size of TiN particles.

  16. Titanium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fage, Simon W; Muris, Joris; Jakobsen, Stig S

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to titanium (Ti) from implants and from personal care products as nanoparticles (NPs) is common. This article reviews exposure sources, ion release, skin penetration, allergenic effects, and diagnostic possibilities. We conclude that human exposure to Ti mainly derives from dental...... and medical implants, personal care products, and foods. Despite being considered to be highly biocompatible relative to other metals, Ti is released in the presence of biological fluids and tissue, especially under certain circumstances, which seem to be more likely with regard to dental implants. Although...... most of the studies reviewed have important limitations, Ti seems not to penetrate a competent skin barrier, either as pure Ti, alloy, or as Ti oxide NPs. However, there are some indications of Ti penetration through the oral mucosa. We conclude that patch testing with the available Ti preparations...

  17. Reactive Spark Plasma Sintering and Mechanical Properties of Zirconium Diboride–Titanium Diboride Ultrahigh Temperature Ceramic Solid Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthiselva N. S.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultrahigh temperature ceramics (UHTCs such as diborides of zirconium, hafnium tantalum and their composites are considered to be the candidate materials for thermal protection systems of hypersonic vehicles due to their exceptional combination of physical, chemical and mechanical properties. A composite of ZrB2-TiB2 is expected to have better properties. In this study, an attempt has been made to fabricate ZrB2-TiB2 ceramics using mechanically activated elemental powders followed by reactive spark plasma sintering (RSPS at 1400 °C. Microstructure and phase analysis was carried out using X-ray diffractometer (XRD and electron microscopy to understand microstructure evolution. Fracture toughness and hardness were evaluated using indentation methods. Nanoindentation was used to measure elastic modulus. Compressive strength of the composites has been reported.

  18. Multifunctional zirconium nitride/copper multilayer coatings on medical grade 316L SS and titanium substrates for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, D Dinesh; Kaliaraj, Gobi Saravanan

    2018-01-01

    Protecting from wear and corrosion of many medical devices in the biomedical field is an existing scientific challenge. Surface modification with multilayer ZrN/Cu coating was deposited on medical grade stainless steel (SS) and titanium substrates to enhance their surface properties. Structural results revealed that the ZrN/Cu coatings are highly crystalline and uniform microstructure on both the substrates. Dry and wet tribological measurements of the coated titanium substrate exhibit enhanced wear resistance and low friction coefficient due to the improved microstructure. Similarly, the corrosion resistance was exceptionally improved on titanium substrates, resulting from the high inertness of coating to the SBF electrolyte solution. Antibacterial activity and epifluorescence results signify the effective killing of pathogens by means of ion release killing as well as contact killing mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Matrix-reinforcement reactivity in P/M titanium matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amigo, V.; Romero, F.; Salvador, M. D.; Busquets, D.

    2007-01-01

    The high reactivity of titanium and the facility of the same one to form intermetallics makes difficult obtaining composites with this material and brings the need in any case of covering the principal fibres used as reinforcement. To obtain composites of titanium reinforced with ceramic particles ins proposed in this paper, for this reason it turns out to be fundamental to evaluate the reactivity between the matrix and reinforcement. Both titanium nitride and carbide (TiN and TiC) are investigated as materials of low reactivity whereas titanium silicide (TiSi 2 ) is also studied as materials of major reactivity, already stated by the scientific community. This reactivity will be analysed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) there being obtained distribution maps of the elements that allow to establish the possible influence of the sintering temperature and time. Hereby the matrix-reinforcement interactions are optimized to obtain suitable mechanical properties. (Author) 39 refs

  20. Microstructural and Mechanical Characterization of a Custom-Built Implant Manufactured in Titanium Alloy by Direct Metal Laser Sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Larosa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Custom-built implants manufacture has always presented difficulties which result in high cost and complex fabrication, mainly due to patients’ anatomical differences. The solution has been to produce prostheses with different sizes and use the one that best suits each patient. Additive manufacturing technology, incorporated into the medical field in the late 80's, has made it possible to obtain solid biomodels facilitating surgical procedures and reducing risks. Furthermore, this technology has been used to produce implants especially designed for a particular patient, with sizes, shapes, and mechanical properties optimized, for different areas of medicine such as craniomaxillofacial surgery. In this work, the microstructural and mechanical properties of Ti6Al4V samples produced by direct metal laser sintering (DMLS are studied. The microstructural and mechanical characterizations have been made by optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and microhardness and tensile tests. Samples produced by DMLS have a microstructure constituted by hexagonal α′ martensite with acicular morphology. An average microhardness of 370 HV was obtained and the tensile tests showed ultimate strength of 1172 MPa, yield strength of 957 MPa, and elongation at rupture of 11%.

  1. Titanium carbide-carbon porous nanocomposite materials for radioactive ion beam production: processing, sintering and isotope release properties

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2081922; Stora, Thierry

    2017-01-26

    The Isotope Separator OnLine (ISOL) technique is used at the ISOLDE - Isotope Separator OnLine DEvice facility at CERN, to produce radioactive ion beams for physics research. At CERN protons are accelerated to 1.4 GeV and made to collide with one of two targets located at ISOLDE facility. When the protons collide with the target material, nuclear reactions produce isotopes which are thermalized in the bulk of the target material grains. During irradiation the target is kept at high temperatures (up to 2300 °C) to promote diffusion and effusion of the produced isotopes into an ion source, to produce a radioactive ion beam. Ti-foils targets are currently used at ISOLDE to deliver beams of K, Ca and Sc, however they are operated at temperatures close to their melting point which brings target degradation, through sintering and/or melting which reduces the beam intensities over time. For the past 10 years, nanostructured target materials have been developed and have shown improved release rates of the produced i...

  2. Influence of Sintering Temperature on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of In Situ Reinforced Titanium Composites by Inductive Hot Pressing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Arévalo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This research is focused on the influence of processing temperature on titanium matrix composites reinforced through Ti, Al, and B4C reactions. In order to investigate the effect of Ti-Al based intermetallic compounds on the properties of the composites, aluminum powder was incorporated into the starting materials. In this way, in situ TixAly were expected to form as well as TiB and TiC. The specimens were fabricated by the powder metallurgy technique known as inductive hot pressing (iHP, using a temperature range between 900 °C and 1400 °C, at 40 MPa for 5 min. Raising the inductive hot pressing temperature may affect the microstructure and properties of the composites. Consequently, the variations of the reinforcing phases were investigated. X-ray diffraction, microstructural analysis, and mechanical properties (Young’s modulus and hardness of the specimens were carried out to evaluate and determine the significant influence of the processing temperature on the behavior of the composites.

  3. Influence of nitriding atmosphere on the modification of surface titanium with focus on the behavior of blood platelets adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitoriano, J.O.; Alves, C.; Braz, D.C.; Camara, R.B.G.; Rocha, H.A.O.

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to analyze the influence of surface modification of titanium on the adhesion of blood platelets, through techniques of adhesion and morphological analyzes. Discs of titanium grade II received different surface treatments with plasma of Ar + N_2 + H_2 and Ar + H_2, forming two experimental groups including only polished samples used as standard. Before and after treatment the samples were characterized according to topography, crystalline structure and wettability, using atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and testing of sessile drop, respectively. Platelet rich plasma (PRP) was applied on the modified surfaces in a culture plates. Images obtained by electron microscopy of adhered platelets were analyzed to verify the behavior of platelets in the different experimental conditions. (author)

  4. Method of sintering ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.

    1992-01-01

    A method for sintering ceramic materials is described. A ceramic article is coated with layers of protective coatings such as boron nitride, graphite foil, and niobium. The coated ceramic article is embedded in a container containing refractory metal oxide granules and placed within a microwave oven. The ceramic article is heated by microwave energy to a temperature sufficient to sinter the ceramic article to form a densified ceramic article having a density equal to or greater than 90% of theoretical density.

  5. Laser formation of titanium nitride films as a result of Ti coating modification in a nitrogen atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskin, Sergei

    1998-12-01

    Laser treatment of the 303 and 416 stainless steels with Ti precoating was studied. CW CO2 and UV ArF excimer lasers were used. The TiN films were formed at a treatment velocity of 0.5 to 3 - 5 cm/sec and a power density of CO2 laser at (3 - 5) 104 W/cm2. X-ray diffractometry, x-ray mapping and Auger electron spectroscopy techniques indicated a TiN phase on the surface with oxygen content 12 - 25 at%. The thickness of the TiN film was 0.3 - 0.4 micrometers after treatment of the 5 micrometers Ti coating and about 900 angstroms for the 0.3 micrometers coating. Some characteristics of TiN films were examined and features of the nitriding process are discussed.

  6. The Effect of Mesoporous Carbon Nitride Modification by Titanium Oxide Nanoparticles on Photocatalytic Degradation of 1,3-Dinitrobenzene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Ershad Moradi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, well ordered, mesoporous carbon nitride (MCN sorbent with uniform mesoporous wall, high surface area and pore volume has been fabricated using the simple polymerization reaction between ethylene diamine and carbon tetrachloride in mesoporous silica media, and then modified by TiO2 nanoparticles (Ti-MCN. The structural order and textural properties of the nanoporous materials were studied by XRD, elemental analysis, and nitrogen adsorption–desorption experiments. Photodegradation experiments for 1,3-dinitrobenzene were conducted in batch mode, the Ti-MCN catalysts were found to be more active compared to the free TiO2 nanoparticles for 1,3-dinitrobenzene degradation.

  7. Layer by layer assembly of catalase and amine-terminated ionic liquid onto titanium nitride nanoparticles modified glassy carbon electrode: Study of direct voltammetry and bioelectrocatalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saadati, Shagayegh; Salimi, Abdollah; Hallaj, Rahman; Rostami, Amin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Catalase and amine-terminated ionic liquid were immobilized to GC/TiNnp with LBL assembly method. ► First a thin layer of NH 2 -IL is covalently attached to GC/TiNnp electrode using electro-oxidation. ► With alternative assemble of IL and catalase with positive and negative charged, multilayer was formed. ► Immobilized catalase shows excellent electrocatalytic activity toward H 2 O 2 reduction. ► Biosensor response is directly correlated to the number of bilayers. - Abstract: A novel, simple and facile layer by layer (LBL) approach is used for modification of glassy carbon (GC) electrode with multilayer of catalase and nanocomposite containing 1-(3-Aminopropyl)-3-methylimidazolium bromide (amine terminated ionic liquid (NH 2 -IL)) and titanium nitride nanoparticles (TiNnp). First a thin layer of NH 2 -IL is covalently attached to GC/TiNnp electrode using electro-oxidation method. Then, with alternative self assemble positively charged NH 2 -IL and negatively charged catalase a sensitive H 2 O 2 biosensor is constructed, whose response is directly correlated to the number of bilayers. The surface coverage of active catalase per bilayer, heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (k s ) and Michaelis–Menten constant (K M ) of immobilized catalase were 3.32 × 10 −12 mol cm −2 , 5.28 s −1 and 1.1 mM, respectively. The biosensor shows good stability, high reproducibility, long life-time, and fast amperometric response with the high sensitivity of 380 μA mM −1 cm −2 and low detection limit of 100 nM at concentration range up to 2.1 mM.

  8. Layer by layer assembly of catalase and amine-terminated ionic liquid onto titanium nitride nanoparticles modified glassy carbon electrode: Study of direct voltammetry and bioelectrocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saadati, Shagayegh [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salimi, Abdollah, E-mail: absalimi@uok.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center for Nanotechnology, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hallaj, Rahman; Rostami, Amin [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-11-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalase and amine-terminated ionic liquid were immobilized to GC/TiNnp with LBL assembly method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First a thin layer of NH{sub 2}-IL is covalently attached to GC/TiNnp electrode using electro-oxidation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer With alternative assemble of IL and catalase with positive and negative charged, multilayer was formed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Immobilized catalase shows excellent electrocatalytic activity toward H{sub 2}O{sub 2} reduction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biosensor response is directly correlated to the number of bilayers. - Abstract: A novel, simple and facile layer by layer (LBL) approach is used for modification of glassy carbon (GC) electrode with multilayer of catalase and nanocomposite containing 1-(3-Aminopropyl)-3-methylimidazolium bromide (amine terminated ionic liquid (NH{sub 2}-IL)) and titanium nitride nanoparticles (TiNnp). First a thin layer of NH{sub 2}-IL is covalently attached to GC/TiNnp electrode using electro-oxidation method. Then, with alternative self assemble positively charged NH{sub 2}-IL and negatively charged catalase a sensitive H{sub 2}O{sub 2} biosensor is constructed, whose response is directly correlated to the number of bilayers. The surface coverage of active catalase per bilayer, heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (k{sub s}) and Michaelis-Menten constant (K{sub M}) of immobilized catalase were 3.32 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} mol cm{sup -2}, 5.28 s{sup -1} and 1.1 mM, respectively. The biosensor shows good stability, high reproducibility, long life-time, and fast amperometric response with the high sensitivity of 380 {mu}A mM{sup -1} cm{sup -2} and low detection limit of 100 nM at concentration range up to 2.1 mM.

  9. Electron Cloud in Steel Beam Pipe vs Titanium Nitride Coated and Amorphous Carbon Coated Beam Pipes in Fermilab's Main Injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backfish, Michael

    2013-04-01

    This paper documents the use of four retarding field analyzers (RFAs) to measure electron cloud signals created in Fermilab’s Main Injector during 120 GeV operations. The first data set was taken from September 11, 2009 to July 4, 2010. This data set is used to compare two different types of beam pipe that were installed in the accelerator. Two RFAs were installed in a normal steel beam pipe like the rest of the Main Injector while another two were installed in a one meter section of beam pipe that was coated on the inside with titanium nitride (TiN). A second data run started on August 23, 2010 and ended on January 10, 2011 when Main Injector beam intensities were reduced thus eliminating the electron cloud. This second run uses the same RFA setup but the TiN coated beam pipe was replaced by a one meter section coated with amorphous carbon (aC). This section of beam pipe was provided by CERN in an effort to better understand how an aC coating will perform over time in an accelerator. The research consists of three basic parts: (a) continuously monitoring the conditioning of the three different types of beam pipe over both time and absorbed electrons (b) measurement of the characteristics of the surrounding magnetic fields in the Main Injector in order to better relate actual data observed in the Main Injector with that of simulations (c) measurement of the energy spectrum of the electron cloud signals using retarding field analyzers in all three types of beam pipe.

  10. Silicon nitride-fabrication, forming and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yehezkel, O.

    1983-01-01

    This article, which is a literature survey of the recent years, includes description of several methods for the formation of silicone nitride, and five methods of forming: Reaction-bonded silicon nitride, sintering, hot pressing, hot isostatic pressing and chemical vapour deposition. Herein are also included data about mechanical and physical properties of silicon nitride and the relationship between the forming method and the properties. (author)

  11. The influence of powder composition and sintering temperature on transformation kinetics, structure and mechanical properties of hot-pressed silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoch, H.; Ziegler, G.

    1977-01-01

    The strength at room temperature of hot-pressed silicon nitride is strongly dependent on the structure which in turn depends on powder composition and process parameters. Connections between production conditions (MgO content, pressing temperature, pressing time), structure (α/β content and morphology), and the properties at room temperature are discussed. The growth of oblong β grains - as a direct result of phase transition from α- to β-Si 3 N 4 - results in microstructural meshing and thus in a higher strength. Optimum mechanical properties are achieved after full phase transformation and with a microstructure as fine as possible. The direct connection between strength and transformed β fraction indicates a possible way for a relatively fast determination of optimum properties for a given initial powder. (orig.) [de

  12. Ab Initio Study of the Atomic Level Structure of the Rutile TiO2(110)-Titanium Nitride (TiN) Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez Moreno, José Julio; Nolan, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) is widely used in industry as a protective coating due to its hardness and resistance to corrosion and can spontaneously form a thin oxide layer when it is exposed to air, which could modify the properties of the coating. With limited understanding of the TiO 2 -TiN interfacial system at present, this work aims to describe the structural and electronic properties of oxidized TiN based on a density functional theory (DFT) study of the rutile TiO 2 (110)-TiN(100) interface model system, also including Hubbard +U correction on Ti 3d states. The small lattice mismatch gives a good stability to the TiO 2 -TiN interface after depositing the oxide onto TiN through the formation of interfacial Ti-O bonds. Our DFT+U study shows the presence of Ti 3+ cations in the TiO 2 region, which are preferentially located next to the interface region as well as the rotation of the rutile TiO 2 octahedra in the interface structure. The DFT+U TiO 2 electronic density of states (EDOS) shows localized Ti 3+ defect states forming in the midgap between the top edge of the valence and the bottom of the conduction band. We increase the complexity of our models by the introduction of nonstoichiometric compositions. Although the vacancy formation energies for Ti in TiN (E vac (Ti) ≥ 4.03 eV) or O in the oxide (E vac (O) ≥ 3.40 eV) are quite high relative to perfect TiO 2 -TiN, defects are known to form during the oxide growth and can therefore be present after TiO 2 formation. Our results show that a structure with exchanged O and N can lie 0.82 eV higher in energy than the perfect system, suggesting the stability of structures with interdiffused O and N anions at ambient conditions. The presence of N in TiO 2 introduces N 2p states localized between the top edge of the O 2p valence states and the midgap Ti 3+ 3d states, thus reducing the band gap in the TiO 2 region for the exchanged O/N interface EDOS. The outcomes of these simulations give us a most comprehensive

  13. Fabrication of vanadium nitride by carbothermal nitridation reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xitang; Wang Zhuofu; Zhang Baoguo; Deng Chengji

    2005-01-01

    Vanadium nitride is produced from V 2 O 5 by carbon-thermal reduction and nitridation. When the sintered temperature is above 1273 K, VN can be formed, and the nitrogen content of the products increased with the firing temperature raised, and then is the largest when the sintered temperature is 1573 K. The C/V 2 O 5 mass ratio of the green samples is the other key factor affecting on the nitrogen contents of the products. The nitrogen content of the products reaches the most when the C/V 2 O 5 mass ratio is 0.33, which is the theoretical ratio of the carbothermal nitridation of V 2 O 5 . (orig.)

  14. Boric oxide or boric acid sintering aid for sintering ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawler, H.A.

    1979-01-01

    The invention described relates to the use of liquid sintering aid in processes involving sintering of ceramic materials to produce dense, hard articles having industrial uses. Although the invention is specifically discussed in regard to compositions containing silicon carbide as the ceramic material, other sinterable carbides, for example, titanium carbide, may be utilized as the ceramic material. A liquid sintering aid for densifying ceramic material is selected from solutions of H 3 BO 3 , B 2 O 3 and mixtures of these solutions. In sintering ceramic articles, e.g. silicon carbide, a shaped green body is formed from a particulate ceramic material and a resin binder, and the green body is baked at a temperature of 500 to 1000 0 C to form a porous body. The liquid sintering aid of B 2 O 3 and/or H 3 BO 3 is then dispersed through the porous body and the treated body is sintered at a temperature of 1900 to 2200 0 C to produce the sintered ceramic article. (U.K.)

  15. Evaluation and silicon nitride internal combustion engine components. Final report, Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voldrich, W. [Allied-Signal Aerospace Co., Torrance, CA (United States). Garrett Ceramic Components Div.

    1992-04-01

    The feasibility of silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) use in internal combustion engines was studied by testing three different components for wear resistance and lower reciprocating mass. The information obtained from these preliminary spin rig and engine tests indicates several design changes are necessary to survive high-stress engine applications. The three silicon nitride components tested were valve spring retainers, tappet rollers, and fuel pump push rod ends. Garrett Ceramic Components` gas-pressure sinterable Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (GS-44) was used to fabricate the above components. Components were final machined from densified blanks that had been green formed by isostatic pressing of GS-44 granules. Spin rig testing of the valve spring retainers indicated that these Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} components could survive at high RPM levels (9,500) when teamed with silicon nitride valves and lower spring tension than standard titanium components. Silicon nitride tappet rollers showed no wear on roller O.D. or I.D. surfaces, steel axles and lifters; however, due to the uncrowned design of these particular rollers the cam lobes indicated wear after spin rig testing. Fuel pump push rod ends were successful at reducing wear on the cam lobe and rod end when tested on spin rigs and in real-world race applications.

  16. Flash sintering of ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancer, C. E. J.

    2016-10-01

    During flash sintering, ceramic materials can sinter to high density in a matter of seconds while subjected to electric field and elevated temperature. This process, which occurs at lower furnace temperatures and in shorter times than both conventional ceramic sintering and field-assisted methods such as spark plasma sintering, has the potential to radically reduce the power consumption required for the densification of ceramic materials. This paper reviews the experimental work on flash sintering methods carried out to date, and compares the properties of the materials obtained to those produced by conventional sintering. The flash sintering process is described for oxides of zirconium, yttrium, aluminium, tin, zinc, and titanium; silicon and boron carbide, zirconium diboride, materials for solid oxide fuel applications, ferroelectric materials, and composite materials. While experimental observations have been made on a wide range of materials, understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for the onset and latter stages of flash sintering is still elusive. Elements of the proposed theories to explain the observed behaviour include extensive Joule heating throughout the material causing thermal runaway, arrested by the current limitation in the power supply, and the formation of defect avalanches which rapidly and dramatically increase the sample conductivity. Undoubtedly, the flash sintering process is affected by the electric field strength, furnace temperature and current density limit, but also by microstructural features such as the presence of second phase particles or dopants and the particle size in the starting material. While further experimental work and modelling is still required to attain a full understanding capable of predicting the success of the flash sintering process in different materials, the technique non-etheless holds great potential for exceptional control of the ceramic sintering process.

  17. The Influence of Sintering Temperature of Reactive Sintered (Ti, MoC-Ni Cermets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Jõeleht

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Titanium-molybdenum carbide nickel cermets ((Ti, MoC-Ni were produced using high energy milling and reactive sintering process. Compared to conventional TiC-NiMo cermet sintering the parameters for reactive sintered cermets vary since additional processes are present such as carbide synthesis. Therefore, it is essential to acquire information about the suitable sintering regime for reactive sintered cermets. One of the key parameters is the final sintering temperature when the liquid binder Ni forms the final matrix and vacancies inside the material are removed. The influence of the final sintering temperature is analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical properties of the material are characterized by transverse rupture strength, hardness and fracture toughness.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.3.7179

  18. Preparation and study of the nitrides and mixed carbide-nitrides of uranium and of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anselin, F.

    1966-06-01

    A detailed description is given of a simple method for preparing uranium and plutonium nitrides by the direct action of nitrogen under pressure at moderate temperatures (about 400 C) on the partially hydrogenated bulk metal. It is shown that there is complete miscibility between the UN and PuN phases. The variations in the reticular parameters of the samples as a function of temperature and in the presence of oxide have been used to detect and evaluate the solubility of oxygen in the different phases. A study has been made of the sintering of these nitrides as a function of the preparation conditions with or without sintering additives. A favorable but non-reproducible, effect has been found for traces of oxide. The best results were obtained for pure UN at 1600 C (96 per cent theoretical density) on condition that a well defined powder, was used. The criterion used is the integral width of the X-ray diffraction lines. The compounds UN and PuN are completely miscible with the corresponding carbides. This makes it possible to prepare carbide-nitrides of the general formula (U,Pu) (C,N) by solid-phase diffusion, at around 1400 C. The sintering of these carbide-nitrides is similar to that of the carbides if the nitrogen content is low; in particular, nickel is an efficient sintering agent. For high contents, the sintering is similar to that of pure nitrides. (author) [fr

  19. Indentation fatigue in silicon nitride, alumina and silicon carbide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Repeated indentation fatigue (RIF) experiments conducted on the same spot of different structural ceramics viz. a hot pressed silicon nitride (HPSN), sintered alumina of two different grain sizes viz. 1 m and 25 m, and a sintered silicon carbide (SSiC) are reported. The RIF experiments were conducted using a Vicker's ...

  20. Coating of the orthopaedic titanium alloys with sol-gel derived hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milev, A.; Green, D.; Chai, C.S.; Ben-Nissan, B.

    1999-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) is known to be both biocompatible and bioactive material, however, due to its poor mechanical properties and design limitations is not suitable for applying as a load bearing implant. This could be overcome by using appropriate metallic substrates covered with HAp, derived via different techniques. These coatings allow improved adhesion strength of the load bearing substrate to the bone, resulting in shorter healing periods as well as predictable behaviour of the implant for longer periods of time. There are different techniques of producing HAp appropriate for coating purposes. Due to the small particle size of the grains derived, sol-gel route is preferable where lower sintering temperatures are of primary importance. For better adhesion between substrate and hydroxyapatite coating, the surface of titanium substrate, in this study, was converted to titanium nitride and/or oxynitride. Sintering temperatures of 900 deg C have been used for producing crystalline HAp coatings. The control of sol-gel solutions and the analysis of the coatings were carried out using XRD, SEM and DTA techniques. Results obtained indicate high quality HAp coatings can be produced on titanium substrates especially with complex shapes that benefits over the other coating methods

  1. New Routes to Lanthanide and Actinide Nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butt, D.P.; Jaques, B.J.; Osterberg, D.D. [Boise State University, 1910 University Dr., Boise, Idaho 83725-2075 (United States); Marx, B.M. [Concurrent Technologies Corporation, Johnstown, PA (United States); Callahan, P.G. [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Hamdy, A.S. [Central Metallurgical R and D Institute, Helwan, Cairo (Egypt)

    2009-06-15

    The future of nuclear energy in the U.S. and its expansion worldwide depends greatly on our ability to reduce the levels of high level waste to minimal levels, while maintaining proliferation resistance. Implicit in the so-called advanced fuel cycle is the need for higher levels of fuel burn-up and consequential use of complex nuclear fuels comprised of fissile materials such as Pu, Am, Np, and Cm. Advanced nitride fuels comprised ternary and quaternary mixtures of uranium and these actinides have been considered for applications in advanced power plants, but there remain many processing challenges as well as necessary qualification testing. In this presentation, the advantages and disadvantages of nitride fuels are discussed. Methods of synthesizing the raw materials and sintering of fuels are described including a discussion of novel, low cost routes to nitrides that have the potential for reducing the cost and footprint of a fuel processing plant. Phase pure nitrides were synthesized via four primary methods; reactive milling metal flakes in nitrogen at room temperature, directly nitriding metal flakes in a pure nitrogen atmosphere, hydriding metal flakes prior to nitridation, and carbo-thermically reducing the metal oxide and carbon mixture prior to nitridation. In the present study, the sintering of UN, DyN, and their solid solutions (U{sub x}, Dy{sub 1-x}) (x = 1 to 0.7) were also studied. (authors)

  2. Method of preparing uranium nitride or uranium carbonitride bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, H.A.; McClusky, J.K.

    1976-01-01

    Sintered uranium nitride or uranium carbonitride bodies having a controlled final carbon-to-uranium ratio are prepared, in an essentially continuous process, from U 3 O 8 and carbon by varying the weight ratio of carbon to U 3 O 8 in the feed mixture, which is compressed into a green body and sintered in a continuous heating process under various controlled atmospheric conditions to prepare the sintered bodies. 6 claims, no drawings

  3. Compressive creep of silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, C.R.M. da; Melo, F.C.L. de; Cairo, C.A.; Piorino Neto, F.

    1990-01-01

    Silicon nitride samples were formed by pressureless sintering process, using neodymium oxide and a mixture of neodymium oxide and yttrio oxide as sintering aids. The short term compressive creep behaviour was evaluated over a stress range of 50-300 MPa and temperature range 1200 - 1350 0 C. Post-sintering heat treatments in nitrogen with a stepwise decremental variation of temperature were performed in some samples and microstructural analysis by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy showed that the secondary crystalline phase which form from the remnant glass are dependent upon composition and percentage of aditives. Stress exponent values near to unity were obtained for materials with low glass content suggesting grain boundary diffusion accommodation processes. Cavitation will thereby become prevalent with increase in stress, temperature and decrease in the degree of crystallization of the grain boundary phase. (author) [pt

  4. Performance analysis of nitride alternative plasmonic materials for localized surface plasmon applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, U.; Naik, G. V.; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    . Titanium nitride and zirconium nitride, which were recently suggested as alternative plasmonic materials in the visible and near-infrared ranges, are compared to the performance of gold. In contrast to the results from quasistatic methods, both nitride materials are very good alternatives to the usual...

  5. Microstructural comparison of effects of hafnium and titanium additions in spark-plasma-sintered Fe-based oxide-dispersion strengthened alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yina, E-mail: huangyina1981@hotmail.com [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); School of Electronic Science & Applied Physics, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei, Anhui 230009 (China); Zhang, Hongtao [Department of Materials, Loughborough University, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Auger, Maria A.; Hong, Zuliang [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Ning, Huanpo [School of Engineering of Materials Science, Queen Mary University of London, London, E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Nanoforce Technology Ltd, London, E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Gorley, Michael J. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Grant, Patrick S. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Reece, Michael J.; Yan, Haixue [School of Engineering of Materials Science, Queen Mary University of London, London, E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Nanoforce Technology Ltd, London, E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Roberts, Steve G. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-15

    Two oxide dispersion strengthened alloys: 14Cr-0.25Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-0.22Hf (wt.%) and Fe-14Cr-0.25Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-0.4Ti (wt.%) were fabricated by mechanical alloying and subsequently consolidated by spark plasma sintering (SPS). Electron backscatter diffraction showed grain sizes in the range 0.5–15 μm in both alloys. Transmission electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy showed a homogeneous distribution of nano-oxides precipitated during SPS. Using high resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atom probe tomography, several different oxide phases were found in both alloys, but the majority of dispersoids were Y-Hf-O type in Fe-14Cr-0.25Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-0.22Hf and Y-Ti-O type in Fe-14Cr-0.25Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-0.4Ti. There were a variety of orientation relationships between the different dispersoids and the ferritic matrix. Both alloys had dispersoid densities of ∼10{sup 23}/m{sup 3}, with average diameters of 4.3 nm and 3.5 nm in the 0.22Hf and 0.4Ti containing alloys, respectively. Per atom added, Hf (0.07 at.%) is suggested to be more potent than Ti (0.46 at.%) in refining the nano-oxides.

  6. TIDES-ACS Trial: comparison of titanium-nitride-oxide coated bio-active-stent to the drug (everolimus)-eluting stent in acute coronary syndrome. Study design and objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colkesen, E B; Eefting, F D; Rensing, B J; Suttorp, M J; Ten Berg, J M; Karjalainen, P P; Van Der Heyden, J A

    2015-02-01

    Drug-eluting stents (DES), delivering antiproliferative drugs from a durable polymer, have shown to reduce in-stent restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) compared to bare-metal stents (BMS). However, they have been associated with a hypersensitivity reaction, delayed healing, and incomplete endothelialization, which may contribute to an increased risk of late stent thrombosis. Consequently, a prolonged duration of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) is needed, with an increased risk of bleeding complication. A number of stent technologies are being developed in an attempt to modify late thrombotic events and DAPT duration. The Optimax™ stent is such a novel, next generation bioactive stent (BAS), in which a thicker layer of titanium-nitride-oxide coating is inserted over the stent struts. The rationale of this is to obtain more efficient and rapid vascular healing at the site of the stent implantation. The aim of TIDES-ACS Trial is to compare clinical outcome in patients presenting with ACS, treated with PCI using Optimax-BAS versus Synergy™-EES. Second objective is to explore whether the Optimax™-BAS use is superior compared with Synergy™-EES use with respect of hard end points (cardiac death, myocardial infarction [MI] and major bleeding). A prospective, randomized, multicenter trial (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02049229), will be conducted in interventional centres in Finland (six centres), France (five centres) and Holland (two centres), including a total of 1800 patients.

  7. Semiconducting cubic titanium nitride in the Th3P4 structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhadram, Venkata S.; Liu, Hanyu; Xu, Enshi; Li, Tianshu; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Hrubiak, Rostislav; Lany, Stephan; Strobel, Timothy A.

    2018-01-01

    We report the discovery of a long-sought-after phase of titanium nitride with stoichiometry Ti 3 N 4 using diamond anvil cell experiments combined with in situ high-resolution x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy techniques, supported by ab initio calculations. Ti 3 N 4 crystallizes in the cubic Th 3 P 4 structure [space group I ¯ 4 3 d (220)] from a mixture of TiN and N 2 above ≈ 75 GPa and ≈ 2400 K. The density ( ≈ 5.22 g/cc) and bulk modulus ( K 0 = 290 GPa) of cubic- Ti 3 N 4 ( c - Ti 3 N 4 ) at 1 atm, estimated from the pressure-volume equation of state, are comparable to rocksalt TiN. Ab initio calculations based on the GW approximation and using hybrid functionals indicate that c - Ti 3 N 4 is a semiconductor with a direct band gap between 0.8 and 0.9 eV, which is larger than the previously predicted values. The c - Ti 3 N 4 phase is not recoverable to ambient pressure due to dynamic instabilities, but recovery of Ti 3 N 4 in the defect rocksalt (or related) structure may be feasible.

  8. Fabrication of aluminum nitride crucibles for molten salt and plutonium compatibility studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    The overall objective of this research was to fabricate a calcium oxide sinter-aided aluminum nitride crucible and determine the compatibility of this crucible with molten chloride salts and plutonium metal in the DOR process. Calcium oxide sinter-aided aluminum nitride was preferred over yttrium oxide sinter-aided aluminum nitride because of (1) the presence of calcium chloride, calcium oxide, and calcium metal in the molten salts utilized in the DOR process, and (2) the higher volatility of the secondary phases formed compared with phases resulting from the addition of yttrium oxide during the aluminum nitride sintering process. The calcium oxide system may yield a higher purity crystal structure with fewer secondary phases present than in the yttrium oxide system. The secondary phases that are present in the grain boundaries may be unreactive with the calcium chloride salt due to the presence of calcium in the secondary phases

  9. Electrospun Gallium Nitride Nanofibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melendez, Anamaris; Morales, Kristle; Ramos, Idalia; Campo, Eva; Santiago, Jorge J.

    2009-01-01

    The high thermal conductivity and wide bandgap of gallium nitride (GaN) are desirable characteristics in optoelectronics and sensing applications. In comparison to thin films and powders, in the nanofiber morphology the sensitivity of GaN is expected to increase as the exposed area (proportional to the length) increases. In this work we present electrospinning as a novel technique in the fabrication of GaN nanofibers. Electrospinning, invented in the 1930s, is a simple, inexpensive, and rapid technique to produce microscopically long ultrafine fibers. GaN nanofibers are produced using gallium nitrate and dimethyl-acetamide as precursors. After electrospinning, thermal decomposition under an inert atmosphere is used to pyrolyze the polymer. To complete the preparation, the nanofibers are sintered in a tube furnace under a NH 3 flow. Both scanning electron microscopy and profilometry show that the process produces continuous and uniform fibers with diameters ranging from 20 to a few hundred nanometers, and lengths of up to a few centimeters. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows the development of GaN nanofibers with hexagonal wurtzite structure. Future work includes additional characterization using transmission electron microscopy and XRD to understand the role of precursors and nitridation in nanofiber synthesis, and the use of single nanofibers for the construction of optical and gas sensing devices.

  10. Corrosion Behavior of Titanium Based Ceramic Coatings Deposited on Steels

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Rania

    2016-01-01

    Titanium based ceramic films are increasingly used as coating materials because of their high hardness, excellent wear resistance and superior corrosion resistance. Using electrochemical and spectroscopic techniques, the electrochemical properties of different coatings deposited on different steels under different conditions were examined in this study. Thin films of titanium nitride (TiN), titanium diboride (TiB2), and titanium boronitride with different boron concentrations (TiBN-1&2) w...

  11. Optimization of time–temperature schedule for nitridation of silicon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pact was optimized by kinetic study of the reaction, 3Si + 2N2 = Si3N4 at four different temperatures (1250°C,. 1300°C, 1350°C and 1400°C). ... Reaction sintered silicon nitride; nitridation; reaction kinetics. 1. Introduction. Formation of ..... cation of silica layer resulted in active oxidation of silicon at high temperature to ...

  12. Zirconium nitride hard coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, Daiane; Amorim, Cintia Lugnani Gomes de; Soares, Gabriel Vieira; Figueroa, Carlos Alejandro; Baumvol, Israel Jacob Rabin; Basso, Rodrigo Leonardo de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    Zirconium nitride (ZrN) nanometric films were deposited onto different substrates, in order to study the surface crystalline microstructure and also to investigate the electrochemical behavior to obtain a better composition that minimizes corrosion reactions. The coatings were produced by physical vapor deposition (PVD). The influence of the nitrogen partial pressure, deposition time and temperature over the surface properties was studied. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and corrosion experiments were performed to characterize the ZrN hard coatings. The ZrN films properties and microstructure changes according to the deposition parameters. The corrosion resistance increases with temperature used in the films deposition. Corrosion tests show that ZrN coating deposited by PVD onto titanium substrate can improve the corrosion resistance. (author)

  13. Preparation of uranium-plutonium mixed nitride pellets with high purity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Yasuo; Shiozawa, Ken-ichi; Ohmichi, Toshihiko

    1992-01-01

    Uranium-plutonium mixed nitride pellets have been prepared in the gloveboxes with high purity Ar gas atmosphere. Carbothermic reduction of the oxides in N 2 -H 2 mixed gas stream was adopted for synthesizing mixed nitride. Sintering was carried out in various conditions and the effect on the pellet characteristics was investigated. (author)

  14. Sintering and densification; new techniques: sinter forging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winnubst, A.J.A.

    1998-01-01

    In this chapter pressure assisted sintering methods will be described. Attention will mainly be paid to sinter forging as a die-wall free uniaxial pressure sintering technique, where large creep strains are possible. Sinter forging is an effective tool to reduce sintering temperature and time and to obtain a nearly theoretically dense ceramic. In this way grain size in tetragonal zirconia ceramics can be reduced down to 100 nm. Another important phenomenon is the reduction of the number density and size of cracks and flaws resulting in higher strength and improved reliability, which is of utmost importance for engineering ceramics. The creep deformation during sinter forging causes a rearrangement of the grains resulting in a reduction of interatomic spaces between grains, while grain boundary (glassy) phases can be removed. The toughness and in some cases the wear resistance is enhanced after sinter forging as a result of the grain-boundary-morphology improvement. (orig.)

  15. Problems and possibilities of development of boron nitride ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusanova, L.N.; Romashin, A.G.; Kulikova, G.I.; Golubeva, O.P.

    1988-01-01

    The modern state of developments in the field of technology of ceramics produced from boron nitride is analyzed. Substantial difficulties in production of pure ceramics from hexagonal and wurtzite-like boron nitride are stated as related to the structure peculiarities and inhomogeneity of chemical bonds in elementary crystal cells of various modifications. Advantages and disadvantages of familiar technological procedures in production of boron nitride ceramics are compared. A new technology is suggested, which is based on the use of electroorganic compounds for hardening and protection of porous high-purity boron-nitride die from oxidation, and as high-efficient sintered elements for treatment of powders of various structures and further pyrolisis. The method is called thermal molecular lacing (TML). Properties of ceramics produced by the TML method are compared with characteristics of well-known brands of boron nitride ceramics

  16. Additive Manufacturing of Dense Hexagonal Boron Nitride Objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquez Rossy, Andres E [ORNL; Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL; Elliott, Amy M [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL

    2017-05-12

    The feasibility of manufacturing hexagonal boron nitride objects via additive manufacturing techniques was investigated. It was demonstrated that it is possible to hot-extrude thermoplastic filaments containing uniformly distributed boron nitride particles with a volume concentration as high as 60% and that these thermoplastic filaments can be used as feedstock for 3D-printing objects using a fused deposition system. Objects 3D-printed by fused deposition were subsequently sintered at high temperature to obtain dense ceramic products. In a parallel study the behavior of hexagonal boron nitride in aqueous solutions was investigated. It was shown that the addition of a cationic dispersant to an azeotrope enabled the formulation of slurries with a volume concentration of boron nitride as high as 33%. Although these slurries exhibited complex rheological behavior, the results from this study are encouraging and provide a pathway for manufacturing hexagonal boron nitride objects via robocasting.

  17. Simple process to fabricate nitride alloy powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jae Ho; Kim, Dong-Joo; Kim, Keon Sik; Rhee, Young Woo; Oh, Jang-Soo; Kim, Jong Hun; Koo, Yang Hyun

    2013-01-01

    alloy powders were obtained. Two types of the simple thermal treatment procedures were tested to fabricate nitride powders. First, the procedure is a direct nitriding process in which the metal powders were annealed at 1000 deg. C under nitrogen gas and then further annealed at 1500 deg. C under hydrogen containing Ar gas atmosphere. It was revealed that the particles were fragmented to smaller particles during the annealing. The XRD results showed that the uranium metal converted to UN 2 phase during the annealing at 1000 deg. C and then decomposed to UN phase during the further annealing at 1500 deg. C. Observed fragmentation and cracking of particles were caused by sequential volume changes of expansion and contraction which were accompanied by the formation and decomposition of uranium nitrides. Although uranium nitride powders were successfully fabricated during the simple nitriding process, it seems that milling of the obtained powder might be necessary to fabricate sintered nitride fuel pellets. In order to fabricate finer nitride powders, a nitriding procedure has been modified. In the modified process, the particles were heat-treated at 250 deg. C in H 2 before nitriding. The addition of a hydriding step was effective in obtaining fine uranium nitride powder. In the case of U-10 wt% Zr-alloy, however, only a few large cracks were developed on the particle surface and the particle maintained its size. This result reveals that hydriding and nitriding kinetics or mechanisms of U-10 wt% Zr alloy are quite different from those of U metal

  18. Superplastic forging nitride ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, P.C.; Seydel, E.R.; Raj, R.

    1988-03-22

    A process is disclosed for preparing silicon nitride ceramic parts which are relatively flaw free and which need little or no machining, said process comprising the steps of: (a) preparing a starting powder by wet or dry mixing ingredients comprising by weight from about 70% to about 99% silicon nitride, from about 1% to about 30% of liquid phase forming additive and from 1% to about 7% free silicon; (b) cold pressing to obtain a preform of green density ranging from about 30% to about 75% of theoretical density; (c) sintering at atmospheric pressure in a nitrogen atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 1,400 C to about 2,200 C to obtain a density which ranges from about 50% to about 100% of theoretical density and which is higher than said preform green density, and (d) press forging workpiece resulting from step (c) by isothermally uniaxially pressing said workpiece in an open die without initial contact between said workpiece and die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing and so that pressed workpiece does not contact die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing, to substantially final shape in a nitrogen atmosphere utilizing a temperature within the range of from about 1,400 C to essentially 1,750 C and strain rate within the range of about 10[sup [minus]7] to about 10[sup [minus]1] seconds[sup [minus]1], the temperature and strain rate being such that surface cracks do not occur, said pressing being carried out to obtain a shear deformation greater than 30% whereby superplastic forging is effected.

  19. Indentation fatigue in silicon nitride, alumina and silicon carbide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    carbide ceramics. A K MUKHOPADHYAY. Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata 700 032, India. Abstract. Repeated indentation fatigue (RIF) experiments conducted on the same spot of different structural ceramics viz. a hot pressed silicon nitride (HPSN), sintered alumina of two different grain sizes viz.

  20. Titanium Metal Powder Production by the Plasma Quench Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. A. Cordes; A. Donaldson

    2000-09-01

    The goals of this project included the scale-up of the titanium hydride production process to a production rate of 50 kg/hr at a purity level of 99+%. This goal was to be achieved by incrementally increasing the production capability of a series of reactor systems. This methodic approach was designed to allow Idaho Titanium Technologies to systematically address the engineering issues associated with plasma system performance, and powder collection system design and performance. With quality powder available, actual fabrication with the titanium hydride was to be pursued. Finally, with a successful titanium production system in place, the production of titanium aluminide was to be pursued by the simultaneously injection of titanium and aluminum precursors into the reactor system. Some significant accomplishments of the project are: A unique and revolutionary torch/reactor capable of withstanding temperatures up to 5000 C with high thermal efficiency has been operated. The dissociation of titanium tetrachloride into titanium powder and HC1 has been demonstrated, and a one-megawatt reactor potentially capable of producing 100 pounds per hour has been built, but not yet operated at the powder level. The removal of residual subchlorides and adsorbed HC1 and the sintering of powder to form solid bodies have been demonstrated. The production system has been operated at production rates up to 40 pounds per hour. Subsequent to the end of the project, Idaho Titanium Technologies demonstrated that titanium hydride powder can indeed be sintered into solid titanium metal at 1500 C without sintering aids.

  1. Nano-structure and tribological properties of B+ and Ti+ co-implanted silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Naoki; Noda, Katsutoshi; Yamauchi, Yukihiko

    2005-01-01

    Silicon nitride ceramics have been co-implanted with boron and titanium ions at a fluence of 2 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 and an energy of 200 keV. TEM results indicated that the boron and titanium-implanted layers were amorphized separately and titanium nitride nano-crystallites were formed in the titanium-implanted layer. XPS results indicated that the implantation profile varied a little depending on the ion implantation sequence of boron and titanium ions, with the boron implantation peak shifting to a shallower position when implanted after Ti + -implantation. Wear tests of these ion-implanted materials were carried out using a block-on-ring wear tester under non-lubricated conditions against commercially available silicon nitride materials. The specific wear rate was reduced by ion implantation and showed that the specific wear rate of Ti + -implanted sample was the lowest, followed by B + , Ti + co-implanted and B + -implanted samples

  2. Plasma nitriding of steels

    CERN Document Server

    Aghajani, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the effect of plasma nitriding on the properties of steels. Parameters of different grades of steels are considered, such as structural and constructional steels, stainless steels and tools steels. The reader will find within the text an introduction to nitriding treatment, the basis of plasma and its roll in nitriding. The authors also address the advantages and disadvantages of plasma nitriding in comparison with other nitriding methods. .

  3. Metal surface nitriding by laser induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomann, A. L.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Andreazza-Vignolle, C.; Andreazza, P.; Hermann, J.; Blondiaux, G.

    1996-10-01

    We study a nitriding technique of metals by means of laser induced plasma. The synthesized layers are composed of a nitrogen concentration gradient over several μm depth, and are expected to be useful for tribological applications with no adhesion problem. The nitriding method is tested on the synthesis of titanium nitride which is a well-known compound, obtained at present by many deposition and diffusion techniques. In the method of interest, a laser beam is focused on a titanium target in a nitrogen atmosphere, leading to the creation of a plasma over the metal surface. In order to understand the layer formation, it is necessary to characterize the plasma as well as the surface that it has been in contact with. Progressive nitrogen incorporation in the titanium lattice and TiN synthesis are studied by characterizing samples prepared with increasing laser shot number (100-4000). The role of the laser wavelength is also inspected by comparing layers obtained with two kinds of pulsed lasers: a transversal-excited-atmospheric-pressure-CO2 laser (λ=10.6 μm) and a XeCl excimer laser (λ=308 nm). Simulations of the target temperature rise under laser irradiation are performed, which evidence differences in the initial laser/material interaction (material heated thickness, heating time duration, etc.) depending on the laser features (wavelength and pulse time duration). Results from plasma characterization also point out that the plasma composition and propagation mode depend on the laser wavelength. Correlation of these results with those obtained from layer analyses shows at first the important role played by the plasma in the nitrogen incorporation. Its presence is necessary and allows N2 dissociation and a better energy coupling with the target. Second, it appears that the nitrogen diffusion governs the nitriding process. The study of the metal nitriding efficiency, depending on the laser used, allows us to explain the differences observed in the layer features

  4. Experimental demonstration of titanium nitride plasmonic interconnects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinsey, N.; Ferrera, M.; Naik, G. V.

    2014-01-01

    An insulator-metal-insulator plasmonic interconnect using TiN, a CMOS-compatible material, is proposed and investigated experimentally at the telecommunication wavelength of 1.55 mu m. The TiN waveguide was shown to obtain propagation losses less than 0.8 dB/mm with a mode size of 9.8 mu m...

  5. Titanium ; dream new material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Tae; Kim Seung Eon; Heoon, Yong Taek; Jung, Hui Won

    2001-11-01

    The contents of this book are history of Titanium, present situation of Titanium industry, property of Titanium alloy, types of it, development of new alloy of Titanium smelting of Titanium, cast of Titanium and heat treatment of Titanium, Titanium alloy for plane, car parts, biological health care, and sport leisure and daily life, prospect, and Titanium industrial development of Titanium in China.

  6. Structure and characteristics of functional powder composite materials obtained by spark plasma sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oglezneva, S. A.; Kachenyuk, M. N.; Kulmeteva, V. B.; Ogleznev, N. B.

    2017-07-01

    The article describes the results of spark plasma sintering of ceramic materials based on titanium carbide, titanium carbosilicide, ceramic composite materials based on zirconium oxide, strengthened by carbon nanostructures and composite materials of electrotechnical purpose based on copper with addition of carbon structures and titanium carbosilicide. The research shows that the spark plasma sintering can achieve relative density of the material up to 98%. The effect of sintering temperature on the phase composition, density and porosity of the final product has been studied. It was found that with addition of carbon nanostructures the relative density and hardness decrease, but the fracture strength of ZrO2 increases up to times 2. The relative erosion resistance of the electrodes made of composite copper-based powder materials, obtained by spark plasma sintering during electroerosion treatment of tool steel exceeds that parameter of pure copper up to times 15.

  7. AlN powder synthesis via nitriding reaction of aluminum sub-chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohashi, T.; Nishida, T.; Sugiura, M. (Waseda Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Graduate School); Fuwa, A. (Waseda Univ., Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-06-01

    In order to obtain the pertinent properties of aluminium nitride in its sintered form, it is desirable to have powders of finer sizes with narrower size distribution and higher purity, thereby making the sintering processing easier and the final body denser. Instead of using sublimated aluminum tri-chloride vapor (AlCl3) as an aluminum source in the vapor phase nitriding reaction, the mixed aluminum chloride vapor consisted of aluminum tri-chloride, bi-chloride and mono-chloride are used in the reaction with ammonia at temperatures of 1000 and 1200K. The mixed chloride vapors are produced by reacting chlorine with molten aluminum at 1000 or 1200K under atmospheric pressure. The reaction of this mixed chloride vapor with ammonia is then experimentally investigated to study the aluminum nitride powder morphology. The aluminum nitride powders synthesized under various ammonia concentrations are characterized for size distribution, mean particle size and particle morphology. 24 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. On the use of titanium hydride for powder injection moulding of titanium-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrenoo-Morelli, E.; Bidaux, J.-E.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Titanium and titanium-based alloys are excellent materials for a number of engineering applications because of their high strength, lightweight, good corrosion resistance, non magnetic characteristic and biocompatibility. The current processing steps are usually costly, and there is a growing demand for net-shape solutions for manufacturing parts of increasing complexity. Powder injection moulding is becoming a competitive alternative, thanks to the advances in production of good quality base-powders, binders and sintering facilities. Titanium hydride powders, have the attractiveness of being less reactive than fine titanium powders, easier to handle, and cheaper. This paper summarizes recent advances on PIM of titanium and titanium alloys from TiH2 powders, including shape-memory NiTi alloys. (author)

  9. Sintering of nonstoichiometric UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susnik, D.; Holc, J.

    1983-01-01

    Activated sintering of UO 2 pellets at 1100 deg C is described. In CO 2 atmosphere is UO 2 is nonstoichiometric and pellets from active UO 2 powders sinter at 900 deg C to high density. At 1100 deg C the final sintered density is practically achieved at heating on sintering temperature. After reduction and cooling in H 2 atmosphere which is followed sintering in CO 2 the structure is identical to the structured UO 2 pellets sintered at high temperature in H 2 . Density of activated sintered UO 2 pellets is stable, even after additional sintering at 1800 deg C. (author)

  10. Space-confined preparation of high surface area tungsten oxide and tungsten nitride inside the pores of mesoporous silica SBA-15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Simon; Beyer, Hans; Köhler, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    For the direct preparation of high surface area nitride materials, a lack of suitable precursors exists. Indirect preparation by gas phase nitridation (e.g. by ammonia) requires high temperatures and often results in sintering. The present work demonstrates that the space-confined preparation of ...

  11. Evaluation of Antibacterial Activity of Titanium Surface Modified by PVD/PACVD Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Min-Kyung; Lee, Min-Joo; Park, Sang-Won; Lee, Kwangmin; Yun, Kwi-Dug; Kim, Hyun-Seung; Oh, Gye-Jeong; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Lim, Hyun-Pil

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the response of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) via crystal violet staining assay on titanium surface modified by physical vapor deposition/plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition process. Specimens were divided into the following three groups: polished titanium (control group), titanium modified by DC magnetron sputtering (group TiN-Ti), and titanium modified by plasma nitriding (group N-Ti). Surface characteristics of specimens were observed by using nanosurface 3D optical profiler and field emission scanning electron microscope. Group TiN-Ti showed TiN layer of 1.2 microm in thickness. Group N-Ti was identified as plasma nitriding with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Roughness average (Ra) of all specimens had values 0.05). Within the process condition of this study, modified titanium surfaces by DC magnetron sputtering and plasma nitriding did not influence the adhesion of S. mutans.

  12. Tool design and materials for electro sinter forging (ESF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cannella, Emanuele; Nielsen, Chris Valentin

    ) process, the main requirement is the electrical current passing through the electrical conducting powder. To obtain this, a closed-die setup with electrical insulating properties was used. Furthermore, the alignment between the compacting punch and die needed to be ensured by pre-aligning or alternatively...... by using an alignment system. The present work is focused on the designing phase of a tool for the electro sinter forging of a disc, made from titanium powder. By applying a pre-alignment system, the setup resulted suitable for this application. A tool design for sintering rings is also showed....

  13. Sintering of beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caillat, R.; Pointud, R.

    1955-01-01

    This study had for origin to find a process permitting to manufacture bricks of beryllium oxide of pure nuclear grade, with a density as elevated as possible and with standardized shape. The sintering under load was the technique kept for the manufacture of the bricks. Because of the important toxicity of the beryllium oxide, the general features for the preliminary study of the sintering, have been determined while using alumina. The obtained results will be able to act as general indication for ulterior studies with sintering under load. (M.B.) [fr

  14. Nitridation of vanadium by ion beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Masato; Chayahara, Akiyoshi; Kinomura, Atsushi; Ensinger, Wolfgang

    1994-01-01

    The nitridation of vanadium by ion beam irradiation is studied by the ion implantation method and the dynamic mixing method. The nitrogen ion implantation was carried out into deposited V(110) films. Using both methods, three phases are formed, i.e. α-V, β-V 2 N, and δ-VN. Which phases are formed is related to the implantation dose or the arrival ratio. The orientation of the VN films produced by the dynamic ion beam mixing method is (100) and that of the VN films produced by the ion implantation method is (111). The nitridation of vanadium is also discussed in comparison with that of titanium and chromium. ((orig.))

  15. Corrosion-electrochemical characteristics of oxide-carbide and oxide-nitride coatings formed by electrolytic plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomashov, N.D.; Chukalovskaya, T.V.; Medova, I.L.; Duradzhi, V.N.; Plavnik, G.M.

    1990-01-01

    The composition, structure, microhardness and corrosion-electrochemical properties of oxide-carbide and oxide-nitride coatings on titanium in 5n H 2 SO 4 , 50 deg, produced by the method of chemical-heat treatment in electrolytic plasma, containing saturation components of nitrogen and carbon, were investigated. It is shown that the coatings produced have increased hardness, possess high corrosion resistance in sulfuric acid solution at increased temperature, as to their electrochemcial behaviour they are similar to titanium carbide and nitride respectively. It is shown that high corrosion resistance is ensured by electrochemical mechanism of the oxide-carbide and oxide-nitride coating protection

  16. Corrosion surface protection by using titanium carbon nitride/titanium-niobium carbon nitride multilayered system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caicedo, J.C., E-mail: jcesarca@calima.univalle.edu.co [Grupo de Peliculas Delgadas, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Amaya, C. [Grupo de Peliculas Delgadas, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Laboratorio de Recubrimientos Duros, CDT-ASTIN SENA, Cali (Colombia); Cabrera, G. [Grupo de Peliculas Delgadas, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Esteve, J. [Department de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain); Aperador, W. [Universidad Militar Nueva Granada Bogota D.C (Colombia); Gomez, M.E. [Grupo de Peliculas Delgadas, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Prieto, P. [Grupo de Peliculas Delgadas, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Centro de Excelencia en Nuevos Materiales, CENM, Calle 13 100-00 Edificio 320, espacio 1026, Cali (Colombia)

    2011-07-29

    The aim of this work is the improvement of the electrochemical behavior of 4140 steel substrate using TiCN/TiNbCN multilayered system as a protective coating. We have grown [TiCN/TiNbCN]{sub n} multilayered via reactive r.f. magnetron sputtering technique in which was varied systematically the bilayer period ({Lambda}), and the bilayer number (n), maintaining constant the total thickness of the coatings ({approx} 3 {mu}m). The coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscopy, electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy assisted with selected area electron diffraction. The electrochemical properties were studied by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy and Tafel curves. XRD results showed a preferential growth in the face-centered cubic (111) crystal structure for [TiCN/TiNbCN]{sub n} multilayered coatings [1]. In this work was obtained the maximum corrosion resistance for the coating with ({Lambda}) equal to 15 nm, corresponding to n = 200 bilayered. The polarization resistance and corrosion rate were around 8.6 kOhm cm{sup 2} and 7.59 . 10{sup -4} mm/year, these values were 8.6 and 0.001 times better than those showed by the uncoated 4140 steel substrate (1.0 kOhm and 0.57 mm/year), respectively. The improvement of the electrochemical behavior of the 4140 coated with this TiCN/TiNbCN multilayered system can be attributed to the presence of several interfaces that act as obstacles for the inward and outward diffusions of Cl{sup -} ion species, generating an increment in the energy or potential required for translating the corrosive ions across the coating/substrate interface. Moreover, the interface systems affect the means free path on the ions toward the metallic substrate, due to the decreasing of the defects presented in the multilayered coatings.

  17. Corrosion surface protection by using titanium carbon nitride/titanium-niobium carbon nitride multilayered system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caicedo, J.C.; Amaya, C.; Cabrera, G.; Esteve, J.; Aperador, W.; Gomez, M.E.; Prieto, P.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work is the improvement of the electrochemical behavior of 4140 steel substrate using TiCN/TiNbCN multilayered system as a protective coating. We have grown [TiCN/TiNbCN] n multilayered via reactive r.f. magnetron sputtering technique in which was varied systematically the bilayer period (Λ), and the bilayer number (n), maintaining constant the total thickness of the coatings (∼ 3 μm). The coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscopy, electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy assisted with selected area electron diffraction. The electrochemical properties were studied by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy and Tafel curves. XRD results showed a preferential growth in the face-centered cubic (111) crystal structure for [TiCN/TiNbCN] n multilayered coatings [1]. In this work was obtained the maximum corrosion resistance for the coating with (Λ) equal to 15 nm, corresponding to n = 200 bilayered. The polarization resistance and corrosion rate were around 8.6 kOhm cm 2 and 7.59 . 10 -4 mm/year, these values were 8.6 and 0.001 times better than those showed by the uncoated 4140 steel substrate (1.0 kOhm and 0.57 mm/year), respectively. The improvement of the electrochemical behavior of the 4140 coated with this TiCN/TiNbCN multilayered system can be attributed to the presence of several interfaces that act as obstacles for the inward and outward diffusions of Cl - ion species, generating an increment in the energy or potential required for translating the corrosive ions across the coating/substrate interface. Moreover, the interface systems affect the means free path on the ions toward the metallic substrate, due to the decreasing of the defects presented in the multilayered coatings.

  18. Science of sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuczynski, G.

    1977-01-01

    Although the methods of integration of materials by sintering, have been used since the early history of humanity, the actual understanding of the process involved came only in the last three decades. As in the most human endeavors, the art preceded theory. The comprehension of the elementary processes occuring during sintering comes from the studies of model system. Although the elementary processes occuring during sintering are today quite well understood, the problem of shrinkage of a powder compact which was at the origin of Sintering Science is still far from solved. This is due to the complexity of the internal geometry of the compacts. The recent attempts to apply statistics to this problem, seem to offer some promise

  19. Uranium dioxide. Sintering test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    Description of a sintering method and of the equipment devoted to uranium dioxide powder caracterization and comparison between different samples. Determination of the curve giving specific volume versus pressure and micrographic examination of a pellet at medium pressure [fr

  20. Kinetics of UO2 sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ristic, M.M.

    1962-01-01

    Detailed conclusions related to the UO 2 sintering can be drawn from investigating the kinetics of the sintering process. This report gives an thorough analysis of the the data concerned with sintering available in the literature taking into account the Jander and Arrhenius laws. This analysis completes the study of influence of the O/U ratio and the atmosphere on the sintering. Results presented are fundamentals of future theoretical and experimental work related to characterisation of the UO 2 sintering process

  1. Colloidal characterization of silicon nitride and silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The colloidal behavior of aqueous ceramic slips strongly affects the forming and sintering behavior and the ultimate mechanical strength of the final ceramic product. The colloidal behavior of these materials, which is dominated by electrical interactions between the particles, is complex due to the strong interaction of the solids with the processing fluids. A surface titration methodology, modified to account for this interaction, was developed and used to provide fundamental insights into the interfacial chemistry of these systems. Various powder pretreatment strategies were explored to differentiate between true surface chemistry and artifacts due to exposure history. The colloidal behavior of both silicon nitride and carbide is dominated by silanol groups on the powder surfaces. However, the colloid chemistry of silicon nitride is apparently influenced by an additional amine group. With the proper powder treatments, silicon nitride and carbide powder can be made to appear colloidally equivalent. The impact of these results on processing control will be discussed.

  2. Influence of nitriding atmosphere on the modification of surface titanium with focus on the behavior of blood platelets adhesion; Influencia da atmosfera nitretante na modificacao de superficies de titanio com enfase no comportamento de adesao de plaquetas sanguineas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitoriano, J.O.; Alves, C. [Universidade Federal Rural do Semi-Arido (UFERSA), RN (Brazil); Braz, D.C.; Camara, R.B.G.; Rocha, H.A.O., E-mail: clodomiro.jr@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), RN (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The present study aimed to analyze the influence of surface modification of titanium on the adhesion of blood platelets, through techniques of adhesion and morphological analyzes. Discs of titanium grade II received different surface treatments with plasma of Ar + N{sub 2} + H{sub 2} and Ar + H{sub 2}, forming two experimental groups including only polished samples used as standard. Before and after treatment the samples were characterized according to topography, crystalline structure and wettability, using atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and testing of sessile drop, respectively. Platelet rich plasma (PRP) was applied on the modified surfaces in a culture plates. Images obtained by electron microscopy of adhered platelets were analyzed to verify the behavior of platelets in the different experimental conditions. (author)

  3. Cranioplasty with individual titanium implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishinov, S.; Stupak, V.; Sadovoy, M.; Mamonova, E.; Koporushko, N.; Larkin, V.; Novokshonov, A.; Dolzhenko, D.; Panchenko, A.; Desyatykh, I.; Krasovsky, I.

    2017-09-01

    Cranioplasty is the second procedure in the history of neurosurgery after trepanation, and it is still relevant despite the development of civilization and progress in medicine. Each cranioplasty operation is unique because there are no two patients with identical defects of the skull bones. The development of Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) technique opened up the possibility of direct implant printing of titanium, a biocompatible metal used in medicine. This eliminates the need for producing any intermediate products to create the desired implant. We have produced 8 patient-specific titanium implants using this technique for patients who underwent different decompressive cranioectomies associated with bone tumors. Follow-up duration ranged from 6 to 12 months. We observed no implant-related reactions or complications. In all cases of reconstructive neurosurgery we achieved good clinical and aesthetic results. The analysis of the literature and our own experience in three-dimensional modeling, prototyping, and printing suggests that direct laser sintering of titanium is the optimal method to produce biocompatible surgical implants.

  4. Selective ablation of a titanium nitride film on tungsten carbide substrate using ultrashort laser pulses; Ablação seletiva de um filme de nitreto de titânio em substrato de carboneto de tungstênio utilizando laser de pulsos ultracurtos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Eduardo Spinelli

    2017-07-01

    Surface coatings are applied to many cutting tools in the metallurgical industry in order to improve cutting efficiency and extend its useful life. In this work, tests were performed to remove the coating of titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN) on tungsten carbide (WC-Co) pellets, using an ultrashort laser pulses beam. After determination of the damage thresholds of the film and the substrate, were ablated on the surface of the coating lines using two ablation conditions, it was initially operated on the low fluence regime for the film, and later on the low fluence regime of the substrate, far below the threshold of the film, applying high overlapping pulses. A laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system was set up to monitor the materials present in the plasma generated by the laser, but the system did not present sufficient sensitivity to read the low intensity of the plasma generated in the process and was not used. After the analysis of the traces by electron microscopy, optical profilometer and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, it was not possible to determine a safe process to carry out the selective removal of the film in question, however, due to the data obtained and observations of the results in some traces, new possibilities were raised, opening the discussion for future work. (author)

  5. Sintering Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Randall M.

    1996-01-01

    Although sintering is an essential process in the manufacture of ceramics and certain metals, as well as several other industrial operations, until now, no single book has treated both the background theory and the practical application of this complex and often delicate procedure. In Sintering Theory and Practice, leading researcher and materials engineer Randall M. German presents a comprehensive treatment of this subject that will be of great use to manufacturers and scientists alike. This practical guide to sintering considers the fact that while the bonding process improves strength and other engineering properties of the compacted material, inappropriate methods of control may lead to cracking, distortion, and other defects. It provides a working knowledge of sintering, and shows how to avoid problems while accounting for variables such as particle size, maximum temperature, time at that temperature, and other problems that may cause changes in processing. The book describes the fundamental atomic events that govern the transformation from particles to solid, covers all forms of the sintering process, and provides a summary of many actual production cycles. Building from the ground up, it begins with definitions and progresses to measurement techniques, easing the transition, especially for students, into advanced topics such as single-phase solid-state sintering, microstructure changes, the complications of mixed particles, and pressure-assisted sintering. German draws on some six thousand references to provide a coherent and lucid treatment of the subject, making scientific principles and practical applications accessible to both students and professionals. In the process, he also points out and avoids the pitfalls found in various competing theories, concepts, and mathematical disputes within the field. A unique opportunity to discover what sintering is all about--both in theory and in practice What is sintering? We see the end product of this thermal

  6. Surface characterization of nickel titanium orthodontic arch wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Manu; Seema, Saraswathy; Tiwari, Brijesh; Sharma, Himanshu S.; Londhe, Sanjay; Arora, Vimal

    2015-01-01

    Background Surface roughness of nickel titanium orthodontic arch wires poses several clinical challenges. Surface modification with aesthetic/metallic/non metallic materials is therefore a recent innovation, with clinical efficacy yet to be comprehensively evaluated. Methods One conventional and five types of surface modified nickel titanium arch wires were surface characterized with scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive analysis, Raman spectroscopy, Atomic force microscopy and 3D profilometry. Root mean square roughness values were analyzed by one way analysis of variance and post hoc Duncan's multiple range tests. Results Study groups demonstrated considerable reduction in roughness values from conventional in a material specific pattern: Group I; conventional (578.56 nm) > Group V; Teflon (365.33 nm) > Group III; nitride (301.51 nm) > Group VI (i); rhodium (290.64 nm) > Group VI (ii); silver (252.22 nm) > Group IV; titanium (229.51 nm) > Group II; resin (158.60 nm). It also showed the defects with aesthetic (resin/Teflon) and nitride surfaces and smooth topography achieved with metals; titanium/silver/rhodium. Conclusions Resin, Teflon, titanium, silver, rhodium and nitrides were effective in decreasing surface roughness of nickel titanium arch wires albeit; certain flaws. Findings have clinical implications, considering their potential in lessening biofilm adhesion, reducing friction, improving corrosion resistance and preventing nickel leach and allergic reactions. PMID:26843749

  7. Electrochemical properties of lanthanum nitride with calcium nitride additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesunova, R.P.; Fishman, L.S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports on the electrochemical properties of lanthanum nitride with calcium nitride added. The lanthanum nitride was obtained by nitriding metallic lanthanum at 870 K in an ammonia stream. The product contained Cl, Pr, Nd, Sm, Fe, Ca, Cu, Mo, Mg, Al, Si, and Be. The calcium nitride was obtained by nitriding metallic calcium in a nitrogen stream. The conductivity on the LaN/C 3 N 2 system components are shown as a function of temperature. A table shows the solid solutions to be virtually electronic conductors and the lanthanum nitride a mixed conductor

  8. Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murduck, J.M.; Lepetre, Y.J.; Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources. 8 figs

  9. Morphological analysis and modelling of sintering and of sintered materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jernot, Jean-Paul

    1982-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the study of solid phase sintering of metallic powders, and aims at describing as precisely as possible the different involved matter transport mechanisms, first by using a thermodynamic approach to sintering. Sintering diagrams are also used to determine prevailing mechanisms. The microstructure of sintered materials has been studied by using image quantitative analysis, thus by using a morphological approach to sintering. Morphological parameters allow, on the one hand, the evolution of powders during sintering to be followed, and, on the other hand, sintered products to be correctly characterised. Moreover, the author reports the study of the evolution of some physical properties of sintered materials with respect to their microstructure parameters. This leads to the development of a modelling of the behaviour of these materials [fr

  10. Degradation of nitride coatings in low-pressure gas discharge plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Yurii; Shugurov, Vladimir; Krysina, Olga; Petrikova, Elizaveta; Tolkachev, Oleg

    2017-12-01

    The paper provides research data on the defect structure, mechanical characteristics, and tribological properties of commercially pure VT1-0 titanium exposed to surface modification on a COMPLEX laboratory electron-ion plasma setup which allows nitriding, coating deposition, and etching in low-pressure gas discharge plasma in a single vacuum cycle. It is shown that preliminary plasma nitriding forms a columnar Ti2N phase in VT1-0 titanium and that subsequent TiN deposition results in a thin nanocrystalline TiN layer. When the coating-substrate system is etched, the coating fails and the tribological properties of the material degrade greatly.

  11. Sintering of Synroc D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, G.

    1982-01-01

    Sintering has been investigated as a method for the mineralization and densification of high-level nuclear defense waste powder. Studies have been conducted on Synroc D composite powder LS04. Optimal densification has been found to be highly dependent on the characteristics of the starting material. Powder subjected to milling, which was believed to reduce the level of agglomeration and possibly particle size, was found to densify better than powder not subjected to this milling. Densities of greater than 95% of theoretical could be achieved for samples sintered at 1150 to 1200 0 C. Mineralogy was found to be as expected for Synroc D for samples sintered in a CO 2 /CO atmosphere where the Fe +2 /Fe +3 ratio was maintained at 1.0 to 5.75. In a more oxidizing, pure CO 2 atmosphere a new phase, not previously identified in Synroc D, was found

  12. Sintering of composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordia, R.K.; Scherer, G.W.

    1988-01-01

    Several constitutive laws have been used in the literature to predict the response of sintering bodies under external and internal stress fields. These analyses are based on the assumptions of linear and isotropic behavior. The authors provide a critical examination of these equations and show that some of the available constitutive laws predict a negative Poisson's ratio. These laws have been used to analyze sintering of ceramic matrix composites with rigid inclusions and predict large values of the internal stresses and significant retardation of the densification of composites. Since a negative value of Poisson's ratio has never been observed in sinter - forging experiments, the authors conclude that either the stresses are small (as predicted by the constitutive laws with positive Poisson's ratio) or the basic assumption of linearity and isotropy used in all the analyses is incorrect. Finally, the authors discuss some phenomena that could be important in understanding the densification of ceramic matrix composites

  13. Kinetic modelling of chlorination of nitrided ilmenite using MATLAB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, Sivakumar, E-mail: srsivakumar@usm.my; Kwok, Teong Chen, E-mail: ctck@live.com; Hamid, Sheikh Abdul Rezan Sheikh Abdul, E-mail: rezanshk@gmail.com [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300, Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)

    2016-07-19

    In the present study, chlorination of nitride ilmenite using 2{sup k} factorial design was investigated. The reduction experiments were carried out in a temperature range of 400°C to 500°C, chlorination duration from 1 hour to 3 hours and using different type of carbon reactant. Phases of raw materials and reduced samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Ilmenite was reduced to TiO{sub x}C{sub y}N{sub z} through carbothermal and nitridation for further chlorination into titanium tetrachloride. The Design of Experiment analysis suggested that the types of carbon reactant contribute most influence to the extent of chlorination of nitride ilmenite. The extent of chlorination was highest at 500°C with 3 hours chlorination time and carbon nanotube as carbon reactant.

  14. Ion nitriding of aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitz, T.

    2002-09-01

    The present study is devoted to the investigation of the mechanism of aluminium nitriding by a technique that employs implantation of low-energy nitrogen ions and diffusional transport of atoms. The nitriding of aluminium is investigated, because this is a method for surface modification of aluminium and has a potential for application in a broad spectrum of fields such as automobile, marine, aviation, space technologies, etc. However, at present nitriding of aluminium does not find any large scale industrial application, due to problems in the formation of stoichiometric aluminium nitride layers with a sufficient thickness and good quality. For the purposes of this study, ion nitriding is chosen, as an ion beam method with the advantage of good and independent control over the process parameters, which thus can be related uniquely to the physical properties of the resulting layers. Moreover, ion nitriding has a close similarity to plasma nitriding and plasma immersion ion implantation, which are methods with a potential for industrial application. (orig.)

  15. Preparation of Ti3Al intermetallic compound by spark plasma sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tsutomu; Fukui, Takahiro

    2018-04-01

    Sintered compacts of single phase Ti3Al intermetallic compound, which have excellent potential as refractory materials, were prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS). A raw powder of Ti3Al intermetallic compound with an average powder diameter of 176 ± 56 μm was used in this study; this large powder diameter is disadvantageous for sintering because of the small surface area. The samples were prepared at sintering temperatures (Ts) of 1088, 1203, and 1323 K, sintering stresses (σs) of 16, 32, and 48 MPa, and a sintering time (ts) of 10 min. The calculated relative densities based on the apparent density of Ti3Al provided by the supplier were approximately 100% under all sintering conditions. From the experimental results, it was evident that SPS is an effective technique for dense sintering of Ti3Al intermetallic compounds in a short time interval. In this report, the sintering characteristics of Ti3Al intermetallic compacts are briefly discussed and compared with those of pure titanium compacts.

  16. The pressureless sintering and mechanical properties of AlON ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, N., E-mail: zhangning5832@163.com [Key Lab. of Advanced Materials and Manufacturing Technology of Liaoning Province, Shenyang University, Shenyang, Liaoning 110044 (China); Liang, B.; Wang, X.Y.; Kan, H.M.; Zhu, K.W. [Key Lab. of Advanced Materials and Manufacturing Technology of Liaoning Province, Shenyang University, Shenyang, Liaoning 110044 (China); Zhao, X.J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang, Liaoning 110004 (China)

    2011-07-25

    Highlights: {yields} A one-step pressureless sintering process was proposed, which is simple and viable. {yields} Cheap and easily available {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and aluminum powders were chosen as raw materials substituting for expensive AlN ultrafine powders. {yields} The sintering temperature of AlON ceramic was reduced by 50 deg. C and the flexural strength was enhanced by 29.4%. - Abstract: Aluminum oxynitride (AlON) ceramic was synthesized by one-step pressureless sintering technology using low cost and easily available {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and aluminum powders as raw materials. The sintering temperature was reduced because aluminum powders were nitridized into high activity AlN under the flowing nitrogen atmosphere. The curves of thermal analysis, microstructure and atomic distribution were investigated. The influence of sintering temperatures on phase composition, sintering densification and flexural strength was also explored. The experimental results showed that {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and aluminum powders were acceptable substitutes for more expensive AlN ultrafine powders. Under the optimum sintering process at 1750 deg. C for 2 h, the sintered density and flexural strength of AlON ceramic were higher, 3.62 g/cm{sup 3} and 321 MPa, respectively. The sintering temperature was decreased by 50 deg. C because newly formed high activity AlN in situ reacted with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} into Al{sub 23}O{sub 27}N{sub 5}, enhancing flexural strength by 29.4%. However, the sintering temperature could not be too high because grain growth and displacement of oxygen atoms from AlON ceramics by nitrogen atoms caused a decline in sintering densification and flexural strength.

  17. Processing and characterization of laser sintered hybrid B4C/cBN reinforced Ti-based metal matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ankit; Hussain, Manowar; Misra, Saurav; Das, Alok Kumar; Mandal, Amitava

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to make a boron carbide (B4C) and cubic boron nitride (cBN) reinforced Ti6Al4V metal matrix composites (MMC's) by direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) technique using the continuous wave (CW) SPI fiber laser and to check the feasibility of the formation of three dimensional objects by this process. For this study, the process parameters like laser power density (3.528-5.172 W/cm2 (×104), scanning speed (3500-4500 mm/min), composition of the reinforced materials B4C (5-25% by volume) and cBN (3% by volume) were taken as input variables and hatching gap (0.2 mm), spot diameter (0.4 mm), layer thickness (0.4 mm) were taken as constant. It was analyzed that surface characteristic, density and the mechanical properties of sintered samples were greatly influenced by varying the input process parameters. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-Ray diffraction (XRD) were performed for microstructural analysis, elemental analysis, and recognition of intermetallic compounds respectively. Mechanical properties like micro-hardness & wear rate were examined by Vickers micro-hardness tester & pin on disc arrangement respectively. From hardness tests, it was observed that hardness property of the sintered specimens was increased as compared to the parent material. The XRD results show that there is a good affinity between Ti6Al4V-B4C-cBN to produce various intermetallic compounds which themselves enhance the mechanical properties of the samples. From FESEM analysis, we can conclude that there is a uniform distribution of reinforcements in the titanium alloy matrix. Furthermore, the coefficient of friction (COF) was characterized by the irregular pattern and it tends to decrease with an increase in the volume % of reinforcement. The results obtained in this work may be useful in preparing the MMC's with improved mechanical properties and overall characteristics.

  18. Fabrication and properties of graphene reinforced silicon nitride composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yaping; Li, Bin, E-mail: libin@nudt.edu.cn; Zhang, Changrui; Wang, Siqing; Liu, Kun; Yang, Bei

    2015-09-17

    Silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramic composites reinforced with graphene platelets (GPLs) were prepared by hot pressed sintering and pressureless sintering respectively. Adequate intermixing of the GPLs and the ceramic powders was achieved in nmethyl-pyrrolidone (NMP) under ultrasonic vibration followed by ball-milling. The microstructure and phases of the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic composites were investigated by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effects of GPLs on the composites' mechanical properties were analyzed. The results showed that GPLs were well dispersed in the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic matrix. β-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4,} O′-sialon and GPLs were present in the hot-pressed composites while pressureless sintered composites contain β-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, Si, SiC and GPLs. Graphene has the potential to improve the mechanical properties of both the hot pressed and pressureless sintered composites. Toughening effect of GPLs on the pressureless sintered composites appeared more effective than that on the hot pressed composites. Toughening mechanisms, such as pull-out, crack bridging and crack deflection induced by GPLs were observed in the composites prepared by the two methods.

  19. Fabrication and properties of graphene reinforced silicon nitride composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yaping; Li, Bin; Zhang, Changrui; Wang, Siqing; Liu, Kun; Yang, Bei

    2015-01-01

    Silicon nitride (Si 3 N 4 ) ceramic composites reinforced with graphene platelets (GPLs) were prepared by hot pressed sintering and pressureless sintering respectively. Adequate intermixing of the GPLs and the ceramic powders was achieved in nmethyl-pyrrolidone (NMP) under ultrasonic vibration followed by ball-milling. The microstructure and phases of the Si 3 N 4 ceramic composites were investigated by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effects of GPLs on the composites' mechanical properties were analyzed. The results showed that GPLs were well dispersed in the Si 3 N 4 ceramic matrix. β-Si 3 N 4, O′-sialon and GPLs were present in the hot-pressed composites while pressureless sintered composites contain β-Si 3 N 4 , Si, SiC and GPLs. Graphene has the potential to improve the mechanical properties of both the hot pressed and pressureless sintered composites. Toughening effect of GPLs on the pressureless sintered composites appeared more effective than that on the hot pressed composites. Toughening mechanisms, such as pull-out, crack bridging and crack deflection induced by GPLs were observed in the composites prepared by the two methods

  20. Relation between microstructure and thermal conductivity in aluminium nitride substrates; Relations entre la microstructure et la conductivite thermique dans les substrats de nitrure d`aluminium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarrige, J.; Lecompte, J.P.; Seck, O. [Faculte des Sciences (CNRS), 87 - Limoges (France). Laboratoire de Materiaux Ceramiques et Traitements de Surface

    1996-12-31

    Sintered aluminium nitride is a promising ceramic substrate for future power electronics applications. This ceramic is characterized by a high thermal conductivity (100 to 200 W/m.K) which depends on two main factors: the oxygen content of the AlN powder used for the sintering process and the microstructure of the sintered material. The oxygen content changes with sintering additions. For instance, boron nitride allows the diffusion of oxygen from the nitride grains to the grain joints. With a complement of yttrium oxide in the liquid phase, the BN/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} couple allows to increase the conductivity to 190 W/m.K with a reduction of the oxygen content. The second part of the study concerns the microstructure of sintered materials. A control of conductivity can be obtained using an adjustment of the sintering cycles. Only two types of microstructure, the secondary phase dispersed in the AlN matrix and the secondary phase that concentrates around triple junctions, allow a better contact between nitride grains and thus higher conductivities of 210 W/m.K. (J.S.) 6 refs.

  1. Surface improvement and biocompatibility of TiAl{sub 24}Nb{sub 10} intermetallic alloy using rf plasma nitriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abd El-Rahman, A.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Sohag University (Egypt)], E-mail: ahmedphys96@hotmail.com; Maitz, M.F. [Institut fuer Ionenstrahlphysik und Materialforschung, Forschungszentrum Dresden Rossendorf (Germany); Kassem, M.A. [Department of Materials and Metals Engineering, Faculty of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Suez Canal University (Egypt); El-Hossary, F.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Sohag University (Egypt); Prokert, F.; Reuther, H.; Pham, M.T.; Richter, E. [Institut fuer Ionenstrahlphysik und Materialforschung, Forschungszentrum Dresden Rossendorf (Germany)

    2007-09-30

    The present work describes the surface improvement and biocompatibility of TiAl{sub 24}Nb{sub 10} intermetallic alloy using rf plasma nitriding. The nitriding process was carried out at different plasma power from 400 W to 650 W where the other plasma conditions were fixed. Grazing incidence X-ray diffractometry (GIXRD), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), tribometer and a nanohardness tester were employed to characterize the nitrided layer. Further potentiodynamic polarization method was used to describe the corrosion behavior of the un-nitrided and nitrided alloy. It has been found that the Vickers hardness (HV) and corrosion resistance values of the nitrided layers increase with increasing plasma power while the wear rates of the nitrided layers reduce by two orders of magnitude as compared to those of the un-nitrided layer. This improvement in surface properties of the intermetallic alloy is due to formation of a thin modified layer which is composed of titanium nitride in the alloy surface. Moreover, all modified layers were tested for their sustainability as a biocompatible material. Concerning the application area of biocompatibility, the present treated alloy show good surface properties especially for the nitrided alloy at low plasma power of 400 W.

  2. Influence of spark plasma sintering conditions on the sintering and functional properties of an ultra-fine grained 316L stainless steel obtained from ball-milled powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, C., E-mail: clement.keller@insa-rouen.fr [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, CNRS-UMR 6634, Université de Rouen, INSA de Rouen, Avenue de l' Université, 76800 Saint-Etienne du Rouvray (France); Tabalaiev, K.; Marnier, G. [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, CNRS-UMR 6634, Université de Rouen, INSA de Rouen, Avenue de l' Université, 76800 Saint-Etienne du Rouvray (France); Noudem, J. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie des Matériaux, CNRS-UMR 6508, Université de Caen, ENSICAEN, 7 bd du Maréchal Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Sauvage, X. [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, CNRS-UMR 6634, Université de Rouen, INSA de Rouen, Avenue de l' Université, 76800 Saint-Etienne du Rouvray (France); Hug, E. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie des Matériaux, CNRS-UMR 6508, Université de Caen, ENSICAEN, 7 bd du Maréchal Juin, 14050 Caen (France)

    2016-05-17

    In this work, 316L samples with submicrometric grain size were sintered by spark plasma sintering. To this aim, 316L powder was first ball-milled with different conditions to obtain nanostructured powder. The process control agent quantity and milling time were varied to check their influence on the crystallite size of milled powder. Samples were then sintered by spark plasma sintering using different sets of sintering parameters (temperature, dwell time and pressure). For each sample, grain size and density were systematically measured in order to investigate the influence of the sintering process on these two key microstructure parameters. Results show that suitable ball-milling and subsequent sintering can be employed to obtain austenitic stainless steel samples with grain sizes in the nanometer range with porosity lower than 3%. However, ball-milling and subsequent sintering enhance chromium carbides formation at the sample surface in addition to intragranular and intergranular oxides in the sample as revealed by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. It has been shown that using Boron nitride together with graphite foils to protect the mold from powder welding prevent such carbide formation. For mechanical properties, results show that the grain size refinement strongly increases the hardness of the samples without deviation from Hall-Petch relationship despite the oxides formation. For corrosion resistance, grain sizes lower than a few micrometers involve a strong decrease in the pitting potential and a strong increase in passivation current. As a consequence, spark plasma sintering can be considered as a promising tool for ultra-fine grained austenitic stainless steel.

  3. Liquid phase sintered SiC. Processing and transformation controlled microstructure tailoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Izhevskyi

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Microstructure development and phase formation processes during sintering of silicon carbide based materials with AlN-Y2O3, AlN-Yb2O3, and AlN-La2O3 sintering additives were investigated. Densification of the materials occurred by liquid-phase sintering mechanism. Proportion of alpha- and beta-SiC powders in the initial mixtures was a variable parameter, while the molar ratio of AlN/RE2O3, and the total amount of additives (10 vol. % were kept constant. Shrinkage behavior during sintering in interrelation with the starting composition of the material and the sintering atmosphere was investigated by high temperature dilatometry. Kinetics of b-SiC to a-SiC phase transformation during post-sintering heat treatment at temperatures 1900-1950 °C was studied, the degree of phase transformation being determined by quantitative x-ray analysis using internal standard technique. Evolution of microstructure resulting from beta-SiC to alpha-SiC transformation was followed up by scanning electron microscopy on polished and chemically etched samples. Transformation-controlled grain growth mechanism similar to the one observed for silicon nitride based ceramics was established. Possibility of in-situ platelet reinforced dense SiC-based ceramics fabrication with improved mechanical properties by means of sintering was shown.

  4. Structure and properties of nitrided surface layer produced on NiTi shape memory alloy by low temperature plasma nitriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czarnowska, Elżbieta; Borowski, Tomasz; Sowińska, Agnieszka; Lelątko, Józef; Oleksiak, Justyna; Kamiński, Janusz; Tarnowski, Michał; Wierzchoń, Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Low temperature plasma nitriding process of NiTi shape memory alloy is presented. • The possibility of treatment details of sophisticated shape. • TiN surface layer has diffusive character. • TiN surface layer increases corrosion resistance of NiTi alloy. • Produced TiN layer modify the biological properties of NiTi alloy. - Abstract: NiTi shape memory alloys are used for bone and cardiological implants. However, on account of the metallosis effect, i.e. the release of the alloy elements into surrounding tissues, they are subjected to various surface treatment processes in order to improve their corrosion resistance and biocompatibility without influencing the required shape memory properties. In this paper, the microstructure, topography and morphology of TiN surface layer on NiTi alloy, and corrosion resistance, both before and after nitriding in low-temperature plasma at 290 °C, are presented. Examinations with the use of the potentiodynamic and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy methods were carried out and show an increase of corrosion resistance in Ringer's solution after glow-discharge nitriding. This surface titanium nitride layer also improved the adhesion of platelets and the proliferation of osteoblasts, which was investigated in in vitro experiments with human cells. Experimental data revealed that nitriding NiTi shape memory alloy under low-temperature plasma improves its properties for bone implant applications

  5. Structure and properties of nitrided surface layer produced on NiTi shape memory alloy by low temperature plasma nitriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarnowska, Elżbieta [Children' s Memorial Health Institute, Pathology Department, Al. Dzieci Polskich 20, 04-730 Warsaw (Poland); Borowski, Tomasz [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Sowińska, Agnieszka [Children' s Memorial Health Institute, Pathology Department, Al. Dzieci Polskich 20, 04-730 Warsaw (Poland); Lelątko, Józef [Silesia University, Faculty of Computer Science and Materials Science, 75 Pułku Piechoty 1A, 41-500 Chorzów (Poland); Oleksiak, Justyna; Kamiński, Janusz; Tarnowski, Michał [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Wierzchoń, Tadeusz, E-mail: twierz@inmat.pw.edu.pl [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Low temperature plasma nitriding process of NiTi shape memory alloy is presented. • The possibility of treatment details of sophisticated shape. • TiN surface layer has diffusive character. • TiN surface layer increases corrosion resistance of NiTi alloy. • Produced TiN layer modify the biological properties of NiTi alloy. - Abstract: NiTi shape memory alloys are used for bone and cardiological implants. However, on account of the metallosis effect, i.e. the release of the alloy elements into surrounding tissues, they are subjected to various surface treatment processes in order to improve their corrosion resistance and biocompatibility without influencing the required shape memory properties. In this paper, the microstructure, topography and morphology of TiN surface layer on NiTi alloy, and corrosion resistance, both before and after nitriding in low-temperature plasma at 290 °C, are presented. Examinations with the use of the potentiodynamic and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy methods were carried out and show an increase of corrosion resistance in Ringer's solution after glow-discharge nitriding. This surface titanium nitride layer also improved the adhesion of platelets and the proliferation of osteoblasts, which was investigated in in vitro experiments with human cells. Experimental data revealed that nitriding NiTi shape memory alloy under low-temperature plasma improves its properties for bone implant applications.

  6. Influence of sintering atmospheres on the aluminium sintering characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mintzer, S.; Bermudez Belkys, S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the aluminium powder (Al) cool compacted (at 95% from theoretical density) which was sintered at 903 K during 4 hours at different atmospheres; oxidizing (air), inert Argon (Ar), Nitrogen (N) and high vacuum. The results obtained show: a) porosity measurements; greater porosity when sintering in Ar and air. b) Metallographic and Scanning observations: many fine pores (< 1 μm) and pore lines distributed at random, at air sintering and greater pores distributed preferentially near the surface, in Ar and N atmospheres. c) Dimensional changes: tendency to contraction of the samples at N and vacuum sintering and expansion in Ar or air. d) Mechanical properties: greater strength and fluence stresses at air and N sintering. The analysis of the results is performed considering sintering modes in presence of an oxide layer and dropped inert gases. (Author)

  7. Sintering behavior and mechanical properties of a metal injection molded Ti–Nb binary alloy as biomaterial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Dapeng; Chang, Keke; Ebel, Thomas; Nie, Hemin; Willumeit, Regine; Pyczak, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The sintering of the MIM Ti–Nb alloy consists of three steps. • The Nb particles act as diffusion barriers during sintering. • The TiC x only precipitate in the cooling step during sintering. • The TiC x hardly influence the sintering process of MIM Ti–Nb alloy. • The MIM Ti–Nb alloy exhibits high strength, low Young’s modulus but poor ductility. - Abstract: Sintering behavior, microstructure and mechanical properties of a Ti–16Nb alloy processed by metal injection molding (MIM) technology using elemental powders were investigated in this work by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), dilatometer, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). It was found that from 700 °C to 1500 °C the homogenization and densification process of MIM Ti–16Nb alloy consisted of three steps, i.e., Ti-diffusion-controlled step, Ti–Nb-diffusion step and matrix-diffusion step. Titanium carbide formation was observed in the samples sintered at 1300 °C and 1500 °C, but not in the ones sintered at 900 °C and 1100 °C. The MIM Ti–16Nb specimens sintered at 1500 °C exhibited a good combination of high tensile strength and low Young’s modulus. However, the titanium carbide particles led to poor ductility

  8. Oxidation of nitride films in aqueous solution: Correlation between surface analysis and electrochemical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.; Alias, M.N.

    1994-01-01

    Ac impedance and dc polarization tests of 304 stainless steels coated by cathodic arc plasma deposition (CAPD) titanium nitride and zirconium nitride were conducted in aqueous chloride solution. Cyclic polarization data suggested passive films were formed over the nitride coatings which are most likely hydrated titanium oxide and zirconium oxides. ESCA analysis of fresh samples and samples exposed during impedance tests indicated a layer rich in oxygen over the ZrN coating after exposure but not over TiN coating. Chemical shifts in the Zr 3d 5/2 core electrons indicate transformation from ZrN to its oxide; the shifts in Ti 2P 3/2 did not support the change from TiN to its oxide. The influence of these shifts on corrosion protection is documented

  9. Metal Nitrides for Plasmonic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, Gururaj V.; Schroeder, Jeremy; Guler, Urcan

    2012-01-01

    Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications.......Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications....

  10. Properties of minor actinide nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Masahide; Itoh, Akinori; Akabori, Mitsuo; Arai, Yasuo; Minato, Kazuo

    2004-01-01

    The present status of the research on properties of minor actinide nitrides for the development of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle based on nitride fuel and pyrochemical reprocessing is described. Some thermal stabilities of Am-based nitrides such as AmN and (Am, Zr)N were mainly investigated. Stabilization effect of ZrN was cleary confirmed for the vaporization and hydrolytic behaviors. New experimental equipments for measuring thermal properties of minor actinide nitrides were also introduced. (author)

  11. Introduction to powder metallurgy processes for titanium manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteban, P. G.; Bolzoni, L.; Ruiz-Navas, E. M.; Gordo, E.

    2011-01-01

    The development of new extraction processes to produce titanium in powder form leads Powder Metallurgy to an advantage position among the manufacturing processes for titanium. The cost reduction of base material, coupled with the economy of the powder metallurgy processes, give titanium industry the chance to diversify its products, which could lead to production volumes able to stabilise the price of the metal. This work reviews some of the Powder Metallurgy techniques for the manufacturing of titanium parts, and describes the two typical approaches for titanium manufacturing: Blending Elemental and Prealloyed Powders. Among others, conventional pressing and sintering are described, which are compared with cold and hot isostatic pressing techniques. Real and potential applications are described. (Author) 71 refs.

  12. The mechanism of hard metal TiC-TiNi composite liquid-phase sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimov, V.V.

    2006-01-01

    The sintering conditions are investigated for hard alloys on their production from powders of titanium nickelide with particle size of 10-25 μ and titanium carbide with particles of 5-10 μ at temperatures of 1280-1350 deg C under pressure of 0.1 MPa with holding at heat for 180-900 s. The analysis of experimental data shows that optimum sintering conditions are determined by the quantity of a binding phase TiNi. In the systems with a binding phase content no more than 40 % a heterogeneous structure with nonuniform aggregates of TiC and TiNi phases is observed. With increasing a binding phase amount up to 50-70 % and a temperature up to 1350 deg C, titanium nickelide melts and spreads uniformly among carbide grains. This results in a low porosity of the composite material and in an increase of thermodynamic stability of the system [ru

  13. Processing development for ceramic structural components: the influence of a presintering of silicon on the final properties of reaction bonded silicon nitride. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-03-01

    The influence of a presintering of silicon on the final properties of reaction bonded silicon nitride has been studied using scanning electron and optical microscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis, 4 pt. bend test, and mecury intrusion porosimetry. It has been shown that presintering at 1050/sup 0/C will not affect the final nitrided properties. At 1200/sup 0/C, the oxide layer is removed, promoting the formation of B-phase silicon nitride. Presintering at 1200/sup 0/C also results in compact weight loss due to the volatilization of silicon, and the formation of large pores which severely reduce nitrided strength. The development of the structure of sintered silicon compacts appears to involve a temperature gradient, with greater sintering observed near the surface.

  14. Hydrothermal Cold Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xiaoyu

    Solid state sintering transforms particle compact to a physically robust and dense polycrystalline monolith driven by reduction of surface energy and curvature. Since bulk diffusion is required for neck formation and pore elimination, sintering temperature about 2/3 of melting point is needed. It thus places limitations for materials synthesis and integration, and contributes to significant energy consumption in ceramic processing. Furthermore, since surface transport requires lower temperature than bulk processes, grain growth is often rapid and can be undesired for physical properties. For these reasons, several techniques have been developed including Liquid Phase Sintering (LPS), Hot Pressing (HP) and Field Assisted Sintering Technique (FAST), which introduce either viscous melt, external pressure or electric field to speed up densification rates at lower temperature. However, because of their inherent reliability on bulk diffusion, temperatures required are often too high for integrating polymers and non-noble metals. Reduction of sintering temperature below 400 °C would require a different densification mechanism that is based on surface transport with external forces to drive volume shrinkage. Densification method combining uniaxial pressure and solution under hydrothermal condition was first demonstrated by Kanahara's group at Kochi University in 1986 and was brought to our attention by the work of Kahari, etc, from University of Oulu on densification of Li2MoO 4 in 2015. This relatively new process showed promising ultra-low densification temperature below 300 °C, however little was known about its fundamental mechanism and scope of applications, which became the main focus of this dissertation. In this work, a uniaxial hydraulic press, a standard stainless steel 1/2 inch diameter die with heating band were utilized in densifying metal oxides. Applied pressure and sintering temperature were between 100 MPa and 700 MPa and from room temperature to 300

  15. Titanium di-oxide films using a less hygroscopic colloidal precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandana,, E-mail: vandana1@nplindia.org; Batra, Neha; Kumar, Praveen; Sharma, Pooja; Singh, P.K., E-mail: pksingh@nplindia.org

    2014-04-01

    We report the study of titanium dioxide films (TiO{sub 2}) using titanium di-isopropoxyl di-2ethyl hexanoate Ti(OC{sub 3}H{sub 7}){sub 2} (C{sub 7}H{sub 15}COO){sub 2} colloidal precursor. This compound is less hygroscopic in nature and easy to use with processes like spin or dip coating. Thin films of TiO{sub 2} are made on silicon substrates and their structural and optical properties are studied. The effect of Ti content in the precursor, sintering temperature and its duration on film thickness and refractive index are investigated. Refractive index shows an increasing trend with the rise in the sintering temperature but remains unchanged with the time. The film thickness decreases with both sintering temperature and time and increases with Ti content in the precursor. Reflectivity measurements show marked reduction in the reflection losses compared to bare silicon surface wherein the film thickness is altered by spin speed. XRD results show anatase phase in the samples sintered at lower temperature (<680 °C), however, a mix of anatase, brookite and rutile phases is seen above this temperature. In the samples sintered above 1100 °C, rutile phase is dominant. These results are supported by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Atomic force microscopy reveals larger grain size at higher sintering temperature. The titanium dioxide films of desirable thickness and refractive index could be used as an antireflection coating on solar cells. - Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} films are made using titanium di-isopropoxyl di-2ethyl hexanoate precursor. • Effect of Ti content in the precursor, sintering temperature and time is studied. • Refractive index (μ) increases with sintering temperature but is independent of time. • Films of desired thickness and μ could be used as an antireflection coating. • XRD results show that rutile phase dominates in samples sintered above 1100 °C.

  16. Physical and chemical characterization of titanium-alginate samples for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morani, L.M.; Ribeiro, A.A.; Oliveira, M.V. de; Dantas, F.M.L., E-mail: marize.varella@int.gov.b [Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia (INT), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Leao, M.H.M.R. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (EQ/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica

    2010-07-01

    The sol-gel technique combined with powder metallurgy may be an alternative to produce titanium parts for bioengineering, with the advantage of eliminating the powder compaction step, which may introduce defects. The present work introduces a system consisted of titanium powder and sodium alginate suspension, which undergoes reticulation in contact with a calcium salt solution, obtaining titanium/calcium alginate hydrogel with granule morphology. The characterization of the raw materials and granules of calcium alginate and titanium/calcium alginate was performed by x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The granules topography was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy/EDS. Titanium and sodium alginate chemical composition were adequate for use as raw materials, showing that the methodology used is suitable for processing titanium samples for further consolidation by sintering, in order to produce titanium parts. (author)

  17. Mechanisms of sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Ashok; Soni, N.C.; Moorthy, V.K.

    1980-01-01

    The basic mechanisms by which the material moves during sintering have not only held a strange fascination but are also very important in determining the properties of the end product. Kuczynski's exponent method has been subsequently refined by several schools to make it increasingly reliable. There is now a fairly good understanding of mechanisms in some of the materials. However in others the issue is complicated by their basic nature. The problems of ambiguity in criterion and that of more than one mechanism being simultaneously operative have been tackled with dexterity by Ashby for drawing sintering mechanism diagrams. The method has been modified to give Relative Contribution Diagrams (RCD). These yield additional information and have been used for analysis. The main criticism against this is that it uses a very large number of rate equations and material properties, which can communicate their inaccuracies to the diagram. A case study of UO 2 was undertaken and it has been shown quantitatively that inaccuracies in a smaller number of properties only affect the diagrams to any significant extent. (auth.)

  18. Lubricant influence on the ejection and roughness of in-die electro sinter forged Ti-discs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cannella, Emanuele; Nielsen, Chris Valentin

    2018-01-01

    Electro Sinter Forging (ESF) is a new sintering process based on Joule heating by high electrical current flowing through compacted metal powder under mechanical pressure. The whole process takes about three seconds and is based on a closed-die setup, where the sample is sintered inside a die....... A near-net shape component is therefore manufactured. One of the challenges associated with this process is the ejection of the sample after sintering. Due to powder compaction and axial loading during sintering, a radial pressure is generated at the die/sample interface. Consequently, the ejection can...... of commercially pure titanium powder. The force was measured while ejecting the samples by using a speed-controlled press. The surface roughness parameter Sa was measured by using a laser confocal microscope....

  19. The effect of the atmosphere and the role of pore filling on the sintering of aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaffer, G.B.; Hall, B.J.; Bonner, S.J.; Huo, S.H.; Sercombe, T.B.

    2006-01-01

    Alloys of Al-3.8Cu-1Mg-0.7Si, Al-4Cu-0.6Si-0.1Mg, Al-4Cu-1.2Mg and Al-1.9Mg-1.9Si were made using air atomised powder and conventional press-and-sinter powder metallurgy techniques. These were sintered under nitrogen with a controlled water content which varied from 3 to 630 ppm (a dew point of -69 to -25 deg. C), nitrogen-5%hydrogen, argon and argon-5%hydrogen, all at atmospheric pressure, or a vacuum of -2 torr. Dry nitrogen is the most efficacious atmosphere. Vacuum is more effective than argon while hydrogen, and thus water, is extremely prejudicial to sintered density. The minimum dew point for optimum sintering is -60 deg. C (10.5 ppm H 2 O). The key feature in the beneficial effect of nitrogen is the formation of aluminium nitride. This reduces the pressure in the pore spaces relative to the external atmosphere, which induces pore filling at grain sizes that are smaller than those required for sintering in inert atmospheres. It is suggested that pore filling is an important densification mechanism during the sintering of aluminium

  20. Silicon nitride nanosieve membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tong, D.H.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Gadgil, V.J.; Bostan, C.G.; Berenschot, Johan W.; van Rijn, C.J.M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2004-01-01

    An array of very uniform cylindrical nanopores with a pore diameter as small as 25 nm has been fabricated in an ultrathin micromachined silicon nitride membrane using focused ion beam (FIB) etching. The pore size of this nanosieve membrane was further reduced to below 10 nm by coating it with

  1. Laser sintering of copper nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenou, Michael; Saar, Amir; Ermak, Oleg; Kotler, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    Copper nanoparticle (NP) inks serve as an attractive potential replacement to silver NP inks in functional printing applications. However their tendency to rapidly oxidize has so far limited their wider use. In this work we have studied the conditions for laser sintering of Cu-NP inks in ambient conditions while avoiding oxidation. We have determined the regime for stable, low-resistivity copper (< ×3 bulk resistivity value) generation in terms of laser irradiance and exposure duration and have indicated the limits on fast processing. The role of pre-drying conditions on sintering outcome has also been studied. A method, based on spectral reflectivity measurements, was used for non-contact monitoring of the sintering process evolution. It also indicates preferred spectral regions for sintering. Finally, we illustrated how selective laser sintering can generate high-quality, fine line (<5 µm wide) and dense copper circuits. (paper)

  2. Development and Characterization of Titanium Compound N anostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhou

    The development and characterization of titanium compound nanostructures have been achieved, for potential applications in energy industry. Oil and gas, one of the traditional industry fields, observes accumulating demands on active implementations of nanotechnology, for the numerous advantages that nanomaterials can introduce to both product performances and field operations. By using chemical vapor deposition and liquid exfoliation, various titanium compound nanostructures have been synthesized through this project. Attractively, these two material fabrication methods have been recognized to be industrial friendly in terms of cost efficiency and productivity. The development of nanostructures, aiming at oil and gas field applications, presents novel solutions for existing issues, such as low durability of drilling tools, high friction in mechanical operations and ineffective heat dissipation. Titanium compound nanostructures, including titanium borides, nitrides and sulfides are therefore investigated for such applications as protective coating, lubrication and thermal management.

  3. Boron nitride coated uranium dioxide and uranium dioxide-gadolinium oxide fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunduz, G [Department of Chemical Engineering, Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey); Uslu, I; Tore, C; Tanker, E [Turkiye Atom Enerjisi Kurumu, Ankara (Turkey)

    1997-08-01

    Pure Urania and Urania-gadolinia (5 and 10%) fuels were produced by sol-gel technique. The sintered fuel pellets were then coated with boron nitride (BN). This is achieved through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using boron trichloride and ammonia. The coated samples were sintered at 1600 K. The analyses under scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed a variety of BN structures, mainly platelike and rodlike structures were observed. Burnup calculations by using WIMSD4 showed that BN coated and gadolinia containing fuels have larger burnups than other fuels. The calculations were repeated at different pitch distances. The change of the radius of the fuel pellet or the moderator/fuel ratio showed that BN coated fuel gives the highest burnups at the present design values of a PWR. Key words: burnable absorber, boron nitride, gadolinia, CVT, nuclear fuel. (author). 32 refs, 14 figs.

  4. Boron nitride coated uranium dioxide and uranium dioxide-gadolinium oxide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunduz, G.; Uslu, I.; Tore, C.; Tanker, E.

    1997-01-01

    Pure Urania and Urania-gadolinia (5 and 10%) fuels were produced by sol-gel technique. The sintered fuel pellets were then coated with boron nitride (BN). This is achieved through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using boron trichloride and ammonia. The coated samples were sintered at 1600 K. The analyses under scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed a variety of BN structures, mainly platelike and rodlike structures were observed. Burnup calculations by using WIMSD4 showed that BN coated and gadolinia containing fuels have larger burnups than other fuels. The calculations were repeated at different pitch distances. The change of the radius of the fuel pellet or the moderator/fuel ratio showed that BN coated fuel gives the highest burnups at the present design values of a PWR. Key words: burnable absorber, boron nitride, gadolinia, CVT, nuclear fuel. (author). 32 refs, 14 figs

  5. Development of titanium based biocomposite by powder metallurgy processing with in situ forming of Ca-P phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karanjai, Malobika [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials, Balapur P.O., Hyderabad 500005, Andhra Pradesh (India)]. E-mail: malobika@arci.res.in; Sundaresan, Ranganathan [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials, Balapur P.O., Hyderabad 500005, Andhra Pradesh (India); Rao, Gummididala Venkata Narasimha [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials, Balapur P.O., Hyderabad 500005, Andhra Pradesh (India); Mohan, Tallapragada Raja Rama [Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science Department, Indian Institute of Technology, Powai, Mumbai 400076, Maharashtra (India); Kashyap, Bhagwati Prasad [Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science Department, Indian Institute of Technology, Powai, Mumbai 400076, Maharashtra (India)

    2007-02-25

    Composites of titanium and calcium-phosphorus phases were developed by powder metallurgy processing and evaluated for bioactivity. Titanium hydride powder and precursors of calcium and phosphorus in the form of calcium carbonate and di-ammonium hydrogen orthophosphate were mixed in different proportions, compacted and calcined in different atmospheres. The calcined compacts were subsequently crushed, recompacted and sintered in vacuum. In situ formation of bioactive phases like hydroxylapatite, tricalcium phosphate and calcium titanate during the calcination and sintering steps was studied using X-ray diffraction. The effect of calcination atmosphere on density, interconnected porosity, phase composition and modulus of rupture of sintered composites was examined. The sintered composites were immersed in simulated body fluid for 7 days to observe their in vitro behaviour with XRD and FTIR spectroscopic identification of deposits. Composites with 10 wt% precursors sintered from vacuum calcined powder gave the best results in terms of bioactive phases, density and strength.

  6. The preparation of high-adsorption, spherical, hexagonal boron nitride by template method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ning, E-mail: zhangning5832@163.com; Liu, Huan; Kan, Hongmin; Wang, Xiaoyang; Long, Haibo; Zhou, Yonghui

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • The high-adsorption, spherical, hexagonal boron nitride powders were prepared. • The influence mechanism of template content on the micro-morphology and adsorption was explored. • At appropriate synthesis temperature, higher adsorption mesoporous spheres h-BN began to form. - Abstract: This research used low-cost boric acid and borax as a source of boron, urea as a nitrogen source, dodecyl-trimethyl ammonium chloride (DTAC) as a template, and thus prepared different micro-morphology hexagonal boron nitride powders under a flowing ammonia atmosphere at different nitriding temperatures. The effects of the template content and nitriding temperature on the micro-morphology of hexagonal boron nitride were studied and the formation mechanism analysed. The influences of the template content and nitriding temperature on adsorption performance were also explored. The results showed that at a nitriding temperature of 675 °C, the micro-morphologies of h-BN powder were orderly, inhomogeneous spherical, uniform spherical, beam, and pie-like with increasing template content. The micro-morphology was inhomogeneous spherical at a DTAC dose of 7.5%. The micro-morphology was uniform spherical at a DTAC dose of 10%. At a DTAC dose of 12%, the micro-morphology was a mixture of beam and pie-like shapes. At a certain template content (DTAC at 10%) and at lower nitriding temperatures (625 °C and 650 °C), spherical shell structures with surface subsidence began to form. The porous spheres would appear at a nitriding temperature of 675 °C, and the ball diameter thus formed was approximately 500–600 nm. The ball diameter was about 600–700 nm when the nitriding temperature was 700 °C. At a nitriding temperature of 725 °C, the ball diameter was between 800 and 1000 nm and sintering necking started to form. When the relative pressure was higher, previously closed pores opened and connected with the outside world: the adsorption then increased significantly. The

  7. Production of pure sintered alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, J.C. da; Huebner, H.W.

    1982-01-01

    With the aim of optimizing the sintering parameters, the strength of a large number of alumina samples was determined which were produced under widely varying sintering conditions and with different amounts of MgO content. The strength as a function of sintering time or temperature was found to go through a maximum. With increasing time, this maximum is shifted to lower temperatures, and with decreasing temperature to longer times. Data pairs of sintering times and temperatures which yeld the strength maximum were determined. The value of the strength at the maximum remains unchanged. The strength is high (= 400 MN/m 2 , at a grain size of 3 um and a porosity of 2 per cent) and comparable to foreign aluminas produced for commercial purposes, or even higher. The increase in the sintering time from 1 h to 16 h permits a reduction of the sintering temperature from 1600 to 1450 0 C without losing strength. The practical importance of this fact for a production of sintered alumina on a large scale is emphasized. (Author) [pt

  8. Effect of intense vibration treatment on the powder fine structure and reaction ability during sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pribytkov, G.A.; Chzhan Khajfen; Yuj Baokhaj; Khu Zoangchi

    2003-01-01

    Effects of a vibration grinding treatment of TiC-Ni and TiC-Ni-Cr titanium carbide-metal powder composition on the size of X-ray coherent scattering zones as well as the melt and crystallization temperatures under liquid-phase sintering have been investigated. Hardness and strength of composites sintered from the blends grinded for 4 h and more are found to be decreased that is explained by high porosity due to oxygen contamination of powder blends during a dry grinding treatment [ru

  9. Nitriding of high speed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, E.D.; Pagon, A.M.; Hubbard, P.; Dowey, S.J.; Pilkington, A.; McCulloch, D.G.; Latham, K.; DuPlessis, J.

    2010-01-01

    Current practice when nitriding HSS cutting tools is to avoid embrittlement of the cutting edge by limiting the depth of the diffusion zone. This is accomplished by reducing the nitriding time and temperature and eliminating any compound layer formation. However, in many applications there is an argument for generating a compound layer with beneficial tribological properties. In this investigation results are presented of a metallographic, XRD and XPS analysis of nitrided surface layers generated using active screen plasma nitriding and reactive vapour deposition using cathodic arc. These results are discussed in the context of built up edge formation observed while machining inside a scanning electron microscope. (author)

  10. Defects in dilute nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.M.; Buyanova, I.A.; Tu, C.W.; Yonezu, H.

    2005-01-01

    We provide a brief review our recent results from optically detected magnetic resonance studies of grown-in non-radiative defects in dilute nitrides, i.e. Ga(In)NAs and Ga(Al,In)NP. Defect complexes involving intrinsic defects such as As Ga antisites and Ga i self interstitials were positively identified.Effects of growth conditions, chemical compositions and post-growth treatments on formation of the defects are closely examined. These grown-in defects are shown to play an important role in non-radiative carrier recombination and thus in degrading optical quality of the alloys, harmful to performance of potential optoelectronic and photonic devices based on these dilute nitrides. (author)

  11. Sinterability and microstructure evolution during sintering of ferrous powder mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kétner Bendo Demétrio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work is focused on ferrous powder metallurgy and presents some results of a development of a suitable masteralloy for use as an additive to iron powder for the production of sintered steels. The masteralloy was produced by melting a powder mixture containing approximately Fe + 20% Ni + 20% Mn + 20% Si + 1% C (wt%, in order to obtain a cast billet that was converted into fine powder by crushing and milling. It was observed presence of SiC in the masteralloy after melting that is undesirable in the alloy. Si element should be introduced by using ferrosilicon. Sintered alloys with distinct contents of alloying elements were prepared by mixing the masteralloy powder to plain iron powder. Samples were produced by die compaction of the powder mixtures and sintering at 1200 °C in a differential dilatometer in order to record their linear dimensional behaviour during heating up and isothermal sintering, aiming at studying the sinterability of the compacts. Microstructure development during sintering was studied by SEM, XRD and microprobe analyses.

  12. Optical detections from worn and unworn titanium compound surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Inge Lise; Guibert, M.; Martin, J.-M.

    2010-01-01

    of a titanium nitride (TiN) layer we obtain an increase in the reflected light as a result of wear. The relative change of reflectance of light from the tribological TiAlN coated surface to the underlying layer of TiN is similar for non-worn surfaces and for surfaces exposed to an abrasive wear process...... of a residual thickness of realistic tribological coatings prior to complete wear....

  13. Dependence of fracture toughness of molybdenum laser welds on dendritic spacing and in situ titanium additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jellison, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    The fracture toughness of molybdenum welds has been improved by in situ gettering of oxygen by means of physically deposited titanium. The addition of titanium suppressed brittle intergranular fracture. Pulsed laser welds (both Nd:YAG and CO 2 ) exhibited superior toughness to that of continuous wave CO 2 laser welds. Also, welds of vacuum arc remelted grades were tougher than those of sintered molybdenum. However, weld toughness could not be correlated with either oxygen or carbon content

  14. The preparation of titanium-vanadium carbide/nickel cermets. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precht, W.; Sprissler, B.

    1976-01-01

    Titanium/vanadium alloy carbide rods were prepared by a zone melting procedure. Wetting studies were carried out using sections of the fused rods and candidate matrix material. It was established that nickel exhibits excellent wetting of (Ti, V) C, and accordingly cermet blends were prepared and liquid phase sintered. Processing parameters are discussed as well as their effect on the final microstructure. Alternate methods for cermet preparation are offered which use as received titanium carbide and vanadium carbide powders

  15. Estimation of sensing characteristics for refractory nitrides based gain assisted core-shell plasmonic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishodia, Manmohan Singh; Pathania, Pankaj

    2018-04-01

    Refractory transition metal nitrides such as zirconium nitride (ZrN), hafnium nitride (HfN) and titanium nitride (TiN) have emerged as viable alternatives to coinage metals based plasmonic materials, e.g., gold (Au) and silver (Ag). The present work assesses the suitability of gain assisted ZrN-, HfN- and TiN-based conventional core-shell nanoparticles (CCSNPs) and multilayered core-shell nanoparticles (MCSNPs) for refractive index sensing. We report that the optical gain incorporation in the dielectric layer leads to multifold enhancement of the scattering efficiency (Qsca), substantial reduction of the spectral full width at half maximum, and a higher figure of merit (FOM). In comparison with CCSNPs, the MCSNP system exhibits superior sensing characteristics such as higher FOM, ˜ 45% reduction in the critical optical gain, response shift towards the biological window, and higher degree of tunability. Inherent biocompatibility, growth compatibility, chemical stability and flexible spectral tuning of refractory nitrides augmented by superior sensing properties in the present work may pave the way for refractory nitrides based low cost sensing.

  16. Optical characterization of gallium nitride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirilyuk, Victoria

    2002-01-01

    Group III-nitrides have been considered a promising system for semiconductor devices since a few decades, first for blue- and UV-light emitting diodes, later also for high-frequency/high-power applications. Due to the lack of native substrates, heteroepitaxially grown III-nitride layers are usually

  17. Process for making a titanium diboride-chromium diboride-yttrium titanium oxide ceramic composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.

    1992-04-28

    A ceramic composition is described. The ceramic composition consists essentially of from about 84 to 96 w/o titanium diboride, from about 1 to 9 w/o chromium diboride, and from about 3 to about 15 w/o yttrium-titanium-oxide. A method of making the ceramic composition is also described. The method of making the ceramic composition comprises the following steps: Step 1--A consolidated body containing stoichiometric quantities of titanium diboride and chromium diboride is provided. Step 2--The consolidated body is enclosed in and in contact with a thermally insulated package of yttria granules having a thickness of at least 0.5 inches. Step 3--The consolidated body enclosed in the thermally insulated package of yttria granules is heated in a microwave oven with microwave energy to a temperature equal to or greater than 1,900 degrees centigrade to sinter and uniformly disperse yttria particles having a size range from about 1 to about 12 microns throughout the consolidated body forming a densified body consisting essentially of titanium diboride, chromium diboride, and yttrium-titanium-oxide. The resulting densified body has enhanced fracture toughness and hardness. No Drawings

  18. Improved Processing of Titanium Alloys by Metal Injection Moulding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidambe, A T; Figueroa, I A; Todd, I; Hamilton, H

    2011-01-01

    The commercially pure (CP-Ti) and Ti6Al4V (Ti-64) powders with powder size of sub 45-micron were mixed with a water soluble binder consisting of a major fraction of Polyethylene Glycol (PEG), a minor fraction of Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and some stearic acid as surfactant. The pelletised mix was injection-moulded into standard tensile bar specimens and then subjected solvent debinding by water leaching and thermal debinding in an argon atmosphere. The titanium compacts were then subjected to sintering studies using the Taguchi method. The results of the oxygen impurity levels of the sintered parts are presented in this paper. Titanium parts conforming to Grade 2 requirements were achieved for CP-Ti whilst those conforming to Grade 5 were achieved for Ti-64.

  19. Electrochemical surface modification of titanium in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyo-Han; Ramaswamy, Narayanan

    2009-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys have good biocompatibility with body cells and tissues and are widely used for implant applications. However, clinical procedures place more stringent and tough requirements on the titanium surface necessitating artificial surface treatments. Among the many methods of titanium surface modification, electrochemical techniques are simple and cheap. Anodic oxidation is the anodic electrochemical technique while electrophoretic and cathodic depositions are the cathodic electrochemical techniques. By anodic oxidation it is possible to obtain desired roughness, porosity and chemical composition of the oxide. Anodic oxidation at high voltages can improve the crystallinity of the oxide. The chief advantage of this technique is doping of the coating of the bath constituents and incorporation of these elements improves the properties of the oxide. Electrophoretic deposition uses hydroxyapatite (HA) powders dispersed in a suitable solvent at a particular pH. Under these operating conditions these particles acquire positive charge and coatings are obtained on the cathodic titanium by applying an external electric field. These coatings require a post-sintering treatment to improve the coating properties. Cathodic deposition is another type of electrochemical method where HA is formed in situ from an electrolyte containing calcium and phosphate ions. It is also possible to alter structure and/or chemistry of the obtained deposit. Nano-grained HA has higher surface energy and greater biological activity and therefore emphasis is being laid to produce these coatings by cathodic deposition.

  20. Nonlinearity in superconducting titanium nitride coplanar waveguide resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neilinger, P.; Trgala, M.; Hrebikova, I.; Mikula, M.; Zahoran, M.; Truchly, M.; Grajcar, M.; Leporis, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present fabrication and characterization of superconducting CPW TiN resonator at 20 and 300 nm film thickness. Further we demonstrate strong nonlinearity in thin TiN resonators. (authors)

  1. Nanocrystalline Porous Hydrogen Storage Based on Vanadium and Titanium Nitrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Goncharov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes results of our study of the application of ion-beam assisted deposition (IBAD technology for creation of nanoporous thin-film structures that can absorb more than 6 wt.% of hydrogen. Data of mathematical modeling are presented highlighting the structure formation and component creation of the films during their deposition at the time of simultaneous bombardment by mixed beam of nitrogen and helium ions with energy of 30 keV. Results of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed that VNx films consist of 150–200 nm particles, boundaries of which contain nanopores of 10–15 nm diameters. Particles themselves consist of randomly oriented 10–20 nm nanograins. Grain boundaries also contain nanopores (3–8 nm. Examination of the absorption characteristics of VNx, TiNx, and (V,TiNx films showed that the amount of absorbed hydrogen depends very little on the chemical composition of films, but it is determined by the structure pore. The amount of absorbed hydrogen at 0.3 MPa and 20°C is 6-7 wt.%, whereas the bulk of hydrogen is accumulated in the grain boundaries and pores. Films begin to release hydrogen even at 50°C, and it is desorbed completely at the temperature range of 50–250°C. It was found that the electrical resistance of films during the hydrogen desorption increases 104 times.

  2. Titanium nitride stamps replicating nanoporous anodic alumina films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navas, D; Sanchez, O; Asenjo, A; Jaafar, M; Baldonedo, J L; Vazquez, M; Hernandez-Velez, M

    2007-01-01

    Fabrication of nanostructured TiN films by magnetron sputtering using nanoporous anodic alumina films (NAAF) as substrates is reported. These hard nanostructured films could be used for pre-patterning aluminium foils and to obtain nanoporous films replicating the starting NAAF over a wide range of pore diameters and spacings. Pre-patterned Al foils are obtained by compression with pressures lower than those previously reported, then a new NAAF can be fabricated by means of only one anodization process. As an example, one of the TiN stamps was used for pre-patterning an Al foil at a pressure of 200 kg cm -2 and then it was anodized in oxalic acid solution obtaining the corresponding replica of the starting NAAF

  3. A titanium nitride based metamaterial for applications in the visible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, Gururaj V.; Saha, Bivas; Liu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Epitaxially grown TiN/Al0.6Sc0.4N superlattice behaves as a hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) in the visible range. Since HMMs enhance photonic-density-of-states and reduce lifetime of an emitter, we observed nine times decrease in lifetime of a dye molecule placed close to this HMM. © 2013 The Optic...

  4. Low loss superconducting titanium nitride coplanar waveguide resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vissers, M. R.; Gao, J.; Wisbey, D. S.; Hite, D. A.; Pappas, D. P.; Tsuei, C. C.; Corcoles, A. D.; Steffen, M.

    2010-01-01

    Thin films of TiN were sputter-deposited onto Si and sapphire wafers with and without SiN buffer layers. The films were fabricated into rf coplanar waveguide resonators, and internal quality factor measurements were taken at millikelvin temperatures in both the many photon and single photon limits, i.e., high and low electric field regimes, respectively. At high field, we found the highest internal quality factors (∼10 7 ) were measured for TiN with predominantly a (200)-TiN orientation. The (200)-TiN is favored for growth at high temperature on either bare Si or SiN buffer layers. However, growth on bare sapphire or Si(100) at low temperature resulted in primarily a (111)-TiN orientation. Ellipsometry and Auger measurements indicate that the (200)-TiN growth on the bare Si substrates is correlated with the formation of a thin, ≅2 nm, layer of SiN during the predeposition procedure. On these surfaces we found a significant increase of Q i for both high and low electric field regimes.

  5. {sup 14}N depth profiles in Ti and Ti6Al4V nitrided by various methods, measured by nuclear reaction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vickridge, I; Trompetter, B [Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences Ltd., Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Brown, I [Industrial Research Ltd, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)

    1994-12-31

    Titanium alloys have desirable mechanical properties for applications in many areas, but their surface properties, such as friction coefficient, hardness, and wear and corrosion resistance often need to be enhanced. This may be accomplished by forming a thin layer of titanium nitride on the surface, by such methods as thermal nitriding, Ion Beam Assisted Deposition (IBAD), sol-gel technology, or ion implantation. Ion Beam Analysis is assuming an increasing importance for characterising the composition of the outer few microns since it is the only technique that can rapidly yield quantitative concentration depth profiles of {sup 14}N with minimal disruption of the analysed region. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  6. {sup 14}N depth profiles in Ti and Ti6Al4V nitrided by various methods, measured by nuclear reaction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vickridge, I.; Trompetter, B. [Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences Ltd., Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Brown, I. [Industrial Research Ltd, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)

    1993-12-31

    Titanium alloys have desirable mechanical properties for applications in many areas, but their surface properties, such as friction coefficient, hardness, and wear and corrosion resistance often need to be enhanced. This may be accomplished by forming a thin layer of titanium nitride on the surface, by such methods as thermal nitriding, Ion Beam Assisted Deposition (IBAD), sol-gel technology, or ion implantation. Ion Beam Analysis is assuming an increasing importance for characterising the composition of the outer few microns since it is the only technique that can rapidly yield quantitative concentration depth profiles of {sup 14}N with minimal disruption of the analysed region. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Liquid phase sintering of carbides using a nickel-molybdenum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barranco, J.M.; Warenchak, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Liquid phase vacuum sintering was used to densify four carbide groups. These were titanium carbide, tungsten carbide, vanadium carbide, and zirconium carbide. The liquid phase consisted of nickel with additions of molybdenum of from 6.25 to 50.0 weight percent at doubling increments. The liquid phase or binder comprised 10, 20, and 40 percent by weight of the pressed powders. The specimens were tested using 3 point bending. Tungsten carbide showed the greatest improvement in bend rupture strength, flexural modulus, fracture energy and hardness using 20 percent binder with lesser amounts of molybdenum (6.25 or 12.5 wt %) added to nickel compared to pure nickel. A refinement in the carbide microstructure and/or a reduction in porosity was seen for both the titanium and tungsten carbides when the alloy binder was used compared to using the nickel alone. Curves depicting the above properties are shown for increasing amounts of molybdenum in nickel for each carbide examined. Loss of binder phase due to evaporation was experienced during heating in vacuum at sintering temperatures. In an effort to reduce porosity, identical specimens were HIP processed at 15 ksi and temperatures averaging 110 C below the sintering g temperature. The tungsten carbide and titanium carbide series containing 80 and 90 weight percent carbide phase respectively showed improvement properties after HIP while properties decreased for most other compositions

  8. Microstructural development and mechanical properties of iron based cermets processed by pressureless and spark plasma sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvaredo, P.; Gordo, E.; Van der Biest, O.; Vanmeensel, K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Processing of Fe-based cermets by pressureless sintering and spark plasma sintering. ► Influence of carbon content on the sintering mechanism and hardness. ► The cermet phase diagram was calculated and permits to explain the microstructure. ► SPS provides ferritic matrix and different carbide distribution than CPS samples. ► Pressureless sintered samples contain retained austenite at room temperature. - Abstract: Iron-based cermets are an interesting class of metal-ceramic composites in which properties and the factors influencing them are to be explored. In this work the metal matrix contains Cr, W, Mo and V as alloying elements, and the hard phase is constituted by 50 vol% of titanium carbonitride (TiCN) particles. The work studies the influence of the C content and the processing method on the sinterability, microstructure and hardness of the developed cermet materials. For that purpose, cermet samples with different C content in the matrix (0 wt%, 0.25 wt%, 0.5 wt%, 1.0 wt%) were prepared by conventional pressureless sintering (CPS) and, in order to achieve finer microstructures and to reduce the sintering time, by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The density and hardness (HV30) of the processed materials was evaluated, while their phase composition and microstructure was characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The equilibrium phase diagram of the composite material was calculated by ThermoCalc software in order to elucidate the influence of the carbon content on the obtained phases and developed microstructures.

  9. Hot pressing of uranium nitride and mixed uranium plutonium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, J.Y.

    1975-01-01

    The hot pressing characteristics of uranium nitride and mixed uranium plutonium nitride were studied. The utilization of computer programs together with the experimental technique developed in the present study may serve as a useful purpose of prediction and fabrication of advanced reactor fuel and other high temperature ceramic materials for the future. The densification of nitrides follow closely with a plastic flow theory expressed as: d rho/ dt = A/T(t) (1-rho) [1/1-(1-rho)/sup 2/3/ + B1n (1-rho)] The coefficients, A and B, were obtained from experiment and computer curve fitting. (8 figures) (U.S.)

  10. Comprehensive perspective on the mechanism of preferred orientation in reactive-sputter-deposited nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajikawa, Yuya; Noda, Suguru; Komiyama, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    Texture control of sputter-deposited nitride films has provoked a great deal of interest due to its technological importance. Despite extensive research, however, the reported results are scattered and discussions about the origin of preferred orientation (PO) are sometimes conflicting, and therefore controversial. The aim of this study is to acquire a clear perspective in order to discuss the origin of PO of sputter-deposited nitrides. Among nitrides, we focus on titanium nitride (TiN), aluminum nitride (AlN), and tantalum nitride (TaN), which are three commonly used nitrides. First, we collected reported experimental results about the relation between operating conditions and PO, because PO is considered to be determined by film formation processes, such as surface diffusion or grain growth, which is affected by operating conditions. We also collected reported results about such PO-determining processes. Then, we categorized the PO-determining processes into an initial stage and a growth stage of film deposition, and further categorized each stage into a vapor-solid interface and a solid-solid interface. Then, we related each stage and interface to film morphology and to PO-determining processes. Finally, based on existing results, previous models, and proposed schema, we discuss the origin of PO. Based on previous experimental results on film morphology, PO of nitride films occurred in the growth stage at the vapor-solid interface, where the sticking process of the precursor and the surface diffusion process determine PO, rather than in the initial stage and in the growth stage at the solid-solid interface. TiN (002) PO, however, seems to be caused in the initial stage at the solid-solid interface

  11. Formation of Ti-N graded bioceramic layer by DC hollow-cathode plasma nitriding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Chuan-lin

    2004-01-01

    Ti-N graded ceramic layer was formed on titanium by using DC hollow-cathode plasma nitriding technique. The structure of Ti-N layer was analyzed using X-ray diffractometry(XRD) with Cu Kα radiation, and the microhardness( HV0.1) was measured from the surface to inner along the cross section of Ti-N layer. The results indicate that the Ti-N graded layer is composed of ε-Ti2 N, δ-TiN and α-Ti(N) phases. Mechanism discussion shows that hollow-cathode discharge can intensify gas ionization, increase current density and enhance the nitriding potential, which directly increases the thickness of the diffusion coatings compared with traditional nitriding methods.

  12. Wear monitoring of protective nitride coatings using image processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Inge Lise; Guibert, M.; Belin, M.

    2010-01-01

    -meter with up to 105 19 repetitive cycles, eventually leaving the embedded TiN signal layer uncovered at the bottom the wear scar. 20 The worn surface was characterized by subsequent image processing. A color detection of the wear scar with 21 the exposed TiN layer by a simple optical imaging system showed......A double-layer model system, consisting of a thin layer of tribological titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN) on 17 top of titanium nitride (TiN), was deposited on polished 100Cr6 steel substrates. The TiAlN top-coatings 18 were exposed to abrasive wear by a reciprocating wear process in a linear tribo...... a significant increase up to a factor of 2 of 22 the relative color values from the TiAlN top layers to the embedded TiN signal layers. This behavior agrees 23 well with the results of reflectance detection experiment with a red laser optical system on the same system. 24 Thus we have demonstrated that image...

  13. Sintering diagrams of UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, A.; Soni, N.C.; Moorthy, V.K.

    1979-01-01

    Ashby's method (see Acta Met., vol. 22, p. 275, 1974) of constructing sintering diagrams has been modified to obtain contribution diagrams directly from the computer. The interplay of sintering variables and mechanisms are studied and the factors that affect the participation of mechanisms in UO 2 are determined. By studying the physical properties, it emerges that the order of inaccuracies is small in most cases and do not affect the diagrams. On the other hand, even a 10% error in activation energies, which is quite plausible, would make a significant difference to the diagram. The main criticism of Ashby's approach is that the numerous properties and equations used, communicate their inaccuracies to the diagrams and make them unreliable. The present study has considerably reduced the number of factors that need to be refined to make the sintering diagrams more meaningful. (Auth.)

  14. Interaction of titanium beryllide with steam at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munakata, Kenzo; Wada, Kohei; Akimoto, Yusuke; Takeda, Haruki; Nakamura, Ayano; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Nakamichi, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Some central and peripheral parts of a plasma sintered titanium beryllide disk were exposed to water vapor at 1273 K. • H 2 gas generation rate of the central part was found to be lower than that of the peripheral part. • Central parts of a plasma sintered titanium beryllide disk were exposed to water vapor at 1273 K with different temperature controls. • H 2 gas generation was found to be affected by thermal treatment. - Abstract: Some central and peripheral parts of a plasma sintered titanium beryllide disk were exposed to water vapor at temperatures raised up to 1273 K. Hydrogen generation and oxidation properties of the titanium beryllide were investigated. The amount of H 2 generation of the central part was found to be smaller than that of the peripheral part, and this can be attributed to difference in the larger fractions of the Be phase on their surface. Thus, different temperature programed experiments were performed using samples cut out from the central part. In an experiment, the temperature of the sample was raised stepwise and behavior of hydrogen generation was investigated. It was found that hydrogen generation does not take place at the temperatures below 1273 K and the amount of hydrogen generated is far smaller. Another experiment was carried out after a sample had been annealed under a dry Ar gas at 1273 K. In this case, the amount of hydrogen generated from the surface decreased. These results indicate the thermal treatment of the titanium beryllide samples affects their reactivity with water vapor

  15. Preparation and sintering of Zr(C,N,O) phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamborenea, S.; Mazzoni, A.D.; Aglietti, E.F.

    2003-01-01

    The Zr(C,O,N) compounds form a great mono-phase zone belonging to the pseudoternary ZrO-ZrN-ZrC system.Theses phases have cubic crystalline structure with a o parameter depending on the C, O 2 and N 2 content.These phases have many potential applications in the manufacture of ceramic pieces utilizable as electronic conductors.The Zr (C,O,N) phases can be obtained from ZrO 2 by carbonitriding reactions: that is carbothermal reduction and simultaneous nitriding.In this work a series of experiences of carbonitriding of zirconia under different conditions (temperatures between 1400 and 1600degC, times of 120 min, carbon content between 20 and 40%) in order to obtain suitable powders to be sintered.The XRD analysis shows the Zr(C,O,N) as the main products and β -ZrON as the only secondary product in proportions depending on the obtaining conditions.The variables employed were the C content and the reaction temperature.The Zr(C,O,N) content varies between 40 and 90% and tends to increase with the temperature and the carbon content whereas the β -ZrON phase varies between the 40 and 10 % decreasing its proportion with temperature and the carbon content.The oxidation resistance of these phases was studied by DTA-TG tests in air.Results show complete oxidation reaction at ∼500degC in air.The sintering of these materials was made on disks obtained by pressing of powders of Zr(C,N,O) contents higher than 90%.Sintering was performed in nitrogen atmosphere and temperatures between 1450 and 1620degC.Disks were characterized by pycnometry and Hg volumeter.The densities obtained were between 5 and 6,6g/cm 3 with a tendency to increase with the Zr(C,N,O) phase content, the temperature and the sintering time.Sintered disks were characterized by dilatometry in N 2

  16. Visible-light photocatalytic activity of nitrided TiO2 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camps, Enrique; Escobar-Alarcon, L.; Camacho-Lopez, Marco Antonio; Casados, Dora A. Solis

    2010-01-01

    TiO 2 thin films have been applied in UV-light photocatalysis. Nevertheless visible-light photocatalytic activity would make this material more attractive for applications. In this work we present results on the modification of titanium oxide (anatase) sol-gel thin films, via a nitriding process using a microwave plasma source. After the treatment in the nitrogen plasma, the nitrogen content in the TiO 2 films varied in the range from 14 up to 28 at%. The titanium oxide films and the nitrided ones were characterized by XPS, micro-Raman spectroscopy and UV-vis spectroscopy. Photocatalytic activity tests were done using a Methylene Blue dye solution, and as catalyst TiO 2 and nitrided TiO 2 films. The irradiation of films was carried out with a lamp with emission in the visible (without UV). The results showed that the nitrided TiO 2 films had photocatalytic activity, while the unnitrided films did not.

  17. Phosphorus containing sintered alloys (review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muchnik, S.V.

    1984-01-01

    Phosphorus additives are considered for their effect on the properties of sintered alloys of different applications: structural, antifriction, friction, magnetic, hard, superhard, heavy etc. Data are presented on compositions and properties of phosphorus-containing materials produced by the powder metallurgy method. Phosphorus is shown to be an effective activator of sintering in some cases. When its concentration in the material is optimal it imparts the material such properties as strength, viscosity, hardness, wear resistance. Problems concerning powder metallurgy of amorphous phosphorus-containing alloys are reported

  18. Kinetics of sintering of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soni, N.C.; Moorthy, V.K.

    1978-01-01

    The kinetics of sintering of UO 2 powders derived from ADU route and calcined at different temperatures was studied. The activation energy for sintering was found to depend on the calcination temperature, the density chosen and the sintering temperature range. The motive force for sintering is the excess free energy in the particle system. This exists in the powder compact in the form of surface energy and the excess lattice energy due to defects. The defects which can be eliminated at the operating temperature are responsible for the mobility and hence sintering. This concept of the motive force for sintering has been used to explain the difference in the activation energies observed in the present study. This would also explain phenomena such as attainment of limiting density, presence of optimum sintering temperature and the influence of calcination treatments on the sintering behaviour of powders. (author)

  19. Recycling of mill scale in sintering process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Hussiny N.A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This investigation deals with the effect of replacing some amount of Baharia high barite iron ore concentrate by mill scale waste which was characterized by high iron oxide content on the parameters of the sintering process., and investigation the effect of different amount of coke breeze added on sintering process parameters when using 5% mill scale waste with 95% iron ore concentrate. The results of this work show that, replacement of iron ore concentrate with mill scale increases the amount of ready made sinter, sinter strength and productivity of the sinter machine and productivity at blast furnace yard. Also, the increase of coke breeze leads to an increase the ready made sinter and productivity of the sintering machine at blast furnace yard. The productivity of the sintering machine after 5% decreased slightly due to the decrease of vertical velocity.

  20. Titanium and titanium alloys: fundamentals and applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leyens, C; Peters, M

    2003-01-01

    ... number of titanium alloys have paved the way for light metals to vastly expand into many industrial applications. Titanium and its alloys stand out primarily due to their high specific strength and excellent corrosion resistance, at just half the weight of steels and Ni-based superalloys. This explains their early success in the aerospace and the...

  1. Studying hardness, workability and minimum bending radius in selectively laser-sintered Ti–6Al–4V alloy samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galkina, N. V.; Nosova, Y. A.; Balyakin, A. V.

    2018-03-01

    This research is relevant as it tries to improve the mechanical and service performance of the Ti–6Al–4V titanium alloy obtained by selective laser sintering. For that purpose, sintered samples were annealed at 750 and 850°C for an hour. Sintered and annealed samples were tested for hardness, workability and microstructure. It was found that incomplete annealing of selectively laser-sintered Ti–6Al–4V samples results in an insignificant reduction in hardness and ductility. Sintered and incompletely annealed samples had a hardness of 32..33 HRC, which is lower than the value of annealed parts specified in standards. Complete annealing at temperature 850°C reduces the hardness to 25 HRC and ductility by 15...20%. Incomplete annealing lowers the ductility factor from 0.08 to 0.06. Complete annealing lowers that value to 0.025. Complete annealing probably results in the embrittlement of sintered samples, perhaps due to their oxidation and hydrogenation in the air. Optical metallography showed lateral fractures in both sintered and annealed samples, which might be the reason why they had lower hardness and ductility.

  2. Strengthening and elongation mechanism of Lanthanum-doped Titanium-Zirconium-Molybdenum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Ping, E-mail: huping1985@126.com [School of Metallurgy Engineering, Xi’an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi’an 710055 (China); Jinduicheng Molybdenum Co., Ltd., Xi’an 710068 (China); Hu, Bo-liang; Wang, Kuai-she; Song, Rui; Yang, Fan [School of Metallurgy Engineering, Xi’an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi’an 710055 (China); Yu, Zhi-tao [Ruifulai Tungsten & Molybdenum Co., Ltd., Xi’an 721914 (China); Tan, Jiang-fei [School of Metallurgy Engineering, Xi’an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi’an 710055 (China); Cao, Wei-cheng; Liu, Dong-xin; An, Geng [Jinduicheng Molybdenum Co., Ltd., Xi’an 710068 (China); Guo, Lei [Ruifulai Tungsten & Molybdenum Co., Ltd., Xi’an 721914 (China); Yu, Hai-liang [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2016-12-15

    The microstructural contributes to understand the strengthening and elongation mechanism in Lanthanum-doped Titanium-Zirconium-Molybdenum alloy. Lanthanum oxide particles not only act as heterogeneous nucleation core, but also act as the second phase to hinder the grain growth during sintering crystallization. The molybdenum substrate formed sub-grain under the effect of second phase when the alloy rolled to plate.

  3. Photoluminescence and hydrogen gas-sensing properties of titanium dioxide nanostructures synthesized by hydrothermal treatments

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sikhwivhilu, LM

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanostructures were synthesized by microwave-assisted and conventionally heated hydrothermal treatment of TiO2 powder. The tubular structures were converted to a rodlike shape by sintering the samples at various temperatures...

  4. Method for producing polycrystalline boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexeevskii, V.P.; Bochko, A.V.; Dzhamarov, S.S.; Karpinos, D.M.; Karyuk, G.G.; Kolomiets, I.P.; Kurdyumov, A.V.; Pivovarov, M.S.; Frantsevich, I.N.; Yarosh, V.V.

    1975-01-01

    A mixture containing less than 50 percent of graphite-like boron nitride treated by a shock wave and highly defective wurtzite-like boron nitride obtained by a shock-wave method is compressed and heated at pressure and temperature values corresponding to the region of the phase diagram for boron nitride defined by the graphite-like compact modifications of boron nitride equilibrium line and the cubic wurtzite-like boron nitride equilibrium line. The resulting crystals of boron nitride exhibit a structure of wurtzite-like boron nitride or of both wurtzite-like and cubic boron nitride. The resulting material exhibits higher plasticity as compared with polycrystalline cubic boron nitride. Tools made of this compact polycrystalline material have a longer service life under impact loads in machining hardened steel and chilled iron. (U.S.)

  5. Characterization of TiN, TiC and Ti(C,N) in titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels focusing on the significance of different particle morphologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelic, S.K., E-mail: susanne.michelic@unileoben.ac.at [Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Loder, D. [Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Reip, T.; Ardehali Barani, A. [Outokumpu Nirosta GmbH, Essener Straße 244, 44793 Bochum (Germany); Bernhard, C. [Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2015-02-15

    Titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels are a competitive option to classical austenitic stainless steels owing to their similar corrosion resistance. The addition of titanium significantly influences their final steel cleanliness. The present contribution focuses on the detailed metallographic characterization of titanium nitrides, titanium carbides and titanium carbonitrides with regard to their size, morphology and composition. The methods used are manual and automated Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy as well as optical microscopy. Additional thermodynamic calculations are performed to explain the precipitation procedure of the analyzed titanium nitrides. The analyses showed that homogeneous nucleation is decisive at an early process stage after the addition of titanium. Heterogeneous nucleation gets crucial with ongoing process time and essentially influences the final inclusion size of titanium nitrides. A detailed investigation of the nuclei for heterogeneous nucleation with automated Scanning Electron Microscopy proved to be difficult due to their small size. Manual Scanning Electron Microscopy and optical microscopy have to be applied. Furthermore, it was found that during solidification an additional layer around an existing titanium nitride can be formed which changes the final inclusion morphology significantly. These layers are also characterized in detail. Based on these different inclusion morphologies, in combination with thermodynamic results, tendencies regarding the formation and modification time of titanium containing inclusions in ferritic chromium steels are derived. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The formation and modification of TiN in the steel 1.4520 was examined. • Heterogeneous nucleation essentially influences the final steel cleanliness. • In most cases heterogeneous nuclei in TiN inclusions are magnesium based. • Particle morphology provides important information

  6. Master Sintering Surface: A practical approach to its construction and utilization for Spark Plasma Sintering prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouchly V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The sintering is a complex thermally activated process, thus any prediction of sintering behaviour is very welcome not only for industrial purposes. Presented paper shows the possibility of densification prediction based on concept of Master Sintering Surface (MSS for pressure assisted Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS. User friendly software for evaluation of the MSS is presented. The concept was used for densification prediction of alumina ceramics sintered by SPS.

  7. SINTERING OF NASCENT CALCIUM OXIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses the measurement of the sintering rate of CaO in a nitrogen atmosphere at temperatures of 700-1100 C. CaO prepared from ultrapure CaCO3 was compared with an impure CaO derived from limestone. Both materials yielded an initial surface area of 104 sq m/g. The rat...

  8. Pyrochemical reprocessing of nitride fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazono, Yoshihisa; Iwai, Takashi; Arai, Yasuo

    2004-01-01

    Electrochemical behavior of actinide nitrides in LiCl-KCl eutectic melt was investigated in order to apply pyrochemical process to nitride fuel cycle. The electrode reaction of UN and (U, Nd)N was examined by cyclic voltammetry. The observed rest potential of (U, Nd)N depended on the equilibrium of U 3+ /UN and was not affected by the addition of NdN of 8 wt.%. (author)

  9. Microwave Combustion and Sintering Without Isostatic Pressure. Topical Report August 1, 1995 - October 30, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebadian, M.A.; Monroe, N.D.H.

    1998-01-01

    This investigation involves a study of the influence of key processing parameters on the heating of materials using microwave energy. Selective and localized heating characteristics of microwaves will be utilized in the sintering of ceramics without hydrostatic pressure. In addition, combustion synthesis will be studied for the production of powders, carbides, and nitrides by combining two or more solids or a solid and a gas to form new materials. The insight gained from the interaction of microwaves with various materials will be utilized in the mobilization and subsequent redeposition of uranium

  10. Nitride stabilized core/shell nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttiyiel, Kurian Abraham; Sasaki, Kotaro; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2018-01-30

    Nitride stabilized metal nanoparticles and methods for their manufacture are disclosed. In one embodiment the metal nanoparticles have a continuous and nonporous noble metal shell with a nitride-stabilized non-noble metal core. The nitride-stabilized core provides a stabilizing effect under high oxidizing conditions suppressing the noble metal dissolution during potential cycling. The nitride stabilized nanoparticles may be fabricated by a process in which a core is coated with a shell layer that encapsulates the entire core. Introduction of nitrogen into the core by annealing produces metal nitride(s) that are less susceptible to dissolution during potential cycling under high oxidizing conditions.

  11. Production of a low young modulus titanium alloy by powder metallurgy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalcy Roberto dos Santos

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Titanium alloys have several advantages over ferrous and non-ferrous metallic materials, such as high strengthto-weight ratio and excellent corrosion resistance. A blended elemental titanium powder metallurgy process has been developed to offer low cost commercial products. The process employs hydride-dehydride (HDH powders as raw material. In this work, results of the Ti-35Nb alloy sintering are presented. This alloy due to its lower modulus of elasticity and high biocompatibility is a promising candidate for aerospace and medical use. Samples were produced by mixing of initial metallic powders followed by uniaxial and cold isostatic pressing with subsequent densification by isochronal sintering between 900 up to 1600 °C, in vacuum. Sintering behavior was studied by means of microscopy and density. Sintered samples were characterized for phase composition, microstructure and microhardness by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Vickers indentation, respectively. Samples sintered at high temperatures display a fine plate-like alpha structure and intergranular beta. A few remaining pores are still found and density above 90% for specimens sintered in temperatures over 1500 °C is reached.

  12. Composite materials and bodies including silicon carbide and titanium diboride and methods of forming same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillo, Thomas M.; Chu, Henry S.; Harrison, William M.; Bailey, Derek

    2013-01-22

    Methods of forming composite materials include coating particles of titanium dioxide with a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon, and reacting the titanium dioxide with the substance including boron and the substance including carbon to form titanium diboride. The methods may be used to form ceramic composite bodies and materials, such as, for example, a ceramic composite body or material including silicon carbide and titanium diboride. Such bodies and materials may be used as armor bodies and armor materials. Such methods may include forming a green body and sintering the green body to a desirable final density. Green bodies formed in accordance with such methods may include particles comprising titanium dioxide and a coating at least partially covering exterior surfaces thereof, the coating comprising a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon.

  13. Introduction to powder metallurgy processes for titanium manufacturing; Introduccion al procesado pulvimetalurgico del titanio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteban, P. G.; Bolzoni, L.; Ruiz-Navas, E. M.; Gordo, E.

    2011-07-01

    The development of new extraction processes to produce titanium in powder form leads Powder Metallurgy to an advantage position among the manufacturing processes for titanium. The cost reduction of base material, coupled with the economy of the powder metallurgy processes, give titanium industry the chance to diversify its products, which could lead to production volumes able to stabilise the price of the metal. This work reviews some of the Powder Metallurgy techniques for the manufacturing of titanium parts, and describes the two typical approaches for titanium manufacturing: Blending Elemental and Prealloyed Powders. Among others, conventional pressing and sintering are described, which are compared with cold and hot isostatic pressing techniques. Real and potential applications are described. (Author) 71 refs.

  14. Modeling the microstructural evolution during constrained sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Tikare, V.

    A numerical model able to simulate solid state constrained sintering of a powder compact is presented. The model couples an existing kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) model for free sintering with a finite element (FE) method for calculating stresses on a microstructural level. The microstructural response...... to the stress field as well as the FE calculation of the stress field from the microstructural evolution is discussed. The sintering behavior of two powder compacts constrained by a rigid substrate is simulated and compared to free sintering of the same samples. Constrained sintering result in a larger number...

  15. Strain-enhanced sintering of iron powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amador, D.R.; Torralba, J.M. [Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Departamento de Ciencias de Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Monge, M.A.; Pareja, R. [Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica, Madrid (Spain)

    2005-02-01

    Sintering of ball-milled and un-milled Fe powders has been investigated using dilatometry, X-ray, density, and positron annihilation techniques. A considerable sintering enhancement is found in milled powders showing apparent activation energies that range between 0.44 and 0.80 eV/at. The positron annihilation results, combined with the evolution of the shrinkage rate with sintering temperature, indicate generation of lattice defects during the sintering process of milled and un-milled powders. The sintering enhancement is attributed to pipe diffusion along the core of moving dislocations in the presence of the vacancy excess produced by plastic deformation. Positron annihilation results do not reveal the presence of sintering-induced defects in un-milled powders sintered above 1200 K, the apparent activation energy being in good agreement with that for grain-boundary diffusion in {gamma}-Fe. (orig.)

  16. Mechanisms of dynamic deformation and dynamic failure in aluminum nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Guangli; Chen, C.Q.; Ramesh, K.T.; McCauley, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    Uniaxial quasi-static, uniaxial dynamic and confined dynamic compression experiments have been performed to characterize the failure and deformation mechanisms of a sintered polycrystalline aluminum nitride using a servohydraulic machine and a modified Kolsky bar. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are used to identify the fracture and deformation mechanisms under high rate and high pressure loading conditions. These results show that the fracture mechanisms are strong functions of confining stress and strain rate, with transgranular fracture becoming more common at high strain rates. Dynamic fracture mechanics and micromechanical models are used to analyze the observed fracture mechanisms. TEM characterization of fragments from the confined dynamic experiments shows that at higher pressures dislocation motion becomes a common dominant deformation mechanism in AlN. Prismatic slip is dominant, and pronounced microcrack–dislocation interactions are observed, suggesting that the dislocation plasticity affects the macroscopic fracture behavior in this material under high confining stresses.

  17. Point defects in cubic boron nitride after neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atobe, Kozo; Honda, Makoto; Ide, Munetoshi; Yamaji, Hiromichi; Matsukawa, Tokuo; Fukuoka, Noboru; Okada, Moritami; Nakagawa, Masuo.

    1993-01-01

    The production of point defects induced by reactor neutrons and the thermal behavior of defects in sintered cubic boron nitride are investigated using the optical absorption and electron spin resonance (ESR) methods. A strong structureless absorption over the visible region was observed after fast neutron irradiation to a dose of 5.3 x 10 16 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) at 25 K. This specimen also shows an ESR signal with g-value 2.006 ± 0.001, which can be tentatively identified as an electron trapped in a nitrogen vacancy. On examination of the thermal decay of the signal, the activation energy for recovery of the defects was determined to be about 1.79 eV. (author)

  18. Method of activating an article of passive ferrous or non-ferrous metal prior to carburising, nitriding and /or nitrocarburising

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    Source: US2012111456A A method of activating an article of passive ferrous or non-ferrous metal by heating at least one compound containing nitrogen and carbon, wherein the article is treated with gaseous species derived from the compound. The activated article can be subsequently carburised......, nitrided or nitrocarburised in shorter time at lower temperature and resulting superior mechanical properties compared with non-activated articles and even articles of stainless steel, nickel alloy, cobalt alloy or titanium based material can be carburised, nitrided or nitrocarburised....

  19. Effect of ion nitridation process on hardness and the corrosion resistance of biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirjoadi; Lely Susita; Bambang Siswanto; Sudjatmoko

    2012-01-01

    Ion nitriding process has been performed on metal biomaterials to improve their mechanical properties of materials, particularly to increase hardness and corrosion resistance. This metallic biomaterials used for artificial bone or a prosthetic graft and used as devices of orthopedic biomaterials are usually of 316L SS metal-type and Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The purpose of this study is to research the development and utilization of ion nitridation method in order to get iron and titanium nitride thin films on the metallic biomaterials for artificial bone that has wear resistance and corrosion resistance is better. Microhardness of the samples was measured using a microhardness tester, optimum hardness of SS 316L samples are about 582 VHN, this was obtained at the nitriding temperature of 500 °C, the nitriding time of 3 hours and the nitrogen gas pressure of 1.6 mbar, while optimum hardness of Ti-6Al-4V alloy is 764 VHN, this was obtained at the nitriding temperature of 500 °C, the nitriding time of 4 hours and the nitrogen gas pressure of 1.6 mbar. The hardness value of SS 316L sample and Ti-6Al-4V alloy increase to 143% and 153%, if compared with standard samples. The optimum corrosion resistance at temperature of 350 °C for SS 316L and Ti-6Al-4V are 260,12 and 110,49 μA/cm 2 or corrosion rate are 29,866 and 15,189 mpy, respectively. (author)

  20. Progress in Titanium Metal Powder Injection Molding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randall M. German

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Metal powder injection molding is a shaping technology that has achieved solid scientific underpinnings. It is from this science base that recent progress has occurred in titanium powder injection molding. Much of the progress awaited development of the required particles with specific characteristics of particle size, particle shape, and purity. The production of titanium components by injection molding is stabilized by a good understanding of how each process variable impacts density and impurity level. As summarized here, recent research has isolated the four critical success factors in titanium metal powder injection molding (Ti-MIM that must be simultaneously satisfied—density, purity, alloying, and microstructure. The critical role of density and impurities, and the inability to remove impurities with sintering, compels attention to starting Ti-MIM with high quality alloy powders. This article addresses the four critical success factors to rationalize Ti-MIM processing conditions to the requirements for demanding applications in aerospace and medical fields. Based on extensive research, a baseline process is identified and reported here with attention to linking mechanical properties to the four critical success factors.

  1. Aluminum nitride insulating films for MOSFET devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicki, G. W.; Maserjian, J.

    1972-01-01

    Application of aluminum nitrides as electrical insulator for electric capacitors is discussed. Electrical properties of aluminum nitrides are analyzed and specific use with field effect transistors is defined. Operational limits of field effect transistors are developed.

  2. Vacuum-sintered body of a novel apatite for artificial bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Kenichi; Fujita, Tatsushi; Morisaki, Yuriko

    2013-12-01

    We produced regenerative artificial bone material and bone parts using vacuum-sintered bodies of a novel apatite called "Titanium medical apatite (TMA®)" for biomedical applications. TMA was formed by chemically connecting a Ti oxide molecule with the reactive [Ca10(PO4)6] group of Hydroxyapatite (HAp). The TMA powders were kneaded with distilled water, and solid cylinders of compacted TMA were made by compression molding at 10 MPa using a stainless-steel vessel. The TMA compacts were dried and then sintered in vacuum (about 10-3 Pa) or in air using a resistance heating furnace in the temperature range 1073-1773 K. TMA compacts were sintered at temperatures greater than 1073 K, thus resulting in recrystallization. The TMA compact bodies sintered in the range 1273-1773 K were converted into mixtures composed of three crystalline materials: α-TCP (tricalcium phosphate), β-TCP, and Perovskite-CaTiO3. The Perovskite crystals were stable and hard. In vacuum-sintering, the Perovskite crystals were transformed into fibers (approximately 1 µm in diameter × 8 µm in length), and the fiber distribution was uniform in various directions. We refer to the TMA vacuum-sintered bodies as a "reinforced composite material with Perovskite crystal fibers." However, in atmospheric sintering, the Perovskite crystals were of various sizes and were irregularly distributed as a result of the effect of oxygen. After sintering temperature at 1573 K, the following results were obtained: the obtained TMA vacuum-sintered bodies (1) were white, (2) had a density of approximately 2300 kg/m3 (corresponding to that of a compact bone or a tooth), and had a thermal conductivity of approximately 31.3 W/(m·K) (corresponding to those of metal or ceramic implants). Further, it was possible to cut the TMA bodies into various forms with a cutting machine. An implant made of TMA and inserted into a rabbit jaw bone was covered by new bone tissues after just one month because of the high

  3. Field assisted sintering of refractory carbide ceramics and fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gephart, Sean

    materials. While FAST sintered materials showed higher average values, in general they also showed consistently larger variation in the scattered data and consequently larger standard deviation for the resulting material properties. In addition, dynamic impact testing (V50 test) was conducted on the resulting materials and it was determined that there was no discernable correlation between observed mechanical properties of the ceramic materials and the resulting dynamic testing. Another study was conducted on the sintering of SiC and carbon fiber reinforced SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMC) using FAST. There has been much interest recently in fabricating high strength, low porosity SiC CMC.s for high temperature structural applications, but the current methods of production, namely chemical vapor infiltration (CVI), melt infiltration (MI), and polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP), are considered time consuming and involve material related shortcomings associated with their respective methodologies. In this study, SiC CMC.s were produced using the 25 ton laboratory unit with a target sample size of 40 mm diameter and 3 mm thickness, as well as on the larger 250 ton industrial FAST system targeting a sample size of 101.6 x 101.6 x 3 mm3 to investigate issues associated with scaling. Several sintering conditions were explored including: pressure of 35-65 MPa, temperature of 1700-1900°C, and heating rates between 50-400°C/min. The SiC fibers used in this study were coated using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with boron nitride (BN) and pyrolytic carbon to act as a barrier layer and preserve the integrity of the fibers during sintering. Then the barrier coating was coated by an outer layer of SiC to enhance the bonding between the fibers and the SiC matrix. Microstructures of the sintered samples were examined by FE-SEM. Mechanical properties including flexural strength-deflection and stress-strain were characterized using 4-point bend testing. Tensile testing was

  4. Effects of surface treatment on the cavitation erosion of high-chrome steel, zirconium, titanium and their alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinin, V.G.

    1994-01-01

    The erosion resistance of some structural materials used for equipment components of the first and second circuits of NPPs is studied under cavitation created by an ultrasonic vibrator. It appears that after various thermomechanical treatments (programmed loading, low-temperature rolling) and coating deposition (titanium, zirconium and titanium nitride), the erosion resistance of the materials under consideration increases and the plasticity value is not notably modified. The titanium coatings deposited onto the steel increase the corrosion-fatigue resistance in a sodium chloride environment, in several cases

  5. Microwave sintering of ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayannis, V. G.

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, the potential of microwave irradiation as an innovative energy- efficient alternative to conventional heating technologies in ceramic manufacturing is reviewed, addressing the advantages/disadvantages, while also commenting on future applications of possible commercial interest. Ceramic materials have been extensively studied and used due to several advantages they exhibit. Sintering ceramics using microwave radiation, a novel technology widely employed in various fields, can be an efficient, economic and environmentally-friendlier approach, to improve the consolidation efficiency and reduce the processing cycle-time, in order to attain substantial energy and cost savings. Microwave sintering provides efficient internal heating, as energy is supplied directly and penetrates the material. Since energy transfer occurs at a molecular level, heat is generated throughout the material, thus avoiding significant temperature gradients between the surface and the interior, which are frequently encountered at high heating rates upon conventional sintering. Thus, rapid, volumetric and uniform heating of various raw materials and secondary resources for ceramic production is possible, with limited grain coarsening, leading to accelerated densification, and uniform and fine-grained microstructures, with enhanced mechanical performance. This is particularly important for manufacturing large-size ceramic products of quality, and also for specialty ceramic materials such as bioceramics and electroceramics. Critical parameters for the process optimization, including the electromagnetic field distribution, microwave-material interaction, heat transfer mechanisms and material transformations, should be taken into consideration.

  6. Chemical vapor deposition of refractory ternary nitrides for advanced diffusion barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Custer, Jonathan S.; Fleming, James G.; Roherty-Osmun, Elizabeth; Smith, Paul Martin

    1998-09-22

    Refractory ternary nitride films for diffusion barriers in microelectronics have been grown using chemical vapor deposition. Thin films of titanium-silicon-nitride, tungsten-boron-nitride, and tungsten-silicon-nitride of various compositions have been deposited on 150 mm Si wafers. The microstructure of the films are either fully amorphous for the tungsten based films, or nauocrystalline TiN in an amorphous matrix for titanium-silicon-nitride. All films exhibit step coverages suitable for use in future microelectronics generations. Selected films have been tested as diffusion barriers between copper and silicon, and generally perform extremely weH. These fiIms are promising candidates for advanced diffusion barriers for microelectronics applications. The manufacturing of silicon wafers into integrated circuits uses many different process and materials. The manufacturing process is usually divided into two parts: the front end of line (FEOL) and the back end of line (BEOL). In the FEOL the individual transistors that are the heart of an integrated circuit are made on the silicon wafer. The responsibility of the BEOL is to wire all the transistors together to make a complete circuit. The transistors are fabricated in the silicon itself. The wiring is made out of metal, currently aluminum and tungsten, insulated by silicon dioxide, see Figure 1. Unfortunately, silicon will diffuse into aluminum, causing aluminum spiking of junctions, killing transistors. Similarly, during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of tungsten from ~fj, the reactivity of the fluorine can cause "worn-holes" in the silicon, also destroying transistors. The solution to these problems is a so-called diffusion barrier, which will allow current to pass from the transistors to the wiring, but will prevent reactions between silicon and the metal.

  7. Application of Silicon Nitride (Si3N4 Ceramics in Ball Bearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wijianto Wijianto

    2016-08-01

    operation up to 1000°C, greater thermal shock resistance, lower density and low thermal expansion. This properties gives some benefit for ball bearing material such as higher running speed, reduce vibration of the shaft, will improve the life time and maintenance cost, lower heat generated, less energy consumption, lower wear rate, reducing noise level and reduce of using lubricant. The sintering methods are used to produce ball bearing from silicon nitride. Some techniques can be applied to increase ceramics strength which are reduce porosity, reduce grain size, reduce surface flaw and proof stressing. The surface finishing of the ceramic bearing is very important because silicon nitride as a brittle material, its strength is limited to the flaw sizes especially the flaw at the surface.

  8. Fabrication and testing of uranium nitride fuel for space power reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, R. B.; Chidester, K. M.; Hoth, C. W.; Mason, R. E.; Petty, R. L.

    1988-02-01

    Uranium nitride fuel was selected for previous space power reactors because of its attractive thermal and physical properties; however, all UN fabrication and testing activities were terminated over ten years ago. An accelerated irradiation test, SP-1, was designed to demonstrate the irradiation performance of Nb-1 Zr clad UN fuel pins for the SP-100 program. A carbothermic-reduction/nitriding process was developed to synthesize UN powders. These powders were fabricated into fuel pellets by conventional cold-pressing and sintering. The pellets were loaded into Nb-1 Zr cladding tubes, irradiated in a fast-test reactor, and destructively examined after 0.8 at% burnup. Preliminary postirradiation examination (PIE) results show that the fuel pins behaved as designed. Fuel swelling, fission-gas release, and microstructural data are presented, and suggestions to enhance the reliability of UN fuel pins are discussed.

  9. Sintering of ZrC by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and spark plasma sintering (SPS). Effect of impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allemand, Alexandre; Le Flem - Dormeval, Marion; Guillard, Francois

    2005-01-01

    Carbides are generally used as structural materials for high temperature applications. Particularly, ZrC because of low activation, neutronic transparency, cubic structure (isotropic behaviour) and good thermal conductivity, is one of the candidates under consideration for structural materials in the core of new high temperature nuclear reactors (Generation IV). Just a few studies about densification of monolithic ZrC exist. They mainly involve natural sintering or hot pressing at high temperature (until 2700 deg. C). Unfortunately those processes induce grain growth and do not lead to fully densified ZrC. The aim of this study is to compare the characteristics and the properties of ZrC sintered by HIP and by SPS. Fully dense ZrC can be reached either by HIP or by SPS, grain size being more or less controlled. Microstructural observations and mechanical testing of several ZrC grades shows that powder impurities play an important role in the quality of the grain boundaries and consequently in the mechanical properties. In particular, the porosity falls from 17% to 3 % just by reducing the free carbon content in starting ZrC powder. The densification process of dense monolithic ZrC was improved by combining a HIP at 1600 deg. C (titanium canning) followed by a post-HIP at 1900 deg. C (no canning required). Four-point bending tests are in progress to confirm the improvement of fracture strength. (authors)

  10. Simulation of the Nitriding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krukovich, M. G.

    2004-01-01

    Simulation of the nitriding process makes it possible to solve many practical problems of process control, prediction of results, and development of new treatment modes and treated materials. The presented classification systematizes nitriding processes and processes based on nitriding, enables consideration of the theory and practice of an individual process in interrelation with other phenomena, outlines ways for intensification of various process variants, and gives grounds for development of recommendations for controlling the structure and properties of the obtained layers. The general rules for conducting the process and formation of phases in the layer and properties of the treated surfaces are used to create a prediction computational model based on analytical, numerical, and empirical approaches.

  11. Modeling of sintering of functionally gradated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasik, M.; Zhang, B.

    2001-01-01

    The functionally gradated materials (FGMs) are distinguished from isotropic materials by gradients of composition, phase distribution, porosity, and related properties. For FGMs made by powder metallurgy, sintering control is one of the most important factors. In this study sintering process of FGMs is modeled and simulated with a computer. A new modeling approach was used to formulate equation systems and the model for sintering of gradated hard metals, coupled with heat transfer and grain growth. A FEM module was developed to simulate FGM sintering in conventional, microwave and hybrid conditions, to calculate density, stress and temperature distribution. Behavior of gradated WC-Co hardmetal plate and cone specimens was simulated for various conditions, such as mean particle size, green density distribution and cobalt gradation parameter. The results show that the deformation behavior and stress history of graded powder compacts during heating, sintering and cooling could be predicted for optimization of sintering process. (author)

  12. Production of sintered alumina from powder; optimization of the sinterized parameters for the maximum mechanical resistence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, J.C. da.

    1981-02-01

    Pure, sinterized alumina and the optimization of the parameters of sinterization in order to obtain the highest mechanical resistence are discussed. Test materials are sinterized from a fine powder of pure alumina (Al 2 O 3 ), α phase, at different temperatures and times, in air. The microstructures are analysed concerning porosity and grain size. Depending on the temperature or the time of sinterization, there is a maximum for the mechanical resistence. (A.R.H.) [pt

  13. Intrinsic Osteoinductivity of Porous Titanium Scaffold for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Tamaddon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Large bone defects and nonunions are serious complications that are caused by extensive trauma or tumour. As traditional therapies fail to repair these critical-sized defects, tissue engineering scaffolds can be used to regenerate the damaged tissue. Highly porous titanium scaffolds, produced by selective laser sintering with mechanical properties in range of trabecular bone (compressive strength 35 MPa and modulus 73 MPa, can be used in these orthopaedic applications, if a stable mechanical fixation is provided. Hydroxyapatite coatings are generally considered essential and/or beneficial for bone formation; however, debonding of the coatings is one of the main concerns. We hypothesised that the titanium scaffolds have an intrinsic potential to induce bone formation without the need for a hydroxyapatite coating. In this paper, titanium scaffolds coated with hydroxyapatite using electrochemical method were fabricated and osteoinductivity of coated and noncoated scaffolds was compared in vitro. Alizarin Red quantification confirmed osteogenesis independent of coating. Bone formation and ingrowth into the titanium scaffolds were evaluated in sheep stifle joints. The examinations after 3 months revealed 70% bone ingrowth into the scaffold confirming its osteoinductive capacity. It is shown that the developed titanium scaffold has an intrinsic capacity for bone formation and is a suitable scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

  14. A study for preparation of Ti-Fe coating by high temperature sintering method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Yonghai

    1995-03-01

    A new technology for preparation of Ti-Fe alloy coating on the steel substrate was investigated by high temperature sintering method. The pulp of titanium hydride powder was coated on the cleaned steel substrate, then heated in vacuum for desorption of hydrogen and sintered at high temperature in argon atmosphere for forming Ti-Fe alloy coating. The electron probe analysis shows a strong coherent diffusion layer formed between the elements of titanium and iron. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that the coating consists of α-Ti, TiFe and TiFe 2 three phases. The wear resistance of the coating is twice as large as that of grey cast iron and the hardness determined can reach 7300∼7800 N/mm 2 . The coating is almost porous free. The corrosion potential increases with the time and the corrosion resistance is near to that of pure titanium. The working life of ridge-type diaphragm valve coated by Ti-Fe alloy for carbonization tower of alkali factories is five times higher than that of valve made of grey cast iron. Therefore, this new technology can be widely used in metallurgical, chemical and nuclear industries. (9 figs., 10 tabs.)

  15. Resistance of direct metal laser sintered Ti6Al4V alloy against growth of fatigue cracks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konečná, R.; Kunz, Ludvík; Bača, A.; Nicoletto, G.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 185, NOV (2017), s. 82-91 ISSN 0013-7944 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Titanium alloys * Ti6Al4V * Fatigue crack growth * Threshold value of stress intensity factor * Direct metal laser sintering Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics OBOR OECD: Audio engineering, reliability analysis Impact factor: 2.151, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013794417300292

  16. Microwave sintering of hydroxyapatite-based composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Y.; Roy, D.M.; Cheng, J.; Roy, R.; Agrawal, D.K.

    1993-01-01

    Composites of hydroxyapatite/partially stabilized zirconia (HAp/PSZ) and hydroxyapatite/silicon carbide whiskers (HAp/SiC) were sintered at 1100-1200 degrees C by microwave at 2.45 GHz. Characterization of the sintered composites was carried out by density, microstructure, phase composition, and fracture toughness measurements. The results show that although not yet fully densified, a much higher sintered density in the HAp/PSZ composite was achieved by microwave sintering than by conventional sintering at the same temperature. A relative density of 93% was achieved by 20 min. microwave processing at 1200 degrees C. Comparatively, 2 h conventional sintering of the same material at 1200 degrees C led to only 75.5% relative density. K IC of this microwave sintered HAp/PSZ of 93% density was found to be 3.88 MPa√m, which is 250% of the value for pure HAp of the same density. A further increase in K IC could be expected if full or nearly full densification was achieved. Sintering of PSZ particles in the HAp/PSZ composite was also observed in the microwave processed sample. Microwave sintering of HAp/SiC was not successful in the current study due to the oxidation of SiC in air at high temperature. 8 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  17. Sintering of a class F fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph J. Biernacki; Anil K. Vazrala; H. Wayne Leimer [Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2008-05-15

    The sinterability of a class F fly ash was investigated as a function of processing conditions including sintering temperature (1050-1200{sup o}C) and sintering time (0-90 min). Density, shrinkage, splitting tensile strength, water absorption and residual loss on ignition (RLOI) were evaluated as measures of sintering efficiency. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray microanalysis and X-ray diffraction was used to examine microstructure and phase development due to processing. The results show that premature densification can inhibit complete carbon removal and that carbon combustion is influenced by both internal and external mass transfer conditions. 18 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brow, Richard K.; McCollister, Howard L.; Phifer, Carol C.; Day, Delbert E.

    1997-01-01

    Barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are provided comprising various combinations (in terms of mole-%) of boron oxide (B.sub.2 O.sub.3), barium oxide (BaO), lanthanum oxide (La.sub.2 O.sub.3), and at least one other oxide selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide (Al.sub.2 O.sub.3), calcium oxide (CaO), lithium oxide (Li.sub.2 O), sodium oxide (Na.sub.2 O), silicon dioxide (SiO.sub.2), or titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2). These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys having an improved aqueous durability and favorable sealing characteristics. Examples of the sealing-glass compositions are provided having coefficients of thermal expansion about that of titanium or titanium alloys, and with sealing temperatures less than about 900.degree. C., and generally about 700.degree.-800.degree. C. The barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are useful for components and devices requiring prolonged exposure to moisture or water, and for implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps).

  19. A comparative study of nitride purity and Am fabrication losses in PuN materials by the powder and internal gelation production routes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedberg, Marcus, E-mail: marhed@chalmers.se; Ekberg, Christian

    2016-12-15

    Fabrication of plutonium containing fuels through the internal gelation method has mostly been studied in mixed metal systems such as U, Pu or Zr,Pu. In this work production of undiluted PuN has been performed by carbothermal reduction on both oxide powder and Pu microspheres produced by the internal gelation method. Nitride purities reached using the different methods have been studied together with final densities achieved during pellet fabrication as well as losses of ingrown Am during the different production steps. Formation of Pu microspheres was successfully performed using the internal gelation method, although extensive microsphere fracturing occurred during thermal treatment. Final densities of PuN pellets produced by cold pressing and sintering reached 70–80% of theoretical density. Am losses during the carbothermal reduction step was on average about 3.7%. After sintering about 11% of Am was lost in total through the entire production process if sintering in N{sub 2} + 5% H{sub 2} atmosphere while about 50% of the Am in total was lost when using Ar as sintering atmosphere. - Highlights: • Internal gelation Pu based sols was performed. • Nitride formation by carbothermal reduction on Pu microspheres and powders was performed. • Pelletization and sintering of pellets was performed. • Am losses were measured throughout the production steps.

  20. Precipitation of metal nitrides from chloride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slater, S.A.; Miller, W.E.; Willit, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Precipitation of actinides, lanthanides, and fission products as nitrides from molten chloride melts is being investigated for use as a final cleanup step in treating radioactive salt wastes generated by electrometallurgical processing of spent nuclear fuel. The radioactive components (eg, fission products) need to be removed to reduce the volume of high-level waste that requires disposal. To extract the fission products from the salt, a nitride precipitation process is being developed. The salt waste is first contacted with a molten metal; after equilibrium is reached, a nitride is added to the metal phase. The insoluble nitrides can be recovered and converted to a borosilicate glass after air oxidation. For a bench-scale experimental setup, a crucible was designed to contact the salt and metal phases. Solubility tests were performed with candidate nitrides and metal nitrides for which there are no solubility data. Experiments were performed to assess feasibility of precipitation of metal nitrides from chloride melts

  1. Alternative sintering methods compared to conventional thermal sintering for inkjet printed silver nanoparticle ink

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niittynen, J.; Abbel, R.; Mäntysalo, M.; Perelaer, J.; Schubert, U.S.; Lupo, D.

    2014-01-01

    In this contribution several alternative sintering methods are compared to traditional thermal sintering as high temperature and long process time of thermal sintering are increasing the costs of inkjet-printing and preventing the use of this technology in large scale manufacturing. Alternative

  2. Boron Carbide: Stabilization of Highly-Loaded Aqueous Suspensions, Pressureless Sintering, and Room Temperature Injection Molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Cano, Andres

    Boron carbide (B4C) is the third hardest material after diamond and cubic boron nitride. It's unique combination of properties makes B4C a highly valuable material. With hardness values around 35 MPa, a high melting point, 2450°C, density of 2.52 g/cm3, and high chemical inertness, boron carbide is used in severe wear components, like cutting tools and sandblasting nozzles, nuclear reactors' control rots, and finally and most common application, armor. Production of complex-shaped ceramic component is complex and represents many challenges. Present research presents a new and novel approach to produce complex-shaped B4C components. Proposed approach allows forming to be done at room temperatures and under very low forming pressures. Additives and binder concentrations are kept as low as possible, around 5Vol%, while ceramics loadings are maximized above 50Vol%. Given that proposed approach uses water as the main solvent, pieces drying is simple and environmentally safe. Optimized formulation allows rheological properties to be tailored and adjust to multiple processing approaches, including, injection molding, casting, and additive manufacturing. Boron carbide samples then were pressureless sintered. Due to the high covalent character of boron carbide, multiples sintering aids and techniques have been proposed in order to achieve high levels of densification. However, is not possible to define a clear sintering methodology based on literature. Thus, present research developed a comprehensive study on the effect of multiple sintering aids on the densification of boron carbide when pressureless sintered. Relative densities above 90% were achieved with values above 30MPa in hardness. Current research allows extending the uses and application of boron carbide, and other ceramic systems, by providing a new approach to produce complex-shaped components with competitive properties.

  3. Correlation of Critical Temperatures and Electrical Properties in Titanium Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandini, C.; Lacquaniti, V.; Monticone, E.; Portesi, C.; Rajteri, M.; Rastello, M. L.; Pasca, E.; Ventura, G.

    Recently transition-edge sensors (TES) have obtained an increasing interest as light detectors due to their high energy resolution and broadband response. Titanium (Ti), with transition temperature up to 0.5 K, is among the suitable materials for TES application. In this work we investigate Ti films obtained from two materials of different purity deposited by e-gun on silicon nitride. Films with different thickness and deposition substrate temperature have been measured. Critical temperatures, electrical resistivities and structural properties obtained from x-ray are related to each other.

  4. Classification of titanium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macias B, L.R.; Garcia C, R.M.; Maya M, M.E.; Ita T, A. De; Palacios G, J.

    2002-01-01

    In this work the X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (Sem) and the X-ray Dispersive Energy Spectroscopy techniques are used with the purpose to achieve a complete identification of phases and mixture of phases of a crystalline material as titanium dioxide. The problem for solving consists of being able to distinguish a sample of titanium dioxide being different than a titanium dioxide pigment. A standard sample of titanium dioxide with NIST certificate is used, which indicates a purity of 99.74% for the TiO 2 . The following way is recommended to proceed: a)To make an analysis by means of X-ray diffraction technique to the sample of titanium dioxide pigment and on the standard of titanium dioxide waiting not find differences. b) To make a chemical analysis by the X-ray Dispersive Energy Spectroscopy via in a microscope, taking advantage of the high vacuum since it is oxygen which is analysed and if it is concluded that the aluminium oxide appears in a greater proportion to 1% it is established that is a titanium dioxide pigment, but if it is lesser then it will be only titanium dioxide. This type of analysis is an application of the nuclear techniques useful for the tariff classification of merchandise which is considered as of difficult recognition. (Author)

  5. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Graphene-Reinforced Titanium Matrix/Nano-Hydroxyapatite Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Jiang, Xiaosong; Shao, Zhenyi; Zhu, Degui; Zhu, Minhao

    2018-04-16

    Biomaterial composites made of titanium and hydroxyapatite (HA) powder are among the most important biomedicalmaterials due to their good mechanical properties and biocompatibility. In this work, graphene-reinforced titanium matrix/nano-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites were prepared by vacuum hot-pressing sintering. The microstructure and mechanical properties of graphene-reinforced titanium matrix/nano-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites with different graphene content were systematically investigated. Microstructures of the nanocomposites were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), back scattered electron imaging (BSE), scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The mechanical properties were determined from microhardness, shear strength, and compressive strength. Results showed that during the high-temperature sintering process, complex chemical reactions occurred, resulting in new phases of nucleation such as Ca₃(PO₄)₂, Ti x P y , and Ti₃O.The new phases, which easily dropped off under the action of external force, could hinder the densification of sintering and increase the brittleness of the nanocomposites. Results demonstrated that graphene had an impact on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the nanocomposites. Based on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the nanocomposites, the strengthening and fracture mechanisms of the graphene-reinforced titanium matrix/nano-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites with different graphene content were analyzed.

  6. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Graphene-Reinforced Titanium Matrix/Nano-Hydroxyapatite Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Biomaterial composites made of titanium and hydroxyapatite (HA powder are among the most important biomedicalmaterials due to their good mechanical properties and biocompatibility. In this work, graphene-reinforced titanium matrix/nano-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites were prepared by vacuum hot-pressing sintering. The microstructure and mechanical properties of graphene-reinforced titanium matrix/nano-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites with different graphene content were systematically investigated. Microstructures of the nanocomposites were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD, back scattered electron imaging (BSE, scanning electron microscope (SEM equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS, electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA, and transmission electron microscope (TEM. The mechanical properties were determined from microhardness, shear strength, and compressive strength. Results showed that during the high-temperature sintering process, complex chemical reactions occurred, resulting in new phases of nucleation such as Ca3(PO42, TixPy, and Ti3O.The new phases, which easily dropped off under the action of external force, could hinder the densification of sintering and increase the brittleness of the nanocomposites. Results demonstrated that graphene had an impact on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the nanocomposites. Based on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the nanocomposites, the strengthening and fracture mechanisms of the graphene-reinforced titanium matrix/nano-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites with different graphene content were analyzed.

  7. Nitrides and carbides of molybdenum and tungsten with high specific-surface area: their synthesis, structure, and catalytic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volpe, L.

    1985-01-01

    Temperature-programmed reactions between trioxides of molybdenum or tungsten and ammonia provide a new method to synthesize dimolybdenum and ditungsten nitrides with specific surface areas to two-hundred-and-twenty and ninety-one square meters per gram, respectively. These are the highest values on record for any unsupported metallic powders. They correspond to three-four nonometer particles. The reaction of molybdenum trioxide with ammonia is topotactic in the sense that one-zero-zero planes of dimolybdenum nitride are parallel to zero-one-zero planes of molybdenum trioxide. As the trioxide transforms, it passes through an oxynitride intermediate with changing bulk structure and increasing surface area and extent of reduction. The nitride product consists of platelets, pseudomorphous with the original trioxide, which can be regarded as highly porous defect single crystals. By treating small particles of dimolybdenum or ditungsten nitride with methane-dihydrogen mixtures it is possible to replace interstitial nitrogen atoms by carbon atoms, without sintering, and thus to prepare carbides of molybdenum and tungsten with very high specific surface areas. Molybdenum nitride powders catalyze ammonia synthesis. A pronounced increase in the catalytic activity with increasing particle size confirms the structure-sensitive character of this reaction

  8. Dielectric Properties of Sol-Gel Derived Barium Strontium Titanate and Microwave Sintering of Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmi, Fathi A.

    This thesis consists of two areas of research: (1) sol-gel processing of Ba_{rm 1-x}Sr_{rm x} TiO_3 ceramics and their dielectric properties measurement; and (2) microwave versus conventional sintering of ceramics such as Al_2 O_3, Ba_{ rm 1-x}Sr_{rm x}TiO_3, Sb-doped SnO _2 and YBa_2Cu _3O_7. Sol-gel powders of BaTiO_3, SrTiO_3, and their solid solutions were synthesized by the hydrolysis of titanium isopropoxide and Ba and Sr methoxyethoxides. The loss tangent and dielectric constant of both sol-gel and conventionally prepared and sintered Ba_{rm 1-x}Sr _{rm x}TiO _3 ceramics were investigated at high frequencies. The sol-gel prepared ceramics showed higher dielectric constant and lower loss compared to those prepared conventionally. Ba _{rm 1-x}Sr _{rm x}TiO_3 ceramics were tunable with applied bias, indicating the potential use of this material for phase shifter applications. Porous Ba_{0.65}Sr _{0.35}TiO_3 was also investigated to lower the dielectric constant. Microwave sintering of alpha -Al_2O_3 and SrTiO_3 was investigated using an ordinary kitchen microwave oven (2.45 GHz; 600 Watts). The use of microwaves with good insulation of alpha -Al_2O_3 and SrTiO_3 samples resulted in their rapid sintering with good final densities of 96 and 98% of the theoretical density, respectively. A comparison of grain size for conventionally and microwave sintered SrTiO_3 samples did not show a noticeable difference. However, the grain size of microwave sintered alpha-Al_2O _3 was found to be larger than that of conventionally sintered sample. These results show that rapid sintering of ceramics can be achieved by using microwave radiation. The sintering behavior of coprecipitated Sb-doped SnO_2 was investigated using microwave power absorption. With microwave power, samples were sintered at 1450^circC for 20 minutes and showed a density as high as 99.9% of theoretical. However, samples fired in a conventional electric furnace at the same temperature for 4 hours showed only

  9. Effects of sintering temperature on the density and porosity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-01

    bonding) between the salt beads at all the temperatures in which sintering was performed. .... and the sintering of some covalent solids and low- stability ceramics. The entire sintering process is gen- erally considered to occur in ...

  10. Stoichiometric carbon nitride synthesized by ion beam sputtering and post nitrogen ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valizadeh, R.; Colligon, J.S.; Katardiev, I.V.; Faunce, C.A.; Donnelly, S.E.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Carbon nitride films have been deposited on Si (100) by ion beam sputtering a vitreous graphite target with nitrogen and argon ions with and without concurrent N2 ion bombardment at room temperature. The sputtering beam energy was 1000 eV and the assisted beam energy was 300 eV with ion / atom arrival ratio ranging from 0.5 to 5. The carbon nitride films were deposited both as single layer directly on silicon substrate and as multilayer between two layers of stoichiometric amorphous silicon nitride and polycrystalline titanium nitride. The deposited films were implanted ex-situ with 30 keV nitrogen ions with various doses ranging from 1E17 to 4E17 ions.cm -2 and 2 GeV xenon ion with a dose of 1E12 ions.cm -2 . The nitrogen concentration of the films was measured with Rutherford Backscattering (RBS), Secondary Neutral Mass Spectrometry (SNMS) and Parallel Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (PEELS). The nitrogen concentration for as deposited sample was 34 at% and stoichiometric carbon nitride C 3 N 4 was achieved by post nitrogen implantation of the multi-layered films. Post bombardment of single layer carbon nitride films lead to reduction in the total nitrogen concentration. Carbon K edge structure obtained from PEELS analysis suggested that the amorphous C 3 N 4 matrix was predominantly sp 2 bonded. This was confirmed by Fourier Transforrn Infra-Red Spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the single CN layer which showed the nitrogen was mostly bonded with carbon in nitrile (C≡N) and imine (C=N) groups. The microstructure of the film was determined by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) which indicated that the films were amorphous

  11. Reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porz, F.

    1982-10-01

    Reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) has been characterized. The oxidation behaviour in air up to 1500 0 C and 3000 h and the effects of static and cyclic oxidation on room-temperature strength have been studied. (orig./IHOE) [de

  12. Electrowinning molten titanium from titanium dioxide

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Vuuren, DS

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available the Manufacturing and Materials Industry in it quest for global competitiveness CSIR Manufacturing and Materials Technology 3 Rationale – Titanium Cost Build-up Material Cost Ilmenite $0.27/kg Ti sponge Titanium slag $0.75/kg Ti Sponge TiCl4 and TiO2 $3....10/kg Ti Sponge Ti Sponge raw materials costs $5.50/kg Ti Sponge Total Ti Sponge cost $9-$11/kg Ti Sponge Ti ingot $15-17/kg Ti Aluminium $1.7/kg Al Supporting the Manufacturing and Materials Industry in its quest for global competitivenessorting...

  13. A finite difference model of the iron ore sinter process

    OpenAIRE

    Muller, J.; de Vries, T.L.; Dippenaar, B.A.; Vreugdenburg, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Iron ore fines are agglomerated to produce sinter, which is an important feed material for blast furnaces worldwide. A model of the iron ore sintering process has been developed with the objective of being representative of the sinter pot test, the standard laboratory process in which the behaviour of specific sinter feed mixtures is evaluated. The model aims to predict sinter quality, including chemical quality and physical strength, as well as key sinter process performance parameters such ...

  14. Quantifying the properties of low-cost powder metallurgy titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolzoni, L.; Ruiz-Navas, E.M.; Gordo, E.

    2017-01-01

    The extensive industrial employment of titanium is hindered by its high production costs where reduction of these costs can be achieved using cheap alloying elements and appropriate alternative processing techniques. In this work the feasibility of the production of low-cost titanium alloys is addressed by adding steel to pure titanium and processing the alloys by powder metallurgy. In particular, a spherical 4140 LCH steel powder commonly used in metal injection moulding is blended with irregular hydride-dehydride Ti. The new low-cost alloys are cold uniaxially pressed and sintered under high vacuum and show comparable properties to other wrought-equivalent and powder metallurgy titanium alloys. Differential thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction analyses confirm that Ti can tolerate the employment of iron as primary alloying element without forming detrimental TiFe-based intermetallic phases. Thus, the newly designed α+β alloys could be used for cheaper non-critical components.

  15. Quantifying the properties of low-cost powder metallurgy titanium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolzoni, L., E-mail: bolzoni.leandro@gmail.com [WaiCAM (Waikato Centre for Advanced Materials), The University of Waikato, Private Bag 3105, 3240 Hamilton (New Zealand); Ruiz-Navas, E.M.; Gordo, E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University Carlos III of Madrid, Avda. de la Universidad, 30, 28911 Leganés, Madrid (Spain)

    2017-02-27

    The extensive industrial employment of titanium is hindered by its high production costs where reduction of these costs can be achieved using cheap alloying elements and appropriate alternative processing techniques. In this work the feasibility of the production of low-cost titanium alloys is addressed by adding steel to pure titanium and processing the alloys by powder metallurgy. In particular, a spherical 4140 LCH steel powder commonly used in metal injection moulding is blended with irregular hydride-dehydride Ti. The new low-cost alloys are cold uniaxially pressed and sintered under high vacuum and show comparable properties to other wrought-equivalent and powder metallurgy titanium alloys. Differential thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction analyses confirm that Ti can tolerate the employment of iron as primary alloying element without forming detrimental TiFe-based intermetallic phases. Thus, the newly designed α+β alloys could be used for cheaper non-critical components.

  16. Electrochemical process for the manufacturing of titanium alloy matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Soare

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a new method for precursors’ synthesis of titanium alloys matrix composites through an electrochemical process in molten calcium chloride. The cathode of the cell was made from metallic oxides powders and reinforcement ceramic particles, which were pressed and sintered into disk form and the anode from graphite. The process occurred at 850 °C, in two stages, at 2,7 / 3,2 V: the ionization of the oxygen in oxides and the reduction with calcium formed by electrolysis of calcium oxide fed in the electrolyte. The obtained composite precursors, in a form of metallic sponge, were consolidated by pressing and sintering. Chemical and structural analyses on composites samples were performed.

  17. Liquid phase sintered superconducting cermet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, S.P.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a method of making a superconducting cermet having superconducting properties with improved bulk density, low porosity and in situ stabilization. It comprises: forming a structure of a superconducting ceramic material having the formula RM 2 Cu 3 O (6.5 + x) wherein R is one or more rare earth elements capable of reacting to form a superconducting ceramic, M is one or more alkaline earth metal elements selected from barium and strontium capable of reacting to form a superconducting ceramic, x is greater than 0 and less than 0.5; and a precious metal compound in solid form selected from the class consisting of oxides, sulfides and halides of silver; and liquid phase sintering the mixture at a temperature wherein the precious metal of the precious metal compound is molten and below the melting point of the ceramic material. The liquid phase sintering is carried out for a time less than 36 hours but sufficient to improve the bulk density of the cermet

  18. Sintered-to-size FBR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, D.E.; Schaus, P.S.

    1984-04-01

    Fabrication of sintered-to-size PuO 2 -UO 2 fuel pellets was completed for testing of proposed FBR product specifications. Approximately 6000 pellets were fabricated to two nominal diameters and two densities by cold pressing and sintering to size. Process control and correlation between test and production batches are discussed

  19. Sintering characteristics of nano-ceramic coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hosson, J.T.M.; Popma, R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper concentrates on sintering characteristics of nano-sized ceramic SiO2 particles. The sintering process is studied as a function of temperature using a conventional furnace and using a laser beam. The underlying idea is to combine the nanoceramic sol-gel concept with inkjet technology and

  20. Thermally stable sintered porous metal articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gombach, A.L.; Thellmann, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    A sintered porous metal article is provided which is essentially thermally stable at elevated temperatures. In addition, a method for producing such an article is also provided which method comprises preparing a blend of base metal particles and active dispersoid particles, forming the mixture into an article of the desired shape, and heating the so-formed article at sintering temperatures

  1. Sintering of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is a high performance polymer having low coefficient of friction, good abrasion resistance, good chemical ... In this study, we report our results on compaction and sintering behaviour of two grades of UHMWPE with reference to the powder morphology, sintering ...

  2. Mechanical characteristics of microwave sintered silicon carbide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In firing of products by conventionally sintered process, SiC grain gets oxidized producing SiO2 (∼ 32 wt%) and deteriorates the quality of the product substantially. Partially sintered silicon carbide by such a method is a useful material for a varieties of applications ranging from kiln furniture to membrane material.

  3. Recrystallization and embrittlement of sintered tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bega, N.D.; Babak, A.V.; Uskov, E.I.

    1982-01-01

    The recrystallization of sintered tungsten with a cellular structure of deformation is studied as related to its embrittlement. It is stated that in case of preliminary recrystallization the sintered tungsten crack resistance does not depend on the testing temperature. The tungsten crack resistance is shown to lower with an increase of the structure tendency to primary recrystallization [ru

  4. Master sintering curves of two different alumina powder compacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaclav Pouchly

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Concept of Master Sintering Curve is a strong tool for optimizing sintering schedule. The sintering behaviour can be predicted, and sintering activation energy can be calculated with the help of few dilatometric measurements. In this paper an automatic procedure was used to calculate Master Sintering Curves of two different alumina compacts. The sintering activation energies were determined as 640 kJ/mol for alumina with particle size of 240 nm, respective 770 kJ/mol for alumina with particle size of 110 nm. The possibility to predict sintering behaviour with the help of Master Sintering Curve was verified.

  5. Fractographical characterization of hot pressed and pressureless sintered AlN-doped ZrB{sub 2}–SiC composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadi, Zohre [Department of Materials Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nayebi, Behzad [School of Materials and Metallurgy Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Young Researchers and Elite Club, Khorramabad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Khorramabad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahedi Asl, Mehdi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghassemi Kakroudi, Mahdi, E-mail: mg_kakroudi@tabrizu.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    In this paper, ZrB{sub 2}–SiC composites doped with 0–5 wt.% AlN were prepared by a low pressure hot pressing as well as a pressureless sintering methods at 1900 °C for 2 h. The influence of aluminum nitride addition on the sinterability and microstructure development of such ceramic composites was studied by a fractographical approach. The results revealed that only 1 wt.% AlN can aid the densification process of the hot pressed ceramic composite via the liquid phase sintering mechanism due to the formation of nano-scale metakaolinite spinel layers. In the pressureless sintering method, adding more AlN can increase the formation of gaseous products which raised the amount of porosities in the final microstructure. The formation of nano-graphite phase in the hot pressing process, the formation of Al{sub 2}OC in the pressureless sintering process, and the formation of BN in the both processes were disclosed by X-ray diffraction, SEM and TEM analyses. - Highlights: • The effect of AlN addition on densification of ZrB{sub 2}–SiC composites was studied. • AlN promotes the densification in hot pressed samples by liquid phase formation. • A fully dense composite was obtained by adding 1 wt.% AlN in hot pressing process. • In pressureless sintering, more AlN content intensifies the formation of porosities.

  6. Two steps sintering alumina doped with niobia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, L.B.; Hatzfeld, J.; Heck, M.; Pokorny, A.; Bergmann, C.P.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, high surface area commercial alumina was doped with niobia and sintered in two steps in order to obtain dense materials with lower processing temperatures. The powders were milled and uniaxially pressed (200 MPa). The first step of sintering took place at 1100°C for 3, 6, 9 and 12 hours, followed by the second step at 1350°C for 3 hours. The relative density, porosity and water absorption of the samples were determined by the Archimedes method. The crystalline phases were analyzed by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and the morphology of the samples after sintering, evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The results indicate that the use of niobia combined with the two steps sintering promotes an increase in the density of the material, even at lower sintering temperatures. (author)

  7. Sintered ceramics having controlled density and porosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brassfield, H.C.; DeHollander, W.R.; Nivas, Y.

    1980-01-01

    A new method was developed for sintering ceramic uranium dioxide powders, in which ammonium oxalate is admixed with the powder prior to being pressed into a cylindrical green body, so that the end-point density of the final nuclear-reactor fuel product can be controlled. When the green body is heated, the ammonium oxalate decomposes and leaves discrete porosity in the sintered body, which corresponds to the ammonium oxalate regions in the green body. Thus the end-point density of the sintered body is a function of the amount of ammonium oxalate added. The final density of the sintered product is about 90-97% of the theoretical. The addition of ammonium oxalate also allows control of the pore size and distribution throughout the fuel. The process leaves substantially no impurities in the sintered strucuture. (DN)

  8. Chitosan patterning on titanium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Gilabert Chirivella, Eduardo; Pérez Feito, Ricardo; Ribeiro, Clarisse; Ribeiro, Sylvie; Correia, Daniela; González Martin, María Luisa; Manero Planella, José María; Lanceros Méndez, Senentxu; Gallego Ferrer, Gloria; Gómez Ribelles, José Luis

    2017-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys are widely used in medical implants because of their excellent properties. However, bacterial infection is a frequent cause of titanium-based implant failure and also compromises its osseointegration. In this study, we report a new simple method of providing titanium surfaces with antibacterial properties by alternating antibacterial chitosan domains with titanium domains in the micrometric scale. Surface microgrooves were etched on pure titanium disks at i...

  9. Microstructure and mechanical properties of sintered Ti Binary alloys for dental applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz Atay, H.; Haro Rodriguez, M.; Amigo Mata, A.; Vicente Escuder, V.; Amigo Borras, V.

    2016-07-01

    Biomaterials have shown rapid growth in the field of elderly population demands with the prolongation of human life. One of those biomaterials, titanium, has excellent properties and biocompatibility though it may cause weakening in the structures due to its higher stiffness. In this study, powder metallurgy process was used to produce Ti-Cr, Ti-Mo and Ti-Cu metal alloys to overcome this problem. Metal powders were mixed by mechanical alloying. After pressing and sintering, alloys structures were investigated. Characterizations were carried out by size analyzer, SEM-EDX, optical microscope and three points bending test. (Author)

  10. On the sintering kinetics in UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marajofsky, A.

    1998-01-01

    The fabrication process of UO 2 pellets from powders involve pressing and a sintering anneal at high temperature (1650 deg. C to 1750 deg. C) during two or more hours in a hydrogen atmosphere. An alternative method is the oxidative sintering, made at lower temperature (1000 deg. C to 1300 deg. C) in a CO 2 or CO/CO 2 atmosphere. The sintering phenomena consist in the densification of the material by a thermal treatment below the fusion point. For a compact made by pressing a powder, sintering is the process of annulation of the porosity present in the compact or pellet. Several theories describe the sintering phenomena dividing it in three stages, initial, intermediate and final: in all of them the densification is a continuous growing function of time. Nevertheless it has been experimentally reported that a reduction of the density occurs in the third step of the sintering. The phenomena has been called solarization. Solarization has been attributed to the effect of the evolved gases from additives or to the CO 2 atmosphere in oxidative sintering. Thus, it is convenient to distinguish between solarization in oxidative or reducing conditions. Reducing solarization is a consequence of the tendency towards equilibrium of intergranular pores. In oxidative sintering it occurs in the reducing anneal after the sintering and is due to the change in the lattice parameter. This work shows examples of both types of solarization and qualitative interpretation of this phenomena. Both situations show the need of strict control of the sintering and powder production conditions. (author)

  11. Production of titanium tetrachloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perillo, P.M.; Botbol, O.

    1990-01-01

    This report presents a summary of results from theoperation of a laboratory scale for the production in batches of approximately 100 gs of titanium tetrachloride by chlorination with chloroform and carbon tetrachloride between 340 deg C and 540 deg C. Chlorination agent vapors were passed through a quartz column reacting with titanium oxide powder agglomerated in little spheres. Obtained titanium tetrachloride was condensed in a condenser, taken in a ballon and then purified by fractional distillation. Optimun temperature for chloroform was 400 deg C with 74 % yield and for carbon tetrachloride was 500 deg C with 69 % yield. (Author) [es

  12. Transformation-Toughened Silicon Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    of pores, could be eliminated by iso - statically pressing the green flexure test bars after the burnout operation and before the sintering...Company Fourth and Canal Streets PO Box 27003 Richmond, VA 23261 Stephen C. Danforth Rutgers University Post Office Box 909 Bowser Road

  13. Surface modification of the titanium implant using TEA CO2 laser pulses in controllable gas atmospheres - Comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciganovic, J.; Stasic, J.; Gakovic, B.; Momcilovic, M.; Milovanovic, D.; Bokorov, M.; Trtica, M.

    2012-01-01

    Interaction of a TEA CO 2 laser, operating at 10.6 μm wavelength and pulse duration of 100 ns (FWHM), with a titanium implant in various gas atmospheres was studied. The Ti implant surface modification was typically studied at the moderate laser beam energy density/fluence of 28 J/cm 2 in the surrounding of air, N 2 , O 2 or He. The energy absorbed from the TEA CO 2 laser beam is partially converted to thermal energy, which generates a series of effects, such as melting, vaporization of the molten material, shock waves, etc. The following titanium implant surface changes and phenomena were observed, depending on the gas used: (i) creation of cone-like surface structures in the atmospheres of air, N 2 and O 2 , and dominant micro-holes/pores in He ambient; (ii) hydrodynamic features, most prominent in air; (iii) formation of titanium nitride and titanium oxide layers, and (iv) occurrence of plasma in front of the implant. It can be concluded from this study that the reported laser fluence and gas ambiences can effectively be applied for enhancing the titanium implant roughness and creation of titanium oxides and nitrides on the strictly localized surface area. The appearance of plasma in front of the implants indicates relatively high temperatures created above the surface. This offers a sterilizing effect, facilitating contaminant-free conditions.

  14. Surface modification of the titanium implant using TEA CO{sub 2} laser pulses in controllable gas atmospheres - Comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciganovic, J.; Stasic, J.; Gakovic, B.; Momcilovic, M.; Milovanovic, D. [VINCA Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. BOX 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Bokorov, M. [Faculty of Sciences, Department of Biology and Ecology, University of Novi Sad, Trg Dositeja Obradovica 3, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Trtica, M., E-mail: etrtica@vinca.rs [VINCA Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. BOX 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2012-01-15

    Interaction of a TEA CO{sub 2} laser, operating at 10.6 {mu}m wavelength and pulse duration of 100 ns (FWHM), with a titanium implant in various gas atmospheres was studied. The Ti implant surface modification was typically studied at the moderate laser beam energy density/fluence of 28 J/cm{sup 2} in the surrounding of air, N{sub 2}, O{sub 2} or He. The energy absorbed from the TEA CO{sub 2} laser beam is partially converted to thermal energy, which generates a series of effects, such as melting, vaporization of the molten material, shock waves, etc. The following titanium implant surface changes and phenomena were observed, depending on the gas used: (i) creation of cone-like surface structures in the atmospheres of air, N{sub 2} and O{sub 2}, and dominant micro-holes/pores in He ambient; (ii) hydrodynamic features, most prominent in air; (iii) formation of titanium nitride and titanium oxide layers, and (iv) occurrence of plasma in front of the implant. It can be concluded from this study that the reported laser fluence and gas ambiences can effectively be applied for enhancing the titanium implant roughness and creation of titanium oxides and nitrides on the strictly localized surface area. The appearance of plasma in front of the implants indicates relatively high temperatures created above the surface. This offers a sterilizing effect, facilitating contaminant-free conditions.

  15. Microstructure and mechanical properties of direct metal laser sintered TI-6AL-4V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becker, Thorsten Hermann

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS is a selective laser melting (SLM manufacturing process that can produce near net shape parts from metallic powders. A range of materials are suitable for SLM; they include various metals such as titanium, steel, aluminium, and cobalt-chrome alloys. This paper forms part of a research drive that aims to evaluate the material performance of the SLM-manufactured metals. It presents DMLS-produced Ti-6Al-4V, a titanium alloy often used in biomedical and aerospace applications. This paper also studies the effect of several heat treatments on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti-6Al-4V processed by SLM. It reports the achievable mechanical properties of the alloy, including quasi-static, crack growth behaviour, density and porosity distribution, and post-processing using various heat-treatment conditions.

  16. Sputter deposited titanium disilicide at high substrate temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanielian, M.; Blackstone, S.; Lajos, R.

    1984-08-01

    Titanium disilicide films were sputter deposited from a composite TiSi2.1 target on bare silicon wafers both at room temperature and at 600 °C. The room temperature as-deposited films require a 900 °C sintering step to reduce their resistivity. On the other hand, the as-deposited 600 °C films are fully reacted, polycrystalline, have no oxygen contamination, large grain sizes, and are oxidation resistant. Further annealing of these films at 900 °C produces no changes in their crystal structure, composition, resistivity, or grain size.

  17. An Insoluble Titanium-Lead Anode for Sulfate Electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferdman, Alla

    2005-05-11

    The project is devoted to the development of novel insoluble anodes for copper electrowinning and electrolytic manganese dioxide (EMD) production. The anodes are made of titanium-lead composite material produced by techniques of powder metallurgy, compaction of titanium powder, sintering and subsequent lead infiltration. The titanium-lead anode combines beneficial electrochemical behavior of a lead anode with high mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of a titanium anode. In the titanium-lead anode, the titanium stabilizes the lead, preventing it from spalling, and the lead sheathes the titanium, protecting it from passivation. Interconnections between manufacturing process, structure, composition and properties of the titanium-lead composite material were investigated. The material containing 20-30 vol.% of lead had optimal combination of mechanical and electrochemical properties. Optimal process parameters to manufacture the anodes were identified. Prototypes having optimized composition and structure were produced for testing in operating conditions of copper electrowinning and EMD production. Bench-scale, mini-pilot scale and pilot scale tests were performed. The test anodes were of both a plate design and a flow-through cylindrical design. The cylindrical anodes were composed of cylinders containing titanium inner rods and fitting over titanium-lead bushings. The cylindrical design allows the electrolyte to flow through the anode, which enhances diffusion of the electrolyte reactants. The cylindrical anodes demonstrate higher mass transport capabilities and increased electrical efficiency compared to the plate anodes. Copper electrowinning represents the primary target market for the titanium-lead anode. A full-size cylindrical anode performance in copper electrowinning conditions was monitored over a year. The test anode to cathode voltage was stable in the 1.8 to 2.0 volt range. Copper cathode morphology was very smooth and uniform. There was no

  18. Characterizations of additive manufactured porous titanium implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basalah, Ahmad; Shanjani, Yaser; Esmaeili, Shahrzad; Toyserkani, Ehsan

    2012-10-01

    This article describes physical, chemical, and mechanical characterizations of porous titanium implants made by an additive manufacturing method to gain insight into the correlation of process parameters and final physical properties of implants used in orthopedics. For the manufacturing chain, the powder metallurgy technology was combined with the additive manufacturing to fabricate the porous structure from the pure tanium powder. A 3D printing machine was employed in this study to produce porous bar samples. A number of physical parameters such as titanium powder size, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) amount, sintering temperature and time were investigated to control the mechanical properties and porosity of the structures. The produced samples were characterized through porosity and shrinkage measurements, mechanical compression test and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed a level of porosity in the samples in the range of 31-43%, which is within the range of the porosity of the cancelluous bone and approaches the range of the porosity of the cortical bone. The results of the mechanical test showed that the compressive strength is in the wide range of 56-509 MPa implying the effect of the process parameters on the mechanical strengths. This technique of manufacturing of Ti porous structures demonstrated a low level of shrinkage with the shrinkage percentage ranging from 1.5 to 5%. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Pyrolytic carbon coating for cytocompatibility of titanium oxide nanoparticles: a promising candidate for medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behzadi, Shahed; Simchi, Abdolreza; Imani, Mohammad; Yousefi, Mohammad; Galinetto, Pietro; Amiri, Houshang; Stroeve, Pieter; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticles for biomedical use must be cytocompatible with the biological environment that they are exposed to. Current research has focused on the surface functionalization of nanoparticles by using proteins, polymers, thiols and other organic compounds. Here we show that inorganic nanoparticles such as titanium oxide can be coated by pyrolytic carbon (PyC) and that the coating has cytocompatible properties. Pyrolization and condensation of methane formed a thin layer of pyrolytic carbon on the titanium oxide core. The formation of the PyC shell retards coalescence and sintering of the ceramic phase. Our MTT assay shows that the PyC-coated particles are cytocompatible at employed doses. (paper)

  20. Synchrotron X-ray CT characterization of titanium parts fabricated by additive manufacturing. Part I. Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlett, Nicola Vivienne Yorke; Tyson, Peter; Fraser, Darren; Mayo, Sheridan; Maksimenko, Anton

    2016-07-01

    Synchrotron X-ray tomography has been applied to the study of titanium parts fabricated by additive manufacturing (AM). The AM method employed here was the Arcam EBM(®) (electron beam melting) process which uses powdered titanium alloy, Ti64 (Ti alloy with approximately 6%Al and 4%V), as the feed and an electron beam for the sintering/welding. The experiment was conducted on the Imaging and Medical Beamline of the Australian Synchrotron. Samples were chosen to examine the effect of build direction and complexity of design on the surface morphology and final dimensions of the piece.

  1. Ion nitridation - physical and technological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elbern, A.W.

    1980-01-01

    Ion nitridation, is a technique which allows the formation of a controlled thickness of nitrides in the surface of the material, using this material as the cathode in a low pressure glow discharge, which presents many advantages over the conventional method. A brief review of the ion nitriding technique, the physical fenomena involved, and we discuss technological aspects of this method, are presented. (Author) [pt

  2. Electroplating on titanium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    Activation process forms adherent electrodeposits of copper, nickel, and chromium on titanium alloy. Good adhesion of electroplated deposits is obtained by using acetic-hydrofluoric acid anodic activation process.

  3. Melting and Sintering of Ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Aslaug

    1997-01-01

    -1300°C, and a trend of higher fusion temperatures with increasing contents of Al-silicates and quartz was found.c) Fly ashes, bottom ashes and deposits from coal/straw co-firing were all found to consist mainly of metal-alumina and alumina-silicates. These ashes all melt in the temperature range 1000......The thesis contains an experimental study of the fusion and sintering of ashes collected during straw and coal/straw co-firing.A laboratory technique for quantitative determination of ash fusion has been developed based on Simultaneous Thermal Analysis (STA). By means of this method the fraction......, the biggest deviations being found for salt rich (i.e. straw derived) ashes.A simple model assuming proportionality between fly ash fusion and deposit formation was found to be capable of ranking deposition rates for the different straw derived fly ashes, whereas for the fly ashes from coal/straw co-firing...

  4. Thermodynamics and mechanisms of sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pask, J.A.

    1978-10-01

    A phenomenological overview and exploration of the thermodynamic and geometric factors play a role in the process of densification of model compact systems consisting of crystalline spheres of uniform size in regular and irregular packing that form grain boundaries at every contact point. A further assumption is the presence of isotropic surface and grain boundary energies. Although such systems are unrealistic in comparison with normal powder compacts, their potential sintering behavior can be analyzed and provided with a limiting set of behavior conditions which can be looked upon as one boundary condition. This approach is logically realistic since it is easier to understand and provide a basis for understanding the more complex real powder systems

  5. Titanium oxide fever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jonge, D.; Visser, J.

    2012-01-01

    One measure to improve air quality is to apply photo-catalytic substances that capture NOx onto the road surface or onto baffle boards alongside the roads. The effect of titanium oxide containing clinkers with coating was discussed in the report 'Demonstration project of air-purifying pavement in Hengelo, The Netherlands' that was published in May 2011. This article examines the way in which the effectiveness of this study was determined. Can titanium oxide containing clinkers and coatings indeed capture NOx?. [nl

  6. Machining of titanium alloys

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a collection of examples illustrating the resent research advances in the machining of titanium alloys. These materials have excellent strength and fracture toughness as well as low density and good corrosion resistance; however, machinability is still poor due to their low thermal conductivity and high chemical reactivity with cutting tool materials. This book presents solutions to enhance machinability in titanium-based alloys and serves as a useful reference to professionals and researchers in aerospace, automotive and biomedical fields.

  7. Topotactic synthesis of vanadium nitride solid foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyama, S.T.; Kapoor, R.; Oyama, H.T.; Hofmann, D.J.; Matijevic, E.

    1993-01-01

    Vanadium nitride has been synthesized with a surface area of 120 m 2 g -1 by temperature programmed nitridation of a foam-like vanadium oxide (35 m 2 g -1 ), precipitated from vanadate solutions. The nitridation reaction was established to be topotactic and pseudomorphous by x-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The crystallographic relationship between the nitride and oxide was {200}//{001}. The effect of precursor geometry on the product size and shape was investigated by employing vanadium oxide solids of different morphologies

  8. Microhardness and microplasticity of zirconium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neshpor, V.S.; Eron'yan, M.A.; Petrov, A.N.; Kravchik, A.E.

    1978-01-01

    To experimentally check the concentration dependence of microhardness of 4 group nitrides, microhardness of zirconium nitride compact samples was measured. The samples were obtained either by bulk saturation of zirconium iodide plates or by chemical precipitation from gas. As nitrogen content decreased within the limits of homogeneity of zirconium nitride samples where the concentration of admixed oxygen was low, the microhardness grew from 1500+-100 kg/mm 2 for ZrNsub(1.0) to 27000+-100 kg/mm 2 for ZrNsub(0.78). Microplasticity of zirconium nitride (resistance to fracture) decreased, as the concentration of nitrogen vacancies was growing

  9. Science of sintering and its future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ristic, M.M.

    1975-01-01

    Some new books published by M.Yu. Baljshin, V.A. Ivensen, V.V. Skorohod and others are characterized by the wish to give a complete approach to the problems of sintering theory. Bearing just this in mind while writing the book ''An Essay on the Generalization of Sintering Theory'' (G.V.Samsonov, M.M. Ristic with the collaborators) an idea was born: to ask the most eminent scientists in this field to present their own opinions on the theme ''The Science of Sintering and Modern Views on its Future''. There were formed 18 questions, given in the appendix to be answered. The received answers were presented in 10 chapters of this book. The fourth part of the book consists of papers of eminent scientists engaged in the field of sintering science (some of which were published here for the first time). This material is published in the book with the consent of the authors and these original contributions provide a more profound knowledge of sintering. The initial idea, that the book should have a monograph character and in which the answers would serve as some data on the latest notions of the science of sintering, was somewhat changed since the original opinions of individual scientists are given in the book and these, are sometimes very contradictory. This, in fact, gives the book a special charm because the unsolved problems in the science of sintering are most evidently stressed in this way

  10. Analysis of the properties of silicon nitride based ceramic (Si_3N_4) cutting tool using different addictive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Joaquim Lopes; Souza, Jose Vitor Candido de; Raymundo, Emerson Augusto; Silva, Oliverio Macedo Moreira

    2013-01-01

    The constant search for new materials is part of the scientific and technological development of the industries. Ceramic been presenting important developments in terms of scientific and technological development, highlighting the predominance of covalent ceramics, which has important applications where abrasion resistance and hardness are required. Between covalent materials, several research papers in search of property improvements and cost reduction. However the production of ceramics of silicon nitride (Si_3N_4) with a reduced cost is possible only if used methods and different additives. The aim of this work is the development of compositions based on silicon nitride (Si_3N_4) using different additives such as Y_2O_3, CeO_2, Al_2O_3 , and CTR_2O_3 in varying amounts. For the development of ceramics, the mixtures were homogenized, dried, compacted and sintered using the sintering process of 1850°C for 1 hour, with a heating rate of 25°C/min. The characterizations were performed as a function of relative density by Archimedes method, the mass loss measured before and after sintering, phase analysis by X-ray diffraction, microstructure by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and hardness and fracture toughness indentation method. The results showed relative density 97-98, Vickers hardness 17-19 GPa, fracture toughness from 5.6 to 6.8 MPa.m"1"/"2. The different phases were obtained depending on the types of additives used. The obtained results are promising for tribological applications. (author)

  11. Sintering and microstructure of ice: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackford, Jane R

    2007-01-01

    Sintering of ice is driven by the thermodynamic requirement to decrease surface energy. The structural morphology of ice in nature has many forms-from snowflakes to glaciers. These forms and their evolution depend critically on the balance between the thermodynamic and kinetic factors involved. Ice is a crystalline material so scientific understanding and approaches from more conventional materials can be applied to ice. The early models of solid state ice sintering are based on power law models originally developed in metallurgy. For pressure sintering of ice, these are based on work on hot isostatic pressing of metals and ceramics. Recent advances in recognizing the grain boundary groove geometry between sintering ice particles require models that use new approaches in materials science. The newer models of sintering in materials science are beginning to incorporate more realistic processing conditions and microstructural complexity, and so there is much to be gained from applying these to ice in the future. The vapour pressure of ice is high, which causes it to sublime readily. The main mechanism for isothermal sintering of ice particles is by vapour diffusion; however other transport mechanisms certainly contribute. Plastic deformation with power law creep combined with recrystallization become important mechanisms in sintering with external pressure. Modern experimental techniques, low temperature scanning electron microscopy and x-ray tomography, are providing new insights into the evolution of microstructures in ice. Sintering in the presence of a small volume fraction of the liquid phase causes much higher bond growth rates. This may be important in natural snow which contains impurities that form a liquid phase. Knowledge of ice microstructure and sintering is beneficial in understanding mechanical behaviour in ice friction and the stability of snow slopes prone to avalanches. (topical review)

  12. Spectra of soft X-ray excitation potentials of titanium and vanadium compounds with carbon and nitrogen of a variable composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brytov, I.A.; Bleher, B. Eh.; Neshpor, V.S.

    1979-01-01

    Lsub(3,2) spectra of excitation potentials (SEP) of a soft X-ray radiation of titanium and vanadium carbides and titanium nitrides in their homogeneity range, as well as solid solutions of nitrogen in α-titanium, are studied. The binding energies of electrons of the exciting levels relatively to the Fermi level are determined, adequacy of different quantomechanical calculations is experimentally proved. The observed changes in SEP at the variation of the metalloid concentration are explained by a quantitative transformation model of valent state energetic spectra when metalloid vacancies and connected with them local levels form

  13. Plasma-spray synthesis and characterization of ti-based nitride and oxide nanogranules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antipas, Georgios S.E., E-mail: gantipas@metal.ntua.gr [School of Mining Engineering and Metallurgy, National Technical University of Athens, Athens (Greece)

    2014-09-15

    The synthesis of nanosized Ti-based nanogranules via plasma spraying is reported. The synthesis route involved use of both nitrogen and oxygen gases with varying results. In the case of nitrogen, a mixture of titanium nitrides were produced, yielding both the Ti2N and the sub-stoichiometric TiN0.61 compounds. In the case of oxygen, both the stoichiometric rutile and TiO ceramic phases were indexed. Based on EDS analysis, even fractional oxygen concentrations caused tungsten impurities which originated from the cathode electrode. The method yielded particle mass median sizes of the order of 15nm and the smallest particles detected were 5nm. (author)

  14. Design of sintering-stable heterogeneous catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallas-Hulin, Agata

    One of the major issues in the use of metal nanoparticles in heterogeneous catalysis is sintering. Sintering occurs at elevated temperatures because of increased mobility of nanoparticles, leading to their agglomeration and, as a consequence, to the deactivation of the catalyst. It is an emerging...... problem especially for the noble metals-based catalysis. These metals being expensive and scarce, it is worth developing catalyst systems which preserve their activity over time. Encapsulation of nanoparticles inside zeolites is one of the ways to prevent sintering. Entrapment of nanoparticles inside...

  15. Solidification of HLLW into sintered ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O-Oka, K.; Ohta, T.; Masuda, S.; Tsunoda, N.

    1979-01-01

    Simulated HLLW from the PNC reprocessing plant at Tokai was solidified into sintered ceramics by normal sintering or hot-pressing with addition of some oxides. Among various ceramic products obtained so far, the most preferable was nepheline-type sintered solids formed with addition of SiO 2 and Al 2 O 3 to the simulated waste calcine. The solid shows advantageous properties in leach rate and mechanical strength, which suggest that the ceramic solids were prepared with additions of ZrO 2 or MnO 2 , and some of them showed good characteristics

  16. Effect of rigid inclusions on sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahaman, M.N.; De Jonghe, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    The predictions of recent theoretical studies on the effect of inert, rigid inclusions on the sintering of ceramic powder matrices are examined and compared with experimental data. The densification of glass matrix composites with inclusion volume fractions of ≤0.15 can be adequately explained by Scherer's theory for viscous sintering with rigid inclusions. Inclusions cause a vast reduction in the densification rates of polycrystalline matrix composites even at low inclusion volume fractions. Models put forward to explain the sintering of polycrystalline matrix composites are discussed

  17. Immobilization of Uranium Silicides in Sintered Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateos, P.; Russo, D.O.; Heredia, A.D.; Sanfilippo, M.

    2003-01-01

    High activity nuclear spent fuels vitrification by fusion is a well known technology which has industrial scale in France, England, Japan, EEUU. Borosilicates glasses are used in this process.Sintered glasses are an alternative to the immobilization task in which there is also a wide experience around the world.The available technics are: cold pressing and sintering , hot-pressing and hot isostatic pressing.This work compares Borosilicates and Iron silicates sintered glasses behaviour when different ammounts of nuclear simulated waste is added

  18. Titanium by design: TRIP titanium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Jamie

    Motivated by the prospect of lower cost Ti production processes, new directions in Ti alloy design were explored for naval and automotive applications. Building on the experience of the Steel Research Group at Northwestern University, an analogous design process was taken with titanium. As a new project, essential kinetic databases and models were developed for the design process and used to create a prototype design. Diffusion kinetic models were developed to predict the change in phase compositions and microstructure during heat treatment. Combining a mobility database created in this research with a licensed thermodynamic database, ThermoCalc and DICTRA software was used to model kinetic compositional changes in titanium alloys. Experimental diffusion couples were created and compared to DICTRA simulations to refine mobility parameters in the titanium mobility database. The software and database were able to predict homogenization times and the beta→alpha plate thickening kinetics during cooling in the near-alpha Ti5111 alloy. The results of these models were compared to LEAP microanalysis and found to be in reasonable agreement. Powder metallurgy was explored using SPS at GM R&D to reduce the cost of titanium alloys. Fully dense Ti5111 alloys were produced and achieved similar microstructures to wrought Ti5111. High levels of oxygen in these alloys increased the strength while reducing the ductility. Preliminary Ti5111+Y alloys were created, where yttrium additions successfully gettered excess oxygen to create oxides. However, undesirable large oxides formed, indicating more research is needed into the homogeneous distribution of the yttrium powder to create finer oxides. Principles established in steels were used to optimize the beta phase transformation stability for martensite transformation toughening in titanium alloys. The Olson-Cohen kinetic model is calibrated to shear strains in titanium. A frictional work database is established for common alloying

  19. Nitridation of U and Pu recovered in liquid Cd cathode by molten salt electrorefining of (U,Pu)N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Takumi; Iwai, Takashi; Arai, Yasuo [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan)

    2009-06-15

    Solid solutions of actinide mono-nitrides have been proposed as a candidate fuel of the accelerator-driven system (ADS) and Gen.IV-type fast reactors because the thermal conductivity and metal density are higher than those of actinide oxides and also they have high melting temperature. Pyrochemical process has several advantages over conventional wet process in treating of spent nitride fuel. One of the key technologies of the pyrochemical reprocessing of nitride fuel is the formation of the nitrides from actinides in the liquid Cd cathode. The nitridation-distillation combined method was developed and has been adopted to convert the actinides to the nitrides. In this method, the nitridation of actinides and the distillation of Cd occurred simultaneously by heating the actinide-Cd alloys in N{sub 2} gas stream. In the present study, the nitride formation behavior of U and Pu recovered in Cd cathode by molten salt electrorefining of (U,Pu)N was experimentally investigated. In addition, the nitride pellet was prepared form the powder obtained by the nitridation of U and Pu recovered in Cd cathode. (U,Pu)N (PuN = 80 mol %) was used as the starting material in the experiment. Molten salt electrorefining of (U,Pu)N pellet was carried out in the LiCl-KCl eutectic salt with 1.2 wt% PuCl{sub 3} and 0.3 wt% UCl{sub 3} of about 110 g at the constant anodic potential of -0.60 to -0.55 V vs. Ag/AgCl for about 9 hours at 773 K. After the electrorefining, about 42 % of U and Pu in the starting (U,Pu)N pellet was dissolved at the anode and recovered into the liquid Cd cathode. The recovered U-Pu-Cd alloy was heated in an alumina crucible at 973 K for 10 hours under N{sub 2} gas (99.999 %) stream (0.015 L/min). Fine black powder was recovered after heating the U-Pu-Cd alloy. The powder was identified as the single phase solid solution of (U,Pu)N by the XRD analysis. After milling in the agate mortar for 1 hour, the powder was compacted into green pellet under a pressure of about

  20. Nitride alloy layer formation of duplex stainless steel using nitriding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleque, M. A.; Lailatul, P. H.; Fathaen, A. A.; Norinsan, K.; Haider, J.

    2018-01-01

    Duplex stainless steel (DSS) shows a good corrosion resistance as well as the mechanical properties. However, DSS performance decrease as it works under aggressive environment and at high temperature. At the mentioned environment, the DSS become susceptible to wear failure. Surface modification is the favourable technique to widen the application of duplex stainless steel and improve the wear resistance and its hardness properties. Therefore, the main aim of this work is to nitride alloy layer on the surface of duplex stainless steel by the nitriding process temperature of 400°C and 450°C at different time and ammonia composition using a horizontal tube furnace. The scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analyzer are used to analyse the morphology, composition and the nitrided alloy layer for treated DSS. The micro hardnesss Vickers tester was used to measure hardness on cross-sectional area of nitrided DSS. After nitriding, it was observed that the hardness performance increased until 1100 Hv0.5kgf compared to substrate material of 250 Hv0.5kgf. The thickness layer of nitride alloy also increased from 5μm until 100μm due to diffusion of nitrogen on the surface of DSS. The x-ray diffraction results showed that the nitride layer consists of iron nitride, expanded austenite and chromium nitride. It can be concluded that nitride alloy layer can be produced via nitriding process using tube furnace with significant improvement of microstructural and hardness properties.

  1. Influence of sintering atmosphere on the mechanical properties of steel P / M AISI 430L; Influencia de la atmosfera de sinterizacion en las propiedades mecanicas de los aceros P/M AISI 430L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iglesias, F. J.; Martinez, C.; Costes, M. T.; Ruiz, J. M.; Garcia, L. E.; Corpas, F.

    2014-04-01

    It has studied the stainless steel powder metallurgy AISI 430L. It has compared the sintering in two different atmospheres; in vacuum, and in an atmosphere containing nitrogen. It has developed a heat treatment with the aim of improving the mechanical properties. This has been done through microstructural modification of complex nitrides of iron and chromium precipitates during the phase of sintering. Physical properties have been evaluated and are been performing a microstructural analysis for microstructure related to the increase in mechanical properties. (Author)

  2. Two-dimensional simulation of sintering process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Pinto, Lucio Carlos Martins; Vasconcelos, Wander L.

    1996-01-01

    The results of two-dimensional simulations are directly applied to systems in which one of the dimensions is much smaller than the others, and to sections of three dimensional models. Moreover, these simulations are the first step of the analysis of more complex three-dimensional systems. In this work, two basic features of the sintering process are studied: the types of particle size distributions related to the powder production processes and the evolution of geometric parameters of the resultant microstructures during the solid-state sintering. Random packing of equal spheres is considered in the sintering simulation. The packing algorithm does not take into account the interactive forces between the particles. The used sintering algorithm causes the densification of the particle set. (author)

  3. SINTERED REFRACTORY TUNGSTEN ALLOYS. Gesinterte hochschmelzende wolframlegierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieffer, R.; Sedlatschek, K.; Braun, H.

    1971-12-15

    Dependence of the melting point of the refractory metals on their positions in the periodic system - alloys of tungsten with other refractory metals - sintering of the alloys - processing of the alloys - technological properties.

  4. U3O8 microspheres sintering kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoy, A.L.E.

    1986-01-01

    U 3 O 8 microspheres sintering kinetics was determined using a hot-stage optical microscopy apparatus, able to reach temperature up to 1350 0 C in controlled atmospheres. The sintered material had its microstructure analysed by optical and electron microscopy. The microspheres were characterized initialy utilizing X-ray diffractometry and thermogravimetry. The equation which describes the microspheres shrinkage in function of the time was obtained using finite difference analysis X-ray diffractometry indicated hexagonal structure for the microspheres main starting material, ammonium diuranate thermogravimetric analysis showed reduction of this material to U 3 O 8 at 600 0 C. Ceramography results showed 5 hours sintered microspheres grain sizes G vary with the temperature. Sintered U 3 O 8 micrographs compared with published results for UO 2 , indicate similar homogeneity microstructural characteristics and suggest the processed micorspheres to be potentially useful as nuclear fuels. (Author) [pt

  5. Pressureless sintering of whisker-toughened ceramic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiegs, T.N.

    1993-05-04

    A pressureless sintering method is disclosed for use in the production of whisker-toughened ceramic composites wherein the sintered density of composites containing up to about 20 vol. % SiC whiskers is improved by reducing the average aspect ratio of the whiskers to from about 10 to about 20. Sintering aids further improve the density, permitting the production of composites containing 20 vol. % SiC with sintered densities of 94% or better of theoretical density by a pressureless sintering method.

  6. Sustainable carbothermal reduction and nitridation of Malaysian ilmenite by polyethylene terephthalate and coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Eltefat; Hamid, Sheikh Abdul Rezan Sheikh Abdul; Hussin, Hashim; Baharun, Norlia; Ariffin, Kamar Shah; Ramakrishnan, Sivakumar; Fauzi, M. N. Ahmad; Ismail, Hanafi

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the carbothermal reduction and nitridation (CTRN) of Malaysian ilmenite has been studied as a part of crucial steps involved in reduction and subsequent chlorination processes for synthesizing titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4) from nitrided Malaysian ilmenite concentrates. In CTRN, waste plastics such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) could be utilized as an alternative source of carbon reductant. In this study, titanium oxycarbonitride (TiOxCyNz) separated from iron (Fe) phase was synthesized by non-isothermal CTRN of Malaysian ilmenite under H2-N2 atmosphere by utilizing a mixture of Sarawak Mukah-Balingan coal and PET as reducing agents in a horizontal tube furnace. Experiments have been carried out in the temperature range of 1150-1250°C for 3 hours with various ratios of PET to coal (25 wt.% PET, 50 wt.% PET, and 75 wt.% PET). X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) methods of analysis were conducted to assess the microstructures and chemical compositions of the unreduced and reduced samples. The results indicated that utilizing PET had a significant effect on iron separation from titanium oxycarbonitride (TiO0.02C0.13N0.85) at 1250°C with a mixture of 75 wt.% PET. Furthermore, XRD and SEM studies demonstrated that with increasing PET weight ratio in the mixtures, the rate of conversion increased and a low-carbon TiOxCyNz with minimal intermediate titanium sub-oxides was synthesized. The method of applying PET as potential reductant for CTRN of ilmenite has beneficial side effects in sustainable recycling of waste PET.

  7. Sintering of Fine Particles in Suspension Plasma Sprayed Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leszek Latka

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Suspension plasma spraying is a process that enables the production of finely grained nanometric or submicrometric coatings. The suspensions are formulated with the use of fine powder particles in water or alcohol with some additives. Subsequently, the suspension is injected into plasma jet and the liquid additives evaporate. The remaining fine solids are molten and subsequently agglomerate or remain solid, depending on their trajectory in the plasma jet. The coating’s microstructure results from these two groups of particles arriving on a substrate or previously deposited coating. Previous experimental studies carried out for plasma sprayed titanium oxide and hydroxyapatite coatings enabled us to observe either a finely grained microstructure or, when a different suspension injection mode was used, to distinguish two zones in the microstructure. These two zones correspond to the dense zone formed from well molten particles, and the agglomerated zone formed from fine solid particles that arrive on the substrate in a solid state. The present paper focuses on the experimental and theoretical analysis of the formation process of the agglomerated zone. The experimental section establishes the heat flux supplied to the coating during deposition. In order to achieve this, calorimetric measurements were made by applying experimental conditions simulating the real coatings’ growth. The heat flux was measured to be in the range from 0.08 to 0.5 MW/m2,depending on the experimental conditions. The theoretical section analyzes the sintering during the coating’s growth, which concerns the fine particles arriving on the substrate in the solid state. The models of volume, grain boundary and surface diffusion were analyzed and adapted to the size and chemistry of the grains, temperature and time scales corresponding to the suspension plasma spraying conditions. The model of surface diffusion was found to best describe the sintering during suspension

  8. Mechanical characteristics of microwave sintered silicon carbide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    sintered process, SiC grain gets oxidized producing SiO2 (∼ 32 wt%) and deteriorates the quality of the product substantially. Partially sintered .... product, could be due to oxidation of SiC, e.g. 50% weight gain of a green SiC sample ... because, the charging current is 90° advanced in phase, ideally, with respect to the ...

  9. Techniques for ceramic sintering using microwave energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimrey, H.D.; Janney, M.A.; Becher, P.F.

    1987-01-01

    The use of microwave energy for ceramic sintering offers exciting new possibilities for materials processing. Based on experience gathered in microwave processing associated with the heating of fusion plasmas, we have developed hardware and methods for uniformly heating ceramic parts of large volume and irregular shape to temperatures in excess of 1600 0 C, in vacuum or pressurized atmosphere. Microwave processing at 28 GHz yields enhanced densification rates with a corresponding reduction in sintering temperatures. 6 refs

  10. Synthesis of carbon nitride powder by selective etching of TiC0.3N0.7 in chlorine-containing atmosphere at moderate temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sui Jian; Lu Jinjun

    2010-01-01

    We reported the synthesis of carbon nitride powder by extracting titanium from single inorganic precursor TiC 0.3 N 0.7 in chlorine-containing atmosphere at ambient pressure and temperature not exceeding 500 deg. C. The TiC 0.3 N 0.7 crystalline structure acted as a template, supplying active carbon and nitrogen atoms for carbon nitride when it was destroyed in chlorination. X-ray diffraction data showed that the obtained carbon nitride powders were amorphous, which was in good agreement with transmission electron microscope analysis. The composition and structure of carbon nitride powders were analyzed by employing Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results indicated that disorder structure was most likely for the carbon nitride powders and the N content depended greatly on the chlorination temperature. Thermal analysis in flowing N 2 indicated that the mass loss started from 300 deg. C and the complete decomposition occurred at around 650 deg. C, confirming the low thermal stability of the carbon nitride material.

  11. Method of preparation of uranium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline Loetsch; Thomson, Robert Kenneth James

    2013-07-09

    Method for producing terminal uranium nitride complexes comprising providing a suitable starting material comprising uranium; oxidizing the starting material with a suitable oxidant to produce one or more uranium(IV)-azide complexes; and, sufficiently irradiating the uranium(IV)-azide complexes to produce the terminal uranium nitride complexes.

  12. Atomic Resolution Microscopy of Nitrides in Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson

    2014-01-01

    MN and CrMN type nitride precipitates in 12%Cr steels have been investigated using atomic resolution microscopy. The MN type nitrides were observed to transform into CrMN both by composition and crystallography as Cr diffuses from the matrix into the MN precipitates. Thus a change from one...

  13. Low temperature anodic bonding to silicon nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weichel, Steen; Reus, Roger De; Bouaidat, Salim

    2000-01-01

    Low-temperature anodic bonding to stoichiometric silicon nitride surfaces has been performed in the temperature range from 3508C to 4008C. It is shown that the bonding is improved considerably if the nitride surfaces are either oxidized or exposed to an oxygen plasma prior to the bonding. Both bu...

  14. Fusion bonding of silicon nitride surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Kasper; Østergaard, Christian; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    2011-01-01

    While silicon nitride surfaces are widely used in many micro electrical mechanical system devices, e.g. for chemical passivation, electrical isolation or environmental protection, studies on fusion bonding of two silicon nitride surfaces (Si3N4–Si3N4 bonding) are very few and highly application...

  15. Solid state sintering of silicon nitride ARL-CR-114. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangels, J.; Mikijelj, B. [Ceradyne, Inc., Costa Mesa, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    This report describes the development of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}material compositions in the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-Mo{sub 2}C system with good high temperature stress rupture properties which could be used in engine components. Two distinct processing routes were examined in the course of the program: SSN and SRBSN. SRBSN was chosen for material property optimization. After characterization of two optimized compositions in the above system, demonstration engine components (exhaust valve blanks) were manufactured using the established processing procedures. Dimensional tolerance capabilities of the process were established and material properties of the components were shown to be comparable to those established during material development.

  16. Macrophage proinflammatory response to the titanium alloy equipment in dental implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X; Li, H S; Yin, Y; Feng, Y; Tan, X W

    2015-08-07

    Titanium alloy and stainless steel (SS) had been widely used as dental implant materials because of their affinity with epithelial tissue and connective tissue, and good physical, chemical, biological, mechanical properties and processability. We compared the effects of titanium alloy and SS on macrophage cytokine expression as well as their biocompatibility. Mouse macrophage RAW264.7 cells were cultured on titanium alloy and SS surfaces. Cells were counted by scanning electron microscopy. A nitride oxide kit was used to detect released nitric oxide by macrophages on the different materials. An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels. Scanning electron microscopy revealed fewer macrophages on the surface of titanium alloy (48.2 ± 6.4 x 10(3) cells/cm(2)) than on SS (135 ± 7.3 x 10(3) cells/cm(2)). The nitric oxide content stimulated by titanium alloy was 22.5 mM, which was lower than that stimulated by SS (26.8 mM), but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.07). The level of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 released was significantly higher in the SS group (OD value = 0.128) than in the titanium alloy group (OD value = 0.081) (P = 0.024). The transforming growth factor-b1 mRNA expression levels in macrophages after stimulation by titanium alloy for 12 and 36 h were significantly higher than that after stimulation by SS (P = 0.31 and 0.25, respectively). Macrophages participate in the inflammatory response by regulating cytokines such as nitric oxide, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and transforming growth factor-b1. There were fewer macrophages and lower inflammation on the titanium alloy surface than on the SS surface. Titanium alloy materials exhibited better biological compatibility than did SS.

  17. Alloy Effects on the Gas Nitriding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, M.; Sisson, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Alloy elements, such as Al, Cr, V, and Mo, have been used to improve the nitriding performance of steels. In the present work, plain carbon steel AISI 1045 and alloy steel AISI 4140 were selected to compare the nitriding effects of the alloying elements in AISI 4140. Fundamental analysis is carried out by using the "Lehrer-like" diagrams (alloy specific Lehrer diagram and nitriding potential versus nitrogen concentration diagram) and the compound layer growth model to simulate the gas nitriding process. With this method, the fundamental understanding for the alloy effect based on the thermodynamics and kinetics becomes possible. This new method paves the way for the development of new alloy for nitriding.

  18. Spark Plasma Sintering of Ultracapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Curtis W. [CK Technologies, Camirillo, CA (United States); Boatner, Lynn A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tucker, Dennis [NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX (United States); Kolopus, James A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cheng, Zhongyang [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A solid-state ultracapacitor module to replace standard electrochemical batteries would achieve major performance gains and mass/volume reduction. This report summarizes a project to evaluate an alternative sintering process to produce a solid-state ultracapacitor to overcome the limitations of both the electrochemical batteries presently in use on spacecraft and of currently available electrochemical ultracapacitors. It will provide a robust energy storage device with higher reliability, wider working temperature range, longer lifetime, and less weight and volume than electrochemical batteries. As modern electronics decrease in size, more efficient and robust remote power is needed. Current state-of-the-art rechargeable batteries cannot be rapidly charged, contain harmful chemicals, and suffer from early wear-out mechanisms. Solid-state ultracapacitors are recyclable energy storage devices that offer the promise of higher power and a greater number of charge/discharge cycles than current rechargeable batteries. In addition, the theoretical energy density when compared to current electrochemical batteries indicates that a significant weight savings is possible. This is a project to develop a very high density solid-state ultracapacitor with giant permittivity and acceptable dielectric loss to overcome the energy-density barrier such that it will be a suitable replacement for batteries.

  19. Analysis of Laser Sintering Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav Markovič

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The new, high-tech development and customization is one ofthe most important factors in promoting the country‘s economicgrowth indicators. The economic downturn in the industryrequires technology and equipment using a minimumof raw materials and providing maximum performance. Thisstatement perfectly describes the innovative, forward-looking,cost-effective laser powder sintering (SLS technology. Here,thanks to the latest engineering achievements, product surfacesare modified and improved, they gain new characteristics. SLSis viable in automobile, engineering, construction, aerospace,aircraft, printing, medical and other areas.In order to create a product which meets the standards andtechnical documentation it is necessary to use and ensure highquality of raw materials, high-end equipment, qualified personnel,the working environment with proper climatic conditions, ergonomics,etc. But all of these, the quality of the product becomesthe decisive indicators meaningless if know how to properly selectthe laser processing operation. Scanning speed, beam power,pulse frequency, protective gases, powder layer thickness – allof them are the physical and mechanical characteristics of thechange in a small range changes the quality of the product of thefuture, the field of application and performance characteristics.

  20. Fabrication of Silicon Nitride Dental Core Ceramics with Borosilicate Veneering material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wananuruksawong, R.; Jinawath, S.; Padipatvuthikul, P.; Wasanapiarnpong, T.

    2011-10-01

    Silicon nitride (Si3N4) ceramic is a great candidate for clinical applications due to its high fracture toughness, strength, hardness and bio-inertness. This study has focused on the Si3N4 ceramic as a dental core material. The white Si3N4 was prepared by pressureless sintering at relative low sintering temperature of 1650 °C in nitrogen atmosphere. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of Si3N4 ceramic is lower than that of Zirconia and Alumina ceramic which are popular in this field. The borosilicate glass veneering was employed due to its compatibility in thermal expansion. The sintered Si3N4 specimens represented the synthetic dental core were paintbrush coated by a veneer paste composed of borosilicate glass powder (tube furnace between 1000-1200°C. The veneered specimens fired at 1100°C for 15 mins show good bonding, smooth and glossy without defect and crazing. The veneer has thermal expansion coefficient as 3.98×10-6 °C-1, rather white and semi opaque, due to zirconia addition, the Vickers hardness as 4.0 GPa which is closely to the human teeth.

  1. Fabrication of Silicon Nitride Dental Core Ceramics with Borosilicate Veneering material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wananuruksawong, R; Jinawath, S; Wasanapiarnpong, T; Padipatvuthikul, P

    2011-01-01

    Silicon nitride (Si 3 N 4 ) ceramic is a great candidate for clinical applications due to its high fracture toughness, strength, hardness and bio-inertness. This study has focused on the Si 3 N 4 ceramic as a dental core material. The white Si 3 N 4 was prepared by pressureless sintering at relative low sintering temperature of 1650 deg. C in nitrogen atmosphere. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of Si 3 N 4 ceramic is lower than that of Zirconia and Alumina ceramic which are popular in this field. The borosilicate glass veneering was employed due to its compatibility in thermal expansion. The sintered Si 3 N 4 specimens represented the synthetic dental core were paintbrush coated by a veneer paste composed of borosilicate glass powder ( 2 O 3 - partial stabilized zirconia) and 30 wt% of polyvinyl alcohol (5 wt% solution). After coating the veneer on the Si 3 N 4 specimens, the firing was performed in electric tube furnace between 1000-1200 deg. C. The veneered specimens fired at 1100 deg. C for 15 mins show good bonding, smooth and glossy without defect and crazing. The veneer has thermal expansion coefficient as 3.98x10 -6 deg. C -1 , rather white and semi opaque, due to zirconia addition, the Vickers hardness as 4.0 GPa which is closely to the human teeth.

  2. Modelling structure and properties of amorphous silicon boron nitride ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Christian Schön

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Silicon boron nitride is the parent compound of a new class of high-temperature stable amorphous ceramics constituted of silicon, boron, nitrogen, and carbon, featuring a set of properties that is without precedent, and represents a prototypical random network based on chemical bonds of predominantly covalent character. In contrast to many other amorphous materials of technological interest, a-Si3B3N7 is not produced via glass formation, i.e. by quenching from a melt, the reason being that the binary components, BN and Si3N4, melt incongruently under standard conditions. Neither has it been possible to employ sintering of μm-size powders consisting of binary nitrides BN and Si3N4. Instead, one employs the so-called sol-gel route starting from single component precursors such as TADB ((SiCl3NH(BCl2. In order to determine the atomic structure of this material, it has proven necessary to simulate the actual synthesis route.Many of the exciting properties of these ceramics are closely connected to the details of their amorphous structure. To clarify this structure, it is necessary to employ not only experimental probes on many length scales (X-ray, neutron- and electron scattering; complex NMR experiments; IR- and Raman scattering, but also theoretical approaches. These address the actual synthesis route to a-Si3B3N7, the structural properties, the elastic and vibrational properties, aging and coarsening behaviour, thermal conductivity and the metastable phase diagram both for a-Si3B3N7 and possible silicon boron nitride phases with compositions different from Si3N4: BN = 1 : 3. Here, we present a short comprehensive overview over the insights gained using molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations to explore the energy landscape of a-Si3B3N7, model the actual synthesis route and compute static and transport properties of a-Si3BN7.

  3. Titanium metal: extraction to application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambogi, Joseph (USGS, Reston, VA); Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2002-09-01

    In 1998, approximately 57,000 tons of titanium metal was consumed in the form of mill products (1). Only about 5% of the 4 million tons of titanium minerals consumed each year is used to produce titanium metal, with the remainder primarily used to produce titanium dioxide pigment. Titanium metal production is primarily based on the direct chlorination of rutile to produce titanium tetrachloride, which is then reduced to metal using the Kroll magnesium reduction process. The use of titanium is tied to its high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. Aerospace is the largest application for titanium. In this paper, we discuss all aspects of the titanium industry from ore deposits through extraction to present and future applications. The methods of both primary (mining of ore, extraction, and purification) and secondary (forming and machining) operations will be analyzed. The chemical and physical properties of titanium metal will be briefly examined. Present and future applications for titanium will be discussed. Finally, the economics of titanium metal production also are analyzed as well as the advantages and disadvantages of various alternative extraction methods.

  4. Industrial experience with titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, B.M.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    1997-09-01

    Titanium is a reference material for the construction of waste containers in the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. It has been in industrial service for over 30 a, often in severe corrosion environments, but it is still considered a relatively exotic material with limited operating history. This has arisen because of the aerospace applications of this material and the misconception that the high strength-to-weight ratio dominates the choice of this material. In fact, the advantage of titanium lies in its high reliability and excellent corrosion resistance. It has a proven record in seawater heat exchanger service and a demonstrated excellent reliability even in polluted water. For many reasons it is the technically correct choice of material for marine applications. In this report we review the industrial service history of titanium, particularly in hot saline environments, and demonstrate that it is a viable waste container material, based upon this industrial service history and operating experience. (author)

  5. Quasi-static strength and fractography analysis of two dental implants manufactured by direct metal laser sintering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrke, Sergio Alexandre; Pérez-Díaz, Leticia; Dedavid, Berenice Anina

    2018-01-30

    New manufacturing methods was developed to improve the tissues integration with the titanium alloy pieces. The present in vitro study was to assess the resistance and fracture mode after applied a quasi-static compressive force on the two dental implants manufactured by direct metal laser sintering. Twenty dental implants manufactured by direct metal laser sintering, using titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) granules in two designs (n = 10 per group): Conventional dental implant (group Imp1) two-piece implant design, where the surgical implant and prosthetic abutment are two separate components and, the one-piece implant (group Imp2), where the surgical implant and prosthetic abutment are one integral piece. All samples were subjected to quasi-static loading at a 30° angle to the implant axis in a universal testing machine. The mean fracture strengths were 1269.2 ± 128.8 N for the group Imp1 and, 1259.5 ± 115.1 N for the group Imp2, without statistical differences (P = .8722). In both groups, the fracture surface does not present crack between the compact core and the superficial (less dense and porous) part of the implants. Based on the measured resistance data for the two implant models manufactured by direct metal laser sintering tested in the present study, we can suggest that they have adequate capacity to withstand the masticatory loads. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Spark plasma sintering of α-Si3N4 ceramics with Al2O3 and Y2O3 as additives and its morphology transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceja-Cardenas, L.; Lemus-Ruiz, J.; Jaramillo-Vigueras, D.; Torre, S.D. de la

    2010-01-01

    The spark plasma sintering SPS technique has been used to densify pure α-Si 3 N 4 commercial powder, having Y 2 O 3 and Al 2 O 3 additions; from 0, 2.5 and 5.0 wt% to 0, 1.5 and 3 wt%, respectively. Such powder admixtures were previously spray-dried at 160 o C in such a way that powder was thoroughly homogenized. Set sintering treatment included: 0-20 min holding time and 38 MPa axial load, sintering temperature of 1500 o C and heating rate of 300 o C/min. The maximum relative density developed on studied specimens ranged from 99.4 to 99.8% and could only be attained once the β-phase nucleated from the α-silicon nitride matrix. Obtained Si 3 N 4 composites combine both α- and β-phases. The later phase becomes evident trough the rod-like geometry, which forms throughout the presence of a liquid face. The largest hardness value developed (1588 Hv (20kgf) ) on studied ceramics (3M-series - 3 min) matched close to the corresponding counterpart found in literature (1600 Hv), the former developed in much shorter sintering times. Using X-ray diffraction XRD and scanning electron microscope SEM analyses, the two major phases of Si 3 N 4 were identified in the resultant microstructures. The morphology evolution of Si 3 N 4 particles as occurred upon SPS-sintering is analyzed.

  7. Physical and Chemical Properties of TiOxNy Prepared by Low-Temperature Oxidation of Ultrathin Metal Nitride Directly Deposited on SiO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Yue-Ping; HAN Yan

    2009-01-01

    Physical and chemical properties of titanium oxynitride (TiOxNy) formed by low-temperature oxidation of titanium nitride (TIN) layer are investigated for advanced metal-oxide--semiconductor (MOS) gate dielectric application.TiOx Ny exhibits polycrystalline properties after the standard thermal process for MOS device fabrication,showing the preferred orientation at [200].Superior electrical properties of TiOxNy can be maintained before and after the annealing,probably due to the nitrogen incorporation in the oxide bulk and at the interface.Naturally formed transition layer between TiOxNy and SiO2 is also confirmed.

  8. Solvothermal synthesis: a new route for preparing nitrides

    CERN Document Server

    Demazeau, G; Denis, A; Largeteau, A

    2002-01-01

    Solvothermal synthesis appears to be an interesting route for preparing nitrides such as gallium nitride and aluminium nitride, using ammonia as solvent. A nitriding additive is used to perform the reaction and, in the case of gallium nitride, is encapsulated by melt gallium. The syntheses are performed in the temperature range 400-800 deg. C and in the pressure range 100-200 MPa. The synthesized powders are characterized by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Finely divided gallium nitride GaN and aluminium nitride AlN, both with wurtzite-type structure, can be obtained by this route.

  9. Surface modification of titanium and titanium alloys by ion implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautray, Tapash R; Narayanan, R; Kwon, Tae-Yub; Kim, Kyo-Han

    2010-05-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys are widely used in biomedical devices and components, especially as hard tissue replacements as well as in cardiac and cardiovascular applications, because of their desirable properties, such as relatively low modulus, good fatigue strength, formability, machinability, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. However, titanium and its alloys cannot meet all of the clinical requirements. Therefore, to improve the biological, chemical, and mechanical properties, surface modification is often performed. In view of this, the current review casts new light on surface modification of titanium and titanium alloys by ion beam implantation. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Sintering uranium oxide in the reaction product of hydrogen-carbon dioxide mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Hollander, W.R.; Nivas, Y.

    1975-01-01

    Compacted pellets of uranium oxide alone or containing one or more additives such as plutonium dioxide, gadolinium oxide, titanium dioxide, silica, and alumina are heated to 900 to 1599 0 C in the presence of a mixture of hydrogen and carbon dioxide, either alone or with an inert carrier gas and held at the desired temperature in this atmosphere to sinter the pellets. The sintered pellets are then cooled in an atmosphere having an oxygen partial pressure of 10 -4 to 10 -18 atm of oxygen such as dry hydrogen, wet hydrogen, dry carbon monoxide, wet carbon monoxide, inert gases such as nitrogen, argon, helium, and neon and mixtures of ayny of the foregoing including a mixture of hydrogen and carbon dioxide. The ratio of hydrogen to carbon dioxide in the gas mixture fed to the furnace is controlled to give a ratio of oxygen to uranium atoms in the sintered particles within the range of 1.98:1 to about 2.10:1. The water vapor present in the reaction products in the furnace atmosphere acts as a hydrolysis agent to aid removal of fluoride should such impurity be present in the uranium oxide. (U.S.)

  11. Effect of additives on enhanced sintering and grain growth in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgeois, L.

    1992-06-01

    The use of sintering additives has been the most effective way of promoting grain growth of uranium dioxide. We have established a same mechanism for additives which belongs to corundum structure: chromium, aluminium, vanadium and titanium sesquioxides. Study of thermodynamical stabilities of dopants has lead to define suitable sintering atmospheres in order to enhance grain growth. Low solubility limits have been defined at T=1700 deg C for four additives, from variations of final grain size versus initial dopant concentration Identification of second phase after cooling has been done from electronic diffraction patterns. It appears that these solubilities decrease sharply as positive deviation from stoichiometry of uranium dioxide increases. Dilatometric analysis of sintering of doped uranium dioxide has shown in certain cases some enhancement in densification rates, at the point of onset of abnormal grain growth, which is believed to be the source. Nevertheless, the following growth is accompanied with pores coalescence mechanisms and pores entrapment inside grains. Increased thermal stability, during standard annealing, is expected, limiting thereby redensification of nuclear fuel in reactors. Finally, from investigations of additives vaporizations, Al 2 O 3 and Cr 2 O 3 , oxygen exchanges between additives and matrix are believed to occur, which should lead to enhance pore mobility. (Author)., refs., figs., tabs

  12. Pore Formation Process of Porous Ti3SiC2 Fabricated by Reactive Sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huibin Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Porous Ti3SiC2 was fabricated with high purity, 99.4 vol %, through reactive sintering of titanium hydride (TiH2, silicon (Si and graphite (C elemental powders. The reaction procedures and the pore structure evolution during the sintering process were systematically studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscope (SEM. Our results show that the formation of Ti3SiC2 from TiH2/Si/C powders experienced the following steps: firstly, TiH2 decomposed into Ti; secondly, TiC and Ti5Si3 intermediate phases were generated; finally, Ti3SiC2 was produced through the reaction of TiC, Ti5Si3 and Si. The pores formed in the synthesis procedure of porous Ti3SiC2 ceramics are derived from the following aspects: interstitial pores left during the pressing procedure; pores formed because of the TiH2 decomposition; pores formed through the reactions between Ti and Si and Ti and C powders; and the pores produced accompanying the final phase synthesized during the high temperature sintering process.

  13. Surface Roughness and Tool Wear on Cryogenic Treated CBN Insert on Titanium and Inconel 718 Alloy Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thamizhmanii, S; Mohideen, R; Zaidi, A M A; Hasan, S

    2015-01-01

    Machining of materials by super hard tools like cubic boron nitride (cbn) and poly cubic boron nitride (pcbn) is to reduce tool wear to obtain dimensional accuracy, smooth surface and more number of parts per cutting edge. wear of tools is inevitable due to rubbing action between work material and tool edge. however, the tool wear can be minimized by using super hard tools by enhancing the strength of the cutting inserts. one such process is cryogenic process. this process is used in all materials and cutting inserts which requires wear resistance. the cryogenic process is executed under subzero temperature -186° celsius for longer period of time in a closed chamber which contains liquid nitrogen. in this research, cbn inserts with cryogenically treated was used to turn difficult to cut metals like titanium, inconel 718 etc. the turning parameters used is different cutting speeds, feed rates and depth of cut. in this research, titanium and inconel 718 material were used. the results obtained are surface roughness, flank wear and crater wear. the surface roughness obtained on titanium was lower at high cutting speed compared with inconel 718. the flank wear was low while turning titanium than inconel 718. crater wear is less on inconel 718 than titanium alloy. all the two materials produced saw tooth chips. (paper)

  14. Cathodoluminescence of cubic boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkachev, V.D.; Shipilo, V.B.; Zajtsev, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    Three optically active defects are detected in mono- and polycrystal cubic boron nitride (β-BN). Analysis of intensity of temperature dependences, halfwidth and energy shift of 1.76 eV narrow phononless line (center GC-1) makes it possible to interprete the observed cathodoluminescence spectra an optical analog of the Moessbaner effect. Comparison of the obtained results with the known data for diamond monocrystals makes it possible to suggest that the detected center GC-1 is a nitrogen vacancy . The conclusion, concerning the Moessbauer optical spectra application, is made to analyze structural perfection of β-BN crystal lattice

  15. Surface analysis in steel nitrides by using Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueiredo, R.S. de.

    1991-07-01

    The formation of iron nitride layer at low temperatures, 600-700 K, by Moessbauer spectroscopy is studied. These layers were obtained basically through two different processes: ion nitriding and ammonia gas nitriding. A preliminary study about post-discharge nitriding was made using discharge in hollow cathode as well as microwave excitation. The assembly of these chambers is also described. The analysis of the nitrided samples was done by CEMS and CXMS, aided by optical microscopy, and the CEMS and CXMS detectors were constructed by ourselves. We also made a brief study about these detectors, testing as acetone as the mixture 80% He+10% C H 4 as detection gases for the use of CEMS. The surface analysis of the samples showed that in the ammonia gas process nitriding the nitrided layer starts by the superficial formation of an iron nitride rich nitrogen. By thermal evolution this nitride promotes the diffusion of nitrogen and the formation of other more stable nitrides. (author)

  16. boron nitride coating of uranium dioxide and uranium dioxide-gadolinium oxide fuels by chemical precipitation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uslu, I.; Tanker, E.; Guenduez, G.

    1997-01-01

    In this research pure urania and urania-gadolinia (5 and 10 %) fuels were coated with boron nitride (BN). This is achieved through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using boron tricloride BCl 3 ) and ammonia (NH 3 ) at 600 C.Boron tricloride and ammonia are carried to tubular furnace using hydrogen as carrier gas. The coated samples were sintered at 1600 K. The properties of the coated samples were observed using BET surface area analysis, infrared spectra (IR), X-Ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) techniques

  17. Thermogravimetric experiments with titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, L.J.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1991-02-01

    In the process of preparing for pyrophoricity experiments involving uranium, we conducted hydriding and air-exposure experiments on titanium. In these experiments the hydriding reactions and response to air-exposure was generally within the range expected based on work reported by others. One aberrant behavior was a sudden weight gain followed by a significant weight loss. We speculate that loss may be due to hydrogen evolution from the TiH 2 resulting from local heating by oxidation reactions. We verified that titanium is not pyrophoric at temperatures less than 750 degree C. 18 refs. 1 fig

  18. A study on some properties of sintered stainless steel powder compacts with sintering conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Bang Sik; Kim, Kwan Hyu; Lee, Doh Jae; Choi, Dap Chun

    1986-01-01

    Sintered specimens for the mechanical and corrosion tests were prepared from 316L, 410L and 434L stainless steel powder compacts with green densities in the range of 6.2∼7.0g/cm 3 . The experimental variables studied were green density, sintering atmosphere, temperature and time, type of lubricant used and cooling rate after sintering operation. Mechanical properties of green compacts and sintered specimens were evaluated. The corrosion tests were performed by potentiodynamic anodic polarization technique. Mechanical properties were very sensitive to the sintering atmosphere; sintering in dissociated ammonia resulted in the strengthing but embrittlement of sintered 316L, 410L and 434L strainless steel powder compacts. Their corrosion resistance was also decreased. The tensile strength was increased with increases in sintering time and temperature while the decreases in the yield strength were observed. The tensile properties of green compacts were shown to closely related to the green density. Addition of 1% acrawax as a lubricant was appeared to be most effective for the improvement of green strength. (Author)

  19. Solid-state sintering of tungsten heavy alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurwell, W.E.

    1994-10-01

    Solid-state sintering is a technologically important step in the fabrication of tungsten heavy alloys. This work addresses practical variables affecting the sinterability: powder particle size, powder mixing, and sintering temperature and time. Compositions containing 1 to 10 micrometer (μM) tungsten (W) powders can be fully densified at temperatures near the matrix solidus. Blending with an intensifier bar provided good dispersion of elemental powders and good as-sintered mechanical properties under adequate sintering conditions. Additional ball milling increases powder bulk density which primarily benefits mold and die filling. Although fine, 1 μm W powder blends have high sinterability, higher as-sintered ductilities are reached in shorter sintering times with coarser, 5 μm W powder blends; 10μm W powder blends promise the highest as-sintered ductilities due to their coarse microstructural W

  20. Discrimination symbol applying method for sintered nuclear fuel product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaki, Jin

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a symbol applying method for applying discrimination information such as an enrichment degree on the end face of a sintered nuclear product. Namely, discrimination symbols of information of powders are applied by a sintering aid to the end face of a molded member formed by molding nuclear fuel powders under pressure. Then, the molded product is sintered. The sintering aid comprises aluminum oxide, a mixture of aluminum oxide and silicon dioxide, aluminum hydride or aluminum stearate alone or in admixture. As an applying means of the sintering aid, discrimination symbols of information of powders are drawn by an isostearic acid on the end face of the molded product, and the sintering aid is sprayed thereto, or the sintering aid is applied directly, or the sintering aid is suspended in isostearic acid, and the suspension is applied with a brush. As a result, visible discrimination information can be applied to the sintered member easily. (N.H.)