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Sample records for single-incision pediatric endosurgery

  1. Single-Incision Pediatric Endosurgery (SIPES oophoropexy in an adolescent with Hodgkin lymphoma prior to pelvic irradiation

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    Aaron D. Seims

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Oophoropexy for fertility preservation during pelvic irradiation dates back to the mid-1960s. For Hodgkin lymphoma (HL, this was performed during a staging laparotomy. Laparoscopic ovarian fixation has supplanted open pexy with advancements in technology and abandonment of staging laparotomies. Single-Incision Pediatric Endosurgery (SIPES is applicable to numerous multi-port operations. Use of this technique for oophoropexy prior to pelvic irradiation, however, has not been reported. A 19 year-old with stage IVb HL involving the left iliac node basin was to receive radiotherapy and was evaluated for bilateral oophoropexy. An Olympus TriPort™ was introduced at the umbilicus, through which a 5 mm zero-degree laparoscope and a needle driver were introduced. Transabdominal passage of a ski needle through a 2 mm nick in the skin of the anterolateral wall allowed for right sided fixation of the ovaries. Operative recovery was uncomplicated, and post-operative imaging demonstrated satisfactory positioning of the gonads outside the planned radiation field. In conclusion, SIPES oophoropexy is a technically simple method for fertility preservation that offers improved cosmesis.

  2. Single incision pediatric endoscopic surgery: advantages of relatively large incision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, E.; Afsarlar, E.; Karaman, I.

    2015-01-01

    To describe Single Incision Pediatric Endoscopic Surgery (SIPES) performed on children with various diagnoses, emphasizing its advantages. Study Design: An observational case series. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Pediatric Surgery, Dr. Sami Ulus Maternity and Child Health Hospital, Ankara, Turkey, from January 2011 to November 2014. Methodology: A review of patient charts was conducted in which SIPES was preferred as the surgical procedure. Patient demographics, operative details, operative time, clinical outcomes, postoperative pain and cosmesis were analyzed. Results: SIPES was performed on 45 patients (21 girls, 24 boys). Thirty-three appendectomies, 5 varicocelectomies, 3 oophorectomies, 2 ovarian and one paratubal cyst excision, and one fallopian tube excision were performed. All except one procedures were performed through our standard 2cm umbilical vertical or smile incision. In 18 cases, abdominal irrigation/aspiration was easily performed through the existing larger incision, as is done with open surgical technique. None of the patients had early postoperative shoulder/back pain since complete disinflation of CO/sub 2/ could be ensured. All of the patients/parents were satisfied with the cosmesis. Conclusion: SIPES has the advantages of limiting the surgical scar to within the umbilicus and providing easy disinflation of CO/sub 2/, allowing intraabdominal cleaning and extraction of large volume tissue samples through a single large umbilical incision. (author)

  3. Single incision laparoscopic hepatectomy: Advances in laparoscopic liver surgery.

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    Tayar, Claude; Claude, Tayar; Subar, Daren; Daren, Subar; Salloum, Chady; Chady, Salloum; Malek, Alexandre; Alexandre, Malek; Laurent, Alexis; Alexis, Laurent; Azoulay, Daniel; Daniel, Azoulay

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic liver surgery is now an established practice in many institutions. It is a safe and feasible approach in experienced hands. Single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) has been performed for cholecystectomies, nephrectomies, splenectomies and obesity surgery. However, the use of SILS in liver surgery has been rarely reported. We report our initial experience in seven patients on single incision laparoscopic hepatectomy (SILH). From October 2010 to September 2012, seven patients underwent single-incision laparoscopic liver surgery. The abdomen was approached through a 25 mm periumbilical incision. No supplemental ports were required. The liver was transected using a combination of LigaSure™ (Covidien-Valleylab. Boulder. USA), Harmonic Scalpel and Ligaclips (Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.). Liver resection was successfully completed for the seven patients. The procedures consisted of two partial resections of segment three, two partial resections of segment five and three partial resections of segment six. The mean operative time was 98.3 min (range: 60-150 min) and the mean estimated blood loss was 57 ml (range: 25-150 ml). The postoperative courses were uneventful and the mean hospital stay was 5.1 days (range: 1-13 days). Pathology identified three benign and four malignant liver tumours with clear margins. SILH is a technically feasible and safe approach for wedge resections of the liver without oncological compromise and with favourable cosmetic results. This surgical technique requires relatively advanced laparoscopic skills. Further studies are needed to determine the potential advantages of this technique, apart from the better cosmetic result, compared to the conventional laparoscopic approach.

  4. Single incision laparoscopic hepatectomy: Advances in laparoscopic liver surgery

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    Tayar Claude

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laparoscopic liver surgery is now an established practice in many institutions. It is a safe and feasible approach in experienced hands. Single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS has been performed for cholecystectomies, nephrectomies, splenectomies and obesity surgery. However, the use of SILS in liver surgery has been rarely reported. We report our initial experience in seven patients on single incision laparoscopic hepatectomy (SILH. Patients and Methods: From October 2010 to September 2012, seven patients underwent single-incision laparoscopic liver surgery. The abdomen was approached through a 25 mm periumbilical incision. No supplemental ports were required. The liver was transected using a combination of LigaSure TM (Covidien-Valleylab. Boulder. USA, Harmonic Scalpel and Ligaclips (Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.. Results: Liver resection was successfully completed for the seven patients. The procedures consisted of two partial resections of segment three, two partial resections of segment five and three partial resections of segment six. The mean operative time was 98.3 min (range: 60-150 min and the mean estimated blood loss was 57 ml (range: 25-150 ml. The postoperative courses were uneventful and the mean hospital stay was 5.1 days (range: 1-13 days. Pathology identified three benign and four malignant liver tumours with clear margins. Conclusion: SILH is a technically feasible and safe approach for wedge resections of the liver without oncological compromise and with favourable cosmetic results. This surgical technique requires relatively advanced laparoscopic skills. Further studies are needed to determine the potential advantages of this technique, apart from the better cosmetic result, compared to the conventional laparoscopic approach.

  5. Single Incision Laparoscopic Splenectomy: Our First Experiences

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    Umut Barbaros

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Most laparoscopic surgeons have attempted to reduce incisional morbidity and improve cosmetic outcomes by using less and smaller trocars. Single incision laparoscopic splenectomy is a new laparoscopic procedure. Herein we would like to present our experiences.Material and Methods: Between January 2009 and June 2009, data of the 7 patients who underwent single incision laparoscopic splenectomy were evaluated retrospectively.Results: There were 7 patients (5 females and 2 males with a mean age of 29.9 years. The most common splenectomy indication was idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Single incision laparoscopic splenectomy was performed successfully in 6 patients. In one patient the operation was converted to an open procedure.Conclusion: With surgeons experienced in minimally invasive surgery, single incision laparoscopic splenectomy could be performed successfully. However, in order to demonstrate the differneces between standard laparoscopic splenectomy and SILS splenetomy, prospective randomized comparative studies are required.

  6. Single-incision total laparoscopic hysterectomy

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    Sinha Rakesh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Single-incision laparoscopic surgery is an alternative to conventional multiport laparoscopy. Single-access laparoscopy using a transumbilical port affords maximum cosmetic benefits because the surgical incision is hidden in the umbilicus. The advantages of single-access laparoscopic surgery may include less bleeding, infection, and hernia formation and better cosmetic outcome and less pain. The disadvantages and limitations include longer surgery time, difficulty in learning the technique, and the need for specialized instruments. Ongoing refinement of the surgical technique and instrumentation is likely to expand its role in gynecologic surgery in the future. We perform single-incision total laparoscopic hysterectomy using three ports in the single transumbilical incision.

  7. Single incision laparoscopic colorectal resection: Our experience

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    Chinnusamy Palanivelu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A prospective case series of single incision multiport laparoscopic colorectal resections for malignancy using conventional laparoscopic trocars and instruments is described. Materials and Methods: Eleven patients (seven men and four women with colonic or rectal pathology underwent single incision multiport laparoscopic colectomy/rectal resection from July till December 2010. Four trocars were placed in a single transumblical incision. The bowel was mobilized laparoscopically and vessels controlled intracorporeally with either intra or extracorporeal anastomosis. Results: Three patients had carcinoma in the caecum, one in the hepatic flexure, two in the rectosigmoid, one in the descending colon, two in the rectum and two had ulcerative pancolitis (one with high grade dysplasia and another with carcinoma rectum. There was no conversion to standard multiport laparoscopy or open surgery. The median age was 52 years (range 24-78 years. The average operating time was 130 min (range 90-210 min. The average incision length was 3.2 cm (2.5-4.0 cm. There were no postoperative complications. The average length of stay was 4.5 days (range 3-8 days. Histopathology showed adequate proximal and distal resection margins with an average lymph node yield of 25 nodes (range 16-30 nodes. Conclusion: Single incision multiport laparoscopic colorectal surgery for malignancy is feasible without extra cost or specialized ports/instrumentation. It does not compromise the oncological radicality of resection. Short-term results are encouraging. Long-term results are awaited.

  8. Single-incision laparoscopic partial gastrectomy for gastric submucosal tumors without compromising transumbilical stapling.

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    Takata, Akihiro; Nakajima, Kiyokazu; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Yamasaki, Makoto; Miyata, Hiroshi; Takiguchi, Shuji; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2014-01-01

    Although SILS has become an increasingly popular type of surgery, its application for gastric submucosal tumors (SMT) has been only sporadically reported. We herein describe 12 recent cases with gastric SMT located in the greater curvature or anterior wall. The aim is to validate technical feasibility and safety of single-incision laparoscopic partial gastrectomy. Thus far, this is one of the largest series of patients with gastric SMT who underwent SILS. From July 2009 to April 2013, single-incision laparoscopic partial gastrectomy was attempted in 12 consecutive patients with gastric SMT. Three trocars were assembled in the umbilical incision, and the lesion was mobilized and staple-resected with endoscopic stapling devices. SILS surgery was successfully completed without any additional trocars. The median operating time was 96.5 min, and median blood loss was 7.5 mL. The median tumor size was 30 mm, with histopathologic diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (10) and schwannoma (2). There was no immediate postoperative morbidity. During a median follow-up of 12 months, all patients were on full regular diet without any gastrointestinal symptoms. SILS with transumbilical gastric stapling is a safe and practical alternative to conventional multiport laparoscopy in patients with gastric SMT, except for cases originating in the lesser curvature and close to the cardia/ pylorus. © 2013 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Single-incision laparoscopic bariatric surgery

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    Huang Chih-Kun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bariatric surgery has been established as the best option of treatment for morbid obesity. In recent years single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS has emerged as another modality of carrying out the bariatric procedures. While SILS represents an advance, its application in morbid obesity at present is limited. In this article, we review the technique and results of SILS in bariatric surgery. Methods: The PubMed database was searched and totally 11 series reporting SILS in bariatric surgery were identified and analyzed. The case reports were excluded. Since 2008, 114 morbidly obese patients receiving SILS bariatric surgeries were reported. Results: The procedures performed included SILS gastric banding, sleeve gastrectomy and gastric bypass. No mortality was reported in the literatures. Sixteen patients (14.05% needed an additional incision for a liver retractor, a trocar or for conversion. Only one complication of wound infection was reported in these series. All the surgeons reported that the patients were highly satisfied with the scar. Conclusion: Because of abundant visceral and subcutaneous fat and multiple comorbidities in morbid obesity, it is more challenging for surgeons to perform the procedures with SILS. It is clear that extensive development of new instruments and technical aspects of these procedures as well as randomized studies to compare them with traditional laparoscopy are essential before these procedures can be utilized in day-to-day clinical practice.

  10. Current Status of Single-incision Laparoscopic Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Irfan; Ciancio, Fabio; Ferrara, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in minimally invasive surgery have centered on reducing the number of incisions required, which has led to the development of the single-incision laparoscopic technique. A panel of European single-incision laparoscopy experts met to discuss the current status of, and the future ex...... to be published to confirm its value. An ideal training route for surgeons who are adopting the technique was agreed upon, as was the need for a single, large clinical registry of data....

  11. Single-incision sling operations for urinary incontinence in women.

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    Nambiar, Arjun; Cody, June D; Jeffery, Stephen T

    2014-06-01

    Urinary incontinence has been shown to affect up to 50% of women. Studies in the United States have shown that up to 80% of these women have an element of stress urinary incontinence. Colposuspension and now mid-urethral slings have been shown to be effective in treating patients with stress incontinence. However, associated adverse events include bladder and bowel injury, groin pain and haematoma formation. This has led to the development of third-generation single-incision slings, also referred to as mini-slings.It should be noted that TVT-Secur (Gynecare, Bridgewater, NJ, USA) is one type of single-incision sling; it has been withdrawn from the market because of poor results. However, it is one of the most widely studied single-incision slings and was used in several of the trials included in this review. Despite its withdrawal from clinical use, it was decided that data pertaining to this sling should be included in the first iteration of this review, so that level 1a data are available in the literature to confirm its lack of efficacy. To assess the effectiveness of mini-sling procedures in women with urodynamic clinical stress or mixed urinary incontinence in terms of improved continence status, quality of life or adverse events. We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Trials Register, which contains trials identified from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and MEDLINE in process; we handsearched journals and conference proceedings (searched 6 February 2013) and searched ClinicalTrials.gov (searched 20 September 2012), the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (searched 20 September 2012) and the reference lists of relevant articles. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials in women with urodynamic stress incontinence, symptoms of stress incontinence or stress-predominant mixed urinary incontinence, in which at least one trial arm involves one of the

  12. [Preliminary clinical experience of single incision laparoscopic colorectal surgery].

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    Wu, S D; Han, J Y

    2016-06-01

    Objective: To discuss the preliminary experience of single incision laparoscopic colorectal surgery. Methods: The clinical data and surgical outcomes of 104 selected patients who underwent single incision laparoscopic colorectal surgery in the 2 nd Department of General Surgery, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University from January 2010 to September 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. There were 62 male and 42 female patients, aging from 21 to 87 years with a mean of (61±12) years. Eighty-five patients were diagnosed with malignancy while the rest 19 cases were benign diseases. All the procedures were performed by the same surgeon using the rigid laparoscopic instruments. Surgical and oncological outcomes were analyzed in 4 kinds of procedures which are over 5 cases respectively, including low anterior resection, abdominoperineal resection, radical right colon resection and radical sigmoidectomy. Results: Single incision laparoscopic colorectal surgery was performed in 104 selected patients and was successfully managed in 99 cases with a total conversion rate of 4.8%. Radical procedures for malignancy in cases with the number of patients more than 5 were performed for 74 cases. For low anterior resection, 35 cases with an average surgical time of (191±57) minutes, average estimated blood loss of (117±72) ml and average number of harvested lymph nodes of 14.6±1.1. For abdominoperineal resection, 9 cases with an average surgical time of (226±54) minutes, average estimated blood loss of (194±95) ml and average number of harvested lymph nodes of 14.1±1.5. For radical right colon resection, 16 cases with an average surgical time of (222±62) minutes, average estimated blood loss of (142±68) ml and average number of harvested lymph nodes of 15.4±2.4. For radical sigmoidectomy, 14 cases with an average surgical time of (159±32) minutes, average estimated blood loss of (94±33) ml and average number of harvested lymph nodes of 13.9±1.5. The overall

  13. Single Incision Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy vs Conventional Cholecystectomy in Developing Country

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    P B Thapa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Use of laparoscopic surgery has demanded principles of less trauma of access hence less scar and so probably less complications. Hence conventional laparoscopic surgeries were tried with natural orifice transluminal surgery (NOTES and then single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS. With refinement in instruments and surgeons skills SILS have bridged up between conventional and NOTES in order to quench the desire of less or no scar at all. METHODS: Comparative case control study between conventional laparoscopic cholecystectomy and SILS in public teaching hospital. RESULTS: Total 20 patients underwent SILS cholecystectomy and 20 underwent conventional cholecystectomy and found that no difference between both in terms of post operative pain score, hospital stay and post operative wound infection except significant difference in mean operative time and patient's level of satisfaction was less in patient with SILC if were subjected to pay for instruments in order to maintain cosmesis. CONCLUSIONS: Though SILS have gained rapid acceptance in surgical fraternity, large number of randomized controlled trials are necessary to show its benefit over conventional laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Keywords: cholecystectomy, conventional, laparoscopy, single incision, surgery

  14. Single-incision laparoscopic surgery for diverticulitis in overweight patients.

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    Rink, Andreas D; Vestweber, Boris; Hahn, Jasmina; Alfes, Angelika; Paul, Claudia; Vestweber, Karl-Heinz

    2015-10-01

    Single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) has been introduced as a new technique for the treatment of various colorectal diseases. Recurrent or complicated diverticulitis of the sigmoid colon is a frequent indication for minimally invasive sigmoid colectomy. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of obesity on the outcome of SILS sigmoid colectomy. From September 2009 to October 2014, data from 377 patients who had intended SILS sigmoid colectomy for diverticulitis at our institution were collected in a prospective database. The patients were categorized in the following subgroups: group 1 (normal weight, body mass index (BMI)  35 kg/m(2)). The groups were equivalent for sex, age, status of diverticulitis, the presence of acute inflammation in the specimen, and the percentage of teaching operations, but the percentage of patients with accompanying diseases was significantly more frequent in groups 2, 3, and 4 (p = 0.04, 0.008, and 0.018, respectively). As compared to group 1, the conversion rate was significantly increased in groups 2 and 4 (2.3 vs. 9.3% (p = 0.013) and 2.3 vs. 12.5% (p = 0.017), respectively). The duration of surgery, hospitalization, and morbidity did not differ between the four groups. Up to a body mass index of 35 kg/m(2), increased body weight does not significantly reduce the feasibility and outcome of single-incision laparoscopic surgery for diverticulitis.

  15. Single-incision laparoscopic surgery for pyloric stenosis.

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    Kozlov, Yury; Novogilov, Vladimir; Podkamenev, Alexey; Rasputin, Andrey; Weber, Irina; Solovjev, Alexey; Yurkov, Pavel

    2012-04-01

    Laparoscopy is the most common procedure for correction of congenital pyloric stenosis. The standard laparoscopic approach is based on the three-port technique. In contrast to the standard laparoscopic technique, the single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) requires only one incision. We report on our experience with this surgical approach. Between September 2009 and August 2010 a total of 24 children underwent a laparoscopic pyloromyotomy, 12 in SILS technique. The single incision was carried through the center of the umbilicus. The working instruments were introduced in a two-dimensional direction into the peritoneal cavity via the same umbilical incision. The two groups were compared for patients' demographics, operative report and early postoperative outcomes. All SILS procedures were performed successfully with no conversion rate. There were no differences in the preoperative parameters between the two groups regarding age before surgery and body weight at operation. Operative time and time of full enteral intake was similar to comparable procedures with usage of a standard laparoscopic approach. There were no operative or postoperative complications. The early experience described in this study confirms that SILS can be applied for treatment of pyloric stenosis with outcomes similar to the standard laparoscopic surgery.

  16. Single-incision laparoscopic splenectomy with innovative gastric traction suture

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    Srikanth G

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Laparoscopic splenectomy is now the gold standard for patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP undergoing splenectomy. There are a few reports in literature on single-incision laparoscopic (SIL splenectomy. Herein, we describe a patient undergoing SIL splenectomy for ITP without the use of a disposable port device. We report a 20-year-old female patient with steroid-refractory ITP having a platelet count of 14,000/cmm who underwent a SIL splenectomy. Dissection was facilitated by the use of a single articulating grasper and a gastric traction suture and splenic vessels were secured at the hilum with an endo-GIA stapler. She made an uneventful postoperative recovery and was discharged on the second postoperative day. She is doing well with no visible scar at 8-month follow-up.

  17. Early experience with single incision laparoscopic surgery: eliminating the scar from abdominal operations.

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    Dutta, Sanjeev

    2009-09-01

    Single incision laproscopic surgery (SILS) involves performing abdominal operations with laparoscopic instruments placed through a single, small umbilical incision. The primary goal is to avoid visible scarring. This is the first report of SILS cholecystectomy in children and the first report in the literature of SILS splenectomy. A retrospective chart review was performed in 20 consecutive inpatient SILS procedures (13 males, 7 females; ages 2-17 years) from May to December 2008. Outcome measures included need for conversion, operative time, time to oral analgesia, length of hospitalization, cosmetic outcome, and complications. There were 4 total splenectomies, 3 cholecystectomies, 2 combined splenectomy/cholecystectomies, and 11 appendectomies performed. All procedures were completed successfully without need for conversion to standard laparoscopy or open surgery. Mean operative time was 90 minutes for splenectomy, 68 minutes for cholecystectomy, 165 minutes for combined splenectomy/cholecystectomy, and 33 minutes for appendectomy. Mean hospital stay was 1 day for appendectomy, 1 day for cholecystectomy, and 2.5 days for splenectomy. One splenectomy patient received 1 U packed red blood cell transfusion. All appendectomy patients were converted to oral analgesia within 24 hours and splenectomy patients within 48 hours. All families were very pleased with the cosmetic outcome. Single incision laparoscopic surgery is feasible for a variety of pediatric general surgical conditions, allowing for scarless abdominal operations. This early experience suggests that outcomes are comparable to standard laparoscopic surgery but with improved cosmesis, however, a larger series is necessary to confirm these findings and to determine if there are any benefits in pain or recovery. Surgeons performing SILS should have a firm foundation of advanced minimal access surgical skills and a cautious, gradated approach to attempting the various procedures. Technological refinements will

  18. Single-Incision Laparoscopic Sterilization of the Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus).

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    Hartman, Marthinus J; Monnet, Eric; Kirberger, Robert M; Schmidt-Küntzel, Anne; Schulman, Martin L; Stander, Jana A; Stegmann, George F; Schoeman, Johan P

    2015-07-01

    To describe laparoscopic ovariectomy and salpingectomy in the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) using single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS). Prospective cohort. Female cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) (n = 21). Cheetahs were randomly divided to receive either ovariectomy (n = 11) or salpingectomy (n = 10). The use and complications of a SILS port was evaluated in all of cheetahs. Surgery duration and insufflation volumes of carbon dioxide (CO2 ) were recorded and compared across procedures. Laparoscopic ovariectomy and salpingectomy were performed without complications using a SILS port. The poorly-developed mesosalpinx and ovarian bursa facilitated access to the uterine tube for salpingectomy in the cheetah. The median surgery duration for ovariectomy was 24 minutes (interquartile range 3) and for salpingectomy was 19.5 minutes (interquartile range 3) (P = .005). The median volume of CO2 used for ovariectomy was 11.25 L (interquartile range 3.08) and for salpingectomy was 4.90 L (interquartile range 2.52), (P = .001) CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopic ovariectomy and salpingectomy can be performed in the cheetah using SILS without perioperative complications. Salpingectomy is faster than ovariectomy and requires less total CO2 for insufflation. © Copyright 2015 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  19. Single incision laparoscopic liver resection (SILL – a systematic review

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    Benzing, Christian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Today, minimally invasive liver resections for both benign and malignant tumors are routinely performed. Recently, some authors have described single incision laparoscopic liver resection (SILL procedures. Since SILL is a relatively young branch of laparoscopy, we performed a systematic review of the current literature to collect data on feasibility, perioperative results and oncological outcome.Methods: A literature research was performed on Medline for all studies that met the eligibility criteria. Titles and abstracts were screened by two authors independently. A study was included for review if consensus was obtained by discussion between the authors on the basis of predefined inclusion criteria. A thorough quality assessment of all included studies was performed. Data were analyzed and tabulated according to predefined outcome measures. Synthesis of the results was achieved by narrative review. Results: A total of 15 eligible studies were identified among which there was one prospective cohort study and one randomized controlled trial comparing SILL to multi incision laparoscopic liver resection (MILL. The rest were retrospective case series with a maximum of 24 patients. All studies demonstrated convincing results with regards to feasibility, morbidity and mortality. The rate of wound complications and incisional hernia was low. The cosmetic results were good.Conclusions: This is the first systematic review on SILL including prospective trials. The results of the existing studies reporting on SILL are favorable. However, a large body of scientific evidence on the field of SILL is missing, further randomized controlled studies are urgently needed.

  20. Two hundred seventy-five single-incision laparoscopic gastric band insertions: what have we learnt?

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    Murgatroyd, Beth; Chakravartty, Saurav; Sarma, Diwakar R; Patel, Ameet G

    2014-07-01

    Single-incision surgery in the morbidly obese patient has not been widely adopted, but remains a popular choice amongst patients. In the bariatric patient, it presents its own surgical challenges with hepatomegaly and increased abdominal adiposity. Here, we present our experience of 275 single-incision laparoscopic gastric bands.Between June 2009 and April 2013, 275 obese patients underwent single-incision laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding through a single incision using a multichannel single port and via a pars flaccida approach. Prospective data collection was undertaken including operating time, additional ports and additional procedures undertaken.In this series, median operative time was 60 (range 34-170) min. An additional port was placed in 15 patients (5%), including two conversions to four-port technique (0.7%). Of these patients (n = 15), the majority were male (p rate of success for all BMIs. Following 275 single-incision band insertions additional port placements were more commonly required in male patients, BMI >45 and earlier in the learning curve.

  1. 76 FR 71980 - SEDASYS Computer-Assisted Personalized Sedation System; Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Incorporated's...

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    2011-11-21

    ...] SEDASYS Computer-Assisted Personalized Sedation System; Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Incorporated's Petition for... SEDASYS computer-assisted personalized sedation system (SEDASYS) submitted by Ethicon Endo-Surgery Inc... advisory committee will review CDRH's denial of a PMA for the SEDASYS Computer-Assisted Personalized...

  2. 76 FR 75887 - SEDASYS Computer-Assisted Personalized Sedation System; Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Incorporated's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ...] SEDASYS Computer-Assisted Personalized Sedation System; Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Incorporated's Petition for... of a premarket approval application (PMA) for the SEDASYS computer-assisted personalized sedation system (SEDASYS) submitted by Ethicon Endo-Surgery Inc. (EES), the sponsor for SEDASYS. This meeting has...

  3. Single incision laparoscopic pancreas resection for pancreatic metastasis of renal cell carcinoma.

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    Barbaros, Umut; Sümer, Aziz; Demirel, Tugrul; Karakullukçu, Nazlı; Batman, Burçin; Içscan, Yalın; Sarıçam, Gülay; Serin, Kürçsat; Loh, Wei-Liang; Dinççağ, Ahmet; Mercan, Selçuk

    2010-01-01

    Transumbilical single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) offers excellent cosmetic results and may be associated with decreased postoperative pain, reduced need for analgesia, and thus accelerated recovery. Herein, we report the first transumbilical single incision laparoscopic pancreatectomy case in a patient who had renal cell cancer metastasis on her pancreatic corpus and tail. A 59-year-old female who had metastatic lesions on her pancreas underwent laparoscopic subtotal pancreatectomy through a 2-cm umbilical incision. Single incision pancreatectomy was performed with a special port (SILS port) and articulated equipment. The procedure lasted 330 minutes. Estimated blood loss was 100mL. No perioperative complications occurred. The patient was discharged on the seventh postoperative day with a low-volume (20mL/day) pancreatic fistula that ceased spontaneously. Pathology result of the specimen was renal cell cancer metastases. This is the first reported SILS pancreatectomy case, demonstrating that even advanced surgical procedures can be performed using the SILS technique in well-experienced centers. Transumbilical single incision laparoscopic pancreatectomy is feasible and can be performed safely in experienced centers. SILS may improve cosmetic results and allow accelerated recovery for patients even with malignancy requiring advanced laparoscopic interventions.

  4. Single-incision sleeve gastrectomy versus conventional laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy--a randomised pilot study.

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    Lakdawala, Muffazal A; Muda, Nor Hisham; Goel, Sunita; Bhasker, Aparna

    2011-11-01

    This is a prospective pilot study done to evaluate the feasibility and to assess the outcomes and complication rates of the single-incision sleeve gastrectomy versus the conventional five-port laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. A prospective comparative analysis was done of 50 patients in each arm who underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and single-incision sleeve gastrectomy from September 2009 until April 2010. Both groups were matched for age, gender and BMI and were then randomly assigned to either group. Postoperative pain scoring was done using the visual analogue scale. Postoperative outcomes in terms of pain scores, excess weight loss, resolution of comorbidities and complication rates were compared in both groups, at the end of 6 months. Operating times in both groups were comparable with experience. Intraoperative blood loss was similar in both groups. VAS scoring revealed lesser postoperative pain after the first 8 h in the single-incision group as compared to the laparoscopy group-P < 0.0001. At 6 months, excess weight loss and resolution of comorbidities were comparable in both groups. There were no major complications or mortalities in either group. Single-incision laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy is a feasible surgical procedure for morbid obesity in selected individuals. When compared to conventional laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, it has equally effective weight loss and resolution of comorbidities. It also has the added benefits of little or no visible scarring and reduced postoperative pain.

  5. Safety and feasibility of single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy in obese patients

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    Masaki Wakasugi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Current literature frequently indicates that experienced laparoscopic surgeons can safely perform single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy, but there have been few reports evaluating the feasibility and safety of performing single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy for obese patients. Therefore, a large single-center database was retrospectively reviewed to evaluate the feasibility and safety of single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy for obese patients by comparing the outcomes of normal-weight and obese patients undergoing single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy.A retrospective analysis of 608 patients undergoing SILC between May 2009 and May 2015 at Osaka Police Hospital was performed, and the outcomes of obese [body mass index (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2] and normal-weight patients (18.5 ≤ BMI < 25 kg/m2 were compared.Thirty-eight obese patients (mean BMI 32.5 kg/m2 were compared to 362 normal-weight patients (mean BMI 22.0 kg/m2. The American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA scores of the obese patients were significantly higher than those of normal-weight patients. The mean operative times in the normal-weight and the obese groups were 110 min vs. 127 min, respectively (p < 0.05. There were no significant differences in the bleeding volume and the conversion rate to a different operative procedure. Perioperative complications were seen in 6% (23/362 of the patients in the normal-weight group and 8% (3/38 of the patients in the obese group (p = 0.7. The mean postoperative hospital stay was 4.5 days for the normal-weight group and 4.4 days for the obese group (p = 0.8.Single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy, which offers good cosmetic outcomes, seems feasible and safe in obese patients.•Single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy offers good cosmetic outcomes.•Single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy seems feasible and safe in obese patients.

  6. Learning Curve for Laparoendoscopic Single-Incision Live Donor Nephrectomy: Implications for Laparoendoscopic Practice and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troppmann, Christoph; Santhanakrishnan, Chandrasekar; Fananapazir, Ghaneh; Troppmann, Kathrin M; Perez, Richard V

    2017-05-01

    The learning curve for laparoendoscopic single-incision live donor nephrectomy, which is technically more complex than the multiport, conventional laparoendoscopic approach, is unknown. In a retrospective cohort study, we analyzed the learning curve of the initial 114 consecutive single-incision laparoendoscopic nephrectomies performed in nonselected live kidney donors. Median donor body mass index was 26 kg/m 2 (range 20-34). In all, 92% of the nephrectomies were performed on the left side; 18% of the recovered kidneys had multiple renal arteries. Cumulative sum (CUSUM) analysis of operating time (OT) demonstrated that the learning curve was achieved after case 61. For the learning curve phase (Group 1 [cases 1-61]) vs the postlearning phase (Group 2 [cases 62-114]), the difference of the mean OT was 20 minutes (p = 0.05). Mean warm ischemic time in the donors was significantly longer during the learning phase (Group 1, 6 minutes; Group 2, 5 minutes; p = 0.04). Rates of conversions to multiport procedures and of donor complications were not significantly different between Groups 1 and 2. For the recipients, we observed delayed graft function in 2 (2%) cases, no technical graft losses; and 1-year death-censored graft survival was 100% (p = n.s. for all comparisons of Group 1 vs 2). Single-incision laparoendoscopic donor nephrectomy had a long learning curve (>60 cases), but resulted in excellent donor and recipient outcomes. The long learning curve has significant implications for the programs and surgeons who contemplate transitioning from multiport to single-incision nephrectomy. Furthermore, our observations are highly relevant for informing the development of training requirements for fellows to be trained in single-incision laparoendoscopic nephrectomy.

  7. Single-incision, laparoscopic-assisted jejunal resection and anastomosis following a gunshot wound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Jacob A; Shigemoto, Reynsen; Reese, David J; Case, J Brad

    2015-01-01

    A 2 yr old castrated male Pomeranian was evaluated for a 6 wk history of chronic vomiting, intermittent anorexia, and lethargy. Physical examination revealed a palpable, nonpainful, soft-tissue mass in the midabdominal area. Abdominal radiographs and ultrasound revealed a focal, eccentric thickening of the jejunal wall with associated jejunal mural foreign body and partial mechanical obstruction. Following diagnosis of a partial intestinal obstruction as the cause of chronic vomiting, the patient underwent general anesthesia for a laparoscopic-assisted, midjejunal resection and anastomosis using a single-incision laparoscopic surgery port. The patient was discharged the day after surgery, and clinical signs abated according to information obtained during a telephone interview conducted 2 and 8 wk postoperatively. The dog described in this report is a unique case of partial intestinal obstruction treated by laparoscopic-assisted resection and anastomosis using a single-incision laparoscopic surgery port.

  8. A gross anatomic study of distal tibia and fibula for single-incision approach

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Hui; Zhao, Jie; Yu, Baoqing; Ye, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of single incision for plating for the treatment of distal tibia and fibula fractures by a gross anatomic study. Methods The anatomical structures of the anterolateral lower legs were identified. The lower leg length was measured from the top of fibular head to the tip of lateral malleolus. The distances between the extensor digitorum longus and anterior border of distal thirds of the tibia as well as the fibula were also measured. Add...

  9. Single-Incision Laparoscopic Splenectomy and Splenic Autotransplantation for an Enlarged Wandering Spleen with Torsion

    OpenAIRE

    Katsura, Shunsaku; Kawamura, Daichi; Harada, Eijiro; Enoki, Tadahiko; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2013-01-01

    A wandering spleen is a rare condition in which the spleen is not located in the left upper quadrant, but instead is found in the lower abdomen or in the pelvic region because of the laxity of the peritoneal attachments. The unusually long pedicle is susceptible to twisting, which can lead to ischemia, and eventually to necrosis. We herein report a case of an enlarged wandering spleen with torsion, successfully treated by single-incision laparoscopic splenectomy and autotransplantation. The t...

  10. No-Drain Single Incision Liposuction Pull-Through Technique for Gynecomastia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Ashraf A; Ibrahim, Amr; Afifi, Ahmed M

    2017-04-01

    Several different methods have been proposed for treatment of gynecomastia, depending on the amount of breast enlargement and skin redundancy. The liposuction pull-through technique has been proposed as an efficacious treatment for many gynecomastia cases. This work aims to study the outcome of this technique when applied as an outpatient procedure, without the use of drains and through a single incision. Fifty-two patients with bilateral gynecomastia without significant skin excess were included in this study. The liposuction pull-through technique was performed through a single incision just above the inframammary fold and without the use of drains. Patients were followed up for 6 months. The proposed technique was able to treat the gynecomastia in all patients, with a revision rate of 1.9% to remove residual glandular tissues. There were no seromas, hematomas, nipple distortion, permanent affection of nipple sensation or wound healing problems. The liposuction pull-through technique is an effective treatment for gynecomastia without significant skin redundancy. It combines the benefits of the direct excision of glandular tissues, with the minimally invasive nature of liposuction. Performing the procedure through a single incision without the use of drains and without general anesthesia is a safe alternative. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors http://www.springer.com/00266 .

  11. Review of various liver retraction techniques in single incision laparoscopic surgery for the exposure of hiatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanivelu, Praveenraj; Patil, Kedar Pratap; Parthasarathi, Ramakrishnan; Viswambharan, Jaiganesh K; Senthilnathan, Palanisami; Palanivelu, Chinnusamy

    2015-01-01

    The main aspect of concern for upper GI procedures has been the retraction of the liver especially large left lobes as commonly encountered in Bariatric surgery. Not doing so would compromise the view of the hiatus, hence theoretically reducing the quality of the surgery and increasing the possibility of complications. The aim of this study was to review the various liver retraction techniques in single incision surgery being done at our institute and analyze them. A retrospective study of the various techniques and a subsequent analysis was made based on advantages and disadvantages of each method. Objectively a quantitative measure of hiatal exposure was done using a scoring system based on the grade of exposure after reviewing the surgical videos. From January 2011 to January 2013 total 104 patients underwent single incision surgery with the various liver retraction techniques with following grades of exposure -liver suspension tube technique with naso gastric tubing (2.11) and with corrugated drain (2.09) needlescopic method (1.2), Umbilical tape sling (1.95), crural stitch method (2.5). Needeloscopic method has the best grade of exposure and is the easiest to start with. The average time to create the liver retraction was 2.8 to 8.6 min.There was no procedure related morbidity or mortality. The mentioned liver retraction techniques are cost effective and easy to learn. We recommend using these techniques to have a good exposure of hiatus, without compromising the safety of surgery in single incision surgery.

  12. Assessment of treatment options for rectosigmoid cancer: single-incision plus one port laparoscopic surgery, single-incision laparoscopic surgery, and conventional laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruoyan; Wang, Yanan; Zhang, Ze; Li, Tingting; Liu, Hao; Zhao, Liying; Deng, Haijun; Li, Guoxin

    2017-06-01

    The advantages of reduced-port laparoscopic surgery (RPLS) for rectosigmoid cancer treatment have been disputed. This study evaluated the outcomes of RPLS compared to conventional laparoscopic surgery (CLS) for rectosigmoid cancer. Data from 211 patients who underwent a selective sigmoidectomy or anterior resection from August 2011 to June 2014 at a single institution were collected and analyzed via propensity score matching. Operative outcomes, inflammatory responses, pain intensity, oncologic outcomes, quality of life, and cosmetic results were compared between groups. After matching, 96 patients (48 CLS and 48 RPLS) were evaluated. Sixteen RPLS cases underwent single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS), and 32 underwent single-incision plus one port laparoscopic surgery (SILS + 1). Baseline clinical characteristics were comparable between the RPLS and the CLS groups. Morbidity, pathologic outcomes, and 3-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates were also comparable between the 2 groups. Compared with the CLS group, the RPLS group had a shorter total incision length (p time to liquid diet (p = 0.027), ambulation (p = 0.026), and discharge (p times, C-reactive protein levels at 24 h and 96 h, and interleukin-6 levels at 24 h postoperatively were significantly lower in the SILS + 1 group than those in the CLS and SILS groups (p cosmetic results, and both groups showed better results than the CLS group (p < 0.001). RPLS for rectosigmoid cancer is feasible, with short-term safety and long-term oncological safety comparable to that of CLS. Better cosmesis and accelerated recovery can be expected. SILS + 1 is a better choice than CLS or SILS for rectosigmoid cancer because it minimizes invasiveness and reduces technical difficulties.

  13. Analysis of single-incision versus dual-incision fasciotomy for tibial fractures with acute compartment syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Jesse E; McClure, D Jake; Mir, Hassan R

    2013-11-01

    To analyze the rate of postoperative infection and nonunion after tibial fractures in patients treated for acute compartment syndrome (ACS) using (1) single-incision versus (2) dual-incision fasciotomy technique. Retrospective. Level I trauma center. Review of all adult tibial fractures operatively treated (n = 2756) over a 12-year period identified 175 patients with concurrent ACS requiring fasciotomy. Of 60 patients treated with intramedullary nails, 36 patients had single-incision fasciotomy and 24 had dual-incision fasciotomy. Of 81 patients treated with plate fixation, 59 patients had single-incision fasciotomy and 22 had dual-incision fasciotomy. Tibial fixation with fasciotomy for ACS. Occurrence of postoperative infection and nonunion. Both fasciotomy groups were similar across recorded patient and treatment characteristics. Need for skin graft was similar between fasciotomy groups. For patients treated with intramedullary nail (n = 60), 1 infection (2.8%) occurred in single-incision group versus 2 (8.3%) in dual-incision group (P = 0.558). Seven nonunions (19.4%) occurred in single-incision group versus 3 (12.5%) in dual-incision group (P = 0.726). For plate fixation patients (n = 81), 15 infections (25.4%) occurred with single-incision fasciotomy versus 5 infections (22.7%) with dual-incision fasciotomy (P = 1.000). Seven nonunions (11.9%) occurred with single-incision group versus 4 nonunions (18.2%) with dual-incision group (P = 0.479). This is the first study to compare a single-incision fasciotomy technique to a dual-incision technique in the setting of tibial fractures with ACS, with similar infection and nonunion rates with either technique. The choice of fasciotomy technique can be based on surgeon experience or patient condition as opposed to a suspected elevated infection or nonunion risk with either technique. Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  14. Review of various liver retraction techniques in single incision laparoscopic surgery for the exposure of hiatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveenraj Palanivelu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The main aspect of concern for upper GI procedures has been the retraction of the liver especially large left lobes as commonly encountered in Bariatric surgery. Not doing so would compromise the view of the hiatus, hence theoretically reducing the quality of the surgery and increasing the possibility of complications. The aim of this study was to review the various liver retraction techniques in single incision surgery being done at our institute and analyze them. Material and Methods: A retrospective study of the various techniques and a subsequent analysis was made based on advantages and disadvantages of each method. Objectively a quantitative measure of hiatal exposure was done using a scoring system based on the grade of exposure after reviewing the surgical videos. From January 2011 to January 2013 total 104 patients underwent single incision surgery with the various liver retraction techniques with following grades of exposure -liver suspension tube technique with naso gastric tubing (2.11 and with corrugated drain (2.09 needlescopic method (1.2, Umbilical tape sling (1.95, crural stitch method (2.5. Needeloscopic method has the best grade of exposure and is the easiest to start with. The average time to create the liver retraction was 2.8 to 8.6 min.There was no procedure related morbidity or mortality. Conclusions: The mentioned liver retraction techniques are cost effective and easy to learn. We recommend using these techniques to have a good exposure of hiatus, without compromising the safety of surgery in single incision surgery.

  15. Mast Quadrant-assisted Minimally Invasive Modified Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Single Incision Versus Double Incision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Lei Xia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The concept of minimally invasive techniques is to make every effort to reduce tissue damage. Certainly, reducing skin incision is an important part of these techniques. This study aimed to investigate the clinical feasibility of Mast Quadrant-assisted modified transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF with a small single posterior median incision. Methods: During the period of March 2011 to March 2012, 34 patients with single-segment degenerative lumbar disease underwent the minimally invasive modified TLIF assisted by Mast Quadrant with a small single posterior median incision (single incision group. The cases in this group were compared to 37 patients with single-segment degenerative lumbar disease in the double incision group. The perioperative conditions of patients in these two groups were statistically analyzed and compared. The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI scores, Visual Analog Scale (VAS scores, and sacrospinalis muscle damage evaluation indicators before operation and 3, 12 months postoperation were compared. Results: A total of 31 and 35 cases in the single incision and double incision groups, respectively, completed at least 12 months of systemic follow-up. The differences in perioperative conditions between the two groups were not statistically significant. The incision length of the single incision group was significantly shorter than that of the double incision group (P < 0.01. The ODI and VAS scores of patients in both groups improved significantly at 3 and 12 months postoperation. However, these two indicators at 3 and 12 months postoperation and the sacrospinalis muscle damage evaluation indicators at 3 months postoperation did not differ significantly between the two groups (P ≥ 0.05. Conclusions: Mast Quadrant-assisted modified TLIF with a small single posterior median incision has excellent clinical feasibility compared to minimally invasive TLIF with a double paramedian incision.

  16. The Evolution of the Appendectomy: From Open to Laparoscopic to Single Incision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah J. Switzer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Beginning with its initial description by Fitz in the 19th century, acute appendicitis has been a significant long-standing medical challenge; today it remains the most common gastrointestinal emergency in adults. Already in 1894, McBurney advocated for the surgical removal of the inflamed appendix and is credited with the initial description of an Open Appendectomy (OA. With the introduction of minimally invasive surgery, this classic approach evolved into a procedure with multiple, smaller incisions; a technique termed Laparoscopic Appendectomy (LA. There is much literature describing the advantages of this newer approach. To name a few, patients have significantly less wound infections, reduced pain, and a reduction in ileus compared with the OA. In the past few years, Single Incision Laparoscopic Appendectomy (SILA has gained popularity as the next major evolutionary advancement in the removal of the appendix. Described as a pioneer in the era of “scarless surgery,” it involves only one transumbilical incision. Patients are postulated to have reduced post-operative complications such as infection, hernias, and hematomas, as well as a quicker recovery time and less post-operative pain scores, in comparison to its predecessors. In this review, we explore the advancement of the appendectomy from open to laparoscopic to single incision.

  17. Single-incision versus conventional laparoscopic appendectomy in 688 patients: a retrospective comparative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hung-Hua; Hung, Chin-Sheng; Wang, Weu; Tam, Ka-Wai; Chang, Chun-Chao; Liu, Hui-Hsiung; Yen, Ko-Li; Wei, Po-Li

    2014-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic surgery has become the standard for treating appendicitis. The cosmetic benefits of using single-incision laparoscopy are well known, but its duration, complications and time to recovery have not been well documented. We compared 2 laparoscopic approaches for treating appendicitis and evaluated postoperative pain, complications and time to full recovery. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the cases of consecutive patients with appendicitis and compared those who underwent conventional laparoscopic appendectomy (CLA) performed using 3 incisions and those who underwent single-incision laparoscopic appendectomy (SILA). During SILA, the single port was prepared to increase visibility of the operative site. Results Our analysis included 688 consecutive patients: 618 who underwent CLA and 70 who underwent SILA. Postsurgical complications occurred more frequently in the CLA than the SILA group (18.1% v. 7.1%, p = 0.018). Patients who underwent SILA returned to oral feeding sooner than those who underwent CLA (median 12 h v. 22 h, p cosmetic advantages, SILA led to rapid recovery and no increase in postsurgical pain or complications. PMID:24869622

  18. [Drainage of amoebic liver abscess by single incision laparoscopic surgery. Report of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telich-Tarriba, José Eduardo; Parrao-Alcántara, Iris Jocelyn; Montes-Hernández, Jesús Manuel; Vega-Pérez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Single incision laparoscopic surgery has increased recently due to successful results, achieved in several procedures. The aim of the present work is to present the first case in which single incision laparoscopy is used for the drainage of an amoebic liver abscess. A 44-year-old man presented with intense right upper quadrant pain, generalised jaundice, tachycardia, fever, hepatomegaly and a positive Murphy's sign. Laboratory results revealed an increased plasma bilirubin, elevated alkaline phosphatase and transaminases, leucocytosis, negative viral panel for hepatitis, and positive antibodies against Entamoeba histolytica. On an abdominal computed tomography a 15 × 12.1 cm hypodense lesion was observed in the patient's liver, identified as an amoebic liver abscess. Analgesics and antibiotics were started and subsequently the patient was submitted to laparoscopic drainage of the abscess using a single port approach. Drainage and irrigation of the abscess was performed. Four days later the patient was discharged without complications. Management of amoebic liver abscess is focused on the elimination of the infectious agent and obliteration of the abscess cavity in order to prevent its complications, especially rupture. Laparoscopic surgery has proved to be a safe and effective way to manage this entity. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  19. A novel locally operated master-slave robot system for single-incision laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horise, Yuki; Matsumoto, Toshinobu; Ikeda, Hiroki; Nakamura, Yuta; Yamasaki, Makoto; Sawada, Genta; Tsukao, Yukiko; Nakahara, Yujiro; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Takiguchi, Shuji; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Miyazaki, Fumio; Sekimoto, Mitsugu; Kawai, Toshikazu; Nishikawa, Atsushi

    2014-12-01

    Single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) provides more cosmetic benefits than conventional laparoscopic surgery but presents operational difficulties. To overcome this technical problem, we have developed a locally operated master-slave robot system that provides operability and a visual field similar to conventional laparoscopic surgery. A surgeon grasps the master device with the left hand, which is placed above the abdominal wall, and holds a normal instrument with the right hand. A laparoscope, a slave robot, and the right-sided instrument are inserted through one incision. The slave robot is bent in the body cavity and its length, pose, and tip angle are changed by manipulating the master device; thus the surgeon has almost the same operability as with normal laparoscopic surgery. To evaluate our proposed system, we conducted a basic task and an ex vivo experiment. In basic task experiments, the average object-passing task time was 9.50 sec (SILS cross), 22.25 sec (SILS parallel), and 7.23 sec (proposed SILS). The average number of instrument collisions was 3.67 (SILS cross), 14 (SILS parallel), and 0.33 (proposed SILS). In the ex vivo experiment, we confirmed the applicability of our system for single-port laparoscopic cholecystectomy. We demonstrated that our proposed robot system is useful for single-incision laparoscopic surgery.

  20. Single Incision Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy by Using a 2 mm Atraumatic Grasper without Trocar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Gulpinar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We present our experience in single incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy by using a grasper directly without using a trocar in five patients. Methods and Results. The technique involves the use of Karl Storz 27290F grasper in order to perform gallbladder retraction in single port cholecystectomy. The grasper was introduced directly into the skin through abdominal wall without using any trocar and used to mobilize gallbladder whenever needed during surgery without causing any perforation or leakage of the gallbladder. There were no intraoperative and postoperative complications in 5 patients with the advantages of shorter operation time and almost invisible postoperative skin scar formation. Conclusion. We claim that the use of this instrument in SILS surgery might be advantageous than the conventional placement of sutures for the gallbladder mobilization.

  1. Single-incision Laparoscopic Surgery (SILS) in general surgery: a review of current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froghi, Farid; Sodergren, Mikael Hans; Darzi, Ara; Paraskeva, Paraskevas

    2010-08-01

    Single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) aims to eliminate multiple port incisions. Although general operative principles of SILS are similar to conventional laparoscopic surgery, operative techniques are not standardized. This review aims to evaluate the current use of SILS published in the literature by examining the types of operations performed, techniques employed, and relevant complications and morbidity. This review considered a total of 94 studies reporting 1889 patients evaluating 17 different general surgical operations. There were 8 different access techniques reported using conventional laparoscopic instruments and specifically designed SILS ports. There is extensive heterogeneity associated with operating methods and in particular ways of overcoming problems with retraction and instrumentation. Published complications, morbidity, and hospital length of stay are comparable to conventional laparoscopy. Although SILS provides excellent cosmetic results and morbidity seems similar to conventional laparoscopy, larger randomized controlled trials are needed to assess the safety and efficacy of this novel technique.

  2. Single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy for cholecystitis requiring percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igami, Tsuyoshi; Aoba, Taro; Ebata, Tomoki; Yokoyama, Yukihiro; Sugawara, Gen; Nagino, Masato

    2015-03-01

    Single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy (SILC) has been performed for patients with gallbladder stones but without acute cholecystitis. We report our experience of performing SILC for patients with cholecystitis requiring percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder drainage (PTGBD). We performed SILC via an SILS-Port with additional 5-mm forceps through an umbilical incision in ten patients with cholecystitis requiring PTGBD. All procedures were completed successfully. The mean operative time was 124 min (range 78-169 min) and there were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. The mean postoperative hospital stay was 2.7 days. All patients were satisfied with the cosmetic results. Our procedure may represent an alternative to conventional laparoscopic cholecystectomy (CLC) for patients who fervently demand the cosmetic advantages, despite cholecystitis requiring PTGBD. SILC should be performed carefully to avoid bile duct injury because the only advantage of SILC over CLC is cosmetic.

  3. Single-incision laparoscopic splenectomy and splenic autotransplantation for an enlarged wandering spleen with torsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsura, Shunsaku; Kawamura, Daichi; Harada, Eijiro; Enoki, Tadahiko; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2014-06-01

    A wandering spleen is a rare condition in which the spleen is not located in the left upper quadrant, but instead is found in the lower abdomen or in the pelvic region because of the laxity of the peritoneal attachments. The unusually long pedicle is susceptible to twisting, which can lead to ischemia, and eventually to necrosis. We herein report a case of an enlarged wandering spleen with torsion, successfully treated by single-incision laparoscopic splenectomy and autotransplantation. The transplanted splenic tissues could be identified on a spleen scintigram obtained 3 months after the surgery. Howell-Jolly bodies were not observed in blood specimens. This procedure is able to prevent an overwhelming postsplenectomy infection, and leads to satisfactory cosmetic results.

  4. Transobturator Midurethral Slings versus Single-Incision Slings for Stress Incontinence in Overweight Patients

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    Omer Bayrak

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurpose:To compare transobturator midurethral sling (TOS and single-incision sling procedures in terms of their effects on urinary incontinence and the quality of life in overweight (BMI ≥25-29.9 kg/m2 female patients using the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire scoring form (ICIQ-SF and Quality of Life of Persons with Urinary Incontinence scoring form (I-QOL.Materials and Methods:In this prospective trial, the patients were divided into two groups consecutively; first 20 overweight female patients underwent the TOS (Unitape T®,Promedon, Cordoba, Argentina procedure and the subsequent 20 consecutive overweight female patients underwent the single-incision sling [TVT-secur (Ethicon Inc., Sommerville, USA] procedure. Age, urinary incontinence period, parity and daily pads usage were recorded. No usage of pads was defined as subjective cure rate postoperatively. Before the operation and 6. month after the surgery, the patients completed the ICIQ-SF and I-QOL.Results:There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of mean age, duration of incontinence, parity, and BMI (p>0.05. ICIQ-SF and I-QOL revealed that the patients in the TOS group showed significantly better improvement (76.20% versus 64.10%, p=0.001, 81.31% versus 69.28%, p=0.001, respectively. In addition, subjective cure rates were found higher in TOS group (75% versus 55%, p=0.190.Conclusions:The existing data is showed that incontinence symptoms and the quality of life have higher improvement in overweight female patients who underwent the TOS procedure. It is likely that the TOS procedure may provide stronger urethral support and better contributes to continence in this group of patients.

  5. Hybrid Single-Incision Laparoscopic Colon Cancer Surgery Using One Additional 5 mm Trocar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Ook; Choi, Dae Jin; Lee, Donghyoun; Lee, Sung Ryol; Jung, Kyung Uk; Kim, Hungdai; Chun, Ho-Kyung

    2018-02-01

    Single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) is a feasible and safe procedure for colorectal cancer. However, SILS has some technical limitations such as collision between instruments and inadequate countertraction. We present a hybrid single-incision laparoscopic surgery (hybrid SILS) technique for colon cancer that involves use of one additional 5 mm trocar. Hybrid SILS for colon cancer was attempted in 70 consecutive patients by a single surgeon between August 2014 and July 2016 at Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine. Using prospectively collected data, an observational study was performed on an intention-to-treat basis. Hybrid SILS was technically completed in 66 patients, with a failure rate of 5.7% (4/70). One patient was converted to open surgery for para-aortic lymph node dissection. Another was converted to open surgery due to severe peritoneal adhesion. An additional trocar was inserted for adhesiolysis in the other two cases. Median lengths of proximal and distal margins were 12.8 cm (interquartile range [IQR], 10.0-18.6), and 8.2 cm (IQR, 5.5-18.3), respectively. Median total number of lymph nodes harvested was 24 (IQR, 18-33). Overall rate of postoperative morbidity was 12.9%, but there were no Clavien-Dindo grade III or IV complications. There was no postoperative mortality or reoperation. Median postoperative hospital stay was 6 days (IQR, 5-7). Hybrid SILS using one additional 5 mm trocar is a safe and effective minimally invasive surgical technique for colon cancer. Experienced laparoscopic surgeons can perform hybrid SILS without a learning curve based on the formulaic surgical techniques presented in this article.

  6. Single incision multi-trocar hepatic cyst excision with partial splenectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palanivelu Chinnusamy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgery has the potential to remove the entire hydatid cyst and can lead to complete cure. Presence of hydatid cysts in multiple abdominal organs imposes special challenges for laparoscopic management. The patient position and port placement for one organ may not be adequate for other and proper exposure in hydatid cyst is of paramount importance to prevent spillage and complete removal of the cyst. Single incision multi-trocar technique has a unique advantage of allowing surgeon to work in different quadrants of abdomen using the same incision and ports. We report in this paper the first Laparo-endoscopic single-site hepatic cyst excision with partial splenectomy for hydatid cyst in liver and spleen using conventional laparoscopic instruments. Patient and Technique: The procedure was performed on a 64 year old female diagnosed to have Hydatid cyst in segment VIII of liver and another cyst in lower pole of spleen a transverse 3 cm incision was made 6 cm above umbilicus and was deepened up to fascia. Two 10mm and one 5mm ports were inserted. Procedure was completed in 160 minutes without any intra-operative complication. There were no post-operative complication and patient was discharged on day 5. Conclusion: Single incision multi-trocar surgery has cosmetic advantage over standard laparoscopic approach. It is even more marked when two procedures are combined in different quadrants of abdomen. As this is a rare combination procedure so it remains to be determined if this technique offers additional advantages of decreased analgesia, decreased hospital stay or cost effectiveness.

  7. Single incision multi-trocar hepatic cyst excision with partial splenectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnusamy, Palanivelu; Ahluwalia, Jasmeet Singh; Palanisamy, Senthilnathan; Seshiyer, Rajan Pidigu

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Surgery has the potential to remove the entire hydatid cyst and can lead to complete cure. Presence of hydatid cysts in multiple abdominal organs imposes special challenges for laparoscopic management. The patient position and port placement for one organ may not be adequate for other and proper exposure in hydatid cyst is of paramount importance to prevent spillage and complete removal of the cyst. Single incision multi-trocar technique has a unique advantage of allowing surgeon to work in different quadrants of abdomen using the same incision and ports. We report in this paper the first Laparo-endoscopic single-site hepatic cyst excision with partial splenectomy for hydatid cyst in liver and spleen using conventional laparoscopic instruments. PATIENT AND TECHNIQUE: The procedure was performed on a 64 year old female diagnosed to have Hydatid cyst in segment VIII of liver and another cyst in lower pole of spleen a transverse 3 cm incision was made 6 cm above umbilicus and was deepened up to fascia. Two 10mm and one 5mm ports were inserted. Procedure was completed in 160 minutes without any intra-operative complication. There were no post-operative complication and patient was discharged on day 5. CONCLUSION: Single incision multi-trocar surgery has cosmetic advantage over standard laparoscopic approach. It is even more marked when two procedures are combined in different quadrants of abdomen. As this is a rare combination procedure so it remains to be determined if this technique offers additional advantages of decreased analgesia, decreased hospital stay or cost effectiveness. PMID:23741118

  8. Feasibility of single-incision laparoscopic surgery for appendicitis in abnormal anatomical locations: A single surgeon′s initial experience

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    Sanoop K Zachariah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Single-incision laparoscopic surgery is considered as a more technically demanding procedure than the standard laparoscopic surgery. Based on an initial and early experience, single-incision laparoscopic appendectomy (LA was found to be technically advantageous for dealing with appendicitis in unusual anatomical locations. This study aims to highlight the technical advantages of single-incision laparoscopic surgery in dealing with the abnormally located appendixes and furthermore report a case of acute appendicitis occurring in a sub-gastric position, which is probably the first such case to be reported in English literature. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of the first 10 cases of single-incision LA which were performed by a single surgeon is presented here. Results: There were seven females and three males. The mean age of the patients was 30.6 (range 18-52 years, mean BMI was 22.7 (range 17-28 kg/m 2 and the mean operative time was 85.5 (range 45-150 min. The mean postoperative stay was 3.6 (range 1-7 days. The commonest position of the appendix was retro-caecal (50% followed by pelvic (30%. In three cases the appendix was found to be in abnormal locations namely sub-hepatic, sub-gastric and deep pelvic or para-vesical or para-rectal. All these cases could be managed with this technique without any conversions Conclusion: Single-incision laparoscopic surgery appears to be a feasible and safe technique for dealing with appendicitis in rare anatomical locations. Appendectomy may be a suitable procedure for the initial training in single-incision laparoscopic surgery.

  9. Single-incision laparoscopic distal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer through a homemade single port access device.

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    Jiang, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Shu; Wang, Gang; Zhao, Kun; Liu, Jiang; Ning, Li; Li, Jieshou

    2015-01-01

    We presented a series of single-incision laparoscopic distal gastrectomies for early gastric cancer patients through a type of homemade single port access device and some other conventional laparoscopic instruments. A single-incision laparoscopic distal gastrectomy with D1 + α lymph node dissection was performed on a 46 years old male patient who had an early gastric cancer. This single port access device has facilitated the conventional laparoscopic instruments to accomplish the surgery and we made in only 6 minutes. Total operating time for this surgery was 240 minutes. During the operation, there were about 100 milliliters of blood loss, and 17 lymph-nodes were retrieved. This homemade single port access device shows its superiority in economy and convenience for complex single-incision surgeries. Single-incision laparoscopic distal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer can be conducted by experienced laparoscopic surgeons. Fully take advantage of both SILS and fast track surgery plan can bring to successful surgeries with minimal postoperative pain, quicker mobilization, early recovery of intestinal function, and better cosmesis effect for the patients.

  10. Single-incision video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery left-lower lobe anterior segmentectomy (S8).

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    Galvez, Carlos; Lirio, Francisco; Sesma, Julio; Baschwitz, Benno; Bolufer, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Unusual anatomical segmentectomies are technically demanding procedures that require a deep knowledge of intralobar anatomy and surgical skill. In the other hand, these procedures preserve more normal lung parenchyma for lesions located in specific anatomical segments, and are indicated for benign lesions, metastasis and also early stage adenocarcinomas without nodal involvement. A 32-year-old woman was diagnosed of a benign pneumocytoma in the anterior segment of the left-lower lobe (S8, LLL), so we performed a single-incision video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (SI-VATS) anatomical S8 segmentectomy in 140 minutes under intercostal block. There were no intraoperative neither postoperative complications, the chest tube was removed at 24 hours and the patient discharged at 5 th postoperative day with low pain on the visual analogue scale (VAS). Final pathologic exam reported a benign sclerosant pneumocytoma with free margins. The patient has recovered her normal activities at 3 months completely with radiological normal controls at 1 and 3 months.

  11. Single-Incision Laparoscopic Colectomy for Cancer: Short-Term Outcomes and Comparative Analysis

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    Rodrigo Pedraza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Single-incision laparoscopic colectomy (SILC is a viable and safe technique; however, there are no single-institution studies comparing outcomes of SILC for colon cancer with well-established minimally invasive techniques. We evaluated the short-term outcomes following SILC for cancer compared to a group of well-established minimally invasive techniques. Methods. Fifty consecutive patients who underwent SILC for colon cancer were compared to a control group composed of 50 cases of minimally invasive colectomies performed with either conventional multiport or hand-assisted laparoscopic technique. The groups were paired based on the type of procedure. Demographics, intraoperative, and postoperative outcomes were assessed. Results. With the exception of BMI, demographics were similar between both groups. Most of the procedures were right colectomies ( and anterior resections (. There were no significant differences in operative time (127.9 versus 126.7 min, conversions (0 versus 1, complications (14% versus 8%, length of stay (4.5 versus 4.0 days, readmissions (2% versus 2%, and reoperations (2% versus 2%. Oncological outcomes were also similar between groups. Conclusions. SILC is an oncologically sound alternative for the management of colon cancer and results in similar short-term outcomes as compared with well-established minimally invasive techniques.

  12. Multipurpose internal retractor for Single-incision surgery (SIS): single-institution case series.

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    Galvani, Carlos A; Garza, Ulises; Echeverria, Angela; Kaul, Amit; Samamé, Julia

    2014-04-01

    Single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SIS) is less invasive than standard laparoscopic surgery; however, it is more difficult due to restriction of motion and the impossibility to use assistants. To overcome these obstacles, we developed a self-sustaining multipurpose internal retractor by attaching a Lone Star retractor hook to a laparoscopic bulldog clamp. Herein, we report our SIS experience using our novel retractor. Between October 2008 and April 2011, 104 patients underwent SIS using the internal retractor: 67 bandings (43% simultaneous hiatal hernia repair), 8 sleeve gastrectomies, 27 cholecystectomies, and 2 Nissen fundoplication. Mean age was 40 (range, 21 to 85) and mean body mass index was 40 kg/m (range, 20 to 64 kg/m). No intraoperative complications were observed from the use of the retractor but 2 cases required additional retraction due to liver size. This retractor has been successfully used for different SIS procedures showing to be safe, adaptable, and easy to use, lessening some challenges of SIS.

  13. First Canadian experience with robotic single-incision pyeloplasty: Comparison with multi-incision technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Jeffrey; Rowe, Neal; Archambault, Jason; Nastis, Sofia; Sener, Alp; Luke, Patrick P

    2016-01-01

    We compared the outcomes of single-incision, robot-assisted laparoscopic pyeloplasty vs. multiple-incision pyeloplasty using the da Vinci robotic system. We reviewed all consecutive robotic pyeloplasties by a single surgeon from January 2011 to August 2015. A total of 30 procedures were performed (16 single:14 multi-port). Two different single-port devices were compared: the GelPort (Applied Medical, Rancho Santa Margarita, CA) and the Intuitive single-site access port (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA). Patient demographics were similar between the two groups. Mean operating time was similar among the single and multi-port groups (225.2 min vs. 198.9 minutes [p=0.33]). There was no significant difference in length of hospital stay in either group (86.2 hr vs. 93.2 hr [p=0.76]). There was no difference in success rates or postoperative complications among groups. Single-port robotic pyeloplasty is non-inferior to multiple-incision robotic surgery in terms of operative times, hospitalization time, success rates, and complications. Verifying these results with larger cohorts is required prior to the wide adoption of this technique. Ongoing objective measurements of cosmesis and patient satisfaction are being evaluated.

  14. Physical and mental workload in single-incision laparoscopic surgery and conventional laparoscopy.

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    Koca, Dilek; Yıldız, Sedat; Soyupek, Feray; Günyeli, İlker; Erdemoglu, Ebru; Soyupek, Sedat; Erdemoglu, Evrim

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate mental workload and fatigue in fingers, hand, arm, shoulder in single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) and multiport laparoscopy. Volunteers performed chosen tasks by standard laparoscopy and SILS. Time to complete tasks and finger and hand strength were evaluated. Lateral, tripod, and pulp pinch strengths were measured. Hand dexterity was determined by pegboard. Electromyography recordings were taken from biceps and deltoid muscles of both extremities. The main outcome measurement was median frequency (MF) slope. NASA-TLX was used for mental workload. Time to complete laparoscopic tasks were longer in the SILS group (P laparoscopy. Pegboard time was increased in both hands after SILS (P laparoscopy was close to reference slope, indicating there was more fatigue in biceps and deltoid muscles of both upper extremities in SILS group. NASA-TLX score was 73 ± 13.3 and 42 ± 19.5 in SILS and multiport laparoscopy, respectively (P laparoscopy (P < .01). SILS is mentally and physically demanding, particularly on arms and shoulders. Fatigue of big muscles, effort, and frustration were major challenges of SILS. Ergonomic intervention of instruments are needed to decrease mental and physical workload. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Randomized Trial of Immediate Postoperative Pain Following Single-incision Versus Traditional Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Liu, Yang; Han, Wei; Liu, Jun; Jin, Lan; Li, Jian-She; Zhang, Zhong-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Background: We undertook a randomized controlled trial to ascertain if single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy (SILC) was more beneficial for reducing postoperative pain than traditional laparoscopic cholecystectomy (TLC). Moreover, the influencing factors of SILC were analyzed. Methods: A total of 552 patients with symptomatic gallstones or polyps were allocated randomly to undergo SILC (n = 138) or TLC (n = 414). Data on postoperative pain score, operative time, complications, procedure conversion, and hospital costs were collected. After a 6-month follow-up, all data were analyzed using the intention-to-treat principle. Results: Among SILC group, 4 (2.9%) cases required conversion to TLC. Mean operative time of SILC was significantly longer than that of TLC (58.97 ± 21.56 vs. 43.38 ± 19.02 min, P 5 (≥100 min: 5/7 patients vs. <40 min, 3/16 patients, P = 0.015). Conclusions: The primary benefit of SILC appears to be slightly less pain immediately after surgery. Surgeon training seems to be important because the shorter operative time for SILC may elicit less pain immediately after surgery. PMID:26668145

  16. Randomized Trial of Immediate Postoperative Pain Following Single-incision Versus Traditional Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

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    Wei Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We undertook a randomized controlled trial to ascertain if single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy (SILC was more beneficial for reducing postoperative pain than traditional laparoscopic cholecystectomy (TLC. Moreover, the influencing factors of SILC were analyzed. Methods: A total of 552 patients with symptomatic gallstones or polyps were allocated randomly to undergo SILC (n = 138 or TLC (n = 414. Data on postoperative pain score, operative time, complications, procedure conversion, and hospital costs were collected. After a 6-month follow-up, all data were analyzed using the intention-to-treat principle. Results: Among SILC group, 4 (2.9% cases required conversion to TLC. Mean operative time of SILC was significantly longer than that of TLC (58.97 ± 21.56 vs. 43.38 ± 19.02 min, P 5 (≥100 min: 5/7 patients vs. <40 min, 3/16 patients, P = 0.015. Conclusions: The primary benefit of SILC appears to be slightly less pain immediately after surgery. Surgeon training seems to be important because the shorter operative time for SILC may elicit less pain immediately after surgery.

  17. SILC for SILC: Single Institution Learning Curve for Single-Incision Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

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    Chee Wei Tay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. We report the single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy (SILC learning experience of 2 hepatobiliary surgeons and the factors that could influence the learning curve of SILC. Methods. Patients who underwent SILC by Surgeons A and B were studied retrospectively. Operating time, conversion rate, reason for conversion, identity of first assistants, and their experience with previous laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC were analysed. CUSUM analysis is used to identify learning curve. Results. Hundred and nineteen SILC cases were performed by Surgeons A and B, respectively. Eight cases required additional port. In CUSUM analysis, most conversion occurred during the first 19 cases. Operating time was significantly lower (62.5 versus 90.6 min, P = 0.04 after the learning curve has been overcome. Operating time decreases as the experience increases, especially Surgeon B. Most conversions are due to adhesion at Calot’s triangle. Acute cholecystitis, patients’ BMI, and previous surgery do not seem to influence conversion rate. Mean operating times of cases assisted by first assistant with and without LC experience were 48 and 74 minutes, respectively (P = 0.004. Conclusion. Nineteen cases are needed to overcome the learning curve of SILC. Team work, assistant with CLC experience, and appropriate equipment and technique are the important factors in performing SILC.

  18. Single incision laparoscopic-assisted intestinal surgery (SILAIS) in 7 dogs and 1 cat.

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    Case, J Brad; Ellison, Gary

    2013-06-01

    To describe the clinical findings and short-term outcome in 7 dogs and 1 cat undergoing single-incision laparoscopic-assisted intestinal surgery (SILAIS) using an SILS™ or EndoCone™ port. Prospective case series. Dogs (n = 7) and cat (n = 1). An SILS™ port using three 5-mm instrument cannulas or EndoCone™ port was used to perform an initial limited laparoscopic abdominal exploration. The stomach and descending duodenum were explored intracorporeally and the jejunum through orad descending colon was explored extracorporeally. All intestinal procedures (enterotomy, biopsy, resection, and anastomosis) were performed extracorporeally. Omentalization of affected bowel was accomplished either intracorporeally or extracorporeally. Short-term outcome was determined. SILAIS was completed successfully in all but 1 dog and all animals had a good short-term outcome. Most (n = 5) animals were discharged the day after surgery. SILAIS was performed in a median of 120 minutes (interquartile range; 82-148 minutes) and was associated with a moderate level of difficulty. No major complications occurred but conversion to celiotomy (n = 1) and enlargement of the incision (n = 3) was required because of inability to exteriorize the affected bowel. SILAIS using an SILS™ or EndoCone™ port in dogs and cats is feasible and appears effective in selected cases. Single portal laparoscopic-assisted intestinal surgery might be an effective method of minimizing morbidity in dogs and cats with uncomplicated intestinal disease. © Copyright 2013 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  19. Single-incision laparoscopic surgery in a survival animal model using a transabdominal magnetic anchoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yong Beom; Park, Chan Ho; Kim, Hee Cheol; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Lee, Woo Yong; Chun, Ho-Kyung

    2011-12-01

    Though single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) can reduce operative scarring and facilitates postoperative recovery, it does have some limitations, such as reduction in instrument working, difficulty in triangulation, and collision of instruments. To overcome these limitations, development of new instruments is needed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and safety of a magnetic anchoring system in performing SILS ileocecectomy. Experiments were performed in a living dog model. Five dogs (26.3-29.2 kg) underwent ileocecectomy using a multichannel single port (OCTO port; Darim, Seoul, Korea). The port was inserted at the umbilicus and maintained a CO(2) pneumoperitoneum. Two magnet-fixated vascular clips were attached to the colon using an endoclip applicator, and it was held together across the abdominal wall by using an external handheld magnet. The cecum was then retracted in an upward direction by moving the external handheld magnet, and the mesocolon was dissected with Ultracision(®). Extracorporeal functional end-to-end anastomosis was done using a linear stapler. All animals survived during the observational period of 2 weeks, and then re-exploration was performed under general anesthesia for evaluation of intra-abdominal healing and complications. Mean operation time was 70 min (range 55-100 min), with each subsequent case taking less time. The magnetic anchoring system was effective in achieving adequate exposure in all cases. All animals survived and convalesced normally without evidence of clinical complication during the observation period. At re-exploration, all anastomoses were completely healed and there were no complications such as abscess, bleeding or organ injury. SILS ileocecectomy using a magnetic anchoring system was safe and effective in a dog model. The development of magnetic anchoring systems may be beneficial for overcoming the limitations of SILS.

  20. Single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) in gynaecology: feasibility and operative outcomes.

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    Behnia-Willison, Fariba; Foroughinia, Leila; Sina, Maryam; McChesney, Phil

    2012-08-01

    Single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) represents the latest advancement in minimally invasive surgery, combining the benefits of conventional laparoscopic surgery, such as less pain and faster recovery, with improved cosmesis. Although the successful use of this technique is well reported in general surgery and urology, there is a lack of studies on SILS in gynaecology. To evaluate the feasibility, safety, cosmesis and outcome of SILS in gynaecology. A prospective case series analysis of 105 women scheduled to undergo surgery by SILS from August 2010 to November 2011. Intra-operative data such as operative time, estimated blood loss, complications, additional ports and hospital stay were collected. Post-operative pain and cosmetic outcomes (scar size) were also recorded. Out of 105 women, SILS was performed for 84 (60 excisions of endometriosis, 13 divisions of adhesions, five hysterectomies, two mesh sacrohysteropexies and four ovarian cystectomies). SILS was not undertaken for 21 women because of a number of factors, including the lack of required equipment (eg bariatric scope, SILS port, roticulating instruments and diathermy leads). Four women required insertion of additional ports because of surgical difficulties. One intra-operative (uterine perforation) and seven post-operative complications (six wound infections and one vault haematoma) occurred. Mean operation times were as follows: mesh sacrohysteropexy - 60 min, excision of endometriosis - 55 min, hysterectomy - 150 min, laparoscopic division of adhesions - 62 min and ovarian cystectomy - 40 min. Our experience shows that SILS is a feasible and safe technique for the surgical management of various gynaecological conditions. Satisfaction is high because of improved cosmesis and reduced analgesic requirements post-operatively. © 2012 The Authors ANZJOG © 2012 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  1. Transumbilical single incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy with conventional instruments: A continuing study

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    Rajeev Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The feasibility of the single incision, multiport transumbilical approach(SILC for the treatment of symptomatic gallbladder calculus disease has been established. Aims: The study examines both short and long term morbidity of the SILC approach. Materials and Methods: All the 1338 patients were operated by the same surgeon through a transversely placed umbilical incision in the upper third of the umbilicus.Three conventional ports,10,5 and 5 mm were introduced through the same skin incision but through separate transfascial punctures.The instruments were those used for standard laparoscopic cholecystectomy(SLC.Patients with acute cholecystitis and calculous pancreatitis were included,while those with choledocholithiasis were excluded.Results were compared with those of SLC. Results: Forty patients had difficult gall bladders, 214 had acute cholecystitis, and 16 had calculous pancreatitis.The mean operating time was 24.7 mins as compared to 18.4 mins in SLC. Intracorporeal knotting was required in four patients. Conversion to SLC was required in 12 patients.Morrisons pouch drain was left in 3 patients.Injectable analgesics were required in 85% vs 90% (SILC vs SLC on day 1 and 25% vs 45% on day 2 and infection was seen in 6(0. 45% patients.Port site hernia was seen in 2 patients. The data was compared with that of SLC and significance calculated by the student ′t′ test. A p value less than 0.05 was considered as significant. Conclusions: Trans umbilical SILC gives comparable results to SLC, and is a superior alternative when cosmesis and postoperative pain are considered, but the operative time is significantly more.

  2. Single Incision Distal Biceps Repair With Hemi-Krackow Suture Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goljan, Peter; Patel, Nimit; Stull, Justin D.; Donnelly, Brandon P.; Culp, Randall W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many surgical methods exist for distal biceps repair. We present the technique and early outcomes of a series of distal biceps repairs completed with a novel suturing technique utilizing a hemi-Krackow locking stitch at the tendon-bone interface. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of patients who underwent primary distal biceps repair using a single anterior incision with 2 suture anchors utilizing a hemi-Krackow stitch. With both anchors, a locking stitch along the tendon edge was complimented by the other strand passing through the central aspect of the distal tendon and advanced to pull the tendon edge down to the bone with appropriate tension. Patients with revision surgery and the use of allograft were excluded. Clinical outcomes included elbow range of motion and grip strength. All patients completed a Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (QuickDASH) questionnaire and reported satisfaction level, pain level, and any postoperative complications. Results: Fourteen patients with an average age of 51.3 years (range, 27.8-66.4 years) were included in the study. The dominant arm was injured in 9 cases. At an average of 16.4 months’ follow-up (range, 6.8-34.3 months), all patients had elbow range of motion of 0° to >130°, and grip strength was 101.5% of the uninjured arm (range, 70.6%-121.4%). The Average QuickDASH score was 6.5 (range, 0-36.5). Conclusion: Single incision biceps repair with suture anchor fixation using our hemi-Krackow stitch provided a strong repair allowing easy tensioning of the biceps tendon to bone and showed satisfactory functional outcomes at early follow-up. No patients required revision surgery, and there was only 1 case of transient nerve complaints. PMID:27390570

  3. A Comparative Study of Single Incision versus Conventional Four Ports Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajong, Ranendra; Hajong, Debobratta; Natung, Tanie; Anand, Madhur; Sharma, Girish

    2016-10-01

    Cholelithiasis is one of the most common disorders of the digestive tract encountered by general surgeons worldwide. Conventional or open cholecystectomy was the mainstay of treatment for a long time for this disease. In the 1980s laparoscopic surgery revolutionized the management of biliary tract diseases. It brought about a revolutionary change in the basic concepts of surgical principles and minimal access surgery gradually started to be acknowledged as a safe means of carrying out surgeries. To investigate the technical feasibility, safety and benefit of Single Incision Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy (SILC) versus Conventional Four Port Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy (C4PLC). This prospective randomized control trial was conducted to compare the advantages if any between the SILC and C4PLC. Thirty two patients underwent SILC procedure and C4PLC, each. The age of the patients ranged from 16-60years. Other demographic data and indications for cholecystectomy were comparable in both the groups. Simple comparative statistical analysis was carried out in the present study. Results on continuous variables are shown in Mean ± SD; whereas results on categorical variables are shown in percentage (%) by keeping the level of significance at 5%. Intergroup analysis of the various study parameters was done by using Fisher exact test. SPSS version 22 was used for statistical analysis. The mean operating time was higher in the SILC group (69 ± 4.00 mins vs. 38.53 ± 4.00 mins) which was of statistical significance (p=post-operative pain, with lesser analgesic requirements (p=operating time was longer otherwise it has almost similar clinical outcomes to those of C4PLC.

  4. Video. Chopstick surgery: a novel technique enables use of the Da Vinci Robot to perform single-incision laparoscopic surgery.

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    Joseph, R A; Salas, N A; Johnson, C; Goh, A; Cuevas, S P; Donovan, M A; Kaufman, M G; Miles, B; Reardon, P R; Bass, B L; Dunkin, B J

    2010-12-01

    Single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) is limited by the coaxial arrangement of the instruments. A surgical robot with "wristed" instruments could overcome this limitation but the "arms" collide when working coaxially. This video demonstrates a new technique of "chopstick surgery," which enables use of the robotic arms through a single incision without collision. Experiments were conducted utilizing the da Vinci S® robot (Sunnyvale, CA) in a porcine model with three laparoscopic ports (12 mm, 2-5 mm) introduced through a single "incision." Pilot work conducted while performing Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS) tasks determined the optimal setup for SILS to be a triangular port arrangement with 2-cm trocar distance and remote center at the abdominal wall. Using this setup, an experienced robotic surgeon performed a cholecystectomy and nephrectomy in a porcine model utilizing the "chopstick" technique. The chopstick arrangement crosses the instruments at the abdominal wall so that the right instrument is on the left side of the target and the left instrument on the right. This arrangement prevents collision of the external robotic arms. To correct for the change in handedness, the robotic console is instructed to drive the "left" instrument with the right hand effector and the "right" instrument with the left. Both procedures were satisfactorily completed with no external collision of the robotic arms, in acceptable times and with no technical complications. This is consistent with results obtained in the box trainer where the chopstick configuration enabled significantly improved times in all tasks and decreased number of errors and eliminated instrument collisions. Chopstick surgery significantly enhances the functionality of the surgical robot when working through a small single incision. This technique will enable surgeons to utilize the robot for SILS and possibly for intraluminal or transluminal surgery.

  5. "Chopstick" surgery: a novel technique improves surgeon performance and eliminates arm collision in robotic single-incision laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Rohan A; Goh, Alvin C; Cuevas, Sebastian P; Donovan, Michael A; Kauffman, Matthew G; Salas, Nilson A; Miles, Brian; Bass, Barbara L; Dunkin, Brian J

    2010-06-01

    Single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) is limited by the coaxial arrangement of the instruments. A surgical robot with wristed instruments could overcome this limitation, but the arms often collide when working coaxially. This study tests a new technique of "chopstick" surgery to enable use of the robotic arms through a single incision without collision. Experiments were conducted utilizing the da Vinci S robot (Intuitive Surgical, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA) in a Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS) box trainer with three laparoscopic ports (1 x 12 mm, 2 x 5 mm) introduced through a single "incision." Pilot work determined the optimal setup for SILS to be a triangular port arrangement with 2-cm trocar distance and remote center at the abdominal wall. Using this setup, five experienced robotic surgeons performed three FLS tasks utilizing either a standard robotic arm setup or the chopstick technique. The chopstick arrangement crosses the instruments at the abdominal wall so that the right instrument is on the left side of the target and the left instrument on the right. This results in separation of the robotic arms outside the box. To correct for the change in handedness, the robotic console is instructed to drive the "left" instrument with the right-hand effector and the "right" instrument with the left. Performances were compared while measuring time, errors, number of clutching maneuvers, and degree of instrument collision (Likert scale 1-4). Compared with the standard setup, the chopstick configuration increased surgeon dexterity and global performance through significantly improved performance times, eliminating instrument collision, and decreasing number of camera manipulations, clutching maneuvers, and errors during all tasks. Chopstick surgery significantly enhances the functionality of the surgical robot when working through a small single incision. This technique will enable surgeons to utilize the robot for SILS and possibly for intraluminal or

  6. Initial experience with laparoscopic single-incision triangulated umbilical surgery (SITUS) in simple and radical nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagele, Udo; Walcher, Ute; Herrmann, Thomas R W

    2012-10-01

    New transumbilical laparoendoscopic procedures are an emerging field in urologic surgery. We introduced the concept of single-incision triangulated umbilical surgery (SITUS) in 2009. SITUS technique uses straight optics and instruments in a triangulated fashion via three trocars placed through an umbilical incision resulting in a familiar laparoscopic environment. Aim of the study was to demonstrate the feasibility of SITUS in simple and radical nephrectomy in daily routine. From October 2009 to July 2010, in 3 patients with cirrhotic kidneys a simple and in 12 patients a radical nephrectomy was performed in SITUS technique. The umbilical fold was incised at three-fourth of its circumference; in the patient with radical nephrectomy, additionally small "c"-shaped skin flaps were removed. After achieving a pneumoperitoneum by Verres technique, a 5-mm camera port and then a cranial 5 mm and a caudal 11 mm working trocar were placed with at a distance of 5-10 cm with the aid of two Langenbeck hooks, thus allowing triangulation except in the radical nephrectomy patients, where an 11-mm caudal trocar (Endopath, Ethicon, Hamburg, GER) was used. Using long conventional laparoscopic instruments, En-Seal pressure coagulator and dissector (Erbe, Tuebingen, Germany), Hem-O-Lock clips (Weck, Teleflex, USA), and a 30° 5-mm optic (Karl Storz, Tuttlingen, GER), the interventions were executed like conventional laparoscopic transperitoneal procedures. OR time was mean 127 min [120, 153] for cirrhotic kidney nephrectomy group and mean 137 min [91, 185] in the radical nephrectomy group. Mean hemoglobin drop was 1.5 g/dl [1.2, 1.7] in benign cases and 2.4 [1.1, 4.9] in radial nephrectomies. All except one diabetic patient with wound infection had an uneventful follow-up without postoperative complications. The patients were discharged at postoperative day 5 [3, 29]. SITUS technique for simple and radical nephrectomy is an attractive alternative to conventional laparoscopy and single

  7. Single-Incision Versus Three-Port Laparoscopic Appendectomy: Short- and Long-Term Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellei, Samatha; Borri, Alessandro

    2017-08-01

    To compare the outcome of patients who had undergone single-incision laparoscopic appendectomy (SILA) with others who had undergone three-port laparoscopic appendectomy (3-PORT). Data from all adults with uncomplicated appendicitis treated by laparoscopic appendectomy between June 2012 and December 2015 were prospectively collected. Patients with chronic pain, appendix malignancy, at least two previous laparotomies, and those undergoing concomitant surgery for different condition were excluded from analysis. Postoperative pain was assessed by a visual analog scale (VAS). Patients were reviewed postoperatively at 7 days and 1 month in the outpatient clinic. Late complications were assessed with a telephonic interview. A total of 91 patients were included (46 SILA; 45 3-PORT). There were 16 males and 30 females in the SILA group (mean age = 26.76 ± 10.58 years) and 18 males and 27 females in the 3-PORT group (mean age = 26.84 ± 10.79 years). The mean operative time for SILA was 48.54 ± 12.80 min, for the 3-PORT group the mean operative time was 46.33 ± 15.54 min (P = 0.46). No case required conversion. Mean postoperative hospital length of stay was 1.87 ± 0.69 days for SILA and 2.38 ± 1.11 days for 3-PORT (P = 0.01). VAS value of 3.91 ± 1.96 and mean ketorolac usage of 0.38 ± 0.65 in 3-PORT group and SILA patients reported 3.70 ± 1.58 and 0.39 ± 0.58, respectively (P = 0.91). Our mean follow-up in SILA group was 25.75 ± 10.82 months, for 3-PORT group the mean follow-up was 26.9 ± 11.8 months. Eleven patients missed long-term follow-up. No incisional hernia was found. There is a statistically significant difference in cosmetic evaluation in favor of SILA (P PORT laparoscopic appendectomy, but after SILA procedure discharge was quicker and long-term cosmetic satisfaction was superior.

  8. Single-incision trocar-less endoscopic management of giant liver hydatid cyst in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Himanshu; Agrawal, Vikesh; Tiwari, Abhishek; Sharma, Dhananjaya

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Laparoscopic management of giant hydatid cyst has limitations such as spillage, poor control, difficulties in suctioning the contents through special ports which are not easily available, difficulty in the obliteration of residual cavity and recurrence. We describe single-incision trocar-less endoscopic (SITE) technique which simplifies enucleation and management of residual cavity. Method: Inclusion criteria for these cases were patients having single uncomplicated giant hydatid cyst >5 cm present at the surface of the liver and palpable on clinical examination. The cysts which were <5 cm, multiple, deep-seated and impalpable were excluded from the study. Technique: An incision of 1 cm is marked over the site of the maximum bulge and deepened to open peritoneum, cyst is held with two stay sutures, injection of scolicidal agent and aspiration is done and suction of the cyst content is done. After suction of the contents, 5 mm telescope is inserted, and the cyst cavity is inspected, clearance and cyst procedure is done. Results: In 6 years, 62 cases of giant hydatid cyst fulfilling the inclusion criteria and were taken for SITE technique. SITE was successful in all patients and none needed a conversion. Twenty-nine (46.77%) underwent omentopexy and three (4.83%) underwent SITE capitonnage. There was post-operative biliary leak in one (0.016%) patient who underwent capitonnage, which was managed by prolonged drainage which resolved in 10 days. Mean operative duration was 52 min (30 min to 85 min). Mean follow-up was for 18 months (12–36 months). One (0.016%) patient had cyst recurrence. Discussion: SITE has advantages of endoscopic clearance and does not require special ports which are expensive, technically difficult to use and often unavailable. It allows controlled handling, effective suction and easier management of bile communication. SITE can be a preferred procedure for endoscopic management of giant liver hydatid cysts. Conclusion: SITE

  9. Transvaginal Excision of an Eroded Sacrocolpopexy Mesh by Using Single-Incision Laparoscopic Surgery Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Stefan; Siegenthaler, Franziska; Imboden, Sara; Kuhn, Annette; Mueller, Michael D

    To show a new technique of using single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) equipment in vaginal surgery to create a "pneumovagina." Explanatory video demonstrating the technique and intraoperative findings. University hospital. The 68-year-old patient was referred with a vaginal mesh erosion that resulted in abscess formation at the vaginal apex. The patient was symptomatic with an increasingly foul-smelling vaginal discharge for about 1 year. She had a laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy in a remote hospital 22 months before the current operation and had a total abdominal hysterectomy 15 years ago. The, patient's history was uneventful without dyspareunia, incontinence or voiding difficulties, and she was otherwise content with the sacrocolpopexy result. The local institutional review board granted exemption for this publication. Frequently, pelvic organ prolapse can only be effectively treated if the surgical procedure comprises support of the central compartment. Laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy shows superior outcomes for this indication, with success rates of up to 96%. However, a rare side effect of laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy is mesh erosion, occurring in up to 2.4% [1]. These erosions are usually treated laparoscopically [2]. In this video we show an alternative route for excision of a symptomatic exposed mesh by using a transvaginal approach: The SILS trocar is used vaginally for abscess irrigation and mesh excision with minimally invasive instruments. For treatment of the abscess and removal of the exposed mesh, the SILS trocar was placed vaginally, and laparoscopic instruments were used. The abscess was incised, cleansed and irrigated, debrided, and the mesh excised. Because no mesh material was exposed after excision, the vagina was not closed to avoid creating a cavity with the risk of promoting reabscess formation, and secondary wound healing was anticipated. Laparoscopy was used to confirm that no intra-abdominal lesion coexisted or occurred. There were

  10. Single-incision laparoscopic surgery: outcomes from 224 colonic resections performed at a single center using SILS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestweber, Boris; Galetin, Thomas; Lammerting, Kathrin; Paul, Claudia; Giehl, Jeanette; Straub, Eberhard; Kaldowski, Bodo; Alfes, Angelika; Vestweber, Karl-Heinz

    2013-02-01

    Compared with single-incision laparoscopy, multiport laparoscopy is associated with greater risk of postoperative wound pain, infection, incisional hernias, and suboptimal cosmetic outcomes. The feasibility of minimally invasive single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) for colorectal procedures is well-established, but outcome data remain limited. Patients with benign diverticular disease, Crohn's disease, or ulcerative colitis admitted to Klinikum Leverkusen, Germany, for colonic resection between July 2009 and March 2011 (n = 224) underwent single-incision laparoscopic surgery using the SILS port system. Surgeons had ≥7 years' experience in laparoscopic colon surgery but no SILS experience. Patient demographic and clinical data were collected prospectively. Pain was evaluated by using a visual analog scale (0-10). Data were analyzed by using the SPSS PASW Statistics 18 database. The majority of patients underwent sigmoid colectomy with high anterior resection (AR) or left hemicolectomy (n = 150) for diverticulitis. Our conversion rate to open surgery was 6.3 %, half in patients undergoing sigmoid colectomy with high AR or left hemicolectomy, 95 % of whom had diverticulitis. Mean operating time was 166 ± 74 (range, 40-441) min in the overall population, with shorter times for single-port transanal tumor resection (SPTTR; 89 ± 51 min; range, 40-153 min) and longer times for proctocolectomy (325 min; range, 110-441 min). Mean hospital stay was approximately 10 days, longer after abdominoperineal rectal resection or proctocolectomy (12-16 days). Most complications occurred following sigmoid colectomy with high AR or left hemicolectomy [19/25 (76 %) of early and 4/5 (80 %) of late complications, respectively]. Pain was surgery, conducted by experienced laparoscopic surgeons without specific training in use of the SILS port.

  11. Elective gastropexy with a reusable single-incision laparoscopic surgery port in dogs: 14 cases (2012-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Mandy; Case, J Brad; Coisman, James

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the technique, clinical findings, and short-term outcome in dogs undergoing laparoscopic-assisted incisional gastropexy with a reusable single-incision surgery port. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 14 client-owned dogs. PROCEDURES Medical records of dogs referred for elective laparoscopic gastropexy between June 2012 and August 2013 were reviewed. History, signalment, results of physical examination and preoperative laboratory testing, surgical procedure, duration of surgery, postoperative complications, duration of hospital stay, and short-term outcome were recorded. All patients underwent general anesthesia and were positioned in dorsal recumbency. After an initial limited laparoscopic exploration, single-incision laparoscopic-assisted gastropexy was performed extracorporeally in all dogs via a conical port placed in a right paramedian location. Concurrent procedures included laparoscopic ovariectomy (n = 4), gastric biopsy (2), and castration (7). Short-term outcome was evaluated. RESULTS Median duration of surgery was 76 minutes (range, 40 to 90 minutes). Intraoperative complications were minor and consisted of loss of pneumoperitoneum in 2 of 14 dogs. A postoperative surgical site infection occurred in 1 dog and resolved with standard treatment. Median duration of follow-up was 371 days (range, 2 weeks to 1.5 years). No dogs developed gastric dilation-volvulus during the follow-up period, and all owners were satisfied with the outcome. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that single-incision laparoscopic-assisted gastropexy with a reusable conical port was feasible and effective in appropriately selected cases. Investigation of the potential benefits of this reusable port versus single-use devices for elective gastropexy in dogs is warranted.

  12. Vaginal mesh repair SYSTEMS for pelvic organ prolapse: Anatomical study comparing transobturator/trangluteal versus single incision techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagna, Giuseppe; Panico, Giovanni; Morciano, Andrea; Gadonneix, Pierre; Delmas, Vincent; Cervigni, Mauro; Ercoli, Alfredo; Scambia, Giovanni

    2017-09-18

    The present study aim to compare the anatomic landmarks of two pelvic floor repair systems, in order to identify the potential neurovascular lesions related to different mesh fixation techniques. Abdominal and perineal dissections of 10 fresh cadavers after prolapse surgery using transobturator/transgluteal versus single incision techniques. Neuro-vascular structures of obturator region and perineum were isolated. Distances between needles and anatomical structures were measured. During transobturator anterior repair, the superficial cannula passed 2.5 ± 0.6 cm medially to the obturator canal. The distance of superficial arm to the anterior obturator vessels was 2.2 ± 0.4 cm. The distance of deep cannula to the posterior obturator vessels branches was 1.3 ± 0.5 cm. In two of these cases we observed a lesion of posterior obturator vessels. During single incision repair the distance between the obturator canal and the superficial arms was 2.3 ± 0.7. The mean distances of superficial arms to the anterior and posterior obturator vessels were, respectively, 2.3 ± 0.5 cm and 3.2 ± 0.7 cm. During transgluteal posterior repair the distance between the cannula guide and the ischial spine was 1.7 ± 0.5 cm while it measured 2.3 ± 0.4 cm when single incision posterior device was placed. Anterior transobturator system presents an increased risk of posterior obturator vessels branches injury. During posterior transgluteal repair the distance of the ischio-anal fossa to sacrospinous ligament represents a way that could rule against the correct needle positioning with increased risk of pudendal lesions. Single incision approach offers an easier access to the sacrospinous ligament with lower risk of pudendal lesions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Case-mix study of single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) vs. Conventional laparoscopic surgery in colonic cancer resections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mynster, Tommie; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer

    2013-01-01

    of administrations or amount of opioids were seen. Conclusion. With reservation of a small study group we find SILS is like worthy to CLS in colorectal cancer surgery and a benefit in postoperative recovery and pain is possible, but has to be investigated in larger randomised studies.......Single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) may be even less invasive to a patient than conventional laparoscopic surgery (CLS). Aim of the study of the applicability of the procedure, the first 1½ year of experiences and comparison with CLS for colonic cancer resections Material and methods. Since...

  14. The transverse colon cancer with the reversed rotation of the midgut treated with single incision laparoscopic colectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Yasumitsu; Hattori, Masakazu; Fujita, Manami; Nishida, Youji; Douden, Kenji; Hashizume, Yasuo

    2013-06-01

    Reversed rotation of the midgut is a rare type of intestinal malrotation. Moreover, synchronous colon cancer has rarely been reported. Preliminary experience with single-incision laparoscopic colectomy (SILC) for colon cancer with reversed rotation of the midgut is reported. An 82-year-old woman was admitted because of a fecal occult blood. A colonoscopy revealed transverse colon cancer. An air-barium contrast enema showed the right-sided sigmoid colon and the left-sided cecum. A computed tomography revealed that the duodenum and the transverse colon were situated at the ventral side of the superior mesenteric artery, and a preoperative diagnosis of suspicion of reversed rotation of the midgut was made. First, a lap protector was inserted through a 4.0 cm transumbilical incision. Four 5 mm ports were placed in the lap protector. On the observation of laparoscopy, the cecum and the ascending colon were not fixed with the retroperitoneum and situated on the left, and the sigmoid colon was situated on the right. We successfully mobilized the transverse colon using a single-incision laparoscopic approach. Resection was achieved following extracorporealization, and the anastomosis was performed extracorporeally using staplers. The patient was discharged on the thirteenth postoperative day. Postoperative follow-up did not reveal any umbilical wound complications. SILC for colon cancer associated with malrotation of the midgut is feasible and a promising alternative method because of its less invasiveness and its adaptability to the malrotation without extending the skin incision.

  15. 76 FR 15321 - SEDASYS Computer-Assisted Personalized Sedation System; Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.'s, Petition...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    ...] SEDASYS Computer-Assisted Personalized Sedation System; Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.'s, Petition for Review... denial of premarket approval for its SEDASYS computer-assisted personalized sedation system (SEDASYS system). ADDRESSES: Submissions related to the petition should be filed with the Division of Dockets...

  16. Evaluating single-incision slings in female stress urinary incontinence: the usefulness of the CONSORT statement criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diallo, Stéphanie; Cour, Florence; Josephson, Anne; Vidart, Adrien; Botto, Henri; Lebret, Thierry; Bonan, Brigitte

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the usefulness and applicability of the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) for journal articles reporting randomized, controlled trials evaluating single-incision slings in the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence. Original articles reporting randomized, controlled trials assessing single-incision slings in the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence were searched for in the PubMed and Embase databases in 2011. Reporting quality was studied by 2 hospital pharmacists and 2 urologic surgeons. Primary outcome was the score out of 20 in the abstract CONSORT checklist. Secondary outcomes were the scores in the standard CONSORT checklist and the extension CONSORT additional items for trials assessing nonpharmacologic treatments. Among 135 articles retrieved, 8 met the inclusion criteria and were assessed. Abstract scores ranged from 4.7-14.1. Standard scores were >10.0 out of 20 for most articles; the extension scores did not exceed 5.0 out of 10. Four reported trials were not identified as randomized in the title. The interventions were incompletely reported. Four articles reported whether blinding was achieved but lack of blinding was never discussed as a potential source of bias. Few articles reported the operators and centers characteristics and their impact on statistical analysis. The combination of the 3 checklists was considered a useful guideline to enhance and assess the reporting quality of a surgical trial. Our results support the further use of CONSORT criteria as a basic standardized tool in all stages of clinical evaluation for any prosthetic device in female pelvic surgery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Single-site robotic cholecystectomy (SSRC) versus single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy (SILC): comparison of learning curves. First European experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinoglio, Giuseppe; Lenti, Luca Matteo; Maglione, Valeria; Lucido, Francesco Saverio; Priora, Fabio; Bianchi, Paolo Pietro; Grosso, Federica; Quarati, Raul

    2012-06-01

    Single-incision laparoscopic surgery is an emerging procedure developed to decrease parietal trauma and improve cosmetic results. However, many technical constraints, such as lack of triangulation, instrument collisions, and cross-handing, hamper this approach. Using a robotic platform may overcome these problems and enable more precise surgical actions by increasing freedom of movement and by restoring intuitive instrument control. We retrospectively collected, under institutional review board approval, data on the first 25 patients who underwent single-site robotic cholecystectomies (SSRC) at our center. Patients enrolled in this study underwent SSRC for symptomatic biliary gallstones or polyposis. Exclusion criteria were: BMI > 33; acute cholecystitis; previous upper abdominal surgery; ASA > II; and age >80 and <18 years. All procedures were performed with the da Vinci Si Surgical System and a dedicated SSRC kit (Intuitive). After discharge, patients were followed for 2 months. These SSRC cases were compared to our first 25 single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomies (SILC) and with the literature. There were no differences in patient characteristics between groups (gender, P = 0.4404; age, P = 0.7423; BMI, P = 0.5699), and there were no conversions or major complications in either cohort. Operative time was significantly longer for the SILC group compared with SSRC (83.2 vs. 62.7 min, P = 0.0006), and SSRC operative times did not change significantly along the series. The majority of patients in each group were discharged within 24 h, with an average length of hospital stay of 1.2 days for the SILC group and 1.1 days for the SSRC group (P = 0.2854). No wound complications (infection, incisional hernia) were observed in the SSRC group and in the SILC. Our preliminary experience shows that SSRC is safe, can easily be learned, and performed in a reproducible manner and is faster than SILC.

  18. Single-incision Laparoscopic Appendectomy for acute Appendicitis using a 10-mm Laparoscope and the Glove Port Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsushimi, Takaaki; Mori, Hirohito; Sudo, Manabu; Minami, Yoshihide; Ueki, Koichi; Tamai, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the single incision laparoscopic appendectomy (SILA) using existing instruments, the 10-mm laparoscope, and glove port technique. SILA was performed on 16 patients (8 male cases, 8 female cases) between June 2012 and September 2015. A 20-mm incision was made in the umbilicus and a wound retractor was placed. A 10-mm trocar for the laparoscope and two 5-mm trocars were fixed to the three fingers of the latex gloves and it was attached to the wound retractor. Another thin forceps were inserted from right low abdomen. Average age of patients was 32.6 ± 17.7 years. Preoperative average white blood cell was 13,325 ± 4,584 /mm 3 , and average CRP was 1.81 ± 3.70 mg/dL. Preoperative body temperature was 36.8 ± 0.5°C. The mean appendix size was 9.6 ± 2.3 mm and none of the patients had an abscess on preoperative CT. The CT also revealed a fecal pellet in 5/16 (31%) of patients. Mean operation time was 66.4 ± 25.4 minutes, and minimal intraoperative bleeding was observed in all patients. Average hospital stay was 5.3 ± 1.9 days and none of the patients had complications. SILA using the 10-mm laparoscope and glove port technique may be a safe and feasible operation for mild to moderate appendicitis.

  19. Comparison of the clinical outcomes of transobturator and single-incision slings for stress urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Ying Wu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of anti-incontinence surgeries employing the transobturator sling and single-incision sling (SIS. Our hypothesis is that the outcome of the SIS is not inferior to the obturator sling. This retrospective study reviewed the medical records of patients who underwent anti-incontinence surgery with the transobturator sling or SIS from July 2005 to November 2014. Patients who underwent concomitant pelvic organ reconstruction with an artificial mesh were excluded. Assessments included preoperative and postoperative urodynamic examinations, perioperative complications, and postoperative urogenital symptoms. A total of 122 women were recruited according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Among them, 68 patients underwent transobturator sling procedures while 54 patients underwent SIS procedures. The subjective failure rate of the transobturator sling and SIS were 10.2% and 18.5%, respectively (p = 0.292. The objective failure rate, defined as a pad test showing more than 2 g of urine, was 10.2% for the transobturator sling and 12.9% for the SIS (p = 0.777. SIS resulted in less blood loss, operative time, length of hospital stay, and transient voiding dysfunction after the operation. No major complication occurred after either surgical intervention. In conclusion, SIS and transobturator slings might have similar efficacy, safety, and effects on new-onset urogenital symptoms.

  20. Single-incision laparoscopic surgery and conventional laparoscopic treatment of varicocele in adolescents: Comparison between two techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Marte

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS has gained great popularity in paediatric surgery due to its minimally invasive approach and improved cosmetic results. Notwithstanding, reports describing its adoption in children are still fragmentary and some perplexities have been raised by some surgeons. We reviewed our experience with the SILS Palomo varicocelectomy procedure (SIL-V in children and adolescents, comparing this group with a similar series operated using conventional laparoscopic varicocelectomy (CL-V. Patients and Methods: A total of 69 Palomo laparoscopic varicocelectomies were performed in patients aged 11-17 years from January 2011 to January 2013. Indications for surgery included grades II-III varicocele or ipsilateral testicular hypotrophy. The SIL-V procedure was performed in 44 patients with roticulating and conventional 5 mm instruments. Testicular vessels were isolated "en bloc," clipped and cut. Operating time, visual analogue scale and post-operative results were compared to a similar group of 25 patients operated with CL-V. Results: No patient of the SIL-V group required conversion to conventional laparoscopy, none to open surgery. Mean operative time was 22 min (range: 19-28 in the SIL-V group, not significantly different compared with CL-V (mean 21 min, range: 18-25. All patients experienced a smooth recovery from surgery without any complications, and were discharged on day 1. No difficulties were found in the SIL-V group. The post-operative pain score was significantly better in SIL-V. Conclusion: The SIL-V procedure is safe and effective and allows a fast and efficient isolation of the vascular bundle. The use of conventional instruments is technically feasible in SIL-V.

  1. Single-Incision Carpal Tunnel Release and Distal Radius Open Reduction and Internal Fixation: A Cadaveric Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Michael P; Sessions, Blane A; Dudoussat, Bryan S; Kane, Patrick M

    2016-08-01

    The safety of surgical approaches for single- versus double-incision carpal tunnel release in association with distal radius open reduction and internal fixation remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to identify critical structures to determine if a single-incision extension of the standard flexor carpi radialis (FCR) approach can be performed safely. Nine cadaveric arms with were dissected under loupe magnification, utilizing a standard FCR approach. After the distal radius exposure was complete, the distal portion of the FCR incision was extended to allow release of the carpal tunnel. Dissection of critical structures was performed, including the recurrent thenar motor branch of the median nerve, the palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve (PCBm), the palmar carpal and superficial palmar branches of the radial artery, and proximally the median nerve proper. The anatomic relationship of these structures relative to the surgical approach was recorded. Extension of the standard FCR approach as described in this study did not damage any critical structure in the specimens dissected. The PCBm was noted to arise from the radial side of the median nerve an average of 6.01cm proximal to the proximal edge of the transverse carpal ligament. The PCBm became enveloped in the layers of the antebrachial fascia and the transverse carpal ligament at the incision site, protecting it from injury. The recurrent motor branch of the median nerve, branches of the radial artery and the median nerve proper were not at risk during extension of the FCR approach to release the carpal tunnel. Extension of the standard FCR approach to include carpal tunnel release can be performed with minimal risk to the underlying structures. This exposure may offer benefits in both visualization and extent of carpal tunnel release.

  2. Is There a Cosmetic Advantage to Single-Incision Laparoscopic Surgical Techniques Over Standard Laparoscopic Surgery? A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Luke; Manley, Kate

    2016-06-01

    Single-incision laparoscopic surgery represents an evolution of minimally invasive techniques, but has been a controversial development. A cosmetic advantage is stated by many authors, but has not been found to be universally present or even of considerable importance by patients. This systematic review and meta-analysis demonstrates that there is a cosmetic advantage of the technique regardless of the operation type. The treatment effect in terms of cosmetic improvement is of the order of 0.63.

  3. Transumbilical single-incision laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy and total intracorporeal reconstruction of the digestive tract in the treatment of benign peptic ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong-Sheng; Wu, Shuo-Dong; Kong, Jing

    2014-12-01

    Single-incision laparoscopic surgery is being applied increasingly in many surgical specialties. However, few reports are available regarding its use in the treatment of benign peptic ulcer disease. We report here on nine patients with gastric or duodenal ulcers who underwent transumbilical single-incision laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy (SILSG) between November 2010 and June 2013. All procedures were performed with conventional laparoscopic instruments placed through a single operating portal of entry created within the umbilicus. Total intracorporeal gastrojejunostomy or gastroduodenostomy was then performed for reconstruction of the digestive tract. Only one case required conversion from single-incision to multiple-incision surgery. Among the eight patients who successfully underwent SILSG, total intracorporeal gastroduodenostomy was performed in two and gastrojejunostomy in six. The mean operation time was 290 ± 50 min (range 230-360 min), and blood loss was 200 ± 66 mL (range 100-300 mL). The patients recovered fully, and the single umbilical scars healed well. We believe this is the first report of SILSG with total intracorporeal gastrojejunostomy or gastroduodenostomy in the treatment of benign peptic ulcers. On the basis of this initial experience, SILSG for this indication in the hands of experienced surgeons appears to be feasible and safe. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Task performance in standard laparoscopy in comparison with single-incision laparoscopy in a modified skills trainer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Andrew S; Khandelwal, Saurabh

    2016-08-01

    Single-incision laparoscopy (SIL) is similar to conventional laparoscopic surgery (LAP), but carries specific technical challenges due to lack of triangulation, reduced dexterity, conflicts due to inline instrumentation, and impaired visualization. This study was designed to evaluate technical skill performance of SIL versus LAP surgery in a simulated environment. We developed a modified laparoscopic skills trainer for SIL based upon the fundamentals of laparoscopic surgery (FLS) model. This includes a standard laparoscopic tower for visualization, allowing replication of the conflicts between scope and instruments. It also has a modified trainer box allowing use of different access devices and instruments for SIL. Sixteen subjects at different levels of training (novice through expert) completed four FLS tasks with standard LAP techniques. They then practiced the same tasks using SIL technique until they reached a steady state of performance. The first and last SIL trials were recorded. Baseline SIL peg transfer was worse than FLS (254 ± 157 s vs 99 ± 27, p < 0.0002). Final SIL time was still significantly worse than FLS (173 ± 130, p < 0.02). FLS, baseline SIL, and final SIL circle cutting were not significantly different (p = 0.058). Final SIL loop ligation was significantly faster than FLS (48 ± 19 vs 70 ± 42, p < 0.05). FLS suturing was faster than SIL suturing (281 ± 188 vs. 526 ± 105, p < 0.01). There was substantial dropout due to frustration with SIL, and only two surgeons were able to successfully complete SIL suturing. There are technical challenges with SIL that vary depending on task. Peg transfer and suturing were significantly impaired in SIL, while circle cutting was not significantly affected, and ligating loop was faster with SIL than LAP. These challenges may impact clinical outcomes of SIL and should influence training in SIL as well as future product development.

  5. Robot-assisted single-site compared with laparoscopic single-incision cholecystectomy for benign gallbladder disease: protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grochola, Lukasz Filip; Soll, Christopher; Zehnder, Adrian; Wyss, Roland; Herzog, Pascal; Breitenstein, Stefan

    2017-02-09

    Recent advances in robotic technology suggest that the utilization of the da Vinci Single-Site™ platform for cholecystectomy is safe, feasible and results in a shorter learning curve compared to conventional single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Moreover, the robot-assisted technology has been shown to reduce the surgeon's stress load compared to standard single-incision laparoscopy in an experimental setup, suggesting an important advantage of the da Vinci platform. However, the above-mentioned observations are based solely on case series, case reports and experimental data, as high-quality clinical trials to demonstrate the benefits of the da Vinci Single-Site™ cholecystectomy have not been performed to date. This study addresses the question whether robot-assisted Single-Site™ cholecystectomy provides significant benefits over single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy in terms of surgeon's stress load, while matching the standards of the conventional single-incision approach with regard to peri- and postoperative outcomes. It is designed as a single centre, single-blinded randomized controlled trial, which compares both surgical approaches with the primary endpoint surgeon's physical and mental stress load at the time of surgery. In addition, the study aims to assess secondary endpoints such as operating time, conversion rates, additional trocar placement, intra-operative blood loss, length of hospital stay, costs of procedure, health-related quality of life, cosmesis and complications. Patients as well as ward staff are blinded until the 1 st postoperative year. Sample size calculation based on the results of a previously published experimental setup utilizing an estimated effect size of surgeon's comfort of 0.8 (power of 0.8, alpha-error level of 0.05, error margin of 10-15%) resulted in a number of 30 randomized patients per arm. The study is the first randomized controlled trial that compares the da Vinci Single Site™ platform to

  6. No difference in incidence of port-site hernia and chronic pain after single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy versus conventional laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mette W; Brandt, Erik; Oehlenschläger, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    and matched 1:2 with patients subjected to CLC using pre-defined criteria. Follow-up data were obtained from the Danish National Patient Registry, mailed patient questionnaires, and clinical examination. A port-site hernia was defined as a repair for a port-site hernia or clinical hernia located at one......BACKGROUND: Conventional laparoscopic cholecystectomy (CLC) is regarded as the gold standard for cholecystectomy. However, single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy (SLC) has been suggested to replace CLC. This study aimed at comparing long-term incidences of port-site hernia and chronic pain...... after SLC versus CLC. METHODS: We conducted a matched cohort study based on prospective data (Jan 1, 2009-June 1, 2011) from the Danish Cholecystectomy Database with perioperative information and clinical follow-up. Consecutive patients undergoing elective SLC during the study period were included...

  7. The feasibility and safety of single-incision totally extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair after previous lower abdominal surgery: 350 procedures at a single center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakasugi, Masaki; Suzuki, Yozo; Tei, Mitsuyoshi; Anno, Kana; Mikami, Tsubasa; Tsukada, Ryo; Koh, Masahiro; Furukawa, Kenta; Masuzawa, Toru; Kishi, Kentaro; Tanemura, Masahiro; Akamatsu, Hiroki

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and safety of single-incision laparoscopic surgery for totally extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair (SILS-TEP) with previous lower abdominal surgery (PLAS). A retrospective analysis of 350 patients undergoing SILS-TEP for a primary inguinal hernia from January 2012 to December 2015 at Osaka Police Hospital was performed, and the outcomes of the patients with and without PLAS were compared. SILS-TEP was performed in 84 patients with PLAS and 266 patients without PLAS. Appendectomy was the most common previous operative procedure. There were more patients with an ASA score of ≥3 in the PLAS group than in the control group (p < 0.05). The mean operative time, and the rates of conversion and postoperative complications were comparable between the two groups. There were no cases of recurrence in either group. SILS-TEP could be safely performed in patients with PLAS and achieved better cosmetic outcomes than conventional laparoscopic surgery.

  8. Single-incision laparoscopic surgery through the umbilicus is associated with a higher incidence of trocar-site hernia than conventional laparoscopy: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, S A; Morales-Conde, S; Antoniou, G A; Granderath, F A; Berrevoet, F; Muysoms, F E

    2016-02-01

    Single-incision laparoscopic surgery has been developed with the objective to reduce surgical trauma, decrease associated surgical stress and to improve cosmetic outcome. However, concerns have been raised regarding the risk of trocar-site hernia following this approach. Previous meta-analyses have suggested a trend toward higher hernia rates, but have failed to demonstrate a significant difference between single-incision and conventional laparoscopic surgery. Medline, AMED, CINAHL and CENTRAL were searched up to May 2014. Randomized controlled trials comparing single-incision and conventional laparoscopic surgery were considered for inclusion. Studies with patients aged less than 18 years and those reporting on robotic surgery were disregarded. Pooled odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated to measure the comparative risk of trocar-site hernia following single-incision and conventional laparoscopic surgery. Nineteen randomized trials encompassing 1705 patients were included. Trocar-site hernia occurred in 2.2% of patients in the single-incision group and in 0.7% of patients in the conventional laparoscopic surgery group (odds ratio 2.26, 95% confidence interval 1.00-5.08, p = 0.05). Sensitivity analysis of quality randomized trials validated the outcome estimates of the primary analysis. There was no heterogeneity among studies (I2 = 0%) and no evidence of publication bias. Single-incision laparoscopic surgery involving entry into the peritoneal cavity through the umbilicus is associated with a slightly higher risk of trocar-site hernia than conventional laparoscopy. Its effect on long-term morbidity and quality of life is a matter for further investigation.

  9. Single incision device (TVT Secur) versus retropubic tension-free vaginal tape device (TVT) for the management of stress urinary incontinence in women: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Sue; Tang, Selphee; Schulz, Jane; Murphy, Magnus; Goncalves, Jose; Kaye, Stephen; Dederer, Lorel; Robert, Magali

    2014-12-22

    In 2006, Ethicon Inc. introduced a new minimally invasive single incision sling device for the surgical treatment of stress urinary incontinence, the Gynecare TVT Secur®. For device licensing, no new evidence of TVT Secur efficacy and safety was needed: rather evidence was provided of the long-term follow-up of patients who had a procedure using a predecate retropubic tension-free vaginal tape device. Before adopting TVT Secur into our routine clinical practice, we decided to evaluate it. The objective of our Canadian multi-centre pragmatic randomized controlled trial was to compare the effectiveness of the new single-incision device, TVT Secur, to the established TVT device, in terms of objective cure of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) at 12 months postoperatively. Other outcomes included: complications, symptoms, and incontinence-related quality of life. The sample size estimate for our trial was 300, but the trial stopped early because of poor recruitment. 74 women participated (40 allocated to TVT Secur, 34 to TVT). At 12 months postoperatively, 27/33(82%) of TVT Secur group were cured, compared with 25/28(89%) of the TVT group (relative risk 0.92, 95% confidence interval 0.75 to 1.13, p=0.49). Most women reported little or no SUI symptoms (35/37(95%) vs 29/30(97%), >0.999). Quality of life improved significantly from baseline for both groups (IIQ-7 mean change -25 for both groups) but did not differ between groups (p=0.880). Our small randomized trial did not find statistically significant differences in outcomes between women allocated to the TVT Secur device versus those allocated to the TVT device for stress urinary incontinence. Despite the discontinuation of TVT Secur in March 2013 for commercial reasons, the importance of our study lies in making evidence available for the many women who had a TVT Secur device implanted and their physicians who may be considering alternative treatments. Our experience illustrates the difficulty of undertaking research

  10. A safety study of transumbilical single incision versus conventional laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanan; Liu, Ruoyan; Zhang, Ze; Xue, Qi; Yan, Jun; Yu, Jiang; Liu, Hao; Zhao, Liying; Mou, Tingyu; Deng, Haijun; Li, Guoxin

    2015-11-30

    Single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) is an emerging minimally invasive surgery to reduce abdominal incisions. However, despite the increasing clinical application of SILS, no evidence from large-scale, randomized controlled trials is available for assessing the feasibility, short-term safety, oncological safety, and potential benefits of SILS compared with conventional laparoscopic surgery (CLS) for colorectal cancer. This is a single-center, open-label, noninferiority, randomized controlled trial. A total of 198 eligible patients will be randomly assigned to transumbilical single incision plus one port laparoscopic surgery (SILS plus one) group or to a CLS group at a 1:1 ratio. Patients ranging in age from 18 to 80 years with rectosigmoid cancer diagnosed as cT1-4aN0-2 M0 and a tumor size no larger than 5 cm are considered eligible. The primary endpoint is early morbidity, as evaluated by an independent investigator. Secondary outcomes include operative outcomes (operative time, estimated blood loss, and incision length), pathologic outcomes (tumor size, length of proximal and distal resection margins, and number of harvested lymph nodes), postoperative inflammatory and immune responses (white blood cells [WBC], neutrophil percentage [NE %], C-reactive protein [CRP], interleukin-6 [IL-6], and tumor necrosis factor-α [TNF-α]), postoperative recovery (time to first ambulation, flatus, liquid diet, soft diet, and duration of hospital stay), pain intensity, body image and cosmetic assessment, 3-year disease free survival (DFS), and 5-year overall survival (OS). Follow-up visits are scheduled for 1 and 3 months after surgery, then every 3 months for the first 2 years and every 6 months for the next 3 years. This trial will provide valuable clinical evidence for the objective assessment of the feasibility, safety, and potential benefits of SILS plus one compared with CLS for the radical resection of rectosigmoid cancer. The hypothesis is that SILS plus one is

  11. Pediatrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spackman, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    The utilization of the Lixiscope in pediatrics was investigated. The types of images that can presently be obtained are discussed along with the problems encountered. Speculative applications for the Lixiscope are also presented.

  12. Pediatrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasheed, Shabana; Teo, Harvey James Eu Leong; Littooij, Annemieke Simone

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of pediatric patients involves many diverse modalities, including radiography, ultrasound imaging, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and scintigraphic and angiographic studies. It is therefore important to be aware of potential pitfalls that may be related to these modalities

  13. The Role of Hand-Assisted Laparoscopic Technique in the Age of Single-Incision Laparoscopy: An Effective Alternative to Avoid Open Conversion in Colorectal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kyung Uk; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Cho, Yong Beom; Kim, Hee Cheol; Lee, Woo Yong; Chun, Ho-Kyung

    2018-04-01

    Continuous efforts to reduce the numbers and size of incisions led to the emergence of a new technique, single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS). It has been rapidly accepted as the preferred surgical approach in the colorectal area. In the age of SILS, what is the role of hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery (HALS)? We introduce the way to take advantage of it, as an effective alternative to avoid open conversion. This is a retrospective review of prospectively collected data of SILS colectomies performed by a single surgeon in Samsung Medical Center between August 2009 and December 2012. Out of 631 cases of SILS colectomy, 47 cases needed some changes from the initial approach. Among these, five cases were converted to HALS. Four of them were completed successfully without the need for open conversion. One patient with rectosigmoid colon cancer invading bladder was finally opened to avoid vesical trigone injury. The mean operation time of the 4 patients was 265.0 minutes. The mean estimated blood loss was 587.5 mL. The postoperative complication rate associated with the operation was 25%. Conversion from SILS to HALS in colorectal surgery was feasible and effective. It seemed to add minimal morbidity while preserving advantages of minimally invasive surgery. It could be considered an alternative to open conversion in cases of SILS, especially when the conversion to conventional laparoscopy does not seem to be helpful.

  14. Surgical Value of Elective Minimally Invasive Gallbladder Removal: A Cost Analysis of Traditional 4-Port vs Single-Incision and Robotically Assisted Cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Richard M; Umer, Affan; Bozzuto, Bethany J; Dilungo, Jennifer L; Ellner, Scott

    2016-03-01

    As the cost of health care is subjected to increasingly greater scrutiny, the assessment of new technologies must include the surgical value (SV) of the procedure. Surgical value is defined as outcome divided by cost. The cost and outcome of 50 consecutive traditional (4-port) laparoscopic cholecystectomies (TLC) were compared with 50 consecutive, nontraditional laparoscopic cholecystectomies (NTLC), between October 2012 and February 2014. The NTLC included SILS (n = 11), and robotically assisted single-incision cholecystectomies (ROBOSILS; n = 39). Our primary outcomes included minimally invasive gallbladder removal and same-day discharge. Thirty-day emergency department visits or readmissions were evaluated as a secondary outcome. The direct variable surgeon costs (DVSC) were distilled from our hospital cost accounting system and calculated on a per-case, per item basis. The average DVSC for TLC was $929 and was significantly lower than NTLC at $2,344 (p day discharge. There were no differences observed in secondary outcomes in 30-day emergency department visits (TLC [2%] vs NTLC [6%], p = 0.61) or readmissions (TLC [4%] vs NTLC [2%], p > 0.05), respectively. The relative SV was significantly higher for TLC (1) compared with NTLC (0.34) (p < 0.05), and SILS (0.66) and ROBOSILS (0.36) (p < 0.05). Nontraditional, minimally invasive gallbladder removal (SILS and ROBOSILS) offers significantly less surgical value for elective, outpatient gallbladder removal. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Surgeon-tailored polypropylene mesh as a needleless single-incision sling versus TVT-O for the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElSheemy, Mohammed S; Fathy, Hesham; Hussein, Hussein A; Hussein, Eman A; Hassan, Sarah Mohamed

    2015-06-01

    To compare safety and efficacy of surgeon-tailored polypropylene mesh through needleless single-incision technique (STM) versus tension-free vaginal tape-obturator (TVT-O) aiming to decrease cost of treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI). This is important in developing countries due to limited healthcare resources. A retrospective cohort study was done at Urology and Gynecology Departments (dual-center), Cairo University, from January 2011 to August 2013. STM was inserted in 72 females, while TVT-O was inserted in 48 females. Females evaluated by cough stress test, stress and urge incontinence quality of life questionnaire (SUIQQ), Q max and abdominal leak point pressure (ALPP) were included. Different factors were compared between both groups using paired t, Wilcoxon's signed rank, McNemar, Chi-square, Fisher's exact, independent t or Mann-Whitney tests. Age, parity, previous surgeries, ALPP, intrinsic sphincter deficiency (ISD), associated prolapse and associated prolapse repair were comparable in both groups. No significant difference was found between both groups in postoperative complications (except groin pain), cure, SUIQQ indices improvement and Q max decline. In total, 65 (90 %) cured, 6 (8 %) improved while failure was detected in one (1 %) patient in STM group, while 42 (87 %) cured, 4 (8 %) improved and failure was detected in two (4 %) patients in TVT-O group. Presence of ISD (p = 0.565), urgency (p = 0.496), UUI (p = 0.531), previous surgeries (p = 0.345), associated urogenital prolapse (p = 0.218) or associated prolapse repair (p = 0.592) did not lead to any significant difference in outcome between both groups. Cost of mesh decreased from US$500 (TVT-O) to US$10 (STM). Outcome of STM is comparable to TVT-O. Furthermore, STM is more economic.

  16. Contasure-Needleless® single incision sling compared with transobturator TVT-O® for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence: long-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Franco, Eva; Amat Tardiu, Lluís

    2015-02-01

    This study compared transobturator tension-free vaginal tape (TVT-O®) and Contasure-Needleless (C-NDL®) at long-term follow-up . Non-inferiority, prospective, single-centre , quasi-randomised trial started in September 2006 and finished in April 2011 to compare C-NDL® with transobturator vaginal tape (TVT-O®) mesh in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) . Epidemiological information, intraoperative and postoperative complications, subjective estimates of blood loss and pain levels were recorded. We also analysed the postoperative stress test, the subjective impression of improvement using the Sandvik Severity Index and the quality of life during follow-up using the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ-SF) . Two hundred and fifty-seven women with primary SUI were scheduled to receive TVT-O® or C-NDL® and were followed up at least 3 years after the procedure . One hundred and eleven women in the C-NDL® group (84.7%) had a negative stress test, compared with 54 women (88.9%) in the TVT-O® group (p = 0.0065 for the non-inferiority test). The postoperative Sandvik Severity Index was 0 or better than the preoperative score in 90.7% of patients in the C-NDL® group and 95.4% of patients in the TVT-O® group (p = 0.0022). The complication rate was similar in both groups. There were significant differences (p = 0.02) in postoperative pain within the TVT-O® group. The degree of satisfaction was not statistically significant between the two groups. The outcomes for the C-NDL® group were similar to those of the TVT-O® group, adding the concept of "single incision tape" to the tension-free sling option.

  17. Analgesic efficacy of ultrasound guided transversus abdominis plane block versus local anesthetic infiltration in adult patients undergoing single incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bava, Ejas P; Ramachandran, Rashmi; Rewari, Vimi; Chandralekha; Bansal, Virinder Kumar; Trikha, Anjan

    2016-01-01

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block has been used to provide intra- and post-operative analgesia with single incision laparoscopic (SIL) bariatric and gynecological surgery with mixed results. Its efficacy in providing analgesia for SIL cholecystectomy (SILC) via the same approach remains unexplored. The primary objective of our study was to compare the efficacy of bilateral TAP block with local anesthetic infiltration for perioperative analgesia in patients undergoing SILC. This was a prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blinded trial performed in a tertiary care hospital. Forty-two patients undergoing SILC were randomized to receive either ultrasound-guided (USG) bilateral mid-axillary TAP blocks with 0.375% ropivacaine or local anesthetic infiltration of the port site. The primary outcome measure was the requirement of morphine in the first 24 h postoperatively. The data were analyzed using t -test, Mann-Whitney test or Chi-square test. The 24 h morphine requirement (mean ± standard deviation) was 34.57 ± 14.64 mg in TAP group and 32.76 ± 14.34 mg in local infiltration group ( P = 0.688). The number of patients requiring intraoperative supplemental fentanyl in TAP group was 8 and in local infiltration group was 16 ( P = 0.028). The visual analog scale scores at rest and on coughing were significantly higher in the local infiltration group in the immediate postoperative period ( P = 0.034 and P = 0.007, respectively). USG bilateral TAP blocks were not effective in decreasing 24 h morphine requirement as compared to local anesthetic infiltration in patients undergoing SILC although it provided some analgesic benefit intraoperatively and in the initial 4 h postoperatively. Hence, the benefits of TAP blocks are not worth the effort and time spent for administering them for this surgery.

  18. Feasibility of single-incision thoracoscopic surgery using a modified chest wall pulley for primary spontaneous pneumothorax: a propensity score matching analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboshima, Kenji; Nagata, Machiko; Wakahara, Teppei; Matoba, Yasumi; Maniwa, Yoshimasa

    2017-09-01

    Recently, single-incision thoracoscopic surgery (SITS) has been recognized as a favorable treatment choice for primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) compared with conventional three-port video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). However, conventional SITS bullectomy often results in collisions with surgical devices. Therefore, we devised a method of SITS using a chest wall pulley for lung excision (PulLE) and modified PulLE (mPulLE) system, which substitutes threads to eliminate such collisions. We compared the mPulLE system with conventional procedures using propensity score matching (PSM) to adjust for patient backgrounds. Using PSM, we evaluated the surgical results of 210 PSP patients who underwent VATS, including mPulLE (n = 23) and three-port VATS (n = 102), at our institution between January 2010 and August 2016. We selected 17 mPulLE cases and 17 three-port VATS. There were no marked differences between the groups in the patient backgrounds or surgical results. However, there was a significant difference between the mPulLE cases and the three-port VATS cases in the operative time (71.7 ± 15.7 vs. 85.9 ± 25.5 min, respectively, P = 0.0388) and the number of autosutures used (3.6 ± 1.2 vs. 4.5 ± 1.2, respectively, P = 0.0178). The surgical results of mPulLE in patients with PSP with multiple lesions were equivalent to those achieved with three-port VATS under the same conditions.

  19. Distal biceps brachii tendon repairs: a single-incision technique using a cortical button with interference screw versus a double-incision technique using suture fixation through bone tunnels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Edward; Olsen, Joshua R; Williams, Richard B; Rouse, Lucien; Maloney, Michael; Voloshin, Ilya

    2015-05-01

    Distal biceps brachii tendon repairs performed with a tension slide technique using a cortical button (CB) and interference screw are stronger than those based on suture fixation through bone tunnels (BTs) in biomechanical studies. However, clinical comparison of these 2 techniques is lacking in the literature. To perform a clinical comparison of the single-incision CB and double-incision BT techniques. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Distal biceps tendon ruptures repaired through either the single-incision CB or double-incision BT technique were retrospectively identified at a single institution. Patients>1 year out from surgery were assessed for range of motion, strength, and complications, and they completed a DASH questionnaire (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand). Patients in the CB group (n=20) were older (52±9.5 vs 43.7±8.7 years; P=.008), had a shorter interval from surgery to evaluation (17.7±5 vs 30.8±16.5 months; P=.001), and were less likely to smoke (0% vs 28.5%; P=.02) compared with the BT patients (n=21). DASH scores were similar between groups (4.46±4.4 [CB] vs 5.7±7.5 [BT]; P=.65). Multivariate analysis revealed no differences in range of motion or strength between groups. More CB patients (30%; n=6) experienced a complication compared with those in the BT group (4.8%; n=1) (P=.04), and these complications were predominantly paresthesias of the superficial radial nerve that did not resolve. There were no reoperations or repair failures in either group. Both the single-incision CB and double-incision BT techniques provided excellent clinical results. Complications were more common in the single-incision CB group and most commonly involved paresthesias of the superficial radial nerve. © 2015 The Author(s).

  20. Sexual function and quality of life following retropubic TVT and single-incision sling in women with stress urinary incontinence: results of a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Gert; Steetskamp, Joscha; Meyer, Mira; Laterza, Rosa; Skala, Christine; Albrich, Stefan; Koelbl, Heinz

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this prospective cohort study was to compare effectiveness, morbidity, quality of life (QoL) and sexual function in women treated with tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) versus single-incision sling (SIS) in the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Retropubic TVT sling or SIS was implanted in local anesthesia and patients were followed post-operatively for 6 months. Evaluation was performed to assess post-operative rate of continence, complications, changes in sexual function and patient reported quality of life. Female sexual function was evaluated before and after sling procedure using Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) in sexually active patients. From January 2009 to December 2011, 150 patients were enrolled and underwent a procedure to implant the retropubic TVT (n = 75) or the MiniArc(®) and Ajust(®) SIS (n = 75). Overall, 93.3 % of the patients who successfully received SIS demonstrated total restoration (84 %) or improvement of continence (9.3 %) at the 6 month post-operative study visit. In TVT group we found 88 % total continence and 6.7 % improvement, respectively. Improvements were seen in the QoL scores related to global bladder feeling (89.3 %) in SIS group and 96 % for TVT. Post-operative FSFI score improves significantly and were comparable in both groups (SIS pre-operative 24.30 ± 4.56 to 27.22 ± 4.66 (P TVT 24.63 ± 6.62 to 28.47 ± 4.41, respectively). The SIS procedure appears to be as effective in improving incontinence-related quality of life and sexual function as the TVT through 6 months of post-operative follow-up. No differences in complications and sexual function were demonstrated between the groups.

  1. [A retrospective controlled clinical study of single-incision plus one port laparoscopic surgery for sigmoid colon and upper rectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G X; Li, J M; Wang, Y N; Deng, H J; Mou, T Y; Liu, H

    2017-07-01

    Objective: To evaluate the short-term and oncologic outcomes of single-incision plus one port laparoscopic surgery (SILS+ 1) for sigmoid colon and upper rectal cancer. Methods: The clinic data of 46 patients with sigmoid colon and upper rectal cancer underwent SILS+ 1 at Department of General Surgery, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University from September 2013 to September 2014 were retrospectively reviewed (SILS+ 1 group). After generating 1∶1 ration propensity scores given the covariates of age, gender, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, surgeons, tumor location, the distance of tumor from anal, tumor diameter, and pathologic TNM stage, 46 patients with sigmoid colon and upper rectal cancer underwent conventional laparoscopic surgery (CLS) in the same time were matched as CLS group. The baseline characteristics and short-term outcomes were compared using t test, χ(2) test or Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Log-rank tests demonstrated the distribution of disease free survival. Results: The two study groups were well balanced with respect to the baseline characteristics of the propensity score derivation model. As compared to the CLS group, patients in SILS+ 1 group had a smaller incision ((6.9±1.1) cm vs . (8.4±1.2) cm, t =6.502, P =0.000), less estimated blood loss (20(11) ml vs . 50(30) ml, Z =2.414, P =0.016), shorter intracorporeal operating time ((67.0±25.8) minutes vs . (75.5±27.7) minutes, t =2.062, P =0.042) and significantly faster recovery course including shorter time to first ambulation ((46.7±20.3) hours vs . (78.6±28.0) hours, t =6.255, P =0.000), shorter time to first oral diet ((64.7±28.8) hours vs . (77.1±30.0) hours, t =2.026, P =0.047), shorter time of postoperative hospital stay ((7.8±2.2) days vs . (6.5±2.2) days, t =2.680, P =0.009), and lower postoperative visual analogue scale scores ( F =4.721, P =0.032). No significant difference was observed in total operating

  2. Randomized trial of a comparison of the efficacy of TVT-O and single-incision tape TVT SECUR systems in the treatment of stress urinary incontinent women--2-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masata, Jaromir; Svabik, Kamil; Zvara, Karel; Drahoradova, Petra; El Haddad, Rachid; Hubka, Petr; Martan, Alois

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of the use of tension-free vaginal tape obturator (TVT-O) and single-incision TVT SECUR, hammock and U approach (TVT-S, H and U), in the treatment of urodynamic stress urinary incontinence (SUI). This single-center randomized three-arm trial compared the objective and subjective efficacy and early failure rate of the TVT-O and TVT-S H and U approach by objective criteria (cough test) and subjective criteria using the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire--Short Form (ICIQ-UI SF). The objective efficacy rate was defined as the number of patients with a negative cough stress test. Subjective cure was defined by no stress leakage of urine after surgery based on the evaluation of ICIQ-UI SH (when patients ticked "Never"/"Urine does not leak" in answer to question 6: When does urine leak?). Objective and subjective efficacy were evaluated using Last Failure Carried Forward analysis, i.e., final analysis also included patients with early failure. To describe outcome at different time points, the Last Observation Carried Forward method was also implemented. One hundred ninety-seven women with proven SUI were randomized into three groups--TVT-O (n = 68), TVT-S H (n = 64), and TVT-S U (n = 65). Each patient allocated to a treatment group received the planned surgery. There were no differences in each group in preoperative characteristics. Median follow-up after surgery was 2 years (SD, 0.8; range, 0.1 to 3.8 years). Of the subjects, 92.6% in the TVT-O group, 68.8% in the TVT-S H group, and 69.2% in the TVT-S U group had negative stress test (p TVT-O group, 68.8% in the TVT-S H group, and 61.5% in the TVT-S U group were subjectively continent (p = 0.02). Our study demonstrated a significantly lower subjective and objective cure rate in the single-incision TVT group compared to the TVT-O group.

  3. Comparison of the efficacy of tension-free vaginal tape obturator (TVT-O) and single-incision tension-free vaginal tape (Ajust™) in the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence: a 1-year follow-up randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masata, Jaromir; Svabik, Kamil; Zvara, Karel; Hubka, Petr; Toman, Ales; Martan, Alois

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of the tension-free vaginal tape obturator (TVT-O) and single-incision tension-free vaginal tape (Ajust™) in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence in a randomized two-arm study with a 1-year follow-up. This single-centre randomized trial compared the objective and subjective cure rates of TVT-O and Ajust using objective criteria (cough test) and subjective criteria (International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire short form, ICIQ-UI SF). The objective cure rate was defined as the number of patients with a negative cough stress test. Subjective cure was defined as no stress leakage of urine after surgery based on the ICIQ-UI SF. The primary outcome was to establish differences in objective and subjective cure rates between the TVT-O and Ajust groups. We also compared postoperative pain profiles using a visual analogue scale (VAS), improvement in quality of life using the ICIQ- UI SF and the Incontinence Quality of Life questionnaire, and overall satisfaction with the surgical procedure using a VAS and a five-item Likert scale. Inclusion criteria were age over 18 years, signed informed consent, and urodynamic stress urinary incontinence. Following a power calculation, 50 patients were enrolled into each group (Ajust and TVT-O). The mean follow-up after surgery was 445 days (SD 157.6 days) in the TVT-O group and 451.8 days (SD 127.6 days) in the Ajust group (p = 76.6 %). At 1 year, 47 patients were evaluated in the TVT-O group and 49 in the Ajust group. No differences in subjective cure rates or objective cure rates were observed. In the Ajust and TVT-O groups, the rates for no subjective stress leakage were 89.8 % and 91.5 %, respectively (p = 1.0, OR 1.22, 95 % CI 0.24 - 6.58), and the rates for a negative stress test were 89.8 % and 87.2 %, respectively (p = 0.76, OR 0.77, 95 % CI 0.17 - 3.32). In the Ajust group two patients reported de novo pain during sexual

  4. Advances in minimally invasive surgery in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Hope T; Kane, Timothy D

    2014-08-01

    Surgery has changed dramatically over the last several decades. The emergence of MIS has allowed pediatric surgeons to manage critically ill neonates, children, and adolescents with improved outcomes in pain, postoperative course, cosmesis, and return to normal activity. Procedures that were once thought to be too difficult to attempt or even contraindicated in pediatric patients in many instances are now the standard of care. New and emerging techniques, such as single-incision laparoscopy, endoscopy-assisted surgery, robotic surgery, and techniques yet to be developed, all hold and reveal the potential for even further advancement in the management of these patients. The future of MIS in pediatrics is exciting; as long as our primary focus remains centered on developing techniques that limit morbidity and maximize positive outcomes for young patients and their families, the possibilities are both promising and infinite.

  5. Single-incision laparoscopic surgery using colon-lifting technique for colorectal cancer: a matched case-control comparison with standard multiport laparoscopic surgery in terms of short-term results and access instrument cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Shoichi; Watanabe, Kazuteru; Ota, Mitsuyoshi; Watanabe, Jun; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Yamagishi, Shigeru; Tatsumi, Kenji; Suwa, Hirokazu; Kunisaki, Chikara; Taguri, Masataka; Morita, Satoshi; Endo, Itaru

    2012-05-01

    Single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) has been used for colorectal cancer as a minimally invasive procedure. However, there are still difficulties concerning effective triangulation and countertraction. The study's purpose was to clarify the usefulness of the colon-lifting technique (CLT) in SILS for colorectal cancer. SILS was performed for cancer (cT2N0 or less) of the right-sided colon (near the ileocecum), sigmoid, or rectosigmoid. The SILS™ Port was used for transumbilical access. A suture string was inserted through the abdominal wall and passed through the mesocolon. The colon was retracted anteriorly and fixed to the abdominal wall. The main mesenteric vessels were placed under tension. Lymph node dissection was performed by medial approach. Short-term surgical outcomes and access port costs were compared between SILS (using CLT) and the standard multiport technique (MPT). The two groups were case-matched by propensity scoring. Analyzed variables included preoperative Dukes stage and tumor location. From June 2009 to April 2011, 27 patients underwent SILS, and from April 2005 to April 2011, 85 patients underwent MPT. Propensity scoring generated 23 matched patients per group for SILS versus MPT comparisons. There were no significant differences in operating time, blood loss, early complications, postoperative analgesic frequency, or length of hospital stay. One MPT patient was converted to open surgery (4.5%); no SILS patients were converted. There were no significant differences in the length of distal cut margin and the number of harvested lymph nodes, except incision length (SILS vs. MPT: 33 vs. 55 mm, P Japanese yen, P CLT was safe and effective in providing radical treatment of cT2N0 cancer in the right-sided colon, sigmoid, or rectosigmoid. SILS was advantageous with respect to cosmesis and lower cost of access instruments.

  6. The SIMS trial: adjustable anchored single-incision mini-slings versus standard tension-free midurethral slings in the surgical management of female stress urinary incontinence. A study protocol for a pragmatic, multicentre, non-inferiority randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Fattah, Mohamed; MacLennan, Graeme; Kilonzo, Mary; Assassa, R Phil; McCormick, Kirsty; Davidson, Tracey; McDonald, Alison; N’Dow, James; Wardle, Judith; Norrie, John

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Single-incision mini-slings (SIMS) represent the third generation of midurethral slings. They have been developed with the aim of offering a true ambulatory procedure for treatment of female stress urinary incontinence (SUI) with reduced morbidity and earlier recovery while maintaining similar efficacy to standard midurethral slings (SMUS). The aim of this study is to determine the clinical and cost-effectiveness of adjustable anchored SIMS compared with tension-free SMUS in the surgical management of female SUI, with 3-year follow-up. Methods and analysis A pragmatic, multicentre, non-inferiority randomised controlled trial. Primary outcome measure The primary outcome measure is the patient-reported success rate measured by the Patient Global Impression of Improvement at 12 months. The primary economic outcome will be incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year gained at 12 months. Secondary outcome measures The secondary outcomes measures include adverse events, objective success rates, impact on other lower urinary tract symptoms, health-related quality of life profile and sexual function, and reoperation rates for SUI. Secondary economic outcomes include National Health Service and patient primary and secondary care resource use and costs, incremental cost-effectiveness and incremental net benefit. Statistical analysis The statistical analysis of the primary outcome will be by intention-to-treat and also a per-protocol analysis. Results will be displayed as estimates and 95% CIs. CIs around observed differences will then be compared with the prespecified non-inferiority margin. Secondary outcomes will be analysed similarly. Ethics and dissemination The North of Scotland Research Ethics Committee has approved this study (13/NS/0143). The dissemination plans include HTA monograph, presentation at international scientific meetings and publications in high-impact, open-access journals. The results will be included in the updates of the National

  7. Pediatric Ophthalmologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Ophthalmologist? Page Content Article Body If your child ... treat your child. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Ophthalmologists Have? Pediatric ophthalmologists are medical doctors who ...

  8. Pediatric Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Science Education & Training Home Conditions Asthma (Pediatric) Asthma (Pediatric) Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... meet the rising demand for asthma care. Our pediatric asthma team brings together physicians, nurses, dietitians, physical ...

  9. Contemporary Management of Achalasia by Pediatric Surgeons: A Survey of the International Pediatric Endosurgical Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Joanna L; Rentea, Rebecca M; St Peter, Shawn D

    2016-07-01

    Achalasia is a rare neurodegenerative disorder of the esophagus. Surgical repair consists of esophagomyotomy, often in conjunction with an antireflux procedure. We sought to determine practice patterns in surgical treatment of pediatric achalasia. Data regarding preferences were collected as part of a comprehensive online-based survey sent to members of the International Pediatric Endosurgery Group (IPEG) completed by 191 surgeons of which 141 performed esophagomyotomies for achalasia. Procedures performed per surgeon were 1-2 (n = 21, 15%); 3-5 (n = 49, 34%); 6-10 (n = 39, 28%); 11-20 (n = 21, 15%); >20 (n = 11, 8%). Most approached the operation laparoscopically (n = 127, 90%). Workup before esophageal myotomy consisted of a diagnostic esophagram (n = 133, 94%) or manometry (n = 102, 73%). Only 60% of surgeons (n = 84) required an EGD. No preference observed in division location of the phrenoesophageal ligament for mobilization of the esophagus. There was a predominant preference for hook cautery (n = 82, 58%) over harmonic shears (n = 30, 21%), heated sealing device LigaSure™ (n = 18, 13%), and other devices (n = 11, 8%) for muscle division. Intraoperatively, 57% (n = 80) had endoscopy and 50% (n = 71) had postoperative esophagram before initiation of enteral feeding. For antireflux procedure, Thal/Dor approach was performed most frequently (n = 111, 79%) followed by the Toupet (n = 18, 13%) and Nissen (n = 4, 3%) and none (n = 7, 5%). Diet restrictions were provided in 76% (n = 107) of postoperative patients. Given the infrequency of achalasia in children, there are a range of treatment plans among pediatric surgeons. We have identified current practices as a first step in developing more standard treatment pathways.

  10. A multicentre prospective randomised study of single-incision mini-sling (Ajust®) versus tension-free vaginal tape-obturator (TVT-O™) in the management of female stress urinary incontinence: pain profile and short-term outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Alyaa; Agur, Wael; Abdel-All, Mohamed; Guerrero, Karen; Lim, Chi; Allam, Mohamed; Yousef, Mohamed; N'Dow, James; Abdel-fattah, Mohamed

    2012-11-01

    To compare the postoperative pain profile, peri-operative details, and short-term patient-reported and objective success rates of single-incision mini-slings (SIMS) versus standard mid-urethral slings (SMUS). In a multicentre prospective randomised trial in six UK centres in the period between October 2009 and October 2010, 137 women were randomised to either adjustable SIMS (Ajust®, C. R. Bard Inc., NJ, USA), performed under local anaesthesia as an opt-out policy (n=69), or SMUS (TVT-O™, Ethicon Inc., Somerville, USA) performed under general anaesthesia (n=68). Randomisation was done through number-allocation software and using telephone randomisation. Postoperative pain profile (primary outcome) was assessed on a ten-point visual analogue scale at fixed time-points. Pre- and post operatively (4-6 months) women completed symptom severity, urgency perception scale (UPS), quality of life and sexual function questionnaires. In addition, women completed a Patient Global Impression of Improvement Questionnaire and underwent a cough stress test at 4-6 months follow up. Sample size calculation was performed and data were analysed using SPSS 18. Descriptive analyses are given and between-group comparisons were performed using chi-square, Fischer exact test and Mann-Whitney test as appropriate. Significance level was set at 5%. Women in the SIMS Ajust® group had a significantly lower postoperative pain profile up to 4 weeks (p=TVT-O™ groups respectively. There was a trend towards higher rates of de novo urgency or worsening of pre-existing urgency in the SIMS Ajust® group (21.7% versus 8.8%) but this did not reach statistical significance (p=0.063). Women in the SIMS Ajust® group had shorter hospital stay (median (IQR) 3.65 (2.49, 4.96)) compared to (4.42 (3.16, 5.56)) the TVT-O™ group 95% CI (-0.026, 1.326), with significantly earlier return to normal activities (p=0.025) and to work (p=0.006). The adjustable single-incision mini-sling (Ajust®) is associated

  11. Myocarditis - pediatric

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007307.htm Myocarditis - pediatric To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pediatric myocarditis is inflammation of the heart muscle in ...

  12. Chronicle of pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz-Bohm, Gabriele; Richter, Ernst

    2012-01-01

    The chronicle of pediatric radiology covers the following issues: Development of pediatric radiology in Germany (BRD, DDR, pediatric radiological accommodations); development of pediatric radiology in the Netherlands (chronology and pediatric radiological accommodations); development of pediatric radiology in Austria (chronology and pediatric radiological accommodations); development of pediatric radiology in Switzerland (chronology and pediatric radiological accommodations).

  13. Pediatric dysrhythmias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meki Bilici

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric dysrhythmias are rare but important causes of admission to pediatric clinics and emergency departments. Due to the development of successful surgical treatment of congenital heart diseases and improvements in the diagnostic tools, pediatric dysrhythmias are more frequently diagnosed. Although pediatric dysrhythmias are may be asymptomatic, they may manifest with weakness, dizziness, decrease in the effort capacity, easy fatigability, irregularity in heartbeats, palpitations, syncope and cardiac arrest. Since dysrhythmias may give rise to significant hemodynamic outcomes, their recognition by pediatricians and family physicians is vital for the patients. This review aims to contribute to the correct diagnosis and management of the cases with frequently encountered pediatric dysrhythmias.

  14. Single-incision laparoscopic surgery and conventional laparoscopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indications for surgery included grades II-III varicocele or ipsilateral testicular hypotrophy. The SIL-V procedure was performed in 44 patients with roticulating and conventional 5 mm instruments. Testicular vessels were isolated “en bloc,” clipped and cut. Operating time, visual analogue scale and post-operative results were ...

  15. Bariatric single incision laparoscopic surgery – review of initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Frask

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review was to assess the results of published experience with bariatric SILS surgery, with a particular focus on treatment feasibility and safety. An EMBASE and MEDLINE database search was performed identifying 13 articles totalling 87 patients in the laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB group, 10 patients in the laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG group, and 1 patient in the Roux-en-Y SILS group. In most series the learning curve was steep and operating times halved with time, reaching 53 min for LAGB and 90 min for LSG. In single case reports using strict selection criteria patients were discharged up to 24 hours following surgery. Treatment safety was satisfactory. Only two studies reported some minor complications with rates of up to 9.8%, including port malposition, port site infection, and seroma or haematoma formation. There were no complications in other studies. LAGB, LSG and Roux-en-Y surgeries were feasible although technically demanding and difficult.

  16. Single Incision Laparoscopic Surgery for a Large Endometriotic Cyst

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the last decade, laparoscopy has become the standard treatment for many gynecological conditions.[1,2] Today, laparoscopy is hailed as the standard approach in the surgical treatment of benign adnexal pathology.[1,2] Attempts to minimize access-related injuries and complications resulted in development of single port ...

  17. Pediatric Dentistese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharath Asokan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful practice of pediatric dentistry depends on the establishment of a good relationship between the dentist and the child. Such a relationship is possible only through effective communication. Pediatric dentistry includes both an art and a science component. The focus has been mostly on the technical aspects of our science, and the soft skills we need to develop are often forgotten or neglected. This paper throws light on the communication skills we need to imbibe to be a successful pediatric dentist. A new terminology “Pediatric Dentistese” has been coined similar to motherese, parentese, or baby talk. Since baby talk cannot be applied to all age groups of children, pediatric dentistese has been defined as “the proactive development-based individualized communication between the pediatric dentist and the child which helps to build trust, allay fear, and treat the child effectively and efficiently.”

  18. Pediatric MRI

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIH Study of Normal Brain Development is a longitudinal study using anatomical MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS) to map pediatric...

  19. Pediatric Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NICHD Research Information Find a Study More Information Preeclampsia and Eclampsia About NICHD Research Information Find a ... or visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Safe Child website . What is pediatric critical care? ...

  20. Pediatric Terminology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) works with NCI Enterprise Vocabulary Services (EVS) to provide standardized terminology for coding pediatric clinical trials and other research activities.

  1. Pediatric Dentistese

    OpenAIRE

    Sharath Asokan; Sivakumar Nuvvula

    2017-01-01

    Successful practice of pediatric dentistry depends on the establishment of a good relationship between the dentist and the child. Such a relationship is possible only through effective communication. Pediatric dentistry includes both an art and a science component. The focus has been mostly on the technical aspects of our science, and the soft skills we need to develop are often forgotten or neglected. This paper throws light on the communication skills we need to imbibe to be a successful pe...

  2. Pediatric Anthropometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinich, Kathleen D.; Reed, Matthew P.

    Anthropometry is the measurement of human size, shape, and physical capabilities. Most pediatric anthropometry data are gathered to describe child growth patterns, but data on body size, mass distribution, range of motion, and posture are used to develop crash test dummies and computational models of child occupants. Pediatric anthropometry data are also used to determine child restraint dimensions, so they will accommodate the applicable population of child occupants.

  3. Pediatric Headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slover, Robin; Kent, Sheryl

    2015-08-01

    Pediatric headaches are common, and many may never require intervention by a health care provider. However, migraines can become more difficult to treat, especially if they become chronic daily headaches. Pediatric headache is a subjective and unique experience that requires attention to both psychological and physiologic components in diagnosis and treatment. A biopsychosocial, multidisciplinary approach, including both medication management and psychological treatment, is considered essential for effective management.

  4. Virtual Pediatric Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Imaging Encyclopedia of Pediatric Thoracic Disease Virtual Pediatric Hospital is the Apprentice's Assistant™ Last revised on February ... GeneralPediatrics.com | PediatricEducation.org | SearchingPediatrics.com Virtual Pediatric Hospital is curated by Donna M. D'Alessandro, M. ...

  5. Pediatric Angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanaik, Debendra; Lieberman, Jay Adam

    2017-08-08

    The aims of this study are to update the clinician on current understanding of angioedema as it presents in the pediatric population and to review proper diagnostic techniques and treatment modalities for various types of angioedema. Angioedema is still best classified by whether it is likely histaminergic or kinin-mediated. New guidelines have been published around the world to help diagnose and treat both forms (urticaria/angioedema and hereditary angioedema). The vast majority of the studies on treatment have been conducted in the adult population; however, there are data available in the pediatric population. In the realm of hereditary angioedema, there are multiple new therapies that have been studied in the pediatric population (down to 2 years in some studies) in recent years and offer the clinician options for treatment. Angioedema (whether occurring with or without urticaria) is common in the pediatric population. The majority of the recent studies has been conducted in hereditary angioedema, and now, the clinician should have various options to treat all forms of angioedema. Many treatment options, especially for hereditary angioedema, are further being examined specifically in the pediatric population.

  6. Pediatric rosacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellen, Roselyn; Silverberg, Nanette B

    2016-07-01

    Because rosacea is uncommon in the pediatric population, care must be taken to exclude other papulopustular disorders. Children can present with vascular, papulopustular, and/or ocular findings. Importantly, ocular symptoms can appear before the cutaneous symptoms of rosacea, leading to misdiagnosis. Rosacea is a clinical diagnosis, but histopathologic examination typically reveals dilated vessels, perivascular lymphohistiocytic infiltrates in the upper dermis, elastosis, and disorganization of the upper dermal connective tissue. Treatment involves avoiding known triggers and utilizing topical and/or systemic therapies. Although treatment can control flares, pediatric rosacea often persists into adulthood.

  7. Pediatric AIDS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    means ostracism, neglect, loss of family, abuse, or orphan status 2. In spite of the now estimated 40 million ... The human virus is difficult to be cultured in animals except chimpanzee. It differs from the simian virus 4. .... 1994 revised HIV pediatric classification system: clinical categories13. Category N: not symptomatic.

  8. Pediatric trichotillomania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, J P; Franklin, M E

    2012-06-01

    Trichotillomania (TTM) is an impulse control disorder characterized by chronic hair-pulling, distress, and impairment. Although the negative effects of TTM are documented and often readily evident, there remains a paucity of psychopathology and treatment research on this disorder, particularly in pediatric populations. In an effort to improve assessment of pediatric TTM, several TTM-specific instruments for youth have now been developed to reliably identify symptoms and examine related phenomenology. Instrument development has now yielded instruments to evaluate TTM and related symptoms in the context of clinical trials of youth, and the first randomized controlled trial of any treatment for pediatric TTM was recently published. Using the initial pediatric TTM studies as building blocks, future research is now needed to create a stronger body of knowledge about the relative and combined efficacy of potential interventions for TTM in youth, as well as to examine the effects of TTM phenomenology and comorbidity on treatment outcome. Dissemination efforts must also be heightened for this knowledge to best reach these vulnerable populations.

  9. Pediatric vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barut, Kenan; Sahin, Sezgin; Kasapcopur, Ozgur

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to define childhood vasculitis and to highlight new causative factors and treatment modalities under the guidance of recently published studies. Childhood vasculitis is difficult to diagnose because of the wide variation in the symptoms and signs. New nomenclature and classification criteria were proposed for the diagnosis of pediatric vasculitis. Recently, progress has been made toward understanding the genetic susceptibility to pediatric vasculitis as it was in other diseases. Various radiological techniques provide great opportunities in establishing the diagnosis of pediatric vasculitis. Mild central nervous system disease can accompany Henoch-Schonlein purpura and can go unnoticed. Antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis is rare in children. Increased severity of the disease, subglottic stenosis, and renal disease are described more frequently among children. Biological therapies are used with success in children as in adults. Future studies, whose aims are to evaluate treatment responses, prognosis and to design guidelines for activity, and damage index of vasculitis for children are required. Henoch-Schonlein purpura and Kawasaki disease are the most frequent vasculitides of children. Experience from adult studies for treatment and prognosis are usually used because of low incidence of other vasculitides in children. Multicenter studies of pediatric vasculitis should be conducted to detail treatment responses and prognosis in children.

  10. Pediatric tracheostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisi, Paolo; Forte, Vito

    2016-06-01

    Tracheotomy refers to a surgical incision made into a trachea. Tracheostomy, on the other hand, refers to a surgical procedure whereby the tracheal lumen is positioned in close proximity to the skin surface. Tracheostomy is an uncommon procedure in the pediatric population. When required tracheostomy is typically performed as an open surgical procedure under general anesthesia with the patient intubated. However, it may need to be performed under local anesthesia or over a rigid bronchoscope in the patient with a precarious airway. Over the past half century, the primary indication for pediatric tracheostomy has shifted from acute infectious airway compromise to the need for prolonged ventilatory support in neurologically compromised children. The surgical technique, choice of tracheostomy tube, and post-operative care requires a nuanced approach in infants and young children. This article will review these topics in a comprehensive fashion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pediatric stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoermann, M.

    2008-01-01

    Stroke in childhood has gained increasingly more attention and is accepted as an important disease in childhood. The reasons for this severe event and the consequences for the rest of the life are totally different than for adults. This is also true for the diagnosis and therapy. This paper gives a comprehensive overview on the characteristics of pediatric stroke to assist radiologists in making a rapid and safe diagnosis in order to identify the underlying disease. (orig.) [de

  12. Pediatric fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ablin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia (FM is currently defined as chronic widespread pain (CWP with allodynia or hyperalgesia to pressure pain. It is classified as one of the large group of soft-tissue pain syndromes. Pain is the cardinal symptom of FM; however, most patients also experience additional symptoms such as debilitating fatigue, disrupted or non-restorative sleep, functional bowel disturbances, and a variety of neuropsychiatric problems, including cognitive dysfunction, anxiety and depressive symptoms. Its pathogenesis is not entirely understood, although it is currently believed to be the result of a central nervous system (CNS malfunction that increases pain transmission and perception. FMS usually involves females, and in these patients it often makes its first appearance during menopause. But it is often diagnosed both in young as well as elderly individuals. Pediatric FMS is a frustrating condition affecting children and adolescents at a crucial stage of their physical and emotional development. Pediatric FMS is an important differential diagnosis to be considered in the evaluation of children suffering from widespread musculoskeletal pain, and must be differentiated from a spectrum of inflammatory joint disorders such as juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, juvenile ankylosing spondylitis, etc. The management of pediatric FMS is centered on the issues of education, behavioral and cognitive change (with a strong emphasis on physical exercise, and a relatively minor role for pharmacological treatment with medications such as muscle relaxants, analgesics and tricyclic agents.

  13. Pediatric psychopharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, M A; Kastelic, E A; Frosch, E

    2001-01-01

    This paper reviews research in pediatric psychopharmacology over the past decade. The authors first discuss social, economic, and other influences on pediatric psychopharmacology research and prescribing patterns including changing models of childhood psychopathology, increased government funding, and changes in industry regulations. Definitions are offered for current research terminology including efficacy, effectiveness, and adverse events. Design trends and new approaches to outcome measurement are also presented. New data from the last 10 years of research is reviewed for each major class of psychotropic agents. Criteria for inclusion in the review are presented and include aspects of study design (placebo-controlled, large sample size), source of funding (government funded vs. industry), and vision (creative applications). Data for short-term efficacy, long-term efficacy, effectiveness, and safety and adverse events are discussed for each class of medication, although for many, there remains little empirical data. Findings for stimulants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, neuroleptics, alpha-adrenergic agonists, mood stabilizers, buproprion, secretin, naltrexone, immune therapies, and natural supplements are all presented. Finally, the authors offer some speculations regarding the future of pediatric psychopharmacology research.

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging ... the limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch ...

  15. Pediatric sleep apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep apnea - pediatric; Apnea - pediatric sleep apnea syndrome; Sleep-disordered breathing - pediatric ... During sleep, all of the muscles in the body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses ... limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of ...

  17. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... discharge; Heart valve surgery - children - discharge; Heart surgery - pediatric - discharge; Heart transplant - pediatric - discharge ... Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 434. ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small ... of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  1. Find a Pediatric Dentist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AAPD AAPD Publications Advertising Brochures Journals & Publications Full Journal Archives Access Pediatric Dentistry Today Practice Management and Marketing Newsletter Pediatric Dentistry Journal Open Access Articles Oral ...

  2. Pediatric neuroimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tidwell, A.S.; Solano, M.; Schelling, S.H.

    1994-01-01

    In this article, some of the common and not-so-common neuropediatric disorders were discussed. As in the full-grown animal, abnormalities of the CNS in the pediatric animal patient may be classified according to the type of insult present (eg, malformation, injury, neoplasia, inflammation, or degeneration). To recognize the imaging manifestations of such disorders, an appreciation of normal anatomy, the pathological response of nervous system tissue to insult, and the principles of image interpretation is required. These fundamentals may then be applied to any CNS disease, regardless of frequency and to any animal patient, regardless of age

  3. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, J.A. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Computed tomography has made possible the excellent and basic work having to do with the characteristics of the trachea, its caliber, shape, and length in children. Another group of articles has to do with interventional pediatric radiology. This year there were a number of articles of which only a sample is included, dealing with therapeutic procedures involving drainage of abscesses, angioplasty, nephrostomy, therapeutic embolization, and the removal of esophageal foreign bodies. Obviously, there is no reason to think that techniques developed for the adult may not be applicable to the infant or child; also, there is no reason to believe that processes peculiar to the child should not be amenable to intervention, for instance, use of embolization of hepatic hemangioma and transluminal balloon valvuloplasty for pulmonary valvular stenosis. Among the reports and reviews, the author would add that sonography remains a basic imaging technique in pediatric radiology and each year its application broadens. For example, there is an excellent article having to do with sonography of the neonatal and infant hip and evaluation of the inferior vena cava and the gallbladder. Nuclear medicine continues to play a significant role in diagnosis, which is featured in two articles concerned with problems of the hip

  4. SILS: Is It Cost- and Time-Effective Compared to Standard Pediatric Laparoscopic Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Saidul; Adams, Stephen D; Mahomed, Anies A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to review our experience with single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) and to compare costs and operative time to standard laparoscopic surgery (SLS). A prospectively collected database of operative times and costs was analysed for the years 2008-2011. SILS cases were compared to standard laparoscopy on a procedure-matched basis. Patient demographics, on-table time and consumable costs were collated. Descriptive statistics and Mann-Whitney U-test were utilized with SPSS for windows. Analysis of the data demonstrate that neither consumable costs nor operative time were significantly different in each group. Comparing operative costs, SILS appendicectomy, nephrectomy/heminephrectomy, and ovarian cystectomy/oophorectomy showed cost benefit over SLS (£397 versus £467; £942 versus £1127; £394 versus £495). A trend toward higher cost for SILS Palomo procedure is noted (£734 versus £400). Operative time for SILS appendicectomy, nephrectomy/heminephrectomy, and Palomo was lower compared to SLS (60 versus 103 minutes[mins.]; 130 versus 60 mins.; 60 versus 80 mins.). In conclusion, SILS appears to be cost-effective for the common pediatric surgical operations. There is no significant difference in operating time in this series, but small sample size is a limiting factor. Studies with larger numbers will be necessary to validate these initial observations.

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) ... molecular information. In many centers, nuclear medicine images can be superimposed with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic ...

  6. Pediatric dermatopathology: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, Fatma S; Diniz, Gulden; Aktas, Safiye

    2017-08-01

    Dermatopathology is a subspecialty of pathology and dermatology involving correlation of clinical information with microscopic observations of skin biopsies to provide diagnostic information. Pediatric dermatology is a subspecialty of dermatology for which specific points need to be known for evaluating and managing skin disorders in children. The histopathological approach and other important factors for definitive diagnoses in pediatric dermatopathology are reviewed. Skin diseases in children are not necessarily smaller versions of those that develop in adults and some diaseases may be confined to pediatric age group. An experienced team of dermatology and pathology increases the success of skin biopsies in pediatric dermatology besides the excellent technical skills. The histopathologic findings of skin lesions in children should be evaluated by pediatric pathologists, who have a specific interest for pediatric dermatopathology, in close collaboration with pediatric dermatologists. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist and patient consultation. View full size with caption Related Articles and Media General Nuclear Medicine Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Epilepsy Images related to Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine ...

  8. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... navigate their brain tumor diagnosis. WATCH AND SHARE Brain tumors and their treatment can be deadly so ... Pediatric Central Nervous System Cancers Read more >> Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation 302 Ridgefield Court, Asheville, NC 28806 ...

  9. Pediatric Voiding Cystourethrogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scan for mobile link. Children's (Pediatric) Voiding Cystourethrogram A children’s (pediatric) voiding cystourethrogram uses fluoroscopy – a form of real-time x-ray – to examine a child’s bladder ...

  10. American Pediatric Surgical Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Pediatric Surgical Association Search for: Login Resources + For Members For Professionals For Training Program Directors For Media For ... Surgical Outcomes Surveys & Results Publications Continuing Education + ExPERT Pediatric Surgery NaT Annual Meeting CME MOC Requirements Residents / ...

  11. Pediatric heart surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... Ginther RM, Forbess JM. Pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass. In: ... Care . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 37. LeRoy S, ...

  12. Pediatric Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. Pediatric Celiac Disease If your child has celiac disease, ... physician. Established by the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) Celiac Disease Eosinophilic ...

  13. Pediatric Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric Thyroid Cancer Pediatric Thyroid Cancer Patient Health Information News media interested in ... and neck issues, should be consulted. Types of thyroid cancer in children: Papillary : This form of thyroid cancer ...

  14. Pediatric MATCH Infographic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infographic explaining NCI-COG Pediatric MATCH, a cancer treatment clinical trial for children and adolescents, from 1 to 21 years of age, that is testing the use of precision medicine for pediatric cancers.

  15. Annals of Pediatric Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Annals of Pediatric Surgery is striving to fill an important niche that provides focus to clinical care, technical innovation and clinical research. The Annals of Pediatric Surgery has the responsibility to serve not only pediatric surgeons in the Middle East and North Africa but also should be an important conduit for scientific ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the body. jaundice in newborns and older children. epilepsy . location, anatomy and function of the thyroid gland. ... General Nuclear Medicine Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Epilepsy Images related to Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Videos related to Children's (Pediatric) ...

  17. Radiodiagnosis in pediatrics today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baklanova, V.F.

    1982-01-01

    The fields of radiodiagnosis application in pediatrics are considered. The improvement of roentgenologic methods and application of various contrast proparations enable to study and precisely differentiate congenital and acquired diseases. The scope of roentgenology application in pediatrics extends due to differentiation of pediatric specialities. New methods of investigation with decreasing radiation exposure to minimal are realized [ru

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  19. Age Limit of Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Amy Peykoff; Hackell, Jesse M

    2017-09-01

    Pediatrics is a multifaceted specialty that encompasses children's physical, psychosocial, developmental, and mental health. Pediatric care may begin periconceptionally and continues through gestation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood. Although adolescence and young adulthood are recognizable phases of life, an upper age limit is not easily demarcated and varies depending on the individual patient. The establishment of arbitrary age limits on pediatric care by health care providers should be discouraged. The decision to continue care with a pediatrician or pediatric medical or surgical subspecialist should be made solely by the patient (and family, when appropriate) and the physician and must take into account the physical and psychosocial needs of the patient and the abilities of the pediatric provider to meet these needs. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  20. What Is a Pediatric Urologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Urologist? Page Content Article Body If your child ... treat your child. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Urologists Have? Pediatric urologists are medical doctors who ...

  1. What Is a Pediatric Neurosurgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Neurosurgeon? Page Content Article Body If your child ... childhood and adolescence. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Neurosurgeons Have? Pediatric neurosurgeons are medical doctors who ...

  2. What Is a Pediatric Gastroenterologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Gastroenterologist? Page Content Article Body If your child ... children, and teens. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Gastroenterologists Have? Pediatric gastroenterologists are medical doctors who ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of the ... abdomen using ultrasound. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  4. What Is a Pediatric Geneticist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Geneticist? Page Content Article Body Fortunately, most children ... with similar problems. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Geneticists Have? Pediatric geneticists are medical doctors who ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is ... a CT scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is ... a CT scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  7. Advances in pediatric dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Richard K; Best, Jed M

    2011-07-01

    This article addresses advances in 4 key areas related to pediatric dentistry: (1) caries detection tools, (2) early interventions to arrest disease progression, (3) caries-risk assessment tools, and (4) trends in pediatric procedures and dental materials. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pediatric Endocrinology Nurses Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Springs 2018! Wednesday, May 16, 2018 ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​ Journal of Pediatric Nursing The Journal of Pediatric Nursing provides original, peer-reviewed research that is ...

  9. Economics of pediatric burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Michael J; Phillips, Linda G

    2008-07-01

    Sustaining a burn injury sets in motion a cycle of pain, disfigurement, and a search for survival. In pediatric burns, the injury extends to the parents where fear, ignorance, and helplessness forever change their lives. Pediatric burn injuries are caused by fire, hot liquids, clothing irons, hair curlers, caustic substances like drain cleaner, the grounding of an electrical source, and exposure to radiation. Efficiency in the delivery of pediatric burn care is critical. Maximizing resource utilization means continual self-evaluation and economic analysis of therapeutic modalities. Griffiths et al found that most childhood burns are due to scalds, which can be treated for $1061 per percent burn. Paddock et al reduced the cost of treating superficial pediatric burns and reduced the length of stay in hospital using silver-impregnated gauze over traditional methods. Barrett et al found improved cosmesis of skin grafts using cultured epithelial autografts but at a substantially increased cost. Corpron et al showed that pediatric burn units that treat burns >10% total body surface area and operative treatment of pediatric burns regardless of size generate positive revenue. There is a paucity of evidentiary pediatric burn economic data. More research is needed to address areas of pediatric burn care inefficiency. Improving knowledge of cost in all health care endeavors will create competition and drive down expenditures.

  10. Pediatric inhalation injury

    OpenAIRE

    Sen, Soman

    2017-01-01

    Smoke inhalation injury can cause severe physiologic perturbations. In pediatric patients, these perturbations cause profound changes in cardiac and pulmonary physiology. In this review, we examine the pathology, early management options, ventilator strategy, and long-term outcomes in pediatric patients who have suffered a smoke inhalation injury.

  11. Social pediatrics: weaving horizontal and vertical threads through pediatric residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, Meta; Martimianakis, Maria Athina Tina; Levy, Rebecca; Atkinson, Adelle; Ford-Jones, Elizabeth; Shouldice, Michelle

    2017-01-13

    Social pediatrics teaches pediatric residents how to understand disease within their patients' social, environmental and political contexts. It's an essential component of pediatric residency training; however there is very little literature that addresses how such a broad-ranging topic can be taught effectively. The aim of this study was to determine and characterize social pediatric education in our pediatric residency training in order to identify strengths and gaps. A social pediatrics curriculum map was developed, attending to 3 different dimensions: (1) the intended curriculum as prescribed by the Objectives of Training for Pediatrics of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC), (2) the formal curriculum defined by rotation-specific learning objectives, and (3) the informal/hidden curriculum as reflected in resident and teacher experiences and perceptions. Forty-one social pediatric learning objectives were extracted from the RCPSC Objectives of Training for Pediatrics, most were listed in the Medical Expert (51%) and Health Advocate competencies (24%). Almost all RCPSC social pediatric learning objectives were identified in more than one rotation and/or seminar. Adolescent Medicine (29.2%), Pediatric Ambulatory Medicine (26.2%) and Developmental Pediatrics (25%) listed the highest proportion of social pediatric learning objectives. Four (10%) RCPSC social pediatric objectives were not explicitly named within learning objectives of the formal curriculum. The informal curriculum revealed that both teachers and residents viewed social pediatrics as integral to all clinical encounters. Perceived barriers to teaching and learning of social pediatrics included time constraints, particularly in a tertiary care environment, and the value of social pediatrics relative to medical expert knowledge. Despite the lack of an explicit thematic presentation of social pediatric learning objectives by the Royal College and residency training program

  12. Single-Incision Laparoscopic Surgery (SILS Assisted Sigma Resection Via Pfannenstiel Incision for Complicated Diverticulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Dietrich

    2014-02-01

    Results: The operation time ranged from 89 to 280 min. There were no conversions, and no additional trocars were used. The postoperative hospital stay ranged from 5 to 14 days. All patients were discharged without any intraoperative or postoperative complications. Conclusions: SILS sigma or anterior rectum resection for complicated diverticulitis can be performed via a Pfannenstiel incision. This approach provides direct visualization and access into the pelvis as well as the option to benefit from open surgery devices. The Pfannenstiel incision may generally be recommended for the favorable cosmetic effect and the very low rate of incisional hernias, as reported in the literature. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2014; 3(1.000: 10-15

  13. Impact of obesity on surgical outcome after single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Obuchi

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Our findings show that obesity, intended as a BMI ≥30 kg/m2, does not have an adverse impact on the technical difficulty and post-operative outcomes of SILC. Obesity-related comorbidities did not increase the risks for SILC.

  14. A triangulating operating platform enhances bimanual performance and reduces surgical workload in single-incision laparoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Erwin; Martinec, Danny V; Cassera, Maria A; Goers, Trudie A; Dunst, Christy M; Swanstrom, Lee L

    2011-03-01

    Single-site laparoscopy (SSL) attempts to further reduce the surgical impact of minimally invasive surgery. However, crossed instruments and the proximity of the endoscope to the operating instruments placed through one single site leads to inevitable instrument or trocar collision. We hypothesized that a novel, single-port, triangulating surgical platform (SPSP) might enhance performance by improving bimanual coordination and decreasing the surgeon's mental workload. Fourteen participants, proficient in basic laparoscopic skills, were tested on their ability to perform a validated intracorporeal suturing task by either an SSL approach with crossed articulated instruments or a novel SPSP, providing true-right and true-left manipulation. Standard laparoscopic (SL) access served as control. Sutures were evaluated using validated scoring methods and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index was used to rate mental workload. All participants proficiently performed intracorporeal knots by SL (mean score 99.0; 95% CI 97.0 to 100.9). Performance decreased significantly (more than 50%, p mental workload when using true-right and true-left manipulation. This study objectively assessed SSL performance and current attempts for instrumentation improvement in single-site access. While SSL significantly impairs basic laparoscopic skills, surgical platforms providing true-left and true-right maneuvering of instruments appear to be more intuitive and address some of the current challenges of SSL that may otherwise limit its widespread acceptance. Copyright © 2011 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Single Incision Distal Biceps Repair With Hemi-Krackow Suture Technique: Surgical Technique and Early Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Goljan, Peter; Patel, Nimit; Stull, Justin D.; Donnelly, Brandon P.; Culp, Randall W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many surgical methods exist for distal biceps repair. We present the technique and early outcomes of a series of distal biceps repairs completed with a novel suturing technique utilizing a hemi-Krackow locking stitch at the tendon-bone interface. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of patients who underwent primary distal biceps repair using a single anterior incision with 2 suture anchors utilizing a hemi-Krackow stitch. With both anchors, a locking stitch along the ten...

  16. Single incision versus reduced port splenectomy--searching for the best alternative to conventional laparoscopic splenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monclova, Julio Lopez; Targarona, Eduardo M; Vidal, Pablo; Peraza, Yerald; Garcia, Francisco; Otero, Carlos Rodriguez; Pallares, Luis; Balague, Carmen; Trias, Manuel

    2013-03-01

    Laparoscopic splenectomy (LS) is a well accepted approach for the treatment of multiple hematologic diseases. Single port access splenectomy (SPAS) emphasizes the concept of surgery through one small incision. The reduced port access splenectomy (RPAS) entails the use of fewer trocars of smaller sizes. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes after LS, SPAS, and RPAS, and to analyze the aesthetic result and patient satisfaction. We included patients who underwent LS (group 1, n = 15), SPAS (group 2, n = 8), and RPAS (group 3, n = 10) between June 2008 and February 2012, whose final spleen weight was less of 500 g. The outcome parameters analyzed were operative time, need of additional trocars, blood loss, blood transfusion, weight of the spleen, postoperative complications, and duration of hospital stay. To evaluate the cosmetic result, patients were asked to take the Body Image Questionnaire. Patients in group 3 were younger than group 1. Operative time was significantly longer in group 2 compared to groups 1 and 3 (83 ± 19 vs. 131 ± 43 vs. 81 ± 22 min, p = 0.01). There was no need to convert to open surgery in any group, nor were there differences in intra- or postoperative outcome. There were no differences between the groups in relation to the analgesic requirements. Twenty-two out of the 33 patients answered the questionnaire. There was a significant advantage in group 2 and 3 in the body image index with respect to group 1. There were no differences between groups 2 and 3 (7.3 ± 2.8 vs. 5.8 ± 1.3 vs. 5.1 ± 0.4, p RPAS is a good alternative to LS and SPAS. It improves the aesthetic results as compared to LS, whereas minimizes the technical challenges faced with SPAS.

  17. [Robotics in pediatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, J I

    2011-10-01

    Despite the extensive use of robotics in the adult population, the use of robotics in pediatrics has not been well accepted. There is still a lack of awareness from pediatric surgeons on how to use the robotic equipment, its advantages and indications. Benefit is still controversial. Dexterity and better visualization of the surgical field are one of the strong values. Conversely, cost and a lack of small instruments prevent the use of robotics in the smaller patients. The aim of this manuscript is to present the controversies about the use of robotics in pediatric surgery.

  18. Pediatric radiology; Kinderradiologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staatz, G. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Kinderradiologie; Honnef, D. [Universitaetsklinikum der RWTH Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Piroth, W. [HELIOS Klinikum Wuppertal Universitaetsklinik Witten/Herdecke, Wuppertal (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Radkow, T. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Radiologisches Inst.

    2007-07-01

    The book covers the actual knowledge on radiotherapy in pediatrics. The book contains 99 contributions in the following chapters: lungs and mediastinum, heart and cardiovascular system, neck, gastrointestinal tract, urogenital tract, musculoskeletal system, central nervous system.

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... its earliest stages as well as a patient’s immediate response to therapeutic interventions. Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine ... supplements and if he or she has any allergies. Also inform your doctor of any recent illnesses ...

  20. Annals of Pediatric Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annals of Pediatric Surgery. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 10, No 1 (2014) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... imaging techniques. top of page Additional Information and Resources The Alliance for Radiation Safety in Pediatric Imaging's " ... To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR- ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging ... stool. Your child should also drink plenty of water to help flush the radioactive material from his ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging ... computer aids in creating the images from the data obtained by the gamma camera. A probe is ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... View full size with caption Related Articles and Media General Nuclear Medicine Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) ... or your insurance provider to get a better understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is ... this time is PET/MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's ( ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging ... at birth) or that develop during childhood. Physicians use nuclear medicine imaging to evaluate organ systems, including ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging is performed to help diagnose childhood disorders that are congenital (present at birth) or that develop during childhood. Physicians use nuclear medicine imaging to ...

  9. Pediatric Ocular Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What are the most common causes of eye injuries in children? Pediatric eye trauma most often occurs at school ... should happen when a child gets an eye injury? A child that sustains an eye injury should seek immediate ...

  10. Pediatric Nephrolithiasis: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Tayaba; Kamat, Deepak

    2017-06-01

    The incidence of pediatric nephrolithiasis is on the rise. The composition of kidney stones in children is different than in adults, as most stones in children have a composition of calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate mixed with a small amount of uric acid. The symptoms of pediatric nephrolithiasis are nonspecific. Computed tomography (CT) is the gold standard for diagnosis; however, because of radiation exposure associated with a CT scan, ultrasonography is also an accepted modality for the diagnosis. Extensive metabolic evaluation is important to rule out an underlying metabolic disorder. Urinary decompression, medical expulsion therapy, and surgical interventions such as ureteroscopy and extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy are some of the options available for treating pediatric nephrolithiasis. [Pediatr Ann. 2017;46(6):e242-e244.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures result in low radiation exposure, acceptable for diagnostic exams. Thus, the radiation risk ... long-term adverse effects from such low-dose exposure. For more information about safety in pediatric radiology ...

  12. Nuclear medicine in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, A.F.G. da; Meguerian, B.A.; Moura Filho, R.S. de

    1981-01-01

    A brief review is done of radionuclide applications in pediatrics. The following subjects are commented: radioisotopic investigations of cardiovascular system; pulmonary system; liver; urinary tract; brain; subarachnoide space; thyroid and skeleton. (M.A.) [pt

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... child is taking as well as vitamins and herbal supplements and if he or she has any ... What are the limitations of Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine procedures can be time consuming. It ...

  14. Annals of Pediatric Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annals of Pediatric Surgery. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 7, No 1 (2011) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  15. Annals of Pediatric Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annals of Pediatric Surgery. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 14, No 1 (2018) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging is performed ... the thyroid gland. top of page How does the nuclear medicine procedure work? With ordinary x-ray ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: ... Related Articles and Media General Nuclear Medicine Children's (Pediatric) CT ( ...

  18. The pediatric knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Robert C

    2013-03-01

    Knee pain is a common problem in children and adolescents, and MRI of the knee is the most commonly performed pediatric cross-sectional musculoskeletal imaging exam. The purpose of this pictorial review is to highlight differences between adult and pediatric knee imaging with an emphasis on normal developmental variants, injury and disease patterns unique to children and adolescents, and differences in response and presentation to conditions affecting both adults and children.

  19. Pediatric vascular access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, James S.

    2006-01-01

    Pediatric interventional radiologists are ideally suited to provide vascular access services to children because of inherent safety advantages and higher success from using image-guided techniques. The performance of vascular access procedures has become routine at many adult interventional radiology practices, but this service is not as widely developed at pediatric institutions. Although interventional radiologists at some children's hospitals offer full-service vascular access, there is little or none at others. Developing and maintaining a pediatric vascular access service is a challenge. Interventionalists skilled in performing such procedures are limited at pediatric institutions, and institutional support from clerical staff, nursing staff, and technologists might not be sufficiently available to fulfill the needs of such a service. There must also be a strong commitment by all members of the team to support such a demanding service. There is a slippery slope of expected services that becomes steeper and steeper as the vascular access service grows. This review is intended primarily as general education for pediatric radiologists learning vascular access techniques. Additionally, the pediatric or adult interventional radiologist seeking to expand services might find helpful tips. The article also provides education for the diagnostic radiologist who routinely interprets radiographs containing vascular access devices. (orig.)

  20. Cerebral imaging in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, I.

    1998-01-01

    Radioisotope brain imaging has focused mainly on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). However the use of ligand which go to specific receptor sites is being introduced in pediatrics, mainly psychiatry. rCBF is potentially available in many institutions, especially with the availability of multi-headed gamma cameras. The use of this technique in pediatrics requires special attention to detail in the manner of data acquisition and handling the child. The interpretation of the rCBF study in a child requires knowledge of normal brain maturation. The major clinical use in pediatrics is epilepsy because of the advances in surgery and the frequency of complex partial seizures. Other indications in pediatric neurology include brain death, acute neurological loss including stroke, language disorders, cerebral palsy, hypertension due to renovascular disease, traumatic brain injury and migraine. There are pediatric physiological conditions in which rCBF has been undertaken, these include anorexia nervosa, autism, Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) and attention deficit disorder-hyperactivity (ADHD). Research using different ligands to specific receptor sites will also be reviewed in pediatrics

  1. Cerebral imaging in pediatrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, I. [London, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children (United Kingdom)

    1998-06-01

    Radioisotope brain imaging has focused mainly on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). However the use of ligand which go to specific receptor sites is being introduced in pediatrics, mainly psychiatry. rCBF is potentially available in many institutions, especially with the availability of multi-headed gamma cameras. The use of this technique in pediatrics requires special attention to detail in the manner of data acquisition and handling the child. The interpretation of the rCBF study in a child requires knowledge of normal brain maturation. The major clinical use in pediatrics is epilepsy because of the advances in surgery and the frequency of complex partial seizures. Other indications in pediatric neurology include brain death, acute neurological loss including stroke, language disorders, cerebral palsy, hypertension due to renovascular disease, traumatic brain injury and migraine. There are pediatric physiological conditions in which rCBF has been undertaken, these include anorexia nervosa, autism, Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) and attention deficit disorder-hyperactivity (ADHD). Research using different ligands to specific receptor sites will also be reviewed in pediatrics.

  2. Do pediatric gastroenterology doctors address pediatric obesity?

    OpenAIRE

    Batra, Suruchi; Yee, Caitlin; Diez, Bernadette; Nguyen, Nicholas; Sheridan, Michael J; Tufano, Mark; Sikka, Natalie; Townsend, Stacie; Hourigan, Suchitra

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To assess how often obesity is acknowledged at pediatric gastroenterology outpatient visits. Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed to identify obese children seen at a gastroenterology subspecialty clinic over a 1-year period of time; 132 children were identified. Demographics, obesity comorbidities, reasons for referral, diagnosis of obesity, and a plan to address obesity were abstracted. Chi-square or Fisher?s exact tests were used to examine statistical associatio...

  3. Pediatric antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimaz, Rolando; Descloux, Elodie

    2006-08-01

    APS is rare in the pediatric age, but it represents an interesting phenomenon because most of the known "second hit" risk factors such as atherosclerosis, smoking, hypertension, contraceptive hormonal treatment, and pregnancy are not present in childhood. This could also be the reason for the prevalence of some clinical manifestations rather than others in PAPS. On the other hand, the increased frequency of infectious processes in the childhood age is likely responsible for the relatively high prevalence of non-pathogenic and transient aPL. Such points raise the problem of a different diagnosis or monitoring approach in pediatric APS. Of particular interest is the special entity of neonatal APS, which represents an in vivo model of acquired autoimmune disease, in which transplacentally acquired aPL cause thrombosis in the newborn. International registries for pediatric and neonatal APS are currently in place; epidemiologic, clinical, and laboratory re-search will help to shed light on all the still obscure aspects of this fascinating but rare disorder in the very young. Finally, treatment is less aggressive overall in pediatric APS, given the reluctance to anticoagulate children over the long term. Studies on the outcome of pediatric APS and the relative risks of prolonged anticoagulation in children are necessary to determine the type and duration of anticoagulation therapy.

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of ... 30 minutes. top of page What will my child experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound examinations ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose in X- ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) ... are the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric ... cross-sectional images generated during a CT scan can be reformatted in multiple planes, and can even ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, ...

  9. What Is a Pediatric Endocrinologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and testicular dysfunction Diabetes Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) Obesity Problems with Vitamin D (rickets, hypocalcemia) Where Can I Find A Pediatric Endocrinologist? Pediatric endocrinologists practice in a variety of ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  11. NCI Pediatric Preclinical Testing Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI has awarded grants to five research teams to participate in its Pediatric Preclinical Testing Consortium, which is intended to help to prioritize which agents to pursue in pediatric clinical trials.

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  13. PET imaging in pediatric oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shulkin, B.L.

    2004-01-01

    High-quality PET imaging of pediatric patients is challenging and requires attention to issues commonly encountered in the practice of pediatric nuclear medicine, but uncommon to the imaging of adult patients. These include intravenous access, fasting, sedation, consent, and clearance of activity from the urinary tract. This paper discusses some technical differences involved in pediatric PET to enhance the quality of scans and assure the safety and comfort of pediatric patients. (orig.)

  14. Pediatric nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    This symposium presented the latest techniques and approaches to the proper medical application of radionuclides in pediatrics. An expert faculty, comprised of specialists in the field of pediatric nuclear medicine, discussed the major indications as well as the advantages and potential hazards of nuclear medicine procedures compared to other diagnostic modalities. In recent years, newer radiopharmaceuticals labeled with technetium-99m and other short-lived radionuclides with relatively favorable radiation characteristics have permitted a variety of diagnostic studies that are very useful clinically and carry a substantially lower radiation burden then many comparable X-ray studies. This new battery of nuclear medicine procedures is now widely available for diagnosis and management of pediatric patients. Many recent research studies in children have yielded data concerning the effacacy of these procedures, and current recommendations will be presented by those involved in conducting such studies. Individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  15. Integrative Pediatrics: Looking Forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary McClafferty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Increase in the prevalence of disease and illness has dramatically altered the landscape of pediatrics. As a result, there is a demand for pediatricians with new skills and a sharper focus on preventative health. Patient demand and shifting pediatric illness patterns have accelerated research in the field of pediatric integrative medicine. This emerging field can be defined as healing-oriented medicine that considers the whole child, including all elements of lifestyle and family health. It is informed by evidence and carefully weighs all appropriate treatment options. This Special Issue of Children, containing a collection of articles written by expert clinicians, represents an important educational contribution to the field. The goal of the edition is to raise awareness about integrative topics with robust supporting evidence, and to identify areas where more research is needed.

  16. Radiology illustrated. Pediatric radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In-One (ed.) [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-11-01

    Depicts characteristic imaging findings of common and uncommon diseases in the pediatric age group. Will serve as an ideal diagnostic reference in daily practice. Offers an excellent teaching aid, with numerous high-quality illustrations. This case-based atlas presents images depicting the findings typically observed when imaging a variety of common and uncommon diseases in the pediatric age group. The cases are organized according to anatomic region, covering disorders of the brain, spinal cord, head and neck, chest, cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal system, genitourinary system, and musculoskeletal system. Cases are presented in a form resembling teaching files, and the images are accompanied by concise informative text. The goal is to provide a diagnostic reference suitable for use in daily routine by both practicing radiologists and radiology residents or fellows. The atlas will also serve as a teaching aide and a study resource, and will offer pediatricians and surgeons guidance on the clinical applications of pediatric imaging.

  17. Pediatric neurology and neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diebler, C.

    1987-01-01

    In this book, a neuroradiologist and a neuropediatrician have combined forces to provide the widest possible knowledge in investigating cranial and cerebral disorders in infancy and childhood. Based on more than 20,000 pediatric CT examinations, with a follow-up time often exceeding ten years, the book aims to bridge interdisciplinary gaps and help radiologists, pediatricians and neurosurgeons solve the various problems of pediatric neuroradiology that frequently confront them. For each disease, the etiology, clinical manifestations, pathological lesions and radiological presentations are discussed, supported by extensive illustrations. Malformative, vascular, traumatic, tumoral, infectious and metabolic diseases are reviewed. Miscellaneous conditions presenting particular symptoms or syndromes are also studied, such as hydrocephalus and neurological complications of leukemia. The combined expertise and experience contained in this volume make it an outstanding reference work in the field of pediatric neuroradiology. (orig./MG)

  18. Radiology illustrated. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In-One

    2014-01-01

    Depicts characteristic imaging findings of common and uncommon diseases in the pediatric age group. Will serve as an ideal diagnostic reference in daily practice. Offers an excellent teaching aid, with numerous high-quality illustrations. This case-based atlas presents images depicting the findings typically observed when imaging a variety of common and uncommon diseases in the pediatric age group. The cases are organized according to anatomic region, covering disorders of the brain, spinal cord, head and neck, chest, cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal system, genitourinary system, and musculoskeletal system. Cases are presented in a form resembling teaching files, and the images are accompanied by concise informative text. The goal is to provide a diagnostic reference suitable for use in daily routine by both practicing radiologists and radiology residents or fellows. The atlas will also serve as a teaching aide and a study resource, and will offer pediatricians and surgeons guidance on the clinical applications of pediatric imaging.

  19. Pediatric nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelfand, M.J.; Hannon, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology methods have had less impact upon pediatric cardiology than upon adult cardiology. Most pediatric heart disease results from congenital malformations of the heart and great vessels, which is usually discovered in infancy, and is most often treated definitively in infancy or early childhood. Unfortunately, nuclear medicine techniques are limited in their spatial resolution - structures that overlie each other are separated with difficulty. As a result, nuclear cardiology is usually of limited value in the anatomic characterization of the congenital heart abnormalities. Nevertheless, it has been useful in the detection and quantification of the pathophysiologic consequences of many congenital cardiac malformations. The authors review application of nuclear medicine in pediatric cardiology, and attempt to assess each in terms of its clinical utility

  20. Pediatric postprimary pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shewchuk, Jason R.; Reed, Martin H.

    2002-01-01

    Heading AbstractBackground. Postprimary pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is not commonly seen in children.Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine the radiographic findings and patient characteristics of pediatric postprimary pulmonary TB.Materials and methods. We reviewed the clinical charts and chest radiographs in six patients.Results. The radiographic findings of pediatric postprimary pulmonary TB include upper-lobe consolidation and cavitation, multifocal ill-defined airspace opacities, evidence of prior pulmonary TB, and apical pleural thickening. Pleural effusions and lymphadenopathy are not commonly present. Although postprimary disease typically does not affect young children, five of the children in this series were less than ten years of age at the time of presentation.Conclusion The possibility of postprimary TB should be considered in pediatric patients at risk for this disease who present with upper-lobe pulmonary consolidation and cavitation. These patients are highly infectious and early recognition and treatment can limit transmission of TB. (orig.)

  1. Pediatric nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This symposium presented the latest techniques and approaches to the proper medical application of radionuclides in pediatrics. An expert faculty, comprised of specialists in the field of pediatric nuclear medicine, discussed the major indications as well as the advantages and potential hazards of nuclear medicine procedures compared to other diagnostic modalities. In recent years, newer radiopharmaceuticals labeled with technetium-99m and other short-lived radionuclides with relatively favorable radiation characteristics have permitted a variety of diagnostic studies that are very useful clinically and carry a substantially lower radiation burden then many comparable X-ray studies. This new battery of nuclear medicine procedures is now widely available for diagnosis and management of pediatric patients. Many recent research studies in children have yielded data concerning the effacacy of these procedures, and current recommendations will be presented by those involved in conducting such studies. Individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base

  2. [Arrhythmias in pediatric patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauersfeld, U; Pfammatter, J P

    2004-04-01

    Arrhythmias in children occur frequently as isolated phenomena, however, may also represent comorbidities of congenital heart disease. Therefore electrophysiologic assessments must include morphologic and hemodynamic evaluations. Besides the arrhythmias commonly seen in adults children present with arrhythmias unique to pediatric patients. Antiarrhythmic therapy depends on patient age, expected natural history of the arrhythmia and possible congenital heart disease. As in adult patients in addition to antiarrhythmic drug therapy radiofrequency catheter ablation is a preferred definitive treatment especially in patients with supraventricular tachycardias. Bradycardias can be successfully treated with pacing systems which can already be implanted in the newborn period. As antiarrhythmic treatment in pediatric patients may be very complex a referral to a pediatric cardiology center is recommended.

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful ... of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging ( ... the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  7. Advanced Pediatric Airway Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, Charles M; Jabbour, Noel

    2017-10-01

    Simulation is an emerging and viable means to increase pediatric airway surgical training. A variety of simulators currently exist that may be used or modified for laryngoscopy, bronchoscopy, and endoscopic intervention, although anatomic realism and utility for complex procedures are limited. There is a need for further development of improved endoscopic and anatomic models. Innovative techniques are enabling small-scale manufacturing of generalizable and patient-specific simulators. The high acuity of the pediatric airway patient makes the use of simulation an attractive modality for training, competency maintenance, and patient safety quality-improvement studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Orthobiologics in Pediatric Orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Robert F; Mooney, James F

    2017-07-01

    Orthobiologics are biologic devices or products used in orthopedic surgery to augment or enhance bone formation. The use of orthobiologics in pediatric orthopedics is less frequent than in other orthopedic subspecialties, mainly due to the naturally abundant healing potential and bone formation in children compared with adults. However, orthobiologics are used in certain situations in pediatric orthopedics, particularly in spine and foot surgery. Other uses have been reported in conjunction with specific procedures involving the tibia and pelvis. The use of bioabsorable implants to stabilize children's fractures is an emerging concept but has limited supporting data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Psychological issues in pediatric obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurvinder Kalra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric obesity is a major health problem and has reached epidemiological proportions today. The present paper reviews major psychological issues in pediatric obesity from a developmental perspective. Research and literature has shown that a number of developmental, family, maternal and child factors are responsible in the genesis of pediatric obesity. Family food habits, early developmental lifestyle of the child, parenting, early family relationships and harmony all contribute towards the growth and development of a child. The present review focuses on the role of developmental psychological factors in the pathogenesis of pediatric obesity and highlights the developmental factors that must be kept in mind when evaluating a case of pediatric obesity.

  10. Attention for pediatric interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Ming; Cheng Yongde

    2005-01-01

    Radiological interventions possess wide utilization in the diagnosis and treatment for pediatric patients. Pediatric interventional radiology is an important branch of interventional radiology and also an important branch of pediatric radiology. Pediatric interventional radiology has grown substantially over the last 30 years, radiologists closely cooperation with surgeons and other physicians providing a new horizon in the management of pediatric diseases in western countries. It includes pediatric cardiac interventional radiology, pediatric neuro-interventional radiology, pediatric vascular interventional radiology, pediatric nonvascular interventional radiology, pediatric tumor interventional radiology and others. In the United States, every children hospital which owns two hundred beds has to have special trained interventional radiologists in radiologic department installing with advanced digital subtraction angiographic equipment. Interventional therapeutic procedures and diagnostic angiography have been proceeding more and more for the congenital and acquired diseases of children. The promising results give use uprising and interventional therapy as an alternative or a replacement or supplement to surgical operation. Pediatric interventional radiology is rather underdeveloped in China with a few special pediatric interventional radiologist, lack of digital subtraction angiography equipment. Pediatric radiologists have no enough field for interventional procedures such as pediatric neuro-interventional radiology and pediatric vascular interventional radiology. In the contrary adult interventional radiologists do have better interventional jobs in China and Pediatric cardiologists also share the same trend. They perform angiocardiography for congenital heart diseases and treat congenital heart disease with interventional procedures including balloon dilation of valves and vessels, coil embolization of collaterals, patent ducts and other arterial fistulae

  11. Pediatric organ donation and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Jennifer K; Myrick, Craig W; Meyers, Rebecka L; Bratton, Susan L; Nakagawa, Thomas A

    2013-06-01

    There is increasing unmet need for solid organ donation. Alternative donor sources, such as donation after circulatory determination of death (DCDD), are needed. The objective of this study was to examine the impact of DCDD on trends in pediatric organ donation and transplantation. Data were obtained from the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network for US organ recipients and donors from 2001 to 2010 stratified according to age, organ, and deceased donor type (DCDD or donation after neurologic determination of death). Additional data included transplant wait-list removals due to death. From 2001 to 2010, pediatric organ transplant recipients increased from 1170 to 1475. Organs from DCDD donors were transplanted into children infrequently but increased from 1 to 31. Pediatric donation after neurologic determination of death decreased by 13% whereas DCDD increased by 174% (50 to 137). Recipients of pediatric grafts decreased from 3042 to 2751. Adults receiving grafts from pediatric donors decreased from 2243 to 1780; children receiving pediatric grafts increased from 799 to 971. Transplant recipients receiving pediatric DCDD grafts were few but increased annually from 50 to 128 adults and 0 to 9 children. Pediatric candidates dying waiting for an organ decreased from 262 to 110. From 2001 to 2010, children received more solid organ transplants and fewer children died waiting. Organ recovery from pediatric and adult DCDD donors increased. The number of pediatric recipients of DCDD grafts remains small. Adults primarily receive the direct benefit from pediatric DCDD but other changes in organ allocation have directly benefited children.

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... such low-dose exposure. For more information about safety in pediatric radiology procedures, visit the Image Gently ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... decades, and there are no known long-term adverse effects from such low-dose exposure. For more information about safety in pediatric radiology procedures, visit the Image Gently website . Allergic reactions to radiopharmaceuticals may occur but are extremely rare ...

  15. Pitfalls in pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelkemier, Dawn R.; Taylor, George A.

    2015-01-01

    This essay depicts some of the diagnostic errors identified in a large academic pediatric imaging department during a 13-year period. Our aim is to illustrate potential situations in which errors are more likely to occur and more likely to cause harm, and to share our difficult cases so other radiologists might learn without having to experience those situations themselves. (orig.)

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also very helpful. Often, a monitor with children's programming and/or children’s DVDs are available in the ... The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media General Nuclear Medicine Children's (Pediatric) CT ( ...

  17. Pediatric acute lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dahlem, P.; van Aalderen, W. M. C.; Bos, A. P.

    2007-01-01

    Among ventilated children, the incidence of acute lung injury (ALI) was 9%; of that latter group 80% developed the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The population-based prevalence of pediatric ARDS was 5.5 cases/100.000 inhabitants. Underlying diseases in children were septic shock (34%),

  18. Pediatric brainstem oligodendroglioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Mohindra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors present the first report of pediatric brainstem oligodendroglioma, infiltrating midbrain, and medulla oblongata. The report details clinical features, radiological findings, and surgical steps. As this entity is exceedingly uncommon, the overall epidemiology, prognosis, and long-term outcome remain far from established.

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... both imaging exams at the same time. An emerging imaging technology, but not readily available at this time is PET/MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging is performed to help diagnose childhood disorders ...

  20. Pediatric acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodack, Marie I

    2010-10-01

    Although pediatric patients are sometimes included in studies about visual problems in patients with acquired brain injury (ABI), few studies deal solely with children. Unlike studies dealing with adult patients, in which mechanisms of brain injury are divided into cerebral vascular accident (CVA) and traumatic brain injury (TBI), studies on pediatric patients deal almost exclusively with traumatic brain injury, specifically caused by accidents. Here we report on the vision problems of 4 pediatric patients, ages 3 to 18 years, who were examined in the ophthalmology/optometry clinic at a children's hospital. All patients had an internally caused brain injury and after the initial insult manifested problems in at least one of the following areas: acuity, binocularity, motility (tracking or saccades), accommodation, visual fields, and visual perceptual skills. Pediatric patients can suffer from a variety of oculo-visual problems after the onset of head injury. These patients may or may not be symptomatic and can benefit from optometric intervention. Copyright © 2010 American Optometric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Pediatric Low Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Pediatric Low Vision What is Low Vision? Partial vision loss that cannot be corrected causes ... and play. What are the signs of Low Vision? Some signs of low vision include difficulty recognizing ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... radioactive energy that is emitted from the patient's body and converts it into an image. The gamma camera itself does not emit any ... about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × ... Related Articles and Media General Nuclear Medicine Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) ...

  3. Pharmacotherapy of Pediatric Insomnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Judith A.

    2009-01-01

    General guidelines for the use of medication to treat pediatric insomnia are presented. It should be noted that medication is not the first treatment choice and should be viewed within the context of a more comprehensive treatment plan. The pharmacological and clinical properties of over the counter medications and FDA-approved insomnia drugs are…

  4. Pediatric Urinary Tract Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    SBA National Resource Center: 800-621-3141 Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections and Catheterization in Children with Neurogenic Bladder and ... To protect the kidneys from damage – By preventing urinary tract infections (UTI) – By identifying and treating vesicoureteral remux (VUR). ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... radioactive energy that is emitted from the patient's body and converts it into an image. The gamma camera itself does not emit any ... View full size with caption Related Articles and Media General Nuclear ... to Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Videos related ...

  6. Pediatric parechovirus infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esposito, Susanna; Rahamat-Langendoen, Janette; Ascolese, Beatrice; Senatore, Laura; Castellazzi, Luca; Niesters, Hubert G. M.

    Human parechoviruses (HPeVs) are members of the large and growing family of Picornaviridae. Although 16 types have been described on the basis of the phylogenetic analyses of the VP1 encoding region, the majority of published reports relate to the HPeV types 1-8. In pediatrics, HPeV1, HPeV2 and

  7. Pediatric parechovirus infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esposito, S.; Rahamat-Langendoen, J.C.; Ascolese, B.; Senatore, L.; Castellazzi, L.; Niesters, H.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Human parechoviruses (HPeVs) are members of the large and growing family of Picornaviridae. Although 16 types have been described on the basis of the phylogenetic analyses of the VP1 encoding region, the majority of published reports relate to the HPeV types 1-8. In pediatrics, HPeV1, HPeV2 and

  8. Annals of Pediatric Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Annals of Pediatric Surgery is striving to fill an important niche that provides focus to clinical care, technical innovation and clinical research. ... Nonconventionalmesocaval prosthetic shunt interposition in refractory case with portal hypertension in a 10-kg female infant · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL ...

  9. Acupuncture for Pediatric Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda Golianu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain is a growing problem in children, with prevalence as high as 30.8%. Acupuncture has been found to be useful in many chronic pain conditions, and may be of clinical value in a multidisciplinary treatment program. The basic principles of acupuncture are reviewed, as well as studies exploring basic mechanisms of acupuncture and clinical efficacy. Conditions commonly treated in the pediatric pain clinic, including headache, abdominal pain, fibromyalgia, juvenile arthritis, complex regional pain syndrome, cancer pain, as well as perioperative pain studies are reviewed and discussed. Areas in need of further research are identified, and procedural aspects of acupuncture practice and safety studies are reviewed. Acupuncture can be an effective adjuvant in the care of pediatric patients with painful conditions, both in a chronic and an acute setting. Further studies, including randomized controlled trials, as well as trials of comparative effectiveness are needed.

  10. Pediatric obesity. An introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanovski, Jack A

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of child and adolescent obesity in the United States increased dramatically between 1970 and 2000, and there are few indications that the rates of childhood obesity are decreasing. Obesity is associated with myriad medical, psychological, and neurocognitive abnormalities that impact children's health and quality of life. Genotypic variation is important in determining the susceptibility of individual children to undue gains in adiposity; however, the rapid increase in pediatric obesity prevalence suggests that changes to children's environments and/or to their learned behaviors may dramatically affect body weight regulation. This paper presents an overview of the epidemiology, consequences, and etiopathogenesis of pediatric obesity, serving as a general introduction to the subsequent papers in this Special Issue that address aspects of childhood obesity and cognition in detail. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Hippocrates on Pediatric Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgantzos, Markos; Tsoucalas, Gregory; Karamanou, Marianna; Giatsiou, Styliani; Tsoukalas, Ioannis; Androutsos, George

    2015-01-01

    Hippocrates of Kos is well known in medicine, but his contributions to pediatric dermatology have not previously been examined. A systematic study of Corpus Hippocraticum was undertaken to document references of clinical and historical importance of pediatric dermatology. In Corpus Hippocraticum, a variety of skin diseases are described, along with proposed treatments. Hippocrates rejected the theory of the punishment of the Greek gods and supported the concept that dermatologic diseases resulted from a loss of balance in the body humors. Many of the terms that Hippocrates and his pupils used are still being used today. Moreover, he probably provided one of the first descriptions of skin findings in smallpox, Henoch-Schönlein purpura (also known as anaphylactoid purpura, purpura rheumatica, allergic purpura), and meningococcal septicemia. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Acupuncture for Pediatric Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golianu, Brenda; Yeh, Ann Ming; Brooks, Meredith

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain is a growing problem in children, with prevalence as high as 30.8%. Acupuncture has been found to be useful in many chronic pain conditions, and may be of clinical value in a multidisciplinary treatment program. The basic principles of acupuncture are reviewed, as well as studies exploring basic mechanisms of acupuncture and clinical efficacy. Conditions commonly treated in the pediatric pain clinic, including headache, abdominal pain, fibromyalgia, juvenile arthritis, complex regional pain syndrome, cancer pain, as well as perioperative pain studies are reviewed and discussed. Areas in need of further research are identified, and procedural aspects of acupuncture practice and safety studies are reviewed. Acupuncture can be an effective adjuvant in the care of pediatric patients with painful conditions, both in a chronic and an acute setting. Further studies, including randomized controlled trials, as well as trials of comparative effectiveness are needed. PMID:27417472

  13. Acitretin in pediatric dermatoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjyot Gautam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acitretin, a synthetic retinoid and the active metabolite of etretinate has been increasingly used over the past two decades. It has proved effective in the treatment of many conditions associated with hyperkeratosis and dyskeratosis. A Google scholar search for the use of acitretin in pediatric dermatoses was done using the words “pediatric dermatoses,” “acitretin,” “etretinate,” “systemic retinoids,” “psoriasis,” “pityriasis rubra pilaris,” “ichthyoses,” “disorders of keratinization,” “Darier's disease,” “palmoplantar keratoderma,” “verrucae,” “lichen planus,” “lupus erythematosus,” and “lichen sclerosus.” All the articles were retrieved and classified into review articles, studies, double-blinded trials, and case reports. The final data were then analyzed and presented in a narrative fashion. It has been found that acitretin is useful in a number of pediatric dermatoses. It is preferred over other drugs in pustular psoriasis. Good results can be obtained in various disorders of keratinization, and it may even prove life-saving in conditions like harlequin ichthyosis. However, long-term maintenance therapy is required and exacerbations are known on discontinuing the drug. It can also be used as alternative therapy for many other pediatric dermatoses where the primary treatment has failed. Acitretin should be used even in children for the proper indications. However, proper clinical and laboratory surveillance has to be maintained in patients on long-term acitretin.

  14. Canine pediatric dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Amy J; Fiani, Nadine; Verstraete, Frank J M

    2014-03-01

    The oral examination is an important part of the physical examination of every patient. In neonate and adolescent dogs, it is important to inspect the oral cavity for congenital and acquired dental and oral pathology. This article reviews the more common pediatric and juvenile dental anomalies that affect dogs in order to provide a resource for the basic understanding of the oral cavity in these patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Pediatric Toxic Shock Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Yee, Jennifer; King, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Audience: This scenario was developed to educate emergency medicine residents on the diagnosis and management of a pediatric patient with toxic shock syndrome. The case is also appropriate for teaching of medical students and advanced practice providers, as well as a review of the principles of crisis resource management, teamwork, and communication. Introduction: Toxic shock syndrome is a low-frequency, high-acuity scenario requiring timely identification and aggressive management....

  16. Emergency pediatric radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carty, H. [ed.

    1999-11-01

    This unique book covers the main clinical presentations of children to an emergency room and considers in detail the radiological investigation of such emergencies. Numerous high-quality illustrations of the radiological manifestations of acutely presenting illness in children ensure that the volume will serve as a rapid reference source for both pediatricians and radiologists. All of the authors are specialist pediatric radiologists who provide emergency radiological services on a daily basis, and the text reflects this level of expertise. (orig.)

  17. Introduction to pediatric oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McWhirter, W.R.; Masel, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book covers the varied and complex aspects of management in pediatric oncology. Emphasis is placed on a team approach and on establishing and maintaining an individualized, humanistic relationships with the patient. Numerous illustrations show modern imaging techniques that are proving most valuable in the investigation of suspected or confirmed childhood cancer. Physical and psychological side effects of short-term and long-term treatment are also discussed.

  18. Pediatric palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trapanotto Manuela

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The WHO defines pediatric palliative care as the active total care of the child's body, mind and spirit, which also involves giving support to the family. Its purpose is to improve the quality of life of young patients and their families, and in the vast majority of cases the home is the best place to provide such care, but for cultural, affective, educational and organizational reasons, pediatric patients rarely benefit from such an approach. In daily practice, it is clear that pediatric patients experience all the clinical, psychological, ethical and spiritual problems that severe, irreversible disease and death entail. The international literature indicates a prevalence of incurable disease annually affecting 10/10,000 young people from 0 to 19 years old, with an annual mortality rate of 1/10,000 young people from birth to 17 years old. The needs of this category of patients, recorded in investigations conducted in various parts of the world, reveal much the same picture despite geographical, cultural, organizational and social differences, particularly as concerns their wish to be treated at home and the demand for better communications between the professionals involved in their care and a greater availability of support services. Different patient care models have been tested in Italy and abroad, two of institutional type (with children staying in hospitals for treating acute disease or in pediatric hospices and two based at home (the so-called home-based hospitalization and integrated home-based care programs. Professional expertise, training, research and organization provide the essential foundations for coping with a situation that is all too often underestimated and neglected.

  19. Pediatric allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharpe, Chet A; Kemp, Stephen F

    2015-02-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a common pediatric problem with significant comorbidities and potential complications. This article is an overview of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and current therapeutic strategies. Allergic rhinitis management in a specific child is age dependent and influenced by the severity and frequency of the symptoms and the presence of any concurrent conditions. Current strategies permit symptomatic control and improved quality of life for most patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Interventional bronchoscopy in pediatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, L; Litzler, S; Tran, T M H; Mihailidou, E

    2007-12-01

    There is a wide range of indications for therapeutic bronchoscopy in children today: foreign body removal, bronchoaspiration, endoscopy-assisted tracheal intubation, selective intubation and airway management during thoracic surgery or in children undergoing mechanical ventilation. Some adult-derived methods may find potential indications in pediatric patients: airway stenosis dilation, laser photoresection, tracheobronchial stenting. There are no rules regarding such procedures in children, and supposed benefits have to be weighted against those of more conventional therapies.

  1. Pediatric Hypovitaminosis D

    OpenAIRE

    Rafiu Ariganjoye MD, MBA, FAAP, FAIHQ, CPE, CHCQM

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin D, a secosteroid, is essential for the development and maintenance of healthy bone in both the adult and pediatric populations. Low level of 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25-(OH)-D) is highly prevalent in children worldwide and has been linked to various adverse health outcomes including rickets, osteomalacia, osteomalacic myopathy, sarcopenia, and weakness, growth retardation, hypocalcemia, seizure and tetany, autism, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, cancers (prostate, colon, brea...

  2. Pediatric Tibial Osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Brad; Street, Matthew; Leigh, Warren; Crawford, Haemish

    2016-01-01

    Osteomyelitis shows a strong predilection for the tibia in the pediatric population and is a significant source of complications. The purpose of this article is to retrospectively review a large series of pediatric patients with tibial osteomyelitis. We compare our experience with that in the literature to determine any factors that may aid diagnosis and/or improve treatment outcomes. A 10-year retrospective review was performed of clinical records of all cases of pediatric tibial osteomyelitis managed at the 2 children's orthopaedic departments in the Auckland region. The Osteomyelitis Database was used to identify all cases between 1997 and 2007, at Starship Children's Hospital, and 1998 and 2008 at Middlemore's Kids First Hospital. One hundred ninety-one patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria, and had a review of clinical notes and relevant investigations. The average duration of symptoms before presentation to hospital was 5.7 days. Less than 40% of patients had a recent episode of trauma. Almost 60% of patients could not bear weight on admission. Over 40% of patients had a temperature above 38°C. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was elevated in 78% and the C-reactive protein was elevated in 90% of patients. In total, 42% of blood cultures and almost 75% of tissue cultures were positive, with Staphylococcus aureus being the most commonly cultured organism. X-rays, bone scans, and magnetic resonance imaging were all used to aid the diagnosis. About 43% of patients had surgery. Treatment length was an average of 2 weeks 6 days of intravenous antibiotics followed by 3 weeks 2 days of oral treatment. Six postsurgical complications and 46 readmissions were noted: 25 for relapse, with the remainder due to social and antibiotic-associated complications. Although generally diagnosed on presentation, pediatric tibial osteomyelitis can require more sophisticated investigations and prolonged management. Treatment with intravenous and oral antibiotics and surgical

  3. Pediatric Neck Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Machado de Carvalho

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction  Neck masses include a wide variety of diagnostic possibilities, with more than 60 etiologies that depend on clinical aspects such as age, location and time of disease progression. The interview and physical examination guide research that cross the neck masses in pediatric patients in 3 groups: infectious / inflammatory, and neoplastic embryonic remnants. The aim of this study was to present a protocol for evaluation of neck masses in the pediatric age group, based on a review of literature on the subject and experience of this service. Materials and Methods Survey of literature data from PubMed / Medline, Google Scholar and Scopus Database without language restriction, since 1980 sources, with the MeSH term "Pediatric neck mass".  Results Prepared flowchart guidelines to be followed according with diagnostic suspicions. Patients were divided into 3 groups according to the initial clinical manifestations and according to etiological hypotheses formulated recommend evaluations protocols.  Conclusion The standardization of the evaluation of neck masses in children proves valuable and can help in the differential diagnosis of different etiologies involved.

  4. Obesity in pediatric trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Cordelie E; Arbabi, Saman; Nathens, Avery B; Vavilala, Monica S; Rivara, Frederick P

    2017-04-01

    The implications of childhood obesity on pediatric trauma outcomes are not clearly established. Anthropomorphic data were recently added to the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) Research Datasets, enabling a large, multicenter evaluation of the effect of obesity on pediatric trauma patients. Children ages 2 to 19years who required hospitalization for traumatic injury were identified in the 2013-2014 NTDB Research Datasets. Age and gender-specific body mass indices (BMI) were calculated. Outcomes included injury patterns, operative procedures, complications, and hospital utilization parameters. Data from 149,817 pediatric patients were analyzed; higher BMI percentiles were associated with significantly more extremity injuries, and fewer injuries to the head, abdomen, thorax and spine (p values Obese children also had significantly longer lengths of stay and more frequent ventilator requirement. Among children admitted after trauma, increased BMI percentile is associated with increased risk of death and potentially preventable complications. These findings suggest that obese children may require different management than nonobese counterparts to prevent complications. Level III; prognosis study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. What Is a Pediatric Heart Surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Heart Surgeon? Page Content Article Body If your ... require heart surgery. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Heart Surgeons Have? Pediatric heart surgeons are medical ...

  6. National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a chapter from the list. View List Our SIGs - Select a SIG for more information - Acute Care PNP Adolescent Health ... Care Immunization Injury Education & Prevention Integrative Health Newborn SIG Pediatric General Surgery Pediatric Health Care Home Pediatric ...

  7. What Is a Pediatric Infectious Diseases Specialist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Infectious Diseases Specialist? Page Content Article Body If your child ... teen years. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Infectious Diseases Specialists Have? Pediatric infectious diseases specialists are medical ...

  8. What Is a Pediatric Allergist / Immunologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Allergist/Immunologist? Page Content Article Body If your ... immune system problems. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Allergists/Immunologists Have? Pediatric allergists/immunologists are medical ...

  9. Pediatric Melanoma and Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Rose

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Importance—Pediatric melanoma occurs, albeit rarely. Should patients be treated by today’s medical standards, or be subjected to medically unnecessary clinical studies? Observations—We identified international, industry-sponsored pediatric melanoma studies triggered by regulatory demands in www.clinicaltrials.gov and further pediatric melanoma studies demanded by European Union pediatric investigation plans. We retrieved related regulatory documents from the internet. We analyzed these studies for rationale and medical beneficence on the basis of physiology, pediatric clinical pharmacology and rationale. Regulatory authorities define children by chronological age, not physiologically. Newborns’ organs are immature but they develop and mature rapidly. Separate proof of efficacy in underage patients is justified formally/regulatorily but lacks medical sense. Children—especially post-puberty—and adults vis-a-vis medications are physiologically very similar. Two adolescent melanoma studies were terminated in 2016 because of waning recruitment, while five studies in pediatric melanoma and other solid tumors, triggered by European Union pediatric investigation plans, continue recruiting worldwide. Conclusions and Relevance—Regulatory-demanded pediatric melanoma studies are medically superfluous. Melanoma patients of all ages should be treated with effective combination treatment. Babies need special attention. Children need dose-finding and pharmacokinetic studies but adolescents metabolize and respond to drugs similarly to adults. Institutional Review Boards/ethics committees should suspend ongoing questionable pediatric melanoma studies and reject newly submitted questionable studies.

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Children's (pediatric) abdominal ultrasound imaging produces pictures ...

  12. Moral Dilemmas in Pediatric Orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercuri, John J; Vigdorchik, Jonathan M; Otsuka, Norman Y

    2015-12-01

    All orthopedic surgeons face moral dilemmas on a regular basis; however, little has been written about the moral dilemmas that are encountered when providing orthopedic care to pediatric patients and their families. This article aims to provide surgeons with a better understanding of how bioethics and professionalism apply to the care of their pediatric patients. First, several foundational concepts of both bioethics and professionalism are summarized, and definitions are offered for 16 important terms within the disciplines. Next, some of the unique aspects of pediatric orthopedics as a subspecialty are reviewed before engaging in a discussion of 5 common moral dilemmas within the field. Those dilemmas include the following: (1) obtaining informed consent and assent for either surgery or research from pediatric patients and their families; (2) performing cosmetic surgery on pediatric patients; (3) caring for pediatric patients with cognitive or physical impairments; (4) caring for injured pediatric athletes; and (5) meeting the demand for pediatric orthopedic care in the United States. Pertinent considerations are reviewed for each of these 5 moral dilemmas, thereby better preparing surgeons for principled moral decision making in their own practices. Each of these dilemmas is inherently complex with few straightforward answers; however, orthopedic surgeons have an obligation to take the lead and better define these kinds of difficult issues within their field. The lives of pediatric patients and their families will be immeasurably improved as a result. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... New Dentist Resources Volunteering in AAPD AAPD Publications Advertising Brochures Journals & Publications Full Journal Archives Access Pediatric ... Us Site Map Privacy Policy Terms of Use facebook twitter instagram

  14. Pediatric imaging. Rapid fire questions and answers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quattromani, F.; Lampe, R.

    2008-01-01

    The book contains the following contributions: Airway, head, neck; allergy, immunology rheumatology; pediatric cardiac imaging; child abuse; chromosomal abnormalities; conscious sedation; contrast agents and radiation protection; pediatric gastrointestinal imaging; genetic disorders in infants and children; pediatric genitourinary imaging; pediatric hematology, oncology imaging; pediatric intenrventional radiology; metabolic and vitamin disorders; muscoskeletal disorders (osteoradiology); neonatology imaging; pediatric neuroimaging; imaging of the respiratory tract in infants and children; vascular anomalies

  15. Pediatric imaging. Rapid fire questions and answers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quattromani, F.; Lampe, R. (eds.) [Texas Tech Univ. Health Sciences Center, School of Medicine, Lubbock, TX (United States); Handal, G.A. [Texas Tech Univ. Health Sciences Center, School of Medicine, El Paso, TX (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The book contains the following contributions: Airway, head, neck; allergy, immunology rheumatology; pediatric cardiac imaging; child abuse; chromosomal abnormalities; conscious sedation; contrast agents and radiation protection; pediatric gastrointestinal imaging; genetic disorders in infants and children; pediatric genitourinary imaging; pediatric hematology, oncology imaging; pediatric intenrventional radiology; metabolic and vitamin disorders; muscoskeletal disorders (osteoradiology); neonatology imaging; pediatric neuroimaging; imaging of the respiratory tract in infants and children; vascular anomalies.

  16. Drug repurposing in pediatrics and pediatric hematology oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatt, Julie; Corey, Seth J

    2013-01-01

    Drug 'repurposing', that is, using old drugs for new indications, has been proposed as a more efficient strategy for drug development than the current standard of beginning with novel agents. In this review, we explore the scope of drug repurposing in pediatric hematology oncology and in pediatrics in general. Drugs commonly used in children were identified using the Harriet Lane Handbook (HLH) and searched in PubMed for different uses. Additional drugs were identified by searching PubMed and Google.com for 'drug repurposing' or 'drug repositioning'. Almost 10% of drugs with primary uses in pediatrics have been repurposed in pediatric hematology oncology or pediatrics. The observant clinician, pharmacologist and translational bioinformatician, as well as structural targeting, will have a role in discovering new repurposing opportunities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Pediatric Cardiac Surgery In Eritrea.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The teams consisted of volunteer physicians from Germany, Italy and Switzerland including cardiac surgeons, pediatric cardiologists, cardiac anesthesiologists, pediatric intensivists, perfusionists, and other nursing staff. Each mission has routinely included at least 18 health professionals of different category to maximize the.

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ... ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's ...

  19. Obesity and Pediatric Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughns, Janelle D; Conklin, Laurie S; Long, Ying; Zheng, Panli; Faruque, Fahim; Green, Dionna J; van den Anker, John N; Burckart, Gilbert J

    2018-05-01

    There is a lack of dosing guidelines for use in obese children. Moreover, the impact of obesity on drug safety and clinical outcomes is poorly defined. The paucity of information needed for the safe and effective use of drugs in obese patients remains a problem, even after drug approval. To assess the current incorporation of obesity as a covariate in pediatric drug development, the pediatric medical and clinical pharmacology reviews under the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Amendments Act of 2007 and the FDA Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA) of 2012 were reviewed for obesity studies. FDA labels were also reviewed for statements addressing obesity in pediatric patients. Forty-five drugs studied in pediatric patients under the FDA Amendments Act were found to have statements and key words in the medical and clinical pharmacology reviews and labels related to obesity. Forty-four products were identified similarly with pediatric studies under FDASIA. Of the 89 product labels identified, none provided dosing information related to obesity. The effect of body mass index on drug pharmacokinetics was mentioned in only 4 labels. We conclude that there is little information presently available to provide guidance related to dosing in obese pediatric patients. Moving forward, regulators, clinicians, and the pharmaceutical industry should consider situations in drug development in which the inclusion of obese patients in pediatric trials is necessary to facilitate the safe and effective use of new drug products in the obese pediatric population. © 2018, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... to a digital cloud server. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MRI ...

  1. Archives: Annals of Pediatric Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 32 of 32 ... Archives: Annals of Pediatric Surgery. Journal Home > Archives: Annals of Pediatric Surgery. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 32 of 32 Items ...

  2. Perceived fatigue following pediatric burns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Moniek; Mouton, Leonora J.; Dijkstra, Froukje; Niemeijer, Anuschka S.; van Brussel, Marco; van der Woude, Lucas H. V.; Disseldorp, Laurien M.; Nieuwenhuis, Marianne K.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Fatigue is a common consequence of numerous pediatric health conditions. In adult burn survivors, fatigue was found to be a major problem. The current cross-sectional study is aimed at determining the levels of perceived fatigue in pediatric burn survivors. Methods: Perceived fatigue was

  3. Perceived fatigue following pediatric burns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Moniek; Mouton, Leonora J.; Dijkstra, Froukje; Niemeijer, Anuschka S.; van Brussel, Marco|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30481962X; Van der Woude, Lucas H. V.; Disseldorp, Laurien M.; Nieuwenhuis, Marianne K.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Fatigue is a common consequence of numerous pediatric health conditions. In adult burn survivors, fatigue was found to be a major problem. The current cross-sectional study is aimed at determining the levels of perceived fatigue in pediatric burn survivors. Methods Perceived fatigue was

  4. Pediatric lymphomas in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Gualco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study provides the clinical pathological characteristics of 1301 cases of pediatric/adolescent lymphomas in patients from different geographic regions of Brazil. METHODS: A retrospective analyses of diagnosed pediatric lymphoma cases in a 10-year period was performed. We believe that it represents the largest series of pediatric lymphomas presented from Brazil. RESULTS: Non-Hodgkin lymphomas represented 68% of the cases, including those of precursor (36% and mature (64% cell origin. Mature cell lymphomas comprised 81% of the B-cell phenotype and 19% of the T-cell phenotype. Hodgkin lymphomas represented 32% of all cases, including 87% of the classical type and 13% of nodular lymphocyte predominant type. The geographic distribution showed 38.4% of the cases in the Southeast region, 28.7% in the Northeast, 16.1% in the South, 8.8% in the North, and 8% in the Central-west region. The distribution by age groups was 15-18 years old, 33%; 11-14 years old, 26%; 6-10 years old, 24%; and 6 years old or younger, 17%. Among mature B-cell lymphomas, most of the cases were Burkitt lymphomas (65%, followed by diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (24%. In the mature T-cell group, anaplastic large cell lymphoma, ALK-positive was the most prevalent (57%, followed by peripheral T-cell lymphoma, then not otherwise specified (25%. In the group of classic Hodgkin lymphomas, the main histological subtype was nodular sclerosis (76%. Nodular lymphocyte predominance occurred more frequently than in other series. CONCLUSION: Some of the results found in this study may reflect the heterogeneous socioeconomical status and environmental factors of the Brazilian population in different regions.

  5. Pediatric obesity: Current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greydanus, Donald E; Agana, Marisha; Kamboj, Manmohan K; Shebrain, Saad; Soares, Neelkamal; Eke, Ransome; Patel, Dilip R

    2018-04-01

    This discussion reflects on concepts of obesity in children and adolescents in the early 21st century. It includes reflections on its history, definition, epidemiology, diagnostic perspectives, psychosocial considerations, musculoskeletal complications, endocrine complications and principles of management. In addition to emphasis on diet and exercise, research and clinical applications in the second decade of the 21 st century emphasize the increasing use of pharmacotherapy and bariatric surgery for adolescent and adult populations with critical problems of overweight and obesity. We conclude with a discussion of future directions in pediatric obesity management. Copyright © 2018 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Pediatric cerebral aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmete, Joseph J; Toma, Ahmed K; Davagnanam, Indran; Robertson, Fergus; Brew, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    Childhood intracranial aneurysms differ from those in the adult population in incidence and gender prevalence, cause, location, and clinical presentation. Endovascular treatment of pediatric aneurysms is the suggested approach because it offers both reconstructive and deconstructive techniques and a better clinical outcome compared with surgery; however, the long-term durability of endovascular treatment is still questionable, therefore long-term clinical and imaging follow-up is necessary. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of intracranial aneurysms in children are discussed, and data from endovascular treatments are presented. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Pediatric Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawal, Nidhi; Yazigi, Nada

    2017-06-01

    Excellent outcomes over the last 3 decades have made liver transplantation the treatment of choice for many advanced liver disorders. This success also opened liver transplantation to new indications such as liver tumors and metabolic disorders. The emergence of such new indications for liver transplantation is bringing a new stream of patients along with disease-specific challenges. The cumulative number of liver transplant recipients is peaking, requiring novel systems of health care delivery that meet the needs of this special patient population. This article reviews updates and new development in pediatric liver transplantation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. News on pediatric urology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Masnata

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric urology is a pediatric speciality dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of congenital and acquired genitourinary tract diseases. It is a speciality that is rapidly changing, thanks to the technological development that has been emerging in recent years. There have been important diagnostic and therapeutic news.Congenital anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract (CAKUT include various entities of structural malformations that result from defects in their morphogenesis. Clinical research and genetic studies on the origins of CAKUT are quickly evolving, with significant growth of high-quality research.Management goals of CAKUT include prevention of febrile urinary tract infections (UTIs in newborns and toddles and renal injury, while minimizing the morbidity of treatment and follow-up. Treatment options include observation with or without continuous antibiotic prophylaxis (CAP and surgical correction. Now, randomized controlled studies show that children with normal urinary tracts or low-grade vesicoureteral reflux (VUR do not benefit from prophylaxis.All children with known mechanical or functional obstructions of the urinary tract are considered to have UTI. Functional obstruction often results from lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD of either neurogenic or non-neurogenic origin and dilating VUR.The role of bladder and bowel dysfunction (BBD in children with UTI and the long-term risk of renal scarring have shed new light on treatment strategies. Often it is BBD, rather than reflux, that causes UTI in children older than 2 years.Pediatric urology has evolved in recent years, with a greater focus on bladder and renal function, minimally invasive treatment, evidence-based interventions, and guideline adherence. Other topics in pediatric urology include urinary incontinence in children with special needs and the use of robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery (RALS in children, with advantages over conventional laparoscopic surgery

  9. Functional Constipation in Pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis De la Torre Mondragón

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Constipation is a common disease and one of the most frequent reasons of visits in pediatric clinics, complications related to constipation denote an inadequate diagnosis and/or treatment. This article is addressed for physicians who provide care to children with functional constipation and, it proposes in a practical manner how to diagnose this problem, emphasizing the essential information that should be obtained from the clinical history and from the workup helpful for its diagnosis. The “bowel management program” is the proposed treatment; this pro- gram has a rate success higher than 90%, even, in patients with severe chronic constipation with frequent relapses and multiple treatments.

  10. Recent developments in pediatric headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershey, Andrew D

    2010-06-01

    This review will focus on some of the recent findings in pediatric headache including headache characteristics, epidemiology, comorbid associations and treatment updates. Pediatric headache remains a frequent health problem for children and their families, yet there remain many gaps in our knowledge. This review will broadly address some of the recent findings and highlight the gaps in our understanding and treatment of pediatric headache. There will be a focus on pediatric migraine as this has been the best characterized and studied. Our understanding of pediatric headache is improving with increased recognition of the characteristics and associated symptomology. This should further guide the individualized treatment approaches for improved outcome and reduction of progression into adulthood.

  11. Pediatric radiotherapy planning and treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Olch, Arthur J

    2013-01-01

    "This is a very well-written and -organized book covering the planning and delivery aspects unique to pediatric radiotherapy. The author is a respected and well-known medical physicist with extensive pediatric radiotherapy experience. … a very useful book for any clinical physicist treating pediatric cases and seeking contextual and historical perspective. … a great reference for medical physicists who may not see many pediatric cases and can look to this text as a one-stop shop for not only a comprehensive overview, but detailed explanation for specific pediatric disease sites. Overall, it is a great addition to the reference library of any radiation therapy physicist."-Medical Physics, April 2014.

  12. A history of pediatric immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiehm, E Richard; Johnston, Richard B

    2005-03-01

    Immunology has played a prominent role in the history of medicine. Pediatric immunologists have focused on immune aberrations in pediatric disorders, particularly those involving host defense mechanisms. These efforts have paid rich dividends in terms of fundamental knowledge of the immune system and major therapeutic advances, including 1) i.v. immunoglobulin therapy, 2) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and 3) gene therapy. Pediatric immunology as an organized discipline emerged in the early 1950s, when pediatricians and their basic scientist colleagues began to focus on clinical and basic research related to immunodeficiency. Since then, key organizations and infrastructure have been developed to support this research and the clinical care of immunodeficient patients. We review here the evolution of contemporary pediatric immunology, particularly in North America, from its roots in 19th-century Europe to its current expression as one of the fundamental scientific and clinical disciplines of pediatrics.

  13. 78 FR 48438 - Pediatric Ethics Subcommittee of the Pediatric Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ...] Pediatric Ethics Subcommittee of the Pediatric Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug... of Subcommittee: Pediatric Ethics Subcommittee of the Pediatric Advisory Committee. General Function... pediatric ethical issues. Date and Time: The meeting will be held on September 9, 2013, from 8 a.m. to 5:30...

  14. Pediatric Hypovitaminosis D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafiu Ariganjoye MD, MBA, FAAP, FAIHQ, CPE, CHCQM

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D, a secosteroid, is essential for the development and maintenance of healthy bone in both the adult and pediatric populations. Low level of 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25-(OH-D is highly prevalent in children worldwide and has been linked to various adverse health outcomes including rickets, osteomalacia, osteomalacic myopathy, sarcopenia, and weakness, growth retardation, hypocalcemia, seizure and tetany, autism, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, cancers (prostate, colon, breast, infectious diseases (viral, tuberculosis, and autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. Risk factors for hypovitaminosis D are people with darker skin pigmentation, use of sunscreen, insufficient ultraviolet B exposure, prematurity, living in northern latitudes, malnutrition, obesity, exclusive breastfeeding, low maternal vitamin D level, certain medications, drinking unfortified cow’s milk, liver failure, chronic renal insufficiency, cystic fibrosis, asthma, and sickle cell hemoglobinopathy. This review highlights and summarizes the molecular perspectives of vitamin D deficiency and its potential adverse health outcomes in pediatric age groups. The recommended treatment regimen is beyond the scope of this review.

  15. Abdominal emergencies in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coca Robinot, D; Liébana de Rojas, C; Aguirre Pascual, E

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal symptoms are among the most common reasons for pediatric emergency department visits, and abdominal pain is the most frequently reported symptom. Thorough history taking and physical examination can often reach the correct diagnosis. Knowing the abdominal conditions that are most common in each age group can help radiologists narrow the differential diagnosis. When imaging tests are indicated, ultrasonography is usually the first-line technique, enabling the diagnosis or adding relevant information with the well-known advantages of this technique. Nowadays, plain-film X-ray studies are reserved for cases in which perforation, bowel obstruction, or foreign body ingestion is suspected. It is also important to remember that abdominal pain can also occur secondary to basal pneumonia. CT is reserved for specific indications and in individual cases, for example, in patients with high clinical suspicion of abdominal disease and inconclusive findings at ultrasonography. We review some of the most common conditions in pediatric emergencies, the different imaging tests indicated in each case, and the imaging signs in each condition. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Pediatric contact dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD in children, until recently, was considered rare. ACD was considered as a disorder of the adult population and children were thought to be spared due to a lack of exposure to potential allergens and an immature immune system. Prevalence of ACD to even the most common allergens in children, like poison ivy and parthenium, is relatively rare as compared to adults. However, there is now growing evidence of contact sensitization of the pediatric population, and it begins right from early childhood, including 1-week-old neonates. Vaccinations, piercing, topical medicaments and cosmetics in younger patients are potential exposures for sensitization. Nickel is the most common sensitizer in almost all studies pertaining to pediatric contact dermatitis. Other common allergens reported are cobalt, fragrance mix, rubber, lanolin, thiomersol, neomycin, gold, mercapto mix, balsum of Peru and colophony. Different factors like age, sex, atopy, social and cultural practices, habit of parents and caregivers and geographic changes affect the patterns of ACD and their variable clinical presentation. Patch testing should be considered not only in children with lesions of a morphology suggestive of ACD, but in any child with dermatitis that is difficult to control.

  17. Updates in pediatric nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oken, E; Lightdale, J R

    2001-06-01

    Ongoing research in several areas of pediatric nutrition has new practical applications for community-based pediatricians. For example, a fresh understanding of risk factors for rickets persuades pediatricians to recognize and treat this disease, which was thought to be nearly extinct in the modern industrialized world. Similarly, an expanded awareness of the antibacterial components of breast milk encourages a more complete dialogue between pediatricians and new mothers about the potential benefits of breast-feeding. For those infants with feeding intolerance, new data help to refine the indications for hypoallergenic formulas, which are increasingly recommended for children with a variety of symptoms. The past year also has seen breakthroughs in our understanding of supplemental nutrition for children. Vitamin A may provide direct benefits for the most vulnerable of children, namely premature infants at high risk for lung disease. At the other end of the pediatric spectrum, adolescent athletes seeking to enhance their performance are consuming poorly studied sports supplements that may not be beneficial and may even be toxic. Finally, a greater appreciation for the epidemic of obesity that is sweeping the United States and other countries suggests that children at high risk may represent a far more diverse population than had been recognized previously.

  18. Pediatric DXA: clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binkovitz, Larry A. [Columbus Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Columbus, OH (United States); Sparke, Paul [Capital University, Department of Chemistry, Columbus, OH (United States); Henwood, Maria J. [Columbus Children' s Hospital, Department of Endocrinology, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Normal bone mineral accrual requires adequate dietary intake of calcium, vitamin D and other nutrients; hepatic and renal activation of vitamin D; normal hormone levels (thyroid, parathyroid, reproductive and growth hormones); and neuromuscular functioning with sufficient stress upon the skeleton to induce bone deposition. The presence of genetic or acquired diseases and the therapies that are used to treat them can also impact bone health. Since the introduction of clinical DXA in pediatrics in the early 1990s, there has been considerable investigation into the causes of low bone mineral density (BMD) in children. Pediatricians have also become aware of the role adequate bone mass accrual in childhood has in preventing osteoporotic fractures in late adulthood. Additionally, the availability of medications to improve BMD has increased with the development of bisphosphonates. These factors have led to the increased utilization of DXA in pediatrics. This review summarizes much of the previous research regarding BMD in children and is meant to assist radiologists and clinicians with DXA utilization and interpretation. (orig.)

  19. PET applications in pediatrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shulkin, B. L. [Ann Arbor, Univ. of Michigan Medical Center (United States). Pediatric Nuclear Medicine Section

    1997-12-01

    This article summarizes the major PET studies which have been performed in pediatric patients to elucidate and characterize diseases and normal development. Issues special for the application of the technique in children, such as dosimetry, patient preparation, and image acquisition are discussed. Studies of central nervous system (CNS) development and pathology, including epilepsy, intraventricular hemorrhage, neonatal asphyxia, tumors, and effects on the CNS from treatment of other tumors are reviewed. These have contributed information fundamental to their understanding of CNS development and pathology. PET investigations into the pathophysiology of congenital heart disease have begun and hold great promise to aid their understanding of these conditions. The second major area in which PET has been applied is the study of non CNS neoplasms. Neuroblastoma has been investigated with tracers which explore basic biochemical features which characterize this tumor, as well as with tracers which explore biochemical events relatively specific for this malignancy. Other common and uncommon tumors of childhood are discussed. The PET technique has been shown useful for answering questions of clinical relevance for the management of these uncommon neoplasms. PET is likely to continue to aid their understanding of many pediatric diseases and may gain more widespread clinical acceptance as the technology continues to disseminate rapidly.

  20. Pediatric facial burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Theodore A; Gosain, Arun K

    2008-07-01

    Despite major advances in the area of burn management, burn injury continues to be a leading cause of pediatric mortality and morbidity. Facial burns in particular are devastating to the affected child and result in numerous physical and psychosocial sequelae. Although many of the principles of adult burn management can be applied to a pediatric patient with facial burns, the surgeon must be cognizant of several important differences. Facial burns and subsequent scar formation can drastically affect the growth potential of a child's face. Structures such as the nose and teeth may become deformed due to abnormal external forces caused by contractures. Serious complications such as occlusion amblyopia and microstomia must be anticipated and urgently addressed to avert permanent consequences, whereas other reconstructive procedures can be delayed until scar maturation occurs. Furthermore, because young children are actively developing the concept of self, severe facial burns can alter a child's sense of identity and place the child at high risk for future emotional and psychologic disturbances. Surgical reconstruction of burn wounds should proceed only after thorough planning and may involve a variety of skin graft, flap, and tissue expansion techniques. The most favorable outcome is achieved when facial resurfacing is performed with respect to the aesthetic units of the face. Children with facial burns remain a considerable challenge to their caregivers, and these patients require long-term care by a multidisciplinary team of physicians and therapists to optimize functional, cosmetic, and psychosocial outcomes.

  1. Pediatric DXA: clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binkovitz, Larry A.; Sparke, Paul; Henwood, Maria J.

    2007-01-01

    Normal bone mineral accrual requires adequate dietary intake of calcium, vitamin D and other nutrients; hepatic and renal activation of vitamin D; normal hormone levels (thyroid, parathyroid, reproductive and growth hormones); and neuromuscular functioning with sufficient stress upon the skeleton to induce bone deposition. The presence of genetic or acquired diseases and the therapies that are used to treat them can also impact bone health. Since the introduction of clinical DXA in pediatrics in the early 1990s, there has been considerable investigation into the causes of low bone mineral density (BMD) in children. Pediatricians have also become aware of the role adequate bone mass accrual in childhood has in preventing osteoporotic fractures in late adulthood. Additionally, the availability of medications to improve BMD has increased with the development of bisphosphonates. These factors have led to the increased utilization of DXA in pediatrics. This review summarizes much of the previous research regarding BMD in children and is meant to assist radiologists and clinicians with DXA utilization and interpretation. (orig.)

  2. Pediatric Palliative Care at a Glance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ® ™ ® Pediatric Palliative Care at a Glance A child’s serious illness affects the entire family. Pediatric palliative (pal-lee-uh-tiv) care can support ... extra support, palliative care can help. What is pediatric palliative care? Pediatric palliative care is supportive care ...

  3. Pediatric drug development: formulation considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Areeg Anwer; Charoo, Naseem Ahmad; Abdallah, Daud Baraka

    2014-10-01

    Absence of safe, effective and appropriate treatment is one of the main causes of high mortality and morbidity rates among the pediatric group. This review provides an overview of pharmacokinetic differences between pediatric and adult population and their implications in pharmaceutical development. Different pediatric dosage forms, their merits and demerits are discussed. Food and Drug Administration Act of 1997 and the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act 2002 added 6 months patent extension and exclusivity incentives to pharmaceutical companies for evaluation of medicinal products in children. Prescription Drug User Fee Act and Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007 made it mandatory for pharmaceutical companies to perform pediatric clinical studies on new drug products. Drug development program should include additional clinical bridge studies to evaluate differences in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs in adult and child populations. Additionally, pharmaceutical development should consider ease of administration, palatability, appropriate excipients, stability and therapeutic equivalency of pediatric dosage forms. Pediatric population is diverse with individual preferences and demand for custom made dosage formulations. Practically it is not feasible to have different pharmaceutical dosage forms for each group. Hence, an appropriate dosage form that can be administered across pediatric population is warranted.

  4. Seminar Pediatrics. Medical and Technical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montivero, M.; Nespral, D.O.; Alak, Maria del Carmen

    2012-01-01

    The Association of Biology and Nuclear Medicine has organized the 'Seminar Pediatrics - Medical and Technical Applications', held in Buenos Aires in May 2012, in order to collaborate with the scientific growth of nuclear medicine in pediatrics. The main topics covered were: management of pediatric patients and medical application in childhood, dosimetry in pediatric nuclear medicine, scope of radioisotope - studies in nephrourological pathologies, PET in pediatrics, among others.

  5. Pediatric calcaneal osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Warren; Crawford, Haemish; Street, Matthew; Huang, Mark; Manners, Simon; Puna, Rupesh

    2010-12-01

    Osteomyelitis continues to be a common problem amongst the pediatric population. Osteomyelitis of the calcaneus is an uncommon problem that still poses a problem to the treating physician. The purpose of this article is to retrospectively review a large series of pediatric patients with calcaneal osteomyelitis. We compare our experience with that in the literature to determine any factors that may aid earlier diagnosis and or improve treatment outcomes. A 10-year retrospective review was performed of clinical records of all cases of pediatric calcaneal osteomyelitis managed at the 2 children's orthopaedic departments in the Auckland region. The Osteomyelitis Database was used to identify all cases between 1997 and 2007, at Starship Children's Hospital, and 1998 and 2008 at Middlemore's Kids First Hospital. Sixty patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria, and had a review of clinical notes and relevant investigations. The average duration of symptoms before presentation to hospital was 6.8 days. About 40% of patients had a recent episode of trauma. About 82% of patients could not bear weight on admission. Only 22% of patients had a temperature above 38°C. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was elevated in 81% and the C-reactive protein was elevated in 77% of patients. About 27% of patients had positive blood cultures with Staphylococcus aureus being the most commonly cultured organism. X-rays, bone scans, and magnetic resonance imaging were all used to aid the diagnosis. About 20% of patients had surgery with an average of 1.3 surgeries for those who progressed to surgery. Treatment length was an average of 2 weeks 6 days of intravenous antibiotics followed by 3 weeks 2 days of oral treatment. There were no postsurgical complications and 10 readmissions: 3 for relapse, 3 for peripherally inserted central catheter line problems, and 4 for antibiotic-associated complications. Although sometimes more difficult to diagnose, calcaneal osteomyelitis can be diagnosed with an

  6. Medical Comorbidities in Pediatric Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Howard; Singhi, Samata; Gladstein, Jack

    2016-02-01

    Comorbid conditions frequently occur in pediatric headaches and may significantly affect their management. Comorbidities that have been associated with pediatric headaches include attention-deficit or hyperactivity disorder, autism, developmental disabilities, depression, anxiety, epilepsy, obesity, infantile colic, atopic disorders, inflammatory bowel disease, and irritable bowel syndrome. The goal of this article is to review these comorbidities associated with pediatric headache, thereby empowering child neurologists to identify common triggers and tailor management strategies that address headache and its comorbidities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. MRI imaging in pediatric appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Riley

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available An 8-year-old male presents with two days of abdominal pain and emesis. Computed tomography was concerning for obstruction or reactive ileus with an apparent transition point in the right lower quadrant, possibly due to Crohn's. Magnetic resonance imaging was concerning for perforated appendicitis. As demonstrated by this case MRI can be as sensitive as CT in detecting pediatric appendicitis [2]. We recommend using MRI instead of CT to diagnose appendicitis to avoid ionizing radiation and increased cancer risk in the pediatric population. Keywords: Computer tomography, Magnetic resonance imaging, Pediatric appendicitis

  8. Pediatric neuropsychology: toward subspecialty designation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Ida Sue; Wills, Karen; Rey-Casserly, Celiane; Armstrong, Kira; Westerveld, Michael

    2011-08-01

    Clinical neuropsychology is a rapidly expanding field of study in the psychological sciences whose practitioners are expert in the assessment, treatment, and research of individuals with known or suspected central nervous system disease or disorder. Pediatric neuropsychology has emerged as a distinct subspecialty area with related education, training, and clinical expertise for a growing number of neuropsychologists. This paper details the numerous steps taken by two affiliated organizations, the American Board of Clinical Neuropsychology and its membership organization, the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology, in the interest of the larger pediatric neuropsychology community and in pediatric neuropsychology subspecialty development.

  9. Pediatric Cushing's disease: Management Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Martin O; Storr, Helen L

    2012-12-01

    Cushing's disease (CD), caused by an ACTH-secreting pituitary corticotroph adenoma, is the commonest cause of Cushing syndrome in children over 5 years of age. It is rare in the pediatric age range and presents difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Key presenting features include weight gain, growth failure and change in facial appearance. Most pediatric endocrinologists have limited experience managing children or adolescents with CD and thus benefit from close consultation with adult colleagues. We describe a diagnostic protocol which broadly follows the model for adult patients. Treatment strategies are examined and appraised. The management of pediatric CD patients after cure is also discussed.

  10. Pediatric AIDS | Khazbak | Egyptian Journal of Pediatric Allergy and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Egyptian Journal of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology (The). Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 2, No 1 (2004) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  11. History of academic general and ambulatory pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, Robert J; Green, Morris

    2003-01-01

    Academic general pediatrics and ambulatory care are closely linked to the development of the Ambulatory Pediatric Association, an organization with nearly 2000 members active in teaching, patient care, and research. Primary care, behavioral-developmental pediatrics, prevention, health promotion, community pediatrics, socioeconomic issues, cultural and ethnic diversity, advocacy, research in education, social issues, and environmental health lie within the purview of general pediatrics. In part, because of their teaching and patient care obligations, but also due to a lack of fellowship research training, many general pediatrics faculty have had difficulty in accomplishing significant research. By supporting fellowship training in general pediatrics, The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation General Pediatrics Academic Development Program and the current fellowship program supported by the Bureau of Health Manpower are important efforts to remedy this deficiency. The sciences basic to general pediatrics research include epidemiology, biostatistics, and the behavioral sciences. In addition, general pediatrics research often borrows from other sciences and collaborates with investigators in other disciplines. Partnerships between general pediatrics divisions and practicing pediatricians for teaching and research, e.g. the Community Education in Community Settings program, provides a realistic educational program for future pediatricians. The Pediatric Research in Office Setting network is another important vehicle for translation of research into the practice of general pediatrics. The steady growth of the Ambulatory Pediatric Association over the past four decades is testimony to the creativity, adaptability, and verve that has characterized the discipline of general pediatrics.

  12. Pediatric Posttraumatic Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacperski, Joanne; Hung, Ryan; Blume, Heidi K

    2016-02-01

    Concussion and mild traumatic brain injury are common injuries in pediatrics, and posttraumatic headache is the most common complaint following them. Although most children and teens recover from a simple, isolated concussion without incidents within 1-2 weeks, some develop symptoms that can last for months. It is important to manage both acute and persistent posttraumatic headaches appropriately to speed recovery, minimize disability, and maximize function. In this article, we review the definitions, epidemiology, and current recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of acute and persistent posttraumatic headaches. Although this is still a developing field and there is much that we still need to learn about concussion and the best strategies to prevent and treat these injuries and their sequelae, we hope that this review will help providers to understand the current evidence and treatment recommendations to improve care for children with concussion and mild traumatic brain injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Iopamidol in pediatric angiocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strife, J.L.; Kirks, D.R.; Bisset, G.S. III; Hannon, D.; Schwartz, D.

    1987-01-01

    Iopamidol (ISOVUE-370) has been used extensively in adult angiocardiography, but clinical trials in pediatric patients with congenital heart disease are limited. The authors study group comprised 25 children referred for elective cardiac catheterization and cineangiocardiography. Patients were aged 3 months to 15 years (mean, 2 years) and weighted 14-62 kg (mean, 17 kg). Depending on the congenital heart lesion, the total amount of contrast agent injected ranged from 1 to 5 ml/kg. The potential benefits of iopamidol include fewer minor side effects, decreased movement or reaction of the child, and fewer direct effects of contrast agent on biochemical changes, compared with published results of using ionic contrast media. In addition, there were fewer electrocardiographic changes during iopamidol injection, and less change in the end-diastolic pressures after injection compared to results obtained with ionic contrast media. Visual rating of the cineangiograms revealed that all were of diagnostic quality, and 75% were rated as showing ''superior opacification.''

  14. Pediatric nuclear oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howman Giles, R.; Bernard, E.; Uren, R.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear medicine plays an important and increasing role in the management of childhood malignancy. This is particularly true in the solid tumours of childhood. It is also helpful in the management of the complications of cancer treatment such as the infections which often accompany immune suppression in oncology patients. Scintigraphy is a complementary investigation to other radiological techniques and adds the functional dimension to anatomical investigations such as CT, MRI and ultrasound. In selected malignancies radionuclides are also used in treatment. This review discusses the technical considerations relating to children and the specific techniques relating to pediatric oncology. Specific tumours and the various applications of radionuclides are discussed in particular lymphoma, primary bone tumours, soft tissue sarcomas, neuroblastoma, Wilms' tumour, brain tumours and leukemia. Uncommon tumours are also discussed and how radionuclides are useful in the investigation of various complications which occur in oncology patients

  15. Pediatric thoracic CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frush, Donald P.; Herlong, J. Rene

    2005-01-01

    One of the principal benefits of contemporary multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) has been the ability to obtain high-data sets for evaluation of the cardiovascular system. The benefits of the greater number of detector rows and submillimeter image thicknesses were quickly recognized and are especially advantageous in children. For example, since imaging is performed so quickly, issues with motion are minimized. This is a substantial benefit of CTA compared with MR imaging, the traditional noninvasive cross sectional modality for pediatric cardiovascular imaging. This, together with faster and more powerful computers, including improved transfer and storage capabilities, offers improved depiction of the heart, great vessels, other vasculature and adjacent intrathoracic structures in a fashion that is well accepted by clinical colleagues. In order to be successful, however, one must have an understanding of the technology and often unique technical considerations in infants and children. With this familiarity, excellent cardiovascular examinations can be performed even in the most challenging case. (orig.)

  16. Pediatric Headache: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, Raquel; DiSabella, Marc T

    2017-03-01

    Headache represents the most common neurologic disorder in the general population including children and is increasingly being recognized as a major source of morbidity in youth related to missed school days and activities. In this article, we take a holistic approach to the child presenting with headache with a focus on the detailed headache history, physical and neurologic examinations, and diagnostic evaluation of these patients. Clinical presentations and classification schema of multiple primary and secondary headache types in children are discussed using the International Headache Criteria (IHCD-3) as a guide, and a summary provided of the various treatment modalities employed for pediatric headache including lifestyle modifications, behavioral techniques, and abortive and preventive medications. Copyright © 2017 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetics of pediatric obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manco, Melania; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2012-07-01

    Onset of obesity has been anticipated at earlier ages, and prevalence has dramatically increased worldwide over the past decades. Epidemic obesity is mainly attributable to modern lifestyle, but family studies prove the significant role of genes in the individual's predisposition to obesity. Advances in genotyping technologies have raised great hope and expectations that genetic testing will pave the way to personalized medicine and that complex traits such as obesity will be prevented even before birth. In the presence of the pressing offer of direct-to-consumer genetic testing services from private companies to estimate the individual's risk for complex phenotypes including obesity, the present review offers pediatricians an update of the state of the art on genomics obesity in childhood. Discrepancies with respect to genomics of adult obesity are discussed. After an appraisal of findings from genome-wide association studies in pediatric populations, the rare variant-common disease hypothesis, the theoretical soil for next-generation sequencing techniques, is discussed as opposite to the common disease-common variant hypothesis. Next-generation sequencing techniques are expected to fill the gap of "missing heritability" of obesity, identifying rare variants associated with the trait and clarifying the role of epigenetics in its heritability. Pediatric obesity emerges as a complex phenotype, modulated by unique gene-environment interactions that occur in periods of life and are "permissive" for the programming of adult obesity. With the advent of next-generation sequencing techniques and advances in the field of exposomics, sensitive and specific tools to predict the obesity risk as early as possible are the challenge for the next decade.

  18. Pediatric Toxic Shock Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Yee

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This scenario was developed to educate emergency medicine residents on the diagnosis and management of a pediatric patient with toxic shock syndrome. The case is also appropriate for teaching of medical students and advanced practice providers, as well as a review of the principles of crisis resource management, teamwork, and communication. Introduction: Toxic shock syndrome is a low-frequency, high-acuity scenario requiring timely identification and aggressive management. If patients suffering from this condition are managed incorrectly, they may progress into multi-organ dysfunction and potentially death. Toxic shock syndrome has been associated with Streptococcus and Staphylococcus aureus (Staph. Approximately half of Staph cases are associated with menstruation, which was first described in the 1970s-1980s and was associated with the use of absorbent tampons.1 Group A Streptococcus may cause complications such as necrotizing fasciitis and gangrenous myositis.2 Pediatric patients may present critically ill from toxic shock syndrome. Providers need to perform a thorough history and physical exam to discern the source of infection. Management requires aggressive care with antibiotics and IV fluids. Objectives: By the end of this simulation session, the learner will be able to: 1 Recognize toxic shock syndrome. 2 Review the importance of a thorough physical exam. 3 Discuss management of toxic shock syndrome, including supportive care and the difference in antibiotic choices for streptococcal and staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome. 4 Appropriately disposition a patient suffering from toxic shock syndrome. 5 Communicate effectively with team members and nursing staff during a resuscitation of a critically ill patient. Method: This session was conducted using high-fidelity simulation, followed by a debriefing session and lecture on toxic shock syndrome.

  19. Cardiomyopathy in the pediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric cardiomyopathies are a group of myocardial diseases with complex taxonomies. Cardiomyopathy can occur in children at any age, and it is a common cause of heart failure and heart transplantation in children. The incidence of pediatric cardiomyopathy is increasing with time. They may be associated with variable comorbidities, which are most often arrhythmia, heart failure, and sudden death. Medical imaging technologies, including echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance, and nuclear cardiology, are helpful in reaching a diagnosis of cardiomyopathy. Nevertheless, endomyocardial biopsy is the final diagnostic method of diagnosis. Patients warrant surgical operations, such as palliative operations, bridging operations, ventricular septal maneuvers, and heart transplantation, if pharmaceutical therapies are ineffective. Individual therapeutic regimens due to pediatric characteristics, genetic factors, and pathogenesis may improve the effects of treatment and patients' survival. Key Words: cardiomyopathy, classification, pediatrics

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children and Radiation Safety Videos related to Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your child. top of page Additional Information and Resources The Alliance for Radiation Safety in Pediatric Imaging's " ... To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR- ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

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    Full Text Available ... Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... immediately after the exam. A few patients experience side effects from the contrast material, including nausea and local ... Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio ...

  6. What Is a Pediatric Rheumatologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or tendons), other symptoms of arthritis, or an autoimmune disorder, your pediatrician may recommend a pediatric rheumatologist. What ... muscle, and bone disorders, including the following: Arthritis Autoimmune disorders, such as lupus, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, Kawasaki ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... View full size with caption Related Articles and Media Appendicitis Images related to Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen ... or your insurance provider to get a better understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of many focal lesions and tumors MRI has ... are the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? High-quality images are assured only if your child is ...

  9. Childhood obesity for pediatric gastroenterologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jeannie S; Barlow, Sarah E; Quiros-Tejeira, Ruben E; Scheimann, Ann; Skelton, Joseph; Suskind, David; Tsai, Patrika; Uko, Victor; Warolin, Joshua P; Xanthakos, Stavra A

    2013-01-01

    Obesity in childhood is one of the major health issues in pediatric health care today. As expected, the prevalence of obesity-related comorbidities has risen in parallel with that of obesity. Consultation regarding these concomitant diseases and subsequent management by subspecialists, including pediatric gastroenterologists, is now common and has resulted in obesity being recognized as a chronic disease requiring coordination of care. Although medications and even surgery may provide effective, though often temporary, treatments for obesity and its comorbidities, behavioral interventions addressing healthy dietary and physical activity habits remain a mainstay in the obesity treatment paradigm. Therefore, the issue of weight management must be addressed by both general practitioner and subspecialist alike. In this report, we review select aspects of pediatric obesity and obesity-related management issues because it relates in particular to the field of pediatric gastroenterology and hepatology.

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that ... and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  11. Childhood Obesity for Pediatric Gastroenterologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jeannie S.; Barlow, Sarah E.; Quiros-Tejeira, Ruben E.; Scheimann, Ann; Skelton, Joseph; Suskind, David; Tsai, Patrika; Uko, Victor; Warolin, Joshua P.; Xanthakos, Stavra A.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity in childhood is one of the major health issues in pediatric health care today. As expected, the prevalence of obesity-related comorbidities has risen in parallel with that of obesity. Consultation regarding these concomitant diseases and subsequent management by subspecialists, including pediatric gastroenterologists, is now common and has resulted in obesity being recognized as a chronic disease requiring coordination of care. Although medications and even surgery may provide effective, though often temporary, treatments for obesity and its comorbidities, behavioral interventions addressing healthy dietary and physical activity habits remain a mainstay in the obesity treatment paradigm. Therefore, the issue of weight management must be addressed by both general practitioner and subspecialist alike. In this report, we review select aspects of pediatric obesity and obesity-related management issues because it relates in particular to the field of pediatric gastroenterology and hepatology. PMID:23282941

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your doctor and the technologist prior to the exam if your child has a known allergy to ... sick, talk to your physician about rescheduling the exam. What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What are some ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

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    Full Text Available ... Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless exam that uses special x-ray equipment to create ... your doctor and the technologist prior to the exam if your child has a known allergy to ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... using ultrasound. View full size with caption Related Articles and Media Appendicitis Images related to Children's (Pediatric) ... facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments ...

  15. Nutrition for the pediatric athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnithan, Viswanath B; Goulopoulou, Styliani

    2004-08-01

    A paucity of literature exists with regard to research on nutrition for the pediatric athlete. This lack of research makes the development of specific nutritional recommendations for young athletes problematic. This issue is made difficult by the macro- and micronutrient intake required for growth and development in conjunction with that required for sports. Exogenous carbohydrate drinks could be considered for the young athlete engaged in both endurance exercise and high-intensity exercise. Monitoring of the energy intake during resistance training in the pediatric athlete needs to be considered, as there is evidence to suggest that energy deficits may occur. If decrements in exercise performance are noted, then serum ferritin and hemoglobin concentrations should be monitored, as nonanemic iron deficiency is prevalent in the pediatric athlete. The pediatric athlete exercising in the heat is susceptible to voluntary dehydration and evidence exists to suggest that a carbohydrate-electrolyte drink will abolish this phenomenon.

  16. Advances in pediatrics. Volume 32

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barness, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on pediatrics. Topics include: the biological role and clinical implications of taurine; human milk nonprotein nitrogen; monoclonal antibodies in the diagnosis and treatment of childhood diseases; and human immune responses to polysaccharide antigens.

  17. Radionuclide methods in pediatric cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, O.; Ruth, C.; Samanek, M.

    1990-01-01

    The use of radionuclide methods in pediatric cardiology is discussed for non-invasive evaluation of myocardial function and perfusion, regional lung perfusion and ventilation, and for measuring central and peripheral hemodynamics. (H.W.). 16 refs

  18. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose in X-Ray ... Materials Anesthesia Safety Children and Radiation Safety Images related to Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Videos related ...

  19. Preventable Pediatric Stroke via Vaccination?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig A. Press

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from the Vascular Effects of Infection in Pediatric Stroke (VIPS group studied the risk of arterial ischemic stroke (AIS associated with minor infection and routine childhood vaccinations.

  20. Management of pediatric hand burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liodaki, Eirini; Kisch, Tobias; Mauss, Karl L; Senyaman, Oezge; Kraemer, Robert; Mailänder, Peter; Wünsch, Lutz; Stang, Felix

    2015-04-01

    Hand burns are common in the pediatric population. Optimal hand function is a crucial component of a high-quality survival after burn injury. This can only be achieved with a coordinated approach to the injuries. The aim of this study was to review the management algorithm and outcomes of pediatric hand burns at our institution. In total, 70 children fulfilling our study criteria were treated for a burn hand injury in our Burn Care Center between January 2008 and May 2013. 14 of the 70 pediatric patients underwent surgery because of the depth of the hand burns. The management algorithm depending on the depth of the burn is described. Two patients underwent correction surgery due to burn contractures later. For a successful outcome of the burned hand, the interdisciplinary involvement and cooperation of the plastic and pediatric surgeon, hand therapist, burn team, patient and their parents are crucial.

  1. Burnout Syndrome in Pediatric Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Youbi, Reem A.; Jan, Mohammed M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Burnout is a common work-related syndrome consisting of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and diminished feelings of personal accomplishment. Burnout influences the performance and efficiency of the healthcare professionals and therefore the quality of the care provided. This study aims to assess the burnout rates and potential determinants in pediatrics.Methods: A cross-sectional, descriptive study involving physicians practicing pediatrics in the Jeddah area of Saudi Arabi...

  2. Pulmonary metastasectomy in pediatric patients

    OpenAIRE

    Erginel, Basak; Gun Soysal, Feryal; Keskin, Erbug; Kebudi, Rejin; Celik, Alaaddin; Salman, Tansu

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aims to evaluate the outcomes of pulmonary metastasectomy resections in pediatric patients. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 43 children who were operated on in the Pediatric Surgery Clinic between January 1988 and 2014. Forty-three children (26 boys; 17 girls; mean age 10???4.24?years, range 6?months?18?years) who underwent pulmonary metastasectomy resection were included in the study. The patients were evaluated based on age, gender, history o...

  3. Imaging of pediatric neurovascular emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yang; Goodman, William C; Maldonado, Michael D; Du, Xinli

    2018-01-11

    Pediatric strokes are rare but critical diagnoses to make in the emergency setting. They are associated with a set of pathologies that are not frequently encountered in the adult population. Some of these diseases have variable clinical presentations and imaging appearance depending on the age of onset and severity of the underlying pathologies. This article reviews the differential diagnoses and noninvasive imaging evaluation of pediatric cerebral ischemic and hemorrhagic diseases.

  4. Pediatric Obesity: Etiology and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Crocker, Melissa K.; Yanovski, Jack A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews factors that contribute to excessive weight gain in children and outlines current knowledge regarding approaches for treating pediatric obesity. Virtually all of the known genetic causes of obesity primarily increase energy intake. Genes regulating the leptin signaling pathway are particularly important for human energy homeostasis. Obesity is a chronic disorder that requires long-term strategies for management. The foundation for all treatments for pediatric obesity remain...

  5. What is a pediatric tumor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mora J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Jaume Mora1,21Department of Oncology, 2Developmental Tumor Biology Laboratory, Hospital Sant Joan de Deu, Fundacio Sant Joan de Deu, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: Working together with medical oncologists, the question of whether a Ewing sarcoma in a 25-year-old is a pediatric tumor comes up repeatedly. Like Ewing's, some tumors present characteristically at ages that cross over what has been set as the definition of pediatrics (15 years, 18 years, or 21 years?. Pediatric oncology textbooks, surprisingly, do not address the subject of defining a pediatric tumor. They all begin with an epidemiology chapter defining the types of tumors appearing at distinct stages of childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood. Describing the epidemiology of tumors in relation to age, it becomes clear that the disease is related to the phenomenon of aging. The question, however, remains: is there a biological definition of what pediatric age is? And if so, will tumors occurring during this period of life have anything to do with such biological definition? With the aim of finding an objective definition, the fundamental concepts of what defines "pediatrics" was reviewed and then the major features of tumors arising during development were analyzed. The tumors were explored from the perspective of a host immersed in the normal process of growth and development. This physiological process, from pluripotential and undifferentiated cells, makes possible the differentiation, maturation, organization, and function of tissues, organs, and apparatus. A biological definition of pediatric tumors and the infancy–childhood–puberty classification of developmental tumors according to the infancy–childhood–puberty model of normal human development are proposed.Keywords: growth and development, pediatric tumor, infant, childhood and adolescence, pubertal tumors

  6. Specialist training in pediatric anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tom G

    2009-01-01

    There has been a great deal of focus on specialist training in pediatric anesthesia in the last decade or so. Internationally, however, there is still no uniform agreement as to how such a training program should be arranged and organized. Since September 2003, the Scandinavian Society of Anaesth......There has been a great deal of focus on specialist training in pediatric anesthesia in the last decade or so. Internationally, however, there is still no uniform agreement as to how such a training program should be arranged and organized. Since September 2003, the Scandinavian Society...... of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine has coordinated an advanced Inter-Nordic educational program in pediatric anesthesia and intensive care. The training program is managed by a Steering Committee. This program is intended for physicians who recently have received their specialist degree in anesthesiology...... and intensive care. The training period is 12 months of which 9 months are dedicated to pediatric anesthesia and 3 months to pediatric intensive care. During the 1-year training period, the candidates are designated a Scandinavian host clinic (at a tertiary pediatric center in Scandinavia approved...

  7. Workforce Issues in Pediatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Don K

    2017-06-01

    High salaries indicate a demand for pediatric surgeons in excess of the supply, despite only a slight growth in the pediatric-age population and a sharp increase in numbers of trainees. Top-level neonatal intensive care units require 24-hour-7-day pediatric surgical availability, so hospitals are willing to pay surgeons a premium and engage high-priced locum tenens surgeons to fill vacancies in coverage. With increased supply comes an erosion of the numbers of cases performed by trainees and surgeons in practice. Caseloads may be inadequate to gain expertise and maintain skills. A quality initiative sponsored by the American College of Surgeons and the American Pediatric Surgical Association will discourage underresourced community facilities and surgeons without specialty training from performing operations on children, mostly common conditions such as appendicitis. This will further increase demand for specialty-trained practitioners. Receiving less attention are considerations of value, the ratio of quality per dollar cost. Cost concerns, paramount among buyers of health care (businesses, insurance companies, and governmental health agencies), will prefer community hospitals that have lower cost structures than specialty children's facilities. Less recognized are the costs to families, who for a myriad of reasons would prefer closer alternatives. Cost considerations support providing pediatric surgical services in local facilities. Quality considerations may be addressed by a tiered system where top centers would care for conditions that require technical expertise and advanced modalities. Evidence indicates that pediatric surgeons already direct such cases to more specialized centers.

  8. Management of pediatric mandible fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goth, Stephen; Sawatari, Yoh; Peleg, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The pediatric mandible fracture is a rare occurrence when compared with the number of mandible fractures that occur within the adult population. Although the clinician who manages facial fractures may never encounter a pediatric mandible fracture, it is a unique injury that warrants a comprehensive discussion. Because of the unique anatomy, dentition, and growth of the pediatric patient, the management of a pediatric mandible fracture requires true diligence with a variance in treatment ranging from soft diet to open reduction and internal fixation. In addition to the variability in treatment, any trauma to the face of a child requires additional management factors including child abuse issues and long-term sequelae involving skeletal growth, which may affect facial symmetry and occlusion. The following is a review of the incidence, relevant anatomy, clinical and radiographic examination, and treatment modalities for specific fracture types of the pediatric mandible based on the clinical experience at the University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery program. In addition, a review of the literature regarding the management of the pediatric mandible fracture was performed to offer a more comprehensive overview of this unique subset of facial fractures.

  9. Large-scale single incised valley from a small catchment basin on the western Adriatic margin (central Mediterranean Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maselli, Vittorio; Trincardi, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    The Manfredonia Incised Valley (MIV) is a huge erosional feature buried below the Apulian shelf, on the western side of the Adriatic margin. The incision extends more than 60 km eastward, from the Tavoliere Plain to the outer shelf, not reaching the shelf edge. High-resolution chirp sonar profiles allow reconstruction of the morphology of the incision and its correlation at regional scale. The MIV records a single episode of incision, induced by the last glacial-interglacial sea level fall that forced the rivers draining the Tavoliere Plain to advance basinward, reaching their maximum extent at the peak of the Last Glacial Maximum. The valley was filled during a relatively short interval of about 10,000 yr during the Late Pleistocene-Holocene sea level rise and almost leveled-off at the time of maximum marine ingression, possibly recording the short-term climatic fluctuations that occurred. The accommodation space generated by the lowstand incision was exploited during the following interval of sea level rise by very high rates of sediment supply that allowed the preservation of up to 45 m of valley fill. High-resolution chirp sonar profiles highlight stratal geometries that are consistent with a typical transgressive valley fill of an estuary environment, including bay-head deltas, central basin and distal barrier-island deposits, organized in a backstepping configuration. The highest complexity of the valley fill is reached in the shallowest and most proximal area, where a kilometric prograding wedge formed during a period dominated by riverine input, possibly connected to high precipitation rates. Based on the depth of the valley margins during this interval, the fill was likely isochronous with the formation of sapropel S1 in the Mediterranean region and may have recorded significant fluctuations within the hydrological cycle.

  10. Citation classics in pediatric orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Ranjit A; Dhawale, Arjun A; Zavaglia, Bogard C; Slobogean, Bronwyn L; Mulpuri, Kishore

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the clinical pediatric orthopaedic articles with at least 100 citations published in all orthopaedic journals and to examine their characteristics. All journals dedicated to orthopaedics and its subspecialties were selected from the Journal Citation Report 2001 under the subject category "orthopedics." Articles cited 100 times or more were identified using the database of the Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED, 1900 to present). The articles were ranked in a comprehensive list. Two authors independently reviewed the full text of each article and applied the inclusion and exclusion criteria to the list of articles. The 2 lists were then compared. All disagreements were resolved by consensus with input from the senior author. The final list of pediatric orthopaedic articles was then compiled. There were a total of 49 journals under the search category "orthopedics." Five journals were excluded as they were non-English journals. The remaining 44 journals were screened for articles with at least 100 citations. A total of 135 clinical pediatric orthopaedic articles cited at least 100 times were included. The most cited article was cited 692 times. The mean number of citations per article was 159 (95% confidence interval, 145-173). All the articles were published between 1949 and 2001, with 1980 and 1989 producing the most citation classics (34). The majority (90) originated from the United States, followed by the United Kingdom (12) and Canada (11). Scoliosis/kyphosis was the most common topic with 26 papers. The second most common subject was hip disorders (24). Therapeutic studies were the most common study type (71). Ninety-seven papers were assigned a 4 for level of evidence. The list of citation classics in pediatric orthopaedic articles is useful for several reasons. It identifies important contributions to the field of pediatric orthopaedics and their originators; it facilitates the understanding and discourse

  11. Perceived fatigue following pediatric burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkerman, Moniek; Mouton, Leonora J; Dijkstra, Froukje; Niemeijer, Anuschka S; van Brussel, Marco; van der Woude, Lucas H V; Disseldorp, Laurien M; Nieuwenhuis, Marianne K

    2017-12-01

    Fatigue is a common consequence of numerous pediatric health conditions. In adult burn survivors, fatigue was found to be a major problem. The current cross-sectional study is aimed at determining the levels of perceived fatigue in pediatric burn survivors. Perceived fatigue was assessed in 23 children and adolescents (15 boys and 8 girls, aged 6-18 years, with burns covering 10-46% of the total body surface area, 1-5 years post burn) using both child self- and parent proxy reports of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Multidimensional Fatigue Scale. Outcomes were compared with reference values of non-burned peers. At group level, pediatric burn survivors did not report significantly more symptoms of fatigue than their non-burned peers. Individual assessments showed, however, that four children experienced substantial symptoms of fatigue according to the child self-reports, compared to ten children according to the parent proxy reports. Furthermore, parents reported significantly more symptoms of fatigue than the children themselves. Age, gender, extent of burn, length of hospital stay, and number of surgeries could not predict the level of perceived fatigue post-burn. Our results suggest that fatigue is prevalent in at least part of the pediatric burn population after 1-5 years. However, the fact that parents reported significantly more symptoms of fatigue then the children themselves, hampers evident conclusions. It is essential for clinicians and therapists to consider both perspectives when evaluating pediatric fatigue after burn and to determine who needs special attention, the pediatric burn patient or its parent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  12. Pediatric pelvic fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Candice P; Holman, Joel; Herman, Martin J

    2007-03-01

    Pediatric pelvic fractures account for only 1% to 2% of fractures seen by orthopaedic surgeons who treat children. They are typically associated with high-energy trauma, requiring a comprehensive workup for concomitant life-threatening injuries. Anteroposterior radiographs and rapid-sequence computed tomography are the standards of diagnostic testing to identify the fracture and recognize associated injuries. Treatment is individualized based on patient age, fracture classification, stability of the pelvic ring, extent of concomitant injuries, and hemodynamic stability of the patient. Most pelvic injuries in children are treated nonsurgically, with protected weight bearing and gradual return to activity. Open reduction and internal fixation is required for acetabular fractures with >2 mm of fracture displacement and for any intra-articular or triradiate cartilage fracture displacement >2 mm. To prevent limb-length discrepancies, external fixation is necessary for pelvic ring displacement >2 cm. Fractures involving immature triradiate cartilage may lead to growth disturbance of the acetabulum, resulting in acetabular dysplasia, hip subluxation, or hip joint incongruity. Osteonecrosis of the femoral head may develop after acetabular fractures associated with hip dislocation. Other complications include myositis ossificans and neurologic deficits secondary to sciatic, femoral, and/or lumbosacral plexus nerve injuries.

  13. The Geographic Distribution of Pediatric Anesthesiologists Relative to the US Pediatric Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muffly, Matthew K; Medeiros, David; Muffly, Tyler M; Singleton, Mark A; Honkanen, Anita

    2017-07-01

    The geographic relationship between pediatric anesthesiologists and the pediatric population has potentially important clinical and policy implications. In the current study, we describe the geographic distribution of pediatric anesthesiologists relative to the US pediatric population (0-17 years) and a subset of the pediatric population (0-4 years). The percentage of the US pediatric population that lives within different driving distances to the nearest pediatric anesthesiologist (0 to 25 miles, >25 to 50 miles, >50 to 100 miles, >100 to 250 miles, and >250 miles) was determined by creating concentric driving distance service areas surrounding pediatric anesthesiologist practice locations. US Census block groups were used to determine the sum pediatric population in each anesthesiologist driving distance service area. The pediatric anesthesiologist-to-pediatric population ratio was then determined for each of the 306 hospital referral regions (HRRs) in the United States and compared with ratios of other physician groups to the pediatric population. All geographic mapping and analysis was performed using ArcGIS Desktop 10.2.2 mapping software (Redlands, CA). A majority of the pediatric population (71.4%) lives within a 25-mile drive of a pediatric anesthesiologist; however, 10.2 million US children (0-17 years) live greater than 50 miles from the nearest pediatric anesthesiologist. More than 2.7 million children ages 0 to 4 years live greater than 50 miles from the nearest identified pediatric anesthesiologist. The median ratio of pediatric anesthesiologists to 100,000 pediatric population at the HRR level was 2.25 (interquartile range, 0-5.46). Pediatric anesthesiologist geographic distribution relative to the pediatric population by HRR is lower and less uniform than for all anesthesiologists, neonatologists, and pediatricians. A substantial proportion of the US pediatric population lives greater than 50 miles from the nearest pediatric anesthesiologist, and

  14. Pediatric kidney transplantation: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma A

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Amit Sharma, Rajesh Ramanathan, Marc Posner, Robert A Fisher Hume-Lee Transplant Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA Abstract: Pediatric kidney transplantation is the preferred treatment for children with end-stage renal disease. The most common indications for transplantation in children are renal developmental anomalies, obstructive uropathy, and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Living donor kidney transplants are often performed pre-emptively and offer excellent graft function. Policy changes in deceased-donor kidney allocation have increased the proportion of such transplants in pediatric recipients. Adequate pretransplant workup along with evaluation of urologic abnormalities is imperative in achieving good outcomes. Overall, patient and graft outcomes after kidney transplantation have improved, with five-year deceased donor and living donor graft survivals of 78.8% and 84.3%, respectively. Improvements in induction and maintenance immunosuppression have contributed to the gradual improvement in outcomes. Unique challenges in pediatric recipients include increased graft thrombosis, adverse growth, and abnormal development relating to immunosuppression, increased rejection due to nonadherence, increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections, and post-transplant malignancy. This review focuses on the current practices and outcomes in pediatric kidney transplantation in North America. We discuss the indications for transplantation, the evaluation process, some key surgical and immunologic considerations, and the common risk factors for graft dysfunction. Keywords: pediatric kidney transplantation, end-stage renal disease, dialysis, organ donors, immunosuppression

  15. Robotic surgery in pediatric urology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Howe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available While robotic surgery has shown clear utility and advantages in the adult population, its role in pediatrics remains controversial. Pediatric-sized robotic instruments and equipment are not readily available yet, so certain modifications can be made in order to make robotic surgery successful in children. While the cost of robotic surgery remains high compared to open procedures, patients experience greater satisfaction and quality of life with robotic surgery. Robotic pyeloplasty is a standard of care in older children, and has even been performed in infants and re-do surgery. Other robotic procedures performed in children include heminephroureterectomy, ureteroureterostomy, ureteral reimplantation, urachal cyst excision, bladder diverticulectomy, and bladder reconstructive procedures such as augmentation, appendicovesicostomy, antegrade continence enema, bladder neck reconstruction and sling, as well as other procedures. Robotic surgery has also been used in oncologic cases such as partial nephrectomy and retroperitoneal lymph node dissection. Future improvements in technology with production of pediatric-sized robotic instruments, along with increases in robotic-trained pediatric urologists and surgeon experience along each's learning curve, will help to further advance the field of robotic surgery in pediatric urology.

  16. Robotic surgery in pediatric urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Adam; Kozel, Zachary; Palmer, Lane

    2017-01-01

    While robotic surgery has shown clear utility and advantages in the adult population, its role in pediatrics remains controversial. Pediatric-sized robotic instruments and equipment are not readily available yet, so certain modifications can be made in order to make robotic surgery successful in children. While the cost of robotic surgery remains high compared to open procedures, patients experience greater satisfaction and quality of life with robotic surgery. Robotic pyeloplasty is a standard of care in older children, and has even been performed in infants and re-do surgery. Other robotic procedures performed in children include heminephroureterectomy, ureteroureterostomy, ureteral reimplantation, urachal cyst excision, bladder diverticulectomy, and bladder reconstructive procedures such as augmentation, appendicovesicostomy, antegrade continence enema, bladder neck reconstruction and sling, as well as other procedures. Robotic surgery has also been used in oncologic cases such as partial nephrectomy and retroperitoneal lymph node dissection. Future improvements in technology with production of pediatric-sized robotic instruments, along with increases in robotic-trained pediatric urologists and surgeon experience along each's learning curve, will help to further advance the field of robotic surgery in pediatric urology.

  17. Kerala Pioneering Pediatric Surgery in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TP Joseph

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric surgeons of Kerala are very proud to have led the development of superspeciality in any branch of medicine in Kerala and also superspeciality of Pediatric surgery in whole of India. Late Prof. Raman Nair returned in 1954 after training under Dr. Everett Koop in US. Same year, in his far-sighted vision for future development of the speciality, he moved to SATH, Medical College, Trivandrum and started Pediatric surgery as a speciality attached to Paediatrics department; this was the beginning of Pediatric surgery in India. He opted for Pediatric surgery as a full time job and did not do any general surgery work in adults. He was the first full time Pediatric surgeon of India; during the next few years, 2 surgeons, one in Calcutta, Prof. UC Chakraboty and Prof. D Anjaneyulu in Hyderabad started working as full time Pediatric surgeons. In Mumbai, Delhi and Chennai, Pediatric surgery developed much later and then all over the country.

  18. American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conference Learn More Explore career opportunities in pediatric hematology/oncology Visit the ASPHO Career Center. Learn More ... Use & Privacy Policy » © The American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology

  19. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from NINRnews? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... ... on Jan 8, 2014 This vignette shares the story of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her ...

  20. Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Doctor Near You Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease) Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease) Patient Health ... pH probe: A small wire with an acid sensor is placed through the nose down to the ...

  1. What Is a Pediatric Sports Medicine Specialist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 18-21yrs. Healthy Living Healthy Living Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Growing Healthy Sleep Safety & ... Overuse injuries Cartilage injuries Exercise-induced asthma Concussions ... Pediatric Sports Medicine Specialist? Pediatric sports medicine specialists practice in ...

  2. Pandemic influenza and pediatric intensive care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nap, Raoul E.; Andriessen, Maarten P. H. M.; Meessen, Nico E. L.; Albers, Marcel J. I. J.; van der Werf, Tjip S.

    Objective: To assess the adequacy of preparedness planning for an influenza pandemic by modeling the pediatric surge capacity of healthcare facility and pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) requirements over time. Governments and Public Health authorities have planned preparedness activities and

  3. Pediatric Hospital Medicine: A Proposed New Subspecialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Douglas J; McGuinness, Gail A; Cunha, Christopher A; Emans, S Jean; Gerson, William T; Hazinski, Mary F; Lister, George; Murray, Karen F; St Geme, Joseph W; Whitley-Williams, Patricia N

    2017-03-01

    Over the past 20 years, hospitalists have emerged as a distinct group of pediatric practitioners. In August of 2014, the American Board of Pediatrics (ABP) received a petition to consider recommending that pediatric hospital medicine (PHM) be recognized as a distinct new subspecialty. PHM as a formal subspecialty raises important considerations related to: (1) quality, cost, and access to pediatric health care; (2) current pediatric residency training; (3) the evolving body of knowledge in pediatrics; and (4) the impact on both primary care generalists and existing subspecialists. After a comprehensive and iterative review process, the ABP recommended that the American Board of Medical Specialties approve PHM as a new subspecialty. This article describes the broad array of challenges and certain unique opportunities that were considered by the ABP in supporting PHM as a new pediatric subspecialty. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  4. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... now Try it free Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe ... This vignette shares the story of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates ...

  5. Transition from Pediatric to Adult OI Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moving from Pediatric to Adult Care Introduction Teen and young adult years are a critical time for major life changes. An ... for youth who have OI is moving from pediatric care into the adult care system. Children’s hospitals ...

  6. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... now Try it free Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe ... This vignette shares the story of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates ...

  7. Pediatric oncologic emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zietz, Hallie A.

    1997-01-01

    Oncologic emergencies arise in three ways: disease or therapy induced cytopenias; a space occupying lesion causing pressure on or obstruction of surrounding tissues; or leukemia or tumors creating life-threatening metabolic or hormonal problems. Knowledge of presenting signs and symptoms of these emergencies are essential in pediatric oncologic nursing. Neutropenia opens the door for all manner of infections, but the most life threatening is septicemia progressing to shock. A variety of organisms can cause septic shock in the neutropenic patient, but episodes are most often due to gram-negative organisms and the endotoxins they release. Shock, while still compensated, may present with a elevated or subnormal temperature, flushed, warm, dry skin, widening pulse pressure, tachycardia, tachypnoea and irritability, but without medical intervention will progress to hypo tension, cool, clammy extremities, decreased urinary out- put, and eventually to bradycardia and cardiogenic shock. Another emergency in the cytopenia category is bleeding as a result of thrombocytopenia. Of greatest concern is intracranial hemorrhage that may occur at platelet counts of less than 5,000/mm3. Space-occupying lesions of the chest may produce superior vena cava syndrome (SVGS), pleural and pericardial effusions, and cardiac tamponade. SVGS is most often caused by non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and presents as cough, hoarseness, dyspnea, orthopnea and chest pain. Signs include swelling, plethora, cyanosis, edema of conjunctiva and wheezing. Pleural and pericardial effusions present with respiratory or cardiac distress as does cardiac tamponade. Abdominal emergencies arise because of inflammation, mechanical obstruction, hemorrhage (often from steroid induced ulcers), and perforation. Pain is the most common presenting symptom, although vital sign alterations, fever, blood in vomitus or stool, abdominal distension and cessation of flatus are also important components of the acute abdomen

  8. Pediatric obesity & type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dea, Tara L

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on (a) identifying obesity and other risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes, (b) differentiating between pediatric type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, and (c) treating pediatric type 2 diabetes. Obesity has significant implications on a child's health, including an increased risk for insulin resistance and progression to type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes in children, characterized by insulin resistance and relative pancreatic b-cell failure due to the increased demand for insulin production, has now reached epidemic proportions. Longitudinal research on pediatric type 2 diabetes, however, is lacking because this epidemic is relatively new. Treatment of type 2 diabetes in children is focused on lifestyle modification with weight management/increased physical activity, and pharmacological management through oral medication or insulin therapy. Because children with type 2 diabetes are at risk for developing diabetes-related complications earlier in life, they need to be closely monitored for comorbidities.

  9. Dexmedetomidine in the pediatric population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plambech, Morten; Afshari, A

    2015-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine, an alpha-2 agonist approved only for sedation in adult intensive care patients, is increasingly used off-label in- and outside Europe in the pediatric setting for various indications such as to prevent agitation, as premedication in the form of intranasal, buccal and oral solution...... of sedation of children. In this paper, we assess 51 minor trials in the form of 44 randomized controlled trials and 7 prospective observational studies in an attempt to update the available evidence on dexmedetomidine use in pediatrics. Furthermore, we discuss its potential indications, benefits and adverse....... Based on the best current evidence dexmedetomidine is found suitable and safe for various indications. However, in order to discover its full potential, indications, dosing and safety profile for various ages and procedures, it should urgently be examined by conducting good quality pediatric trials...

  10. Tropical pediatrics: 2002 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Ocampo, Perla D; Santos Ocampo-Padilla, Cynthia

    2003-01-01

    It also presents the challenges that confront children in the tropics and their effects on the health of these children. These challenges include the technology divide, economic disparity, ecological changes, urbanization and industrialization, globalization, political instability, population explosion, and gender inequality. The paper paints a scenario of tropical pediatrics into the year 2015. Problems brought about by both underdevelopment and modernization, with urbanization and industrialization, will persist. Infectious diseases will continue to be the leading causes of deaths. The paper presents some significant achievements in the fight against tropical diseases and tries to predict what future progress will contribute to the alleviation of such diseases. The paper also outlines the commitment of the International Society of Tropical Pediatrics (ISTP) to improve the state of tropical pediatrics in the next 15 years.

  11. Lorazepam v. diazepam for pediatric status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Rovina Fiona; Turnbull, Jennifer

    2016-05-01

    Clinical question Is intravenous (IV) lorazepam superior to IV diazepam in the treatment of pediatric status epilepticus? Article chosen Chamberlain JM, Okada P, Holsti M, et al. Lorazepam v. diazepam for pediatric status epilepticus: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA 2014;311(16):1652-60. To determine whether lorazepam has better efficacy and safety than diazepam for treating pediatric status epilepticus.

  12. Fathering and the Pediatric Cancer Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    Company, 1974. Bowlby , John . Attachment and Loss: Volume I. New York: Basic Books, Inc., 1969. Brazelton, T. Berry. Infants and Mothers: Differences in...conmittee, acted as my preceptor during my year in the Pediatric Oncology Clinic. To Dr. John Hutter, Pediatric Oncologist, and Sonnie Larman, Pediatric...37 Informants ..... .................. . . . . . . 39 John ................... . . . . .. 40 Steve........................ .. ... 41 AnlSisv of

  13. Japanese consensus guidelines for pediatric nuclear medicine. Part 1: Pediatric radiopharmaceutical administered doses (JSNM pediatric dosage card). Part 2: Technical considerations for pediatric nuclear medicine imaging procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Masaki, Hidekazu; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Okuno, Mitsuo; Oguma, Eiji; Onuma, Hiroshi; Kanegawa, Kimio; Kanaya, Shinichi; Kamiyama, Hiroshi; Karasawa, Kensuke; Kitamura, Masayuki; Kida, Tetsuo; Kono, Tatsuo; Kondo, Chisato; Sasaki, Masayuki; Terada, Hitoshi; Nakanishi, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Teisuke; Hataya, Hiroshi; Hamano, Shin-ichiro; Hirono, Keishi; Fujita, Yukihiko; Hoshino, Ken; Yano, Masayuki; Watanabe, Seiichi

    2014-06-01

    The Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine has recently published the consensus guidelines for pediatric nuclear medicine. This article is the English version of the guidelines. Part 1 proposes the dose optimization in pediatric nuclear medicine studies. Part 2 comprehensively discusses imaging techniques for the appropriate conduct of pediatric nuclear medicine procedures, considering the characteristics of imaging in children.

  14. Pediatric health, medicine, and therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E Wainwright

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Claire E Wainwright1,21Royal Children’s Hospital, Brisbane and Queensland, Queensland, Australia; 2Queensland Children’s Medical Research Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, AustraliaThe idea of children as small adults with health care needs that can be managed by extrapolation from adult studies has now largely been abandoned. We now recognize that adult health and disease are closely linked to childhood factors and the critical and ethical importance of clinical research in pediatrics is increasingly being recognized.  While funding and output from pediatric clinical research continues to lag behind health research in adults, particularly in the area of therapeutics, the last decade has thankfully seen a dramatic increase in the number of pediatric studies and particularly randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs. Since the 1997 Food and Drug Administration (FDA Modernization Act in the United States (US and the subsequent changes in drug registration regulatory systems in the US and Europe, there has been a huge increase in the number of pediatric studies sponsored by pharmaceutical companies. In the United Kingdom, the Medicine for Children’s Research Network was established in 2005 to address the lack of clinical studies in pediatrics. Over the first five years they reported an exciting increase in the number of high quality clinical studies and on their website they have a current portfolio of over 200 pediatric studies, half of which are RCTs and half are sponsored by pharmaceutical companies. Other countries particularly across Europe are also establishing similar programs. 

  15. Extrapulmonary involvement in pediatric tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritsaneepaiboon, Supika; Andres, Mariaem M; Tatco, Vincent R; Lim, Cielo Consuelo Q; Concepcion, Nathan David P

    2017-09-01

    Tuberculosis in childhood is clinically challenging, but it is a preventable and treatable disease. Risk factors depend on age and immunity status. The most common form of pediatric tuberculosis is pulmonary disease, which comprises more than half of the cases. Other forms make up the extrapulmonary tuberculosis that involves infection of the lymph nodes, central nervous system, gastrointestinal system, hepatobiliary tree, and renal and musculoskeletal systems. Knowledge of the imaging characteristics of pediatric tuberculosis provides clues to diagnosis. This article aims to review the imaging characteristics of common sites for extrapulmonary tuberculous involvement in children.

  16. Medication Errors in Outpatient Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrier, Kyla

    2016-01-01

    Medication errors may occur during parental administration of prescription and over-the-counter medications in the outpatient pediatric setting. Misinterpretation of medication labels and dosing errors are two types of errors in medication administration. Health literacy may play an important role in parents' ability to safely manage their child's medication regimen. There are several proposed strategies for decreasing these medication administration errors, including using standardized dosing instruments, using strictly metric units for medication dosing, and providing parents and caregivers with picture-based dosing instructions. Pediatric healthcare providers should be aware of these strategies and seek to implement many of them into their practices.

  17. The Future of Pediatric Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Jeff; Emerick, Jill; Saxena, Harshita

    2016-03-01

    The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports a steady increase in obesity over the last 30 years. The greatest increase was seen in 15 to 19 year olds, whose obesity prevalence almost doubled from 10.5% to 19.4%. The solution to pediatric obesity requires a multidisciplinary approach addressing cultural norms, technologic advances, and family engagement. Future treatment strategies to combat the obesity epidemic will have to extend beyond the health care provider's office. Behavior modification remains the key component to pediatric obesity prevention and treatment. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Pediatric epilepsy: The Indian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadgil, Pradnya; Udani, Vrajesh

    2011-10-01

    Epilepsy is a common clinical entity in neurology clinics. The understanding of the genetics of epilepsy has undergone a sea change prompting re-classification by the International league against epilepsy recently. The prevalence rates of epilepsy in India are similar to those of developed nations. However, the large treatment gap is a major challenge to our public health system. Perinatal injuries are a major causative factor in pediatric group. We have discussed a few common etiologies such as neurocysticercosis and newer genetic epilepsy syndromes. We have also briefly touched upon the Indian experience in pediatric epilepsy surgery.

  19. Delirium in Pediatric Critical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Anita K; Bell, Michael J; Traube, Chani

    2017-10-01

    Delirium occurs frequently in the critically ill child. It is a syndrome characterized by an acute onset and fluctuating course, with behaviors that reflect a disturbance in awareness and cognition. Delirium represents global cerebral dysfunction due to the direct physiologic effects of an underlying medical illness or its treatment. Pediatric delirium is strongly associated with poor outcomes, including increased mortality, prolonged intensive care unit length of stay, longer time on mechanical ventilation, and increased cost of care. With heightened awareness, the pediatric intensivist can detect, treat, and prevent delirium in at-risk children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pediatric AIDS | Khazbak | Egyptian Journal of Pediatric Allergy and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Egyptian Journal of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology (The). Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 2, No 1 (2004) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  1. Integration of Pediatric Mental Health in General Pediatrics in Eritrea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    intervention, counseling, guidance, care coordination, and chronic illness management. Pediatric mental health care should be friendly to families and fully coordinated with the child's other health care. The presence of a child and adolescent psychiatrist and/or other mental health professionals in the primary care setting ...

  2. Wanted: pediatric nephrologists! - why trainees are not choosing pediatric nephrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Maria; Iglesia, Edward; Ko, Zion; Amamoo, Ahinee; Mahan, John; Desai, Tejas; Gibson, Keisha; Jhaveri, Kenar; Primack, William

    2014-09-01

    A workforce crisis for many pediatric specialties, particularly nephrology, is due to growing retirement rates, attrition during training, and retention difficulties. To obtain specific information regarding pediatric nephrology trainee shortages, we administered two cross-sectional surveys to non-renal pediatric subspecialty fellows and pediatric nephrology program directors. We characterized the fellows' experiences with nephrology and the program directors' experiences with their fellows as well as their outcomes in the last 10 years. We analyzed responses from 531 non-renal fellows (14.4% response rate). Overall, 317 (60%) fellows rated nephrology as difficult, particularly women (65.4% vs. 49.5%, p nephrology as more difficult compared to all others (p = 0.001). More men than women (24% vs. 8%, p nephrology workforce. These findings support our belief that a strong effort needs to be made by the academic community to teach nephrology in more interesting and understandable formats. While these are national samples, we were unable to contact non-nephrology fellows directly and program directors from larger programs were underrepresented. Difficulties in attracting/retaining trainees (particularly women) to nephrology must be addressed systematically, identifying incentives to practice in this field. Bold concerted efforts are required and we propose seven steps to achieve this goal.

  3. Why Is Diagnosing Pediatric Malnutrition Important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corkins, Mark R

    2017-02-01

    The literature indicates that pediatric malnutrition is more common than the number of times it is actually diagnosed. A new pediatric malnutrition definition is now available with criteria to make the diagnosis. If pediatric malnutrition is present, it should be diagnosed for financial, educational, and research purposes as well as the effects on patient development and mortality. These reasons extend beyond the health of an individual patient to potential impacts on society as a whole. When all of these reasons are examined and added, making the diagnosis of pediatric malnutrition becomes an obligation of the pediatric caregiver.

  4. Pediatric glaucoma: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchini G

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Giorgio Marchini, Marco Toscani, Francesca Chemello Eye Clinic, Department of Neurological and Movement Sciences, University of Verona, Verona, Italy Abstract: “Childhood glaucoma” is a heterogeneous group of severe pediatric conditions often associated with significant visual loss and characterized by elevated intraocular pressure (IOP and optic-disk cupping. Successful IOP control is crucial but challenging and most often achieved surgically, with medical therapy playing a supportive role. There are many classifications of childhood glaucoma, but they can simply be divided into primary, in which a developmental abnormality of the anterior chamber angle only exists, and secondary, in which aqueous outflow is reduced due to independent mechanisms that secondarily impair the function of the filtration angle. The worldwide prevalence of childhood blindness ranges from 0.03% in high-income countries to 0.12% in undeveloped countries. The majority of cases do not have an identified genetic mutation and, where the mutation is known, the genes often account for only a small proportion of cases. Several pathogenetic mechanisms are known to contribute to the development of childhood glaucoma. Whatever the cause, it results in a reduced aqueous outflow at the level of the trabecular meshwork. Age of onset and magnitude of the elevated IOP largely determine the clinical manifestation the high variability of clinical manifestations. Glaucoma from any cause in a neonate and infant is characterized by the classic triad of epiphora, photophobia, and blepharospasm, and could be associated with eye enlargement (buphthalmos and Haab striae. The eye examination, usually performed under general anesthesia, includes: tonometry, anterior-segment examination, gonioscopy, corneal diameter and axial length measurement, dilated fundoscopy with optic-nerve-head evaluation. Medical therapy, considering the high frequency of side effects, is generally used as

  5. Introduction of a pediatric palliative care curriculum for pediatric residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Joshua D; Chamberlain, Lisa J; Palmer, Laura; Contro, Nancy; Sourkes, Barbara; Sectish, Theodore C

    2008-03-01

    The Pediatric Palliative Care Curriculum (PPCC) was introduced as a pilot study in response to the published need for increased pediatric education in end-of-life (EOL) care. The PPCC was designed to better train residents in EOL issues so they could become more comfortable and knowledgeable in caring for children and adolescents with life-threatening illnesses. The PPCC consisted of six hour-long sessions run by a clinical psychologist, a licensed social worker, and faculty with experience in EOL care. The curriculum repeated every 6 weeks for 1 year. Residents in the training program at Stanford University rotating through oncology, pulmonology, and pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) were invited to attend. Session topics included: (1) personal coping skills, (2) being a caring professional, (3) recognizing cultural and familial differences, (4) pain management, (5) practical issues, and (6) meeting a bereaved parent. Pretest and posttest surveys with five-point Likert scale questions were used to measure curricular impact. Statistically significant improvement was found in resident self-report of: feeling prepared to initiate do-not-resuscitate discussions (p palliative care (p Pediatric residents who participated in this pilot study felt they learned important skills in pediatric EOL care and enhanced their confidence in their ability to care for dying patients and their families. Interventions like the PPCC may be useful at other institutions and aid in the transition to competency-based training.

  6. Phantom Limb Pain in Pediatric Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick DeMoss

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Phantom limb pain (PLP is a prevalent problem for children and adolescents undergoing amputation due to cancer treatment. The symptoms are wide ranging from sharp to tingling. PLP in children typically lasts for a few minutes but can be almost constant and can be highly distressing. This focused review describes the characteristics, epidemiology, mechanisms, and evidence-based treatment of PLP in pediatric populations, focusing on pediatric cancer. In pediatric oncology, the administration of chemotherapy is a risk factor that potentially sensitizes the nervous system and predisposes pediatric cancer patients to develop PLP after amputation. Gabapentin, tricyclic antidepressants, opiates, nerve blocks, and epidural catheters have shown mixed success in adults and case reports document potential utility in pediatric patients. Non-pharmacologic treatments, such as mirror therapy, psychotherapy, and acupuncture have also been used in pediatric PLP with success. Prospective controlled trials are necessary to advance care for pediatric patients with PLP.

  7. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen ...

  9. Pediatric headache: a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Howard; Gladstein, Jack

    2012-02-01

    In this review we describe the epidemiology, classification, and approach to the diagnosis and treatment of episodic and chronic migraine in children. We review both traditional and alternative medications, and offer a glimpse into the future of pediatric headache. © 2012 American Headache Society.

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... child may resume their usual activities and normal diet immediately after the exam. A few patients experience ... in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and vascular disease, and muscular and bone ... (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played ... are the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? High-quality images are assured only if your child is ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s ... determine the presence of certain diseases. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted ...

  14. Promoting innovation in pediatric nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, Dennis M

    2010-01-01

    Truly impactful innovation can only be recognized in retrospect. Moreover, almost by definition, developing algorithmic paths on roadmaps for innovation are likely to be unsuccessful because innovators do not generally follow established routes. Nonetheless, environments can be established within Departments of Pediatrics that promote innovating thinking. The environmental factors necessary to do so include: (1) demand that academic Pediatrics Departments function in an aggressively scholarly mode; (2) capture the most fundamental science in postnatal developmental biology; (3) focus education and training on the boundaries of our knowledge, rather than the almost exclusive attention to what we think we already know; (4) devote mentoring, time and resources to only the most compelling unanswered questions in the pediatric sciences, including nutrition; (5) accept only systematic, evidence-based answers to clinical questions; (6) if systematic, evidence-based data are not available, design the proper studies to get them; (7) prize questioning the answers to further move beyond the knowledge limit; (8) support the principle that experiments in children will be required to convincingly answer clinical questions important to children, and (9) establish the multicenter resources in pediatric scientist training, clinical study design and implementation, and laboratory and instrument technologies required to answer today's questions with tomorrow's methods. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Family Functioning in Pediatric Trichotillomania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Phoebe S.; Franklin, Martin E.; Keuthen, Nancy J.; Flessner, Christopher A.; Woods, Douglas W.; Piacentini, John A.; Stein, Dan J.; Loew, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about how pediatric trichotillomania (TTM), a clinically significant and functionally impairing disorder, is impacted by, and impacts, family functioning. We explored dimensions of family functioning and parental attitudes in a sample of children and adolescents who participated in an Internet-based survey and satisfied…

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  17. Pediatric nephrology practice in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Akl

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The practice of pediatric nephrology in a developing country such as Jordan is governed by social, cultural, and economic issues. The prevalence of consanguinity contributes to the emergence of rare heredofamilial disorders and congenital anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract. Epigenetic factors modify underlying genetic defect predisposing to symptomatic crystalluria. Future research should be directed at prevention.

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the procedure performed? What will my child experience during and after the procedure? Who interprets the results and how do we get them? What are the benefits vs. risks? What are the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? ...

  19. Dexmedetomidine in the pediatric population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plambech, Morten; Afshari, A

    2015-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine, an alpha-2 agonist approved only for sedation in adult intensive care patients, is increasingly used off-label in- and outside Europe in the pediatric setting for various indications such as to prevent agitation, as premedication in the form of intranasal, buccal and oral solutio...

  20. Advances in pediatrics. Volume 31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barness, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses the advances made in pediatrics. The topics discussed are--Molecular biology of thalassemia; genetic mapping of humans; technology of recombinant-DNA; DNA-sequencing and human chromosomes and etiology of hereditary diseases; acne; and T-cell abnormalities.

  1. Grand Rounds in Pediatric Nephrology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Case Presentation. Grand Rounds in Pediatric Nephrology. Elisabeth M. Hodson. Centre for Kidney Research, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Locked Bag 4001, Westmead NSW 2145, Australia .... nephrotic syndrome (SSNS) with minimal change disease ... and reduced renal function while severe SLE nephropathy.

  2. Management of pediatric ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turner, Dan; Levine, Arie; Escher, Johanna C

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric ulcerative colitis (UC) shares many features with adult-onset disease but there are some unique considerations; therefore, therapeutic approaches have to be adapted to these particular needs. We aimed to formulate guidelines for managing UC in children based on a systematic review (SR) ...

  3. Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing in Pediatrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takken, Tim; Bongers, Bart C; van Brussel, Marco; Haapala, Eero A; Hulzebos, Erik Hj

    2017-01-01

    Aerobic fitness is an important determinant of overall health. Higher aerobic fitness has been associated with many health benefits. Because myocardial ischemia is rare in children, indications for exercise testing differ in children compared to adults. Pediatric exercise testing is imperative to

  4. The Pediatric Cataract Register (PECARE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haargaard, Birgitte; Nyström, Alf; Rosensvärd, Annika

    2015-01-01

    examination with a pencil light at age 5 weeks, whereas newborn red reflex examination using a handheld ophthalmoscope is routine protocol in Swedish maternity wards. Data regarding age of referral were derived from the Pediatric Cataract Register (PECARE). All children operated on before 1 year of age...

  5. Assessing Competence in Pediatric Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Apul E.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    In response to the need to assure physician competence, a rating scale was developed at the University of Minnesota Medical School for use in evaluating clinical competence in pediatric cardiology. It was tested on first- and second-year specialists. Development and testing procedures are described. (JT)

  6. Handbook of pediatric HIV care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Read, Jennifer S; Zeichner, Steven L. (Steven Leonard)

    2006-01-01

    ... and guidelines necessary for effective management of infected children. Dr. Stephen L. Zeichner received his undergraduate and graduate degrees at the University of Chicago. He trained in pediatrics and infectious diseases at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. An investigator in the HIV and AIDS Malignancy Branch, National Cancer Institute, NIH, and an adjunc...

  7. Microbiology of pediatric orbital cellulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinley, Steven H; Yen, Michael T; Miller, Aaron M; Yen, Kimberly G

    2007-10-01

    To evaluate the microbiology of pediatric orbital cellulitis associated with sinusitis. Retrospective review of medical records of pediatric patients treated for orbital cellulitis. All pediatric patients treated for orbital cellulitis associated with sinusitis at Texas Children's Hospital between December 1, 2001 and September 30, 2005 were reviewed. Data collected included patient age, history, microbiology results, and surgical intervention. Thirty-eight cases were identified. Fifteen cases required medical management, whereas 23 patients received a combination of medical and surgical intervention. Three patients had multiple surgical procedures performed. Of the procedures performed, four were sinus irrigation, 12 were sinusotomy and drainage, nine were orbitotomy with drainage of abscess, and one was craniotomy with drainage of abscess. Surgical aspirate specimens yielded a higher positive culture result rate with 9/9 of orbital abscesses and 13/16 of sinus aspirates demonstrating a positive yield. Two of the 27 blood cultures had a positive yield. Staphylococcus species was the most common organism isolated. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) represented 73% of S. aureus isolates. Streptococcus species was the next most common pathogen. Three cultures yielded Haemophilus species with one being positive for H. influenzae. Organisms responsible for causing pediatric orbital cellulitis are evolving, with Staphylococcus followed by Streptococcus species being the most common pathogens. The occurrence of MRSA in pediatric orbital cellulitis is increasing, and empiric antimicrobial therapy should be directed against these organisms if they are prevalent in the community. Sinus and orbital abscess aspirates yielded the greatest number of positive cultures, though these invasive surgical procedures should be performed only when clinically indicated.

  8. Pediatric hospitalists and medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottolini, Mary C

    2014-07-01

    Pediatric hospital medicine (PHM) is moving toward becoming an American Board of Pediatrics (ABP) subspecialty, roughly a decade after its formal inception in 2003. Education has played a central role as the field has evolved. Hospitalists are needed to educate trainees, medical students, residents, fellows, and nurse practitioner and physician assistant students in inpatient pediatric practice. Continuous professional development is needed for hospitalists currently in practice to augment clinical skills, such as providing sedation and placing peripherally inserted central catheter lines, and nonclinical skills in areas such as quality improvement methodology, hospital administration, and health service research. To address the educational needs of the current and future state of PHM, additional training is now needed beyond residency training. Fellowship training will be essential to continue to advance the field of PHM as well as to petition the ABP for specialty accreditation. Training in using adult educational theory, curriculum, and assessment design are critical for pediatric hospitalists choosing to advance their careers as clinician-educators. Several venues are available for gaining advanced knowledge and skill as an educator. PHM clinician-educators are advancing the field of pediatric education as well as their own academic careers by virtue of the scholarly approach they have taken to designing and implementing curricula for unique PHM teaching situations. PHM educators are changing the educational paradigm to address challenges to traditional education strategies posed by duty hour restrictions and the increasing drive to shorten the duration of the hospitalization. By embracing learning with technology, such as simulation and e-learning with mobile devices, PHM educators can address these challenges as well as respond to learning preferences of millennial learners. The future for PHM education is bright. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Simulation-based medical education in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopreiato, Joseph O; Sawyer, Taylor

    2015-01-01

    The use of simulation-based medical education (SBME) in pediatrics has grown rapidly over the past 2 decades and is expected to continue to grow. Similar to other instructional formats used in medical education, SBME is an instructional methodology that facilitates learning. Successful use of SBME in pediatrics requires attention to basic educational principles, including the incorporation of clear learning objectives. To facilitate learning during simulation the psychological safety of the participants must be ensured, and when done correctly, SBME is a powerful tool to enhance patient safety in pediatrics. Here we provide an overview of SBME in pediatrics and review key topics in the field. We first review the tools of the trade and examine various types of simulators used in pediatric SBME, including human patient simulators, task trainers, standardized patients, and virtual reality simulation. Then we explore several uses of simulation that have been shown to lead to effective learning, including curriculum integration, feedback and debriefing, deliberate practice, mastery learning, and range of difficulty and clinical variation. Examples of how these practices have been successfully used in pediatrics are provided. Finally, we discuss the future of pediatric SBME. As a community, pediatric simulation educators and researchers have been a leading force in the advancement of simulation in medicine. As the use of SBME in pediatrics expands, we hope this perspective will serve as a guide for those interested in improving the state of pediatric SBME. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Pediatric advanced life support and sedation of pediatric dental patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jongbin

    2016-01-01

    Programs provided by the Korea Association of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation include Basic Life Support (BLS), Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS), Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS), and Korean Advanced Life Support (KALS). However, programs pertinent to dental care are lacking. Since 2015, related organizations have been attempting to develop a Dental Advanced Life Support (DALS) program, which can meet the needs of the dental environment. Generally, for initial management of emergency ...

  11. Social Media in Pediatric Orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lander, Sarah T; Sanders, James O; Cook, Peter C; O'Malley, Natasha T

    Internet searches and social media utilization in health care has exploded over the past 5 years, and patients utilize it to gain information on their health conditions and physicians. Social media has the potential to serve as a means for education, communication, and marketing in all health care specialties. Physicians are sometimes reluctant to engage because of concerns of privacy, litigation, and lack of experience with this modality. Many surgical subspecialties have capitalized on social media but no study to date has examined the specific footprint of pediatric orthopaedic surgeons in this realm. We aim to quantify the utilization of individual social media platforms by pediatric orthopaedic surgeons, and identify any differences between private and hospital-based physicians, but also regional differences. Using the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America Member Directory, each active member's social media presence was reviewed through an Internet search. Members were stratified on the basis of practice model and geographic location. Individual Internet searches, social media sites, and number of publications were reviewed for social media presence. Of 987 Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America members, 95% had a professional webpage, 14.8% a professional Facebook page, 2.2% a professional Twitter page, 36.8% a LinkedIn profile, 25.8% a ResearchGate profile, 33% at least 1 YouTube. Hospital-based physicians had a lower mean level of utilization of social media compared with their private practice peers, and a higher incidence of Pubmed publications. Private practice physicians had double the social media utilization. Regional differences reveal that practicing Pediatric Orthopaedists in the Northeast had increased utilization of ResearchGate and LinkedIn and the West had the lowest mean social media utilization levels. The rapid expansion of social media usage by patients and their family members is an undeniable force affecting the health

  12. International Pediatric Otolaryngology Group (IPOG) consensus recommendations : Hearing loss in the pediatric patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liming, Bryan J; Carter, John; Cheng, Alan; Choo, Daniel; Curotta, John; Carvalho, Daniela; Germiller, John A; Hone, Stephen; Kenna, Margaret A; Loundon, Natalie; Preciado, Diego; Schilder, Anne; Reilly, Brian J; Roman, Stephane; Strychowsky, Julie; Triglia, Jean-Michel; Young, Nancy; Smith, Richard J H

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide recommendations for the workup of hearing loss in the pediatric patient. METHODS: Expert opinion by the members of the International Pediatric Otolaryngology Group. RESULTS: Consensus recommendations include initial screening and diagnosis as well as the workup of

  13. Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome : Consensus Recommendations From the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jouvet, Philippe; Thomas, Neal J.; Willson, Douglas F.; Erickson, Simon; Khemani, Robinder; Smith, Lincoln; Zimmerman, Jerry; Dahmer, Mary; Flori, Heidi; Quasney, Michael; Sapru, Anil; Cheifetz, Ira M.; Rimensberger, Peter C.; Kneyber, Martin; Tamburro, Robert F.; Curley, Martha A. Q.; Nadkarni, Vinay; Valentine, Stacey; Emeriaud, Guillaume; Newth, Christopher; Carroll, Christopher L.; Essouri, Sandrine; Dalton, Heidi; Macrae, Duncan; Lopez-Cruces, Yolanda; Quasney, Michael; Santschi, Miriam; Watson, R. Scott; Bembea, Melania

    Objective: To describe the final recommendations of the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference. Design: Consensus conference of experts in pediatric acute lung injury. Setting: Not applicable. Subjects: PICU patients with evidence of acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress

  14. Pediatric Posttraumatic Headache: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Meeryo C; Blume, Heidi K

    2016-01-01

    Head injuries are common in pediatrics, and headaches are the most common complaint following mild head trauma. Although moderate and severe traumatic brain injuries occur less frequently, headaches can complicate recovery. There is currently an intense spotlight on concussion and there has been a corresponding increase in the number of children seeking care for headache after mild traumatic brain injury or concussion. Understanding the natural history of, and recognition of factors that are associated with posttraumatic headache will help providers and families to limit disability and may prompt earlier intervention to address disabling headaches. While there are few studies on the treatment of posttraumatic headache, proper evaluation and management of posttraumatic headaches is essential to prevent further injury and to promote recovery. In this article, we will review the current definitions and epidemiology of pediatric posttraumatic headache and discuss current recommendations for the evaluation and management of this syndrome in children and adolescents. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Gender and Sexuality in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merens, Teri A

    2016-05-01

    The terms gender and sexuality, once rarely discussed in a public forum, are now dominant topics of conversation on social media, in all forms of entertainment, politics, law, and medicine. The pediatric primary care physician, like all people and institutions involved in the delivery of health care, must be diligent about providing compassionate and competent care to patients and families contending with gender issues. The complex variety of obstacles these patients may face require a well-informed, sensitive clinician who can offer sound medical advice and appropriate referral. This article guides pediatricians through some of the challenges related to gender identity so they can assist their patients in navigating through any difficulties. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(5):e158-e161.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Emergency Care of Pediatric Burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Ashley M; Fey, Ryan

    2018-05-01

    Although the overall incidence of and mortality rate associated with burn injury have decreased in recent decades, burns remain a significant source of morbidity and mortality in children. Children with major burns require emergent resuscitation. Resuscitation is similar to that for adults, including pain control, airway management, and administration of intravenous fluid. However, in pediatrics, fluid resuscitation is needed for burns greater than or equal to 15% of total body surface area (TBSA) compared with burns greater than or equal to 20% TBSA for adults. Unique to pediatrics is the additional assessment for non-accidental injury and accurate calculation of the percentage of total burned surface area (TBSA) in children with changing body proportions are crucial to determine resuscitation parameters, prognosis, and disposition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Virtual Reality in Pediatric Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Thomas D; Riva, Giuseppe; Parsons, Sarah; Mantovani, Fabrizia; Newbutt, Nigel; Lin, Lin; Venturini, Eva; Hall, Trevor

    2017-11-01

    Virtual reality (VR) technologies allow for controlled simulations of affectively engaging background narratives. These virtual environments offer promise for enhancing emotionally relevant experiences and social interactions. Within this context, VR can allow instructors, therapists, neuropsychologists, and service providers to offer safe, repeatable, and diversifiable interventions that can benefit assessments and learning in both typically developing children and children with disabilities. Research has also pointed to VR's capacity to reduce children's experience of aversive stimuli and reduce anxiety levels. Although there are a number of purported advantages of VR technologies, challenges have emerged. One challenge for this field of study is the lack of consensus on how to do trials. A related issue is the need for establishing the psychometric properties of VR assessments and interventions. This review investigates the advantages and challenges inherent in the application of VR technologies to pediatric assessments and interventions. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  18. Pediatric neurorehabilitation and the ICF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinuzzi, Andrea; De Polo, Gianni; Bortolot, Sonia; Pradal, Monica

    2015-01-01

    One of the major intended uses of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) is the clinical world of rehabilitation. The intrinsic qualities of ICF, especially in its children and youth version (ICF-CY) seem to perfectly match the needs for the complex process of pediatric neurorehabilitation. We here report on the effect that the implementation of ICF-CY had on team members and families when it was used as a guiding structure in framing the rehabilitation project in a pediatric outpatient clinic dealing with adolescents with cerebral palsy and complex needs. The two-year experience was positive and an ad-hoc questionnaire delivered to team members and families returned very positive remarks. The main messages coming from this experience is on the feasibility of the introduction of ICF-CY language and the bio-psycho-social model in the described setting and on the positive response by the stakeholders.

  19. Computerized tomography in pediatric oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granata, Claudio, E-mail: cgranata@sirm.org [Department of Radiology, IRCCS Giannina Gaslini Hospital, Genova (Italy); Magnano, Gianmichele [Department of Radiology, IRCCS Giannina Gaslini Hospital, Genova (Italy)

    2013-07-15

    Computerized tomography (CT) is an extremely powerful imaging modality, which provides extremely valuable information for the diagnosis, staging, and management of pediatric solid tumors. In recent years, the concern of potential risks associated with ionizing radiation from diagnostic imaging – especially from CT – has greatly increased. In children with cancer the radiation burden from CT studies can easily accumulate because of repeated studies for disease staging, assessment of response to therapy, and follow up. The purpose of this article is to review the role of CT and its imaging key points for diagnosis, staging and planning surgical excision of common extracranial pediatric tumors, according to protocol specific imaging guidelines. The issue of the radiation burden from CT in children with cancer, and criteria of good practice to reduce it, will also be discussed.

  20. Microbiome and pediatric atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Claire E; McShane, Diana B; Gilligan, Peter H; Burkhart, Craig N; Morrell, Dean S

    2015-12-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition with drastic impacts on pediatric health. The pathogenesis of this common disease is not well understood, and the complex role of the skin microbiome in the pathogenesis and progression of atopic dermatitis is being elucidated. Skin commensal organisms promote normal immune system functions and prevent the colonization of pathogens. Alterations in the skin microbiome may lead to increased Staphylococcus aureus colonization and atopic dermatitis progression. Despite the evidence for their important role, probiotics have not been deemed efficacious for the treatment of atopic dermatitis, although studies suggest that probiotics may be effective at preventing the development of atopic dermatitis when given to young infants. This review will cover the most recent published work on the microbiome and pediatric atopic dermatitis. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  1. Advances in Pediatric Urologic Laparoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Smaldone

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of laparoscopic surgery in children has undergone a dramatic evolution. Initially used as a diagnostic modality for many pediatric urologists, complex as well as reconstructive procedures are now being performed laparoscopically. Laparoscopic orchiopexy and nephrectomy are well established and are being performed at many centers. Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy, adrenalectomy, and dismembered pyeloplasty series have reported shortened hospital stays and operative times that are comparable to that of open techniques or are decreasing with experience. The initial experiences with laparoscopic ureteral reimplantation and laparoscopic-assisted bladder reconstructive surgery have been described, reporting encouraging results with regards to feasibility, hospital stay, and cosmetic outcome. This report will provide a directed review of the literature to establish the current indications for laparoscopy in pediatric urologic surgery.

  2. Pediatric overuse injuries in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Quynh B; Mortazavi, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    Overuse injuries in the pediatric and adolescent population are a growing problem in the United States as more children participate in recreational and organized sports. It is not uncommon for children and adolescents to play on multiple teams simultaneously or to be involved in sports year-round. Without adequate rest, the demands of exercise can exceed the body's ability to repair tissues, leading to repetitive microtrauma and overuse injury. Unlike in adults, the consequences of overuse injury in the pediatric and adolescent athlete are far more serious because the growing bones are vulnerable to stress. The ability to identify individuals who are at risk of overuse injuries is key so that education, prevention, and early diagnosis and treatment can occur. Preventive measures of modifying training factors (ie, magnitude, intensity, and frequency of sports participation) and correcting improper biomechanics (alignment, laxity, inflexibility, and muscle imbalance) should always be part of the management plan.

  3. Pediatric obesity. An introduction ☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanovski, Jack A.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of child and adolescent obesity in the United States increased dramatically between 1970 and 2000, and there are few indications that the rates of childhood obesity are decreasing. Obesity is associated with myriad medical, psychological, and neurocognitive abnormalities that impact children’s health and quality of life. Genotypic variation is important in determining the susceptibility of individual children to undue gains in adiposity; however, the rapid increase in pediatric obesity prevalence suggests that changes to children’s environments and/or to their learned behaviors may dramatically affect body weight regulation. This paper presents an overview of the epidemiology, consequences, and etiopathogenesis of pediatric obesity, serving as a general introduction to the subsequent papers in this Special Issue that address aspects of childhood obesity and cognition in detail. PMID:25836737

  4. Honey dressing in pediatric burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bangroo A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The medicinal properties of honey have been recognized since antiquity. Although used as an adjuvant method of accelerating wound healing from ancient times, honey has been sporadically used in the treatment of burns. Honey acts mainly as a hyperosmolar medium and prevents bacterial growth. Because of its high viscosity, it forms a physical barrier, and the presence of enzyme catalase gives honey an antioxidant property. Its high-nutrient content improves substrate supply in local environment promoting epithelialization and angiogenesis. In pediatric burn patients no exclusive study has been conducted using honey as a burn dressing. An attempt is being made to evaluate the effect of honey in the management of burns in pediatric patients.

  5. Lasers and pediatric dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlow, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    There are several types of lasers that will allow pediatric dentists to remove soft tissue (such as diode or Neodynium:Yttrium-Aluminum-Garnet (Nd:YAG) lasers) or remove both hard and soft tissue (such as the Erbium:YAG laser), in addition to photobiostimulation or therapeutic lasers that produce their healing benefits without producing heat. Lasers allow pediatric dentists to provide optimal care without many of the fear factors that result from conventional dental techniques. Lasers are extremely safe and effective when the user has a proper understanding of laser physics. Using lasers for caries removal, bone removal, and soft tissue treatment can reduce postoperative discomfort and infection and make it possible for dentists to provide safe, simple treatments.

  6. Dental traumatology: an orphan in pediatric dentistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Daugaard-Jensen, Jette

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic dental injuries are very frequent during childhood and adolescence. In fact, 2 out of 3 children have suffered a traumatic dental injury before adulthood. This fact links dental traumatology to pediatric dentistry. Unfortunately, this is not reflected by active participation by pediatric dentists in acute treatment, follow-up, and research. To examine the status of pediatric dentistry in relation to dental trauma, a publication analysis was undertaken in 1980, 1990, 2000, and 2007 about trauma articles published in 4 pediatric journals: journal of Dentistry for Children, Pediatric Dentistry, The journal of Pedodontics, and the International journal of Pediatric Dentistry. This study shows an average publication rate of trauma articles of approximately 3 percent of all articles published and with no improvement in later decennia. If only clinical studies are considered (leaving out case reports), the publication rate is less than 1 percent--completely out of proportion to the size of the problem dental trauma impose in children.

  7. Imaging in the diagnosis of pediatric urolithiasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colleran, Gabrielle C.; Callahan, Michael J.; Paltiel, Harriet J.; Chow, Jeanne S. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Nelson, Caleb P.; Cilento, Bartley G. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Urology, Boston, MA (United States); Baum, Michelle A. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Nephrology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Pediatric urolithiasis is an important and increasingly prevalent cause of pediatric morbidity and hospital admission. Ultrasound (US) is the recommended primary imaging modality for suspected urolithiasis in children. There is, however, widespread use of CT as a first-line study for abdominal pain in many institutions involved in pediatric care. The objective of this review is to outline state-of-the-art imaging modalities and methods for diagnosing urolithiasis in children. The pediatric radiologist plays a key role in ensuring that the appropriate imaging modality is performed in the setting of suspected pediatric urolithiasis. Our proposed imaging algorithm starts with US, and describes the optimal technique and indications for the use of CT. We emphasize the importance of improved communication with a greater collaborative approach between pediatric and general radiology departments so children undergo the appropriate imaging evaluation. (orig.)

  8. Perspectives on pediatric physical therapy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spake, Ellen F

    2014-01-01

    The Section on Pediatrics convened an Education Summit in July 2012 to examine, discuss, and respond to documented inconsistencies and challenges in teaching pediatric physical therapy content in entry-level professional education programs. This lecture was designed to provide attendees with the history of pediatric physical therapy education, stemming from the author's early involvement with the Section on Pediatrics and as a long-standing academician. The limited literature on pediatric physical therapy education was reviewed and used to highlight the continued variability across programs. The challenge was presented to build upon attendees' scholarship of teaching and learning. These remarks were designed to help understand the growth and development in pediatric physical therapy education over the past 40 years and to encourage others to use what has been learned to build a stronger foundation for the future.

  9. Imaging in the diagnosis of pediatric urolithiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colleran, Gabrielle C.; Callahan, Michael J.; Paltiel, Harriet J.; Chow, Jeanne S.; Nelson, Caleb P.; Cilento, Bartley G.; Baum, Michelle A.

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric urolithiasis is an important and increasingly prevalent cause of pediatric morbidity and hospital admission. Ultrasound (US) is the recommended primary imaging modality for suspected urolithiasis in children. There is, however, widespread use of CT as a first-line study for abdominal pain in many institutions involved in pediatric care. The objective of this review is to outline state-of-the-art imaging modalities and methods for diagnosing urolithiasis in children. The pediatric radiologist plays a key role in ensuring that the appropriate imaging modality is performed in the setting of suspected pediatric urolithiasis. Our proposed imaging algorithm starts with US, and describes the optimal technique and indications for the use of CT. We emphasize the importance of improved communication with a greater collaborative approach between pediatric and general radiology departments so children undergo the appropriate imaging evaluation. (orig.)

  10. Dental traumatology: an orphan in pediatric dentistry?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Daugaard-Jensen, Jette

    2009-01-01

    dentists in acute treatment, follow-up, and research. To examine the status of pediatric dentistry in relation to dental trauma, a publication analysis was undertaken in 1980, 1990, 2000, and 2007 about trauma articles published in 4 pediatric journals: journal of Dentistry for Children, Pediatric......Traumatic dental injuries are very frequent during childhood and adolescence. In fact, 2 out of 3 children have suffered a traumatic dental injury before adulthood. This fact links dental traumatology to pediatric dentistry. Unfortunately, this is not reflected by active participation by pediatric...... Dentistry, The journal of Pedodontics, and the International journal of Pediatric Dentistry. This study shows an average publication rate of trauma articles of approximately 3 percent of all articles published and with no improvement in later decennia. If only clinical studies are considered (leaving out...

  11. Child Neurology Education for Pediatric Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Dara V F; Patel, Anup D; Behnam-Terneus, Maria; Sautu, Beatriz Cunill-De; Verbeck, Nicole; McQueen, Alisa; Fromme, H Barrett; Mahan, John D

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the current state of child neurology education during pediatric residency provides adequate preparation for pediatric practice. A survey was sent to recent graduates from 3 pediatric residency programs to assess graduate experience, perceived level of competence, and desire for further education in child neurology. Responses from generalists versus subspecialists were compared. The response rate was 32%, half in general pediatric practice. Only 22% feel very confident in approaching patients with neurologic problems. This may represent the best-case scenario as graduates from these programs had required neurology experiences, whereas review of Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education-accredited residency curricula revealed that the majority of residencies do not. Pediatric neurologic problems are common, and pediatric residency graduates do encounter such problems in practice. The majority of pediatricians report some degree of confidence; however, some clear areas for improvement are apparent.

  12. Pulmonary metastasectomy in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erginel, Basak; Gun Soysal, Feryal; Keskin, Erbug; Kebudi, Rejin; Celik, Alaaddin; Salman, Tansu

    2016-02-02

    This study aims to evaluate the outcomes of pulmonary metastasectomy resections in pediatric patients. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 43 children who were operated on in the Pediatric Surgery Clinic between January 1988 and 2014. Forty-three children (26 boys; 17 girls; mean age 10±4.24 years, range 6 months-18 years) who underwent pulmonary metastasectomy resection were included in the study. The patients were evaluated based on age, gender, history of disease, surgical procedures, complications, duration of hospitalization, duration of chest tube placement, and procedure outcome. Indications for pediatric resections were oncological. Metastasis was secondary to Wilms' tumor in 14 patients, osteosarcoma in 7 patients, Ewing's sarcoma in 5 patients, rhabdomyosarcoma in 5 patients, lymphoma in 3 patients, hepatoblastoma in 2 patients, and other tumors in 7 patients. A total of 59 thoracotomies were performed. Approaches utilized included unilateral posterolateral thoracotomy (n=33), bilateral posterolateral thoracotomy (n=8), and sternotomy (n=2). Wedge resection was the procedure of choice (n=44). In selected cases, 11 segmentectomies, 3 lobectomies, and 1 pneumonectomy were performed. There was no perioperative mortality. One patient suffered prolonged air leak and three patients from fever. All patients received chemotherapy. Radiotherapy was administered to 16 patients (37.2%). Of those 16 patients, 7 had Wilms' tumor, 6 had Ewing's sarcoma/PNET, and 3 were rhabdomyosarcoma patients. During a median follow-up of 3 years, the overall survival was 74.4%. Multidisciplinary treatment involving pediatric oncologists, surgeons, and radiation oncologists is necessary to obtain positive results in children who have pulmonary metastases of oncological diseases. Wedge resection is a suitable option for children because less lung tissue is resected.

  13. Pediatric obesity. An introduction ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Yanovski, Jack A.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of child and adolescent obesity in the United States increased dramatically between 1970 and 2000, and there are few indications that the rates of childhood obesity are decreasing. Obesity is associated with myriad medical, psychological, and neurocognitive abnormalities that impact children’s health and quality of life. Genotypic variation is important in determining the susceptibility of individual children to undue gains in adiposity; however, the rapid increase in pediatric...

  14. Pediatric hydrocephalus outcomes: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Vinchon, Matthieu; Rekate, Harold; Kulkarni, Abhaya V

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The outcome of pediatric hydrocephalus, including surgical complications, neurological sequelae and academic achievement, has been the matter of many studies. However, much uncertainty remains, regarding the very long-term and social outcome, and the determinants of complications and clinical outcome. In this paper, we review the different facets of outcome, including surgical outcome (shunt failure, infection and independence, and complications of endoscopy), clinical outcome (neuro...

  15. Informed consent in pediatric research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibson, Tom; Koren, Gideon

    2015-02-01

    Pediatric drug research is gradually becoming more and more accepted as the norm for assessing whether a drug is safe and efficacious for infants and children. The process of informed consent and assent for these trials presents a major challenge. The aim of this review is to map historical, ethical and legal aspects relevant to the challenges of informed consent in the setting of pediatric drug research. The impact of age, level of maturity and life circumstances on the process of obtaining informed consent as well as the relations between consent and assent are discussed. There appears to be a lack of regulatory clarity in the area of pediatric clinical trials; while numerous statements have been made regarding children's rights to autonomy and their ability to care for themselves and for younger ones, the ever changing status of adolescence is still difficult to translate to informed consent. This may delay scientific and clinical advancement for children who are at the very junction of being independent and not needing parental permission. Obtaining consent and assent for pediatric clinical trials is a delicate matter, as both parent and child need to agree to participate. The appropriate transfer of information to guardians and the children, especially concerning potential risks and benefits, is at the heart of informed consent, as it serves to protect both patient and physician. As many adults lack health literacy, one must ensure that guardians receive relevant information at a level and in forms they can understand regarding the trials their children are asked to participate in.

  16. The Genetics of Pediatric Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Chesi, Alessandra; Grant, Struan F. A.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity among children and adults has notably escalated over recent decades and represents a global major health problem. We now know that both genetics and environmental factors contribute to its complex etiology. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed compelling genetic signals influencing obesity risk in adults. Recent reports for childhood obesity revealed that many adult loci also play a role in the pediatric setting. Childhood GWAS have uncovered novel loci below the detec...

  17. Pharmacological cognitive enhancement in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colaneri, Natalie; Sheldon, Mark; Adesman, Andrew

    2018-03-13

    Given the pervasiveness of psychotropic medication in the youth population and an increasingly competitive culture regarding educational performance, children, teenagers, and/or their parents may increasingly seek psychotropic substances in an effort to enhance a student's cognitive abilities and/or academic performance. Physicians must become aware of this very important and clinically relevant issue and work to ensure that medications remain in the hands of patients seeking wellness and not enhancement. The current article highlights findings on the pervasiveness of stimulant misuse and diversion in youth, the motivations and effects of stimulant use, health and legal consequences associated with use, and physician perceptions and preventive practices. Ethical concerns regarding pharmacological cognitive enhancement in pediatrics are also outlined - including coercion for nonusers, inequities in access, and threats to an individual's sense of self with regard to authenticity and autonomy. Pharmacological cognitive enhancement in pediatrics will become a larger, clinically relevant issue in the coming years. Physicians who care for children and adolescents must become more aware of this issue. Given the myriad health, legal, and ethical concerns, clinicians should discourage use of pharmaceuticals for enhancement purposes in the pediatric population.

  18. Pediatric multiple sclerosis in Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín A. Peña

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of Venezuelan pediatric patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. METHODS: Database records from the National Program for MS were searched for patients with an established diagnosis of MS whose first symptoms appeared before age 18. RESULTS: The national database held records of 1.710 patients; 3.8% had onset of the first symptoms before age 18. 46.7% were boys, yielding an F:M ratio of 1.13:1. Many children had a disease onset characterized by motor impairment (30.7%, brainstem/cerebellum and spinal cord affectation (27.6%, headache (26%. Less frequent symptoms were sensory symptoms (8% and optic neuritis (7%. DISCUSSION: Pediatric MS patients in Venezuela represent a significant proportion of all MS cases. The clinical pattern is characterized by motor symptoms at onset, and predominantly monosymptomatic presentation with a relapsing-remitting pattern. This is the first systematic attempt to estimate the prevalence of pediatric MS in Venezuela.

  19. Prehospital management of pediatric SVT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Kevin; Walters, William; Jaslow, David

    2003-10-01

    Accurate prehospital diagnosis and early initiation of emergency medical treatment for pediatric patients found to have supraventricular tachycardia is a reasonable task to accomplish and one that does not have to be anxiety-provoking. The most important point to remember is that the standard approach to resuscitation and stabilization for pediatric patients with narrow complex tachycardias (and those with aberrant or wide complexes identifiable as WPW) applies to all variations of SVT; thus, it is not necessary to precisely diagnose the variant prior to initiation of treatment, except for WPW, in which adenosine administration is contraindicated. Once the dysrhythmia is identified as SVT, the patient must rapidly be categorized as stable or unstable, which will then lead the EMS provider down the correct branch of the treatment algorithm. Every attempt should be made to perform a 12-lead ECG pre- and post-resuscitation, as well at to administer sedation prior to emergent synchronized cardioversion. Dosages of medications need not be memorized, provided that a readily available guide, such as a Broselow tape or regional tertiary care center laminated resuscitation card, is at hand. Finally, while termination of pediatric SVT, whether spontaneous or by EMS intervention, will also likely terminate the EMS provider's own palpitations, it is essential that these patients be seen in an emergency department immediately in order to accurately diagnose their medical condition and provide the patient and family with an appropriate disposition based on the events surrounding the incident.

  20. Pediatric tibia fractures: current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setter, Kevin J; Palomino, Kathryn E

    2006-02-01

    Fracture of the tibia is a common occurrence in children. The operative treatment of pediatric tibia fractures has undergone a recent change. However, there is no clear consensus regarding the superiority of one treatment option. The literature clearly supports the fact that the vast majority of pediatric tibia fractures can and should be managed nonoperatively. This is secondary to their inherent stability. A variety of factors including fracture type, location, severity and patient age determine the best treatment options for a particular fracture. A thorough understanding of these factors and how they affect outcome, help the clinician formulate the proper plan of treatment. A randomized prospective controlled trial will be necessary to establish which surgical options are superior for which type of pediatric tibia fracture. Until then, recent studies have indicated that flexible intramedullary nails may lead to a shorter time to union and a decreased rate of refracture when compared with external fixation of unstable tibial shaft fractures. What remains unclear are the specific indications and contraindication for the use of flexible nails. External fixation still remains a successful treatment option for unstable tibial shaft fractures.

  1. Spectrum of pediatric neuromyelitis optica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotze, Timothy E; Northrop, Jennifer L; Hutton, George J; Ross, Benjamin; Schiffman, Jade S; Hunter, Jill V

    2008-11-01

    Our goal was to describe the spectrum of clinical phenotypes, laboratory and imaging features, and treatment in pediatric patients with neuromyelitis optica. The study consisted of a retrospective chart review of patients followed in a pediatric multiple sclerosis center with a diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. Nine patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders were included, all of whom were female. There were 4 black children, 2 Latin American children, 2 white children, and 1 child of mixed Latin American/white heritage. Median age at initial attack was 14 years (range: 1.9-16 years). Median disease duration was 4 years (range: 0.6-9 years). Tests for neuromyelitis optica immunoglobulin G were positive for 7 patients. Eight patients had transverse myelitis and optic neuritis, and 1 patient had longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis without optic neuritis but had a positive neuromyelitis optica immunoglobulin G antibody titer. Cerebral involvement on MRI was found in all subjects, 5 of whom were symptomatic with encephalopathy, seizures, hemiparesis, aphasia, vomiting, or hiccups. Immunosuppressive therapy reduced attack frequency and progression of disability. Pediatric neuromyelitis optica has a diverse clinical presentation and may be difficult to distinguish from multiple sclerosis in the early stages of the disease. The recognition of the broad spectrum of this disease to include signs and symptoms of brain involvement is aided by the availability of a serum biomarker: neuromyelitis optica immunoglobulin G. Early diagnosis and immunosuppresive treatment may help to slow the accumulation of severe disability.

  2. Odontogenic lesions in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Qi-Gen; Shi, Shuang; Sun, Chang-Fu

    2014-05-01

    The purpose was to evaluate our 20-year experience of pediatric odontogenic lesions. Pediatric patients with a diagnosis of odontogenic lesion were identified. Three hundred ten patients were odontogenic; dentigerous cyst was seen in 62.0% of the cases. Most (70.2%) of them occurred in mixed dentition period, and it had a male preponderance. Odontogenic keratocystic tumor occurred in the permanent dentition period. It had an equal site distribution. Odontoma was seen in 20.0% of the cases. Its site of predilection was the mandible. Ameloblastoma was the most common odontogenic tumor. Most of the cases occurred in the permanent dentition period. It affected the male and female equally. Calcifying epithelioma odontogenic tumor was seen in 11.8% of the cases. All the lesions occurred in the primary dentition period. It had no sex or site preponderance. Myxoma was seen in 3.6% of the cases. It was most common in the permanent dentition period, and it was more frequent in the male. Iliac crest bone graft was successfully performed in 28 patients, postoperative infection occurred in 2 patients, and no donor-site dysfunctions were reported. The observed differences in lesion type and distribution in this study compared with previous researches may be attributable to genetic and geographic variation in the populations studied. Iliac crest bone graft was suggested for pediatric mandible reconstruction.

  3. Cognitive dysfunction in pediatric multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Suppiej, Agnese; Cainelli, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    Agnese Suppiej,1 Elisa Cainelli1,2 1Child Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Pediatric University Hospital, Padua, Italy; 2Lifespan Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory (LCNL), Department of General Psychology, University of Padua, Italy Abstract: Cognitive and neuropsychological impairments are well documented in adult ­multiple sclerosis (MS). Research has only recently focused on cognitive disabilities in pediatric cases, highlighting some differences between pediatric and adul...

  4. Pediatric obesity in acute and critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Andrea M

    2008-01-01

    Pediatric obesity has reached epidemic proportions in the United States. Significant obesity-related comorbidities are being noted at earlier ages and often have implications for the acute and critically ill child. This article will review the latest in epidemiologic trends of pediatric obesity and examine how it affects multisystem body organs. The latest data evaluating the specific effects of obesity on acute and critically ill children will be reviewed. Available nonpharmacologic, pharmacologic, and surgical strategies to combat pediatric obesity will be discussed.

  5. Introduction-Pediatric epilepsy surgery techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydenhag, Bertil; Cukiert, Arthur

    2017-04-01

    This supplement includes the proceedings from the Pediatric Epilepsy Surgery Techniques Meeting held in Gothenburg (July 4-5, 2014), which focused on presentations and discussions regarding specific surgical technical issues in pediatric epilepsy surgery. Pediatric epilepsy neurosurgeons from all over the world were present and active in very fruitful and live presentations and discussions. These articles represent a synopsis of the areas and subjects dealt with there. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  6. Limited Approach in Endoscopic Dacryocystorhinostomy of Pediatrics

    OpenAIRE

    Hashemi, Seyyed Mostafa; Eshaghian, Afrooz

    2017-01-01

    Background: Limited spatial nasal cavity in children, make pediatric dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) a difficult surgical procedure. We apply a limited approach to pediatric DCR and follow them for their consequences. Materials and Methods: An experimental study was done in pediatric DCR with limited approach (age < 14-year-old). After written consent, with general anesthesia, with nasal endoscopic surgery, lacrimal bone is exposed and extruded. In contrast with routine procedure, ascending proce...

  7. Preface [to: Practical Pediatric Dermatology: Controversies in Diagnosis and Treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.P. Oranje (Arnold); N. Al-Mutairi (Nawaf); T. Shwayder (Tor)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractPediatric dermatology is a young field that combines dermatologic and pediatric skills and expertises. Knowledge of dermatology and pediatrics is necessary for optimal care of children with skin diseases. A multidisciplinary approach in which there is cooperation between

  8. New frontiers in pediatric Allo-SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talano, J M; Pulsipher, M A; Symons, H J; Militano, O; Shereck, E B; Giller, R H; Hancock, L; Morris, E; Cairo, M S

    2014-09-01

    The inaugural meeting of 'New Frontiers in Pediatric Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation' organized by the Pediatric Blood and Transplant Consortium (PBMTC) was held at the American Society of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Annual Meeting. This meeting provided an international platform for physicians and investigators active in the research and utilization of pediatric Allo-SCT in children and adolescents with malignant and non-malignant disease (NMD), to share information and develop future collaborative strategies. The primary objectives of the conference included: (1) to present advances in Allo-SCT in pediatric ALL and novel pre and post-transplant immunotherapy; (2) to highlight new strategies in alternative allogeneic stem cell donor sources for children and adolescents with non-malignant hematological disorders; (3) to discuss timing of immune reconstitution after Allo-SCT and methods of facilitating more rapid recovery of immunity; (4) to identify strategies of utilizing Allo-SCT in pediatric myeloproliferative disorders; (5) to develop diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to hematological complications post pediatric Allo-SCT; (6) to enhance the understanding of new novel cellular therapeutic approaches to pediatric malignant and non-malignant hematological disorders; and (7) to discuss optimizing drug therapy in pediatric recipients of Allo-SCT. This paper will provide a brief overview of the conference.

  9. Pediatric melanoma: incidence, treatment, and prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saiyed FK

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Faiez K Saiyed,1 Emma C Hamilton,1 Mary T Austin,1,2 1Department of Pediatric Surgery, McGovern Medical School, 2Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: The purpose of this review is to outline recent advancements in diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of pediatric melanoma. Despite the recent decline in incidence, it continues to be the deadliest form of skin cancer in children and adolescents. Pediatric melanoma presents differently from adult melanoma; thus, the traditional asymmetry, border irregularity, color variegation, diameter >6 mm, and evolution (ABCDE criteria have been modified to include features unique to pediatric melanoma (amelanotic, bleeding/bump, color uniformity, de novo/any diameter, evolution of mole. Surgical and medical management of pediatric melanoma continues to derive guidelines from adult melanoma treatment. However, more drug trials are being conducted to determine the specific impact of drug combinations on pediatric patients. Alongside medical and surgical treatment, prevention is a central component of battling the incidence, as ultraviolet (UV-related mutations play a central role in the vast majority of pediatric melanoma cases. Aggressive prevention measures targeting sun safety and tanning bed usage have shown positive sun-safety behavior trends, as well as the potential to decrease melanomas that manifest later in life. As research into the field of pediatric melanoma continues to expand, a prevention paradigm needs to continue on a community-wide level. Keywords: melanoma, pediatric, adolescent, childhood

  10. Epigenetic Modifications in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael James Burke

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant epigenetic modifications are well-recognized drivers for oncogenesis. Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is no exception and serves as a model toward the significant impact these heritable alterations can have in leukemogenesis. In this brief review, we will focus on the main aspects of epigenetics which control leukemogenesis in pediatric ALL, mainly DNA methylation, histone modification and microRNA alterations. As we continue to gain better understanding of the driving mechanisms for pediatric ALL at both diagnosis and relapse, therapeutic interventions directed toward these pathways and mechanisms can be harnessed and introduced into clinical trials for pediatric ALL.

  11. In vivo diagnostic nuclear medicine. Pediatric experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetz, W.A.; Hendee, W.R.; Gilday, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    The use of radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic tests in children is increasing and interest in these is evidenced by the addition of scientific sessions devoted to pediatric medicine at annual meetings of The Society of Nuclear Medicine and by the increase in the literature on pediatric dosimetry. Data presented in this paper describe the actual pediatric nuclear medicine experience from 26 nationally representative U.S. hospitals and provide an overview of the pediatric procedures being performed the types of radiopharmaceuticals being used, and the activity levels being administered

  12. Optimization of electronic prescribing in pediatric patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maat, B.

    2014-01-01

    Improving pediatric patient safety by preventing medication errors that may result in adverse drug events and consequent healthcare expenditure,is a worldwide challenge to healthcare. In pediatrics, reported medication error rates in general, and prescribing error rates in particular, vary between

  13. Superman play and pediatric blunt abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machi, J M; Gyuro, J; Losek, J D

    1996-01-01

    Two pediatric patients with life-threatening intra-abdominal injuries associated with Superman play are presented. The cases illustrate the importance of knowing the mechanism of injury in the assessment of children with blunt abdominal trauma. The diagnostic value of liver enzymes and the controversies surrounding the radiographic assessment of pediatric blunt abdominal trauma are presented.

  14. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 187,809 views 4:24 Portraits of Life, Love and Legacy through Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 5: ... 40,142 views 4:38 Portraits of Life, Love & Legacy Through Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 54:51. ...

  15. Pulmonary parenchymal changes in the pediatric patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, G.O. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis of the pediatric chest radiograph for parenchymal pathology is similar to that of the adult. This chapter focuses primarily on the radiographic changes of certain entities presenting to the pediatric intensive care unit (ICU), including airway diseases, pneumonia, pulmonary hemorrhage, and lung trauma, as well as problems related to general anesthesia and surgery

  16. Nursing 436A: Pediatric Oncology for Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Cynthia L.

    A description is provided of "Pediatric Oncology for Nurses," the first in a series of three courses offered to fourth-year nursing students in pediatric oncology. The first section provides a course overview, discusses time assignments, and describes the target student population. Next, a glossary of terms, and lists of course goals, long-range…

  17. Female authorship in Latin American pediatric journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Paula; Marcos, Cecilia; Ferrero, Fernando

    2017-12-01

    The participation of women in science increases every day. Here we estimated their participation in authorship in three Latin American pediatric journals indexed in PubMed. All articles published in 2015 in the Archivos Argentinos de Pediatría, the Jornal de Pediatría and the Revista Chilena de Pediatría were identified, and the first and last authors and the total number of authors by sex were determined. A total of 329 articles were identified. Out of 1432 authors, 59.9% were women. Also, 54.4% of all first authors and 48% of last authors were women. No significant difference was observed in female authorship ratio among the three journals. Archivos Argentinos de Pediatría had a significantly lower number of women as first and last authors. Women authorship ratio across three Latin American pediatric journals reached 59.9%. Their role as first or last authors was significantly lower in the Archivos Argentinos de Pediatría. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría

  18. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 186,248 views 4:24 Portraits of Life, Love and Legacy through Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 5: ... 40,056 views 4:38 Portraits of Life, Love & Legacy Through Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 54:51. ...

  19. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Up next The Keeney Family discuss pediatric palliative care - Duration: 12:07. Hospice of the Western Reserve 11,132 views 12:07 Caroline Symmes' Story - Duration: 4:24. ... of Life, Love and Legacy through Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 5:39. Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) ...

  20. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Little Stars 12,195 views 10:35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society 4,258 views 3:29 Pediatric Palliative ... views 3:34 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 62,474 views 5: ...

  1. New directions in pediatric digital imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, B.D.; Adams, R.B.; Blackham, W.C.

    1985-01-01

    In this chapter the authors describe several simple experiments performed utilizing digital equipment which apply to clinical situations in pediatrics and which suggest future directions for research in digital imaging. They also discuss experimental systems which they believe will overcome certain limitations of current equipment and might be applicable to pediatric digital imaging in the future

  2. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reserve 11,132 views 12:07 Portraits of Life, Love and Legacy through Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: ... Meriter 195,536 views 13:34 Portraits of Life, Love & Legacy Through Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 54: ...

  3. Epidemiological Pattern and Management of Pediatric Asthma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    Epidemiological Pattern and Management of Pediatric Asthma. Review of Ain Shams Pediatric Hospital Chest Clinic Data. Cairo, Egypt 1995-2004. INTRODUCTION. Bronchial asthma is a major worldwide health problem, which has received increased attention in recent years due to its rising trend and impact on the child's ...

  4. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Little Stars 12,195 views 10:35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society 4,256 views 3:29 Pediatric Palliative ... views 3:34 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 62,410 views 5: ...

  5. Vedolizumab in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ledder, Oren; Assa, Amit; Levine, Arie

    2017-01-01

    Background: Vedolizumab, an anti-integrin antibody, has proven to be effective in adults with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), but the data in pediatrics are limited. We describe the short-term effectiveness and safety of vedolizumab in a European multi-center pediatric IBD cohort. Method: Retro...

  6. Clostridium difficile and pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinelli, Massimo; Strisciuglio, Caterina; Veres, Gabor

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clostridium difficile infection is associated with pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in several ways. We sought to investigate C. difficile infection in pediatric patients with IBD in comparison with a group of children with celiac disease and to evaluate IBD disease course o...

  7. Atypical disease phenotypes in pediatric ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levine, Arie; de Bie, Charlotte I; Turner, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Definitive diagnosis of pediatric ulcerative colitis (UC) may be particularly challenging since isolated colitis with overlapping features is common in pediatric Crohn's disease (CD), while atypical phenotypes of UC are not uncommon. The Paris classification allows more accurate phenotyping of at...

  8. Pandemic Influenza Pediatric Office Plan Template

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HCTT CHE

    2010-01-01

    This is a planning tool developed by pediatric stakeholders that is intended to assist pediatric medical offices that have no pandemic influenza plan in place, but may experience an increase in patient calls/visits or workload due to pandemic influenza.

  9. Efficacy of carvedilol in pediatric heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Alex Hørby; Fatkin, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of: Huang M, Zhang X, Chen S et al. The effect of carvedilol treatment on chronic heart failure in pediatric patients with dilated cardiomyopathy: a prospective, randomized-controlled study. Pediatr. Cardiol. 34, 680-685 (2013). A role for β-blockers in children with heart failure has...

  10. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 62,888 views 5:21 Portraits of Life, Love and Legacy through Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 5:39. Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) 25,017 ...

  11. Prevention and management of outpatient pediatric burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Shannon P; Billmire, David A

    2008-07-01

    Burns are common injuries in the pediatric population, with an estimated 250,000 pediatric burn patients seeking medical care annually. A relative few require inpatient management. This article discusses suggestions for burn prevention, as well as acute burn care and long-term management of small burns.

  12. Pediatric Exposures to Veterinary Pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasi, Suzanne; Roberts, Kristin J; Stull, Jason; Spiller, Henry A; McKenzie, Lara B

    2017-03-01

    To describe the epidemiology of veterinary pharmaceutical-related exposures to children based on calls to a regional poison control center. A retrospective analysis of pediatric (≤19 years of age) exposures to pharmaceutical products intended for animal use, managed by a regional poison control center from 1999 through 2013, was conducted. Case narratives were reviewed and coded for exposure-related circumstances and intended species. Descriptive statistics were generated. From 1999 through 2013, the Central Ohio Poison Center received 1431 calls that related to a veterinary pharmaceutical exposure for children ≤19 years of age. Most of the pediatric calls (87.6%) involved children ≤5 years of age. Exploratory behavior was the most common exposure-related circumstance (61.4%) and ingestion accounted for the exposure route in 93% of cases. Substances commonly associated with exposures included: veterinary drugs without human equivalent (17.3%), antimicrobial agents (14.8%), and antiparasitics (14.6%). Based on substance and quantity, the majority of exposures (96.9%) were not expected to result in long-term or lasting health effects and were managed at home (94.1%). A total of 80 cases (5.6%) were referred to a health care facility, and 2 cases resulted in a moderate health effect. Children ≤5 years of age are most at risk for veterinary pharmaceutical-related exposures. Although most exposures do not result in a serious medical outcome, efforts to increase public awareness, appropriate product dispensing procedures, and attention to home storage practices may reduce the risk of veterinary pharmaceutical exposures to young children. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  13. Pediatric liver transplantation: A report from a pediatric surgical unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Rao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Liver transplantation is well established worldwide as an effective treatment for end-stage liver disease in children. Acceptance in India has been slow because of considerations of cost, infections, inability to support long-term care, and non-availability of expertise. Aim: This study was designed to report our experience with pediatric liver transplantation. Materials and Methods: Twenty-eight children underwent liver transplantation. Results: Biliary atresia was the commonest indication (n = 15 followed by metabolic liver disease. Twenty-six children had living donor transplants, mothers being the donors in a majority of these. Common surgical complications included bile leaks (n = 3 and vascular problems (n = 6. Common medical complications included infections, acute rejection, and renal failure. Overall, patient survival was 71%, while that for the last 14 cases was 92%. All survivors are doing well, have caught up with physical and developmental milestones and are engaged in age appropriate activities. Conclusions: The study demonstrates the feasibility of a successful pediatric liver transplant program in our country.

  14. Hypnosis in pediatrics: applications at a pediatric pulmonary center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbar, Ran D

    2002-01-01

    Background This report describes the utility of hypnosis for patients who presented to a Pediatric Pulmonary Center over a 30 month period. Methods Hypnotherapy was offered to 303 patients from May 1, 1998 – October 31, 2000. Patients offered hypnotherapy included those thought to have pulmonary symptoms due to psychological issues, discomfort due to medications, or fear of procedures. Improvement in symptoms following hypnosis was observed by the pulmonologist for most patients with habit cough and conversion reaction. Improvement of other conditions for which hypnosis was used was gauged based on patients' subjective evaluations. Results Hypnotherapy was associated with improvement in 80% of patients with persistent asthma, chest pain/pressure, habit cough, hyperventilation, shortness of breath, sighing, and vocal cord dysfunction. When improvement was reported, in some cases symptoms resolved immediately after hypnotherapy was first employed. For the others improvement was achieved after hypnosis was used for a few weeks. No patients' symptoms worsened and no new symptoms emerged following hypnotherapy. Conclusions Patients described in this report were unlikely to have achieved rapid improvement in their symptoms without the use of hypnotherapy. Therefore, hypnotherapy can be an important complementary therapy for patients in a pediatric practice. PMID:12460456

  15. Hypnosis in pediatrics: applications at a pediatric pulmonary center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anbar Ran D

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This report describes the utility of hypnosis for patients who presented to a Pediatric Pulmonary Center over a 30 month period. Methods Hypnotherapy was offered to 303 patients from May 1, 1998 – October 31, 2000. Patients offered hypnotherapy included those thought to have pulmonary symptoms due to psychological issues, discomfort due to medications, or fear of procedures. Improvement in symptoms following hypnosis was observed by the pulmonologist for most patients with habit cough and conversion reaction. Improvement of other conditions for which hypnosis was used was gauged based on patients' subjective evaluations. Results Hypnotherapy was associated with improvement in 80% of patients with persistent asthma, chest pain/pressure, habit cough, hyperventilation, shortness of breath, sighing, and vocal cord dysfunction. When improvement was reported, in some cases symptoms resolved immediately after hypnotherapy was first employed. For the others improvement was achieved after hypnosis was used for a few weeks. No patients' symptoms worsened and no new symptoms emerged following hypnotherapy. Conclusions Patients described in this report were unlikely to have achieved rapid improvement in their symptoms without the use of hypnotherapy. Therefore, hypnotherapy can be an important complementary therapy for patients in a pediatric practice.

  16. Pediatric palliative care and pediatric medical ethics: opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feudtner, Chris; Nathanson, Pamela G

    2014-02-01

    The fields of pediatric palliative care (PPC) and pediatric medical ethics (PME) overlap substantially, owing to a variety of historical, cultural, and social factors. This entwined relationship provides opportunities for leveraging the strong communication skills of both sets of providers, as well as the potential for resource sharing and research collaboration. At the same time, the personal and professional relationships between PPC and PME present challenges, including potential conflict with colleagues, perceived or actual bias toward a palliative care perspective in resolving ethical problems, potential delay or underuse of PME services, and a potential undervaluing of the medical expertise required for PPC consultation. We recommend that these challenges be managed by: (1) clearly defining and communicating clinical roles of PPC and PME staff, (2) developing questions that may prompt PPC and PME teams to request consultation from the other service, (3) developing explicit recusal criteria for PPC providers who also provide PME consultation, (4) ensuring that PPC and PME services remain organizationally distinct, and (5) developing well-defined and broad scopes of practice. Overall, the rich relationship between PPC and PME offers substantial opportunities to better serve patients and families facing difficult decisions.

  17. Should Pediatric Euthanasia be Legalized?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Marije; Kaczor, Christopher; Battin, Margaret P; Maeckelberghe, Els; Lantos, John D; Verhagen, Eduard

    2018-02-01

    Voluntary active euthanasia for adults at their explicit request has been legal in Belgium and the Netherlands since 2002. In those countries, acceptance of the practice for adults has been followed by acceptance of the practice for children. Opponents of euthanasia see this as a dangerous slippery slope. Proponents argue that euthanasia is sometimes ethically appropriate for minors and that, with proper safeguards, it should be legally available in appropriate circumstances for patients at any age. In this Ethics Rounds, we asked philosophers from the United States and the Netherlands, and a Dutch pediatrician, to discuss the ethics of legalizing euthanasia for children. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  18. An Update on Pediatric Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla-Udawatta, Monica; Madani, Shailender; Kamat, Deepak

    2017-05-01

    There has been a rise in the incidence and number of admissions of children with pancreatitis over the past 20 years. Current management practices for pancreatitis in children are adapted from standards of care for adults, and there are a lack of multicenter, prospective research studies on pancreatitis in children. There are inherent differences in the clinical presentation and natural course of pancreatitis between adults and children. This review focuses on the current understanding of the epidemiology, etiologies, evaluation, and management of children with pancreatitis. [Pediatr Ann. 2017;46(5):e207-e211.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Burden of pediatric hepatitis C

    OpenAIRE

    El-Shabrawi, Mortada Hassan; Kamal, Naglaa Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major health burden infecting 170-210 million people worldwide. Additional 3-4 millions are newly-infected annually. Prevalence of pediatric infection varies from 0.05%-0.36% in the United States and Europe; up to 1.8%-5.8% in some developing countries. The highest prevalence occurs in Egypt, sub-Saharan Africa, Amazon basin and Mongolia. HCV has been present in some populations for several centuries, notably genotypes 1 and 2 in West Africa. Parenteral anti-schis...

  20. Pediatric practice in physical therapy. A survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heriza, C B; Lunnen, K Y; Fischer, J; Harris, M

    1983-06-01

    This study was undertaken to define the role and functions of the physical therapist in pediatrics, specifically at the advanced clinical competence level. Questionnaires mailed to all members of the Section on Pediatrics of the American Physical Therapy Association were used to collect the data reported here. Of 109 consultative, evaluation, treatment planning, and implementation tasks, 37 were not considered important to the practice of physical therapy in pediatrics. Of the 72 tasks identified as important, 46 were at entry level and 10 at the advanced level. Sixteen tasks were not clearly defined. This initial survey provides useful data to begin to interpret the physical therapist's role in pediatrics. Validation studies are needed to verify that the identified advanced level responsibilities represent skills necessary for practice in pediatrics at the advanced competence level.

  1. Dental traumatology: an orphan in pediatric dentistry?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Daugaard-Jensen, Jette

    2009-01-01

    dentists in acute treatment, follow-up, and research. To examine the status of pediatric dentistry in relation to dental trauma, a publication analysis was undertaken in 1980, 1990, 2000, and 2007 about trauma articles published in 4 pediatric journals: journal of Dentistry for Children, Pediatric...... case reports), the publication rate is less than 1 percent--completely out of proportion to the size of the problem dental trauma impose in children.......Traumatic dental injuries are very frequent during childhood and adolescence. In fact, 2 out of 3 children have suffered a traumatic dental injury before adulthood. This fact links dental traumatology to pediatric dentistry. Unfortunately, this is not reflected by active participation by pediatric...

  2. Pediatric central nervous system vascular malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burch, Ezra A. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Orbach, Darren B. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Neurointerventional Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Pediatric central nervous system (CNS) vascular anomalies include lesions found only in the pediatric population and also the full gamut of vascular lesions found in adults. Pediatric-specific lesions discussed here include infantile hemangioma, vein of Galen malformation and dural sinus malformation. Some CNS vascular lesions that occur in adults, such as arteriovenous malformation, have somewhat distinct manifestations in children, and those are also discussed. Additionally, children with CNS vascular malformations often have associated broader vascular conditions, e.g., PHACES (posterior fossa anomalies, hemangioma, arterial anomalies, cardiac anomalies, eye anomalies and sternal anomalies), hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome (related to the RASA1 mutation). The treatment of pediatric CNS vascular malformations has greatly benefited from advances in endovascular therapy, including technical advances in adult interventional neuroradiology. Dramatic advances in therapy are expected to stem from increased understanding of the genetics and vascular biology that underlie pediatric CNS vascular malformations. (orig.)

  3. Pediatric central nervous system vascular malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burch, Ezra A.; Orbach, Darren B.

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric central nervous system (CNS) vascular anomalies include lesions found only in the pediatric population and also the full gamut of vascular lesions found in adults. Pediatric-specific lesions discussed here include infantile hemangioma, vein of Galen malformation and dural sinus malformation. Some CNS vascular lesions that occur in adults, such as arteriovenous malformation, have somewhat distinct manifestations in children, and those are also discussed. Additionally, children with CNS vascular malformations often have associated broader vascular conditions, e.g., PHACES (posterior fossa anomalies, hemangioma, arterial anomalies, cardiac anomalies, eye anomalies and sternal anomalies), hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome (related to the RASA1 mutation). The treatment of pediatric CNS vascular malformations has greatly benefited from advances in endovascular therapy, including technical advances in adult interventional neuroradiology. Dramatic advances in therapy are expected to stem from increased understanding of the genetics and vascular biology that underlie pediatric CNS vascular malformations. (orig.)

  4. Defining Service and Education in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Debra; Gagne, Josh; Kesselheim, Jennifer C

    2017-11-01

    Program directors (PDs) and trainees are often queried regarding the balance of service and education during pediatric residency training. We aimed to use qualitative methods to learn how pediatric residents and PDs define service and education and to identify activities that exemplify these concepts. Focus groups of pediatric residents and PDs were performed and the data qualitatively analyzed. Thematic analysis revealed 4 themes from focus group data: (1) misalignment of the perceived definition of service; (2) agreement about the definition of education; (3) overlapping perceptions of the value of service to training; and (4) additional suggestions for improved integration of education and service. Pediatric residents hold positive definitions of service and believe that service adds value to their education. Importantly, the discovery of heterogeneous definitions of service between pediatric residents and PDs warrants further investigation and may have ramifications for Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and those responsible for residency curricula.

  5. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Antonio; Mazon, Angel; Martin-Mateos, Maria Anunciacion; Plaza, Ana-Maria; Garde, Jesus; Alonso, Elena; Martorell, Antonio; Boquete, Manuel; Lorente, Felix; Ibero, Marcel; Bone, Javier; Pamies, Rafael; Garcia, Juan Miguel; Echeverria, Luis; Nevot, Santiago; Martinez-Cañavate, Ana; Fernandez-Benitez, Margarita; Garcia-Marcos, Luis

    2011-11-01

    The data of the ISAAC project in Spain show a prevalence of childhood asthma ranging from 7.1% to 15.3%, with regional differences; a higher prevalence, 22.6% to 35.8%, is described for rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis is found in 4.1% to 7.6% of children. The prevalence of food allergy is 3%. All children in Spain have the right to be visited in the National Health System. The medical care at the primary level is provided by pediatricians, who have obtained their titles through a 4-yr medical residency training program. The education on pediatric allergy during that period is not compulsory and thus very variable. There are currently 112 certified European pediatric allergists in Spain, who have obtained the accreditation of the European Union of Medical Specialist for proven skills and experience in pediatric allergy. Future specialists in pediatric allergy should obtain their titles through a specific education program to be developed in one of the four accredited training units on pediatric allergy, after obtaining the title on pediatrics. The Spanish Society of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology (SEICAP) gathers over 350 pediatric allergists and pediatricians working in this field. SEICAP has a growing activity including yearly congresses, continued education courses, elaboration of technical clinical documents and protocols, education of patients, and collaboration with other scientific societies and associations of patients. The official journal of SEICAP is Allergologia et Immunophatologia, published every 2 months since 1972. The web site of SEICAP, http://www.seicap.es, open since 2004, offers information for professionals and extensive information on pediatric allergic and immunologic disorders for the lay public; the web site is receiving 750 daily visits during 2011. The pediatric allergy units are very active in clinical work, procedures as immunotherapy or induction of oral tolerance in food allergy, contribution to scientific literature, and

  6. Burnout Syndrome in Pediatric Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem A. Al-Youbi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Burnout is a common work-related syndrome consisting of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and diminished feelings of personal accomplishment. Burnout influences the performance and efficiency of the healthcare professionals and therefore the quality of the care provided. This study aims to assess the burnout rates and potential determinants in pediatrics.Methods: A cross-sectional, descriptive study involving physicians practicing pediatrics in the Jeddah area of Saudi Arabia was conducted utilizing the Maslach Burnout Inventory in addition to questions regarding work-related and lifestyle-related factors.Results: One hundred and thirty pediatricians (55% females were included with age ranging between 25 and 45 years (mean: 30. Most (46% were consultants and 54% practiced in a university based setting. Burnout scores were abnormal in 107 (82% and in 45 (34% the syndrome was severe. Males were more likely to reach a severe burnout category compared to females (40% vs. 31%; p=0.012. Academic pediatricians working in a university setting were much more likely to experience severe burnout compared to their counterparts working in other hospitals (50% vs. 19%; p=0.0005. Consultants were also more likely to experience severe burnout compared to residents and assistants (46% vs. 27%; p=0.03.Conclusion: At least one third of practicing pediatricians suffer from burnout syndrome. Specific strategies should be developed and implemented to limit and prevent professional burnout.

  7. Pediatric Nasal Lobular Capillary Hemangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan M. Virbalas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. LCH is a benign vascular growth of the skin and mucous membranes commonly affecting the head and neck. Since it was first described in the nineteenth century, this entity has been variously known as “human botryomycosis” and “pyogenic granuloma.” The shifting nomenclature reflects an evolving understanding of the underlying pathogenesis. We review the histopathology of and current epidemiological data pertaining to LCH which suggests that the development of these lesions may involve a hyperactive inflammatory response influenced by endocrine factors. We report two new cases of pediatric lobular capillary hemangioma (LCH of the nasal cavity and review current theories regarding the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of nasal LCH. Methods. Retrospective case series. Case Series. Two adolescent females presented with symptoms of recurrent epistaxis, nasal obstruction, and epiphora. Both patients underwent computed tomography imaging and biopsy of their intranasal mass. The tumors were excised using image-guided transnasal endoscopic technique. Seven other cases of nasal LCH have been reported to date in the pediatric population. Conclusion. Nasal LCH is a rare cause of an intranasal mass and is associated with unilateral epistaxis, nasal obstruction, and epiphora. We advocate for image-guided endoscopic excision of LCH in the adolescent population.

  8. Pediatric Obesity: Looking into Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Malavolti

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of pediatric obesity continues to rise worldwide. Increasing the number of health care practitioners as well as pediatricians with expertise in obesity treatment is necessary. Because many obese patients suffer obesity-associated cardiovascular, metabolic and other health complications that could increase the severity of obesity, it is fundamental not only to identify the child prone to obesity as early as possible, but to recognize, treat and monitor obesity-related diseases during adolescence. This short review outlines the treatment of pediatric obesity that may have applications in the primary care setting. It examines current information on eating behavior, sedentary behavior, and details studies of multidisciplinary, behavior-based, obesity treatment programs. We also report the less common and more aggressive forms of treatment, such as medication and bariatric surgery. We emphasize that health care providers have the potential to improve outcomes by performing early identification, helping families create the best possible home environment, and by providing structured guidance to obese children and their families.

  9. Pediatric Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizilay, Ahmet; Koca, Çiğdem Firat

    2016-06-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is defined as sudden unilateral or bilateral sensorineural hearing loss with at least 30 dB decrease in threshold in 3 contiguous test frequencies occurring over 72 hours or less. It is rare among children. The mechanism of the process and prognosis of the disorder remains unclear. The current incidence of sudden sensorineural hearing loss among pediatric population is unknown. The authors carried out a retrospective chart analysis of patients under 15 years of age from 2004 to 2015, who consulted to the Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Department of Inonu University Medical Faculty. Age, sex, number of affected ear and side, audiometric evaluations, medical follow-up, treatment method, duration of treatment recovery, associated complaints; tinnitus and/or vertigo, presence of mumps disease were recorded for each patient. A 4-frequency pure-tone average (500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz) was calculated for each ear. Complete recovery, defined as some hearing level compared with the nonaffected ear, was observed in 3 patients (21.4 %) and there was no partial hearing recovery. The hearing loss of 11 patient remained unchanged after prednisolone treatment. Two of the 11 patients had bilaterally total sensorineural hearing loss and evaluated as appropriate for cochlear implantation. Sex of patient and laterality of hearing loss were not correlated with hearing recovery. Sensorineural hearing loss among pediatrics has been the issue of otolaryngologists. The incidence, etiology, and treatment methods should be more studied.

  10. Flow Cytometry in Pediatric Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handoo, Anil; Dadu, Tina

    2018-01-15

    The utility of flow cytometry as a useful diagnostic modality for the assessment of hematopoietic neoplasms has been established beyond doubt. In fact, it is now an integral part of the diagnosis and classification of various diseases like leukemias and lymphomas along with molecular studies and cytogenetics. Prognostication and disease monitoring by flow cytometry is also being recognized increasingly as one of the important fortes. This is evident by the number of articles in the published in literature on the minimal residual disease detection by flow cytometry especially in the last decade or so. To add to this, ever growing list of utilities in hematopoietic malignancies, many non-hematopoietic neoplasms can also be analyzed by flow cytometry. The examples include fluid specimens from serous cavity effusions and samples from solid tissues like lymph nodes, reticulo-endothelial tissue, central nervous system tissue, etc. Flow cytometry technique provides a unique blend of rapidity, high sensitivity and specificity compared to cyto-morphology and conventional immunohistochemical staining. It is also remarkable for simultaneous analysis of more than one marker on the cells. Evaluation of limited samples such as cerebrospinal fluid or fine needle aspiration samples makes Flow cytometry a valuable tool. DNA ploidy analysis and assessment of pediatric non-hematopoietic neoplasms by Flow cytometry has envisaged the utility vista of this technique. This review is aimed at providing an insight into the applications of flow cytometry in pediatric malignancies.

  11. [Management of pediatric status epilepticus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas L, Carmen Paz; Varela E, Ximena; Kleinsteuber S, Karin; Cortés Z, Rocío; Avaria B, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric Status Epilepticus (SE) is an emergency situation with high morbidity and mortality that requires early and aggressive management. The minimum time criterion to define SE was reduced from 30 to 5 minutes, defined as continuous seizure activity or rapidly recurrent seizures without resumption of consciousness for more than 5 minutes. This definition considers that seizures that persist for > 5 minutes are likely to do so for more than 30 min. Those that persist for more than 30 minutes are more difficult to treat. Refractory SE is the condition that extends beyond 60-120 minutes and requires anesthetic management. Super-refractory SE is the state of no response to anesthetic management or relapse during withdrawal of these drugs. The aim of this review is to provide and update on convulsive SE concepts, pathophysiology, etiology, available antiepileptic treatment and propose a rational management scheme. A literature search of articles published between January 1993 and January 2013, focused on pediatric population was performed. The evidence about management in children is limited, mostly corresponds to case series of patients grouped by diagnosis, mainly adults. These publications show treatment alternatives such as immunotherapy, ketogenic diet, surgery and hypothermia. A 35% mortality, 26% of neurological sequelae and 35% of recovery to baseline condition is described on patient’s evolution.

  12. Trichoscopy in pediatric age group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrata Malakar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Approach to trichology in the pediatric age group is based on the clinical expertise of the dermatologist and investigative techniques. Currently, the trichoscope is an indispensible, noninvasive tool in the diagnosis of trichological disorders. It not only highlights the subtle tricoscopic points invisible to the naked eye but also serves as a prognostic and monitoring tool in therapeutic management. Trichoscopy goes a long way in improving the diagnostic and clinical acumen of the physician. In the pediatric age group, trichoscopy deals with pattern analysis ranging from hair shaft patterns to follicular, perifollicular, and interfollicular patterns. It not only describes the key trichoscopic features of noncicatricial alopecias, cicatricial alopecias, and genetic hair shaft defects but also helps to delineate various trichological mimics from each other. For compiling data, all trichology cases presenting to a tertiary care center were examined and photographed with a Fotofinder, DermLite Foto II Pro, and DermLite DL 3N. All trichological data were analyzed, and interpretations were based on the literature available.

  13. Retrospective Survey of Biopsied Oral Lesions in Pediatric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Lin Wang

    2009-11-01

    Conclusion: The mucous extravasation phenomenon, odontoma, or dentigerous cyst was the most common inflammatory and reactive, neoplastic, or cystic lesion, respectively, in pediatric patients. The relatively high incidence of inflammatory and reactive lesions in pediatric patients implies the importance of stringent oral hygiene in children. Most oral neoplastic lesions in pediatric patients are benign, and malignant oral tumors rarely occur in pediatric patients.

  14. Disaster and mass casualty events in the pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Rita V; Iverson, Ellen; Goodhue, Catherine J; Neches, Robert; Upperman, Jeffrey S

    2010-11-01

    Recent disasters involving pediatric victims have highlighted the need for pediatric hospital disaster preparedness. Although children represent 25% of the U.S. population, there are significant gaps in pediatric disaster preparedness across the country. Disaster planners and others tend to overlook pediatric needs, and therefore plans are often inadequate. To establish an effective hospital and community-based pediatric disaster management system, administrative and hospital leadership are key. Disaster planners and hospital leadership should establish and improve their management of pediatric victims in the event of a disaster through staff training, family reunification planning, and use of available pediatric disaster management tools. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller-Bernstein, Carmi; Etzioni, Amos

    2013-03-01

    After the geographic and sociodemographic settings as well as the health care in Israel are briefly described, the scope of pediatric allergy and immunology in Israel is presented. This includes specific disorders commonly encountered, the environment that induces symptoms, the specialists who treat them, and the common challenges of patients, parents, doctors, and allied health personnel who collaborate to manage the maladies and patient care. Allergies usually affect some overall 15-20% of the pediatric population. The main allergens are inhaled, ingested, or injected (insects stings). Generally, the incidence of the various allergens affecting children in Israel, is similar to other parts of the Western world. Owing to the high consanguinity rate in the Israeli population, the prevalence of the various immunodeficiency conditions (in the adaptive as well as the innate system) is higher than that reported worldwide. Pediatric allergists/immunologists also treat autoimmune disorders affecting the pediatric group. Pediatric allergy and clinical immunology are not separate specialties. The 25 specialists who treat children with allergic/immunologic diseases have undergone a basic training in Pediatrics. They also received an additional 2-yr training in allergy and clinical immunology and then have to pass the board examinations. They work mainly in pediatric allergy units, in several hospitals that are affiliated to the five medical schools in the country. Aside from clinical work, most of the centers are also heavily involved in clinical and basic research in allergy and immunology. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Pharmacotherapy in the Management of Pediatric Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Aaron S; Fox, Claudia K

    2017-08-01

    This review provides a rationale for the use of pharmacotherapy in pediatric weight management, summarizes results of some of the key pediatric clinical trials of approved and "off-label" obesity medications, introduces new options in the pediatric pipeline, and offers a glimpse into the future of pediatric obesity medicine. Despite the need for adjunctive treatments to enhance the outcomes of lifestyle modification therapy among youth with obesity, none of the obesity medications evaluated to date have been shown to meaningfully reduce BMI or cardiometabolic risk factors. Promising medications recently approved for the treatment of obesity in adults will soon be tested in pediatric trials, offering hope that new therapeutic options will soon be available. As new medications are approved to treat pediatric obesity, it will be important to evaluate the safety and efficacy of combination pharmacotherapy and investigate predictors of response. Application of precision medicine approaches to the field of pediatric obesity management will improve the long-term outlook for the tens of millions of youth afflicted with this serious and recalcitrant disease.

  17. Pediatric surgeon density in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell, Angela; Numanoglu, Alp; Arnold, Marion; Rode, Heinz

    2017-12-27

    There are limited data regarding the available pediatric surgical workforce in South Africa and their employment prospects on completion of their specialist training. This aim of this study was to quantify and analyze the pediatric surgical workforce in South Africa as well as to determine their geographic and sector distribution. This involved a quantitative descriptive analysis of all registered specialist as well as training pediatric surgeons in South Africa. The results showed 2.6 pediatric surgeons per one million population under 14 years. More than half (69%) were male and the median age was 46.8 years. There were however, more female surgical registrars currently in training. The majority of the pediatric surgical practitioners were found in Gauteng, followed by the Western Cape and Kwa-Zulu Natal. The majority of specialists reportedly worked in the public sector, however the number of public sector pediatric surgeons available to those without health insurance fell below those available to private patients. Interprovincial differences as well as intersectoral differences were marked indicating geographic and socioeconomic maldistribution of pediatric surgeons. Addressing this maldistribution requires concerted efforts to expand public sector specialist posts. Descriptive audit LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: IV. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Pediatric history in Pisa and the birth of world pediatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnetani, I; Farnetani, F

    2009-10-01

    The University of Pisa was the first in the world to nominate a professor of pediatirics. It was Gaetano Palloni who was nominated professor of ''children diseases'' on April 8(th), 1802 and was assigned to one of the two branch offices of the Pisan University, the one in Florence. He was assigned to ''Ospedale degli Innocenti'' where he taught and also supervised the clinical part. In 1923, he was nominated director of the Gennaro Fiore paediatric clinic and stayed there until 1952 when Augusto Gentili took over. In half a century there were only two professors and this didactic continuity made it possible for Pisa to become one of the greatest Italian pediatric schools.

  19. Pediatric diseases and operational deployments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearn, J

    2000-04-01

    Many nations now export military health as a proactive arm of the nation's contribution to the maintenance of international peace in trouble regions of the world; and all nations are called upon from time to time in emergency and disaster situations to help out in their regions of interest. Children and young teenagers constitute some 50% of war-stricken populations. This paper explores this increasingly important role of military medicine from the point of view of a practicing pediatrician and career doctor-soldier. Many international operational deployments undertaken in the last 5 years have required the insertion of pediatric clinical and preventive health resources. Deployments to Rwanda, the countries of the former Yugoslavia, Somalia, Bougainville (in Papua New Guinea), Irian Jaya (in Indonesia), and the Aitape tsunami disaster response (the Sepik region of Papua New Guinea) have all necessitated major pediatric interventions. In some operational deployments, in excess of one-third of patient and clinical contacts have involved the care of children, including clinical treatments ranging from life-saving resuscitation to the care of children with both tropical and subtropical illnesses. They have also involved mass immunization campaigns (e.g., in Rwanda) to prevent measles and meningococcal septicemia. In developing countries, at any time approximately 1 to 4 teenage and adult women is pregnant; and of these, 1 in 15 is suffering a miscarriage during any 2-week period. The implications of this audit are that service members must be multi-skilled not only in the traditional aspects of military medicine and nursing but also in (a) the developmental aspects of childhood; (b) the prevention of infectious childhood diseases by immunization and other means; (c) the recognition and management of diseases of childhood; and (d) the management of the normal neonate and infant, especially those orphaned in refugee disaster and other emergency situations. Doctor

  20. Nuclear Medicine in Pediatric Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanesi, Ornella; Stellin, Giovanni; Zucchetta, Pietro

    2017-03-01

    Accurate cardiovascular imaging is essential for the successful management of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). Echocardiography and angiography have been for long time the most important imaging modalities in pediatric cardiology, but nuclear medicine has contributed in many situations to the comprehension of physiological consequences of CHD, quantifying pulmonary blood flow symmetry or right-to-left shunting. In recent times, remarkable improvements in imaging equipments, particularly in multidetector computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, have led to the progressive integration of high resolution modalities in the clinical workup of children affected by CHD, reducing the role of diagnostic angiography. Technology has seen a parallel evolution in the field of nuclear medicine, with the advent of hybrid machines, as SPECT/CT and PET/CT scanners. Improved detectors, hugely increased computing power, and new reconstruction algorithms allow for a significant reduction of the injected dose, with a parallel relevant decrease in radiation exposure. Nuclear medicine retains its distinctive capability of exploring at the tissue level many functional aspects of CHD in a safe and reproducible way. The lack of invasiveness, the limited need for sedation, the low radiation burden, and the insensitivity to body habitus variations make nuclear medicine an ideal complement of echocardiography. This is particularly true during the follow-up of patients with CHD, whose increasing survival represent a great medical success and a challenge for the health system in the next decades. Metabolic imaging using 18 FDG PET/CT has expanded its role in the management of infection and inflammation in adult patients, particularly in cardiology. The same expansion is observed in pediatric cardiology, with an increasing rate of studies on the use of FDG PET for the evaluation of children with vasculitis, suspected valvular infection or infected prosthetic devices. The