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Sample records for single-student oral responding

  1. An investigation into how EFL learners emotionally respond to teachers’ oral corrective feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan de Dios Martínez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This research study draws on research in SLA and language pedagogy and hopes to throw some light on the pedagogical effectiveness of the oral feedback process in L2 classrooms by focusing exclusively on the potential affective damage that teachers´ oral corrective feedback can cause among learners in classroom settings. The paper describes a study in which we investigated how EFL learners actually perceive or rather emotionally respond to the oral feedback process. This paper aims to investigate to what extent the way teachers provide oral corrective feedback is somehow associated with learners´ motivations and attitudes. For this purpose, a short questionnaire was designed and distributed among a sample of 208 EFL secondary school learners. The article first reviews the literature on the controversial role of corrective feedback in L2 classrooms. Next, the findings are reported and discussed. This research paper suggests that EFL learners emotionally respond to teachers´ oral corrective feedback in different ways. Additionally, it found evidence that anxiety can have a negative effect on the way learners benefit from the oral feedback process. Thus, the paper issues warnings about the potential affective damage oral corrective feedback can cause among learners in classroom situations.

  2. A case of black hairy tongue responding to oral nystatin and vitamin B complex treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Kutlu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Black hairy tongue, also known as lingua villosa nigra, is characterized by desquamation defects on the dorsal side of the tongue with reactive hypertrophy of the filiform papillae. Although the etiology of the disease is unknown, conditions such as smoking, alcohol and candidal infection are accused. In this study, a case of black hairy tongue which is considered to occur due to poor oral hygiene and candidal infection is presented.

  3. Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP Rinses for the Treatment of Non-Responding Oral Lichen Planus: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Merigo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-rich plasma (PRP has been proposed for different applications in the medical field and in maxillofacial surgery thanks to its many growth factors, such as epidermal growth factor (EGF, fibroblast growth factor (FGF, and keratinocyte growth factor (KGF. Oral lichen planus (OLP is a disease that affects the oral mucosa in a chronic way. This disease frequently worsens the quality of life of patients, particularly when clinical manifestations are of the erythematous or erosive/ulcerative type. The properties of PRP that are supported by scientific literature in both oral medicine and other medical fields have suggested the introduction of PRP in clinical practice for the medical treatment of different soft tissues diseases, such as when OLP patients do not respond to conventional therapies, or when conventional treatments have some contraindications or side effects. The aim of this work is to describe the use of PRP used as an oral rinse for the treatment of a patient diagnosed as affected by OLP at the Dentistry, Special Needs and Maxillo-Facial Surgery Unit of the Hospital of Piacenza. PRP protocol was started after the failure of conventional therapies based on the use of topical and systemic corticosteroids, hydroxychloroquine, and low-level laser therapy applications.

  4. Metastatic primary duodenal adeno-carcinoma responding to metronomic oral cyclophosphamide chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anis Bandyopadhyay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary adenocarcinoma of duodenum is a very rare tumour with a prevalence of only 0.3 to 1% of among all the tumours of gastrointestinal tracts. Localised tumours, if resected have good prognosis but those with metastates entails a poor prognosis, where generally palliation may be the only feasible option. Low dose continous cytotoxic treatment or metronomic chemotherapy prevents neoangiogenesis and chemoresistance thereby, provides excellent symptom relief and palliation in many advanced heavily pretreated solid malignancies. It offers as an affordable, less toxic therapy with moderate to good efficacy. Here we report a case of a 52 year female who, presented with history of maleana, pallor and pedal edema for last 2 months. Her performance status was poor (KPS 40 and she had enlarged left supraclavicular lymph node, palpable liver and vague mass in paraumbilical region. Upper GI endoscopy revealed large ulceroproliferative growth in the D2 segment and HPE showed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. CT scan revealed paratracheal and retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy and bone scan revealed vertebral metastasis. Patient received oral cyclophosphamide and hematinic and vitamin support, along with radiation to spine. There was near complete clinical response, and progression free period of about 32 weeks. Thus, single agent cyclophosphamide in the present case provided near total clinical response and prolonged period of freedom from disease progression with excellent palliation of symptoms. Hence in patient of advanced and metastatic small bowel cancer, with poor performance status metronomic therapy with single agent cyclophosphamide may provide viable option both for treatment and palliation.

  5. Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) Rinses for the Treatment of Non-Responding Oral Lichen Planus: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Elisabetta Merigo; Aldo Oppici; Anna Parlatore; Luigi Cella; Fabio Clini; Matteo Fontana; Carlo Fornaini

    2018-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been proposed for different applications in the medical field and in maxillofacial surgery thanks to its many growth factors, such as epidermal growth factor (EGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), and keratinocyte growth factor (KGF). Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a disease that affects the oral mucosa in a chronic way. This disease frequently worsens the quality of life of patients, particularly when clinical manifestations are of the erythematous or erosive/ulce...

  6. Stimulation of the young poor responder: comparison of the luteal estradiol/gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist priming protocol versus oral contraceptive microdose leuprolide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastri, Shefali M; Barbieri, Elizabeth; Kligman, Isaac; Schoyer, Katherine D; Davis, Owen K; Rosenwaks, Zev

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle outcomes in young poor responders treated with a luteal estradiol/gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist (E(2)/ANT) protocol versus an oral contraceptive pill microdose leuprolide protocol (OCP-MDL). Retrospective cohort. Academic practice. Poor responders: 186 women, aged <35 years undergoing IVF with either E(2)/ANT or OCP-MDL protocols. None. Clinical pregnancies, oocytes retrieved, cancellation rate. Patients in the E(2)/ANT group had a greater gonadotropin requirement (71.9 ± 22.2 vs. 57.6 ± 25.7) and lower E(2) level (1,178.6 ± 668 vs. 1,627 ± 889), yet achieved similar numbers of oocytes retrieved and fertilized, and a greater number of embryos transferred (2.3 ± 0.9 vs. 2.0 ± 1.1) with a better mean grade (2.14 ± .06 vs. 2.7 ± 1.8) compared with the OCP/MDL group. The E2/ANT group exhibited a trend toward improved implantation rates (30.5% vs. 21.1%) and ongoing pregnancy rates per started cycle: 44 out of 117 (37%) versus 17 out of 69 (25%). Poor responders aged <35 years may be treated with the aggressive E(2)/ANT protocol to improve cycle outcomes. Both protocols remain viable options for this group. Adequately powered, randomized clinical comparison appears justified. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Academics respond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazel, Spencer

    2015-01-01

    Contribution to the article "Academics respond: Brexit would weaken UK university research and funding", Guardian Witness, The Guardian, UK......Contribution to the article "Academics respond: Brexit would weaken UK university research and funding", Guardian Witness, The Guardian, UK...

  8. oral

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chlorhexidine 0,2% gluconate is used as a mouth rinse and is an effective antibacterial agent. Its primary side- effects are staining of the teeth and the oral mucosa, particularly the dorsal surface of the tongue. However, this is transient. It has been shown to be effective as a prophylactic agent in preventing oral candidosis in ...

  9. The Circulating Concentration and 24-h Urine Excretion of Magnesium Dose- and Time-Dependently Respond to Oral Magnesium Supplementation in a Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Del Gobbo, Liana C; Hruby, Adela; Rosanoff, Andrea; He, Ka; Dai, Qi; Costello, Rebecca B; Zhang, Wen; Song, Yiqing

    2016-03-01

    Accurate determination of Mg status is important for improving nutritional assessment and clinical risk stratification. We aimed to quantify the overall responsiveness of Mg biomarkers to oral Mg supplementation among adults without severe diseases and their dose- and time responses using available data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We identified 48 Mg supplementation trials (n = 2131) through searches of MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library up to November 2014. Random-effects meta-analysis was used to estimate weighted mean differences of biomarker concentrations between intervention and placebo groups. Restricted cubic splines were used to determine the dose- and time responses of Mg biomarkers to supplementation. Among the 35 biomarkers assessed, serum, plasma, and urine Mg were most commonly measured. Elemental Mg supplementation doses ranged from 197 to 994 mg/d. Trials ranged from 3 wk to 5 y (median: 12 wk). Mg supplementation significantly elevated circulating Mg by 0.04 mmol/L (95% CI: 0.02, 0.06) and 24-h urine Mg excretion by 1.52 mmol/24 h (95% CI: 1.20, 1.83) as compared to placebo. Circulating Mg concentrations and 24-h urine Mg excretion responded to Mg supplementation in a dose- and time-dependent manner, gradually reaching a steady state at doses of 300 mg/d and 400 mg/d, or after ~20 wk and 40 wk, respectively (all P-nonlinearity ≤ 0.001). The higher the circulating Mg concentration at baseline, the lower the responsiveness of circulating Mg to supplementation, and the higher the urinary excretion (all P-linearity urine calcium were significantly more elevated by Mg supplementation than by placebo (all P-values urine Mg excretion to oral Mg supplementation. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  10. Responding to Misbehavior

    OpenAIRE

    Telep, Valya Goodwin, 1955-

    2009-01-01

    This series of lessons was prepared for parents like you - parents who want to do a better job of disciplining their children. The lessons were especially written for parents of preschool children, ages two to six, but some of the discipline methods are appropriate for older children, too. This lesson focuses on responding to misbehavior.

  11. Liraglutide versus Sitagliptin in a 24-week, Multicenter, Open-label, Randomized, Parallel-group Study in Japanese Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients Responding Inadequately to a Sulfonylurea and/or One or Two Other Oral Antidiabetic Drugs (JDDM 33

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Yokoyama

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective Liraglutide (glucagon-like peptide-1 [GLP-1] receptor agonist and sitagliptin (dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor are approved in Japan for treating type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. We compared the efficacy and safety of adding liraglutide or sitagliptin to a sulfonylurea in Japanese T2DM patients. Methods Patients aged 18 to <80 years with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c; National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program [NGSP] of 6.9–9.4%, body mass index ≤35 kg/m 2 , and treatment with a sulfonylurea and/or one or two non-sulfonylurea oral antidiabetic drugs for greater than or equal to eight weeks before enrollment were eligible. Patients were randomized in an open-label manner to either 0.9 mg/day liraglutide ( n = 50 or 50–100 mg/day sitagliptin ( n = 49 and were treated for 24 weeks. Non-sulfonylureas were discontinued before randomization. Patients using other oral antidiabetic drugs started sulfonylurea treatment. The primary endpoint was the change in HbA1c from baseline to Week 24. Results HbA1c decreased in both groups, and the reduction was significantly greater throughout in the liraglutide group except for Week 24 (0.59 ± 0.80 vs. 0.24 ± 0.94%; P = 0.0525. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG decreased significantly in the liraglutide group compared with the sitagliptin group (-21.15 ± 31.22 vs. +0.46 ± 39.39 mg/dL; P = 0.0014. Homeostasis model assessment of β cell function and C-peptide increased significantly in the liraglutide group but not in the sitagliptin group. Hypoglycemic symptoms and adverse events occurred in four and nine patients, respectively, in the liraglutide group, and in two and five patients, respectively, in the sitagliptin group. Conclusion Treatment with liraglutide or sitagliptin together with a sulfonylurea improved HbA1c in Japanese T2DM patients in primary care. Both drugs were associated with low rates of adverse events and hypoglycemia. The improvement in β cell function probably contributed to the

  12. Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... section Home A-Z Health Topics Oral health Oral health > A-Z Health Topics Oral health (PDF, 154 ... To receive Publications email updates Enter email Submit Oral health Women have unique oral health concerns. Changing hormone ...

  13. Knowledge, attitude towards and practice of oral hygiene among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Though the respondents had poor knowledge of oral hygiene, there was a positive attitude and good practice of oral hygiene. There is a need for education on oral hygiene to antenal clinic attendees as a means of improving knowledge and preventing oral pathologies in pregnancy. Key words: Oral hygiene, ...

  14. First Responders and Criticality Accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valerie L. Putman; Douglas M. Minnema

    2005-11-01

    Nuclear criticality accident descriptions typically include, but do not focus on, information useful to first responders. We studied these accidents, noting characteristics to help (1) first responders prepare for such an event and (2) emergency drill planners develop appropriate simulations for training. We also provide recommendations to help people prepare for such events in the future.

  15. Oral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral cancer can form in any part of the mouth. Most oral cancers begin in the flat cells that cover the ... your mouth, tongue, and lips. Anyone can get oral cancer, but the risk is higher if you are ...

  16. Responder Technology Alert (February 2015)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upton, Jaki F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stein, Steven L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-04-10

    As part of technology foraging for the Responder Technology Alliance, established by the Department of Homeland Science and Technologies First Responders Group, this report summarizes technologies that are relevant in the area of “wearables,” with the potential for use by first responders. The content was collected over the previous month(s) and reproduced from a general Internet search using the term wearables. Additional information is available at the websites provided. This report is not meant to be an exhaustive list nor an endorsement of any technology described herein. Rather, it is meant to provide useful information about current developments in the areas wearable technology.

  17. Development and testing of responder : phase III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-28

    This report documents the research project Development and Testing of Responder Phase III. Under previous research, a Responder system has been developed to provide relevant and timely information to first responders, allow responders to provid...

  18. Oral lichen planus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasool, S.; Katpar, S.; Ali, A.

    2007-01-01

    Lichen planus is a mucocutaneous dermatological disorder, with intraoral manifestation. Skin lesions prevail with oral mucosal lesions. Prevalence of lichen planus, as an oral pre-malignant lesion, is 1-2 % population. Lateral border, dorsal tongue, gingiva, hard palate and vermilion border are common sites and lesions appear as reticular, plaque-like and papular intraoral types. Skin presents with pururitic, polygonal papules. Atrophic and erosive are the known intraoral pre-malignant types. A case report is presented, which responded well to steroid therapy. (author)

  19. The "I" in Extreme Responding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cabooter, E.; Millet, K.; Weijters, B.; Pandelaere, M.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the impact of self-construal on extreme responding in six studies. The results show that people with an independent self-construal generally answer more extremely to survey items than those with an interdependent self-construal, especially when the items are self-relevant (Studies 1a

  20. Self-reported periodontal problems and oral hygiene practices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    % had not seen the dentist within the last 12 months. Conclusion: Data revealed that periodontal problems and poor oral hygiene practices were prevalent among the respondents. Keywords: Periodontal problems; oral hygiene practices; ...

  1. Oral myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalaimalai Saravanan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is a pathologic condition in humans occurring because of parasitic infestation. Parasites causing myiasis belong to the order Diptera. Oral myiasis is seen secondary to oral wounds, suppurative lesions, and extraction wounds, especially in individuals with neurological deficit. In such cases, neglected oral hygiene and halitosis attracts the flies to lay eggs in oral wounds resulting in oral myiasis. We present a case of oral myiasis in 40-year-old male patient with mental disability and history of epilepsy.

  2. Testosterone for Poor Ovarian Responders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polyzos, Nikolaos P; Davis, Susan R; Drakopoulos, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone, an androgen that directly binds to the androgen receptor, has been shown in previous small randomized controlled trials to increase the reproductive outcomes of poor ovarian responders. In most of these studies, transdermal testosterone in relatively high doses was administered before...... ovarian stimulation with a duration varying from 5 to 21 days. Nevertheless, the key question to be asked is whether, based on ovarian physiology and testosterone pharmacokinetics, a short course of testosterone administration of more than 10 mg could be expected to have any beneficial effect...... stages. In addition, extreme testosterone excess is not only likely to induce adverse events but has also the potential to be ineffective and even detrimental. Thus, evidence from clinical studies is not enough to either "reopen" or "close" the "androgen chapter" in poor responders, mainly because...

  3. Biodetection Technologies for First Responders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baird, Cheryl L.; Seiner, Derrick R.; Ozanich, Richard M.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Colburn, Heather A.; Straub, Tim M.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2012-10-24

    In a white powder scenario, there are a large number of field-deployable assays that can be used to determine if the suspicious substance contains biological material and warrants further investigation. This report summarizes commercially available technologies that are considered hand portable and can be used by first responders in the field. This is not meant to be an exhaustive list, nor do the authors endorse any of the technologies described herein. Rather, it is meant to provide useful information about available technologies to help end-users make informed decisions about biodetection technology procurement and use.

  4. Responding book banning in indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aji, RNB; Artono; Liana, C.

    2018-01-01

    The prohibition of books conducted by the government through its apparatus without any due process of law is unfortunate. The Constitutional Court of the Republic of Indonesia (MKRI) in 2010 was decided that book banning is contradictory to the 1945 Constitution (UUD 1945). The purpose of this paper is to know Indonesia, according to the Constitutional Court must absolutely carry out the function of due process of law that is law enforcement in a judicial system when it wants to prohibit printed material which is a book, whether it is a book that is considered criticism and books that teach radicalism. It would be wise for anyone who disagrees with a book, and then responds by writing through a book. The result of this article is to support and suggest that the government and its apparatus in the state of the law should not arbitrarily impose a book ban. Likewise, people should not take violence action to respond this issue. In historical records, the prohibition of books without due process of law is always followed by the withdrawal of books and make people unable to deal with differences, especially in knowledge. That’s why, the government and its apparatus must create a conducive situation and support the creation of various perspectives in the framework of the progress of science through a book. It would implicate that people can respect in any perspective and thought.

  5. Switching clozapine responders to olanzapine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littrell, K H; Johnson, C G; Hilligoss, N M; Peabody, C D; Littrell, S H

    2000-12-01

    Clozapine is an atypical antipsychotic indicated for the management of severely ill patients with schizophrenia who have failed to respond adequately to standard drug treatment. The significant risk of agranulocytosis and seizure associated with clozapine has led to the restrictions in its use. Additionally, drug-induced sedation, sialorrhea, enuresis, and weight gain are often cited as problematic consequences of clozapine treatment. Our primary objective was to determine the effectiveness and safety of a method of slow cross-titration from clozapine to olanzapine among patients responsive to clozapine treatment but experiencing medication-induced adverse events. Changes in symptomatology, mood, subjective response, and safety were examined in 20 outpatients meeting DSM-IV criteria for schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder who converted from clozapine to olanzapine. Patients were considered clozapine-responsive as evidenced by improved social function and decreased symptoms with clozapine therapy; however, they were interested in alternative pharmacologic treatment because of clozapine-related side effects. Equivalent efficacy of olanzapine to clozapine was found in 90% of the patients (18/20) in the study group, without rehospitalization or suicidal behavior in any of the patients. Also notable was a reduction in drug-induced side effects and improved subjective response to pharmacotherapy. The successful conversion from clozapine to olanzapine has the potential to provide great benefits for the patient, including reducing drug-induced side effects while maintaining symptom control. These preliminary results suggest that further research on converting clozapine responders to olanzapine is warranted.

  6. Oral histoplasmosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil Karthikeya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Histoplasmosis is a systemic fungal disease that takes various clinical forms, among which oral lesions are rare. The disseminated form of the disease that usually occurs in association with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV is one of the AIDS-defining diseases. Isolated oral histoplasmosis, without systemic involvement, with underlying immunosuppression due to AIDS is very rare. We report one such case of isolated oral histoplasmosis in a HIV-infected patient.

  7. The relationship between oral hygiene and oral colonisation with Candida species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzurovic, Selma; Babajic, Emina; Masic, Tarik; Smajic, Rubina; Selmanagic, Aida

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine relationship between oral hygiene and colonisation of Candia species in oral cavity. Maintenance oral hygiene is reducing pathological agents in the mouth and preventing violation of oral health. Study included 140 patients. For oral hygiene assessement were used the dental plaque index, oral hygiene index and dental calculus index. Ph test strips were used to determine pH of saliva. For isolation of Candida species oral swabs were taken to all patients. It was found out that pH of oral cavity does not varies notably, no matter of oral hygiene level. Candida species were identified in 28.6% respondents. The most present were Candida albicans, in 85% cases. The presence of plaque, tartar and high index oral hygiene (IOH) in patients with Candida is statistically significant. It was found that 83.4% of patients with Candida poorly maintained oral hygiene. Poor oral hygiene is associated with a significantly higher score in the presence of tartar, plaque and high IOH. In total patient's population 67% has amalgam fillings. Presence of amalgam fillings in patients with identified Candida was statistically significant. This study indicates low level of oral hygiene. Correlation between presence of Candida species and poor oral hygiene was proved. Also Candida was more present among patients with amalgam fillings. Improvement of oral hygiene is necessery for oral health and health in general, as well.

  8. Drug use among complete responders, partial responders and non-responders in a longitudinal survey of nonagenarians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wastesson, Jonas W; Rasmussen, Lotte; Oksuzyan, Anna

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: In observational studies, non-response can limit representativity and introduce bias. We aimed to investigate the longitudinal changes in the number of used drugs among complete responders, partial responders, and non-responders in a whole birth cohort of Danish nonagenarians participating...... in a longitudinal survey. METHODS: We obtained prescription data on all individuals born in 1905 and living in Denmark when the Danish 1905 cohort study was initiated in 1998 (n = 3600) using the Danish National Prescription Registry. Drug use was assessed for complete responders, non-responders at baseline......, and partial responders (i.e., dropouts) in the 4-month period preceding each wave of the study (1998, 2000, 2003, and 2005), that is, as the cohort aged from 92-93 to 99-100 years. RESULTS: Complete responders, non-responders, and partial responders used a similar number of drugs at baseline, on average 4...

  9. Knowledge and attitudes of Saudi dental undergraduates on oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujan, Omar; Alzoghaibi, Ibrahim; Azzeghaiby, Saleh; Altamimi, Mohammed Alsakran; Tarakji, Bassel; Hanouneh, Salah; Idress, Majdy; Alenzi, Faris Q; Iqbal, Mazhar; Taifour, Shahama

    2014-12-01

    Oral cancer awareness among future dental practitioners may have an impact on the early detection and prevention of oral cancer. A cross-sectional survey was undertaken to assess the current knowledge of future Saudi dentists on oral cancer and their opinions on oral cancer prevention. A pretested questionnaire was sent to 550 undergraduate dental students in the fourth, fifth, and sixth year of the Al-Farabi College for Dentistry and Nursing, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Questions relating to knowledge of oral cancer, risk factors, and opinions on oral cancer prevention and practices were posed. Four hundred seventy-nine students returned the questionnaire (87.1 %). Eighty-one percent of respondents correctly answered questions relating to oral cancer awareness. Eighty-seven percent of respondents felt confident in performing a systematic oral examination to detect changes consistent with oral malignancy. Interestingly, 57 % of respondents had seen the use of oral cancer diagnostics aids. Thirty-seven percent of respondents felt inadequately trained to provide tobacco and alcohol cessation advice. There is a need to reinforce the undergraduate dental curriculum with regards to oral cancer education; particularly in its prevention and early detection. Incorporating the use of oral cancer diagnostic aids should be made mandatory.

  10. Knowledge and Use of Oral Rehydration Therapy among Mothers of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge about diarrhoea diseases and oral rehydration therapy was high among respondents, but their use of oral rehydration was low. Training, public enlightenment and social marketing strategies are needed to promote the use of oral rehydration therapy among mothers of under-five children in military cantonment.

  11. Como responder ao momento presente?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Filomena Molder

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Foi com esta pergunta — já um efeito de um primeiro encontro entre Irene Pimentel e eu própria — que decidimos desafiar colegas, estudantes e funci­onários da nossa Faculdade, FCSH (Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Huma­nas, de outras Faculdades da Universidade Nova de Lisboa, de outras Uni­versidades e todos os interessados em con­siderar e discutir em comum aquilo que se passava em Portugal e que no anúncio da Jornada de 6 de De­zembro de 2012 se descrevia como um “processo de desmantela­mento social, económico e cultural sem precedentes — pese embora tantas compara­ções, baseadas na premissa da ‘eterna repetição’ — e cujas consequências não param de exceder as previsões dos responsáveis por esse desmantelamento”. Acedendo com todo o empenho e gratidão ao convite que me foi dirigido por Humberto Brito para fazer uma resenha da Jornada a publicar no primeiro número de Forma de Vida (saúdo a revista e o título, decidi-me, no entanto, a pôr de lado a resenha, que sob a forma de “Editorial” será em breve publi­cada no blogue Responder ao Momento Presente, entre­tanto criado, conjuntamente com os textos escritos pelos nossos convidados, com as parti­cipações de pessoas que corresponderam ao nosso apelo e ainda com contri­bui­ções que se alargaram para lá da Jornada; a que se juntará uma gravação em video, também disponível no Youtube. Texto publicado originalmente em Forma de Vida, Lisboa, n.1, fev. 2013. Agrade­cemos à autora por permitir a republicação neste número do Boletim. [N.E.

  12. Como responder ao momento presente?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Filomena Molder

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1984-784X.2013v13n19p13 Foi com esta pergunta — já um efeito de um primeiro encontro entre Irene Pimentel e eu própria — que decidimos desafiar colegas, estudantes e funci­onários da nossa Faculdade, FCSH (Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Huma­nas, de outras Faculdades da Universidade Nova de Lisboa, de outras Uni­versidades e todos os interessados em con­siderar e discutir em comum aquilo que se passava em Portugal e que no anúncio da Jornada de 6 de De­zembro de 2012 se descrevia como um “processo de desmantela­mento social, económico e cultural sem precedentes — pese embora tantas compara­ções, baseadas na premissa da ‘eterna repetição’ — e cujas consequências não param de exceder as previsões dos responsáveis por esse desmantelamento”. Acedendo com todo o empenho e gratidão ao convite que me foi dirigido por Humberto Brito para fazer uma resenha da Jornada a publicar no primeiro número de Forma de Vida (saúdo a revista e o título, decidi-me, no entanto, a pôr de lado a resenha, que sob a forma de “Editorial” será em breve publi­cada no blogue Responder ao Momento Presente, entre­tanto criado, conjuntamente com os textos escritos pelos nossos convidados, com as parti­cipações de pessoas que corresponderam ao nosso apelo e ainda com contri­bui­ções que se alargaram para lá da Jornada; a que se juntará uma gravação em video, também disponível no Youtube.   Texto publicado originalmente em Forma de Vida, Lisboa, n.1, fev. 2013. Agrade­cemos à autora por permitir a republicação neste número do Boletim. [N.E.

  13. Oral Hygiene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Marie Toftdahl; Villadsen, Dorte Buxbom

    The aim of the study was to explore how adults with schizo- phrenia describe their lived experiences with oral hygiene. 23 adults with schizophrenia were interviewed within a period of four months in late 2015. Transcriptions of the interviews were analysed using the Reflective Lifeworld Research...... phenomenological approach of Dahlberg, Dahlberg, and Nyström. The essence of the phenomenon, oral hygiene, is described as a challenge: a mixture of ability and assigning priority; a challenge in which significant others, for better or worse, play an important role. We recommend a systematic cooperation between...... health care professionals and adults with schizophrenia in order to improve oral health, well-being and recovery....

  14. Oral Hygiene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Dorte Buxbom; Sørensen, Marie Toftdahl

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study is to explore how adults with schizophrenia describe their lived experiences with oral hygiene. 23 adults with schizophrenia were interviewed within a period of four months in late 2015. Transcriptions of the interviews were analysed using the Reflective Lifeworld Research...... phenomenological approach of Dahlberg, Dahlberg, and Nyström. The essence of the phenomenon, oral hygiene, is described as a challenge: a mixture of ability and assigning priority; a challenge in which significant others, for better or worse, play an important role. We recommend a systematic cooperation between...... health care professionals and adults with schizophrenia in order to improve oral health, well-being and recovery....

  15. Oral Histoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folk, Gillian A; Nelson, Brenda L

    2017-12-01

    A 44-year-old female presented to her general dentist with the chief complaint of a painful mouth sore of 2 weeks duration. Clinical examination revealed an irregularly shaped ulcer of the buccal and lingual attached gingiva of the anterior mandible. A biopsy was performed and microscopic evaluation revealed histoplasmosis. Histoplasmosis, caused by Histoplasma capsulate, is the most common fungal infection in the United States. Oral lesions of histoplasmosis are generally associated with the disseminated form of histoplasmosis and may present as a fungating or ulcerative lesion of the oral mucosa. The histologic findings and differential diagnosis for oral histoplasmosis are discussed.

  16. What is wrong with non-respondents?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne Illemann; Ekholm, Ola; Gray, Linsay

    2015-01-01

    : Health survey non-respondents in Denmark have an increased hazard ratio of alcohol-, drug-, and smoking-related mortality and morbidity compared with respondents, which may indicate more unfavourable health behaviours among non-respondents. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  17. Herpes - oral

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... virus type 2 (HSV-2) most often causes genital herpes . However, sometimes HSV-2 is spread to the ... the virus to the genitals. Both oral and genital herpes viruses can sometimes be spread, even when you ...

  18. [Oral contraceptives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenbaum, H

    1976-10-23

    The author presents an alphabetical list of oral contraceptives. To classify the commercial names of oral contraceptives all over the world is practically impossible for the following reasons: some agents are discontinued without the medical profession being aware of it; the same product can have various names depending on the country and the laboratory. Some products exist in different forms (21 pills including 7 inactive tablets). Finally, some laboratories change the posology of a product without changing its name.

  19. Disparities in Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2020: Oral Health Objectives Site Map Disparities in Oral Health Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Oral health ... to get and keep dental insurance. Disparities in Oral Health Some of the oral health disparities that exist ...

  20. Differences in change in coping styles between good responders, moderate responders and non-responders to pulmonary rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoilkova-Hartmann, Ana; Janssen, Daisy J A; Franssen, Frits M E; Wouters, Emiel F M

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) improves exercise tolerance and health status in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Data on the effects of PR on coping styles are limited. Aim of the present study was to compare changes in coping styles between patients who had a good, moderate and no improvement in either exercise tolerance or health status after PR. Coping styles of 439 COPD patients undergoing PR were assessed by the Utrecht Coping List (UCL) at baseline and after PR. Patients' pulmonary function, six-minute walking distance (6MWD), St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-A and HADS-D) were recorded. Good, moderate and non-responders were defined on the basis of minimally clinically important difference (MCID) for SGRQ total score and/or 6MWD. Overall, 54.0% of the patients fulfilled the criteria for good responders, while 22.1% were moderate responders. Change in passive reaction pattern coping style differed significantly between good responders and non-responders following PR (p styles after PR occurred among the good responders, whereas the majority of moderate responders' and non-responders' coping styles were not significantly influenced by PR. Good responders decreased their passive reaction pattern coping style in contrast to non-responders after PR. In general, PR did not change the coping among moderate and non-responders. Further research is warranted to determine whether including interventions targeting coping styles may modify coping behaviour of COPD patients, as well as improvement in exercise tolerance or health status after PR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Defense Technology Opportunities for First Responders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    White, Rodney; Bedard, Louis; Derrah, Scott; Boucher, Robert

    2004-01-01

    For this study, the US and Canadian governments assessed the potential for technology transfer of five technologies, which were developed to meet military requirements, to civilian first responders...

  2. Global Oral Health Inequalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, N.; Amaechi, B.; Niederman, R.; Acevedo, A.-M.; Vianna, R.; Ganss, C.; Ismail, A.; Honkala, E.

    2011-01-01

    The IADR Global Oral Health Inequalities Task Group on Dental Caries has synthesized current evidence and opinion to identify a five-year implementation and research agenda which should lead to improvements in global oral health, with particular reference to the implementation of current best evidence as well as integrated action to reduce caries and health inequalities between and within countries. The Group determined that research should: integrate health and oral health wherever possible, using common risk factors; be able to respond to and influence international developments in health, healthcare, and health payment systems as well as dental prevention and materials; and exploit the potential for novel funding partnerships with industry and foundations. More effective communication between and among the basic science, clinical science, and health promotion/public health research communities is needed. Translation of research into policy and practice should be a priority for all. Both community and individual interventions need tailoring to achieve a more equal and person-centered preventive focus and reduce any social gradient in health. Recommendations are made for both clinical and public health implementation of existing research and for caries-related research agendas in clinical science, health promotion/public health, and basic science. PMID:21490233

  3. Oral candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millsop, Jillian W; Fazel, Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Oral candidiasis (OC) is a common fungal disease encountered in dermatology, most commonly caused by an overgrowth of Candida albicans in the mouth. Although thrush is a well-recognized presentation of OC, it behooves clinicians to be aware of the many other presentations of this disease and how to accurately diagnose and manage these cases. The clinical presentations of OC can be broadly classified as white or erythematous candidiasis, with various subtypes in each category. The treatments include appropriate oral hygiene, topical agents, and systemic medications. This review focuses on the various clinical presentations of OC and treatment options. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Oral myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treville Pereira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is a relatively rare condition arising from the invasion of body tissues or cavities of living animals or humans by maggots or larvae of certain species of flies. It is an uncommon clinical condition, being more frequent in underdeveloped countries and hot climate regions, and is associated with poor hygiene, suppurative oral lesions; alcoholism and senility. Its diagnosis is made basically by the presence of larvae. The present article reports a case of oral myiasis involving 20 larvae in a patient with neurological deficiency.

  5. Mobile-Only Web Survey Respondents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lugtig, P.J.; Toepoel, V.; amin, alerk

    2016-01-01

    Web surveys are no longer completed on just a desktop or laptop computer. Respondents increasingly use mobile devices, such as tablets and smartphones to complete web surveys. In this article, we study how respondents in the American Life Panel complete surveys using varying devices. We show that

  6. Resilience among first responders | Pietrantoni | African Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nine hundred and sixty-one first responders filled out an on-line questionnaire, containing measure of sense of community, collective efficacy, self-efficacy and work-related mental health outcomes (compassion fatigue, burnout and compassion satisfaction). Results. First responders reported high level of compassion ...

  7. Socio Economic Assessment of Urban Forestry Respondents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    ABSTRACT: The paper investigates the socio economic assessment of urban forestry respondents' income in Okitipupa, Nigeria. Data were collected using structured questionnaires and these were administered to 200 urban forestry respondents. Data were collected on socioeconomic characteristics viz: age, gender, ...

  8. Oral cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancers tend to spread quickly. Smoking and other tobacco use are linked to most cases of oral cancer. Heavy alcohol use also increases the risk for ... cancer greatly increases the chance of survival. Prevention ... Avoiding smoking or other tobacco use Having dental problems corrected Limiting or avoiding alcohol ...

  9. Oral leukoplakia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, Palle; Dabelsteen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    nature is oral leukoplakia, and for decades it has been discussed how to treat these lesions. Various treatment modalities, such as systemic therapies and surgical removal, have been suggested. The systemic therapies tested so far include retinoids, extracts of green tea, inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2...

  10. Oral leukoplakia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard Larsen, Marie; Sorensen, J. A.; Godballe, C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Oral leukoplakia (OL) is a common premalignant lesion. The possible benefits of specific interventions in preventing a malignant transformation of OL are not well understood. This review assesses different invasive treatment techniques for OL and evaluate the optimal treatment...

  11. Oral calcitonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdy RC

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ronald C Hamdy,1,2 Dane N Daley11Osteoporosis Center, College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, 2Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Johnson City, TN, USAAbstract: Calcitonin is a hormone secreted by the C-cells of the thyroid gland in response to elevations of the plasma calcium level. It reduces bone resorption by inhibiting mature active osteoclasts and increases renal calcium excretion. It is used in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis, Paget's disease of bone, and malignancy-associated hypercalcemia. Synthetic and recombinant calcitonin preparations are available; both have similar pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles. As calcitonin is a peptide, the traditional method of administration has been parenteral or intranasal. This hinders its clinical use: adherence with therapy is notoriously low, and withdrawal from clinical trials has been problematic. An oral formulation would be more attractive, practical, and convenient to patients. In addition to its effect on active osteoclasts and renal tubules, calcitonin has an analgesic action, possibly mediated through β-endorphins and the central modulation of pain perception. It also exerts a protective action on cartilage and may be useful in the management of osteoarthritis and possibly rheumatoid arthritis. Oral formulations of calcitonin have been developed using different techniques. The most studied involves drug-delivery carriers such as Eligen® 8-(N-2hydroxy-5-chloro-benzoyl-amino-caprylic acid (5-CNAC (Emisphere Technologies, Cedar Knolls, NJ. Several factors affect the bioavailability and efficacy of orally administered calcitonin, including amount of water used to take the tablet, time of day the tablet is taken, and proximity to intake of a meal. Preliminary results looked promising. Unfortunately, in two Phase III studies, oral calcitonin (0.8 mg with 200 mg 5-CNAC, once a day for postmenopausal osteoporosis and twice a day for osteoarthritis failed to

  12. Eating disorder professionals' perceptions of oral health knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L B; Boyd, L D; Rainchuso, L; Rothman, A; Mayer, B

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the oral health knowledge among professionals who specialize in treating eating disorders, and identify to what extent their education, and training addresses oral health care delivery, and recommendations for individuals with eating disorders. Participants for this study were licensed behavioural and medical providers specializing in eating disorder treatment (n = 107), and recruited through professional eating disorder organizations. Participants completed an anonymous, online questionnaire (33 items) assessing level of oral health-related education, knowledge and treatment recommendations within the participant's respective eating disorder discipline. The majority of respondents (85%) were formally trained in eating disorders, and of those trained, 64.4% were not satisfied with the level of oral health education during formal education, and 19.5% report no oral health education. Respondents consider their knowledge of risk of oral disease for their clients/patients as average or above (84%), and ranked tooth erosion as the greatest reason for oral care (63%) while dry mouth led in the rankings for least significant reason for oral care (33%). Referral for oral care was found to be more common after reports of complication (55%). According to these findings, eating disorder professionals regard oral health care for their clients as significant, and may be unaware of associated oral risk factors, current oral care standards and long-term oral effects of disordered eating apart from enamel erosion. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Criticality Safety Basics for INL Emergency Responders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valerie L. Putman

    2012-08-01

    This document is a modular self-study guide about criticality safety principles for Idaho National Laboratory emergency responders. This guide provides basic criticality safety information for people who, in response to an emergency, might enter an area that contains much fissionable (or fissile) material. The information should help responders understand unique factors that might be important in responding to a criticality accident or in preventing a criticality accident while responding to a different emergency.

    This study guide specifically supplements web-based training for firefighters (0INL1226) and includes information for other Idaho National Laboratory first responders. However, the guide audience also includes other first responders such as radiological control personnel.

    For interested readers, this guide includes clearly marked additional information that will not be included on tests. The additional information includes historical examples (Been there. Done that.), as well as facts and more in-depth information (Did you know …).

    INL criticality safety personnel revise this guide as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Revision 0, issued May 2007, established the basic text. Revision 1 incorporates operation, program, and training changes implemented since 2007. Revision 1 increases focus on first responders because later responders are more likely to have more assistance and guidance from facility personnel and subject matter experts. Revision 1 also completely reorganized the training to better emphasize physical concepts behind the criticality controls that help keep emergency responders safe. The changes are based on and consistent with changes made to course 0INL1226.

  14. Responder Technology Alert Monthly (December 2014)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upton, Jaki F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stein, Steven L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-02-13

    As part of technology foraging for the Responder Technology Alliance, established by the Department of Homeland Science and Technologies First Responders Group, this report summarizes technologies that are relevant in the area of “wearables,” with the potential for use by first responders. The content was collected over the previous month(s) and reproduced from a general Internet search using the term wearables. Additional information is available at the websites provided. This report is not meant to be an exhaustive list nor an endorsement of any technology described herein. Rather, it is meant to provide useful information about current developments in the areas wearable technology.

  15. Responder Technology Alert Monthly (January 2015)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upton, Jaki F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stein, Steven L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-02-01

    As part of technology foraging for the Responder Technology Alliance, established by the Department of Homeland Science and Technologies First Responders Group, this report summarizes technologies that are relevant in the area of “wearables,” with the potential for use by first responders. The content was collected over the previous month(s) and reproduced from a general Internet search using the term wearables. Additional information is available at the websites provided. This report is not meant to be an exhaustive list nor an endorsement of any technology described herein. Rather, it is meant to provide useful information about current developments in the areas wearable technology.

  16. Association between seeking oral health information online and knowledge in adults with spinal cord injury: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Hon K.; Azuero, Andres; London, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Objective To characterize adults with spinal cord injury (SCI) who seek oral health information online, and investigate whether seeking oral health information online is associated with oral health knowledge and behaviors. Methods An online oral health survey was posted on the South Carolina Spinal Cord Injury Association website. Respondents were 192 adult residents of the US ages 19–83 years who identified themselves as having SCI occurring at least 1 year before the survey date. Results About 12% (n = 23) of the respondents searched oral health information online in the past 12 months. Significant associations between the proportion of respondents who searched for oral health information online and socio-demographic and the proportion of respondents who engaged in various oral health behaviors were not detected. However, multivariable logistic regression indicated that respondents who searched oral health information online in the past 12 months have 3.4 times the odds of possessing adequate oral health knowledge compared to respondents who did not search oral health information online (adjusted odds ratio = 3.41, 95% confidence interval = 1.35, 8.62, P = 0.01). Conclusions Given the significant association between seeking oral health information online and adequate oral health knowledge, this study suggests that online oral health information may be a potential avenue for dental health professionals to supplement oral health education in adults with SCI. PMID:21903017

  17. Oral Histoplasmosis

    OpenAIRE

    Folk, Gillian A.; Nelson, Brenda L.

    2017-01-01

    A 44-year-old female presented to her general dentist with the chief complaint of a painful mouth sore of 2 weeks duration. Clinical examination revealed an irregularly shaped ulcer of the buccal and lingual attached gingiva of the anterior mandible. A biopsy was performed and microscopic evaluation revealed histoplasmosis. Histoplasmosis, caused by Histoplasma capsulate, is the most common fungal infection in the United States. Oral lesions of histoplasmosis are generally associated with the...

  18. Preschool Needle Pain Responding: Establishing 'Normal'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxman, Jordana A; DiLorenzo, Miranda G; Pillai Riddell, Rebecca R; Flora, David B; Greenberg, Saul; Garfield, Hartley

    2017-06-01

    The current study sets forth to provide descriptive data for preschool vaccination pain responding as well as examine longitudinal relationships over early childhood. Growth mixture modeling was first used to describe stable subgroups of preschoolers on the basis of their pain response patterns over 2-minutes post-needle. Secondly, a parallel-process growth curve model was used to assess the stability of acute pain responding from 12 months of age to preschool age. Specifically, we examined whether preschool pain-related distress or regulation could be predicted from 12-month acute pain responding. Preschool participants were part of a Canadian longitudinal cohort (The Opportunities to Understand Childhood Hurt [OUCH] cohort; N = 302). Growth mixture modeling analyses discerned 3 distinct groups of preschoolers, with an important minority not regulating to low-no pain by 2 minutes post-needle. There were no significant associations between 12-month and preschool pain responding. These results highlight the steep trajectory of development between these different stages of early childhood and the variability of pain responding at the preschool vaccination. This study provides descriptive data for preschool vaccination pain responding as well as examines longitudinal relationships over early childhood. Demonstrating significantly different pain patterns from infancy, 25% of preschoolers are displaying suboptimal regulation trajectories. This considerable minority poses a significant concern because of the established trajectory of phobia onset in middle childhood. Copyright © 2017 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Oral Care during Pregnancy: Attitudes of Brazilian Public Health Professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, Renata Toledo; Ribeiro, Rosangela Almeida; Costa, Luciane Rezende; Leles, Claudio Rodrigues; Freire, Maria do Carmo Matias; Paiva, Saul Martins

    2012-01-01

    There is little information about health professionals’ behavior regarding oral health care during pregnancy. We evaluated attitudes of obstetricians/gynecologists, nurses, and dentists working at a public community service towards pregnant women’s oral health. Health professionals responded to a self-applied questionnaire. Cluster analysis identified two clusters of respondents; Chi-square, Student’s t test, and logistic regression were used to compare the two clusters in terms of the indepe...

  20. Dependent Interviewing and Sub-Optimal Responding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Eggs

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available With proactive dependent interviewing (PDI respondents are reminded of the answer they gave in the previous interview, before being asked about their current status. PDI is used in panel surveys to assist respondent recall and reduce spurious changes in responses over time. PDI may however provide scope for new errors if respondents falsely accept the previous information as still being an accurate description of their current situation. In this paper we use data from the German Labour Market and Social Security panel study, in which an error was made with the preload data for a PDI question about receipt of welfare benefit. The survey data were linked to individual administrative records on receipt of welfare benefit. A large proportion of respondents accepted the false preload. This behaviour seems mainly driven by the difficulty of the response task: respondents with a more complex history of receipt according to the records were more likely to confirm the false preload. Personality also seemed related to the probability of confirming. Predictors of satisficing, indicators of satisficing on other items in the survey, and characteristics of the survey and interviewer were not predictive of confirming the false preload.

  1. Oral health related knowledge and behaviour among nursing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To investigate oral health knowledge and behaviour amongst nursing students in a Nigerian tertiary hospital. Materials and methods: The study was conducted at University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital on respondents aged 17 to 40 years, using self administered structured questionnaire. Result: From oral health ...

  2. Knowledge and Utilization of Oral Rehydration Therapy (ORT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge and Utilization of Oral Rehydration Therapy (ORT) among Mothers in Enugu, Nigeria: A Health Facility Survey. ... Although 77.0% of the respondents could not describe correctly the preparation of salt-sugar solution (SSS)/oral rehydration salt solution (ORS), a high ORT utilization rate of 74.6% was recorded.

  3. Mischievous responding in Internet Gaming Disorder research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybylski, Andrew K

    2016-01-01

    The most recent update to the American Psychiatric Association's (APA) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) included Internet Gaming Disorder as a new potential psychiatric condition that merited further scientific study. The present research was conducted in response to the APA Substance-Related Disorders Working Group's research call to estimate the extent to which mischievous responding-a known problematic pattern of participant self-report responding in questionnaires-is relevant to Internet Gaming Disorder research. In line with a registered sampling and analysis plan, findings from two studies (n tot = 11,908) provide clear evidence that mischievous responding is positively associated with the number of Internet Gaming Disorder indicators participants report. Results are discussed in the context of ongoing problem gaming research and the discussion provides recommendations for improving the quality of scientific practice in this area.

  4. Process and Outcome in Paired Oral Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaraton, Anne

    2006-01-01

    This article responds to points raised in the article "The paired format in the Cambridge Speaking Tests" by Julie Norton in the 59/4 issue of this Journal on the potential drawbacks of a paired format in oral testing, based on observations about the nature of the discourse produced in this context. This article argues that, although the author…

  5. Oral Thrush (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Parents / Oral Thrush Print en español Muguet (candidiasis oral) What Is Oral Thrush? Oral thrush is a ... Candida overgrowth also causes diaper rash and vaginal yeast infections . Babies can have oral thrush and a diaper rash at the same ...

  6. Towards understanding oral health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaura, E.; ten Cate, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    During the last century, dental research has focused on unraveling the mechanisms behind various oral pathologies, while oral health was typically described as the mere absence of oral diseases. The term ‘oral microbial homeostasis' is used to describe the capacity of the oral ecosystem to maintain

  7. Responding to Loneliness: Counseling the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, M. Honore

    1984-01-01

    Describes the development and implementation of a group on "Responding to Loneliness" for the elderly. Focuses on building positive self-esteem; learning social and personal skills; managing stress and anxiety; developing problem-solving strategies; and building a social network. (Author/JAC)

  8. Methods for Handling Missing Secondary Respondent Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Rebekah; Johnson, David

    2013-01-01

    Secondary respondent data are underutilized because researchers avoid using these data in the presence of substantial missing data. The authors reviewed, evaluated, and tested solutions to this problem. Five strategies of dealing with missing partner data were reviewed: (a) complete case analysis, (b) inverse probability weighting, (c) correction…

  9. Responding with Care to Students Facing Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souers, Kristin

    2018-01-01

    Exposure to trauma--which many experts view as include ongoing life stressors like poverty, parents divorcing, death of a family member, or drug abuse in the home--is prevalent among school-aged children. Teachers know that facing trauma impedes students' ability to focus and learn, but it can be challenging to keep responding caringly to a…

  10. Editorial: How to respond to reviewers' comments

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soji, Zimkhitha

    Is the content and writing satisfactory enough to make it worth reviewing? Not adequately addressing concerns raised by the reviewers and/or editors does not help the peer-review and publishing processes. Poor judgement when responding to reviewers'/editors' comments often produces a undesirable outcome. Merely ...

  11. School Principals and Racism: Responding to Aveling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Claire; Mahoney, Caroline; Fox, Brandi; Halse, Christine

    2016-01-01

    This study responds to Nado Aveling's call in "Anti-racism in Schools: A question of leadership?" ("Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education," 2007, 28(1), 69-85) for further investigation into racism in Australian schools. Aveling's interview study concluded that an overwhelming number of school principals…

  12. 42 CFR 93.225 - Respondent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respondent. 93.225 Section 93.225 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH...

  13. Responding to Misinformation about Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Eva K.; Estow, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    This study examined responses to climate change misinformation and messages designed to counter misinformation. Participants (N = 406) first responded to a social media post denying the existence of global warming and then were randomly assigned to read one of three responses to the original post (correction, collaboration, control). Participants…

  14. Oral sex, oral health and orogenital infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saini Rajiv

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral sex is commonly practiced by sexually active male-female and same-gender couples of various ages, including adolescents. The various type of oral sex practices are fellatio, cunnilingus and analingus. Oral sex is infrequently examined in research on adolescents; oral sex can transmit oral, respiratory, and genital pathogens. Oral health has a direct impact on the transmission of infection; a cut in your mouth, bleeding gums, lip sores or broken skin increases chances of infection. Although oral sex is considered a low risk activity, it is important to use protection and safer sex precautions. There are various methods of preventing infection during oral sex such as physical barriers, health and medical issues, ethical issues and oral hygiene and dental issues. The lesions or unhealthy periodontal status of oral cavity accelerates the phenomenon of transmission of infections into the circulation. Thus consequences of unhealthy or painful oral cavity are significant and oral health should be given paramount importance for the practice of oral sex.

  15. Oral Health Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2018 About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Oral Health and Overal Health Gum Disease and Cardiovascular Health ... news feeds delivered directly to your desktop! more... Oral Health Glossary Article Chapters Oral Health Glossary print full ...

  16. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Us Home Health Info Health Information The Oral Cancer Exam See a step-by-step video explaining what happens during an oral cancer examination. An oral cancer exam is painless and ...

  17. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contact Us Home Health Info Health Information The Oral Cancer Exam See a step-by-step video explaining what happens during an oral cancer examination. An oral cancer exam is painless and ...

  18. [Oral testing for sulfite asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, H; Kirsten, D; Jörres, R A; Magnussen, H

    1996-06-01

    Patients with asthma may develop bronchoconstriction after ingestion of sulfites. We studied the sensitivity and specificity of an oral provocation challenge with metabisulfite to detect a sulfite-sensitive asthma. We performed an oral dose-response metabisulfite challenge in 44 patients with a history of sulfite-sensitive asthma, 27 patients with asthma but without a history of sulfite sensitivity, and 8 control subjects without asthma. Metabisulfite was administered in capsules in a single-blind manner. Airway response was assessed by FEV decline, measured 30' after each dose. Thirty-nine percent of patients with a history of sulfite-sensitive asthma demonstrated a significant bronchoconstriction after ingestion of metabisulfite, whereas patients without an appropriate history and control subjects did not respond to the challenge. The oral metabisulfite challenge exhibits a high specificity (100%) but low sensitivity of about 40%. Nonetheless, taking into account the uncertainties in the patients' history of sulfite-sensitive asthma, the oral metabisulfite challenge as performed by us is a useful method for the diagnosis of sulfite sensitive asthma.

  19. Transcriptional changes induced by bevacizumab combination therapy in responding and non-responding recurrent glioblastoma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urup, Thomas; Staunstrup, Line Maersk; Michaelsen, Signe Regner

    2017-01-01

    Background: Bevacizumab combined with chemotherapy produces clinical durable response in 25-30% of recurrent glioblastoma patients. This group of patients has shown improved survival and quality of life. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in gene expression associated with response...... and resistance to bevacizumab combination therapy.Methods: Recurrent glioblastoma patients who had biomarker-accessible tumor tissue surgically removed both before bevacizumab treatment and at time of progression were included. Patients were grouped into responders (n = 7) and non-responders (n = 14). Gene......-responders 1 gene was significantly differentially expressed. In responders, this approach revealed 256 significantly differentially expressed genes (72 down-and 184 up-regulated genes at the time of progression). Genes differentially expressed in responders revealed a shift towards a more proneural and less...

  20. Oral Syphilis: A Reemerging Infection Prompting Clinicians’ Alertness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Dybeck Udd

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Syphilis is a rare but increasing disease. Due to changing sexual habits, presentation of oral manifestations may rise. Since syphilis may mimic other oral manifestations, diagnoses can be difficult. Clinicians need to be aware that ambiguous oral manifestations may in fact be caused by oral syphilis. Here, we present a case of extended diagnostic delay highlighting the importance of consulting an expert in infectious diseases in case of obscure oral lesions not responding to standard treatment. Despite seven visits to six different medical doctors, a patient who presented with oral syphilis was continuously misdiagnosed. After 6 months of increasing complaints and deteriorating severity of disease, the patient was referred to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon where the correct diagnosis was determined and proper treatment initiated.

  1. Self-reported poor oral hygiene among in-school adolescents in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siziya, Seter; Muula, Adamson S; Rudatsikira, Emmanuel

    2011-07-22

    Dental health is a neglected aspect of adolescent health globally but more so in low-income countries. Secondary analysis using the 2004 Zambia Global School-Based Health Survey (GSHS) was conducted in which we estimated frequencies of relevant socio-demographic variables and explored associations between selected explanatory variables and self-reported poor oral hygiene (not cleaning or brushing teeth) within the last 30 days of the completion of questionnaire. Most of the 2257 respondents were males (53.9%) and went hungry (82.5%). More than 4 in 10 respondents drank alcohol (42.2%) while 37.2% smoked cannabis. Overall 10.0% of the respondents reported to have poor oral hygiene. Male respondents were 7% less likely to report to have poor oral hygiene compared to females. Compared to respondents who never drank alcohol, those who drank alcohol were 27% more likely to report to have poor oral hygiene. Respondents who smoked cannabis were 4% more likely to report to have poor oral hygiene compared to those who did not smoke cannabis. Finally, respondents who went hungry were 35% more likely to report to have poor oral hygiene compared to those who did not go hungry. Results from this study indicate that female gender, alcohol drinking, cannabis smoking, and going hungry were associated with self-reported poor oral hygiene. The identification of these factors should guide the design and implementation of programs aimed to improve oral health among adolescents.

  2. Self-reported poor oral hygiene among in-school adolescents in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudatsikira Emmanuel

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dental health is a neglected aspect of adolescent health globally but more so in low-income countries. Secondary analysis using the 2004 Zambia Global School-Based Health Survey (GSHS was conducted in which we estimated frequencies of relevant socio-demographic variables and explored associations between selected explanatory variables and self-reported poor oral hygiene (not cleaning or brushing teeth within the last 30 days of the completion of questionnaire. Findings Most of the 2257 respondents were males (53.9% and went hungry (82.5%. More than 4 in 10 respondents drank alcohol (42.2% while 37.2% smoked cannabis. Overall 10.0% of the respondents reported to have poor oral hygiene. Male respondents were 7% less likely to report to have poor oral hygiene compared to females. Compared to respondents who never drank alcohol, those who drank alcohol were 27% more likely to report to have poor oral hygiene. Respondents who smoked cannabis were 4% more likely to report to have poor oral hygiene compared to those who did not smoke cannabis. Finally, respondents who went hungry were 35% more likely to report to have poor oral hygiene compared to those who did not go hungry. Conclusions Results from this study indicate that female gender, alcohol drinking, cannabis smoking, and going hungry were associated with self-reported poor oral hygiene. The identification of these factors should guide the design and implementation of programs aimed to improve oral health among adolescents.

  3. Responding to the Housing and Financial Crises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scanlon, Kathleen; Lunde, Jens; Whitehead, Christine

    2011-01-01

    The long period of house price growth in markets across the world ended with the US and global financial crisis of 2007/08. The crisis and the consequent recession had profound effects on mortgage market actors – including households, institutions and governments – in most advanced economies......, whether or not they participated in this rapid house price growth. Many of the trends observed during the boom, especially the innovations in financial instruments, were reversed. This paper presents evidence on how mortgage markets and stakeholders responded in the initial period after the crash....... In particular it reports on a 2009 survey of housing experts from 16 industrialised countries, which concentrated on how each country's mortgage system responded to the crisis and how governments addressed the problems of borrowers....

  4. Responder individuality in red blood cell alloimmunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körmöczi, Günther F; Mayr, Wolfgang R

    2014-11-01

    Many different factors influence the propensity of transfusion recipients and pregnant women to form red blood cell alloantibodies (RBCA). RBCA may cause hemolytic transfusion reactions, hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn and may be a complication in transplantation medicine. Antigenic differences between responder and foreign erythrocytes may lead to such an immune answer, in part with suspected specific HLA class II associations. Biochemical and conformational characteristics of red blood cell (RBC) antigens, their dose (number of transfusions and pregnancies, absolute number of antigens per RBC) and the mode of exposure impact on RBCA rates. In addition, individual circumstances determine the risk to form RBCA. Responder individuality in terms of age, sex, severity of underlying disease, disease- or therapy-induced immunosuppression and inflammation are discussed with respect to influencing RBC alloimmunization. For particular high-risk patients, extended phenotype matching of transfusion and recipient efficiently decreases RBCA induction and associated clinical risks.

  5. Mischievous responding in Internet Gaming Disorder research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew K. Przybylski

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The most recent update to the American Psychiatric Association’s (APA Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5 included Internet Gaming Disorder as a new potential psychiatric condition that merited further scientific study. The present research was conducted in response to the APA Substance-Related Disorders Working Group’s research call to estimate the extent to which mischievous responding—a known problematic pattern of participant self-report responding in questionnaires—is relevant to Internet Gaming Disorder research. In line with a registered sampling and analysis plan, findings from two studies (ntot = 11,908 provide clear evidence that mischievous responding is positively associated with the number of Internet Gaming Disorder indicators participants report. Results are discussed in the context of ongoing problem gaming research and the discussion provides recommendations for improving the quality of scientific practice in this area.

  6. Nuclear Fallout Decision Tool for First Responders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archibald, E. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Buddemeier, B. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2010-08-11

    If terrorists detonated an improvised nuclear device (IND) in an urban area, thousands of people would die from the blast, and many more would become sick or die from exposure to fallout radiation. Proper sheltering and evacuation can protect people from fallout and save lives. This project provides guidance to first responders as to when to evacuate and what route to take to protect themselves against fallout radiation.

  7. Responder Individuality in Red Blood Cell Alloimmunization

    OpenAIRE

    Körmöczi, Günther F.; Mayr, Wolfgang R.

    2014-01-01

    Many different factors influence the propensity of transfusion recipients and pregnant women to form red blood cell alloantibodies (RBCA). RBCA may cause hemolytic transfusion reactions, hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn and may be a complication in transplantation medicine. Antigenic differences between responder and foreign erythrocytes may lead to such an immune answer, in part with suspected specific HLA class II associations. Biochemical and conformational characteristics of red...

  8. Preventing and responding to medical identity theft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amori, Geraldine

    2008-01-01

    Medical identity theft is a crime with two victims: patients and providers. It is easy to commit and lucrative because healthcare record keeping and business interactions are complex and mainly electronic. Patients whose identity has been stolen are vulnerable to both medical error and financial loss. Providers may suffer both reputation loss and financial loss. There are steps to help prevent and to respond appropriately to medical identity theft.

  9. Responding to the Challenge of True Uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallin, Carina Antonia; Andersen, Torben Juul

    We construe a conceptual framework for responding effectively to true uncertainty in the business environment. We drill down to the essential micro-foundational capabilities - sensing and seizing of dynamic capabilities - and link them to classical strategic issue management theory with suggestions...... on how to operationalize these essential capabilities. By definition true uncertainty represents environmental conditions that are hard to foresee, which can catch the unprepared by surprise while presenting opportunities to the conscious organization. We demonstrate that organizations relying...

  10. Teachers' knowledge about oral health and their interest in oral health education in Hail, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljanakh, Mohammad; Siddiqui, Ammar Ahmed; Mirza, Asaad Javaid

    2016-01-01

    To assess the dental health knowledge and the interest of secondary school teachers in imparting oral health education in Hail, Saudi Arabia. It was a questionnaire based cross-sectional survey of secondary school teachers in Hail, Saudi Arabia, carried out from November 2014 to January 2015. A validated self-administered questionnaire was used to determine teachers' oral health knowledge and their interest in participating in oral health education of school children. Data analysis was performed using SPSS version 20 statistical software. Two hundred and twenty three secondary school teachers responded to the survey. Results showed that about 80 to 90 % of teachers had sufficient knowledge of causes and prevention of dental caries and gingivitis. About 94% of teachers agreed that they can play an effective role in oral health promotion while 96% were found to be interested in performing additional duty as oral health promoter. A large majority (91.9 %) had the opinion that oral health education must be included in school curriculum. Teachers in Hail region had adequate amount of knowledge regarding oral health, and they were interested to play their role in promoting oral health education. Based on the findings of this study, it is recommended to include dental health education in curriculum at secondary school level and to provide sufficient training to teachers to enable them to participate actively in oral health promotion activities.

  11. Mucosite oral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Spezzia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A mucosite consta de irritação ou inflamação da mucosa bucal, provocada por ação da radioterapia de cabeça e pescoço e da quimioterapia. O objetivo deste artigo foi verificar como a ocorrência de mucosite oral pode influir na saúde bucal dos pacientes com câncer. Para tratamento odontológico o laser de baixa intensidade é o de opção. O emprego do laser de baixa potência tem cunho, tanto preventivo, como curativo para tratamento das lesões causadas. Concluiu-se que se pode evitar intercorrências no transcorrer do tratamento oncológico radioterápico e quimioterápico, fazendo-se uso da terapia laser, o que vai permitir melhores condições e qualidade de vida aos pacientes acometidos por mucosite.

  12. Immunoglobulin treatment in post-polio syndrome: Identification of responders and non-responders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Östlund, Gunilla; Broman, Lisbet; Werhagen, Lars; Borg, Kristian

    2015-09-01

    To define and characterize responders and non-responders in a group of 124 patients with post-polio syndrome who received a single treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin. Open trial, prospective follow-up study. Clinical examination and data from medical records. Short Form 36 (SF-36), Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) and visual analogue scale (VAS) measured quality of life, physical activity and intensity of pain, respectively. Data were obtained before treatment and at 6-month follow-up. Two responder groups were identified with the outcome SF-36 Vitality and 3 with Bodily pain, respectively. Forty-five percent were positive-responders, identified before treatment by reduced physical function, muscle atrophy in the lower extremities, higher levels of fatigue and pain, and a VAS pain score above 20. Negative-responders were identified by good physical function and mental health, lesser muscle atrophy in the lower extremities, and low levels of fatigue and pain. Intravenous immunoglobulin is a biological intervention, and therefore it is important to be able to identify responders and non-responders. In order to maximize a positive outcome it is suggested that patients with a high level of fatigue and/or pain and reduced physical function are selected.

  13. L-059: EPR-First responders: Radiological emergency manual for first responders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This conference is an emergency manual review about the first responders knowledge. The IAEA safety standard manuals, the medical gestion, the security forces and the fast communications are very important in a radiological emergency

  14. Infant differential behavioral responding to discrete emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walle, Eric A; Reschke, Peter J; Camras, Linda A; Campos, Joseph J

    2017-10-01

    Emotional communication regulates the behaviors of social partners. Research on individuals' responding to others' emotions typically compares responses to a single negative emotion compared with responses to a neutral or positive emotion. Furthermore, coding of such responses routinely measure surface level features of the behavior (e.g., approach vs. avoidance) rather than its underlying function (e.g., the goal of the approach or avoidant behavior). This investigation examined infants' responding to others' emotional displays across 5 discrete emotions: joy, sadness, fear, anger, and disgust. Specifically, 16-, 19-, and 24-month-old infants observed an adult communicate a discrete emotion toward a stimulus during a naturalistic interaction. Infants' responses were coded to capture the function of their behaviors (e.g., exploration, prosocial behavior, and security seeking). The results revealed a number of instances indicating that infants use different functional behaviors in response to discrete emotions. Differences in behaviors across emotions were clearest in the 24-month-old infants, though younger infants also demonstrated some differential use of behaviors in response to discrete emotions. This is the first comprehensive study to identify differences in how infants respond with goal-directed behaviors to discrete emotions. Additionally, the inclusion of a function-based coding scheme and interpersonal paradigms may be informative for future emotion research with children and adults. Possible developmental accounts for the observed behaviors and the benefits of coding techniques emphasizing the function of social behavior over their form are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Responding to the Challenge of True Uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallin, Carina Antonia; Andersen, Torben Juul

    We construe a conceptual framework for responding effectively to true uncertainty in the business environment. We drill down to the essential micro-foundational capabilities - sensing and seizing of dynamic capabilities - and link them to classical strategic issue management theory with suggestions...... on aggregation of stakeholder sensing and predictions of emergent strategic issues can positively influence the two capabilities and help the firm adapt in the face of uncertainty and unpredictability. Robust measures predicating performance based on information from key stakeholders involved in the firm’s core...

  16. "Responding to Climate Change" Course: Research Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfirman, S. L.; Bowman, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    The "Responding to Climate Change" Barnard/Columbia course integrates current research as well as hands-on research-based activities modified for a classroom environment. The course covers the major response themes of adaptation, mitigation and communication. In the spring of 2015 the course was oriented around Arctic and Antarctic case studies. Each week a different theme is addressed, such as the physical setting, changing ecosystems, governance issues, perspectives of residents and indigenous peoples, geoengineering, commercial interests, security, and health and developmental issues. Frequent guest lectures from thematic experts keep the course grounded in realities and present the students with cutting edge issues. Activities match the weekly theme, for example during the week on Arctic development, students engage with the marine spatial planning simulation Arctic SMARTIC (Strategic Management of Resources in Times of Change) based on research on Arctic sea ice trends and projections coupled with current and projected developmental interests of stakeholders. Created under the Polar Learning and Responding: PoLAR Climate Change Education Partnership (thepolarhub.org), a complete set of SMARTIC resources is available on line for use by others (http://www.camelclimatechange.org/view/article/175297/). The Responding to Climate Change course is designed to be current and respond to events. For the Arctic case study, students developed proposals for the US State Department as the upcoming Chair of the Arctic Council. Student evaluations indicated that they appreciated the opportunity to connect science with policy and presentation of preliminary proposals in a workshop format was valued as a way to develop and hone their ideas. An additional finding was that students were surprisingly tolerant of technical issues when guest lecturers were linked in via Skype, allowing interaction with thematic experts across the US. Students commented positively on this exposure to

  17. How to define responders in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Cyrus; Adachi, Jonathan D; Bardin, Thomas; Berenbaum, Francis; Flamion, Bruno; Jonsson, Helgi; Kanis, John A; Pelousse, Franz; Lems, Willem F; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Reiter, Susanne; Reginster, Jean-Yves; Rizzoli, René; Bruyère, Olivier

    2013-06-01

    Osteoarthritis is a clinical syndrome of failure of the joint accompanied by varying degrees of joint pain, functional limitation, and reduced quality of life due to deterioration of articular cartilage and involvement of other joint structures. Regulatory agencies require relevant clinical benefit on symptoms and structure modification for registration of a new therapy as a disease-modifying osteoarthritis drug (DMOAD). An international Working Group of the European Society on Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) and International Osteoporosis Foundation was convened to explore the current burden of osteoarthritis, review current regulatory guidelines for the conduct of clinical trials, and examine the concept of responder analyses for improving drug evaluation in osteoarthritis. The ESCEO considers that the major challenges in DMOAD development are the absence of a precise definition of the disease, particularly in the early stages, and the lack of consensus on how to detect structural changes and link them to clinically meaningful endpoints. Responder criteria should help identify progression of disease and be clinically meaningful. The ideal criterion should be sensitive to change over time and should predict disease progression and outcomes such as joint replacement. The ESCEO considers that, for knee osteoarthritis, clinical trial data indicate that radiographic joint space narrowing >0.5 mm over 2 or 3 years might be a reliable surrogate measure for total joint replacement. On-going research using techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and biochemical markers may allow the identification of these patients earlier in the disease process.

  18. Identifying "super responders" in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Stephen J; Hemnes, Anna R

    2017-01-01

    Pharmacotherapeutic options for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) have increased dramatically in the last two decades and along with this have been substantial improvements in survival. Despite these advances, however, PAH remains a progressive and ultimately fatal disease for most patients and only epoprostenol has been shown to improve survival in a randomized control trial. Clinical observations of the heterogeneity of treatment response to different classes of medications across the phenotypically diverse PAH population has led to the identification of patients who derive significantly more benefit from certain medications than the population mean, the so-called "super responders." This was first recognized among PAH patients with acute vasodilator response during invasive hemodynamic testing, a subset of whom have dramatically improved survival when treated with calcium channel blocker (CCB) therapy. Retrospective studies have now suggested a sex discrepancy in response to endothelin receptor antagonists (ERA) and phosphodiesterase inhibitors, and more recently a few studies have found genomic associations with response to CCBs and ERAs. With increasing availability of "omics" technologies, recognition of these "super responders," combined with careful clinical and molecular phenotyping, will lead to advances in pharmacogenomics, precision medicine, and continued improvements in survival among PAH patients.

  19. How tree roots respond to drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Ivano; Herzog, Claude; Dawes, Melissa A; Arend, Matthias; Sperisen, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The ongoing climate change is characterized by increased temperatures and altered precipitation patterns. In addition, there has been an increase in both the frequency and intensity of extreme climatic events such as drought. Episodes of drought induce a series of interconnected effects, all of which have the potential to alter the carbon balance of forest ecosystems profoundly at different scales of plant organization and ecosystem functioning. During recent years, considerable progress has been made in the understanding of how aboveground parts of trees respond to drought and how these responses affect carbon assimilation. In contrast, processes of belowground parts are relatively underrepresented in research on climate change. In this review, we describe current knowledge about responses of tree roots to drought. Tree roots are capable of responding to drought through a variety of strategies that enable them to avoid and tolerate stress. Responses include root biomass adjustments, anatomical alterations, and physiological acclimations. The molecular mechanisms underlying these responses are characterized to some extent, and involve stress signaling and the induction of numerous genes, leading to the activation of tolerance pathways. In addition, mycorrhizas seem to play important protective roles. The current knowledge compiled in this review supports the view that tree roots are well equipped to withstand drought situations and maintain morphological and physiological functions as long as possible. Further, the reviewed literature demonstrates the important role of tree roots in the functioning of forest ecosystems and highlights the need for more research in this emerging field.

  20. How tree roots respond to drought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivano eBrunner

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The ongoing climate change is characterised by increased temperatures and altered precipitation patterns. In addition, there has been an increase in both the frequency and intensity of extreme climatic events such as drought. Episodes of drought induce a series of interconnected effects, all of which have the potential to alter the carbon balance of forest ecosystems profoundly at different scales of plant organisation and ecosystem functioning. During recent years, considerable progress has been made in the understanding of how aboveground parts of trees respond to drought and how these responses affect carbon assimilation. In contrast, processes of belowground parts are relatively underrepresented in research on climate change. In this review, we describe current knowledge about responses of tree roots to drought. Tree roots are capable of responding to drought through a variety of strategies that enable them to avoid and tolerate stress. Responses include root biomass adjustments, anatomical alterations, and physiological acclimations. The molecular mechanisms underlying these responses are characterized to some extent, and involve stress signalling and the induction of numerous genes, leading to the activation of tolerance pathways. In addition, mycorrhizas seem to play important protective roles. The current knowledge compiled in this review supports the view that tree roots are well equipped to withstand drought situations and maintain morphological and physiological functions as long as possible. Further, the reviewed literature demonstrates the important role of tree roots in the functioning of forest ecosystems and highlights the need for more research in this emerging field.

  1. Subjective oral health in Dutch adults

    OpenAIRE

    Verrips, G.H.W.; Schuller, A.A.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether the subjective oral health (SOH) of the Dutch adult population was associated with clinical and demographic variables. Methods: A clinical examination was conducted in a sample of 1,018 people from the Dutch city of ‘s-Hertogenbosch. SOH was measured using the Dutch translation of the short form of the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-NL14). Results: The average score on the OHIP-NL14 was 2.8 ± 5.9 and 51% of the respondents had a score of 0. Dental status was the mo...

  2. Oral sex and oral cancer in the context of human papillomavirus infection: lay public understanding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario A. Brondani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV is a risk factor for ano-genital and cervical cancers and has been associated with head and neck malignancies in the context of oral sex for the transmission of the virus. However, the level of knowledge that lay people have in terms of HPV transmission through oral sex and oral cancer development remains unknown. A pilot sample of 150 questionnaires was distributed at specific non-profit health organizations in Vancouver, Canada. Questions included perceived risks for oral sex in terms of HPV infection and oral cancer development, and the frequency with which respondents were asked about oral sexual practices by physicians and dentists. Data were analysed statistically by age group (19– 30, 31–50, 50\\, gender (male, female, and sexual orientation (queer, straight. 110 questionnaires were returned fully completed. For the transmission of HPV, 58% of the participants believed that oral sex is an activity of no or low risk, whereas 72% considered the same activity to be of no risk for the development of oral cancer. There was no statistical difference between gender and sexual orientation. Participants never discussed related health risks in regard to oral sex with their physicians or dentists. In conclusion, although recent attention has been given to the potential links between HPV infection and oral cancer, such links remain mostly unknown by the public. Physicians and dentists could discuss oral sex practices to raise awareness with their patients. This is a small sample size study and the results should be interpreted with caution.

  3. Hazard perception in emergency medical service responders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, K A; Scialfa, C T

    2016-10-01

    The perception of on-road hazards is critically important to emergency medical services (EMS) professionals, the patients they transport and the general public. This study compared hazard perception in EMS and civilian drivers of similar age and personal driving experience. Twenty-nine EMS professionals and 24 non-professional drivers were given a dynamic hazard perception test (HPT). The EMS group demonstrated an advantage in HPT that was independent of simple reaction time, another indication of the validity of the test. These results are also consistent with the view that professional driving experience results in changes in the ability to identify and respond to on-road hazards. Directions for future research include the development of a profession-specific hazard perception tool for both assessment and training purposes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Biodetection Technologies for First Responders: 2014 Edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozanich, Richard M.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Colburn, Heather A.; Straub, Tim M.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2014-03-28

    This report summarizes commercially-available, hand-portable technologies that can be used by first responders in the field. This is not meant to be an exhaustive list, nor an endorsement of any technology described herein. Rather, this report is meant to provide useful information about available technologies to help end-users make informed decisions about biodetection technology procurement and use. Information listed in this report is primarily vendor-provided; however, where possible it has been supplemented with additional information obtained from publications, reports, and websites. Manufacturers were given the chance to review summaries of their technologies from August through November 2013 to verify the accuracy of technical specifications, available references, and pricing.

  5. Oral Contraceptives and Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Services Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Oral Contraceptives and Cancer Risk On This Page What are oral contraceptives? What is known about the relationship between oral ...

  6. Just-in-time training of dental responders in a simulated pandemic immunization response exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvard, Michael D; Hirst, Jeremy L; Vesper, Benjamin J; DeTella, George E; Tsagalis, Mila P; Roberg, Mary J; Peters, David E; Wallace, Jimmy D; James, James J

    2014-06-01

    The reauthorization of the Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Act in 2013 incorporated the dental profession and dental professionals into the federal legislation governing public health response to pandemics and all-hazard situations. Work is now necessary to expand the processes needed to incorporate and train oral health care professionals into pandemic and all-hazard response events. A just-in-time (JIT) training exercise and immunization drill using an ex vivo porcine model system was conducted to demonstrate the rapidity to which dental professionals can respond to a pandemic influenza scenario. Medical history documentation, vaccination procedures, and patient throughput and error rates of 15 dental responders were evaluated by trained nursing staff and emergency response personnel. The average throughput (22.33/hr) and medical error rates (7 of 335; 2.08%) of the dental responders were similar to those found in analogous influenza mass vaccination clinics previously conducted using certified public health nurses. The dental responder immunization drill validated the capacity and capability of dental professionals to function as a valuable immunization resource. The ex vivo porcine model system used for JIT training can serve as a simple and inexpensive training tool to update pandemic responders' immunization techniques and procedures supporting inoculation protocols.

  7. Knowledge of paediatricians regarding child oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Raquel; Aguiar, Carlos Menezes; da Silva Araújo, Ana Cláudia; Dias Filho, Edmir Barros Ribeiro

    2012-07-01

    In dentistry, clinical practice is directed towards attitudes that promote oral health and the paediatricians occupy a privileged position in this process. To assess the knowledge and attitudes of paediatricians in relation to the oral health of their patients. A cross-sectional study was carried out at the Institute of Integrative Medicine Professor Fernando Figueira, Recife, Brazil. A total of 182 paediatricians participated by filling out a questionnaire. A total of 63.9% believed the first visit to the dentist should occur before the child completes 1 year of life. Moreover, 67.8% considered their knowledge on oral health to be insufficient. Approximately 78% of the paediatricians diagnosed caries through an analysis of cavities. Only 29.9% always recommended fluoride dentifrice. The term 'fluorosis' was unknown by 48.3% of the respondents. Concerning pacifiers, 32.6% did not allow it and 66.9% did not either recommend it or restrict it. A total of 83.4% classified the oral health content in their medical education as either nonexistent or deficient; this figure remained high (72.4%) in relation to residency. It is important to develop oral health information programmes to paediatricians. Information on oral health should be included in medical curricula and residency. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry © 2011 BSPD, IAPD and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Nicotine Oral Inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotine oral inhalation is used to help people stop smoking. Nicotine oral inhalation should be used together with a ... support groups, counseling, or specific behavioral change techniques. Nicotine inhalation is in a class of medications called ...

  9. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Advancing the nation's oral health through research and innovation Health Info Research Grants & Funding Careers & Training News & ... Advancing the nation's oral health through research and innovation Health Info Research Grants & Funding Careers & Training News & ...

  10. Oral Cancer - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Oral Cancer URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Oral Cancer - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  11. WS-020: EPR-First Responders: Cards of response measures for first responders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this working session is that the participants know how to use the cards of response measures for first responders. In a radiological emergency is useful to have cards which contains a list of the steps to be followed as well as the protection instructions and risk evaluation

  12. Oral vaccination of fish

    OpenAIRE

    Embregts, Carmen W.E.; Forlenza, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The limited number of oral vaccines currently approved for use in humans and veterinary species clearly illustrates that development of efficacious and safe oral vaccines has been a challenge not only for fish immunologists. The insufficient efficacy of oral vaccines is partly due to antigen breakdown in the harsh gastric environment, but also to the high tolerogenic gut environment and to inadequate vaccine design. In this review we discuss current approaches used to develop oral vaccines fo...

  13. ADAPTIVE CHEMOREFLECTORY MECHANISMS RESPONDING TO EXTREME FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Krivoschekov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of adaptive chemoreflectory mechanisms responding of extreme factors opens prospects for understanding of a role of a phenotype in this process, and also for search of new methods of the forecast and diagnostics. We analysed individual-typological variability of hypoxic tolerance and muscular working capacity at healthy people with various kinds of habitual sports activity. It is established, that formatting of new neuro-visceral interactions which occurs under the influence of individual training process, is reflected in reactivity of cardiovascular and respiratory systems in response to hypoxia. Adaptive strategy produces changes in systemic response to hypoxia which correlates with aerobic work capacity and EEG activity of a brain at sportsmen of different specializations. Individually-typological characteristics of sportsmen (typology of nervous system also mediate EEG response to hypoxia, but they can be modified by the influence of phenotypic adaptive mechanisms (aerobic, anaerobic or mixed type of individual training process. The obtained results testify, that sports loadings forms specific adjustment of mechanisms of chemoreflectory regulation of cardiovascular and respiratory systems.

  14. Harbour porpoises respond to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heide-Jørgensen, Mads Peter; Iversen, Maria; Nielsen, Nynne Hjort; Lockyer, Christina; Stern, Harry; Ribergaard, Mads Hvid

    2011-12-01

    The effects of climate change on marine ecosystems and in particular on marine top predators are difficult to assess due to, among other things, spatial variability, and lack of clear delineation of marine habitats. The banks of West Greenland are located in a climate sensitive area and are likely to elicit pronounced responses to oceanographic changes in the North Atlantic. The recent increase in sea temperatures on the banks of West Greenland has had cascading effects on sea ice coverage, residency of top predators, and abundance of important prey species like Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). Here, we report on the response of one of the top predators in West Greenland; the harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena). The porpoises depend on locating high densities of prey species with high nutritive value and they have apparently responded to the general warming on the banks of West Greenland by longer residence times, increased consumption of Atlantic cod resulting in improved body condition in the form of larger fat deposits in blubber, compared to the situation during a cold period in the 1990s. This is one of the few examples of a measurable effect of climate change on a marine mammal population.

  15. Utilities respond to nuclear station blackout rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, A.M.; Beasley, B.; Tenera, L.P.

    1990-01-01

    The authors discuss how nuclear plants in the United States have taken actions to respond to the NRC Station Blackout Rule, 10CFR50.63. The rule requires that each light water cooled nuclear power plant licensed to operate must be able to withstand for a specified duration and recover from a station blackout. Station blackout is defined as the complete loss of a-c power to the essential and non-essential switch-gear buses in a nuclear power plant. A station blackout results from the loss of all off-site power as well as the on-site emergency a-c power system. There are two basic approaches to meeting the station blackout rule. One is to cope with a station blackout independent of a-c power. Coping, as it is called, means the ability of a plant to achieve and maintain a safe shutdown condition. The second approach is to provide an alternate a-c power source (AAC)

  16. Chromatin proteins: key responders to stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen T Smith

    Full Text Available Environments can be ever-changing and stresses are commonplace. In order for organisms to survive, they need to be able to respond to change and adapt to new conditions. Fortunately, many organisms have systems in place that enable dynamic adaptation to immediate stresses and changes within the environment. Much of this cellular response is coordinated by modulating the structure and accessibility of the genome. In eukaryotic cells, the genome is packaged and rolled up by histone proteins to create a series of DNA/histone core structures known as nucleosomes; these are further condensed into chromatin. The degree and nature of the condensation can in turn determine which genes are transcribed. Histones can be modified chemically by a large number of proteins that are thereby responsible for dynamic changes in gene expression. In this Primer we discuss findings from a study published in this issue of PLoS Biology by Weiner et al. that highlight how chromatin structure and chromatin binding proteins alter transcription in response to environmental changes and stresses. Their study reveals the importance of chromatin in mediating the speed and amplitude of stress responses in cells and suggests that chromatin is a critically important component of the cellular response to stress.

  17. Severe Valproic Acid Intoxication Responding to Hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ertuğ Arslanköylü

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Valproic acid is a commonly used antiepileptic drug which causes intoxication easily due to its narrow therapeutic window. Here, we present a child with valproic acid poisoning who responded to hemodialysis. A 14-year-old male patient with epilepsy and mental motor retardation was admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit due to valproic acid intoxication. Plasma valproic acid level was 710 µg/mL. The patient’s vital signs were stable and a decrease was observed in the valproic acid and ammonia levels with supportive treatment at the beginning. On the third day of the admission, hemodynamic and mental status of the patient deteriorated, plasma ammonia and lactate levels elevated, thus, we decided to perform hemodialysis. After hemodialysis, the patient’s hemodynamic status and mental function improved in conjunction with the reduction in valproic acid, ammonia and lactate levels. Thus he was transferred to the pediatric ward. Hemodialysis may be considered an effective treatment choice for severe valproic acid intoxication. Here, it was shown that hemodialysis may also be effective in patients with deteriorated general status under supportive treatment in the late phase of valproic acid intoxication.

  18. Oral Health and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Oral Health and Aging Oral Health and Aging Past Issues / Summer 2016 Table of ... years. He spoke with NIH MedlinePlus magazine about oral health issues common in older adults. What has been ...

  19. Oral Manifestations of Menopause

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    manifested in the oral cavity.[9] The teeth and gums are more affected by the hormonal changes occurring before menopause, which decrease the body's ability to fight minor infections or maintain a healthy balance of useful and harmful bacteria within the oral environment.[10] The dentist needs to be aware of oral ...

  20. Oral vaccination of fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Embregts, Carmen W.E.; Forlenza, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The limited number of oral vaccines currently approved for use in humans and veterinary species clearly illustrates that development of efficacious and safe oral vaccines has been a challenge not only for fish immunologists. The insufficient efficacy of oral vaccines is partly due to antigen

  1. Relationship between oral health knowledge, practices and oral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Studies have shown that strong knowledge on oral health demonstrates better oral care practice and an association between increased knowledge and better oral health exists. Aim: To assess the influence of oral health knowledge and oral care practices to oral health status of secondary school students in ...

  2. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans ... out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans ...

  3. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with oral or ... Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with oral or ...

  4. Oral Health in Rural Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Guide Rural Health Topics & States Topics View more Oral Health in Rural Communities Adequate access to oral healthcare ... about oral health programs in my area? What oral health disparities are present in rural America? According to ...

  5. Oral cancer awareness among dentists in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Bobby K; Sundaram, Devipriya B; Sharma, Prem

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess oral cancer awareness among dentists in Kuwait. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 200 dentists working at the Ministry of Health Dental Centers and Kuwait University Dental Center using a structured questionnaire. Dentists' knowledge about risk factors of oral cancer and about diagnostic concepts, current practices and opinions, preferred point of referral as well as interest in continuing education were assessed and the responses were analyzed. Of the 200 dentists surveyed, 153 responded (76.5% response rate). The mean knowledge score of the respondents was 20.6 ± 4.0 out of a total score of 30. Thirty-five (22.9%) dentists had consistently high knowledge scores for both risk factors and diagnostic concepts. Of the 153 dentists, 132 (86.3%) were interested in obtaining further information about oral cancer. This study highlighted the need for improved knowledge and education of dental practitioners on oral cancer. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Oral Health and Swallowing Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Furuta, Michiko; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2013-01-01

    Oral health impacts systemic health. Therefore, oral care is an important consideration in maintaining quality of life (QOL). Previously, maintenance and improvement of oral hygiene was considered essential for achieving oral health. In addition to oral hygiene, oral care in terms of oral function is now considered to maintain QOL. Ingestion of exogenous nutrients via the oral cavity is fundamental to the function of all higher animals, not only human beings. Chewing and swallowing processes ...

  7. Infantile Spasms Respond Poorly to Topiramate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Amanda; Cole, Justin W; Mytinger, John R

    2015-08-01

    Infantile spasms are seizures typical of an age-related epileptic encephalopathy. Although evidence supporting topiramate for infantile spasms is lacking, many clinicians use it for this indication. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of infantile spasm remission with topiramate at our institution. A low rate of infantile spasm remission was hypothesized. This was a single-center retrospective medical record review of patients treated with topiramate for infantile spasms between January 2009 and September 2013. Records were reviewed for accuracy of diagnosis and outcome. Clinical remission of infantile spasms was defined as resolution for at least 28 days at any time during treatment with topiramate. For patients with clinical remission, posttreatment electroencephalographs were reviewed to assess for electrographic remission. To assess for confounding variables affecting remission rate, demographics and outcomes were compared with patients treated with adrenocorticotropic hormone within the same period using the same criteria for remission. Three of 31 (9.7%) patients achieved clinical remission with topiramate, two of whom also experienced electrographic remission. The third patient had electrographic remission with previous adrenocorticotropic hormone treatment but infantile spasm remission only after receiving topiramate. All three of these patients experienced subsequent electroclinical relapse during topiramate therapy. Although there were no significant demographic differences between the topiramate and adrenocorticotropic hormone cohorts, more adrenocorticotropic hormone patients achieved clinical remission (9.7% versus 56%; P infantile spasms with topiramate was uncommon and no patient experienced persistent electroclinical remission. These findings suggest that infantile spasms respond poorly to topiramate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Oral steroid contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sech, Laura A; Mishell, Daniel R

    2015-11-01

    Oral steroid contraception is a popular method of family planning worldwide. Over the past several decades, this method of contraception has changed significantly by decreasing the estrogen dose, changing the progestin component, and reducing the hormone free interval. Despite the popularity of oral steroid contraception, there has been much criticism regarding the associated risks of venous thromboembolism and stroke. Despite these established, yet uncommon risks, oral steroid contraception has many important health benefits. This review highlights the available formulations of oral contraceptives along with their evidence-based associated risks and benefits. Highlights regarding future directions for development of novel oral contraceptives are also addressed.

  9. Essentials of oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, César

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the 10 most common cancers in the world, with a delayed clinical detection, poor prognosis, without specific biomarkers for the disease and expensive therapeutic alternatives. This review aims to present the fundamental aspects of this cancer, focused on squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC), moving from its definition and epidemiological aspects, addressing the oral carcinogenesis, oral potentially malignant disorders, epithelial precursor lesions and experimental methods for its study, therapies and future challenges. Oral cancer is a preventable disease, risk factors and natural history is already being known, where biomedical sciences and dentistry in particular are likely to improve their poor clinical indicators.

  10. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Other Oral Surgeries Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Oral and maxillofacial surgeons surgically treat the soft tissues of the ... and Other Oral Surgeries Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Oral and maxillofacial surgeons surgically treat the soft tissues of the ...

  11. 76 FR 6475 - Emergency Responder Health Monitoring and Surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-04

    ... NIOSH-223] Emergency Responder Health Monitoring and Surveillance AGENCY: National Institute for... comment. The document is entitled, ``Emergency Responder Health Monitoring and Surveillance.'' The draft... and conducting surveillance of their health and safety during the entire cycle of emergency response...

  12. First Responders Guide to Computer Forensics: Advanced Topics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nolan, Richard; Baker, Marie; Branson, Jake; Hammerstein, Josh; Rush, Kris; Waits, Cal; Schweinsberg, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    First Responders Guide to Computer Forensics: Advanced Topics expands on the technical material presented in SEI handbook CMU/SEI-2005-HB-001, First Responders Guide to Computer Forensics [Nolan 05...

  13. Improving Situational Awareness for First Responders via Mobile Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Bradley J.; Mah, Robert W.; Papasin, Richard; Del Mundo, Rommel; McIntosh, Dawn M.; Jorgensen, Charles

    2006-01-01

    This project looks to improve first responder incident command, and an appropriately managed flow of situational awareness using mobile computing techniques. The prototype system combines wireless communication, real-time location determination, digital imaging, and three-dimensional graphics. Responder locations are tracked in an outdoor environment via GPS and uploaded to a central server via GPRS or an 802. II network. Responders can also wireless share digital images and text reports, both with other responders and with the incident commander. A pre-built three dimensional graphics model of the emergency scene is used to visualize responder and report locations. Responders have a choice of information end points, ranging from programmable cellular phones to tablet computers. The system also employs location-aware computing to make responders aware of particular hazards as they approach them. The prototype was developed in conjunction with the NASA Ames Disaster Assistance and Rescue Team and has undergone field testing during responder exercises at NASA Ames.

  14. 39 CFR 962.11 - Respondent access to information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Respondent access to information. 962.11 Section... RELATIVE TO THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT § 962.11 Respondent access to information. (a)(1) Except... § 962.6, the Respondent shall be entitled to obtain all exculpatory information in the possession of the...

  15. Improving oral health and oral health care delivery for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crall, James J

    2011-02-01

    National and state-level evidence has documented ongoing disparities in children's health and utilization of oral health care services, prompting a re-examination of factors associated with poor oral health and low use of oral health services. These efforts have yielded a wide array of proposals for improving children's oral health and oral health care delivery. This paper offers a perspective on the current context of efforts to improve children's oral health and oral health care delivery.

  16. Naltrexone reduces ethanol- and sucrose-reinforced responding in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, K L; Winger, G; Pakarinen, E D; Woods, J H

    1998-09-01

    These experiments evaluated the ability of naltrexone (NTX) to reduce selectively oral and i.v. ethanol-reinforced responding, and examined the ethanol-NTX interaction in terms of the competitive opioid antagonist property of NTX. Five rhesus monkeys self-administered ethanol or sucrose and concurrently available water. Ethanol concentration was varied from 0.25% to 8% (w/v). Naltrexone (0.032-0.32 mg/kg) or saline was given i.m. 30 min prior to some drinking sessions. NTX (0.32 mg/kg) reduced ethanol-reinforced responding at the concentration that maintained the most responding (1% or 2%). NTX (0.1 mg/kg) reduced ethanol-reinforced responding, both at a low ethanol concentration (0.25%) that produced little ethanol intake (g/kg), and at a higher concentration (4%) with an appreciable intake. Thus, NTX (0.1 mg/kg) shifted the ethanol concentration-consumption curve down, in an insurmountable manner. NTX (0.1 and 0.32 mg/kg) also reduced reinforced responding for sucrose 100 g/l. In another experiment, three rhesus monkeys were given opportunities to self-administer ethanol i.v. NTX (0.1 mg/kg) reduced the number of ethanol injections obtained by the monkeys at all ethanol doses tested (0.01, 0.032, and 0.1 g/kg per injection). The dose-effect curve was also shifted down. These results showed that NTX reduced behavior maintained by either ethanol or sucrose non-selectively. Furthermore, the ability of NTX to suppress ethanol-reinforced responding did not depend on the route of ethanol administration and was not overcome by increasing the concentration or dose per injection of ethanol.

  17. Oral hygiene in population of southern Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalandyk-Konstanty, Aleksandra; Konstanty-Kalandyk, Janusz; Zarzecka, Joanna; Kapelak, Bogdan; Drwiła, Rafał; Kiełtyka, Agnieszka; Piątek, Jacek; Sadowski, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Proper oral hygiene is an important element in the prevention of many diseases. Oral hygiene habits different depending on the place of residence, age and public awareness. The aim of the study was assessment of oral hygiene habits in a group of patients admitted for cardiac surgery. The database has been made on the basis of anonymous questionnaires filled by all participants. The study included 643 patients admitted to the hospital for surgical treatment of acquired heart disease. We divided patients into 3 groups depending on age, place of residence and type of heart disease. More than 30% of patients brush their teeth once a day or less. Over 40% of all respondents do not attend for regular visits to the dentist. Most patients, who do not brush teeth or dentures were in group > 70 years old (6%) and live in the countryside. Patients in a big city perform control visit the most often (64%) and this group had the largest proportion of pa- tients who declared that the visits take place once a year or more (46%). Habits of proper oral hygiene among patients scheduled for cardiac surgery are at high level. 9 out of 10 patients declares daily teeth brushing. Among patients living in the country, 46% do not use regular visits and only 29% go to the dentist once a year or more often. Education campaigns about influence of the improper oral cavity hygiene should be initiated.

  18. CIRUN: Climate Information Responding to User Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busalacchi, A. J.

    2009-12-01

    The Earth System will experience real climate change over the next 50 years, exceeding the scope of natural climate variability. A paramount question facing society is how to adapt to this certainty of climate variability and change. In response, OSTP and NOAA are considering how comprehensive climate services would best inform decisions about adaptation. Similarly, NASA is considering the optimal configuration of the next generation of Earth, environmental, and climate observations to be deployed over the coming 10-20 years. Moreover, much of the added-value information for specific climate-related decisions will be provided by private, academic and non-governmental organizations. In this context, over the past several years the University of Maryland has established the CIRUN (Climate Information: Responding to User Needs) initiative to identify the nature of national needs for climate information and services from a decision support perspective. To date, CIRUN has brought together decisionmakers in a number of sectors to help understand their perspectives on climate with the goal of improving the usefulness of climate information, observations and prediction products to specific user communities. CIRUN began with a major workshop in October 2007 that convened 430 participants in agriculture, parks and recreation, terrestrial ecosystems, insurance/investment, energy, national security, state/local/municipal, water, human health, commerce and manufacturing, transportation, and coastal/marine sectors. Plenary speakers such as Norman Augustine, R. James Woolsey, James Mahoney, and former Senator Joseph Tydings, breakout panel sessions, and participants provided input based on the following: - How would you characterize the exposure or vulnerability to climate variability or change impacting your organization? - Does climate variability and/or change currently factor into your organization's objectives or operations? - Are any of your existing plans being affected by

  19. Radiation induced oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Satheesh Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene

  20. Pediatricians and the Oral Health Needs of Children: One Potential Means for Reducing Oral Healthcare Inequities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Ryan Z; Erwin, Paul Campbell

    2015-01-01

    Children in poverty have limited access to oral healthcare. One approach to reduce such health inequities is to expand the involvement of primary care physicians in the provision of oral healthcare. The purpose of this study was to assess pediatricians' knowledge, attitudes, and professional experiences regarding oral health in children, and to determine their willingness to incorporate preventive dental education and procedures into their practices. We conducted a survey of pediatricians in Tennessee to assess their knowledge, attitudes, and professional experiences regarding oral health, and to determine their willingness to incorporate preventive dental education and procedures into their practices. Of the 450 providers randomly selected for survey distribution, 107 returned completed surveys (response rate, 23.8%). The majority of respondents reported that they are likely to examine children's teeth during well-child care visits, but only a minority use preventive techniques such as application of fluoride varnish. Pediatricians receive very little education on oral health during medical school and residency programs. Expanding oral healthcare access through primary care physicians will require adequate training in medical school, residency, and in continuing education courses.

  1. IAEA responds to cancer crisis in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    doctors and other health workers to operate them - are needed to help low and middle income countries fight cancer. Currently, only about 2,500 radiotherapy machines are operating. Moreover, most developing countries lack effective public health policies and comprehensive diagnostic programmes that are essential to managing the growing cancer epidemic. On World Cancer Day, the IAEA is pleased to announce its decision to install a MDS Nordion Equinox cancer therapy system at the Tanzanian clinic as part of a larger PACT effort to help the country advance its National Cancer Strategy and Action Plan, which will now for the first time include not only curative treatment but also cancer surveillance, prevention, early detection, and palliation.'The need to respond to this cancer crisis is clear and compelling,' MDS Nordion President Steve West said. 'We are proud to be part of PACT and the global response to improve cancer care in Tanzania and ultimately throughout the developing world.' The International Union Against Cancer (UICC) and its member organizations in over 80 countries are dedicating World Cancer Day 2006 to fighting childhood cancers by focusing on early detection and equal access to treatment. More than 80% of children affected by cancer live in low-income countries, where the cure rate is very low and most receive no treatment. The UICC advocates a coordinated strategy by the global cancer control community - one that combines innovative science and sound public health policies. This approach can save a large proportion of the 90,000 children lost every year to cancer. Cancer Treatment in Tanzania: The majority of cancers prevalent in Tanzania today require radiotherapy treatment. PACT will establish its first Centre of Excellence at the Ocean Road Cancer Institute (ORCI) in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The ORCI estimates that each year there are over 20,000 new patients with cancer in Tanzania. Currently, ORCI can treat only about 2,500 patients per year - only a

  2. Latino Youths' Knowledge of Oral Cancer and Use of Tobacco and Alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto, Maria Teresa; Goodman, Harold S.; Horowitz, Alice M.; Watson, Maria Rosa; Duran-Medina, Carmen

    1998-01-01

    Latino youths completed surveys about their knowledge of risk factors for oral cancer and tobacco and alcohol use. Additionally, trained youths attempted to purchase cigarettes from local stores. Respondents were ill-informed about oral cancer. Over half knew risk factors for smoking and alcohol use. Over half of the stores would have sold…

  3. Oral health opinions and practices of pediatricians: Updated results from a National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinonez, RB; Kranz, AM; Lewis, CW; Barone, L; Boulter, S; O’Connor, KG; Keels, MA

    2014-01-01

    Background Professional guidelines and state Medicaid policies encourage pediatricians to provide oral health screening, anticipatory guidance, and fluoride varnish application to young patients. Because oral health activities are becoming more common in medical offices, the objective of this paper was to assess pediatricians’ attitudes and practices related to oral health and examine changes since 2008. Methods As part of the 2012 Periodic Survey of Fellows, a random sample of 1638 members of the American Academy of Pediatrics was surveyed on their participation in oral health promotion activities. Univariate statistics were used to examine pediatricians’ attitudes, practices, and barriers related to screening, risk assessment, counseling, topical fluoride application among patients from birth to 3 years of age. Bivariate statistics were used to examine changes since 2008. Results Analyses were limited to 402 pediatricians providing preventive care (51% of all respondents). The majority of respondents supported providing oral health activities in medical offices, but fewer reported engaging in these activities with most patients. Significantly more respondents agree they should apply fluoride varnish (2008=19%; 2012=41%), but only 7% report doing so with >75% of patients. Although significantly more respondents reported receiving oral health training, limited time, lack of training and billing remain barriers to delivering these services. Conclusions Pediatricians continue to have widespread support for, but less direct involvement with oral health activities in clinical practice. Existing methods of training should be examined to identify methods effective at increasing pediatricians’ participation in oral health activities. PMID:25439160

  4. African Journal of Oral Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The African Journal of Oral Health Sciences is devoted to research into oral diseases and encourages a multidisciplinary approach. Emphasis is on oral pathology, oral microbiology, oral medicine, oral physiology and biochemistry and related clinical sciences.

  5. Oral health behavior and factors associated with poor oral status in Qatar: results from a national health survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheema, Sohaila; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Al-Thani, Mohamed Hamad; Al-Thani, Al Anoud Mohammed; Abraham, Amit; Al-Mannai, Ghanim Ali; Al-Emadi, Abdulla Asad; Al-Chetachi, Walaa Fattah; Almalki, Badria Ali; Hassan Khalifa, Shams Eldin Ali; Haj Bakri, Ahmad Omar; Lowenfels, Albert; Mamtani, Ravinder

    2017-09-01

    Oral health is a crucial determinant of quality of life. We aimed to determine oral health condition and factors associated with poor oral status in the adult national population of Qatar. We used data from the World Health Organization supported STEPS (STEPwise approach to Surveillance) Survey conducted by the Supreme Council of Health, Qatar in 2012. A total of 2,496 Qataris (1,053 men, 1,443 women) answered the national survey. The Rao-Scott Chi-Square test was used to analyze oral health characteristics and multinomial logistic regression to assess risk factors. The self-perceived oral status of approximately 40 percent of respondents was either "average" or "poor" rather than "good." Poor oral status was more often reported by women (OR = 1.93; 95%CI = 1.30-2.80), by older (OR = 3.38; 95%CI = 1.59-7.19) and less educated respondents (OR = 3.58; 95%CI = 2.15-5.96). Other risk groups included people with diabetes (OR = 1.87; 95%CI = 1.24-2.81), smokeless tobacco users (OR = 3.90; 95%CI = 1.75-8.68), or ever tobacco users (OR = 1.66; 95%CI = 1.03-2.67). Oral health status appeared to be independent of diet, BMI status, and history of hypertension. Difficulties and behaviors related to oral health were more frequently reported by women than by men. These included pain (P oral hygiene. Our results provide evidence that oral health remains a public health concern in Qatar. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Public Health Dentistry published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  6. Towards understanding oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaura, Egija; ten Cate, Jacob M

    2015-01-01

    During the last century, dental research has focused on unraveling the mechanisms behind various oral pathologies, while oral health was typically described as the mere absence of oral diseases. The term 'oral microbial homeostasis' is used to describe the capacity of the oral ecosystem to maintain microbial community stability in health. However, the oral ecosystem itself is not stable: throughout life an individual undergoes multiple physiological changes while progressing through infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and old age. Recent discussions on the definition of general health have led to the proposal that health is the ability of the individual to adapt to physiological changes, a condition known as allostasis. In this paper the allostasis principle is applied to the oral ecosystem. The multidimensionality of the host factors contributing to allostasis in the oral cavity is illustrated with an example on changes occurring in puberty. The complex phenomenon of oral health and the processes that prevent the ecosystem from collapsing during allostatic changes in the entire body are far from being understood. As yet individual components (e.g. hard tissues, microbiome, saliva, host response) have been investigated, while only by consolidating these and assessing their multidimensional interactions should we be able to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the ecosystem, which in turn could serve to develop rational schemes to maintain health. Adapting such a 'system approach' comes with major practical challenges for the entire research field and will require vast resources and large-scale multidisciplinary collaborations. 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel

  7. Global Oral Health Inequalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, I.; Tabak, L.A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite impressive worldwide improvements in oral health, inequalities in oral health status among and within countries remain a daunting public health challenge. Oral health inequalities arise from a complex web of health determinants, including social, behavioral, economic, genetic, environmental, and health system factors. Eliminating these inequalities cannot be accomplished in isolation of oral health from overall health, or without recognizing that oral health is influenced at multiple individual, family, community, and health systems levels. For several reasons, this is an opportune time for global efforts targeted at reducing oral health inequalities. Global health is increasingly viewed not just as a humanitarian obligation, but also as a vehicle for health diplomacy and part of the broader mission to reduce poverty, build stronger economies, and strengthen global security. Despite the global economic recession, there are trends that portend well for support of global health efforts: increased globalization of research and development, growing investment from private philanthropy, an absolute growth of spending in research and innovation, and an enhanced interest in global health among young people. More systematic and far-reaching efforts will be required to address oral health inequalities through the engagement of oral health funders and sponsors of research, with partners from multiple public and private sectors. The oral health community must be “at the table” with other health disciplines and create opportunities for eliminating inequalities through collaborations that can harness both the intellectual and financial resources of multiple sectors and institutions. PMID:21490232

  8. A Survey of Oral Health Education Provided by Certified Diabetes Educators

    OpenAIRE

    Yuen, Hon K.; Onicescu, Georgiana; Hill, Elizabeth G.; Jenkins, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate certified diabetes educators’ (CDEs) perceptions of the adequacy of their diabetes education curricula in providing oral health information. A questionnaire was mailed to all CDEs with a mailing address in South Carolina (SC), United States (US). Of the 130 respondents, almost all (93.8%) expressed that oral health should be part of the curriculum. However, the majority of them (76.9%) reported that their curricula did not include an oral health mo...

  9. Oral health knowledge, perceptions and behaviour among nursing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: The purpose of the study was to investigate oral health knowledge, perceptions and behaviour amongst nursing students in a Nigerian tertiary hospital. Materials and methods: The study was conducted at University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital on 244 respondents aged 17 to 40 years, using self administered ...

  10. Adolescents and oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, J S

    1991-01-01

    Oral contraceptive (OC) options for adolescents are provides. Clarification for those desiring a birth control method is necessary and the benefits of decreased acne and dysmenorrhea with low dose OCs should be stressed along with the importance of compliance. A community effort is suggested to communicate the sexual and contraceptive alternatives, including abstinence and outercourse (sexual stimulation to orgasm without intercourse). Attention is given to concerns associated with teenage sexual activity, prevention of adolescent pregnancy, contraceptive options for the adolescent patient, adolescent attitudes toward birth control OCs, management of the adolescent OC user, manipulation of steroid components of OCs to respond to adolescent concerns, and other hormonal contraceptive options such as minipills or abstinence. The text is supplemented with tables: the % of US women by single years of age for 1971, 1976, 1979, and 1982; comparative pregnancy and abortion rates for the US and 5 other countries; federal cost for teen childbearing; adolescent nonhormonal contraceptive methods (advantages, disadvantages, and retail cost); checklist to identify those at risk for noncompliance with OCs; hormonal side effects of OCs; risks from OCs to adolescents; and benefits of OCs. Concern about adolescent pregnancy dates back to Aristotle. A modern profile shows girls form single-parent families are sexually active at an earlier age, adolescent mothers produce offspring who repeat the cycle, victims of sexual abuse are more likely to be sexually active, and teenagers in foster care are 4 times more likely to be sexually active and 8 times more likely to become pregnant. Prevention involves a multifaceted approach. OCs are the most appropriate contraceptive choice for adolescents. Frequency of intercourse is closely associated with OC use after approximately 15 months of unprotected sexual activity. At risk for noncompliance variables are scales of personality development

  11. A comparative study of the oral hygiene status of smokers and non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of tobacco smoking on gingival health and the oral hygiene status of respondents. Materials and Methods: A cross‑sectional survey of 213 adults from three communities in the Ibadan North local government was carried out. Respondents were divided into two groups ...

  12. Oral Microbiology and Immunology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlén, Gunnar; Fiehn, Nils-Erik; Olsen, Ingar

    , dental assistants and trainees may find it a useful source of reference. The contents are based on general microbiology and immunology. Oral microbiology is given particular attention, with examples relevant to oral infectious diseases. Each chapter opens with a relatively short pre-reading section...

  13. Shared Oral Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hede, Børge; Elmelund Poulsen,, Johan; Christophersen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    Shared Oral Care - Forebyggelse af orale sygdomme på plejecentre Introduktion og formål: Mangelfuld mundhygiejne hos plejekrævende ældre er et alment og veldokumenteret sundhedsproblem, der kan føre til massiv udvikling af tandsygdomme, og som yderligere kan være medvirkende årsag til alvorlige...

  14. An assessment of oral health importance: results of a statewide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Alan B; Beebe, Timothy J; Jenkins, Sarah M

    2009-05-01

    Barriers exist to the U.S. surgeon general's call to action toward a goal of achieving oral health for all Americans. The authors describe perceptions of oral health among the public according to the results of a statewide survey conducted in Minnesota. During a four-month period in 2005, 1,636 noninstitutionalized adults received a mixed-mode mail and telephone survey. The 40-item survey contained questions regarding the importance of oral health to respondents (overall), as well as the relative importance of oral health to overall health compared with diabetes, heart disease and arthritis. The majority of respondents (76.1 percent) rated the overall importance of their oral health as "very important." Interestingly, 58.2 percent, 45.8 percent and 69.2 percent of respondents believed that oral health was "about as important" as or "more important" than diabetes, heart disease and arthritis, respectively. Only sex and educational level were associated with self-reports of overall importance of oral health. The findings suggest that the majority of survey respondents considered oral health to be very important and equal in importance to certain medical conditions. Among survey respondents, men with less than a college education were less likely than others to value oral health. Clinicians should recognize that this may affect behavior in this patient group, especially among those who may not visit a dentist regularly. When researchers design interventions to address oral health perceptions among the public, health care professionals and/or policymakers, they need to take this patient group into account.

  15. Recruiting an Internet Panel Using Respondent-Driven Sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schonlau Matthias

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Respondent-driven sampling (RDS is a network sampling technique typically employed for hard-to-reach populations when traditional sampling approaches are not feasible (e.g., homeless or do not work well (e.g., people with HIV. In RDS, seed respondents recruit additional respondents from their network of friends. The recruiting process repeats iteratively, thereby forming long referral chains.

  16. Oral hygiene management in patients with visual sensory disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Barbato

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Oral hygiene maintenance is one of the most difficult tasks for visually impaired people. The aim of study was to investigate about knowledge on oral hygiene practices among patients with visual sensory disabilities by proposing an effective management in order to achieve and maintain oral health status of these patients. Methods:It was administered a questionnaire about oral health management to the patients with visual disabilities accessing to dental unit of “Mons. Di Liegro” Hospital of Gaeta. Results: The survey covered a sample of 49 patients, aged between 14 and 95 years. More than half (66% was blind ( 65% of cases with primary blindness and the remaining 35% with secondary blindness. Only 32.65% brushed their teeth 3 times a day; 68% of the surveyed patients limited home oral hygiene procedures to toothbrush and toothpaste; 79% used manual toothbrush; 49% of respondents reported odontophobia (it was basically generated by pain often due to bad experience during childhood. More than half declared a dental office attendance as needed. Conclusions: This study showed as, although starting from a compromised oral health and inadequate knowledge of oral hygiene practices, visual impaired/ blind patients were able to achieve and maintain a good level of oral hygiene, using the most appropriate techniques and instruments.

  17. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are ...

  18. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Other Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons ...

  19. What Is an Oral Piercing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to your desktop! more... What Is an Oral Piercing? Article Chapters What Is an Oral Piercing? print full article print this chapter email this article Oral piercing can cause pain, swelling, infection, drooling, taste loss, ...

  20. American Academy of Oral Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Statements Newsletters AAOM: Representing the Discipline of Oral Medicine Oral Medicine is the discipline of dentistry concerned with the ... offers credentialing, resources and professional community for oral medicine practitioners. Our membership provides care to thousands. We ...

  1. Oral hygiene practices and habits among dental professionals in Chennai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopinath V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and objectives : The present study was carried out to assess the oral hygiene practices and habits among practicing general dentists. Materials and Methods : The study was carried out in four dental schools with the help of a self administered questionnaire. The questionnaire covered dentists′ oral self care, smoking habits, professional reading and oral health concepts. A total of 700 dentists responded, of which 457 were males. Recommended oral self care (ROSC included tooth brushing one per day, eating sugary snacks daily or rarely and regularly using fluoride tooth paste. Results : The data obtained was then subjected to statistical analyses and evaluated using chi-square tests and logistic regressions.It was found that 55.9% of all respondents brushed twice a day, 59.4% consumed sugar containing snacks less than once daily and 55.1% of them used fluoride containing paste regularly while brushing. 81.1% of the 700 dentists never used tobacco products. In all, 19.6% 0f the practicing general dentists followed recommended oral self care. Conclusion : From the present study, it can be concluded that only 19.6% of south Indian dentists follow recommended oral self care and hence awareness programs and continuous dental education programs among dentists is essential to improve the present scenario and to increase the number of dental professionals following ROSC.

  2. Literatura Oral Hispanica (Hispanic Oral Literature).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpine, Dave

    As part of a class in Hispanic Oral Literature, students collected pieces of folklore from various Hispanic residents in the region known as "Siouxland" in Iowa. Consisting of some of the folklore recorded from the residents, this paper includes 18 "cuentos y leyendas" (tales and legends), 48 "refranes" (proverbs), 17…

  3. Analysis of the impact of the level of education and oral health habits of mothers on oral health and the level of oral hygiene of children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanović Marko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Children in early childhood acquire habits regarding oral health which in later life are very difficult to change. These habits children learn from their parents or guardian, usually a mother. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the level of education and habits regarding oral health habits of mothers in the oral health of children and their level of oral hygiene. The study included a total of 146 pairs of children (aged 5 years and their mothers. All respondents were from the territory of Kosovska Mitrovica. The education level of mothers and their habits related to oral health, as well as the habits of children related to oral health were determined using a questionnaire. Oral hygiene in children is determined by clinical examination using a plaque index after Silness-LOE. From the total number of mothers 52.7% had secondary education, and 47.3% had university graduates. Test results showed that the level of education of mothers had a crucial importance to the quality of oral hygiene in children. From the total number of surveyed children, 53.4% of children had a PI ≤1, and 46.6% of children PI ˃1. The results indicate that children of mothers who brush their teeth two or three times a day also brush their teeth twice or more a day (62%, as well as visits to the dentist mothers in the past 12 months has an impact on more regular visits of children at the dentist. Mother's assistance during teeth washing is very important by the data that 69% of children who brush their teeth with mother's assistance has a plaque index ≤1. Toothpaste with fluoride is used by 76% of children. Although children of mothers who have better habits related to oral health also have better habits and better oral hygiene, the situation is far from ideal, attention should be directed towards educating parents, and thereby indirectly the children.

  4. World Workshop on Oral Medicine VI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brailo, Vlaho; Firriolo, Francis John; Tanaka, Takako Imai

    2015-01-01

    were being used for education, and three were multipurpose. Clinical software was being utilized as databases developed to integrate of different type of clinical information. Research software was designed to facilitate multicenter research. Educational software represented interactive, case......: An invitation letter explaining the objectives was sent to the global Oral Medicine community. Respondents were interviewed to obtain information about different aspects of OMSS functionality. RESULTS: Ten OMSS tools were identified. Four were being used for clinical care, one was being used for research, two......-orientated technology designed for clinical training in Oral Medicine. Easy access to patient data was the most commonly reported advantage. Difficulty of use and poor integration with other software was the most commonly reported disadvantage. CONCLUSIONS: The OMSS presented in this paper demonstrate how information...

  5. Subjective Oral Health in Dutch Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gijsbert H.W. Verrips

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine whether the subjective oral health (SOH of the Dutch adult population was associated with clinical and demographic variables. Methods: A clinical examination was conducted in a sample of 1,018 people from the Dutch city of ‘s-Hertogenbosch. SOH was measured using the Dutch translation of the short form of the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-NL14. Results: The average score on the OHIP-NL14 was 2.8 ± 5.9 and 51% of the respondents had a score of 0. Dental status was the most important predictor of SOH. Conclusions:  The SOH in the Dutch adult population was much better than in groups of adults in Australia, the United Kingdom and New Zealand. Nevertheless, there were important variations in SOH related to dental and socio-economic status.

  6. Oral Mirtazapine in Persistent Chronic Urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Kulaç

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic urticaria accounts for up to 75% of patients with urticaria attending dermatology clinics and can persist for many years. Chronic urticaria often causes significant quality of life issues due to pruritus and urticarial lesions resistant to treatment. Patients attending urticaria clinics have a similar impairment of quality of life as those with eczema or those with coronary disease awaiting by pass surgery. A good response to standard treatment with oral H1 receptor antagonists occurs in under 50%. Immunomodulatory or immunosuppression therapy might therefore required in patients with severe refractory chronic urticaria. But these treatments have too many adverse effects and difficulties in their using. In two current reports, three cases of severe chronic urticaria, unresponsive to conventional therapy, with a successful response to antidepressant mirtazapine were presented. Herein we present three cases responding oral mirtazapine, resistant combination therapies including antihistaminics, leucotrien antagonists and systemic corticosteroids. (Turkderm 2008; 42: 31-3

  7. Examining the association between oral health and oral HPV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Thanh Cong; Markham, Christine M; Ross, Michael Wallis; Mullen, Patricia Dolan

    2013-09-01

    Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the cause of 40% to 80% of oropharyngeal cancers; yet, no published study has examined the role of oral health in oral HPV infection, either independently or in conjunction with other risk factors. This study examined the relation between oral health and oral HPV infection and the interactive effects of oral health, smoking, and oral sex on oral HPV infection. Our analyses comprised 3,439 participants ages 30 to 69 years for whom data on oral HPV and oral health were available from the nationally representative 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Results showed that higher unadjusted prevalence of oral HPV infection was associated with four measures of oral health, including self-rated oral health as poor-to-fair [prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.56; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.25-1.95], indicated the possibility of gum disease (PR = 1.51; 95% CI, 1.13-2.01), reported use of mouthwash to treat dental problems in the past week (PR = 1.28; 95% CI, 1.07-1.52), and higher number of teeth lost (Ptrend = 0.035). In multivariable logistic regression models, oral HPV infection had a statistically significant association with self-rated overall oral health (OR = 1.55; 95% CI, 1.15-2.09), independent of smoking and oral sex. In conclusion, poor oral health was an independent risk factor of oral HPV infection, irrespective of smoking and oral sex practices. Public health interventions may aim to promote oral hygiene and oral health as an additional measure to prevent HPV-related oral cancers.

  8. An Assessment of Global Oral Health Education in U.S. Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Janet; Gluch, Joan I

    2017-02-01

    Dental schools need to produce graduates who are adequately prepared to respond to the complex needs and challenges of the increasingly diverse and interconnected world in which they will practice dentistry. To enhance discussions about the coverage of global oral health competencies in dental education, the aims of this study were to assess how global health education is currently incorporated into predoctoral dental training in the U.S. and which global oral health competencies are being covered. Surveys were emailed to all 64 accredited U.S. dental schools during the 2015-16 academic year. Respondents from 52 schools completed the survey (response rate 81%). The results showed that social determinants of oral diseases and conditions, how to identify barriers to use of oral health services, and how to work with patients who have limited dental health literacy were covered in the greatest number of responding schools' curricula. Key areas of global health curricula that were covered rarely included global dental infrastructure, data collection design, and horizontal and vertical programming approaches to health improvement. Despite current dialogue on the addition of global oral health competencies to dental curricula, only 41% of the responding schools were currently planning to expand their global oral health education. Based on these results, the authors conclude that it may be most feasible for dental schools to add recommended global oral health competencies to their curricula by incorporating didactic content into already established courses.

  9. Training Law Enforcement Officials on Responding to Equine Calls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kathleen P.; Stauffer, Gary; Stauffer, Monte; Anderson, Doug; Biodrowski, Kristie

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of equine abuse/neglect cases is an ongoing issue. However, officials responding to equine cases are rarely experienced in handling horses. Therefore, workshops teaching basic horse husbandry were offered to better equip and prepare officials to respond to equine cases. Trainings consisted of both classroom and hands-on sessions.…

  10. 39 CFR 958.11 - Respondent's access to information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Respondent's access to information. 958.11 Section... § 958.11 Respondent's access to information. Except as provided in this section, after receiving the... Determining Official under 39 U.S.C. 3018, and all exculpatory information in the possession of the...

  11. Understanding and Responding to Adolescent Girls' Online Cruelty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokal, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Many school counsellors have identified "cyber-bullying" among adolescent girls as a growing concern. In order to respond to this issue, this article begins with a new model of cyber-communications from the unique perspective of adolescent girls. Next, it explores the limitations of responding to this model, based on current understandings of…

  12. Collaboration and interaction of first responders with the general public

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmerik, M. van; Dinesen, C.; Rijk, R. van; Bird, M.; Wester, M.; Hansen, L.J.; Vinther-Larsen, L.; Padron, C.; Boswinkel, R.; Ven, J. van de

    2016-01-01

    There is an increased focus on the need for collaboration between first responders and the general public. This type of collaboration requires soft skills that are not necessarily included in more traditional command and control trainings for first responders. Learning to collaborate with the

  13. Increasing Poverty: How Do Leaders in One Suburban District Respond?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Jennifer Dawn

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the question of how suburban school district leaders in one large Midwestern school district respond to increasing student poverty. The purpose of this study was to determine how suburban school district leaders respond to increasing student poverty in their decision making and actions. Data for this study came from one…

  14. Interviewer-Respondent Interactions in Conversational and Standardized Interviewing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittereder, Felicitas; Durow, Jen; West, Brady T.; Kreuter, Frauke; Conrad, Frederick G.

    2018-01-01

    Standardized interviewing (SI) and conversational interviewing are two approaches to collect survey data that differ in how interviewers address respondent confusion. This article examines interviewer-respondent interactions that occur during these two techniques, focusing on requests for and provisions of clarification. The data derive from an…

  15. [Epidemiology of oral HPV infection in young healthy individuals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cab-Sánchez, Beddler G; Hernández-Solís, Sandra E; Rueda-Gordillo, Florencio; Conde-Ferráez, Laura; Gómez-Carballo, Jesús G; González-Losa, María Del Refugio

    2017-12-01

    HPV infection is the most common sexually transmitted viral infection, and is associated with several neoplasms. To describe the epidemiology, natural history and risk factors associated with oral HPV infection in asymptomatic young adults. A prospective and longitudinal study was conducted, including subjects without oral pathology, who were sampled from the oral mucosa. All subjects with positive results were re-sampled 6 months later. The presence of HPV was identified by PCR. Demographic and sexual behavior data were obtained with a survey that was responded without the intervention of the researcher. 102 samples were collected from subject of 18-26 years old, 60 (58.8%) were male. The prevalence of the virus was 6.9%; all positive subjects had active sexual life. Same-gender relationships were the only variable associated with the presence of the virus (p Oral HPV infection is transient and is associated to same-gender relationships, mainly women who have sex with women.

  16. Prevention of gingival trauma : Oral hygiene devices and oral piercings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoenderdos, N.L.

    2017-01-01

    Maintaining healthy teeth and soft oral tissues for life is important. Oral hygiene devices and oral piercings can damage the soft oral tissues. This thesis investigates the safety of manual toothbrushes, interdental brushes and rubber bristles interdental cleaners by analysing the gingival abrasion

  17. ART integration in oral health care systems in Latin American countries as perceived by directors of oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oswaldo Ruiz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to carry out a situation analysis of: a prevalence of ART training courses; b integration of ART into the oral healthcare systems and; c strengths and weaknesses of ART integration, in Latin American countries. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A structured questionnaire, consisting of 18 questions, was emailed to directors of national or regional oral health departments of all Latin American countries and the USA. For two countries that had not responded after 4 weeks, the questionnaire was sent to the Dean of each local Dental School. The questions were related to ART training courses, integration of ART in the dental curriculum and the oral healthcare system, barriers to ART implementation in the public health system and recommendations for ART implementation in the services. Factor analysis was used to construct one factor in the barrier-related question. Means and percentages were calculated. RESULTS: The response rate, covering 55% of all Latin American countries, was 76%. An ART training course had been given in all Latin American countries that responded, with more than 2 having been conducted in 64.7% of the respondent countries. ART was implemented in public oral health services in 94.7 % of the countries, according to the respondents. In 15.8% of the countries, ART was applied throughout the country and in 68.4%, in some areas or regions of a country. ART had been used for more, or less, than three years in 42.1% and 47.4% of the countries, respectively. Evaluation and monitoring activities to determine the effectiveness of ART restorations and ART sealants had been carried out in 42.1% of the countries, while evaluation training courses had taken place in only 3 countries (15.8%. Respondents perceived the "increase in the number of treated patients" as the major benefit of ART implementation in public oral health services. The major perceived barrier factors to ART implementation were "operator opinion" and "high

  18. Amiloidosis oral nodular Oral nodular amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Martos Díaz

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. La amiloidosis constituye una entidad marcada por el depósito de amiloide en diferentes tejidos. En la cavidad oral se manifiesta habitualmente en forma de macroglosia, y más raramente, como nódulos dispuestos en la superficie. Caso clínico. Varón afecto de Mieloma Múltiple, que comienza con lesiones nodulares en labio inferior y lengua. A raíz de estas lesiones, mediante estudio histológico, es diagnosticado de Amiloidosis Sistémica. Discusión. Los nódulos amiloideos en la cavidad oral, constituyen una manifestación rara de la amiloidosis sistémica. Su aparición conlleva la necesidad de realizar un diagnostico diferencial con otras entidades y el diagnostico de certeza se obtiene mediante el análisis histológico.Introduction. Amyloidosis is a condition characterized by the deposit of amyloid in different tissues. In the oral cavity it is usually manifested as macroglossia and, more rarely, as nodules on the surface. Clinical case. A man had multiple myeloma that began with nodular lesions of the lower lip and tongue. As a result of these lesions, the patient was diagnosed of systemic amyloidosis by histological study. Discussion. Amyloid nodules in the oral cavity are a rare manifestation of systemic amyloidosis. Its appearance entails the necessity to make I diagnose differential with other organizations and I diagnose of certainty is obtained by means of the histological analysis.

  19. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to NIDCR Contact Us Home Health Info Health Information The Oral Cancer Exam See a step-by- ... National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md. This information is not copyrighted. Make as many copies as ...

  20. Ipratropium Oral Inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipratropium oral inhalation is used to prevent wheezing, shortness of breath, coughing, and chest tightness in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; a group of diseases that affect the lungs and airways) such as chronic bronchitis (swelling of ...

  1. Oral Appliances Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is an effective treatment option for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). A custom-fit oral sleep appliance can improve your sleep, restore your alertness and revitalize your health. Here is a guide to help you get ...

  2. [Oral precancer and cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-López, José; Omaña-Cepeda, Carlos; Jané-Salas, Enric

    2015-11-06

    We reviewed the concept of oral precancerous lesions, oral cancer, and the possibility of early diagnosis. With the keywords: premalignant oral lesions prevention, a search was performed over the past 10 years. Also clinical trials are searched from January 2011 until today with the keywords: oral cancer prevention AND dentistry. It is emphasized that there can be no significant changes related to the concept of precancerous lesions and cancer, and those relating to the early diagnosis. Despite the numerous described methods of screening, biopsy remains the most useful test, and therefore it is essential, mainly if we consider the new possibilities of molecular studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Cromolyn Oral Inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your doctor.Cromolyn oral inhalation helps to prevent asthma attacks (sudden episodes of shortness of breath, wheezing, and coughing) but will not stop an asthma attack that has already started. Your doctor will prescribe ...

  4. Fostering oral presentation performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, van Stan; Gulikers, Judith; Biemans, Harm; Mulder, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Previous research revealed significant differences in the effectiveness of various feedback sources for encouraging students’ oral presentation performance. While former studies emphasised the superiority of teacher feedback, it remains unclear whether the quality of feedback actually differs

  5. Oral Cancer Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 14T22:05:33+00:00 October, 2016 | This last weekend the OCF 3rd Annual Southern California Oral Cancer Walk for Awareness took place in Fountain Valley at Mile Square Park. The walk is a little different ...

  6. Intravenous versus oral etoposide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Abir Salwa; Grönberg, Malin; Langer, Seppo W.

    2018-01-01

    High-grade gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (GEP-NENs, G3) are aggressive cancers of the digestive system with poor prognosis and survival. Platinum-based chemotherapy (cisplatin/carboplatin + etoposide) is considered the first-line palliative treatment. Etoposide is frequently...... administered intravenously; however, oral etoposide may be used as an alternative. Concerns for oral etoposide include decreased bioavailability, inter- and intra-patient variability and patient compliance. We aimed to evaluate possible differences in progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS......) in patients treated with oral etoposide compared to etoposide given as infusion. Patients (n = 236) from the Nordic NEC study were divided into three groups receiving etoposide as a long infusion (24 h, n = 170), short infusion (≤ 5 h, n = 33) or oral etoposide (n = 33) according to hospital tradition. PFS...

  7. Responders and non-responders to drug treatment in social phobia : Differences at baseline and prediction of response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slaap, BR; Westenberg, HGM; DenBoer, JA

    1996-01-01

    Differences between responders and non-responders to drug therapy were investigated in social phobia. Two previously published studies were pooled to obtain data of 30 patients who were treated for 12 weeks with brofaromine or fluvoxamine. Four criterion variables were used to divide patients in

  8. Comparing Choral Responding and a Choral Responding Plus Mnemonic Device during Geography Lessons for Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydon, Todd; Musti-Rao, Shobana; Alter, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Four male 9th-grade students with mild to moderate disabilities participated in a single case design that compared choral responding (CR) and a choral responding plus mnemonic device (CR+) during geography lessons. The authors used an alternating treatments design to evaluate the effects of the two strategies on students' on-task behavior and…

  9. The oral health care experiences of NSW Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Megan A; Hunt, Jennifer; Walker, David; Williams, Rodger

    2015-02-01

    Aboriginal people continue to experience a disproportionately heavy burden of oral disease. A range of oral health services may be available to Aboriginal communities, including those provided by Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs). This study explored the oral health care experiences and activities of ACCHSs to inform policy and program decision making. Mixed methods, including an online survey and semi-structured interviews with senior ACCHS staff, were used. Areas of inquiry included perceived community need for oral health care, oral health care models, accessibility of other oral health services and barriers to providing oral health care. Twenty-nine NSW ACCHSs participated in the study. The activities of NSW ACCHSs in oral health care are diverse and reflect the localised approaches they take to delivering primary health care. ACCHSs commonly face barriers in delivering oral health care, as do Aboriginal communities in accessing other oral health services. NSW ACCHSs are important but under-acknowledged providers of a range of oral health services to Aboriginal communities and are well placed to provide this care as part of their comprehensive primary health care model. ACCHS roles in improving Aboriginal oral health would be strengthened by greater acknowledgement of their contributions and expertise and the development of transparent, long-term funding policies that respond to community need. © 2014 Public Health Association of Australia.

  10. Oral vs. salivary diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Joana; Corby, Patricia M.; Barber, Cheryl A.; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    The field of "salivary diagnostics" includes studies utilizing samples obtained from a variety of sources within the oral cavity. These samples include; whole unstimulated saliva, stimulated whole saliva, duct saliva collected directly from the parotid, submandibular/sublingual glands or minor salivary glands, swabs of the buccal mucosa, tongue or tonsils, and gingival crevicular fluid. Many publications state "we collected saliva from subjects" without fully describing the process or source of the oral fluid. Factors that need to be documented in any study include the time of day of the collection, the method used to stimulate and collect the fluid, and how much fluid is being collected and for how long. The handling of the oral fluid during and post-collection is also critical and may include addition of protease or nuclease inhibitors, centrifugation, and cold or frozen storage prior to assay. In an effort to create a standard protocol for determining a biomarker's origin we carried out a pilot study collecting oral fluid from 5 different sites in the mouth and monitoring the concentrations of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines detected using MesoScaleDiscovery (MSD) electrochemiluminesence assays. Our data suggested that 3 of the cytokines are primarily derived from the submandibular gland, while 7 of the cytokines come from a source other than the major salivary glands such as the minor salivary glands or cells in the oral mucosae. Here we review the literature on monitoring biomarkers in oral samples and stress the need for determining the blood/saliva ratio when a quantitative determination is needed and suggest that the term oral diagnostic be used if the source of an analyte in the oral cavity is unknown.

  11. Immunologically mediated oral diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Jimson, Sudha; Balachader, N.; Anita, N.; Babu, R.

    2015-01-01

    Immune mediated diseases of oral cavity are uncommon. The lesions may be self-limiting and undergo remission spontaneously. Among the immune mediated oral lesions the most important are lichen planus, pemphigus, erythema multiformi, epidermolysis bullosa, systemic lupus erythematosis. Cellular and humoral mediated immunity play a major role directed against epithelial and connective tissue in chronic and recurrent patterns. Confirmatory diagnosis can be made by biopsy, direct and indirect imm...

  12. ON ORAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Svetitsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes a rise in the incidence of oral cancer in the Rostov Region since the 1990s. The study has indicated that this rise is associated with regional population growth due to the forced migrants after the collapse of the USSR. Financial problems, unbalanced nutrition, poor oral hygiene, and depression in this group of patients have contributed to the higher incidence of precancers and cancers.

  13. Diabetes and oral health

    OpenAIRE

    Kjersti Skjold Rønningen; Morten Enersen

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diabetes describes a group of disorders characterized by elevated levels of glucose in the blood and abnormalities of carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism. A number of oral diseases and disorders have been associated with diabetes, and periodontitis has been identified as a possible risk factor for poor metabolic control in subjects with diabetes.Methods: This paper reviews the scientific literature to identify oral conditions that have been proposed and are known to be affect...

  14. Oral sex and oral health: An enigma in itself

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Tarun; Puri, Gagan; Aravinda, Konidena; Arora, Neha; Patil, Deepa; Gupta, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Oral sex is commonly practiced by sexually active couples of various age groups, including male-female and same-gender adolescents. The various type of oral sex practices are fellatio, cunnilingus, and analingus. Oral sex can transmit oral, respiratory, and genital infections from one site in body to the other. Oral health has a direct correlation on the transmission of infection; a cut in the mouth, bleeding gums, lip sores or broken skin increases chances of life-threatening infections. Alt...

  15. Oral microbiome and oral and gastrointestinal cancer risk

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Jiyoung; Chen, Calvin Y.; Hayes, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of evidence implicates human oral bacteria in the etiology of oral and gastrointestinal cancers. Epidemiological studies consistently report increased risks of these cancers in men and women with periodontal disease or tooth loss, conditions caused by oral bacteria. More than 700 bacterial species inhabit the oral cavity, including at least 11 bacterial phyla and 70 genera. Oral bacteria may activate alcohol and smoking-related carcinogens locally or act systemically, through c...

  16. Prevention of gingival trauma: Oral hygiene devices and oral piercings

    OpenAIRE

    Hoenderdos, N.L.

    2017-01-01

    Maintaining healthy teeth and soft oral tissues for life is important. Oral hygiene devices and oral piercings can damage the soft oral tissues. This thesis investigates the safety of manual toothbrushes, interdental brushes and rubber bristles interdental cleaners by analysing the gingival abrasion score. The efficacy of the various oral hygiene devices is measured by the use of dental plaque scores and gingivitis scores. In addition, the prevalence, the short- and long-term effects and the ...

  17. Determinants of Oral Health: Does Oral Health Literacy Matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Naghibi Sistani, Mohammad Mehdi; Yazdani, Reza; Virtanen, Jorma; Pakdaman, Afsaneh; Murtomaa, Heikki

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate oral health literacy, independent of other oral health determinants, as a risk indicator for self-reported oral health. Methods. A cross-sectional population-based survey conducted in Tehran, Iran. Multiple logistic regression analysis served to estimate the predictive effect of oral health literacy on self-reported oral health status (good versus poor) controlling for socioeconomic and demographic factors and tooth-brushing behavior. Results. In all, among 1031 partici...

  18. [Reliability of information from proxy respondents in health surveys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardim, Renata; Barreto, Sandhi Maria; Giatti, Luana

    2010-08-01

    The use of proxy respondents in household surveys can be a source of information bias in epidemiological studies. This study assesses the agreement, reliability, magnitude, and direction of possible biases as well as the influence of proxy characteristics on the disagreements between self-report and proxy reports among 710 pairs of primary-secondary respondents. The influence of the proxy perspective on pair-agreement was also assessed, by comparing proxies' answers using their own perspective and that of primary respondents. Reliability was investigated in relation to lifestyle, health assessment, morbidity, and health care use. In general, the results showed good agreement and reliability. Disagreements were statistically associated with the following characteristics of proxy respondents: older age, lower schooling, and the proxy's knowledge of the primary respondent's health. Adults agreed more in evaluating the health of elderly when they used the elderly primary informant's perspective to respond. The results confirm the presence of bias when proxy respondents are used for hypertension and medical consultations.

  19. International Scavenging for First Responder Guidance and Tools: IAEA Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Berthelot, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bachner, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-05-05

    In fiscal years (FY) 2016 and 2017, with support from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) examined the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) radiological emergency response and preparedness products (guidance and tools) to determine which of these products could be useful to U.S. first responders. The IAEA Incident and Emergency Centre (IEC), which is responsible for emergency preparedness and response, offers a range of tools and guidance documents for responders in recognizing, responding to, and recovering from radiation emergencies and incidents. In order to implement this project, BNL obtained all potentially relevant tools and products produced by the IAEA IEC and analyzed these materials to determine their relevance to first responders in the U.S. Subsequently, BNL organized and hosted a workshop at DHS National Urban Security Technology Laboratory (NUSTL) for U.S. first responders to examine and evaluate IAEA products to consider their applicability to the United States. This report documents and describes the First Responder Product Evaluation Workshop, and provides recommendations on potential steps the U.S. federal government could take to make IAEA guidance and tools useful to U.S. responders.

  20. Refugee child oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, E; Rajan, S; Casey, S; Kilpatrick, N

    2017-04-01

    The number of people forced to flee their homes and move around the world is increasing rapidly. Such refugee populations are not only more likely to have poor physical, mental and social health outcomes but also to experience difficulties accessing health services in their new country. In particular, children from refugee backgrounds are at increased risk of poor oral health which in time is associated with poor adult oral health and impacts on child health (e.g. growth and development) and well-being. To date, there is little evidence about the nature and extent of their oral health problems nor interventions to improve their oral health status. This article summarises the evidence surrounding the oral health status of children from refugee backgrounds. In addition, a systematic review of the international literature over the past 10 years is presented which identifies interventions to improve the oral health of these vulnerable paediatric populations. Based on this evidence, potential strategies available to dental service providers to optimise provision of responsive dental care are discussed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Dissociating indifferent, directional, and extreme responding in personality data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zettler, Ingo; Lang, Jonas W B; Hülsheger, Ute R

    2015-01-01

    - and observer reports of personality traits. The three-process model captures indifferent, directional, and extreme responding. Substantively, we hypothesize that, and test whether, trait Honesty-Humility is negatively linked to extreme responding. METHOD: We applied the three-process model to personality data...... supporting the hypothesis that Honesty-Humility is negatively linked to extreme responding. CONCLUSION: In Likert-based personality data, applying the three-process model can unveil individual differences in the response process. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  2. Responder Technology Alert Monthly (Oct-Nov 2014)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upton, Jaki F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stein, Steven L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-01-21

    As part of technology foraging for the Responder Technology Alliance, established by the Department of Homeland Science and Technologies First Responders Group, this report summarizes technologies that are relevant in the area of “wearables,” with the potential for use by first responders. The content was collected over the previous month(s) and reproduced from a general Internet search using the term wearables. Additional information is available at the websites provided. This report is not meant to be an exhaustive list nor an endorsement of any technology described herein. Rather, it is meant to provide useful information about current developments in the areas wearable technology.

  3. Strengthening of oral health systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2014-01-01

    Around the globe many people are suffering from oral pain and other problems of the mouth or teeth. This public health problem is growing rapidly in developing countries where oral health services are limited. Significant proportions of people are underserved; insufficient oral health care...... is either due to low availability and accessibility of oral health care or because oral health care is costly. In all countries, the poor and disadvantaged population groups are heavily affected by a high burden of oral disease compared to well-off people. Promotion of oral health and prevention of oral...... diseases must be provided through financially fair primary health care and public health intervention. Integrated approaches are the most cost-effective and realistic way to close the gap in oral health between rich and poor. The World Health Organization (WHO) Oral Health Programme will work...

  4. Graphite oral tattoo: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Moraes, Renata Mendonça; Gouvêa Lima, Gabriela de Morais; Guilhermino, Marinaldo; Vieira, Mayana Soares; Carvalho, Yasmin Rodarte; Anbinder, Ana Lia

    2015-01-01

    Pigmented oral lesions compose a large number of pathological entities, including exogenous pigmentat oral tattoos, such as amalgam and graphite tattoos. We report a rare case of a graphite tattoo on the palate of a 62-year-old patient with a history of pencil injury, compare it with amalgam tattoos, and determine the prevalence of oral tattoos in our Oral Pathology Service. We also compare the clinical and histological findings of grafite and amalgam tattoos. Oral tattoos affect women more f...

  5. Practice patterns in prescribing oral care products by dental practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena B. Abdrashitova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the practice patterns of dental practitioners in how they choose oral care products for prescriptions to their patients. One hundred seventy-three respondents were selected for a medico-sociological study. They were divided into 3 groups based on their work experience: less than 5 years (30.0%, 5–9 years (40.0% and 10–14 years (30.0%. The majority of respondents were dental therapists (71.0%, and the rest were paedodontists, dental surgeons, periodontists and orthodontists (11.0%, 7.0%, 4.0% and 1.0%, respectively. The study was conducted using a questionnaire specially developed by us, which consisted of 34 questions grouped into several domains. Analysis of the obtained results has shown that the majority of dental practitioners (88.7% were competent in prescribing oral care products. Professionals with work experience over 10 years often choose oral care products incorrectly; 80.6% of them believe that long-term use of personal oral care products containing antiseptic components affects the oral microbial flora, which suggests that it is necessary to amend the existing classification of toothpastes.

  6. Public transportation's role in responding to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This paper details the role public transportation has in responding to the challenge of climate change. It collects and analyzes data from across the country on public transportation fuel use, vehicles deployed, rides taken, and other key metrics, dr...

  7. Climate change 101 : understanding and responding to global climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    To inform the climate change dialogue, the Pew Center on Global Climate Change and the Pew Center on the States have developed a series of brief reports entitled Climate Change 101: Understanding and Responding to Global Climate Change. These reports...

  8. Microalgae respond differently to nitrogen availability during culturing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Culture growth and in-gel changes in isoenzyme pattern and activity of glutamate synthase, glutamate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase were studied. The results demonstrated that the algae responded ...

  9. Emergency First Responders' Experience with Colorimetric Detection Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandra L. Fox; Keith A. Daum; Carla J. Miller; Marnie M. Cortez

    2007-10-01

    Nationwide, first responders from state and federal support teams respond to hazardous materials incidents, industrial chemical spills, and potential weapons of mass destruction (WMD) attacks. Although first responders have sophisticated chemical, biological, radiological, and explosive detectors available for assessment of the incident scene, simple colorimetric detectors have a role in response actions. The large number of colorimetric chemical detection methods available on the market can make the selection of the proper methods difficult. Although each detector has unique aspects to provide qualitative or quantitative data about the unknown chemicals present, not all detectors provide consistent, accurate, and reliable results. Included here, in a consumer-report-style format, we provide “boots on the ground” information directly from first responders about how well colorimetric chemical detection methods meet their needs in the field and how they procure these methods.

  10. Southern Nevada assisted living residents' perception of their oral health status and access to dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dounis, Georgia; Ditmyer, Marcia M; McCants, Robert; Lee, Yoonah; Mobley, Connie

    2012-06-01

    Oral health is an integral component of general health, and quality of life. The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of oral health status and acces\\s to dental care by Southern Nevada Assisted Living Facilities Residents. A cross-sectional questionnaire study design was used to survey residents between 34 and 99 years old residing in Assisted Living Facilities. Seventy respondents (42 males and 28 females) completed a survey that included personal oral hygiene, access to care, and demographic information. Data analyses included descriptive statistics and chi-square. Mean age was 75.78 years, and the majority had a college education (n = 41). Four currently smoked cigarettes. Twenty-nine (males = 14; females = 15) reported having dental insurance. Eleven respondents had seen a dentist twice a year, while 33 reported a visit less than 6 months. Forty-one reported the facility did not provide oral health care with majority (n = 64) indicating that accessing oral health care was difficult. Self-rated response to oral hygiene, a majority (n = 64) reported their oral hygiene as fair and five reported their oral hygiene as poor. Assisted living residents in Southern Nevada reported difficulty accessing dental services within and outside of the facility. Oral care models to address this unique population should be explored. © 2010 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Factors associated with oral problems among adults with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Hon K; Shotwell, Matthew S; Magruder, Kathryn M; Slate, Elizabeth H; Salinas, Carlos F

    2009-01-01

    To explore factors associated with self-reported current oral (tooth and gum) problems and oral pain in the past 12 months among adults with spinal cord injury. An online oral health survey on the South Carolina Spinal Cord Injury Association website. Respondents were 192 adult residents of the US who identified themselves as having spinal cord injury at least 1 year before the survey date. Approximately 47% of respondents reported having oral problems at the time of the survey, and 42% reported experiencing oral pain in the 12 months before the survey date. Multiple predictor analyses (controlling for age, gender, income, and dental insurance) indicated that current oral problems were positively associated with dry mouth symptoms, financial barriers to dental care access, smoking, and paraplegia. Oral pain experienced in the past 12 months was positively associated with dry mouth symptoms, financial barriers to dental care access, minority race, and paraplegia. Adults with spinal cord injury reported a high prevalence of oral problems and oral pain. Those with paraplegia were more likely to report problems than those with tetraplegia. Because dry mouth and smoking were significantly associated with these problems, patient education from both dental and medical providers should emphasize awareness of the side effects of xerostomia-causing medications, dry mouth management, and smoking cessation. Findings also indicate unmet needs for low-cost preventive and treatment dental services for this vulnerable population.

  12. Awareness and knowledge of oral cancer among university students in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Dubai, Sami Abdo Radman; Ganasegeran, Kurubaran; Alabsi, Aied M; Alshagga, Mustafa Ahmed; Ali, Riyadh Saif

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the level of knowledge of oral cancer and its associated factors among university students in Malaysia. A cross sectional study was conducted among 200 university students in Malaysia. A self administered questionnaire was used to collect data. It included questions on socio- demographic data, awareness and knowledge of oral cancer. Mean age of the respondents was 21.5 ± 2.5 and the age ranged from 18 to 27 years. The majority of the respondents were aware of oral cancer (92.0%) and recognized the followings as signs and symptoms of oral cancer: ulcer and oral bleeding (71.0%), followed by swelling (61.5%). A satisfactory knowledge was observed on the following risk factors; smoking (95.5%), poor oral hygiene (90.5%), family history (90.0%), alcohol (84.5%) and poor fitting dentures (83.0%). However, unsatisfactory knowledge was observed about hot/spicy food (46.5%), obesity (36.0%), old age (31.5%), dietary factor (29.0%) and smokeless tobacco (25.5%). Knowledge of oral cancer was associated significantly with age (p<0.01), year of study (p<0.01) and course of study (p<0.01). Instead of satisfactory awareness and knowledge of oral cancer and its clinical presentations, inadequate knowledge was observed about its risk factors. There is a need to introduce oral cancer education among university students.

  13. ORAL MYIASIS CONVERTING TO ORAL SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshay

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Oral Myiasis, a condition of infestation of the body by fly larvae (maggots is a rare pathology in humans. It is associated with poor oral hygiene, alcoholism, senility, suppurating lesions, severe halitosis. It is seen frequently in tropical countries and hot climatic regions. The reported cases in literature of oral Myiasis associated with oral cancer are few. The treatment is a mechanical removal of the maggots but a systemic treatment with Ivermectin, a semi - synthetic macrolide antibiotic, has been used successfully for treatment for oral m yiasis. We present a case of 55 yr old male alcoholic patient with oral myiasis with extensive proliferative growth of oral cavity. Our patient was managed with manual debridement and administration of systemic ivermect in along with antibiotic coverage. Incisional biopsy of the proliferative lesion showed well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. Thus our patient showed presence of oral myiasis in association with oral squamous cell carcinoma.

  14. Challenging dentistry to recognize and respond to family violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aved, Barbara M; Meyers, Larry; Burmas, Elita Lin

    2007-08-01

    Few studies have examined efforts to engage the dental community about roles and responsibilities in recognizing and responding to family violence through targeted educational programs. Evaluation of the Dental Professionals Against Violence course showed 1,213 dental professionals gained knowledge and confidence about identifying and appropriately responding where abuse/violence in patients was suspected. Practice changes included increased awareness of signs and symptoms of abuse among patients and application of the training materials for office staff.

  15. Respondents characteristics, their awareness and benefits of Sukur ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The result of investigation into the socio–economic characteristics of the respondents showed that the average monthly income across all the respondents that ranged from N12, 611.11 – N15, 736.11 was less than N18, 500.00 which is the Nigerian civil service minimum wage. The major values of the study area in order of ...

  16. Connecting, Protecting, and Informing the Next Generation of First Responders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-10

    Protecting , and Informing the Next Generation of First Responders MIT Lincoln Laboratory is developing high-tech tools to improve situational awareness...responders in the field. For example, Lincoln’s NGFR-enhanced version of the mobile app utilizes the Sony Smart Eyeglass to take data from wearable sensors...Lincoln’s involvement with S&T’s NGFR Apex program is a prime example of the Laboratory’s homeland protection mission in action: creating prototypes

  17. Oral care practices for orally intubated critically ill adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feider, Laura L; Mitchell, Pamela; Bridges, Elizabeth

    2010-03-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia is a major threat to patients receiving mechanical ventilation in hospitals. Oral care is a nursing intervention that may help prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia. To describe oral care practices performed by critical care nurses for orally intubated critically ill patients and compare these practices with recommendations for oral care in the 2005 AACN Procedure Manual for Critical Care and the guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A descriptive, cross-sectional design with a 31-item Web-based survey was used to describe oral care practices reported by 347 randomly selected members of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses. Oral care was performed every 2 (50%) or 4 (42%) hours, usually with foam swabs (97%). Oral care was reported as a high priority (47%). Nurses with 7 years or more of critical care experience performed oral care more often (P=.008) than did less experienced nurses. Nurses with a bachelor's degree in nursing used foam swabs (P=.001), suctioned the mouth before the endotracheal tube (P=.02), and suctioned after oral care (Ptoothpaste (40%), brushing with a foam swab (90%), using chlorhexidine gluconate oral rinse (49%), suctioning the oral cavity (84%), and assessing the oral cavity (73%). Oral care practices and policies differed for all those items. Survey results indicate that discrepancies exist between reported practices and policies. Oral care policies appear to be present, but not well used.

  18. Methodology for Assessing Radiation Detectors Used by Emergency Responders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piotr Wasiolek; April Simpson

    2008-01-01

    The threat of weapons of mass destruction terrorism resulted in the U.S. Department of Homeland Security deploying large quantities of radiation detectors throughout the emergency responder community. However, emergency responders specific needs were not always met by standard health physics instrumentation used in radiation facilities. Several American National Standards Institute standards were developed and approved to evaluate the technical capabilities of detection equipment. Establishing technical capability is a critical step, but it is equally important to emergency responders that the instruments are easy to operate and can withstand the rugged situations they encounter. The System Assessment and Validation for Emergency Responders (SAVER) Program (managed by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Office of Grants and Training, Systems Support Division) focuses predominantly on the usability, ergonomics, readability, and other features of the detectors, rather than performance controlled by industry standards and the manufacturers. National Security Technologies, LLC, as a SAVER Technical Agent, conducts equipment evaluations using active emergency responders who are familiar with the detection equipment and knowledgeable of situations encountered in the field, which provides more relevant data to emergency responders

  19. As-yet-uncultivated oral bacteria: breadth and association with oral and extra-oral diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Siqueira Jr, José F.; Rôças, Isabela N.

    2013-01-01

    It has been shown that 40-60% of the bacteria found in different healthy and diseased oral sites still remain to be grown in vitro, phenotypically characterized, and formally named as species. The possibility exists that these as-yet-uncultivated bacteria play important ecological roles in oral bacterial communities and may participate in the pathogenesis of several oral infectious diseases. There is also a potential for these as-yetuncultivated oral bacteria to take part in extra-oral infect...

  20. The Oral Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arweiler, Nicole B; Netuschil, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    The oral microbiota represents an important part of the human microbiota, and includes several hundred to several thousand diverse species. It is a normal part of the oral cavity and has an important function to protect against colonization of extrinsic bacteria which could affect systemic health. On the other hand, the most common oral diseases caries, gingivitis and periodontitis are based on microorganisms. While (medical) research focused on the planktonic phase of bacteria over the last 100 years, it is nowadays generally known, that oral microorganisms are organised as biofilms. On any non-shedding surfaces of the oral cavity dental plaque starts to form, which meets all criteria for a microbial biofilm and is subject to the so-called succession. When the sensitive ecosystem turns out of balance - either by overload or weak immune system - it becomes a challenge for local or systemic health. Therefore, the most common strategy and the golden standard for the prevention of caries, gingivitis and periodontitis is the mechanical removal of this biofilms from teeth, restorations or dental prosthesis by regular toothbrushing.

  1. Canine oral melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Philip J

    2007-05-01

    Melanoma is the most common oral malignancy in the dog. Oral and/or mucosal melanoma has been routinely considered an extremely malignant tumor with a high degree of local invasiveness and high metastatic propensity. Primary tumor size has been found to be extremely prognostic. The World Health Organization staging scheme for dogs with oral melanoma is based on size, with stage I = or = 4cm tumor and/or lymph node metastasis, and stage IV = distant metastasis. Median survival times for dogs with oral melanoma treated with surgery are approximately 17 to 18, 5 to 6, and 3 months with stage I, II, and III disease, respectively. Significant negative prognostic factors include stage, size, evidence of metastasis, and a variety of histologic criteria. Standardized treatments such as surgery, coarse-fractionation radiation therapy, and chemotherapy have afforded minimal to modest stage-dependent clinical benefits and death is usually due to systemic metastasis. Numerous immunotherapeutic strategies have been employed to date with limited clinical efficacy; however, the use of xenogeneic DNA vaccines may represent a leap forward in clinical efficacy. Oral melanoma is a spontaneous syngeneic cancer occurring in outbred, immunocompetent dogs and appears to be a more clinically faithful therapeutic model for human melanoma; further use of canine melanoma as a therapeutic model for human melanoma is strongly encouraged. In addition, the development of an expanded but clinically relevant staging system incorporating the aforementioned prognostic factors is also strongly encouraged.

  2. Probiotics and oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzini, Bernard; Pizzo, Giuseppe; Scapagnini, Giovanni; Nuzzo, Domenico; Vasto, Sonya

    2012-01-01

    Probiotics are living microorganisms (e.g., bacteria) that are either the same as or similar to organisms found naturally in the human body and may be beneficial to health. Current researches have shown that the balance between beneficial and pathogenic bacteria is essential in order to maintain the oral health. Therefore, oral cavity has recently been suggested as a relevant target for probiotic applications. Dental caries can be seen as a microbial imbalance where the oral microbiota shift towards community dominance which produces acidogenic and acid-tolerant gram positive bacteria. Similarly, the accumulation of bacteria within the biofilm, facilitated by poor oral hygiene, predisposes to allogenic shifts in the microbial community, leading to the onset of periodontal inflammation. Probiotic bacteria belonging to the genus of Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium and Streptococcus have been proven effective for preventing caries by reducing the number of cariogenic bacteria in saliva after a short period of consuming the probiotic. In contrast, the effect of probiotics on improving gingivitis and periodontitis has been less investigated. The currently available studies on the effect of probiotics on periodontal pathogens and clinical periodontal parameters showed differing results depending on the strains used and the endpoints analyzed. Many of the clinical studies are pilot in nature and with low quality, therefore, properly conducted clinical trials, using probiotic strains with in vitro proven periodontal probiotic effects, are needed. The putative beneficial effects of probiotics on oral malodour have also been evaluated, but further evidence is needed to fully explore the potential of probiotics for preventing malodour.

  3. Oral health during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Hugh; Douglass, Alan B; Douglass, Joanna M; Silk, Laura

    2008-04-15

    Oral health care in pregnancy is often avoided and misunderstood by physicians, dentists, and patients. Evidence-based practice guidelines are still being developed. Research suggests that some prenatal oral conditions may have adverse consequences for the child. Periodontitis is associated with preterm birth and low birth weight, and high levels of cariogenic bacteria in mothers can lead to increased dental caries in the infant. Other oral lesions, such as gingivitis and pregnancy tumors, are benign and require only reassurance and monitoring. Every pregnant woman should be screened for oral risks, counseled on proper oral hygiene, and referred for dental treatment when necessary. Dental procedures such as diagnostic radiography, periodontal treatment, restorations, and extractions are safe and are best performed during the second trimester. Xylitol and chlorhexidine may be used as adjuvant therapy for high-risk mothers in the early postpartum period to reduce transmission of cariogenic bacteria to their infants. Appropriate dental care and prevention during pregnancy may reduce poor prenatal outcomes and decrease infant caries.

  4. THE IMPORTANCE OF ORAL HEALTH BEHAVIOUR OF CHILDREN FOR THEIR ORAL HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelić Ivana

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Caries or tooth decay regardless of the good knowledge of the nature of the disease and the possibility of its effective prevention is still the most widespread disease in our population. It also very often threatens the functions of organs and even the entire organism. Health culture is an integral part of general culture and health education plays an important role in maintaining health of individuals. Aim. The main objective of this study is to determine the influence of oral health behaviour of schoolchildren aged 12 to 14 on their oral health. The schoolchildren attended the seventh and eight grade at Drago Milovic Elementary School in Tivat. Method. The survey was conducted during the period from the end of January to April 2015 at Drago Milovic Elementary School in Tivat. It comprised all seventh and eight-graders that were at school those days. The survey instrument was a questionnaire specially designed for this study and it consisted of 36 closed-ended questions. Clinical examination of oral health in children was used as an additional research instrument. Assessment of oral health was carried out under natural light with dental mirror and probe according to WHO recommendations. The parameter used to assess the state of oral health was DMFT index — the number of carious, extracted and filled teeth. In addition, the assessment of oral hygiene was conducted using soft debris index according to Green-Vermillion which determines absence or presence, quantity and distribution of dental plaque and other soft deposits. Results. The majority of students stated that they lack knowledge regarding the effectiveness of fluoride toothpaste (69.4%. It was found that the lowest incidence of caries occurred among those students who think that teeth should be brushed after every meal, and the highest incidence of this diagnosis occurred in respondents who think that teeth should be brushed once a day. Half of the surveyed students

  5. Influence of Institutional Guidelines on Oral Hygiene Practices in Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyoshi-Teo, Hiroko; Blegen, Mary

    2015-07-01

    Maintaining oral hygiene is a key component of preventing ventilator-associated pneumonia; however, practices are inconsistent. To explore how characteristics of institutional guidelines for oral hygiene influence nurses' oral hygiene practices and perceptions of that practice. Oral hygiene section of a larger survey study on prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia. Critical care nurses at 8 hospitals in Northern California that had more than 1000 ventilator days in 2009 were recruited to participate in the survey. Twenty-one questions addressed oral hygiene practices and practice perceptions. Descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, and Spearman correlations were used for analyses. A total of 576 critical care nurses (45% response rate) responded to the survey. Three types of institutional oral hygiene guidelines existed: nursing policy, order set, and information bulletin. Nursing policy provided the most detail about the oral hygiene care; however, adherence, awareness, and priority level were higher with order sets (P oral cavity and used oral swabs more often when those practices were included in institutional guidelines. The content and dissemination method of institutional guidelines on oral hygiene do influence the oral hygiene practices of critical care nurses. Future studies examining how institutional guidelines could best be incorporated into routine workflow are needed. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  6. Adoption of oral health curriculum by physician assistant education programs in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langelier, Margaret H; Glicken, Anita Duhl; Surdu, Simona

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe inclusion of didactic and clinical instruction in oral health in physician assistant (PA) education programs in 2014. A previous study in 2008 found that PA education program directors generally understood the importance of teaching about the linkage of oral health with systemic health; yet, few programs had actually integrated oral health instruction into the PA curriculum. This study was undertaken to ascertain the number of PA programs teaching oral health topics and to evaluate the content of instruction and implementation strategies. The study used a Web-based survey using a skip logic design that branched respondents based on inclusion or the absence of an oral health curriculum in the PA education program. The questions included predefined response options with the opportunity for narrative responses and comments. Analysis of survey data was completed using SPSS (IBM) and SAS (SAS Institute, Inc) and consisted mainly of frequencies and cross tabulations. There was greater inclusion of oral health curriculum in 2014 than in 2008 with most PA programs now providing didactic and clinical training in oral health. Stakeholders' efforts to engage PA program faculty with integration of oral health subject matter into core curriculum have resulted in wider availability of training for PA students in oral health promotion and prevention services. Efforts to equip PA faculty to teach oral health topics and clinical skills should continue as past efforts have resulted in wider integration of oral health subject matter into core PA curriculum.

  7. Sex redefined: the reclassification of oral-genital contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans, Jason D; Gillen, Martie; Akande, Katrina

    2010-06-01

    Although partially anecdotal, some evidence suggests that oral-genital contact is increasingly excluded from young people's notions of what behaviors constitute sex. Such a shift may have implications for STD prevention. In 2007, a convenience sample of 477 university students participated in a survey that included the question "Would you say you 'had sex' with someone if the most intimate behavior you engaged in was" each of 11 behaviors. Chi-square tests and independent samples t tests were used to assess gender differences, and chi-square analyses were used to compare the data with similar data collected in 1991. Predictors of beliefs concerning the classification of oral-genital contact were assessed using logistic regression analysis. The majority of respondents indicated that penile-vaginal intercourse and penile-anal intercourse constitute sex (98% and 78%, respectively), but only about 20% believed the same was true of oral-genital contact. The proportion classifying oral-genital contact as sex in 2007 was about half that in 1991. This difference was consistent for both sexes and for both giving and receiving oral-genital stimulation. Responses did not vary by respondents' sexual experience or demographic characteristics. Sociocultural conceptualizations of oral-genital contact have shifted in a way that may leave people who engage in this activity unmindful of its potential health risks. Sex education programs, which generally focus on penile-vaginal contact, could help STD prevention efforts by explaining the risks associated with oral-genital stimulation and the measures that can be taken to minimize those risks.

  8. Oral Health Beliefs, Attitudes, and Practices of Albanian Immigrants in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xhihani, Blerina; Rainchuso, Lori; Smallidge, Dianne; Dominick, Christine

    2017-04-01

    Research indicates a high prevalence of oral disease among Albanians. There is a lack of evidence regarding oral health beliefs and practices among Albanian immigrants in the United States and abroad. This research seeks to better understand the oral health beliefs, attitudes, and practices among Albanian immigrants living in the United States. A descriptive study was employed with a purposive sample (n = 211) of Albanian adult immigrants. A cross-sectional validated questionnaire was provided in both English and Albanian, with a response rate of 66 %. Results revealed a high use of dental services among respondents, with 68 % reported as having a dental visit and cleaning within the past year. Although 25 % of participants stated their parents and grandparents have used folk remedies, 88 % of them stated that use of folk remedies did not influence their decision to seek professional dental care. Increasing age was inversely associated with the belief in the importance of retaining natural teeth, as older respondents were less likely to agree with the prior statement; older respondents were more likely to agree with the statement "bleeding gums are normal." Low oral health care access and utilization was not a factor among the majority of the Albanian immigrants studied. Focusing on providing age appropriate oral health education and behavioral strategies could increase oral health knowledge and potentially improve poor oral health status among this population.

  9. Fluoride and Oral Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S

    2016-01-01

    The discovery during the first half of the 20th century of the link between natural fl uoride, adjusted fl uoride levels in drinking water and reduced dental caries prevalence proved to be a stimulus for worldwide on-going research into the role of fl uoride in improving oral health...... including salt, milk, tablets, toothpaste, gels and varnishes. In 1993, the World Health Organization convened an Expert Committee to provide authoritative information on the role of fl uorides in the promotion of oral health throughout the world (WHO TRS 846, 1994). This present publication is a revision...... of the original 1994 document, again using the expertise of researchers from the extensive fi elds of knowledge required to successfully implement complex interventions such as the use of fl uorides to improve dental and oral health. Financial support for research into the development of these new fl uoride...

  10. Oral pregnancy tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh M Gondivkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyogenic granuloma is one of the inflammatory hyperplasias seen in the oral cavity. This term is a misnomer because the lesion is unrelated to infection and in reality arises in response to various stimuli such as low-grade local irritation, traumatic injury, or hormonal factors. It predominantly occurs in the second decade of life in young females, possibly because of the vascular effects of female hormones. Clinically, oral pyogenic granuloma is a smooth or lobulated exophytic lesion manifesting as small, red erythematous growth on a pedunculated or sometimes sessile base, which is usually hemorrhagic. Although excisional surgery is the treatment of choice , some other treatment protocols such as the use of Nd:YAG laser, flash lamp pulsed dye laser, cryosurgery, intralesional injection of ethanol or corticosteroids, and sodium tetradecyl sulfate sclerotherapy have been proposed. We present the case of a 25-year-old pregnant woman with large oral pyogenic granuloma.

  11. Oral varix: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazos, Jerónimo P; Piemonte, Eduardo D; Panico, René L

    2015-06-01

    Ageing produces several changes on the oral cavity, and oral varix (OV) is among the most common, and they are related with some medical diseases; however, this association is not clear. The aim of this article is to offer a review of OV, regarding aetiology, clinical and histological features, associated factors, treatment and its clinical significance. Except for a higher incidence of OV in elder individuals, there is limited evidence that supports its relationship with medical conditions such us cardiovascular diseases or portal hypertension. Also, there is no consensus regarding its pathogenesis, but the hemodynamic theory embodies the most comprehensive approach. The high prevalence in elderly people stresses the need for regular oral examination, but more detailed studies regarding OV in relation to systemic diseases are needed. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Oral Microbiology and Immunology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlén, Gunnar; Fiehn, Nils-Erik; Olsen, Ingar

    , dental assistants and trainees may find it a useful source of reference. The contents are based on general microbiology and immunology. Oral microbiology is given particular attention, with examples relevant to oral infectious diseases. Each chapter opens with a relatively short pre-reading section......This textbook is based on the curricula for dental students in the Nordic countries, and the authors teach the subject at three universities in Denmark, Norway and Sweden. Although primarily for undergraduates, the book may also appeal to Ph.D. students and general practitioners. In addition...

  13. Sclerotherapy for oral hemangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navadeepak Korvipati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemangiomas are well-known benign neoplasms of the body most commonly occurring in the head and neck region and less commonly in the oral cavity. The predominant site of occurrence, in the oral cavity, is lips followed by gingiva, tongue and palate. Treatment is primarily dependent on correct diagnosis of the lesion and its anatomic location. Here, we report a case of hemangioma on posterior third of the tongue in 34-year-old male patient, who was treated by sclerotherapy with sodium tetradecylsulphate (setrol sclerosing agent.

  14. Maintaining oral health after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Hazel

    Oral care is essential to maintain oral health and prevent complications such as tooth loss, gingivitis and periodontitis. Poor oral hygiene in dependent, hospitalised patients could lead to serious complications such as chest infection, pneumonia, poor nutritional intake and increased length of hospital stay. Patients who have had a stroke may have physical and cognitive problems that make them dependent on others for their personal care, including oral care. It is essential that nurses and carers understand why maintaining oral hygiene is important following stroke and the consequences of poor oral care.

  15. REVITALIZING THE SUNAN KUDUS’ MULTICULTURALISM IN RESPONDING ISLAMIC RADICALISM IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Said

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article’s main focus is on exploring Sunan Kudus’multiculturalism in Java with special focus on revitalizing them in responding Islamic radicalism in Indonesia. In this writing the authors use the semiotic and phenomenological approaches and supported by the oral history. Semiotics in this case can be a form of deconstruction of the understanding that was considered to be established. So it will be able to find the cultural capital with does not separate the spiritualism of Sunan Kudus. Some important conclusions are: First, the presence of Sunan Kudus in has brought the mission of Walisong to transmit a peaceful Islam in Java through a cultural approach, according to prominent local situation and conditions of each. Second, Sunan Kudus has built a successful political integration with the rights of democratic participation that considers tolerance and equality for citizens even though dealing with the different religious communities such as Hindu and Confucianism so that awakened a ‘social system’ with democratic civility, known as “Kudus Darussalam”. Third, the values and spirit of multiculturalism of Sunan Kudus are a cultural capital that will be the habitus of the community and strengthen democratic civility to the level of actions (behaviors, when reconstructed through a systematic educational values in responding the Islamic radicalism in the name of democracy. Keywords: Revitalizing, Sunan Kudus’ multiculturalism, Islamic radicalism

  16. Current practice and knowledge of oral care for cancer patients: a survey of supportive health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Gerry J; Epstein, Joel B; Williams, Karen B; Gorsky, Meir; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E

    2005-01-01

    The Oral Care Study Section of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) and the International Society for Oral Oncology (ISOO) conducted a survey on clinical practices of oral/dental management of cancer patients among supportive health care providers. The main purpose was to evaluate the knowledge and current practice for preventing and managing oral side effects associated with intensive chemotherapy (ICT), hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT), and radiation therapy to the head and neck (H&N RT). A questionnaire designed and pretested was sent to 212 MASCC/ISOO members around the world with different dental and medical backgrounds. Seventy-four individuals (35%) responded. The majority of respondents were aware of possible oral complications and provided patients with clinical strategies and recommendations although there was considerable variability among the respondents. Approximately 75% stated that patients were referred for oral/dental care prior to H&N RT and ICT including HCT. However, integrated dental and medical services were reported available in only about 25% of the institutions, and most patients were referred to community-based dental professionals. The survey represents a first review of current, international oral care practices. It suggests a need to develop evidence-based clinical guidelines to support effective oral/dental interventions and management strategies for this population. Furthermore, strategies for implementation of oral care protocols and better integration of dental and medical services should be developed. Caution in interpreting these findings is urged due to the limited response rate.

  17. Oral and written instruction of oral hygiene: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnacke, Daniela; Beldoch, Magdalena; Bohn, Gertrude-Heidi; Seghaoui, Ouarda; Hegel, Nicole; Deinzer, Renate

    2012-10-01

    This randomized, evaluator-masked, controlled study evaluates the effectiveness of oral in contrast to written instruction of oral hygiene. Eighty-three students without clinical signs of periodontitis were randomly assigned to either a control group or one of three experimental conditions: 1) written instruction, 2) standardized oral instruction, or 3) individualized oral instruction. Plaque and bleeding indices were assessed to analyze intervention effects on oral health and oral hygiene skills. Measurements took place at baseline and 4 weeks after intervention. Groups differed significantly with respect to gingival bleeding and were tentatively significant with respect to oral hygiene skills. Participants who had received oral individualized instructions showed the best results. A gradient of effectiveness of the instruction methods was observed with most favorable results for the individualized instruction.

  18. Tryptophan depletion and aggressive responding in healthy males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, F G; Dougherty, D M; Swann, A C; Collins, D; Davis, C M; Cherek, D R

    1996-07-01

    In order to study the effect of decreasing plasma tryptophan levels on aggressive responding in a controlled laboratory setting, we administered two doses (25 g and 100 g) of a tryptophan-free amino acid mixture to ten healthy male subjects after 24 h of a low tryptophan diet. Subjects were screened for current or past psychiatric, or non-psychiatric medical illness. Aggressive responding on a free-operant laboratory measure of aggression (the Point Subtraction Aggression Paradigm) and plasma tryptophan levels were measured before and after drinking the amino acid mixture. There was a significant increase in aggressive responding 5 h after the 100 g mixture and a significant increase in aggressive responding 6 h after the 25 g mixture compared to a baseline day when no drink was administered. There was also a significant decrease in plasma tryptophan at 5 hours after ingestion compared to baseline for both doses of amino acid mixture. This study supports the hypothesis that tryptophan depletion increases aggressive responding in healthy males in a laboratory setting, probably by decreasing brain serotonin.

  19. Inequalities in oral health and oral health promotion

    OpenAIRE

    Moysés, Samuel Jorge

    2012-01-01

    This article offers a critical review of the problem of inequalities in oral health and discusses strategies for disease prevention and oral health promotion. It shows that oral health is not merely a result of individual biological, psychological, and behavioral factors; rather, it is the sum of collective social conditions created when people interact with the social environment. Oral health status is directly related to socioeconomic position across the socioeconomic gradient in almost all...

  20. Probiotics as oral health biotherapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Shyamali; Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Tabrizian, Maryam; Prakash, Satya

    2012-09-01

    Oral health is affected by its resident microorganisms. Three prominent oral disorders are dental caries, gingivitis and periodontitis, with the oral microbiota playing a key role in the initiation/progression of all three. Understanding the microbiota and the diseases they may cause is critical to the development of new therapeutics. This review is focused on probiotics for the prevention and/or treatment of oral diseases. This review describes the oral ecosystem and its correlation with oral health/disease. The pathogenesis and current prevention/treatment strategies of periodontal diseases (PD) and dental caries (DC) are depicted. An introduction of probiotics is followed by an analysis of their role in PD and DC, and their potential role(s) in oral health. Finally, a discussion ensues on the future research directions and limitations of probiotics for oral health. An effective oral probiotic formulation should contribute to the prevention/treatment of microbial diseases of the oral cavity. Understanding the oral microbiota's role in oral disease is important for the development of a therapeutic to prevent/treat dental diseases. However, investigations into clinical efficacy, delivery/dose optimization, mechanism(s) of action and other related parameters are yet to be fully explored. Keeping this in mind, investigations into oral probiotic therapies are proving promising.

  1. Oral biofilms, oral and periodontal infections, and systemic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddi, Abhiram; Scannapieco, Frank A

    2013-10-01

    Oral biofilms harbor several hundreds of species of bacteria as well as spirochetes, protozoa, fungi and viruses. The composition of the oral biofilm varies from health to disease. It is the source of microorganisms that cause dental and periodontal infections. Oral infections and periodontal disease have been implicated in the etiopathogenesis of several important chronic systemic diseases.

  2. Oral hygiene practices and risk of oral leukoplakia | Macigo | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the influence of oral hygiene habits and practices on the risk of developing oral leukoplakia. Design: Case control study. Setting: Githongo sublocation in Meru District. Subjects: Eighty five cases and 141 controls identified in a house-to-house screening. Results: The relative risk (RR) of oral ...

  3. The New Orality: Oral Characteristics of Computer-Mediated Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Sharmila Pixy; Montgomery, Maureen

    1996-01-01

    Considers the characteristics of orality and literacy developed in the work of scholars such as Walter Ong to consider computer-mediated communication (CMC) as the potential site of a "new orality" which is neither purely oral or literate. Notes that the medium of CMC is writing, which has traditionally represented the…

  4. Metabolomic Studies of Oral Biofilm, Oral Cancer, and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washio, Jumpei; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2016-06-02

    Oral diseases are known to be closely associated with oral biofilm metabolism, while cancer tissue is reported to possess specific metabolism such as the 'Warburg effect'. Metabolomics might be a useful method for clarifying the whole metabolic systems that operate in oral biofilm and oral cancer, however, technical limitations have hampered such research. Fortunately, metabolomics techniques have developed rapidly in the past decade, which has helped to solve these difficulties. In vivo metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm have produced various findings. Some of these findings agreed with the in vitro results obtained in conventional metabolic studies using representative oral bacteria, while others differed markedly from them. Metabolomic analyses of oral cancer tissue not only revealed differences between metabolomic profiles of cancer and normal tissue, but have also suggested a specific metabolic system operates in oral cancer tissue. Saliva contains a variety of metabolites, some of which might be associated with oral or systemic disease; therefore, metabolomics analysis of saliva could be useful for identifying disease-specific biomarkers. Metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm, oral cancer, and saliva could contribute to the development of accurate diagnostic, techniques, safe and effective treatments, and preventive strategies for oral and systemic diseases.

  5. ORAL HYGIENE PRACTICES AND RISK OF ORAL LEUKOPLAKIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-04-01

    Apr 1, 2006 ... Results: The relative risk (RR) of oral leukoplakia increased gradually across the various brushing .... results of the assessment of other oral leukoplakia ... survey of persons aged 15 years and above aimed at identifying the study subjects. The screening yielded 85 oral leukoplakia cases identified on the.

  6. Imaging in oral cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supreeta Arya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral cavity squamous cell cancers form a significant percentage of the cancers seen in India. While clinical examination allows direct visualization, it cannot evaluate deep extension of disease. Cross-sectional imaging has become the cornerstone in the pretreatment evaluation of these cancers and provides accurate information about the extent and depth of disease that can help decide the appropriate management strategy and indicate prognosis. Early cancers are treated with a single modality, either surgery or radiotherapy while advanced cancers are offered a combination of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Imaging can decide resectability, help plan the precise extent of resection, and indicate whether organ conservation therapy should be offered. Quality of life issues necessitate preservation of form and function and pretreatment imaging helps plan appropriate reconstruction and counsel patients regarding lifestyle changes. Oral cavity has several subsites and the focus of the review is squamous cancers of the gingivobuccal region, oral tongue and retromolar trigone as these are most frequently encountered in the subcontinent. References for this review were identified by searching Medline and PubMed databases. Only articles published in English language literature were selected. This review aims to familiarize the radiologist with the relevant anatomy of the oral cavity, discuss the specific issues that influence prognosis and management at the above subsites, the optimal imaging methods, the role of imaging in accurately staging these cancers and in influencing management. A checklist for reporting will emphasize the information to be conveyed by the radiologist.

  7. [Oral lymphomas in AIDS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llanes, F; López, G; Asenjo, J A; Martín, C

    1989-05-01

    We present two cases of AIDS in drug-addicts, with mouth lymphoma. The diagnosis was established by a gum biopsy which gave high-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma lymphoblastic "B" type. It is very rare that the oral mucous is affected by lymphomas, but in AIDS and immunodeficiencies it is more common.

  8. Oral Health and Women

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-12

    This women's health podcast focuses on the importance of maintaining good oral health during pregnancy.  Created: 5/12/2009 by Office of Women’s Health (OWH) and National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/12/2009.

  9. Evaluation and Oral Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Alan M., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Articles in this journal issue focus primarily on evaluation in the language arts and oral communication. Following an introduction to the two themes, the articles discuss the following: (1) pop quizzes in literature, (2) holistic scoring, (3) self-evaluation strategies in prewriting and rewriting, (4) what not to do in student/teacher…

  10. Choosing an oral contraceptive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisberg, E

    1988-10-01

    This article serves as a summary of the principles of prescription, hormone content, minor side effects, prescriptions for atypical individuals and significant drug interactions for oral contraceptives. There are 5 principles for prescribing oral contraceptives: the lowest possible dose should be given that is effective and produces the least side effects: adequate instructions should be given about the mode of action, taking the medication and possible side effects; adequate instructions about managing missed pills should be given; adequate supervision and explanations should be given if side effects occur; remember that each woman is different and idiosyncratic reactions to different formulations can occur. Possible side effects include: breakthrough bleeding, amenorrhoea, dysmenorrhoea, breast fullness and tenderness, nausea, chloasma, depression, acne, migraines and weight gain. Certain individuals such as epileptics, diabetics, women over 35 and women who have recently given birth need special care. Rifampicin, the phenytoins and barbiturates can all decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives. Oral contraceptives may effect the action of anticoagulants, antidiabetic agents and imipramine.

  11. Oral heparin (Emisphere).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, A

    2000-07-01

    Emisphere (formerly in collaboration with Elan) is developing an oral heparin formulation for the potential treatment of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). The formulation uses Emisphere's proprietary carrier molecule, P-414, and had started phase III trials by January 2000 [353372]. The protocol for the trials was finalized in December 1999, and aims to demonstrate the safety and superior efficacy of oral heparin dosed for 30 days post-operatively compared to injectable enoxaparin sodium for 10 days, in the prevention of DVT following hip-replacement surgery. The studies will take place in 95 centers in the US, UK and Canada, and are expected to enroll 2250 patients [350778]. The two trials involved are expected to be completed by mid-2001 [353372]. In May 1998, Emisphere initiated a phase II study for its oral heparin product for the prevention of DVT. The study had three arms of approximately 40 patients each, who had undergone surgery for hip replacement, and was conducted at approximately 20 sites in the US and Canada. Two different doses of oral heparin were compared to subcutaneous heparin. The objective was to demonstrate that the orally administered heparin is well tolerated and comparable to subcutaneous heparin in preventing DVT [288267]. Positive preliminary results were reported in January 1999, showing that the oral formulations were comparable to injectable heparin [311218]. Final results, reported in August 1999, demonstrated that heparin administered orally via a novel carrier system (P-414; SNAC) was comparable, in both safety and activity, to subcutaneous heparin when used to prevent venous thromboembolic events following elective hip arthroplasty [337262,337712]. The heparin formulation was developed as part of a collaboration between Emisphere and Elan investigating oral formulations of heparin and heparinoids. By January 1998, the lead product had completed four phase I trials in patients following knee and hip surgery [274905]. Results from phase I

  12. Oral cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dios, Pedro Diz; Lestón, Juan Seoane

    2010-06-01

    Pain may be the initial symptom in oral cancer, and is a common complaint both in patients awaiting treatment and in those already in treatment. However, little has been published in the literature on the management of oral cancer pain. Effective pain control requires a multimodal approach in which pharmacological management based on the World Health Organization (WHO) analgesic ladder continues to play an essential role. Although different routes are available for the administration of analgesics, oral delivery continues to be the principal route for pain control in the first instance. Interventional approaches include blockade of a peripheral nerve or of the relevant ganglion, and the use of central neuraxial blockade. The intraventricular or intrathecal administration of opioids, with or without local anaesthetics, has been indicated for severe intractable pain. The development of new treatment modalities provides additional options, though further clinical research is required. There is no evidence of the efficacy of non-pharmacological methods such as acupuncture or transcutaneous nerve stimulation in the management of oral cancer pain. Surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy have also been suggested, but their results have not been quantified. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. POLITENESS STRATEGIES IN RESPONDING TO COMPLIMENTS IN JAVANESE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukarno Sukarno

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:  Javanese has been studied from many different perspectives. However, no one discusses how Javanese respond to compliments politely. The aim of this study is to investigate the politeness strategies as applied to respond to compliments by the Javanese people in Jember, East Java. The notion of politeness plays crucial role in the realization of speech acts (utterances and verbal communication in Javanese, such as responding to compliements. As utterances and verbal communications should be interpreted based on the sosio-cultural background, the politeness strategies in responding to compliments in Javanese cannot be separated from the concepts of the Javanese culture, such as: andhap-asor (lowering oneself, while exalting the others and tanggap ing sasmita (understanding the hidden meaning. First, as a Javanese, one must be able to apply the concept of andhap-asor in responding to compliments by denigrating himself. Second, a good Javanese should also have a sense of tanggap ing sasmita while responding to compliments. Consequently, failure to apply one of the cultural factors can be detrimental to the speaker, reducing the harmony of the conversation. This paper examines how politeness is manifested and conveyed within the major framework of the Javanese culture. This study is about socio-cultural pragmatics in which utterances are discussed in relation to their situations, and the cultural background which support them. The data are in the form of dialogues among students-teachers, and students-students which show the different social status among the interlocutors. The data of this research were collected by recording, and by note taking (for the parts in which recording is not possible. The data are aimed to generate the strategies used by the Javanese (in Jember, Indonesia to build politeness strategies in responding to compliments. Finally, the data of this research are examined both from the general theory of politeness, and

  14. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tissues of the face, mouth and gums to improve function, appearance and oral health. Click here to ... tissues of the face, mouth and gums to improve function, appearance and oral health. Click here to ...

  15. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained to ... and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained to ...

  16. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... mouth and gums to improve function, appearance and oral health. Click here to find out more. Facial Cosmetic ... mouth and gums to improve function, appearance and oral health. Click here to find out more. Facial Cosmetic ...

  17. Oral epithelial dysplasia classification systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warnakulasuriya, S; Reibel, J; Bouquot, J

    2008-01-01

    . In this report, we review the oral epithelial dysplasia classification systems. The three classification schemes [oral epithelial dysplasia scoring system, squamous intraepithelial neoplasia and Ljubljana classification] were presented and the Working Group recommended epithelial dysplasia grading for routine...

  18. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at risk for oral cancer? Learn the facts. White patches of the oral tissues — leukoplakia Red patches — erythroplakia Red and white patches — erythroleukoplakia A sore that fails to heal ...

  19. Cryogun cryotherapy for oral leukoplakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hung-Pin; Chen, Hsin-Ming; Cheng, Shih-Jung; Yu, Chuan-Hang; Chiang, Chun-Pin

    2012-09-01

    Our previous study showed that cotton-swab cryotherapy is an alternative treatment modality for oral leukoplakia. This study used liquid nitrogen spray with a cryogun (cryogun cryotherapy) to treat 60 oral leukoplakia lesions. Complete regression was achieved in all 60 oral leukoplakia lesions after cryogun cryotherapy. We found that 60 oral leukoplakia lesions treated with cryogen cryotherapy needed significantly fewer mean treatments (3.1 ± 1.3) to achieve complete regression than 60 previously reported oral leukoplakia lesions treated with cotton-swab cryotherapy (mean, 6.3 ± 3.8 treatments). Oral leukoplakia lesions on oral mucosal sites other than the tongue, oral leukoplakia, the cryogun cryotherapy needed fewer mean treatments to achieve complete regression of the lesions than the cotton-swab cryotherapy. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for further information Your oral and maxillofacial surgeon (OMS) is the expert for diagnosing and surgically treating ... late in its development. Your family dentist or OMS is in the best position to detect oral ...

  1. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and maxillofacial ... and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and maxillofacial ...

  2. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... finely attune the oral and maxillofacial surgeon to the need for harmony between facial appearance and function. As ... finely attune the oral and maxillofacial surgeon to the need for harmony between facial appearance and function. As ...

  3. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ... Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  4. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oral and maxillofacial surgeons surgically treat the soft tissues of the face, mouth and gums to improve ... Oral and maxillofacial surgeons surgically treat the soft tissues of the face, mouth and gums to improve ...

  5. Oral care of hospitalized children

    OpenAIRE

    Machalová, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    This bachelor's thesis deals with the care of oral cavity for hospitalized children and compares the standards of oral cavity care for children hospitalized in standard pediatric wards with those for children hospitalized in the pediatric bone marrow transplant unit. The thesis provides the anatomical and physiological beckground information on oral care, describes the most common pathological issues, stresses the importance of proper mouth care and explains how to practise oral hygiene and s...

  6. Changeability of Oral Cavity Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Surdacka, Anna; Strzyka?a, Krystyna; Rydzewska, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Objectives In dentistry, the results of in vivo studies on drugs, dental fillings or prostheses are routinely evaluated based on selected oral cavity environment parameters at specific time points. Such evaluation may be confounded by ongoing changes in the oral cavity environment induced by diet, drug use, stress and other factors. The study aimed to confirm oral cavity environment changeability. Methods 24 healthy individuals aged 20?30 had their oral cavity environment prepared by having p...

  7. Age-related oral changes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mckenna, Gerald

    2010-10-01

    Age-related oral changes are seen in the oral hard and soft tissues as well as in bone, the temporomandibular joints and the oral mucosa. As older patients retain their natural teeth for longer, the clinical picture consists of normal physiological age changes in combination with pathological and iatrogenic effects. Clinical Relevance: With an ageing population retaining more of its natural teeth for longer, dental professionals should expect to observe oral age changes more frequently.

  8. Oral Candida as an aggravating factor of mucositis Induced by radiotherapy; Candida Oral como fator agravante da mucosite radioinduzida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simoes, Cristiane Araujo; Castro, Jurema Freire Lisboa de; Cazal, Claudia [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de odontologia

    2011-07-01

    Antineoplastic treatment induces some undesirable consequences in head and neck cancer patients. Often, the emergence of major clinical manifestations, such as oral mucositis, results in temporary interruption of the treatment, decreasing the patients' quality of life, and increasing hospital costs. Radio-induced or chemo-induced oral mucositis is possibly aggravated by opportunist fungal infections, which turn the mucositis more resistant to the conventional treatments. Objective: this study aims to identify the presence of Candida sp. as a possible aggravating factor of oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer under antineoplastic treatment. Method: all patients with radio- or chemo-induced oral mucositis from the Cancer Hospital of Pernambuco, treated between October 2008 and April 2009, were selected for the study. The prevalence of Candida sp was measured through the cytological analysis of oral mucosa in patients with oral mucositis. The fungal presence was correlated with the mucositis severity. Results: the results showed a positive association between fungal colonization and more several lesions (degrees III and IV of mucositis). Conclusion: The outcomes shown may contribute to a solution for unconventional mucosites, which do not respond to the usual treatment. (author)

  9. Clinical consequences of oral mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Carlton G; Wingard, John

    2004-02-01

    To identify the clinical manifestations, risk factors, secondary complications, and assessment and management of oral mucositis. Professional journals, websites, and books. Secondary consequences of oral mucositis include infection, xerostomia, hemorrhage, and nutritional deficits. Nurses should have an extensive knowledge base about the appropriate interventions that can be used to alleviate or lessen the consequences often associated with oral mucositis.

  10. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cancer of the head, neck and mouth. The Oral Cancer Foundation estimates that close to 42,000 Americans ... diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Oral cancer’s mortality is particularly high, not because it is ...

  11. EAMJ-MArch Oral health

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    iMac User

    2008-03-01

    Mar 1, 2008 ... elsewhere on handicapped children have shown varying results; some showing poor oral health and others showing similar oral health status as those of normal children (1-5). These differences may be attributable, at least in part, to the differences in the level of disability and the level of oral health care.

  12. Promoting oral health as part of an interprofessional community-based women's health event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Shelia S; Funk, Amy D; Shockey, Alcinda K; Sharps, Gina M; Crout, Richard J; Frere, Cathryn L; Morgan, Susan K; DeBiase, Christina B; Hobbs, Gerald R

    2014-09-01

    Heart disease is the number one killer of women, and studies have shown connections between cardiovascular and oral health. However, interprofessional community-based participatory initiatives promoting women's oral health have received little research attention. This study evaluated the effectiveness of personalized oral health education (POHE) during a free one-day interprofessional women's health promotion event. The objectives were to 1) assess the participants' knowledge about the connection between oral health and heart disease; 2) disseminate information about oral-systemic linkages; 3) encourage comprehensive dental examinations; and 4) evaluate POHE outcomes. West Virginia University School of Dentistry faculty and students delivered POHE to the participants. These POHE instructors were calibrated with a standardized script regarding periodontal disease, health impact of tobacco, xerostomia-inducing medications, and oral hygiene instruction. Immediately prior to and following each POHE session, all the participants (N=165; 100 percent response rate) completed a number-coded questionnaire. The findings showed that the participants' knowledge of oral-systemic health linkages had increased following the POHE. The respondents received oral health kits and were offered discount vouchers toward the cost of a comprehensive oral examination at the dental school. This replicable model may prove useful to other dental schools in promoting women's oral health.

  13. Tips for Good Oral Health during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tips for Good Oral Health During Pregnancy B elow are tips for taking care of your oral health while you are pregnant. Getting oral health care, practicing good oral hygiene, eating healthy foods, ...

  14. Oral health: equity and social determinants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwan, Stella; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2010-01-01

    This book chapter discusses the social determinants of oral health, and identifies interventions that have been, or can be, used in addressing oral health inequities (e.g. oral health promotion, education programmes, improving access to oral health care)....

  15. Identification of genetic polymorphisms that predict responder/non-responder profiles to the RhD antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Joanne C G; Armstrong, Nicola J; Yuan, Fang Fang; Flower, Robert L; Dyer, Wayne B

    2015-12-01

    Regular plasma donors who produce high titre anti-D immunoglobulin (Ig) are overseen by the Australian Red Cross Blood Service RhD Program. New donors to the program are immunised with small amounts of RhD-positive RBCs, whilst donors who have developed anti-D due to previous RhD-incompatible blood transfusion or pregnancy are boosted with RhD-positive RBCs to maintain a high level of serum anti-D Ig. A significant proportion of primarily immunised individuals do not respond to RhD immunisation and are therefore unnecessarily exposed to the risks involved in RBC sensitisation. We genotyped 184 anti-D donors for ∼9000 immunological and inflammatory genetic polymorphisms on an Affymetrix GeneChip, and validated the results with a High-Resolution Melt analysis assay. We built and validated a predictive logistic regression model using High Responder and Non-Responder anti-D donors that incorporated highly-associated polymorphisms and gender. High Responder and Non-Responder profiles in anti-D donors were significantly associated with a shortlist of 13 genetic polymorphisms and sex of the donor. The derivation of a logistic regression model showed an accuracy rate of 92.6% that was subsequently validated as 60.0% with an independent set of donor samples. This study has developed a logistic regression model and a genotyping assay that can predict the responder profiles of anti-D donors and could potentially be applied to new donors and transfusion-dependent patients in a clinical setting. Additionally, target polymorphisms identified in immunological genes could help to elucidate the immunomodulatory pathways regulating the immune response to the RhD antigen, and to other RBC antigens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Detecting and explaining aberrant responding on the Outcome Questionnaire-45

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conijn, J.M.; Emons, W.H.M.; de Jong, K.; Sijtsma, K.

    2015-01-01

    We applied item response theory based person-fit analysis (PFA) to data of the Outcome Questionnaire-45 (OQ-45) to investigate the prevalence and causes of aberrant responding in a sample of Dutch clinical outpatients. The Formula person-fit statistic was used to detect misfitting item-score

  17. Plant Reproduction: AMOR Enables Males to Respond to Female Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresselhaus, Thomas; Coimbra, Silvia

    2016-04-25

    The pollen tube of flowering plants undertakes a long journey to transport two sperm cells for double fertilization. New work on pollen tube guidance has identified an arabinogalactan-derived ovular factor that primes tubes to respond to female gametophyte-secreted attraction signals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Dense graph limits under respondent-driven sampling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Siva Athreya

    Sub-graph count (fingerprints). Source: IUPUI Network Sampling course. Page 15. Aim and Result. • Motivation: provide a rigorous framework for Respondent. Driven Sampling on dense graphs. • Theorem : (in words). Limit of a dense graph sequence constructed via R.D.S., where the sequence of the vertex-sets is ergodic, ...

  19. WS-009: EPR-First Responders: Personnel protection guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this working session is that the participants can apply their knowledge in a laboratory explosion with radioactive material and a contamination risks by cobalt source. The first responder have to identify the incident commander, the type of response required, the risks of the emergency, the requirements for transporting the victims to the hospital and the actors involved in a radiological emergency

  20. Understanding and responding to HIV risk in young South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    women (Box 1). The factors fall into several broad categories that describe a network of inter-related risk (Fig. 1). At a structural level, young women at greatest risk of HIV acquisition are those from socioeconomically deprived communities. ARTICLE. Understanding and responding to HIV risk in young. South African women: ...

  1. Authors' Rejoinder to Respondents (Shulman, Steinberg, & Piquero, 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Males, Mike A.; Brown, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Respondents, in "A Mistaken Account of the Age-Crime Curve: Response to Males and Brown," dispute our finding that virtually all of the discrepancy in violent crime rates between adolescents/emerging adults versus older adults is explained not by young age per se but by higher poverty levels among the young. Our rejoinder argues that…

  2. Responding to LGBT forced migration in East Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitta Zomorodi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Following the passage of Uganda’s Anti-Homosexuality Act in December 2013, hundreds of LGBT individuals fled to Kenya seeking safety. A variety of interventions is needed in both Uganda and Kenya to respond effectively.

  3. Responding Proactively to Criticisms of Literacy-Learning Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanacore, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    Offers five suggestions which may be helpful to educators in responding proactively to criticisms of literacy-learning practices, as they work cooperatively with parents, Boards of Education, tutors, and other key players in reinforcing the perspective that literacy learning is genuinely valued and is connected to meaningful contexts during daily…

  4. How the Brain Responds to "Any": An MEG Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesan, Graciela; Johnson, Blake W.; Crain, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The word "any" may appear in some sentences, but not in others. For example, "any" is permitted in sentences that contain the word "nobody", as in "Nobody ate any fruit". However, in a minimally different context "any" seems strikingly anomalous: *"Everybody ate any fruit". The aim of the present study was to investigate how the brain responds to…

  5. Editorial: How to respond to reviewers' comments | Muchenje | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Animal Science. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 47, No 2 (2017) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Editorial: How to respond to reviewers' comments.

  6. The Self as a Responding-and Responsible-Artifact

    OpenAIRE

    Dennett, Daniel C.

    2003-01-01

    The powerful illusion of a unified, Cartesian self responsible for intentional action is contrasted with the biologically sounder model of competitive processes that yield an only partially coherent agency, and the existence of the illusion of self is explained as an evolved feature of communicating agents, capable of responding to requests and queries about their own decisions and actions.

  7. Investigating prosodic relations between initiating and responding laughs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Truong, Khiet Phuong; Trouvain, Jürgen

    In dialogue, it is not uncommon for people to laugh together. This joint laughter often results in overlapping laughter, consisting of an initiating laugh (the first one), and a responding laugh (the second one). In previous studies, we found that overlapping laughs are acoustically different from

  8. Poetic Voices: Writing, Reading, and Responding to Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandre, Patricia E.

    2012-01-01

    "Poetic Voices: Writing, Reading, and Responding to Poetry" was the title of the 2011 Master Class in Children's Literature. Woven into this session were the insights of poets Joyce Sidman and Pat Mora who shared their creative processes and the voices that inspire their poetry. In addition, Barbara Kiefer provided advice regarding how to connect…

  9. Internationalizing the Business School--Responding to the Customer's Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Bernard A.

    1997-01-01

    Efforts to internationalize the business curriculum in the United States must be supported by strong institutional commitment and implementation, and reflect the world business community and the country's multicultural business environment. Programs should conform to new accreditation standards and respond to client demand concerning emerging…

  10. 76 FR 18716 - Manoj Bhayana, Respondent; Final Decision and Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    ... financial position * * *'' to do so. (Id.) Such a response demonstrates Respondent's attitude towards... statements to his ``low level'' position at SparesGlobal or justify his misconduct based on his asserted fear..., corporation, or business organization related to Manoj Bhayana by affiliation, ownership, control, or position...

  11. Responding to Individual Differences in Inclusive Classrooms in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kraayenoord, Christina E.; Waterworth, David; Brady, Trish

    2014-01-01

    Responding to individual differences in classrooms in which there is increasing diversity is one of the challenges of inclusive education in Australia. The linking of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) and assistive technologies (ATs) is one way in which this challenge can be addressed. This article describes an initiative, known as…

  12. Global warming: fly populations are responding rapidly to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heerwaarden, Belinda; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2007-01-09

    New studies on chromosome inversion polymorphisms in Drosophila species show that the genetic constitution of populations is responding to recent climate change and that widespread species may have the potential to undergo adaptive shifts. Genetic markers in widespread species can act as indicators of climate change on natural populations.

  13. Occupational health surveillance: Pulmonary function testing in emergency responders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D McCluskey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Emergency responders may be exposed to a variety of fumes, gases, and particulates during the course of their job that can affect pulmonary function (PF and require the use of respiratory protection. This investigation used occupational health monitoring examination data to characterize PF in a population currently employed as emergency responders. PF tests for workers who required health examinations to ensure fitness for continued respirator use were compared to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III Raw Spirometry database to determine if decreased PF was associated with employment as an emergency responder. The results of this research indicated that the emergency responders experienced a modest, but statistically significant, increase in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 and forced vital capacity (FVC mean values over the NHANES III population in both total and stratified analyses, including stratification by age, gender, height, and smoking history. Results are likely due to a combination of effectively controlled exposures in the workplace, and the healthy worker effect among long-term workers. PF testing required by the Occupational and Safety Health Administration (OSHA has substantial utility for conducting occupational surveillance at the population level. In this investigation, we were able to quickly evaluate if abnormal PF existed in an industrial sector known to have exposures that, when uncontrolled, can lead to PF impairment.

  14. Responding electronically to student drafts on campus: Dis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... comments which do not promote dialogue. The study's main recommendations are that writing respondents should ensure that feedback phrasing is dialogical to encourage students to critique and explore discourses and for discipline experts to incorporate draft dialogue as a feedback practice into their writing practices.

  15. 17 CFR 200.113 - Opportunity to respond; interception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Opportunity to respond; interception. 200.113 Section 200.113 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION; CONDUCT AND ETHICS; AND INFORMATION AND REQUESTS Code of Behavior Governing Ex Parte...

  16. Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Camilla; Reibel, Jesper; Hietanen, J

    2012-01-01

    In Scandinavia, as in many European countries, most patients consult their general dentist once a year or more. This gives the dentist a unique opportunity and an obligation to make an early diagnosis of oral diseases, which is beneficial for both the patient and the society. Thus, the dentist must...... as new approaches, treatments and diagnostic possibilities develop. Likewise, the role of the dentist in the community changes and may vary in different countries. As members of the Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine and subject representatives of oral pathology and oral...... medicine, we feel obliged to contribute to the discussion of how the guidelines of the dental curriculum support the highest possible standards of dental education. This article is meant to delineate a reasonable standard of oral pathology and oral medicine in the European dental curriculum and to guide...

  17. An empirically generated responder definition for rosacea treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staedtler G

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Gerald Staedtler,1 Kaweh Shakery,2 Jan Endrikat,3,4 Richard Nkulikiyinka,2 Christoph Gerlinger1,4 1Bayer AG, Pharmaceutical Statistics, 2Bayer AG, Dermatology & Anti-infectives 2, 3Bayer AG, Radiology, Berlin, 4Department of Gynecology, Obstetrics and Reproductive Medicine, University Medical School of Saarland, Homburg/Saar, Germany Objective: The aim of this study was to empirically generate a responder definition for the treatment of papulopustular rosacea.Methods: A total of 8 multicenter clinical studies on patients with papulopustular facial rosacea were analyzed. All patients were treated with azelaic acid and/or comparator treatments. The severity of rosacea was described by the Investigator Global Assessment (IGA and the number of lesions. Patients with the IGA score of “clear/minimal” were considered as responders, and those staying in the range of IGA “mild to severe” as nonresponders. The respective number of lesions was determined.Results: A total of 2,748 patients providing 12,410 measurements were included. After treatment, responders showed 2.23±2.48 lesions (median 2 lesions [0–3], and nonresponders showed 13.74±10.40 lesions (median 12 lesions [6–18]. The optimal cutoff point between both groups was 5.69 lesions.Conclusion: The calculated cutoff point of 5.69 lesions allows discrimination of responders (5 or less remaining lesions and nonresponders (6 or more remaining lesions of therapeutic interventions in rosacea. Keywords: rosacea, Investigator Global Assessment, facial lesions, responder

  18. Burdens on emergency responders after a terrorist attack in Berlin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesemann, U; Zimmermann, P; Mahnke, M; Butler, O; Polk, S; Willmund, G

    2018-02-16

    Terrorist attacks induce various responses in emergency responders. Addressing this range of responses in individual workers is of central interest. To assess the gender- and occupation-specific effects of a terrorist attack, particularly in emergency responders. This was a pilot study. Emergency responders present during the 2016 terrorist attack at Breitscheidplatz in Berlin were asked to participate. Measures for crisis management had been previously implemented. Stress (Patient Health Questionnaire [PHQ]), quality of life (The World Health Organization Quality of Life [WHOQOL-BREF]), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 [PCL-5]) and current psychological symptoms (Brief Symptom Inventory [BSI]) were assessed. Thirty-seven subjects were included, 11 female and 26 male. The occupational groups included 16 firefighters, six police officers, five psychosocial health care personnel and nine members of aid organizations. Three months after the attack, female workers showed higher scores in stress and paranoid ideation, police officers showed higher scores in hostility and firefighters scored lower quality of life in environment and physical health. The mental health burden identified in this study plays an important role for emergency responders after terrorist attacks. Differences between occupational groups may be attributable to differences in tasks that responders perform during acute incidents. The presence of these differences 3 months after the incident suggests that these are at least medium-term conditions. This study may inform the development of treatments and policies and it thus recommended to develop a multi-level assessment and treatment programme that is gender- and occupation-specific. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  19. Oral health: equity and social determinants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwan, Stella; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2010-01-01

    This book chapter discusses the social determinants of oral health, and identifies interventions that have been, or can be, used in addressing oral health inequities (e.g. oral health promotion, education programmes, improving access to oral health care).......This book chapter discusses the social determinants of oral health, and identifies interventions that have been, or can be, used in addressing oral health inequities (e.g. oral health promotion, education programmes, improving access to oral health care)....

  20. Maxillectomy defects - to reconstruct or not? Pilot survey of Nigerian oral and maxillofacial surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdurrazaq Olanrewaju Taiwo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The choice of reconstruction options for maxillectomy defects varies significantly. Factors affecting it range from the type of defect to the surgeon's expertise. This study aims to evaluate the practice of Nigerian Oral and Maxillofacial surgeons in the reconstruction of post-maxillectomy defects. Materials and Methods: The survey was conducted by use of questionnaires administered at the annual scientific meeting of the oral and maxillofacial surgeons of Nigeria in Ibadan 2012. Results: A response rate of 66.7% was achieved. All of our respondents are consultant oral and maxillofacial surgeons, 80% of whom practice in a teaching hospital. All but one of them perform maxillectomies, however only 25% of them offer surgical reconstruction of the resulting defects to patients. Flaps have been used by 25% of the respondents, while none of them has employed microvascular reconstruction. Prosthetic rehabilitation of patients is pervasive among the respondents. Conclusion: Maxillectomy defects have far-reaching consequences on patients' quality of life and attempts should be made to reconstruct such defects. Although maxillectomy is a commonly performed procedure among oral and maxillofacial surgeons in Nigeria, especially for malignancies of the oral and paranasal sinuses, surgical reconstruction of resulting defects is not so frequently done. Microvascular surgery, which is becoming a frequently utilized option among surgeons in developed nations, is still infrequently used in our environment. There is a need for oral and maxillofacial surgeons in our climes to improve their skills so as to increase the range of reconstructive options offered.

  1. Immunologically mediated oral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimson, Sudha; Balachader, N; Anita, N; Babu, R

    2015-04-01

    Immune mediated diseases of oral cavity are uncommon. The lesions may be self-limiting and undergo remission spontaneously. Among the immune mediated oral lesions the most important are lichen planus, pemphigus, erythema multiformi, epidermolysis bullosa, systemic lupus erythematosis. Cellular and humoral mediated immunity play a major role directed against epithelial and connective tissue in chronic and recurrent patterns. Confirmatory diagnosis can be made by biopsy, direct and indirect immunoflouresence, immune precipitation and immunoblotting. Therapeutic agents should be selected after thorough evaluation of immune status through a variety of tests and after determining any aggravating or provoking factors. Early and appropriate diagnosis is important for proper treatment planning contributing to better prognosis and better quality of life of patient.

  2. Immunologically mediated oral diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Jimson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune mediated diseases of oral cavity are uncommon. The lesions may be self-limiting and undergo remission spontaneously. Among the immune mediated oral lesions the most important are lichen planus, pemphigus, erythema multiformi, epidermolysis bullosa, systemic lupus erythematosis. Cellular and humoral mediated immunity play a major role directed against epithelial and connective tissue in chronic and recurrent patterns. Confirmatory diagnosis can be made by biopsy, direct and indirect immunoflouresence, immune precipitation and immunoblotting. Therapeutic agents should be selected after thorough evaluation of immune status through a variety of tests and after determining any aggravating or provoking factors. Early and appropriate diagnosis is important for proper treatment planning contributing to better prognosis and better quality of life of patient.

  3. An orthodontic oral appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marklund, Marie; Legrell, Per Erik

    2010-11-01

    This pilot study was performed to test the hypothesis that an orthodontic oral appliance (OA) that is designed to work against the backwardly directed forces on the upper incisors may counteract the reduction in overjet from these devices. Thirty patients with normal bites, good oral health, and milder sleep apnea were randomized to treatment with either OAs or orthodontic OAs. Bite changes were evaluated on plaster casts and radiographs and by questionnaires after a mean of 2.4 years in 19 frequent users. Four of nine patients in the orthodontic OA group increased their overjet by > or =0.4 mm, while none of the 10 patients in the OA group experienced that effect. Only the orthodontic OA increases the overjet; this design may therefore be beneficial to patients at risk of negative effects on their bite during OA treatment.

  4. Oral Myiasis : Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Ramli, Roszalina; Abd Rahman, Roslan

    2002-01-01

    Myiasis occurs when living tissues of mammals are invaded by eggs or larvae of flies, mainly from the order of Diptera. Most of the previousty reported cases are in the tropics and they were usually associated with inadequate personal hygiene, sometimes with poor manual dexterity. This report describes two cases of oral myiasis in cerebral palsy patients in Seremban General Hospital, Malaysia. This article also discusses the therapeutic property of maggots and highlights the importance of ora...

  5. Fluoride and Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S; Lennon, M A; Petersen, P E; Rugg-Gunn, A J; Whelton, H; Whitford, G M

    2016-06-01

    The discovery during the first half of the 20th century of the link between natural fluoride, adjusted fluoride levels in drinking water and reduced dental caries prevalence proved to be a stimulus for worldwide on-going research into the role of fluoride in improving oral health. Epidemiological studies of fluoridation programmes have confirmed their safety and their effectiveness in controlling dental caries. Major advances in our knowledge of how fluoride impacts the caries process have led to the development, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of other fluoride vehicles including salt, milk, tablets, toothpaste, gels and varnishes. In 1993, the World Health Organization convened an Expert Committee to provide authoritative information on the role of fluorides in the promotion of oral health throughout the world (WHO TRS 846, 1994). This present publication is a revision of the original 1994 document, again using the expertise of researchers from the extensive fields of knowledge required to successfully implement complex interventions such as the use of fluorides to improve dental and oral health. Financial support for research into the development of these new fluoride strategies has come from many sources including government health departments as well as international and national grant agencies. In addition, the unique role which industry has played in the development, formulation, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of the various fluoride vehicles and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of 'Fluoride and Oral Health' has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fluoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published in peer reviewed literature.

  6. Probiotics and Oral Health

    OpenAIRE

    Haukioja, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The number of products containing probiotics, viable bacteria with proven health benefits, entering the market is increasing. Traditionally, probiotics have been associated with gut health, and most clinical interest has been focused on their use for prevention or treatment of gastrointestinal infections and diseases; however, during the last decade several investigators have also suggested the use of probiotics for oral health purposes. The aim of this review is to examine potential mechanis...

  7. Challenges in Comparative Oral Epic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Miles Foley

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Originally written in 2001 and subsequently published in China, this collaborative essay explores five questions central to comparative oral epic with regard to Mongolian, South Slavic, ancient Greek, and Old English traditions: “What is a poem in oral epic tradition?” “What is a typical scene or theme in oral epic tradition?” “What is a poetic line in oral epic tradition?” “What is a formula in an oral epic tradition?” “What is the register in oral epic poetry?” Now available for the first time in English, this essay reflects a foundational stage of what has become a productive and long-term collaboration between the Center for Studies in Oral Tradition and the Institute of Ethnic Literature of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences.

  8. Chemoprevention of oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh Chhaparwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer is one among the ten most common cancers in the world and shows a marked geographic variation in occurrence. It causes considerable morbidity and is associated with a 5-year survival rate of less than 50%. Current treatment primarily consists of surgery and radiotherapy and improvement in long-term cure rates with these modalities has reached a plateau. As, curative therapy available for oral cancer often results in debilitating changes in appearance, speech, swallowing and breathing, preventive strategies are desirable. Cancer chemoprevention is the use of natural, synthetic or biologic chemical agents to reverse, suppress, or prevent carcinogenic progression. Chemoprevention has been an extensively-studied strategy and continues to hold promise in the management of oral cancer. Many agents have been evaluated as possible chemopreventive agents including vitamin A and retinoids, betacarotene, vitamin E and dietary agents. Recently, molecularly targeted approach has generated interest among researchers worldwide which includes cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibitors, EGFR inhibitors and adenovirus vectors. This article reviews the various aspects of chemoprevention and describes important chemopreventive agents and design of chemopreventive trials.

  9. Dementia and oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Spezzia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dementia is a neurodegenerative disease that progressively and irreversibly affects the central nervous system, leading to a decline in cognitive function. There is loss of brain function, which affects memory, thought, language, judgment and behavior. Since the patients present difficulties with self-care, there is a compromised oral hygiene. There will inevitably be loss of self-care during the course of the disease. The moment one diagnoses dementia, one should refer the patient to a dentist for evaluation, since the more severe the disease is, the harder it is to perform orthodontic procedures, due to loss of patient cooperation. Dental treatment will include guidance on essential oral hygiene for caregivers and family members, since these will be responsible for its performance, as the patient will be unable to perform basic self-care. When a proper dental plan with preventive approach is performed, acting from the diagnosis of the disease on, one can assist in improving the quality of life of these individuals. This paper aims to conduct an update of studies on the oral effects caused by dementia.

  10. Development and evaluation of first responder equipment for nuclear forensics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Ken'ichi; Kurosawa, Kenji; Akiba, Norimitsu; Kuroki, Kenro; Schwantes, Jon M.; Pierson, Richard; Piper, Roman K.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear forensics are the technical means by which nuclear and other radioactive materials used in illegal activities are characterized as to physical and chemical condition, provenance, and history. Sampling for traditional forensics evidence (e.g. fingerprints, DNA, hair, fibers, and digital evidence) contaminated by radionuclides, and categorization of nuclear and other radioactive materials by on-sight measurement are required for first responders. Portable radiological equipment and radiation protection for first responders to achieve emergency tasks safely at the incident sites have been developed and evaluated in National Research Institute of Police Science. In this report, we introduce wireless network dosimetry system and neutron protection shield with water under sampling and categorization. Described next in this report are evaluation tests of active personal dosimeters using neutron irradiation field in Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. We evaluated them under fast and thermal neutron field. We confirmed the large fluctuation of the response for each dosimeter caused by the energy dependence of the detectors. (author)

  11. Respondent-Driven Sampling – Testing Assumptions: Sampling with Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barash Vladimir D.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Classical Respondent-Driven Sampling (RDS estimators are based on a Markov Process model in which sampling occurs with replacement. Given that respondents generally cannot be interviewed more than once, this assumption is counterfactual. We join recent work by Gile and Handcock in exploring the implications of the sampling-with-replacement assumption for bias of RDS estimators. We differ from previous studies in examining a wider range of sampling fractions and in using not only simulations but also formal proofs. One key finding is that RDS estimates are surprisingly stable even in the presence of substantial sampling fractions. Our analyses show that the sampling-with-replacement assumption is a minor contributor to bias for sampling fractions under 40%, and bias is negligible for the 20% or smaller sampling fractions typical of field applications of RDS.

  12. How Did Climate and Humans Respond to Past Volcanic Eruptions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toohey, Matthew; Ludlow, Francis; Legrande, Allegra N.

    2016-01-01

    To predict and prepare for future climate change, scientists are striving to understand how global-scale climatic change manifests itself on regional scales and also how societies adapt or don't to sometimes subtle and complex climatic changes. In this regard, the strongest volcanic eruptions of the past are powerful test cases, showcasing how the broad climate system responds to sudden changes in radiative forcing and how societies have responded to the resulting climatic shocks. These issues were at the heart of the inaugural workshop of the Volcanic Impacts on Climate and Society (VICS) Working Group, convened in June 2016 at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University in Palisades, N.Y. The 3-day meeting gathered approximately 50 researchers, who presented work intertwining the history of volcanic eruptions and the physical processes that connect eruptions with human and natural systems on a global scale.

  13. Herpes simplex and cytomegalovirus coinfected oral ulcers in HIV-positive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regezi, J A; Eversole, L R; Barker, B F; Rick, G M; Silverman, S

    1996-01-01

    Four HIV-positive patients with herpes simplex virus and cytomegalovirus coinfected oral ulcers are presented. All patients had persistent oral pain associated with nonhealing mucosal ulcers. Lesions occurred on the palate, retromolar pad, tongue, and lip, and the clinical appearance of the ulcers was nonspecific. Histologic and immunohistochemical stains showed herpes simples virus alterations in keratinocyte nuclei and cytomegalovirus alterations in mesenchymal/endothelial cell nuclei and cytoplasm. Lesions in one patient responded to ganciclovir therapy. One patient improved with acyclovir, and another healed normally after excisional biopsy. Each virus alone has been described as causing oral ulcerations; their appearance together in the same lesion would suggest a synergistic relationship.

  14. Integration of Training Civilian and Military Disaster Responders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    TRAINING CIVILIAN AND MILITARY DISASTER RESPONDERS by Leonard H. Guercia, Jr. September 2011 Thesis Advisor: Sam Clovis Second Reader...Guercia, Jr. Approved by: Sam Clovis Thesis Advisor William Austin Second Reader Harold A. Trinkunas, PhD Chair, Department...admiration. Their efforts transformed me from a tentative new student to a well-written professional. I want to extend a special thanks to Dr. Clovis

  15. Responding to the needs of older women experiencing domestic violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straka, Silvia M; Montminy, Lyse

    2006-03-01

    Older women experiencing domestic violence are an invisible group who fall into the gap between two forms of family violence: elder abuse and domestic violence. This article reviews the literature in both fields, describing each paradigm, how it explains and responds to its specific form of violence, and why neither has been able to provide an adequate response to domestic violence against older women. A collaborative response is needed, accounting for both the age and gender dimensions of the problem.

  16. Intractable properties of responding under a fixed-interval schedule

    OpenAIRE

    Gentry, G. David; Marr, M. Jackson

    1982-01-01

    The behavior engendered by the fixed-interval schedule is characterized by its variability within and across intervals. The present experiment was designed to assess further the magnitude of interval-to-interval dynamics and to explore conditions which might enhance control by response number for subsequent output. Pigeons were exposed to three experimental manipulations after responding had stabilized under a fixed-interval five-minute schedule. First, a discrete five-stimulus counter was ad...

  17. [Investigation on knowledge, attitudes and practice of oral heath in 275 Kazak people in Changji district].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Rui; Wang, Xue-jing; You, Qing-ling

    2014-12-01

    To explore the situation of Kazak people's knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) about oral health and to offer scientific evidence for carrying out oral health education for Kazak people in Xinjiang Changji district. Three hundred Kazak people were randomly included from those who went to the People's Hospital, Department of Stomatology in Xinjiang Changji district for oral examination to conduct a survey on oral KAP. Two hundred seventy-five valid questionnaires were obtained. The data was inputted individually into Excel 2003 on 2 computers, and SPSS 17.0 software package was used for X(2) test. The percentage of the examined Kazak people in Xinjiang Changji district who obtained oral health knowledge through media was 69.4%. Only 8.7% of the subjects had their oral cavity examined regularly. 44% of the subjects achieved oral heath knowledge positively and 64.4% of the subjects believed in health education. 56% of the subjects brushed teeth twice or more per day and only 4% of the subjects used dental floss. Regarding the attitude towards treating dental diseases, 69.5% of the subjects would like to choose the departments of stomatology in the central hospitals, and 6.9% of the subjects didn't care about the doctors. The unbalanced development of oral health knowledge, attitude and practice and the difference in education and income were statistically significant in oral health behavior such as the times of brushing teeth, the choice of doctors and hospitals. The Kazak responders in Xinjiang Changji district have little knowledge about oral health, although their attitude towards oral health is very positive. Because their oral health behavior is not satisfactory, it is very important to provide with them further education of oral health.

  18. Betel nut chewing, oral premalignant lesions, and the oral microbiome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda Y Hernandez

    Full Text Available Oral cancers are attributed to a number of causal agents including tobacco, alcohol, human papillomavirus (HPV, and areca (betel nut. Although betel nut chewing has been established as an independent cause of oral cancer, the mechanisms of carcinogenesis are poorly understood. An investigation was undertaken to evaluate the influence of betel nut chewing on the oral microbiome and oral premalignant lesions. Study participants were recruited from a dental clinic in Guam. Structured interviews and oral examinations were performed. Oral swabbing and saliva samples were evaluated by 454 pyrosequencing of the V3- V5 region of the 16S rRNA bacterial gene and genotyped for HPV. One hundred twenty-two adults were enrolled including 64 current betel nut chewers, 37 former chewers, and 21 with no history of betel nut use. Oral premalignant lesions, including leukoplakia and submucous fibrosis, were observed in 10 chewers. Within-sample bacterial diversity was significantly lower in long-term (≥10 years chewers vs. never chewers and in current chewers with oral lesions vs. individuals without lesions. Between-sample bacterial diversity based on Unifrac distances significantly differed by chewing status and oral lesion status. Current chewers had significantly elevated levels of Streptococcus infantis and higher and lower levels of distinct taxa of the Actinomyces and Streptococcus genera. Long-term chewers had reduced levels of Parascardovia and Streptococcus. Chewers with oral lesions had significantly elevated levels of Oribacterium, Actinomyces, and Streptococcus, including Streptococcus anginosus. In multivariate analyses, controlling for smoking, oral HPV, S.anginosus, and S. infantis levels, current betel nut chewing remained the only predictor of oral premalignant lesions. Our study provides evidence that betel nut chewing alters the oral bacterial microbiome including that of chewers who develop oral premalignant lesions. Nonetheless, whether

  19. Platelet "first responders" in wound response, cancer, and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menter, David G; Kopetz, Scott; Hawk, Ernest; Sood, Anil K; Loree, Jonathan M; Gresele, Paolo; Honn, Kenneth V

    2017-06-01

    Platelets serve as "first responders" during normal wounding and homeostasis. Arising from bone marrow stem cell lineage megakaryocytes, anucleate platelets can influence inflammation and immune regulation. Biophysically, platelets are optimized due to size and discoid morphology to distribute near vessel walls, monitor vascular integrity, and initiate quick responses to vascular lesions. Adhesion receptors linked to a highly reactive filopodia-generating cytoskeleton maximizes their vascular surface contact allowing rapid response capabilities. Functionally, platelets normally initiate rapid clotting, vasoconstriction, inflammation, and wound biology that leads to sterilization, tissue repair, and resolution. Platelets also are among the first to sense, phagocytize, decorate, or react to pathogens in the circulation. These platelet first responder properties are commandeered during chronic inflammation, cancer progression, and metastasis. Leaky or inflammatory reaction blood vessel genesis during carcinogenesis provides opportunities for platelet invasion into tumors. Cancer is thought of as a non-healing or chronic wound that can be actively aided by platelet mitogenic properties to stimulate tumor growth. This growth ultimately outstrips circulatory support leads to angiogenesis and intravasation of tumor cells into the blood stream. Circulating tumor cells reengage additional platelets, which facilitates tumor cell adhesion, arrest and extravasation, and metastasis. This process, along with the hypercoagulable states associated with malignancy, is amplified by IL6 production in tumors that stimulate liver thrombopoietin production and elevates circulating platelet numbers by thrombopoiesis in the bone marrow. These complex interactions and the "first responder" role of platelets during diverse physiologic stresses provide a useful therapeutic target that deserves further exploration.

  20. Prehospital Management of Acute Stroke in Rural versus Urban Responders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Gregory; Bal, Simerpreet; Schellenberg, Kerri Lynn; Alcock, Susan; Ghrooda, Esseddeeg

    2017-08-01

    Stroke guideline compliance of rural Canadian prehospital emergency medical services (EMS) care in acute stroke is unknown. In this quality assurance study, we sought to compare rural and urban care by prehospital EMS evaluation/management indicators from patients assessed at an urban Canadian stroke center. One hundred adult patients were randomly selected from the stroke registry. Patients were transported through Rural EMS bypass protocols or urban EMS protocols (both bypass and direct) to our stroke center between January and December 2013. Patients were excluded if they were first evaluated at any other health center. Prehospital care was assessed using ten indicators for EMS evaluation/management, as recommended by acute stroke guidelines. Compliance with acute stroke EMS evaluation/management indicators were statistically similar for both groups, except administrating a prehospital diagnostic tool (rural 31.8 vs. urban 70.3%; P = 0.002). Unlike urban EMS, rural EMS did not routinely document scene time. Rural EMS responders' compliance to prehospital stroke evaluation/management was similar to urban EMS responders. Growth areas for both groups may be with prehospital stroke diagnostic tool utilization, whereas rural EMS responders may also improve with scene time documentation.

  1. Prehospital management of acute stroke in rural versus urban responders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Hansen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Stroke guideline compliance of rural Canadian prehospital emergency medical services (EMS care in acute stroke is unknown. In this quality assurance study, we sought to compare rural and urban care by prehospital EMS evaluation/management indicators from patients assessed at an urban Canadian stroke center. Materials and Methods: One hundred adult patients were randomly selected from the stroke registry. Patients were transported through Rural EMS bypass protocols or urban EMS protocols (both bypass and direct to our stroke center between January and December 2013. Patients were excluded if they were first evaluated at any other health center. Prehospital care was assessed using ten indicators for EMS evaluation/management, as recommended by acute stroke guidelines. Results: Compliance with acute stroke EMS evaluation/management indicators were statistically similar for both groups, except administrating a prehospital diagnostic tool (rural 31.8 vs. urban 70.3%; P = 0.002. Unlike urban EMS, rural EMS did not routinely document scene time. Conclusion: Rural EMS responders' compliance to prehospital stroke evaluation/management was similar to urban EMS responders. Growth areas for both groups may be with prehospital stroke diagnostic tool utilization, whereas rural EMS responders may also improve with scene time documentation.

  2. Responding to oil spills in the open ocean environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, A.E.

    1994-01-01

    The primary objectives in responding to any oil spill is to control the source of the spill, then, contain, collect, and recover the spilled product. Accomplishing those objectives is an immense challenge. It becomes much more difficult when attempted in the open ocean environment due to the more complex logistical and communications problems one encounters when operating miles from the nearest land. Often times, too, the response must be coordinated with either a salvage operation, a fire-fighting operation, a well control operation or a combination of any of these. There have been volumes of papers comparing the relative merits of mechanical recovery, in-situ burning, dispersant application, and bioremediation in responding to open ocean spills. Although each approach deserves special consideration in different circumstances, this presentation focuses on mechanical methods; the specialized equipment and operational tactics that are best utilized in responding to a major spill in the open ocean. This paper is divided into two sections. The first section, Equipment Used in Open Ocean Spills, addresses in general terms, the special equipment required in an offshore response operation. The second section, entitled Operational Tactics Used In Open Ocean Spills offers an overview of the tactics employed to achieve the general objectives of containment, collection, recovery, and temporary storage

  3. Willingness, ability, and intentions of health care workers to respond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couig, Mary Pat

    2012-01-01

    Health care workers (HCWs) are a critical component of the emergency management cycle (prevention, mitigation, preparation, response, and recovery). The potential for large numbers of injured from either a man-made or natural disaster has resulted in the development of surge capacity plans and attempts to predict how many HCWs will be available to respond. Since 1991 (with the majority of the research published in 2002 and later), researchers have been conducting studies to learn about the willingness, ability, and intentions of HCWs to respond to disasters. Potential and real barriers to disaster response are being explored as well. This chapter focuses on research authored or coauthored by nurses. Nurse-authored research is just a portion of the growing body of knowledge in this area; however, the findings are consistent with other published works. HCWs are more likely to be willing and able to respond to natural disasters and less likely to be willing and able during infectious outbreaks or incidents with potential exposure to harmful agents (biological, chemical, nuclear, or radiological). HCW concerns include safety of self and family, availability of protective equipment, medicines and vaccines, and caretaking responsibilities (children, elders, and pets).

  4. Phosphine Exposure Among Emergency Responders - Amarillo, Texas, January 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Emily M; Patel, Ketki; Victory, Kerton R; Calvert, Geoffrey M; Nogueira, Leticia M; Bojes, Heidi K

    2018-04-06

    Phosphine is a highly toxic gas that forms when aluminum phosphide, a restricted-use pesticide* typically used in agricultural settings, reacts with water. Acute exposure can lead to a wide range of respiratory, cardiovascular, and gastrointestinal symptoms, and can be fatal (1). On January 2, 2017, the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) was notified by the Texas Panhandle Poison Center of an acute phosphine exposure incident in Amarillo, Texas. DSHS investigated potential occupational phosphine exposures among the 51 on-scene emergency responders; 40 (78.4%) did not use respiratory protection during response operations. Fifteen (37.5%) of these 40 responders received medical care for symptoms or as a precaution after the incident, and seven (17.5%) reported new or worsening symptoms consistent with phosphine exposure within 24 hours of the incident. Emergency response organizations should ensure that appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) is used during all incidents when an unknown hazardous substance is suspected. Additional evaluation is needed to identify targeted interventions that increase emergency responder PPE use during this type of incident.

  5. NARAC Dispersion Model Product Integration With RadResponder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aluzzi, Fernando [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Work on enhanced cooperation and interoperability of Nuclear Incident Response Teams (NIRT) is a joint effort between DHS/FEMA, DOE/NNSA and EPA. One such effort was the integration between the RadResponder Network, a resource sponsored by FEMA for the management of radiological data during an emergency, and the National Atmospheric Advisory Center (NARAC), a DOE/NNSA modeling resource whose predictions are used to aid radiological emergency preparedness and response. Working together under a FEMA-sponsored project these two radiological response assets developed a capability to read and display plume model prediction results from the NARAC computer system in the RadResponder software tool. As a result of this effort, RadResponder users have been provided with NARAC modeling predictions of contamination areas, radiological dose levels, and protective action areas (e.g., areas warranting worker protection or sheltering/evacuation) to help guide protective action decisions and field monitoring surveys, and gain key situation awareness following a radiological/nuclear accident or incident (e.g., nuclear power plant accident, radiological dispersal device incident, or improvised nuclear detonation incident). This document describes the details of this integration effort.

  6. Oral leukoplakia and oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewley, Arnaud F; Farwell, D Gregory

    Oral leukoplakia is defined as a white oral lesion not related to another disease process. These lesions are largely asymptomatic, and the clinical relevance of oral leukoplakia is primarily tied to its association with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. Timely workup and effective management of these lesions can reduce the risk of malignant transformation and promote early diagnosis of invasive tumors. A biopsy should be performed promptly of any persistent or suspicious leukoplakia with subsequent management dictated by histologic findings. Benign lesions can be observed or treated with topical therapy, and dysplastic lesions should be excised. Some risk of malignant transformation remains even after treatment, and close follow-up is required. Oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma is an aggressive malignancy that can result from malignant conversion of oral leukoplakia or occur de novo. These tumors are primarily treated with surgical resection and adjuvant radiation or chemoradiation as dictated by histopathologic findings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Irradiation mucositis and oral flora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spijkervet, F.K.L.

    1989-01-01

    This study, which is motivated by the substantial morbidity of local signs of mucositis and generalized symptoms that result from mucositis induced by therapeutic irradiation, has the following objectives: To investigate if it is possible to prevent irradiation mucositis via oral flora elimination, and, if it is true that flora plays a role in irradiation mucositis, what fraction of the oral flora may be involved; to evaluate oral Gram-negative bacillary carriage; to investigate the possibility to eradicate Gram-negative bacilli from the oral cavity; to evaluate oral yeast carriage; to investigate the possibility to eradicate yeasts stomatitis and the 'selectivity' of elimination of flora. Two methods are described for monitoring alterations of mucositis of the oral cavity and changes in oral flora. Chlorhexidine has been tested as the commonly used prophylaxis. The effect of chlorhexidine 0.1% rinses on oral flora and mucositis has been studied in a prospective placebo controlled double blind randomized programme. The results of the influence of saliva on the antimicrobial activity of chlorhexidine and the results of selective elimination of oral flora in irradiated patients who have head and neck cancer are reported. Salivary inactivation of the topical antimicrobials used for selective elimination of oral flora has been studied and the results are reported. Finally, the objectives that have been achieved (or not) are delineated. The significance of the results of the study are discussed in terms of published information and further lines of research are suggested. (author). 559 refs.; 29 figs.; 20 tabs

  8. Forensic odontology in India, an oral pathologist's perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Pushparaja; Raviprakash, A

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Oral pathologists have major responsibilities in the development of forensic science. We conducted a survey to evaluate the degree of involvement of oral pathologists in forensic investigations in India and the difficulties faced by them. Materials and Methods: Data was collected during 2007–2009 by means of a questionnaire survey among qualified oral pathologists related to confidence in handling forensic cases, knowledge and awareness, training in forensic odontology, practical exposure to forensic cases, and difficulties faced. Results: A total of 120 oral pathologists responded to the questionnaire. Of these, 28% expressed confidence in handling forensic cases, 7% had been exposed to formal training in forensic odontology, and 6% had handled forensic cases earlier. Only two participants said that they were part of the forensic team in their respective cities. Forty-eight percent of the participants said that they read forensic journals regularly. Conclusion: Oral pathologists are generally not very confident about handling forensic cases mainly because of inadequate formal training in the field of forensic dentistry, inadequate exposure to the subject, minimal importance given to the subject in the undergraduate and postgraduate curriculum, and no practical exposure to forensic cases. PMID:22022135

  9. [Oral infections and pregnancy: knowledge of health professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, L; Le Borgne, H; Samson, M; Boutigny, H; Philippe, H-J; Soueidan, A

    2013-11-01

    The abundance of recent studies on the relationship between oral diseases and complications of pregnancy leads to questions on knowledge of health professionals. This study aims to establish an inventory of knowledge and practice of health professionals in France on this issue. A questionnaire on knowledge of the relationship between oral diseases and complications of pregnancy was referred to gynaecologists and obstetricians, midwives and dentists. This study was conducted at the University Hospital of Nantes and Le Mans General Hospital. Eighty-seven professionals of pregnancy and 259 dentists responded to the survey. Bleeding gums and pregnancy gingivitis are the oral manifestations most cited by all practitioners. There is however a difference concerning the epulis and caries risk. The most cited Pregnancy complications are risk of premature delivery and chorioamniotitis. Only dentists had received initial training on pregnancy complications. Finally, all health professionals point to the lack of continued education on this topic. There is a good knowledge of the pregnancy complications associated with oral disease despite the lack of training of pregnancy, but the attitudes of care are not still in adequacy. It appears necessary to strengthen the training of all practitioners in this field. The design and implementation of a specific questionnaire on oral health status could allow better identification of the patients at risk by the professionals of pregnancy, and optimize so the care of pregnant women. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Forensic odontology in India, an oral pathologist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Pushparaja; Raviprakash, A

    2011-01-01

    Oral pathologists have major responsibilities in the development of forensic science. We conducted a survey to evaluate the degree of involvement of oral pathologists in forensic investigations in India and the difficulties faced by them. Data was collected during 2007-2009 by means of a questionnaire survey among qualified oral pathologists related to confidence in handling forensic cases, knowledge and awareness, training in forensic odontology, practical exposure to forensic cases, and difficulties faced. A total of 120 oral pathologists responded to the questionnaire. Of these, 28% expressed confidence in handling forensic cases, 7% had been exposed to formal training in forensic odontology, and 6% had handled forensic cases earlier. Only two participants said that they were part of the forensic team in their respective cities. Forty-eight percent of the participants said that they read forensic journals regularly. Oral pathologists are generally not very confident about handling forensic cases mainly because of inadequate formal training in the field of forensic dentistry, inadequate exposure to the subject, minimal importance given to the subject in the undergraduate and postgraduate curriculum, and no practical exposure to forensic cases.

  11. Oral hygiene, dentition, sexual habits and risk of oral cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Talamini, R.; Vaccarella, S.; Barbone, F.; Tavani, A.; La Vecchia, C.; Herrero, R.; Muñoz, N.; Franceschi, S.

    2000-01-01

    In an Italian case-control study of oral cancer, number of missing teeth and other aspects of dental care were similar, but the general condition of the mouth, as indicated by gum bleeding, tartar deposits and mucosal irritation, was worse among oral cancer cases than controls. No differences were detected in sexual practices (including oral sex) and (previous) sexually transmitted infections. ? 2000 Cancer Research Campaign

  12. Oral hygiene, dentition, sexual habits and risk of oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talamini, R; Vaccarella, S; Barbone, F; Tavani, A; La Vecchia, C; Herrero, R; Muñoz, N; Franceschi, S

    2000-11-01

    In an Italian case-control study of oral cancer, number of missing teeth and other aspects of dental care were similar, but the general condition of the mouth, as indicated by gum bleeding, tartar deposits and mucosal irritation, was worse among oral cancer cases than controls. No differences were detected in sexual practices (including oral sex) and (previous) sexually transmitted infections. Copyright 2000 Cancer Research Campaign.

  13. Measuring conceptual health knowledge in the context of oral health literacy: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macek, Mark D; Haynes, Don; Wells, William; Bauer-Leffler, Simon; Cotten, P Ann; Parker, Ruth M

    2010-01-01

    Health literacy encompasses several abilities including word recognition, reading comprehension, communication skills, and conceptual knowledge. To date, conceptual knowledge has not been included in oral health literacy research. This study assesses the validity and reliability of a new instrument and describes conceptual oral health knowledge among a sample of low-income adults. One hundred Baltimore adults were administered the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM), Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (Short-TOFHLA), and a new survey of conceptual oral health knowledge. Respondents were also asked about sociodemographics, dental health, and utilization. Psychometric analysis was used to identify a subset of oral health knowledge questions from the new survey instrument. The resulting Comprehensive Measure of Oral Health Knowledge (CMOHK) was categorized into three levels of knowledge (poor, fair, good). Nearly one-third of Baltimore adults exhibited the lowest level. CMOHK scores were significantly associated with age, education level, and word recognition (REALM). CMOHK scores were not associated with reading comprehension (Short-TOFHLA) or dental care visits. Instrument reliability was good (Cronbach alpha = 0.74). This preliminary study yielded a new measure of oral health conceptual knowledge, available for use in future oral health literacy studies. The author presents a conceptual framework of oral health literacy that separates health literacy into four unique components and places decision-making at the center. Future studies are needed to determine whether this framework is supported by empirical data and leads to improvements in oral health and reductions in health disparities.

  14. Serum metabolomics in oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Gokul; Ramani, Pratibha; Patankar, Sangeeta

    2017-01-01

    Metabolomics is a core discipline of system biology focusing on the study of low molecular weight compounds in biological system. Analysis of human metabolome, which is composed of diverse group of metabolites, can aid in diagnosis and prognosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The aim of the present study is to analyze and identify serum metabolites in oral leukoplakia and OSCC as a potential diagnostic biomarker and a predictor for malignant transformation of oral leukoplakia. Serum metabolomic profile of patients diagnosed with oral leukoplakia (n = 21) and OSCC (n = 22) was compared with normal controls (n = 18) using quadrupole time of flight-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. MassHunter profile software was used for metabolite identification, and statistical analysis to assess the variation of the metabolites was performed using Mass Profiler Professional software. Statistical significance between the three groups was expressed using ANOVA (P oral leukoplakia and OSCC than in normal controls. Furthermore, significant upregulation of 5,6-dihydrouridine, 4-hydroxypenbutolol glucuronide, 8-hydroxyadenine, and putrescine was evident in OSCC group than in oral leukoplakia. Upregulation of L-carnitine, lysine, 2-methylcitric acid, putrescine; 8-hydroxyadenine; 17-estradiol; 5,6-dihydrouridine; and MTA suggests their diagnostic potential in oral leukoplakia and OSCC. Further, a significant upregulation of putrescine, 8-hydroxyadenine, and 5,6-dihydrouridine in OSCC than in oral leukoplakia indicates their potential role in predicting the malignant transformation of oral leukoplakia.

  15. Autophagy Genes of Host Responds to Disruption of Gut Microbial Community by Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sudha B; Wilson, Melissa; Ritz, Nathaniel; Lin, Henry C

    2017-06-01

    Defective autophagic machinery, such as that in Crohn's disease patients homozygous for ATG16L1 risk allele, is associated with alteration of resident gut bacterial communities. However, whether or not host autophagy responds to changes in the resident gut microbial community is not known. Here, we investigated the effect of antibiotic-induced disruption of the gut microbiome (dysbiosis) on autophagy gene expression and the expression of antimicrobial peptides/protein (AMP) over time. To test the hypothesis that antibiotic treatment may cause time-dependent changes in gut bacterial density, autophagy genes, and antimicrobial protein/peptide gene expression. Mice (n = 8 per group) were treated with antibiotic cocktail and sacrificed at different intervals of recovery (days 3, 7, 10, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 42) post-antibiotics. DNA and RNA were extracted from small intestinal tissues. Bacterial density, expression of host autophagy genes, and AMP genes were analyzed by relative quantitative PCR. Fold change difference in comparison with untreated control group was calculated using 2 -ΔΔCt method. Statistical analysis was performed using nonparametric Mann-Whitney test. Gut bacterial density changed in a time-dependent fashion in response to antibiotic treatment. These changes were concurrent with upregulation of autophagy genes and antimicrobial peptide/protein gene expression. We further showed that an oral gavage of a resident microbe Desulfovibrio, which bloomed in antibiotic-treated animals, induced Atg5 and lysozyme (Lyz) gene expression. Autophagy genes respond to dysbiosis induced by antibiotics. This response may be a host mechanism to detect and possibly correct dysbiosis by activating antimicrobial peptides/proteins that control the microbial load in the gut.

  16. Value correlates of the motivations to respond without prejudice / Correlatos valorativos das motivações para responder sem preconceito

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdiney V. Gouveia

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study aimed at establishing to what extent both internal and external motivations to respond without prejudice towards Blacks would correlate with human values. As many as 308 subjects from João Pessoa – comprising high school and university students as well as individuals from the community as a whole – were considered. The Basic Values Questionnaire, the Impression Management Scale and the Scale of Internal and External Motivation to Respond without Prejudice, and also demographic questions were applied. Results showed that the internal motivation was positively correlated with the suprapersonal values, specifically maturity, beauty and knowledge. Moreover, the external motivation did correlate, predominantly, with the achievement values, specifically those of prestige and privacy. Such results are in line with those found in the literature, which indicate the opposition between egalitarianism (suprapersonal vs. protestant ethic (achievement values so as to explicate the prejudice and the motivations that would prevent such attitude.

  17. Oral Health Literacy and Behavior of Health Sciences University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuti N Mohd-Dom

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to determine the level of oral health literacy and behavior among health sciences. Methods: The method used descriptive cross-sectional survey involving 609 students from Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy and Allied Health Sciences in the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia. Oral health literacy level and behaviour was assessed with a validated and pretested self-administered questionnaire using the Newest Vital Sign (NVS tool and modified Oral Health Adult Literacy Questionnaire (OHL-AQ. Results: A total of 509 participants involved in the study (83.6%. The overall mean oral health literacy score was 10.27 (95% CI 7.92, 12.62, which found dental students showing statistically significant higher scores (mean=11.36, 95% CI 9.70, 13.02 compared to medical (mean=10.72, 95% CI 8.67, 12.77, allied health sciences (mean=9.89, 95% CI 7.34, 12.44 and pharmacy (mean=9.55, 95% CI 7.23, 11.87. Almost all respondents are non-smokers (99.8% and non-drinkers (97.2%. Only 19.1% pay regular dental visits every 6-12 months while 51.1% visit dentist only when they have dental pain. Conclusion: There appears to be a positive relationship between oral health literacy and oral health behavior. Health science university students should be provided substantial dental health education in their curriculum as they show good potential as strategic partners in oral health.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v22i2.404

  18. Knowledge of oral health issues among low-income Baltimore adults: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macek, Mark D; Manski, Marion C; Schneiderman, Maryann T; Meakin, Sarah J; Haynes, Don; Wells, William; Bauer-Leffler, Simon; Cotten, P Ann; Parker, Ruth M

    2011-01-01

    This pilot study documents conceptual knowledge of oral health among low-income adults in Baltimore. Selected questions from the Baltimore Health Literacy and Oral Health Knowledge Project, a cross-sectional, population-based investigation of oral health literacy, were used for this analysis. Participants were asked questions during face-to-face interviews about basic oral health and the prevention and management of dental caries and periodontal diseases. Descriptive analyses included tests of association with selected socio-demographic variables (age, sex, education level, annual household income). The majority of respondents were African American women, 45 to 64 years of age, with 12 years of education and an income less than or equal to $25,000. Ninety-one percent of respondents knew that sugar caused dental caries, while 82% understood that the best way to prevent tooth decay was to brush and floss every day. Knowledge of oral hygiene practices and the prevention and management of gingivitis and periodontitis was mixed. Seventy-six percent understood that the best way to remove tartar was by a dental cleaning. However, only 15% knew how often to floss their teeth and only 21% knew that plaque was composed of germs. Conceptual oral health knowledge is one component of oral health literacy. In turn, oral health literacy impacts communication. Practitioners should account for limited conceptual knowledge when they discuss oral health issues with their low-income and minority patients. If this is not accounted for, they will probably find that their oral hygiene education messages are being ignored and health promotion is being adversely affected.

  19. Knowledge of Oral Health Issues Among Low–Income Baltimore Adults: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macek, Mark D.; Manski, Marion C.; Schneiderman, MaryAnn T.; Meakin, Sarah J.; Haynes, Don; Wells, William; Bauer–Leffler, Simon; Cotten, P. Ann; Parker, Ruth M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This pilot study documents conceptual knowledge of oral health among low–income adults in Baltimore. Methods Selected questions from the Baltimore Health Literacy and Oral Health Knowledge Project, a cross–sectional, population–based investigation of oral health literacy, were used for this analysis. Participants were asked questions during face–to–face interviews about basic oral health and the prevention and management of dental caries and periodontal diseases. Descriptive analyses included tests of association with selected socio–demographic variables (age, sex, education level, annual household income). Results The majority of respondents were African American women, 45 to 64 years of age, with 12 years of education and an income less than or equal to $25,000. Ninety–one percent of respondents knew that sugar caused dental caries, while 82% understood that the best way to prevent tooth decay was to brush and floss every day. Knowledge of oral hygiene practices and the prevention and management of gingivitis and periodontitis was mixed. Seventy–six percent understood that the best way to remove tartar was by a dental cleaning. However, only 15% knew how often to floss their teeth and only 21% knew that plaque was composed of germs. Conclusion Conceptual oral health knowledge is one component of oral health literacy. In turn, oral health literacy impacts communication. Practitioners should account for limited conceptual knowledge when they discuss oral health issues with their low–income and minority patients. If this is not accounted for, they will probably find that their oral hygiene education messages are being ignored and health promotion is being adversely affected. PMID:21396263

  20. Latent classes of nonresponders, rapid responders, and gradual responders in depressed outpatients receiving antidepressant medication and psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeau, Michel A; Quilty, Lena C; De Fruyt, Filip; De Bolle, Marleen; Rouillon, Frédéric; Bagby, R Michael

    2015-03-01

    We used growth mixture modeling (GMM) to identify subsets of patients with qualitatively distinct symptom trajectories resulting from treatment. Existing studies have focused on 12-week antidepressant trials. We used data from a concurrent antidepressant and psychotherapy trial over a 6-month period. Eight hundred twenty-one patients were randomized to receive either fluoxetine or tianepine and received cognitive-behavioral therapy, supportive therapy, or psychodynamic therapy. Patients completed the Montgomery-Åsberg depression rating scale (MADRS) at the 0, 1, 3, and 6-month periods. Patients also completed measures of dysfunctional attitudes, functioning, and personality. GMM was conducted using MADRS scores and the number of growth classes to be retained was based on the Bayesian information criterion. Criteria supported the presence of four distinct latent growth classes representing gradual responders of high severity (42% of sample), gradual responders of moderate severity (31%), nonresponders (15%), and rapid responders (11%). Initial severity, greater use of emotional coping strategies, less use of avoidance coping strategies, introversion, and less emotional stability predicted nonresponder status. Growth classes were not associated with different treatments or with proportion of dropouts. The longer time period used in this study highlights potential overestimates of nonresponders in previous research and the need for continued assessments. Our findings demonstrate distinct growth trajectories that are independent of treatment modality and generalizable to most psychotherapy patients. The correlates of class membership provide directions for future studies, which can refine methods to predict likely nonresponders as a means to facilitate personalized treatments. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Antimicrobials and oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein-DeVore, L

    1991-10-01

    Effective control of plaque and gingivitis are among our most important treatment goals. Several antimicrobial products have demonstrated safety and various degrees of effectiveness as adjuncts to mechanical plaque control. Our clinical decisions relating to antimicrobial products should be based on the expanding body of research that documents product safety and effectiveness in reducing both plaque and gingivitis. Antimicrobials present exciting prospects for in-office and home use, but they do not replace thorough root debridement and traditional plaque control. However, when selected based on individual patient needs and used in recommended regimens, antimicrobials can be important additions to both professional treatment and oral hygiene practices.

  2. Oral Tradition and Sappho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Scott Garner

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Through an exploration of Sappho’s verse-structuring tendencies and repeated phraseology, the current essay demonstrates that Sappho’s stanzaic poetry was enabled primarily by a traditional system of composition that allowed her words to be encoded with extralexical meaning (or to use John Miles Foley’s term, “traditional referentiality”. Through a renewed appreciation of these oral traditional influences on Sappho’s poetry we thus can begin to approach an understanding of this art much closer to that held by its earliest ancient Greek audiences.

  3. Oral epithelioid hemangioendothelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Tomar Bhattacharya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (HE is an intermediate malignant potential vascular neoplasm with uncertain clinical behavior, wide variations in microscopic findings, and prognosis. According to the World Health Organization (2002 classification, epithelioid HE has been considered under malignant tumors which rarely metastasize. The epithelioid variant, the most aggressive one, has similar gender predilection and sporadic occurrence in children. The patients usually present with an asymptomatic oral mass whereas few cases may report with the painful bleeding lesion. We attempt to present a case in an adolescent male with previously never described biological behavior, diverse histopathological features, and immunohistochemistry findings.

  4. Oral complications in cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl, W.

    1983-02-01

    Ionizing radiation used in treating the head and neck area produces oral side effects such as mucositis, salivary changes, trismus and radiation caries. Sequelae of cancer chemotherapy often include oral stomatitis, myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Infections of dental origin in compromised patients are potentially lethal. Specific programs to eliminate dental pathology before radiation and chemotherapy, and to maintain oral hygiene during and after therapy, will minimize these complications.

  5. Oral cancer: A multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanuthai, K; Rojanawatsirivej, S; Thosaporn, W; Kintarak, S; Subarnbhesaj, A; Darling, M; Kryshtalskyj, E; Chiang, C-P; Shin, H-I; Choi, S-Y; Lee, S-S; Aminishakib, P

    2018-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and clinicopathologic features of the oral cancer patients. Biopsy records of the participating institutions were reviewed for oral cancer cases diagnosed from 2005 to 2014. Demographic data and site of the lesions were collected. Sites of the lesion were subdivided into lip, tongue, floor of the mouth, gingiva, alveolar mucosa, palate, buccal/labial mucosa, maxilla and mandible. Oral cancer was subdivided into 7 categories: epithelial tumors, salivary gland tumors, hematologic tumors, bone tumors, mesenchymal tumors, odontogenic tumors, and others. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics using SPSS software version 17.0. Of the 474,851 accessioned cases, 6,151 cases (1.30%) were diagnosed in the category of oral cancer. The mean age of the patients was 58.37±15.77 years. A total of 4,238 cases (68.90%) were diagnosed in males, whereas 1911 cases (31.07%) were diagnosed in females. The male-to-female ratio was 2.22:1. The sites of predilection for oral cancer were tongue, labial/buccal mucosa, gingiva, palate, and alveolar mucosa, respectively. The three most common oral cancer in the descending order of frequency were squamous cell carcinoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Although the prevalence of oral cancer is not high compared to other entities, oral cancer pose significant mortality and morbidity in the patients, especially when discovered late in the course of the disease. This study highlights some anatomical locations where oral cancers are frequently encountered. As a result, clinicians should pay attention to not only teeth, but oral mucosa especially in the high prevalence area as well since early detection of precancerous lesions or cancers in the early stage increase the chance of patient being cured and greatly reduce the mortality and morbidity. This study also shows some differences between pediatric and elderly oral cancer patients as well as between Asian and non-Asian oral cancer patients.

  6. Oral pigmentation induced by Premarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérusse, R; Morency, R

    1991-07-01

    Pigmented lesions of the oral cavity are important entities. The wide range of their clinical differential diagnosis includes such diverse systemic conditions as Addison's disease, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, malignant melanoma, Kaposi's sarcoma, as well as specific oral lesions, such as amalgam tattoo or gingival melanosis. This paper reports a very rare cause of oral pigmentation, a melanic type, related to the use of Premarin.

  7. Drug Reactions in Oral Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Derviş

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Both immunologic and nonimmunologic drug reactions can be seen in oral mucosa. Since considerable number of these reactions heals spontaneously without being noticed by the patients, exact frequency of the lesions is unknown. Most common lesions are xerostomia, taste disorders, mucosal ulcerations and edema. In this article, oral lesions resulting from drug intake similar to those from oral lesions of local and systemic diseases, and diagnostic problems caused by these similarities, have been reviewed.

  8. Oral complications in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carl, W.

    1983-01-01

    Ionizing radiation used in treating the head and neck area produces oral side effects such as mucositis, salivary changes, trismus and radiation caries. Sequelae of cancer chemotherapy often include oral stomatitis, myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Infections of dental origin in compromised patients are potentially lethal. Specific programs to eliminate dental pathology before radiation and chemotherapy, and to maintain oral hygiene during and after therapy, will minimize these complications

  9. Pathogenesis of oral FIV infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Craig; Boegler, Karen; Carver, Scott; MacMillan, Martha; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle

    2017-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is the feline analogue of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and features many hallmarks of HIV infection and pathogenesis, including the development of concurrent oral lesions. While HIV is typically transmitted via parenteral transmucosal contact, recent studies prove that oral transmission can occur, and that saliva from infected individuals contains significant amounts of HIV RNA and DNA. While it is accepted that FIV is primarily transmitted by biting, few studies have evaluated FIV oral infection kinetics and transmission mechanisms over the last 20 years. Modern quantitative analyses applied to natural FIV oral infection could significantly further our understanding of lentiviral oral disease and transmission. We therefore characterized FIV salivary viral kinetics and antibody secretions to more fully document oral viral pathogenesis. Our results demonstrate that: (i) saliva of FIV-infected cats contains infectious virus particles, FIV viral RNA at levels equivalent to circulation, and lower but significant amounts of FIV proviral DNA; (ii) the ratio of FIV RNA to DNA is significantly higher in saliva than in circulation; (iii) FIV viral load in oral lymphoid tissues (tonsil, lymph nodes) is significantly higher than mucosal tissues (buccal mucosa, salivary gland, tongue); (iv) salivary IgG antibodies increase significantly over time in FIV-infected cats, while salivary IgA levels remain static; and, (v) saliva from naïve Specific Pathogen Free cats inhibits FIV growth in vitro. Collectively, these results suggest that oral lymphoid tissues serve as a site for enhanced FIV replication, resulting in accumulation of FIV particles and FIV-infected cells in saliva. Failure to induce a virus-specific oral mucosal antibody response, and/or viral capability to overcome inhibitory components in saliva may perpetuate chronic oral cavity infection. Based upon these findings, we propose a model of oral FIV pathogenesis and suggest

  10. Pathogenesis of oral FIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Miller

    Full Text Available Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV is the feline analogue of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and features many hallmarks of HIV infection and pathogenesis, including the development of concurrent oral lesions. While HIV is typically transmitted via parenteral transmucosal contact, recent studies prove that oral transmission can occur, and that saliva from infected individuals contains significant amounts of HIV RNA and DNA. While it is accepted that FIV is primarily transmitted by biting, few studies have evaluated FIV oral infection kinetics and transmission mechanisms over the last 20 years. Modern quantitative analyses applied to natural FIV oral infection could significantly further our understanding of lentiviral oral disease and transmission. We therefore characterized FIV salivary viral kinetics and antibody secretions to more fully document oral viral pathogenesis. Our results demonstrate that: (i saliva of FIV-infected cats contains infectious virus particles, FIV viral RNA at levels equivalent to circulation, and lower but significant amounts of FIV proviral DNA; (ii the ratio of FIV RNA to DNA is significantly higher in saliva than in circulation; (iii FIV viral load in oral lymphoid tissues (tonsil, lymph nodes is significantly higher than mucosal tissues (buccal mucosa, salivary gland, tongue; (iv salivary IgG antibodies increase significantly over time in FIV-infected cats, while salivary IgA levels remain static; and, (v saliva from naïve Specific Pathogen Free cats inhibits FIV growth in vitro. Collectively, these results suggest that oral lymphoid tissues serve as a site for enhanced FIV replication, resulting in accumulation of FIV particles and FIV-infected cells in saliva. Failure to induce a virus-specific oral mucosal antibody response, and/or viral capability to overcome inhibitory components in saliva may perpetuate chronic oral cavity infection. Based upon these findings, we propose a model of oral FIV pathogenesis

  11. Oral Health in Psychiatric Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ozlem Gurbuz; Kursat Altinbas; Erhan Kurt

    2011-01-01

    Although oral health is a major determinant of general health and quality of life, it has a low priority in the context of mental illness. Chronic mental illness and its treatment carry inherent risks for significant oral diseases. Both the disease itself and its various pharmacologic management modalities lead to a range of oral complications and side effects, with caries, periodontal disease and xerostomia being encountered most frequently. Older age, female gender, length of hospitalizatio...

  12. Oral Health Status and Oral Health Care Model in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Zhang, Shan Shan; Zheng, Shu Guo; Xu, Tao; Si, Yan

    To review the current oral health status and oral health care models in China in an effort to provide recommendations for the future implementation of these models. A systematic literature review was conducted. The Medline, EMBASE, CNKI and Wanfang databases were searched for English and Chinese articles reporting relevant data from 1949 to the present. Data from three national oral health epidemiology surveys, Chinese government reports and national statistics yearbooks from 2011 to 2015 were also included. The oral health status of preschool children were significantly improved over the past 10 years, while caries experience among 35 to 45-year-old and 65 to 74-year-old groups showed an increase in 2005. The status of poor oral hygiene was observed for both adolescent and elderly groups. The ratio of dentist-to-population in China was reported as 1:10,000 in 2009, which was much lower than that of developed countries. The workforce of the dental service is distributed unevenly and remains insufficient for such a highly populated country. Although the need for dental treatment was perceived as high, the true demand for dental service in China was relatively low and not seen as critical. This situation clearly did not reflect so well with true oral disease conditions. There are several basic social medical insurance systems available in China, which covered most of the population's need for medical attention, but seldom covered dental treatment. National oral health policy in China should emphasise oral health promotion, especially in school education for children and young adults, to further strengthen daily toothbrushing, use of fluoride toothpaste and dental floss, and actively promote annual oral health examination. Oral health management should focus on cost-effective primary and secondary prevention with the long-term goal of maintaining oral health.

  13. African Journal of Oral Health Sciences: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The African Journal of Oral Health Sciences is devoted to research into oral diseases and encourages a multidisciplinary approach. Emphasis is on oral pathology, oral microbiology, oral medicine, oral physiology and biochemistry and related clinical sciences.

  14. Improving oral healthcare: towards measurement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baâdoudi, F; Maskrey, N; Listl, S; van der Heijden, G J M G; Duijster, D

    2016-11-04

    In the last 30 years oral healthcare is increasingly being contested. Needs and expectations have evolved to a point of advanced restorative techniques, long term planning for preventative care and evidence-based practice, and patients and payers increasingly require more explicit demonstration of competence. However, relevant data are currently not routinely collected that would support approaches needed to further improve oral health and care. This paper sets out the case to collect and evaluate routinely available data. Variations in care and oral health could be described, which in turn would provide valuable insights for all wishing to further improve oral health and care.

  15. Improving oral hygiene for patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, Debbie; Hampson, Victoria; Queen, Kerry; Kirk, Donna; Clarkson, Jan; Young, Linda

    2015-01-13

    Systematic reviews and patient safety initiatives recommend that oral hygiene should be part of routine patient care. However, evidence suggests it is often neglected in hospitals and care homes. Research recommends encouraging beliefs that support oral hygiene, and teaching nurses appropriate skills, as necessary prerequisites to implementing best practice in hospital wards. This article describes a pilot study of an educational workshop on oral hygiene. Results from the pilot study suggest that this workshop is a feasible intervention for a service-wide trial. The literature suggests that other interventions are required to complement this approach if nurses are to make oral hygiene a priority in daily patient care.

  16. Oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rio, R; Simões-Silva, L; Garro, S; Silva, M-J; Azevedo, Á; Sampaio-Maia, B

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that placenta may harbour a unique microbiome that may have origin in maternal oral microbiome. Although the major physiological and hormonal adjustments observed in pregnant women lead to biochemical and microbiological modifications of the oral environment, very few studies evaluated the changes suffered by the oral microbiota throughout pregnancy. So, the aim of our study was to evaluate oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy and to compare it with non-pregnant women. The oral yeast colonization was assessed in saliva of 30 pregnant and non-pregnant women longitudinally over a 6-months period. Demographic information was collected, a non-invasive intra-oral examination was performed and saliva flow and pH were determined. Pregnant and non-pregnant groups were similar regarding age and level of education. Saliva flow rate did not differ, but saliva pH was lower in pregnant than in non-pregnant women. Oral yeast prevalence was higher in pregnant than in non-pregnant women, either in the first or in the third trimester, but did not attain statistical significance. In individuals colonized with yeast, the total yeast quantification (Log10CFU/mL) increase from the 1st to the 3rd trimester in pregnant women, but not in non-pregnant women. Pregnancy may favour oral yeast growth that may be associated with an acidic oral environment.

  17. Oral Health in Psychiatric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Gurbuz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Although oral health is a major determinant of general health and quality of life, it has a low priority in the context of mental illness. Chronic mental illness and its treatment carry inherent risks for significant oral diseases. Both the disease itself and its various pharmacologic management modalities lead to a range of oral complications and side effects, with caries, periodontal disease and xerostomia being encountered most frequently. Older age, female gender, length of hospitalization, duration of mental illness, psychiatric diagnosis are the most discussed predictors for adverse dental outcomes in the reviewed studies. Poor oral hygiene, higher intake of carbonates, smoking, poor perception of oral health self-needs, length of psychiatric disorder, length of psychotropic treatment, and less access to dental care pose at high risk for poor oral health among this population. This article emphasizes the importance of preventive dentistry programs to improve dental healthcare psychiatric chronic inpatients and the signifance of bridging dental health education to psychiatric rehabilitation programs. In this review, general information concerning the oral manifestations of mental illness, effect of medication of mental illness on oral health, the factors affecting oral health among this special population have been provided.

  18. Association between Oral Anticoagulation Knowledge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Association between Oral Anticoagulation Knowledge, Anticoagulation Control, and Demographic Characteristics of Patients Attending an Anticoagulation Clinic in Saudi Arabia: A Cross-Sectional Prospective Evaluation.

  19. "Visual" Cortex Responds to Spoken Language in Blind Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedny, Marina; Richardson, Hilary; Saxe, Rebecca

    2015-08-19

    Plasticity in the visual cortex of blind individuals provides a rare window into the mechanisms of cortical specialization. In the absence of visual input, occipital ("visual") brain regions respond to sound and spoken language. Here, we examined the time course and developmental mechanism of this plasticity in blind children. Nineteen blind and 40 sighted children and adolescents (4-17 years old) listened to stories and two auditory control conditions (unfamiliar foreign speech, and music). We find that "visual" cortices of young blind (but not sighted) children respond to sound. Responses to nonlanguage sounds increased between the ages of 4 and 17. By contrast, occipital responses to spoken language were maximal by age 4 and were not related to Braille learning. These findings suggest that occipital plasticity for spoken language is independent of plasticity for Braille and for sound. We conclude that in the absence of visual input, spoken language colonizes the visual system during brain development. Our findings suggest that early in life, human cortex has a remarkably broad computational capacity. The same cortical tissue can take on visual perception and language functions. Studies of plasticity provide key insights into how experience shapes the human brain. The "visual" cortex of adults who are blind from birth responds to touch, sound, and spoken language. To date, all existing studies have been conducted with adults, so little is known about the developmental trajectory of plasticity. We used fMRI to study the emergence of "visual" cortex responses to sound and spoken language in blind children and adolescents. We find that "visual" cortex responses to sound increase between 4 and 17 years of age. By contrast, responses to spoken language are present by 4 years of age and are not related to Braille-learning. These findings suggest that, early in development, human cortex can take on a strikingly wide range of functions. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3511674-08$15.00/0.

  20. Called to respond: The potential of unveiling hiddens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison L Black

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Interested in exploring how personal stories and aesthetic modes of representing experiences can nudge open academic and educational spaces, this article/collection of particles seeks to document our encounters of being affected and called to respond to things the other has written and represented. As a way of engaging with questions about what research and research data might be and become, our attention has been drawn to stories and images from our lives that we have not shaken off – and to how, as we have opened these to the other, making once private moments public, our hiddens have morphed tenderly into a shared knowing and being. As we have acted on the call we have felt to respond we have found ourselves entering spaces of collaboration, communion, contemplation, and conversation – spaces illuminated by what we have not been able to – and cannot – set aside. Using visual and poetic materials we explore heartfelt and heartbroken aspects of our educational worlds and lives, to be present with each other and our (reemerging personal and professional meanings. We see the shared body (of work, of writing, of image that develops from the taking of brave steps and the risky slipping off of academic masks and language, as a manifestation of the trusted and nurturing spaces that can be generated through collaborative opportunities to gather together. These steps towards unveiling hiddens are producing in us and of us a friendship, fluency, and fluidity as we write new ways of becoming. In turn, we hope the uncovering and revealing of our dialogue in the public gathering of this journal might supports readers’ telling of their own life stories through what calls them to respond.

  1. How To Respond to Catastrophic Events in Supply Chain Management

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Sooyeon

    2011-01-01

    In March of 2011, a massive earthquake and tsunami struck into Japan. Soon after this event, Toyota in the UK announced that their production had to been halted caused by disruption on supply chain relationship with Japan. Like this, a catastrophic event disturbs not only domestic situation but also international business. Supply chain is one of the most affected areas and also capable to control on business at the same time when a disaster occurs. In this work, how to respond supply chain sy...

  2. Oral Allergy Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuto Kondo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral allergy syndrome (OAS is defined as the symptoms of IgE-mediated immediate allergy localized in the oral mucosa, and the characteristics depend on the lability of the antigen. Another term used for this syndrome is pollen-food allergy (PFS; the patient is sensitized with pollen via the airways and exhibits an allergic reaction to food antigen with a structural similarity to the pollen (class 2 food allergy. In addition to PFS, latex-fruit syndrome is also well-known as the disease exhibiting OAS. In treating the condition, it must be noted that most but not all symptoms of PFS are those of OAS. In many cases, antigens become edible by heating, but some are resistant to heating. Also, since the exacerbation of atopic dermatitis is occasionally observed after the intake of cooked antigens in asymptomatic individuals, careful inquiry of the history is important in designing the treatment. Immunotherapy against the cross-reacting pollen has also been attempted in PFS.

  3. Oral distress in primary Sjögren's syndrome: implications for health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enger, Tone B; Palm, Øyvind; Garen, Torhild; Sandvik, Leiv; Jensen, Janicke L

    2011-12-01

    The aims of the study were to evaluate oral distress in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) compared with age- and sex-matched Norwegian normative data, to estimate the occurrence of oral symptoms in pSS, and to evaluate the impact of oral distress on health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) was used to assess HRQoL, and the Oral Health Impact Profile 14 (OHIP-14) was used to measure oral distress. Of the 246 pSS patients invited to participate in the study, 177 (72%) responded. Data were analysed for the female participants (n = 163). Significant deviations from normative estimates were found in all OHIP-14 item results, and the findings indicated a high level of oral distress among the pSS patients. Health-related quality of life was decreased among pSS patients, with the largest deviations from normative estimates related to general health and role physical. The patients with high levels of oral distress scored significantly lower than patients with low levels of oral distress in five of the SF-36 subscales, indicating that oral conditions have a marked impact on general quality of life. In conclusion, oral distress in pSS is pronounced and severe, and should receive increased attention with a view to improving the quality of life for these patients. © 2011 Eur J Oral Sci.

  4. Oral Hygiene and Oral Flora Evaluation in Psychiatric Patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: The World Health Organization has stated that psychiatric patients are a group of people who have oral and dental illnesses. Aims: The aims of this study were to document the oral hygiene of individuals with chronic psychiatric illness, to determine the extraoral and intraoral findings, to detect the dominant ...

  5. Oral hygiene and oral flora evaluation in psychiatric patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-03-02

    Mar 2, 2015 ... Context: The World Health Organization has stated that psychiatric patients are a group of people who have oral and dental illnesses. Aims: The aims of this study were to document the oral hygiene of individuals with chronic psychiatric illness, to determine the extraoral and intraoral findings, to detect the ...

  6. Oral hygiene practices and risk of oral leukoplakia | Macigo | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of chewing stick as compared to conventional tooth brush had no significant influence on RR of oral leukoplakia. Non-users of toothpastes had a significantly higher risk of oral leukoplakia than users (RR = 1.8; 95% confidence levels (CI) = 1 .4-2.5). Among tobacco smokers, the RR increased from 4.6 in those who ...

  7. Oral hygiene practices and oral health care seeking behaviours ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To determine the oral hygiene practices and oral health care seeking behaviours among primary school teachers. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional descriptive study was conducted among primary school teachers from public schools in Ndola district, Zambia.The primary schools were selected using stratified ...

  8. Can the oral microflora affect oral ulcerative mucositis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laheij, A.M.G.A.; de Soet, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review: Oral mucositis is one of the most prevalent toxicities after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Mucositis is initiated by the chemotherapy or radiotherapy preceding the transplantation. It is commonly accepted that microorganisms play a role in the process of oral mucositis.

  9. Oral Insulin – Fact or Fiction? - Possibilities of Achieving Oral ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 5. Oral Insulin – Fact or Fiction? - Possibilities of Achieving Oral Delivery of Insulin. K Gowthamarajan Giriraj T Kulkarni. General Article Volume 8 Issue 5 May 2003 pp 38-46 ...

  10. [Oral care recommendations for patients with oral autoimmune bullous diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobocinski, V; Dridi, S-M; Bisson, C; Jeanne, S; Gaultier, F; Prost-Squarcioni, C; Bernard, P; Pascal, F; Lefevre, B; Weber, P; Abasq, C; Agbo-Godeau, S; Joly, P; Ingen-Housz-Oro, S; Duvert-Lehembre, S

    2017-03-01

    Autoimmune bullous diseases (AIBD) may cause chronic oral lesions that progress insidiously. To provide recommendations for optimal oral-dental management of patients presenting AIBD with oral involvement. In the absence of scientific studies with high levels of proof, these recommendations have been drawn up at two meetings by a committee of experts on AIBD comprising 7 dermatologists, 1 stomatologist, 1 maxillofacial surgeon, 2 odontologists and 4 parodontologists. The oral lesions associated with AIBD may be classified into three grades of severity: severe (generalised erosive gingivitis affecting at least 30% of dental sites), moderate (localised erosive gingivitis affecting less than 30% of dental sites) and controlled (no erosive oral lesions). Good oral-dental hygiene suited to the severity of the oral lesions, must be practised continually by these patients so as to avoid the formation of dental plaque, which aggravates symptoms. Dental and parodontal care must be considered in accordance with the severity grade of the oral lesions: in severe cases, the dental plaque must be eliminated manually with a curette, but several types of care (descaling, treatment for tooth decay, non-urgent extractions, etc.) must be suspended until the grade of severity is moderate or until the disease is stabilised. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Role of oral microbiome on oral cancers, a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholizadeh, Pourya; Eslami, Hosein; Yousefi, Mehdi; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Aghazadeh, Mohammad; Kafil, Hossein Samadi

    2016-12-01

    The oral cavity is inhibited by many of the bacterial species. Some of them have a key role in the development of oral disease. Interrelationships between oral microbiome and systemic conditions such as head-and-neck cancer have become increasingly appreciated in recent years. Emerging evidence also suggests a link between periodontal disease and oral cancer, and the explanation being that chronic inflammation could be a major factor in both diseases. Squamous cell carcinoma is that the most frequently occurring malignancy of the oral cavity and adjacent sites, representing over 90% of all cancers. The incidence of oral cancer is increasing, significantly among young people and women. Worldwide there are 350,000-400,000 new cases diagnosed every year. Bacteria, viruses, and fungi are strongly implicated as etiological factors in certain cancers. In this review we will discuss the association between the development of oral cancer in potentially malignant oral lesions with chronic periodontitis, chronic Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, candida, other microbes and described mechanisms which may be involved in these carcinoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. The oral microbiome - an update for oral healthcare professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilian, M; Chapple, I L C; Hannig, M

    2016-01-01

    and health. The mouth houses the second most diverse microbial community in the body, harbouring over 700 species of bacteria that colonise the hard surfaces of teeth and the soft tissues of the oral mucosa. Through recent advances in technology, we have started to unravel the complexities of the oral...

  13. 75 FR 82463 - Yuri I. Montgomery, Respondent; Final Decision and Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ... to the present, Memoranda of Agreement (MOA) and Office of Personnel Management letters issued in... compulsion of the Order Denying Respondent's Motion for More Definite Statement.'' Respondent's Answer...

  14. Tanzania Dental Journal Vol. 14 No. 1, May 2007 Oral health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Abstract. Aim: The purpose of the study was to investigate oral health knowledge, perceptions and behaviour amongst nursing students in a Nigerian tertiary hospital. Materials and methods: The study was conducted at University of Nigeria. Teaching Hospital on 244 respondents aged 17 to 40 years, using self ...

  15. Barriers to oral health care utilization in Ibadan, South West Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Socio-demographic variables and oral health care seeking behaviour were requested and in addition, the respondents were asked to rank ... Factor analysis was employed in order to identify four factors with the highest loading. The mean scores .... the ethical clearance for the study was obtained from the joint University of ...

  16. Assessing Oral Hygiene in Hospitalized Older Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Poor oral health for all older adults can result in higher risk for heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and oral cancer. Findings from this study indicated older veterans needed to improve their oral hygiene habits but barriers to oral hygiene performance prevented them from receiving and performing oral hygiene measures.

  17. Literacy and Orality in Our Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Walter J.

    1978-01-01

    Points out the importance of orality in past centuries and in some contemporary cultures (including that of the black urban ghetto); discusses the problems in moving from oral expression to writing; and notes contrasts between primary orality, writing and printing, and secondary orality--the orality induced by radio and television. (GW)

  18. Symptomatic response to blocked and unblocked pentagastrin stimulation in functional dyspepsia - Comparison of responders and non-responders to omeprazole identified in a single-subject trial model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, L.G.; Bytzer, P.

    2008-01-01

    hypothesized that RSD trial responders and non-responders would react differently to gastric acid stimulation. Development of epigastric pain was expected in RSD trial responders after pentagastrin stimulation during placebo treatment, but not during omeprazole treatment. In non-responders, epigastric pain...... was expected not to be influenced by gastric acid stimulation or type of treatment. Methods: Nineteen patients were evaluated. Symptomatic response to pentagastrin (6 mu g/kg) was assessed twice in each patient following placebo and omeprazole (40 mg bid) treatment in a randomized, double-blind, cross...... but not during omeprazole treatment. Results: The acid provocation test was positive in 43% (3/7) of responders compared to only 17% (2/12) non-responders. VAS-score changes showed trends towards a more pronounced symptom reduction during omeprazole treatment in responders compared to non-responders. Conclusion...

  19. Oral pathology case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. S. Amorim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A 9-year-old child was referred to Pediatric Dentistry Consultation due to a painful mandibular swelling, with slow growth and not responding to antibiothicotherapy. Physical examination showed mandibular swelling in the 4th quarter, with lush bulging of the vestibular cortical bone. The imaging study (dental orthopantomography and mandibular CT revealed radiolucent image, which stretched from alveolar crest to the basic board, where was placed the tooth 45. The diagnosis of dentigerous cyst was made. Treatment consisted of excision of the cyst along with the extraction of the associated tooth, without inferior dental nerve injury.

  20. The Condition of Oral Health in Regular Users of Psychoactive Substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minic, I; Pejcic, A

    2016-02-09

    Besides various harmful effects on the overall health, chronic consumption of psychoactive substances has different consequences on oral health. The goal of this paper was to examine the condition of oral health in psychoactive substance users during the healing process and to do a comparative analysis of maintaining oral hygiene before and during the substance abuse treatment. The study included 26 regular users of psychoactive substance. All the respondents used different types of psychoactive substances for at least two years and were treated for three months. The examination was divided into two parts. The first included completing the questionnaires that contained questions related to maintaining oral hygiene while using psychoactive substances and during the substance abuse treatment (the moment of interviewing). The second included the clinical examination of the respondents during the therapy. Taking into account all information collected from the questionnaires, respondents used heroin statistically significantly more than all the other substances ( p psychoactive substances, gingiva and other periodontal tissues suffer the worst damage, but when the healing process starts, the awareness about the importance of maintaining oral hygiene improves.

  1. Adhesion and migration of cells responding to microtopography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estévez, Maruxa; Martínez, Elena; Yarwood, Stephen J; Dalby, Matthew J; Samitier, Josep

    2015-05-01

    It is known that cells respond strongly to microtopography. However, cellular mechanisms of response are unclear. Here, we study wild-type fibroblasts responding to 25 µm(2) posts and compare their response to that of FAK(-/-) fibroblasts and fibroblasts with PMA treatment to stimulate protein kinase C (PKC) and the small g-protein Rac. FAK knockout cells modulated adhesion number and size in a similar way to cells on topography; that is, they used more, smaller adhesions, but migration was almost completely stalled demonstrating the importance of FAK signaling in contact guidance and adhesion turnover. Little similarity, however, was observed to PKC stimulated cells and cells on the topography. Interestingly, with PKC stimulation the cell nuclei became highly deformable bringing focus on these surfaces to the study of metastasis. Surfaces that aid the study of cellular migration are important in developing understanding of mechanisms of wound healing and repair in aligned tissues such as ligament and tendon. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Transcription Machinery: Ready To Respond to Host Attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flentie, Kelly; Garner, Ashley L.

    2016-01-01

    Regulating responses to stress is critical for all bacteria, whether they are environmental, commensal, or pathogenic species. For pathogenic bacteria, successful colonization and survival in the host are dependent on adaptation to diverse conditions imposed by the host tissue architecture and the immune response. Once the bacterium senses a hostile environment, it must enact a change in physiology that contributes to the organism's survival strategy. Inappropriate responses have consequences; hence, the execution of the appropriate response is essential for survival of the bacterium in its niche. Stress responses are most often regulated at the level of gene expression and, more specifically, transcription. This minireview focuses on mechanisms of regulating transcription initiation that are required by Mycobacterium tuberculosis to respond to the arsenal of defenses imposed by the host during infection. In particular, we highlight how certain features of M. tuberculosis physiology allow this pathogen to respond swiftly and effectively to host defenses. By enacting highly integrated and coordinated gene expression changes in response to stress, M. tuberculosis is prepared for battle against the host defense and able to persist within the human population. PMID:26883824

  3. Hospital Preparedness to Respond to Biological and Chemical Terrorist Attack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florin, P.

    2007-01-01

    There is a growing concern about the terrorist use of chemical or biological agents against civilian population. A large proportion of hospitals are probably poorly prepared to handle victims of chemical or biological terrorism. At national level, starting with 2008 hospitals will be under the administration and control of local authorities. That is good opportunities for local authorities and public health office to tailor the activity of the hospitals to the real needs in the area of responsibility, and to allocate the suitable budget for them. Commonly hospitals are not fully prepared to respond to massive casualty disaster of any kind, either i their capacity to care for large numbers of victims or in their ability to provide care in coordination with a regional or national incident command structure. Preparedness activities to respond properly to chemical or biological attack including the adequate logistic, the principle of training and drill for the hospital emergency units and medical personal, communication and integration of the hospital team in local and regional civil response team are developed by the author.(author)

  4. Perceptions of Hunting and Hunters by U.S. Respondents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Byrd

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Public acceptance of hunting and hunting practices is an important human dimension of wildlife management in the United States. Researchers surveyed 825 U.S. residents in an online questionnaire about their views of hunting, hunters, and hunting practices. Eighty-seven percent of respondents from the national survey agreed that it was acceptable to hunt for food whereas 37% agreed that it was acceptable to hunt for a trophy. Over one-quarter of respondents did not know enough about hunting over bait, trapping, and captive hunts to form an opinion about whether the practice reduced animal welfare. Chi-square tests were used to explore relationships between perceptions of hunters and hunting practices and demographics. Those who knew hunters, participated in hunting-related activities, visited fairs or livestock operations, or were males who had more favorable opinions on hunting. A logistic regression model showed that not knowing a hunter was a statistically significant negative predictor of finding it acceptable to hunt; owning a pet was statistically significant and negative for approving of hunting for a trophy.

  5. A Simple Evacuation Modeling and Simulation Tool for First Responders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Daniel B [ORNL; Payne, Patricia W [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Although modeling and simulation of mass evacuations during a natural or man-made disaster is an on-going and vigorous area of study, tool adoption by front-line first responders is uneven. Some of the factors that account for this situation include cost and complexity of the software. For several years, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been actively developing the free Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit (IMPACT) to address these issues. One of the components of IMPACT is a multi-agent simulation module for area-based and path-based evacuations. The user interface is designed so that anyone familiar with typical computer drawing tools can quickly author a geospatially-correct evacuation visualization suitable for table-top exercises. Since IMPACT is designed for use in the field where network communications may not be available, quick on-site evacuation alternatives can be evaluated to keep pace with a fluid threat situation. Realism is enhanced by incorporating collision avoidance into the simulation. Statistics are gathered as the simulation unfolds, including most importantly time-to-evacuate, to help first responders choose the best course of action.

  6. Strategies in responding to a hostile takeover bid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper examines the steps to be taken by a corporation and its board in order to be properly prepared before a hostile takeover bid is made. The procedures and steps to be followed in responding to a bid with a view to maximizing value for shareholders are also outlined. Reasons why a company may become target for a hostile takeover bid are reviewed, followed by a more detailed examination of the responsibilities of a board in responding to a takeover bid. These responsibilities include the adoption of a shareholders' rights plan ('poison pill'), review of executive employment contracts, making sure that a corporate indemnification agreement and directors' and officers' liability insurance plan are in place, implementation of structural deterrents, investor communication plans, preparing the 'black book', creating or updating the list of 'white knights', designating a data room, entering into confidentiality agreements with white knights, preparation of a response timetable, review of recent takeover bids, strategies for dealing with hostile bidders, strategies for enticing one or more a white knights to enter the bidding. Sample copy of a confidentiality agreement is contained in Schedule A. A list of break-up fees in recent Canadian mergers and acquisitions transactions is provided in Schedule B. 24 refs

  7. MINER - A Mobile Imager of Neutrons for Emergency Responders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsmith, John E. M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brennan, James S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gerling, Mark D [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kiff, Scott D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mascarenhas, Nicholas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Van De Vreugde, James L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-10-01

    We have developed a mobile fast neutron imaging platform to enhance the capabilities of emergency responders in the localization and characterization of special nuclear material. This mobile imager of neutrons for emergency responders (MINER) is based on the Neutron Scatter Camera, a large segmented imaging system that was optimized for large-area search applications. Due to the reduced size and power requirements of a man-portable system, MINER has been engineered to fit a much smaller form factor, and to be operated from either a battery or AC power. We chose a design that enabled omnidirectional (4π) imaging, with only a ~twofold decrease in sensitivity compared to the much larger neutron scatter cameras. The system was designed to optimize its performance for neutron imaging and spectroscopy, but it does also function as a Compton camera for gamma imaging. This document outlines the project activities, broadly characterized as system development, laboratory measurements, and deployments, and presents sample results in these areas. Additional information can be found in the documents that reside in WebPMIS.

  8. Life Threatening Idiopathic Recurrent Angioedema Responding to Cannabis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Frenkel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 27-year-old man with recurrent episodes of angioedema since he was 19, who responded well to treatment with medical grade cannabis. Initially, he responded to steroids and antihistamines, but several attempts to withdraw treatment resulted in recurrence. In the last few months before prescribing cannabis, the frequency and severity of the attacks worsened and included several presyncope events, associated with scrotal and neck swelling. No predisposing factors were identified, and extensive workup was negative. The patient reported that he was periodically using cannabis socially and that during these periods he was free of attacks. Recent data suggest that cannabis derivatives are involved in the control of mast cell activation. Consequently, we decided to try a course of inhaled cannabis as modulators of immune cell functions. The use of inhaled cannabis resulted in a complete response, and he has been free of symptoms for 2 years. An attempt to withhold the inhaled cannabis led to a recurrent attack within a week, and resuming cannabis maintained the remission, suggesting a cause and effect relationship.

  9. Responding to patient safety incidents: the "seven pillars".

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, T B; Helmchen, L A; Smith, K M; Centomani, N; Gunderson, A; Mayer, D; Chamberlin, W H

    2010-12-01

    Although acknowledged to be an ethical imperative for providers, disclosure following patient safety incidents remains the exception. The appropriate response to a patient safety incident and the disclosure of medical errors are neither easy nor obvious. An inadequate response to patient harm or an inappropriate disclosure may frustrate practitioners, dent their professional reputation, and alienate patients. The authors have presented a descriptive study on the comprehensive process for responding to patient safety incidents, including the disclosure of medical errors adopted at a large, urban tertiary care centre in the United States. In the first two years post-implementation, the "seven pillars" process has led to more than 2,000 incident reports annually, prompted more than 100 investigations with root cause analysis, translated into close to 200 system improvements and served as the foundation of almost 106 disclosure conversations and 20 full disclosures of inappropriate or unreasonable care causing harm to patients. Adopting a policy of transparency represents a major shift in organisational focus and may take several years to implement. In our experience, the ability to rapidly learn from, respond to, and modify practices based on investigation to improve the safety and quality of patient care is grounded in transparency.

  10. Perceived Effectiveness, Self-efficacy, and Social Support for Oral Appliance Therapy Among Older Veterans With Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo, Nancy J; Alessi, Cathy A; Martin, Jennifer L; Mitchell, Michael N; Hays, Ron D; Col, Nananda; Patterson, Emily S; Jouldjian, Stella; Josephson, Karen; Fung, Constance H

    2016-11-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a prevalent sleep disorder among older adults. Oral appliances are increasingly prescribed as therapy for obstructive sleep apnea. Adherence to oral appliance therapy is highly variable. Based on value-expectancy theory and other social-psychological theories, adherence to oral appliance therapy may be influenced by patients' perceived effectiveness of the therapy, self-efficacy, and availability of social support. We examined these perceptions among older adults with obstructive sleep apnea who were prescribed oral appliance therapy. We mailed surveys to all patients aged ≥65 years who had been prescribed oral appliance therapy for obstructive sleep apnea over the prior 36 months at a Veterans Affairs medical center. We examined frequencies of responses to items that assessed perceived effectiveness, self-efficacy, and social support for nightly use of oral appliances from friends, family, or health care staff. Thirty-nine individuals responded (response rate, 30%; mean [SD] age 71.4 [SD 6.3] years; 97% male). Thirty-six percent of the respondents perceived regular use of oral appliance therapy to be effective in managing obstructive sleep apnea; 39% agreed that they felt confident about using oral appliances regularly; 41% felt supported by people in their life in using oral appliance therapy; and 38% agreed that health care staff would help them to use their oral appliance regularly. These rates represented less than half of respondents despite the finding that 65% of patients believed that they would use their oral appliance regularly. Although oral appliance therapy is increasingly prescribed for obstructive sleep apnea, only about one third of older adults prescribed it perceived it to be an effective treatment, were confident about oral appliance use, and/or believed that they would receive needed support. Future research is needed to better understand older adults' perceptions so that interventions can be designed to improve the

  11. Oral health status and access to oral health care for U.S. adults aged 18-64: National Health Interview Survey, 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Barbara; Simile, Catherine M; Adams, Patricia F; Cohen, Robin A

    2012-07-01

    This report presents statistics from the 2008 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) on selected measures of oral health status and oral health care access for adults aged 18-64. Estimates are presented by sex, age, race and ethnicity, nativity, education, poverty status, health and dental insurance status, region, place of residence, dentition status, current smoking status, current drinking status, and diabetes status. NHIS is a multistage probability sample survey conducted annually by interviewers of the U.S. Census Bureau for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics, and is representative of the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States. Data are collected for all family members during face-to-face interviews with adults present at the time of interview. Additional health information is obtained from one randomly selected adult. If the selected adult is physically or mentally incapable of responding for himself or herself, a proxy respondent is used. Among adults aged 18-64, about three-quarters had very good or good oral health, 17% had fair oral health, and 7% had poor oral health. Adults with Medicaid were almost five times as likely as adults with private health insurance to have poor oral health. Adults with Medicaid (21%) were almost twice as likely as adults overall (12%) to not have had a dental visit in more than 5 years. Among adults aged 18-64, the main reason to forgo a dental visit for an oral health problem in the past 6 months was cost; 42% could not afford treatment or did not have insurance. Fear was the reason that 1 out of 10 adults did not visit the dentist for an oral health problem.

  12. DISCRIMINAÇÕES SIMPLES SIMULTÂNEAS E RESPONDER RELACIONAL SIMPLE SIMULTANEOUS DISCRIMINATION AND RELATIONAL RESPONDING

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira, Márcio Borges; Todorov, João Claudio; Nalini, Lauro Eugênio Guimarães

    2012-01-01

    O presente trabalho apresentou um procedimento de treino discriminativo alternativo às propostas atuais sobre responder relacional e emergência de relações entre estímulos. Participaram 17 alunos do curso de Psicologia e 16 alunos e um professor do curso de Engenharia de Telecomunicações. Os participantes foram expostos a treinos de discriminações simples simultâneas com estímulos compostos. Após o treino, os estímulos foram decompostos e relações aprendidas e novas entre estímulos foram test...

  13. How do foster carers manage the oral health of children in foster care? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muirhead, Vanessa; Subramanian, Sri-Kavi; Wright, Desmond; Wong, Ferranti S L

    2017-12-01

    This qualitative study explored how the foster family environment influenced children's oral health. It also aimed to better understand foster carers' oral health knowledge, attitudes and experiences of managing foster children's oral health behaviours and oral health care. An interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) study design was used to recruit a purposive sample of foster carers in Tower Hamlets, United Kingdom, from a range of backgrounds (maximum variation sampling). Participants were aged 21 years and older and provided full-time foster care for children for a minimum of 1 year. The foster carers took part in focus groups that were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data analysis followed a five-step IPA process, which included reading the transcripts, note taking, identifying emerging themes, connecting related themes and writing up the final themes. Iterative data gathering and analysis continued to reach thematic saturation. Three focus groups were conducted, involving a total of 12 foster carers. Eight of the 12 participants had fostered children for more than 10 years and they were currently fostering 22 children aged five to 18 years old. Four themes emerged from within the context of the supportive and nurturing foster family environment that described how foster carers' responded to and managed the oral health of their foster children. Foster carers had adopted an oral health caregiving role, "in loco parentis" responding to the poor oral health of their vulnerable foster children. They were hypervigilant about establishing and monitoring children's oral health routines and taking their children to see a dentist; these were seen as an integral part of being good foster carers. They were knowledgeable about the causes of children's oral ill health, gained from their own dental experiences and from looking after their own children. Foster carers had experienced tensions while adopting this oral health caregiving role with dentists who had

  14. Qualitative study of oral health norms and behaviour among elderly people in Scotland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, L; Eadie, D

    1991-01-01

    between 1 1/2 and 2 1/2 hours. The results showed that oral and denture hygiene was a sensitive issue and part of individual routine behaviour which most respondents were reluctant to change. Tooth loss was expected and accepted as part of a natural ageing process. Dental visits were regarded as problem......This study was undertaken to examine oral health norms and behaviour among elderly people in Scotland. Qualitative methodology in the form of informal group discussions was used. The study population comprised 9 groups of 6-8 respondents aged 65 years and over, selected according to the quota...... criteria of sex, social class, level of dependency and oral health status. All groups were recruited by a professional market research interviewer, using a random route procedure. Discussions were conducted under the guidance of an experienced group moderator and tape recorded. Each group discussion lasted...

  15. Oral complications of cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreizen, S.; Daly, T.E.; Drane, J.B.; Brown, L.R.

    1977-02-01

    Injury to surrounding tissues during radiotherapy for oral cancer can have devastating physical and psychologic consequences for the patient. Oral complications include xerostomia, dental decay, mucositis, taste loss, osteoradionecrosis, infection, and trismus. In many instances, these problems can be eradicated or controlled with appropriate treatment.

  16. Tobacco Use and Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seffrin, John R.; Randall, B. Grove

    1982-01-01

    Oral disease risks regarding the use of tobacco arise not only from smoking but also from the oral use of tobacco in the form of snuff. Such diseases range from simple tooth decay to various forms of cancer. A fact list is suggested for presenting the risks to school-age youth. (JN)

  17. BETTER ORAL HEALTH TO ALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikki Murtomaa

    2016-12-01

    The behavioral science experts are of opinion that only comprehensive and integrated common-risk-factor-based health promotion activities can enhance oral health and its equity as a part of general health. Are health professionals ready to assume their responsibility for promoting better oral health?

  18. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available AAOMS - Oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find ... Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained to appropriately administer local ...

  19. Oral health in frail elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksema, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Ageing points towards increasing health problems and rising costs for the society. One of these health problems is the deteriorating oral health in care dependent elderly. The latter is related to the high need for care on many levels in these elderly. The lack of attention for oral care can be

  20. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Here’s what you need to know. Click here ... will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Here’s what you need to know. Click here ...

  1. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Americans will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Here’s what you need to know. ... Americans will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Here’s what you need to know. ...

  2. Oral treatment for multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Killestein, J.; Rudick, R.A.; Polman, C.H.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The armamentarium for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) is increasing rapidly. Several oral treatments have shown benefit and will generate much interest because of the convenience of such administration. However, availability of convenient oral drugs will

  3. Cheiro-oral syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-yu DONG

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The clinical and imaging features of 11 cheiro-oral syndrome (COS cases were retrospectively analyzed. All patients were unilaterally involved, including 10 cases of acute lacunar cerebral infarction, and one case of cerebral hemorrhage. Thalamic ischemic stroke (5 cases was most common, and secondly were parietal lobe infarction (3 cases and brainstem infarction (3 cases. Three of 11 cases developed progressive stroke during treatment. All patients were followed up for 3 months after discharge, 2 cases still presented ipsilateral fingertips and perioral numbness, one progressive case left hemi-dysesthesia. Damage of nerve conduction from medulla oblongata to parietal lobe can induce COS. Although the prognosis of COS is good, progressive risk can be seen in some cases. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.12.015

  4. Amiloidosis bucal Oral amyloidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Isabella Lima Arrais Ribeiro; Vilson Lacerda Brasileiro Junior; Olavo Hoston Gonçalves Pereira; Marize Raquel Diniz da Rosa; Hálamo José Moura de Lira

    2012-01-01

    A amiloidose é uma doença complexa rara de difícil diagnóstico que ocorre devido à deposição de substância amilóide no meio extracelular. Ao ser diagnosticado na cavidade bucal, deve-se monitorar o paciente a fim de avaliar possíveis complicações sistêmicas da doença. Diante disso, o objetivo do presente estudo é relatar um caso de amiloidose oral em uma paciente do gênero feminino de 72 anos de idade. Baseado nos sinais clínicos observados, a hipótese diagnóstica foi de fibroma traumático. A...

  5. Efficacy comparison of oral steroid, intratympanic steroid, hyperbaric oxygen and oral steroid + hyperbaric oxygen treatments in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimoglu, Yalcin; Inci, Ender; Edizer, Deniz Tuna; Ozdilek, Alper; Aslan, Mehmet

    2011-12-01

    Idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss is a rare disorder of unknown pathogenesis in which hearing is lost partially or totally. About 60 treatment modalities have been described. We aimed to compare the efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen, oral steroid, intratympanic steroid therapy and their combinations in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients. Files of patients who were followed up between 2004 and 2010 in our clinic were examined retrospectively. Patients were divided into four groups according to the therapy received: Oral steroid, oral steroid + hyperbaric oxygen, intratympanic steroid and hyperbaric oxygen. Treatment success was assessed by Siegel criteria and mean gains using pre-treatment and post-treatment audiograms. 217 patients and 219 ears were examined. The proportion of patients responding to therapy was the highest in the oral steroid + hyperbaric oxygen group with 86.88% (53/61) followed by the oral steroid group with 63.79% (37/58), the intratympanic steroid group with 46,51% (20/43) and the hyperbaric oxygen group with 43.85% (25/57). The proportion of patients who had complete recovery was the highest in the oral steroid + hyperbaric oxygen group with 42.6% (26/61) followed by the oral steroid group with 19.0% (11/58), the hyperbaric oxygen group with 17.5% (10/57) and the intratympanic steroid group with 11.6% (5/43). The oral steroid + hyperbaric oxygen group has the highest mean hearing gain among all groups (p sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients receiving oral steroid + hyperbaric oxygen combination therapy have a higher likelihood of recovery than patients receiving oral steroids, hyperbaric oxygen or intratympanic steroids alone.

  6. The Oral Paradigm and Snapchat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oren Soffer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this short essay, I argue that the ephemeral nature of emerging instant-messaging applications, such as Snapchat, applies an oral paradigm. While online discourse of computer-mediated communication shares many qualities with oral communication, the case of ephemeral applications is unique, as the oral features are already integrated in the application technology design and as orality is often implemented on highly visual products. Snapchat applies technology that fades visual contents as if they were spoken words fading in the air after utterance. Moreover, Snapchat’s promise to delete all messages from its database after they are viewed echoes a key characteristic of primary oral culture: that is, the inability (and in our case, the obligation not to store knowledge. In this, Snapchat demonstrates counter-logic to the contemporary grammar of new media, which is based on information aggregation.

  7. Oral health promotion at worksites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, L

    1989-01-01

    Many workplace-based health promotion programmes have been reported but only a few include or focus specifically on oral health. Although certain obstacles to oral health promotion in the workplace exist from the management side, from the dental profession and from the employees, these seem...... is at present sparse and there are few guidelines to actual strategies for effective oral health promotion. However, elements of strategies that have been successful in various geographical and economic environments include: active involvement of the work force, the use of dental auxiliaries, voluntary daily...... mouthrinsing, screening activities, use of mass media, oral hygiene instruction and prophylaxis and paraprofessional training. It is recommended that future research concentrates on these elements to build up a meaningful and relevant data base upon which effective oral health promotion programmes can...

  8. Oral candidiasis and angular cheilitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Victoria; Fazel, Nasim

    2010-01-01

    Candidiasis, an often encountered oral disease, has been increasing in frequency. Most commonly caused by the overgrowth of Candida albicans, oral candidiasis can be divided into several categories including acute and chronic forms, and angular cheilitis. Risk factors for the development of oral candidiasis include immunosuppression, wearing of dentures, pharmacotherapeutics, smoking, infancy and old age, endocrine dysfunction, and decreased salivation. Oral candidiasis may be asymptomatic. More frequently, however, it is physically uncomfortable, and the patient may complain of burning mouth, dysgeusia, dysphagia, anorexia, and weight loss, leading to nutritional deficiency and impaired quality of life. A plethora of antifungal treatments are available. The overall prognosis of oral candidiasis is good, and rarely is the condition life threatening with invasive or recalcitrant disease.

  9. Direct oral anticoagulants: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco Moreno, Ana Isabel; Martín Díaz, Rosa María; García Navarro, María José

    2017-12-30

    Vitamin K antagonists were the only choice for chronic oral anticoagulation for more than half a century. Over the past few years, direct oral anticoagulants have emerged, including one direct thrombin inhibitor (dabigatran etexilate) and three factor Xa inhibitors (apixaban, edoxaban and rivaroxaban). In randomised controlled trials comparing direct oral anticoagulants with traditional vitamin K antagonists, the direct oral anticoagulants all showed a favourable benefit-risk balance in their safety and efficacy profile, in prevention of thromboembolic events in patients with atrial fibrillation and in the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and acute coronary syndrome. In 2008, dabigatran was the first direct oral anticoagulant approved by the European Medicine Agency. Subsequently, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban were also authorised. This article reviews the evidence related to the use of these drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Oral lichen planus: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupaa, R. Jayasri; Sankari, S. Leena; Masthan, K. M. K.; Rajesh, E.

    2015-01-01

    Lichen planus is an immunologically mediated mucocutaneous disease that is triggered by varied etiological agents. The oral lichenoid reaction is considered a variant of the disease that needs to be clearly diagnosed as a separate entity from oral lichen planus and treated. They follow a strict cause-effector relationship, protocols that suggest the differentiation. Lichen planus has varied clinical forms in the oral mucosa and cutaneously that has different prognosis. This condition also arises in association with various other systemic conditions such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus. There have been cases reported in the esophagus, larynx, scalp, nail, cutaneous areas, especially arms and wrists, trunk. There is reported malignant transformation that essentiates careful examination, treatment protocol and regular follow-up sessions. This article throws light on the disease condition of oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid reaction that is essential for the differentiation and treatment. PMID:26015696

  11. Enhanced Efficacy of High Dose Oral Vancomycin Therapy in Clostridium difficile Diarrhea for Hospitalized Adults Not Responsive to Conventional Oral Vancomycin Therapy: Antibiotic Stewardship Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke A. Cunha

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Current therapy of Clostridium difficile diarrhea (CDD is problematic. Optimal treatment for CDD remains oral vancomycin, but there is little data on oral vancomycin dosing regimens. The objective of this C. difficile diarrhea study was to compare the efficacy of “high dose” vancomycin, 500 mg (PO q6h, as sole treatment and in those who after 72 h failed to respond to conventional doses of oral vancomycin, 125–250 mg (PO q6h. Hospitalized adults with CDD were evaluated by various oral vancomycin regimens, i.e., a conventional dose group (125–250 mg (PO q6h, a “high dose escalation” dose group (250 mg → 500 mg (PO q6h, and a “high dose” group (500 mg (PO q6h. Oral vancomycin treatment groups were compared by time to improvement, i.e., decrease in >50% of watery stools/day and duration of therapy. The high dose escalation and high dose oral vancomycin groups showed the most rapid resolution of diarrhea. There was marked decrease in stools/day after “high dose” vancomycin escalation from conventional dosing, i.e., 250 mg (PO q6h → 500 mg (PO q6h. This study demonstrated that “high dose” escalation or initial high dose oral vancomycin, i.e., 500 mg (PO q6h was the most efficacious regimen for CDD.

  12. Geriatric Respondents and Non-Respondents To Probiotic Intervention Can Be Differentiated By Inherent Gut Microbiome Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suja eSenan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Scope: Probiotic interventions are known to have been shown to influence the composition of the intestinal microbiota in geriatrics. The growing concern is the apparent variation in response to identical strain dosage among human volunteers. One factor that governs this variation is the host gut microbiome. In this study, we attempted to define a core gut metagenome which could act as a predisposition signature marker of inherent bacterial community that can help predict the success of a probiotic intervention. Methods and Results: To characterize the geriatric gut microbiome we designed primers targeting the 16S rRNA hypervariable region V2-V3 followed by semiconductor sequencing using Ion Torrent PGM. Among respondents and non- respondents the chief genera of phylum Firmicutes that showed significant differences are Lactobacillus, Clostridium, Eubacterium, and Blautia (q< 0.002 while in the genera of phylum Proteobacteria included Shigella, Escherichia, Burkholderia and Camphylobacter (q <0.002. Conclusion: We have identified potential microbial biomarkers and taxonomic patterns that correlate with a positive response to probiotic intervention in geriatric volunteers. Future work with larger cohorts of geriatrics with diverse dietary influences could reveal the potential of the signature patterns of microbiota for personalized nutrition.

  13. Oral Health in the US: Key Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Policy Oral Health in the U.S.: Key Facts Oral Health in the U.S.: Key Facts Published: Jun 01, ... Email Print This fact sheet provides data on oral health care coverage and access for children, nonelderly adults ...

  14. Why Is Oral Health Important for Men?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2018 About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Oral Health and Overal Health Gum Disease and Cardiovascular Health ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... Why is Oral Health Important for Men? Article Chapters Why is Oral ...

  15. Why Is Oral Health Important for Women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2018 About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Oral Health and Overal Health Gum Disease and Cardiovascular Health ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... Why Is Oral Health Important for Women? Article Chapters Why Is Oral ...

  16. Pregnancy Cravings Can Harm Your Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2018 About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Oral Health and Overal Health Gum Disease and Cardiovascular Health ... your desktop! more... Pregnancy Cravings Can Harm Your Oral Health Article Chapters Pregnancy Cravings Can Harm Your Oral ...

  17. Changeability of oral cavity environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdacka, Anna; Strzyka A, Krystyna; Rydzewska, Anna

    2007-01-01

    In dentistry, the results of in vivo studies on drugs, dental fillings or prostheses are routinely evaluated based on selected oral cavity environment parameters at specific time points. Such evaluation may be confounded by ongoing changes in the oral cavity environment induced by diet, drug use, stress and other factors. The study aimed to confirm oral cavity environment changeability. 24 healthy individuals aged 20-30 had their oral cavity environment prepared by having professional hygiene procedures performed and caries lesions filled. Baseline examination and the examination two years afterwards, evaluated clinical and laboratory parameters of oral cavity environment. Caries incidence was determined based on DMFT and DMFS values, oral cavity hygiene on Plaque Index (acc. Silness & Loe) and Hygiene Index (acc. O'Leary), and the gingival status on Gingival Index (acc. Loe & Silness) and Gingival Bleeding Index (acc. Ainamo & Bay). Saliva osmolarity, pH and concentrations of Ca(2+), Pi, Na(+), Cl(-), total protein, albumins, F(-) and Sr(2+) were determined. The results confirmed ongoing changeability of the oral cavity environment. After 2 years of the study reduction in oral cavity hygiene parameters PLI and HI (P<0.1), and gingival indices as well as lower saliva concentration of Ca(2+) (P<.001), Pi (P<.06), K(+) (P<.04), Sr(2+) (P<.03), Na(+) (P<.1), against the baseline values, were observed. Total protein and albumin saliva concentrations were also significantly lower. Physiological oral cavity environment is subject to constant, individually different, changes which should be considered when analysing studies that employ oral cavity environment parameters.

  18. The Management of Oral Pemphigus Vulgaris with Systemic Corticosteroid and Dapsone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Azizi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and aims. Oral pemphigus vulgaris is a chronic autoimmune mucocutaneous intraepithelial disease that primarily affects patients over the age of fifty, resulting in mucosal ulceration and is a potentially life-threatening disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of dapsone in combination with systemic corticosteroids to treat the oral lesions of oral pemphigus.

    Materials and methods. Twenty patients diagnosed with oral pemphigus were selected. Oral manifestations were graded according to the severity of disease from 1 to 3. All patients were treated initially with systemic corticosteroids. Each was assigned to one of 4 groups according to their response to therapy. Patients who responded less than 50% healing of lesions began a trial of dapsone. After 4 weeks, signs and symptoms were recorded, and if a patient was lesion-free, the dapsone dosage was gradually tapered.

    Results. Five patients with mild to moderate disease were treated with systemic corticosteroids alone. 15 patients with moderate to severe disease were treated with systemic corticosteroid and dapsone therapy. Of these, 10 patients had significant benefits, while 5 patients did not respond to dapsone adjuvant.

    Conclusions. The use of dapsone in combination with systemic corticosteroids is a useful method for treatment of oral pemphigus.

  19. Yap1: a DNA damage responder in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Lori A; Degtyareva, Natalya; Doetsch, Paul W

    2012-04-01

    Activation of signaling pathways in response to genotoxic stress is crucial for cells to properly repair DNA damage. In response to DNA damage, intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species increase. One important function of such a response could be to initiate signal transduction processes. We have employed the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae to delineate DNA damage sensing mechanisms. We report a novel, unanticipated role for the transcription factor Yap1 as a DNA damage responder, providing direct evidence that reactive oxygen species are an important component of the DNA damage signaling process. Our findings reveal an epistatic link between Yap1 and the DNA base excision repair pathway. Corruption of the Yap1-mediated DNA damage response influences cell survival and genomic stability in response to exposure to genotoxic agents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. How Do Business Interest Groups Respond to Political Challenges?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paster, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    adaptation. The paper illustrates these two response strategies with four episodes of political conflict in the political-economic history of Germany: (i) the adoption of social insurance under Bismarck, (ii) the adoption of unemployment insurance in the 1920s, (iii) the adoption of board-level...... their interests, using four episodes of political conflict in Germany. The paper elaborates a model of response strategies and their likely impact on political outcomes. The model suggests that business interest groups can respond to political challenges in two ways: by seeking confrontation or by pursuing...... codetermination in the early 1950s, (iv) and the Agenda 2010 labour market reforms of the early 2000s. These four case studies show that adaptation facilitates social compromise, while confrontation results in a bifurcated outcome, producing either dominance or defeat of business interests, depending on what side...

  1. Respondents, Operants, and Emergents: Toward an Integrated Perspective on Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbaugh, Daune M.; Washburn, David A.; Hillix, William A.

    1996-01-01

    A triarchic organization of behavior, building on Skinner's description of respondents and operants, is proposed by introducing a third class of behavior called 'emergents.' Emergents are new responses, never specifically reinforced, that require operations more complex than association. Some of these operations occur naturally only in animals above a minimum level of brain complexity, and are developed in an interaction between treatment and organismic variables. (Here complexity is defined in terms of relative levels of hierarchical integration made possible both by the amount of brain, afforded both by brain-body allometric relationships and by encephalization, and, also, the elaboration of dendritic and synaptic connections within the cortex and connections between various parts/regions of the brain.) Examples of emergents are discussed to advance this triarchic view, of behavior. The prime example is language. This triarchic view reflects both the common goals and the cumulative nature of psychological science.

  2. Responding to emergencies: How organization and management make a difference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metlay, D.S.; Haber, S.B.; Luckas, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    There is an observable and definable process that occurs during the course of responding to an abnormal event at a nuclear power plant. Each of the elements that comprise that process involves collective action and consequently is influenced by the character and effectiveness of organizational and managerial arrangements. Factors which affect each element include overt ones like the allocation of authority and responsibility and the skill of personnel, as well as covert factors like the methods used to resolve uncertainty. The purpose of this research project is to examine the process of response that occurs to an abnormal event at a nuclear power plant and where possible to identify the organizational and management factors that influence that process

  3. Responding to the refusal of care in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jennifer; Venkat, Arvind; Davenport, Moira

    2014-01-01

    The emergency department (ED) serves as the primary gateway for acute care and the source of health care of last resort. Emergency physicians are commonly expected to rapidly assess and treat patients with a variety of life-threatening conditions. However, patients do refuse recommended therapy, even when the consequences are significant morbidity and even mortality. This raises the ethical dilemma of how emergency physicians and ED staff can rapidly determine whether patient refusal of treatment recommendations is based on intact decision-making capacity and how to respond in an appropriate manner when the declining of necessary care by the patient is lacking a basis in informed judgment. This article presents a case that illustrates the ethical tensions raised by the refusal of life-sustaining care in the ED and how such situations can be approached in an ethically appropriate manner.

  4. Responding to emergencies: How organization and management make a difference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metlay, D.S.; Haber, S.B.; Luckas, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    There is an observable and definable process that occurs during the course of responding to an abnormal event at a nuclear power plant. Each of the elements that comprise that process involves collective action and consequently is influenced by the character and effectiveness of organizational and managerial arrangements. Factors which affect each element include overt ones like the allocation of authority and responsibility and the skill of personnel, as well as covert factors like the methods used to resolve uncertainty. The purpose of this research project is to examine the process of response that occurs to an abnormal event at a nuclear power plant and where possible to identify the organizational and management factors that influence that process

  5. Misery loves company: mood-congruent emotional responding to music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Patrick G; Schellenberg, E Glenn; Griffith, Andrew T

    2011-10-01

    We examined emotional responding to music after mood induction. On each trial, listeners heard a 30-s music excerpt and rated how much they liked it, whether it sounded happy or sad, and how familiar it was. When the excerpts sounded unambiguously happy or sad (Experiment 1), the typical preference for happy-sounding music was eliminated after inducing a sad mood. When the excerpts sounded ambiguous with respect to happiness and sadness (Experiment 2), listeners perceived more sadness after inducing a sad mood. Sad moods had no influence on familiarity ratings (Experiments 1 and 2). These findings imply that "misery loves company." Listeners in a sad mood fail to show the typical preference for happy-sounding music, and they perceive more sadness in music that is ambiguous with respect to mood.

  6. Data from Interviews with 95 Respondents Recollecting Repeated Dental Visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca M. Willén

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In 2012, Swedish dental care patients (n = 95 participated in a quasi-experiment in which they were interviewed twice about dental visits they had made between 2002 and 2012. For verification purposes, the participants' narratives were compared to the dental records. The qualitative data was quantified, stored as a .csv file, and supplemented with a codebook in plain text. All study materials are freely available online. The data can be reused to further analyse memory for repeated events. The data can be used both as data from an experiment (including both interviews and as single interview data (including data only from the first interview, i.e., before the respondents were provided with memory cues.

  7. Oral candidiasis following steroid therapy for oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marable, D R; Bowers, L M; Stout, T L; Stewart, C M; Berg, K M; Sankar, V; DeRossi, S S; Thoppay, J R; Brennan, M T

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this multicentre study was to determine the incidence of oral candidiasis in patients treated with topical steroids for oral lichen planus (OLP) and to determine whether the application of a concurrent antifungal therapy prevented the development of an oral candidiasis in these patients. Records of 315 patients with OLP seen at four Oral Medicine practices treated for at least 2 weeks with steroids with and without the use of an antifungal regimen were retrospectively reviewed. The overall incidence of oral fungal infection in those treated with steroid therapy for OLP was 13.6%. There was no statistically significant difference in the rate of oral candidiasis development in those treated with an antifungal regimen vs those not treated prophylactically (14.3% vs 12.6%) (P = 0.68). Despite the use of various regimens, none of the preventive antifungal strategies used in this study resulted in a significant difference in the rate of development of an oral candidiasis in patients with OLP treated with steroids. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Primate dental ecology: How teeth respond to the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuozzo, Frank P; Ungar, Peter S; Sauther, Michelle L

    2012-06-01

    Teeth are central for the study of ecology, as teeth are at the direct interface between an organism and its environment. Recent years have witnessed a rapid growth in the use of teeth to understand a broad range of topics in living and fossil primate biology. This in part reflects new techniques for assessing ways in which teeth respond to, and interact with, an organism's environment. Long-term studies of wild primate populations that integrate dental analyses have also provided a new context for understanding primate interactions with their environments. These new techniques and long-term field studies have allowed the development of a new perspective-dental ecology. We define dental ecology as the broad study of how teeth respond to, or interact with, the environment. This includes identifying patterns of dental pathology and tooth use-wear, as they reflect feeding ecology, behavior, and habitat variation, including areas impacted by anthropogenic disturbance, and how dental development can reflect environmental change and/or stress. The dental ecology approach, built on collaboration between dental experts and ecologists, holds the potential to provide an important theoretical and practical framework for inferring ecology and behavior of fossil forms, for assessing environmental change in living populations, and for understanding ways in which habitat impacts primate growth and development. This symposium issue brings together experts on dental morphology, growth and development, tooth wear and health, primate ecology, and paleontology, to explore the broad application of dental ecology to questions of how living and fossil primates interact with their environments. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Novel Evidence-Based Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Responder Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furie, Richard A.; Petri, Michelle A.; Wallace, Daniel J.; Ginzler, Ellen M.; Merrill, Joan T.; Stohl, William; Chatham, W. Winn; Strand, Vibeke; Weinstein, Arthur; Chevrier, Marc R.; Zhong, John; Freimuth, William W.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To describe a new systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) Responder Index (SRI) based on the belimumab phase II SLE trial and demonstrate its potential utility in SLE clinical trials. Methods Data from a 449-patient randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 3 doses of belimumab (1, 4, 10 mg/kg) or placebo plus standard of care therapy (SOC) over a 56-week period were analyzed. SELENA-SLEDAI and BILAG SLE disease activity instruments, SF-36 Health Survey, and biomarker analyses were used to create a novel SRI. Response to treatment in a subset of SLE patients (n=321) who were serologically active (ANA ≥1:80 and/or anti-dsDNA antibody ≥30 IU) at baseline was retrospectively evaluated using the SRI. Results SRI response is defined as: 1) ≥4-point reduction in SELENA-SLEDAI score; 2) no new BILAG A or no more than 1 new BILAG B domain score; and 3) no deterioration from baseline in the Physician’s Global Assessment (PGA) by ≥0.3 points. In serologically active patients, addition of belimumab to SOC resulted in a response in 46% of patients at week 52 compared with 29% for the placebo patients (P=0.006). SRI responses were independent of baseline autoantibody subtype. Conclusion Evidence-based evaluation of a large randomized, placebo-controlled trial in SLE resulted in the ability to define a robust responder index based on improvement in disease activity without worsening of the overall condition or the development of significant disease activity in new organ systems. PMID:19714615

  10. Balancing safety and enjoyment. Current practice when recommending tastes for people with intellectual disabilities who are non-orally fed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Darren David

    2014-10-01

    Eating and drinking problems are common among people with intellectual disabilities. Having a compromised swallow or being at risk of inadequate nutrition are two reasons for introducing non-oral feeding. Such procedures involve the creation of an external opening for food and drink to be delivered directly into the stomach through a tube. In recent years maintenance of the swallow and quality of life issues have led to introduction of small amounts of food and drink (oral tastes) for people who are non-orally fed. Little evidence exists about the reasoning used to inform this decision or the types of oral tastes offered. This study aims to address these omissions. An exploratory survey, distributed via email, was used to gather information from speech and language therapists and dietitians about their current practice and their decision-making processes when offering oral tastes to people who are non-orally fed. Data presented here reflect the responses from respondents working primarily with people with intellectual disabilities (55 out of 158 respondents). Oral tastes were being offered and clinical decision-making around this centred on balancing the wellbeing and wishes of the person with intellectual disabilities and their carers with the risks to wellbeing inherent in implementing and supporting an oral taste programme. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Sturge-Weber syndrome: oral and extra-oral manifestations

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathi, Amitandra Kumar; Kumar, Vivek; Dwivedi, Rahul; Saimbi, Charanjit Singh

    2015-01-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome is a rare, congenital, neuro-oculo-cutaneous disorder which is characterised extra-orally by unilateral port wine stains on the face, glaucoma, seizures and mental retardation, and intra-orally by ipsilateral gingival haemangioma which frequently affects the maxilla or mandible. In the present case, a 15-year-old female patient presented with a port wine stain on the right side of the face and glaucoma of the right eye, and intra-orally with gingival haemangioma on the r...

  12. Oral cancer: A multicenter study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojanawatsirivej, Somsri; Thosaporn, Watcharaporn; Kintarak, Sompid; Subarnbhesaj, Ajiravudh; Darling, Mark; Kryshtalskyj, Eugene; Chiang, Chun-Pin; Shin, Hong-In; Choi, So-Young; Lee, Sang-shin; Shakib, Pouyan-Amini

    2018-01-01

    Background To determine the prevalence and clinicopathologic features of the oral cancer patients. Material and Methods Biopsy records of the participating institutions were reviewed for oral cancer cases diagnosed from 2005 to 2014. Demographic data and site of the lesions were collected. Sites of the lesion were subdivided into lip, tongue, floor of the mouth, gingiva, alveolar mucosa, palate, buccal/labial mucosa, maxilla and mandible. Oral cancer was subdivided into 7 categories: epithelial tumors, salivary gland tumors, hematologic tumors, bone tumors, mesenchymal tumors, odontogenic tumors, and others. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics using SPSS software version 17.0. Results Of the 474,851 accessioned cases, 6,151 cases (1.30%) were diagnosed in the category of oral cancer. The mean age of the patients was 58.37±15.77 years. A total of 4,238 cases (68.90%) were diagnosed in males, whereas 1911 cases (31.07%) were diagnosed in females. The male-to-female ratio was 2.22:1. The sites of predilection for oral cancer were tongue, labial/buccal mucosa, gingiva, palate, and alveolar mucosa, respectively. The three most common oral cancer in the descending order of frequency were squamous cell carcinoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Conclusions Although the prevalence of oral cancer is not high compared to other entities, oral cancer pose significant mortality and morbidity in the patients, especially when discovered late in the course of the disease. This study highlights some anatomical locations where oral cancers are frequently encountered. As a result, clinicians should pay attention to not only teeth, but oral mucosa especially in the high prevalence area as well since early detection of precancerous lesions or cancers in the early stage increase the chance of patient being cured and greatly reduce the mortality and morbidity. This study also shows some differences between pediatric and elderly oral cancer patients as well as

  13. Oral symptoms and salivary findings in oral lichen planus, oral lichenoid lesions and stomatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristine Roen; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Reibel, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To examine if patients with oral lichen planus, oral lichenoid lesions and generalised stomatitis and concomitant contact allergy have more frequent and severe xerostomia, lower unstimulated and chewing-stimulated saliva and citric-acid-stimulated parotid saliva flow rates, and higher...... of xerostomia, clinical examination, sialometry, mucosal biopsy and contact allergy testing. RESULTS: Nineteen patients had oral lichen planus, 19 patients had oral lichenoid lesions and 11 patients had generalised stomatitis. 38.8% had contact allergy. Xerostomia was significantly more common and severe...... in the chewing stimulated saliva samples from patients when compared to healthy controls. The differences were not significant and they were irrespective of the presence of contact allergy. CONCLUSION: Xerostomia is prevalent in patients with oral lichen planus, lichenoid lesions and generalised stomatitis...

  14. The Use of Telemedicine in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Eric W; Strauss, Robert A; Janus, Charles; Carrico, Caroline K

    2016-04-01

    To determine the perceived utility and demand for the application of telemedicine for improved patient care between nonsurgical dental practitioners (GPs) and oral and maxillofacial surgeons (OMS). Two distinct questionnaires were made, one for GPs and one for OMSs. The GP questionnaire was sent to practicing Virginia Dental Association members on an e-mail list (approximately 2,200). The OMS questionnaire was sent by the Virginia Society of Oral Maxillofacial Surgery to members on an e-mail list (approximately 213). Questionnaires included questions about access to care, benefits of telemedicine consultations, reliability of telemedicine consultations, and perceived barriers against and opportunities for the implementation of telemedicine. The questionnaire was completed by 226 GP and 41 OMS respondents. There was a significant difference among responses of GPs based on practice location: rural patients had a longer average time from referral to OMS consultation (P = .003), rural patients traveled longer distances (P oral and maxillofacial surgery. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Detrimental consequences of women life cycle on the oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jammula Surya Prasanna

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The majority of us visit a dentist only when we experience a toothache, as visiting the dentist regularly is the last thing that strikes our mind. Many clinical studies have concluded that oral bacteria can lead to a genre of health conditions which may sometimes be very serious. As females go, through certain stages in their reproductive life cycle, alterations arise in the level of sex steroid hormones circulating in their bloodstream. Specifically, variations in levels of progesterone and estrogen in women may adversely affect the periodontal tissues in the mouth. Extensive research suggests a relationship between periodontal diseases and puberty, menstruation, pregnancy, oral contraceptive use, and menopause. Estrogen and progesterone affect the entire body, including the oral tissues. The gingival tissues respond to this increased level of estrogen and progesterone by undergoing vasodilatation and increased capillary permeability. Consequently, there is an increased migration of fluid and white blood cells out of blood vessels. Also associated with increased progesterone levels are alterations in the existing microbial populations. The levels of Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria, such as Prevotella intermedia, increase as a result of the high concentration of hormones available as a nutrient for growth. This article discusses the plethora of causes which affect the oral health of women as they undergo the different life cycles.

  16. Amiloidosis bucal Oral amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Lima Arrais Ribeiro

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A amiloidose é uma doença complexa rara de difícil diagnóstico que ocorre devido à deposição de substância amilóide no meio extracelular. Ao ser diagnosticado na cavidade bucal, deve-se monitorar o paciente a fim de avaliar possíveis complicações sistêmicas da doença. Diante disso, o objetivo do presente estudo é relatar um caso de amiloidose oral em uma paciente do gênero feminino de 72 anos de idade. Baseado nos sinais clínicos observados, a hipótese diagnóstica foi de fibroma traumático. Após realização de biópsia e exame histopatológico, o diagnóstico foi de amiloidose oral, o que foi confirmado com a coloração do espécime com o reagente vermelho congo. Depósitos de amilóide foram encontrados no tecido conjuntivo, na avaliação através da luz polarizada, que apresentou birrefringência. Tal achado foi preocupante, já que a amiloidose geralmente acomete diversos tecidos levando a comprometimentos sistêmicos. Por essa razão a paciente foi encaminhada a procurar atendimento médico. No entanto, houve abandono do tratamento e a mesma veio a óbito 6 meses após o diagnóstico da doença. Lesões orais aparentemente simples podem revelar doenças raras e de difícil tratamento. O diagnóstico preciso e acompanhamentos médicos são fundamentais na sobrevida do paciente.La amiloidosis es una enfermedad compleja, rara, de difícil diagnóstico, que ocurre debido al depósito de sustancia amiloidea en medio extracelular. Al ser diagnosticada en la cavidad bucal, el paciente debe tener supervisión médica para evaluar las posibles complicaciones sistémicas de la enfermedad. El objetivo del presente estudio fue presentar un caso de amiloidosis bucal en un paciente del género femenino de 72 años de edad. Basados en las señales clínicas observadas, la hipótesis diagnóstica fue de un fibroma traumático. Después de la realización de una biopsia y del examen histopatológico, el diagnóstico fue de amiloidosis

  17. [Significance of proper oral hygiene for health condition of mouth and teeth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljaljević, Agima; Matijević, Snezana; Terzić, Natasa; Andjelić, Jasmina; Mugosa, Boban

    2012-01-01

    Proper mouth and teeth hygiene has influence on the prevention of a great number of diseases and very often some of them are not related only to oral cavity. Most frequent diseases of mouth and teeth such as caries and periodontal diseases are caused, among other factors, by poor oral hygiene. They are also more frequent in young population. The aim of this study was to estimate the influence of sociodemographic characteristics and hygienic habit on oral health in children aged 11-15 years. This cross-sectional study was conducted by the dental teams in dentist surgeries in Tivat Health Center between May and September 2009. The sample consisted of patients 11 to 15 years of age. A questionnaire and dental examination of mouth and teeth were used as research instruments. The examinations were conducted in accordance with the World Health Organization methodology and criteria. The data obtained from the interviews were correlated with those obtained from the clinical examinations. The results show that the majority of respondents brush their teeth twice a day and visit the dentist once in every six months. The research also shows that 57% respondents have caries of deciduous teeth and over 63% respondents of permanent teeth. Gingivitis was found in 14% and orthodontic anomalies in 44.7% respondents. A half of respondents who brush their teeth rarely have problems with gingivitis. There is a highly statistically significant difference between the occurrence of gingivitis and the frequency of teeth brushing. There is a significant difference between mouth and oral hygiene and sex as well as other sociodemographic characteristics of respondents. The study showed the correlation between occurrence of caries and the gingivitis and frequency of teeth brushing and dental visits.

  18. Significance of proper oral hygiene for health condition of mouth and teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljaljević Agima

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Proper mouth and teeth hygiene has influence on the prevention of a great number of diseases and very often some of them are not related only to oral cavity. Most frequent diseases of mouth and teeth such as caries and periodontal diseases are caused, among other factors, by poor oral hygiene. They are also more frequent in young population. The aim of this study was to estimate the influence of sociodemographic characteristics and hygienic habit on oral health in children aged 11-15 years. Methods. This crosssectional study was conducted by the dental teams in dentist surgeries in Tivat Health Center between May and September 2009. The sample consisted of patients 11 to 15 years of age. A questionnaire and dental examination of mouth and teeth were used as research instruments. The examinations were conducted in accordance with the World Health Organization methodology and criteria. The data obtained from the interviews were correlated with those obtained from the clinical examinations. Results. The results show that the majority of respondents brush their teeth twice a day and visit the dentist once in every six months. The research also shows that 57% respondents have caries of deciduous teeth and over 63% respondents of permanent teeth. Gingivitis was found in 14% and orthodontic anomalies in 44.7% respondents. A half of respondents who brush their teeth rarely have problems with gingivitis. There is a highly statistically significant difference between the occurrence of gingivitis and the frequency of teeth brushing. Conclusion. There is a significant difference between mouth and oral hygiene and sex as well as other sociodemographic characteristics of respondents. The study showed the correlation between occurrence of caries and the gingivitis and frequency of teeth brushing and dental visits.

  19. Developing the profession of radiography: Making use of oral history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, Sola; Iphofen, Ron

    2005-01-01

    This paper is based on ongoing research into the profession of radiography using the oral history method. Knowledge of radiographic practice as a profession has in the past been based on what is written or learnt from other professions both within and beyond the field of health care. The profession has experienced substantial technological and sociological changes both in training and in practice over the past few decades and these look set to continue into the immediate future. Evidence-based practice is invoked as a quality measure on all health professions, and part of the body of knowledge which forms the evidence base of practice development involves an understanding of how the profession has responded to change and what this might mean for the further changes it is likely to meet. This paper explores the potential role of oral history research as a tool for the development of knowledge about the practice of radiography

  20. Oral tartrazine challenge in childhood asthma: effect on bronchial reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariparsad, D; Wilson, N; Dixon, C; Silverman, M

    1984-01-01

    Ten asthmatic children who gave a history of cough or wheeze after orange drinks, were tested for tartrazine sensitivity. On separate days, either oral tartrazine (1 mg) or a placebo capsule were administered double blind. Bronchial reactivity was measured before, 30 and 60 min after ingestion by means of a histamine-inhalation challenge test. There was no change in baseline lung function after tartrazine, but histamine sensitivity (PC20) increased significantly in four of the children. No response was obtained to a larger dose of tartrazine (10 mg) in four of the non-responders. Alteration in the bronchial reactivity after an oral challenge, appears to be a sensitive means of detecting tartrazine sensitivity.

  1. Developing the profession of radiography: Making use of oral history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decker, Sola [School of Radiography, Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery and Health Studies, University of Wales, Bangor, Archimedes Centre, Technology Park, Wrexham LL13 7YP (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: rdsa01@bangor.ac.uk; Iphofen, Ron [Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery and Health Studies, University of Wales, Bangor, Archimedes Centre, Technology Park, Wrexham LL13 7YP (United Kingdom)

    2005-11-01

    This paper is based on ongoing research into the profession of radiography using the oral history method. Knowledge of radiographic practice as a profession has in the past been based on what is written or learnt from other professions both within and beyond the field of health care. The profession has experienced substantial technological and sociological changes both in training and in practice over the past few decades and these look set to continue into the immediate future. Evidence-based practice is invoked as a quality measure on all health professions, and part of the body of knowledge which forms the evidence base of practice development involves an understanding of how the profession has responded to change and what this might mean for the further changes it is likely to meet. This paper explores the potential role of oral history research as a tool for the development of knowledge about the practice of radiography.

  2. Clinical approach in the management of oral chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) in a series of specialized medical centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elad, Sharon; Jensen, Siri Beier; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E

    2015-01-01

    GVHD patients, diagnostic and evaluation methods in their practice, preferred treatment strategies for mucosal and salivary gland involvement, and preventive measures. RESULTS: Twelve responders, representing 12 sites, stated that they treat oral cGVHD patients on a regular basis. This fraction of responders...... twenty questionnaires were sent to the members of the Oral Care Study Group (OCSG) of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer/International Society of Oral Oncology (MASCC/ISOO). The questionnaire included 50 questions about the responder's demographics, level of exposure to c......GVHD was predominantly steroids (91.7 %), and the second preferred treatment was tacrolimus (41.7 %). The preferred treatment for hyposalivation was pilocarpine (41.7 %). The recommended frequency of oral cancer screening varied; half of the providers suggest a follow-up every 6 months. CONCLUSIONS: The responses...

  3. Circadian clock and oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirvani, Minou; Khuu, Cuong; Utheim, Tor Paaske; Sand, Lars Peter; Sehic, Amer

    2018-02-01

    The circadian clock is comprised of a master component situated in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus and subordinate clock genes in almost every cell of the body. The circadian clock genes and their encoded proteins govern the organism to follow the natural signals of time, and adapt to external changes in the environment. The majority of physiological processes in mammals exhibit variable circadian rhythms, which are generated and coordinated by an oscillation in the expression of the clock genes. A number of studies have reported that alteration in the expression level of clock genes is correlated with several pathological conditions, including cancer. However, little is known about the role of clock genes in homeostasis of the oral epithelium and their disturbances in oral carcinogenesis. The present review summarizes the current state of knowledge of the implications of clock genes in oral cancer. It has been demonstrated that the development of oral squamous cell carcinoma undergoes circadian oscillation in relation to tumor volume and proliferation rate. The circadian clock gene period ( PER)1 has been associated with oral cancer pathogenesis and it is suggested that changes in the expression of PER1 may exhibit an important role in the development, invasion, and metastasis of oral squamous cell carcinoma. However, its role remains elusive and there is a need for further research in order to understand the underlying mechanisms of the clock genes in oral cancer pathogenesis.

  4. Dental undergraduate students’ knowledge, attitudes and practices in oral health self-care: A survey from a South African university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenuka Singh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dental students are seen as role-models for promoting good oral health behaviour, yet there is little published evidence in South Africa (SA that describes student knowledge and attitudes towards their own oral healthcare. Objective. To investigate undergraduate dental therapy and oral hygiene students’ knowledge and attitudes towards their self-care practices and the perceived influence of the dental curriculum on these practices. Methods. This was a descriptive survey of 64 undergraduate dental students at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, SA. A self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. Results. Fifty-two respondents returned the completed questionnaires, yielding an 81% response rate. Almost all respondents (n=30; 96.8% (2nd-year students, and n=21; 100% (3rd-year students indicated the use of toothpaste and toothbrush to clean their teeth. Most respondents reported cleaning their teeth from 1 to 5 minutes, with 52% (n=27 reporting 1 - 2 minutes and 42% (n=22 3 - 5 minutes. Only three respondents reported cleaning their teeth for >5 minutes (n=3; 6%. Other practices included the use of toothpicks (n=12; 23%, dental floss (n=42; 81%, and interdental brushes (n=5; 10%. Almost all respondents (n=50; 96% indicated the use of commercially available mouth rinses. All 2nd-year students (n=30 and 90% of 3rd-year students (n=18 agreed that exposure to clinical training increased their awareness of self-care practices. Conclusion. Respondents reported good knowledge and practice of oral health self-care, but there were inconsistencies in these practices. Respondents also agreed that the dental undergraduate curriculum did influence their knowledge and oral health self-care practices.

  5. Responder de Cães por Exclusão em Tarefas de Discriminação Condicional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Clara de Freitas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study trained the responding by exclusion in dogs, based on a conditional discrimination between dictated names and objects, and empirically evaluated the influence in that performance of human social cues (gestures directed to stimuli towards the opposite stimulus. As a result, both animals showed rapid acquisition of control by the new stimulus, a pattern that persisted even after the inclusion of conflicting social cues toward the wrong stimulus (orally instructing the selection of S+, but pointing to the S-. The influence of conflicting social cues when the stimuli involved were familiar is clear, a pattern showed by the disruption of pre-established control. We discuss the relevance of this study in the comparison of different aspects of the environment on the behavior of dogs, and the need to include control probes for novelty in future research is emphasized. Keywords: exclusion; animal learning; conditional discrimination; dogs.

  6. Oral lichen planus to oral lichenoid lesions: Evolution or revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudhia, Bhavin B; Dudhia, Sonal B; Patel, Purv S; Jani, Yesha V

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis between different diseases may be impaired by clinical and histopathologic similarities, as observed in the oral lichen planus (OLP) and oral lichenoid lesion (OLL). Inspite of similar clinicopathological features; etiology, diagnosis and prognosis differ which mandates separation of OLL from OLP. Hence, it is essential for the oral physician and oral pathologist to be familiarized with the individual variations among clinicopathological features of OLP and OLL as well as to obtain a thorough history and perform a complete mucocutaneous examination in addition to specific diagnostic testing. The difficulties faced to establish the diagnosis between these two pathologies are widely investigated in the literature with a lack of definite conclusion. This review is an attempt to throw some light on these clinicopathologic entities with the aim to resolve the diagnostic dilemma. PMID:26980966

  7. Diabetes mellitus and oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudiyirickal, Marina George; Pappachan, Joseph M

    2015-05-01

    The oral health is influenced by systemic health, and one of the most common chronic diseases encountered in dental practice is diabetes mellitus. Diabetes can worsen oral infections and vice versa. In the literature, periodontitis and diabetes in the young to middle-aged adults have been the most widely researched area. Understanding the patho-physiology, clinical manifestations and management of different types of orofacial diseases in diabetic patients are important to the diabetologist and the dentist for the optimal care of patients with these diseases. This review explores the inter-link between diabetes and oral health.

  8. Oral and non-oral sensorimotor interventions enhance oral feeding performance in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucile, Sandra; Gisel, Erika G; McFarland, David H; Lau, Chantal

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether oral, tactile/kinaesthetic (T/K), or combined (oral+T/K) interventions enhance oral feeding performance and whether combined interventions have an additive/synergistic effect. Seventy-five preterm infants (mean gestational age 29 wk; standard error of the mean [SEM] 0.3 wk; mean birthweight 1340.3g; SEM 52.5 g; 49 males and 26 females) were randomly assigned to one of three intervention groups or a control group. The oral group received sensorimotor input to the oral structures, the T/K group received sensorimotor input to the trunk and limbs, and the combined group received both. The outcomes were time from introduction of nipple feeding to independent oral feeding (d), proficiency (intake in the first 5 min, %), volume transfer (%), rate of transfer (mL/min), volume loss (%), and length of hospital stay (d). Infants in the three intervention groups achieved independent oral feeding 9-10 days earlier than those in the control group (pfeedings per day, volume transfer (p ≤ 0.001; effect size 0.8-1.1) at one to two, three to five, and six to eight oral feedings per day, and overall rate of transfer (p ≤ 0.018; effect size 0.8-1.1) were greater, and overall volume losses were less (p ≤ 0.007; effect size 0.9-1.1), than in the control group (p ≤ 0.042). The combined group attained independent oral feeding at a significantly younger postmenstrual age than controls (p=0.020) and had clinically greater proficiency than the T/K group (p=0.020; effect size 0.7) and oral group (p=0.109; effect size 0.5). Length of hospital stay was not significantly different between groups (p=0.792; effect size 0.02-0.3). Oral and T/K interventions accelerated the transition from introduction to independent oral feeding and enhanced oral feeding skills. T/K has beneficial effects beyond the specific targeted system. The combined sensorimotor intervention led to an additive/synergistic effect for proficiency, further benefiting this

  9. Responder safety and health: preparing for future disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reissman, Dori B; Howard, John

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews lessons learned about managing the safety and health of workers who were involved in disaster response, recovery, and cleanup after the 2001 World Trade Center (WTC) disaster. The first two sections review ongoing responder health burdens and the tragic toll of this disaster from a worker safety and health perspective. The remaining sections address changes in federal infrastructure, response planning, and resources for protection of response and recovery personnel. Proper preparation includes pre-event and "just-in-time" disaster-worker training on likely hazards, organizational assets for hazard monitoring, and hands-on instruction in the use of assigned protective equipment. Good planning includes predeployment medical review to ensure "fitness for duty" and considers the following: (1) personal risk factors, (2) hazards likely to be associated with particular field locations, and (3) risks involved with assigned tasks (eg, workload and pace, work/rest cycles, available resources, and team/supervisory dynamics). Planning also should address worker health surveillance, medical monitoring, and availability of medical care (including mental health services). Disaster safety managers should anticipate likely hazards within planning scenarios and prepare asset inventories to facilitate making timely safety decisions. Disaster safety management begins immediately and provides ongoing real-time guidance to incident leadership at all levels of government. Robust standards must be met to reliably protect workers/responders. An integrated and measurable multiagency safety management function must be built into the incident command system before an incident occurs. This function delineates roles and responsibilities for rapid exposure assessments, ensuring cross-agency consistency in data interpretation, and timely, effective communication of information and control strategies. The ability to perform this safety management function should be tested and

  10. Oral health promotion efficiency in the control of oral biofilm

    OpenAIRE

    Nélio Jorge Veiga; Patricia Carvalho; Octávio Ribeiro; Inês Coelho

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy of oral health instructions, particularly in the control of dental plaque, as well as assess the effectiveness of the reinforcement of the same instructions. Methods: A quasi-experimental study was conducted at the University Clinic of the Portuguese Catholic University (UCP) in Viseu-Portugal from January to June 2012. Three different assessments were performed with 30 participants using the O’Leary Plaque Index and a questionnaire on oral health behavior, w...

  11. Self-reported oral health status of adults resident in Medway, Kent in 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pau, Allan; Allen, Christopher D

    2011-10-01

    In order to assess the oral health status, oral behaviours and use of oral healthcare services of the adult population of Medway (Kent) in 2009, NHS Medway commissioned an assessment. Its aims were to understand oral health and impacts, behaviours and the use of dental services in order to inform future development of dental services. A self-reported postal questionnaire survey using relevant questions from the 1998 national Adult Dental Health Survey (ADHS) was performed. A stratified sample was drawn from all those aged 16 years and over, living in Medway and registered with a general medical practice. Stratification was into the three areas within Medway (Chatham, Gillingham and Rainham, and Rochester and Strood). Where appropriate, respondents answered the questions using a five-point Likert scale. The resulting data were analysed by area of domicile, age, gender, and deprivation. Eight thousand questionnaires were sent out, of which 3101 (39%) were returned. Because of this low response and the need to weight responses to represent the distribution of the Medway population, this investigation must be considered as a service evaluation rather than a research project. Of respondents, 4% were edentate, 16% had 1-20 teeth, and 80% had 21 or more teeth. Fifty-one per cent of respondents reported at least one oral health impact; most commonly this was physical pain and psychological discomfort; least commonly, social disability and handicap. Sixteen per cent reported that their last dental visit was over 24 months ago and 31% reported that they attended only when in trouble or never (most commonly, because of anxiety and cost). There were marked variations in oral health status and use of dental services between those living in the most and least deprived areas. • Medway adults were more likely than the 2009 national ADHS respondents to be dentate but less likely to have 21 or more teeth. •Oral health impacts have been substantial, especially the experience of

  12. Antifungal prescribing pattern and attitude towards the treatment of oral candidiasis among dentists in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shayyab, Mohammad H; Abu-Hammad, Osama A; Al-Omiri, Mahmoud K; Dar-Odeh, Najla S

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the attitude of Jordanian dentists towards the treatment of oral candidiasis and their current antifungal prescribing habits, shedding more light on the possible influence of their socio-professional factors on the pattern of prescribing and practice. A structured validated questionnaire was developed and tested; it was then emailed to a random sample of 600 Jordanian dental practitioners during the period of this cross-sectional survey. The questionnaire recorded practitioners' personal details and their attitude and prescribing of antifungal therapy for oral candidiasis. Statistical significance was based on probability values of oral candidiasis. Of the 423 questionnaires returned, only 330 were included. The attitude of respondents was significantly influenced by their experience [odds ratio (OR) = 0.14; P oral candidiasis is much better among the least-experienced dentists working in private practice. Nystatin and miconazole are the most popular choices of antifungal agents among Jordanian dentists. © 2015 FDI World Dental Federation.

  13. Genetic Abnormalities in Oral Leukoplakia and Oral Cancer Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kil, Tae Jun; Kim, Hyun Sil; Kim, Hyung Jun; Nam, Woong; Cha, In-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The cancer progression of oral leukoplakia is an important watchpoint in the follow-up observation of the patients. However, potential malignancies of oral leukoplakia cannot be estimated by histopathologic assessment alone. We evaluated genetic abnormalities at the level of copy number variation (CNV) to investigate the risk for developing cancer in oral leukoplakias. The current study used 27 oral leukoplakias with histological evidence of dysplasia. The first group (progressing dysplasia) consisted of 7 oral lesions from patients with later progression to cancer at the same site. The other group (non- progressing dysplasia) consisted of 20 lesions from patients with no occurrence of oral cancer and longitudinal follow up (>7 years). We extracted DNA from Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded (FFPE) samples and examined chromosomal loci and frequencies of CNVs using Taqman copy number assays. CNV frequently occurred at 3p, 9p, and 13q loci in progressing dysplasia. Our results also indicate that CNV at multiple loci-in contrast to single locus occurrences-is characteristic of progressing dysplasia. This study suggests that genetic abnormalities of the true precancer demonstrate the progression risk which cannot be delineated by current histopathologic diagnosis.

  14. Immediate postpartum oral contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambrell, R D

    1970-07-01

    Oral contraceptives were administered on Postpartum Day 5 to 363 patients, 83 of whom were breast-feeding, to determine if bleeding quantity could be reduced and menstrual periods established earlier in the puerperium, to evaluate the effect on lactation, and to note if side effects could be minimized by initiating pill usage earlier postpartum; 245 patients, of whom 91 were breast-feeding, served as controls. All of the women were patients at the U.S. Air Force Hospital in Wiesbaden, West Germany. 54% of the lactating mothers on the pill were successfully breast-feeding at 6 weeks compared with 59% of the controls. 87% of the patients taking pills had their 1st menstrual period before 6 weeks postpartum compared with 23% of the controls. No significant decrease in quantity of bleeding was noted. Patients taking the pill did report a weight gain. The uterus returned to normal size sooner in the group taking the pill and there was less breast tenderness. 65% of the multigravida mothers taking the pill thought they had a more favorable postpartum course, 24% saw no difference, and 11% thought their postpartum experience was less favorable. Patient acceptance was excellent and no major porblems were encountered.

  15. Oral cavity eumycetoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Alborghetti Nai

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Mycetoma is a pathological process in which eumycotic (fungal or actinomycotic causative agents from exogenous source produce grains. It is a localized chronic and deforming infectious disease of subcutaneous tissue, skin and bones. We report the first case of eumycetoma of the oral cavity in world literature. CASE REPORT: A 43-year-old male patient, complaining of swelling and fistula in the hard palate. On examination, swelling of the anterior and middle hard palate, with fistula draining a dark liquid was observed. The panoramic radiograph showed extensive radiolucent area involving the region of teeth 21-26 and the computerized tomography showed communication with the nasal cavity, suggesting the diagnosis of periapical cyst. Surgery was performed to remove the lesion. Histopathological examination revealed purulent material with characteristic grain. Gram staining for bacteria was negative and Grocott-Gomori staining for the detection of fungi was positive, concluding the diagnosis of eumycetoma. The patient was treated with ketoconazole for nine months, and was considered cured at the end of treatment. CONCLUSION: Histopathological examination, using histochemical staining, and direct microscopic grains examination can provide the distinction between eumycetoma and actinomycetoma accurately.

  16. Oral contraception following abortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Yan; Liu, Xiaoting; Zhang, Bin; Cheng, Linan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Oral contraceptives (OCs) following induced abortion offer a reliable method to avoid repeated abortion. However, limited data exist supporting the effective use of OCs postabortion. We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis in the present study reported immediate administration of OCs or combined OCs postabortion may reduce vaginal bleeding time and amount, shorten the menstruation recovery period, increase endometrial thickness 2 to 3 weeks after abortion, and reduce the risk of complications and unintended pregnancies. A total of 8 major authorized Chinese and English databases were screened from January 1960 to November 2014. Randomized controlled trials in which patients had undergone medical or surgical abortions were included. Chinese studies that met the inclusion criteria were divided into 3 groups: administration of OC postmedical abortion (group I; n = 1712), administration of OC postsurgical abortion (group II; n = 8788), and administration of OC in combination with traditional Chinese medicine postsurgical abortion (group III; n = 19,707). In total, 119 of 6160 publications were included in this analysis. Significant difference was observed in group I for vaginal bleeding time (P = 0.0001), the amount of vaginal bleeding (P = 0.03), and menstruation recovery period (P abortion (P abortion, and reduce the risk of complications and unintended pregnancies. PMID:27399060

  17. Infant oral health care: beliefs and practices of American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubna, Shikha; Perez-Spiess, Silvia; Cernigliaro, Julie; Julliard, Kell

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) members about their beliefs and practices regarding the age 1 dental visit. A 31-item survey was mailed to 1,500 randomly selected AAPD members to assess their beliefs and practices regarding the age 1 dental visit and prenatal dental counseling. Descriptive analyses and chi-square tests were done to analyze the data. Five hundred fifty-four (~37%) surveys were returned; 496 (91%) respondents agreed with the AAPD Policy on the Dental Home, while 490 (~90%) respondents performed age 1 dental evaluations. The most commonly cited reason respondents gave for not performing infant evaluations was "parents do not see the value." Eighty-five (~15 %) respondents provided prenatal dental counseling to members in their community, and 250 (~51%) who performed infant oral evaluations inquired about parents' dental history. Younger, more recently trained pediatric dentists were more likely to agree with the policy compared to older, more experienced pediatric dentists. Most respondents agreed with the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry's Policy on the Dental Home and performed infant oral evaluations. Few respondents (15%) provided prenatal dental counseling to individuals/groups in their community.

  18. Evaluating awareness regarding oral hygiene practices and exploring gender differences among patients attending for oral prophylaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Oberoi, Sukhvinder Singh; Mohanty, Vikrant; Mahajan, Ananya; Oberoi, Avneet

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oral hygiene is intimated in health of all parts of the body including oral cavity. The understanding of actual practices in keeping the oral heath at standard based on patient's perceptions of oral health care is vital. Understanding the effect of gender on oral health would facilitate the development of successful attitude and behavior modification approach towards sustainable oral health. Purpose of Study: To evaluate awareness regarding oral hygiene practices and exploring gen...

  19. Escleromixedema: um caso tratado com prednisona oral Scleromyxedema: a case treated with oral prednisone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Bezerra da Trindade Neto

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available O escleromixedema é uma mucinose cutânea idiopática caracterizada por erupção papulosa, induração da pele e paraproteinemia. Histologicamente, se observa proliferação de fibroblastos na derme superior associada a depósito de mucina. O tratamento é difícil, não existindo na atualidade modalidade terapêutica totalmente eficaz para controlar a enfermidade. Relata-se o caso de um paciente de 68 anos com escleromixedema, sem manifestação sistêmica, que respondeu à terapia oral com corticosteróide.Scleromyxedema is an idiopathic cutaneous mucinosis characterized by a papular eruption, skin induration and paraproteinemia. Histologically, fibrolast proliferation can be observed in the upper dermis associated with a mucine deposition. Treatment is difficult and at present there is no totally effective therapeutic modality to control the disease. The present report is on a 68-year-old patient with scleromyxedema without systemic manifestation, who responded to oral steroid therapy.

  20. Marine assemblages respond rapidly to winter climate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, James W; Batt, Ryan D; Pinsky, Malin L

    2017-07-01

    Even species within the same assemblage have varied responses to climate change, and there is a poor understanding for why some taxa are more sensitive to climate than others. In addition, multiple mechanisms can drive species' responses, and responses may be specific to certain life stages or times of year. To test how marine species respond to climate variability, we analyzed 73 diverse taxa off the southeast US coast in 26 years of scientific trawl survey data and determined how changes in distribution and biomass relate to temperature. We found that winter temperatures were particularly useful for explaining interannual variation in species' distribution and biomass, although the direction and magnitude of the response varied among species from strongly negative, to little response, to strongly positive. Across species, the response to winter temperature varied greatly, with much of this variation being explained by thermal preference. A separate analysis of annual commercial fishery landings revealed that winter temperatures may also impact several important fisheries in the southeast United States. Based on the life stages of the species surveyed, winter temperature appears to act through overwinter mortality of juveniles or as a cue for migration timing. We predict that this assemblage will be responsive to projected increases in temperature and that winter temperature may be broadly important for species relationships with climate on a global scale. © The Authors Global Change Biology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Management of Poor Responders in IVF: Is There Anything New?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Ubaldi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that in the last two decades an enormous number of papers on the topic of poor ovarian response have been published in the literature, so far it has been impossible to identify any efficient treatment to improve the ovarian response and the clinical outcome of this group of patients. The incidence of poor ovarian responders among infertile women has been estimated at 9–24% but according to recent reviews, it seems to have slightly increased. The limitation in quantifying the incidence of these patients among the infertile population is due to the difficulty of a clear definition in literature. A recent paper by the Bologna ESHRE working group on poor ovarian response has been the first real attempt to find a common definition. Current literature proposes new risk factors which could be the cause of a reduction in ovarian reserve, which also includes genetic factors. This represents the first necessary step towards finding applicable solutions for these patients. To date, there is a substantial lack of literature that identifies an ideal protocol for these patients. The use of the “Bologna criteria” and the introduction of long acting gonadotropin in clinical practice have given rise to new promising stimulation protocols for this group of patients.

  2. Homicides of law enforcement officers responding to domestic disturbance calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kercher, Cassandra; Swedler, David I; Pollack, Keshia M; Webster, Daniel W

    2013-10-01

    To describe the law enforcement officer (LEO), encounter, perpetrator and victim characteristics of domestic disturbance-related LEO homicides in the USA from 1996 to 2010. Narrative text analysis was conducted on the Federal Bureau of Investigation's annual report 'Law Enforcement Officers Killed and Assaulted'. Potential cases were confirmed if the narrative included the term 'domestic disturbance' or a domestic disturbance situation was described. 116 LEOs were killed while responding to domestic disturbance calls. Ninety-five per cent of these homicides were committed with a firearm. Sixty-seven per cent of LEOs were wearing body armour when killed; however, 52% received the fatal wound to the head/neck. Sixty-one per cent of suspects had a criminal history mentioned within the narratives and perpetrators of intimate partner violence (IPV) were more likely to be killed by LEOs than suspects involved in other forms of domestic violence. Victims of the domestic disturbance were killed in 21% of the IPV-related LEO homicide cases as opposed to only 5% of other domestic disturbance calls. A firearm was the most common weapon used in the murder of a domestic disturbance victim (86%). This study describes domestic disturbance-related LEO homicides. Future research in this area should further examine the dangers unique to domestic disturbance calls. A longitudinal analysis could provide greater understanding of the injury and mortality risks faced by LEOs, in order to inform homicide prevention among law enforcement.

  3. Chemical spill responder's use of website data bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turpin, R.; Betsinger, G.

    2001-01-01

    The Emergency Response Team (ERT) of the US Environmental Protection Agency provides technical assistance to state and local government agencies. It has also provided hazardous waste and emergency response assistance to countries in North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa and Asia. In order to address the increased level of involvement in multi-governmental response activities and counter terrorist incidents, ERT has developed a responder's technical assistance website. The site contains 6 links that can be divided into the following three information support areas: (1) generation information about ERT, (2) a response resources site which provides information regarding air sampling, monitoring plans, phytoremediation, and information related to oil spill incidents where physical and chemical properties of specific petroleum products are needed. The health and safety section of this site links to the Environment Canada Emergencies Science Division (ESD) website. The ESD site has a document entitled Properties of Crude Oils and Oil Products which provides information on Louisiana crude. This site also provides links to all Federal agency websites that have hazardous waste operations and emergency response requirements or guidelines, and (3) the Weather Information Program (WIP) and Response Operation and Validation Retriever (ROVR) service which provides interactive response pages for Federal on-scene coordinators, remedial project managers and the general public. This paper also described the next generation of ROVR and WIP interactive function involving real-time on-site air plume modeling

  4. Anti-p200 pemphigoid responding to dapsone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Van Lerberghe

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Anti-p200 pemphigoid is a rare autoimmune subepidermal blistering disease. Clinical presentation is similar to standard bullous pemphigoid (BP but mucous membranes and cephalic lesions are more frequent. Histology and direct immunofluorescence (IF are identical to BP but indirect IF discloses linear deposits of immunoglobulin G (IgG on the dermal side of artificial salt-split skin. Specific diagnosis is based on western immunoblotting that shows circulating IgG recognizing a 200-kDa protein localized on the dermal extract. The 200-kDa antigen was recently identified as laminin γ1. Anti-p200 pemphigoid should be considered before all atypical or topical steroid-resistant bullous disease, as well as mucous membranes pemphigoid or epidermolysis bullosa acquisita. Dapsone appears to be the most effective treatment and should be used as the first option in combination with topical steroids. In this report, we describe the case of a patient with a typical clinical and immunopathological anti-p200 pemphigoid, responding to a combination of topical steroids and dapsone.

  5. Responding to emergencies: How organization and management make a difference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metlay, D.S.; Haber, S.B.; Luckas, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    There is an observable and definable process that occurs during the course of responding to an abnormal event at a nuclear power plant (NPP). Each of the elements that comprise that process involves collective action and, consequently, is influenced by the character and effectiveness of organizational and managerial arrangements. Factors which affect each element include overt ones like the allocation of authority and responsibility and the skill of the personnel, as well as covert factors like the methods used to resolve uncertainty. The purpose of this research project is to examine the process of response that occurs to an abnormal event at a NPP and where possible, to identify the organizational and managerial factors that influence that process. The first task in this project involved the review and analysis of an extensive volume of documentation, primarily Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) documents. Based on the documentation reviewed during the first task of this project, it is possible to specify an observable and definable process for response to accident and emergency situations in a NPP. The process can be described by eight major elements; the initiating transient, information about plant behavior, diagnosing the problem, availability of emergency procedures, adequacy of emergency procedures, implementing emergency procedures, developing an ad hoc response evaluating an ad hoc response and implementing an ad hoc response. Importantly, the process to be described is an iterative one. Procedures and improvised responses are executed sequentially and the results of action are assessed and additional steps are taken if necessary

  6. Wild North Island Robins (Petroica longipes respond to Prey Animacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Garland

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available North Island robins of New Zealand are a food hoarding species, which is unique in that they almost exclusively cache highly perishable hunted insects for later retrieval. In order to do so, they either kill and dismember or paralyze their prey for caching, depending on the prey size and kind. The present study comprises two experiments, using a Violation of Expectancy (VoE paradigm to examine variation in search behavior response to different prey conditions. The first experiment presents three different types of prey (mealworms, earthworms and locusts in expected (present and unexpected (absent conditions. The second experiment presents prey in varying states of animacy (alive and whole, dead and whole, dead and halved, and an inanimate stick and reveals prey in expected (same state or unexpected (differing state conditions. While robins did not respond with differential search times to different types of unexpectedly missing prey in Experiment 1, in Experiment 2 robins searched longer in conditions where prey was found in a differing state of animacy than initially shown. Robins also searched longer for prey when immediately consuming retrieved prey than when caching retrieved prey. Results indicate that North Island robins may be sensitive to prey animacy upon storage and retrieval of insect prey; such information could play a role in storage, pilfering and retrieval strategies of such a perishable food source.

  7. METHYLPREDNISOLONE PULSE THERAPY IN MANAGEMENT OF NON RESPONDER NEPHROTIC SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Madani

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Some patients with the diagnosis of childhood nephrotic syndrome are unresponsive to conventional treatment regimens. Recent studies of more aggressive therapies have provided strong evidence of the benefit of high dose methylprednisolonc (MP protocol with alternate - day prednisone alone or with alternate - day prednisone plus an alkylating agent (I in these patients."nFrom May 1996 to May 1997 we have treated 14 patients with non-responder nephrotic syndrome with mcthyprcdnisolone protocol. Eight patients had histologic diagnosis of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, 3 diffuse mesangial proliferation and 3 has minimal change disease. C'ylosporin was added in two patients to methylprcdnisotonc at the beginning of the second course of therapy. Tfie patients were observed for an average of 8 months (range 4-12 months. In the last follow up there were no patients in remission and all remained nephrotic. Seven patients had persistent massive proteinuria with normal creatinine clearance (CrCI. Two had decreased CrCl. Five progressed to end-stage renal disease. Tlicsc observations suggest that "Puke" methy{prednisolone is not effective in patients with non respondcr nephrotic syndrome.

  8. Network Structure and Biased Variance Estimation in Respondent Driven Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdery, Ashton M; Mouw, Ted; Bauldry, Shawn; Mucha, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores bias in the estimation of sampling variance in Respondent Driven Sampling (RDS). Prior methodological work on RDS has focused on its problematic assumptions and the biases and inefficiencies of its estimators of the population mean. Nonetheless, researchers have given only slight attention to the topic of estimating sampling variance in RDS, despite the importance of variance estimation for the construction of confidence intervals and hypothesis tests. In this paper, we show that the estimators of RDS sampling variance rely on a critical assumption that the network is First Order Markov (FOM) with respect to the dependent variable of interest. We demonstrate, through intuitive examples, mathematical generalizations, and computational experiments that current RDS variance estimators will always underestimate the population sampling variance of RDS in empirical networks that do not conform to the FOM assumption. Analysis of 215 observed university and school networks from Facebook and Add Health indicates that the FOM assumption is violated in every empirical network we analyze, and that these violations lead to substantially biased RDS estimators of sampling variance. We propose and test two alternative variance estimators that show some promise for reducing biases, but which also illustrate the limits of estimating sampling variance with only partial information on the underlying population social network.

  9. Signal Network Analysis of Plant Genes Responding to Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Sub; Kim, Jinbaek; Kim, Sang Hoon

    2012-12-01

    In this project, we irradiated Arabidopsis plants with various doses of gamma-rays at the vegetative and reproductive stages to assess their radiation sensitivity. After the gene expression profiles and an analysis of the antioxidant response, we selected several Arabidopsis genes for uses of 'Radio marker genes (RMG)' and conducted over-expression and knock-down experiments to confirm the radio sensitivity. Based on these results, we applied two patents for the detection of two RMG (At3g28210 and At4g37990) and development of transgenic plants. Also, we developed a Genechip for use of high-throughput screening of Arabidopsis genes responding only to ionizing radiation and identified RMG to detect radiation leaks. Based on these results, we applied two patents associated with the use of Genechip for different types of radiation and different growth stages. Also, we conducted co-expression network study of specific expressed probes against gamma-ray stress and identified expressed patterns of duplicated genes formed by whole/500kb segmental genome duplication

  10. TRPM5-expressing solitary chemosensory cells respond to odorous irritants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Weihong; Ogura, Tatsuya; Margolskee, Robert F; Finger, Thomas E; Restrepo, Diego

    2008-03-01

    Inhaled airborne irritants elicit sensory responses in trigeminal nerves innervating the nasal epithelium, leading to protective reflexes. The sensory mechanisms involved in the detection of odorous irritants are poorly understood. We identified a large population of solitary chemosensory cells expressing the transient receptor potential channel M5 (TRPM5) using transgenic mice where the promoter of TRPM5 drives the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP). Most of these solitary chemosensory cells lie in the anterior nasal cavity. These GFP-labeled solitary chemosensory cells exhibited immunoreactivity for synaptobrevin-2, a vesicle-associated membrane protein important for synaptic transmission. Concomitantly, we found trigeminal nerve fibers apposed closely to the solitary chemosensory cells, indicating potential transmission of sensory information to trigeminal fibers. In addition, stimulation of the nasal cavity with high concentrations (0.5-5 mM) of a variety of odorants elicited event-related potentials (ERPs) in areas rich in TRPM5-expressing solitary chemosensory cells. Furthermore, odorous chemicals and trigeminal stimuli induced changes in intracellular Ca(2+) levels in isolated TRPM5-expressing solitary chemosensory cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Together, our data show that the TRPM5-expressing cells respond to a variety of chemicals at high exposure levels typical of irritants and are positioned in the nasal cavity appropriately to monitor inhaled air quality.

  11. A national survey of oral and maxillofacial surgeons' attitudes towards the treatment and dental rehabilitation of oral cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alani, A; Owens, J; Dewan, K; Summerwill, A

    2009-12-12

    To investigate the attitudes of maxillofacial surgeons in the treatment and dental rehabilitation of oral cancer patients in the UK. The survey was conducted by postal questionnaires with 17 close-ended questions. A total of 229 questionnaires were sent to members of the British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons over a one week period. A follow-up was sent if a reply was not received within 12 weeks. These results were compared to a similar study that was carried out approximately 15 years ago. The response rate was 65.5% (150/229). Overall 62% of respondents (92/150) carried out maxillary resections, which represents a decline of 23% on the previous study. There has been an increase in surgeons reconstructing the maxillary defect from 38% in the 1995 study to 91% in the present study. Ninety-eight percent of respondents had their patients seen in a multidisciplinary team (MDT) clinic, but in only 30% of the cases was a restorative dentist present on these clinics. There has been an improvement in the accessibility of a restorative dentist for this patient cohort, from 65% to 90%. The use of implants for dental rehabilitation post-cancer surgery has increased from 43% to 93%. This study highlights the changes in the dental and oral rehabilitation of patients undergoing resective surgery for oral cancer and especially those undergoing a maxillectomy procedure. It illustrates the increased use of implants for post-surgery rehabilitation and shows the different trends in which these implants are placed. An important aspect of this study is the input of the dental team. Current national guidelines state that a consultant restorative dentist needs to be a member of the MDT; this survey shows that this was the case in only 30% of responses.

  12. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... one of your body's most important early warning systems. Don't ignore any suspicious lumps or sores. ... and maxillofacial surgeon. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons: The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery Contact Us ...

  13. Oral delivery of anticancer drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thanki, Kaushik; Gangwal, Rahul P; Sangamwar, Abhay T

    2013-01-01

    The present report focuses on the various aspects of oral delivery of anticancer drugs. The significance of oral delivery in cancer therapeutics has been highlighted which principally includes improvement in quality of life of patients and reduced health care costs. Subsequently, the challenges...... incurred in the oral delivery of anticancer agents have been especially emphasized. Sincere efforts have been made to compile the various physicochemical properties of anticancer drugs from either literature or predicted in silico via GastroPlus™. The later section of the paper reviews various emerging...... trends to tackle the challenges associated with oral delivery of anticancer drugs. These invariably include efflux transporter based-, functional excipient- and nanocarrier based-approaches. The role of drug nanocrystals and various others such as polymer based- and lipid based...

  14. Oncofetal fibronectins in oral carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandel, U; Gaggero, B; Reibel, J

    1994-01-01

    in breast and oral tumors. Another oncofetal FN isoform containing the ED-B sequence is derived by alternative splicing, and FN containing ED-B has been found to be a stromal marker of malignancies in various tissues. Here we report a comparative study by immunohistology of the distribution of the ED......-B-containing isoform and the oncofetal FN isoform derived by O-glycosylation, in oral squamous cell carcinomas, premalignant lesions, and normal oral mucosa. A selective expression of the ED-B-containing isoform was demonstrated in close relation to the invading carcinoma (38/38), whereas there was virtually...... no staining in submucosa underlying premalignant lesions (1/11) and normal epithelium (0/5). The ED-B-containing FN showed close co-distribution and staining pattern with the oncofetal isoform derived by O-glycosylation. These results demonstrate that accumulation of FN adjacent to oral carcinomas includes...

  15. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Who We ... Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ ...

  16. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... teeth or become infected. It can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out ... and surgically treating cancer of the head, neck and mouth. The Oral Cancer Foundation estimates that close to ...

  17. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Neck Pathology Download Download the ebook for further information Your oral and maxillofacial surgeon (OMS) is the ... well be the key to complete recovery. The information provided here is not intended as a substitute ...

  18. Loggerhead oral cavity morphometry study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard external morphometrics and internal oral cavity morphometrics data were collected on wild and captive reared loggerhead sea turtles in size classes ranging...

  19. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... disorders are not uncommon. Individuals with a TMJ disorder may experience a variety of symptoms, such as earaches, ... Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ ...

  20. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively ...

  1. Oral candidosis in lichen planus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Camilla; Kieffer-Kristensen, L; Reibel, J

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Candida albicans is the most common fungal pathogen in humans, but other Candida species cause candidosis. Candida species display significant differences in their susceptibility to antimycotic drugs. Patients with symptomatic or erythematous oral lichen planus (OLP) commonly have...

  2. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the head, neck and mouth. The Oral Cancer Foundation estimates that close to 42,000 Americans will ... cheek out to see its inside surface as well as the back of the gums Pull out ...

  3. Oral Manifestations of Eating Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Neeta Misra; Anshul Mehra; Pradyuman Misra; Jaya Mehra

    2010-01-01

    Eating disorders are potentially life-threatening disorders. In this article, we discuss the oral manifestations of eating disorders so as to enable dental practitioners to recognize the effects of eating disorders and to manage the patients with eating disorders.

  4. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Who We ... can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Oral, Head ...

  5. Menopause and the oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Mutneja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Menopause is associated with a large number of symptoms ranging from physical to psychological. These symptoms may unfavorably affect oral health and treatment needs requiring dentists to be aware of the symptoms and health care needs of peri-menopausal/menopausal/postmenopausal women. This article attempts to provide an insight into the multifarious oral manifestations at menopause along with the relevant prosthodontic implications.

  6. Diabetes mellitus and oral health

    OpenAIRE

    T Radhika; Ranganathan Kannan

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic disorders characterized by abnormal secretion and metabolic action of insulin. Hyperglycemia, the key feature of this endocrine disorder causes multisystem damage leading to untoward effects in various tissues collectively referred to as "Diabetic complications". Diabetes alters the oral health to a great extent. Indeed, periodontitis has been reported as the sixth complication of this disease. This article gives an overview of the oral effects of dia...

  7. Herpetic Recurrent Oral Erythema Multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Shantala Arunkumar; Savitha S.Shettar; Mamata G.P; Rajeshwari G. Annigeri; Shakuntala G. K

    2016-01-01

    Erythema multiforme is considered as an immunologic disease possibly occurring because of predisposition to certain microorganisms, radiotherapy, systemic diseases, malignancy, and food or drug allergy. Here we report a case of herpes-induced recurrent erythema multiforme primarily manifesting in oral mucosa during first two episodes and third episode was characterized by oral lesions followed by skin lesions and the severity was increased with the subsequent episod...

  8. Smart Talk: Improving Children's Oral Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, Janie F.; Perkins, J. Helen

    2003-01-01

    Encourages caregivers to engage children in oral language activities that will help children develop skills necessary for reading and writing. Examines: (1) oral language as a predecessor to reading; (2) talking leading to learning; and (3) rich oral environment as a scaffold. Concludes with examples of oral-language activities for infants,…

  9. AN UPDATED REVIEW ON ORAL LEUKOPLAKIA

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Kavitaa Nedunchezhian

    2017-01-01

    Oral leukoplakia, the most commonly occurring potentially malignant disorder of the oral mucosa. The WHO (1997) defined leukoplakia as “a predominantly white lesion of the oral mucosa that cannot be characterized as any other definable lesion”. The present review covers the incidence, etiological factors, classification, diagnostic criteria in assessing and finally the management strategies aimed at preventing and treating oral leukoplakia.

  10. Oral chemotherapy handling and storage practices among Veterans Affairs oncology patients and caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trovato, James A; Tuttle, Laura A

    2014-04-01

    This questionnaire-based study was designed to identify the oral chemotherapy medication handling, storage, and disposal practices among cancer patients and their caregivers. This was a single-center observational survey study approved by the Investigational Review Board and VA Research & Development Committee. Patients were eligible for inclusion if they had an active order for an oral antineoplastic medication and an appointment at the oncology clinic. A questionnaire related to the storage, handling, disposal, patient education and counseling, and patients' perception of safety of oral antineoplastic medications was developed and given to patients in the clinic. Survey responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics. A total of 45 surveys were given to eligible patients in the oncology clinic and 42 surveys were returned to the study team. The majority, 40 participants (95%) were male. Participants ranged in age from 51 to 85 years (median, 65 years). Thirty-eight patients (90.5%) responded that the medication was stored away from extreme heat, cold, and humidity. Thirty-two patients (76%) reported keeping their medications in the original container. Hand washing was not a consistent practice among patients. Eleven patients (26%) reported always washing their hands after handling their anticancer medication; another 6 (14%) responded "sometimes". Of the 42 participants who answered, only 6 patients (14%) reported always or sometimes wearing gloves. The majority of patients responding to this survey store their oral anticancer medications appropriately, but patients' and caregivers' handling and disposal practices are inconsistent and frequently do not follow the published recommendations.

  11. Caregivers’ attitudes, knowledge and practices of oral care at nursing homes in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stančić Ivica

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Within the elderly population, residents in nursing homes, there is a greather risk of caries, periodontal disease and teeth loss. Assistance of caregivers in maintaininig good oral hygiene besides improving oral health can improve of residents general health and the qulity of their lives. The aim of this study was to examine the attitudes of caregivers and knowledge about oral health, as well as the practice regarding oral care they apply at nursing homes in Serbia. Methods. The survey was conducted at the Gerontology Center Belgrade, consisting of four nursing homes located in the urban area. The study included 58 caregivers. They were contacted on working days, in all work shifts, during January, February and March of 2013. They were asked to fill in a self-administered questionnaire consisting of 26 closed-type questions. Results. The caregivers mostly considered that it was very important to take care of oral health of the residents, but 69% responded that the level of their oral health was low or very low. As the main barriers to oral hygiene maintenance, the caregivers indicated lack of time. The caregivers had more knowledge about periodontal disease than about the main cause of caries and its prevention. Formal medical education had the influence on the knowledge about oral diseases. Oral hygiene procedures carried out by the mayority of caregivers were denture cleaning and tooth brushing. Conclusion. The caregivers were aware of the limitations in everyday oral care of nursing homes residents in Serbia, although solving these problems requires the involvement of the entire public health service.

  12. The association between current unemployment and clinically determined poor oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sudani, Fouad Y H; Vehkalahti, Miira M; Suominen, Anna L

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether current unemployment was associated with poor oral health and whether there was a difference in oral health according to the duration of the current unemployment. As part of the Health 2000 Survey in Finland (a nationwide comprehensive health examination survey), we used its data based on interviews, questionnaires, and clinical oral examinations of the 30- to 63-year-old respondents (n = 4773). Current employment status was measured in its dichotomous form, employed versus unemployed, and length of current unemployment was classified into four categories. We measured oral health in terms of numbers of missing teeth, of sound teeth, of filled teeth, of decayed teeth, and of teeth with deepened periodontal pockets (≥4 mm, ≥6 mm). Poisson regression models were fitted for all oral health outcomes except number of decayed teeth, for which negative binomial regression model was used. Oral health-related behaviors and sociodemographic and socioeconomic factors were added to the analyses. The unemployed subjects had higher numbers of missing teeth, of decayed teeth, and of teeth with periodontal pockets than the employed ones. The association remained consistent even after adjustments. Oral health-related behaviors seemed to mediate the association. We found no association between unemployment and number of sound teeth. Current long-term unemployment showed stronger association with poor oral health than short-term among women. The unemployed can be considered as a risk group for poor oral health. Oral healthcare should be reoriented toward those who are unemployed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Oral health promotion efficiency in the control of oral biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nélio Jorge Veiga

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the efficacy of oral health instructions, particularly in the control of dental plaque, as well as assess the effectiveness of the reinforcement of the same instructions. Methods: A quasi-experimental study was conducted at the University Clinic of the Portuguese Catholic University (UCP in Viseu-Portugal from January to June 2012. Three different assessments were performed with 30 participants using the O’Leary Plaque Index and a questionnaire on oral health behavior, with a one-month interval between each assessment. In the first assessment, all participants received the same instructions of oral hygiene and the O’Leary Plaque Index registration and the application of the questionnaire were performed; in the second assessment, a new registration of the O’Leary Index was made, but only the experimental group (n=16 received the reinforcement of oral health instructions, and in the third assessment, a new registration of the O’Leary Plaque Index was made for all the individuals (n=30. Results: Both control and experimental groups showed a decrease in the O’Leary Plaque Index, but the latter showed a more significant decrease in the last assessment: 38.19% (n=16 vs. 69.57% (n=14, p <0.05. Regarding the frequency of toothbrushing, in the experimental group, 68.8% (n=11 brushed the teeth at least twice a day, while in the control group only 57.1% (n=8 performed the same frequency of toothbrushing. In this case, statistically significant differences were found between the two groups (p<0.05. Conclusion: Oral health promotion through oral hygiene instruction was effective in improving oral health behaviors, and, consequentely, the control of dental biofilm. doi:10.5020/18061230.2014.p117

  14. Long distance migratory songbirds respond to extremes in arctic seasonality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelman, N.; Asmus, A.; Chmura, H.; Krause, J.; Perez, J. H.; Sweet, S. K.; Gough, L.; Wingfield, J.

    2017-12-01

    Arctic regions are warming rapidly, with extreme weather events increasing in frequency, duration and intensity, as in other regions. Many studies have focused on how shifting seasonality in environmental conditions affect the phenology and productivity of vegetation, while far fewer have examined how arctic fauna responds. We studied two species of long-distance migratory songbirds, Lapland longspurs, Calcarius lapponicus, and White-crowned sparrows, Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii, across seven consecutive breeding seasons in northern Alaskan tundra. We aimed to understand how spring environmental conditions affected breeding cycle phenology, food availability, body condition, stress physiology, and ultimately, reproductive success. Spring temperatures, precipitation, storm frequency, and snow-free dates differed significantly among years, with 2013 characterized by unusually late snow cover, and 2015 and 2016 characterized by unusually early snow-free dates and several late spring snowstorms. In response, we found that relative to other study years, there was a significant delay in breeding cycle phenology for both study species in 2013, while breeding cycle phenology was significantly earlier in 2015 only. For both species, we also found significant variation among years in: the seasonal patterns of arthropod availability during the nesting stage; body condition, and; stress physiology. Finally, we found significant variation in reproductive success of both species across years, and that daily survival rates were decreased by snow storm events. Our findings suggest that arctic-breeding passerine communities may be able to adjust phenology to unpredictable shifts in the timing of spring, but extreme conditions during the incubation and nestling stages are detrimental to reproductive success.

  15. Context-aware event detection smartphone application for first responders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddhu, Sanjay K.; Dave, Rakesh P.; McCartney, Matt; West, James A.; Williams, Robert L.

    2013-05-01

    The rise of social networking platforms like Twitter, Facebook, etc…, have provided seamless sharing of information (as chat, video and other media) among its user community on a global scale. Further, the proliferation of the smartphones and their connectivity networks has powered the ordinary individuals to share and acquire information regarding the events happening in his/her immediate vicinity in a real-time fashion. This human-centric sensed data being generated in "human-as-sensor" approach is tremendously valuable as it delivered mostly with apt annotations and ground truth that would be missing in traditional machine-centric sensors, besides high redundancy factor (same data thru multiple users). Further, when appropriately employed this real-time data can support in detecting localized events like fire, accidents, shooting, etc…, as they unfold and pin-point individuals being affected by those events. This spatiotemporal information, when made available for first responders in the event vicinity (or approaching it) can greatly assist them to make effective decisions to protect property and life in a timely fashion. In this vein, under SATE and YATE programs, the research team at AFRL Tec^Edge Discovery labs had demonstrated the feasibility of developing Smartphone applications, that can provide a augmented reality view of the appropriate detected events in a given geographical location (localized) and also provide an event search capability over a large geographic extent. In its current state, the application thru its backend connectivity utilizes a data (Text & Image) processing framework, which deals with data challenges like; identifying and aggregating important events, analyzing and correlating the events temporally and spatially and building a search enabled event database. Further, the smartphone application with its backend data processing workflow has been successfully field tested with live user generated feeds.

  16. Transcription Factors Responding to Pb Stress in Maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanling Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pb can damage the physiological function of human organs by entering the human body via food-chain enrichment. Revealing the mechanisms of maize tolerance to Pb is critical for preventing this. In this study, a Pb-tolerant maize inbred line, 178, was used to analyse transcription factors (TFs expressed under Pb stress based on RNA sequencing data. A total of 464 genes expressed in control check (CK or Pb treatment samples were annotated as TFs. Among them, 262 differentially expressed transcription factors (DETs were identified that responded to Pb treatment. Furthermore, the DETs were classified into 4 classes according to their expression patterns, and 17, 12 and 2 DETs were significantly annotated to plant hormone signal transduction, basal transcription factors and base excision repair, respectively. Seventeen DETs were found to participate in the plant hormone signal transduction pathway, where basic leucine zippers (bZIPs were the most significantly enriched TFs, with 12 members involved. We further obtained 5 Arabidopsis transfer DNA (T-DNA mutants for 6 of the maize bZIPs, among which the mutants atbzip20 and atbzip47, representing ZmbZIP54 and ZmbZIP107, showed obviously inhibited growth of roots and above-ground parts, compared with wild type. Five highly Pb-tolerant and 5 highly Pb-sensitive in maize lines were subjected to DNA polymorphism and expression level analysis of ZmbZIP54 and ZmbZIP107. The results suggested that differences in bZIPs expression partially accounted for the differences in Pb-tolerance among the maize lines. Our results contribute to the understanding of the molecular regulation mechanisms of TFs in maize under Pb stress.

  17. Rat embryonic palatal shelves respond to TCDD in organ culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, B.D.; Birnbaum, L.S.

    1990-01-01

    TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin), a highly toxic environmental contaminant, is teratogenic in mice, inducing cleft palate (CP) and hydronephrosis at doses which are not overtly maternally or embryo toxic. Palatal shelves of embryonic mice respond to TCDD, both in vivo and in organ culture, with altered differentiation of medial epithelial cells. By contrast, in the rat TCDD produces substantial maternal, embryonic, and fetal toxicity, including fetal lethality, with few malformations. In this study the possible effects of maternal toxicity on induction of cleft palate were eliminated by exposure of embryonic rat palatal shelves in organ culture. The shelves were examined for specific TCDD-induced alterations in differentiation of the medial cells. On Gestation Day (GD) 14 or 15 palatal shelves from embryonic F344 rats were placed in organ culture for 2 to 3 days (IMEM:F12 medium, 5% FBS, 0.1% DMSO) containing 0, 1 x 10(-8), 1 x 10(-9), 1 x 10(-10), or 5 x 10(-11) M TCDD. The medial epithelial peridermal cells degenerated on shelves exposed to control media or 5 x 10(-11) M TCDD. Exposure to 10(-10), 10(-9), and 10(-8) M TCDD inhibited this degeneration in 20, 36, and 60% of the shelves, respectively, and was statistically significant at the two highest doses. A normally occurring decrease in [3H]TdR incorporation was inhibited in some GD 15 shelves cultured with 10(-10) and 10(-9) M TCDD. The medial cells of TCDD-exposed shelves continued to express high levels of immunohistochemically detected EGF receptors. The altered differentiation of rat medial epithelium is similar to that reported for TCDD-exposed mouse medial cells in vivo and in vitro. However, in order to obtain these responses, the cultured rat shelves require much higher concentrations of TCDD than the mouse shelves

  18. Effect of different oral hygiene measures on oral malodor in children aged 7-15 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Piyusha S; Pujar, Pallavi; Subbareddy, V V

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of various oral hygiene measures individually and in combination in reducing oral malodor. A total number of 120 children diagnosed as having oral malodor (oral malodor scores 2 and above) were included in the study. Children were then grouped under four oral hygiene categories (tooth brushing, tongue cleaning, mouth rinsing, and a combination group). There were 30 children in each group. The children were asked to perform oral hygiene methods individually and in combination. The children were then reassessed for oral malodor 2 h later. The results were analyzed and compared. Both individual oral hygiene measure or in combination of tooth brushing, tongue cleaning, and mouth rinsing; all were effective in reducing oral malodor. Significant reduction (P oral malodor was seen when all three oral hygiene measures performed together. Oral malodor was significantly reduced after performing oral hygiene measures individually, but reduced more when used in combination.

  19. Oral health impact on quality of life assessment among dental patients in Bangalore city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Pradeep

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Over the past few decades mankind has been mainly affected with chronic noncommunicable diseases, which led to compromised quality of life. Common dental diseases come under same categories that are largely social and behavioral in origin. Health-related quality of life helps us address the limitations of traditional clinical indicators of health. Aim: To measure the impact of oral health on quality of life among patients visiting dental teaching hospitals and private clinics in Bangalore city using oral health-related quality of life (OHQoL - U.K index. Materials and Methods: A total of 1200 individuals who are above 16-year of age were selected through stratified cluster random sampling technique for this study. Data were collected using OHQoL-U.K instrument. Results: Most of the subjects (78% perceived their oral health as impacting their quality of life. Many participants perceived their oral health had positive impact on life quality through enhancing their smile, appearance, speech. But 44.9% and 28.5% of respondents said their oral health has a negative impact on quality of life because of breath odor and finance respectively. Subjects are belonging to lower socioeconomic background, women and older adults (>45 years perceived their oral health has a negative impact on quality of life compared to subjects from higher social class, men and young adults. Conclusion: Oral health has more impact on physical and functional aspects rather than on social and psychological domains.

  20. Promoting oral cancer awareness and early detection using a mass media approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Amyza; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Wan Abd Ghani, Wan Maria Nabillah; Abdullah, Norlida; Doss, Jennifer Geraldine; Navonil, Roy; Abdul Rahman, Zainal Ariff; Ismail, Siti Mazlipah; Talib, Norain Abu; Zain, Rosnah Binti; Cheong, Sok Ching

    2012-01-01

    Less than 50% of oral cancer cases are diagnosed at early stages of the disease and this is in part due to poor awareness and lack of knowledge on the signs and symptoms of oral cancer. This study sought to measure the baseline awareness of oral cancer in Malaysia and aimed to increase public awareness and knowledge of oral cancer using a mass media campaign. Baseline awareness and impact of the campaign was measured using self-administered questionnaires sent via email to individuals. The campaign was aired on two national television channels and the reach was monitored through an independent programme monitoring system. 78.2% of respondents had heard of oral cancer, and this increased significantly after the campaign. However, the ability to recognize signs and symptoms remains unchanged. We found that the level of awareness differed between the distinct ethnic subgroups and the reach of the campaign was not uniform across all ethnicities. This substantial study to measure the oral cancer awareness in Malaysia provides important baseline data for the planning of public health policies. Despite encouraging evidence that a mass media campaign could increase the awareness of oral cancer, further research is required to address the acceptability, comprehensiveness and effectiveness. Furthermore, different campaign approaches may be required for specific ethnic groups in a multi-ethnic country such as Malaysia.