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Sample records for single-blind controlled pilot

  1. Evaluation of homoeopathic treatment in polycystic ovary syndrome: A single-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled pilot study

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    Chetna Deep Lamba; Praveen Oberai; Raj K Manchanda; Padmalaya Rath; P Hima Bindu; Maya Padmanabhan

    2018-01-01

    Background and Objectives: This study was conducted with the primary objective of evaluating efficacy of Homoeopathy in establishing the menstrual regularity with improvement in either ultrasonological findings or hirsutism/acne. The quality of life was also assessed using polycystic ovary syndrome questionnaire (PCOSQ). Materials and Methods: A single-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled pilot study was conducted from February 2014 to May 2015 at two research centres. The cases fulfilling t...

  2. Varenicline for opioid withdrawal in patients with chronic pain: a randomized, single-blinded, placebo controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooten, W Michael; Warner, David O

    2015-03-01

    The objectives of this randomized, single-blinded, placebo-controlled pilot trial were to investigate the effects of varenicline on opioid withdrawal among chronic pain patients undergoing opioid detoxification in an interdisciplinary pain program and the feasibility of varenicline use in this population. Twenty-one patients were recruited (varenicline=10, placebo=11), and 7 patients in the varenicline and 11 in the placebo group completed the study. Opioid withdrawal was quantified using the Clinical Opiate Withdrawal Scale, and varenicline-related adverse effects were assessed. Opioid withdrawal scores tended to decrease over the course of opioid tapering in those receiving varenicline and increase in those receiving placebo. Varenicline was well-tolerated in this population, with no adverse drug effects (including nausea) observed and no effect on improvements in pain severity and depression. This randomized pilot study provides preliminary data for future trials of varenicline in opioid-dependent adults with chronic pain undergoing medically directed opioid detoxification. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of homoeopathic treatment in polycystic ovary syndrome: A single-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetna Deep Lamba

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: This study was conducted with the primary objective of evaluating efficacy of Homoeopathy in establishing the menstrual regularity with improvement in either ultrasonological findings or hirsutism/acne. The quality of life was also assessed using polycystic ovary syndrome questionnaire (PCOSQ. Materials and Methods: A single-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled pilot study was conducted from February 2014 to May 2015 at two research centres. The cases fulfilling the eligibility criteria were enrolled (n = 60 and randomised to either the homoeopathic intervention (HI (n = 30 or identical placebo (P (n = 30 with uniform lifestyle modification (LSM for 6 months. Results: The menstrual regularity with improvement in other signs/symptoms was observed in 60% of the cases (n = 18 in HI + LSM group and none (n = 0 in control group (P = 0.001. Statistically significant difference (P = 0.016 was observed in reduction of intermenstrual duration (from 76.1 ± 37.7 to 46.6 ± 38.7 days in HI + LSM in comparison to placebo + LSM group (from 93.0 ± 65.2 to 93.9 ± 96.2 days. In PCOSQ, also, significant improvement was observed in HI group in domains of weight, fertility, emotions and menstrual problems (P < 0.05 with no difference in body hair (P = 0.708. No change was observed in respect of improvement in the ultrasound findings. Pulsatilla was the most frequently indicated medicine (n = 12, 40%. Conclusion: HI along with LSM has shown promising outcome; further comparative study with standard conventional treatment on adequate sample size is desirable.

  4. A dual-task home-based rehabilitation programme for improving balance control in patients with acquired brain injury: a single-blind, randomized controlled pilot study.

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    Peirone, Eliana; Goria, Paolo Filiberto; Anselmino, Arianna

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the safety, feasibility and effectiveness of a dual-task home-based rehabilitation programme on balance impairments among adult patients with acquired brain injury. Single-blind, randomized controlled pilot study. Single rehabilitation centre. Sixteen participants between 12 and 18 months post-acquired brain injury with balance impairments and a score task home-based programme six days a week for seven weeks. The primary outcome measure was the Balance Evaluation System Test; secondary measures were the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale and Goal Attainment Scaling. At the end of the pilot study, the intervention group showed significantly greater improvement in Balance Evaluation System Test scores (17.87, SD 6.05) vs. the control group (5.5, SD 3.53; P = 0.008, r = 0.63). There was no significant difference in improvement in Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale scores between the intervention group (25.25, SD 25.51) and the control group (7.00, SD 14.73; P = 0.11, r = 0.63). There was no significant improvement in Goal Attainment Scaling scores in the intervention (19.37, SD 9.03) vs. the control group (16.28, SD 6.58; P = 0.093, r = 0.63). This pilot study shows the safety, feasibility and short-term benefit of a dual-task home-based rehabilitation programme to improve balance control in patients with acquired brain injury. A sample size of 26 participants is required for a definitive study.

  5. The effect of non-weight bearing group-exercising on females with non-specific chronic low back pain: a randomized single blind controlled pilot study.

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    Masharawi, Youssef; Nadaf, Nedal

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of active non-weight-bearing (NWB) group exercising on women with non specific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP). Forty females with NSCLBP were assigned in a randomized control longitudinal single blinded pilot study. 20 of them were assigned to a NWB bi-weekly group exercise class and 20 females were included in the control group. The exercises involved the entire lumbo-pelvic spine aimed at improving lumbar mobility/flexibility and stability. Pain intensity (VAS), back specific disability (Rolland Morris questionnaire-RMQ), and lumbar flexion and extension ranges of motion measurements were taken prior to intervention (t(0)), immediately following 4 weeks of intervention (t(1)) and 8 weeks later (t(fu)). Reliability trials were conducted on 10 females. Non-parametric tests were used for statistical significance (p exercising improves functional, painful status, lumbar flexion and extension ranges of motion in women suffering from NSCLBP.

  6. A randomized, controlled, single-blind, 6-month pilot study to evaluate the efficacy of MS-Line!: a cognitive rehabilitation programme for patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gich, Jordi; Freixanet, Jordi; García, Rafael; Vilanova, Joan Carles; Genís, David; Silva, Yolanda; Montalban, Xavier; Ramió-Torrentà, Lluís

    2015-09-01

    MS-Line! was created to provide an effective treatment for cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. To assess the efficacy of MS-Line!. A randomized, controlled, single-blind, 6-month pilot study. Patients were randomly assigned to an experimental group (cognitive rehabilitation with the programme) or to a control group (no cognitive rehabilitation). Randomization was stratified by cognitive impairment level. Cognitive assessment included: selective reminding test, 10/36 spatial recall test (10/36 SPART), symbol digit modalities test, paced auditory serial addition test, word list generation (WLG), FAS test, subtests of WAIS-III, Boston naming test (BNT), and trail making test (TMT). Forty-three patients (22 in the experimental group, 21 in the control group) were analyzed. Covariance analysis showed significant differences in 10/36 SPART (P=0.0002), 10/36 SPART delayed recall (P=0.0021), WLG (P=0.0123), LNS (P=0.0413), BNT (P=0.0007) and TMT-A (P=0.010) scores between groups. The study showed a significant improvement related to learning and visual memory, executive functions, attention and information processing speed, and naming ability in those patients who received cognitive rehabilitation. The results suggest that MS-Line! is effective in improving cognitive impairment in MS patients. © The Author(s), 2015.

  7. A Pilot Randomized, Single Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Traditional Acupuncture for Vasomotor Symptoms and Mechanistic Pathways of Menopause

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    Painovich, Jeannette M.; Shufelt, Chrisandra L.; Azziz, Ricardo; Yang, Yuching; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Braunstein, Glenn D.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Stewart, Paul M.; Merz, C. Noel Bairey

    2011-01-01

    Objective To conduct a pilot study for feasibility of planning a definitive clinical trial comparing traditional acupuncture (TA) to sham acupuncture (SA) and waiting control (WC) on menopause related vasomotor symptoms (VMS), quality of life (QOL), and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in peri and post-menopausal women. Methods Thirty-three peri and post-menopausal women with at least 7 VMS daily were randomized to TA, SA or WC. The TA and SA groups were given three treatments per week for 12 weeks. Outcomes included the number and severity of VMS, MENQOL questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, Spielberg State-Trait Anxiety Instrument, Pittsburgh Quality Sleep Index, 24 hour urine cortisol and metabolites, and ACTH stimulation testing. Results Both TA and SA groups demonstrated improved VMS trends compared to WC (Δ −3.5±3.00 vs. −4.1±3.79 vs. −1.2±2.4, respectively, p=.20), and significantly improved MENQOL vasomotor scores (Δ − 1.5±2.02 vs. −1.8±1.52 vs. 0.3±0.64, respectively, p=.04). There were no psychosocial group differences. Exit 24-hour urinary measures were lower in the TA vs the SA or WC in total cortisol metabolites (4,658.9±1,670.9 vs 7,735.8±3,747.9 vs 5,166.0±2,234.5, p=0.03, respectively) and DHEA (41.4±27.46, 161.2±222.77, 252.4±385.40, respectively, p=0.05). The ACTH stimulation cortisol response data also trended in the hypothesized direction (p=0.17). Conclusion Both TA and SA reduce VMS frequency and severity and improve VMS-related quality of life compared to WC; however, TA alone may impact the HPA axis. This association is viewed as preliminary and hypothesis-generating and should be explored in a large clinical trial. PMID:21968279

  8. The Effects of Functional Training, Bicycle Exercise, and Exergaming on Walking Capacity of Elderly Patients With Parkinson Disease: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Single-blinded Trial.

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    Ferraz, Daniel Dominguez; Trippo, Karen Valadares; Duarte, Gabriel Pereira; Neto, Mansueto Gomes; Bernardes Santos, Kionna Oliveira; Filho, Jamary Oliveira

    2018-05-01

    To compare the effects of functional training, bicycle exercise, and exergaming on walking capacity of elderly with Parkinson disease (PD). A pilot randomized, controlled, single-blinded trial. A state reference health care center for elderly, a public reference outpatient clinic for the elderly. Elderly individuals (≥60 years of age; N=62) with idiopathic PD (stage 2 to 3 of modified Hoehn and Yahr staging scale) according to the London Brain Bank. The participants were randomly assigned to three groups. Group 1 (G1) participated in functional training (n=22); group 2 (G2) performed bicycle exercise (n=20), and group 3 (G3) trained with Kinect Adventures (Microsoft, Redmond, WA) exergames (n=20). The primary outcome measure was the 6-minute walk test (6MWT); secondary outcome measures were the 10-m walk test (10MWT), sitting-rising test (SRT), body mass index, Parkinson Disease Questionnaire-39, World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 (WHODAS 2.0), and 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale. All groups showed significant improvements in 6MWT (G1 P=.008; G2 P=.001; G3 P=.005), SRT (G1 Ptraining had similar outcomes compared with functional training and bicycle exercise. The three physical exercise modalities presented significant improvements on walking capacity, ability to stand up and sit, and functionality of the participants. Copyright © 2018 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of sulfur bath on hip osteoarthritis: a randomized, controlled, single-blind, follow-up trial: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Csaba; Bozsik, Ágnes; Pecze, Mariann; Borbély, Ildikó; Fogarasi, Andrea; Kovács, Lajos; Tefner, Ildikó Katalin; Bender, Tamás

    2016-11-01

    The effects of balneotherapy were evaluated in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip. This randomized, controlled, investigator-blinded study enrolled outpatients with hip osteoarthritis according to ACR criteria. In addition to home exercise therapy, one patient group received balneotherapy for 3 weeks on 15 occasions. The mineral water used in this study is one of the mineral waters with the highest sulfide ion content (13.2 mg/L) in Hungary. The control group received exercise therapy alone. The WOMAC Likert 3.1 index and the EQ-5D quality of life self-administered questionnaire were completed three times during the study: prior to first treatment, at the end of the 3-week treatment course, and 12 weeks later. The main endpoint was achievement of Minimal Clinically Important Improvement (MCII) at 12 weeks, defined as ≥7.9 points in a normalized WOMAC function score. The intention to treat analysis included 20 controls and 21 balneotherapy patients. At 12 weeks, 17 (81 %) balneotherapy group patients had Minimal Clinically Important Improvement and 6 (30 %) of controls ( p = 0.001). Comparing the results of the two groups at the end of treatment, there was a significant difference in the WOMAC stiffness score only, whereas after 12 weeks, the WOMAC pain, stiffness, function, and total scores also showed a significant difference in favor of the balneotherapy group. The difference between the two groups was significant after 12 weeks in point of EQVAS score, too. The results of our study suggest that the combination of balneotherapy and exercise therapy achieves more sustained improvement of joint function and decreases in pain than exercise therapy alone.

  10. Effect of Hominis placenta Pharmacopuncture on the Dysmenorrhea (A Pilot study, Single blind, Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial

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    Su-Min Kim

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective : This study was designed to evaluate the effect of Hominis placenta Pharmacopuncture treatment on Dysmenorrhea of Women. Methods : 49 subjects who were suffering from dysmenorrhea volunteered to answer the MMP(Measure of Menstrual Pain and MSSL(Menstrual Symptom Severity List questionnaire. They were divided into two groups, a Hominis placenta Pharmacopuncture treatment group(Experiment al group, n=25 and a Normal Saline(N/S treatment group(Control group, n=24. The two groups were injected on the CV4, S36, Sp9 and Sp6 acupuncture point. They were treated totally five times depending on the individual menstruation cycles. The scores of MMP and MSSL were measured overall three times before and after the menstruation cycle. The collected data were analyzed as paired t-test, independent t-test using SPSS 12.0 WIN Program. Results : As a result of the evaluation by MMP and MSSL, a significant improvement on dysmenorrhea was made in the two groups(p<0.05, and both scores of Experiment group were decreased more than Control group. But there was no significant difference between the two groups. Conclusions : The Hominis placenta Pharmacopuncture treatment and the Normal Saline treatment were effective in decreasing the symptom of Dysmenorrhea.

  11. Acute effects of exergames on cognitive function of institutionalized older persons: a single-blinded, randomized and controlled pilot study.

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    Monteiro-Junior, Renato Sobral; da Silva Figueiredo, Luiz Felipe; Maciel-Pinheiro, Paulo de Tarso; Abud, Erick Lohan Rodrigues; Braga, Ana Elisa Mendes Montalvão; Barca, Maria Lage; Engedal, Knut; Nascimento, Osvaldo José M; Deslandes, Andrea Camaz; Laks, Jerson

    2017-06-01

    Improvements on balance, gait and cognition are some of the benefits of exergames. Few studies have investigated the cognitive effects of exergames in institutionalized older persons. To assess the acute effect of a single session of exergames on cognition of institutionalized older persons. Nineteen institutionalized older persons were randomly allocated to Wii (WG, n = 10, 86 ± 7 year, two males) or control groups (CG, n = 9, 86 ± 5 year, one male). The WG performed six exercises with virtual reality, whereas CG performed six exercises without virtual reality. Verbal fluency test (VFT), digit span forward and digit span backward were used to evaluate semantic memory/executive function, short-term memory and work memory, respectively, before and after exergames and Δ post- to pre-session (absolute) and Δ % (relative) were calculated. Parametric (t independent test) and nonparametric (Mann-Whitney test) statistics and effect size were applied to tests for efficacy. VFT was statistically significant within WG (-3.07, df = 9, p = 0.013). We found no statistically significant differences between the two groups (p > 0.05). Effect size between groups of Δ % (median = 21 %) showed moderate effect for WG (0.63). Our data show moderate improvement of semantic memory/executive function due to exergames session. It is possible that cognitive brain areas are activated during exergames, increasing clinical response. A single session of exergames showed no significant improvement in short-term memory, working memory and semantic memory/executive function. The effect size for verbal fluency was promising, and future studies on this issue should be developed. RBR-6rytw2.

  12. The effect of balneotherapy on chronic shoulder pain. A randomized, controlled, single-blind follow-up trial. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tefner, Ildikó Katalin; Kovács, Csaba; Gaál, Ramóna; Koroknai, András; Horváth, Remény; Badruddin, Rakib Mohammed; Borbély, Ildikó; Nagy, Katalin; Bender, Tamás

    2015-06-01

    The effects of balneotherapy on chronic shoulder pain were studied. In this single-blind, randomized, follow-up study involving 46 patients with chronic shoulder pain, one group of patients received physiotherapy--exercise and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation--and the other group received balneotherapy in addition to physiotherapy for 4 weeks on 15 occasions. The following parameters were recorded before treatment (at week 0) and after treatment (at weeks 4, 7, and 13): Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI), the Short Form (36) Health Survey (SF-36) and EuroQuol-5D (EQ-5D) quality of life questionnaires, pain at rest and on movement on the visual analog scale (VAS), and active and passive range of motion. The SPADI pain, function, and total scores and the VAS scores at rest and on movement significantly improved in both groups after treatments. A greater improvement was observed in the balneotherapy group compared to the control group; regarding some parameters (VAS score on movement and SPADI function score at visit 2; VAS score at rest at visits 3 and 4), the difference between the groups was significant. The improvement of SF-36 and EQ-5D quality of life scores and the active range of motion was more pronounced in the balneotherapy group, the difference between the groups was not significant, except for EQ-5D at visit 2. Improvement of passive range of motion was not significant. Balneotherapy may have a beneficial effect on the clinical parameters and quality of life of patients with chronic shoulder pain. The number of patients should be increased.

  13. Effects of a tele-prehabilitation program or an in-person prehabilitation program in surgical candidates awaiting total hip or knee arthroplasty: Protocol of a pilot single blind randomized controlled trial.

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    Doiron-Cadrin, Patrick; Kairy, Dahlia; Vendittoli, Pascal-André; Lowry, Véronique; Poitras, Stéphane; Desmeules, François

    2016-12-15

    The accessibility for total joint arthroplasty often comes up against long wait lists, and may lead to deleterious effects for the awaiting patients. This pilot single blind randomized controlled trial aims to evaluate the impact of a telerehabilitation prehabilitation program before a hip or knee arthroplasty compared to in-person prehabilitation or to usual wait for surgery. Thirty-six patients on a wait list for a total hip or knee arthroplasty will be recruited and randomly assigned to one of three groups. The in-person prehabilitation group (n = 12) will receive a 12-week rehabilitation program (2 sessions/week) including education, exercises of the lower limb and cardiovascular training. Patients in the tele-prehabilitation group (n = 12) will receive the same intervention using a telecommunication software. The control group (n = 12) will be provided with the hospital's usual documentation before surgery. The Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS) will be the primary outcome measure taken at baseline and at 12 weeks. Secondary measures will include self-reported function and quality of life as well as performance tests. A mixed-model, 2-way repeated-measure ANOVA will be used to analyse the effects of the rehabilitation programs. This pilot study is the first to evaluate the feasibility and the impact of a telerehabilitation prehabilitation program for patients awaiting a total joint arthroplasty. The results of this pilot-RCT will set the foundations for further research in the fields of rehabilitation and tele-medicine for patients suffering from lower limb osteoarthritis. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02636751.

  14. Effect of lyophilized lactobacilli and 0.03 mg estriol (Gynoflor®) on vaginitis and vaginosis with disrupted vaginal microflora: a multicenter, randomized, single-blind, active-controlled pilot study.

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    Donders, G G G; Van Bulck, B; Van de Walle, P; Kaiser, R R; Pohlig, G; Gonser, S; Graf, F

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of lyophilized lactobacilli in combination with 0.03 mg estriol when compared to metronidazole in the treatment of bacterial vaginal infections. Multicenter, randomized, single-blind, active-controlled pilot study in 3 independent gynecological practices in Belgium. Forty-six, 18- to 50-year-old premenopausal women with a disrupted vaginal flora due to a bacterial vaginal infection (bacterial vaginosis, aerobic vaginitis) were included, provided that fresh phase-contrast microscopy of the vaginal fluid showed lactobacillary flora grade 2B or 3. Patients were given a blinded box with either 12 vaginal tablets of Gynoflor® (study medication) or 6 vaginal suppositories containing 500 mg metronidazole (control medication). Eight efficacy variables were studied to assess the status of the vaginal flora at entry, 3-7 days (control 1), 4-6 (control 2) weeks and 4 months after the end of therapy. At control 1, the combined variables equally improved in the lactobacilli group as in the metronidazole group. At control 2, the lactobacillus preparation showed slightly inferior results when compared to metronidazole. At 4 months, this analysis could not be performed due to low numbers, but analysis of recurrence rate and extra medication needed was not different between both groups. Lyophilized lactobacilli in combination with low-dose estriol are equivalent to metronidazole in the short-term treatment of bacterial vaginal infections, but have less effect after 1 month. Further studies are required to evaluate the long-term efficacy of lactobacilli when applied repeatedly. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Effects of an exercise and manual therapy program on physical impairments, function and quality-of-life in people with osteoporotic vertebral fracture: a randomised, single-blind controlled pilot trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherburn Margaret

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This randomised, single-blind controlled pilot trial aimed to determine the effectiveness of a physiotherapy program, including exercise and manual therapy, in reducing impairments and improving physical function and health-related quality of life in people with a history of painful osteoporotic vertebral fracture. Methods 20 participants were randomly allocated to an intervention (n = 11 or control (n = 9 group. The intervention group attended individual sessions with an experienced clinician once a week for 10 weeks and performed daily home exercises with adherence monitored by a self-report diary. The control group received no treatment. Blinded assessment was conducted at baseline and 11 weeks. Questionnaires assessed self-reported changes in back pain, physical function, and health-related quality of life. Objective measures of thoracic kyphosis, back and shoulder muscle endurance (Timed Loaded Standing Test, and function (Timed Up and Go test were also taken. Results Compared with the control group, the intervention group showed significant reductions in pain during movement (mean difference (95% CI -1.8 (-3.5 to -0.1 and at rest (-2.0 (-3.8 to -0.2 and significantly greater improvements in Qualeffo physical function (-4.8 (-9.2 to -0.5 and the Timed Loaded Standing test (46.7 (16.1 to 77.3 secs. For the perceived change in back pain over the 10 weeks, 9/11 (82% participants in the intervention group rated their pain as 'much better' compared with only 1/9 (11% participants in the control group. Conclusion Despite the modest sample size, these results support the benefits of exercise and manual therapy in the clinical management of patients with osteoporotic vertebral fractures, but need to be confirmed in a larger sample. Trail registration NCT00638768

  16. Feasibility and Preliminary Efficacy of Visual Cue Training to Improve Adaptability of Walking after Stroke: Multi-Centre, Single-Blind Randomised Control Pilot Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollands, Kristen L.; Pelton, Trudy A.; Wimperis, Andrew; Whitham, Diane; Tan, Wei; Jowett, Sue; Sackley, Catherine M.; Wing, Alan M.; Tyson, Sarah F.; Mathias, Jonathan; Hensman, Marianne; van Vliet, Paulette M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Given the importance of vision in the control of walking and evidence indicating varied practice of walking improves mobility outcomes, this study sought to examine the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of varied walking practice in response to visual cues, for the rehabilitation of walking following stroke. Design This 3 arm parallel, multi-centre, assessor blind, randomised control trial was conducted within outpatient neurorehabilitation services Participants Community dwelling stroke survivors with walking speed adaptability practice using visual cues are feasible and may improve mobility and balance. Future studies should continue a carefully phased approach using identified methods to improve retention. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01600391 PMID:26445137

  17. Effects of exercise training on circulating levels of Dickkpof-1 and secreted frizzled-related protein-1 in breast cancer survivors: A pilot single-blind randomized controlled trial.

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    Tae Ho Kim

    Full Text Available Wingless and integration site growth factor (Wnt signaling is a tumorigenesis-related signaling pathway. Dickkpof-1 (DKK1 and secreted frizzled-related protein-1 (SFRP1 are endogenous negative regulators of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Accumulating evidence indicates that higher serum levels of DKK1 are correlated with poor prognosis of various types of cancer. Here, we investigated whether exercise training causes changes in the serum levels of DKK1 and SFRP1 in patients with breast cancer.Twenty-four breast cancer survivors, after chemo- or radiotherapy, participated in this single-blind randomized, controlled pilot study. Subjects were randomized to either an exercise program or a control group for 12 weeks and completed pre- and post-training tests for health-related fitness and body composition as well as blood biomarkers. The serum levels of DKK1 and SFRP1 were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as the primary outcome.Exercise training for 12 weeks remarkably increased muscle strength, endurance, and flexibility and decreased body fat percentage, waist circumference, and visceral fat area (all p < 0.05. Exercise training lowered serum insulin levels and leptin/adiponectin ratios (all p < 0.05. The levels of DKK1 and SFRP1 were also significantly decreased by exercise training in breast cancer survivors (all p < 0.01.Our results indicate that DKK1 and SFRP1 may be potentially useful biomarkers for evaluating the beneficial effects of long-term exercise on physical fitness and metabolism as well as the prognosis of patients with cancer.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02895178.

  18. Upper limb robot-assisted therapy in cerebral palsy: a single-blind randomized controlled trial.

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    Gilliaux, Maxime; Renders, Anne; Dispa, Delphine; Holvoet, Dominique; Sapin, Julien; Dehez, Bruno; Detrembleur, Christine; Lejeune, Thierry M; Stoquart, Gaëtan

    2015-02-01

    Several pilot studies have evoked interest in robot-assisted therapy (RAT) in children with cerebral palsy (CP). To assess the effectiveness of RAT in children with CP through a single-blind randomized controlled trial. Sixteen children with CP were randomized into 2 groups. Eight children performed 5 conventional therapy sessions per week over 8 weeks (control group). Eight children completed 3 conventional therapy sessions and 2 robot-assisted sessions per week over 8 weeks (robotic group). For both groups, each therapy session lasted 45 minutes. Throughout each RAT session, the patient attempted to reach several targets consecutively with the REAPlan. The REAPlan is a distal effector robot that allows for displacements of the upper limb in the horizontal plane. A blinded assessment was performed before and after the intervention with respect to the International Classification of Functioning framework: body structure and function (upper limb kinematics, Box and Block test, Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test, strength, and spasticity), activities (Abilhand-Kids, Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory), and participation (Life Habits). During each RAT session, patients performed 744 movements on average with the REAPlan. Among the variables assessed, the smoothness of movement (P robotic group than in the control group. This single-blind randomized controlled trial provides the first evidence that RAT is effective in children with CP. Future studies should investigate the long-term effects of this therapy. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Balneotherapy in fibromyalgia: a single blind randomized controlled clinical study.

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    Ozkurt, Seçil; Dönmez, Arif; Zeki Karagülle, M; Uzunoğlu, Emel; Turan, Mustafa; Erdoğan, Nergis

    2012-07-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of balneotherapy in fibromyalgia management. Fifty women with fibromyalgia under pharmacological treatment were randomly assigned to either the balneotherapy (25) or the control (25) group. Four patients from the balneotherapy group and one patient from the control group left the study after randomization. The patients in the balneotherapy group (21) had 2 thermomineral water baths daily for 2 weeks in Tuzla Spa Center. The patients in the control group (24) continued to have their medical treatment and routine daily life. An investigator who was blinded to the study arms assessed the patients. All patients were assessed four times; at the beginning of the study, at the end of the 2nd week, the 1st month, and the 3rd month after balneotherapy. Outcome measures of the study were pain intensity, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), patient's global assessment, investigator's global assessment, SF-36 scores, and tender point count. Balneotherapy was found to be superior at the end of the cure period in terms of pain intensity, FIQ, Beck Depression Inventory, patient's global assessment, investigator's global assessment scores, and tender point count as compared to the control group. The superiority of balneotherapy lasted up to the end of the 3rd month, except for the Beck Depression Inventory score and the investigator's global assessment score. Significant improvements were observed in PF, GH, and MH subscales of SF-36 during the study period in the balneotherapy group; however, no such improvement was observed in the control group. Balneotherapy was superior only in VT subscale at the end of therapy and at the end of the third month after the therapy as compared to the controls. It was concluded that balneotherapy provides beneficial effects in patients with fibromyalgia.

  20. A pilot single-blind multicentre randomized controlled trial to evaluate the potential benefits of computer-assisted arm rehabilitation gaming technology on the arm function of children with spastic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Nick; Weightman, Andrew; Gallagher, Justin; Levesley, Martin; Mon-Williams, Mark; Clarke, Mike; O'Connor, Rory J

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the potential benefits of computer-assisted arm rehabilitation gaming technology on arm function of children with spastic cerebral palsy. A single-blind randomized controlled trial design. Power calculations indicated that 58 children would be required to demonstrate a clinically important difference. Intervention was home-based; recruitment took place in regional spasticity clinics. A total of 15 children with cerebral palsy aged five to 12 years were recruited; eight to the device group. Both study groups received 'usual follow-up treatment' following spasticity treatment with botulinum toxin; the intervention group also received a rehabilitation gaming device. ABILHAND-kids and Canadian Occupational Performance Measure were performed by blinded assessors at baseline, six and 12 weeks. An analysis of covariance showed no group differences in mean ABILHAND-kids scores between time points. A non-parametric analysis of variance on Canadian Occupational Performance Measure scores showed a statistically significant improvement across time points (χ 2 (2,15) = 6.778, p = 0.031), but this improvement did not reach minimal clinically important difference. Mean daily device use was seven minutes. Recruitment did not reach target owing to unanticipated staff shortages in clinical services. Feedback from children and their families indicated that the games were not sufficiently engaging to promote sufficient use that was likely to result in functional benefits. This study suggests that computer-assisted arm rehabilitation gaming does not benefit arm function, but a Type II error cannot be ruled out. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Effect of Auricular Acupress Therapy on Insomnia of Cancer Patients : Randomized, Single Blinded, Placebo Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Sook Jung

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Auricular acupressure is one of the traditional health care treatments in oriental medicine. Approximately, 30~40% of the cancer patients have said to be suffering from insomnia and half of them having chronic and severe insomnia at the same time. Insomnia caused cancer patients feel more pain, fatigue, depression and anxiety and it sometimes let the power to have the best of cancer pull down. Objective: To investigate how effective the auricular acupressure treatment to cancer patients suffering from insomnia. Methods: We recruited participants from East-West Cancer Center of Daejeon University. Finally, of the people whose age range from 20 to 75, 12 patients who got less than 40 points from the score of Oh's sleeping score (OSS were recruited. Single-blind, randomized pilot study was performed. The treatment group received auricular acupressure treatment (AAT on active points and the control group had received sham acupressure treatment (SAT for five times. Sleep parameters were checked by using OSS and numeric rating scale (NRS. We checked the scale everytime, both before and after treatment. We analyzed the data statistically by using independent T-test, paired T-test and analysis of variance (ANOVA test. (p<0.05 Results: Twelve cancer patients participated in this pilot study and there was no significant difference between control and treatment group. Only 7 of them had completed the whole treatment process, 4 patients of AAT group and 3 participants of SAT. The OSS of AAT group had increased from 34.0± 4.3 to 39.5±3.1 and that of SAT group had increased from 38.3±3.5 to 40.0±0.0. There was no significant difference between them. The NRS of AAT group had increased from 6.3±2.9 to 4.8±2.1 and that of SAT group had increased from 7.0±1.0 to 5.0±2.6. No significant difference was observed between them. Conclusion: Although both groups did not show significant differences, most of the experimental participants showed

  2. Combined effects of cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation and transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation on robot-assisted gait training in patients with chronic brain stroke: A pilot, single blind, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picelli, Alessandro; Chemello, Elena; Castellazzi, Paola; Filippetti, Mirko; Brugnera, Annalisa; Gandolfi, Marialuisa; Waldner, Andreas; Saltuari, Leopold; Smania, Nicola

    2018-01-01

    Preliminary evidence showed additional effects of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation over the damaged cerebral hemisphere combined with cathodal transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation during robot-assisted gait training in chronic stroke patients. This is consistent with the neural organization of locomotion involving cortical and spinal control. The cerebellum is crucial for locomotor control, in particular for avoidance of obstacles, and adaptation to novel conditions during walking. Despite its key role in gait control, to date the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation of the cerebellum have not been investigated on brain stroke patients treated with robot-assisted gait training. To evaluate the effects of cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation combined with transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation on robot-assisted gait training in patients with chronic brain stroke. After balanced randomization, 20 chronic stroke patients received ten, 20-minute robot-assisted gait training sessions (five days a week, for two consecutive weeks) combined with central nervous system stimulation. Group 1 underwent on-line cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation over the contralesional cerebellar hemisphere + cathodal transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation. Group 2 received on-line anodal transcranial direct current stimulation over the damaged cerebral hemisphere + cathodal transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation. The primary outcome was the 6-minute walk test performed before, after, and at follow-up at 2 and 4 weeks post-treatment. The significant differences in the 6-minute walk test noted between groups at the first post-treatment evaluation (p = 0.041) were not maintained at either the 2-week (P = 0.650) or the 4-week (P = 0.545) follow-up evaluations. Our preliminary findings support the hypothesis that cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation over the contralesional

  3. Effect of cryotherapy after elbow arthrolysis: a prospective, single-blinded, randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shi-yang; Chen, Shuai; Yan, He-de; Fan, Cun-yi

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of cryotherapy after elbow arthrolysis on elbow pain, blood loss, analgesic consumption, range of motion, and long-term elbow function. Prospective, single-blinded, randomized controlled study. University hospital. Patients (N=59; 27 women, 32 men) who received elbow arthrolysis. Patients were randomly assigned into a cryotherapy group (n=31, cryotherapy plus standard care) or a control group (n=28, standard care). Elbow pain at rest and in motion were measured using a visual analog scale (VAS) on postoperative day (POD) 1 to POD 7 and at 2 weeks and 3 months after surgery. Blood loss and analgesic consumption were recorded postoperatively. Elbow range of motion (ROM) was measured before surgery and on POD 1, POD 7, and 3 months after surgery. The Mayo Elbow Performance Score (MEPS) was evaluated preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively. VAS scores were significantly lower in the cryotherapy group during the first 7 PODs, both at rest and in motion (Pcryotherapy group than the control group for pain relief (P.05). Cryotherapy is effective in relieving pain and reducing analgesic consumption for patients received elbow arthrolysis. The application of cryotherapy will not affect blood loss, ROM, or elbow function. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Efficacy of peloid therapy in patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis: a randomized, controlled, single blind study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ökmen, Burcu Metin; Eröksüz, Rıza; Altan, Lale; Aksoy, Meliha Kasapoğlu

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of peloid on pain, functionality, daily life activities, and quality of life of lateral epicondylitis (LE) patients. In this randomized, controlled, single-blind study, 75 patients who were diagnosed with chronic LE were enrolled to the study. Patients were randomized into two groups using the random number table. The patients in the first group (group 1) ( n = 33), were given lateral epicondylitis band (LEB) (during the day for 6 weeks) + peloid therapy (five consecutive days a week for 2 weeks), and the second group (group 2) ( n = 32), received LEB treatment alone. The patients were assessed by using Patient Rated Tennis Elbow Evaluation (PRTEE) and Nottingham Health Profile (NHP). The data were obtained before treatment (W0), immediately after treatment (W2), and 1 month after treatment (W6). In analysis of the collected data, the Wilcoxon signed rank test for intra-group comparisons and Mann-Whitney U test for comparisons between groups were used. Both in groups 1 and 2, there was a statistically significant improvement in all the evaluation parameters at W2 and W6 when compared to W0 ( p 0.05), a statistically significant difference was found in favor of group 1 for all the evaluation parameters at W6 ( p < 0.05). Our results have shown that peloid treatment could be effective in providing improvement in pain relief, function, daily life activities, and quality of life in LE patients.

  5. Randomized, single blind, controlled trial of inhaled glutathione vs placebo in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, C; Tosco, A; Abete, P; Carnovale, V; Basile, C; Magliocca, A; Quattrucci, S; De Sanctis, S; Alatri, F; Mazzarella, G; De Pietro, L; Turino, C; Melillo, E; Buonpensiero, P; Di Pasqua, A; Raia, V

    2015-03-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF) the defective CF transmembrane conductance regulator protein may be responsible for the impaired transport of glutathione (GSH), the first line defense of the lung against oxidative stress. The aim of this single-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was to evaluate the effect of inhaled GSH in patients with CF. 54 adult and 51 pediatric patients were randomized to receive inhaled GSH or placebo twice daily for 12 months. Twelve month treatment with inhaled GSH did not achieve our predetermined primary outcome measure of 15% improvement in FEV1%. Only in patients with moderate lung disease, 3, 6 and 9 months therapy with GSH resulted in a statistically significant increase of FEV1 values from the baseline. Moreover GSH therapy improved 6-minute walking test in pediatric population. GSH was well tolerated by all patients. Inhaled GSH has slight positive effects in CF patients with moderate lung disease warranting further study. ClinicalTrials.gov; No.: NCT01450267; URL: www.clinicaltrialsgov. Copyright © 2014 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Dense cranial electroacupuncture stimulation for major depressive disorder--a single-blind, randomized, controlled study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang-Jin Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies suggest that electroacupuncture possesses therapeutic benefits for depressive disorders. The purpose of this study was to determine whether dense cranial electroacupuncture stimulation (DCEAS could enhance the antidepressant efficacy in the early phase of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD. METHODS: In this single-blind, randomized, controlled study, patients with MDD were randomly assigned to 9-session DCEAS or noninvasive electroacupuncture (n-EA control procedure in combination with fluoxetine (FLX for 3 weeks. Clinical outcomes were measured using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17, Clinical Global Impression-severity (CGI-S, and Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS as well as the response and remission rates. RESULTS: Seventy-three patients were randomly assigned to n-EA (n = 35 and DCEAS (n = 38, of whom 34 in n-EA and 36 in DCEAS group were analyzed. DCEAS-treated patients displayed a significantly greater reduction from baseline in HAMD-17 scores at Day 3 through Day 21 and in SDS scores at Day 3 and Day 21 compared to patients receiving n-EA. DCEAS intervention also produced a higher rate of clinically significant response compared to n-EA procedure (19.4% (7/36 vs. 8.8% (3/34. The incidence of adverse events was similar in the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: DCEAS is a safe and effective intervention that augments the antidepressant efficacy. It can be considered as an additional therapy in the early phase of SSRI treatment of depressed patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN88008690.

  7. Distance education and diabetes empowerment: A single-blind randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Zirak, Mohammad; Hemmati Maslakpak, Masomeh; Parizad, Naser

    2017-11-01

    Diabetes is one of the biggest problems in healthcare systems and kills many people every year. Diabetes management is impossible when only utilizing medication. So, patients must be educated to manage their diabetes. This study aims to assess the effect of education by telephone and short message service on empowering patients with type 2 diabetes (primary outcome). A single-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted in the Urmia diabetes association in Iran. Sixty six participants with definitive diagnosis of type 2 diabetes entered into the study. Patients with secondary health problems were excluded. Patients were selected by simple random sampling then allocated into intervention (n=33) and control (n=33) groups. The intervention group received an educational text message daily and instructive phone calls three days a week for three months along with usual care. The Diabetes Empowerment Scale (DES) with confirmed validity and reliability was used for collecting data. Data was analyzed using SPSS V6.1. Independent t-test, paired t-test and chi-square were used to analyze the data. The empowerment of the intervention group compared with the control group significantly improved after three months of distance education (p<0.00, EF=1. 16). The study findings show that the distance education has a significant effect on empowering patients with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, using distance education along with other diabetes management intervention is highly effective and should be part of the care in diabetes treatment. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The effects of assertiveness training in patients with schizophrenia: a randomized, single-blind, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tso-Ying; Chang, Shih-Chin; Chu, Hsin; Yang, Chyn-Yng; Ou, Keng-Liang; Chung, Min-Huey; Chou, Kuei-Ru

    2013-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of group assertiveness training on assertiveness, social anxiety and satisfaction with interpersonal communication among patients with chronic schizophrenia. Only limited studies highlighted the effectiveness of group assertiveness training among inpatients with schizophrenia. Given the lack of group assertiveness training among patients with schizophrenia, further development of programmes focusing on facilitating assertiveness, self-confidence and social skills among inpatients with chronic schizophrenia is needed. This study used a prospective, randomized, single-blinded, parallel-group design. This study employed a prospective, randomized, parallel-group design. Seventy-four patients were randomly assigned to experimental group receiving 12 sessions of assertiveness training, or a supportive control group. Data collection took place for the period of June 2009-July 2010. Among patients with chronic schizophrenia, assertiveness, levels of social anxiety and satisfaction with interpersonal communication significantly improved immediately after the intervention and at the 3-month follow-up in the intervention group. The results of a generalized estimating equation (GEE) indicated that: (1) assertiveness significantly improved from pre- to postintervention and was maintained until the follow-up; (2) anxiety regarding social interactions significantly decreased after assertiveness training; and (3) satisfaction with interpersonal communication slightly improved after the 12-session intervention and at the 3-month follow-up. Assertivenss training is a non-invasive and inexpensive therapy that appears to improve assertiveness, social anxiety and interpersonal communication among inpatients with chronic schizophrenia. These findings may provide a reference guide to clinical nurses for developing assertiveness-training protocols. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Effectiveness of PELOID therapy in carpal tunnel syndrome: A randomized controlled single blind study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metin Ökmen, Burcu; Kasapoğlu Aksoy, Meliha; Güneş, Aygül; Eröksüz, Riza; Altan, Lale

    2017-08-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome(CTS) is the most common neuromuscular cause of upper extremity disability. We aimed to investigate the effectiveness of peloid therapy in patients with CTS. This randomized, controlled, single-blind study enrolled 70 patients between the ages of 30 to 65 who had a diagnosis of either mild, mild-to-moderate, or moderate CTS. The patients were randomized into two groups using random number table. In the first group, (Group 1)( n = 35), patients were given splint (every night for 6 weeks) + peloid treatment(five consecutive days a week for 2 weeks) and in the second group, (Group 2)( n = 28), patients received splint treatment(every night for 6 weeks) alone. The patients were assessed by using visual analog scale(VAS) for pain, electroneuromyography(ENMG), the Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire(BCTSQ), hand grip strength(HGS), finger grip strength(FGS), and Short Form-12(SF-12). The data were obtained before treatment(W0), immediately after treatment(W2), and one month after treatment(W6). Both in Group 1 and 2, there was a statistically significant improvement in all the evaluation parameters at W2 and W6 when compared to W0( p < 0.05). Comparison of the groups with each other revealed significantly better results for VAS, BCTSQ, mSNCV, SF-12 in Group 1 than in Group 2 at W2( p < 0.05). There was also a statistically significant difference in favor of Group 1 for VAS, BCTSQ, FGS and MCS at W6 when compared to W0 ( p < 0.05). The results of our study demonstrated that in patients with CTS; peloid + splint treatment was more effective than splint treatment alone in pain, functionality and life quality both at after treatment(W2) and one month after treatment (W6). We may suggest peloid as a supplementary therapeutic agent in CTS.

  10. Efficacy of paraffin bath therapy in hand osteoarthritis: a single-blinded randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilek, Banu; Gözüm, Mehtap; Şahin, Ebru; Baydar, Meltem; Ergör, Gül; El, Ozlem; Bircan, Çigdem; Gülbahar, Selmin

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of paraffin bath therapy on pain, function, and muscle strength in patients with hand osteoarthritis. Prospective single-blinded randomized controlled trial. Department of physical medicine and rehabilitation in a university hospital. Patients with bilateral hand osteoarthritis (N=56). Patients were randomized into 2 groups with a random number table by using block randomization with 4 patients in a block. Group 1 (n=29) had paraffin bath therapy (5 times per week, for 3-week duration) for both hands. Group 2 (n=27) was the control group. All patients were informed about joint-protection techniques, and paracetamol intake was recorded. The primary outcome measures were pain (at last 48h) at rest and during activities of daily living (ADL), assessed with a visual analog scale (0-10cm) at 12 weeks. The secondary outcome measures were the Australian Canadian Osteoarthritis Hand Index (AUSCAN) and the Dreiser Functional Index (DFI), used for subjective functional evaluation, loss of range of motion (ROM), grip and pinch strength, painful and tender joint counts, and paracetamol intake. A researcher blind to group allocation recorded the measures for both hands at baseline, 3 weeks, and 12 weeks at the hospital setting. At baseline, there were no significant differences between groups in any of the parameters (P>.05). After treatment, the paraffin group exhibited significant improvement in pain at rest and during ADL, ROM of the right hand, and pain and stiffness dimensions of the AUSCAN (P.05). The control group showed a significant deterioration in right hand grip and bilateral lateral pinch and right chuck pinch strength (Pparaffin group (Pparaffin group were significantly higher than the control group at 12 weeks (PParaffin bath therapy seemed to be effective both in reducing pain and tenderness and maintaining muscle strength in hand osteoarthritis. It may be regarded as a beneficial short-term therapy option, which is effective for a 12

  11. Therapist guided internet based cognitive behavioural therapy for body dysmorphic disorder: single blind randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enander, Jesper; Andersson, Erik; Mataix-Cols, David; Lichtenstein, Linn; Alström, Katarina; Andersson, Gerhard; Ljótsson, Brjánn; Rück, Christian

    2016-02-02

    To evaluate the efficacy of therapist guided internet based cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) programme for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD-NET) compared with online supportive therapy. A 12 week single blind parallel group randomised controlled trial. Academic medical centre. 94 self referred adult outpatients with a diagnosis of body dysmorphic disorder and a modified Yale-Brown obsessive compulsive scale (BDD-YBOCS) score of ≥ 20. Concurrent psychotropic drug treatment was permitted if the dose had been stable for at least two months before enrolment and remained unchanged during the trial. Participants received either BDD-NET (n=47) or supportive therapy (n=47) delivered via the internet for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was the BDD-YBOCS score after treatment and follow-up (three and six months from baseline) as evaluated by a masked assessor. Responder status was defined as a ≥ 30% reduction in symptoms on the scale. Secondary outcomes were measures of depression (MADRS-S), global functioning (GAF), clinical global improvement (CGI-I), and quality of life (EQ5D). The six month follow-up time and all outcomes other than BDD-YBOCS and MADRS-S at 3 months were not pre-specified in the registration at clinicaltrials.gov because of an administrative error but were included in the original trial protocol approved by the regional ethics committee before the start of the trial. BDD-NET was superior to supportive therapy and was associated with significant improvements in severity of symptoms of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD-YBOCS group difference -7.1 points, 95% confidence interval -9.8 to -4.4), depression (MADRS-S group difference -4.5 points, -7.5 to -1.4), and other secondary measures. At follow-up, 56% of those receiving BDD-NET were classed as responders, compared with 13% receiving supportive therapy. The number needed to treat was 2.34 (1.71 to 4.35). Self reported satisfaction was high. CBT can be delivered safely via the internet to patients with body

  12. Controlled single-blind clinical evaluation of low-dose mammographic screen: film systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sickles, E.A.; Genant, H.K.

    1979-01-01

    The ability of five low-dose mammographic screen-film systems to portray normal and abnormal breast structures was evaluated in parallel with a study of physical image properties. Single-blind evaluations of the visibility of normal breast architecture, mass lesions, and calcifications were made on the mammograms of 100 patients radiographed with each of the systems. There was increased noise and slightly poorer resolution of the faster recording systems, but there was no difference in final diagnostic impressions among the five systems. These results suggest that the faster systems will result in substantial dose reduction without sacrificing diagnostic accuracy

  13. Brief report: Pilot single-blind placebo lead-in study of acamprosate in youth with autistic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Craig A; Wink, Logan K; Early, Maureen C; Stiegelmeyer, Elizabeth; Mathieu-Frasier, Lauren; Patrick, Vanessa; McDougle, Christopher J

    2014-04-01

    An excitatory/inhibitory (E:I) imbalance marked by enhanced glutamate and deficient gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurotransmission may contribute to the pathophysiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We report on the first single-blind placebo lead-in trial of acamprosate, a drug with putative mechanisms restoring E:I imbalance, in twelve youth with ASD. We conducted a 12-week single-blind, placebo lead-in study of acamprosate in youth age 5-17 years with autistic disorder. Six of nine subjects who received active drug treatment were deemed treatment responders (defined by a score at final visit of "very much improved" or "much improved" on the Clinical Global Impressions Improvement scale) and ≥25% improvement on the Aberrant Behavior Checklist Social Withdrawal subscale. Future larger-scale dose finding studies of acamprosate in ASD may be warranted given this preliminary indication of benefit.

  14. Gait analysis following treadmill training with body weight support versus conventional physical therapy: a prospective randomized controlled single blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucareli, P R; Lima, M O; Lima, F P S; de Almeida, J G; Brech, G C; D'Andréa Greve, J M

    2011-09-01

    Single-blind randomized, controlled clinical study. To evaluate, using kinematic gait analysis, the results obtained from gait training on a treadmill with body weight support versus those obtained with conventional gait training and physiotherapy. Thirty patients with sequelae from traumatic incomplete spinal cord injuries at least 12 months earlier; patients were able to walk and were classified according to motor function as ASIA (American Spinal Injury Association) impairment scale C or D. Patients were divided randomly into two groups of 15 patients by the drawing of opaque envelopes: group A (weight support) and group B (conventional). After an initial assessment, both groups underwent 30 sessions of gait training. Sessions occurred twice a week, lasted for 30 min each and continued for four months. All of the patients were evaluated by a single blinded examiner using movement analysis to measure angular and linear kinematic gait parameters. Six patients (three from group A and three from group B) were excluded because they attended fewer than 85% of the training sessions. There were no statistically significant differences in intra-group comparisons among the spatial-temporal variables in group B. In group A, the following significant differences in the studied spatial-temporal variables were observed: increases in velocity, distance, cadence, step length, swing phase and gait cycle duration, in addition to a reduction in stance phase. There were also no significant differences in intra-group comparisons among the angular variables in group B. However, group A achieved significant improvements in maximum hip extension and plantar flexion during stance. Gait training with body weight support was more effective than conventional physiotherapy for improving the spatial-temporal and kinematic gait parameters among patients with incomplete spinal cord injuries.

  15. A prospective, randomized, single - blind study comparing intraplaque injection of thiocolchicine and verapamil in Peyronie's Disease: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. L. Toscano Jr.

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: To compare the response to tiocolchicine and verapamil injection in the plaque of patients with Peyronie's disease. Materials and Methods: Prospective, single-blind, randomized study, selecting patients who have presented Peyronie's disease for less than 18 months. Thiocolchicine 4mg or verapamil 5mg were given in 7 injections (once a week. Patients who had received any treatment for Peyronie's disease in the past three months were excluded. The parameters used were the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5 score, analysis of the curvature on pharmaco-induced erections and size of the plaque by ultrasonography. Results: Twenty-five patients were randomized, 13 received thiocolchicine and 12 were treated with verapamil. Both groups were statistically similar. The mean curvature was 46.7° and 36.2° before and after thiocolchicine, respectively (p=0.019 and 50.4° and 42.08° before and after verapamil, respectively (p=0.012. The curvature improved in 69% of patients treated with thiocolchicine and in 66% of those who received verapamil. Regarding sexual function, there was an increase in the IIEF-5 from 16.69 to 20.85 (p=0.23 in the thiocolchicine group. In the verapamil group the IIEF-5 score dropped from 17.50 to 16.25 (p=0.58. In the thiocolchicine group, the plaque was reduced in 61% of patients. In the verapamil group, 8% presented decreased plaque size. No adverse event was associated to thiocolchicine. Conclusion: The use of thiocolchicine in Peyronie's disease demonstrated improvement on penile curvature and reduction in plaque size. Thiocolchicine presented similar results to verapamil in curvature assessment. No significant side effects were observed with the use of tiocolchicine.

  16. The FINISH-3 Trial : A Phase 3, International, Randomized, Single-Blind, Controlled Trial of Topical Fibrocaps in Intraoperative Surgical Hemostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bochicchio, Grant V.; Gupta, Navyash; Porte, Robert J.; Renkens, Kenneth L.; Pattyn, Piet; Topal, Baki; Troisi, Roberto Ivan; Muir, William; Chetter, Ian; Gillen, Daniel L.; Zuckerman, Linda A.; Frohna, Paul A.

    BACKGROUND: This Phase 3, international, randomized, single-blind, controlled trial (FINISH-3) compared the efficacy and safety of Fibrocaps, a ready-to-use, dry-powder fibrin sealant containing human plasma-derived thrombin and fibrinogen, vs gelatin sponge alone for use as a hemostat for surgical

  17. A single blind randomized control trial on support groups for Chinese persons with mild dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young DKW

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Daniel KW Young,1 Timothy CY Kwok,2 Petrus YN Ng1 1Department of Social Work, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong; 2Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong Purpose: Persons with mild dementia experience multiple losses and manifest depressive symptoms. This research study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a support group led by a social worker for Chinese persons with mild dementia. Research methods: Participants were randomly assigned to either a ten-session support group or a control group. Standardized assessment tools were used for data collection at pretreatment and post-treatment periods by a research assistant who was kept blind to the group assignment of the participants. Upon completion of the study, 20 treatment group participants and 16 control group participants completed all assessments. Results: At baseline, the treatment and control groups did not show any significant difference on all demographic variables, as well as on all baseline measures; over one-half (59% of all the participants reported having depression, as assessed by a Chinese Geriatric Depression Scale score ≥8. After completing the support group, the depressive mood of the treatment group participants reduced from 8.83 (standard deviation =2.48 to 7.35 (standard deviation =2.18, which was significant (Wilcoxon signed-rank test; P=0.017, P<0.05, while the control group’s participants did not show any significant change. Conclusion: This present study supports the efficacy and effectiveness of the support group for persons with mild dementia in Chinese society. In particular, this present study shows that a support group can reduce depressive symptoms for participants. Keywords: support group, mild dementia, Chinese, depression

  18. Conductive Education as a Method of Stroke Rehabilitation: A Single Blinded Randomised Controlled Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Bek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Conductive Education for stroke survivors has shown promise but randomised evidence is unavailable. This study assessed the feasibility of a definitive randomised controlled trial to evaluate efficacy. Methods. Adult stroke survivors were recruited through local community notices. Those completing the baseline assessment were randomised using an online program and group allocation was independent. Intervention group participants received 10 weekly 1.5-hour sessions of Conductive Education at the National Institute of Conductive Education in Birmingham, UK. The control group participants attended two group meetings. The study evaluated the feasibility of recruitment procedures, delivery of the intervention, retention of participants, and appropriateness of outcome measures and data collection methods. Independent assessments included the Barthel Index, the Stroke Impact Scale, the Timed Up and Go test, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results. Eighty-two patients were enrolled; 77 completed the baseline assessment (46 men, mean age 62.1 yrs. and were randomised. 70 commenced the intervention (n=37 or an equivalent waiting period (n=33. 32/37 completed the 10-week training and 32/33 the waiting period. There were no missing items from completed questionnaires and no adverse events. Discussion. Recruitment, intervention, and assessment methods worked well. Transport issues for intervention and assessment appointments require review. Conclusion. A definitive trial is feasible. This trial is registered with ISRCTN84064492.

  19. Targeted physiotherapy for patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis: A protocol for a randomised, single-blind controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, Kay M; Vicenzino, Bill; Pandy, Marcus G; Schache, Anthony G; Hinman, Rana S

    2008-01-01

    Background The patellofemoral joint (PFJ) is one compartment of the knee that is frequently affected by osteoarthritis (OA) and is a potent source of OA symptoms. However, there is a dearth of evidence for compartment-specific treatments for PFJ OA. Therefore, this project aims to evaluate whether a physiotherapy treatment, targeted to the PFJ, results in greater improvements in pain and physical function than a physiotherapy education intervention in people with symptomatic and radiographic PFJ OA. Methods 90 people with PFJ OA (PFJ-specific history, signs and symptoms and radiographic evidence of PFJ OA) will be recruited from the community and randomly allocated into one of two treatments. A randomised controlled trial adhering to CONSORT guidelines will evaluate the efficacy of physiotherapy (8 individual sessions over 12 weeks, as well as a home exercise program 4 times/week) compared to a physiotherapist-delivered OA education control treatment (8 individual sessions over 12 weeks). Physiotherapy treatment will consist of (i) quadriceps muscle retraining; (ii) quadriceps and hip muscle strengthening; (iii) patellar taping; (iv) manual PFJ and soft tissue mobilisation; and (v) OA education. Resistance and dosage of exercises will be tailored to the participant's functional level and clinical state. Primary outcomes will be evaluated by a blinded examiner at baseline, 12 weeks and 9 months using validated and reliable pain, physical function and perceived global effect scales. All analyses will be conducted on an intention-to-treat basis using linear mixed regression models, including respective baseline scores as a covariate, subjects as a random effect, treatment condition as a fixed factor and the covariate by treatment interaction. Conclusion This RCT is targeting PFJ OA, an important sub-group of knee OA patients, with a specifically designed conservative intervention. The project's outcome will influence PFJ OA rehabilitation, with the potential to reduce

  20. Targeted physiotherapy for patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis: A protocol for a randomised, single-blind controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schache Anthony G

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The patellofemoral joint (PFJ is one compartment of the knee that is frequently affected by osteoarthritis (OA and is a potent source of OA symptoms. However, there is a dearth of evidence for compartment-specific treatments for PFJ OA. Therefore, this project aims to evaluate whether a physiotherapy treatment, targeted to the PFJ, results in greater improvements in pain and physical function than a physiotherapy education intervention in people with symptomatic and radiographic PFJ OA. Methods 90 people with PFJ OA (PFJ-specific history, signs and symptoms and radiographic evidence of PFJ OA will be recruited from the community and randomly allocated into one of two treatments. A randomised controlled trial adhering to CONSORT guidelines will evaluate the efficacy of physiotherapy (8 individual sessions over 12 weeks, as well as a home exercise program 4 times/week compared to a physiotherapist-delivered OA education control treatment (8 individual sessions over 12 weeks. Physiotherapy treatment will consist of (i quadriceps muscle retraining; (ii quadriceps and hip muscle strengthening; (iii patellar taping; (iv manual PFJ and soft tissue mobilisation; and (v OA education. Resistance and dosage of exercises will be tailored to the participant's functional level and clinical state. Primary outcomes will be evaluated by a blinded examiner at baseline, 12 weeks and 9 months using validated and reliable pain, physical function and perceived global effect scales. All analyses will be conducted on an intention-to-treat basis using linear mixed regression models, including respective baseline scores as a covariate, subjects as a random effect, treatment condition as a fixed factor and the covariate by treatment interaction. Conclusion This RCT is targeting PFJ OA, an important sub-group of knee OA patients, with a specifically designed conservative intervention. The project's outcome will influence PFJ OA rehabilitation, with the

  1. A single-blind controlled study of electrocautery and ultrasonic scalpel smoke plumes in laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, J Edward F; Malik, Momin; Ahmed, Irfan

    2012-02-01

    Surgical smoke containing potentially carcinogenic and irritant chemicals is an inevitable consequence of intraoperative energized dissection. Different energized dissection methods have not been compared directly in human laparoscopic surgery or against commonly encountered pollutants. This study undertook an analysis of carcinogenic and irritant volatile hydrocarbon concentrations in electrocautery and ultrasonic scalpel plumes compared with cigarette smoke and urban city air control samples. Once ethical approval was obtained, gas samples were aspirated from the peritoneal cavity after human laparoscopic intraabdominal surgery solely using either electrocautery or ultrasonic scalpels. All were adsorbed in Tenax tubes and concentrations of carcinogenic or irritant volatile hydrocarbons measured by gas chromatography. The results were compared with cigarette smoke and urban city air control samples. The analyzing laboratory was blinded to sample origin. A total of 10 patients consented to intraoperative gas sampling in which only one method of energized dissection was used. Six carcinogenic or irritant hydrocarbons (benzene, ethylbenzene, styrene, toluene, heptene, and methylpropene) were identified in one or more samples. With the exception of styrene (P = 0.016), a nonsignificant trend toward lower hydrocarbon concentrations was observed with ultrasonic scalpel use. Ultrasonic scalpel plumes had significantly lower hydrocarbon concentrations than cigarette smoke, with the exception of methylpropene (P = 0.332). No significant difference was observed with city air. Electrocautery samples contained significantly lower hydrocarbon concentrations than cigarette smoke, with the exception of toluene (P = 0.117) and methyl propene (P = 0.914). Except for toluene (P = 0.028), city air showed no significant difference. Both electrocautery and ultrasonic dissection are associated with significantly lower concentrations of the most commonly detected carcinogenic and

  2. Telephone-delivered psychoeducational intervention for Hong Kong Chinese dementia caregivers: a single-blinded randomized controlled trial

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    Kwok T

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Timothy Kwok,1,2 Bel Wong,2 Isaac Ip,2 Kenny Chui,2 Daniel Young,2 Florence Ho2 1Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Special Administrative Region; 2Jockey Club Centre for Positive Ageing, Hong Kong, Special Administrative Region Purpose: Many family caregivers of persons with dementia (PWD are unable to participate in community center-based caregiver support services because of logistical constraints. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a telephone-delivered psychoeducational intervention for family caregivers of PWD in alleviating caregiver burden and enhancing caregiving self-efficacy. Subjects and methods: In a single-blinded randomized controlled trial, 38 family caregivers of PWD were randomly allocated into an intervention group or a control group. The intervention group received psychoeducation from a registered social worker over the phone for 12 sessions. Caregivers in the control group were given a DVD containing educational information about dementia caregiving. Outcomes of the intervention were measured by the Chinese versions of the Zarit Burden Interview and the Revised Scale for Caregiving Self-efficacy. Mann–Whitney U tests were used to compare the differences between the intervention and control groups. Results: The level of burden of caregivers in the intervention group reduced significantly compared with caregivers in the control group. Caregivers in the intervention group also reported significantly more gain in self-efficacy in obtaining respite than the control group. Conclusion: A structured telephone intervention can benefit dementia caregivers in terms of self-efficacy and caregiving burden. The limitations of the research and recommendations for intervention are discussed. Keywords: telephone intervention, psychoeducation, dementia caregivers

  3. Perceptive rehabilitation and trunk posture alignment in patients with Parkinson disease: a single blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrone, Michelangelo; Miccinilli, Sandra; Bravi, Marco; Paolucci, Teresa; Melgari, Jean M; Salomone, Gaetano; Picelli, Alessandro; Spadini, Ennio; Ranavolo, Alberto; Saraceni, Vincenzo M; DI Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Sterzi, Silvia

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies aimed to evaluate the potential effects of perceptive rehabilitation in Parkinson Disease reporting promising preliminary results for postural balance and pain symptoms. To date, no randomized controlled trial was carried out to compare the effects of perceptive rehabilitation and conventional treatment in patients with Parkinson Disease. To evaluate whether a perceptive rehabilitation treatment could be more effective than a conventional physical therapy program in improving postural control and gait pattern in patients with Parkinson Disease. Single blind, randomized controlled trial. Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine of a University Hospital. Twenty outpatients affected by idiopathic Parkinson Disease at Hoehn and Yahr stage ≤3. Recruited patients were divided into two groups: the first one underwent individual treatment with Surfaces for Perceptive Rehabilitation (Su-Per), consisting of rigid wood surfaces supporting deformable latex cones of various dimensions, and the second one received conventional group physical therapy treatment. Each patient underwent a training program consisting of ten, 45-minute sessions, three days a week for 4 consecutive weeks. Each subject was evaluated before treatment, immediately after treatment and at one month of follow-up, by an optoelectronic stereophotogrammetric system for gait and posture analysis, and by a computerized platform for stabilometric assessment. Kyphosis angle decreased after ten sessions of perceptive rehabilitation, thus showing a substantial difference with respect to the control group. No significant differences were found as for gait parameters (cadence, gait speed and stride length) within Su-Per group and between groups. Parameters of static and dynamic evaluation on stabilometric platform failed to demonstrate any statistically relevant difference both within-groups and between-groups. Perceptive training may help patients affected by Parkinson Disease into restoring

  4. Comparison between group and personal rehabilitation for dementia in a geriatric health service facility: single-blinded randomized controlled study.

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    Tanaka, Shigeya; Honda, Shin; Nakano, Hajime; Sato, Yuko; Araya, Kazufumi; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of rehabilitation involving group and personal sessions on demented participants. This single-blinded randomized controlled trial included 60 elderly participants with dementia in a geriatric health service facility, or R oken. Staff members, who did not participate in the intervention, examined cognitive function, mood, communication ability, severity of dementia, objective quality of life, vitality, and daily behaviour. After a baseline assessment, participants were randomly divided into three groups: (i) group intervention; (ii) personal intervention; and (iii) control. The 1-h group intervention (3-5 subjects) and 20-min personal intervention (one staff member per participant) were performed twice a week for 12 weeks (24 total sessions). The cognitive rehabilitation programme consisted of reminiscence, reality orientation, and physical exercise, and it was based on five principles of brain-activating rehabilitation; (i) pleasant atmosphere; (ii) communication; (iii) social roles; (iv) praising; and (v) errorless support. Data were analyzed after the second assessment. Outcome measures were analyzed in 43 participants-14 in the control group, 13 in group intervention, and 16 in personal intervention. Repeated measure ancova showed a significant interaction for cognitive function score (Mini-Mental State Examination) between group intervention and controls ( F  = 5.535, P = 0.029). In the post-hoc analysis, group intervention showed significant improvement (P = 0.016). Global severity of dementia tended to improve (P = 0.094) in group intervention compared to control (Mann-Whitney U -test). There were no significant interactions or improvements for other measurements. Group rehabilitation for dementia is more effective for improving cognitive function and global severity of dementia than personal rehabilitation in Roken. © 2016 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  5. Treatment for non-thyroidal illness syndrome in advanced chronic kidney disease: a single-blind controlled study.

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    Yan, Wenjun; Wang, Lijuan; Huang, Tianlun; Xu, Gaosi

    2017-08-01

    Non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) is common among patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is strongly associated with poor prognosis. However, it remains unclear in how to correct this disorder and this study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of sodium bicarbonate (SB) and N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) for correcting NTIS status. Patients with CKD stage 3-4 were single-blind, placebo-controlled treated with placebo, SB, or NAC for 18 weeks. The primary end points were the correction of NTIS and the occurrence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The secondary point was the change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) after the follow-up. The Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed significant lower correcting ratio of NTIS in control group compared with SB group [Hazard ratio (HR) 0.19, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.04-0.89, p = 0.035] and NAC group (HR 0.09, 95 % CI 0.02-0.38, p = 0.001), and increased ESRD risk in control group than in SB group (HR 1.97, 95 % CI 1.02-3.84, p = 0.045) and NAC group (HR 5.50, 95 % CI 2.23-13.57, p < 0.001). The Cox regression analysis demonstrated significantly different effectiveness of placebo, SB and NAC on NTIS correction and ESRD risk, p < 0.05, respectively. Variance analysis displayed a greater reduction in eGFR in controls than in SB (p = 0.044) and NAC group (p < 0.001). SB and NAC are effective in promoting the recovery from NTIS status and delaying the deterioration of renal function in advanced CKD patients.

  6. Home-based step training using videogame technology in people with Parkinson's disease: a single-blinded randomised controlled trial.

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    Song, Jooeun; Paul, Serene S; Caetano, Maria Joana D; Smith, Stuart; Dibble, Leland E; Love, Rachelle; Schoene, Daniel; Menant, Jasmine C; Sherrington, Cathie; Lord, Stephen R; Canning, Colleen G; Allen, Natalie E

    2018-03-01

    To determine whether 12-week home-based exergame step training can improve stepping performance, gait and complementary physical and neuropsychological measures associated with falls in Parkinson's disease. A single-blinded randomised controlled trial. Community (experimental intervention), university laboratory (outcome measures). Sixty community-dwelling people with Parkinson's disease. Home-based step training using videogame technology. The primary outcomes were the choice stepping reaction time test and Functional Gait Assessment. Secondary outcomes included physical and neuropsychological measures associated with falls in Parkinson's disease, number of falls over six months and self-reported mobility and balance. Post intervention, there were no differences between the intervention ( n = 28) and control ( n = 25) groups in the primary or secondary outcomes except for the Timed Up and Go test, where there was a significant difference in favour of the control group ( P = 0.02). Intervention participants reported mobility improvement, whereas control participants reported mobility deterioration-between-group difference on an 11-point scale = 0.9 (95% confidence interval: -1.8 to -0.1, P = 0.03). Interaction effects between intervention and disease severity on physical function measures were observed ( P = 0.01 to P = 0.08) with seemingly positive effects for the low-severity group and potentially negative effects for the high-severity group. Overall, home-based exergame step training was not effective in improving the outcomes assessed. However, the improved physical function in the lower disease severity intervention participants as well as the self-reported improved mobility in the intervention group suggest home-based exergame step training may have benefits for some people with Parkinson's disease.

  7. Comparison of Effectiveness of Reflexology and Abdominal Massage on Constipation among Orthopedic Patients: A single-blind Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alehe Seyyedrassoli

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Constipation is one of the most common health problems presenting in patients hospitalized within orthopedic settings. This present study was done with the aim of determining the effect of foot reflexology and abdominal massage on constipation severity. This study is a single -blind randomized controlled trial completed using 3 groups comprising a total of 60 patients hospitalized in the orthopedic wards of shohada hospital in the Northwest Azerbaijan- Iran. One of the intervention groups involved the use of foot reflexology and in the other abdominal massage was carried out once daily for 6 days. An assessor blinded to the group allocation measured and recorded constipation severity before the intervention, then daily from day 1 until day 6 post intervention by constipation evaluation scale. For data analysis, ANOVA, ANCOVA and repeated measurement ANOVA tests was used in SPSS version 16. There was no significant difference between the intervention and control groups in constipation severity over the first two days (p>0. 05 built from the 3rd until the 6th days after the intervention, the difference was significant (p0.05. After modification and deleting covariate variables, again, there was a significant difference between intervention groups with a control group from day 3 until day 6 of the intervention(p<0. 05, (effect size from 34% to 50%. Time had a significant effect on constipation severity reduction during the study, meaning that constipation, severe in the intervention groups decreased significantly as the study progressed (p<0. 05. The positive effects of foot reflexology and abdominal massage on the severity of constipation in hospitalized patients means that both can be used as economical and noninvasive nursing interventions for the relief of constipation.

  8. Efficacy of the Power Balance Silicone Wristband: a single-blind, randomized, triple placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothier, David D; Thiel, Gundula; Khoo, S G; Dillon, Wanda A; Sulway, Shaleen; Rutka, John A

    2012-06-01

    The Power Balance Silicone Wristband (Power Balance LLC, Laguna Niguel, CA) (power balance band; PBB) consists of a silicone wristband, incorporating two holograms, which is meant to confer improvements in balance on the wearer. Despite its popularity, the PBB has become somewhat controversial, with a number of articles being published in the news media regarding its efficacy. The PBB has not been formally evaluated but remains popular, largely based on anecdotal evidence. This study subjectively and objectively measured the effects of the PBB on balance in normal participants. A prospective, single-blind, randomized, triple placebo-controlled crossover study was undertaken. Twenty participants underwent measurement using the modified Test of Sensory Interaction on Balance (mCTSIB) and gave subjective feedback (visual analogue scale [VAS]) for each of four band conditions: no band, a silicone band, a deactivated PBB, and the PBB. Participants acted as their own controls. The mean of the four mCTSIB conditions (eyes open and closed on both firm and compliant surfaces) was calculated. This mean value and condition 4 of the mCTSIB were compared between band conditions using path length (PL) and root mean square (RMS) as outcome measures. No significant differences were found between band conditions for PL (p  =  .91 and p  =  .94, respectively) and RMS (p  =  .85 and p  =  .96, respectively). VASs also showed no difference between bands (p  =  .25). The PBB appears to have no effect on mCTSIB or VAS measurements of balance.

  9. A single-blinded phenobarbital-controlled trial of levetiracetam as mono-therapy in dogs with newly diagnosed epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredsø, N; Sabers, A; Toft, N; Møller, A; Berendt, M

    2016-02-01

    Treatment of canine epilepsy is problematic. Few antiepileptic drugs have proven efficacy in dogs and undesirable adverse effects and pharmacoresistance are not uncommon. Consequently, the need for investigation of alternative treatment options is ongoing. The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy and tolerability of levetiracetam as mono-therapy in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. The study used a prospective single-blinded parallel group design. Twelve client-owned dogs were included and were randomised to treatment with levetiracetam (30 mg/kg/day or 60 mg/kg/day divided into three daily dosages) or phenobarbital (4 mg/kg/day divided twice daily). Control visits were at days 30, 60 and then every 3 months for up to 1 year. Two or more seizures within 3 months led to an increase in drug dosage (levetiracetam: 10 mg/kg/day, phenobarbital: 1 mg/kg/day). Five of six levetiracetam treated dogs and one of six phenobarbital treated dogs withdrew from the study within 2-5 months due to insufficient seizure control. In the levetiracetam treated dogs there was no significant difference in the monthly number of seizures before and after treatment, whereas in the phenobarbital treated dogs there were significantly (P = 0.013) fewer seizures after treatment. Five phenobarbital treated dogs were classified as true responders (≥50% reduction in seizures/month) whereas none of the levetiracetam treated dogs fulfilled this criterion. Adverse effects were reported in both groups but were more frequent in the phenobarbital group. In this study levetiracetam was well tolerated but was not effective at the given doses as mono-therapy in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effectiveness of balneotherapy in chronic low back pain -- a randomized single-blind controlled follow-up study.

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    Balogh, Zoltán; Ordögh, József; Gász, Attila; Német, László; Bender, Tamás

    2005-08-01

    Balneotherapy, a domain of medical science, focuses on utilizing the beneficial effects of medicinal waters. Low back pain is among the most prevalent musculoskeletal disorders affecting a large proportion of the population during their lifetime. Although small in number, all controlled studies published on this subject have demonstrated the benefits of balneotherapy. This present study was undertaken to compare the effects of hydrotherapy with mineral water vs. tap water on low back pain. A single-blind clinical study was carried out to appraise the therapeutic efficacy of reduced sulphurous water on 60 patients with low back pain. 30 subjects took baths in reduced sulphurous mineral water, whereas the other 30 patients used modified tap water of matching odor. Parameters determined at baseline, after balneo-/hydrotherapy, and at the end of the 3-month follow-up period included the results of the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score, the modified Oswestry index, mobility of the spine, antalgic posture, tenderness of the paravertebral muscles on palpation, the dose requirements for analgesics, and the efficacy assessed by the investigators and by the patients. Bathing in mineral water resulted in a statistically significant improvement. This was reflected by the VAS (p balneotherapy. By contrast, hydrotherapy with tap water resulted only in the temporary improvement of just a single parameter: the VAS score improved significantly (p Balneotherapy in itself can alleviate low back pain. As demonstrated by this study, the analgesic efficacy and improvement of mobility accomplished by the use of mineral water is significantly superior to that afforded by hydrotherapy with tap water. Our results clearly establish the beneficial effects of mineral water. Moreover, it is a valuable adjunct to other forms of physical treatment as well as to pharmacotherapy.

  11. Effect of tomato consumption on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level: a randomized, single-blinded, controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuevas-Ramos D

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Daniel Cuevas-Ramos,1 Paloma Almeda-Valdés,1 Emma Chávez-Manzanera,1 Clara Elena Meza-Arana,2 Griselda Brito-Córdova,1 Roopa Mehta,1 Oscar Pérez-Méndez,3 Francisco J Gómez-Pérez1 1Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, Mexico; 2Department of Internal Medicine, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, Mexico; 3Department of Molecular Biology, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez, Mexico City, Mexico Introduction: Epidemiologic evidence suggests that tomato-based products could reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases. One of the main cardiovascular risk factors is low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C. This study aimed to prospectively evaluate the effect of tomato consumption on HDL-C levels. Subject and methods: We conducted a randomized, single-blinded, controlled clinical trial. We screened 432 subjects with a complete lipid profile. Those individuals with low HDL-C (men 40 mg/dL. A linear regression model that adjusted for those parameters that impact HDL-C levels (age, gender, waist-to-hip ratio, body mass index, fasting triglyceride concentration, simple sugars, alcohol, physical activity, and omega-3 consumption showed an independent association between tomato consumption and the increase in HDL-C (r2 = 0.69; P > 0.0001. Conclusion: Raw tomato consumption produced a favorable effect on HDL-C levels in overweight women. Keywords: lycopene, hypoalphalipoproteinemia, dyslipidemia, overweight, cardiovascular diseases

  12. Immediate effects of kinesiotaping on quadriceps muscle strength: a single-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercelli, Stefano; Sartorio, Francesco; Foti, Calogero; Colletto, Lorenzo; Virton, Domenico; Ronconi, Gianpaolo; Ferriero, Giorgio

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the immediate effects on maximal muscle strength of kinesiotaping (KT) applied to the dominant quadriceps of healthy subjects. Single-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial. "Salvatore Maugeri" Foundation. With ethical approval and informed consent, a convenience sample of 36 healthy volunteers were recruited. Two subjects did not complete the sessions and were excluded from the analysis. Subjects were tested across 3 different sessions, randomly receiving 2 experimental KT conditions applied with the aim of enhancing and inhibiting muscle strength and a sham KT application. Quadriceps muscle strength was measured by means of an isokinetic maximal test performed at 60 and 180 degrees per second. Two secondary outcome measures were performed: the single-leg triple hop for distance to measure limb performance and the Global Rating of Change Scale (GRCS) to calculate agreement between KT application and subjective perception of strength. Compared with baseline, none of the 3 taping conditions showed a significant change in muscle strength and performance (all P > 0.05). Effect size was very low under all conditions (≤0.08). Very few subjects showed an individual change greater than the minimal detectable change. Global Rating of Change Scale scores demonstrated low to moderate agreement with the type of KT applied, but some placebo effects were reported independently of condition. Our findings indicated no significant effect in the maximal quadriceps strength immediately after the application of inhibition, facilitation, or sham KT. These results do not support the use of KT applied in this way to change maximal muscle strength in healthy people.

  13. The effect of laughter therapy on radiation dermatitis in patients with breast cancer: a single-blind prospective pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Moonkyoo; Shin, Sung Hee; Lee, Eunmi; Yun, Eun Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    Background There have not yet been any published studies on the effects of laughter therapy on radiation-induced dermatitis in breast cancer patients treated with radiotherapy (RT). We assessed the effectiveness of laughter therapy in preventing radiation dermatitis in patients with breast cancer. Methods Thirty-seven patients were prospectively enrolled in this study. Eighteen patients were assigned to the experimental group and the other 19 patients were assigned to the control group. The patients who were assigned to the experimental group received laughter therapy during RT. Laughter therapy was started at the onset of RT and was provided twice a week until completion of RT. The patients who were assigned to the control group only received RT without laughter therapy. The grade of radiation dermatitis was scored by a radiation oncologist who was blinded to subject assignment. The patients’ evaluation of pain within the RT field was also assessed. Results In the experimental group, radiation dermatitis of grade 3, 2, and 1 developed in five (33.3%), five (33.3%), and five patients (33.3%), respectively. In comparison, in the control group, radiation dermatitis of grade 3, 2, 1, and 0 developed in seven (36.8%), nine (47.4%), two (10.5%), and one patient (5.3%), respectively. The experimental group exhibited a lower incidence of grade 2 or worse radiation dermatitis than the control group (33.3% versus 47.4%). The mean maximal pain scores in the experimental and control group were 2.53 and 3.95, respectively. The experimental group complained of less severe pain than the control group during RT. However, these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion The results of this study show that laughter therapy can have a beneficial role in preventing radiation dermatitis in patients with breast cancer. To confirm the results of our study, well-designed randomized studies with large sample sizes are required. PMID:25395864

  14. The effect of laughter therapy on radiation dermatitis in patients with breast cancer: a single-blind prospective pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kong M

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Moonkyoo Kong,1 Sung Hee Shin,2 Eunmi Lee,3 Eun Kyoung Yun2 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, 2College of Nursing Science, Kyung Hee University, 3Department of Quality Improvement, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea Background: There have not yet been any published studies on the effects of laughter therapy on radiation-induced dermatitis in breast cancer patients treated with radiotherapy (RT. We assessed the effectiveness of laughter therapy in preventing radiation dermatitis in patients with breast cancer. Methods: Thirty-seven patients were prospectively enrolled in this study. Eighteen patients were assigned to the experimental group and the other 19 patients were assigned to the control group. The patients who were assigned to the experimental group received laughter therapy during RT. Laughter therapy was started at the onset of RT and was provided twice a week until completion of RT. The patients who were assigned to the control group only received RT without laughter therapy. The grade of radiation dermatitis was scored by a radiation oncologist who was blinded to subject assignment. The patients' evaluation of pain within the RT field was also assessed. Results: In the experimental group, radiation dermatitis of grade 3, 2, and 1 developed in five (33.3%, five (33.3%, and five patients (33.3%, respectively. In comparison, in the control group, radiation dermatitis of grade 3, 2, 1, and 0 developed in seven (36.8%, nine (47.4%, two (10.5%, and one patient (5.3%, respectively. The experimental group exhibited a lower incidence of grade 2 or worse radiation dermatitis than the control group (33.3% versus 47.4%. The mean maximal pain scores in the experimental and control group were 2.53 and 3.95, respectively. The experimental group complained of less severe pain than the control group during RT. However, these differences were not

  15. The role of auditory feedback in music-supported stroke rehabilitation: A single-blinded randomised controlled intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vugt, F T; Kafczyk, T; Kuhn, W; Rollnik, J D; Tillmann, B; Altenmüller, E

    2016-01-01

    Learning to play musical instruments such as piano was previously shown to benefit post-stroke motor rehabilitation. Previous work hypothesised that the mechanism of this rehabilitation is that patients use auditory feedback to correct their movements and therefore show motor learning. We tested this hypothesis by manipulating the auditory feedback timing in a way that should disrupt such error-based learning. We contrasted a patient group undergoing music-supported therapy on a piano that emits sounds immediately (as in previous studies) with a group whose sounds are presented after a jittered delay. The delay was not noticeable to patients. Thirty-four patients in early stroke rehabilitation with moderate motor impairment and no previous musical background learned to play the piano using simple finger exercises and familiar children's songs. Rehabilitation outcome was not impaired in the jitter group relative to the normal group. Conversely, some clinical tests suggests the jitter group outperformed the normal group. Auditory feedback-based motor learning is not the beneficial mechanism of music-supported therapy. Immediate auditory feedback therapy may be suboptimal. Jittered delay may increase efficacy of the proposed therapy and allow patients to fully benefit from motivational factors of music training. Our study shows a novel way to test hypotheses concerning music training in a single-blinded way, which is an important improvement over existing unblinded tests of music interventions.

  16. Sotalol vs metoprolol for ventricular rate control in patients with chronic atrial fibrillation who have undergone digitalization: a single-blinded crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochiadakis, G E; Kanoupakis, E M; Kalebubas, M D; Igoumenidis, N E; Vardakis, K E; Mavrakis, H E; Vardas, P E

    2001-01-01

    To compare the effects of sotalol and metoprolol on heart rate, during isotonic (ITE) and isometric (IME) exercise and daily activities, in digitalized patients with chronic atrial fibrillation. The study had a randomized, single-blinded, crossover design. Twenty-three patients with chronic atrial fibrillation received placebo for 4 weeks, followed by a 4-week period of treatment with sotalol and metoprolol in random order. At the end of each period, the patients were assessed with 24-h ECG monitoring, a cardiopulmonary exercise test and a handgrip manoeuvre. Both agents produced a lower heart rate than placebo at rest and at all levels of isotonic exercise (P digitalized patients with atrial fibrillation. Sotalol is superior to metoprolol at submaximal exercise, resulting in better rate control during daily activities.

  17. Impact of complete bladder neck preservation on urinary continence, quality of life and surgical margins after radical prostatectomy: a randomized, controlled, single blind trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyarangi-Dix, Joanne N; Radtke, Jan Philipp; Hadaschik, Boris; Pahernik, Sascha; Hohenfellner, Markus

    2013-03-01

    We investigated the influence of bladder neck preservation on urinary continence, quality of life and surgical margins after radical prostatectomy. A total of 208 men who presented for radical prostatectomy were randomized to complete bladder neck preservation with subsequent urethro-urethral anastomosis or to no preservation as controls. Patients with failed bladder neck preservation were not included in study. We documented objective continence by the 24-hour pad test, social continence by the number of pads per day and quality of life outcomes by the validated Incontinence Quality of Life questionnaire in a single blind setting. Cancer resection was assessed by surgical margin status. At 0, 3, 6 and 12 months mean urine loss in the control vs the bladder neck preservation group was 713.3 vs 237.0, 49.6 vs 15.6, 44.4 vs 5.5 and 25.4 vs 3.1 gm, respectively (each p <0.001). At 3, 6 and 12 months in the control vs the preservation group the social continence rate was 55.3% vs 84.2% (p <0.001), 74.8% vs 89.5% (p = 0.05) and 81.4% vs 94.7% (p = 0.027), and the quality of life score was 80.4 vs 90.3 (p <0.001), 85.4 vs 91.7 (p = 0.016) and 86.0 vs 93.8 (p = 0.001), respectively. We noted significantly less urine loss, higher objective and social continence rates, and higher quality of life scores after complete bladder neck preservation at all followup points. On multiple logistic regression analysis complete bladder neck preservation was an independent positive predictor of continence. No significant difference was found in surgical margin status between the control and bladder neck preservation groups (12.5% vs 14.7%, p = 0.65). In what is to our knowledge the first prospective, randomized, controlled, single blind trial complete bladder neck preservation during radical prostatectomy was associated with a significantly higher urinary continence rate and increased patient satisfaction without compromising resection margins. Copyright © 2013 American Urological

  18. Spa therapy together with supervised self-mobilisation improves pain, function and quality of life in patients with chronic shoulder pain: a single-blind randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chary-Valckenaere, Isabelle; Loeuille, Damien; Jay, Nicolas; Kohler, François; Tamisier, Jean-Noë; Roques, Christian-François; Boulange, Michel; Gay, Gérard

    2018-02-01

    To determine whether spa therapy has a beneficial effect on pain and disability in patients with chronic shoulder pain, this single-blind randomised controlled clinical trial included patients with chronic shoulder pain due to miscellaneous conditions attending one of four spa centres as outpatients. Patients were randomised into two groups: spa therapy (18 days of standardised treatment combining thermal therapy together with supervised mobilisation in a thermal pool) and controls (spa therapy delayed for 6 months: `immediate versus delayed treatment' paradigm). All patients continued usual treatments during the 6-month follow-up period. The main endpoint was the mean change in the French-Quick DASH (F-QD) score at 6 months. The effect size of spa therapy was calculated, and the proportion of patients reaching minimal clinically important improvement (MCII) was compared. Secondary endpoints were the mean change in SF-36, treatment use and tolerance. One hundred eighty-six patients were included (94 patients as controls, 92 in the spa group) and analysed by intention to treat. At 6 months, the mean change in the F-QD score was statistically significantly greater among spa therapy patients than controls (- 32.6 versus - 8.15%; p impact on SF-36 components but not on drug intake. Spa therapy provided a statistically significant benefit on pain, function and quality of life in patients with chronic shoulder pain after 6 months compared with usual care.

  19. Study of the therapeutic effects of a hippotherapy simulator in children with cerebral palsy: a stratified single-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Pablo; Gómez-Trullén, Eva M; Asensio, Angel; García, Elena; Casas, Roberto; Monserrat, Esther; Pandyan, Anand

    2012-12-01

    To investigate whether hippotherapy (when applied by a simulator) improves postural control and balance in children with cerebral palsy. Stratified single-blind randomized controlled trial with an independent assessor. Stratification was made by gross motor function classification system levels, and allocation was concealed. Children between 4 and 18 years old with cerebral palsy. Participants were randomized to an intervention (simulator ON) or control (simulator OFF) group after getting informed consent. Treatment was provided once a week (15 minutes) for 10 weeks. Gross Motor Function Measure (dimension B for balance and the Total Score) and Sitting Assessment Scale were carried out at baseline (prior to randomization), end of intervention and 12 weeks after completing the intervention. Thirty-eight children participated. The groups were balanced at baseline. Sitting balance (measured by dimension B of the Gross Motor Function Measure) improved significantly in the treatment group (effect size = 0.36; 95% CI 0.01-0.71) and the effect size was greater in the severely disabled group (effect size = 0.80; 95% CI 0.13-1.47). The improvements in sitting balance were not maintained over the follow-up period. Changes in the total score of the Gross Motor Function Measure and the Sitting Assessment Scale were not significant. Hippotherapy with a simulator can improve sitting balance in cerebral palsy children who have higher levels of disability. However, this did not lead to a change in the overall function of these children (Gross Motor Function Classification System level V).

  20. Evaluation of the effect of balneotherapy in patients with osteoarthritis of the hands: a randomized controlled single-blind follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Katalin; Kulisch, Ágota; Németh, András; Bender, Tamás

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of thermal mineral water compared with magnetotherapy without balneotherapy as control, in the treatment of hand osteoarthritis. Randomized controlled single-blind follow-up study. Rheumatology specialist clinic of Gunaras Health Spa. Patients between 50 and 70 years of age with hand osteoarthritis, randomly assigned into three groups. The subjects in the first two groups bathed in thermal mineral water of two different temperatures (36°C and 38°C) for three weeks five times a week for 20 minutes a day and received magnetotherapy to their hands three times weekly. The third group received only magnetotherapy. Visual analogue scale scores, handgrip strength, pinchgrip strength, the number of swollen and tender joints of the hand, the duration of morning joint stiffness, Health Assessment Questionnaire, and Short Form-36 questionnaire. The study parameters were administered at baseline, immediately after treatment and after 13 weeks. The study included 63 patients. Statistically significant improvement was observed in several studied parameters after the treatment and during the follow-up study in the thermal water groups versus the control group. The 38°C thermal water treatment significantly improved the pinch strength of the right hand (0.6 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.2 to 1.1) vs. 0.03 (95% CI -0.3 to 0.4), P magnetotherapy improved the pain and function as well as the quality of life in patients with hand osteoarthritis.

  1. Effects of the daily consumption of protein enriched bread and protein enriched drinking yoghurt on the total protein intake in older adults in a rehabilitation centre: A single blind randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Til, A.J.; Naumann, E.; Cox-Claessens, I.J.H.M.; Kremer, S.; Boelsma, E.; van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren, M.A.E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effects of protein enriched bread and drinking yoghurt, substituting regular products, on the total protein intake and the distribution of protein intake over the day in older adults.Design: A single blind randomised controlled trial.Setting: Rehabilitation

  2. Effect of the daily consumption of protein enriched bread and protein enriched drinking yoghurt on the total protein intake in older adults in a rehabilitation centre: a single blind randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Til, van A.J.; Naumann, E.; Cox-Claessens, I.J.H.M.; Kremer, S.; Boelsma, E.; Schueren, van der D.E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effects of protein enriched bread and drinking yoghurt, substituting regular products, on the total protein intake and the distribution of protein intake over the day in older adults. Design A single blind randomised controlled trial. Setting Rehabilitation centre.

  3. Study Protocol: Phase III single-blinded fast-track pragmatic randomised controlled trial of a complex intervention for breathlessness in advanced disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brafman-Kennedy Barbara

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breathlessness in advanced disease causes significant distress to patients and carers and presents management challenges to health care professionals. The Breathlessness Intervention Service (BIS seeks to improve the care of breathless patients with advanced disease (regardless of cause through the use of evidence-based practice and working with other healthcare providers. BIS delivers a complex intervention (of non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatments via a multi-professional team. BIS is being continuously developed and its impact evaluated using the MRC's framework for complex interventions (PreClinical, Phase I and Phase II completed. This paper presents the protocol for Phase III. Methods/Design Phase III comprises a pragmatic, fast-track, single-blind randomised controlled trial of BIS versus standard care. Due to differing disease trajectories, the service uses two broad service models: one for patients with malignant disease (intervention delivered over two weeks and one for patients with non-malignant disease (intervention delivered over four weeks. The Phase III trial therefore consists of two sub-protocols: one for patients with malignant conditions (four week protocol and one for patients with non-malignant conditions (eight week protocol. Mixed method interviews are conducted with patients and their lay carers at three to five measurement points depending on randomisation and sub-protocol. Qualitative interviews are conducted with referring and non-referring health care professionals (malignant disease protocol only. The primary outcome measure is 'patient distress due to breathlessness' measured on a numerical rating scale (0-10. The trial includes economic evaluation. Analysis will be on an intention to treat basis. Discussion This is the first evaluation of a breathlessness intervention for advanced disease to have followed the MRC framework and one of the first palliative care trials to use fast

  4. Effect of Aerobic Exercise on Improving Symptoms of Individuals With Schizophrenia: A Single Blinded Randomized Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-Wei Wang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Antipsychotic treatment can improve the symptoms of schizophrenia; however, residual symptoms after antipsychotic treatment are frequent. The effects of exercise on the symptoms of schizophrenic patients under antipsychotic treatment are inconclusive. The aim of this randomized case-control study was to examine the effects of aerobic exercise (AE on the symptoms of schizophrenic patients receiving antipsychotic treatment.Methods: In total, 33 and 29 participants being treated with antipsychotics for schizophrenia were randomly assigned into the aerobic exercise (AE group and the control group, respectively. The severities of schizophrenic symptoms were measured using the Chinese version of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS before, immediately after, and 3 months after the intervention in both groups.Results: In total, 24 participants (72.7% in the AE group and 22 (75.9% in the control group completed the study. The results indicated that the severities of positive symptoms and general psychopathology in the AE group significantly decreased during the 12 weeks of intervention but did not further significantly change during the 3-month follow-up period. The severities of negative symptoms in the AE group decreased significantly after 12 weeks of intervention and continued decreasing during the 3-month follow-up period. Interaction effects between time and group on the severities of symptoms on the negative and general psychopathology scales were observed.Conclusion: AE can improve the severities of symptoms on the negative and general psychopathology scales in individuals with schizophrenia being treated with antipsychotics.

  5. GOLIAH (Gaming Open Library for Intervention in Autism at Home): a 6-month single blind matched controlled exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouen, Anne-Lise; Narzisi, Antonio; Xavier, Jean; Tilmont, Elodie; Bodeau, Nicolas; Bono, Valentina; Ketem-Premel, Nabila; Anzalone, Salvatore; Maharatna, Koushik; Chetouani, Mohamed; Muratori, Filippo; Cohen, David

    2017-01-01

    To meet the required hours of intensive intervention for treating children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), we developed an automated serious gaming platform (11 games) to deliver intervention at home (GOLIAH) by mapping the imitation and joint attention (JA) subset of age-adapted stimuli from the Early Start Denver Model (ESDM) intervention. Here, we report the results of a 6-month matched controlled exploratory study. From two specialized clinics, we included 14 children (age range 5-8 years) with ASD and 10 controls matched for gender, age, sites, and treatment as usual (TAU). Participants from the experimental group received in addition to TAU four 30-min sessions with GOLIAH per week at home and one at hospital for 6 months. Statistics were performed using Linear Mixed Models. Children and parents participated in 40% of the planned sessions. They were able to use the 11 games, and participants trained with GOLIAH improved time to perform the task in most JA games and imitation scores in most imitation games. GOLIAH intervention did not affect Parental Stress Index scores. At end-point, we found in both groups a significant improvement for Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule scores, Vineland socialization score, Parental Stress Index total score, and Child Behavior Checklist internalizing, externalizing and total problems. However, we found no significant change for by time × group interaction. Despite the lack of superiority of TAU + GOLIAH versus TAU, the results are interesting both in terms of changes by using the gaming platform and lack of parental stress increase. A large randomized controlled trial with younger participants (who are the core target of ESDM model) is now discussed. This should be facilitated by computing GOLIAH for a web platform. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02560415.

  6. Clinical benefits of oral nutritional supplementation for elderly hip fracture patients: a single blind randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Ma Wai Wai; Wu, Jenny; Wong, Euann; Chan, Suk Ping; To, Tze Shing Jess; Chau, Mei Wa Rosanna; Ting, Kwai Hing; Fung, Pui Man; Au, Kit Sing Derrick

    2013-01-01

    malnutrition is an important risk factor for poor outcome in patients recovering after hip fracture surgery. This study aimed to investigate the clinical, nutritional and rehabilitation effects of an oral nutritional supplementation (ONS) in an inpatient rehabilitation setting. this was an observer-blinded randomised controlled trial of elderly post-surgical proximal femoral fracture patients. A ready-to-use oral liquid nutritional supplementation (18-24 g protein and 500 kcal per day) in addition to hospital diet was compared with hospital diet only. Both groups received usual rehabilitation therapy and oral calcium and vitamin D supplements. Outcomes were compared at discharge from rehabilitation and after 4 weeks of discharge. The primary outcome parameters were the serum albumin level, the body mass index (BMI), the functional independence measure (FIM) and the elderly mobility scale (EMS). Secondary outcome parameters were frequency of complications, inpatient length of stay, mortality and acute hospital use within 6 months after discharge. a total of 126 patients were recruited, 65 in the supplementation arm and 61 in the control arm. There was a significant difference in change in BMI with a decrease of 0.25 and 0.03 kg/m(2) in the ONS group and 0.72 and 0.49 kg/m(2) in the control group at hospital discharge and follow-up, respectively (P = 0.012). The length of stay in rehabilitation ward was shortened by 3.80 (SE = 1.81, P = 0.04) days favouring the ONS group. The total number of infection episodes was also reduced significantly. No difference was observed in the rate of change of the serum albumin level, the FIM and the EMS. clinical and nutritional benefits were seen in this trial but rehabilitation benefits could not be demonstrated.

  7. Can Dual Task Walking Improve in Parkinson's Disease After External Focus of Attention Exercise? A Single Blind Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Eric N; Intzandt, Brittany N; Almeida, Quincy J

    2018-01-01

    It may be possible to use attention-based exercise to decrease demands associated with walking in Parkinson's disease (PD), and thus improve dual task walking ability. For example, an external focus of attention (focusing on the effect of an action on the environment) may recruit automatic control processes degenerated in PD, whereas an internal focus (limb movement) may recruit conscious (nonautomatic) control processes. Thus, we aimed to investigate how externally and internally focused exercise influences dual task walking and symptom severity in PD. Forty-seven participants with PD were randomized to either an Externally (n = 24) or Internally (n = 23) focused group and completed 33 one-hour attention-based exercise sessions over 11 weeks. In addition, 16 participants were part of a control group. Before, after, and 8 weeks following the program (pre/post/washout), gait patterns were measured during single and dual task walking (digit-monitoring task, ie, walking while counting numbers announced by an audio-track), and symptom severity (UPDRS-III) was assessed ON and OFF dopamine replacement. Pairwise comparisons (95% confidence intervals [CIs]) and repeated-measures analyses of variance were conducted. Pre to post: Dual task step time decreased in the external group (Δ = 0.02 seconds, CI 0.01-0.04). Dual task step length (Δ = 2.3 cm, CI 0.86-3.75) and velocity (Δ = 4.5 cm/s, CI 0.59-8.48) decreased (became worse) in the internal group. UPDRS-III scores (ON and OFF) decreased (improved) in only the External group. Pre to washout: Dual task step time ( P = .005) and percentage in double support ( P = .014) significantly decreased (improved) in both exercise groups, although only the internal group increased error on the secondary counting task (ie, more errors monitoring numbers). UPDRS-III scores in both exercise groups significantly decreased ( P = .001). Since dual task walking improvements were found immediately, and 8 weeks after the cessation of an

  8. Effects of Taping on Pain and Functional Outcome of Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Pilot Randomized Single-blind Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Taheri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To determine the effects of knee taping in combination with exercise and medical treatment on functional outcome and pain of patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA. Materials and Methods: In a randomized single-blinded clinical trial, 36 patients with knee OA were randomly assigned to two study groups. Both groups received exercise and medical therapy for 6 weeks. In addition, the first group (20 patients received taping in the first 3 weeks. Pain severity (assessed by visual analog scaling, weekly amount of analgesics consumption, timed get up and go test (TUG, and step tests were recorded at baseline, 3 and 6 weeks after the treatment and were further compared between two study groups. Results: There was no significant difference between two groups in pain severity score (P = 0.228, step test score (P = 0.771, TUG test score (P = 0.821 and weekly amount of analgesics consumption (P = 0.873 at baseline. After 3 weeks, weekly amount of analgesics consumption (P = 0.006, pain severity (P < 0.001 was significantly lower in taping group whereas step test score (P = 0.006 was significantly higher in the taping group. After 6 weeks, patients in taping group had significantly lower pain severity (P = 0.011 and higher step test score (P = 0.042. However, there was no significant difference in TUG test score (P = 0.443 and weekly amount of analgesics consumption (P = 0.270 between two groups. Conclusion: Therapeutic knee taping may be an effective method for short-term management of pain and disability in patients with knee OA.

  9. A Randomised Controlled Single-Blind Trial of the Efficacy of Reiki at Benefitting Mood and Well-Being

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Bowden

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a constructive replication of a previous trial conducted by Bowden et al. (2010, where students who had received Reiki demonstrated greater health and mood benefits than those who received no Reiki. The current study examined impact on anxiety/depression. 40 university students—half with high depression and/or anxiety and half with low depression and/or anxiety—were randomly assigned to receive Reiki or to a non-Reiki control group. Participants experienced six 30-minute sessions over a period of two to eight weeks, where they were blind to whether noncontact Reiki was administered as their attention was absorbed in a guided relaxation. The efficacy of the intervention was assessed pre-post intervention and at five-week follow-up by self-report measures of mood, illness symptoms, and sleep. The participants with high anxiety and/or depression who received Reiki showed a progressive improvement in overall mood, which was significantly better at five-week follow-up, while no change was seen in the controls. While the Reiki group did not demonstrate the comparatively greater reduction in symptoms of illness seen in our earlier study, the findings of both studies suggest that Reiki may benefit mood.

  10. A Randomised Controlled Single-Blind Trial of the Efficacy of Reiki at Benefitting Mood and Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Deborah; Goddard, Lorna; Gruzelier, John

    2011-01-01

    This is a constructive replication of a previous trial conducted by Bowden et al. (2010), where students who had received Reiki demonstrated greater health and mood benefits than those who received no Reiki. The current study examined impact on anxiety/depression. 40 university students—half with high depression and/or anxiety and half with low depression and/or anxiety—were randomly assigned to receive Reiki or to a non-Reiki control group. Participants experienced six 30-minute sessions over a period of two to eight weeks, where they were blind to whether noncontact Reiki was administered as their attention was absorbed in a guided relaxation. The efficacy of the intervention was assessed pre-post intervention and at five-week follow-up by self-report measures of mood, illness symptoms, and sleep. The participants with high anxiety and/or depression who received Reiki showed a progressive improvement in overall mood, which was significantly better at five-week follow-up, while no change was seen in the controls. While the Reiki group did not demonstrate the comparatively greater reduction in symptoms of illness seen in our earlier study, the findings of both studies suggest that Reiki may benefit mood. PMID:21584234

  11. Internet-accessed sexually transmitted infection (e-STI testing and results service: A randomised, single-blind, controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Wilson

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Internet-accessed sexually transmitted infection testing (e-STI testing is increasingly available as an alternative to testing in clinics. Typically this testing modality enables users to order a test kit from a virtual service (via a website or app, collect their own samples, return test samples to a laboratory, and be notified of their results by short message service (SMS or telephone. e-STI testing is assumed to increase access to testing in comparison with face-to-face services, but the evidence is unclear. We conducted a randomised controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of an e-STI testing and results service (chlamydia, gonorrhoea, HIV, and syphilis on STI testing uptake and STI cases diagnosed.The study took place in the London boroughs of Lambeth and Southwark. Between 24 November 2014 and 31 August 2015, we recruited 2,072 participants, aged 16-30 years, who were resident in these boroughs, had at least 1 sexual partner in the last 12 months, stated willingness to take an STI test, and had access to the internet. Those unable to provide consent and unable to read English were excluded. Participants were randomly allocated to receive 1 text message with the web link of an e-STI testing and results service (intervention group or to receive 1 text message with the web link of a bespoke website listing the locations, contact details, and websites of 7 local sexual health clinics (control group. Participants were free to use any other services or interventions during the study period. The primary outcomes were self-reported STI testing at 6 weeks, verified by patient record checks, and self-reported STI diagnosis at 6 weeks, verified by patient record checks. Secondary outcomes were the proportion of participants prescribed treatment for an STI, time from randomisation to completion of an STI test, and time from randomisation to treatment of an STI. Participants were sent a £10 cash incentive on submission of self-reported data. We

  12. A single-blinded randomised controlled study to determine the efficacy of Omnilux Revive facial treatment in skin rejuvenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Jaideep; Birch, Jan; Whitehurst, Colin; Lanigan, Sean W

    2005-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of Omnilux Revive facial treatment in skin rejuvenation, twenty-three volunteers received randomised 20 min treatments three times a week for three weeks to one half of their face, with the untreated side acting as control. Regular assessments were carried out, focusing on parameters of subject satisfaction, photographic assessments, skin elasticity (Cutometer) and skin hydration (Corneometer CM825). Ninety-one percent of the volunteers reported visible changes to their skin. Blinded photographic evaluation reported a clinical response in 59% of the subjects. Objective analysis failed to show statistically significant changes in skin hydration or elasticity. The Omnilux Revive LED lamp is a safe alternative non-ablative skin rejuvenation treatment.

  13. The Efficacy of Daily Prefrontal Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) for Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS): A Randomized Controlled Single-blind Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezaki, Yojiro; Badran, Bashar W; DeVries, William H; Moss, Jkeonye; Gonzales, Theresa; George, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a burning oral sensation without any corresponding abnormal findings. In some cases, BMS is refractory to pharmacologic treatments. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over left prefrontal cortex induces analgesic effect in both acute and chronic pain. However, its effect for BMS has not been evaluated. The aim of this randomized, controlled, single-blind study was to assess the efficacy of prefrontal rTMS for BMS. Twenty patients with BMS were recruited and randomized to receive 30,000 pulses in total at 10 Hz TMS (n = 12) or sham TMS (n = 8). We assessed the change of BMS pain condition, functional status and mood until 2 months after the beginning of treatment. In the real group, the BMS pain intensity decreased 67%, and 75% of the patients reported >50% pain decrease on final assessment compared to baseline, without heavy side effects. There was significant pain reduction in subjects in the real group immediately after 1 week of treatment, whereas there was none in those in the sham group. Similar tendency was confirmed in change of functional status. Mood and the affective aspect of pain were not changed in this study. BMS pain was significantly improved with 2 weeks of treatment of high frequency rTMS over left DLPFC compared to sham stimulation. Further study is needed to refine and improve TMS as a potential treatment of BMS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of photobiomodulation therapy and suprascapular nerve-pulsed radiofrequency in chronic shoulder pain: a randomized controlled, single-blind, clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ökmen, Burcu Metin; Ökmen, Korgün

    2017-11-01

    Shoulder pain can be difficult to treat due to its complex anatomic structure, and different treatment methods can be used. We aimed to examine the efficacy of photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) and suprascapular nerve (SSN)-pulsed radiofrequency (RF) therapy. In this prospective, randomized, controlled, single-blind study, 59 patients with chronic shoulder pain due to impingement syndrome received PBMT (group H) or SSN-pulsed RF therapy (group P) in addition to exercise therapy for 14 sessions over 2 weeks. Records were taken using visual analog scale (VAS), Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI), and Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) scoring systems for pretreatment (PRT), posttreatment (PST), and PST follow-up at months 1, 3, and 6. There was no statistically significant difference in initial VAS score, SPADI, and NHP values between group H and group P (p > 0.05). Compared to the values of PRT, PST, and PST at months 1, 3, and 6, VAS, SPADI, and NHP values were statistically significantly lower in both groups (p measurement times in VAS, SPADI, and NHP between the two groups. We established that PBMT and SSN-pulsed RF therapy are effective methods, in addition to exercise therapy, in patients with chronic shoulder pain. PBMT seems to be advantageous compared to SSN-pulsed RF therapy, as it is a noninvasive method.

  15. One-year follow-up of mud-bath therapy in patients with bilateral knee osteoarthritis: a randomized, single-blind controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioravanti, A.; Bacaro, G.; Giannitti, C.; Tenti, S.; Cheleschi, S.; Guidelli, G. M.; Pascarelli, N. A.; Galeazzi, M.

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this prospective parallel randomized single-blind study was to assess that a cycle of mud-bath therapy (MBT) provides any benefits over usual treatment in patients with bilateral knee osteoarthritis (OA). Patients with symptomatic primary bilateral knee OA, according to ACR criteria, were included in the study and randomized to one of two groups: one group received a cycle of MBT at spa center of Chianciano Terme (Italy) in addition to the usual treatment, and one group continued their regular care routine alone. Clinical assessments were performed 7 days before enrollment (screening visit), at the time of enrollment (basal time), after 2 weeks, and after 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after the beginning of the study. All assessments were conducted by two researchers blinded to treatment allocation. The primary efficacy outcomes were the global pain score evaluated by Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) subscore for physical function (W-TPFS). Of the 235 patients screened, 103 met the inclusion criteria: 53 patients were included in the MBT group and 50 in the control group. In the group of patients treated with MBT, we observed a statistically significant ( p knee OA that lasts over time. Mud-bath therapy can represent a useful backup to pharmacologic treatment of knee OA or a valid alternative for patients who do not tolerate pharmacological treatments.

  16. Bilateral and unilateral arm training improve motor function through differing neuroplastic mechanisms: a single-blinded randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitall, Jill; Waller, Sandy McCombe; Sorkin, John D; Forrester, Larry W; Macko, Richard F; Hanley, Daniel F; Goldberg, Andrew P; Luft, Andreas

    2011-02-01

    This randomized controlled trial tests the efficacy of bilateral arm training with rhythmic auditory cueing (BATRAC) versus dose-matched therapeutic exercises (DMTEs) on upper-extremity (UE) function in stroke survivors and uses functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine effects on cortical reorganization. A total of 111 adults with chronic UE paresis were randomized to 6 weeks (3×/week) of BATRAC or DMTE. Primary end points of UE assessments of Fugl-Meyer UE Test (FM) and modified Wolf Motor Function Test Time (WT) were performed 6 weeks prior to and at baseline, after training, and 4 months later. Pretraining and posttraining, fMRI for UE movement was evaluated in 17 BATRAC and 21 DMTE participants. The improvements in UE function (BATRAC: FM Δ = 1.1 + 0.5, P = .03; WT Δ = -2.6 + 0.8, P frontal gyrus (P < .05). Activation change in the latter was correlated with improvement in the WMFT (P = .01). BATRAC is not superior to DMTE, but both rehabilitation programs durably improve motor function for individuals with chronic UE hemiparesis and with varied deficit severity. Adaptations in brain activation are greater after BATRAC than DMTE, suggesting that given similar benefits to motor function, these therapies operate through different mechanisms.

  17. Randomised controlled single-blind study of conventional versus depot mydriatic drug delivery prior to cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madge Simon

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A prerequisite for safe cataract surgery is an adequately dilated pupil. The authors conducted a trial to assess the efficacy (in terms of pupil diameter of a depot method of pre-operative pupil dilatation, as compared with repeated instillations of drops (which is time-consuming for the nursing staff and uncomfortable for the patient. Methods A prospective randomised masked trial was conducted comprising 130 patients with no significant ocular history undergoing elective clear corneal phacoemulsification. 65 patients had mydriatic drops (Tropicamide 1%, Phenylephrine 2.5%, Diclofenac sodium 0.1% instilled prior to surgery, 65 had a wick soaked in the same drop mixture placed in the inferior fornix. Horizontal pupil diameters were recorded on a millimetre scale immediately prior to surgery. Results There was no significant difference in pupil size between the two groups (p = 0.255, Student's t-test. Conclusion There was no significant difference between the mydriasis obtained with the depot system compared with conventional drop application. Use of a depot mydriatic delivery system appears to be a safe and efficient method of drug delivery. Trial Registration International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number Register ISRCTN78047760

  18. Lithium trial in Alzheimer's disease: a randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter 10-week study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hampel, Harald

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: Lithium, a first-line drug for the treatment of bipolar depression, has recently been shown to regulate glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3), a kinase that is involved in the phosphorylation of the tau protein. Since hyperphosphorylation of tau is a core pathological feature in Alzheimer\\'s disease, lithium-induced inhibition of GSK-3 activity may have therapeutic effects in Alzheimer\\'s disease. In the current study, we tested the effect of short-term lithium treatment in patients with Alzheimer\\'s disease. METHOD: A total of 71 patients with mild Alzheimer\\'s disease (Mini-Mental State Examination score > or = 21 and < or = 26) were successfully randomly assigned to placebo (N = 38) or lithium treatment (N = 33) at 6 academic expert memory clinics. The 10-week treatment included a 6-week titration phase to reach the target serum level of lithium (0.5-0.8 mmol\\/L). The primary outcome measures were cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of phosphorylated tau (p-tau) and GSK-3 activity in lymphocytes. Secondary outcome measures were CSF concentration of total tau and beta-amyloid(1-42) (Abeta(1-42)), plasma levels of Abeta(1-42), Alzheimer\\'s Disease Assessment Scale (ADAS)-Cognitive summary scores, MMSE, and Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI). Patients were enrolled in the study from November 2004 to July 2005. RESULTS: No treatment effect on GSK-3 activity or CSF-based biomarker concentrations (P > .05) was observed. Lithium treatment did not lead to change in global cognitive performance as measured by the ADAS-Cog subscale (P = .11) or in depressive symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: The current results do not support the notion that lithium treatment may lead to reduced hyperphosphorylation of tau protein after a short 10-week treatment in the Alzheimer\\'s disease target population. TRIAL REGISTRATION: (Controlled-Trials.com) Identifier: ISRCTN72046462.

  19. A single dose of erythropoietin reduces perioperative transfusions in cardiac surgery: results of a prospective single-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltert, Luca; Rondinelli, Beatrice; Bello, Ricardo; Falco, Mauro; Bellisario, Alessandro; Maselli, Daniele; Turani, Franco; De Paulis, Ruggero; Pierelli, Luca

    2015-07-01

    We conducted a prospective single-blind randomized study to assess whether a single 80,000 IU dose of human recombinant erythropoietin (HRE), given just 2 days before cardiac surgery, could be effective in reducing perioperative allogeneic red blood cell transfusion (aRBCt). Six-hundred patients presenting with preoperative hemoglobin (Hb) level of not more than 14.5 g/dL were randomly assigned to either HRE or control. The primary endpoint was the incidence of perioperative aRBCt. The secondary endpoints were mortality and the incidence of adverse events in the first 45 days after surgery, Hb level on Postoperative Day 4, and number of units of RBC transfusions in the first 4 days after surgery. A total of 17% (HRE) versus 39% (control) required transfusion (relative risk, 0.436; pHRE (0%) and control (3.5%) among the patients with baseline Hb of 13.0 g/dL or more, which included the nonanemic fraction of the study population. The mean (range) Hb level on Postoperative Day 4 was 10.2 (9.9-10.6) g/dL (HRE) versus 8.7 (8.5-9.2) g/dL (control; pHRE (pHRE) versus 3.33% (control). The 45-day adverse event rate was 4.33% (HRE) versus 5.67% (control; both p=NS). In anemic patients (HbHRE administered 2 days before cardiac surgery is effective in reducing the incidence of aRBCt without increasing adverse events. © 2015 AABB.

  20. Functional weight-bearing mobilization after Achilles tendon rupture enhances early healing response: a single-blinded randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkering, Kars P; Aufwerber, Susanna; Ranuccio, Francesco; Lunini, Enricomaria; Edman, Gunnar; Ackermann, Paul W

    2017-06-01

    Functional weight-bearing mobilization may improve repair of Achilles tendon rupture (ATR), but the underlying mechanisms and outcome were unknown. We hypothesized that functional weight-bearing mobilization by means of increased metabolism could improve both early and long-term healing. In this prospective randomized controlled trial, patients with acute ATR were randomized to either direct post-operative functional weight-bearing mobilization (n = 27) in an orthosis or to non-weight-bearing (n = 29) plaster cast immobilization. During the first two post-operative weeks, 15°-30° of plantar flexion was allowed and encouraged in the functional weight-bearing mobilization group. At 2 weeks, patients in the non-weight-bearing cast immobilization group received a stiff orthosis, while the functional weight-bearing mobilization group continued with increased range of motion. At 6 weeks, all patients discontinued immobilization. At 2 weeks, healing metabolites and markers of procollagen type I (PINP) and III (PIIINP) were examined using microdialysis. At 6 and 12 months, functional outcome using heel-rise test was assessed. Healing tendons of both groups exhibited increased levels of metabolites glutamate, lactate, pyruvate, and of PIIINP (all p bearing mobilization group demonstrated significantly higher concentrations of glutamate compared to the non-weight-bearing cast immobilization group (p = 0.045).The upregulated glutamate levels were significantly correlated with the concentrations of PINP (r = 0.5, p = 0.002) as well as with improved functional outcome at 6 months (r = 0.4; p = 0.014). Heel-rise tests at 6 and 12 months did not display any differences between the two groups. Functional weight-bearing mobilization enhanced the early healing response of ATR. In addition, early ankle range of motion was improved without the risk of Achilles tendon elongation and without altering long-term functional outcome. The relationship between

  1. The Immediate Effects of Conventional Physical Therapy on the Knee Joint Load in Subjects with Moderate Knee Osteoarthritis; A Preliminary Single Blinded Randomized Control Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Fattahi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Subjects with knee osteoarthritis typically have higher knee adduction moment. Current research efforts are mainly focused on therapeutic procedures that potentially may modify disease progression. This preliminary study was designed as a single blind (examiner randomized control trial to investigate the impact of conventional physical therapy on pain, and knee joint load in subjects with moderate knee osteoarthritis. Methods: Twelve participants diagnosed with moderate knee OA were randomly assigned into control and intervention groups. Three-dimensional knee kinematic and kinetic data were recorded during the gait before and after 10 sessions of conventional physical therapy. In addition, pain intensity was evaluated by visual analog scale and pain subscale of KOOS questionnaire. The control group did not receive any intervention during the same period. Gait parameters were analyzed within and between groups using nonparametric tests. Results: There was a significant difference between groups in baseline KOOS-pain Score and ML knee force (P=0.048 and P=0.01. Immediately after ten sessions of physical therapy the initial (first peak of knee adduction moment was significantly (P=0.03 lower than that of the control group while the first and second peak of knee AP velocity were significantly (P=0.02, P=0.01 respectively higher. In the intervention group, the second peaks of vertical and anteroposterior (AP knee forces were strongly correlated with the pretest KOOS-pain Score (r=0.99 and r=0.98, P<0.001. Therefore a multivariate general linear model was adopted with adjustment to baseline KOOS-pain. By this adjustment, 51% alleviation of VAS pain score and 81% decrement of first peak of knee adduction moment in comparison to control group was statistically significant (P=0.02, P=0.03 respectively. Conclusion: It seems that ten sessions of conventional physical therapy may modify knee joint load in subjects with moderate knee

  2. Does addition of `mud-pack and hot pool treatment' to patient education make a difference in fibromyalgia patients? A randomized controlled single blind study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bağdatlı, Ali Osman; Donmez, Arif; Eröksüz, Rıza; Bahadır, Güler; Turan, Mustafa; Erdoğan, Nergis

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this randomized controlled single-blind study is to explore whether addition of mud-pack and hot pool treatments to patient education make a significant difference in short and mild term outcomes of the patients with fibromyalgia. Seventy women with fibromyalgia syndrome were randomly assigned to either balneotherapy with mud-pack and hot pool treatments (35) or control (35) groups. After randomization, five patients from balneotherapy group and five patients from control group were dropped out from the study with different excuses. All patients had 6-h patient education programme about fibromyalgia syndrome and were given a home exercise programme. The patients in balneotherapy group had heated pool treatment at 38 °C for 20 min a day, and mud-pack treatment afterwards on back region at 45 °C. Balneotherapy was applied on weekdays for 2 weeks. All patients continued to take their medical treatment. An investigator who was blinded to the intervention assessed all the patients before and after the treatment, at the first and the third months of follow-up. Outcome measures were FIQ, BDI and both patient's and physician's global assessments. Balneotherapy group was significantly better than control group at after the treatment and at the end of the first month follow-up assessments in terms of patient's and physician's global assessment, total FIQ score, and pain intensity, fatigue, non-refreshed awaking, stiffness, anxiety and depression subscales of FIQ. No significant difference was found between the groups in terms of BDI scores. It is concluded that patient education combined with 2 weeks balneotherapy application has more beneficial effects in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome as compared to patient education alone.

  3. Does addition of 'mud-pack and hot pool treatment' to patient education make a difference in fibromyalgia patients? A randomized controlled single blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bağdatlı, Ali Osman; Donmez, Arif; Eröksüz, Rıza; Bahadır, Güler; Turan, Mustafa; Erdoğan, Nergis

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this randomized controlled single-blind study is to explore whether addition of mud-pack and hot pool treatments to patient education make a significant difference in short and mild term outcomes of the patients with fibromyalgia. Seventy women with fibromyalgia syndrome were randomly assigned to either balneotherapy with mud-pack and hot pool treatments (35) or control (35) groups. After randomization, five patients from balneotherapy group and five patients from control group were dropped out from the study with different excuses. All patients had 6-h patient education programme about fibromyalgia syndrome and were given a home exercise programme. The patients in balneotherapy group had heated pool treatment at 38 °C for 20 min a day, and mud-pack treatment afterwards on back region at 45 °C. Balneotherapy was applied on weekdays for 2 weeks. All patients continued to take their medical treatment. An investigator who was blinded to the intervention assessed all the patients before and after the treatment, at the first and the third months of follow-up. Outcome measures were FIQ, BDI and both patient's and physician's global assessments. Balneotherapy group was significantly better than control group at after the treatment and at the end of the first month follow-up assessments in terms of patient's and physician's global assessment, total FIQ score, and pain intensity, fatigue, non-refreshed awaking, stiffness, anxiety and depression subscales of FIQ. No significant difference was found between the groups in terms of BDI scores. It is concluded that patient education combined with 2 weeks balneotherapy application has more beneficial effects in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome as compared to patient education alone.

  4. Spa therapy together with supervised self-mobilisation improves pain, function and quality of life in patients with chronic shoulder pain: a single-blind randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chary-Valckenaere, Isabelle; Loeuille, Damien; Jay, Nicolas; Kohler, François; Tamisier, Jean-Noë; Roques, Christian-François; Boulange, Michel; Gay, Gérard

    2018-06-01

    To determine whether spa therapy has a beneficial effect on pain and disability in patients with chronic shoulder pain, this single-blind randomised controlled clinical trial included patients with chronic shoulder pain due to miscellaneous conditions attending one of four spa centres as outpatients. Patients were randomised into two groups: spa therapy (18 days of standardised treatment combining thermal therapy together with supervised mobilisation in a thermal pool) and controls (spa therapy delayed for 6 months: `immediate versus delayed treatment' paradigm). All patients continued usual treatments during the 6-month follow-up period. The main endpoint was the mean change in the French-Quick DASH (F-QD) score at 6 months. The effect size of spa therapy was calculated, and the proportion of patients reaching minimal clinically important improvement (MCII) was compared. Secondary endpoints were the mean change in SF-36, treatment use and tolerance. One hundred eighty-six patients were included (94 patients as controls, 92 in the spa group) and analysed by intention to treat. At 6 months, the mean change in the F-QD score was statistically significantly greater among spa therapy patients than controls (- 32.6 versus - 8.15%; p < 0.001) with an effect size of 1.32 (95%CI: 0.97-1.68). A significantly greater proportion of spa therapy patients reached MCII (59.3 versus 17.9%). Spa therapy was well tolerated with a significant impact on SF-36 components but not on drug intake. Spa therapy provided a statistically significant benefit on pain, function and quality of life in patients with chronic shoulder pain after 6 months compared with usual care.

  5. Effects of fixed orthodontic treatment and two new mouth rinses on gingival health: A prospective cohort followed by a single-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobouti, Farhad; Rakhshan, Vahid; Heydari, Mohaddeseh; Keikavusi, Shohreh; Dadgar, Sepideh; Shariati, Mahsa

    2018-03-01

    Routine brushing protocols might not suffice to reduce the increased plaque accumulation in orthodontic patients. Antimicrobial mouth rinses are favorable in this regard. This two-phase study evaluated the effects of orthodontic treatment and the application of two mouthwashes not studied before on oral health indices. In this two-phase study (a prospective cohort followed by a parallel randomized controlled trial), plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), gingival bleeding index (GBI), and pocket probing depth (PPD) were measured in 54 orthodontic patients before orthodontic treatment and 4 months later. Then patients were randomized into three groups of mouthrinses: Persica (herbal), Ortho-Kin (containing diluted chlorhexidine), and Placebo (n=18×3). The effects of orthodontic treatment and mouthrinses were analyzed statistically (α=0.05). All the 4 indices increased between the baseline and 4th month of treatment (P values<0.01, paired t-test). They decreased back to baseline levels or below them, after one month of mouthwash application (P values<0.002). Both mouthwashes showed therapeutic effects compared to placebo in terms of PI and GBI. In the case of GI, only Persica showed significantly better results compared to placebo. Regarding PPD, only Ortho-Kin acted better than placebo (P values≤0.05, Tukey). Lack of positive control (regular chlorhexidine mouth rinse) and negative control (a group with no mouthwashes, even without the placebo). Lack of sample size predetermination based on a priori power calculations. The difference between the regime of Persica with that of Ortho-Kin and placebo (which had similar application protocols) disallowed perfectly effective blinding of the patients (hence, single-blind). Fixed orthodontic treatment might disrupt gingival health. Antimicrobial mouthwashes might reverse this. Both evaluated mouthwashes might have therapeutic effects. Copyright © 2018 CEO. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Impairment-oriented training or Bobath therapy for severe arm paresis after stroke: a single-blind, multicentre randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platz, T; Eickhof, C; van Kaick, S; Engel, U; Pinkowski, C; Kalok, S; Pause, M

    2005-10-01

    To study the effects of augmented exercise therapy time for arm rehabilitation as either Bobath therapy or the impairment-oriented training (Arm BASIS training) in stroke patients with arm severe paresis. Single blind, multicentre randomized control trial. Three inpatient neurorehabilitation centres. Sixty-two anterior circulation ischaemic stroke patients. Random assignment to three group: (A) no augmented exercise therapy time, (B) augmented exercise therapy time as Bobath therapy and (C) augmented exercise therapy time as Arm BASIS training. Fugl-Meyer arm motor score. Secondary measure: Action Research Arm Test (ARA). Ancillary measures: Fugl-Meyer arm sensation and joint motion/pain scores and the Ashworth Scale (elbow flexors). An overall effect of augmented exercise therapy time on Fugl-Meyer scores after four weeks was not corroborated (mean and 95% confidence interval (CI) of change scores: no augmented exercise therapy time (n=20) 8.8, 5.2-12.3; augmented exercise therapy time (n=40) 9.9, 6.8-13.9; p = 0.2657). The group who received the augmented exercise therapy time as Arm BASIS training (n=20) had, however, higher gains than the group receiving the augmented exercise therapy time as Bobath therapy (n=20) (mean and 95% CI of change scores: Bobath 7.2, 2.6-11.8; BASIS 12.6, 8.4-16.8; p = 0.0432). Passive joint motion/pain deteriorated less in the group who received BASIS training (mean and 95% CI of change scores: Bobath -3.2, -5.2 to -1.1; BASIS 0.1, -1.8-2.0; p = 0.0090). ARA, Fugl-Meyer arm sensation, and Ashworth Scale scores were not differentially affected. The augmented exercise therapy time as Arm BASIS training enhanced selective motor control. Type of training was more relevant for recovery of motor control than therapeutic time spent.

  7. No difference in terms of radiostereometric analysis between fixed- and mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty: a randomized, single-blind, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schotanus, M G M; Pilot, P; Kaptein, B L; Draijer, W F; Tilman, P B J; Vos, R; Kort, N P

    2017-09-01

    A concern that arises with any new prosthesis is whether it will achieve satisfactory long-term implant stability. The gold standard of assessing the quality of fixation in a new or relatively new implant is to undertake a randomized controlled trial using radiostereometric analysis. It was hypothesized that both mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty and fixed-bearing total knee arthroplasty have comparable migration patterns at 2-year follow-up. This study investigated two types of cemented total knee arthroplasty, the mobile- or fixed-bearing variant from the same family with use of radiostereometric analysis. This prospective, patient-blinded, randomized, controlled trial was designed to investigate early migration of the tibia component after two years of follow-up with use of radiostereometric analysis. A total of 50 patients were randomized to receive a mobile- or fixed-bearing TKA from the same family. Patients were evaluated during 2-year follow-up, including radiostereometric analysis, physical and clinical examination and patient reported outcome measures (PROMs). At two-year follow-up, the mean (±SD) maximum total point motion (MTPM) in the fixed-bearing group was 0.82 (±1.16) versus 0.92 mm (±0.64) in the mobile-bearing group (p = n.s) with the largest migration seen during the first 6 weeks (0.45 ± 0.32 vs. 0.54 ± 0.30). The clinical outcome and PROMs significantly improved within each group, not between both groups. Measuring early micromotion is useful for predicting clinical loosening that can lead to revision. The results of this study demonstrate that early migration of the mobile-bearing is similar to that of the fixed-bearing component at two years and was mainly seen in the first weeks after implantation. Randomized, single-blind, controlled trial, Level I.

  8. Effectiveness of the custom-mold room temperature vulcanizing silicone toe separator on hallux valgus: A prospective, randomized single-blinded controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadchavalpanichaya, Navaporn; Prakotmongkol, Voraluck; Polhan, Nattapong; Rayothee, Pitchaya; Seng-Iad, Sirirat

    2018-04-01

    Silicone toe separator is considered as a conservative treatment for hallux valgus. The prefabricated toe separator does not fit all. However, effectiveness in prescription of the custom-mold toe separator is still unknown. To investigate the effect of using a custom-mold room temperature vulcanizing silicone toe separator to decrease hallux valgus angle and hallux pain. The compliances, complications, and satisfactions of toe separator were also explored. A prospective, randomized single-blinded controlled trial. A total of 90 patients with a moderate degree of hallux valgus were enrolled in a study at the Foot Clinic, Siriraj Hospital, Thailand. Patients were randomized into two groups; the study group was prescribed a custom-mold room temperature vulcanizing silicone toe separator for 6 h per night for 12 months. Patients in both groups received proper foot care and shoes and were permitted to continue drug treatment. In total, 40 patients in the study group and 39 patients in the control group completed the study. The hallux valgus angle was obtained through radiographic measurement. At month 12, both groups had significant differences in mean hallux valgus angle with a decrease of 3.3° ± 2.4° for the study group and increase of 1.9° ± 1.9° for the control group. There were statistically significant differences of hallux valgus angle between the two groups ( p Hallux pain was decreased in the study group. A custom-mold room temperature vulcanizing silicone toe separator can decrease hallux valgus angle and pain with no serious complications. Clinical relevance The custom-mold room temperature vulcanizing silicone toe separator for treatment of hallux valgus reduces deformity and hallux pain.

  9. The effect of vitamin C and/or E supplementations on type 2 diabetic adult males under metformin treatment: A single-blinded randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Aal, Ali Abd; El-Ghffar, Eman A Abd; Ghali, Asmaa Abu; Zughbur, Mohammed R; Sirdah, Mahmoud M

    2018-03-16

    Recently, there has been an increasing interest in the influence of antioxidant vitamins on the efficacy of oral hypoglycemic therapy in type 2 diabetic patients (T2DM). This single-blinded randomized controlled clinical trial aimed to investigate the effect of vitamin C and/or E supplementation on the efficacy of oral hypoglycemic therapy in T2DM Palestinian male patients from the Gaza Strip. Forty T2DM male patients aged 40-60 years on metformin treatment were randomly divided into four groups, each group received an additional one of the following daily oral supplements for 90 days: placebo; vitamin C; vitamin E and vitamin C plus vitamin E. After overnight fasting, venous blood specimens were collected from all individuals into K3-EDTA tubes and serum tubes for measuring the biochemical and hematological parameters of the study at baseline and after 90 days of vitamins supplementation. The results revealed that vitamin C and/or E improve fasting blood sugar (FBS), HbA1c, lipid profile, insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), reduced glutathione (GSH); and Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index (QISCI) compared with diabetic patients group that received placebo. This study provided additional evidence on the beneficial effects of supplementing antioxidant vitamins in T2DM which could improve the clinical condition and attenuate or prevent diabetic pathogenesis and complications that, secondly to poor glycemic control, could attribute to the imbalance between the decline in the endogenous antioxidants and increasing production of the reactive oxygen species leading to the oxidant-mediated damage present in the diabetic context. Copyright © 2018 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A single-blind randomised controlled trial of the effects of a web-based decision aid on self-testing for cholesterol and diabetes. study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ickenroth Martine HP

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-tests, tests on body materials to detect medical conditions, are widely available to the general public. Self-testing does have advantages as well as disadvantages, and the debate on whether self-testing should be encouraged or rather discouraged is still ongoing. One of the concerns is whether consumers have sufficient knowledge to perform the test and interpret the results. An online decision aid (DA with information on self-testing in general, and test specific information on cholesterol and diabetes self-testing was developed. The DA aims to provide objective information on these self-tests as well as a decision support tool to weigh the pros and cons of self-testing. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of the online decision aid on knowledge on self-testing, informed choice, ambivalence and psychosocial determinants. Methods/Design A single blind randomised controlled trial in which the online decision aid 'zelftestwijzer' is compared to short, non-interactive information on self-testing in general. The entire trial will be conducted online. Participants will be selected from an existing Internet panel. Consumers who are considering doing a cholesterol or diabetes self-test in the future will be included. Outcome measures will be assessed directly after participants have viewed either the DA or the control condition. Weblog files will be used to record participants' use of the decision aid. Discussion Self-testing does have important pros and cons, and it is important that consumers base their decision whether they want to do a self-test or not on knowledge and personal values. This study is the first to evaluate the effect of an online decision aid for self-testing. Trial registration Dutch Trial Register: NTR3149

  11. The efficacy of early initiated, supervised, progressive resistance training compared to unsupervised, home-based exercise after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty: a single-blinded randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Peter B; Bogh, Søren B; Kierkegaard, Signe; Sørensen, Henrik; Odgaard, Anders; Søballe, Kjeld; Mechlenburg, Inger

    2017-01-01

    To examine if supervised progressive resistance training was superior to home-based exercise in rehabilitation after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. Single blinded, randomized clinical trial. Surgery, progressive resistance training and testing was carried out at Aarhus University Hospital and home-based exercise was carried out in the home of the patient. Fifty five patients were randomized to either progressive resistance training or home-based exercise. Patients were randomized to either progressive resistance training (home based exercise five days/week and progressive resistance training two days/week) or control group (home based exercise seven days/week). Preoperative assessment, 10-week (primary endpoint) and one-year follow-up were performed for leg extension power, spatiotemporal gait parameters and knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS). Forty patients (73%) completed 1-year follow-up. Patients in the progressive resistance training group participated in average 11 of 16 training sessions. Leg extension power increased from baseline to 10-week follow-up in progressive resistance training group (progressive resistance training: 0.28 W/kg, P= 0.01, control group: 0.01 W/kg, P=0.93) with no between-group difference. Walking speed and KOOS scores increased from baseline to 10-week follow-up in both groups with no between-group difference (six minutes walk test P=0.63, KOOS P>0.29). Progressive resistance training two days/week combined with home based exercise five days/week was not superior to home based exercise seven days/week in improving leg extension power of the operated leg.

  12. An interactive sports video game as an intervention for rehabilitation of community-living patients with schizophrenia: A controlled, single-blind, crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Nobuko; Umemura, Tomohiro; Matsunaga, Masahiro; Hirai, Takayoshi

    2017-01-01

    Hypofrontality is a state of decreased cerebral blood flow in the prefrontal cortex during executive function performance; it is commonly observed in patients with schizophrenia. Cognitive dysfunction, as well as the psychological symptoms of schizophrenia, influences the ability of patients to reintegrate into society. The current study investigated the effects of an interactive sports video game (IVG; Nintendo Wii™ Sports Resort) on frontal lobe function of patients with schizophrenia. A sample of eight patients (6 male and 2 female; mean age = 46.7 years, standard deviation (SD) = 13.7) engaged in an IVG every week for 3 months in a controlled, single-blind, crossover study. Before and after the intervention we examined frontal lobe blood-flow volume using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), and assessed functional changes using the Frontal Assessment Battery, Health-Related Quality of Life scale, and behaviorally-assessed physical function tests. fNIRS revealed that prefrontal activity during IVG performance significantly increased in the IVG period compared with the control period. Furthermore, significant correlations between cerebral blood flow changes in different channels were observed during IVG performance. In addition, we observed intervention-related improvement in health-related quality of life following IVG. IVG intervention was associated with increased prefrontal cortex activation and improved health-related quality of life performance in patients with schizophrenia. Patients with chronic schizophrenia are characterized by withdrawal and a lack of social responsiveness or interest in others. Interventions using IVG may provide a useful low-cost rehabilitation method for such patients, without the need for specialized equipment.

  13. An interactive sports video game as an intervention for rehabilitation of community-living patients with schizophrenia: A controlled, single-blind, crossover study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuko Shimizu

    Full Text Available Hypofrontality is a state of decreased cerebral blood flow in the prefrontal cortex during executive function performance; it is commonly observed in patients with schizophrenia. Cognitive dysfunction, as well as the psychological symptoms of schizophrenia, influences the ability of patients to reintegrate into society. The current study investigated the effects of an interactive sports video game (IVG; Nintendo Wii™ Sports Resort on frontal lobe function of patients with schizophrenia. A sample of eight patients (6 male and 2 female; mean age = 46.7 years, standard deviation (SD = 13.7 engaged in an IVG every week for 3 months in a controlled, single-blind, crossover study. Before and after the intervention we examined frontal lobe blood-flow volume using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS, and assessed functional changes using the Frontal Assessment Battery, Health-Related Quality of Life scale, and behaviorally-assessed physical function tests. fNIRS revealed that prefrontal activity during IVG performance significantly increased in the IVG period compared with the control period. Furthermore, significant correlations between cerebral blood flow changes in different channels were observed during IVG performance. In addition, we observed intervention-related improvement in health-related quality of life following IVG. IVG intervention was associated with increased prefrontal cortex activation and improved health-related quality of life performance in patients with schizophrenia. Patients with chronic schizophrenia are characterized by withdrawal and a lack of social responsiveness or interest in others. Interventions using IVG may provide a useful low-cost rehabilitation method for such patients, without the need for specialized equipment.

  14. Supportive text messages for patients with alcohol use disorder and a comorbid depression: a protocol for a single-blind randomised controlled aftercare trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnett, Dan; Murphy, Edel; Kehoe, Elizabeth; Agyapong, Vincent; McLoughlin, Declan M; Farren, Conor

    2017-05-29

    Alcohol use disorders (AUDs) and mood disorders commonly co-occur, and are associated with a range of negative outcomes for patients. Mobile phone technology has the potential to provide personalised support for such patients and potentially improve outcomes in this difficult-to-treat cohort. The aim of this study is to examine whether receiving supporting SMS text messages, following discharge from an inpatient dual diagnosis treatment programme, has a positive impact on mood and alcohol abstinence in patients with an AUD and a comorbid mood disorder. The present study is a single-blind randomised controlled trial. Patients aged 18-70 years who meet the criteria for both alcohol dependency syndrome/alcohol abuse and either major depressive disorder or bipolar disorder according to the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV Axis I will be randomised to receive twice-daily supportive SMS text messages for 6 months plus treatment as usual, or treatment as usual alone, and will be followed-up at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months postdischarge. Primary outcome measures will include changes from baseline in cumulative abstinence duration, which will be expressed as the proportion of days abstinent from alcohol in the preceding 90 days, and changes from baseline in Beck Depression Inventory scores. The trial has received full ethical approval from the St. Patrick's Hospital Research Ethics Committee (protocol 13/14). Results of the trial will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journal articles and at academic conferences. NCT02404662; Pre-results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. The effect of instruction in analgesic use compared with neuromuscular exercise on knee-joint load in patients with knee osteoarthritis: a randomized, single-blind, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsgaard-Larsen, A; Clausen, B; Søndergaard, J; Christensen, R; Andriacchi, T P; Roos, E M

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the effect of a neuro-muscular exercise (NEMEX) therapy program compared with instructions in optimized analgesics and anti-inflammatory drug use (PHARMA), on measures of knee-joint load in people with mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis (OA). We hypothesized that knee joint loading during walking would be reduced by NEMEX and potentially increased by PHARMA. Single-blind, randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing NEMEX therapy twice a week with PHARMA. Participants with mild-to-moderate medial tibiofemoral knee OA were randomly allocated (1:1) to one of two 8-week treatments. Primary outcome was change in knee load during walking (Knee Index, a composite score from all three planes based on 3D movement analysis) after 8 weeks of intervention. Secondary outcomes were frontal plane peak knee adduction moment (KAM), Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Scores (KOOS) and functional performance tests. Ninety three participants (57% women, 58 ± 8 years with a body mass index [BMI] of 27 ± 4 kg/m 2 (mean ± standard deviation [SD])) were randomized to NEMEX group (n = 47) or PHARMA (n = 46); data from 44 (94%) and 41 (89%) participants respectively, were available at follow-up. 49% of the participants in NEMEX and only 7% in PHARMA demonstrated good compliance. We found no difference in the primary outcome as evaluated by the Knee Index -0.07 [-0.17; 0.04] Nm/%BW HT. Secondary outcomes largely supported this finding. We found no difference in the primary outcome; knee joint load change during walking from a NEMEX program vs information on the recommended use of analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01638962 (July 3, 2012). Ethical Committee: S-20110153. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The SyBil-AA real-time fMRI neurofeedback study: protocol of a single-blind randomized controlled trial in alcohol use disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerchen, Martin Fungisai; Kirsch, Martina; Bahs, Nathalie; Halli, Patrick; Gerhardt, Sarah; Schäfer, Axel; Sommer, Wolfgang H; Kiefer, Falk; Kirsch, Peter

    2018-01-17

    Alcohol Use Disorder is a highly prevalent mental disorder which puts a severe burden on individuals, families, and society. The treatment of Alcohol Use Disorder is challenging and novel and innovative treatment approaches are needed to expand treatment options. A promising neuroscience-based intervention method that allows targeting cortical as well as subcortical brain processes is real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging neurofeedback. However, the efficacy of this technique as an add-on treatment of Alcohol Use Disorder in a clinical setting is hitherto unclear and will be assessed in the Systems Biology of Alcohol Addiction (SyBil-AA) neurofeedback study. N = 100 patients with Alcohol Use Disorder will be randomized to 5 parallel groups in a single-blind fashion and receive real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging neurofeedback while they are presented pictures of alcoholic beverages. The groups will either downregulate the ventral striatum, upregulate the right inferior frontal gyrus, negatively modulate the connectivity between these regions, upregulate, or downregulate the auditory cortex as a control region. After receiving 3 sessions of neurofeedback training within a maximum of 2 weeks, participants will be followed up monthly for a period of 3 months and relapse rates will be assessed as the primary outcome measure. The results of this study will provide insights into the efficacy of real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging neurofeedback training in the treatment of Alcohol Use Disorder as well as in the involved brain systems. This might help to identify predictors of successful neurofeedback treatment which could potentially be useful in developing personalized treatment approaches. The study was retrospectively registered in the German Clinical Trials Register (trial identifier: DRKS00010253 ; WHO Universal Trial Number (UTN): U1111-1181-4218) on May 10th, 2016.

  17. The Effect of G-ORS Along With Rice Soup in the Treatment of Acute Diarrhea in Children: A Single-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kianmehr, Mojtaba; Saber, Ashraf; Moshari, Jalil; Ahmadi, Reza; Basiri-Moghadam, Mahdi

    2016-06-01

    The world health organization guidelines for treatment of diarrhea in children emphasize on continued feeding together with prescription of oral rehydration solution (ORS) and supplementary zinc therapy. However, conflicting viewpoints exist regarding the optimal diet and dietary ingredients for children with diarrhea. Moreover, few studies have investigated the effect of rice soup along with ORS in the treatment of this disease. This study aimed to explore effects of simultaneous taking of glucose oral rehydration solution (G-ORS) and rice soup in the treatment of acute diarrhea in 8 to 24-month-old children. This single-blind controlled clinical trial was conducted in the pediatric ward of 22nd of Bahman hospital, Gonabad, Iran between June 2013 and February 2014. Forty children aged 8-24 months with acute diarrhea were randomly assigned into an intervention group (G-ORS plus rice soup group) comprising 20 babies and a control group (G-ORS) of 20 children based on balanced blocking randomization. The variables under investigation were diarrhea duration, patient hospitalization, need for intravenous (IV) fluids and stool output frequency. Data was analyzed using independent samples t and chi-square test. At the end of study, the time for treating acute watery diarrhea in the intervention and control groups were 21.10 ± 8.81 and 34.55 ± 5.82 hours (P < 0.001) and hospital stay were 34.05 ± 6.62 and 40.20 ± 6.32 hours (P = 0.005). Moreover, stool output frequency were 4.20 ± 0.95 and 8.00 ± 1.37 (P < 0.001) in the first 24 hours, and 2.18 ± 0.60 and 2.80 ± 0.76 (P = 0.03) in the second 24 hours of treatment in intervention and control groups, respectively. Rice soup regimen was highly effective and inexpensive in the treatment of acute diarrhea in children. Thus, in addition to the common treatment by G-ORS, rice soup can be consumed simultaneously with G-ORS.

  18. Effect of Pet Insects on the Psychological Health of Community-Dwelling Elderly People: A Single-Blinded, Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hae-Jin; Youn, Chang-Ho; Kim, Seong-Hyun; Kim, So-Yun

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that animal-assisted therapy has positive effects on mental health, especially in elderly people. Caring for insects is easy, relatively inexpensive, and does not require much space. The aim of this 8-week randomized, controlled, single-blinded study was to investigate the effect of pet insects on the psychological health of community-dwelling elderly people. Elderly subjects (≥65 years old) attending a community center in Daegu, Korea, were enrolled in the study between April and May 2014 and randomized at a 1:1 ratio to receive insect therapy and health advice or only health advice. The insect group received 5 crickets in a cage with sufficient fodder and a detailed instruction manual. At baseline and at 8 weeks, all subjects underwent psychometric tests via a direct interview [Beck Anxiety Inventory, Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15), Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, Insomnia Severity Index, Fatigue Severity Scale, and Brief Encounter Psychosocial Instrument] and laboratory analyses of inflammatory and oxidative stress markers (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, biological antioxidant potential, and derivatives of reactive oxygen metabolites). The insect-caring (n = 46) and control (n = 48) groups did not differ in baseline characteristics. The insect-caring group had significantly lower GDS-15 scores at week 8 (3.20 vs. 4.90, p = 0.004) and, after adjustment for baseline values, a significantly greater change in GDS-15 scores relative to baseline (-1.12 vs. 0.20, p = 0.011). They also had a significantly greater change in MMSE scores relative to baseline (1.13 vs. 0.31, p = 0.045). The two groups did not differ in terms of other psychometric and laboratory tests. No serious risks or adverse events were reported. Caring for insects, which is cost-effective and safe, was associated with a small to medium positive effect on depression and cognitive function in community

  19. Comparison of the effectiveness of orthotic intervention, kinesiotaping, and paraffin treatments in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome: A single-blind and randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansiz Kaplan, Basak; Akyuz, Gulseren; Kokar, Serdar; Yagci, Ilker

    2018-02-17

    The aim of the study was to compare different conservative treatments in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). A single-blind randomized controlled study. Patients (n = 169) diagnosed with mild or moderate CTS were screened; 110 met study requirements. The patients were randomized into 3 groups. The control (CON) comparison provided to all patients was a fabricated night orthotic which held the wrist in a neutral position. The second group received adjunctive kinesiotaping (KIN) and the third group received paraffin (PARA). All patients were evaluated clinically, electrophysiologically, and ultrasonographically before treatment and at 3 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months. There were 36 patients in CON, 37 in KIN, and 37 in PARA. Pain reduction in KIN was better than the other groups at 3 weeks (mean difference [MD] in CON 2.4 ± 2.5, KIN 3.7 ± 2.0, PARA 2.7 ± 2.3; P < .01) and 6 months (MD in CON 3.4 ± 3.0, KIN 4.9 ± 3.1, PARA 3.7 ± 2.9; P < .05). KIN pain reduction was better than CON at 3 months (MD in CON 3.8 ± 2.8, KIN 5.0 ± 2.5; P < .05). Reduction of the cross-sectional area of median nerve at the level of radioulnar joint was greater for KIN than CON at 3 weeks (MD in CON 0.0 ± 0.5, KIN 0.3 ± 0.7; P < .01) than PARA at 3 months (MD in KIN 0.3 ± 0.8, PARA 0.0 ± 0.8; P < .05) and both groups at 6 months (MD in CON 0.1 ± 0.8, KIN 0.5 ± 0.9, PARA 0.0 ± 1.0 P < .05). Adding KIN to night use of an orthotic was more effective in achieving symptomatic and structural improvements than either the orthotic alone or adjunctive use of paraffin in patients with mild and moderate CTS. Copyright © 2018 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of novel inhaler technique reminder labels on the retention of inhaler technique skills in asthma: a single-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basheti, Iman A; Obeidat, Nathir M; Reddel, Helen K

    2017-02-09

    Inhaler technique can be corrected with training, but skills drop off quickly without repeated training. The aim of our study was to explore the effect of novel inhaler technique labels on the retention of correct inhaler technique. In this single-blind randomized parallel-group active-controlled study, clinical pharmacists enrolled asthma patients using controller medication by Accuhaler [Diskus] or Turbuhaler. Inhaler technique was assessed using published checklists (score 0-9). Symptom control was assessed by asthma control test. Patients were randomized into active (ACCa; THa) and control (ACCc; THc) groups. All patients received a "Show-and-Tell" inhaler technique counseling service. Active patients also received inhaler labels highlighting their initial errors. Baseline data were available for 95 patients, 68% females, mean age 44.9 (SD 15.2) years. Mean inhaler scores were ACCa:5.3 ± 1.0; THa:4.7 ± 0.9, ACCc:5.5 ± 1.1; THc:4.2 ± 1.0. Asthma was poorly controlled (mean ACT scores ACCa:13.9 ± 4.3; THa:12.1 ± 3.9; ACCc:12.7 ± 3.3; THc:14.3 ± 3.7). After training, all patients had correct technique (score 9/9). After 3 months, there was significantly less decline in inhaler technique scores for active than control groups (mean difference: Accuhaler -1.04 (95% confidence interval -1.92, -0.16, P = 0.022); Turbuhaler -1.61 (-2.63, -0.59, P = 0.003). Symptom control improved significantly, with no significant difference between active and control patients, but active patients used less reliever medication (active 2.19 (SD 1.78) vs. control 3.42 (1.83) puffs/day, P = 0.002). After inhaler training, novel inhaler technique labels improve retention of correct inhaler technique skills with dry powder inhalers. Inhaler technique labels represent a simple, scalable intervention that has the potential to extend the benefit of inhaler training on asthma outcomes. REMINDER LABELS IMPROVE INHALER TECHNIQUE: Personalized

  1. GAME (Goals - Activity - Motor Enrichment): protocol of a single blind randomised controlled trial of motor training, parent education and environmental enrichment for infants at high risk of cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Catherine; Novak, Iona; Dale, Russell C; Guzzetta, Andrea; Badawi, Nadia

    2014-10-07

    Cerebral palsy is the most common physical disability of childhood and early detection is possible using evidence based assessments. Systematic reviews indicate early intervention trials rarely demonstrate efficacy for improving motor outcomes but environmental enrichment interventions appear promising. This study is built on a previous pilot study and has been designed to assess the effectiveness of a goal - oriented motor training and enrichment intervention programme, "GAME", on the motor outcomes of infants at very high risk of cerebral palsy (CP) compared with standard community based care. A two group, single blind randomised controlled trial (n = 30) will be conducted. Eligible infants are those diagnosed with CP or designated "at high risk of CP" on the basis of the General Movements Assessment and/or abnormal neuroimaging. A physiotherapist and occupational therapist will deliver home-based GAME intervention at least fortnightly until the infant's first birthday. The intervention aims to optimize motor function and engage parents in developmental activities aimed at enriching the home learning environment. Primary endpoint measures will be taken 16 weeks after intervention commences with the secondary endpoint at 12 months and 24 months corrected age. The primary outcome measure will be the Peabody Developmental Motor Scale second edition. Secondary outcomes measures include the Gross Motor Function Measure, Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Affordances in the Home Environment for Motor Development - Infant Scale, and the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Parent well-being will be monitored using the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale. This paper presents the background, design and intervention protocol of a randomised trial of a goal driven, motor learning approach with customised environmental interventions and parental education for young infants at high risk of cerebral palsy. This trial is registered on the Australian

  2. Advanced Cardiac Resuscitation Evaluation (ACRE: A randomised single-blind controlled trial of peer-led vs. expert-led advanced resuscitation training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hughes Thomas C

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advanced resuscitation skills training is an important and enjoyable part of medical training, but requires small group instruction to ensure active participation of all students. Increases in student numbers have made this increasingly difficult to achieve. Methods A single-blind randomised controlled trial of peer-led vs. expert-led resuscitation training was performed using a group of sixth-year medical students as peer instructors. The expert instructors were a senior and a middle grade doctor, and a nurse who is an Advanced Life Support (ALS Instructor. A power calculation showed that the trial would have a greater than 90% chance of rejecting the null hypothesis (that expert-led groups performed 20% better than peer-led groups if that were the true situation. Secondary outcome measures were the proportion of High Pass grades in each groups and safety incidents. The peer instructors designed and delivered their own course material. To ensure safety, the peer-led groups used modified defibrillators that could deliver only low-energy shocks. Blinded assessment was conducted using an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE. The checklist items were based on International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR guidelines using Ebel standard-setting methods that emphasised patient and staff safety and clinical effectiveness. The results were analysed using Exact methods, chi-squared and t-test. Results A total of 132 students were randomised: 58 into the expert-led group, 74 into the peer-led group. 57/58 (98% of students from the expert-led group achieved a Pass compared to 72/74 (97% from the peer-led group: Exact statistics confirmed that it was very unlikely (p = 0.0001 that the expert-led group was 20% better than the peer-led group. There were no safety incidents, and High Pass grades were achieved by 64 (49% of students: 33/58 (57% from the expert-led group, 31/74 (42% from the peer-led group. Exact

  3. Tourniquet application after local forearm warming to improve venodilation for peripheral intravenous cannulation in young and middle-aged adults: A single-blind prospective randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagami, Yuki; Tomita, Kohei; Tsujimoto, Tomomi; Inoue, Tomoko

    2017-07-01

    Local forearm warming before tourniquet application is often used to promote venodilation for peripheral intravenous cannulation; however, few studies have compared the effect of tourniquet application with and without local warming on vein size. To evaluate the effectiveness of tourniquet application after local forearm warming with that of tourniquet application alone in young and middle-aged adults. A single-blind, prospective, parallel group, randomized controlled trial. A national university in Japan. Seventy-two volunteers aged 20-64 years. Participants were randomly allocated to one of two groups: tourniquet application for 30s after forearm application of a heat pack warmed to 40°C±2°C for 15min (active warming group; n=36) or tourniquet application for 30s after applying a non-warmed heat pack for 15min (passive warming group; n=36). The primary outcomes were vein cross-sectional area on the forearm, measured after the intervention by blinded research assistants using ultrasound. Secondary outcomes were shortest diameter, and longest diameter of vein on the forearm, forearm skin temperature, body temperature, pulse, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure. All outcomes were assessed at the same site before and immediately after the intervention, once per participant. Vein cross-sectional area, shortest vein diameter, and longest vein diameter were significantly increased in the active warming group compared with the passive warming group (p application after local warming was superior to tourniquet application alone in increasing vein cross-sectional, shortest diameter, and longest diameter (between-group differences of 2.2mm 2 , 0.5mm, and 0.5mm, respectively), and in raising skin temperature (between-group difference: 5.2°C). However, there were no significant differences in body temperature, pulse, or systolic or diastolic blood pressure between the groups. There were no adverse events associated with either intervention. Tourniquet

  4. Effects of chair yoga therapy on physical fitness in patients with psychiatric disorders: A 12-week single-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikai, Saeko; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Mizuno, Yuya; Tani, Hideaki; Nagaoka, Maki; Tsunoda, Kenichi; Mimura, Masaru; Suzuki, Takefumi

    2017-11-01

    Since falls may lead to fractures and have serious, potentially fatal outcomes, prevention of falls is an urgent public health issue. We examined the effects of chair yoga therapy on physical fitness among psychiatric patients in order to reduce the risk of falls, which has not been previously reported in the literature. In this 12-week single-blind randomized controlled trial with a 6-week follow-up, inpatients with mixed psychiatric diagnoses were randomly assigned to either chair yoga therapy in addition to ongoing treatment, or treatment-as-usual. Chair yoga therapy was conducted as twice-weekly 20-min sessions over 12 weeks. Assessments included anteflexion in sitting, degree of muscle strength, and Modified Falls Efficacy Scale (MFES) as well as QOL, psychopathology and functioning. Fifty-six inpatients participated in this study (36 men; mean ± SD age, 55.3 ± 13.7 years; schizophrenia 87.5%). In the chair yoga group, significant improvements were observed in flexibility, hand-grip, lower limb muscle endurance, and MFES at week 12 (mean ± SD: 55.1 ± 16.6 to 67.2 ± 14.0 cm, 23.6 ± 10.6 to 26.8 ± 9.7 kg, 4.9 ± 4.0 to 7.0 ± 3.9 kg, and 114.9 ± 29.2 to 134.1 ± 11.6, respectively). Additionally, these improvements were observable six weeks after the intervention was over. The QOL-VAS improved in the intervention group while no differences were noted in psychopathology and functioning between the groups. The intervention appeared to be highly tolerable without any notable adverse effects. The results indicated sustainable effects of 20-min, 12-week, 24-session chair yoga therapy on physical fitness. Chair yoga therapy may contribute to reduce the risk of falls and their unwanted consequences in psychiatric patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effectiveness of a low-cost virtual reality system for children with developmental delay: a preliminary randomised single-blind controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Yasser; Gropack, Stacy Jaffee; Coffin, Dale; Godwin, Ellen M

    2012-09-01

    Physical and occupational therapists have started to use the Nintendo Wii™ gaming system with adults and children as part of their regular treatment. Despite the growing use of the Wii and trend towards evidence-based practice, limited evidence is available on the effectiveness of virtual reality using the Wii for children with developmental delay. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of a low-cost gaming system for young children with developmental delay. Single-blind, randomised controlled trial. Forty children with developmental delay (age 39 to 58 months) who attended a segregated or integrated preschool participated in this study. All children's parents read and signed an informed consent form approved by the institutional review board. Children were assigned at random to an experimental (Wii) group (n=20) or a control group (n=20). Two weekly sessions for 10 weeks using Nintendo Wii Sports™ and Nintendo Wii Fit™, including balance, strength training and aerobics games. Participants were evaluated 1 week before and 1 week after the programme by a blinded investigator. Primary outcomes were gait speed, timed up and go test, single leg stance test, five-times-sit-to-stand test, timed up and down stairs test, 2-minute walk test and grip strength. The Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) was used to assess gross motor skills. The two groups were homogenous regarding all parameters at baseline. The Wii training was feasible and enjoyable for those in the experimental group. There were no adverse effects or injuries reported over 267 training sessions. Comparison of groups following the intervention indicated that the experimental group showed significant improvements compared with the control group in single leg stance test {mean difference 1.03 [standard deviation (SD) 1.7], 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.2 to 1.9; P=0.017}, right grip strength [mean difference 1.11 (SD 1.84), 95% CI 0.15 to 2.06; P=0

  6. Changes in co-contraction during stair descent after manual therapy protocol in knee osteoarthritis: A pilot, single-blind, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Montecinos, Carlos; Flores-Cartes, Rodrigo; Montt-Rodriguez, Agustín; Pozo, Esteban; Besoaín-Saldaña, Alvaro; Horment-Lara, Giselle

    2016-10-01

    Manual therapy has shown clinical results in patients with knee osteoarthritis. However, the biomechanical aspects during functional tasks have not been explored in depth. Through surface electromyography, the medial and lateral co-contractions of the knee were measured while descending stairs, prior and posterior to applying a manual therapy protocol in the knee, with emphasis on techniques of joint mobilization and soft-tissue management. Sixteen females with slight or moderate knee osteoarthritis were recruited (eight experimental, eight control). It was observed that the lateral co-contraction index of the experimental group, posterior to intervention, increased by 11.7% (p = 0.014). The application of a manual therapy protocol with emphasis on techniques of joint mobilization and soft-tissue management modified lateral co-contraction, which would have a protective effect on the joint. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Efficacy of Treatment of Different Intervention Programs for Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome–A Single Blinded Randomized Clinical Trial. Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feazadeh Avraham

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Patello-femoral pain syndrome (PFPS is a common knee joint disability. The integration of hip soft tissue regimens are not always emphasized, although current literature implies that there is a significant relationship between the two and there is a lack of randomized clinical trials to substantiate this relationship in clinical practice. A randomized controlled assessor blinded trial was designed to explore different rehabilitation programs related to PFPS. The study was conducted at RAZIEL institute of physical therapy, Netania, Israel with a total of 30 consecutive patients (mean age 35y, diagnosed with PFPS. All patients were randomly allocated into 3 groups. Group I conventional knee rehabilitation program. Included quadriceps strengthening and Trans Electric Neuromuscular Stimulation (TENS. Group II hip oriented rehabilitation program. included stretching, Hip external rotators strengthening and TENS. Group III a combination of the two above programs. Pain and function were documented on initial of the program and again 3 weeks later, on the completion. Pain was assessed by a numeric visual analogue scale (VAS; function was assessed by Patello-femoral joint evaluation scale (PFJES (0-100 points. At end of trial, all groups showed significant improvements in VAS and PFJES (p<0.0001; these improvements did not vary significantly between the 3 groups. The conclusions were that the explored different rehabilitation programs showed a similar beneficial effect.

  8. Short-term therapy with combination dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor saxagliptin/metformin extended release (XR) is superior to saxagliptin or metformin XR monotherapy in prediabetic women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a single-blind, randomized, pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkind-Hirsch, Karen E; Paterson, Martha S; Seidemann, Ericka L; Gutowski, Hanh C

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate efficacy with the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor saxagliptin (SAXA), metformin extended release (MET), and combination (SAXA-MET) in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and impaired glucose regulation. Prospective, randomized, single-blind drug study. Outpatient clinic. Patients (n = 38) with PCOS (aged 18-42 years) and prediabetic hyperglycemia determined by a 75-gram oral glucose tolerance test. Patients were randomized to SAXA-MET (5 mg/2,000 mg), SAXA (5 mg), or MET (2,000 mg) for 16 weeks. Fasting and mean blood glucose, insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, and insulin secretion-sensitivity index (IS-SI) by oral glucose tolerance tests. Free androgen index and lipid levels, average menstrual interval, and anthropometric measurements (body mass index, waist circumference, and waist/height ratio). The study was completed by 34 patients. Nineteen patients had normal glucose tolerance: 3 of 12 (25%) on MET; 6 of 11 (55%) on SAXA; and 10 of 11 (91%) on SAXA-MET (SAXA-MET statistically superior to MET) at study completion. Body mass index, waist circumference, waist/height ratio, free androgen index, insulin sensitivity, IS-SI, and menses improved in all groups; however, IS-SI and menstrual regularity were significantly better with SAXA-MET vs. MET treatment. Triglyceride, triglyceride/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio and mean blood glucose significantly declined in the SAXA-MET and SAXA groups only. This pilot work provides the first evidence regarding the effects of a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor alone and in combination with MET in this patient population. Treatment with SAXA-MET was superior to either drug alone in terms of clinical and metabolic benefits in prediabetic patients with PCOS. NCT02022007. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Dispatcher-assisted compression-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation provides best quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation by laypersons: A randomised controlled single-blinded manikin trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spelten, Oliver; Warnecke, Tobias; Wetsch, Wolfgang A; Schier, Robert; Böttiger, Bernd W; Hinkelbein, Jochen

    2016-08-01

    High-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by laypersons is a key determinant of both outcome and survival for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Dispatcher-assisted CPR (telephone-CPR, T-CPR) increases the frequency and correctness of bystander-CPR but results in prolonged time to first chest compressions. However, it remains unclear whether instructions for rescue ventilation and/or chest compressions should be recommended for dispatcher-assisted CPR. The aim of this study was to evaluate both principles of T-CPR with respect to CPR quality. Randomised controlled single-blinded manikin trial. University Hospital of Cologne, Germany, 1 July 2012 to 30 September 2012. Sixty laypersons between 18 and 65 years. Medically educated individuals, medical professionals and pregnant women were excluded. Participants were asked to resuscitate a manikin and were randomised into three groups: not dispatcher-assisted (uninstructed) CPR (group 1; U-CPR; n = 20), dispatcher-assisted compression-only CPR (group 2; DACO-CPR; n = 19) and full dispatcher-assisted CPR with rescue ventilation (group 3; DAF-CPR; n = 19). Specific parameters of CPR quality [i.e. no-flow-time (NFT) as well as compression and ventilation parameters] were analysed. To compare different groups we used Student's t test and P less than 0.05 was considered significant. Initial NFT was lowest in the DACO-CPR group (mean 21.3 ± 14.4%), followed by dispatcher-assisted full CPR (mean 49.1 ± 8.5%) and by unassisted CPR (mean 55.0 ± 12.9%). Initial NFT covering the time of instruction was lower in DACO-CPR (12.1 ± 5.4%) as compared to dispatcher-assisted full CPR (20.7 ± 8.1%). Compression depth was similar in all three groups: 40.6 ± 13.0 mm (unassisted CPR), 41.0 ± 12.2 mm (DACO-CPR) and 38.8 ± 15.8 mm (dispatcher-assisted full CPR). Average compression frequency was highest in the DACO-CPR group (65.2 ± 22.4 min) compared with the unassisted CPR

  10. Can shielded brackets reduce mucosa alteration and increase comfort perception in orthodontic patients in the first 3 days of treatment? A single-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Lívia Pereira Brocos; de Oliveira, Augusto Henrique Alves; da Silva, Hillionne Ferreira; de Oliveira, Patrícia Teixeira; dos Santos, Patrícia Bittencourt Dutra; Pinheiro, Fabio Henrique de Sá Leitão

    2015-12-01

    Orthodontic patients can experience pain and discomfort on the oral mucosa from trauma caused by friction with the brackets and the wires. In this split-mouth design, single-blind randomized controlled trial, we aimed to investigate whether brackets with a self-snapping customized plastic shield would induce less mucosa alteration and discomfort than those without the shield. The overall sample comprised 42 patients (22 female, 20 male) from a government-funded orthodontic practice, with a mean age of 16.7 years. Eligibility criteria included, among others, no history of mouth ulcers or systemic diseases. Customized shields for the maxillary and mandibular brackets were fabricated and inserted on one side of the mouth. The null hypothesis was that bracket shielding would have no advantage. The primary outcomes were mucosal and discomfort assessments. As the secondary outcome, the numbers of spontaneous detachments of the shields were reported. Treatment allocation was mainly implemented using a random number table for selection of the intervention side. Only the raters in charge of assessing the oral mucosa were blinded to the side of the mouth where the shields had been placed. The mucosa was assessed by 3 calibrated raters at the following time points: immediately before bracket placement (baseline assessment, T0), 3 days after delivering the shields (direct assessment of intervention, T1), and 4 days after removal of the shields (indirect assessment of intervention, T2). The raters used a newly devised yardstick in which the higher the score, the more severe the alteration. Discomfort was assessed at T1 and T2 using a visual analog scale. The Mann-Whitney U test was performed at the 5% level of significance. Of 60 patients, 42 were eligible, and 35 were randomly selected to have one side of the mouth receive the intervention. Two patients discontinued the intervention at T1, and 5 stopped at T2. Seven additional patients were recruited and completed all time

  11. Efficacy and safety of non-immersive virtual reality exercising in stroke rehabilitation (EVREST): a randomised, multicentre, single-blind, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saposnik, Gustavo; Cohen, Leonardo G; Mamdani, Muhammad; Pooyania, Sepideth; Ploughman, Michelle; Cheung, Donna; Shaw, Jennifer; Hall, Judith; Nord, Peter; Dukelow, Sean; Nilanont, Yongchai; De Los Rios, Felipe; Olmos, Lisandro; Levin, Mindy; Teasell, Robert; Cohen, Ashley; Thorpe, Kevin; Laupacis, Andreas; Bayley, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Non-immersive virtual reality is an emerging strategy to enhance motor performance for stroke rehabilitation. There has been rapid adoption of non-immersive virtual reality as a rehabilitation strategy despite the limited evidence about its safety and effectiveness. Our aim was to compare the safety and efficacy of virtual reality with recreational therapy on motor recovery in patients after an acute ischaemic stroke. In this randomised, controlled, single-blind, parallel-group trial we enrolled adults (aged 18-85 years) who had a first-ever ischaemic stroke and a motor deficit of the upper extremity score of 3 or more (measured with the Chedoke-McMaster scale) within 3 months of randomisation from 14 in-patient stroke rehabilitation units from four countries (Canada [11], Argentina [1], Peru [1], and Thailand [1]). Participants were randomly allocated (1:1) by a computer-generated assignment at enrolment to receive a programme of structured, task-oriented, upper extremity sessions (ten sessions, 60 min each) of either non-immersive virtual reality using the Nintendo Wii gaming system (VRWii) or simple recreational activities (playing cards, bingo, Jenga, or ball game) as add-on therapies to conventional rehabilitation over a 2 week period. All investigators assessing outcomes were masked to treatment assignment. The primary outcome was upper extremity motor performance measured by total time to complete the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT) at the end of the 2 week intervention period, analysed in the intention-to-treat population. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NTC01406912. The study was done between May 12, 2012, and Oct 1, 2015. We randomly assigned 141 patients: 71 received VRWii therapy and 70 received recreational activity. 121 (86%) patients (59 in the VRWii group and 62 in the recreational activity group) completed the final assessment and were included in the primary analysis. Each group improved WMFT performance time relative to

  12. Impact of selected magnetic fields on the therapeutic effect in patients with lumbar discopathy: A prospective, randomized, single-blinded, and placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taradaj, Jakub; Ozon, Marcin; Dymarek, Robert; Bolach, Bartosz; Walewicz, Karolina; Rosińczuk, Joanna

    2018-03-23

    Interdisciplinary physical therapy together with pharmacological treatment constitute conservative treatment strategies related to low back pain (LBP). There is still a lack of high quality studies aimed at an objective evaluation of physiotherapeutic procedures according to their effectiveness in LBP. The aim of this study is to carry out a prospective, randomized, single-blinded, and placebocontrolled clinical trial to evaluate the effectiveness of magnetic fields in discopathy-related LBP. A group of 177 patients was assessed for eligibility based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. In the end, 106 patients were randomly assigned into 5 comparative groups: A (n = 23; magnetic therapy: 10 mT, 50 Hz); B (n = 23; magnetic therapy: 5 mT, 50 Hz); C (n = 20; placebo magnetic therapy); D (n = 20; magnetic stimulation: 49.2 μT, 195 Hz); and E (n = 20; placebo magnetic stimulation). All patients were assessed using tests for pain intensity, degree of disability and range of motion. Also, postural stability was assessed using a stabilographic platform. In this study, positive changes in all clinical outcomes were demonstrated in group A (p 0.05). It was determined that the application of magnetic therapy (10 mT, 50 Hz, 20 min) significantly reduces pain symptoms and leads to an improvement of functional ability in patients with LBP.

  13. Effect of Aromatherapy with Peppermint Oil on the Severity of Nausea and Vomiting in Pregnancy: A Single-blind, Randomized, Placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joulaeerad, Narges; Ozgoli, Giti; Hajimehdipoor, Homa; Ghasemi, Erfan; Salehimoghaddam, Fatemeh

    2018-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting are common complaints in the first half of pregnancy. These symptoms can significantly affect a person's personal and professional life. Aromatherapy is one of the types of complementary medicine that is used in the treatment of nausea and vomiting. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of aromatherapy with peppermint oil on the severity of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy (NVP). This was a single-blind clinical trial that was conducted on 56 pregnant women with mild to moderate severity of NVP and 6 to 20 weeks of gestational age. After the determination of gestational age and base severity of NVP in each woman, they were randomly assigned to one of the two groups: peppermint oil (n=28) or placebo (n=28). Inhalation aromatherapy was done for four days and at the end of each day, they responded to the Pregnancy Unique Quantification of Emesis/Nausea questionnaire (PUQE). The data obtained were analyzed with Mann-Whitney test and ANOVA with repeated measures using SPSS software version 22. Also, the level of significance was paromatherapy with peppermint oil and placebo were the same in this study. This similarity can be due to psychological impacts of intervention on pregnant women.

  14. A Single-blind, Split-face, Randomized, Pilot Study Comparing the Effects of Intradermal and Intramuscular Injection of Two Commercially Available Botulinum Toxin A Formulas to Reduce Signs of Facial Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapra, Priya; Sapra, Sheetal; Khanna, Julie; Mraud, Kelli; Bonadonna, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effectiveness of intradermal botulinum toxin type A injection in improving skin texture and midface lift while reducing pore size and sebum production, as well as investigate the differences in effectiveness between onabotulinumtoxinA and abobotulinumtoxinA using intradermal and intramuscular injection methods. Design: A 16-week, single-blind, split-face, randomized study. Each patient served as their own control, receiving onabotulinumtoxinA and abobotulinumtoxinA randomized to either the left or right side of the face. Patients received intradermal botulinum toxin type A injections at Week 0 and intramuscular botulinum toxin type A injections at Week 2. Participants: Ten women aged 35 to 65 years who exhibited static rhytids in the glabellar and periorbital area. Measurements: The primary endpoint was efficacy of split-face treatment of intradermal and intramuscular onabotulinumtoxinA and abobotulinumtoxinA as assessed by a blinded evaluator using baseline and post-treatment photographs. The secondary endpoints included safety as assessed by adverse events and patient satisfaction measured by questionnaires completed at baseline and post-treatment. Results: Intradermal injection of botulinum toxin type A led to a statistically significant improvement in skin texture (p=0.004) while also resulting in mild midface lift (p=0.024), but did not provide a significant reduction of pore size and sebum production. There was no statistically significant difference between onabotulinumtoxinA and abobotulinumtoxinA when injected intradermally or intramuscularly. Conclusion: Intradermal injection of botulinum toxin type A appears to be a safe and effective therapy that provides an improvement in facial skin texture and midface lift. Registry: clinicaltrials.gov (ID#: NCT02907268). PMID:28367260

  15. Whole body and local cryotherapy in restless legs syndrome: A randomized, single-blind, controlled parallel group pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happe, Svenja; Evers, Stefan; Thiedemann, Christian; Bunten, Sabine; Siegert, Rudolf

    2016-11-15

    Treatment of restless legs syndrome (RLS) is primarily based on drugs. Since many patients report improvement of symptoms due to cooling their legs, we examined the efficacy of cryotherapy in RLS. 35 patients (28 women, 60.9±12.5years) with idiopathic RLS and symptoms starting not later than 6pm were randomized into three groups: cold air chamber at -60°C (n=12); cold air chamber at -10°C (n=12); local cryotherapy at -17°C (n=11). After a two week baseline, the different therapies were applied three minutes daily at 6pm over two weeks, followed by a four week observation period. The patients completed several questionnaires regarding RLS symptoms, sleep, and quality of life on a weekly basis (IRLS, ESS), VAS and sleep/morning protocol were completed daily, MOSS/RLS-QLI were completed once in each period. Additionally, the PLM index was measured by a mobile device at the end of baseline, intervention, and follow-up. The IRLS score was chosen as primary efficacy parameter. At the end of follow-up, significant improvement of RLS symptoms and quality of life could be observed only in the -60°C group as compared to baseline (IRLS: p=0.009; RLS-QLI: p=0.006; ESS: p=0.020). Local cryotherapy led to improvement in quality of life (VAS4: p=0.028; RLS-QLI: p=0.014) and sleep quality (MOSS: p=0.020; MOSS2: p=0.022) but not in IRLS and ESS. In the -10°C group, the only significant effect was shortening of number of wake phases per night. Serious side-effects were not reported. Whole body cryotherapy at -60°C and, to a less extent, local cryotherapy seem to be a treatment option for RLS in addition to conventional pharmacological treatment. However, the exact mode of cryotherapy needs to be established. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Single-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial of Poly-Herbal Formula Sahatsatara for Acute Low Back Pain: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiyapha Verayachankul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of poly-herbal formula Sahatsatara (SHT in pain reduction in acute low back pain (LBP patients. Methods: Twenty-nine patients aged 18-65 years with a history of moderate to severe acute LBP ≤3-day (score ≥4 on a 0-10 numeric rating scale [NRS] were enrolled and randomized to receive an ibuprofen (400 mg after meals three times daily or SHT (1,350 mg before meals three times daily for 7 days. The non-inferiority trial margin was set at ±10 percentage points. The outcomes were measured on pain intensity on the 0-10 NRS, disability on the Thai version of the Oswestry disability index [ODI], total analgesic consumption, patient satisfaction, and safety. Results: Fourteen patients and 15 patients were randomly allocated to ibuprofen and SHT groups, respectively. The mean difference in pain intensity and disability between the two groups at day 7 adjusted according to baseline was within ±1 for pain (-0.3; 95% CI, -1.48 to 0.96 and ±10% (-4.9%; 95% CI, -14.86% to 5.02% for the NRS and ODI scores, respectively. One patient in the SHT group and 5 in the ibuprofen group had gastrointestinal irritation, but the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion: SHT was not inferior to ibuprofen in pain relieving and disability in patients with acute LBP. The result suggests a role for SHT as an alternative analgesic in acute LBP. (Thai Clinical Trials Registry number 20141027001

  17. Immediate effect of nonspecific mandibular mobilization on postural control in subjects with temporomandibular disorder: a single-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Ana P; Politti, Fabiano; Hage, Yasmin E; Arruda, Eric E C; Amorin, Cesar F; Biasotto-Gonzalez, Daniela A

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is considered multifactorial and is defined as a group of pain conditions characterized by functional stomatognathic system alterations, which may be affected by or related disrupted postural control. Assess the immediate effect of nonspecific mandibular mobilization (NMM) on the postural control of subjects diagnosed or not with TMD. A simple-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial was performed involving 50 subjects of both genders assigned to two groups: the TMD group and the control group. TMD was diagnosed according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). A stabilometric assessment was performed by testing subjects in a quiet stance on a dual force platform under two visual conditions (eyes open and eyes closed). The Center of Pressure (CoP)-related variables analyzed were displacement, amplitude, speed of anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) displacements and CoP sway area. The mean values of each variable were compared, considering the accepted significance value of ppostural control in patients with TMD.

  18. Analysis of Postural Control During Quiet Standing in a Population with Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Undergoing Moderate Intensity Aerobic Exercise Training: A Single Blind, Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Snehil; Maiya, Arun; Shastry, Barkur A; Guddattu, Vasudev

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 8 wks of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise on postural control during quiet standing in type 2 diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Individuals were included in the study if they had type 2 diabetes with clinical neuropathy, defined by a minimum score of 7 on the Michigan Diabetic Neuropathy Score, following which the patients were randomly assigned to an 8-wk program by computer-generated random number tables to study or control group. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used for data analysis (P < 0.05 was considered significant). After final randomization, there were 36 patients in the study group and 45 in the control group. On comparison of results for control and study groups using repeated-measures analysis of variance only in the eyes closed on foam condition was there was a significant difference between the two groups for sway velocity along the x-axis (df1, df2 = 1, 18, F = 3.86, P = 0.04) and mediolateral displacement (df1, df2 = 1, 18, F = 4.04, P = 0.03). Aerobic exercise training could exert a therapeutic effect on center of pressure movement only along the x-axis in the eyes closed condition on foam surface during quiet standing.

  19. Effects of the daily consumption of protein enriched bread and protein enriched drinking yoghurt on the total protein intake in older adults in a rehabilitation centre: a single blind randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Til, A J; Naumann, E; Cox-Claessens, I J H M; Kremer, S; Boelsma, E; de van der Schueren, M A E

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the effects of protein enriched bread and drinking yoghurt, substituting regular products, on the total protein intake and the distribution of protein intake over the day in older adults. A single blind randomised controlled trial. Rehabilitation centre. Older adults (≥ 55 years) admitted to a rehabilitation centre after hospital discharge (n=34). Participants received a high protein diet (protein enriched bread and protein enriched drinking yoghurt; n=17) or a regular diet (regular bread and regular drinking yoghurt; n=17) for three consecutive weeks. Total protein intake and protein intake per meal, measured twice weekly over a three weeks period (six measurements per participant). Compared with controls, patients who received the protein enriched products had a significantly higher protein intake (115.3 g/d vs 72.5 g/d, Pconsumption of protein enriched products improves protein distribution over the day.

  20. Restricted versus continued standard caloric intake during the management of refeeding syndrome in critically ill adults: a randomised, parallel-group, multicentre, single-blind controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doig, Gordon S; Simpson, Fiona; Heighes, Philippa T; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Chesher, Douglas; Caterson, Ian D; Reade, Michael C; Harrigan, Peter W J

    2015-12-01

    Equipoise exists regarding the benefits of restricting caloric intake during electrolyte replacement for refeeding syndrome, with half of intensive care specialists choosing to continue normal caloric intake. We aimed to assess whether energy restriction affects the duration of critical illness, and other measures of morbidity, compared with standard care. We did a randomised, multicentre, single-blind clinical trial in 13 hospital intensive care units (ICUs) in Australia (11 sites) and New Zealand (two sites). Adult critically ill patients who developed refeeding syndrome within 72 h of commencing nutritional support in the ICU were enrolled and allocated to receive continued standard nutritional support or protocolised caloric restriction. 1:1 computer-based randomisation was done in blocks of variable size, stratified by enrolment serum phosphate concentration (>0·32 mmol/L vs ≤0·32 mmol/L) and body-mass index (BMI; >18 kg/m(2)vs ≤18 kg/m(2)). The primary outcome was the number of days alive after ICU discharge, with 60 day follow-up, in a modified intention-to-treat population of all randomly allocated patients except those mistakenly enrolled. Days alive after ICU discharge was a composite outcome based on ICU length of stay, overall survival time, and mortality. The Refeeding Syndrome Trial was registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR number 12609001043224). Between Dec 3, 2010, and Aug 13, 2014, we enrolled 339 adult critically ill patients: 170 were randomly allocated to continued standard nutritional support and 169 to protocolised caloric restriction. During the 60 day follow-up, the mean number of days alive after ICU discharge in 165 assessable patients in the standard care group was 39·9 (95% CI 36·4-43·7) compared with 44·8 (95% CI 40·9-49·1) in 166 assessable patients in the caloric restriction group (difference 4·9 days, 95% CI -2·3 to 13·6, p=0·19). Nevertheless, protocolised caloric

  1. Safety and efficacy of dual-lead thalamic deep brain stimulation for patients with treatment-refractory multiple sclerosis tremor: a single-centre, randomised, single-blind, pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveria, Seth F; Rodriguez, Ramon L; Bowers, Dawn; Kantor, Daniel; Hilliard, Justin D; Monari, Erin H; Scott, Bonnie M; Okun, Michael S; Foote, Kelly D

    2017-09-01

    Efficacy in previous studies of surgical treatments of refractory multiple sclerosis tremor using lesioning or deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been variable. The aim of this study was to investigate the safety and efficacy of dual-lead thalamic DBS (one targeting the ventralis intermedius-ventralis oralis posterior nucleus border [the VIM lead] and one targeting the ventralis oralis anterior-ventralis oralis posterior border [the VO lead]) for the treatment of multiple sclerosis tremor. We did a single centre, single-blind, prospective, randomised pilot trial at the University of Florida Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration clinic (Gainesville, FL, USA). We recruited adult patients with a clinical diagnosis of multiple sclerosis tremor refractory to previous medical therapy. Before surgery to implant both leads, we randomly assigned patients (1:1) to receive 3 months of optimised single-lead DBS-either VIM or VO. We did the randomisation with a computer-generated sequence, using three blocks of four patients, and independent members of the Center did the assignment. Patients and all clinicians other than the DBS programming nurse were masked to the choice of lead. Patients underwent surgery 1 month after their baseline visit for implantation of the dual lead DBS system. A pulse generator and two extension cables were implanted in a second surgery 3-4 weeks later. Patients then received an initial 3-month period of continuous stimulation of either the VIM or VO lead followed by blinded safety assessment of their tremor with the Tolosa-Fahn-Marin Tremor Rating Scale (TRS) during optimised VIM or VO lead stimulation at the end of the 3 months. After this visit, both leads were activated in all patients for an additional 3 months, and optimally programmed during serial visits as dictated by a prespecified programming algorithm. At the 6-month follow-up visit, TRS score was measured, and mood and psychological batteries were administered under four

  2. Effects of Reiki on Pain and Vital Signs When Applied to the Incision Area of the Body After Cesarean Section Surgery: A Single-Blinded, Randomized, Double-Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagkal Midilli, Tulay; Ciray Gunduzoglu, Nazmiye

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of Reiki on pain and vital signs when applied for 15 minutes to the incision area of the body after cesarean section surgery. The study was single-blinded, randomized, and double-controlled (Reiki, sham Reiki, and control groups). Forty-five patients, equalized by age and number of births, were randomly assigned to the Reiki, sham Reiki, and control groups. The treatment, which was applied to the patients in these 3 groups, was applied for 15 minutes to the incision area of body in the first 24 and 48 hours after the operation within 4 to 8 hours of the application of standard analgesics. The study data were collected using a patient follow-up form and a visual analog scale. Mean visual analog scale measurement values were significantly different from each other according to groups and times (P Reiki group patients between day 1 pre-tx and after application on the second day (day 2 post-tx) measurements. Mean breathing rate and systolic blood pressure measurement values were significantly different from each other according to groups (P Reiki group was observed to use fewer analgesics throughout the study and to need them after a longer time than the sham Reiki and control groups (P Reiki applied for 15 minutes to the incision area after a cesarean operation had the expected effects on pain and the need for the use of analgesics, but it had no effect on vital signs.

  3. Efficacy of ankle control balance training on postural balance and gait ability in community-dwelling older adults: a single-blinded, randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kyeongjin; Lee, Yong Woo

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to investigate the effects of ankle control balance training (ACBT) on postural balance and gait ability in community-dwelling older adults. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-four subjects were randomly divided into two groups, with 27 subjects in the ACBT group and 27 subjects in the control group. Subjects in the ACBT group received ACBT for 60 minutes, twice per week for 4 weeks, and all subjects had undergone fall prevention education for 60 minutes, once per...

  4. The plaque- and gingivitis-inhibiting capacity of a commercially available essential oil product. A parallel, split-mouth, single blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preus, Hans Ragnar; Koldsland, Odd Carsten; Aass, Anne Merete; Sandvik, Leiv; Hansen, Bjørn Frode

    2013-11-01

    Studies have reported commercially available essential oils with convincing plaque and gingivitis preventing properties. However, no tests have compared these essential oils, i.e. Listerine(®), against their true vehicle controls. To compare the plaque and gingivitis inhibiting effect of a commercially-available essential oil (Listerine(®) Total Care) to a negative (22% hydro-alcohol solution) and a positive (0.2% chlorhexidine (CHX)) control in an experimental gingivitis model. In three groups of 15 healthy volunteers, experimental gingivitis was induced and monitored over 21 days, simultaneously treated with Listerine(®) Total Care (test), 22% hydro-alcohol solution (negative control) and 0.2% chlorhexidine solution (positive control), respectively. The upper right quadrant of each individual received mouthwash only, whereas the upper left quadrant was subject to both rinses and mechanical oral hygiene. Plaque, gingivitis and side-effects were assessed at day 7, 14 and 21. After 21 days, the chlorhexidine group showed significantly lower average plaque and gingivitis scores than the Listerine(®) and alcohol groups, whereas there was little difference between the two latter. Listerine(®) Total Care had no statistically significant effect on plaque formation as compared to its vehicle control.

  5. A pilot randomized control trial investigating the effect of mindfulness practice on pain tolerance, psychological well-being, and physiological activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kingston, Jessica; Chadwick, Paul; Meron, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of mindfulness training on pain tolerance, psychological well-being, physiological activity, and the acquisition of mindfulness skills. Methods: Forty-two asymptomatic University students participated in a randomized, single-blind, active control pilot study. ...

  6. Changes in implant stability using different site preparation techniques: twist drills versus piezosurgery. A single-blinded, randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacchi, Claudio; Vercellotti, Tomaso; Torelli, Lucio; Furlan, Fabio; Di Lenarda, Roberto

    2013-04-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to longitudinally monitor stability changes of implants inserted using traditional rotary instruments or piezoelectric inserts, and to follow their variations during the first 90 days of healing. A randomized, controlled trial was conducted on 20 patients. Each patient received two identical, adjacent implants in the upper premolar area: the test site was prepared with piezosurgery, and the control site was prepared using twist drills. Resonance frequency analysis measurements were taken by a blinded operator on the day of surgery and after 7, 14, 21, 28, 42, 56, and 90 days. At 90 days, 39 out of 40 implants were osseointegrated (one failure in the control group). Both groups showed an initial decrease in mean implant stability quotient (ISQ) values: a shift in implant stability to increasing ISQ values occurred after 14 days in the test group and after 21 days in the control group. The lowest mean ISQ value was recorded at 14 days for test implants (97.3% of the primary stability) and at 21 days for the control implants (90.8% of the primary stability). ISQ variations with respect to primary stability differed significantly between the two groups during the entire period of observation: from day 14 to day 42, in particular, the differences were extremely significant (p < .0001). All 39 implants were in function successfully at the visit scheduled 1 year after insertion. The findings from this study suggest that ultrasonic implant site preparation results in a limited decrease of ISQ values and in an earlier shifting from a decreasing to an increasing stability pattern, when compared with the traditional drilling technique. From a clinical point of view, implants inserted with the piezoelectric technique demonstrated a short-term clinical success similar to those inserted using twist drills. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Effect of Yoga in the Treatment of Eating Disorders: A Single-blinded Randomized Controlled Trial with 6-Months Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Kari Ebbesen; Vrabel, Karianne; Bratland-Sanda, Solfrid; Ulleberg, Pål; Benum, Kirsten

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effect of yoga treatment of eating disorders (EDs). Adult females meeting the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-IV criteria for bulimia nervosa or ED not otherwise specified ( n = 30) were randomized to 11-week yoga intervention group (2 × 90 min/week) or a control group. Outcome measures, the Eating Disorder Examination (EDE)-Interview and Eating Disorders Inventory-2 (EDI-2) scores, were administered at baseline, posttest, and at 6-month follow-up. There was a dropout rate of 30% (posttest) and 37% (6-month follow-up). The intervention group showed reductions in EDE global score ( P control group. The differences between the groups increased at 6-month follow-up. There were no differences between the groups in the EDI-2 score. The results indicate that yoga could be effective in the treatment of ED.

  8. The Effect of Home based Exercise on Treatment of Women with Poly Cystic Ovary Syndrome; a single-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Vasheghani-Farahani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most common reproductive endocrine disorder of reproductive age women is a Poly cystic ovary syndrome (PCOS Metabolic syndrome has been more reported in patients with PCOS in comparison to general population. Few investigations have been performed to evaluate the independent effect of exercise on biochemical and clinical symptoms of patients with PCOS. The aim of the study was to find the effect of home base aerobic-strengthening exercises on anthropometric and hormonal variables of patients with PCOS.MaterialsandMethods:In this randomized controlled trial twenty women in the exercise group performed aerobic, strengthening exercises; the other 20 participants in the control group were advised to continue their previous physical activity pattern. Blood pressure, Waist to Hip ratio (WHR, BMI along with hormonal variables(including insulin related factors, sexual hormones and inflammatory factors were assessed at baselineand after the 12 week intervention.Results:16patients in the exercise group and 14 patients in control group finished the study. TheWHR (p<0.001 along with the blood level of insulin (p=0.016, FBS (p=0.044, Prolactine (p=0.022 and hsCRP (p=0.035 and HOMA index (p=0.009 were decreased significantly in the exercise group compared with the control group. No significant differences were found in lipid profile and sexual hormones between groups at the end of the study.Conclusion:We can conclude that 12 weeks combined aerobic-strengthening exercise program in women with poly cystic ovary syndrome can lead to a reduction of waist to hip ratio (WHR and some cardiovascular risk factors (including insulin, FBS, HOMA index and HsCRP along with an increase of prolactine level in these patients.

  9. Adapted physical activity is beneficial on balance, functional mobility, quality of life and fall risk in community-dwelling older women: a randomized single-blinded controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, E; Prókai, L; Mészáros, L; Gondos, T

    2013-06-01

    Exercise programmes have important role in prevention of falls, but to date, we have little knowledge about the effects of Adapted Physical Activity programme on balance of older women. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of an Adapted Physical Activity programme on balance, risk of falls and quality of life in community-dwelling older women. This was a randomized controlled study. Community, in a local sport centre. Older women aged over 60 years. Seventy-six women were randomised to an exercise group providing Adapted Physical Activity programme for 25 weeks or a control group (in which they did not participate in any exercise programme). The one-leg stance test, Timed Up and Go test, incidence of fall and the quality of life (SF-36V2) were measured at baseline and after 25 weeks. The one-leg stance test and the Timed Up and Go test in the exercise group was significantly better than in the control group after the intervention period (P=0.005; P=0.001, respectively). The Physical Functioning, Vitality and General Health subdomains of quality of life were also significantly better in the exercise group compared to the control group (P=0.004; P=0.005; P=0.038, respectively). Relative risk was 0.40 (90% CI 0.174 to 0.920) and the number needed to treat was 5 (95% CI 2.3 to 23.3). This 25-week Adapted Physical Activity programme improves static balance, functional mobility, as well as Physical Functioning, Vitality and General Health subdomains of quality of life. Based on our results, the Adapted Physical Activity programme may be a promising fall prevention exercise programme improving static balance and functional mobility for community-dwelling older women.

  10. Efficacy of ankle control balance training on postural balance and gait ability in community-dwelling older adults: a single-blinded, randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyeongjin; Lee, Yong Woo

    2017-09-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to investigate the effects of ankle control balance training (ACBT) on postural balance and gait ability in community-dwelling older adults. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-four subjects were randomly divided into two groups, with 27 subjects in the ACBT group and 27 subjects in the control group. Subjects in the ACBT group received ACBT for 60 minutes, twice per week for 4 weeks, and all subjects had undergone fall prevention education for 60 minutes, once per week for 4 weeks. The main outcome measures, including the Berg balance scale; the functional reach test and one leg stance test for postural balance; and the timed up-and-go test and 10-meter walking test for gait ability, were assessed at baseline and after 4 weeks of training. [Results] The postural balance and gait ability in the ACBT group improved significantly compared to those in the control group, except BBS. [Conclusion] The results of this study showed improved postural balance and gait abilities after ACBT and that ACBT is a feasible method for improving postural balance and gait ability in community-dwelling older adults.

  11. Single-blind, randomized, controlled trial of pelvic floor muscle training, electrical stimulation, vaginal cones, and no active treatment in the management of stress urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo A. Castro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare the effectiveness of pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, vaginal cones, and no active treatment in women with urodynamic stress urinary incontinence. PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred eighteen subjects were randomly selected to recieve pelvic floor exercises (n=31, ES (n=30, vaginal cones (n=27, or no treatment (untreated control (n=30. Women were evaluated before and after completion of six months of treatment by the pad test, quality of life questionnaire (I-QOL, urodynamic test, voiding diary, and subjective response. RESULTS: In the objective evaluation, we observed a statistically significant reduction in the pad test (p=0.003, in the number of stress urinary episodes (p<0.001, and a significant improvement in the quality of life (p<0.001 in subjects who used pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, and vaginal cones compared to the control group. No significant difference was found between groups in the urodynamic parameters. In the subjective evaluation, 58%, 55%, and 54% of women who had used pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, and vaginal cones, respectively, reported being satisfied after treatment. In the control group, only 21% patients were satisfied with the treatment. CONCLUSION: Based on this study, pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, and vaginal cones are equally effective treatments and are far superior to no treatment in women with urodynamic stress urinary incontinence.

  12. Effectiveness of dry needling versus a classical physiotherapy program in patients with chronic low-back pain: a single-blind, randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüzün, Emİne Handan; Gıldır, Sıla; Angın, Ender; Tecer, Büşra Hande; Dana, Kezban Öztürk; Malkoç, Mehtap

    2017-09-01

    [Purpose] We compared the effectiveness of dry needling with a classical physiotherapy program in patients with chronic low-back pain caused by lumbar disc hernia (LHNP). [Subjects and Methods] In total, 34 subjects were allocated randomly to the study (n=18) and control groups (n=16). In the study group, dry needling was applied using acupuncture needles. The control group performed a home exercise program in addition to hot pack, TENS, and ultrasound applications. Pain was assessed with the short form of the McGill Pain Questionnaire. The number of trigger points and their pressure sensitivity were evaluated with a physical examination (palpation). The Beck Depression Inventory was used to assess depression. The Tampa Kinesiophobia Scale was used to assess fear of movement. [Results] In the study group, the calculated Cohen's effect sizes were bigger than those in the control group in terms of pain, trigger point-related variables, and fear of movement. Effect sizes for reducing depressive symptoms were similar in both groups. [Conclusion] These results suggest that dry needling can be an effective treatment for reducing pain, number of trigger points, sensitivity, and kinesiophobia in patients with chronic low-back pain caused by lumbar disc hernia.

  13. Effect of spa therapy with saline balneotherapy on oxidant/antioxidant status in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a single-blind randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagülle, Mine; Kardeş, Sinan; Karagülle, Oğuz; Dişçi, Rian; Avcı, Aslıhan; Durak, İlker; Karagülle, Müfit Zeki

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been shown to play a contributory role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Recent studies have provided evidence for antioxidant properties of spa therapy. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether spa therapy with saline balneotherapy has any influence on the oxidant/antioxidant status in patients with RA and to assess clinical effects of spa therapy. In this investigator-blind randomized controlled trial, we randomly assigned 50 patients in a 1:1 ratio to spa therapy plus standard drug treatment (spa group) or standard drug treatment alone (control group). Spa group followed a 2-week course of spa therapy regimen consisting of a total of 12 balneotherapy sessions in a thermal mineral water pool at 36-37 °C for 20 min every day except Sunday. All clinical and biochemical parameters were assessed at baseline and after spa therapy (2 weeks). The clinical parameters were pain intensity, patient global assessment, physician global assessment, Health Assessment Questionnaire disability index (HAQ-DI), Disease Activity Score for 28-joints based on erythrocyte sedimentation rate (DAS28-4[ESR]). Oxidative status parameters were malondialdehyde (MDA), nonenzymatic superoxide radical scavenger activity (NSSA), antioxidant potential (AOP), and superoxide dismutase (SOD). The NSSA levels were increased significantly in the spa group ( p = 0.003) but not in the control group ( p = 0.509); and there was a trend in favor of spa therapy for improvements in NSSA levels compared to control ( p = 0.091). Significant clinical improvement was found in the spa group compared to the control in terms of patient global assessment ( p = 0.011), physician global assessment ( p = 0.043), function (HAQ-DI) ( p = 0.037), disease activity (DAS28-4[ESR]) (0.044) and swollen joint count (0.009), and a trend toward improvement in pain scores (0.057). Spa therapy with saline balneotherapy exerts antioxidant effect in patients with RA as reflected by the

  14. Improvement of nutritional support strategies after surgery for benign liver tumor through nutritional risk screening: a prospective, randomized, controlled, single-blind clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xin; Li, Ying; Yang, Huayu; Sang, Xinting; Zhao, Haitao; Xu, Haifeng; Du, Shunda; Xu, Yiyao; Chi, Tianyi; Zhong, Shouxian; Yu, Kang; Mao, Yilei

    2013-02-01

    The rising of individualized therapy requires nutritional risk screening has become a major topic for each particular disease, yet most of the screenings were for malignancies, less for benign diseases. There is no report on the screening of patients with benign liver tumors postoperatively. We aim to evaluate the nutritional support strategies post operation for benign liver tumors through nutritional risk screening. In this prospective, randomized, controlled study, 95 patients who underwent hepatectomy for benign tumors were divided into two groups. Fifty patients in the control group were given routine permissive underfeeding nutritional supply (75 kJ/kg/d), and 45 patients in the experimental group were given lower energy (42 kJ/kg/d) in accordance of their surgical trauma. Routine blood tests, liver/kidney function were monitored before surgery and at the day 1, 3, 5, 9 after surgery, patients were observed for the time of flatus, complications, length of hospitalization (LOH), nutrition-related costs, and other clinical parameters. This completed study is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov, number NCT01292330. The nutrition-related expenses (494.0±181.0 vs. 1,514.4±348.4 RMB, Pgroup were significantly lower than those in the control group. Meanwhile, the lowered energy supply after the surgeries did not have adverse effects on clinical parameters, complications, and LOH. Patient with benign liver tumors can adopt an even lower postoperative nutritional supply that close to that for mild non-surgical conditions, and lower than the postoperative permissive underfeeding standard.

  15. Daily electronic self-monitoring in bipolar disorder using smartphones - the MONARCA I trial: a randomized, placebo-controlled, single-blind, parallel group trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faurholt-Jepsen, M; Frost, M; Ritz, C; Christensen, E M; Jacoby, A S; Mikkelsen, R L; Knorr, U; Bardram, J E; Vinberg, M; Kessing, L V

    2015-10-01

    The number of studies on electronic self-monitoring in affective disorder and other psychiatric disorders is increasing and indicates high patient acceptance and adherence. Nevertheless, the effect of electronic self-monitoring in patients with bipolar disorder has never been investigated in a randomized controlled trial (RCT). The objective of this trial was to investigate in a RCT whether the use of daily electronic self-monitoring using smartphones reduces depressive and manic symptoms in patients with bipolar disorder. A total of 78 patients with bipolar disorder according to ICD-10 criteria, aged 18-60 years, and with 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17) and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) scores ≤17 were randomized to the use of a smartphone for daily self-monitoring including a clinical feedback loop (the intervention group) or to the use of a smartphone for normal communicative purposes (the control group) for 6 months. The primary outcomes were differences in depressive and manic symptoms measured using HAMD-17 and YMRS, respectively, between the intervention and control groups. Intention-to-treat analyses using linear mixed models showed no significant effects of daily self-monitoring using smartphones on depressive as well as manic symptoms. There was a tendency towards more sustained depressive symptoms in the intervention group (B = 2.02, 95% confidence interval -0.13 to 4.17, p = 0.066). Sub-group analysis among patients without mixed symptoms and patients with presence of depressive and manic symptoms showed significantly more depressive symptoms and fewer manic symptoms during the trial period in the intervention group. These results highlight that electronic self-monitoring, although intuitive and appealing, needs critical consideration and further clarification before it is implemented as a clinical tool.

  16. Effect of yoga in the treatment of eating disorders: A single-blinded randomized controlled trial with 6-months follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari Ebbesen Karlsen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the Study: The aim of this study is to examine the effect of yoga treatment of eating disorders (EDs. Methods: Adult females meeting the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-IV criteria for bulimia nervosa or ED not otherwise specified (n = 30 were randomized to 11-week yoga intervention group (2 × 90 min/week or a control group. Outcome measures, the Eating Disorder Examination (EDE-Interview and Eating Disorders Inventory-2 (EDI-2 scores, were administered at baseline, posttest, and at 6-month follow-up. There was a dropout rate of 30% (posttest and 37% (6-month follow-up. Results: The intervention group showed reductions in EDE global score (P < 0.01, the EDE subscale restraint (P < 0.05, and eating concern (P < 0.01 compared to the control group. The differences between the groups increased at 6-month follow-up. There were no differences between the groups in the EDI-2 score. Conclusion: The results indicate that yoga could be effective in the treatment of ED.

  17. Effects of a multimodal exercise program on balance, functional mobility and fall risk in older adults with cognitive impairment: a randomized controlled single-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, E; Sztruhár Jónásné, I; Karóczi, C K; Korpos, A; Gondos, T

    2013-10-01

    Exercise programs have important role in prevention of falls, but to date, there are conflicting findings about the effects of exercise programs on balance, functional performance and fall risk among cognitively impaired older adults. AIM. To investigate the effects of a multimodal exercise program on static and dynamic balance, and risk of falls in older adults with mild or moderate cognitive impairment. A randomized controlled study. A long-term care institute. Cognitively impaired individuals aged over 60 years. Eighty-six participants were randomized to an exercise group providing multimodal exercise program for 12 months or a control group which did not participate in any exercise program. The Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment scale, Timed Up and Go test, and incidence of falls were measured at baseline, at 6 months and at 12 months. There was a significant improvement in balance-related items of Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment scale in the exercise group both at 6 month and 12 month (Pfalls. Our results confirmed that a 12-month multimodal exercise program can improve the balance in cognitively impaired older adults. Based on our results, the multimodal exercise program may be a promising fall prevention exercise program for older adults with mild or moderate cognitive impairment improving static balance but it is supposed that more emphasis should be put on walking component of exercise program and environmental fall risk assessment.

  18. The effects of plantar perception training on balance and falls efficacy of the elderly with a history of falls: A single-blind, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Hyuck

    2018-03-28

    The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of plantar perception training using a hardness discrimination task on balance and falls efficacy of the elderly who have experienced a fall. Sixty-two elderly persons 65 years of age or older were randomly allocated to the experimental group (n = 31) or the control group (n = 31). The experimental group performed a hardness discrimination task using five different levels of hardness of sponge mats, while the control group performed the same task except that they were not asked to discriminate hardness levels of sponge mats. All subjects performed 10 sessions for two weeks. Outcome measures were conducted using center of pressure (CoP) sway in the standing position, the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, and falls efficacy scale (FES) to measure balance and falls efficacy. There were no significant differences in general characteristics between both groups (p > .05). After 10 sessions, plantar perception was significantly improved in the experimental group (F = 101.18, p falls efficacy as well as balance of the elderly. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A Single-Blind randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effect of extended counseling on uptake of pre-antiretroviral care in eastern uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marrone Gaetano

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many newly screened people living with HIV (PLHIV in Sub-Saharan Africa do not understand the importance of regular pre-antiretroviral (ARV care because most of them have been counseled by staff who lack basic counseling skills. This results in low uptake of pre-ARV care and late treatment initiation in resource-poor settings. The effect of providing post-test counseling by staff equipped with basic counseling skills, combined with home visits by community support agents on uptake of pre-ARV care for newly diagnosed PLHIV was evaluated through a randomized intervention trial in Uganda. Methods An intervention trial was performed consisting of post-test counseling by trained counselors, combined with monthly home visits by community support agents for continued counseling to newly screened PLHIV in Iganga district, Uganda between July 2009 and June 2010, Participants (N = 400 from three public recruitment centres were randomized to receive either the intervention, or the standard care (the existing post-test counseling by ARV clinic staff who lack basic training in counseling skills, the control arm. The outcome measure was the proportion of newly screened and counseled PLHIV in either arm who had been to their nearest health center for clinical check-up in the subsequent three months +2 months. Treatment was randomly assigned using computer-generated random numbers. The statistical significance of differences between the two study arms was assessed using chi-square and t-tests for categorical and quantitative data respectively. Risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals were used to assess the effect of the intervention. Results Participants in the intervention arm were 80% more likely to accept (take up pre-ARV care compared to those in the control arm (RR 1.8, 95% CI 1.4-2.1. No adverse events were reported. Conclusions Provision of post-test counseling by staff trained in basic counseling skills, combined with home visits by

  20. The effect of staff training on agitation and use of restraint in nursing home residents with dementia: a single-blind, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testad, Ingelin; Ballard, Clive; Brønnick, Kolbjørn; Aarsland, Dag

    2010-01-01

    Agitation is common in dementia and is associated with use of restraints and use of psychotropic drugs. The aim of this study was to determine whether an education and supervision intervention could reduce agitation and the use of restraints and antipsychotic drugs in nursing homes. Four Norwegian nursing homes were randomly allocated to receive either treatment as usual or an intervention consisting of a 2-day educational seminar and monthly group guidance for 6 months. One hundred forty-five residents with dementia (based on medical records and corroborated with a Functional Assessment Staging score >or= 4) completed baseline and 6-month intervention assessments and were included in the analyses. The co-primary outcome measures were the proportion of residents subject to interactional restraint and the severity of agitation using the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI). Patients were assessed at baseline, immediately after completion of the intervention at 6 months, and 12 months after baseline. Comparison of change in the 2 groups was made using repeated-measures analysis of variance (CMAI) and Mann-Whitney test (restraints). The study was conducted from 2003 to 2004. The proportion of residents starting new restraint was lower in the intervention than in the control group at 6-month evaluation (P = .02), but no statistically significant differences were found at 12-month assessment (P = .57). The total CMAI score declined from baseline to 6 and 12 months' follow-up in the intervention homes compared to a small increase in the control homes (F2,176 = 3.46, P = .034). There were no statistically significant differences in use of antipsychotic drugs. A brief 2-day staff education program followed by continued monthly guidance was able both to improve quality of care by reducing the frequency of interactional restraints and to reduce severity of agitation. ©Copyright 2010 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  1. Stress-related psycho-physiological disorders: randomized single blind placebo controlled naturalistic study of psychometric evaluation using a radio electric asymmetric treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of a radio electric asymmetric treatment on psycho-physiological disorders (PPD). PPD are often stress related and are under the unconscious control of the patient and cannot be traced back to any serious physical disease. The brain stimulation treatment protocol used is called Neuro Psycho Physical Optimization (NPPO) with a Radio Electric Asymmetric Conveyer (REAC) device. Methods Psychological stress and PPD were measured for a group of 888 subjects using the Psychological Stress Measure (PSM) test, a self-administered questionnaire. Data were collected immediately before and after the 4-weeks of REAC treatment cycle. Results This study showed a significant reduction in scores measuring subjective perceptions of stress for subjects treated with a cycle of NPPO REAC treatment. At the end-point the number of subjects reporting symptoms of stress-related PPD on the PSM test was significantly reduced, whereas in the placebo group the difference was not significant. Conclusion A cycle of NPPO treatment with REAC was shown to reduce subjective perceptions of stress measured by the PSM test and in particular on PPD. Trial Registration This trial has been registered in the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) with the number: ACTRN12607000463471. PMID:21771304

  2. Bilateral sphenopalatine ganglion block reduces blood pressure in never treated patients with essential hypertension. A randomized controlled single-blinded study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafyllidi, Helen; Arvaniti, Chrysa; Schoinas, Antonios; Benas, Dimitris; Vlachos, Stefanos; Palaiodimos, Leonidas; Pavlidis, George; Ikonomidis, Ignatios; Batistaki, Chrysanthi; Voumvourakis, Costas; Lekakis, John

    2018-01-01

    Sympathetic fibers connect sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) with the central nervous system. We aimed to study the effect of SPG block in blood pressure (BP) in never treated patients with stage I-II essential hypertension. We performed bilateral SPG block with lidocaine 2% in 33 hypertensive patients (mean age 48±12years, 24 men) and a sham operation with water for injection in 11 patients who served as the control group (mean age 51±12years, 8 men). All patients have been subjected to 24h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring prior and a month after the SBG block in order to estimate any differences in blood pressure parameters. We defined as responders to SBG block those patients with a 24h SBP decrease ≥5mmHg. We found that 24h and daytime DBP (p=0.02) as well as daytime DBP load (p=0.03) were decreased in the study group a month after SPG block. In addition, a significant response was noted in 12/33 responders (36%) regarding: a. SBP and DBP during overall 24h and daytime (pblock is a promising, minimally invasive option of BP decrease in hypertensives, probably through SNS modulation. Additionally, due to its anesthetic effect, SPG block might act as a method of selection for those hypertensive patients with an activated SNS before any other invasive antihypertensive procedure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effectiveness of low-level laser therapy for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome: design of a randomized single-blinded controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbosa Rafael Inácio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common neuropathy in the upper extremity, resulting from the compression of the median nerve at wrist level. Clinical studies are essentials to present evidence on therapeutic resources use at early restoration on peripheral nerve functionality. Low-level laser therapy has been widely investigated in researches related to nerve regeneration. Therefore, it is suggested that the effect of low-level laser therapy associated with other conservative rehabilitation techniques may positively affect symptoms and overall hand function in compressive neuropathies such as carpal tunnel syndrome. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of low-level laser therapy in addition to orthoses therapy and home orientations in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Methods/Design Patients older than 18 years old will be included, with clinical diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome, excluding comorbidies. A physiotherapist will conduct intervention, with a blinding evaluator. Randomization will be applied to allocate the patients in each group: with association or not to low-level laser therapy. All of them will be submitted to orthoses therapy and home orientations. Outcome will be assessed through: pain visual analogic scale, Semmes Weinstein monofilaments™ threshold sensibility test, Pinch Gauge™, Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire and two point discrimination test. Discussion This paper describes the design of a randomized controlled trial, which aim to assess the effectiveness of conservative treatment added to low-level laser therapy for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Trial registration Brazilian Clinical Trials Registry (ReBec - 75ddtf / Universal Trial Number: U1111-1121-5184

  4. Effect of workplace- versus home-based physical exercise on pain in healthcare workers: study protocol for a single blinded cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Markus D; Sundstrup, Emil; Brandt, Mikkel; Kristensen, Anne Zoëga; Jay, Kenneth; Stelter, Reinhard; Lavendt, Ebbe; Aagaard, Per; Andersen, Lars L

    2014-04-07

    The prevalence and consequences of musculoskeletal pain is considerable among healthcare workers, allegedly due to high physical work demands of healthcare work. Previous investigations have shown promising results of physical exercise for relieving pain among different occupational groups, but the question remains whether such physical exercise should be performed at the workplace or conducted as home-based exercise. Performing physical exercise at the workplace together with colleagues may be more motivating for some employees and thus increase adherence. On the other hand, physical exercise performed during working hours at the workplace may be costly for the employers in terms of time spend. Thus, it seems relevant to compare the efficacy of workplace- versus home-based training on musculoskeletal pain. This study is intended to investigate the effect of workplace-based versus home-based physical exercise on musculoskeletal pain among healthcare workers. This study was designed as a cluster randomized controlled trial performed at 3 hospitals in Copenhagen, Denmark. Clusters are hospital departments and hospital units. Cluster randomization was chosen to increase adherence and avoid contamination between interventions. Two hundred healthcare workers from 18 departments located at three different hospitals is allocated to 10 weeks of 1) workplace based physical exercise performed during working hours (using kettlebells, elastic bands and exercise balls) for 5 × 10 minutes per week and up to 5 group-based coaching sessions, or 2) home based physical exercise performed during leisure time (using elastic bands and body weight exercises) for 5 × 10 minutes per week. Both intervention groups will also receive ergonomic instructions on patient handling and use of lifting aides etc. Inclusion criteria are female healthcare workers working at a hospital. Average pain intensity (VAS scale 0-10) of the back, neck and shoulder (primary outcome) and physical

  5. Effect of workplace- versus home-based physical exercise on pain in healthcare workers: study protocol for a single blinded cluster randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence and consequences of musculoskeletal pain is considerable among healthcare workers, allegedly due to high physical work demands of healthcare work. Previous investigations have shown promising results of physical exercise for relieving pain among different occupational groups, but the question remains whether such physical exercise should be performed at the workplace or conducted as home-based exercise. Performing physical exercise at the workplace together with colleagues may be more motivating for some employees and thus increase adherence. On the other hand, physical exercise performed during working hours at the workplace may be costly for the employers in terms of time spend. Thus, it seems relevant to compare the efficacy of workplace- versus home-based training on musculoskeletal pain. This study is intended to investigate the effect of workplace-based versus home-based physical exercise on musculoskeletal pain among healthcare workers. Methods/Design This study was designed as a cluster randomized controlled trial performed at 3 hospitals in Copenhagen, Denmark. Clusters are hospital departments and hospital units. Cluster randomization was chosen to increase adherence and avoid contamination between interventions. Two hundred healthcare workers from 18 departments located at three different hospitals is allocated to 10 weeks of 1) workplace based physical exercise performed during working hours (using kettlebells, elastic bands and exercise balls) for 5 × 10 minutes per week and up to 5 group-based coaching sessions, or 2) home based physical exercise performed during leisure time (using elastic bands and body weight exercises) for 5 × 10 minutes per week. Both intervention groups will also receive ergonomic instructions on patient handling and use of lifting aides etc. Inclusion criteria are female healthcare workers working at a hospital. Average pain intensity (VAS scale 0-10) of the back, neck and shoulder

  6. A novel technique of harmonic tissue dissection reduces seroma formation after modified radical mastectomy compared to conventional electrocautery: a single-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, Mohammed; Fathy, Hamada; Shaban, Hamdy; Abuelela, Sameh T; Marie, Ahmed; Khaled, Islam

    2018-01-01

    Seroma is the most frequent postoperative complication following breast cancer surgery. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of the harmonic focus scalpel versus electrocautery in reducing seroma formation post-mastectomy and axillary clearance. A prospective randomized controlled trial study was conducted at the Department of Surgery of Suez Canal University Hospital from April 26th 2014 to 30th June 2016. Seventy-two women, in whom a mastectomy and axillary clearance for breast cancer were performed, were randomly allocated to either harmonic dissection ( n  = 36) or electrocautery ( n  = 36). The mean operative time was significantly longer for harmonic dissection compared with electrocautery (2.63 ± 0.41 vs. 1.75 ± 0.26 h; p  < 0.0001). In addition, a significantly smaller amount of intraoperative blood loss (69.4 ± 25.1 vs. 255.5 ± 41.6 ml; p  = 0.002) and total drainage volume (1277.8 ± 172.5 ml vs. 3300 ± 167.5 ml; p  = 0.002) were found in the harmonic group. Moreover, there was a significant reduction in the time of drain removal (10.9 ± 1.12 vs. 15.9 ± 1.44; p  = 0.001) and the incidence of seroma formation after drain removal [8.3% vs 33.3%; p  = 0.003] in the harmonic group compared with those in the electrocautery group. Harmonic dissection technique leads to significant decreases in intraoperative blood loss, total drainage volume and postoperative seroma in terms of shorter drain duration with a minimal increase in the operative time and better quality of life. Here, we recommend the use of the harmonic dissection technique in mastectomy and axillary clearance.

  7. Safety, immunogenicity, and tolerability of meningococcal serogroup B bivalent recombinant lipoprotein 2086 vaccine in healthy adolescents: a randomised, single-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Peter C; Marshall, Helen S; Nissen, Michael D; Jiang, Qin; Jansen, Kathrin U; Garcés-Sánchez, Maria; Martinón-Torres, Federico; Beeslaar, Johannes; Szenborn, Leszek; Wysocki, Jacek; Eiden, Joseph; Harris, Shannon L; Jones, Thomas R; Perez, John L

    2012-08-01

    Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B is a major cause of invasive meningococcal disease, but a broadly protective vaccine is not currently licensed. A bivalent recombinant factor H-binding protein vaccine (recombinant lipoprotein 2086) has been developed to provide broad coverage against diverse invasive meningococcus serogroup B strains. Our aim was to test the immune response of this vaccine. This randomised, placebo-controlled trial enrolled healthy adolescents from 25 sites in Australia, Poland, and Spain. Exclusion criteria were previous invasive meningococcal disease or serogroup B vaccination, previous adverse reaction or known hypersensitivity to the vaccine, any significant comorbidities, and immunosuppressive therapy or receipt of blood products in the past 6 months. Participants were randomly assigned with a computerised block randomisation scheme to receive ascending doses of vaccine (60, 120, or 200 μg) or placebo at 0, 2, and 6 months. Principal investigators, participants and their guardians, and laboratory personnel were masked to the allocation; dispensing staff were not. Immunogenicity was measured by serum bactericidal assays using human complement (hSBA) against eight diverse meningococcus serogroup B strains. The co-primary endpoints were seroconversion for the two indicator strains (PMB1745 and PMB17) analysed by the Clopper-Pearson method. Local and systemic reactions and adverse events were recorded. The study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00808028. 539 participants were enrolled and 511 received all three study vaccinations--116 in the placebo group, 21 in the 60 μg group, 191 in the 120 μg group, and 183 in the 200 μg group. The proportion of participants responding with an hSBA titre equal to or greater than the lower limit of quantitation of the hSBA assays (reciprcocal titres of 7 to 18, depending on test strain) was similar for the two largest doses and ranged from 75·6 to 100·0% for the 120 μg dose and 67·9 to

  8. A single-blind cross over study investigating the efficacy of standard and controlled release levodopa in combination with entacapone in the treatment of end-of-dose effect in people with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iansek, R; Danoudis, M

    2011-08-01

    To determine the efficacy of standard levodopa combined with controlled release levodopa and entacapone in controlling end-of-dose symptoms in Parkinson's disease. A single-blind cross over design was used to compare the duration of action for three pharmacological combinations: standard levodopa (L/DDC); standard levodopa combined with entacapone (L/DDC/E); and standard levodopa combined with controlled release levodopa (CR) and entacapone (L/DDC/CR/E). Thirty two participants with wearing-off symptoms and inadequate symptom control with L/DDC/E had their optimum dose of L/DDC determined at base line. Entacapone was added to the optimal L/DDC dose and duration of action determined. Levodopa CR dosage was adjusted to match the optimal L/DDC dose for each participant. All participants were then trialed on L/DDC/CR/E and duration of response calculated. Timed Up and Go (TUG) times and magnitude of extra movements were recorded hourly throughout the day over several days to determine the optimum interval between doses for each combination. The UPDRS (Sections 2 and 3), PDQ39 and fatigue scale, the PDF-16, were recorded at base line and when dosage intervals had stabilized on L/DDC/CR/E. Duration of response was greatest with L/DDC/CR/E compared to L/DDC/E (p DDC/CR/E compared to L/DDC/E (p DDC/CR/E compared to L/DDC (p DDC/CR/E (p = 0.001) however magnitude was mild. Combining standard levodopa and levodopa CR preparations with entacapone is an additional treatment strategy to manage motor fluctuations in advanced PD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A study protocol for a single-blind, randomized controlled trial of adjunctive transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) for chronic pain among patients receiving specialized, inpatient multimodal pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janice Jimenez-Torres, G; Weinstein, Benjamin L; Walker, Cory R; Christopher Fowler, J; Ashford, Philippa; Borckardt, Jeffrey J; Madan, Alok

    2017-03-01

    Available treatments for chronic pain (CP) are modestly effective or associated with iatrogenic harm. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique that may be an effective, adjunctive treatment to non-opioid therapies. In this randomized control trial (RCT), we compare adjunctive active versus sham tDCS among patients in a multimodal inpatient pain management program. The primary objectives of the RCT are to improve pain tolerance and subjective pain experience. Patients admitted to the Pain Management Program at The Menninger Clinic in Houston, Texas are eligible for this trial. Eighty-four participants will be randomized (1:1) into a single-blind, 2×12 (group×time) controlled trial. A battery-powered direct and constant current stimulator (Soterix Medical Inc. 2014) delivers anodal stimulation over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and cathodal stimulation over the right DLPFC. Active tDCS is applied by supplying a 2mA current for 20min/session over 10 sessions. Participants complete self-report and performance-based assessments on a weekly basis just prior to brain stimulation. Self-report assessments are collected via Chronic Pain Tracker version 3.6, an iPad interfaced application. The performance-based pain tolerance task is completed through the cold presser task. Interventions with cross-symptomatic therapeutic potential are absolutely essential in the context of CP, in which psychiatric comorbidity is the norm. Modalities that can be used in tandem with evidence-based, non-opioid therapies have the potential to have a synergistic effect, resulting in increased effectiveness of what have been modestly effective treatments to date. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [A follow-up study on a randomized, single-blind control of King's Brain pills in treatment of memory disorder in elderly people with MCI in a Beijing community].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jin-zhou; Zhu, Ai-hua; Zhong, Jian

    2003-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of King's Brain pills (Compound Chinese ginseng extract from herbs) on the treatment and the delaying of memory decline in the elderly with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in a community by a year follow-up of neuropsychology. 75 patients with MCI were selected from Beixinqiao community of Beijing by a cutoff score of 0.0/0.5 on CDR and were randomly assigned into a treatment group (n = 30 cases), given 4 pills of a compound Chinese ginseng extract (King's Brain) with 2 placebo tablets, and a positive control group (n = 30 cases), given 2 tablets of Piracetam with 4 placebo tablets, as well as a placebo group (n = 15 cases), given a placebo of 4 tablets and 2 pills. All subjects took this medication 3 times a day for 3 months. Single-blind and double-moulding control were used in this study. At a baseline and a middlepoint (after 3 months), and a follow-up end (one year later) following a three months of medication therapeutics, all subjects were assessed using a battery consisting of MMSE and 5 memory items on BNPT battery. In the treatment group, MMSE score 27.50 +/- 1.68 was increased to 28.27 +/- 1.70 after 3 months but decreased to 26.90 +/- 1.90 after one year of the treatment. However, the latter score was higher than that in a placebo group 26.33 +/- 1.03 (P Brain spills and piracetam tablets have protective effect on cognitive and memory decline in elderly with MCI.

  11. The safety and immunogenicity of two hepatitis B vaccine formulations (thiomersal-free and thiomersal-containing) in healthy vietnamese infants: a phase III, prospective, single-blinded, randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieu, Nguyen Trong; Sarnecki, Michal; Tolboom, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of the thiomersal-free (TF) and thiomersal-containing (TC) formulations of Hepavax-Gene in healthy Vietnamese neonates. A single-blind, randomized, controlled study in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Healthy infants, born after a normal gestational period (37-42 weeks) to hepatitis B surface antigen-negative mothers, participated in the study. Subjects were randomly allocated in a 1:1 ratio to receive either Hepavax-Gene TC or Hepavax-Gene TF using a standard 0-1-6-month administration schedule. Postvaccination blood samples were taken at months 1, 6 and 7. Parents/legal guardians recorded solicited local and systemic adverse events up to 4 weeks after each vaccination. Very high proportions of subjects were seroprotected. Seroprotection rates at 1, 6 and 7 months were all above 95% using a 10 IU/L cutoff, and were mostly above 90% using a 100 IU/L cutoff. Seroprotection rates between the 2 formulations were equivalent within a 5% margin for either cutoff titer both after 6 and 7 months. There were no significant differences in the number of adverse events reported between the 2 formulations. Safety results were in line with previous reports for Hepavax-Gene. Both formulations of Hepavax-Gene were well tolerated. There were no local adverse events reported in the TF group. No serious adverse events were reported during the study. The thiomersal-free formulation of Hepavax-Gene was noninferior to the thiomersal-containing formulation of Hepavax-Gene in terms of immunogenicity. There was evidence that the thiomersal-free vaccine was associated with fewer local adverse events.

  12. Alga Ecklonia bicyclis, Tribulus terrestris, and Glucosamine Oligosaccharide Improve Erectile Function, Sexual Quality of Life, and Ejaculation Function in Patients with Moderate Mild-Moderate Erectile Dysfunction: A Prospective, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Single-Blinded Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansalone, Salvatore; Leonardi, Rosario; Antonini, Gabriele; Vitarelli, Antonio; Vespasiani, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of oral therapy with alga Ecklonia bicyclis, Tribulus terrestris, and glucosamine oligosaccharide (Tradamix TX1000) in patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) at 3 months of follow-up. From January 2013 to September 2013, 177 patients diagnosed with mild-moderate ED (IIEF-EF < 26) were enrolled in this multicenter, single-blinded, placebo-controlled study and randomized in Group A (Tradamix, n = 87) and Group B (placebo, n = 90). Penile color Doppler ultrasound measures, IIEF-15 questionnaire, male sexual health questionnaire-ejaculation disorder (MSHQ-EjD), and sexual quality of life (SQoL-M) were collected. We observed significant changes of the IIEF-15 in Group A (mean difference: 11.54; P < 0.05) at 3 months versus Group B (P < 0.05). PSV (P < 0.05), IIEF-intercourse satisfaction (P < 0.05), IIEF-orgasmic function (mean P < 0.05), IIEF-sexual desire (P < 0.05), IIEF-overall satisfaction (P < 0.05), MSHQ-EjD (mean difference: 1.21; P < 0.05), and SQoL-M (mean difference: 10.2; P < 0.05) were significantly changed in Group A versus baseline and Group B. Patients with moderate arterial dysfunction showed significant increase of PSV (P < 0.05), IIEF-EF (P < 0.05), MSHQ-EjD (P < 0.05), and SQoL-M (P < 0.05) in Group A. Therapy with Tradamix improves erectile and ejaculation function and sexual quality of life in patients with mild-moderate ED and in particular for those with moderate arterial dysfunction. PMID:25136552

  13. Alga Ecklonia bicyclis, Tribulus terrestris, and Glucosamine Oligosaccharide Improve Erectile Function, Sexual Quality of Life, and Ejaculation Function in Patients with Moderate Mild-Moderate Erectile Dysfunction: A Prospective, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Single-Blinded Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Sansalone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of oral therapy with alga Ecklonia bicyclis, Tribulus terrestris, and glucosamine oligosaccharide (Tradamix TX1000 in patients with erectile dysfunction (ED at 3 months of follow-up. From January 2013 to September 2013, 177 patients diagnosed with mild-moderate ED (IIEF-EF < 26 were enrolled in this multicenter, single-blinded, placebo-controlled study and randomized in Group A (Tradamix, n=87 and Group B (placebo, n=90. Penile color Doppler ultrasound measures, IIEF-15 questionnaire, male sexual health questionnaire-ejaculation disorder (MSHQ-EjD, and sexual quality of life (SQoL-M were collected. We observed significant changes of the IIEF-15 in Group A (mean difference: 11.54; P<0.05 at 3 months versus Group B (P<0.05. PSV (P<0.05, IIEF-intercourse satisfaction (P<0.05, IIEF-orgasmic function (mean P<0.05, IIEF-sexual desire (P<0.05, IIEF-overall satisfaction (P<0.05, MSHQ-EjD (mean difference: 1.21; P<0.05, and SQoL-M (mean difference: 10.2; P<0.05 were significantly changed in Group A versus baseline and Group B. Patients with moderate arterial dysfunction showed significant increase of PSV (P<0.05, IIEF-EF (P<0.05, MSHQ-EjD (P<0.05, and SQoL-M (P<0.05 in Group A. Therapy with Tradamix improves erectile and ejaculation function and sexual quality of life in patients with mild-moderate ED and in particular for those with moderate arterial dysfunction.

  14. Alga Ecklonia bicyclis, Tribulus terrestris, and glucosamine oligosaccharide improve erectile function, sexual quality of life, and ejaculation function in patients with moderate mild-moderate erectile dysfunction: a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, single-blinded study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansalone, Salvatore; Leonardi, Rosario; Antonini, Gabriele; Vitarelli, Antonio; Vespasiani, Giuseppe; Basic, Dragoslav; Morgia, Giuseppe; Cimino, Sebastiano; Russo, Giorgio Ivan

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of oral therapy with alga Ecklonia bicyclis, Tribulus terrestris, and glucosamine oligosaccharide (Tradamix TX1000) in patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) at 3 months of follow-up. From January 2013 to September 2013, 177 patients diagnosed with mild-moderate ED (IIEF-EF < 26) were enrolled in this multicenter, single-blinded, placebo-controlled study and randomized in Group A (Tradamix, n = 87) and Group B (placebo, n = 90). Penile color Doppler ultrasound measures, IIEF-15 questionnaire, male sexual health questionnaire-ejaculation disorder (MSHQ-EjD), and sexual quality of life (SQoL-M) were collected. We observed significant changes of the IIEF-15 in Group A (mean difference: 11.54; P < 0.05) at 3 months versus Group B (P < 0.05). PSV (P < 0.05), IIEF-intercourse satisfaction (P < 0.05), IIEF-orgasmic function (mean P < 0.05), IIEF-sexual desire (P < 0.05), IIEF-overall satisfaction (P < 0.05), MSHQ-EjD (mean difference: 1.21; P < 0.05), and SQoL-M (mean difference: 10.2; P < 0.05) were significantly changed in Group A versus baseline and Group B. Patients with moderate arterial dysfunction showed significant increase of PSV (P < 0.05), IIEF-EF (P < 0.05), MSHQ-EjD (P < 0.05), and SQoL-M (P < 0.05) in Group A. Therapy with Tradamix improves erectile and ejaculation function and sexual quality of life in patients with mild-moderate ED and in particular for those with moderate arterial dysfunction.

  15. Does the addition of virtual reality training to a standard program of inpatient rehabilitation improve sitting balance ability and function after stroke? Protocol for a single-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehy, L; Taillon-Hobson, A; Sveistrup, H; Bilodeau, M; Fergusson, D; Levac, D; Finestone, H

    2016-03-31

    Sitting ability and function are commonly impaired after stroke. Balance training has been shown to be helpful, but abundant repetitions are required for optimal recovery and patients must be motivated to perform rehabilitation exercises repeatedly to maximize treatment intensity. Virtual reality training (VRT), which allows patients to interact with a virtual environment using computer software and hardware, is enjoyable and may encourage greater repetition of therapeutic exercises. However, the potential for VRT to promote sitting balance has not yet been explored. The objective of this study is to determine if supplemental VRT-based sitting balance exercises improve sitting balance ability and function in stroke rehabilitation inpatients. This is a single-site, single-blind, parallel-group randomized control trial. Seventy six stroke rehabilitation inpatients who cannot stand independently for greater than one minute but can sit for at least 20 minutes (including at least one minute without support) are being recruited from a tertiary-care dedicated stroke rehabilitation unit. Participants are randomly allocated to experimental or control groups. Both participate in 10-12 sessions of 30-45 minutes of VRT performed in sitting administered by a single physiotherapist, in addition to their traditional therapy. The experimental group plays five games which challenge sitting balance while the control group plays five games which minimize trunk lean. Outcome measures of sitting balance ability (Function in Sitting Test, Ottawa Sitting Scale, quantitative measures of postural sway) and function (Reaching Performance Scale, Wolf Motor Function Test, quantitative measures of the limits of stability) are administered prior to, immediately following, and one month following the intervention by a second physiotherapist blind to the participant's group allocation. The treatment of sitting balance post-stroke with VRT has not yet been explored. Results from the current study

  16. Effects of kinesiotaping added to a rehabilitation programme for patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy: protocol for a single-blind, randomised controlled trial addressing symptoms, functional limitations and underlying deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Fábio Carlos Lucas; de Fontenay, Benoît Pairot; Bouyer, Laurent Julien; Desmeules, François; Roy, Jean-Sébastien

    2017-09-24

    Rotator cuff tendinopathy (RCTe) is the most frequent cause of shoulder pain, resulting in considerable losses to society and public resources. Muscle imbalance and inadequate sensorimotor control are deficits often associated with RCTe. Kinesiotaping (KT) is widely used by clinicians for rehabilitation of RCTe. While previous studies have examined the immediate effects of KT on shoulder injuries or the effects of KT as an isolated method of treatment, no published study has addressed its mid-term and long-term effects when combined with a rehabilitation programme for patients with RCTe. The primary objective of this randomised controlled trial (RCT) will be to assess the efficacy of therapeutic KT, added to a rehabilitation programme, in reducing pain and disabilities in individuals with RCTe. Secondary objectives will look at the effects of KT on the underlying factors involved in shoulder control, such as muscular activity, acromiohumeral distance (AHD) and range of motion (ROM). A single-blind RCT will be conducted. Fifty-two participants, randomly allocated to one of two groups (KT or no-KT), will take part in a 6-week rehabilitation programme. The KT group will receive KT added to the rehabilitation programme, whereas the no-KT group will receive only the rehabilitation programme. Measurements will be taken at baseline, week 3, week 6, week 12 and 6 months. Primary outcomes will be symptoms and functional limitations assessed by the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire. Secondary outcomes will include shoulder ROM, AHD at rest and at 60° of abduction, and muscle activation during arm elevation. The added effects of KT will be assessed through a two-way analysis of variance for repeated measures. Ethics approval was obtained from the Ethics Committee of Quebec Rehabilitation Institute of the Centre Integrated University Health and Social Services. Results will be disseminated through international publications in peer-reviewed journals

  17. Effect of single-dose low-level helium-neon laser irradiation on orthodontic pain: a split-mouth single-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobouti, Farhad; Khatami, Maziar; Chiniforush, Nasim; Rakhshan, Vahid; Shariati, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    Pain is the most common complication of orthodontic treatment. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been suggested as a new analgesic treatment free of the adverse effects of analgesic medications. However, it is not studied thoroughly, and the available studies are quite controversial. Moreover, helium neon (He-Ne) laser has not been assessed before. This split-mouth placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial was performed on 16 male and 14 female orthodontic patients requiring bilateral upper canine retraction. The study was performed at a private clinic in Sari, Iran, in 2014. It was single blind: patients, orthodontist, and personnel were blinded of the allocations, but the laser operator (periodontist) was not blinded. Once canine retractor was activated, a randomly selected maxillary quarter received a single dose of He-Ne laser irradiation (632.8 nm, 10 mw, 6 j/cm(2) density). The other quarter served as the placebo side, treated by the same device but powered off. In the first, second, fourth, and seventh days, blinded patients rated their pain sensed on each side at home using visual analog scale (VAS) questionnaires. There was no harm identified during or after the study. Pain changes were analyzed using two- and one-way repeated-measures ANOVA, Bonferroni, and t-test (α = 0.01, β > 0.99). This trial was not registered. It was self-funded by the authors. Sixteen males and 11 females remained in the study (aged 12-21). Average pain scores sensed in all 4 intervals on control and laser sides were 4.06 ± 2.85 and 2.35 ± 1.77, respectively (t-test P < 0.0001). One-way ANOVA showed significant pain declines over time, in each group (P < 0.0001). Two-way ANOVA showed significant effects for LLLT (P < 0.0001) and time (P = <0.0001). Single-dose He-Ne laser therapy might reduce orthodontic pain caused by retracting maxillary canines.

  18. The impact of a computerised test of attention and activity (QbTest) on diagnostic decision-making in children and young people with suspected attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: single-blind randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Chris; Hall, Charlotte L; Guo, Boliang; James, Marilyn; Boadu, Janet; Groom, Madeleine J; Brown, Nikki; Kaylor-Hughes, Catherine; Moldavsky, Maria; Valentine, Althea Z; Walker, Gemma M; Daley, David; Sayal, Kapil; Morriss, Richard

    2018-04-26

    Diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) relies on subjective methods which can lead to diagnostic uncertainty and delay. This trial evaluated the impact of providing a computerised test of attention and activity (QbTest) report on the speed and accuracy of diagnostic decision-making in children with suspected ADHD. Randomised, parallel, single-blind controlled trial in mental health and community paediatric clinics in England. Participants were 6-17 years-old and referred for ADHD diagnostic assessment; all underwent assessment-as-usual, plus QbTest. Participants and their clinician were randomised to either receive the QbTest report immediately (QbOpen group) or the report was withheld (QbBlind group). The primary outcome was number of consultations until a diagnostic decision confirming/excluding ADHD within 6-months from baseline. Health economic cost-effectiveness and cost utility analysis was conducted. Assessing QbTest Utility in ADHD: A Randomised Controlled Trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02209116). One hundred and thirty-two participants were randomised to QbOpen group (123 analysed) and 135 to QbBlind group (127 analysed). Clinicians with access to the QbTest report (QbOpen) were more likely to reach a diagnostic decision about ADHD (hazard ratio 1.44, 95% CI 1.04-2.01). At 6-months, 76% of those with a QbTest report had received a diagnostic decision, compared with 50% without. QbTest reduced appointment length by 15% (time ratio 0.85, 95% CI 0.77-0.93), increased clinicians' confidence in their diagnostic decisions (odds ratio 1.77, 95% CI 1.09-2.89) and doubled the likelihood of excluding ADHD. There was no difference in diagnostic accuracy. Health economic analysis showed a position of strict dominance; however, cost savings were small suggesting that the impact of providing the QbTest report within this trial can best be viewed as 'cost neutral'. QbTest may increase the

  19. Impact of Moringa oleifera lam. Leaf powder supplementation versus nutritional counseling on the body mass index and immune response of HIV patients on antiretroviral therapy: a single-blind randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tshingani, Koy; Donnen, Philippe; Mukumbi, Henri; Duez, Pierre; Dramaix-Wilmet, Michèle

    2017-08-22

    To achieve effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) outcomes, adherence to an antiretroviral regimen and a good immunometabolic response are essential. Food insecurity can act as a real barrier to adherence to both of these factors. Many people living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV) treated with ART in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) are faced with nutritional challenges. A significant proportion are affected by under nutrition, which frequently leads to therapeutic failure. Some HIV care facilities recommend supplementation with Moringa oleifera (M.O.) Lam. leaf powder to combat marginal and major nutritional deficiencies. This study aims to assess the impact of M.O. Lam. leaf powder supplementation compared to nutritional counseling on the nutritional and immune status of PLHIV treated with ART. A single-blind randomized control trial was carried out from May to September 2013 at an outpatient clinic for HIV-infected patients in Kinshasa (DRC). Sixty adult patients who were at stable HIV/AIDS clinical staging 2, 3 or 4 according to the World Health Organization (WHO), and were undergoing ART were recruited. After random allocation, 30 patients in the Moringa intervention group (MG) received the M.O. Lam. leaf powder daily over 6 months, and 30 in the control group (CG) received nutritional counseling over the same period. Changes in the body mass index (BMI) were measured monthly and biological parameters were measured upon admission and at the end of the study for the patients in both groups. The two study groups were similar in terms of long-term nutritional exposure, sociodemographic, socioeconomic, clinical, and biological features. At 6 months follow-up, patients in the MG exhibited a significantly greater increase in BMI and albumin levels than those in the CG. The interaction between the sociodemographic, clinical, and biological characteristics of patients in the two groups was not significant, with the exception of professional

  20. The effect of short-term low-energy ultraviolet B irradiation on bone mineral density and bone turnover markers in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis: A randomized single-blinded controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micić Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The importance of vitamin D on bone health and osteoporosis was studied by many researchers. The main role of the Vitamin D is to absorb calcium and phosphate and increase bone mineralization. Older people are at an increased risk of the inadequate vitamin D production in the skin because of lower sun exposure and reduced ability of the skin to synthesize vitamin D. Objective. The aim of this clinical trial was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of short-term (2 weeks low energy UVB irradiation in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis using bone mineral density and bone turnover markers. Methods. A three-month, single-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted at the University hospital in Daegu, Republic of Korea. Fifty-two postmenopausal Korean women (older than 65 years with osteoporosis were randomly allocated to have either low energy UVB or placebo for 30 minutes a day for two weeks of treatment during winter. Laboratory analysis and physical examination before and 4, 8 and 12 weeks after treatment were carried out and BMD was measured before and 8 and 12 weeks after treatment. The effects of time and treatment interaction between these two groups were evaluated by repeated-measure two-factor analysis, and subgroup analysis was performed to examine UVB effect on the vitamin D insufficient group [serum 25(OHD3 concentration <30 ng/mL]. Results. In vitamin D insufficient group, the effect of UVB irradiation on vitamin D and bone ALP as well as additional benefit on bone formation was confirmed. The vitamin D insufficient group showed statistically significant increment in serum 25(OHD3 compared with the normal group (p<0.05. However, there was no significant difference between two groups in the other bone turnover markers, such as serum calcium, PTH-C, serum osteocalcin, serum CTX and BMD. Conclusion. Low-energy-short-term UVB radiation for postmenopausal women may be of use in vitamin D

  1. A randomized, placebo-controlled, single-blinded, split-faced clinical trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of KLOX-001 gel formulation with KLOX light-emitting diode light on facial rejuvenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolis A

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Andreas Nikolis,1 Steven Bernstein,2 Brian Kinney,3 Nicolo Scuderi,4 Shipra Rastogi,5 John S Sampalis6 1Victoria Park, Plastic Surgery Section, Westmount, QC, Canada; 2Dermatology Department, University of Montreal Health Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada; 3Department of Plastic Surgery, USC School of Medicine, Beverley Hills, CA, USA; 4Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, La Sapienza, Rome, Italy; 5KLOX Technologies, Laval, 6JSS Medical Research, Montreal, QC, Canada Purpose: Many treatment modalities exist to counteract the effects of cutaneous aging. Ablative methods have been the mainstay for nonsurgical facial rejuvenation. In recent years, nonablative techniques have been developed with the aim of achieving facial rejuvenation without epidermal damage. Light-emitting diode (LED photorejuvenation is a novel nonablative technique that induces collagen synthesis through biophotomodulatory pathways. Materials and methods: A single-center, randomized, single-blinded, placebo-controlled, split-faced clinical trial was designed. Thirty-two patients were enrolled for a 12-week study. Patients were randomized into one of four groups: Group A, treatment with KLOX-001 gel formulation and white LED (placebo light; Group B, treatment with a placebo/base gel (no active chromophore formulation and KLOX LED light; Group C, treatment with KLOX-001 gel formulation and KLOX LED light; and Group D, treatment with the standard skin rejuvenating treatment (0.1% retinol-based cream. Patients received treatment at weeks 0, 1, 2, and 3, and returned to the clinic at weeks 4, 8, and 12 for clinical assessments performed by an independent, blinded committee of physicians using subjective clinician assessment scales. Tolerability, adverse outcomes, and patient satisfaction were also assessed. Results: Analysis demonstrated that the KLOX LED light with KLOX placebo/base gel and the KLOX LED light + KLOX-001 gel formulation groups were superior to standard of

  2. Social recovery therapy in combination with early intervention services for enhancement of social recovery in patients with first-episode psychosis (SUPEREDEN3): a single-blind, randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, David; Hodgekins, Jo; French, Paul; Marshall, Max; Freemantle, Nick; McCrone, Paul; Everard, Linda; Lavis, Anna; Jones, Peter B; Amos, Tim; Singh, Swaran; Sharma, Vimal; Birchwood, Max

    2018-01-01

    Provision of early intervention services has increased the rate of social recovery in patients with first-episode psychosis; however, many individuals have continuing severe and persistent problems with social functioning. We aimed to assess the efficacy of early intervention services augmented with social recovery therapy in patients with first-episode psychosis. The primary hypothesis was that social recovery therapy plus early intervention services would lead to improvements in social recovery. We did this single-blind, phase 2, randomised controlled trial (SUPEREDEN3) at four specialist early intervention services in the UK. We included participants who were aged 16-35 years, had non-affective psychosis, had been clients of early intervention services for 12-30 months, and had persistent and severe social disability, defined as engagement in less than 30 h per week of structured activity. Participants were randomly assigned (1:1), via computer-generated randomisation with permuted blocks (sizes of four to six), to receive social recovery therapy plus early intervention services or early intervention services alone. Randomisation was stratified by sex and recruitment centre (Norfolk, Birmingham, Lancashire, and Sussex). By necessity, participants were not masked to group allocation, but allocation was concealed from outcome assessors. The primary outcome was time spent in structured activity at 9 months, as measured by the Time Use Survey. Analysis was by intention to treat. This trial is registered with ISRCTN, number ISRCTN61621571. Between Oct 1, 2012, and June 20, 2014, we randomly assigned 155 participants to receive social recovery therapy plus early intervention services (n=76) or early intervention services alone (n=79); the intention-to-treat population comprised 154 patients. At 9 months, 143 (93%) participants had data for the primary outcome. Social recovery therapy plus early intervention services was associated with an increase in structured

  3. RAPP, a systematic e-assessment of postoperative recovery in patients undergoing day surgery: study protocol for a mixed-methods study design including a multicentre, two-group, parallel, single-blind randomised controlled trial and qualitative interview studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, U; Jaensson, M; Dahlberg, K; Odencrants, S; Grönlund, Å; Hagberg, L; Eriksson, M

    2016-01-13

    Day surgery is a well-established practice in many European countries, but only limited information is available regarding postoperative recovery at home though there is a current lack of a standard procedure regarding postoperative follow-up. Furthermore, there is also a need for improvement of modern technology in assessing patient-related outcomes such as mobile applications. This article describes the Recovery Assessment by Phone Points (RAPP) study protocol, a mixed-methods study to evaluate if a systematic e-assessment follow-up in patients undergoing day surgery is cost-effective and improves postoperative recovery, health and quality of life. This study has a mixed-methods study design that includes a multicentre, two-group, parallel, single-blind randomised controlled trial and qualitative interview studies. 1000 patients >17 years of age who are undergoing day surgery will be randomly assigned to either e-assessed postoperative recovery follow-up daily in 14 days measured via smartphone app including the Swedish web-version of Quality of Recovery (SwQoR) or to standard care (ie, no follow-up). The primary aim is cost-effectiveness. Secondary aims are (A) to explore whether a systematic e-assessment follow-up after day surgery has a positive effect on postoperative recovery, health-related quality of life (QoL) and overall health; (B) to determine whether differences in postoperative recovery have an association with patient characteristic, type of surgery and anaesthesia; (C) to determine whether differences in health literacy have a substantial and distinct effect on postoperative recovery, health and QoL; and (D) to describe day surgery patient and staff experiences with a systematic e-assessment follow-up after day surgery.The primary aim will be measured at 2 weeks postoperatively and secondary outcomes (A-C) at 1 and 2 weeks and (D) at 1 and 4 months. NCT02492191; Pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use

  4. Meningococcal serogroup B-specific responses after vaccination with bivalent rLP2086: 4 year follow-up of a randomised, single-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Helen S; Richmond, Peter C; Beeslaar, Johannes; Jiang, Qin; Jansen, Kathrin U; Garcés-Sánchez, Maria; Martinón-Torres, Federico; Szenborn, Leszek; Wysocki, Jacek; Eiden, Joseph; Harris, Shannon L; Jones, Thomas R; Lee, Su-San; Perez, John L

    2017-01-01

    Bivalent rLP2086 is a recombinant factor H binding protein-based vaccine approved in the USA for prevention of meningococcal serogroup B disease in 10-25-year-olds. We aimed to assess the persistence of bactericidal antibodies up to 4 years after a three-dose schedule of bivalent rLP2086. We did this randomised, single-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2 trial at 25 sites in Australia, Poland, and Spain. In stage 1 of the study (February, 2009-May, 2010), healthy adolescents (aged 11-18 years) were randomly assigned, via an interactive voice and web-response system with computer-generated sequential random numbers, to receive either ascending doses of vaccine (60 μg, 120 μg, and 200 μg) or placebo at months 0, 2, and 6. Dispensing staff were not masked to group allocation, but allocation was concealed from principal investigators, participants and their guardians, and laboratory personnel. In stage 2 of the study (reported here), we enrolled healthy adolescents who had received three doses of 120 μg bivalent rLP2086 (the optimum dose level identified in stage 1) or saline. Immunogenicity was determined in serum bactericidal antibody assay using human complement (hSBA) by use of four meningococcal serogroup B test strains expressing vaccine-heterologous factor H binding protein variants: PMB80 (A22), PMB2001 (A56), PMB2948 (B24), and PMB2707 (B44). Immunogenicity in stage 2 was assessed at months 6, 12, 24, and 48 post-vaccination. We did analysis by intention to treat. This trial is registered as ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00808028. Between March 17, 2010, and Feb 8, 2011, 170 participants who received 120 μg of bivalent rLP2086 and 80 participants who received placebo in stage 1 of the study were entered into stage 2; 210 participants completed stage 2 up to 48 months. 1 month after the third vaccination, 93% (n=139/149) to 100% (n=48/48) of vaccine recipients achieved protective hSBA titres equal to or greater than the lower limit of quantification to each

  5. A pilot study to assess the utility of a freely downloadable mobile application simulator for undergraduate clinical skills training: a single-blinded, randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Richard D; Radenkovic, Dina; Mitrasinovic, Stefan; Cole, Andrew; Pavkovic, Iva; Denn, Peyton Cheong Phey; Hussain, Mahrukh; Kogler, Magdalena; Koutsopodioti, Natalia; Uddin, Wasima; Beckley, Ivan; Abubakar, Hana; Gill, Deborah; Smith, Daron

    2017-12-11

    Medical simulators offer an invaluable educational resource for medical trainees. However, owing to cost and portability restrictions, they have traditionally been limited to simulation centres. With the advent of sophisticated mobile technology, simulators have become cheaper and more accessible. Touch Surgery is one such freely downloadable mobile application simulator (MAS) used by over one million healthcare professionals worldwide. Nevertheless, to date, it has never been formally validated as an adjunct in undergraduate medical education. Medical students in the final 3 years of their programme were recruited and randomised to one of three revision interventions: 1) no formal revision resources, 2) traditional revision resources, or 3) MAS. Students completed pre-test questionnaires and were then assessed on their ability to complete an undisclosed male urinary catheterisation scenario. Following a one-hour quarantined revision period, all students repeated the scenario. Both attempts were scored by allocation-blinded examiners against an objective 46-point mark scheme. A total of 27 medical students were randomised (n = 9 per group). Mean scores improved between baseline and post-revision attempts by 8.7% (p = 0.003), 19.8% (p = 0.0001), and 15.9% (p = 0.001) for no resources, traditional resources, and MAS, respectively. However, when comparing mean score improvements between groups there were no significant differences. Mobile simulators offer an unconventional, yet potentially useful adjunct to enhance undergraduate clinical skills education. Our results indicate that MAS's perform comparably to current gold-standard revision resources; however, they may confer significant advantages in terms of cost-effectiveness and practice flexibility. Not applicable.

  6. A single-blind study of the efficacy and safety of intravenous granisetron compared with alizapride plus dexamethasone in the prophylaxis and control of emesis in patients receiving 5-day cytostatic therapy. The Granisetron Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, K

    1992-01-01

    200 cancer patients who were due to receive fractionated chemotherapy (cisplatin greater than or equal to 15, ifosfamide greater than or equal to 1.2 or etoposide greater than or equal to 120, all mg/m2 per day) for 5 days, entered a multicentre study. Patients were randomised single-blind to receive either prophylactic intravenous granisetron (40 micrograms/kg) or alizapride (4 mg/kg followed by 4 mg/kg at 4 and 8 h post-treatment) plus dexamethasone 8 mg. Granistron was superior to the combination in preventing nausea and vomiting (54% vs. 43% complete responders). The differences were in the cisplatin-treated group. The time to first episode of moderate to severe nausea was significantly longer in the granisetron group (P = 0.03). Dosing with granisetron was more simple, with over 85% of patients requiring only a single prophylactic dose. Fewer patients receiving granisetron experienced adverse events (48% vs. 62%, P = 0.047). The frequency of constipation was, as expected, significantly higher in the granisetron group. Extrapyramidal effects, which were not noted by any granisetron patient, occurred in 5.3% of comparator patients.

  7. Virtual-reality-based cognitive behavioural therapy versus waiting list control for paranoid ideation and social avoidance in patients with psychotic disorders: a single-blind randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pot-Kolder, Roos M C A; Geraets, Chris N W; Veling, Wim; van Beilen, Marije; Staring, Anton B P; Gijsman, Harm J; Delespaul, Philippe A E G; van der Gaag, Mark

    2018-03-01

    Many patients with psychotic disorders have persistent paranoid ideation and avoid social situations because of suspiciousness and anxiety. We investigated the effects of virtual-reality-based cognitive behavioural therapy (VR-CBT) on paranoid thoughts and social participation. In this randomised controlled trial at seven Dutch mental health centres, outpatients aged 18-65 years with a DSM-IV-diagnosed psychotic disorder and paranoid ideation in the past month were randomly assigned (1:1) via block randomisation to VR-CBT (in addition to treatment as usual) or the waiting list control group (treatment as usual). VR-CBT consisted of 16 individual therapy sessions (each 1 h long). Assessments were done at baseline, after treatment (ie, 3 months from baseline), and at a 6 month follow-up visit. The primary outcome was social participation, which we operationalised as the amount of time spent with other people, momentary paranoia, perceived social threat, and momentary anxiety. Analysis was by intention to treat. This trial was retrospectively registered with ISRCTN, number 12929657. Between April 1, 2014, and Dec 31, 2015, 116 patients with a psychotic disorder were randomly assigned, 58 to the VR-CBT group and 58 to the waiting list control group. Compared with the control, VR-CBT did not significantly increase the amount of time spent with other people at the post-treatment assessment. Momentary paranoid ideation (b=-0·331 [95% CI -0·432 to -0·230], pproblems were mediators of change in paranoid ideation. No adverse events were reported relating to the therapy or assessments. Our results suggest that the addition of VR-CBT to standard treatment can reduce paranoid ideation and momentary anxiety in patients with a psychotic disorder. Fonds NutsOhra, Stichting tot Steun VCVGZ. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Muscle energy technique compared to eccentric loading exercise in the management of achilles tendinitis: A pilot randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hariharasudhan Ravichandran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Achilles tendinitis is a common overuse injury among both elite and recreational athletes involved in activities such as repetitive jumping and running. Aim: The aim of this single-blinded randomized study was to compare the efficacy of muscle energy technique (MET and eccentric loading exercise (ELE interventions on improving functional ability and pain reduction among athletes with Achilles tendinitis. Methods: A single-blinded, pilot, randomized study was conducted in the Department of Physical Therapy, Global Hospitals and Health City, India, with 6-week follow-up. A total of 30 patients with Achilles tendinitis were randomly allocated to receive either MET (n = 15 or ELE (n = 15 treatment. Treatment effects were evaluated by pre- and post-treatment assessment of visual analog scale (VAS and Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment-Achilles (VISA-A questionnaire. Measures were performed by single-blinded evaluators at baseline and at 2, 4, and after 6 weeks of treatment. Results: Both groups showed a significant difference in VAS after 6 weeks' ELE group showed a significant improvement during treatment at 2 and 4 weeks in comparison with MET group. The VISA-A scale score significantly improved in both groups. Yet, comparison of VISA scores between groups showed marginally significant difference (P = 0.012. Conclusion: This pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT showed the efficacy of ELE in reducing pain and improving functional ability among patients with Achilles tendinitis. The findings of this study provide the rationale for undertaking a large-scale RCT. A large sized trial is needed to establish evidence for clinical practice of ELE in Achilles tendinitis cases.

  9. Comparison of benzydamine hydrochloride and Salvia officinalis as an adjuvant local treatment to systemic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug in controlling pain after tonsillectomy, adenoidectomy, or both: an open-label, single-blind, randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MD Sinisa Lalićević

    2004-07-01

    Conclusions: In this clinical trial of children and adults who underwent tonsillectomy, adenoidectomy, or both, BNZD, as an adjuvant to an NSAID, was more effective than SO in controlling postoperative pain and infection. The pain-reducing effect of BNZD was of quick onset and persisted for 1 week after surgery. The safety profile of BNZD was comparable to that of SO, with the exception of postoperative infection in adults, for which BNZD was more efficacious. In particular, the use of BNZD was not associated with a high risk for early postoperative hemorrhage.

  10. A walking programme and a supervised exercise class versus usual physiotherapy for chronic low back pain: a single-blinded randomised controlled trial. (The Supervised Walking In comparison to Fitness Training for Back Pain (SWIFT) Trial).

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hurley, Deirdre A

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a persistent disabling condition with rising significant healthcare, social and economic costs. Current research supports the use of exercise-based treatment approaches that encourage people with CLBP to assume a physically active role in their recovery. While international clinical guidelines and systematic reviews for CLBP support supervised group exercise as an attractive first-line option for treating large numbers of CLBP patients at low cost, barriers to their delivery include space and time restrictions in healthcare settings and poor patient attendance. The European Clinical Guidelines have identified the need for research in the use of brief\\/minimal contact self-activation interventions that encourage participation in physical activity for CLBP. Walking may be an ideally suited form of individualized exercise prescription as it is easy to do, requires no special skills or facilities, and is achievable by virtually all ages with little risk of injury, but its effectiveness for LBP is unproven. METHODS AND DESIGN: This study will be an assessor-blinded randomized controlled trial that will investigate the difference in clinical effectiveness and costs of an individualized walking programme and a supervised general exercise programme compared to usual physiotherapy, which will act as the control group, in people with chronic low back pain. A sample of 246 patients will be recruited in Dublin, Ireland through acute general hospital outpatient physiotherapy departments that provide treatment for people with CLBP. Patients will be randomly allocated to one of the three groups in a concealed manner. The main outcomes will be functional disability, pain, quality of life, fear avoidance, back beliefs, physical activity, satisfaction and costs, which will be evaluated at baseline, and 3, 6 and 12 months [follow-up by pre-paid postage]. Qualitative telephone interviews and focus groups will be embedded in the research

  11. Continuous activation of PpIX by daylight is as effective as and less painful than conventional photodynamic therapy for actinic keratoses; a randomized, controlled, single-blinded study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiegell, S.R.; Hædersdal, Merete; Philipsen, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    of the face and scalp were treated with MAL-PDT in two symmetrical areas. One area was illuminated by red LED light (37 J cm(-2)) after 3-h incubation with MAL under occlusive dressing. The other area was treated with daylight for 2.5 h after the MAL cream had been under occlusion for half an hour. Results We...... found no significant difference in the treatment effect between the two treatments (P = 0.13), with a reduction of AK lesions of 79% in the daylight area compared with 71% in the LED area. Treatment response in the daylight area did not depend on the intensity of the daylight. Illumination with LED...... of porphyrins during its formation. Objectives The objective of this randomized controlled study was to compare response rates and adverse effects after methyl aminolevulinate (MAL)-PDT using conventional red light-emitting diode (LED) light vs. daylight. Patients/methods Twenty-nine patients with AK...

  12. Post-operative analgesia following total knee arthroplasty: comparison of low-dose intrathecal morphine and single-shot ultrasound-guided femoral nerve block: a randomized, single blinded, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassanito, L; Vergari, A; Zanghi, F; Messina, A; Bitondo, M; Antonelli, M

    2010-07-01

    Total knee arthroplasty often results in marked postoperative pain. A recent meta-analysis supports the use of femoral nerve block or alternatively spinal injection of morphine plus local anaesthetic for post-operative analgesia. On the other hand, the use of intrathecal morphine may be associated with a large number of distressing side effects (itching, urinary retention, nausea and vomiting, delayed respiratory depression). The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of femoral nerve block and low dose intrathecal morphine in post-operative analgesia after primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty. Fifty-two consecutive patients scheduled for primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty were allocated to the intrathecal morphine group (ITM group) or to the femoral nerve block group (FNB group). In ITM group a subarachnoid puncture was performed at the L3-L4 inter-vertebral space with hyperbaric bupivacaine 15 mg plus 100 mcg of preservative-free morphine. Patients allocated to the FNB group received a single-injection ultrasound-assisted femoral nerve block with ropivacaine 0.75% 25 ml before the spinal injection of hyperbaric bupivacaine 15 mg. All patients received postoperative patient-controlled-analgesia (PCA) morphine, using a 1-mg bolus and a 5-minute lockout period. Data were analyzed using Student t test or two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) for repeated measures with time and treatment as the 2 factors. Post hoc comparisons were performed by Bonferroni test. Statistical significance for all test was a p value < 0.05. Patient characteristics were similar between the 2 groups. We found a statistically significant differences in postoperative pain between the two groups: ITM group had the lower visual analogic pain score (VAS) values. Morphine consumption was lower in the ITM group: average consumption within the first 6 hours was 0.9 mg in IT group compared to 3.1 mg in FNB group; at 12 h 4.2 mg vs 6.3 mg; at 24 h 6.9 mg vs 10.3 mg; at 48 h 9

  13. The effect on knee-joint load of instruction in analgesic use compared with neuromuscular exercise in patients with knee osteoarthritis: study protocol for a randomized, single-blind, controlled trial (the EXERPHARMA trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, Brian; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders; Søndergaard, Jens; Christensen, Robin; Andriacchi, Thomas P; Roos, Ewa M

    2014-11-15

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a mechanically driven disease, and it is suggested that medial tibiofemoral knee-joint load increases with pharmacologic pain relief, indicating that pharmacologic pain relief may be positively associated with disease progression. Treatment modalities that can both relieve pain and reduce knee-joint load would be preferable. The knee-joint load is influenced by functional alignment of the trunk, pelvis, and lower-limb segments with respect to the knee, as well as the ground-reaction force generated during movement. Neuromuscular exercise can influence knee load and decrease knee pain. It includes exercises to improve balance, muscle activation, functional alignment, and functional knee stability. The primary objective of this randomized controlled trial (RCT) is to investigate the efficacy of a NEuroMuscular EXercise (NEMEX) therapy program, compared with optimized analgesics and antiinflammatory drug use, on the measures of knee-joint load in people with mild to moderate medial tibiofemoral knee osteoarthritis. One hundred men and women with mild to moderate medial knee osteoarthritis will be recruited from general medical practices and randomly allocated (1:1) to one of two 8-week treatments, either (a) NEMEX therapy twice a week or (b) information on the recommended use of analgesics and antiinflammatory drugs (acetaminophen and oral NSAIDs) via a pamphlet and video materials. The primary outcome is change in knee load during walking (the Knee Index, a composite score of the first external peak total reaction moment on the knee joint from all three planes based on 3D movement analysis) after 8 weeks of intervention. Secondary outcomes include changes in the external peak knee-adduction moment and impulse and functional performance measures, in addition to changes in self-reported pain, function, health status, and quality of life. These findings will help determine whether 8 weeks of neuromuscular exercise is superior to optimized use

  14. Relay model for recruiting alcohol dependent patients in general hospitals--a single-blind pragmatic randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarz, Anne-Sophie; Bilberg, Randi; Bjerregaard, Lene Berit Skov

    2016-01-01

    - The Relay Model. METHOD/DESIGN: The study is a single-blind pragmatic randomized controlled trial including patients admitted to the hospital. The study group (n = 500) will receive an intervention, and the control group (n = 500) will be referred to treatment by usual procedures. All patients complete......://register.clinicaltrials.gov/by identifier: RESCueH_Relay NCT02188043 Project Relay Model for Recruiting Alcohol Dependent Patients in General Hospitals (TRN Registration: 07/09/2014)....

  15. Adaptive Controller Effects on Pilot Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Anna C.; Gregory, Irene M.; Hempley, Lucas E.

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive control provides robustness and resilience for highly uncertain, and potentially unpredictable, flight dynamics characteristic. Some of the recent flight experiences of pilot-in-the-loop with an adaptive controller have exhibited unpredicted interactions. In retrospect, this is not surprising once it is realized that there are now two adaptive controllers interacting, the software adaptive control system and the pilot. An experiment was conducted to categorize these interactions on the pilot with an adaptive controller during control surface failures. One of the objectives of this experiment was to determine how the adaptation time of the controller affects pilots. The pitch and roll errors, and stick input increased for increasing adaptation time and during the segment when the adaptive controller was adapting. Not surprisingly, altitude, cross track and angle deviations, and vertical velocity also increase during the failure and then slowly return to pre-failure levels. Subjects may change their behavior even as an adaptive controller is adapting with additional stick inputs. Therefore, the adaptive controller should adapt as fast as possible to minimize flight track errors. This will minimize undesirable interactions between the pilot and the adaptive controller and maintain maneuvering precision.

  16. Efficacy and safety of tribendimidine, tribendimidine plus ivermectin, tribendimidine plus oxantel pamoate, and albendazole plus oxantel pamoate against hookworm and concomitant soil-transmitted helminth infections in Tanzania and Côte d'Ivoire: a randomised, controlled, single-blinded, non-inferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Wendelin; Coulibaly, Jean T; Ali, Said M; Ame, Shaali M; Amour, Amour K; Yapi, Richard B; Albonico, Marco; Puchkov, Maxim; Huwyler, Jörg; Hattendorf, Jan; Keiser, Jennifer

    2017-11-01

    Preventive chemotherapy is the current strategy to control soil-transmitted helminth infections (caused by Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm, and Trichuris trichiura). But, to improve efficacy and avoid emerging resistance, new drugs are warranted. Tribendimidine has shown good anthelmintic efficacy and is therefore a frontrunner for monotherapy and combination chemotherapy. We did a randomised, controlled, single-blinded, non-inferiority trial on Pemba Island, Tanzania, and in Côte d'Ivoire. We recruited adolescents aged 15-18 years from four primary schools on Pemba, and school attendees and non-schoolers from two districts in Côte d'Ivoire. Only hookworm-positive participants were randomly assigned (1:1:1:1) to single, oral doses of tribendimidine 400 mg plus placebo (tribendimidine monotherapy), tribendimidine 400 mg plus ivermectin 200 μg/kg, tribendimidine 400 mg plus oxantel pamoate 25 mg/kg, or albendazole 400 mg plus oxantel pamoate 25 mg/kg. Randomisation was done via a computer-generated list in block sizes of four or eight. Participants were asked to provide two stool samples on 2 consecutive days at baseline and again 14-21 days at follow-up. The primary outcome was the difference in egg-reduction rates (ERRs; ie, the geometric mean reduction) in hookworm egg counts between treatment groups, measured by the Kato-Katz technique. Differences in coadministrated treatment groups were assessed for non-inferiority with a margin of -3% to albendazole plus oxantel pamoate based on the available-case population, analysed by intention to treat. Safety was assessed 3 h and 24 h after treatment. This study is registered with ISRCTN (number 14373201). Between July 26, and Dec 23, 2016, we treated 636 hookworm-positive participants, and outcome data were available for 601 participants (151 assigned to tribendimidine monotherapy, 154 to tribendimidine plus ivermectin, 148 to tribendimidine plus oxantel pamoate, and 148 to albendazole plus oxantel pamoate

  17. A single-blind trial of reflexology for irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovey, Philip

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a significant problem for primary care, as treatment options are limited and it can frequently develop into a chronic condition. Complementary and alternative medicine, including reflexology, is being turned to increasingly in an attempt to manage symptoms. There are currently no studies which address the effectiveness of reflexology for IBS. Despite this, it continues to be advocated and used. AIM: To provide the first evidence on the effectiveness of reflexology in the management of the core defining symptoms of IBS. DESIGN OF STUDY: A single-blind trial carried out in primary care settings. SETTING: Thirty-four participants diagnosed with IBS on the basis of the Rome Criteria. METHOD: Participants were allocated to receive either a reflexology foot massage or a non-reflexology foot massage control group. RESULTS: On none of the three symptoms monitored--abdominal pain, constipation/diarrhoea, and abdominal distention--was there a statistically or clinically significant difference between reflexology and control groups. CONCLUSION: On the basis of these results there is nothing to suggest that reflexology produces any specific benefit for patients with IBS. There is currently no evidence to support its use. However this was one (relatively) small scale study; further research that, for example, assesses the impact of therapist (professional and lay) versus therapy, is still needed. PMID:11791811

  18. Pilot-model measurements of pilot responses in a lateral-directional control task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    Pilot response during an aircraft bank-angle compensatory control task was measured by using an adaptive modeling technique. In the main control loop, which is the bank angle to aileron command loop, the pilot response was the same as that measured previously in single-input, single-output systems. The pilot used a rudder to aileron control coordination that canceled up to 80 percent of the vehicle yawing moment due to aileron deflection.

  19. Fractional Carbon Dioxide Laser for Keratosis Pilaris: A Single-Blind, Randomized, Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasanop Vachiramon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Keratosis pilaris (KP is a common condition which can frequently be cosmetically disturbing. Topical treatments can be used with limited efficacy. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of fractional carbon dioxide (CO2 laser for the treatment of KP. Patients and Methods. A prospective, randomized, single-blinded, intraindividual comparative study was conducted on adult patients with KP. A single session of fractional CO2 laser was performed to one side of arm whereas the contralateral side served as control. Patients were scheduled for follow-up at 4 and 12 weeks after treatment. Clinical improvement was graded subjectively by blinded dermatologists. Patients rated treatment satisfaction at the end of the study. Results. Twenty patients completed the study. All patients stated that the laser treatment improved KP lesions. At 12-week follow-up, 30% of lesions on the laser-treated side had moderate to good improvement according to physicians’ global assessment (p=0.02. Keratotic papules and hyperpigmentation appeared to respond better than the erythematous component. Four patients with Fitzpatrick skin type V developed transient pigmentary alteration. Conclusions. Fractional CO2 laser treatment may be offered to patients with KP. Dark-skinned patients should be treated with special caution.

  20. Effect of Probiotic Lactobacillus salivarius UBL S22 and Prebiotic Fructo-oligosaccharide on Serum Lipids, Inflammatory Markers, Insulin Sensitivity, and Gut Bacteria in Healthy Young Volunteers: A Randomized Controlled Single-Blind Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, Hemalatha; Kumar, Manoj; Das, Nilita; Kumar, S Nishanth; Challa, Hanumanth R; Nagpal, Ravinder

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of 6-week supplementation of a probiotic strain Lactobacillus salivarius UBL S22 with or without prebiotic fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS) on serum lipid profiles, immune responses, insulin sensitivity, and gut lactobacilli in 45 healthy young individuals. The patients were divided into 3 groups (15/group), that is, placebo, probiotic, and synbiotic. After 6 weeks, a significant reduction (P < .05) in total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and triglycerides and increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was observed in the probiotic as well as in the synbiotic group when compared to placebo; however, the results of total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol were more pronounced in the synbiotic group. Similarly, when compared to the placebo group, the serum concentrations of inflammatory markers such as high sensitivity C-reactive protein, interleukin (IL) 6, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor α were significantly (P < .05) reduced in both the experimental groups, but again the reduction in the synbiotic group was more pronounced. Also, an increase (P < .05) in the fecal counts of total lactobacilli and a decrease (P < .05) in coliforms and Escherichia coli was observed in both the experimental groups after 6 weeks of ingestion. Overall, the combination of L salivarius with FOS was observed to be more beneficial than L salivarius alone, thereby advocating that such synbiotic combinations could be therapeutically exploited for improved health and quality of life. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Use of ChAd3-EBO-Z Ebola virus vaccine in Malian and US adults, and boosting of Malian adults with MVA-BN-Filo: a phase 1, single-blind, randomised trial, a phase 1b, open-label and double-blind, dose-escalation trial, and a nested, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Milagritos D; Sow, Samba O; Lyke, Kirsten E; Haidara, Fadima Cheick; Diallo, Fatoumata; Doumbia, Moussa; Traore, Awa; Coulibaly, Flanon; Kodio, Mamoudou; Onwuchekwa, Uma; Sztein, Marcelo B; Wahid, Rezwanul; Campbell, James D; Kieny, Marie-Paule; Moorthy, Vasee; Imoukhuede, Egeruan B; Rampling, Tommy; Roman, Francois; De Ryck, Iris; Bellamy, Abbie R; Dally, Len; Mbaya, Olivier Tshiani; Ploquin, Aurélie; Zhou, Yan; Stanley, Daphne A; Bailer, Robert; Koup, Richard A; Roederer, Mario; Ledgerwood, Julie; Hill, Adrian V S; Ballou, W Ripley; Sullivan, Nancy; Graham, Barney; Levine, Myron M

    2016-01-01

    The 2014 west African Zaire Ebola virus epidemic prompted worldwide partners to accelerate clinical development of replication-defective chimpanzee adenovirus 3 vector vaccine expressing Zaire Ebola virus glycoprotein (ChAd3-EBO-Z). We aimed to investigate the safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of ChAd3-EBO-Z in Malian and US adults, and assess the effect of boosting of Malians with modified vaccinia Ankara expressing Zaire Ebola virus glycoprotein and other filovirus antigens (MVA-BN-Filo). In the phase 1, single-blind, randomised trial of ChAd3-EBO-Z in the USA, we recruited adults aged 18-65 years from the University of Maryland medical community and the Baltimore community. In the phase 1b, open-label and double-blind, dose-escalation trial of ChAd3-EBO-Z in Mali, we recruited adults 18-50 years of age from six hospitals and health centres in Bamako (Mali), some of whom were also eligible for a nested, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of MVA-BN-Filo. For randomised segments of the Malian trial and for the US trial, we randomly allocated participants (1:1; block size of six [Malian] or four [US]; ARB produced computer-generated randomisation lists; clinical staff did randomisation) to different single doses of intramuscular immunisation with ChAd3-EBO-Z: Malians received 1 × 10(10) viral particle units (pu), 2·5 × 10(10) pu, 5 × 10(10) pu, or 1 × 10(11) pu; US participants received 1 × 10(10) pu or 1 × 10(11) pu. We randomly allocated Malians in the nested trial (1:1) to receive a single dose of 2 × 10(8) plaque-forming units of MVA-BN-Filo or saline placebo. In the double-blind segments of the Malian trial, investigators, clinical staff, participants, and immunology laboratory staff were masked, but the study pharmacist (MK), vaccine administrator, and study statistician (ARB) were unmasked. In the US trial, investigators were not masked, but participants were. Analyses were per protocol. The primary outcome was safety, measured

  2. Sucralfate versus cimetidine in reflux esophagitis. A single-blind multicenter study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hameeteman, W.; v d Boomgaard, D. M.; Dekker, W.; Schrijver, M.; Wesdorp, I. C.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1987-01-01

    A single-blind randomized multicenter study was performed in 42 patients with endoscopically documented reflux esophagitis. Patients were randomly given 400 mg cimetidine q.i.d. or a suspension of 1 g sucralfate q.i.d. for a period of 8 weeks. Forty patients were evaluated after 8 weeks. Symptomatic

  3. Botulinum toxin in the treatment of orofacial tardive dyskinesia : A single blind study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slotema, Christina W.; van Harten, Peter N.; Bruggeman, Richard; Hoek, Hans W.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Orofacial tardive dyskinesia (OTD) is difficult to treat and Botulinium Toxin A (BTA) may be an option. Methods: In a single blind (raters were blind) study (N= 12, duration 33 weeks) OTD was treated with Botulinum Toxin A in three consecutive sessions with increasing dosages. The

  4. Unilateral pallidotomy in Parkinson's disease : a randomised, single-blind, multicentre trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bie, RMA; de Haan, RJ; Nijssen, PCG; Rutgers, AWF; Beute, GN; Haaxma, R; Schmand, B; Staal, MJ; Speelman, J.D.

    1999-01-01

    Background The results of several cohort studies suggest that patients with advanced Parkinson's disease would benefit from unilateral pallidotomy. We have assessed the efficacy of unilateral pallidotomy in a randomised, single-blind, multicentre trial. Methods We enrolled 37 patients with advanced

  5. Effects of Guided Imagery on Postoperative Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Same-Day Surgical Procedures: A Randomized, Single-Blind Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    2O0O;9Ot3):706-712. 20. Bertrand P, Maye J. A description of the indices of heart rate variabil- ity in orofacial pain paticnis. Bcihcsda, MD: National...neck proce- dures were randomly assigned into 2 groups for this single-blind investigation. Anxiety and baseline pain levels were documented...control group patients received no intervention. Data were collected on pain and nar- cotic consumption at 7- and 2-hour postoperative inter- vals. In

  6. Effectiveness of aerobic gymnastic exercise on stress, fatigue, and sleep quality during postpartum: A pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chiu-Ling; Chen, Chung-Hey

    2018-01-01

    Gymnastics is a preferable safe exercise for postnatal women performing regularly. The aim of this pilot randomized controlled trial was to determine whether the aerobic gymnastic exercise improves stress, fatigue, sleep quality and depression in postpartum women. Single-blinded, randomized controlled trial held from December 2014 until September 2015. Postnatal clinic of a medical center in southern Taiwan. 140 eligible postnatal women were systematically assigned, with a random start to experimental (n=70) or a control (n=70) group. Engage in aerobic gymnastic exercise at least three times (15min per section) a week for three months using compact disc in the home. Perceived Stress Scale, Postpartum Fatigue Scale, Postpartum Sleep Quality Scale, and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. In a two-way ANOVA with repeated measures, the aerobic gymnastic exercise group showed significant decrease in fatigue after practicing exercise 4 weeks and the positive effects extended to the 12-week posttests. Paired t-tests revealed that aerobic gymnastic exercise participants had improved significantly in perceived stress and fatigue after 4 weeks gymnastic exercise; these positive effects extended to the 12-week posttests. In addition, the changes in physical symptoms-related sleep inefficiency after 12 weeks gymnastic exercise were significantly decreased in the experimental group compared with the control group. The findings can be used to encourage postnatal women to perform moderate-intensity gymnastic exercise in their daily life to reduce their stress, fatigue and improve sleep quality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Pilot-model analysis and simulation study of effect of control task desired control response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J. J.; Gera, J.; Jaudon, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    A pilot model analysis was performed that relates pilot control compensation, pilot aircraft system response, and aircraft response characteristics for longitudinal control. The results show that a higher aircraft short period frequency is required to achieve superior pilot aircraft system response in an altitude control task than is required in an attitude control task. These results were confirmed by a simulation study of target tracking. It was concluded that the pilot model analysis provides a theoretical basis for determining the effect of control task on pilot opinions.

  8. Controlled pilot oxidizer for a gas turbine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laster, Walter R.; Bandaru, Ramarao V.

    2010-07-13

    A combustor (22) for a gas turbine (10) includes a main burner oxidizer flow path (34) delivering a first portion (32) of an oxidizer flow (e.g., 16) to a main burner (28) of the combustor and a pilot oxidizer flow path (38) delivering a second portion (36) of the oxidizer flow to a pilot (30) of the combustor. The combustor also includes a flow controller (42) disposed in the pilot oxidizer flow path for controlling an amount of the second portion delivered to the pilot.

  9. Helicopter pilots' views of air traffic controller responsibilities: a mismatch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Daniel; Nixon, Jim

    2018-02-21

    Controllers and pilots must work together to ensure safe and efficient helicopter flight within the London control zone. Subjective ratings of pilot perception of controller responsibility for five key flight tasks were obtained from thirty helicopter pilots. Three types of airspace were investigated. Results indicate that there is variation in pilot understanding of controller responsibility compared to the formal regulations that define controller responsibility. Significant differences in the perception of controller responsibility were found for the task of aircraft separation in class D airspace and along helicopter routes. Analysis of the patterns of response suggests that task type rather than the airspace type may be the key factor. Results are framed using the concept of a shared mental model. This research demonstrates that pilots flying in complex London airspace have an expectation of controller responsibility for certain flight tasks, in certain airspace types that is not supported by aviation regulation. Practitioner Summary: The responsibility for tasks during flight varies according to the flight rules used and airspace type. Helicopter pilots may attribute responsibility to controllers for tasks when controllers have no responsibility as defined by regulation. This variation between pilot perceptions of controller responsibility could affect safety within the London control zone.

  10. Constraint-Induced Aphasia Therapy for Treatment of Chronic Post-Stroke Aphasia: A Randomized, Blinded, Controlled Pilot Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Ball, Angel L; Vannest, Jennifer; Dietz, Aimee R; Allendorfer, Jane B; Martin, Amber N; Hart, Kimberly; Lindsell, Christopher J

    2015-09-24

    To provide a preliminary estimate of efficacy of constraint-induced aphasia therapy (CIAT) when compared to no-intervention in patients with chronic (>1 year) post-stroke aphasia in order to plan an appropriately powered randomized controlled trial (RCT). We conducted a pilot single-blinded RCT. 24 patients were randomized: 14 to CIAT and 10 to no-intervention. CIAT groups received up to 4 hours/day of intervention for 10 consecutive business days (40 hours or therapy). Outcomes were assessed within 1 week of intervention and at 1 and 12 weeks after intervention and included several linguistic measures and a measure of overall subjective communication abilities (mini-Communicative Abilities Log (mini-CAL)). Clinicians treating patients (CIAT group) did not communicate with other team members to maintain blinding and the testing team members were blinded to treatment group assignment. Overall, the results of this pilot RCT support the results of previous observational studies that CIAT may lead to improvements in linguistic abilities. At 12 weeks, the treatment group reported better subjective communication abilities (mini-CAL) than the no-intervention group (p=0.019). Other measures trended towards better performance in the CIAT group. In this pilot RCT intensive language therapy led to an improvement in subjective language abilities. The effects demonstrated allow the design of a definitive trial of CIAT in patients with a variety of post-stroke aphasia types. In addition, our experiences have identified important considerations for designing subsequent trial(s) of CIAT or other interventions for post-stroke aphasia.

  11. Cognitive rehabiliation for Parkinson's disease demantia: a study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, John V; Watermeyer, Tamlyn J; Roberts, Julie; Martyr, Anthony; Lloyd-Williams, Huw; Brand, Andrew; Gutting, Petra; Hoare, Zoe; Edwards, Rhiannon Tudor; Clare, Linda

    2016-03-22

    There is growing interest in developing non-pharmacological treatments to address the cognitive deficits apparent in Parkinson's disease dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies. Cognitive rehabilitation is a goal-oriented behavioural intervention which focuses on improving everyday functioning through management of cognitive difficulties; it has been shown to be effective in Alzheimer's disease. To date, no studies have assessed its potential efficacy for addressing the impact of cognitive impairment in people with Parkinson's disease or dementia with Lewy bodies. Participants (n = 45) will be recruited from movement disorders, care for the elderly and memory clinics. Inclusion criteria include: a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, Parkinson's disease dementia or dementia with Lewy bodies according to consensus criteria and an Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination - III score of ≤ 82. Exclusion criteria include: a diagnosis of any other significant neurological condition; major psychiatric disorder, including depression, which is not related to the patient's Parkinson's disease and unstable medication use for their physical or cognitive symptoms. A single-blind pilot randomised controlled trial, with concurrent economic evaluation, will compare the relative efficacy of cognitive rehabilitation with that of two control conditions. Following a goal-setting interview, the participants will be randomised to one of the three study arms: cognitive rehabilitation (eight weekly sessions), relaxation therapy (eight weekly sessions) or treatment as usual. Randomisation and treatment group allocation will be carried out by a clinical trials unit using a dynamic adaptive sequential randomisation algorithm. The primary outcomes are patients' perceived goal attainment at a 2-months post-intervention assessment and a 6-months follow-up. Secondary outcomes include patients' objective cognitive performance (on tests of memory and executive function) and satisfaction with goal

  12. Goal-orientated cognitive rehabilitation for dementias associated with Parkinson's disease-A pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, John V; Watermeyer, Tamlyn J; Roberts, Julie; Brand, Andrew; Hoare, Zoe; Martyr, Anthony; Clare, Linda

    2018-05-01

    To examine the appropriateness and feasibility of cognitive rehabilitation for people with dementias associated with Parkinson's in a pilot randomised controlled study. This was a single-blind pilot randomised controlled trial of goal-oriented cognitive rehabilitation for dementias associated with Parkinson's. After goal setting, participants were randomised to cognitive rehabilitation (n = 10), relaxation therapy (n = 10), or treatment-as-usual (n = 9). Primary outcomes were ratings of goal attainment and satisfaction with goal attainment. Secondary outcomes included quality of life, mood, cognition, health status, everyday functioning, and carers' ratings of goal attainment and their own quality of life and stress levels. Assessments were at 2 and 6 months following randomisation. At 2 months, cognitive rehabilitation was superior to treatment-as-usual and relaxation therapy for the primary outcomes of self-rated goal attainment (d = 1.63 and d = 1.82, respectively) and self-rated satisfaction with goal attainment (d = 2.04 and d = 1.84). At 6 months, cognitive rehabilitation remained superior to treatment-as-usual (d = 1.36) and relaxation therapy (d = 1.77) for self-rated goal attainment. Cognitive rehabilitation was superior to treatment as usual and/or relaxation therapy in a number of secondary outcomes at 2 months (mood, self-efficacy, social domain of quality of life, carers' ratings of participants' goal attainment) and at 6 months (delayed recall, health status, quality of life, carer ratings of participants' goal attainment). Carers receiving cognitive rehabilitation reported better quality of life, health status, and lower stress than those allocated to treatment-as-usual. Cognitive rehabilitation is feasible and potentially effective for dementias associated with Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Using Statistical Process Control Methods to Classify Pilot Mental Workloads

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kudo, Terence

    2001-01-01

    .... These include cardiac, ocular, respiratory, and brain activity measures. The focus of this effort is to apply statistical process control methodology on different psychophysiological features in an attempt to classify pilot mental workload...

  14. Feasibility and efficacy of wearable devices for upper limb rehabilitation in patients with chronic stroke: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li-Fong; Lin, Yi-Jia; Lin, Zi-Hao; Chuang, Li-Yun; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Lin, Yuan-Hsiang

    2017-06-19

    Wearable devices based on inertial measurement units through wireless sensor networks have many applications such as real-time motion monitoring and functional outcome assessment of stroke rehabilitation. However, additional investigations are warranted to validate their clinical value, particularly in detecting the synergy patterns of movements after stroke. To explore the feasibility and efficacy of wearable devices for upper limb rehabilitation in patients with chronic stroke and to compare the intervention effects (e.g., neurological recovery, active range of motion, and deviation angle) with those in a control group. A single-blind, randomized-controlled pilot study. Rehabilitation ward. A total of 18 patients with chronic stroke were randomly distributed into a device group and control group. Both groups received conventional rehabilitation; nevertheless, the device group was additionally subjected to 15 daily sessions at least three times a week for 5 weeks. The outcome measures included the upper extremity subscores of the Fugl-Meyer assessment, active range of motion, and deviation angle. These measurements were performed pre- and post-treatment. All five Fugl-Meyer assessment subscores improved in both the device and control groups after intervention; in particular, the "shoulder/elbow/forearm" subscore (p = 0.02, 0.03) and "total score" (p = 0.03, 0.03) substantially improved. The active range of motion of shoulder flexion and abduction substantially improved at pre-post treatment in both the device (p = 0.02, 0.03) and control (p = 0.02, 0.03) groups. The deviation angle of shoulder external rotation during shoulder abduction substantially improved in the device group (p = 0.02), but not in the control group. The designed wearable devices are practical and efficient for use in chronic patients with stroke. Wearable devices are expected to be useful for future internet-of-things rehabilitation clinical trials at home and in long-term care institutions.

  15. Podiatry intervention versus usual care to prevent falls in care homes: pilot randomised controlled trial (the PIRFECT study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Gavin; Menz, Hylton B; McFarlane, Sarah; Ogston, Simon; Sullivan, Frank; Williams, Brian; Young, Zoe; Morris, Jacqui

    2017-07-12

    Common foot problems are independent risk factors for falls in older people. There is evidence that podiatry can prevent falls in community-dwelling populations. The feasibility of implementing a podiatry intervention and trial in the care home population is unknown. To inform a potential future definitive trial, we performed a pilot randomised controlled trial to assess: (i) the feasibility of a trial of a podiatry intervention to reduce care home falls, and (ii) the potential direction and magnitude of the effect of the intervention in terms of number of falls in care home residents. Informed by Medical Research Council guidance on developing and evaluating complex interventions, we conducted a single blind, pilot randomised controlled trial in six care homes in the East of Scotland. Participants were randomised to either: (i) a three month podiatry intervention comprising core podiatry care, foot and ankle exercises, orthoses and footwear provision or (ii) usual care. Falls-related outcomes (number of falls, time to first fall) and feasibility-related outcomes (recruitment, retention, adherence, data collection rates) were collected. Secondary outcomes included: generic health status, balance, mobility, falls efficacy, and ankle joint strength. 474 care home residents were screened. 43 (9.1%) participants were recruited: 23 to the intervention, 20 to control. Nine (21%) participants were lost to follow-up due to declining health or death. It was feasible to deliver the trial elements in the care home setting. 35% of participants completed the exercise programme. 48% reported using the orthoses 'all or most of the time'. Completion rates of the outcome measures were between 93% and 100%. No adverse events were reported. At the nine month follow-up period, the intervention group per-person fall rate was 0.77 falls vs. 0.83 falls in the control group. A podiatry intervention to reduce falls can be delivered to care home residents within a pilot randomised

  16. Investigation of piloting aids for manual control of hypersonic maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raney, David L.; Phillips, Michael R.; Person, Lee H., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation of piloting aids designed to provide precise maneuver control for an air-breathing hypersonic vehicle is described. Stringent constraints and nonintuitive high-speed flight effects associated with maneuvering in the hypersonic regime raise the question of whether manual control of such a vehicle should even be considered. The objectives of this research were to determine the extent of manual control that is desirable for a vehicle maneuvering in this regime and to identify the form of aids that must be supplied to the pilot to make such control feasible. A piloted real-time motion-based simulation of a hypersonic vehicle concept was used for this study, and the investigation focused on a single representative cruise turn maneuver. Piloting aids, which consisted of an auto throttle, throttle director, autopilot, flight director, and two head-up display configurations, were developed and evaluated. Two longitudinal control response types consisting of a rate-command/attitude-hold system and a load factor-rate/load-factor-hold system were also compared. The complete set of piloting aids, which consisted of the autothrottle, throttle director, and flight director, improved the average Cooper-Harper flying qualities ratings from 8 to 2.6, even though identical inner-loop stability and control augmentation was provided in all cases. The flight director was determined to be the most critical of these aids, and the cruise turn maneuver was unachievable to adequate performance specifications in the absence of this flight director.

  17. BWR control rod drive scram pilot valve monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soden, R.A.; Kelly, V.

    1984-01-01

    The control rod drive system in a Boiling Water Reactor is the most important safety system in the power plant. All components of the system can be verified except the solenoid operated, scram pilot valves without scramming a rod. The pilot valve mechancial works is the weak link to the control rod drive system. These pilot valves control the hydraulic system which applies pressure to the ''insert'' side of the control rod piston and vents the ''withdraw'' side of the piston causing the rods to insert during a scam. The only verification that the valve is operating properly is to scram the rod. The concern for this portion of the system is demonstrated by the high number of redundant components and complete periodic testing of the electrical circuits. The pilot valve can become hung-up through wear, fracture of internal components, mechanical binding, foreign material or chemicals left in the valve during maintenance, etc. If the valve becomes hung-up the electrical tests performed will not indicate this condition and scramming the rod is in jeopardy. Only an attempt to scram a rod will indicate the hung-up valve. While this condition exists the rod is considered inoperative. This paper describes a system developed at a nuclear power plant that monitors the pilot valves on the control rod drive system. This system utilizes pattern recognition to assure proper internal workings of the scram pilot valves to plant operators. The system is totally automatic such that each time the valve is operated on a ''half scram'', a printout is available to the operator along with light indication that each of the 370 valves (on one unit of a BWR) is operating properly. With this monitoring system installed, all components of the control rod drive system including the solenoid pilot valves can be verified as operational without scramming any rods

  18. BWR control rod drive scram pilot valve monitoring program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soden, R.A.; Kelly, V.

    1986-01-01

    The control rod drive system in a Boiling Water Reactor is the most important safety system in the power plant. All components of the system can be verified except the solenoid operated, scram pilot valves without scramming a rod. The pilot valve mechanical works is the weak link to the control rod drive system. These pilot valves control the hydraulic system which applies pressure to the insert side of the control rod piston and vents the withdraw side of the piston causing the rods to insert during a scram. The only verification that the valve is operating properly is to scram the rod. The concern for this portion of the system is demonstrated by the high number of redundant components and complete periodic testing of the electrical circuits. The pilot valve can become hung-up through wear, fracture of internal components, mechanical binding, foreign material or chemicals left in the valve during maintenance, etc. If the valve becomes hung-up the electrical tests performed will not indicate this condition and scramming the rod is in jeopardy. Only an attempt to scram a rod will indicate the hung-up valve. While this condition exists the rod is considered inoperative. This paper describes a system developed at a nuclear power plant that monitors the pilot valves on the control rod drive system. This system utilizes pattern recognition to assure proper internal workings of the scram pilot valves to plant operators. The system is totally automatic such that each time the valve is operated on a half scram, a printout is available to the operator along with light indication that each of the 370 valves (on one unit of a BWR) is operating properly. With this monitoring system installed, all components of the control rod drive system including the solenoid pilot valves can be verified as operational without scramming any rods

  19. Predicting Loss-of-Control Boundaries Toward a Piloting Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Jonathan; Stepanyan, Vahram; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje

    2012-01-01

    This work presents an approach to predicting loss-of-control with the goal of providing the pilot a decision aid focused on maintaining the pilot's control action within predicted loss-of-control boundaries. The predictive architecture combines quantitative loss-of-control boundaries, a data-based predictive control boundary estimation algorithm and an adaptive prediction method to estimate Markov model parameters in real-time. The data-based loss-of-control boundary estimation algorithm estimates the boundary of a safe set of control inputs that will keep the aircraft within the loss-of-control boundaries for a specified time horizon. The adaptive prediction model generates estimates of the system Markov Parameters, which are used by the data-based loss-of-control boundary estimation algorithm. The combined algorithm is applied to a nonlinear generic transport aircraft to illustrate the features of the architecture.

  20. Upper limb training using Wii Sports Resort for children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy: a randomized, single-blind trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hsiu-Ching; Ada, Louise; Lee, Hsin-Min

    2014-10-01

    To investigate whether Wii Sports Resort training is effective and if any benefits are maintained. Randomized, single-blind trial. Sixty-two hemiplegic children with cerebral palsy (6-13 years). Experimental group undertook six weeks of home-based Wii Sports Resort training plus usual therapy, while the control group received usual therapy. Outcomes were coordination, strength, hand function, and carers' perception of hand function, measured at baseline, six, and 12 weeks by a blinded assessor. There was a trend of mean difference (MD) for the experimental group to have more grip strength by six (MD 4.0 N, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.8 to 8.8, p = 0.10) and 12 (MD 4.1 N, 95% CI -2.1 to 10.3, p = 0.19) weeks, and to have a higher quantity of hand function according to carers' perception by six (MD 4.5 N, 95% CI -0.7 to 9.7, p = 0.09) and strengthened by 12 (MD 6.4, 95% CI 0.6 to 12.3, p = 0.03) weeks than the control group. There was no difference between groups in coordination and hand function by six or 12 weeks. Wii training did not improve coordination, strength, or hand function. Beyond the intervention, carers perceived that the children used their hands more. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Efficient Conversation: The Talk between Pilots and Air Traffic Controllers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, James L.

    Two-way radio communications between air traffic controllers using radar on the ground to give airplane pilots instructions are of interest within the developing framework of the sociology of language. The main purpose of air traffic control language is efficient communication to promote flight safety. This study describes the standardized format…

  2. Process control of an HTGR fuel reprocessing cold pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rode, J.S.

    1976-10-01

    Development of engineering-scale systems for a large-scale HTGR fuel reprocessing demonstration facility is currently underway in a cold pilot plant. These systems include two fluidized-bed burners, which remove the graphite (carbon) matrix from the crushed HTGR fuel by high temperature (900 0 C) oxidation. The burners are controlled by a digital process controller with an all analog input/output interface which has been in use since March, 1976. The advantages of such a control system to a pilot plant operation can be summarized as follows: (1) Control loop functions and configurations can be changed easily; (2) control constants, alarm limits, output limits, and scaling constants can be changed easily; (3) calculation of data and/or interface with a computerized information retrieval system during operation are available; (4) diagnosis of process control problems is facilitated; and (5) control panel/room space is saved

  3. Single-Blinded Prospective Implementation of a Preoperative Imaging Checklist for Endoscopic Sinus Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Error, Marc; Ashby, Shaelene; Orlandi, Richard R; Alt, Jeremiah A

    2018-01-01

    Objective To determine if the introduction of a systematic preoperative sinus computed tomography (CT) checklist improves identification of critical anatomic variations in sinus anatomy among patients undergoing endoscopic sinus surgery. Study Design Single-blinded prospective cohort study. Setting Tertiary care hospital. Subjects and Methods Otolaryngology residents were asked to identify critical surgical sinus anatomy on preoperative CT scans before and after introduction of a systematic approach to reviewing sinus CT scans. The percentage of correctly identified structures was documented and compared with a 2-sample t test. Results A total of 57 scans were reviewed: 28 preimplementation and 29 postimplementation. Implementation of the sinus CT checklist improved identification of critical sinus anatomy from 24% to 84% correct ( P identification of sinus anatomic variants, including those not directly included in the systematic review implemented. Conclusion The implementation of a preoperative endoscopic sinus surgery radiographic checklist improves identification of critical anatomic sinus variations in a training population.

  4. Familiar trespassers in histopathology: An obstacle in diagnosis? A single-blind study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Shashikala

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Histopathologists encounter strange structures in tissue sections that appear unrelated to tissues, and these artifacts may be misinterpreted and misdiagnosed as pathological lesions. These substances may either be present within the tissues or can get implanted into tissue during biopsy procedure or laboratory handling or processing. Aims: The aim of this study is to observe the microscopic appearance of different abnormal structures like commonly implanted food particles or easily incorporated substances during tissue processing with their probable histological misdiagnosis. Materials and Methods: Certain food particles, suture materials, wood pieces, insects, and filter paper were intentionally introduced in the tissue specimens of uterus and lung. Following routine processing and hematoxylin and eosin staining, the slides were subjected to single-blind study and viewed under light and polarizing microscope. Results: The vivid appearances of these structures lead to histological misdiagnosis. Conclusion: Knowledge and familiarity of these commonly encountered extraneous substances will help to prevent misinterpretation.

  5. Postural control and shoulder steadiness in F-16 pilots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Britt; Murray, Mike; Chreiteh, Shadi S

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During maneuvering, fighter pilots experience loads of up to 50-70 kg on their necks. Neck disorders are common and have been linked to impairment in muscle control. We conducted an intervention study introducing targeted training for 24 wk that reduced neck pain. The current study re...

  6. Body weight-supported treadmill training vs. overground walking training for persons with chronic stroke: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs-Miller, Stephanie A; Kalpathi Parameswaran, Anu; Colburn, Dawn; Ertel, Tara; Harmeyer, Amanda; Tucker, Lindsay; Schmid, Arlene A

    2014-09-01

    To compare the effects of body weight-supported treadmill training and overground walking training when matched for task and dose (duration/frequency/intensity) on improving walking function, activity, and participation after stroke. Single-blind, pilot randomized controlled trial with three-month follow-up. University and community settings. A convenience sample of participants (N = 20) at least six months post-stroke and able to walk independently were recruited. Thirty-minute walking interventions (body weight-supported treadmill training or overground walking training) were administered five times a week for two weeks. Intensity was monitored with the Borg Rating of Perceived Exertion Scale at five-minute increments to maintain a moderate training intensity. Walking speed (comfortable/fast 10-meter walk), walking endurance (6-minute walk), spatiotemporal symmetry, and the ICF Measure of Participation and ACTivity were assessed before, immediately after, and three months following the intervention. The overground walking training group demonstrated significantly greater improvements in comfortable walking speed compared with the body weight-supported treadmill training group immediately (change of 0.11 m/s vs. 0.06 m/s, respectively; p = 0.047) and three months (change of 0.14 m/s vs. 0.08 m/s, respectively; p = 0.029) after training. Only the overground walking training group significantly improved comfortable walking speed (p = 0.001), aspects of gait symmetry (p = 0.032), and activity (p = 0.003) immediately after training. Gains were maintained at the three-month follow-up (p training was more beneficial than body weight-supported treadmill training at improving self-selected walking speed for the participants in this study. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Body composition influenced by progressive elastic band resistance exercise of sarcopenic obesity elderly women: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Wei; Ku, Jan-Wen; Lin, Li-Fong; Liao, Chun-De; Chou, Lin-Chuan; Liou, Tsan-Hon

    2017-08-01

    Sarcopenia involves age-related decreases in muscle strength and muscle mass, leading to frailty and disability in elderly people. When combined with obesity, it is defined as sarcopenic obesity (SO), which can result in more functional limitations and metabolic disorders than either disorder alone. The aim of this study was to investigate body composition changes after elastic band resistance training in elderly women with SO. Randomized single-blinded (assessor blinded) controlled pilot trial. Academic medical center. Thirty-five elderly (>60 years old) women with SO. This pilot randomized controlled trial focused on elderly women with SO. The study group underwent progressive elastic band resistance training for 12 weeks (3 times per week). The control group received only a 40-minute lesson about the exercise concept. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was performed before and after intervention to evaluate body composition. Mann-Whitney U and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used to analyze the differences within and between these groups. In total, 35 elderly women with SO were enrolled and divided into study (N.=18) and control groups (N.=17). No difference was observed in age, biochemical parameters, or Body Mass Index between both groups. After the intervention, the fat proportion of body composition in the right upper extremity (P=0.03), left upper extremity (P=0.04), total fat (P=0.035), and fat percentage (P=0.012) had decreased, and bone mineral density (BMD) (P=0.026), T-score (P=0.028), and Z-score (P=0.021) had increased in the study group. Besides, statistical difference was observed in outcome measurements of right upper extremity (P=0.013), total fat (P=0.023), and fat percentage (P=0.012) between the groups. Our study demonstrated that progressive elastic band resistance exercise can reduce fat mass and increase BMD in elderly women with SO, and that this exercise program is feasible for this demographic. Additional studies with larger sample sizes

  8. Cardiovascular rehabilitation soon after stroke using feedback-controlled robotics-assisted treadmill exercise: study protocol of a randomised controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, Oliver; de Bruin, Eling D; Schuster-Amft, Corina; Schindelholz, Matthias; de Bie, Rob A; Hunt, Kenneth J

    2013-09-22

    After experiencing a stroke, most individuals also suffer from cardiac disease, are immobile and thus have low endurance for exercise. Aerobic capacity is seriously reduced in these individuals and does not reach reasonable levels after conventional rehabilitation programmes. Cardiovascular exercise is beneficial for improvement of aerobic capacity in mild to moderate stroke. However, less is known about its impact on aerobic capacity, motor recovery, and quality-of-life in severely impaired individuals. The aim of this pilot study is to explore the clinical efficacy and feasibility of cardiovascular exercise with regard to aerobic capacity, motor recovery, and quality-of-life using feedback-controlled robotics-assisted treadmill exercise in non-ambulatory individuals soon after experiencing a stroke. This will be a single-centred single blind, randomised control trial with a pre-post intervention design. Subjects will be recruited early after their first stroke (≤20 weeks) at a neurological rehabilitation clinic and will be randomly allocated to an inpatient cardiovascular exercise programme that uses feedback-controlled robotics-assisted treadmill exercise (experimental) or to conventional robotics-assisted treadmill exercise (control). Intervention duration depends on the duration of each subject's inpatient rehabilitation period. Aerobic capacity, as the primary outcome measure, will be assessed using feedback-controlled robotics-assisted treadmill-based cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Secondary outcome measures will include gait speed, walking endurance, standing function, and quality-of-life. Outcome assessment will be conducted at baseline, after each 4-week intervention period, and before clinical discharge. Ethical approval has been obtained. Whether cardiovascular exercise in non-ambulatory individuals early after stroke has an impact on aerobic capacity, motor recovery, and quality-of-life is not yet known. Feedback-controlled robotics

  9. CoDuSe group exercise programme improves balance and reduces falls in people with multiple sclerosis: A multi-centre, randomized, controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carling, Anna; Forsberg, Anette; Gunnarsson, Martin; Nilsagård, Ylva

    2017-09-01

    Imbalance leading to falls is common in people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS). To evaluate the effects of a balance group exercise programme (CoDuSe) on balance and walking in PwMS (Expanded Disability Status Scale, 4.0-7.5). A multi-centre, randomized, controlled single-blinded pilot study with random allocation to early or late start of exercise, with the latter group serving as control group for the physical function measures. In total, 14 supervised 60-minute exercise sessions were delivered over 7 weeks. Pretest-posttest analyses were conducted for self-reported near falls and falls in the group starting late. Primary outcome was Berg Balance Scale (BBS). A total of 51 participants were initially enrolled; three were lost to follow-up. Post-intervention, the exercise group showed statistically significant improvement ( p = 0.015) in BBS and borderline significant improvement in MS Walking Scale ( p = 0.051), both with large effect sizes (3.66; -2.89). No other significant differences were found between groups. In the group starting late, numbers of falls and near falls were statistically significantly reduced after exercise compared to before ( p balance and reduced perceived walking limitations, compared to no exercise. The intervention reduced falls and near falls frequency.

  10. A pilot randomized controlled trial of the Occupational Goal Intervention method for the improvement of executive functioning in patients with treatment-resistant schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizzotto, Adriana D B; Celestino, Diego L; Buchain, Patricia C; Oliveira, Alexandra M; Oliveira, Graça M R; Di Sarno, Elaine S; Napolitano, Isabel C; Elkis, Helio

    2016-11-30

    Schizophrenia is a chronic disabling mental disorder that involves impairments in several cognitive domains, especially in executive functions (EF), as well as impairments in functional performance. This is particularly true in patients with Treatment-Resistant Schizophrenia (TRS). The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of the Occupational Goal Intervention (OGI) method for the improvement of EF in patients with TRS. In this randomized, controlled, single-blind pilot study, 25 TRS patients were randomly assigned to attend 30 sessions of either OGI or craft activities (control) over a 15-week period and evaluated by the Behavioural Assessment of the Dysexecutive Syndrome (BADS) as the primary outcome and the Direct Assessment of Functional Status (DAFS-BR) as well as the Independent Living Skills Survey (ILSS-BR) as secondary outcomes, all adapted for the Brazilian population. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was used for monitoring symptom severity. Results showed significant statistical differences, favoring the OGI group in terms of improvement on the BADS, both in subtests (Action Program and Key Search) and the total score. Improvements in EFs were observed by families in various dimensions as measured by different subtests of the ILSS-BR inventory. The OGI group showed no significant results in secondary outcomes (DAFS-BR) except in terms of improvement of communication skills. Although preliminary, our results indicate that the OGI method is efficacious and effective for patients with TRS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Postural control and shoulder steadiness in F-16 pilots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Britt; Murray, Mike; Chreiteh, Shadi S

    2014-01-01

    to a control group (CG; N = 28) or training group (TG; N = 27). Postural control was tested in four different settings: Romberg with open and closed eyes, unilateral stance, and perturbation. Maximal voluntary contraction and force steadiness was measured for shoulder elevation. RESULTS: At follow......-up, there was a significant between-group difference in the Romberg test with closed eyes only (95% confidence ellipse area; CG: 761 +/- 311 mm2; TG: 650 +/- 405 mm2). Prior to randomization, there were no significant differences in postural control and steadiness between 30 pilots who experienced neck pain within...... the previous 3 mo and 25 pilots without such pain. DISCUSSION: Impaired postural control and steadiness may only be quantifiable in individuals experiencing acute neck pain of certain intensity, and there may be a ceiling effect in the ability to improve these parameters. For individuals with highly developed...

  12. Preoperative therapeutic exercise in frail elderly scheduled for total hip replacement: A randomized pilot trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeboom, T.J.; Dronkers, J.J.; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Oosting, E.; Meeteren, N.L.U. van

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of therapeutic exercise before total hip replacement in frail elderly. Design: A single-blind, randomized clinical pilot trial. Setting: Outpatient physiotherapy department. Subjects: Frail elderly with hip osteoarthritis awaiting

  13. Effectiveness of different memory training programs on improving hyperphagic behaviors of residents with dementia: a longitudinal single-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Chieh-Chun; Lin, Li-Chan; Wu, Shiao-Chi; Lin, Ker-Neng; Liu, Ching-Kuan

    2016-01-01

    Hyperphagia increases eating-associated risks for people with dementia and distress for caregivers. The purpose of this study was to compare the long-term effectiveness of spaced retrieval (SR) training and SR training combined with Montessori activities (SR + M) for improving hyperphagic behaviors of special care unit residents with dementia. The study enrolled patients with dementia suffering from hyperphagia resident in eight institutions and used a cluster-randomized single-blind design, with 46 participants in the SR group, 49 in the SR + M group, and 45 participants in the control group. For these three groups, trained research assistants collected baseline data on hyperphagic behavior, pica, changes in eating habits, short meal frequency, and distress to caregivers. The SR and SR + M groups underwent memory training over a 6-week training period (30 sessions), and a generalized estimating equation was used to compare data of all the three groups of subjects obtained immediately after the training period and at follow-ups 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months later. Results showed that the hyperphagic and pica behaviors of both the SR and SR + M groups were significantly improved (P<0.001) and that the effect lasted for 3 months after training. The improvement of fast eating was significantly superior in the SR + M group than in the SR group. The improvement in distress to caregivers in both intervention groups lasted only until the posttest. Improvement in changes in eating habits of the two groups was not significantly different from that of the control group. SR and SR + M training programs can improve hyperphagic behavior of patients with dementia. The SR + M training program is particularly beneficial for the improvement of rapid eating. Caregivers can choose a suitable memory training program according to the eating problems of their residents.

  14. Identification of Time-Varying Pilot Control Behavior in Multi-Axis Control Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaal, Peter M. T.; Sweet, Barbara T.

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments in fly-by-wire control architectures for rotorcraft have introduced new interest in the identification of time-varying pilot control behavior in multi-axis control tasks. In this paper a maximum likelihood estimation method is used to estimate the parameters of a pilot model with time-dependent sigmoid functions to characterize time-varying human control behavior. An experiment was performed by 9 general aviation pilots who had to perform a simultaneous roll and pitch control task with time-varying aircraft dynamics. In 8 different conditions, the axis containing the time-varying dynamics and the growth factor of the dynamics were varied, allowing for an analysis of the performance of the estimation method when estimating time-dependent parameter functions. In addition, a detailed analysis of pilots adaptation to the time-varying aircraft dynamics in both the roll and pitch axes could be performed. Pilot control behavior in both axes was significantly affected by the time-varying aircraft dynamics in roll and pitch, and by the growth factor. The main effect was found in the axis that contained the time-varying dynamics. However, pilot control behavior also changed over time in the axis not containing the time-varying aircraft dynamics. This indicates that some cross coupling exists in the perception and control processes between the roll and pitch axes.

  15. Kinesthetic control simulator. [for pilot training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, P. R.; Thomas, D. F., Jr. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A kinesthetic control simulator is reported that has a flat base upon which rests a support structure having a lower spherical surface for rotation on the base plate with columns which support a platform above the support structure at a desired location with respect to the center of curvature of the spherical surface. A handrail is at approximately the elevation of the hips of the operator above the platform with a ring attached to the support structure which may be used to limit the angle of tilt. Five degree freedom-of-motion can be obtained by utilizing an air pad structure for support of the control simulator.

  16. HIMALAIA (Hypertension Induction in the Management of AneurysmaL subArachnoid haemorrhage with secondary IschaemiA): a randomized single-blind controlled trial of induced hypertension vs. no induced hypertension in the treatment of delayed cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathier, C S; van den Bergh, W M; Slooter, A J C

    2014-04-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is a major complication after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). One option to treat delayed cerebral ischemia is to use induced hypertension, but its efficacy on the eventual outcome has not been proven in a randomized clinical trial. This article describes the design of the HIMALAIA trial (Hypertension Induction in the Management of AneurysmaL subArachnoid haemorrhage with secondary IschaemiA), designed to assess the effectiveness of induced hypertension on neurological outcome in patients with DCI after SAH. To investigate whether induced hypertension improves the functional outcome in patients with delayed cerebral ischemia after SAH. The HIMALAIA trial is a multicenter, singe-blinded, randomized controlled trial in patients with DCI after a recent SAH. Eligible patients will be randomized to either induced hypertension (n = 120) or to no induced hypertension (n = 120). In selected centers, the efficacy of induced hypertension in augmenting cerebral blood flow will be measured by means of cerebral perfusion computerized tomography scanning. Follow-up assessments will be performed at 3 and 12 months after randomization by trial nurses who are blinded to the treatment allocation and management. We will include patients during five years. The primary outcome is the proportion of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients with delayed cerebral ischemia with poor outcome three-months after randomization, defined as a modified Rankin scale of more than 3. Secondary outcome measures are related to treatment failure, functional outcome, adverse events, and cerebral hemodynamics. The HIMALAIA trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov under identifier NCT01613235. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2013 World Stroke Organization.

  17. Complex antioxidants in a randomized single-blinded study of memory in seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, William K; Martin, Roy L; Liu, Yimeng; Peña, Bernice; Marsh, Gary M

    2018-04-01

    Oxidative injury to the brain and aging are theoretical co-causes of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Amyloid plaques and tangles are then secondary phenomenon. The preclinical state would then be 'normal' elderly. A potent complex antioxidant (antiOx) was tested against a popular one-a-day multivitamin (mV) in a randomized single blind design in 'normal' senior subjects over 6 months. Memory testing was done at baseline, 1, 3, and 6 months. The generalized estimating equation (GEE) approach was used to compare the change score of NLT 100 and 20 WR between two groups over time. Analysis of the antiOx group (30 subjects) demonstrated significant improvement in declarative memory (change score for NLT 100 at month 6 = 6.36 p working memory (change score for 20 WR at month 6 = 3.23, p < 0.0001). A change-score analysis over 6 months suggests possible neurogenesis in the antiOx group. The mV group (33 subjects) had a change score of the NLT 100 and 20WR on the sixth month of 2.20 and 0.32 (p = 0.07, 0.35). A complex antioxidant blend, sold as an over-the-counter (OTC) supplement, can improve memory in elder subjects. Antioxidants may be beneficial in AD and other neurodegerative diseases.

  18. A single-blinded randomised clinical trial of permissive underfeeding in patients requiring parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owais, Anwar Elias; Kabir, Syed Irfan; Mcnaught, Clare; Gatt, Marcel; MacFie, John

    2014-12-01

    The importance of adequate nutritional support is well established, but characterising what 'adequate nutrition' represents remains contentious. In recent years there has been increasing interest in the concept of 'permissive underfeeding' where patients are intentionally prescribed less nutrition than their calculated requirements. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of permissive underfeeding on septic and nutrition related morbidity in patients requiring short term parenteral nutrition (PN). This was a single-blinded randomised clinical trial of 50 consecutive patients requiring parenteral nutritional support. Patients were randomized to receive either normocaloric or hypocaloric feeding (respectively 100% vs. 60% of estimated requirements). The primary end point was septic complications. Secondary end points included the metabolic, physiological and clinical outcomes to the two feeding protocols. Permissive underfeeding was associated with fewer septic complications (3 vs. 12 patients; p = 0.003), and a lower incidence of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (9 vs. 16 patients; p = 0.017). Permissively underfed patients had fewer feed related complications (2 vs. 9 patients; p = 0.016). Permissive underfeeding in patients requiring short term PN appears to be safe and may results in reduced septic and feed-related complications. NCT01154179 TRIAL REGISTRY: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01154179. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  19. THERAPY: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED PILOT STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOFIA VON HUMBOLDT

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del estudio que se informa fue ex- plorar si una intervención individual de terapia centrada en la persona (TCP en personas adul- tas mayores puede promover su sentido de cohe- rencia, en comparación con un grupo control (lista de espera. Se plantea que los participantes asignados al azar a TCP informarían mejoras en SDC de pre y post-intervención en comparación con el grupo control. Un grupo de 87 participantes de 65 a 86 años (M = 72.4; DE = 5.15 fue evaluado con la Escala de Sentido de Coherencia (ESDC y el cuestio- nario sociodemográfico en tres momentos dife- rentes: al inicio del estudio (t1, post-tratamiento (t2 y a los 12 meses de seguimiento (t3. Los resultados indicaron que los participan- tes en TCP evidenciaron un aumento significa- tivo en cuanto a su SDC (16.7%, mientras que en el grupo control se encontró una disminu- ción significativa (-2.7%, entre el inicio del es- tudio y el momento de seguimiento. El tamaño del efecto en el grupo TCP fue alto (η2p = .776. En concreto, tanto en la post-intervención como en el momento del seguimiento, los participan- tes que se sometieron a TCP tenían un SDC sig- nificativamente mayor (M = 3.84, DE = .219 Se encontraron diferencias significativas entre el grupo de intervención y el grupo control en la post-intervención y en el seguimiento. Se concluye que los cambios en SDC fueron positivos y mantenidos, por lo tanto, los resul- tados sugieren que la TCP es favorable a la me- jora de SDC. Por otra parte, ya que la SDC se asocia con el bienestar relacionado con la salud de las poblaciones de mayor edad, hay que en- fatizar el desarrollo de SDC en la vejez.

  20. Pilot visual acquisition of traffic : operational communications from air traffic control operational communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    Avionics devices designed to provide pilots with graphically displayed traffic information will enable pilots to acquire and verify the identity of any intruder aircraft within the general area, either before or in accordance with a controller-issued...

  1. Single-blind trial addressing the differential effects of two reflexology techniques versus rest, on ankle and foot oedema in late pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollart, L

    2003-11-01

    This single-blind randomised controlled trial explored the differential effects of two different foot reflexology techniques with a period of rest on oedema-relieving effects and symptom relief in healthy pregnant women with foot oedema. Fifty-five women in the third trimester were randomly assigned to one of the three groups: a period of rest, 'relaxing' reflexology techniques or a specific 'lymphatic' reflexology technique for 15 min with pre- and post-therapy ankle and foot circumference measurements and participant questionnaire. There was no statistically significant difference in the circumference measurements between the three groups; however, the lymphatic technique reflexology group mean circumference measurements were all decreased. A significant reduction in the women's symptom mean measurements in all groups (preflexology techniques, relaxing reflexology techniques and a period of rest had a non-significant oedema-relieving effect. From the women's viewpoint, lymphatic reflexology was the preferred therapy with significant increase in symptom relief.

  2. Soothing and anti-itch effect of quercetin phytosome in human subjects: a single-blind study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maramaldi G

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Giada Maramaldi,1 Stefano Togni,1 Ivan Pagin,1 Luca Giacomelli,2 Roberta Cattaneo,3 Roberto Eggenhöffner,2 Samuele E Burastero4 1Indena S.p.A, Milan, 2Department of Surgical Sciences and Integrated Diagnostics, School of Medicine, Genova University, Genoa, 3Abich Srl, Verbania, 4San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, ItalyBackground: We evaluated the ability of quercetin, a natural antioxidant formulated in a specific delivery system, to reduce skin inflammation induced by a variety of stimuli, including UV radiation, stimulation with a histamine solution, or contact with chemical irritants. In particular, we tested the soothing and anti-itch effect of Quercevita®, 1% cream for external use, a formulation characterized by a phospholipids-based delivery system.Patients and methods: The study was a monocentric, single blind trial that enrolled a group of 30 healthy volunteers. The back of each subject was examined to identify four quadrants with no previous skin damage or naevi that were treated in order to induce a controlled and reversible form of skin stress. The areas were treated as follows: no product; Quercevita® 1% cream, 2 mg/cm2; placebo; positive control (a commercially available topical formulation containing 1% dexchlorpheniramine.Results: Only quercetin phospholipids 1% and dexchlorpheniramine 1% achieved a significant reduction in erythema with comparable results: (–10.05% [P=0.00329] for quercetin phospholipids 1% vs –14.05% [P=0.00046] for the positive control. Moreover, quercetin phospholipids 1% and dexchlorpheniramine 1% were both associated with a significant decrease in mean wheal diameter: (–13.25% and –12.23% for dexchlorpheniramine 1%, respectively. Similar findings were reported for the other tested parameters.Conclusion: Quercetin has a skin protective effect against damage caused by a variety of insults, including UV radiation, histamine, or contact with toxic chemical compounds. Indeed, quercetin is able

  3. Effectiveness of different memory training programs on improving hyperphagic behaviors of residents with dementia: a longitudinal single-blind study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kao CC

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chieh-Chun Kao,1,2 Li-Chan Lin,3 Shiao-Chi Wu,4 Ker-Neng Lin,5,6 Ching-Kuan Liu7,8 1Department of Nursing, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, 2Department of Nursing, Ching Kuo Institute of Management and Health, Keelung, 3Institute of Clinical Nursing, 4Institute of Health and Welfare Policy, National Yang-Ming University, 5Neurological Institute, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, 6Department of Psychology, Soochow University, Taipei, Taiwan; 7Department of Neurology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, 8Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan Background: Hyperphagia increases eating-associated risks for people with dementia and distress for caregivers. The purpose of this study was to compare the long-term effectiveness of spaced retrieval (SR training and SR training combined with Montessori activities (SR + M for improving hyperphagic behaviors of special care unit residents with dementia. Methods: The study enrolled patients with dementia suffering from hyperphagia resident in eight institutions and used a cluster-randomized single-blind design, with 46 participants in the SR group, 49 in the SR + M group, and 45 participants in the control group. For these three groups, trained research assistants collected baseline data on hyperphagic behavior, pica, changes in eating habits, short meal frequency, and distress to caregivers. The SR and SR + M groups underwent memory training over a 6-week training period (30 sessions, and a generalized estimating equation was used to compare data of all the three groups of subjects obtained immediately after the training period and at follow-ups 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months later. Results: Results showed that the hyperphagic and pica behaviors of both the SR and SR + M groups were significantly improved (P<0.001 and that the effect lasted for 3 months after training. The improvement of fast eating was

  4. Synthetic perspective optical flow: Influence on pilot control tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, C. Thomas; Johnson, Walter W.; Perrone, John A.; Phatak, Anil V.

    1989-01-01

    One approach used to better understand the impact of visual flow on control tasks has been to use synthetic perspective flow patterns. Such patterns are the result of apparent motion across a grid or random dot display. Unfortunately, the optical flow so generated is based on a subset of the flow information that exists in the real world. The danger is that the resulting optical motions may not generate the visual flow patterns useful for actual flight control. Researchers conducted a series of studies directed at understanding the characteristics of synthetic perspective flow that support various pilot tasks. In the first of these, they examined the control of altitude over various perspective grid textures (Johnson et al., 1987). Another set of studies was directed at studying the head tracking of targets moving in a 3-D coordinate system. These studies, parametric in nature, utilized both impoverished and complex virtual worlds represented by simple perspective grids at one extreme, and computer-generated terrain at the other. These studies are part of an applied visual research program directed at understanding the design principles required for the development of instruments displaying spatial orientation information. The experiments also highlight the need for modeling the impact of spatial displays on pilot control tasks.

  5. A study of pilot modeling in multi-controller tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitbeck, R. F.; Knight, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    A modeling approach, which utilizes a matrix of transfer functions to describe the human pilot in multiple input, multiple output control situations, is studied. The approach used was to extend a well established scalar Wiener-Hopf minimization technique to the matrix case and then study, via a series of experiments, the data requirements when only finite record lengths are available. One of these experiments was a two-controller roll tracking experiment designed to force the pilot to use rudder in order to coordinate and reduce the effects of aileron yaw. One model was computed for the case where the signals used to generate the spectral matrix are error and bank angle while another model was computed for the case where error and yaw angle are the inputs. Several anomalies were observed to be present in the experimental data. These are defined by the descriptive terms roll up, break up, and roll down. Due to these algorithm induced anomalies, the frequency band over which reliable estimates of power spectra can be achieved is considerably less than predicted by the sampling theorem.

  6. Effect of Playful Balancing Training - A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik Hautop; Jessen, Jari Due

    2013-01-01

    We used the modular playware in the form of modular interactive tiles for playful training of community-dwelling elderly with balancing problem. During short-term play on the modular interactive tiles, the elderly were playing physical, interactive games that were challenging their dynamic balance...... increase in balancing performance (DGI score: 21.3) after short-term playful training with the modular interactive tiles, whereas the control group remained with a score indicating balancing problems and risk of falling (DGI score: 16.6). The small pilot randomized controlled trial suggests...... that the playful interaction with the modular interactive tiles has a significant effect even after a very short time of play. The average total training time to obtain the statistical significant effect amounted to just 2h45m....

  7. Remotely Piloted Vehicles for Experimental Flight Control Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motter, Mark A.; High, James W.

    2009-01-01

    A successful flight test and training campaign of the NASA Flying Controls Testbed was conducted at Naval Outlying Field, Webster Field, MD during 2008. Both the prop and jet-powered versions of the subscale, remotely piloted testbeds were used to test representative experimental flight controllers. These testbeds were developed by the Subsonic Fixed Wing Project s emphasis on new flight test techniques. The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project is under the Fundamental Aeronautics Program of NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD). The purpose of these testbeds is to quickly and inexpensively evaluate advanced concepts and experimental flight controls, with applications to adaptive control, system identification, novel control effectors, correlation of subscale flight tests with wind tunnel results, and autonomous operations. Flight tests and operator training were conducted during four separate series of tests during April, May, June and August 2008. Experimental controllers were engaged and disengaged during fully autonomous flight in the designated test area. Flaps and landing gear were deployed by commands from the ground control station as unanticipated disturbances. The flight tests were performed NASA personnel with support from the Maritime Unmanned Development and Operations (MUDO) team of the Naval Air Warfare Center, Aircraft Division

  8. Behavioral intervention to reduce opioid overdose among high-risk persons with opioid use disorder: A pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Oliver Coffin

    Full Text Available The United States is amidst an opioid epidemic, including synthetic opioids that may result in rapid death, leaving minimal opportunity for bystander rescue. We pilot tested a behavioral intervention to reduce the occurrence of opioid overdose among opioid dependent persons at high-risk for subsequent overdose.We conducted a single-blinded randomized-controlled trial of a repeated dose motivational interviewing intervention (REBOOT to reduce overdose versus treatment as usual, defined as information and referrals, over 16 months at the San Francisco Department of Public Health from 2014-2016. Participants were 18-65 years of age, had opioid use disorder by Structured Clinical Interview, active opioid use, opioid overdose within 5 years, and prior receipt of naloxone kits. The intervention was administered at months 0, 4, 8, and 12, preceded by the assessment which was also administered at month 16. Dual primary outcomes were any overdose event and number of events, collected by computer-assisted personal interview, as well as any fatal overdose events per vital records.A total of 78 persons were screened and 63 enrolled. Mean age was 43 years, 67% were born male, 65% White, 17% African-American, and 14% Latino. Ninety-two percent of visits and 93% of counseling sessions were completed. At baseline, 33.3% of participants had experienced an overdose in the past four months, with a similar mean number of overdoses in both arms (p = 0.95; 29% overdosed during follow-up. By intention-to-treat, participants assigned to REBOOT were less likely to experience any overdose (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 0.62 [95%CI 0.41-0.92, p = 0.019 and experienced fewer overdose events (IRR 0.46, 95%CI 0.24-0.90, p = 0.023, findings that were robust to sensitivity analyses. There were no differences between arms in days of opioid use, substance use treatment, or naloxone carriage.REBOOT reduced the occurrence of any opioid overdose and the number of overdoses

  9. Web-based nursing intervention for self-management of pain after cardiac surgery: pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martorella, Géraldine; Côté, José; Racine, Mélanie; Choinière, Manon

    2012-12-14

    Most adults undergoing cardiac surgery suffer from moderate to severe pain for up to 6 days after surgery. Individual barriers and attitudes regarding pain and its relief make patients reluctant to report their pain and ask for analgesic medication, which results in inadequate pain management. More innovative educational interventions for postoperative pain relief are needed. We developed a Web-based nursing intervention to influence patient's involvement in postoperative pain management. The intervention (SOULAGE-TAVIE) includes a preoperative 30-minute Web-based session and 2 brief face-to-face postoperative booster sessions. The Web application generates reflective activities and tailored educational messages according to patients' beliefs and attitudes. The messages are transmitted through videos of a virtual nurse, animations, stories, and texts. The aim of this single-blinded pilot randomized trial was to investigate the preliminary effects of a virtual nursing intervention (SOULAGE-TAVIE) to improve pain relief in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Participants (N = 60) were adults scheduled for their first cardiac surgery. They were randomly assigned to the experimental group using SOULAGE-TAVIE (n = 30) or the control group using usual care, including an educational pamphlet and postoperative follow-up (n = 30). Data were collected through questionnaires at the time of admission and from day 1 to day 7 after surgery with the help of a blinded research assistant. Outcomes were pain intensity, pain interference with daily activities, patients' pain barriers, tendency to catastrophize in face of pain, and analgesic consumption. The two groups were comparable at baseline across all demographic measures. Results revealed that patients in the experimental group did not experience less intense pain, but they reported significantly less pain interference when breathing/coughing (P = .04). A severe pain interference with breathing/coughing (pain ranked ≥ 7

  10. Pilot case-control study of paediatric falls from windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Brian D; Quistberg, D Alexander; Shandro, Jamie R; Partridge, Rebecca L; Song, Hyun Rae; Ebel, Beth E

    2011-12-01

    Unintentional falls from windows are an important cause of paediatric morbidity. There have been no controlled studies to identify modifiable environmental risk factors for window falls in young children. The authors have piloted a case-control study to test procedures for case identification, subject enrolment, and environmental data collection. Case windows were identified when a child 0-9 years old presented for care after a fall from that window. Control windows were identified (1) from the child's home and (2) from the home of an age- and gender-matched child seeking care for an injury diagnosis not related to a window fall. Study staff visited enrolled homes to collect window measurements and conduct window screen performance tests. The authors enrolled and collected data on 18 case windows, 18 in-home controls, and 14 matched community controls. Six potential community controls were contacted for every one enrolled. Families who completed the home visit viewed study procedures positively. Case windows were more likely than community controls to be horizontal sliders (100% vs 50%), to have deeper sills (6.28 vs 4.31 inches), to be higher above the exterior surface (183 vs 82 inches), and to have screens that failed below a threshold derived from the static pressure of a 3-year-old leaning against the mesh (60.0% vs 16.7%). Case windows varied very little from in-home controls. Case-control methodology can be used to study risk factors for paediatric falls from windows. Recruitment of community controls is challenging but essential, because in-home controls tend to be over-matched on important variables. A home visit allows direct measurement of window type, height, sill depth, and screen performance. These variables should all be investigated in subsequent, larger studies covering major housing markets.

  11. Data-linked pilot reply time on controller workload and communication in a simulated terminal option

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    This report describes an analysis of air traffic control communication and workload in a simulated terminal radar approach : control environment. The objective of this study was to investigate how pilot-to-controller data-link acknowledgment time : m...

  12. Effect of inhalation aromatherapy with lavender essential oil on stress and vital signs in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery: A single-blinded randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikmoradi, Ali; Seifi, Zahra; Poorolajal, Jalal; Araghchian, Malihe; Safiaryan, Reza; Oshvandi, Khodayar

    2015-06-01

    At present, aromatherapy is used widely in medical research. This study aimed to investigate the effects of inhalation aromatherapy using lavender essential oil to reduce mental stress and improve the vital signs of patients after coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG). A single-blinded randomized controlled trial was conducted with 60 patients who had undergone CABG in a 2-day intervention that targeted stress reduction. Sixty subjects following coronary artery bypass surgery in two aromatherapy and control groups. The study was conducted in Ekbatan Therapeutic and Educational Center, Hamadan, Iran, in 2013. On the second and third days after surgery, the aromatherapy group patients received two drops of 2% lavender essential oil for 20min and the control group received two drops of distilled water as a placebo. The primary outcome was mental stress, which was measured before and after the intervention using the DASS-21 questionnaire. The secondary outcomes were vital signs, including the heart rate, respiratory rate, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure, which were measured before and after the intervention. The individual characteristics of the aromatherapy and control groups were the same. There were no significant difference in the mean mental stress scores and vital signs of the aromatherapy and control groups on the second or third days after surgery. Inhalation aromatherapy with lavender essential oil had no significant effects on mental stress and vital signs in patients following CABG, except the systolic blood pressure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Virtual Reality Rehabilitation With Functional Electrical Stimulation Improves Upper Extremity Function in Patients With Chronic Stroke: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stephanie Hyeyoung; Lee, Ji-Yeong; Kim, Mi-Young; Jeon, Yu-Jin; Kim, Suyoung; Shin, Joon-Ho

    2018-03-02

    To compare virtual reality (VR) combined with functional electrical stimulation (FES) with cyclic FES for improving upper extremity function and health-related quality of life in patients with chronic stroke. A pilot, randomized, single-blind, controlled trial. Stroke rehabilitation inpatient unit. Participants (N=48) with hemiplegia secondary to a unilateral stroke for >3 months and with a hemiplegic wrist extensor Medical Research Council scale score ranging from 1 to 3. FES was applied to the wrist extensors and finger extensors. A VR-based wearable rehabilitation device was used combined with FES and virtual activity-based training for the intervention group. The control group received cyclic FES only. Both groups completed 20 sessions over a 4-week period. Primary outcome measures were changes in Fugl-Meyer Assessment-Upper Extremity and Wolf Motor Function Test scores. Secondary outcome measures were changes in Box and Block Test, Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test, and Stroke Impact Scale scores. Assessments were performed at baseline (t0) and at 2 weeks (t1), 4 weeks (t4), and 8 weeks (t8). Between-group comparisons were evaluated using a repeated-measures analysis of variance. Forty-one participants were included in the analysis. Compared with FES alone, VR-FES produced a substantial increase in Fugl-Meyer Assessment-distal score (P=.011) and marginal improvement in Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test-gross score (P=.057). VR-FES produced greater, although nonsignificant, improvements in all other outcome measures, except in the Stroke Impact Scale-activities of daily living/instrumental activities of daily living score. FES with VR-based rehabilitation may be more effective than cyclic FES in improving distal upper extremity gross motor performance poststroke. Copyright © 2018 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Shuttle Primary Reaction Control Subsystem Thruster Fuel Valve Pilot Seal Extrusion: A Failure Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Jess; Saulsberry, Regor L.

    2003-01-01

    Pilot operated valves (POVs) are used to control the flow of hypergolic propellants monomethylhydrazine (fuel) and nitrogen tetroxide (oxidizer) to the Shuttle orbiter Primary Reaction Control Subsystem (PRCS) thrusters. The POV incorporates a two-stage design: a solenoid-actuated pilot stage, which in turn controls a pressure-actuated main stage. Isolation of propellant supply from the thruster chamber is accomplished in part by a captive polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) pilot seal retained inside a Custom 455.1 stainless steel cavity. Extrusion of the pilot seal restricts the flow of fuel around the pilot poppet, thus impeding or preventing the main valve stage from opening. It can also prevent the main stage from staying open with adequate force margin, particularly if there is gas in the main stage actuation cavity. During thruster operation on-orbit, fuel valve pilot seal extrusion is commonly indicated by low or erratic chamber pressure or failure of the thruster to fire upon command (Fail-Off). During ground turnaround, pilot seal extrusion is commonly indicated by slow gaseous nitrogen (GN2) main valve opening times (greater than 38 ms) or slow water main valve opening response times (greater than 33 ms). Poppet lift tests and visual inspection can also detect pilot seal extrusion during ground servicing; however, direct metrology on the pilot seat assembly provides the most quantitative and accurate means of identifying extrusion. Minimizing PRCS fuel valve pilot seal extrusion has become an important issue in the effort to improve PRCS reliability and reduce associated life cycle costs.

  15. A pilot randomised controlled trial to assess the utility of an e-learning package that trains users in adverse drug reaction causality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Elizabeth J; Kirkham, Jamie J; Bellis, Jennifer R; Peak, Matthew; Smyth, Rosalind L; Williamson, Paula R; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2015-12-01

    Causality assessment of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) by healthcare professionals is often informal which can lead to inconsistencies in practice. The Liverpool Causality Assessment Tool (LCAT) offers a systematic approach. An interactive, web-based, e-learning package, the Liverpool ADR Causality Assessment e-learning Package (LACAeP), was designed to improve causality assessment using the LCAT. This study aimed to (1) get feedback on usability and usefulness on the LACAeP, identify areas for improvement and development, and generate data on effect size to inform a larger scale study; and (2) test the usability and usefulness of the LCAT. A pilot, single-blind, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial hosted by the University of Liverpool was undertaken. Participants were paediatric medical trainees at specialty training level 1+ within the Mersey and North-West England Deaneries. Participants were randomised (1 : 1) access to the LACAeP or no training. The primary efficacy outcome was score by correct classification, predefined by a multidisciplinary panel of experts. Following participation, feedback on both the LCAT and the LACAeP was obtained, via a built in survey, from participants. Of 57 randomised, 35 completed the study. Feedback was mainly positive although areas for improvement were identified. Seventy-four per cent of participants found the LCAT easy to use and 78% found the LACAeP training useful. Sixty-one per cent would be unlikely to recommend the training. Scores ranged from 4 to 13 out of 20. The LACAeP increased scores by 1.3, but this was not significant. Improving the LACAeP before testing it in an appropriately powered trial, informed by the differences observed, is required. Rigorous evaluation will enable a quality resource that will be of value in healthcare professional training. © 2015 The Authors. International Journal of Pharmacy Practice published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  16. Water-based vs. non-water-based physiotherapy for rehabilitation of postural deformities in Parkinson's disease: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Daniele; Giantin, Maria Giulia; Manuela, Pilleri; Filippetto, Consuelo; Pelosin, Elisa; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Antonini, Angelo

    2017-08-01

    To compare the efficacy of two physiotherapy protocols (water-based vs. non-water-based) on postural deformities of patients with Parkinson's disease. A single blind, randomized controlled pilot study. Inpatient (Rehabilitative Department). A total of 30 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two eight-week treatment groups: Water-based ( n = 15) or non-water-based physiotherapy exercises ( n = 15). Changes in the degree of cervical and dorsal flexion and in the angle of lateral inclination of the trunk (evaluated by means of a posturographic system) were used as primary outcomes. Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale section III, Time Up and Go Test, Berg Balance Scale, Activities-specific Balance Confidence, Falls Efficacy Scale and the Parkinson's disease quality of life questionnaire (39 items) were the secondary outcomes. All outcomes were assessed at baseline, at the end of training and eight weeks after treatment. Patients were always tested at the time of their optimal antiparkinsonian medication ('on' phase). After the treatment, only Parkinson's disease subjects randomized to water-based treatment showed a significant improvement of trunk posture with a significant reduction of cervical flexion (water-based group: -65.2°; non-water-based group: +1.7°) and dorsal flexion (water-based group: -22.5°; non-water-based group: -6.5°) and lateral inclination of the trunk (water-based group: -2.3°; non-water-based group: +0.3°). Both groups presented significant improvements in the secondary clinical outcomes without between-group differences. Our results show that water-based physiotherapy was effective for improving postural deformities in patients with Parkinson's disease.

  17. Aprotinin decreases the incidence of cognitive deficit following CABG and cardiopulmonary bypass: a pilot randomized controlled study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harmon, Dominic C

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: Cognitive deficit after coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) has a high prevalence and is persistent. Meta-analysis of clinical trials demonstrates a decreased incidence of stroke after CABG when aprotinin is administrated perioperatively. We hypothesized that aprotinin administration would decrease the incidence of cognitive deficit after CABG. METHODS: Thirty-six ASA III-IV patients undergoing elective CABG were included in a prospective, randomized, single-blinded pilot study. Eighteen patients received aprotinin 2 x 10(6) KIU (loading dose), 2 x 10(6) KIU (added to circuit prime) and a continuous infusion of 5 x 10(5) KIU.hr(-1). A battery of cognitive tests was administered to patients and spouses (n = 18) the day before surgery, four days and six weeks postoperatively. RESULTS: Four days postoperatively new cognitive deficit (defined by a change in one or more cognitive domains using the Reliable Change Index method) was present in ten (58%) patients in the aprotinin group compared to 17 (94%) in the placebo group [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.10-0.62, P = 0.005); (P = 0.01)]. Six weeks postoperatively, four (23%) patients in the aprotinin group had cognitive deficit compared to ten (55%) in the placebo group (95% CI 0.80-0.16, P = 0.005); (P = 0.05). CONCLUSION: In this prospective pilot study, the incidence of cognitive deficit after CABG and cardiopulmonary bypass is decreased by the administration of high-dose aprotinin.

  18. Safety of a New Compact Male Intermittent Catheter: Randomized, Cross-Over, Single-Blind Study in Healthy Male Volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagi, Per; Hannibalsen, Jane; Permild, Rikke

    2011-01-01

    in hematuria (p = 0.54) or discomfort/stinging/pain at first micturition (p = 0.56). During insertion, handling was easier (p = 0.0001) and touching the coating was necessary less often (2.2 vs. 81.3% of catheterizations; p catheter; it was preferred by nurses for 20 of 23......Introduction: A new compact male intermittent catheter was compared with a regular intermittent male catheter in terms of safety and acceptability. Methods: In this randomized, single-blind, cross-over study, healthy male volunteers were catheterized twice with a compact catheter and twice...... with a regular catheter. Results: 28 participants were enrolled. Mean ± SD discomfort (visual analogue scale; primary objective) was 2.25 ± 1.5 and 2.52 ± 1.8 for the compact and regular catheters, respectively (difference -0.27; 95% confidence interval -0.73 to 0.19); there was no significant difference...

  19. Subacute effects of cervicothoracic spinal thrust/non-thrust in addition to shoulder manual therapy plus exercise intervention in individuals with subacromial impingement syndrome: a prospective, randomized controlled clinical trial pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Alexis A; Donaldson, Megan; Wassinger, Craig A; Emerson-Kavchak, Alicia J

    2017-09-01

    To determine the subacute effects of cervicothoracic spinal thrust/non-thrust in addition to shoulder non-thrust plus exercise in patients with subacromial pathology. This was a randomized, single blinded controlled trial pilot study. This trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01753271) and reported according to Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials requirements. Patients were randomly assigned to either shoulder treatment plus cervicothoracic spinal thrust/non-thrust or shoulder treatment-only group. Primary outcomes were average pain intensity (Numeric Pain Rating Scale) and physical function (Shoulder Pain and Disability Index) at 2 weeks, 4 weeks, and patient discharge. 18 patients, mean age 43.1(15.8) years satisfied the eligibility criteria and were analyzed for follow-up data. Both groups showed statistically significant improvements in both pain and function at 2 weeks, 4 weeks, and discharge. The between-group differences for changes in pain or physical function were not significant at any time point. The addition of cervicothoracic spinal thrust/non-thrust to the shoulder treatment-only group did not significantly alter improvement in pain or function in patients with subacromial pathology. Both approaches appeared to provide an equally notable benefit. Both groups improved on all outcomes and met the criteria for clinical relevance for both pain and function. 2b.

  20. Comparing the effects of aromatherapy massage and inhalation aromatherapy on anxiety and pain in burn patients: A single-blind randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyyed-Rasooli, Alehe; Salehi, Feridoon; Mohammadpoorasl, Asghar; Goljaryan, Sakineh; Seyyedi, Zahra; Thomson, Brian

    2016-12-01

    Anxiety and pain are recognized as major problems of burn patients; because pharmaceutical treatments for controlling anxiety and pain symptoms lead to complications and an increase in health costs, nonpharmacological nursing interventions were considered for this group of patients. This led to the present study aimed at comparing the effect of aromatherapy massage with inhalation aromatherapy for anxiety and pain in burn patients. This single-blind clinical trial was carried out on 90 patients with burns aromatherapy massage, inhalation aromatherapy, and control group. The patients assigned to the aromatherapy massage group received a massage for half an hour using a blend of lavender and almond oils, while a blend of rose and lavender aroma was used for the inhalation aromatherapy group. Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory was used for measuring anxiety and the visual analog scale (VAS) scale was used for measuring pain. The results showed that three groups were equal in terms of demographics, disease characteristics, and scores of anxiety and pain at the baseline. The mean decreases of anxiety scores were -0.04±5.08, 6.33±12.55, and 6.43±10.60 in the control group, aromatherapy massage group, and inhalation group, respectively (p=0.007). The mean decrease of pain scores were -0.10±0.96, 1.70±1.84, and 0.97±1.56 in the control group, aromatherapy massage group, and inhalation group, respectively (paromatherapy massage and inhalation aromatherapy compared with the control group in reducing both anxiety and pain of burn patients. Therefore, both interventions, which are inexpensive, and noninvasive nursing tasks can be proposed for alleviating anxiety and pain of burn patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  1. Efficacy, Safety, and Preparation of Standardized Parenteral Nutrition Regimens: Three-Chamber Bags vs Compounded Monobags-A Prospective, Multicenter, Randomized, Single-Blind Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jianchun; Wu, Guohao; Tang, Yun; Ye, Yingjiang; Zhang, Zhongtao

    2017-08-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) covering the need for carbohydrates, amino acids, and lipids can either be compounded from single nutrients or purchased as an industrially manufactured ready-to-use regimen. This study compares a commercially available 3-chamber bag (study group) with a conventionally compounded monobag regarding nutrition efficacy, safety, and regimen preparation time. This prospective, randomized, single-blind study was conducted at 5 Chinese hospitals from October 2010-October 2011. Postsurgical patients requiring PN for at least 6 days were randomly assigned to receive the study or control regimen. Plasma concentrations of prealbumin and C-reactive protein (CRP), regimen preparation time, length of hospital stay (LOS), 30-day mortality, safety laboratory parameters, and adverse events (AEs) were recorded. In total, 240 patients (121 vs 119 in study and control groups) participated in this study. Changes in prealbumin concentrations during nutrition support (Δ Prealb(StudyGroup) = 2.65 mg/dL, P < .001 vs Δ Prealb(ControlGroup) = 0.27 mg/dL, P = .606) and CRP values were comparable. Regimen preparation time was significantly reduced in the study group by the use of 3-chamber bags (t (StudyGroup) = 4.90 ± 4.41 minutes vs t (ControlGroup) = 12.13 ± 5.62 minutes, P < .001). No differences were detected for LOS, 30-day mortality, safety laboratory parameters, and postoperative AEs (37 vs 38 in study and control groups). The PN regimen provided by the 3-chamber bag was comparable to the compounded regimen and safe in use. Time savings during regimen preparation indicates that use of 3-chamber bags simplifies the process of regimen preparation.

  2. Neuromuscular training in construction workers: a longitudinal controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faude, Oliver; Donath, Lars; Bopp, Micha; Hofmann, Sara; Erlacher, Daniel; Zahner, Lukas

    2015-08-01

    Many accidents at construction sites are due to falls. An exercise-based workplace intervention may improve intrinsic fall risk factors. In this pilot study, we aimed at evaluating the effects of neuromuscular exercise on static and functional balance performance as well as on lower limb explosive power in construction workers. Healthy middle-aged construction workers were non-randomly assigned to an intervention [N = 20, age = 40.3 (SD 8.3) years] or a control group [N = 20, age = 41.8 (9.9) years]. The intervention group performed static and dynamic balance and strength exercises (13 weeks, 15 min each day). Before and after the intervention and after an 8-week follow-up, unilateral postural sway, backward balancing (on 3- and 4.5-cm-wide beams) as well as vertical jump height were assessed. We observed a group × time interaction for postural sway (p = 0.002) with a reduction in the intervention group and no relevant change in the control group. Similarly, the number of successful steps while walking backwards on the 3-cm beam increased only in the intervention group (p = 0.047). These effects were likely to most likely practically beneficial from pretest to posttest and to follow-up test for postural sway (+12%, standardized mean difference (SMD) = 0.65 and 17%, SMD = 0.92) and backward balancing on the 3-cm beam (+58%, SMD = 0.59 and 37%, SMD = 0.40). Fifteen minutes of neuromuscular training each day can improve balance performance in construction workers and, thus, may contribute to a decreased fall risk.

  3. Doping control container for urine stabilization: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsivou, Maria; Giannadaki, Evangelia; Hooghe, Fiona; Roels, Kris; Van Gansbeke, Wim; Garribba, Flaminia; Lyris, Emmanouil; Deventer, Koen; Mazzarino, Monica; Donati, Francesco; Georgakopoulos, Dimitrios G; Van Eenoo, Peter; Georgakopoulos, Costas G; de la Torre, Xavier; Botrè, Francesco

    2017-05-01

    Urine collection containers used in the doping control collection procedure do not provide a protective environment for urine, against degradation by microorganisms and proteolytic enzymes. An in-house chemical stabilization mixture was developed to tackle urine degradation problems encountered in human sport samples, in cases of microbial contamination or proteolytic activity. The mixture consists of antimicrobial substances and protease inhibitors for the simultaneous inactivation of a wide range of proteolytic enzymes. It has already been tested in lab-scale, as part of World Anti-Doping Agency's (WADA) funded research project, in terms of efficiency against microbial and proteolytic activity. The present work, funded also by WADA, is a follow-up study on the improvement of chemical stabilization mixture composition, application mode and limitation of interferences, using pilot urine collection containers, spray-coated in their internal surface with the chemical stabilization mixture. Urine in plastic stabilized collection containers have been gone through various incubation cycles to test for stabilization efficiency and analytical matrix interferences by three WADA accredited Laboratories (Athens, Ghent, and Rome). The spray-coated chemical stabilization mixture was tested against microorganism elimination and steroid glucuronide degradation, as well as enzymatic breakdown of proteins, such as intact hCG, recombinant erythropoietin and small peptides (GHRPs, ipamorelin), induced by proteolytic enzymes. Potential analytical interferences, observed in the presence of spray-coated chemical stabilization mixture, were recorded using routine screening procedures. The results of the current study support the application of the spray-coated plastic urine container, in the doping control collection procedure. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Hockey Fans in Training: A Pilot Pragmatic Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrella, Robert J; Gill, Dawn P; Zou, Guangyong; DE Cruz, Ashleigh; Riggin, Brendan; Bartol, Cassandra; Danylchuk, Karen; Hunt, Kate; Wyke, Sally; Gray, Cindy M; Bunn, Christopher; Zwarenstein, Merrick

    2017-12-01

    Hockey Fans in Training (Hockey FIT) is a gender-sensitized weight loss and healthy lifestyle program. We investigated 1) feasibility of recruiting and retaining overweight and obese men into a pilot pragmatic randomized controlled trial and 2) potential for Hockey FIT to lead to weight loss and improvements in other outcomes at 12 wk and 12 months. Male fans of two ice hockey teams (35-65 yr; body mass index ≥28 kg·m) located in Ontario (Canada) were randomized to intervention (Hockey FIT) or comparator (wait-list control). Hockey FIT includes a 12-wk active phase (weekly, coach-led group meetings including provision of dietary information, practice of behavior change techniques, and safe exercise sessions plus incremental pedometer walking) and a 40-wk minimally supported phase (smartphone app for sustaining physical activity, private online social network, standardized e-mails, booster session/reunion). Measurement at baseline and 12 wk (both groups) and 12 months (intervention group only) included clinical outcomes (e.g., weight) and self-reported physical activity, diet, and self-rated health. Eighty men were recruited in 4 wk; trial retention was >80% at 12 wk and >75% at 12 months. At 12 wk, the intervention group lost 3.6 kg (95% confidence interval, -5.26 to -1.90 kg) more than the comparator group (P < 0.001) and maintained this weight loss to 12 months. The intervention group also demonstrated greater improvements in other clinical measures, physical activity, diet, and self-rated health at 12 wk; most sustained to 12 months. Results suggest feasible recruitment/retention of overweight and obese men in the Hockey FIT program. Results provide evidence for the potential effectiveness of Hockey FIT for weight loss and improved health in at-risk men and, thus, evidence to proceed with a definitive trial.

  5. Combining control input with flight path data to evaluate pilot performance in transport aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbatson, Matt; Harris, Don; Huddlestone, John; Sears, Rodney

    2008-11-01

    When deriving an objective assessment of piloting performance from flight data records, it is common to employ metrics which purely evaluate errors in flight path parameters. The adequacy of pilot performance is evaluated from the flight path of the aircraft. However, in large jet transport aircraft these measures may be insensitive and require supplementing with frequency-based measures of control input parameters. Flight path and control input data were collected from pilots undertaking a jet transport aircraft conversion course during a series of symmetric and asymmetric approaches in a flight simulator. The flight path data were analyzed for deviations around the optimum flight path while flying an instrument landing approach. Manipulation of the flight controls was subject to analysis using a series of power spectral density measures. The flight path metrics showed no significant differences in performance between the symmetric and asymmetric approaches. However, control input frequency domain measures revealed that the pilots employed highly different control strategies in the pitch and yaw axes. The results demonstrate that to evaluate pilot performance fully in large aircraft, it is necessary to employ performance metrics targeted at both the outer control loop (flight path) and the inner control loop (flight control) parameters in parallel, evaluating both the product and process of a pilot's performance.

  6. RodPilotR - The Innovative and Cost-Effective Digital Control Rod Drive Control System for PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, Clemens

    2008-01-01

    With RodPilot, AREVA NP offers an innovative and cost-effective system for controlling control rods in Pressurized Water Reactors. RodPilot controls the three operating coils of the control rod drive mechanism (lift, moveable gripper and stationary gripper coil). The rods are inserted into or withdrawn from the core as required by the Reactor Control System. The system combines modern components, state-of-the-art logic and a proven electronic control rod drive control principle to provide enhanced reliability and lower maintenance costs. (author)

  7. RodPilot{sup R} - The Innovative and Cost-Effective Digital Control Rod Drive Control System for PWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baron, Clemens [AREVA NP GmbH, NLEE-G, Postfach 1199, 91001 Erlangen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    With RodPilot, AREVA NP offers an innovative and cost-effective system for controlling control rods in Pressurized Water Reactors. RodPilot controls the three operating coils of the control rod drive mechanism (lift, moveable gripper and stationary gripper coil). The rods are inserted into or withdrawn from the core as required by the Reactor Control System. The system combines modern components, state-of-the-art logic and a proven electronic control rod drive control principle to provide enhanced reliability and lower maintenance costs. (author)

  8. Complexity and Pilot Workload Metrics for the Evaluation of Adaptive Flight Controls on a Full Scale Piloted Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Curt; Schaefer, Jacob; Burken, John J.; Larson, David; Johnson, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Flight research has shown the effectiveness of adaptive flight controls for improving aircraft safety and performance in the presence of uncertainties. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA)'s Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control (IRAC) project designed and conducted a series of flight experiments to study the impact of variations in adaptive controller design complexity on performance and handling qualities. A novel complexity metric was devised to compare the degrees of simplicity achieved in three variations of a model reference adaptive controller (MRAC) for NASA's F-18 (McDonnell Douglas, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois) Full-Scale Advanced Systems Testbed (Gen-2A) aircraft. The complexity measures of these controllers are also compared to that of an earlier MRAC design for NASA's Intelligent Flight Control System (IFCS) project and flown on a highly modified F-15 aircraft (McDonnell Douglas, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois). Pilot comments during the IRAC research flights pointed to the importance of workload on handling qualities ratings for failure and damage scenarios. Modifications to existing pilot aggressiveness and duty cycle metrics are presented and applied to the IRAC controllers. Finally, while adaptive controllers may alleviate the effects of failures or damage on an aircraft's handling qualities, they also have the potential to introduce annoying changes to the flight dynamics or to the operation of aircraft systems. A nuisance rating scale is presented for the categorization of nuisance side-effects of adaptive controllers.

  9. The effectiveness of origami on overall hand function after injury: A pilot controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, L; Roden, P; Taylor, Y; Marston, L

    2008-01-01

    This pilot study measured the effectiveness of using origami to improve the overall hand function of outpatients attending an NHS hand injury unit. The initiative came from one of the authors who had used origami informally in the clinical setting and observed beneficial effects. These observed effects were tested experimentally. The design was a pilot non-randomised controlled trial with 13 participants. Allocation of the seven control group members was based on patient preference. The exper...

  10. Effects of Nintendo Wii™ Training on Occupational Performance, Balance, and Daily Living Activities in Children with Spastic Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy: A Single-Blind and Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atasavun Uysal, Songül; Baltaci, Gül

    2016-10-05

    This study aimed at assessing how the addition of Nintendo Wii ™ (NW) system to the traditional therapy influences occupational performance, balance, and daily living activities in children with spastic hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy (CP). The present study is a single-blind and randomized trial involving 24 children aged 6-14 years, classified as level I or II on the Gross Motor Function Classification System. The children were allocated into two groups: an intervention and a control group, and their families participated in the study. The activity performance analysis of the children was undertaken by using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM), functional balance was measured with the Pediatric Balance Scale (PBS), and activities of daily living were assessed with Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI). Twenty-four children with CP were randomly divided into two groups: intervention (n = 12) and control group (n = 12). All children in both groups continued their traditional physiotherapy program twice a week, 45 minutes per session, whereas the participants in the intervention group, additionally, were trained with NW, two other days of the week for 12 weeks, with each session lasting for 30 minutes. Self-care, mobility, PEDI total, PBS, and performance of COPM scores increased in the NW group after intervention. Self-care, mobility, and total PEDI increased in the control group as well. However, there was no statistically significant difference found between the groups, except for PBS (P < 0.05). NW contributed to the implementation of occupational performance, daily living activities, and functional balance. We recommend that NW could be used in the rehabilitation program to engage play-based activities with fun.

  11. Using WhatsApp and Facebook Online Social Groups for Smoking Relapse Prevention for Recent Quitters: A Pilot Pragmatic Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ching Han Helen; Lai, Chi-Keung Jonah; Chan, Wai Fung Vivian; Wang, Man Ping; Li, Ho Cheung William; Chan, Sophia Siu Chee; Lam, Tai-Hing

    2015-01-01

    Background Quit attempters often have episodes of smoking relapse before they eventually quit. Interactive text messaging through mobile phones has been shown to increase abstinence. This service can be potentially applied on the platform of a social networking service to help quitters maintain abstinence. Objective Our aim was to determine if the group discussion and reminders via the WhatsApp or Facebook social group were effective to prevent smoking relapse in quitters who had stopped smoking recently. Methods This was a single-blinded, parallel, 3-arm pilot cluster randomized controlled trial allocating recent quitters, who had completed an 8-week treatment and reported abstinence for at least 7 days, to WhatsApp (n=42), Facebook (n=40), and a control group (n=54). The 2 intervention groups participated in a 2-month online group discussion with either WhatsApp or Facebook moderated by a trained smoking cessation counselor and received a self-help booklet on smoking cessation. The control group only received the booklet. The primary outcome was the 2- and 6-month relapse rates, defined as the proportion of participants who smoked at least 5 cigarettes in 3 consecutive days. Results Fewer participants in the WhatsApp group (17%, 7/42) reported relapse than the control group (42.6%, 23/54) at 2-month (OR 0.27, 95% CI 0.10-0.71) and 6-month (40.5%, 17/42 vs 61.1%, 33/54; OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.19-0.99) follow-ups. The Facebook group (30.0%, 12/40) had an insignificantly lower relapse rate than the control group (42.6%, 23/54) at 2-month (OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.24-1.37) and 6-month (52.5%, 13/40 vs 61.1%, 33/54; OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.31-1.61) follow-ups. The WhatsApp social groups had more moderators’ posts (median 60, IQR 25 vs median 32, IQR 7; P=.05) and participants’ posts (median 35, IQR 50 vs median 6, IQR 9; P=.07) than their Facebook counterparts, but the difference was insignificant. Conclusions The intervention via the WhatsApp social group was effective in reducing

  12. Using WhatsApp and Facebook Online Social Groups for Smoking Relapse Prevention for Recent Quitters: A Pilot Pragmatic Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Yee Tak Derek; Chan, Ching Han Helen; Lai, Chi-Keung Jonah; Chan, Wai Fung Vivian; Wang, Man Ping; Li, Ho Cheung William; Chan, Sophia Siu Chee; Lam, Tai-Hing

    2015-10-22

    Quit attempters often have episodes of smoking relapse before they eventually quit. Interactive text messaging through mobile phones has been shown to increase abstinence. This service can be potentially applied on the platform of a social networking service to help quitters maintain abstinence. Our aim was to determine if the group discussion and reminders via the WhatsApp or Facebook social group were effective to prevent smoking relapse in quitters who had stopped smoking recently. This was a single-blinded, parallel, 3-arm pilot cluster randomized controlled trial allocating recent quitters, who had completed an 8-week treatment and reported abstinence for at least 7 days, to WhatsApp (n=42), Facebook (n=40), and a control group (n=54). The 2 intervention groups participated in a 2-month online group discussion with either WhatsApp or Facebook moderated by a trained smoking cessation counselor and received a self-help booklet on smoking cessation. The control group only received the booklet. The primary outcome was the 2- and 6-month relapse rates, defined as the proportion of participants who smoked at least 5 cigarettes in 3 consecutive days. Fewer participants in the WhatsApp group (17%, 7/42) reported relapse than the control group (42.6%, 23/54) at 2-month (OR 0.27, 95% CI 0.10-0.71) and 6-month (40.5%, 17/42 vs 61.1%, 33/54; OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.19-0.99) follow-ups. The Facebook group (30.0%, 12/40) had an insignificantly lower relapse rate than the control group (42.6%, 23/54) at 2-month (OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.24-1.37) and 6-month (52.5%, 13/40 vs 61.1%, 33/54; OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.31-1.61) follow-ups. The WhatsApp social groups had more moderators' posts (median 60, IQR 25 vs median 32, IQR 7; P=.05) and participants' posts (median 35, IQR 50 vs median 6, IQR 9; P=.07) than their Facebook counterparts, but the difference was insignificant. The intervention via the WhatsApp social group was effective in reducing relapse probably because of enhanced discussion and

  13. Launch Vehicle Manual Steering with Adaptive Augmenting Control In-flight Evaluations Using a Piloted Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Curt

    2014-01-01

    An adaptive augmenting control algorithm for the Space Launch System has been developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center as part of the launch vehicles baseline flight control system. A prototype version of the SLS flight control software was hosted on a piloted aircraft at the Armstrong Flight Research Center to demonstrate the adaptive controller on a full-scale realistic application in a relevant flight environment. Concerns regarding adverse interactions between the adaptive controller and a proposed manual steering mode were investigated by giving the pilot trajectory deviation cues and pitch rate command authority.

  14. Photobiomodulation by helium neon and diode lasers in an excisional wound model: A single blinded trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snehil Dixit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Application of different kinds of lasers in clinical and experimental studies causes photobiomodulation that works at localized cellular and humoral level on various biological systems. Increased numbers of fibroblasts, myofibroblast, and degranulation of mast cells have been the observed benefits post-irradiation. Objective: Was to find out the effect of irradiation with energy densities of 3.38 J/cm 2 , 8 J/cm 2 , and 18 J/cm 2 on animal tissue (albino wistar rats in an excisional wound model and to assess changes in biochemical (hydroxyproline and histopathological levels in excisional wound model. Materials and Methods: The animals were divided into 4 groups, which were labeled as L1, diode laser (18 J/cm 2 , L2 Helium-neon (He-Ne, 8 J/cm 2 , L3 diode laser (3.38 J/cm 2 , and sham treatment for control was depicted by C, respectively. Histological and hydroxyproline analysis was performed on 7, 14, 21 days of post-wounding. One-way analysis of variance, ANOVA and Bonferroni′s multiple comparison tests were done for tissue hydroxyproline levels. Results: There was no significant increase in the hydroxyproline content (P < 0.005 when observed in study group and compared to controls. Whereas significant epithelizations was seen in group treated with He-Ne laser of intensity of 8 J/cm 2 . Conclusion: The experimental observations suggest that low intensity helium-neon laser of 8 J/cm 2 intensity facilitated photo stimulation by tissue repair, but failed to show significant tissue hydroxyproline levels in excisional wound model.

  15. EFFECTIVENESS OF ROCABADO'S TECHNIQUE FOR SUBJECTS WITH TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT DYSFUNCTION - A SINGLE BLIND STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niha Siraj Mulla

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background:A temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction or TMD is a group of conditions characterized by pain in the muscles of mastication, the temporo-mandiblar joint or both. Rocabado has described techniques includes the Rocabado’s manipulation and Rocabado’s exercises which have both been individually advocated for treatment of TMD. The purpose of study is to determine the effectiveness of Rocabado’s techniques on TMJ dysfunction symptoms, pain, TMJ Range of Motion (ROM and jaw functional limitation for subjects with temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction. Method: Pre to post test experimental study design, subjects with temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction randomized into two groups with 15 subjects into each group with total of 30 subjects in Study and control group, respectively. The study group received the Rocabado’s technique which consisted of Rocabado’s non-thrust TMJ manipulation and Rocabado’s exercises along with conventional TMJ exercises and the control group received only conventional TMJ exercises. The exercises were performed for 6 times per each session, six times in a day, one session under supervision and remaining five sessions by the subject at home for 6 days in a week for duration of 2 weeks. The outcome measurements such as VAS for pain, TMJ ROM, Fonseca’s questionnaire rating for TMJ dysfunction symptoms and jaw function limitation score (JFLS was measured before and after two weeks of intervention. Results: Comparative analysis, using Independent ‘t’ test and Mann Whitney U- test found that the means of VAS, TMJ ROM, Fonseca’s questionnaire and JFLS scores showed statistically significant difference (p <0.05 when the pre-intervention means and post-intervention means were compared between two groups. Conclusion: It is concluded that Rocabado’s technique found to have statistically and clinically significant added effect with conventional TMJ exercises shown greater percentage of improvements obtained

  16. Pulmonary gas exchange impairment following tourniquet deflation: a prospective, single-blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lina; Wang, Liangrong; Bai, Yu; Zheng, Liupu; Zhao, Xiyue; Xiong, Xiangqing; Jin, Lida; Ji, Wei; Wang, Wantie

    2010-06-09

    The tourniquet has been considered as a recognized cause of limb ischemia/reperfusion injury in orthopedic surgery resulting in a transient neutrophil, monocyte activation, and enhanced neutrophil transendothelial migration with potential remote tissue injury. This study investigated the effect of unilateral tourniquet application within a safe time limit on pulmonary function and the roles of lipid peroxidation and systemic inflammatory response. Thirty patients undergoing unilateral lower extremity surgery with or without tourniquet were equally divided into a control group with no tourniquet (Group C) and a tourniquet (Group T). Arterial partial pressure of oxygen (P(a)O(2)), arterial-alveolar oxygen tension ratio (a/A ratio), alveolar-arterial oxygen difference (A-aDO(2)) and respiratory index, plasma malondialdehyde, serum interleukin (IL) -6 and IL-8 levels were measured immediately before and 1 hour after tourniquet inflation/operation beginning, 0.5, 2, 6, and 24 hours after tourniquet deflation/operation ending. The results represented no significant changes in Group C with regard to either blood gas variables or levels of circulating mediators, while blood gas variable changes of greater A-aDO(2) and respiratory index and lower PaO2 and a/A ratio were shown at 6 hours following tourniquet deflation. The levels of malondialdehyde, IL-6, and IL-8 were increased over baseline values from 2 to 24 hours following tourniquet deflation in Group T. We concluded that tourniquet application within a safe time limit may cause pulmonary gas exchange impairment several hours after tourniquet deflation, where lipid peroxidation and systemic inflammatory response may be involved. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Exercise training and weight loss, not always a happy marriage: single blind exercise trials in females with diverse BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Matthew; Fatahi, Fardin; Alabduljader, Kholoud; Jelleyman, Charlotte; Moore, Jonathan P; Kubis, Hans-Peter

    2018-04-01

    Individuals show high variability in body weight responses to exercise training. Expectations and motivation towards effects of exercise on body weight might influence eating behaviour and could conceal regulatory mechanisms. We conducted 2 single-blind exercise trials (4 weeks (study 1) and 8 weeks (study 2)) with concealed objectives and exclusion of individuals with weight loss intention. Circuit exercise training programs (3 times a week (45-90 min), intensity 50%-90% peak oxygen uptake for 4 and 8 weeks) were conducted. Thirty-four females finished the 4-week intervention and 36 females the 8-week intervention. Overweight/obese (OV/OB) and lean female participants' weight/body composition responses were assessed and fasting and postprandial appetite hormone levels (PYY, insulin, amylin, leptin, ghrelin) were measured before and after the intervention for understanding potential contribution to individuals' body weight response to exercise training (study 2). Exercise training in both studies did not lead to a significant reduction of weight/body mass index (BMI) in the participants' groups; however, lean participants gained muscle mass. Appetite hormones levels were significantly (p training did not lead to weight loss in female participants, while a considerable proportion of variance in body weight response to training could be explained by individuals' appetite hormone levels and BMI.

  18. Occupational Stress and Hypertension among Railway Loco Pilots and Section Controllers

    OpenAIRE

    Jayakumar, Devasigamoney

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: A cross-sectional study on occupational stress was conducted on loco pilots in 2008, in view of loco pilots being one of the high strain jobs in Indian Railways. Subsequently, a comparative cross-sectional study on occupational stress was conducted among section controllers in 2011, which is another high strain job of Indian Railways. Objective: The studies were conducted to analyze and compare occupational stress and hypertension. Setting and Design: A cross-sectional study on ...

  19. Mobile Phone Text Messages to Support Treatment Adherence in Adults With High Blood Pressure (SMS-Text Adherence Support [StAR]): A Single-Blind, Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrow, Kirsten; Farmer, Andrew J; Springer, David; Shanyinde, Milensu; Yu, Ly-Mee; Brennan, Thomas; Rayner, Brian; Namane, Mosedi; Steyn, Krisela; Tarassenko, Lionel; Levitt, Naomi

    2016-02-09

    We assessed the effect of automated treatment adherence support delivered via mobile phone short message system (SMS) text messages on blood pressure. In this pragmatic, single-blind, 3-arm, randomized trial (SMS-Text Adherence Support [StAR]) undertaken in South Africa, patients treated for high blood pressure were randomly allocated in a 1:1:1 ratio to information only, interactive SMS text messaging, or usual care. The primary outcome was change in systolic blood pressure at 12 months from baseline measured with a validated oscillometric device. All trial staff were masked to treatment allocation. Analyses were intention to treat. Between June 26, 2012, and November 23, 2012, 1372 participants were randomized to receive information-only SMS text messages (n=457), interactive SMS text messages (n=458), or usual care (n=457). Primary outcome data were available for 1256 participants (92%). At 12 months, the mean adjusted change in systolic blood pressure compared with usual care was -2.2 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, -4.4 to -0.04) with information-only SMS and -1.6 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, -3.7 to 0.6) with interactive SMS. Odds ratios for the proportion of participants with a blood pressure high blood pressure, we found a small reduction in systolic blood pressure control compared with usual care at 12 months. There was no evidence that an interactive intervention increased this effect. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02019823. South African National Clinical Trials Register, number SANCTR DOH-27-1212-386; Pan Africa Trial Register, number PACTR201411000724141. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Consuming High-Carotenoid Fruit and Vegetables Influences Skin Yellowness and Plasma Carotenoids in Young Women: A Single-Blind Randomized Crossover Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezdirc, Kristine; Hutchesson, Melinda J; Williams, Rebecca L; Rollo, Megan E; Burrows, Tracy L; Wood, Lisa G; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Collins, Clare E

    2016-08-01

    Consumption of dietary carotenoids from fruits and vegetables (F/V) leads to accumulations in human skin, altering skin yellowness. The influence of the quantity of F/V consumed on skin yellowness and plasma carotenoid concentrations has not been examined previously. To compare the influence of consuming high-carotenoid-containing F/V (HCFV) (176,425 μg beta carotene/wk) vs low-carotenoid F/V (LCFV) (2,073 μg beta carotene/wk) on skin yellowness and plasma carotenoid concentrations, over 4 weeks. A single-blind randomized controlled crossover trial from October 2013 to March 2014. Thirty women were randomized to receive 7 daily servings of HCFV or LCFV for 4 weeks. Following a 2-week washout period they followed the alternate intervention. Skin color (Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage L*a*b* color space, where L* represents skin lightness and positive values of a* and b* represent degrees of redness and yellowness, respectively) was assessed by reflectance spectroscopy in both sun-exposed and nonexposed skin areas. Fasting plasma carotenoids were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography, before and after each intervention period. Linear mixed models were used to determine the HCFV and LCFV response on skin color and plasma carotenoids, adjusting for intervention order, time, and interaction between baseline differences and time. There were no significant differences in mean daily fruit (P=0.42) and vegetable (P=0.17) intakes between HCFV and LCFV groups. Dietary alpha carotene, beta carotene, lutein, and beta cryptoxanthin intakes were significantly different between the two groups (Pcarotenoid concentrations were significantly higher following HCFV than LCFV over 4 weeks. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Using virtual reality to control preoperative anxiety in ambulatory surgery patients: A pilot study in maxillofacial and plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganry, L; Hersant, B; Sidahmed-Mezi, M; Dhonneur, G; Meningaud, J P

    2018-01-06

    Preoperative anxiety may lead to medical and surgical complications, behavioral problems and emotional distress. The most common means of prevention are based on using medication and, more recently, hypnosis. The aim of our study was to determine whether a virtual reality (VR) program presenting natural scenes could be part of a new therapy to reduce patients' preoperative anxiety. Our prospective pilot study consisted of a single-blind trial in skin cancer surgery at the Henri-Mondor teaching hospital in France. In the outpatient surgery department, 20 patients with a score of >11 on the Amsterdam preoperative anxiety and information scale (APAIS) were virtually immersed into a natural universe for 5minutes. Their stress levels were assessed before and after this experience by making use of a visual analog scale (VAS), by measuring salivary cortisol levels, and by determining physiological stress based on heart coherence scores. The VAS score was significantly reduced after the simulation (P<0.009) as was the level of salivary cortisol (P<0.04). Heart coherence scores remained unchanged (P=0.056). VR allows patients to be immersed in a relaxing, peaceful environment. It represents a non-invasive way to reduce preoperative stress levels with no side effects and no need for additional medical or paramedical staff. Our results indicate that VR may provide an effective complementary technique to manage stress in surgery patients. Randomized trials are necessary to determine precise methods and benefits. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Occupational Stress and Hypertension among Railway Loco Pilots and Section Controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Devasigamoney

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: A cross-sectional study on occupational stress was conducted on loco pilots in 2008, in view of loco pilots being one of the high strain jobs in Indian Railways. Subsequently, a comparative cross-sectional study on occupational stress was conducted among section controllers in 2011, which is another high strain job of Indian Railways. Objective: The studies were conducted to analyze and compare occupational stress and hypertension. Setting and Design: A cross-sectional study on occupational stress and hypertension was conducted among 230 loco pilots in 2008, and subsequently, a comparative cross-sectional study was conducted among 82 section controllers in 2011. Materials and Methods: A closed end 24 item questionnaire on occupational stress was administered. Systolic blood pressure above 140 mmHg and diastolic blood pressure above 90 mmHg were considered as hypertension as per the VII Joint National Committee. Chi-square test and t-test were used for testing significance at P < 0.05. Results: The mean stress score was 8.56 in loco pilots and 7.32 in section controllers. The number of loco pilots with more than 12 stress factors was 49 (21.3%) and the number of section controllers with more than 12 stress factors was 7 (8.5%). The number employees with more than 12 stress factors in different categories of loco pilots were 30 (32%) in the goods category, 12 (12%) in the mail/passenger category, and 7 (19%) in the shunter category, and 3 (11%) in the supervisory category and 4 (7%) in the on-board category of section controllers. The prevalence of hypertension in loco pilots was 36.52% (84) and in the section controllers was 53.66% (44). The prevalence of hypertension in the category with more than 12 stress factors was 30.61% (15) in the loco pilots and 28.57% (2) in the section controllers. The prevalence of hypertension in the both the study groups were higher in the older age, with a family history of hypertension, and with a body mass index of

  3. Occupational Stress and Hypertension among Railway Loco Pilots and Section Controllers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Devasigamoney

    2017-01-01

    A cross-sectional study on occupational stress was conducted on loco pilots in 2008, in view of loco pilots being one of the high strain jobs in Indian Railways. Subsequently, a comparative cross-sectional study on occupational stress was conducted among section controllers in 2011, which is another high strain job of Indian Railways. The studies were conducted to analyze and compare occupational stress and hypertension. A cross-sectional study on occupational stress and hypertension was conducted among 230 loco pilots in 2008, and subsequently, a comparative cross-sectional study was conducted among 82 section controllers in 2011. A closed end 24 item questionnaire on occupational stress was administered. Systolic blood pressure above 140 mmHg and diastolic blood pressure above 90 mmHg were considered as hypertension as per the VII Joint National Committee. Chi-square test and t -test were used for testing significance at P stress score was 8.56 in loco pilots and 7.32 in section controllers. The number of loco pilots with more than 12 stress factors was 49 (21.3%) and the number of section controllers with more than 12 stress factors was 7 (8.5%). The number employees with more than 12 stress factors in different categories of loco pilots were 30 (32%) in the goods category, 12 (12%) in the mail/passenger category, and 7 (19%) in the shunter category, and 3 (11%) in the supervisory category and 4 (7%) in the on-board category of section controllers. The prevalence of hypertension in loco pilots was 36.52% (84) and in the section controllers was 53.66% (44). The prevalence of hypertension in the category with more than 12 stress factors was 30.61% (15) in the loco pilots and 28.57% (2) in the section controllers. The prevalence of hypertension in the both the study groups were higher in the older age, with a family history of hypertension, and with a body mass index of more than 25 kg/m 2 . The mean occupational stress and employees with more than 12 stress

  4. Step 1: Human System Integration (HSI) FY05 Pilot-Technology Interface Requirements for Command, Control, and Communications (C3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The document provides the Human System Integration(HSI) high-level functional C3 HSI requirements for the interface to the pilot. Description includes (1) the information required by the pilot to have knowledge C3 system status, and (2) the control capability needed by the pilot to obtain C3 information. Fundamentally, these requirements provide the candidate C3 technology concepts with the necessary human-related elements to make them compatible with human capabilities and limitations. The results of the analysis describe how C3 operations and functions should interface with the pilot to provide the necessary C3 functionality to the UA-pilot system. Requirements and guidelines for C3 are partitioned into three categories: (1) Pilot-Air Traffic Control (ATC) Voice Communications (2) Pilot-ATC Data Communications, and (3) command and control of the unmanned aircraft (UA). Each requirement is stated and is supported with a rationale and associated reference(s).

  5. Application of a pilot control banding tool for risk level assessment and control of nanoparticle exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Samuel Y; Zalk, David M; Swuste, Paul

    2008-08-01

    Control banding (CB) strategies offer simplified solutions for controlling worker exposures to constituents that are found in the workplace in the absence of firm toxicological and exposure data. These strategies may be particularly useful in nanotechnology applications, considering the overwhelming level of uncertainty over what nanomaterials and nanotechnologies present as potential work-related health risks, what about these materials might lead to adverse toxicological activity, how risk related to these might be assessed and how to manage these issues in the absence of this information. This study introduces a pilot CB tool or 'CB Nanotool' that was developed specifically for characterizing the health aspects of working with engineered nanoparticles and determining the level of risk and associated controls for five ongoing nanotechnology-related operations being conducted at two Department of Energy research laboratories. Based on the application of the CB Nanotool, four of the five operations evaluated in this study were found to have implemented controls consistent with what was recommended by the CB Nanotool, with one operation even exceeding the required controls for that activity. The one remaining operation was determined to require an upgrade in controls. By developing this dynamic CB Nanotool within the realm of the scientific information available, this application of CB appears to be a useful approach for assessing the risk of nanomaterial operations, providing recommendations for appropriate engineering controls and facilitating the allocation of resources to the activities that most need them.

  6. Targeting functional fitness, hearing and health-related quality of life in older adults with hearing loss: Walk, Talk 'n' Listen, study protocol for a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Justin; Ghadry-Tavi, Rouzbeh; Knuff, Kate; Jutras, Marc; Siever, Jodi; Mick, Paul; Roque, Carolyn; Jones, Gareth; Little, Jonathan; Miller, Harry; Van Bergen, Colin; Kurtz, Donna; Murphy, Mary Ann; Jones, Charlotte Ann

    2017-01-28

    Hearing loss (HL) is a disability associated with poorer health-related quality of life including an increased risk for loneliness, isolation, functional fitness declines, falls, hospitalization and premature mortality. The purpose of this pilot trial is to determine the feasibility and acceptability of a novel intervention to reduce loneliness, improve functional fitness, social connectedness, hearing and health-related quality of life in older adults with HL. This 10-week, single-blind, pilot randomized control trial (RCT) will include a convenience sample of ambulatory adults aged 65 years or older with self-reported HL. Following baseline assessments, participants will be randomized to either intervention (exercise, health education, socialization and group auditory rehabilitation (GAR)) or control (GAR only) groups. The intervention group will attend a local YMCA twice a week and the control group once a week. Intervention sessions will include 45 min of strengthening, balance and resistance exercises, 30 min of group walking at a self-selected pace and 60 min of interactive health education or GAR. The control group will attend 60-min GAR sessions. GAR sessions will include education about hearing, hearing technologies, enhancing communication skills, and psychosocial support. Pre-post trial data collection and measures will include: functional fitness (gait speed, 30-s Sit to Stand Test), hearing and health-related quality of life, loneliness, depression, social participation and social support. At trial end, feasibility (recruitment, randomization, retention, acceptability) and GAR will be evaluated. Despite evidence suggesting that HL is associated with declines in functional fitness, there are no studies aimed at addressing functional fitness declines associated with the disability of HL. This pilot trial will provide knowledge about the physical, mental and social impacts on health related to HL as a disability. This will inform the feasibility of a

  7. Pilot/Controller Coordinated Decision Making in the Next Generation Air Transportation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearman, Chris; Miller, Ronald c.; Orasanu, Judith M.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: NextGen technologies promise to provide considerable benefits in terms of enhancing operations and improving safety. However, there needs to be a thorough human factors evaluation of the way these systems will change the way in which pilot and controllers share information. The likely impact of these new technologies on pilot/controller coordinated decision making is considered in this paper using the "operational, informational and evaluative disconnect" framework. Method: Five participant focus groups were held. Participants were four experts in human factors, between x and x research students and a technical expert. The participant focus group evaluated five key NextGen technologies to identify issues that made different disconnects more or less likely. Results: Issues that were identified were: Decision Making will not necessarily improve because pilots and controllers possess the same information; Having a common information source does not mean pilots and controllers are looking at the same information; High levels of automation may lead to disconnects between the technology and pilots/controllers; Common information sources may become the definitive source for information; Overconfidence in the automation may lead to situations where appropriate breakdowns are not initiated. Discussion: The issues that were identified lead to recommendations that need to be considered in the development of NextGen technologies. The current state of development of these technologies provides a good opportunity to utilize recommendations at an early stage so that NextGen technologies do not lead to difficulties in resolving breakdowns in coordinated decision making.

  8. A pilot rating scale for evaluating failure transients in electronic flight control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindson, William S.; Schroeder, Jeffery A.; Eshow, Michelle M.

    1990-01-01

    A pilot rating scale was developed to describe the effects of transients in helicopter flight-control systems on safety-of-flight and on pilot recovery action. The scale was applied to the evaluation of hardovers that could potentially occur in the digital flight-control system being designed for a variable-stability UH-60A research helicopter. Tests were conducted in a large moving-base simulator and in flight. The results of the investigation were combined with existing airworthiness criteria to determine quantitative reliability design goals for the control system.

  9. Pilot power based rate control in CDMA 2000 1x EV-DO Rev-A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiao-feng; GU Jian; YANG Hong-wen

    2008-01-01

    This article proposes a new algorithm to improvethe rate control efficiency of enhanced reverse link mediumaccess control (RLMAC) in the code division multiple access(CDMA) lx EV-DO release A(Rev. A) system. The newalgorithm brings reverse access terminal (AT) pilot power tothe RLMAC rate control procedure and makes it easier for alow pilot power user to increase its data rate when the systemis slightly loaded and harder to decrease its date rate when thesystem is heavily loaded. Numerical results of system levelsimulations show that the new algorithm can bring highersystem throughput, lower AT transmission power, and lowersystem load.

  10. Output-Feedback Model Predictive Control of a Pasteurization Pilot Plant based on an LPV model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi Pour, Fatemeh; Ocampo-Martinez, Carlos; Puig, Vicenç

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a model predictive control (MPC) of a pasteurization pilot plant based on an LPV model. Since not all the states are measured, an observer is also designed, which allows implementing an output-feedback MPC scheme. However, the model of the plant is not completely observable when augmented with the disturbance models. In order to solve this problem, the following strategies are used: (i) the whole system is decoupled into two subsystems, (ii) an inner state-feedback controller is implemented into the MPC control scheme. A real-time example based on the pasteurization pilot plant is simulated as a case study for testing the behavior of the approaches.

  11. Defining Feasibility and Pilot Studies in Preparation for Randomised Controlled Trials: Development of a Conceptual Framework.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra M Eldridge

    Full Text Available We describe a framework for defining pilot and feasibility studies focusing on studies conducted in preparation for a randomised controlled trial. To develop the framework, we undertook a Delphi survey; ran an open meeting at a trial methodology conference; conducted a review of definitions outside the health research context; consulted experts at an international consensus meeting; and reviewed 27 empirical pilot or feasibility studies. We initially adopted mutually exclusive definitions of pilot and feasibility studies. However, some Delphi survey respondents and the majority of open meeting attendees disagreed with the idea of mutually exclusive definitions. Their viewpoint was supported by definitions outside the health research context, the use of the terms 'pilot' and 'feasibility' in the literature, and participants at the international consensus meeting. In our framework, pilot studies are a subset of feasibility studies, rather than the two being mutually exclusive. A feasibility study asks whether something can be done, should we proceed with it, and if so, how. A pilot study asks the same questions but also has a specific design feature: in a pilot study a future study, or part of a future study, is conducted on a smaller scale. We suggest that to facilitate their identification, these studies should be clearly identified using the terms 'feasibility' or 'pilot' as appropriate. This should include feasibility studies that are largely qualitative; we found these difficult to identify in electronic searches because researchers rarely used the term 'feasibility' in the title or abstract of such studies. Investigators should also report appropriate objectives and methods related to feasibility; and give clear confirmation that their study is in preparation for a future randomised controlled trial designed to assess the effect of an intervention.

  12. Defining Feasibility and Pilot Studies in Preparation for Randomised Controlled Trials: Development of a Conceptual Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Sandra M; Lancaster, Gillian A; Campbell, Michael J; Thabane, Lehana; Hopewell, Sally; Coleman, Claire L; Bond, Christine M

    2016-01-01

    We describe a framework for defining pilot and feasibility studies focusing on studies conducted in preparation for a randomised controlled trial. To develop the framework, we undertook a Delphi survey; ran an open meeting at a trial methodology conference; conducted a review of definitions outside the health research context; consulted experts at an international consensus meeting; and reviewed 27 empirical pilot or feasibility studies. We initially adopted mutually exclusive definitions of pilot and feasibility studies. However, some Delphi survey respondents and the majority of open meeting attendees disagreed with the idea of mutually exclusive definitions. Their viewpoint was supported by definitions outside the health research context, the use of the terms 'pilot' and 'feasibility' in the literature, and participants at the international consensus meeting. In our framework, pilot studies are a subset of feasibility studies, rather than the two being mutually exclusive. A feasibility study asks whether something can be done, should we proceed with it, and if so, how. A pilot study asks the same questions but also has a specific design feature: in a pilot study a future study, or part of a future study, is conducted on a smaller scale. We suggest that to facilitate their identification, these studies should be clearly identified using the terms 'feasibility' or 'pilot' as appropriate. This should include feasibility studies that are largely qualitative; we found these difficult to identify in electronic searches because researchers rarely used the term 'feasibility' in the title or abstract of such studies. Investigators should also report appropriate objectives and methods related to feasibility; and give clear confirmation that their study is in preparation for a future randomised controlled trial designed to assess the effect of an intervention.

  13. Effects of Spatio-Temporal Aliasing on Pilot Performance in Active Control Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaal, Peter; Sweet, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Spatio-temporal aliasing affects pilot performance and control behavior. For increasing refresh rates: 1) Significant change in control behavior: a) Increase in visual gain and neuromuscular frequency. b) Decrease in visual time delay. 2) Increase in tracking performance: a) Decrease in RMSe. b) Increase in crossover frequency.

  14. Adaptive control of anaerobic digestion processes-a pilot-scale application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, P; Dochain, D; Bastin, G; Naveau, H; Nyns, E J

    1988-03-01

    A simple adaptive control algorithm, for which theoretical stability and convergence properties had been previously demonstrated, has been successfully implemented on a biomethanation pilot reactor. The methane digester, operated in the CSTR mode was submitted to a shock load, and successfully computer controlled during the subsequent transitory state.

  15. Pilot-in-the-Loop Analysis of Propulsive-Only Flight Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Hwei-Lan; Biezad, Daniel J.

    1996-01-01

    Longitudinal control system architectures are presented which directly couple flight stick motions to throttle commands for a multi-engine aircraft. This coupling enables positive attitude control with complete failure of the flight control system. The architectures chosen vary from simple feedback gains to classical lead-lag compensators with and without prefilters. Each architecture is reviewed for its appropriateness for piloted flight. The control systems are then analyzed with pilot-in-the-loop metrics related to bandwidth required for landing. Results indicate that current and proposed bandwidth requirements should be modified for throttles only flight control. Pilot ratings consistently showed better ratings than predicted by analysis. Recommendations are made for more robust design and implementation. The use of Quantitative Feedback Theory for compensator design is discussed. Although simple and effective augmented control can be achieved in a wide variety of failed configurations, a few configuration characteristics are dominant for pilot-in-the-loop control. These characteristics will be tested in a simulator study involving failed flight controls for a multi-engine aircraft.

  16. Designing clinical trials for assessing the effects of cognitive training and physical activity interventions on cognitive outcomes: The Seniors Health and Activity Research Program Pilot (SHARP-P Study, a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejeski W Jack

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The efficacy of non-pharmacological intervention approaches such as physical activity, strength, and cognitive training for improving brain health has not been established. Before definitive trials are mounted, important design questions on participation/adherence, training and interventions effects must be answered to more fully inform a full-scale trial. Methods SHARP-P was a single-blinded randomized controlled pilot trial of a 4-month physical activity training intervention (PA and/or cognitive training intervention (CT in a 2 × 2 factorial design with a health education control condition in 73 community-dwelling persons, aged 70-85 years, who were at risk for cognitive decline but did not have mild cognitive impairment. Results Intervention attendance rates were higher in the CT and PACT groups: CT: 96%, PA: 76%, PACT: 90% (p=0.004, the interventions produced marked changes in cognitive and physical performance measures (p≤0.05, and retention rates exceeded 90%. There were no statistically significant differences in 4-month changes in composite scores of cognitive, executive, and episodic memory function among arms. Four-month improvements in the composite measure increased with age among participants assigned to physical activity training but decreased with age for other participants (intervention*age interaction p = 0.01. Depending on the choice of outcome, two-armed full-scale trials may require fewer than 1,000 participants (continuous outcome or 2,000 participants (categorical outcome. Conclusions Good levels of participation, adherence, and retention appear to be achievable for participants through age 85 years. Care should be taken to ensure that an attention control condition does not attenuate intervention effects. Depending on the choice of outcome measures, the necessary sample sizes to conduct four-year trials appear to be feasible. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00688155

  17. Lysine clonixinate versus dipyrone (metamizole) for the acute treatment of severe migraine attacks: a single-blind, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krymchantowski, Abouch Valenty; Carneiro, Henrique; Barbosa, Jackeline; Jevoux, Carla

    2008-06-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) are effective to treat migraine attacks. Lysine clonixinate (LC) and dipyrone (metamizol) have been proven effective to treat acute migraine. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of the intravenous formulations of LC and dipyrone in the treatment of severe migraine attacks. Thirty patients (28 women, 2 men), aged 18 to 48 years with migraine according the International Headache Society (IHS) (2004) were studied. The patients were randomized into 2 groups when presenting to an emergency department with a severe migraine attack. The study was single-blind. Headache intensity, nausea, photophobia and side effects were evaluated at 0, 30, 60 and 90 minutes after the drug administration. Rectal indomethacin as rescue medication (RM) was available after 2 hours and its use compared between groups. All patients completed the study. At 30 minutes, 0% of the dipyrone group 13% of the LC group were pain free (p=0.46). At 60 and 90 minutes, 2 (13%) and 5 (33%) patients from the dipyrone group and 11 (73%) and 13 (86.7%) patients from the LC group were pain free (p<0.001). At 60 minutes, significantly more patients from the LC group were nausea-free (p<0.001). Regarding photophobia, there were no differences between groups at 60 minutes (p=0.11). The use of RM at 2 hours did not differ among groups (p=0.50). Pain in the site of the injection was reported by more patients of the LC group compared to the dipyrone group (p<0.0001). LC is significantly superior to dipyrone in treating severe migraine attacks. LC promotes significantly more burning at the site of the injection.

  18. What Is the Outcome of an Incision and Drainage Procedure in Endodontic Patients? A Prospective, Randomized, Single-blind Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beus, Hannah; Fowler, Sara; Drum, Melissa; Reader, Al; Nusstein, John; Beck, Mike; Jatana, Courtney

    2018-02-01

    There are no prospective endodontic studies to determine the outcome of an incision and drainage (I&D) procedure for swelling in healthy, endodontic patients. The purpose of this prospective, randomized, single-blind study was to compare the postoperative course of I&D with drain placement versus a mock I&D procedure with mock drain placement after endodontic debridement in swollen emergency patients with symptomatic teeth and a pulpal diagnosis of necrosis. Eighty-one adult emergency patients presenting with clinical swelling received either penicillin or, if allergic, clindamycin and complete endodontic debridement, and then were randomly divided into 2 treatment groups: I&D with drain placement or a mock I&D procedure with mock drain placement. At the end of the appointment, all patients received a combination of ibuprofen/acetaminophen and, if needed, an opioid-containing escape medication. Patients recorded their pain and medication use for 4 days postoperatively. Success was defined as no or mild postoperative pain and no use of an opioid-containing escape medication. Success was evaluated using repeated measure mixed model logistic regression. Both groups had a decrease in postoperative pain and medication use over the 4 days. The mock I&D group had significantly higher success than the I&D group (odds ratio = 2.00; 95% confidence interval, 1.16-3.41). The success rate was 45% with the mock I&D and 33% with the I&D. After endodontic debridement, patients who received a mock I&D procedure with mock drain placement had more success than patients who received I&D with drain placement. Both groups clinically improved over 4 days. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Air charged and microtip catheters cannot be used interchangeably for urethral pressure measurement: a prospective, single-blind, randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehnder, Pascal; Roth, Beat; Burkhard, Fiona C; Kessler, Thomas M

    2008-09-01

    We determined and compared urethral pressure measurements using air charged and microtip catheters in a prospective, single-blind, randomized trial. A consecutive series of 64 women referred for urodynamic investigation underwent sequential urethral pressure measurements using an air charged and a microtip catheter in randomized order. Patients were blinded to the type and sequence of catheter used. Agreement between the 2 catheter systems was assessed using the Bland and Altman 95% limits of agreement method. Intraclass correlation coefficients of air charged and microtip catheters for maximum urethral closure pressure at rest were 0.97 and 0.93, and for functional profile length they were 0.9 and 0.78, respectively. Pearson's correlation coefficients and Lin's concordance coefficients of air charged and microtip catheters were r = 0.82 and rho = 0.79 for maximum urethral closure pressure at rest, and r = 0.73 and rho = 0.7 for functional profile length, respectively. When applying the Bland and Altman method, air charged catheters gave higher readings than microtip catheters for maximum urethral closure pressure at rest (mean difference 7.5 cm H(2)O) and functional profile length (mean difference 1.8 mm). There were wide 95% limits of agreement for differences in maximum urethral closure pressure at rest (-24.1 to 39 cm H(2)O) and functional profile length (-7.7 to 11.3 mm). For urethral pressure measurement the air charged catheter is at least as reliable as the microtip catheter and it generally gives higher readings. However, air charged and microtip catheters cannot be used interchangeably for clinical purposes because of insufficient agreement. Hence, clinicians should be aware that air charged and microtip catheters may yield completely different results, and these differences should be acknowledged during clinical decision making.

  20. Post-operative pain following coblation or monopolar electrocautery tonsillectomy in children: a prospective, single-blinded, randomised comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, N P; Walner, D L

    2011-10-01

    To compare post-operative pain following tonsillectomy by either coblation or monopolar electrocautery in children. A parallel-designed, prospective, single-blinded, randomised trial. Ambulatory surgical facility. Eighty otherwise healthy paediatric patients undergoing coblation or electrocautery tonsillectomy by a fellowship-trained paediatric otolaryngologist. (i) The number of post-operative days with severe pain based on subjective qualification by the caretaker, (ii) post-operative days with pain rated ≥ 5 on a scale of 1-10, (iii) post-operative days requiring oral paracetamol/acetaminophen with codeine solution and (iv) post-operative days until resumption of a regular diet were assessed and recorded daily using a post-operative pain survey as a form of daily diary that was returned at the 2-week follow-up visit. Patients were consecutively enrolled into two groups of 40 patients. Average ages were 5.2 years for coblation tonsillectomy and 6.0 years for electrocautery tonsillectomy. The average number of post-operative days with severe pain was 4.2 for coblation and 5.9 for electrocautery (P = 0.006), days rating pain ≥ 5 were 3.6 for coblation and 4.8 for electrocautery (P = 0.037), days of codeine use were 2.5 for coblation and 2.9 for electrocautery (P = 0.324), and days until resumption of a regular diet were 5.2 for coblation and 6.2 for electrocautery (0.329). Coblation tonsillectomy may reduce post-operative pain and the time until resumption of a regular diet compared to electrocautery tonsillectomy. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. EFFECTIVENESS OF MUSCLE STRETCHING IN OCCUPATION RELATED CHRONIC MECHANICAL LOW BACK PAIN IN COMMUNITY NURSES –A SINGLE BLIND STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Khwairakpam Zhimina Devi; Sai Kumar. N; Vinod Babu. K; V.R. Ayyappan

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: Stretching of Lower Back Muscle, Hamstring and Tensor Fasciae Latae have an immediate effect on Chronic Lower Back Pain. Hence the purpose is to find the short term effect of stretching of Lower Back Muscle, Hamstring and Tensor Fasciae Latae on intensity of low back pain, flexibility and functional disability in occupation related Chronic Mechanical Low Back Pain in Community Nurses. Method: Single blind experimental study design, 40 subjects with Chronic mechani...

  2. Effects of Different Heave Motion Components on Pilot Pitch Control Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaal, Petrus M. T.; Zavala, Melinda A.

    2016-01-01

    The study described in this paper had two objectives. The first objective was to investigate if a different weighting of heave motion components decomposed at the center of gravity, allowing for a higher fidelity of individual components, would result in pilot manual pitch control behavior and performance closer to that observed with full aircraft motion. The second objective was to investigate if decomposing the heave components at the aircraft's instantaneous center of rotation rather than at the center of gravity could result in additional improvements in heave motion fidelity. Twenty-one general aviation pilots performed a pitch attitude control task in an experiment conducted on the Vertical Motion Simulator at NASA Ames under different hexapod motion conditions. The large motion capability of the Vertical Motion Simulator also allowed for a full aircraft motion condition, which served as a baseline. The controlled dynamics were of a transport category aircraft trimmed close to the stall point. When the ratio of center of gravity pitch heave to center of gravity heave increased in the hexapod motion conditions, pilot manual control behavior and performance became increasingly more similar to what is observed with full aircraft motion. Pilot visual and motion gains significantly increased, while the visual lead time constant decreased. The pilot visual and motion time delays remained approximately constant and decreased, respectively. The neuromuscular damping and frequency both decreased, with their values more similar to what is observed with real aircraft motion when there was an equal weighting of the heave of the center of gravity and heave due to rotations about the center of gravity. In terms of open- loop performance, the disturbance and target crossover frequency increased and decreased, respectively, and their corresponding phase margins remained constant and increased, respectively. The decomposition point of the heave components only had limited

  3. Comparison of simultaneous and sequential administration of fentanyl-propofol for surgical abortion: a randomized single-blinded controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Sha, Baoyong; Zhao, Yuan; Fan, Zhe; Liu, Lin; Shen, Xin

    2017-08-01

    Propofol lipid emulsion (PLE) is a nanosized sedative, and it is used with a combination of salted antalgic prodrug, fentanyl citrate (FC). To illustrate the synergistic effect of mixing, we compared the sedation/analgesia resulting from simultaneous and sequential administration in surgically induced abortion (No. ChiCTR-IPC-15006153). Simultaneous group showed lower bispectral index, blood pressure, and heart rate, when cannula was inserted into the uterus. It also showed less frequency of hypertension, sinus tachycardia, movement, pain at the injection site, and additional FC. Therefore, premixing of PLE and FC enhanced the sedation and analgesia; stabilized the hemodynamics; lessened the incidence of movement and injection pain; and reduced the requirement of drugs.

  4. Adding magnesium sulfate to bupivacaine in transversus abdominis plane block for laparoscopic cholecystectomy: A single blinded randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Al-Refaey

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Adding MgSo4 as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in TAP block; during anesthesia for LC; improved postoperative analgesia in the form of increased duration, decreased analgesic requirements and PONV.

  5. Effect of treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in patients with cervicogenic headache: a single-blind, randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Piekartz, Harry; Lüdtke, Kerstin

    2011-01-01

    The present study was comprised of 43 patients (16 men) with cervicogenic headaches for over three months, diagnosed according to the International Classification of Diagnostic Criteria of Headaches (ICDH-II). The patients were randomly assigned to receive either manual therapy for the cervical region (usual care group) or additional manual therapy techniques to the temporomandibular region to additionally influence temporomandibular disorders (TMD). All patients were assessed prior to treatment, after six sessions of treatment, and at a six-month follow-up. The outcome criteria were: intensity of headaches measured on a colored analog scale, the Neck Disability Index (Dutch version), the Conti Anamnestic Questionnaire, noise registration at the mandibular joint using a stethoscope, the Graded Chronic Pain Status (Dutch version), mandibular deviation, range of mouth opening, and pressure/pain threshold of the masticatory muscles. The results indicate in the studied sample of cervicogenic headache patients, 44.1% had TMD. The group that received additional temporomandibular manual therapy techniques showed significantly decreased headache intensities and increased neck function after the treatment period. These improvements persisted during the treatment-free period (follow-up) and were not observed in the usual care group. This trend was also reflected on the questionnaires and the clinical temporomandibular signs. Based on these observations, we strongly believe that treatment of the temporomandibular region has beneficial effects for patients with cervicogenic headaches, even in the long-term.

  6. Virtual Reality Telerehabilitation for Postural Instability in Parkinson’s Disease: A Multicenter, Single-Blind, Randomized, Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marialuisa Gandolfi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Telerehabilitation enables patients to access remote rehabilitation services for patient-physiotherapist videoconferencing in their own homes. Home-based virtual reality (VR balance training has been shown to reduce postural instability in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD. The primary aim was to compare improvements in postural stability after remotely supervised in-home VR balance training and in-clinic sensory integration balance training (SIBT. Methods. In this multicenter study, 76 PD patients (modified Hoehn and Yahr stages 2.5–3 were randomly assigned to receive either in-home VR telerehabilitation (n=38 or in-clinic SIBT (n=38 in 21 sessions of 50 minutes each, 3 days/week for 7 consecutive weeks. VR telerehabilitation consisted of graded exergames using the Nintendo Wii Fit system; SIBT included exercises to improve postural stability. Patients were evaluated before treatment, after treatment, and at 1-month follow-up. Results. Analysis revealed significant between-group differences in improvement on the Berg Balance Scale for the VR telerehabilitation group (p=0.04 and significant Time × Group interactions in the Dynamic Gait Index (p=0.04 for the in-clinic group. Both groups showed differences in all outcome measures over time, except for fall frequency. Cost comparison yielded between-group differences in treatment and equipment costs. Conclusions. VR is a feasible alternative to in-clinic SIBT for reducing postural instability in PD patients having a caregiver.

  7. A single-blinded phenobarbital-controlled trial of levetiracetam as mono-therapy in dogs with newly diagnosed epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredsø, N.; Sabers, A.; Toft, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of canine epilepsy is problematic. Few antiepileptic drugs have proven efficacy in dogs and undesirable adverse effects and pharmacoresistance are not uncommon. Consequently, the need for investigation of alternative treatment options is ongoing. The objective of this study was to inves...

  8. Ultrasound to stimulate mandibular bone defect healing : A placebo-controlled single-blind study in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schortinghuis, J; Ruben, JL; Raghoebar, GM; Stegenga, B

    Purpose: Because of the limitations of the body to heal large maxillofacial bone defects, an attempt was made to stimulate mandibular defect healing with low intensity pulsed ultrasound in rats. This ultrasound consists of a 1.5-MHz pressure wave administered in pulses of 200 musec, with an average

  9. A pilot study to evaluate the efficacy of adding a structured home visiting intervention to improve outcomes for high-risk families attending the Incredible Years Parent Programme: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, Dianne G; Fergusson, David M; Frampton, Christopher M; Merry, Sally N

    2014-02-25

    Antisocial behaviour and adult criminality often have their origins in childhood and are best addressed early in the child's life using evidence-based treatments such as the 'Incredible Years Parent Programme'. However, families with additional risk factors who are at highest risk for poor outcomes do not always make sufficient change while attending such programmes. Additional support to address barriers and improve implementation of positive parenting strategies while these families attend the Incredible Years Programme may improve overall outcomes.The study aims to evaluate the efficacy of adding a structured home visiting intervention (Home Parent Support) to improve outcomes in families most at risk of poor treatment response from the Incredible Years intervention. This study will inform the design of a larger prospective randomised controlled trial. A pilot single-blind, parallel, superiority, randomised controlled trial. Randomisation will be undertaken using a computer-generated sequence in a 1:1 ratio to the two treatments arranged in permuted blocks with stratification by age, sex, and ethnicity. One hundred and twenty six participants enrolled in the Incredible Years Parent Programme who meet the high-risk criteria will be randomly allocated to receive either Incredible Years Parent Programme and Home Parent Support, or the Incredible Years Parent Programme alone. The Home Parent Support is a 10-session structured home visiting intervention provided by a trained therapist, alongside the usual Incredible Years Parent Programme, to enhance the adoption of key parenting skills. The primary outcome is the change in child behaviour from baseline to post-intervention in parent reported Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory Problem Scale. This is the first formal evaluation of adding Home Parent Support alongside Incredible Years Parent Programme for families with risk factors who typically have poorer treatment outcomes. We anticipate that the intervention will help

  10. Gaming and conventional exercises for improvement of arm function after stroke: a randomised controlled pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kottink, A.I.R.; Prange, Grada Berendina; Krabben, T.; Rietman, Johan Swanik; Buurke, Jaap

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The use of new technologies in rehabilitation, such as virtual reality and/or computerized gaming exercises, may be useful to enable patients to practice intensively in a motivating way. The objective of the present randomized controlled pilot study was to compare the effect of reach

  11. EEG Neurofeedback for ADHD: Double-Blind Sham-Controlled Randomized Pilot Feasibility Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, L. Eugene; Lofthouse, Nicholas; Hersch, Sarah; Pan, Xueliang; Hurt, Elizabeth; Bates, Bethany; Kassouf, Kathleen; Moone, Stacey; Grantier, Cara

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Preparing for a definitive randomized clinical trial (RCT) of neurofeedback (NF) for ADHD, this pilot trial explored feasibility of a double-blind, sham-controlled design and adherence/palatability/relative effect of two versus three treatments/week. Method: Unmedicated 6- to 12-year-olds with "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of…

  12. Simulation of Controller Pilot Data Link Communications over VHF Digital Link Mode 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretmersky, Steven C.; Murawski, Robert; Nguyen, Thanh C.; Raghavan, Rajesh S.

    2004-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has established an operational plan for the future Air Traffic Management (ATM) system, in which the Controller Pilot Data Link Communications (CPDLC) is envisioned to evolve into digital messaging that will take on an ever increasing role in controller to pilot communications, significantly changing the way the National Airspace System (NAS) is operating. According to FAA, CPDLC represents the first phase of the transition from the current analog voice system to an International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) compliant system in which digital communication becomes the alternate and perhaps primary method of routine communication. The CPDLC application is an Air Traffic Service (ATS) application in which pilots and controllers exchange messages via an addressed data link. CPDLC includes a set of clearance, information, and request message elements that correspond to existing phraseology employed by current Air Traffic Control (ATC) procedures. These message elements encompass altitude assignments, crossing constraints, lateral deviations, route changes and clearances, speed assignments, radio frequency assignments, and various requests for information. The pilot is provided with the capability to respond to messages, to request clearances and information, to report information, and to declare/rescind an emergency. A 'free text' capability is also provided to exchange information not conforming to defined formats. This paper presents simulated results of the aeronautical telecommunication application Controller Pilot Data Link Communications over VHF Digital Link Mode 3 (VDL Mode 3). The objective of this simulation study was to determine the impact of CPDLC traffic loads, in terms of timely message delivery and capacity of the VDL Mode 3 subnetwork. The traffic model is based on and is used for generating air/ground messages with different priorities. Communication is modeled for the en route domain of the Cleveland

  13. Flight deck human factors issues for National Airspace System (NAS) en route controller pilot data link communications (CPDLC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Fundamental differences exist between transmissions of Air Traffic Control clearances over voice and those transmitted via Controller Pilot Data Link Communications (CPDLC). This paper provides flight deck human factors issues that apply to processin...

  14. Pilot-Induced Oscillation Suppression by Using 1 Adaptive Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Wang

    2012-01-01

    research activities that aim to alleviate this problem. In this paper, the L1 adaptive controller has been introduced to suppress the PIO, which is caused by rate limiting and pure time delay. Due to its architecture, the L1 adaptive controller will achieve a desired response with fast adaptation. The analysis of PIO and its suppression by L1 adaptive controller are presented in detail in the paper. The simulation results indicate that the L1 adaptive control is efficient in solving this kind of problem.

  15. Computer-Based Cognitive Training for Mild Cognitive Impairment: Results from a Pilot Randomized, Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, Deborah E.; Yaffe, Kristine; Belfor, Nataliya; Jagust, William J.; DeCarli, Charles; Reed, Bruce R.; Kramer, Joel H.

    2009-01-01

    We performed a pilot randomized, controlled trial of intensive, computer-based cognitive training in 47 subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The intervention group performed exercises specifically designed to improve auditory processing speed and accuracy for 100 minutes/day, 5 days/week for 6 weeks; the control group performed more passive computer activities (reading, listening, visuospatial game) for similar amounts of time. Subjects had a mean age of 74 years and 60% were men; 7...

  16. A pilot's opinion - VTOL control design requirements for the instrument approach task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, J. M., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    This paper presents pilot opinion supported by test data concerning flight control and display concepts and control system design requirements for VTOL aircraft in the instrument approach task. Material presented is drawn from research flights in the following aircraft: Dornier DO-31, Short SC-1, LTV XC-142A, and Boeing-Vertol CH-46. The control system concepts and mechanizations employed in the above aircraft are discussed, and the effect of control system augmentation is shown on performance. Operational procedures required in the instrument approach task are described, with comments on need for automation and combining of control functions.

  17. Generation of control sequences for a pilot-disassembly system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seliger, Guenther; Kim, Hyung-Ju; Keil, Thomas

    2002-02-01

    Closing the product and material cycles has emerged as a paradigm for industry in the 21st century. Disassembly plays a key role in a life cycle economy since it enables the recovery of resources. A partly automated disassembly system should adapt to a large variety of products and different degrees of devaluation. Also the amounts of products to be disassembled can vary strongly. To cope with these demands an approach to generate on-line disassembly control sequences will be presented. In order to react on these demands the technological feasibility is considered within a procedure for the generation of disassembly control sequences. Procedures are designed to find available and technologically feasible disassembly processes. The control system is formed by modularised and parameterised control units in the cell level within the entire control architecture. In the first development stage product and process analyses at the sample product washing machine were executed. Furthermore a generalized disassembly process was defined. Afterwards these processes were structured in primary and secondary functions. In the second stage the disassembly control at the technological level was investigated. Factors were the availability of the disassembly tools and the technological feasibility of the disassembly processes within the disassembly system. Technical alternative disassembly processes are determined as a result of availability of the tools and technological feasibility of processes. The fourth phase was the concept for the generation of the disassembly control sequences. The approach will be proved in a prototypical disassembly system.

  18. Impacts of safety on the design of light remotely-piloted helicopter flight control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Rito, G.; Schettini, F.

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the architecture definition and the safety assessment of flight control systems for light remotely-piloted helicopters for civil applications. The methods and tools to be used for these activities are standardised for conventional piloted aircraft, while they are currently a matter of discussion in case of light remotely-piloted systems flying into unsegregated airspaces. Certification concerns are particularly problematic for aerial systems weighing from 20 to 150 kgf, since the airworthiness permission is granted by national authorities. The lack of specific requirements actually requires to analyse both the existing standards for military applications and the certification guidelines for civil systems, up to derive the adequate safety objectives. In this work, after a survey on applicable certification documents for the safety objectives definition, the most relevant functional failures of a light remotely-piloted helicopter are identified and analysed via Functional Hazard Assessment. Different architectures are then compared by means of Fault-Tree Analysis, highlighting the contributions to the safety level of the main elements of the flight control system (control computers, servoactuators, antenna) and providing basic guidelines on the required redundancy level. - Highlights: • A method for architecture definition and safety assessment of light RW‐UAS flight control systems is proposed. • Relevant UAS failures are identified and analysed via Functional Hazard Assessment and Fault‐Tree Analysis. • The key safety elements are control computers, servoactuators and TX/RX system. • Single‐simplex flight control systems have inadequate safety levels. • Dual‐duplex flight control systems demonstrate to be safety compliant, with safety budgets dominated by servoactuators.

  19. Hearing loss in civilian airline and helicopter pilots compared to air traffic control personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, Anthony S; Arva, Per

    2009-10-01

    In order to investigate possible hearing loss as a consequence of aviation noise, a comparative analysis of audiometric data from Norwegian Air Traffic Control (ATC) personnel, airline (fixed-wing) pilots, and helicopter pilots was performed. The results may be of use in giving advice regarding preventive measures. Male ATC, airline, and helicopter pilots were selected randomly from the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) medical files. There were 182 subjects included in the study: 50, 81, and 51 subjects for ATC, helicopter, and airline pilots, respectively. Two audiograms with a 2-3-yr interval were analyzed for each individual. Age correction was performed using data from ISO 7129. Threshold changes per year for the frequencies 3, 4, and 6 kHz were examined in particular after age correction. For all three groups, mean hearing threshold levels were above (worse than) ISO 7129 predictions for most frequencies. As expected, hearing thresholds increased with age in the group as a whole. Looking at the 3-, 4-, and 6-kHz frequencies in particular, all groups had small but highly significant increases in hearing thresholds at 4 kHz between the first and second audiogram. The mean hearing thresholds for this group of aviation personnel are higher than International Standard ISO-7129 would predict according to age. Highly significant changes in hearing threshold after age correction, indicating possible noise-induced hearing loss, were found in all groups at 4 kHz. The fact that helicopter pilots had similar hearing loss to their other aviation colleagues indicates that current hearing protection for these pilots is effective in counteracting the increased noise levels in helicopters.

  20. Comparison of self-citation by peer reviewers in a journal with single-blind peer review versus a journal with open peer review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levis, Alexander W; Leentjens, Albert F G; Levenson, James L; Lumley, Mark A; Thombs, Brett D

    2015-12-01

    Some peer reviewers may inappropriately, or coercively request that authors include references to the reviewers' own work. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether, compared to reviews for a journal with single-blind peer review, reviews for a journal with open peer review included (1) fewer self-citations; (2) a lower proportion of self-citations without a rationale; and (3) a lower ratio of proportions of citations without a rationale in self-citations versus citations to others' work. Peer reviews for published manuscripts submitted in 2012 to a single-blind peer review journal, the Journal of Psychosomatic Research, were previously evaluated (Thombs et al., 2015). These were compared to publically available peer reviews of manuscripts published in 2012 in an open review journal, BMC Psychiatry. Two investigators independently extracted data for both journals. There were no significant differences between journals in the proportion of all reviewer citations that were self-citations (Journal of Psychosomatic Research: 71/225, 32%; BMC Psychiatry: 90/315, 29%; p=.50), or in the proportion of self-citations without a rationale (Journal of Psychosomatic Research: 15/71, 21%; BMC Psychiatry: 12/90, 13%; p=.21). There was no significant difference between journals in the proportion of self-citations versus citations to others' work without a rationale (p=.31). Blind and open peer review methodologies have distinct advantages and disadvantages. The present study found that, in reasonably similar journals that use single-blind and open review, there were no substantive differences in the pattern of peer reviewer self-citations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Pilot and Controller Evaluations of Separation Function Allocation in Air Traffic Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, David; Prevot, Thomas; Morey, Susan; Lewis, Timothy; Martin, Lynne; Johnson, Sally; Cabrall, Christopher; Como, Sean; Homola, Jeffrey; Sheth-Chandra, Manasi; style="text-decoration: none; " href="javascript:void(0); " onClick="displayelement('author_20130014930'); toggleEditAbsImage('author_20130014930_show'); toggleEditAbsImage('author_20130014930_hide'); "> style="display:inline; width:12px; height:12px; " src="images/arrow-up.gif" width="12" height="12" border="0" alt="hide" id="author_20130014930_show"> style="width:12px; height:12px; display:none; " src="images/arrow-down.gif" width="12" height="12" border="0" alt="hide" id="author_20130014930_hide">

    2013-01-01

    Two human-in-the-loop simulation experiments were conducted in coordinated fashion to investigate the allocation of separation assurance functions between ground and air and between humans and automation. The experiments modeled a mixed-operations concept in which aircraft receiving ground-based separation services shared the airspace with aircraft providing their own separation service (i.e., self-separation). Ground-based separation was provided by air traffic controllers without automation tools, with tools, or by ground-based automation with controllers in a managing role. Airborne self-separation was provided by airline pilots using self-separation automation enabled by airborne surveillance technology. The two experiments, one pilot-focused and the other controller-focused, addressed selected key issues of mixed operations, assuming the starting point of current-day operations and modeling an emergence of NextGen technologies and procedures. In the controller-focused experiment, the impact of mixed operations on controller performance was assessed at four stages of NextGen implementation. In the pilot-focused experiment, the limits to which pilots with automation tools could take full responsibility for separation from ground-controlled aircraft were tested. Results indicate that the presence of self-separating aircraft had little impact on the controllers' ability to provide separation services for ground-controlled aircraft. Overall performance was best in the most automated environment in which all aircraft were data communications equipped, ground-based separation was highly automated, and self-separating aircraft had access to trajectory intent information for all aircraft. In this environment, safe, efficient, and highly acceptable operations could be achieved for twice today's peak airspace throughput. In less automated environments, reduced trajectory intent exchange and manual air traffic control limited the safely achievable airspace throughput and

  2. Task-Oriented and Relationship-Building Communications between Air Traffic Controllers and Pilots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inwon Kang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available By questioning the lopsided attention on task-oriented factors in air traffic controller-pilot communication, the current study places an equal weighting on both task-oriented and relationship-building communications, and investigates how each type of communication influences sustainable performance in airline operation team. Results show that both task-oriented and relationship-building communications in terms of sustainability of team process predicted greater communication satisfaction at work. Also, both task interdependence and shared leadership influenced both types of air traffic controller-pilot communication. However, only relationship-building communication had a direct influence on perceived work performance whereas task-oriented communication had not. Along with task-oriented factors, this study raises the relationship-oriented factors as important resources for the sustainable team performance in airline industry.

  3. Daily text messaging for weight control among racial and ethnic minority women: randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Dori M; Levine, Erica L; Askew, Sandy; Foley, Perry; Bennett, Gary G

    2013-11-18

    Daily self-monitoring of diet and physical activity behaviors is a strong predictor of weight loss success. Text messaging holds promise as a viable self-monitoring modality, particularly among racial/ethnic minority populations. This pilot study evaluated the feasibility of a text messaging intervention for weight loss among predominantly black women. Fifty obese women were randomized to either a 6-month intervention using a fully automated system that included daily text messages for self-monitoring tailored behavioral goals (eg, 10,000 steps per day, no sugary drinks) along with brief feedback and tips (n=26) or to an education control arm (n=24). Weight was objectively measured at baseline and at 6 months. Adherence was defined as the proportion of text messages received in response to self-monitoring prompts. The average daily text messaging adherence rate was 49% (SD 27.9) with 85% (22/26) texting self-monitored behavioral goals 2 or more days per week. Approximately 70% (16/23) strongly agreed that daily texting was easy and helpful and 76% (16/21) felt the frequency of texting was appropriate. At 6 months, the intervention arm lost a mean of 1.27 kg (SD 6.51), and the control arm gained a mean of 1.14 kg (SD 2.53; mean difference -2.41 kg, 95% CI -5.22 to 0.39; P=.09). There was a trend toward greater text messaging adherence being associated with greater percent weight loss (r=-.36; P=.08), but this did not reach statistical significance. There was no significant association between goal attainment and text messaging adherence and no significant predictors of adherence. Given the increasing penetration of mobile devices, text messaging may be a useful self-monitoring tool for weight control, particularly among populations most in need of intervention. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00939081; http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00939081 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6KiIIcnk1).

  4. Recruitment to Online Therapies for Depression: Pilot Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Ray B; Goldsmith, Lesley; Hewson, Paul; Williams, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    Background Raising awareness of online cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) could benefit many people with depression, but we do not know how purchasing online advertising compares to placing free links from relevant local websites in increasing uptake. Objective To pilot a cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing purchase of Google AdWords with placing free website links in raising awareness of online CBT resources for depression in order to better understand research design issues....

  5. National Spill Control School. A pilot program in environmental training. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberholtzer, G.R.; Acuff, J.T.

    1980-01-01

    Increased environmental awareness and the amended Federal Water Pollution Control Act of 1972 required an increased level of expertise by the American Public in the field of oil spill prevention and control. The National Spill Control School was created at Corpus Christi State University to help meet this need. Drawing on the talents of a nationwide sample of experts in this field, the project team created a unique management oriented course. A review of the origination and experiences of two years of classes of this pilot program is provided in this report.

  6. Managerial span of control: a pilot study comparing departmental complexity and number of direct reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Katreena Collette; Pepper, Ginette; Blegen, Mary

    2013-09-01

    Nurse managers play pivotal roles in hospitals. However, restructuring has resulted in nurse managers having wider span of control and reduced visibility. The purpose of this pilot study was to compare two methods of measuring span of control: departmental complexity and number of direct reports. Forty-one nurse managers across nine hospitals completed The Ottawa Hospital Clinical Manager Span of Control Tool (TOH-SOC) and a demographic survey. A moderate positive relationship between number of direct reports and departmental complexity score was identified (r=.49, p=managers' responsibility. Copyright © 2013 Longwoods Publishing.

  7. Effectiveness of Massage Therapy and Abdominal Hypopressive Gymnastics in Nonspecific Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Rejano, J. J.; Chillón-Martínez, R.; Gómez-Benítez, M. A.; De-La-Casa-Almeida, M.

    2018-01-01

    Background There are a great number of interventions in physiotherapy, but with little evidence of their effectiveness in chronic low back pain. Therefore, this study assesses effectiveness of Massage Therapy and Abdominal Hypopressive Gymnastics and the combination of both to decrease pain and lumbar disability while increasing joint mobility and quality of life in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain. Methods A randomized, single-blinded, controlled, clinical trial with sample (n = 27) was comprised of patients between 20 and 65 years, diagnosed with pain of mechanical origin characterized by having a duration of at least 12 weeks and no serious complications. Each group received 8 interventions of 30 minutes. Results Friedman ANOVA test obtained statistically significant differences of Oswestry, NRS, and Schober variables (p < 0.05) in the three measurements (pretest, posttest 1, and posttest 2), in each individual group. ANOVA Kruskal-Wallis test was used for comparison between groups, and Oswestry Disability values were significantly higher (p = 0.024) in the group receiving both treatments. Conclusion Both individual groups reduce pain levels, improve disability, and increase the flexibility of the lumbar spine. The combination therapy provides greater benefits in terms of lumbar disability. This study is registered on March 8, 2016, with NCT02721914. PMID:29681973

  8. Effectiveness of Massage Therapy and Abdominal Hypopressive Gymnastics in Nonspecific Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bellido-Fernández

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There are a great number of interventions in physiotherapy, but with little evidence of their effectiveness in chronic low back pain. Therefore, this study assesses effectiveness of Massage Therapy and Abdominal Hypopressive Gymnastics and the combination of both to decrease pain and lumbar disability while increasing joint mobility and quality of life in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain. Methods. A randomized, single-blinded, controlled, clinical trial with sample (n=27 was comprised of patients between 20 and 65 years, diagnosed with pain of mechanical origin characterized by having a duration of at least 12 weeks and no serious complications. Each group received 8 interventions of 30 minutes. Results. Friedman ANOVA test obtained statistically significant differences of Oswestry, NRS, and Schober variables (p<0.05 in the three measurements (pretest, posttest 1, and posttest 2, in each individual group. ANOVA Kruskal-Wallis test was used for comparison between groups, and Oswestry Disability values were significantly higher (p=0.024 in the group receiving both treatments. Conclusion. Both individual groups reduce pain levels, improve disability, and increase the flexibility of the lumbar spine. The combination therapy provides greater benefits in terms of lumbar disability. This study is registered on March 8, 2016, with NCT02721914.

  9. A piloted evaluation of an oblique-wing research aircraft motion simulation with decoupling control laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempel, Robert W.; Mcneill, Walter E.; Gilyard, Glenn B.; Maine, Trindel A.

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center developed an oblique-wing research plane from NASA's digital fly-by-wire airplane. Oblique-wing airplanes show large cross-coupling in control and dynamic behavior which is not present on conventional symmetric airplanes and must be compensated for to obtain acceptable handling qualities. The large vertical motion simulator at NASA Ames-Moffett was used in the piloted evaluation of a proposed flight control system designed to provide decoupled handling qualities. Five discrete flight conditions were evaluated ranging from low altitude subsonic Mach numbers to moderate altitude supersonic Mach numbers. The flight control system was effective in generally decoupling the airplane. However, all participating pilots objected to the high levels of lateral acceleration encountered in pitch maneuvers. In addition, the pilots were more critical of left turns (in the direction of the trailing wingtip when skewed) than they were of right turns due to the tendency to be rolled into the left turns and out of the right turns. Asymmetric side force as a function of angle of attack was the primary cause of lateral acceleration in pitch. Along with the lateral acceleration in pitch, variation of rolling and yawing moments as functions of angle of attack caused the tendency to roll into left turns and out of right turns.

  10. Reducing TV watching during adult obesity treatment: two pilot randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynor, Hollie A; Steeves, Elizabeth Anderson; Bassett, David R; Thompson, Dixie L; Gorin, Amy A; Bond, Dale S

    2013-12-01

    The more time adults spend being sedentary, the greater the risk of obesity. The effect of reducing television (TV) watching, a prominent sedentary behavior, on weight loss has not been tested in an adult standard behavioral obesity intervention, and the mechanisms by which reducing TV watching influences energy balance behaviors are not well understood. Two, 8-week, pilot, randomized controlled trials were conducted examining the effect of a reduced TV watching prescription on energy balance behaviors and weight loss within an adult standard behavioral obesity intervention. In the first study, participants (n=24) were randomized into one of two conditions: (a) reduce energy intake and increase moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) (INCREASE PA); or (b) reduce energy intake and decrease TV watching (DECREASE TV). As findings from the first pilot study did not show an increase in MVPA in the DECREASE TV group, the second study was designed to examine the effect of adding a reduced TV prescription to a standard intervention to optimize outcomes. In Pilot Study 2, participants (n=28) were randomized to INCREASE PA or to INCREASE PA+DECREASE TV. Outcomes included objectively measured TV watching and MVPA, self-reported light physical activity (LPA-Pilot Study 2 only), self-reported dietary intake while watching TV, and weight. Conditions with TV watching prescriptions significantly reduced TV watching. Both studies showed medium to large effect sizes for conditions with TV watching prescriptions to show greater reductions in dietary intake while watching TV. Pilot Study 1 found a trend for an increase in MVPA in INCREASE PA and Pilot Study 2 found significant increases in MVPA in both conditions. Pilot Study 2 found a significant increase in LPA in the INCREASE PA+DECREASE TV. Results indicate adding a TV watching prescription to a standard obesity intervention did not enhance increases in MVPA, but may assist with reducing dietary intake while TV watching and

  11. Viability of human dental pulp in determination of sex of an individual by identifying srygene through DNA analysis: A single blind pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prachi Ravikant Naik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of importance of human teeth in personal identification has been recognized from time immemorial. In any natural calamity or man-made catastrophe identification of an individual is of paramount importance. Here tooth plays an important role as it is the last one to get affected in a disaster due to its durable nature and good survival rate. This information comes under the aegis of forensic odontology and is of paramount importance from legal and social viewpoints. This analysis uses highly informative genetic markers and can be carried out easily in a typical forensic lab oratory. The SRY gene marker (sex determining region Y is a sex-determining gene on the Y chromosome in the therians (placental mammals and marsupials and this gene marker is considered as a signature gene to differentiate the male from female sex chromosome. The detection of SRY gene in the DNA from a forensic sample can be confirmatory to type the gender as male. This study was taken up to identify the viability of human tooth pulp by identification of SRY gene in gender determination.

  12. Comparison of Dry Needling versus Orthopedic Manual Therapy in Patients with Myofascial Chronic Neck Pain: A Single-Blind, Randomized Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Campa-Moran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of three interventions for the treatment of myofascial chronic neck pain. Methods. Thirty-six patients were randomly assigned to one of three intervention groups: orthopedic manual therapy (OMT, dry needling and stretching (DN-S, and soft tissue techniques (STT. All groups received two treatment sessions with a 48 h time interval. Outcome measures included neck pain intensity measured using a visual analogue scale, cervical range of motion (ROM, pressure pain threshold for measuring mechanical hyperalgesia, and two self-reported questionnaires (neck disability index and pain catastrophizing scale. Results. The ANOVA revealed significant differences for the group × time interaction for neck disability, neck pain intensity, and pain catastrophizing. The DN-S and OMT groups reduced neck disability. Only the OMT group showed decreases in mechanical hyperalgesia and pain catastrophizing. The cervical ROM increased in OMT (i.e., flexion, side-bending, and rotation and DN-S (i.e., side-bending and rotation groups. Conclusions. The three interventions are all effective in reducing pain intensity. Reduction in mechanical hyperalgesia and pain catastrophizing was only observed in the OMT group. Cervical ROM improved in the DN-S and OMT groups and also neck disability being only clinically relevant for OMT group.

  13. Postural control deficits in people with fibromyalgia: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Postural instability and falls are increasingly recognized problems in patients with fibromyalgia (FM). The purpose of this study was to determine whether FM patients, compared to age-matched healthy controls (HCs), have differences in dynamic posturography, including sensory, motor, and limits of stability. We further sought to determine whether postural instability is associated with strength, proprioception and lower-extremity myofascial trigger points (MTPs); FM symptoms and physical function; dyscognition; balance confidence; and medication use. Last, we evaluated self-reported of falls over the past six months. Methods In this cross-sectional study, we compared middle-aged FM patients and age-matched HCs who underwent computerized dynamic posturography testing and completed the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire-Revised (FIQR) and balance and fall questionnaires. All subjects underwent a neurological and musculoskeletal examination. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the sample and explore the relationships between variables. The relationships between subjective, clinical and objective variables were evaluated by correlation and regression analyses. Results Twenty-five FM patients and twenty-seven HCs (combined mean age ± standard deviation (SD): 48.6 ± 9.7 years) completed testing. FM patients scored statistically lower on composite sensory organization tests (primary outcome; P < 0.010), as well as with regard to vestibular, visual and somatosensory ratio scores on dynamic posturography. Balance confidence was significantly different between groups, with FM patients reporting less confidence than HCs (mean ± SD: 81.24 ± 19.52 vs. 98.52 ± 2.45; P < 0.001). Interestingly, 76% to 84% of FM patients had gastrocnemius and/or anterior tibialis MTPs. Postural stability was best predicted by dyscognition, FIQR score and body mass index. Regarding falls, 3 (11%) of 27 HCs had fallen only once during the past 6 months, whereas 18 (72

  14. Pilot studies of management of ageing of nuclear power plant instrumentation and control components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnay, S.G.; Simola, K.; Kossilov, A.; Pachner, J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes pilot studies which have been implemented to study the aging behavior of safety related component parts of nuclear power plants. In 1989 the IAEA initiated work on pilot studies related to the aging of such components. Four components were identified for study. They are the primary nozzle of a reactor vessel; a motor operated isolating valve; the concrete containment building; and instrumentation and control cables within the containment facility. The study was begun with phase 1 efforts directed toward understanding the aging process, and methods for monitoring and minimizing the effects of aging. Phase 2 efforts are directed toward aging studies, documentation of the ideas put forward, and research to answer questions identified in phase 1. This paper describes progress made on two of these components, namely the motor operated isolation valves, and in-containment I ampersand C cables

  15. Recruitment and accrual of women in a placebo-controlled clinical pilot study on manual therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambron, Jerrilyn A; Hawk, Cheryl; Evans, Roni; Long, Cynthia R

    2004-06-01

    To investigate the accrual rates and recruitment processes among 3 Midwestern sites during a pilot study on manual therapy for chronic pelvic pain. Multisite pilot study for a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Three chiropractic institutions in or near major metropolitan cities in the Midwestern United States. Thirty-nine women aged 18 to 45 with chronic pelvic pain of at least 6 months duration, diagnosed by a board certified gynecologist. The method of recruitment was collected for each individual who responded to an advertisement and completed an interviewer-administered telephone screen. Participants who were willing and eligible after 3 baseline visits were entered into a randomized clinical trial. The number of responses and accrual rates were determined for the overall study, each of the 3 treatment sites, and each of the 5 recruitment efforts. In this study, 355 women were screened over the telephone and 39 were randomized, making the rate of randomization approximately 10%. The most effective recruitment methods leading to randomization were direct mail (38%) and radio advertisements (34%). However, success of the recruitment process differed by site. Based on the accrual of this multisite pilot study, a full-scale trial would not be feasible using this study's parameters. However, useful information was gained on recruitment effectiveness, eligibility criteria, and screening protocols among the 3 metropolitan sites.

  16. Launch Vehicle Manual Steering with Adaptive Augmenting Control In-flight Evaluations of Adverse Interactions Using a Piloted Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Curt; Miller, Chris; Wall, John H.; Vanzwieten, Tannen S.; Gilligan, Eric; Orr, Jeb S.

    2015-01-01

    An adaptive augmenting control algorithm for the Space Launch System has been developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center as part of the launch vehicles baseline flight control system. A prototype version of the SLS flight control software was hosted on a piloted aircraft at the Armstrong Flight Research Center to demonstrate the adaptive controller on a full-scale realistic application in a relevant flight environment. Concerns regarding adverse interactions between the adaptive controller and a proposed manual steering mode were investigated by giving the pilot trajectory deviation cues and pitch rate command authority. Two NASA research pilots flew a total of twenty five constant pitch-rate trajectories using a prototype manual steering mode with and without adaptive control.

  17. Running injuries in novice runners enrolled in different training interventions: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltich, J; Emery, C A; Whittaker, J L; Nigg, B M

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this trial was to evaluate injury risk in novice runners participating in different strength training interventions. This was a pilot randomized controlled trial. Novice runners (n = 129, 18-60 years old, running experience) were block randomized to one of three groups: a "resistance" strength training group, a "functional" strength training group, or a stretching "control" group. The primary outcome was running related injury. The number of participants with complaints and the injury rate (IR = no. injuries/1000 running hours) were quantified for each intervention group. For the first 8 weeks, participants were instructed to complete their training intervention three to five times a week. The remaining 4 months was a maintenance period. NCT01900262. A total of 52 of the 129 (40%) novice runners experienced at least one running related injury: 21 in the functional strength training program, 16 in the resistance strength training program and 15 in the control stretching program. Injury rates did not differ between study groups [IR = 32.9 (95% CI 20.8, 49.3) in the functional group, IR = 31.6 (95% CI 18.4, 50.5) in the resistance group, and IR = 26.7 (95% CI 15.2, 43.2)] in the control group. Although this was a pilot assessment, home-based strength training did not appear to alter injury rates compared to stretching. Future studies should consider methods to minimize participant drop out to allow for the assessment of injury risk. Injury risk in novice runners based on this pilot study will inform the development of future larger studies investigating the impact of injury prevention interventions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Improving Early Childhood Development among Vulnerable Populations: A Pilot Initiative at a Women, Infants, and Children Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian A. Ferguson

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Early childhood development (ECD programs have demonstrated drastic improvements in survival, growth, health, and social productivity. An ECD pilot intervention was delivered to vulnerable populations of a Women, Infants, and Children (WIC clinic in Des Moines, Iowa, to assess ECD outcomes and parental receivability in this setting. Study Design. In a randomized, single blinded control initiative, WIC group sessions of mothers (children aged 2 years and younger were selected for pilot ECD intervention (37 participants or control (36. Care for Child Development ECD course material was supplemented to intervention groups. Survey results were assessed with paired samples T-testing and by an ANOVA. Results. Pilot session receivability demonstrated significance in all areas relative to control: enjoyment, p=0.008; learning capacity, p=0.011; and participant sharing, p=0.023. Furthermore, the previously validated ECD intervention demonstrated significantly improved cumulative 1 month behavior outcomes following the intervention: p=0.006. Conclusions. The WIC setting provides an ideal environment for delivering ECD education beyond traditional counseling in nutrition. High receivability indices among parents demonstrate remarkable capacity for improvement and growth. The significance in receivability, as well as 1 month behavior outcomes, represents parents’ overall readiness to enhance the home environment for their child if merely educated how.

  19. Individual cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia in breast cancer survivors: a randomized controlled crossover pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, Lavinia; McQuaid, John R; Liu, Lianqi; Natarajan, Loki; He, Feng; Cornejo, Monique; Lawton, Susan; Parker, Barbara A; Sadler, Georgia R; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Estimates of insomnia in breast cancer patients are high, with reports of poor sleep lasting years after completion of cancer treatment. This randomized controlled crossover pilot study looked at the effects of individual cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (IND-CBT-I) on sleep in breast cancer survivors. Patients and methods Twenty-one participants were randomly assigned to either a treatment group (six weekly IND-CBT-I sessions followed by six weeks of follow up) or a delayed treatment control group (no treatment for six weeks followed by six weekly IND-CBT-I sessions). Of these, 14 participants completed the pilot study (six in the treatment group and eight in the delayed treatment control group). Results Self-rated insomnia was significantly improved in the treatment group compared to the waiting period in the delayed treatment control group. The pooled pre-post-IND-CBT-I analyses revealed improvements in self-rated insomnia, sleep quality, and objective measures of sleep. Conclusions These preliminary results suggest that IND-CBT-I is appropriate for improving sleep in breast cancer survivors. Individual therapy in a clinic or private practice may be a more practical option for this population as it is more easily accessed and readily available in an outpatient setting. PMID:23616695

  20. Nuclear power plant control room task analysis. Pilot study for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barks, D.B.; Kozinsky, E.J.; Eckel, S.

    1982-05-01

    The purposes of this nuclear plant task analysis pilot study: to demonstrate the use of task analysis techniques on selected abnormal or emergency operation events in a nuclear power plant; to evaluate the use of simulator data obtained from an automated Performance Measurement System to supplement and validate data obtained by traditional task analysis methods; and to demonstrate sample applications of task analysis data to address questions pertinent to nuclear power plant operational safety: control room layout, staffing and training requirements, operating procedures, interpersonal communications, and job performance aids. Five data sources were investigated to provide information for a task analysis. These sources were (1) written operating procedures (event-based); (2) interviews with subject matter experts (the control room operators); (3) videotapes of the control room operators (senior reactor operators and reactor operators) while responding to each event in a simulator; (4) walk-/talk-throughs conducted by control room operators for each event; and (5) simulator data from the PMS

  1. A pilot investigation of acute inhibitory control training in cocaine users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcorn, Joseph L; Pike, Erika; Stoops, William S; Lile, Joshua A; Rush, Craig R

    2017-05-01

    Disrupted response inhibition and presence of drug-cue attentional bias in cocaine-using individuals have predicted poor treatment outcomes. Inhibitory control training could help improve treatment outcomes by strengthening cognitive control. This pilot study assessed the effects of acute inhibitory control training to drug- and non-drug-related cues on response inhibition performance and cocaine-cue attentional bias in cocaine-using individuals. Participants who met criteria for a cocaine-use disorder underwent five sessions of inhibitory control training to either non-drug-related cues (i.e., rectangles) or cocaine cues (n=10/condition) in a single day. Response inhibition and attentional bias were assessed prior to and following training using the stop-signal task and visual-probe task with eye tracking, respectively. Training condition groups did not differ on demographics, inhibitory control training performance, response inhibition, or cocaine-cue attentional bias. Response inhibition performance improved as a function of inhibitory control training in both conditions. Cocaine-cue attentional bias was observed, but did not change as a function of inhibitory control training in either condition. Response inhibition in cocaine-using individuals was augmented by acute inhibitory control training, which may improve treatment outcomes through better behavioral inhibition. Future studies should investigate longer-term implementation of inhibitory control training, as well as combining inhibitory control training with other treatment modalities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Operational water management of Rijnland water system and pilot of ensemble forecasting system for flood control

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zwan, Rene

    2013-04-01

    The Rijnland water system is situated in the western part of the Netherlands, and is a low-lying area of which 90% is below sea-level. The area covers 1,100 square kilometres, where 1.3 million people live, work, travel and enjoy leisure. The District Water Control Board of Rijnland is responsible for flood defence, water quantity and quality management. This includes design and maintenance of flood defence structures, control of regulating structures for an adequate water level management, and waste water treatment. For water quantity management Rijnland uses, besides an online monitoring network for collecting water level and precipitation data, a real time control decision support system. This decision support system consists of deterministic hydro-meteorological forecasts with a 24-hr forecast horizon, coupled with a control module that provides optimal operation schedules for the storage basin pumping stations. The uncertainty of the rainfall forecast is not forwarded in the hydrological prediction. At this moment 65% of the pumping capacity of the storage basin pumping stations can be automatically controlled by the decision control system. Within 5 years, after renovation of two other pumping stations, the total capacity of 200 m3/s will be automatically controlled. In critical conditions there is a need of both a longer forecast horizon and a probabilistic forecast. Therefore ensemble precipitation forecasts of the ECMWF are already consulted off-line during dry-spells, and Rijnland is running a pilot operational system providing 10-day water level ensemble forecasts. The use of EPS during dry-spells and the findings of the pilot will be presented. Challenges and next steps towards on-line implementation of ensemble forecasts for risk-based operational management of the Rijnland water system will be discussed. An important element in that discussion is the question: will policy and decision makers, operator and citizens adapt this Anticipatory Water

  3. U.S. Airline Transport Pilot International Flight Language Experiences, Report 4: Non-Native English-Speaking Controllers Communicating with Native English-Speaking Pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    effortless flow. Varies speech flow for stylistic effect, e.g., to emphasize a point. Uses appropriate discourse markers and connectors spontaneously. L3...were equally represented in Cognitive Aspects of Cross-Linguistic Communica- tion (15%), Pilot Controller Interactions (15%), and Verification...Confirmation of Messages (15%). Cognitive Aspects of Cross-linguistic Communication The speed of communication and understanding is probably a comfortable

  4. An Experimental Study of the Effect of Shared Information on Pilot/Controller Re-Route Negotiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Todd C.; Hansman, R. John

    1999-01-01

    Air-ground data link systems are being developed to enable pilots and air traffic controllers to share information more fully. The sharing of information is generally expected to enhance their shared situation awareness and foster more collaborative decision making. An exploratory, part-task simulator experiment is described which evaluates the extent to which shared information may lead pilots and controllers to cooperate or compete when negotiating route amendments. The results indicate an improvement in situation awareness for pilots and controllers and a willingness to work cooperatively. Independent of data link considerations, the experiment also demonstrates the value of providing controllers with a good-quality weather representation on their plan view displays. Observed improvements in situation awareness and separation assurance are discussed. It is argued that deployment of this relatively simple, low-risk addition to the plan view displays be accelerated.

  5. Reducing Postpartum Weight Retention and Improving Breastfeeding Outcomes in Overweight Women: A Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Martin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Overweight and obesity is prevalent among women of reproductive age (42% BMI > 25 kg/m2 and parity is associated with risk of weight gain. Weight gain greater than that recommended by the Institute of Medicine (IOM is also associated with lower rates of breastfeeding initiation and duration in women. The aim of this pilot randomised controlled trial is to examine the feasibility of recruiting and maintaining a cohort of pregnant women with the view of reducing postpartum weight retention and improving breastfeeding outcomes. Women (BMI of 25–35 kg/m2 (n = 36 were recruited from the John Hunter Hospital antenatal clinic in New South Wales, Australia. Participants were stratified by BMI and randomised to one of three groups with follow-up to six months postpartum. Women received a dietary intervention with or without breastfeeding support from a lactation consultant, or were assigned to a wait-list control group where the dietary intervention was issued at three months postpartum. Feasibility and acceptability was assessed by participation rates and questionnaire. Analysis of variance and covariance was conducted to determine any differences between groups. Sixty-nine per cent of the participants were still enrolled at six months postpartum. This pilot demonstrated some difficulties in recruiting women from antenatal clinics and retaining them in the trial. Although underpowered; the results on weight; biomarkers and breastfeeding outcomes indicated improved metabolic health.

  6. Acupuncture in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: a double-blind controlled pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Lang

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In planning a randomized controlled trial of acupuncture, we conducted a pilot study using validated outcome measures to assess the feasibility of the protocol, and to obtain preliminary data on efficacy and tolerability of 3 different forms of acupuncture treatment as an adjunct for the treatment of chronic pain in patients with Rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Methods The study employs a randomized, prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the effect of electroacupuncture (EA, traditional Chinese acupuncture (TCA and sham acupuncture (Sham in patients with RA. All patients received 20 sessions over a period of 10 weeks. Six acupuncture points were chosen. Primary outcome is the changes in the pain score. Secondary outcomes included the changes in the ACR core disease measures, DAS 28 score and the number of patients who achieved ACR 20 at week 10. Results From 80 eligible patients, 36 patients with mean age of 58 ± 10 years and disease duration of 9.3 ± 6.4 years were recruited. Twelve patients were randomized to each group. Twelve, 10 and 7 patients from the EA, TCA and Sham group respectively completed the study at 20 weeks (p Conclusion This pilot study has allowed a number of recommendations to be made to facilitate the design of a large-scale trial, which in turn will help to clarify the existing evidence base on acupuncture for RA. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00404443

  7. Gaming and Conventional Exercises for Improvement of Arm Function After Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottink, Anke I R; Prange, Gerdienke B; Krabben, Thijs; Rietman, Johan S; Buurke, Jaap H

    2014-06-01

    The use of new technologies in rehabilitation, such as virtual reality and/or computerized gaming exercises, may be useful to enable patients to practice intensively in a motivating way. The objective of the present randomized controlled pilot study was to compare the effect of reach training using a target group specific-designed rehabilitation game to time-matched standardized conventional reach training on arm function after stroke. Twenty chronic stroke patients were randomized to either the rehabilitation game group or the conventional training group. Both groups received three arm training sessions of 30 minutes each week, during a period of 6 weeks. Arm (the upper extremity part of Fugl-Meyer [FM] assessment) and hand (the Action Research Arm [ARA] test) functions were tested 1 week before (T0) and 1 week after (T1) training. A follow-up measurement was performed at 1 month after T1 (T2). ARA and FM scores improved significantly within both groups. Post hoc comparisons revealed significant increases in test scores between T0 and T1 and between T0 and T2 for both ARA and FM, but not for changes from T1 to T2. There were no significant differences between both groups for either clinical test. The present randomized controlled pilot study showed that both arm and hand function improved as much after training with a rehabilitation game as after time-matched conventional training.

  8. The effects of risk perception and flight experience on airline pilots' locus of control with regard to safety operation behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Xuqun; Ji, Ming; Han, Haiyan

    2013-08-01

    The primary objective of this paper was to integrate two research traditions, social cognition approach and individual state approach, and to understand the relationships between locus of control (LOC), risk perception, flight time, and safety operation behavior (SOB) among Chinese airline pilots. The study sample consisted of 193 commercial airline pilots from China Southern Airlines Ltd. The results showed that internal locus of control directly affected pilot safety operation behavior. Risk perception seemed to mediate the relationship between locus of control and safety operation behaviors, and total flight time moderated internal locus of control. Thus, locus of control primarily influences safety operation behavior indirectly by affecting risk perception. The total effect of internal locus of control on safety behaviors is larger than that of external locus of control. Furthermore, the safety benefit of flight experience is more pronounced among pilots with high internal loci of control in the early and middle flight building stages. Practical implications for aviation safety and directions for future research are also discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Different types of exercise in Multiple Sclerosis: Aerobic exercise or Pilates, a single-blind clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Bilge; Küçük, Fadime; Poyraz, Esra Coşkuner; Tomruk, Melda Soysal; İdıman, Egemen

    2017-01-01

    The aim of our study is to examine effects of aerobic and Pilates exercises on disability, cognition, physical performance, balance, depression and fatigue in relapsing-remitting Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients as compared to healthy controls. The subjects were divided as aerobic exercise (n = 26), Pilates (n = 9), and the healthy control group (n = 21). We used MSFC, physical performance, Berg balance scale, Beck depression scale, fatigue impact scale. All evaluations were performed before and after exercise training. There are statistically meaningful differences between Nine hole testing, PASAT 3, physical performance and fatique impact scale before and after aerobic exercise. Also we found significant difference for physical performance in the Pilates group. There are no significant differences in measures of fatique impact scale and depression between aerobic exercise group and the healthy controls after exercise. We found significant differences between Pilates and control group's after measurements except depression. There were significant differences between the Pilates and aerobic group for cognitive tests in favor of the Pilates group. Aerobic exercise and clinical Pilates exercises revealed moderate changes in levels of cognitive, physical performance, balance, depression, fatigue in MS patients.

  10. The effect of acupressure at spleen 6 acupuncture point on the anxiety level and sedative and analgesics consumption of women during labor: A randomized, single-blind clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Samadi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Labor pain is the most severe pain women would experience, which could lead to loss of emotional control that plays a key role in creating a traumatic delivery experience and psychological disorders. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of acupressure on anxiety level and sedative and analgesics consumption in women during labor. Materials and Methods: This study was a randomized, single-blind clinical trial performed at Maryam Hospital in Tehran, Iran. One hundred and thirty-one pregnant women in Labor Ward were selected by convenience sampling. Subjects were randomly allocated to three groups, namely experimental group (pressure group, control group 1(touh group and, control group 2 (routine care group. The study data were gathered using demographic information form, and assessed with Faces Anxiety Scale (FAS. For participants belonging to the experimental group, pressure was applied to the Spleen 6 acupoint for 30 min, and for those with only light touch was applied to the Spleen 6 acupoint for 30 min. The collected data were analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences 16 and descriptive statistics. Results: There was a significant difference between the three groups in terms of the mean of anxiety after 30 min of starting the intervention and 30 min after termination of the intervention; the anxiety of the experimental group was significantly decreased (p = 0.03. Sedative and analgesics consumption was significantly lower in the experimental group compared to the other groups (p = 0.006. Conclusions: This study showed that compression of the Spleen 6 acupoint was an effective complementary method to decrease maternal anxiety and analgesic consumption, especially pethidine.

  11. The effect of massage therapy by patients' companions on severity of pain in the patients undergoing post coronary artery bypass graft surgery: a single-blind randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Sied Saeed; Rast, Fazlola; Momennasab, Marzieh; Ghazinoor, Mahmood; Dehghanrad, Fereshteh; Mousavizadeh, Sied Ali

    2014-07-01

    Pain on mid sternotomy incision site after Coronary Artery Bypass  Graft  Surgery (CABG) is a common problem that causes sleep disturbance, delayed wound healing, and increased use of analgesic drugs. Massage therapy which is mostly performed by healthcare providers is a non-pharmacological approach for managing this pain. The present study aimed to determine the effect of massage therapy by patient's companion on the severity of pain in post CABG patients. In this randomized single-blind clinical trial, 70 post CABG patients were randomly divided into an intervention and a control group. The intervention group received massage by one of their relatives who was trained by an expert nurse. The control group, on the other hand, received routine care. The pain intensity was assessed by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) before and immediately, 30, 60, and 120 minutes after the intervention. Then, the data were entered into the SPSS statistical software (version 16) and analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc test (Scheffe). At the beginning of the study, no significant difference was found between the two groups regarding the pain severity. In the intervention group, the pain severity significantly decreased in all the four time points after the intervention (P=0.001). However, no significant difference was observed in this regard in the control group. Massage therapy by patient's companion trained by a nurse was an effective strategy for pain management in post CABG patients. This could also promote the patient's family participation in the process of care. IRCT201208218505N3.

  12. Piloted simulation tests of propulsion control as backup to loss of primary flight controls for a mid-size jet transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, John; Mah, Robert; Davis, Gloria; Conley, Joe; Hardy, Gordon; Gibson, Jim; Blake, Matthew; Bryant, Don; Williams, Diane

    1995-01-01

    Failures of aircraft primary flight-control systems to aircraft during flight have led to catastrophic accidents with subsequent loss of lives (e.g. , DC-1O crash, B-747 crash, C-5 crash, B-52 crash, and others). Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) investigated the use of engine thrust for emergency flight control of several airplanes, including the B-720, Lear 24, F-15, C-402, and B-747. A series of three piloted simulation tests have been conducted at Ames Research Center to investigate propulsion control for safely landing a medium size jet transport which has experienced a total primary flight-control failure. The first series of tests was completed in July 1992 and defined the best interface for the pilot commands to drive the engines. The second series of tests was completed in August 1994 and investigated propulsion controlled aircraft (PCA) display requirements and various command modes. The third series of tests was completed in May 1995 and investigated PCA full-flight envelope capabilities. This report describes the concept of a PCA, discusses pilot controls, displays, and procedures; and presents the results of piloted simulation evaluations of the concept by a cross-section of air transport pilots.

  13. The effect of counseling on anxiety after traumatic childbirth in nulliparous women; a single blind randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Azizi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traumatic birthing mothers may expose more susceptible to experiences posttraumatic mental disorder such as anxiety. This study aimed to determine the effect of midwifery counseling intervention on the anxiety level after traumatic childbirth of primiparous women.Methods: In a randomized control trial 180 woman who had experienced traumatic childbirth based on DSM-IV criteria have been selected. The subjects were randomly divided into an intervention (n=90 and control (n=90 groups. The intervention group received midwifery counseling during two sessions and control group just received routin health care after childbirth. Both groups were followed up with partial – blind technique and compared 4-6 weeks and 3 months post partum. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics by SPSS software. Results: Demographic characteristics, pregnancy complications and social support level were the same in both groups. In addition, there was no significant difference between two groups according to stress, depression and anxiety level before intervention (P>0.05. There was significant difference between two groups in anxiety level after 4-6 weeks and 3 months followup (P<0.001.Conclusion: Findings of this research shows that performing midwifery-counseling program may have significant effect on decreasing of anxiety level after traumatic childbirth.

  14. Launch Vehicle Manual Steering with Adaptive Augmenting Control:In-Flight Evaluations of Adverse Interactions Using a Piloted Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Curt; Miller, Chris; Wall, John H.; VanZwieten, Tannen S.; Gilligan, Eric T.; Orr, Jeb S.

    2015-01-01

    An Adaptive Augmenting Control (AAC) algorithm for the Space Launch System (SLS) has been developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as part of the launch vehicle's baseline flight control system. A prototype version of the SLS flight control software was hosted on a piloted aircraft at the Armstrong Flight Research Center to demonstrate the adaptive controller on a full-scale realistic application in a relevant flight environment. Concerns regarding adverse interactions between the adaptive controller and a potential manual steering mode were also investigated by giving the pilot trajectory deviation cues and pitch rate command authority, which is the subject of this paper. Two NASA research pilots flew a total of 25 constant pitch rate trajectories using a prototype manual steering mode with and without adaptive control, evaluating six different nominal and off-nominal test case scenarios. Pilot comments and PIO ratings were given following each trajectory and correlated with aircraft state data and internal controller signals post-flight.

  15. 'Putting Life in Years' (PLINY) telephone friendship groups research study: pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountain, Gail A; Hind, Daniel; Gossage-Worrall, Rebecca; Walters, Stephen J; Duncan, Rosie; Newbould, Louise; Rex, Saleema; Jones, Carys; Bowling, Ann; Cattan, Mima; Cairns, Angela; Cooper, Cindy; Edwards, Rhiannon Tudor; Goyder, Elizabeth C

    2014-04-24

    Loneliness in older people is associated with poor health-related quality of life (HRQoL). We undertook a parallel-group randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of telephone befriending for the maintenance of HRQoL in older people. An internal pilot tested the feasibility of the trial and intervention. Participants aged >74 years, with good cognitive function, living independently in one UK city were recruited through general practices and other sources, then randomised to: (1) 6 weeks of short one-to-one telephone calls, followed by 12 weeks of group telephone calls with up to six participants, led by a trained volunteer facilitator; or (2) a control group. The main trial required the recruitment of 248 participants in a 1-year accrual window, of whom 124 were to receive telephone befriending. The pilot specified three success criteria which had to be met in order to progress the main trial to completion: recruitment of 68 participants in 95 days; retention of 80% participants at 6 months; successful delivery of telephone befriending by local franchise of national charity. The primary clinical outcome was the Short Form (36) Health Instrument (SF-36) Mental Health (MH) dimension score collected by telephone 6 months following randomisation. We informed 9,579 older people about the study. Seventy consenting participants were randomised to the pilot in 95 days, with 56 (80%) providing valid primary outcome data (26 intervention, 30 control). Twenty-four participants randomly allocated to the research arm actually received telephone befriending due to poor recruitment and retention of volunteer facilitators. The trial was closed early as a result. The mean 6-month SF-36 MH scores were 78 (SD 18) and 71 (SD 21) for the intervention and control groups, respectively (mean difference, 7; 95% CI, -3 to 16). Recruitment and retention of participants to a definitive trial with a recruitment window of 1 year is feasible. For

  16. ‘Putting Life in Years’ (PLINY) telephone friendship groups research study: pilot randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Loneliness in older people is associated with poor health-related quality of life (HRQoL). We undertook a parallel-group randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of telephone befriending for the maintenance of HRQoL in older people. An internal pilot tested the feasibility of the trial and intervention. Methods Participants aged >74 years, with good cognitive function, living independently in one UK city were recruited through general practices and other sources, then randomised to: (1) 6 weeks of short one-to-one telephone calls, followed by 12 weeks of group telephone calls with up to six participants, led by a trained volunteer facilitator; or (2) a control group. The main trial required the recruitment of 248 participants in a 1-year accrual window, of whom 124 were to receive telephone befriending. The pilot specified three success criteria which had to be met in order to progress the main trial to completion: recruitment of 68 participants in 95 days; retention of 80% participants at 6 months; successful delivery of telephone befriending by local franchise of national charity. The primary clinical outcome was the Short Form (36) Health Instrument (SF-36) Mental Health (MH) dimension score collected by telephone 6 months following randomisation. Results We informed 9,579 older people about the study. Seventy consenting participants were randomised to the pilot in 95 days, with 56 (80%) providing valid primary outcome data (26 intervention, 30 control). Twenty-four participants randomly allocated to the research arm actually received telephone befriending due to poor recruitment and retention of volunteer facilitators. The trial was closed early as a result. The mean 6-month SF-36 MH scores were 78 (SD 18) and 71 (SD 21) for the intervention and control groups, respectively (mean difference, 7; 95% CI, -3 to 16). Conclusions Recruitment and retention of participants to a definitive trial with a

  17. The effect of control and display lag on unmanned air system internal pilot manual landing performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Marshall Everett

    An important characteristic of UASs is lag because it can become a considerable challenge to successful human-in-the-loop control. As such, UASs are designed and configured to minimize system lag, though this can increase acquisition and operation costs considerably. In an effort to cut costs, an organization may choose to accept greater risk and deploy a UAS with high system lag. Before this risk can be responsibly accepted, it must be quantified. While many studies have examined system lag, very few have been able to quantify the risk that various levels of lag pose to an internally piloted, manually landed UAS. This study attempted to do so by evaluating pilot landing performance in a simulator with 0 ms, 240 ms, and 1000 ms of additional lag. Various measures were used, including a novel coding technique. Results indicated that 1000 ms of lag was unsafe by all measures. They also indicate that 240 ms of lag degrades performance, but participants were able to successfully land the simulated aircraft. This study showed the utility of using several measures to evaluate the effect of lag on landing performance and it helped demonstrate that while 1000 ms poses a high risk, 240 ms of lag may be a much more manageable risk. Future research suggested by this research includes: investigating lag between 240 ms and 1000 ms, introducing different weather phenomena, developing system lag training techniques for operators, and investigating the effect of aides such as predictive displays and autopilot-assisted recovery.

  18. Efficacy and safety of a new microneedle patch for skin brightening: A Randomized, split-face, single-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kui Young; Kwon, Hyun Jung; Lee, Changjin; Kim, Daegun; Yoon, Jun Jin; Kim, Myeong Nam; Kim, Beom Joon

    2017-09-01

    Although microneedles are one of the best transdermal drug delivery systems for active compounds, few clinical trials have examined the safety and efficacy of brightening microneedle patches. To determine the efficacy and safety of a newly developed whitening microneedle patch. A split-face study was designed for efficacy assessment with 34 Korean women applying the tested product (a whitening microneedle patch) on one cheek and a control whitening essence on the other. We objectively measured changes in melanin index values and skin brightness by mexameter and chromameter. Each participant also used global assessment to determine skin whitening. In addition, 55 participants were selected for primary skin irritation tests and repeated insult patch tests for safety assessments. Mean skin brightness and melanin indexes improved (Pmicroneedle patch was effective and safe for skin brightening and would be a promising functional cosmetic product. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Sleep education improves the sleep duration of adolescents: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kira, Geoff; Maddison, Ralph; Hull, Michelle; Blunden, Sarah; Olds, Timothy

    2014-07-15

    To determine the feasibility and pilot a sleep education program in New Zealand high school students. A parallel, two-arm randomized controlled pilot trial was conducted. High school students (13 to 16 years) were randomly allocated to either a classroom-based sleep education program intervention (n = 15) or to a usual curriculum control group (n = 14). The sleep education program involved four 50-minute classroom-based education sessions with interactive groups. Students completed a 7-day sleep diary, a sleep questionnaire (including sleep hygiene, knowledge and problems) at baseline, post-intervention (4 weeks) and 10 weeks follow-up. An overall treatment effect was observed for weekend sleep duration (F 1,24 = 5.21, p = 0.03). Participants in the intervention group slept longer during weekend nights at 5 weeks (1:37 h:min, p = 0.01) and 10 weeks: (1:32 h:min, p = 0.03) compared to those in the control group. No differences were found between groups for sleep duration on weekday nights. No significant differences were observed between groups for any of the secondary outcomes (sleep hygiene, sleep problems, or sleep knowledge). A sleep education program appears to increase weekend sleep duration in the short term. Although this program was feasible, most schools are under time and resource pressure, thus alternative methods of delivery should be assessed for feasibility and efficacy. Larger trials of longer duration are needed to confirm these findings and determine the sustained effect of sleep education on sleep behavior and its impact on health and psychosocial outcomes. A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 793.

  20. Efficacy of praziquantel against Schistosoma mekongi and Opisthorchis viverrini: a randomized, single-blinded dose-comparison trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonore Lovis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schistosomiasis and opisthorchiasis are of public health importance in Southeast Asia. Praziquantel (PZQ is the drug of choice for morbidity control but few dose comparisons have been made. METHODOLOGY: Ninety-three schoolchildren were enrolled in an area of Lao PDR where Schistosoma mekongi and Opisthorchis viverrini coexist for a PZQ dose-comparison trial. Prevalence and intensity of infections were determined by a rigorous diagnostic effort (3 stool specimens, each examined with triplicate Kato-Katz before and 28-30 days after treatment. Ninety children with full baseline data were randomized to receive PZQ: the 40 mg/kg standard single dose (n = 45 or a 75 mg/kg total dose (50 mg/kg+25 mg/kg, 4 hours apart; n = 45. Adverse events were assessed at 3 and 24 hours posttreatment. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Baseline infection prevalence of S. mekongi and O. viverrini were 87.8% and 98.9%, respectively. S. mekongi cure rates were 75.0% (95% confidence interval (CI: 56.6-88.5% and 80.8% (95% CI: 60.6-93.4% for 40 mg/kg and 75 mg/kg PZQ, respectively (P = 0.60. O. viverrini cure rates were significantly different at 71.4% (95% CI: 53.4-84.4% and 96.6% (95% CI: not defined, respectively (P = 0.009. Egg reduction rates (ERRs against O. viverrini were very high for both doses (>99%, but slightly lower for S. mekongi at 40 mg/kg (96.4% vs. 98.1% and not influenced by increasing diagnostic effort. O. viverrini cure rates would have been overestimated and no statistical difference between doses found if efficacy was based on a minimum sampling effort (single Kato-Katz before and after treatment. Adverse events were common (96%, mainly mild with no significant differences between the two treatment groups. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Cure rate from the 75 mg/kg PZQ dose was more efficacious than 40 mg/kg against O. viverrini but not against S. mekongi infections, while ERRs were similar for both doses. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Controlled

  1. Combination of intracostal sutures with muscle flap to decrease post thoracotomy pain: A single blinded randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazer, Majid; Hashemzade, Shahryar; Gargari, Reza Movassaghi; Ramouz, Ali; Sanaie, Sarvin; Rasihashemi, Seyed Ziaeddin

    2017-01-01

    To assess the efficacy of intercostal nerve protection by intercostal muscle (ICM) flap in post-thoracotomy pain improvement compared to intracostal suturing. In a randomized controlled trial, ninety-four patients undergoing posterolateral thoracotomy surgery were divided into two subgroups. Intracostal sutures in isolation and in combination with ICM flap techniques were used for thoracotomy closure in both groups. Numeric Pain Scale and Visual Pain Scale as pain scores were assessed on the first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth and seventh postoperative days and follow-up visits during the 2 nd week, 1 st , 2 nd , 4 th and 6 th months after thoracotomy. Out of 94 patients, 58 were male and 36 were females. While the mean age of patients in intracostal group was 45.3 ± 17.6 years, it was 47.4 ± 16.1 years in intracostal plus ICM flap group. The mean operation time for the first group was 191.0 ± 74.7 minutes, while it was 219.3 ± 68.8 minutes in the second (p>0.05). Numeric rating score and visual pain scale did not demonstrate any significant difference in pain severity on postoperative days and follow-up visits between both groups (p>0.05). Although the trend of pain reduction was significant in each group (p0.001). Intracostal sutures in combination with muscle flap did not reduce postoperative pain in thoracotomy compared with intracostal sutures alone in thoracotomy closure.

  2. Advanced piloted aircraft flight control system design methodology. Volume 1: Knowledge base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcruer, Duane T.; Myers, Thomas T.

    1988-01-01

    The development of a comprehensive and electric methodology for conceptual and preliminary design of flight control systems is presented and illustrated. The methodology is focused on the design stages starting with the layout of system requirements and ending when some viable competing system architectures (feedback control structures) are defined. The approach is centered on the human pilot and the aircraft as both the sources of, and the keys to the solution of, many flight control problems. The methodology relies heavily on computational procedures which are highly interactive with the design engineer. To maximize effectiveness, these techniques, as selected and modified to be used together in the methodology, form a cadre of computational tools specifically tailored for integrated flight control system preliminary design purposes. While theory and associated computational means are an important aspect of the design methodology, the lore, knowledge and experience elements, which guide and govern applications are critical features. This material is presented as summary tables, outlines, recipes, empirical data, lists, etc., which encapsulate a great deal of expert knowledge. Much of this is presented in topical knowledge summaries which are attached as Supplements. The composite of the supplements and the main body elements constitutes a first cut at a a Mark 1 Knowledge Base for manned-aircraft flight control.

  3. A pilot scale demonstration of the DWPF process control and product verification strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutson, N.D.; Jantzen, C.M.; Beam, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been designed and constructed to immobilize Savannah River Site high level liquid waste within a durable borosilicate glass matrix for permanent storage. The DWPF will be operated to produce a glass product which must meet a number of product property constraints which are dependent upon the final product composition. During actual operations, the DWPF will control the properties of the glass product by the controlled blending of the waste streams with a glass-forming frit to produce the final melter feed slurry. The DWPF will verify control of the glass product through analysis of vitrified samples of slurry material. In order to demonstrate the DWPF process control and product verification strategy, a pilot-scale vitrification research facility was operated in three discrete batches using simulated DWPF waste streams. All of the DWPF process control methodologies were followed and the glass produce from each experiment was leached according to the Product Consistency Test. Results of the campaign are summarized

  4. The oral microbiota in patients with pancreatic cancer, patients with IPMNs, and controls: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Sara H; Satagopan, Jaya; Xu, Youming; Ling, Lilan; Leong, Siok; Orlow, Irene; Saldia, Amethyst; Li, Peter; Nunes, Pamela; Madonia, Vincent; Allen, Peter J; O'Reilly, Eileen; Pamer, Eric; Kurtz, Robert C

    2017-09-01

    Poor oral health appears to be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer, possibly implicating the oral microbiota. In this pilot study, we evaluated the characteristics of the oral microbiota in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN), and healthy controls. Forty newly diagnosed PDAC patients, 39 IPMN patients, and 58 controls, excluding current smokers and users of antibiotics, provided saliva samples. Common oral bacterial species were comprehensively surveyed by sequencing of the 16S rRNA microbial genes. We obtained measures of diversity and the mean relative proportions of individual taxa. We explored the degree to which these measures differed according to respondent characteristics based on individual interviews. PDAC cases did not differ in diversity measures from either controls or IPMN cases. PDAC cases had higher mean relative proportions of Firmicutes and related taxa, while controls had higher mean relative proportions of Proteobacteria and related taxa. Results were generally similar when comparing PDAC to IPMN cases. Among IPMNs and controls combined, younger individuals had higher levels of several taxa within the Proteobacteria. The only other variable consistently related to mean relative proportions was mouthwash use, with taxa within Firmicutes more common among users. While there were no differences in diversity of the oral microbiota among these groups, there were differences in the mean relative proportions of some taxa. Characteristics of the oral microbiota are not associated with most measures of oral health.

  5. A pilot scale demonstration of the DWPF process control and product verification strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutson, N.D.; Jantzen, C.M.; Beam, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been designed and constructed to immobilize Savannah River Site high level liquid waste within a durable borosilicate glass matrix for permanent storage. The DWPF will be operated to produce a glass product which must meet a number of product property constraints which are dependent upon the final product composition. During actual operations, the DWPF will control the properties of the glass product by the controlled blending of the waste streams with a glass-forming frit to produce the final melter feed slurry. The DWPF will verify control of the glass product through analysis of vitrified samples of slurry material. In order to demonstrate the DWPF process control and product verification strategy, a pilot-scale vitrification research facility was operated in three discrete batches using simulated DWPF waste streams. All of the DWPF process control methodologies were followed and the glass product from each experiment was leached according to the Product Consistency Test. In this paper results of the campaign are summarized

  6. Qat use and esophageal cancer in Ethiopia: A pilot case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria E Leon

    Full Text Available Qat (Catha edulis chewing is reported to induce lesions in the buccal mucosa, irritation of the esophagus, and esophageal reflux. Case series suggest a possible etiological role in oral and esophageal cancers. This pilot study aimed to generate preliminary estimates of the magnitude and direction of the association between qat use and esophageal cancer (EC risk and to inform the logistics required to conduct a multi-center case-control study.Between May 2012 and May 2013, 73 EC cases (including 12 gastro-esophageal junction cases and 133 controls matched individually on sex, age, and residence were enrolled at two endoscopy clinics and a cancer treatment hospital in Addis Ababa. A face-to-face structured questionnaire was administered. Qat use was defined as ever having chewed qat once a week or more frequently for at least one year. Odds ratios were calculated using conditional logistic regression.Only 8% of cases resided in Addis Ababa. Qat use was more frequent in cases (36% than in controls (26%. A 2-fold elevation in EC risk was observed in ever qat chewers compared with never users in unadjusted conditional logistic regression (OR = 2.12; 95% CI = 0.94, 4.74, an association that disappeared after adjusting for differences in tobacco use, consumption of alcohol and green vegetables, education level, and religion (OR = 0.95; 0.22, 4.22. Among never tobacco users, however, a non-significant increase in EC risk was suggested in ever qat users also after adjustment. Increases in EC risk were observed with ever tobacco use, alcohol consumption, low consumption of green vegetables, a salty diet, illiteracy, and among Muslims; the four latter associations were significant.This pilot study generated EC risk estimates in association with a habit practiced by millions of people and never before studied in a case-control design. Results must be interpreted cautiously in light of possible selection bias, with some demographics such as education level

  7. Association Between In-Office And At-Home Tooth Bleaching: A Single Blind Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, João Lima; Rocha, Patrícia Souza; Pardim, Silvia Letícia de Souza; Machado, Ana Cláudia Vieira; Faria-E-Silva, André Luis; Seraidarian, Paulo Isaías

    2018-01-01

    This controlled randomized clinical trial evaluated the effect of associating at-home and in-office bleaching procedures on tooth sensitivity (TS) and bleaching effectiveness. Forty patients subjected to on session of in-office bleaching with 38% peroxide hydrogen. Subsequently, the patients were randomly allocated to receive a second session of in-office bleaching or to use a tray containing 10% carbamide peroxide delivered during 7 consecutive days. The worst TS score reported during or after each bleaching procedure was recorded using a verbal rating scale and TS risk (score different from 0) was calculated. Color changes were measured 7 days after each in-office session (for patients receiving in-office procedures only) or after the end of at-home bleaching (for the combined protocol), and 6 months after the last procedure for both bleaching protocols. Color was assessed by a spectrophotometer and by color match with the Vita Classical and Bleach guide scales. Statistical analyses were carried out to assess possible differences between the protocols regarding the outcomes and to analyze the effect of time of assessment on color changes. The bleaching protocol did not affect the risk for and the maximum level of TS reported, irrespective of the time of assessment. In the color evaluation, the bleaching protocol also did not affect the ultimate tooth color. In conclusion, after one in-office bleaching session, there was no difference in bleaching effectiveness and TS between performing a second in-office session and associating it with 1-week at-home bleaching.

  8. Controlling the COD removal of an A-stage pilot study with instrumentation and automatic process control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mark W; Elliott, Matt; DeArmond, Jon; Kinyua, Maureen; Wett, Bernhard; Murthy, Sudhir; Bott, Charles B

    2017-06-01

    The pursuit of fully autotrophic nitrogen removal via the anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) pathway has led to an increased interest in carbon removal technologies, particularly the A-stage of the adsorption/bio-oxidation (A/B) process. The high-rate operation of the A-stage and lack of automatic process control often results in wide variations of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal that can ultimately impact nitrogen removal in the downstream B-stage process. This study evaluated the use dissolved oxygen (DO) and mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) based automatic control strategies through the use of in situ on-line sensors in the A-stage of an A/B pilot study. The objective of using these control strategies was to reduce the variability of COD removal by the A-stage and thus the variability of the effluent C/N. The use of cascade DO control in the A-stage did not impact COD removal at the conditions tested in this study, likely because the bulk DO concentration (>0.5 mg/L) was maintained above the half saturation coefficient of heterotrophic organisms for DO. MLSS-based solids retention time (SRT) control, where MLSS was used as a surrogate for SRT, did not significantly reduce the effluent C/N variability but it was able to reduce COD removal variation in the A-stage by 90%.

  9. Randomised controlled trial of extraarticular gold bead implantation for treatment of knee osteoarthritis: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nejrup, Kirsten; Olivarius, Niels de Fine; Jacobsen, Judith L.

    2008-01-01

    The primary objective of this double-blind, randomised, controlled trial was to determine if implanting gold beads at five acupuncture points around the knee joint improves 1-year outcomes for patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Participants were 43 adults aged 18-80 years with pain...... and stiffness from non-specific OA of the knee for over a year. The intervention was blinded implantation of gold beads at five acupuncture points around the affected knee through a hypodermic needle, or needle insertion alone. Primary outcome measures were knee pain, stiffness and function assessed...... acupuncture had greater relative improvements in self-assessed outcomes. The treatment was well tolerated. This 1-year pilot study indicates that extraarticular gold bead implantation is a promising treatment modality for patients with OA of the knee. The new treatment should be tested in a larger trial...

  10. Pilot Quality Control Program for Audit RT External Beams at Mexican Hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez R, J T; Tovar M, V M

    2008-01-01

    A pilot quality control program for audit 18 radiotherapy RT external beams at 13 Mexican hospitals is described--for eleven 60 Co beams and seven photon beams of 6, 10 and 15 MV from accelerators. This program contains five parts: a) Preparation of the TLD-100 powder: washing, drying and annealing (one hour 400 deg. C plus 24 hrs 80 deg. C). b) Sending two IAEA type capsules to the hospitals for irradiation at the hospital to a nominal D W = 2 Gy·c) Preparation at the SSDL of ten calibration curves CC in the range of 0.5 Gy to 6 Gy in terms of absorbed dose to water D W for 60 Co with traceability to primary laboratory NRC (Canada), according to a window irradiation: 26/10/2007-7/12/2007. d) Reading all capsules that match their hospital time irradiation and the SSDL window irradiation. f) Evaluation of the Dw imparted by the hospitals

  11. Pilot Quality Control Program for Audit RT External Beams at Mexican Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez R., J. T.; Tovar M., V. M.

    2008-08-01

    A pilot quality control program for audit 18 radiotherapy RT external beams at 13 Mexican hospitals is described—for eleven 60 Co beams and seven photon beams of 6, 10 and 15 MV from accelerators. This program contains five parts: a) Preparation of the TLD-100 powder: washing, drying and annealing (one hour 400 °C plus 24 hrs 80 °C). b) Sending two IAEA type capsules to the hospitals for irradiation at the hospital to a nominal DW = 2 Gy ṡ c ) Preparation at the SSDL of ten calibration curves CC in the range of 0.5 Gy to 6 Gy in terms of absorbed dose to water DW for 60 Co with traceability to primary laboratory NRC (Canada), according to a window irradiation: 26/10/2007-7/12/2007. d) Reading all capsules that match their hospital time irradiation and the SSDL window irradiation. f) Evaluation of the Dw imparted by the hospitals.

  12. Effects of manipulating eating frequency during a behavioral weight loss intervention: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Jessica L; Raynor, Hollie A

    2012-05-01

    Eating frequency has been inversely related to BMI but the impact of eating frequency on weight loss is unclear. This randomized controlled trial pilot study examined the effect of eating frequency on hunger, energy intake, and weight loss during a 6-month behavioral weight loss intervention. Participants (age: 51.0 ± 9.9 years, BMI: 35.5 ± 4.8 kg/m(2), 57.8% female, 94.1% white) were randomized to one of two eating frequency prescriptions: Three meal (n = 25): three eating bouts/day; or grazing (n = 26): eat at least 100 kcals every 2-3 h. Both groups attended 20 sessions and had identical dietary (1,200-1,500 kcals/day, frequency than three meal at 6 months (5.8 ± 1.1 eating bouts/day vs. 3.2 ± 0.6 eating bouts/day, P weight loss intervention.

  13. Patient-Controlled Biofeedback Device for the Treatment of Fecal Incontinence: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damin, Daniel C; Hommerding, Felipe; Schirmer, Delber; Sanches, Paulo R S; Silva Junior, Danton P; Müller, André F; Thome, Paulo R O

    2017-06-01

    Although biofeedback has been used as a first-line therapy for fecal incontinence, it is known to be time consuming and demands attendance to a hospital during the whole period of treatment. In this study, we describe a new biofeedback device specifically developed for home treatment of fecal incontinence, which consists of a microprocessor controlled unit able to register and store the anal pressure waves corresponding to exercises performed by patients at home. In order to test the new device, a pilot study including ten patients with fecal incontinence was conducted. Evaluation of patients before and after the biofeedback training showed significant improvement in manometric and clinical parameters of anal continence. The new method may improve compliance of patients with the training program and reduce their need to be supervised during the treatment. It might represent a new alternative for the treatment of fecal incontinence.

  14. Short-term and practice effects of metronome pacing in Parkinson's disease patients with gait freezing while in the 'on' state: randomized single blind evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubo, Esther; Leurgans, Sue; Goetz, Christopher G

    2004-12-01

    In a randomized single blind parallel study, we tested the efficacy of an auditory metronome on walking speed and freezing in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with freezing gait impairment during their 'on' function. No pharmacological treatment is effective in managing 'on' freezing in PD. Like visual cues that can help overcome freezing, rhythmic auditory pacing may provide cues that help normalize walking pace and overcome freezing. Non-demented PD patients with freezing during their 'on' state walked under two conditions, in randomized order: unassisted walking and walking with the use of an audiocassette with a metronome recording. The walking trials were randomized and gait variables were rated from videotapes by a blinded evaluator. Outcome measures were total walking time (total trial time-total freezing time), which was considered the time over a course of specified length, freezing time, average freeze duration and number of freezes. All outcomes were averaged across trials for each person and then compared across conditions using Signed Rank tests. Twelve non-demented PD patients with a mean age of 65.8 +/- 11.2 years, and mean PD duration of 12.4 +/- 7.3 years were included. The use of the metronome slowed ambulation and increased the total walking time (P metronome recording home and used it daily for 1 week while walking, freezing remained unimproved. Though advocated in prior publications as a walking aid for PD patients, auditory metronome pacing slows walking and is not a beneficial intervention for freezing during their 'on' periods.

  15. Inositol for the prevention of neural tube defects: a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Nicholas D E; Leung, Kit-Yi; Gay, Victoria; Burren, Katie; Mills, Kevin; Chitty, Lyn S; Copp, Andrew J

    2016-03-28

    Although peri-conceptional folic acid (FA) supplementation can prevent a proportion of neural tube defects (NTD), there is increasing evidence that many NTD are FA non-responsive. The vitamin-like molecule inositol may offer a novel approach to preventing FA-non-responsive NTD. Inositol prevented NTD in a genetic mouse model, and was well tolerated by women in a small study of NTD recurrence. In the present study, we report the Prevention of Neural Tube Defects by Inositol (PONTI) pilot study designed to gain further experience of inositol usage in human pregnancy as a preliminary trial to a future large-scale controlled trial to evaluate efficacy of inositol in NTD prevention. Study subjects were UK women with a previous NTD pregnancy who planned to become pregnant again. Of 117 women who made contact, ninety-nine proved eligible and forty-seven agreed to be randomised (double-blind) to peri-conceptional supplementation with inositol plus FA or placebo plus FA. In total, thirty-three randomised pregnancies produced one NTD recurrence in the placebo plus FA group (n 19) and no recurrences in the inositol plus FA group (n 14). Of fifty-two women who declined randomisation, the peri-conceptional supplementation regimen and outcomes of twenty-two further pregnancies were documented. Two NTD recurred, both in women who took only FA in their next pregnancy. No adverse pregnancy events were associated with inositol supplementation. The findings of the PONTI pilot study encourage a large-scale controlled trial of inositol for NTD prevention, but indicate the need for a careful study design in view of the unwillingness of many high-risk women to be randomised.

  16. A case-control pilot study of low-intensity IVF in good-prognosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleicher, Norbert; Weghofer, Andrea; Barad, David H

    2012-04-01

    Low-intensity IVF (LI-IVF) is rapidly gaining in popularity. Yet studies comparing LI-IVF to standard IVF are lacking. This is a case-control pilot study, reporting on 14 first LI-IVF and 14 standard IVF cycles in women with normal age-specific ovarian reserve under age 38, matched for age, laboratory environment, staff and time of cycle. LI-IVF cycles underwent mild ovarian stimulation, utilizing clomiphene citrate, augmented by low-dose gonadotrophin stimulation. Control patients underwent routine ovarian stimulation. LI-IVF and regular IVF patients were similar in age, body mass index, FSH and anti-Müllerian hormone. Standard IVF utilized more gonadotrophins (PIVF demonstrated better odds for pregnancy (OR 7.07; P=0.046) and higher cumulative pregnancy rates (63.3% versus 21.4%; OR 6.6; P=0.02). Adjustments for age, ethnicity and diagnosis maintained significance but oocyte adjustment did not. Cost assessments failed to reveal differences between LI-IVF and standard IVF. In this small study, LI-IVF reduced pregnancy chances without demonstrating cost advantages, raising questions about its utility. In the absence of established clinical and/or economic foundations, LI-IVF should be considered an experimental procedure. Low-intensity IVF (LI-IVF) is increasingly propagated as an alternative to standard IVF. LI-IVF has, however, never been properly assessed in comparison to standard IVF. Such a comparison is presented in the format of a small pilot study, matching LI-IVF cycles with regular IVF cycles and comparing outcomes as well as costs. The study suggests that LI-IVF, at least in this setting, is clinically inferior and economically at best similar to standard IVF. LI-IVF should, therefore, as of this point not be offered as routine IVF treatment but only as an experimental procedure. Copyright © 2012 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial to Promote Immunosuppressant Adherence in Adult Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukor, Daniel; Ver Halen, Nisha; Pencille, Melissa; Tedla, Fasika; Salifu, Moro

    2017-01-01

    Nonadherence to immunosuppressant medication is a prevalent practice among kidney transplant recipients and has been associated with increased risk for graft failure and economic burden. The aim of this pilot study was to test whether a culturally sensitive cognitive-behavioral adherence promotion program could significantly improve medication adherence to tacrolimus prescription as measured by telephone pill counts among kidney transplant recipients. Thirty-three adult transplant recipients were less than 98% adherent to tacrolimus prescription based on 3 telephone pill counts and were randomized either to the 2-session cognitive-behavioral adherence promotion program or to standard care. The curriculum was developed from an iterative process with transplant recipients into a 2-session group program that provided psychoeducation, addressed barriers to adherence, fostered motivation to improve adherence behavior, and discussed cultural messages on adherence behavior. The intervention group displayed significantly higher levels of adherence when compared to the control group (t = 2.2, p = 0.04) and. similarly, when the amount of change was compared between the groups, the intervention group showed more change than the control condition (F (22,1) = 12.005, p = 0.003). Tacrolimus trough concentration levels were used as a secondary measure of adherence and, while there were no significant between-group differences for mean trough concentration levels, the variability in the trough levels did significantly decrease over time indicating more consistent pill-taking behavior in the intervention group. There is preliminary support for the pilot program as a successful intervention in helping patients with their immunosuppressant medication. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. A randomized controlled pilot study of home-based step training in older people using videogame technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Schoene

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stepping impairments are associated with physical and cognitive decline in older adults and increased fall risk. Exercise interventions can reduce fall risk, but adherence is often low. A new exergame involving step training may provide an enjoyable exercise alternative for preventing falls in older people. PURPOSE: To assess the feasibility and safety of unsupervised, home-based step pad training and determine the effectiveness of this intervention on stepping performance and associated fall risk in older people. DESIGN: Single-blinded two-arm randomized controlled trial comparing step pad training with control (no-intervention. SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-seven older adults residing in independent-living units of a retirement village in Sydney, Australia. INTERVENTION: Intervention group (IG participants were provided with a computerized step pad system connected to their TVs and played a step game as often as they liked (with a recommended dose of 2-3 sessions per week for 15-20 minutes each for eight weeks. In addition, IG participants were asked to complete a choice stepping reaction time (CSRT task once each week. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: CSRT, the Physiological Profile Assessment (PPA, neuropsychological and functional mobility measures were assessed at baseline and eight week follow-up. RESULTS: Thirty-two participants completed the study (86.5%. IG participants played a median 2.75 sessions/week and no adverse events were reported. Compared to the control group, the IG significantly improved their CSRT (F31,1 = 18.203, p<.001, PPA composite scores (F31,1 = 12.706, p = 0.001, as well as the postural sway (F31,1 = 4.226, p = 0.049 and contrast sensitivity (F31,1 = 4.415, p = 0.044 PPA sub-component scores. In addition, the IG improved significantly in their dual-task ability as assessed by a timed up and go test/verbal fluency task (F31,1 = 4.226, p = 0.049. CONCLUSIONS: Step pad training can

  19. Results of pilot project on introducing quality control of mammographic equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasileva, Zh.; Lichev, A.; Dimov, A.; Kostova, E.; Dimov, G.

    2003-01-01

    Objective:The results from a pilot project, realized in the framework of the PHARE Project 'Radiation Protection and Safety in Medical Use of the Ionizing Radiation'. The main goal of the project is the elaboration a quality control program for mammographic equipment and its implementation in 4 radiological units in the country. Another task is to examine the possibility for conducting a mammographic screening using this equipment. Material and methods: The developed quality control program has the following components: test parameters; criteria for intervention; minimal frequency of measurement. Methodologies for measurement of the parameters and assessment of the results in accordance with the European Protocol for physical and technical aspects of the mammographic screening. Standard protocols have been elaborated. Results: The quality program has been tested for three month at different hospitals. Conclusions: Optimization and strict control of the process of film development are needed. The exposure equipment. The quality control program should be implemented on all mammographic equipment in the country. For the performance of mammographic screening a strict selection of the equipment is necessary

  20. Group Singing as a Therapy during Diabetes Training--A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groener, J B; Neus, I; Kopf, S; Hartmann, M; Schanz, J; Kliemank, E; Wetekam, B; Kihm, L; Fleming, T; Herzog, W; Nawroth, P P

    2015-11-01

    Comprehensive diabetes treatment has been shown to reduce quality of life in diabetic patients. However, there is evidence to suggest that group singing can have positive effects on quality of life in various clinical settings. In this randomized controlled pilot study, the effect of singing as a therapy to reduce stress and improve quality of life was investigated in insulin-dependent diabetic patients, undergoing a lifestyle intervention program. Patients from the singing group felt less discontented following treatment. This effect, however, was lost after 3 months. No effect on serum cortisol and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels could be seen when comparing the singing group with the control group, although reduced levels of ACTH and cortisol 3 days after treatment could be found and were still present after 3 months within the group of patients who undertook singing as a therapy. Singing led to an increase in bodyweight, which interestingly had no effect on glucose control or methylglyoxal levels. Therefore, singing during a lifestyle intervention program for insulin-dependent diabetic patients had a short lasting and weak effect on patients' mood without affecting glucose control, but no significant effect on stress related hormones. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Effects of errorless skill learning in people with mild-to-moderate or severe dementia: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, R.P.C.; Hensken, L.M.

    2009-01-01

    This pilot study examines whether learning without errors is advantageous compared to trial-and-error learning in people with dementia using a procedural task and a randomized case-control design. A sample of 60 people was recruited, consisting of 20 patients with severe dementia, 20 patients with

  2. Effects of errorless skill learning in people with mild-to-moderate or severe dementia: A randomized controlled pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, R.P.C.; Olde Hensken, L.M.G.

    2009-01-01

    This pilot study examines whether learning without errors is advantageous compared to trial-and-error learning in people with dementia using a procedural task and a randomized case-control design. A sample of 60 people was recruited, consisting of 20 patients with severe dementia, 20 patients with

  3. Laparoscopic Surgical Treatment of Severe Obesity Combined with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: A Pilot Randomized Two-Arm Controlled Clinical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ospanov, Oral B.; Orekeshova, Akzhunis M.; Fursov, Roman A.; Yelemesov, Aset A.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are serious medical, social, and economic problems of modern society. A pilot randomized two-arm controlled clinical study was conducted to compare laparoscopic plication of the greater gastric curvature combined with Nissen fundoplication (LFN+LGP) versus only Nissen fundoplication (LFN). The…

  4. Pilot-scale cooling tower to evaluate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control strategies for cooling system makeup water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, S H; Hsieh, M K; Li, H; Monnell, J; Dzombak, D; Vidic, R

    2012-02-01

    Pilot-scale cooling towers can be used to evaluate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control strategies when using particular cooling system makeup water and particular operating conditions. To study the potential for using a number of different impaired waters as makeup water, a pilot-scale system capable of generating 27,000 kJ∕h heat load and maintaining recirculating water flow with a Reynolds number of 1.92 × 10(4) was designed to study these critical processes under conditions that are similar to full-scale systems. The pilot-scale cooling tower was equipped with an automatic makeup water control system, automatic blowdown control system, semi-automatic biocide feeding system, and corrosion, scaling, and biofouling monitoring systems. Observed operational data revealed that the major operating parameters, including temperature change (6.6 °C), cycles of concentration (N = 4.6), water flow velocity (0.66 m∕s), and air mass velocity (3660 kg∕h m(2)), were controlled quite well for an extended period of time (up to 2 months). Overall, the performance of the pilot-scale cooling towers using treated municipal wastewater was shown to be suitable to study critical processes (corrosion, scaling, biofouling) and evaluate cooling water management strategies for makeup waters of complex quality.

  5. Randomized Controlled Trial for Early Intervention for Autism: A Pilot Study of the Autism 1-2-3 Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Virginia C. N.; Kwan, Queenie K.

    2010-01-01

    We piloted a 2-week "Autism-1-2-3" early intervention for children with autism and their parents immediately after diagnosis that targeted at (1) eye contact, (2) gesture and (3) vocalization/words. Seventeen children were randomized into the Intervention (n = 9) and Control (n = 8) groups. Outcome measures included the Autism Diagnostic…

  6. Illness Management & Recovery (IMR) in the Netherlands : A naturalistic pilot study to explore the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosenschoon, B.J.; Van Weeghel, J.; Bogaards, M.; Deen, M.L.; Mulder, C.L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Illness Management & Recovery (IMR) is a curriculum-based program for people with severe and persistent mental illness. To date, four randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have been published on it. As these produced mixed results, we conducted a pilot study to test the feasibility of

  7. Illness Management & Recovery (IMR) in the Netherlands; a naturalistic pilot study to explore the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.J. Roosenschoon (Bert); J. van Weeghel (Jaap); Bogaards, M. (Moniek); M. Deen (Mathijs); C.L. Mulder (Niels)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Illness Management & Recovery (IMR) is a curriculum-based program for people with severe and persistent mental illness. To date, four randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have been published on it. As these produced mixed results, we conducted a pilot study to test the

  8. Using Robots at Home to Support Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Elizabeth; Garrett, Jeff; Jepsen, Nicola; Li Ogilvie, Vickie; Ahn, Ho Seok; Robinson, Hayley; Peri, Kathryn; Kerse, Ngaire; Rouse, Paul; Pillai, Avinesh; MacDonald, Bruce

    2018-02-13

    Socially assistive robots are being developed for patients to help manage chronic health conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Adherence to medication and availability of rehabilitation are suboptimal in this patient group, which increases the risk of hospitalization. This pilot study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of a robot delivering telehealth care to increase adherence to medication and home rehabilitation, improve quality of life, and reduce hospital readmission compared with a standard care control group. At discharge from hospital for a COPD admission, 60 patients were randomized to receive a robot at home for 4 months or to a control group. Number of hospitalization days for respiratory admissions over the 4-month study period was the primary outcome. Medication adherence, frequency of rehabilitation exercise, and quality of life were also assessed. Implementation interviews as well as benefit-cost analysis were conducted. Intention-to-treat and per protocol analyses showed no significant differences in the number of respiratory-related hospitalizations between groups. The intervention group was more adherent to their long-acting inhalers (mean number of prescribed puffs taken per day=48.5%) than the control group (mean 29.5%, P=.03, d=0.68) assessed via electronic recording. Self-reported adherence was also higher in the intervention group after controlling for covariates (P=.04). The intervention group increased their rehabilitation exercise frequency compared with the control group (mean difference -4.53, 95% CI -7.16 to -1.92). There were no significant differences in quality of life. Of the 25 patients who had the robot, 19 had favorable attitudes. This pilot study suggests that a homecare robot can improve adherence to medication and increase exercise. Further research is needed with a larger sample size to further investigate effects on hospitalizations after improvements are made to the robots. The robots could be

  9. Early Glycemic Control in Critically Ill Emergency Department Patients: Pilot Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen, Jason

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Glycemic control in the critically ill intensive care unit (ICU patient has been shown to improve morbidity and mortality. We sought to investigate the effect of early glycemic control in critically ill emergency department (ED patients in a small pilot trial.Methods: Adult non-trauma, non-pregnant ED patients presenting to a university tertiary referral center and identified as critically ill were eligible for enrollment on a convenience basis. Critical illness was determined upon assignment for ICU admission. Patients were randomized to either ED standard care or glycemic control. Glycemic control involved use of an insulin drip to maintain blood glucose levels between 80-140 mg/dL. Glycemic control continued until ED discharge. Standard patients were managed at ED attending physician discretion. We assessed severity of illness by calculation of APACHE II score. The primary endpoint was in-hospital mortality. Secondary endpoints included vasopressor requirement, hospital length of stay, and mechanical ventilation requirement.Results: Fifty patients were randomized, 24 to the glycemic group and 26 to the standard care cohort. Four of the 24 patients (17% in the treatment arm did not receive insulin despite protocol requirements. While receiving insulin, three of 24 patients (13% had an episode of hypoglycemia. By chance, the patients in the treatment group had a trend toward higher acuity by APACHE II scores. Patient mortality and morbidity were similar despite the acuity difference.Conclusion: There was no difference in morbidity and mortality between the two groups. The benefit of glycemic control may be subject to source of illness and to degree of glycemic control, or have no effect. Such questions bear future investigation. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(1:20-23].

  10. Pilot-in-the-Loop Evaluation of a Yaw Rate to Throttle Feedback Control with Enhanced Engine Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Guo, Ten-Huei; Sowers, T. Shane; Chicatelli, Amy K.; Fulton, Christopher E.; May, Ryan D.; Owen, A. Karl

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation and evaluation of a yaw rate to throttle feedback system designed to replace a damaged rudder. It can act as a Dutch roll damper and as a means to facilitate pilot input for crosswind landings. Enhanced propulsion control modes were implemented to increase responsiveness and thrust level of the engine, which impact flight dynamics and performance. Piloted evaluations were performed to determine the capability of the engines to substitute for the rudder function under emergency conditions. The results showed that this type of implementation is beneficial, but the engines' capability to replace the rudder is limited.

  11. Application of a pilot control strategy identification technique to a joint FAA/NASA ground-based simulation of head-up displays for CTOL aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, W. F.

    1982-01-01

    A technique for measuring a pilot's control strategy was developed, evaluated, and applied to a joint FAA-NASA ground-based simulation of two competing concepts of head-up displays for use in conventional takeoff and landing aircraft. The technique, called the Non-Intrusive Pilot Identification Program (NIPIP), estimates the pilot's input-output describing function and combined pilot-vehicle performance parameters such as crossover frequency and phase margin by using a time domain model of the pilot and a least-squares identification algorithm. NIPIP functions in realtime and uses a sliding time window to maintain freshness in the data; thus time-varying characteristics in the pilot's control strategy can be measured.

  12. Pilot-Scale Demonstration of ALTA for NOx Control in Pulverized Coal-Fired Boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew Fry; Devin Davis; Marc Cremer; Bradley Adams

    2008-04-30

    This report describes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and pilot-scale testing conducted to demonstrate the ability of the Advanced Layered Technology Approach (ALTA) to reduce NO{sub x} emissions in a pulverized coal (PC) boiler. Testing specifically focused on characterizing NO{sub x} behavior with deep burner staging combined with Rich Reagent Injection (RRI). Tests were performed in a 4 MBtu/hr pilot-scale furnace at the University of Utah. Reaction Engineering International (REI) led the project team which included the University of Utah and Combustion Components Associates (CCA). Deep burner staging and RRI, combined with selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR), make up the Advanced Layered Technology Approach (ALTA) for NO{sub x} reduction. The application of ALTA in a PC environment requires homogenization and rapid reaction of post-burner combustion gases and has not been successfully demonstrated in the past. Operation of the existing low-NO{sub x} burner and design and operation of an application specific ALTA burner was guided by CFD modeling conducted by REI. Parametric pilot-scale testing proved the chemistry of RRI in a PC environment with a NOx reduction of 79% at long residence times and high baseline NOx rate. At representative particle residence times, typical operation of the dual-register low-NO{sub x} burner provided an environment that was unsuitable for NO{sub x} reduction by RRI, showing no NOx reduction. With RRI, the ALTA burner was able to produce NO{sub x} emissions 20% lower than the low-NO{sub x} burner, 76 ppmv vs. 94 ppmv, at a burner stoichiometric ratio (BSR) of 0.7 and a normalized stoichiometric ratio (NSR) of 2.0. CFD modeling was used to investigate the application of RRI for NO{sub x} control on a 180 MW{sub e} wall-fired, PC boiler. A NO{sub x} reduction of 37% from baseline (normal operation) was predicted using ALTA burners with RRI to produce a NO{sub x} emission rate of 0.185 lb/MBtu at the horizontal nose of

  13. Effects of sleeping position on back pain in physically active seniors: A controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desouzart, Gustavo; Matos, Rui; Melo, Filipe; Filgueiras, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    The increase in life expectancy of elderly population has aroused the interest of different knowledge areas in understanding the variables that are involved in the aging process, linking them to other concepts such as active aging, healthy aging and the bio-psycho-social changes. This paper presents the results of the first controlled, experimental pilot study that aimed to analyze the relationship between the perception of back pain and the sleeping position adopted by physically active female seniors. Twenty female seniors (mean age 62.70 ± 3.827) participated in this study. The individuals were separated in 2 groups (Experimental and Control Group). For the carrying out of this study, the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) was used to measure the intensity of back pain in the spine before and after four consecutive weeks an Intervention program. Individuals in the Experimental Group were instructed regarding the recommended way to sleep position (Intervention program) according to the pathological problems or the amount of pain reported. The Experimental Group (N = 10) presented significantly (p = 0.009) fewer complaints of back pain after an Intervention program in comparison to individuals who did not receive this type of information (Control Group).

  14. CFD analysis on the dynamic flow characteristics of the pilot-control globe valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, Jin-yuan; Wei, Lin; Jin, Zhi-jiang; Wang, Jian-kai; Zhang, Han; Lu, An-le

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • PCGV utilizes pressure difference to control the action of the valve core. • Three different opening processes with the same spring stiffness are analyzed. • Valve core’s displacements with different spring stiffness are analyzed. • The best design point of spring stiffness and inlet pressure is obtained. • The selection formula for the design of PCGV is generalized. - Abstract: The pilot-control globe valve (PCGV) is a new kind valve with simple structures and low driving energy consumption. It can utilize the pressure difference before and after the valve to control the action of the valve core. However, systematic theoretical research and numerical analysis are deficient at present. In this paper, the mathematical model of PCGV is established and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method is employed to numerically simulate its dynamic characteristics. Through the analysis of the internal flow field distribution, its working principle is verified. Then three different opening processes with the same spring stiffness are analyzed under different static inlet pressures, and the best design point is obtained by studying the characteristic curves of the valve core’s displacement. The relationship of static inlet pressure and the valve core’s displacement is summarized and the selection formula for the valve design is generalized which can reduce the various design work for further optimization and engineering applications of PCGV

  15. Problem Solving Skills Training for Parents of Children with Chronic Pain: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Tonya M.; Law, Emily F.; Bromberg, Maggie; Fales, Jessica; Eccleston, Christopher; Wilson, Anna C.

    2016-01-01

    This pilot randomized controlled trial aimed to determine the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of parental problem solving skills training (PSST) compared to treatment as usual (TAU) on improving parental mental health symptoms, physical health and well-being, and parenting behaviors. Effects of parent PSST on child outcomes (pain, emotional and physical functioning) were also examined. Participants included 61 parents of children aged 10–17 years with chronic pain randomized to PSST (n = 31) or TAU (n = 30). Parents receiving PSST participated in 4–6 individual sessions of training in problem solving skills. Outcomes were assessed at pre-treatment, immediately post-treatment, and at 3-month follow up. Feasibility was determined by therapy session attendance, therapist ratings, and parent treatment acceptability ratings. Feasibility of PSST delivery in this population was demonstrated by high compliance with therapy attendance, excellent retention, high therapist ratings of treatment engagement, and high parent ratings of treatment acceptability. PSST was associated with post-treatment improvements in parental depression (d = −0.68), general mental health (d = 0.64), and pain catastrophizing (d = −0.48), as well as in child depression (d = −0.49), child general anxiety (d = −0.56), and child pain-specific anxiety (d = −0.82). Several effects were maintained at 3-month follow-up. Findings demonstrate that PSST is feasible and acceptable to parents of youth with chronic pain. Treatment outcome analyses show promising but mixed patterns of effects of PSST on parent and child mental health outcomes. Further rigorous trials of PSST are needed to extend these pilot results. PMID:26845525

  16. A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescents With Body Dysmorphic Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataix-Cols, David; Fernández de la Cruz, Lorena; Isomura, Kayoko; Anson, Martin; Turner, Cynthia; Monzani, Benedetta; Cadman, Jacinda; Bowyer, Laura; Heyman, Isobel; Veale, David; Krebs, Georgina

    2015-11-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) typically starts in adolescence, but evidence-based treatments are yet to be developed and formally evaluated in this age group. We designed an age-appropriate cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) protocol for adolescents with BDD and evaluated its acceptability and efficacy in a pilot randomized controlled trial. Thirty adolescents aged 12 to 18 years (mean = 16.0, SD = 1.7) with a primary diagnosis of BDD, together with their families, were randomly assigned to 14 sessions of CBT delivered over 4 months or a control condition of equivalent duration, consisting of written psycho-education materials and weekly telephone monitoring. Blinded evaluators assessed participants at baseline, midtreatment, posttreatment, and at 2-month follow-up. The primary outcome measure was the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale Modified for BDD, Adolescent Version (mean baseline score = 37.13, SD = 4.98, range = 24-43). The CBT group showed a significantly greater improvement than the control group, both at posttreatment (time × group interaction coefficient [95% CI] = -11.26 [-17.22 to -5.31]; p = .000) and at 2-month follow-up (time × group interaction coefficient [95% CI] = -9.62 [-15.74 to -3.51]; p = .002). Six participants (40%) in the CBT group and 1 participant (6.7%) in the control condition were classified as responders at both time points (χ(2) = 4.658, p = .031). Improvements were also seen on secondary measures, including insight, depression, and quality of life at posttreatment. Both patients and their families deemed the treatment as highly acceptable. Developmentally tailored CBT is a promising intervention for young people with BDD, although there is significant room for improvement. Further clinical trials incorporating lessons learned in this pilot study and comparing CBT and pharmacological therapies, as well as their combination, are warranted. Cognitive-Behaviour Therapy for Adolescents With Body Dysmorphic Disorder; http

  17. Prospective randomized controlled trial of an injectable esophageal prosthesis versus a sham procedure for endoscopic treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fockens, P.; Cohen, L.; Edmundowicz, S.A.; Binmoeller, K.; Rothstein, R.I.; Smith, D.; Lin, E.; Nickl, N.; Overholt, B.; Kahrilas, P.J.; Vakil, N.; Abdel Aziz Hassan, A.M.; Lehman, G.A.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to assess whether endoscopic implantation of an injectable esophageal prosthesis, the Gatekeeper Reflux Repair System (GK), is a safe and effective therapy for controlling gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). A prospective, randomized, sham-controlled, single-blinded,

  18. Interaction and efficacy of Keigai-rengyo-to extract and acupuncture in male patients with acne vulgaris: A study protocol for a randomized controlled pilot trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Yoon-Bum

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In consideration of patients seeking to use traditional Chinese medicine, an evidence-based potentiality for safe and effective use of herbal medicine and acupuncture in treatment of acne vulgaris has been suggested. However, despite common use of a combination of herbal medicine and acupuncture in clinical practice, the current level of evidence is insufficient to draw a conclusion for an interaction and efficacy of herbal medicine and acupuncture. Therefore, considering these methodological flaws, this study was designed to assess the interaction and efficacy of an available herbal medicine, Keigai-rengyo-to extract (KRTE, and acupuncture for treatment of acne using the 2 × 2 factorial design and the feasibility of a large clinical trial. Methods/Design A randomized, assessor single blinded, 2 × 2 factorial pilot trial will be conducted. Forty four participants with acne vulgaris will be randomized into one of four groups: waiting list group (WL, KRTE only group (KO, acupuncture only group (AO, and KRTE and acupuncture combined treatment group (KA. After randomization, a total of 8 sessions of acupuncture treatment will be performed twice a week in the AO- and KA groups, respectively. Patients in the KO- and KA groups will be prescribed KRTE 3 times a day at a dose of 7.4 g after meals for 4 weeks. The following outcome measurements will be used in examination of subjects: the mean percentage change and the count change of inflammatory and non-inflammatory acne lesions, the Skindex 29, visual analogue scale (VAS and investigator global assessment (IGA from baseline to the end of the trial. Trial Registration The trial is registered with the Clinical Research Information Service (CRiS, Republic of Korea: KCT0000071.

  19. Recruitment to online therapies for depression: pilot cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ray B; Goldsmith, Lesley; Hewson, Paul; Williams, Christopher J

    2013-03-05

    Raising awareness of online cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) could benefit many people with depression, but we do not know how purchasing online advertising compares to placing free links from relevant local websites in increasing uptake. To pilot a cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing purchase of Google AdWords with placing free website links in raising awareness of online CBT resources for depression in order to better understand research design issues. We compared two online interventions with a control without intervention. The pilot RCT had 4 arms, each with 4 British postcode areas: (A) geographically targeted AdWords, (B) adverts placed on local websites by contacting website owners and requesting links be added, (C) both interventions, (D) control. Participants were directed to our research project website linking to two freely available online CBT resource sites (Moodgym and Living Life To The Full (LLTTF)) and two other depression support sites. We used data from (1) AdWords, (2) Google Analytics for our project website and for LLTTF, and (3) research project website. We compared two outcomes: (1) numbers with depression accessing the research project website, and then chose an onward link to one of the two CBT websites, and (2) numbers registering with LLTTF. We documented costs, and explored intervention and assessment methods to make general recommendations to inform researchers aiming to use similar methodologies in future studies. Trying to place local website links appeared much less cost effective than AdWords and although may prove useful for service delivery, was not worth pursuing in the context of the current study design. Our AdWords intervention was effective in recruiting people to the project website but our location targeting "leaked" and was not as geographically specific as claimed. The impact on online CBT was also diluted by offering participants other choices of destinations. Measuring the impact on LLTTF use was

  20. Overcoming Barriers to Disseminating Exposure Therapies for Anxiety Disorders: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of Training Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Harned, Melanie S.; Dimeff, Linda A.; Woodcock, Eric A.; Skutch, Julie M.

    2011-01-01

    The present study evaluated methods for training mental health providers (N=46) in exposure therapies (ETs) for anxiety disorders. A pilot randomized controlled trial compared: 1) an interactive, multimedia online training (ET OLT), 2) the ET OLT plus a brief Motivational Interviewing-based intervention (ET OLT + MI), and 3) a placebo control OLT. Assessments were completed at baseline, post-training, and one week following training. Both ET OLT and ET OLT + MI received high satisfaction rati...

  1. 1997 annual ground control operating plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-02-01

    This plan presents background information and a working guide to assist Mine Operations and Engineering in developing strategies for addressing ground control issues at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). With the anticipated receipt of waste in late 1997, this document provides additional detail to Panel 1 activities and options. The plan also serves as a foundation document for development and revision of the annual long-term ground control plan. Section 2.0 documents the current status of all underground excavations with respect to location, geology, geometry, age, ground support, operational use, projected life, and physical conditions. Section 3.0 presents the methods used to evaluate ground conditions, including visual observations of the roof, ribs, and floor, inspection of observation holes, and review of instrumentation data. Section 4.0 lists several ground support options and specific applications of each. Section 5.0 discusses remedial ground control measures that have been implemented to date. Section 6.0 presents projections and recommendations for ground control actions based on the information in Sections 2.0 through 5.0 of this plan and on a rating of the critical nature of each specific area. Section 7.0 presents a summary statement, and Section 8.0 includes references. Appendix A provides an overview and critique of ground control systems that have been, or may be, used at the site. Because of the dynamic nature of the underground openings and associated geotechnical activities, this plan will be revised as additional data are incorporated

  2. Pilot program of quality control in mammography and conventional equipment in the Antioquia Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, P.; Puerta, J.A.; Morales, J.; Beltran, C.C.

    2006-01-01

    The Sectional Health Division of Antioquia and the National University of Colombia- Medellin Headquarters formalized an agreement for the realization of the quality control of thirty mammographs and twenty-five conventional X-ray equipment located in the one metropolitan area of Medellin, and ten municipalities of the nine regions in that the antioquen county is divided. The National University of Colombia- Headquarters Medellin possesses a program for the formation in quality control and radiological protection at master level in physics for that which endowed a radiodiagnostic laboratory for these purposes. In the Antioquia department only exists an institution, the San Vicente of Paul University Hospital that possesses a quality control program in radiodiagnostic; this hospital given its great volume of studies in radiodiagnostic has a medical physicist and of that instrumental necessary to maintain the program. The quality control programs have not been implemented in the rest of health institutions, public or private, big or small, until the moment. The project then allowed to carry out an initial evaluation of the pertinent parameters of the quality control of the facilities like its are those that refer to the state of the x-ray generator, the disposition of the installation, the dark room, the film processor and negatoscopies room; these its were carried out with base in the protocol produced in the ARCAL XLIX project in which participated six Latin American countries. The dose average in mammography, following the proposed course in the ARCAL LXXV, where its participate eleven Latin American countries was also evaluated. This study pilot serves like reference of the current state of the regional radiodiagnostic services, with base in this sampling that is representative. The obtained data gave the necessary information so that the Sectional Division of Health of Antioquia can generate tending actions to the implementation of quality guarantee programs and

  3. Effect of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Stroke Rehabilitation: A Pilot Randomized Sham-Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khot, Sandeep P.; Davis, Arielle P.; Crane, Deborah A.; Tanzi, Patricia M.; Li Lue, Denise; Claflin, Edward S.; Becker, Kyra J.; Longstreth, W.T.; Watson, Nathaniel F.; Billings, Martha E.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) predicts poor functional outcome after stroke and increases the risk for recurrent stroke. Less is known about continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment on stroke recovery. Methods: In a pilot randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled trial, adult stroke rehabilitation patients were assigned to auto-titrating or sham CPAP without diagnostic testing for OSA. Change in Functional Independence Measure (FIM), a measure of disability, was assessed between rehabilitation admission and discharge. Results: Over 18 months, 40 patients were enrolled and 10 withdrew from the study: 7 from active and 3 from sham CPAP (p > 0.10). For the remaining 30 patients, median duration of CPAP use was 14 days. Average CPAP use was 3.7 h/night, with at least 4 h nightly use among 15 patients. Adherence was not influenced by treatment assignment or stroke severity. In intention-to-treat analyses (n = 40), the median change in FIM favored active CPAP over sham but did not reach statistical significance (34 versus 26, p = 0.25), except for the cognitive component (6 versus 2.5, p = 0.04). The on-treatment analyses (n = 30) yielded similar results (total FIM: 32 versus 26, p = 0.11; cognitive FIM: 6 versus 2, p = 0.06). Conclusions: A sham-controlled CPAP trial among stroke rehabilitation patients was feasible in terms of recruitment, treatment without diagnostic testing and adequate blinding—though was limited by study retention and CPAP adherence. Despite these limitations, a trend towards a benefit of CPAP on recovery was evident. Tolerance and adherence must be improved before the full benefits of CPAP on recovery can be assessed in larger trials. Citation: Khot SP, Davis AP, Crane DA, Tanzi PM, Li Lue D, Claflin ES, Becker KJ, Longstreth WT, Watson NF, Billings ME. Effect of continuous positive airway pressure on stroke rehabilitation: a pilot randomized sham-controlled trial. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(7):1019–1026. PMID

  4. Mixed methods evaluation of a randomized control pilot trial targeting sugar-sweetened beverage behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoellner, Jamie; Cook, Emily; Chen, Yvonnes; You, Wen; Davy, Brenda; Estabrooks, Paul

    2013-02-01

    This Excessive sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption and low health literacy skills have emerged as two public health concerns in the United States (US); however, there is limited research on how to effectively address these issues among adults. As guided by health literacy concepts and the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), this randomized controlled pilot trial applied the RE-AIM framework and a mixed methods approach to examine a sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intervention (SipSmartER), as compared to a matched-contact control intervention targeting physical activity (MoveMore). Both 5-week interventions included two interactive group sessions and three support telephone calls. Executing a patient-centered developmental process, the primary aim of this paper was to evaluate patient feedback on intervention content and structure. The secondary aim was to understand the potential reach (i.e., proportion enrolled, representativeness) and effectiveness (i.e. health behaviors, theorized mediating variables, quality of life) of SipSmartER. Twenty-five participants were randomized to SipSmartER (n=14) or MoveMore (n=11). Participants' intervention feedback was positive, ranging from 4.2-5.0 on a 5-point scale. Qualitative assessments reavealed several opportunties to improve clarity of learning materials, enhance instructions and communication, and refine research protocols. Although SSB consumption decreased more among the SipSmartER participants (-256.9 ± 622.6 kcals), there were no significant group differences when compared to control participants (-199.7 ± 404.6 kcals). Across both groups, there were significant improvements for SSB attitudes, SSB behavioral intentions, and two media literacy constructs. The value of using a patient-centered approach in the developmental phases of this intervention was apparent, and pilot findings suggest decreased SSB may be achieved through targeted health literacy and TPB strategies. Future efforts are needed to examine

  5. Effectiveness of two home ergonomic programs in reducing pain and enhancing quality of life in informal caregivers of post-stroke patients: A pilot randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo Freitas Moreira, Karen Lucia; Ábalos-Medina, Gracia María; Villaverde-Gutiérrez, Carmen; Gomes de Lucena, Neide María; Belmont Correia de Oliveira, Anderson; Pérez-Mármol, José Manuel

    2018-02-13

    Informal caregivers of post-stroke patients usually undergo high levels of pain and stress and have a reduced quality of life. To evaluate the effectiveness of two home ergonomic interventions aimed at reducing pain intensity and perceived stress and enhancing the quality of life in informal caregivers of chronic post-stroke patients. A randomized single-blind controlled clinical trial was conducted, with a sample of 33 informal caregivers of patients with stroke. Three groups were included: one received postural hygiene training and kinesiotherapy, for 12 weeks, two days a week, one hour per session; another received adaptation of the home environment, and the third was a control group. Pain intensity, stress level and general quality of life were evaluated at three-time points: pre-intervention, post-intervention, and after a follow-up period of three months. Neck pain decreased in the two experimental groups, and increased in the control group. Pain in the shoulders and knees was alleviated in the group that received postural hygiene and kinesiotherapy. In addition, regarding quality of life, this group obtained an improvement in the physical health dimension, while the home adaptation group reported improved social relationships. These results suggest that 12 weeks of training in postural hygiene, combined with kinesiotherapy, and home adaptations can reduce pain and improve several aspects of the quality of life of this population. CLINICALTRIALS. NCT03284580. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Efficacy of Anticholinergics for Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome in Young and Middle-Aged Patients: A Single-Blinded, Prospective, Multi-Center Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doo Sang Kim

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS exhibits variable lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of LUTS and the efficacy of an anticholinergic agent in young and middle-aged CP/CPPS patients. Methods Ninety-six men with CP/CPPS were randomly assigned in a single-blind fashion and received either ciprofloxacin (group 1, 49 patients or ciprofloxacin and solifenacin (5 mg/day; group 2, 47 patients for 8 weeks. The National Institutes of Health chronic prostatitis symptom index (NIH-CPSI, the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS, and the International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5 were used to grade the patients' symptoms and the quality of life impact at the start of the study, and at 4 and 8 weeks from the initiation of the study. Results There was no significant difference between groups 1 and 2 with respect to age, duration of disease, or sub-domains of the IPSS, NIH-CPSI, or IIEF-5 at baseline. Of these patients, 67.4% had LUTS. Statistically significant differences were determined via the NIH-CPSI for total score and the pain and urinary domain scores. Statistically significant differences were determined via the IPSS for total score and the storage domain score. The total score of the IIEF-5 increased, but the change was not significant. There was no statistically significant difference in residual urine. Conclusions Many CP/CPPS patients had LUTS. Solifenacin in CP/CPPS demonstrated improvements in the NIH-CPSI and the IPSS total score and storage score. Storage factors significantly improved via the NIH-CPSI and IPSS assessments in the solifenacin treatment group.

  7. Comparative electrocardiographic effects of intravenous ondansetron and granisetron in patients undergoing surgery for carcinoma breast: A prospective single-blind randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Ganjare

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV are common and distressing symptoms after surgery performed under general anaesthesia. 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 antagonists are routinely used for prevention and treatment of PONV. The aim of our study was to compare the incidence of QTc prolongation and quantify the amount of QTc prolongation with ondansetron and granisetron. Methods: This prospective, randomised, single-blind study was carried out in the OT and Recovery Room (RR of a tertiary referral cancer centre. After obtaining Institutional Review Board approval and written informed consent from the patients, 70 patients undergoing elective surgery for carcinoma breast were included. In the RR, patients randomly received 8 mg of ondansetron or 1 mg of granisetron intravenously. Serial ECGs were recorded at various intervals, Non-invasive blood pressure and SpO 2 were also recorded. Chi-square test and Mann-Whiteny test were used for statistical analysis. Results: The demographics were similar in both groups. The incidence of significant QTc prolongation was significantly higher in the ondansetron group (22 of 37 (59.4% vs. 11 of 33 patients (33.33% ( P<0.05. There was an increase in the QTc interval in both the groups as compared to the baseline. The median prolongation in QTc interval from baseline was much more in the ondansetron group; this was statistically significant only at 5 and 15 min. Conclusion: Granisetron may be a safer option than ondanasetron for prevention and treatment of PONV due to lesser prolongation QTc interval. (ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT01352130

  8. A Randomized Single Blind Parallel Group Study Comparing Monoherbal Formulation Containing Holarrhena antidysenterica Extract with Mesalamine in Chronic Ulcerative Colitis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarika Johari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Incidences of side effects and relapses are very common in chronic ulcerative colitis patients after termination of the treatment. Aims and Objectives: This study aims to compare the treatment with monoherbal formulation of Holarrhena antidysenterica with Mesalamine in chronic ulcerative colitis patients with special emphasis to side effects and relapse. Settings and Design: Patients were enrolled from an Ayurveda Hospital and a private Hospital, Gujarat. The study was randomized, parallel group and single blind design. Materials and Methods: The protocol was approved by Institutional Human Research Ethics Committee of Anand Pharmacy College on 23rd Jan 2013. Three groups (n = 10 were treated with drug Mesalamine (Group I, monoherbal tablet (Group II and combination of both (Group III respectively. Baseline characteristics, factors affecting quality of life, chronicity of disease, signs and symptoms, body weight and laboratory investigations were recorded. Side effects and complications developed, if any were recorded during and after the study. Statistical Analysis Used: Results were expressed as mean ± SEM. Data was statistically evaluated using t-test, Wilcoxon test, Mann Whitney U test, Kruskal Wallis test and ANOVA, wherever applicable, using GraphPad Prism 6. Results: All the groups responded positively to the treatments. All the patients were positive for occult blood in stool which reversed significantly after treatment along with rise in hemoglobin. Patients treated with herbal tablets alone showed maximal reduction in abdominal pain, diarrhea, and bowel frequency and stool consistency scores than Mesalamine treated patients. Treatment with herbal tablet alone and in combination with Mesalamine significantly reduced the stool infection. Patients treated with herbal drug alone and in combination did not report any side effects, relapse or complications while 50% patients treated with Mesalamine exhibited the relapse with

  9. Co-ingestion of carbohydrate and whey protein isolates enhance PGC-1α mRNA expression: a randomised, single blind, cross over study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Karen M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whey protein isolates (WPI supplementation is known to improve resistance training adaptations. However, limited information is available on the effects of WPI plus carbohydrate (CHO supplementation on endurance training adaptations. Method Six endurance trained male cyclists and triathletes (age 29 ± 4 years, weight 74 ± 2 kg, VO2 max 63 ± 3 ml oxygen. kg-1. Min-1, height 183 ± 5 cm; mean ± SEM were randomly assigned to one of two dietary interventions in a single blind cross over design; CHO or CHO + WPI. Each dietary intervention was followed for 16 days which included the last 2 days having increased CHO content, representing a CHO loading phase. The dietary interventions were iso-caloric and carbohydrate content matched. On completion of the dietary intervention, participants performed an exercise bout, consisting of cycling for 60 min at 70% VO2 max, followed by time trial to exhaustion at 90% VO2 max and recovered in the laboratory for 6 hours. Blood samples and muscle biopsies were taken at various time points at rest and through the exercise trial and recovery. Results Compared to CHO, CHO + WPI increased plasma insulin during recovery at 180 mins (P Conclusion This study showed co-ingestion of CHO + WPI may have beneficial effects on recovery and adaptations to endurance exercise via, increased insulin response and up regulation of PGC-1α mRNA expression.

  10. The Effect of Isomaltulose Together with Green Tea on Glycemic Response and Antioxidant Capacity: A Single-Blind, Crossover Study in Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suraphad, Passakorn; Suklaew, Phim On; Ngamukote, Sathaporn; Adisakwattana, Sirichai; Mäkynen, Kittana

    2017-05-06

    Isomaltulose, a naturally-occurring isomer of sucrose, is commonly used as an alternative sweetener in foods and beverages. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of isomaltulose together with green tea on postprandial plasma glucose and insulin concentration, as well as antioxidant capacity in healthy subjects. In a randomized, single-blind, crossover study, 15 healthy subjects (eight women and seven men; ages 23.5 ± 0.7 years; with body mass index of 22.6 ± 0.4 kg/m²) consumed five beverages: (1) 50 g sucrose in 400 mL water; (2) 50 g isomaltulose in 400 mL of water; (3) 400 mL of green tea; (4) 50 g sucrose in 400 mL of green tea; and (5) 50 g isomaltulose in 400 mL of green tea. Incremental area under postprandial plasma glucose, insulin, ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) and malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration were determined during 120 min of administration. Following the consumption of isomaltulose, the incremental 2-h area under the curve (AUC 0-2 h ) indicated a higher reduction of postprandial glucose (43.4%) and insulin concentration (42.0%) than the consumption of sucrose. The addition of green tea to isomaltulose produced a greater suppression of postprandial plasma glucose (20.9%) and insulin concentration (37.7%). In accordance with antioxidant capacity, consumption of sucrose (40.0%) and isomaltulose (28.7%) caused the reduction of green tea-induced postprandial increases in FRAP. A reduction in postprandial MDA after drinking green tea was attenuated when consumed with sucrose (34.7%) and isomaltulose (17.2%). In conclusion, green tea could enhance the reduction of postprandial glucose and insulin concentration when consumed with isomaltulose. In comparison with sucrose, isomaltulose demonstrated less alteration of plasma antioxidant capacity after being consumed with green tea.

  11. Investigation into the visual perceptive ability of anaesthetists during ultrasound-guided interscalene and femoral blocks conducted on soft embalmed cadavers: a randomised single-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, A; Seeley, J; Munirama, S; Columb, M; McKendrick, M; Schwab, A; Corner, G; Eisma, R; Mcleod, G

    2018-04-01

    Errors may occur during regional anaesthesia whilst searching for nerves, needle tips, and test doses. Poor visual search impacts on decision making, clinical intervention, and patient safety. We conducted a randomised single-blind study in a single university hospital. Twenty trainees and two consultants examined the paired B-mode and fused B-mode and elastography video recordings of 24 interscalene and 24 femoral blocks conducted on two soft embalmed cadavers. Perineural injection was randomised equally to 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 ml volumes. Tissue displacement perceived on both imaging modalities was defined as 'target' or 'distractor'. Our primary objective was to test the anaesthetists' perception of the number and proportion of targets and distractors on B-mode and fused elastography videos collected during femoral and sciatic nerve block on soft embalmed cadavers. Our secondary objectives were to determine the differences between novices and experts, and between test-dose volumes, and to measure the area and brightness of spread and strain patterns. All anaesthetists recognised perineural spread using 0.25 ml volumes. Distractor patterns were recognised in 133 (12%) of B-mode and in 403 (38%) of fused B-mode and elastography patterns; P<0.001. With elastography, novice recognition improved from 12 to 37% (P<0.001), and consultant recognition increased from 24 to 53%; P<0.001. Distractor recognition improved from 8 to 31% using 0.25 ml volumes (P<0.001), and from 15 to 45% using 1 ml volumes (P<0.001). Visual search improved with fusion elastography, increased volume, and consultants. A need exists to investigate image search strategies. Copyright © 2018 British Journal of Anaesthesia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A randomized, single-blind, single-dose study evaluating the pharmacokinetic equivalence of proposed biosimilar ABP 980 and trastuzumab in healthy male subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanes, Vladimir; Chow, Vincent; Zhang, Nan; Markus, Richard

    2017-05-01

    This study compared the pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles of the proposed biosimilar ABP 980 and trastuzumab in healthy males. In this single-blind study, 157 healthy males were randomized 1:1:1 to a single 6 mg/kg intravenous infusion of ABP 980, FDA-licensed trastuzumab [trastuzumab (US)], or EU-authorized trastuzumab [trastuzumab (EU)]. Primary endpoints were area under the serum concentration-time curve from time 0 to infinity (AUC inf ) and maximum observed serum concentration (C max ). To establish equivalence, the geometric mean ratio (GMR) and 90% confidence interval (CI) for C max and AUC inf had to be within the equivalence criteria of 0.80-1.25. The GMRs and 90% CIs for C max and AUC inf , respectively, were: 1.04 (0.99-1.08) and 1.06 (1.00-1.12) for ABP 980 versus trastuzumab (US); 0.99 (0.95-1.03) and 1.00 (0.95-1.06) for ABP 980 versus trastuzumab (EU); and 0.96 (0.92-1.00) and 0.95 (0.90-1.01) for trastuzumab (US) versus trastuzumab (EU). All comparisons were within the equivalence criteria of 0.80-1.25. Treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) were reported in 84.0, 75.0, and 78.2 of subjects in the ABP 980, trastuzumab (US), and trastuzumab (EU) groups, respectively. There were no deaths or TEAEs leading to study discontinuation and no binding or neutralizing anti-drug anti-bodies were detected. This study demonstrated the PK similarity of ABP 980 to both trastuzumab (US) and trastuzumab (EU), and of trastuzumab (US) to trastuzumab (EU). No differences in safety and tolerability between treatments were noted; no subject tested positive for binding anti-bodies.

  13. Pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of plant lignan 7-hydroxymatairesinol and effects on serum enterolactone and clinical symptoms in postmenopausal women: a single-blinded, parallel, dose-comparison study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udani, Jay K; Brown, Donald J; Tan, Maria Olivia C; Hardy, Mary

    2013-01-01

    7-Hydroxymaitairesinol (7-HMR) is a naturally occurring plant lignan found in whole grains and the Norway spruce (Piciea abies). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bioavailability of a proprietary 7-HMR product (HMRlignan, Linnea SA, Locarno, Switzerland) through measurement of lignan metabolites and metabolic precursors. A single-blind, parallel, pharmacokinetic and dose-comparison study was conducted on 22 postmenopausal females not receiving hormone replacement therapy. Subjects were enrolled in either a 36 mg/d (low-dose) or 72 mg/d dose (high-dose) regimen for 8 weeks. Primary measured outcomes included plasma levels of 7-HMR and enterolactone (ENL), and single-dose pharmacokinetic analysis was performed on a subset of subjects in the low-dose group. Safety data and adverse event reports were collected as well as data on hot flash frequency and severity. Pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated 7-HMR C max = 757.08 ng/ml at 1 hour and ENL C max = 4.8 ng/ml at 24 hours. From baseline to week 8, plasma 7-HMR levels increased by 191% in the low-dose group (p < 0.01) and by 1238% in the high-dose group (p < 0.05). Plasma ENL levels consistently increased as much as 157% from baseline in the low-dose group and 137% in the high-dose group. Additionally, the mean number of weekly hot flashes decreased by 50%, from 28.0/week to 14.3/week (p < 0.05) in the high-dose group. No significant safety issues were identified in this study. The results demonstrate that HMRlignan is quickly absorbed into the plasma and is metabolized to ENL in healthy postmenopausal women. Clinically, the data demonstrate a statistically significant improvement in hot flash frequency. Doses up to 72 mg/d HMRlignan for 8 weeks were safe and well tolerated in this population.

  14. Effect of Mozart music on heel prick pain in preterm infants: a pilot randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Cavaiuolo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this pilot study was to determine the effect of music by Mozart on heel prick procedural pain in premature infants.Background: Painful procedures are routinely performed in the setting of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU. Pain may exert short- and long-term deleterious effects on premature babies. Many non-pharmacological interventions have been proven efficacious for blunting neonatal pain.Study design: Randomized, controlled trial.Methods: The study was carried out in the NICU of the “G. Rummo” Hospital in Benevento, Italy. The sample consisted of 42 preterm infants, with no hearing loss or significant cerebral lesions on cranial ultrasound. They were randomized to receive heel lance during a music condition or a no-music control condition. We set strict criteria for selecting and delivering the music. Baseline and postprocedural heart rate and transcutaneous oxygen saturation were manually recorded. The Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP score was used to measure the behavioral response to prick. An unpaired t-test was performed for the intergroup comparisons.Results: There were significant differences between groups on heart rate increase, oxygen saturation reduction and PIPP score following the procedure.Conclusions: Listening to Mozart music during heel prick is a simple and inexpensive tool for pain alleviating in preterm stable neonates.

  15. Effect of organic on chemical oxidation for biofouling control in pilot-scale seawater cooling towers

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Bloushi, Mohammed

    2017-09-14

    Due to the scarcity of potable water in many regions of the world, the demand for seawater as an alternative evaporative cooling medium in cooling towers (CTs) has increased significantly in recent years. Seawater make-up in CTs is deemed the most feasible because of its unlimited supply in the coastal areas of Gulf and Red Sea. However, the seawater CTs have higher challenges greatly mitigating their performances because it is an open system where biofouling and bio-corrosion occurring within the fillers and piping of recirculation systems. Their pilot-scale CTs were constructed to assess the performance of three types of oxidizing biocides or oxidants, namely chlorine, chlorine dioxide (ClO2) and ozone, for biofouling control. The test results showed that the addition of organic (5mg/L of methanol (MeOH)) increased the bacterial growth in CT basin. All oxidants were effective in keeping the microbial growth to the minimum. Oxidation increased the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) level from 270 to 600mV. Total residual oxidant (TRO) was increased with oxidation but it was slightly increased with organic addition. Other parameters including pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), conductivity levels were not changed. However, higher formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) was detected with chlorination and ozonation. This indicates the organic level should be limited in the oxidation for biofouling control in seawater CTs.

  16. Music for surgical abortion care study: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Justine; Chaplin, William; Amico, Jennifer; Butler, Mark; Ojie, Mary Jane; Hennedy, Dina; Clemow, Lynn

    2012-05-01

    The study objective was to explore the effect of music as an adjunct to local anesthesia on pain and anxiety during first-trimester surgical abortion. Secondary outcomes included patient satisfaction and coping. We conducted a randomized controlled pilot study of 26 women comparing music and local anesthesia to local anesthesia alone. We assessed pain, anxiety and coping with 11-point verbal numerical scales. Patient satisfaction was measured via a 4-point Likert scale. In the music group, we noted a trend toward a faster decline in anxiety postprocedure (p=.065). The music group reported better coping than the control group (mean±S.D., 8.5±2.3 and 6.2±2.8, respectively; pMusic as an adjunct to local anesthesia during surgical abortion is associated with a trend toward less anxiety postprocedure and better coping while maintaining high patient satisfaction. Music does not appear to affect abortion pain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pilot Quality Control Program for Brachytherapy of Low Dose Rate at the General Hospital of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez R., J. T.; Tovar M., V.; Salinas, B.; Hernández O., O.; Santillán B., L.; Molero M., C.; Montoya M., J.

    2004-09-01

    We describe the pilot quality control program for brachytherapy of low dose rate proposed to be used in the Radiotherapy Department at the General Hospital of Mexico. The program consists of three parts: a) development of calibration procedures, performed in terms of air-kerma strength for calibration of 137Cs and 192Ir brachytherapy sources, and for the calibration of well-type ionization chambers for 137Cs, b) performance of localisation and reconstruction techniques for radioactive sources with a Baltas' phantom. The results obtained for the media deviation , are in the optimum level, ± 0.5 mm hospital. It consists on the characterisation of a TLD-100 powder dosimetry system at SSDL: The calibration curves for powder response (nC or nC/ mg) vs Dw and the control charts for the Harshaw 3500 reader were obtained. The statistical validation of the calibration curve by normality of the residuals and the lack of fit tests were realised. In the other hand, TLD's were irradiated in the hospital to a nominal Dw = 2 Gy with sources of 137Cs. The percent deviations Δ%, between the Dw imparted by the Hospital and the determined by SSDL, are 1.2% Δ⩽ 6.5 % which are consistent with the expanded uncertainty U% for DW, 5.6 U% 10%.

  18. Pilot Quality Control Program for Brachytherapy of Low Dose Rate at the General Hospital of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez R, J.T.; Tovar M, V.; Salinas, B.; Hernandez O, O.; Santillan B, L.; Molero M, C.; Montoya M, J.

    2004-01-01

    We describe the pilot quality control program for brachytherapy of low dose rate proposed to be used in the Radiotherapy Department at the General Hospital of Mexico. The program consists of three parts: a) development of calibration procedures, performed in terms of air-kerma strength for calibration of 137Cs and 192Ir brachytherapy sources, and for the calibration of well-type ionization chambers for 137Cs, b) performance of localisation and reconstruction techniques for radioactive sources with a Baltas' phantom. The results obtained for the media deviation , are in the optimum level, ± 0.5 mm < ± 1.0 mm; the confidence limit Δ, is in the emergency level, Δ=3.2 mm. c) verification of absorbed dose to water DW, given by the hospital. It consists on the characterisation of a TLD-100 powder dosimetry system at SSDL: The calibration curves for powder response (nC or nC/ mg) vs Dw and the control charts for the Harshaw 3500 reader were obtained. The statistical validation of the calibration curve by normality of the residuals and the lack of fit tests were realised. In the other hand, TLD's were irradiated in the hospital to a nominal Dw = 2 Gy with sources of 137Cs. The percent deviations Δ%, between the Dw imparted by the Hospital and the determined by SSDL, are 1.2% Δ≤ 6.5 % which are consistent with the expanded uncertainty U% for DW, 5.6 U% 10%

  19. Pilot randomized controlled trial of dialectical behavior therapy group skills training for ADHD among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Andrew P; McMahon, Robert J; Moran, Lyndsey R; Peterson, A Paige; Dreessen, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    ADHD affects between 2% and 8% of college students and is associated with broad functional impairment. No prior randomized controlled trials with this population have been published. The present study is a pilot randomized controlled trial evaluating dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) group skills training adapted for college students with ADHD. Thirty-three undergraduates with ADHD between ages 18 and 24 were randomized to receive either DBT group skills training or skills handouts during an 8-week intervention phase. ADHD symptoms, executive functioning (EF), and related outcomes were assessed at baseline, post-treatment, and 3-month follow-up. Participants receiving DBT group skills training showed greater treatment response rates (59-65% vs. 19-25%) and clinical recovery rates (53-59% vs. 6-13%) on ADHD symptoms and EF, and greater improvements in quality of life. DBT group skills training may be efficacious, acceptable, and feasible for treating ADHD among college students. A larger randomized trial is needed for further evaluation. © 2014 SAGE Publications.

  20. Yoga as a Therapeutic Intervention in the Management of Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding: A Controlled Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snehal Pankaj Nalgirkar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB is one of the most common gynecological disorders encountered in women during the reproductive age. Yoga therapy has shown promising benefits in several gynecological disorders. Methods: Thirty women between the ages of 20 and 40 years with primary DUB were randomly assigned to a yoga (n = 15 and a waitlist control group (n = 15. Participants in the yoga group received a 3-month yoga module and were assessed for hemoglobin values, endometrial thickness (ET, pictorial blood loss assessment chart (PBAC, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, perceived stress scale, and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI before and after a 3-month follow-up period. Results: At the end of 3 months of intervention, the yoga group, unlike the control group, reported a significant reduction in the anxiety scores (P < 0.05 and perceived stress (P < 0.05. The PSQI scores indicated a reduction in sleep disturbances (P < 0.001 and the need for sleep medications (P < 0.01 and higher global scores (P < 0.001. However, there were no changes in PBAC and ET in both the groups. Conclusion: The results indicate that yoga therapy positively impacts the outcome of DUB by reducing the perceived stress and state anxiety and improving the quality of sleep. This warrants larger clinical trials to validate the findings of this pilot study.

  1. EMDR for Syrian refugees with posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms: results of a pilot randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceren Acarturk

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most common mental health problems among refugees are depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR is an effective treatment for PTSD. However, no previous randomized controlled trial (RCT has been published on treating PTSD symptoms in a refugee camp population. Objective: Examining the effect of EMDR to reduce the PTSD and depression symptoms compared to a wait-list condition among Syrian refugees. Method: Twenty-nine adult participants with PTSD symptoms were randomly allocated to either EMDR sessions (n=15 or wait-list control (n=14. The main outcome measures were Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II at posttreatment and 4-week follow-up. Results: Analysis of covariance showed that the EMDR group had significantly lower trauma scores at posttreatment as compared with the wait-list group (d=1.78, 95% CI: 0.92–2.64. The EMDR group also had a lower depression score after treatment as compared with the wait-list group (d=1.14, 95% CI: 0.35–1.92. Conclusion: The pilot RCT indicated that EMDR may be effective in reducing PTSD and depression symptoms among Syrian refugees located in a camp. Larger RCTs to verify the (cost- effectiveness of EMDR in similar populations are needed.

  2. Maternal note-taking and infant care: a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistin, Caroline J; Barrero-Castillero, Alejandra; Lewis, Sheilajane; Hoch, Rachel; Philipp, Barbara L; Bauchner, Howard; Wang, C Jason

    2012-10-01

    A pilot randomised controlled trial was conducted with postpartum mothers to assess the feasibility and impact of note-taking during newborn teaching. Controls received standard teaching; the intervention group received pen and paper to take notes. Subjects were called 2 days post-discharge to assess infant sleep position, breastfeeding, car seat use, satisfaction and information recall. 126 mothers were randomised. There was a consistent trend that intervention subjects were more likely to report infant supine sleep position (88% vs 78%, relative risks (RR) 1.13; 95% CI 0.95 to 1.34), breastfeeding (96% vs 86%, RR 1.11; 95% CI 0.99 to 1.25) and correct car seat use (98% vs 87%, RR 1.12; 95% CI 1.00 to 1.25). Satisfaction and information recall did not differ. Among first-time mothers, intervention subjects were significantly more likely to report infant supine sleep position (95% vs 65%, RR 1.46; 95% CI 1.06 to 2.00). Maternal note-taking is feasible and potentially efficacious in promoting desirable infant care.

  3. Effect of organic on chemical oxidation for biofouling control in pilot-scale seawater cooling towers

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Bloushi, Mohammed; Saththasivam, Jayaprakash; Jeong, Sanghyun; Amy, Gary L.; Leiknes, TorOve

    2017-01-01

    Due to the scarcity of potable water in many regions of the world, the demand for seawater as an alternative evaporative cooling medium in cooling towers (CTs) has increased significantly in recent years. Seawater make-up in CTs is deemed the most feasible because of its unlimited supply in the coastal areas of Gulf and Red Sea. However, the seawater CTs have higher challenges greatly mitigating their performances because it is an open system where biofouling and bio-corrosion occurring within the fillers and piping of recirculation systems. Their pilot-scale CTs were constructed to assess the performance of three types of oxidizing biocides or oxidants, namely chlorine, chlorine dioxide (ClO2) and ozone, for biofouling control. The test results showed that the addition of organic (5mg/L of methanol (MeOH)) increased the bacterial growth in CT basin. All oxidants were effective in keeping the microbial growth to the minimum. Oxidation increased the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) level from 270 to 600mV. Total residual oxidant (TRO) was increased with oxidation but it was slightly increased with organic addition. Other parameters including pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), conductivity levels were not changed. However, higher formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) was detected with chlorination and ozonation. This indicates the organic level should be limited in the oxidation for biofouling control in seawater CTs.

  4. A pilot randomised controlled trial of negative pressure wound therapy to treat grade III/IV pressure ulcers [ISRCTN69032034

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is widely promoted as a treatment for full thickness wounds; however, there is a lack of high-quality research evidence regarding its clinical and cost effectiveness. A trial of NPWT for the treatment of grade III/IV pressure ulcers would be worthwhile but premature without assessing whether such a trial is feasible. The aim of this pilot randomised controlled trial was to assess the feasibility of conducting a future full trial of NPWT for the treatment of grade III and IV pressure ulcers and to pilot all aspects of the trial. Methods This was a two-centre (acute and community), pilot randomised controlled trial. Eligible participants were randomised to receive either NPWT or standard care (SC) (spun hydrocolloid, alginate or foam dressings). Outcome measures were time to healing of the reference pressure ulcer, recruitment rates, frequency of treatment visits, resources used and duration of follow-up. Results Three hundred and twelve patients were screened for eligibility into this trial over a 12-month recruitment period and 12/312 participants (3.8%) were randomised: 6 to NPWT and 6 to SC. Only one reference pressure ulcer healed (NPWT group) during follow-up (time to healing 79 days). The mean number of treatment visits per week was 3.1 (NPWT) and 5.7 (SC); 6/6 NPWT and 1/6 SC participants withdrew from their allocated trial treatment. The mean duration of follow-up was 3.8 (NPWT) and 5.0 (SC) months. Conclusions This pilot trial yielded vital information for the planning of a future full study including projected recruitment rate, required duration of follow-up and extent of research nurse support required. Data were also used to inform the cost-effectiveness and value of information analyses, which were conducted alongside the pilot trial. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN69032034. PMID:22839453

  5. A pilot randomised controlled trial of negative pressure wound therapy to treat grade III/IV pressure ulcers [ISRCTN69032034

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashby Rebecca L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT is widely promoted as a treatment for full thickness wounds; however, there is a lack of high-quality research evidence regarding its clinical and cost effectiveness. A trial of NPWT for the treatment of grade III/IV pressure ulcers would be worthwhile but premature without assessing whether such a trial is feasible. The aim of this pilot randomised controlled trial was to assess the feasibility of conducting a future full trial of NPWT for the treatment of grade III and IV pressure ulcers and to pilot all aspects of the trial. Methods This was a two-centre (acute and community, pilot randomised controlled trial. Eligible participants were randomised to receive either NPWT or standard care (SC (spun hydrocolloid, alginate or foam dressings. Outcome measures were time to healing of the reference pressure ulcer, recruitment rates, frequency of treatment visits, resources used and duration of follow-up. Results Three hundred and twelve patients were screened for eligibility into this trial over a 12-month recruitment period and 12/312 participants (3.8% were randomised: 6 to NPWT and 6 to SC. Only one reference pressure ulcer healed (NPWT group during follow-up (time to healing 79 days. The mean number of treatment visits per week was 3.1 (NPWT and 5.7 (SC; 6/6 NPWT and 1/6 SC participants withdrew from their allocated trial treatment. The mean duration of follow-up was 3.8 (NPWT and 5.0 (SC months. Conclusions This pilot trial yielded vital information for the planning of a future full study including projected recruitment rate, required duration of follow-up and extent of research nurse support required. Data were also used to inform the cost-effectiveness and value of information analyses, which were conducted alongside the pilot trial. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN69032034.

  6. Real-Time Optimization for use in a Control Allocation System to Recover from Pilot Induced Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    Integration of the Control Allocation technique to recover from Pilot Induced Oscillations (CAPIO) System into the control system of a Short Takeoff and Landing Mobility Concept Vehicle simulation presents a challenge because the CAPIO formulation requires that constrained optimization problems be solved at the controller operating frequency. We present a solution that utilizes a modified version of the well-known L-BFGS-B solver. Despite the iterative nature of the solver, the method is seen to converge in real time with sufficient reliability to support three weeks of piloted runs at the NASA Ames Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) facility. The results of the optimization are seen to be excellent in the vast majority of real-time frames. Deficiencies in the quality of the results in some frames are shown to be improvable with simple termination criteria adjustments, though more real-time optimization iterations would be required.

  7. Piloted Evaluation of Modernized Limited Authority Control Laws in the NASA-Ames Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahasrabudhe, Vineet; Melkers, Edgar; Faynberg, Alexander; Blanken, Chris L.

    2003-01-01

    The UH-60 BLACK HAWK was designed in the 1970s, when the US Army primarily operated during the day in good visual conditions. Subsequently, the introduction of night-vision goggles increased the BLACK HAWK'S mission effectiveness, but the accident rate also increased. The increased accident rate is strongly tied to increased pilot workload as a result of a degradation in visual cues. Over twenty years of research in helicopter flight control and handling qualities has shown that these degraded handling qualities can be recovered by modifying the response type of the helicopter in low speed flight. Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation initiated a project under the National Rotorcraft Technology Center (NRTC) to develop modern flight control laws while utilizing the existing partial authority Stability Augmentation System (SAS) of the BLACK HAWK. This effort resulted in a set of Modernized Control Laws (MCLAWS) that incorporate rate command and attitude command response types. Sikorsky and the US Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate (AFDD) conducted a piloted simulation on the NASA-Ames Vertical h4otion Simulator, to assess potential handling qualities and to reduce the risk of subsequent implementation and flight test of these modern control laws on AFDD's EH-60L helicopter. The simulation showed that Attitude Command Attitude Hold control laws in pitch and roll improve handling qualities in the low speed flight regime. These improvements are consistent across a range of mission task elements and for both good and degraded visual environments. The MCLAWS perform better than the baseline UH-60A control laws in the presence of wind and turbulence. Finally, while the improved handling qualities in the pitch and roll axis allow the pilot to pay more attention to the vertical axis and hence altitude performance also improves, it is clear from pilot comments and altitude excursions that the addition of an Altitude Hold function would further reduce workload and improve overall

  8. Retrospective analysis of the quality of reports by author-suggested and non-author-suggested reviewers in journals operating on open or single-blind peer review models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczuk, Maria K; Dudbridge, Frank; Nanda, Shreeya; Harriman, Stephanie L; Patel, Jigisha; Moylan, Elizabeth C

    2015-09-29

    To assess whether reports from reviewers recommended by authors show a bias in quality and recommendation for editorial decision, compared with reviewers suggested by other parties, and whether reviewer reports for journals operating on open or single-blind peer review models differ with regard to report quality and reviewer recommendations. Retrospective analysis of the quality of reviewer reports using an established Review Quality Instrument, and analysis of reviewer recommendations and author satisfaction surveys. BioMed Central biology and medical journals. BMC Infectious Diseases and BMC Microbiology are similar in size, rejection rates, impact factors and editorial processes, but the former uses open peer review while the latter uses single-blind peer review. The Journal of Inflammation has operated under both peer review models. Two hundred reviewer reports submitted to BMC Infectious Diseases, 200 reviewer reports submitted to BMC Microbiology and 400 reviewer reports submitted to the Journal of Inflammation. For each journal, author-suggested reviewers provided reports of comparable quality to non-author-suggested reviewers, but were significantly more likely to recommend acceptance, irrespective of the peer review model (previewer reports measured by the Review Quality Instrument was 5% higher than for BMC Microbiology (p=0.042). For the Journal of Inflammation, the quality of reports was the same irrespective of the peer review model used. Reviewers suggested by authors provide reports of comparable quality to non-author-suggested reviewers, but are significantly more likely to recommend acceptance. Open peer review reports for BMC Infectious Diseases were of higher quality than single-blind reports for BMC Microbiology. There was no difference in quality of peer review in the Journal of Inflammation under open peer review compared with single blind. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a

  9. Pilot exemption of the controlled area from regulatory control at NPP A1 -lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaninka, A.; Listjak, M.; Slavik, O.; Rau, L.

    2014-01-01

    The contribution includes the lessons learned within frame of the radiological characterisation of surface ground layer in the NPP A1 site of area approximately 60 m2 (9 x 7 m) that was a part of Controlled area. Aim of the characterisation was a demonstration that the area fulfils the requirements to exemption from Controlled area for purpose of decommissioning activities carry out within frame of II. stage of NPP A1 decommissioning project.The requirements on free release of materials into the environment were applied (e.g. 300 Bq/kg for single 137 Cs). Radiological characterisation was performed by two independent methods; in situ scintillation gamma spectrometry and systematic sampling in regular grid followed by gamma spectrometry analyses in accredited laboratory of VUJE, Inc. (S-219). This improved the quality of monitoring and at the same time it enabled the inter-comparison of results obtained by both mentioned independent methods.Characterised ground area was partitioned to smaller sub-areas of 4 m2. At ground layer of 20 cm it means approximately 1000 kg of ground (in compliance with requirements on reference area at even activity distribution according to government regulation No 345/2006) The results of measurements showed that under appropriate conditions (sufficiently low radiation background, on interfering external sources) also the designed in situ method is effective and reliable tool for contaminated ground layer identification. In addition the in situ method is more effective in terms of time and cost consumption on unit of monitored area. (authors)

  10. Improving Sleep for Hospitalized Antepartum Patients: A Non-Randomized Controlled Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kathryn A; Gay, Caryl L

    2017-12-15

    To evaluate feasibility and efficacy of a hospital-based protocol for improving sleep in high- risk antepartum patients. Sleep measures were compared during 1 week of hospitalization before and after implementing a Sleep Improvement Protocol for Antepartum Patients (SIP-AP). A non-randomized convenience sample of usual care controls was compared to a subsequent intervention sample after the protocol was implemented. Women were eligible if they spoke English, were medically stable, pregnant for at least 20 weeks, and hospitalized at least 24 hours; 25 pregnant women had sufficient data for analyses (11 controls, 14 intervention). Sleep was assessed in 3 ways: the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was completed after obtaining consent to estimate sleep quality prior to hospital admission; sleep diary completed each hospital day; and General Sleep Disturbance Scale completed at 7 days or prior to hospital discharge. Symptoms that could affect sleep were assessed with the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale. Both groups recorded similar sleep duration (7 hours) but the intervention group had fewer symptoms and significantly ( P = .015) lower sleep disturbance scores (53.1 ± 14.5) than controls (71.9 ± 18.8). Participant feedback about the intervention was positive, although adherence to components of the intervention protocol was variable. This pilot study provides evidence of the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of the SIP-AP intervention for reducing symptoms and improving sleep of antepartum patients during hospitalization. Further detailed evaluation of specific components of this protocol is warranted, and other types of hospitalized patients may benefit from unit-based modifications to this SIP-AP protocol. © 2017 American Academy of Sleep Medicine

  11. Effect of Vibration on Pain Response to Heel Lance: A Pilot Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnis, Kate; Murray, Eileen; Cherven, Brooke; McCracken, Courtney; Travers, Curtis

    2016-12-01

    Applied mechanical vibration in pediatric and adult populations has been shown to be an effective analgesic for acute and chronic pain, including needle pain. Studies among the neonatal population are lacking. According to the Gate Control Theory, it is expected that applied mechanical vibration will have a summative effect with standard nonpharmacologic pain control strategies, reducing behavioral and physiologic pain responses to heel lancing. To determine the safety and efficacy of mechanical vibration for relief of heel lance pain among neonates. In this parallel design randomized controlled trial, eligible enrolled term or term-corrected neonates (n = 56) in a level IV neonatal intensive care unit were randomized to receive either sucrose and swaddling or sucrose, swaddling, and vibration for heel lance analgesia. Vibration was applied using a handheld battery-powered vibrator (Norco MiniVibrator, Hz = 92) to the lateral aspect of the lower leg along the sural dermatome throughout the heel lance procedure. Neonatal Pain, Agitation, and Sedation Scale (N-PASS) scores, heart rate, and oxygen saturations were collected at defined intervals surrounding heel lancing. Infants in the vibration group (n = 30) had significantly lower N-PASS scores and more stable heart rates during heel stick (P = .006, P = .037) and 2 minutes after heel lance (P = .002, P = .016) than those in the nonvibration group. There were no adverse behavioral or physiologic responses to applied vibration in the sample. Applied mechanical vibration is a safe and effective method for managing heel lance pain. This pilot study suggests that mechanical vibration warrants further exploration as a nonpharmacologic pain management tool among the neonatal population.

  12. Pilot acute study of feedback-controlled retrograde peristalsis invoked by neural gastric electrical stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aelen, P; Jurkov, A; Aulanier, A; Mintchev, M P

    2009-01-01

    Neural gastric electrical stimulation (NGES) is a new method for invoking gastric contractions under microprocessor control. However, optimization of this technique using feedback mechanisms to minimize power consumption and maximize effectiveness has been lacking. The present pilot study proposes a prototype feedback-controlled neural gastric electric stimulator for the treatment of obesity. Both force-based and inter-electrode impedance-based feedback neurostimulators were implemented and tested. Four mongrel dogs (2 M, 2 F, weight 14.9 ± 2.3 kg) underwent subserosal implantation of two-channel, 1 cm, bipolar electrode leads and two force transducers in the distal antrum. Two of the dogs were stimulated with a force feedback system utilizing the force transducers, and the other two animals were stimulated utilizing an inter-electrode impedance-based feedback system utilizing the proximal electrode leads. Both feedback systems were able to recognize erythromycin-driven contractions of the stomach and were capable of overriding them with NGES-invoked retrograde contractions which exceeded the magnitudes of the erythromycin-driven contractions by an average of 100.6 ± 33.5% in all animals. The NGES-invoked contractions blocked the erythromycin-driven contractions past the proximal electrode pair and induced temporary gastroparesis in the vicinity of the distal force transducer despite the continuing erythromycin infusion. The amplitudes of the erythromycin-invoked contractions in the vicinity of the proximal force transducer decreased abruptly by an average of 47.9 ± 6.3% in all four dogs after triggering-invoked retrograde contractions, regardless of the specific feedback-controlled mechanism. The proposed technique could be helpful for retaining food longer in the stomach, thus inducing early satiety and diminishing food intake

  13. Warm ambient temperature decreases food intake in a simulated office setting: A pilot randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly eBernhard

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: We hypothesized that exposure to temperatures above the thermoneutral zone would decrease food intake in young adults in a sedentary office environment over a 2-hour period. Methods: Participants wearing standardized clothing were randomized to perform routine office work in either within the thermoneutral zone, considered control (19-20°C, or above the thermoneutral zone considered warmer (26-27°C treatment in parallel-group design (n=11 and 9, respectively. Thermal images of the inner canthus of their eye and middle finger nail bed, representing proxies of core and peripheral temperatures, respectively, were taken at baseline, 1st, and 2nd hour during this lunchtime study. Relative heat dissipation was estimated as peripheral temperature. General linear models were conducted to examine the effects of thermal treatment the calories intake and potential mediation. Researchers conducted the trial registered as NCT02386891 at Clinicaltrials.gov during April- May 2014. Results: During the 2 hours stay in different ambient temperatures, the participants in the control conditions ate 99.5 kcal more than those in the warmer conditions; however, the difference was not statistically significant. Female participants ate about 350 kcal less than the male participants (P=0.024 in both groups and there was no significant association between calories intake and participant’s BMI. After controlling for thermal treatment, gender and BMI, the participant’s peripheral temperature was significantly associated with calories intake (p=0.002, suggesting a mediating effect. Specifically, for every 1°C increase in peripheral temperature indicating reduced heat dissipation, participants ate 85.9 kcal less food. Conclusions: This pilot study provided preliminary evidence of effects of thermal environment on food intake and the decreased food intake in the experimental (warmer environment is potentially mediated through thermoregulatory mechanisms.

  14. Warm Ambient Temperature Decreases Food Intake in a Simulated Office Setting: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Molly C; Li, Peng; Allison, David B; Gohlke, Julia M

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that exposure to temperatures above the thermoneutral zone (TNZ) would decrease food intake in young adults in a sedentary office environment over a 2-h period. Participants wearing standardized clothing were randomized to perform routine office work in the TNZ, considered control (19-20°C), or above the TNZ considered warmer (26-27°C) using a parallel-group design (n = 11 and 9, respectively). Thermal images of the inner canthus of their eye and middle finger nail bed, representing proxies of core and peripheral temperatures, respectively, were taken at baseline, first, and second hour during this lunchtime study. Heat dissipation was estimated using peripheral temperature. General linear models were built to examine the effects of thermal treatment on caloric intake and potential mediation by heat dissipation. Researchers conducted the trial registered as NCT02386891 at Clinicaltrials.gov during April to May 2014. During the 2-h stay in different ambient temperatures, the participants in the control conditions ate 99.5 kcal more than those in the warmer conditions; however, the difference was not statistically significant. Female participants ate about 350 kcal less than the male participants (p = 0.024) in both groups and there was no significant association between caloric intake and participant's body mass index (BMI). After controlling for thermal treatment, gender and BMI, the participant's peripheral temperature was significantly associated with caloric intake (p = 0.002), suggesting a mediating effect. Specifically, for every 1°C increase in peripheral temperature suggesting increased heat dissipation, participants ate 85.9 kcal less food. This pilot study provided preliminary evidence of effects of thermal environment on food intake. It suggests that decreased food intake in the experimental (warmer) environment is potentially mediated through thermoregulatory mechanisms.

  15. Efficacy of botulinum toxin in treating myofascial pain in bruxers: a controlled placebo pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarda-Nardini, Luca; Manfredini, Daniele; Salamone, Milena; Salmaso, Luigi; Tonello, Stefano; Ferronato, Giuseppe

    2008-04-01

    The present investigation is a preliminary double-blind, controlled placebo, randomized clinical trial with a six month follow-up period. The study aimed to assess the efficacy of type A botulinum toxin (Botox, Allergan, Inc. Irvine, CA) to treat myofascial pain symptoms and to reduce muscle hyperactivity in bruxers. Twenty patients (ten males, ten females; age range 25-45) with a clinical diagnosis of bruxism and myofascial pain of the masticatory muscles were enrolled in a double-blind, controlled placebo, randomized clinical trial, with a treatment group (ten subjects treated with botulinum toxin injections- BTX-A) and a control group (ten subjects treated with saline placebo injections). A number of objective and subjective clinical parameters (pain at rest and during chewing; mastication efficiency; maximum nonassisted and assisted mouth opening, protrusive and laterotrusive movements; functional limitation during usual jaw movements; subjective efficacy of the treatment; tolerance of the treatment) were assessed at baseline time and at one week, one month, and six months follow-up appointments. Descriptive analysis showed that improvements in both objective (range of mandibular movements) and subjective (pain at rest; pain during chewing) clinical outcome variables were higher in the Botox treated group than in the placebo treated subjects. Patients treated with BTX-A had a higher subjective improvement in their perception of treatment efficacy than the placebo subjects. Differences were not significant in some cases due to the small sample size. Results from the present study supported the efficacy of BTX-A to reduce myofascial pain symptoms in bruxers, and provided pilot data which need to be confirmed by further research using larger samples.

  16. Massage therapy and exercise therapy in patients with multiple sclerosis: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negahban, Hossein; Rezaie, Solmaz; Goharpey, Shahin

    2013-12-01

    The primary aim was to investigate the comparative effects of massage therapy and exercise therapy on patients with multiple sclerosis. The secondary aim was to investigate whether combination of both massage and exercise has an additive effect. Randomized controlled pilot trial with repeated measurements and blinded assessments. Local Multiple Sclerosis Society. A total of 48 patients with multiple sclerosis were randomly assigned to four equal subgroups labelled as massage therapy, exercise therapy, combined massage-exercise therapy and control group. The treatment group received 15 sessions of supervised intervention for five weeks. The massage therapy group received a standard Swedish massage. The exercise therapy group was given a combined set of strength, stretch, endurance and balance exercises. Patients in the massage-exercise therapy received a combined set of massage and exercise treatments. Patients in the control group were asked to continue their standard medical care. Pain, fatigue, spasticity, balance, gait and quality of life were assessed before and after intervention. Massage therapy resulted in significantly larger improvement in pain reduction (mean change 2.75 points, P = 0.001), dynamic balance (mean change, 3.69 seconds, P = 0.009) and walking speed (mean change, 7.84 seconds, P = 0.007) than exercise therapy. Patients involved in the combined massage-exercise therapy showed significantly larger improvement in pain reduction than those in the exercise therapy (mean change, 1.67 points, P = 0.001). Massage therapy could be more effective than exercise therapy. Moreover, the combination of massage and exercise therapy may be a little more effective than exercise therapy alone.

  17. Increasing patient involvement in the diabetic foot pathway: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, E; Hacking, B; O'Carroll, R; Young, M; Jahr, J; Borthwick, C; Callander, A; Berrada, Z

    2016-11-01

    This pilot study aimed to explore whether the use of an intervention to increase shared decision-making (Decision Navigation) increased decision self-efficacy and foot-treatment adherence in patients with a diabetic foot ulcer. Fifty-six patients with a diabetic foot ulcer were randomized to receive Decision Navigation (N = 30) or usual care (N = 26). Primary outcomes included decision self-efficacy, adherence to foot treatment as reported by the participant and adherence to foot treatment as reported by the clinician. Secondary outcomes included foot ulcer healing rate, health-related quality of life, decision conflict and decision regret. Despite participants rating Decision Navigation as very helpful, mixed analyses of variance revealed no differences in decision self-efficacy or adherence between those receiving Decision Navigation and those receiving usual care. There were no differences between groups with regards to the secondary outcomes, with the exception of decision conflict which increased over time (12 weeks) for those receiving Decision Navigation. An intervention that facilitated patient involvement in treatment decisions did not have any impact on decisional confidence or adherence to foot treatment. This does not provide support for the suggestion that personalized care can improve health-related outcomes at this progressed stage of the patient's disease trajectory. We suggest that the diabetic foot population may benefit from interventions aimed at increasing motivation to engage with care pathways, centred on challenging personal controllability beliefs. © 2016 Diabetes UK.

  18. A pilot cluster randomized controlled trial of structured goal-setting following stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, William J; Brown, Melanie; William, Levack; McPherson, Kathryn M; Reed, Kirk; Dean, Sarah G; Weatherall, Mark

    2012-04-01

    To determine the feasibility, the cluster design effect and the variance and minimal clinical importance difference in the primary outcome in a pilot study of a structured approach to goal-setting. A cluster randomized controlled trial. Inpatient rehabilitation facilities. People who were admitted to inpatient rehabilitation following stroke who had sufficient cognition to engage in structured goal-setting and complete the primary outcome measure. Structured goal elicitation using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Quality of life at 12 weeks using the Schedule for Individualised Quality of Life (SEIQOL-DW), Functional Independence Measure, Short Form 36 and Patient Perception of Rehabilitation (measuring satisfaction with rehabilitation). Assessors were blinded to the intervention. Four rehabilitation services and 41 patients were randomized. We found high values of the intraclass correlation for the outcome measures (ranging from 0.03 to 0.40) and high variance of the SEIQOL-DW (SD 19.6) in relation to the minimally importance difference of 2.1, leading to impractically large sample size requirements for a cluster randomized design. A cluster randomized design is not a practical means of avoiding contamination effects in studies of inpatient rehabilitation goal-setting. Other techniques for coping with contamination effects are necessary.

  19. Cognitive Analytic Therapy for Bipolar Disorder: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Mark; Kellett, Stephen; Heyland, Simon; Hall, Jo; Majid, Shazmin

    2017-01-01

    The evidence base for treatment of bipolar affective disorder (BD) demands the evaluation of new psychotherapies in order to broaden patient choice. This study reports on the feasibility, safety, helpfulness and effectiveness of cognitive analytic therapy (CAT). In a pilot randomized controlled trial, BD patients in remission were randomized to either receiving 24 sessions of CAT (n = 9) or treatment as usual (n = 9) and were assessed in terms of symptoms, functioning and service usage over time. In the CAT arm no adverse events occurred, 8/9 completed treatment, 5/8 attended all 24 sessions and 2/8 were categorized as recovered. The most common helpful event during CAT was recognition of patterns in mood variability, with helpfulness themes changing according to phase of therapy. No major differences were found when comparing the arms over time in terms of service usage or psychometric outcomes. The study suggests that conducting further research into the effectiveness of CAT in treating BD is warranted and guidance regarding future trials is provided. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Treating BD with CAT appears feasible and safe. Retaining fidelity to the reformulation, recognition and revision structure of CAT appears useful. Participants stated that across the phases of CAT, focussing on patterns of mood variability was consistently helpful. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Effectiveness of square stepping exercise among subjects with Parkinson's disease: A pilot Randomised Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hariharasudhan Ravichandran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Parkinson's disease is a movement disorder that seriously affects body balance and gait; therefore, increases the risk of fall and related complications. Freezing of gait and postural instability are disabling symptoms, which compromises motor independence among Parkinson's disease patients. Aims and Objectives: The purpose of this study analyses the effects of square-stepping exercise (SSE among Parkinson's disease patients in terms of improving balance and reducing fall risk. Materials and Methods: This is a pilot randomized controlled study, in which thirty male and female Parkinson's disease patients between 60 and 70 years of age were selected by simple random sampling method and randomly divided into SSE group (N-15 and conventional physiotherapy (CPT group (N-15. Interventions were provided for 4 weeks. Baseline and posttest outcomes were measured using the Berg balance scale (BBS and timed up and go test (TUG. Results: Statistical measures of mean, standard deviation, and t-test were performed using SPSS 21. SSE exhibited statistical significant improvement in BBS (P < 0.05 and TUG (P < 0.0001 compared to CPT group. Conclusion: SSE is more effective in improving balance and gait in Parkinson's disease. Although further studies with larger samples are required, the result of this study implies that SSE could be used as a mean of rehabilitation in Parkinson's disease.

  1. Mobile application as a prenatal education and engagement tool: A randomized controlled pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledford, Christy J W; Canzona, Mollie Rose; Cafferty, Lauren A; Hodge, Joshua A

    2016-04-01

    Research has shown that mobile applications provide a powerful alternative to traditional paper diaries; however, little data exists in comparing apps to the traditional mode of paper as a patient education and engagement tool in the clinical setting. This study was designed to compare the effectiveness of a mobile app versus a spiral-notebook guide throughout prenatal care. This randomized (n=173) controlled pilot was conducted at an East Coast community hospital. Chi-square and repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to test intervention effects in the sample of 127 pregnant mothers who completed their prenatal care in the healthcare system. Patients who were distributed the mobile application used the tool to record information about pregnancy more frequently (p=.04) and developed greater patient activation (p=.02) than patients who were distributed notebooks. No difference was detected on interpersonal clinical communication. A mobile application successfully activated a patient population in which self-management is a critical factor. This study shows that mobile apps can prompt greater use and result in more activated patients. Findings may be translated to other patient populations who receive recurring care for chronic disease. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. Competence feedback improves CBT competence in trainee therapists: A randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weck, Florian; Kaufmann, Yvonne M; Höfling, Volkmar

    2017-07-01

    The development and improvement of therapeutic competencies are central aims in psychotherapy training; however, little is known about which training interventions are suitable for the improvement of competencies. In the current pilot study, the efficacy of feedback regarding therapeutic competencies was investigated in cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). Totally 19 trainee therapists and 19 patients were allocated randomly to a competence feedback group (CFG) or control group (CG). Two experienced clinicians and feedback providers who were blind to the treatment conditions independently evaluated therapeutic competencies on the Cognitive Therapy Scale at five treatment times (i.e., at Sessions 1, 5, 9, 13, and 17). Whereas CFG and CG included regular supervision, only therapists in the CFG additionally received written qualitative and quantitative feedback regarding their demonstrated competencies in conducting CBT during treatment. We found a significant Time × Group interaction effect (η² = .09), which indicates a larger competence increase in the CFG in comparison to the CG. Competence feedback was demonstrated to be suitable for the improvement of therapeutic competencies in CBT. These findings may have important implications for psychotherapy training, clinical practice, and psychotherapy research. However, further research is necessary to ensure the replicability and generalizability of the findings.

  3. Alcohol interventions for mandated students: behavioral outcomes from a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Diane E; Kilmer, Jason R; King, Kevin M; Larimer, Mary E

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of three single-session interventions with high-risk mandated students while considering the influence of motivational interviewing (MI) microskills. This randomized, controlled pilot trial evaluated single-session interventions: Alcohol Skills Training Program (ASTP), Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students (BASICS) feedback sessions, and treatment-as-usual Alcohol Diversion Program (ADP) educational groups. Participants were 61 full-time undergraduates at a southern U.S. campus sanctioned to a clinical program following violation of an on-campus alcohol policy (Mage = 19.16 years; 42.6% female). RESULTS revealed a significant effect of time for reductions in estimated blood alcohol concentration (eBAC) and number of weekly drinks but not in alcohol-related consequences. Although ASTP and BASICS participants reported significant decreases in eBAC over time, ADP participant levels did not change (with no intervention effects on quantity or consequences). MI microskills were not related to outcomes. RESULTS from this study suggest equivalent behavioral impacts for the MI-based interventions, although individual differences in outcome trajectories suggest that research is needed to further customize mandated interventions. Given the overall decrease in eBAC following the sanction, the lack of reduction in the ADP condition warrants caution when using education-only interventions.

  4. 1% hydrocortisone ointment is an effective treatment of pruritus ani: a pilot randomized controlled crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghnaniem, R; Short, K; Pullen, A; Fuller, L C; Rennie, J A; Leather, A J M

    2007-12-01

    Pruritus ani (PA) is a common condition which is difficult to treat in the absence of obvious predisposing factors. There is paucity of evidence-based guidelines on the treatment of this condition. We examined whether 1% hydrocortisone ointment is an effective treatment for PA. A pilot randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial was carried out. Eleven patients consented to take part in the trial and ten completed the study. After a 2-week run-in period, patients with primary PA were randomly allocated to receive 1% hydrocortisone ointment or placebo for 2 weeks followed by the opposite treatment for a further 2-week period. There was a washout period of 2 weeks between treatments. The primary outcome measure was reduction in itch using a visual analogue score (VAS). The secondary outcome measures were improvement in quality of life measured using a validated questionnaire (Dermatology Life Quality Index, DLQI) and improvement in clinical appearance of the perianal skin using the Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI) score. Treatment with 1% hydrocortisone ointment resulted in a 68% reduction in VAS compared with placebo (P=0.019), a 75% reduction in DLQI score (P=0.067), and 81% reduction in EASI score (P=0.01). A short course of mild steroid ointment is an effective treatment for PA.

  5. A pilot study to examine maturation of body temperature control in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobel, Robin B; Levy, Janet; Katz, Laurence; Guenther, Bob; Holditch-Davis, Diane

    2013-01-01

    To test instrumentation and develop analytic models to use in a larger study to examine developmental trajectories of body temperature and peripheral perfusion from birth in extremely low-birth-weight (EBLW) infants. A case study design. The study took place in a Level 4 neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in North Carolina. Four ELBW infants, fewer than 29 weeks gestational age at birth. Physiologic data were measured every minute for the first 5 days of life: peripheral perfusion using perfusion index by Masimo and body temperature using thermistors. Body temperature was also measured using infrared thermal imaging. Stimulation and care events were recorded over the first 5 days using video which was coded with Noldus Observer software. Novel analytical models using the state space approach to time-series analysis were developed to explore maturation of neural control over central and peripheral body temperature. Results from this pilot study confirmed the feasibility of using multiple instruments to measure temperature and perfusion in ELBW infants. This approach added rich data to our case study design and set a clinical context with which to interpret longitudinal physiological data. © 2013 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  6. Community integration outcomes of people with spinal cord injury and multiple matched controls: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaway, Libby; Enticott, Joanne; Farnworth, Louise; McDonald, Rachael; Migliorini, Christine; Willer, Barry

    2017-06-01

    Australia's National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) is designed to influence home, social and economic participation for Scheme participants. Given the major disability reform underway, this pilot study aimed to: (i) examine community integration outcomes of people with spinal cord injury (SCI); (ii) compare findings with multiple matched controls and (iii) consider findings within the context of Australia's NDIS. Setting: Victoria, Australia. Matched analysis (people with and without SCI). Community Integration Questionnaire (CIQ). n = 40 adults with SCI (M age = 52.8 years; 61% male; 77% traumatic SCI). Matched analyses from each SCI subject aged integration (ρ = 0.02). Relative risk of low home integration was significant in the SCI cohort (conditional RR (95% CI) = 3.1 (1.5-6.3), ρ = 0.001). Relative risk of low CIQ total, social integration and productivity scores did not reach significance. This cohort of SCI participants was less integrated into home and productive occupations than matched norms, holding implications for planning and allocation of supports to influence outcomes within an NDIS. Further research is necessary to understand community integration outcomes in larger matched samples. © 2016 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  7. Pilot scale-SO{sub 2} control by dry sodium bicarbonate injection and an electrostatic precipitator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pliat, M.J.; Wilder, J.M. [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering

    2007-10-15

    A 500 actual cubic feet gas per minute (acfm) pilot-scale SO{sub 2} control study was undertaken to investigate flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by dry sodium sorbents in 400{sup o}F (204.5{sup o}C) flue gases emitted from a coal fired boiler with flue gas concentrations between 350 and 2500 ppm SO{sub 2}. Powdered sodium alkaline reagents were injected into the hot flue gas downstream of the air preheater and the spent reagents were collected using an electrostatic precipitator. Three different sorbents were used: processed sodium bicarbonate of two particle sizes; solution mined sodium bicarbonate, and processed sodium sesquicarbonate. SO{sub 2} concentrations were measured upstream of the reagent injection, 25-ft (7.62 m) downstream of the injection point, and downstream of the electrostatic precipitator. SO{sub 2} collection efficiencies ranged from 40 to 80% using sodium bicarbonate stoichiometric ratios from 0.5 to 3.0. Much of the in-duct SO{sub 2} removal occurred during the first second of reagent reaction time, indicating that the sulfur dioxide-sodium reaction rates may be faster than have been measured for fixed bed measurements reported in the literature.

  8. A mindfulness-based intervention to control weight after bariatric surgery: Preliminary results from a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacko, Sara A; Yeh, Gloria Y; Davis, Roger B; Wee, Christina C

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to develop and test a novel mindfulness-based intervention (MBI) designed to control weight after bariatric surgery. Randomized, controlled pilot trial. Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA. Bariatric patients 1-5 years post-surgery (n=18) were randomized to receive a 10-week MBI or a standard intervention. Primary outcomes were feasibility and acceptability of the MBI. Secondary outcomes included changes in weight, eating behaviors, psychosocial outcomes, and metabolic and inflammatory biomarkers. Qualitative exit interviews were conducted post-intervention. Major themes were coded and extracted. Attendance was excellent (6 of 9 patients attended ≥7 of 10 classes). Patients reported high satisfaction and overall benefit of the MBI. The intervention was effective in reducing emotional eating at 6 months (-4.9±13.7 in mindfulness vs. 6.2±28.4 in standard, p for between-group difference=0.03) but not weight. We also observed a significant increase in HbA1C (0.34±0.38 vs. -0.06±0.31, p=0.03). Objective measures suggested trends of an increase in perceived stress and symptoms of depression, although patients reported reduced stress reactivity, improved eating behaviors, and a desire for continued mindfulness-based support in qualitative interviews. This novel mindfulness-based approach is highly acceptable to bariatric patients post-surgery and may be effective for reducing emotional eating, although it did not improve weight or glycemic control in the short term. Longer-term studies of mindfulness-based approaches may be warranted in this population. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02603601. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Controlling memory impairment in elderly adults using virtual reality memory training: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Optale, Gabriele; Urgesi, Cosimo; Busato, Valentina; Marin, Silvia; Piron, Lamberto; Priftis, Konstantinos; Gamberini, Luciano; Capodieci, Salvatore; Bordin, Adalberto

    2010-05-01

    Memory decline is a prevalent aspect of aging but may also be the first sign of cognitive pathology. Virtual reality (VR) using immersion and interaction may provide new approaches to the treatment of memory deficits in elderly individuals. The authors implemented a VR training intervention to try to lessen cognitive decline and improve memory functions. The authors randomly assigned 36 elderly residents of a rest care facility (median age 80 years) who were impaired on the Verbal Story Recall Test either to the experimental group (EG) or the control group (CG). The EG underwent 6 months of VR memory training (VRMT) that involved auditory stimulation and VR experiences in path finding. The initial training phase lasted 3 months (3 auditory and 3 VR sessions every 2 weeks), and there was a booster training phase during the following 3 months (1 auditory and 1 VR session per week). The CG underwent equivalent face-to-face training sessions using music therapy. Both groups participated in social and creative and assisted-mobility activities. Neuropsychological and functional evaluations were performed at baseline, after the initial training phase, and after the booster training phase. The EG showed significant improvements in memory tests, especially in long-term recall with an effect size of 0.7 and in several other aspects of cognition. In contrast, the CG showed progressive decline. The authors suggest that VRMT may improve memory function in elderly adults by enhancing focused attention.

  10. A Multidisciplinary Intervention Utilizing Virtual Communication Tools to Reduce Health Disparities: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Emerson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Advances in technology are likely to provide new approaches to address healthcare disparities for high-risk populations. This study explores the feasibility of a new approach to health disparities research using a multidisciplinary intervention and advanced communication technology to improve patient access to care and chronic disease management. A high-risk cohort of uninsured, poorly-controlled diabetic patients was identified then randomized pre-consent with stratification by geographic region to receive either the intervention or usual care. Prior to enrollment, participants were screened for readiness to make a behavioral change. The primary outcome was the feasibility of protocol implementation, and secondary outcomes included the use of patient-centered medical home (PCMH services and markers of chronic disease control. The intervention included a standardized needs assessment, individualized care plan, intensive management by a multidisciplinary team, including health coach-facilitated virtual visits, and the use of a cloud-based glucose monitoring system. One-hundred twenty-seven high-risk, potentially eligible participants were randomized. Sixty-one met eligibility criteria after an in-depth review. Due to limited resources and time for the pilot, we only attempted to contact 36 participants. Of these, we successfully reached 20 (32% by phone and conducted a readiness to change screen. Ten participants screened in as ready to change and were enrolled, while the remaining 10 were not ready to change. Eight enrolled participants completed the final three-month follow-up. Intervention feasibility was demonstrated through successful implementation of 13 out of 14 health coach-facilitated virtual visits, and 100% of participants indicated that they would recommend the intervention to a friend. Protocol feasibility was demonstrated as eight of 10 participants completed the entire study protocol. At the end of the three-month intervention

  11. Lung cancer correlates in Lebanese adults: A pilot case–control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Aoun

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: In this pilot study, it was found that in addition to smoking, outdoor and indoor pollution factors were potential risk factors of lung cancer. Additional studies would be necessary to confirm these findings.

  12. Future-oriented computerized information system for power plant process control in a pilot project at Philippsburg nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woehrle, G.; Kraft, M.

    1988-01-01

    The motivation for the pilot project at Philippsburg nuclear power plant resulted from the Three Mile Island accident in 1979. The primary task embraces an efficient computer-aided reduction of information when a fault occurs based on a process engineering analysis of the information accrued. Accompanying this are a consolidation and evaluation of the information available in the control room. In this pilot project the new tasks of status monitoring, information reduction and operationalcontrol have been realized for the first time using a computer-aided process information system. In addition to the existing control computer, an information computer with approximately 1200 analogue and about 10000 binary signals has been installed. The installation of the system was completed in 1984 and in the meantime initial operational experience has become available. (orig.) [de