WorldWideScience

Sample records for single wax dipping

  1. Kondo peak splitting and Kondo dip in single molecular magnet junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Pengbin, E-mail: 120233951@qq.com [Institute of Solid State Physics, Shanxi Datong University, Datong 037009 (China); Shi, Yunlong; Sun, Zhu [Institute of Solid State Physics, Shanxi Datong University, Datong 037009 (China); Nie, Yi-Hang [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Luo, Hong-Gang [Center for Interdisciplinary Studies & Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of the MoE, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Many factors containing bias, spin–orbit coupling, magnetic fields applied, and so on can strongly influence the Kondo effect, and one of the consequences is Kondo peak splitting (KPS). It is natural that KPS should also appear when another spin degree of freedom is involved. In this work we study the KPS effects of single molecular magnets (SMM) coupled with two metallic leads in low-temperature regime. It is found that the Kondo transport properties are strongly influenced by the exchange coupling and anisotropy of the magnetic core. By employing Green's function method in Hubbard operator representation, we give an analytical expression for local retarded Green's function of SMM and discussed its low-temperature transport properties. We find that the anisotropy term behaves as a magnetic field and the splitting behavior of exchange coupling is quite similar to the spin–orbit coupling. These splitting behaviors are explained by introducing inter-level or intra-level transitions, which account for the seven-peak splitting structure. Moreover, we find a Kondo dip at Fermi level under proper parameters. These Kondo peak splitting behaviors in SMM deepen our understanding to Kondo physics and should be observed in the future experiments. - Highlights: • We study Kondo peak splitting in single molecular magnets. • We study Kondo effect by Hubbard operator Green's function method. • We find Kondo peak splitting structures and a Kondo dip at Fermi level. • The exchange coupling and magnetic anisotropy induce fine splitting structure. • The splitting structures are explained by inter-level or intra-level transitions.

  2. Retention of castings fabricated by plastic coping and direct wax up for single crown and bridge in different implant systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmod Kazemi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Adequate retention has significant importance in the prognosis of implant supported cemented the restorations. Limited literature had evaluated the effect of direct wax up or use of plastic coping on the retention of these restorations. This aims of this study was to compare the retention of castings fabricated by the plastic coping and direct wax up for single crown and bridge in three implant systems.   Materials and Methods: 28 specimens of each implant systems were randomly divided into 4 groups. Groups included wax patterns for single crowns and bridges that were made from plastic coping or direct wax up. All the wax patterns were invested and casted with base metal alloy, in similar conditions. After castings were cemented to the related abutments, the specimens were subjected to a pull out force in a universal testing machine at a cross head speed of 0.5 mm/min. The load required to decement each casting was recorded and the mean values for each group were calculated. Data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA.   Results: Comparing the between systems in crowns fabricated from plastic coping, there was no significant difference between Replace and Implantium (P=0.124, but ITI had significantly lower values than that of other systems (P<0.001 Comparing the systems in crowns fabricated from direct wax up, Implantium had the greatest retention and ITI had the lowest retention (P<0/001. Comparing the bridges with both method, Replace had the greatest retention and ITI had the lowest retention.   Conclusion: Implantium and Replace system exhibited the highest retention for fabricating crowns, and bridges, respectively.

  3. Tsunamigenic Earthquakes at Along-dip Double Segmentation and Along-strike Single Segmentation near Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Koyama

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A distinct difference of the earthquake activity in megathrust subduction zones is pointed out, concerning seismic segmentations in the vicinity of Japan—that is, the apparent distribution of earthquake hypocenters characterized by Along-dip Double Segmentation (ADDS and Along-strike Single Segmentation (ASSS. ADDS is double aligned seismic-segmentation of trench-ward seismic segments along the Japan Trench and island-ward seismic segments along the Pacific coast of the Japan Islands. The 2011 Tohoku-oki megathrust earthquake of Mw9.0 occurred in ADDS. In the meantime, the subduction zone along the Nankai Trough, the western part of Japan, is the source region of a multiple rupture of seismic segments by the 1707 Houei earthquake, the greatest earthquake in the history of Japan. This subduction zone is narrow under the Japan Islands, which is composed of single aligned seismic-segmentation side by side along the Nankai Trough, which is typical of ASSS. Looking at the world seismicity, the 1960 and 2010 Chile megathrusts, for example, occurred in ASSS, whereas the 1952 Kamchatka and the 1964 Alaska megathrusts occurred in ADDS. These megathrusts in ADDS result from the rupture of strong asperity in the trench-ward seismic segments. Since the asperity of earthquakes in ASSS is concentrated in the shallow part of subduction zones and the asperity of frequent earthquakes in ADDS is in deeper parts of the island-ward seismic segments than those of ASSS, there must be a difference in tsunami excitations due to earthquakes in ADDS and ASSS. An analysis was made in detail of tsunami and seismic excitations of earthquakes in the vicinity of Japan. Tsunami heights of ASSS earthquakes are about two times larger than those of ADDS earthquakes with the same value of seismic moment. The reason for this different tsunami excitation is also considered in relation to the seismic segmentations of ADDS and ASSS.

  4. Internal fit of single crowns produced by CAD-CAM and lost-wax metal casting technique assessed by the triple-scan protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Bjørn Einar; Rønold, Hans Jacob; Dahl, Jon E

    2017-03-01

    Whether single crowns produced by computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) have an internal fit comparable to crowns made by lost-wax metal casting technique is unknown. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the internal fit of single crowns produced with the lost-wax and metal casting technique with that of single crowns produced with the CAD-CAM technique. The internal fit of 5 groups of single crowns produced with the CAD-CAM technique was compared with that of single crowns produced in cobalt-chromium with the conventional lost-wax and metal casting technique. Comparison was performed using the triple-scan protocol; scans of the master model, the crown on the master model, and the intaglio of the crown were superimposed and analyzed with computer software. The 5 groups were milled presintered zirconia, milled hot isostatic pressed zirconia, milled lithium disilicate, milled cobalt-chromium, and laser-sintered cobalt-chromium. The cement space in both the mesiodistal and buccopalatal directions was statistically smaller (Pcrowns made by the conventional lost-wax and metal casting technique compared with that of crowns produced by the CAD-CAM technique. Single crowns made using the conventional lost-wax and metal casting technique have better internal fit than crowns produced using the CAD-CAM technique. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Biochemical response of sweet potato to bemul-wax coating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas Linn) tuber is a very nutritious but highly perishable crop that is subject to high wastages due to non-availability of appropriate storage techniques. This work assessed the effectiveness of treating the tubers with calcium chloride dip (CCD), bemul-wax (B-wax) and their combinations ...

  6. Dip-Pen Nanolithography on (Bio)Reactive Monolayer and Block-Copolymer Platforms: Deposition of Lines of Single Macromolecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salazar, Ramon B.; Shovsky, A.; Schönherr, Holger; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2006-01-01

    The application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip-mediated molecular transfer (dip-pen nanolithography or DPN) to fabricate nanopatterned (bio)reactive platforms based on dendrimers on reactive self-assembled monolayer (SAM) and polymer thin films is discussed. The transfer of high-molar-mass

  7. Database of Interacting Proteins (DIP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The DIP database catalogs experimentally determined interactions between proteins. It combines information from a variety of sources to create a single, consistent...

  8. Computational study of wax deposition in pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jimiao; Gong, Jing; Liu, Huishu

    2013-07-01

    Wax deposition in subsea pipelines is one of the flow assurance problems for oil and gas production. In contrast to many studies about single phase wax deposition, gas-oil wax deposition studies are very limited. The wax deposition mechanism and model prediction are restricted by many factors such as hydrodynamic and thermal when multiphase flow is involved. Wax deposition modeling becomes complicated under multiphase flowing conditions. wax deposition is depended by the flow pattern. The stratified flow is one of the most common flow patterns in the actual subsea gas-oil flowing conditions. In this work, numerical methods are used to study wax deposition in oil-gas stratified flow through a pipe. Based on the flow analysis about stratified flow, the non-isothermal heat and mass transfer is calculated. The temperature profile of the oil and the concentration profile of wax in oil are obtained. The change of the oil-gas interface i.e. the liquid holdup throughout the pipe must be taken into the heat and mass balance. The valid wax deposition surface must be taken into the wax deposition modeling by establishing function of the liquid holdup and the wetted area by oil. The molecular diffusion is as the deposition mechanism. The increase of the wax fraction in the deposit as a function of time depends on the mass flux from the oil deposit interface into the gel and the growth of the deposit thickness depends on the difference between the mass flux from the bulk oil to the oil deposit interface and the mass flux from the interface into the deposit. In addition, the growth of the wax deposit as a function of time along with the effect oil flow rate, gas flow rate and the inlet temperature are discussed. The presence of gas significantly reduces the severity of wax deposition by altering the heat and mass transfer characteristics.

  9. The potential of postharvest silicon dips to regulate phenolics in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the ability of silicon dips to enhance the phenolic content in order to reduce the incidence of chilling injury in lemon fruit. Fruits were obtained from two farms and dipped in 0, 50, 150 and 250 mg L-1 solutions of K2SiO3 for 30 min and afterward, fruit were air dried and waxed. Thereafter, fruits were ...

  10. Insights from analog gelatin experiments on the effect of bedding dip on sill morphology and crystal load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, R. M.; Marsh, B. D.; Mittal, T.

    2010-12-01

    loss, as does the liquid portion of magma, affecting emplacement characteristics itself and preserving transient features that would otherwise be lost. The particles act as crystal cargo, and track magmatic flow within the sill. Surprisingly, even though the injection process is a single pulse, the wax-particle combination intimately records several internal lobes that might otherwise be interpreted as a multiple-pulse style emplacement. The end product is a handheld magmatic plumbing system that can be examined in full detail. There are many cases of sills in the geologic record where the original host rock bedding dip at the time of emplacement is unknown due perhaps to subsequent tectonism. In addition to the experiments providing insights on the magmatic evolution of slurries, they may thus also prove useful in inferring the original bed orientation.

  11. Ultrasonic dip seal maintenance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poindexter, A.M.; Ricks, H.E.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is a system for removing impurities from the surfaces of liquid dip seals and for wetting the metal surfaces of liquid dip seals in nuclear components. The system comprises an ultrasonic transducer that transmits ultrasonic vibrations along an ultrasonic probe to the metal and liquid surfaces of the dip seal thereby loosening and removing those impurities

  12. Wave Height and Horizon Dip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Werf, Siebren; Shokaryev, Igor

    2015-01-01

    A mariner who takes the height of the sun or a star to find his position at sea, must correct his observation for horizon dip. Throughout history, dip values have been tabulated based on the idealized assumption of a perfectly flat sea. Literature on wave height correction for dip is scarce,

  13. Wax Reinforces Honeycomb During Machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towell, Timothy W.; Fahringer, David T.; Vasquez, Peter; Scheidegger, Alan P.

    1995-01-01

    Method of machining on conventional metal lathe devised for precise cutting of axisymmetric contours on honeycomb cores made of composite (matrix/fiber) materials. Wax filling reinforces honeycomb walls against bending and tearing while honeycomb being contoured on lathe. Innovative method of machining on lathe involves preparation in which honeycomb is placed in appropriate fixture and the fixture is then filled with molten water-soluble wax. Number of different commercial waxes have been tried.

  14. Review of Langmuir-Wave-Caused Dips and Charge-Exchange-Caused Dips in Spectral Lines from Plasmas and their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Dalimier

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We review studies of two kinds of dips in spectral line profiles emitted by plasmas—dips that have been predicted theoretically and observed experimentally: Langmuir-wave-caused dips (L-dips and charge-exchange-caused dips (X-dips. There is a principal difference with respect to positions of L-dips and X-dips relative to the unperturbed wavelength of a spectral line: positions of L-dips scale with the electron density Ne roughly as Ne1/2, while positions of X-dips are almost independent of Ne (the dependence is much weaker than for L-dips. L-dips and X-dips phenomena are important, both fundamentally and practically. The fundamental importance is due to a rich physics behind each of these phenomena. L-dips are a multi-frequency resonance phenomenon caused by a single-frequency (monochromatic electric field. X-dips are due to charge exchange at anticrossings of terms of a diatomic quasi-molecule, whose nuclei have different charges. As for important practical applications, they are as follows: observations of L-dips constitute a very accurate method to measure the electron density in plasmas—a method that does not require knowledge of the electron temperature. L-dips also allow measuring the amplitude of the electric field of Langmuir waves—the only spectroscopic method available for this purpose. Observations of X-dips provide an opportunity to determine rate coefficient of charge exchange between multi-charged ions. This is an important reference data, virtually inaccessible by other experimental methods. The rate coefficients of charge exchange are important for magnetic fusion in Tokamaks, for population inversion in the soft x-ray and VUV ranges, for ion storage devices, as well as for astrophysics (e.g., for the solar plasma and for determining the physical state of planetary nebulae.

  15. 21 CFR 178.3710 - Petroleum wax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Petroleum wax. 178.3710 Section 178.3710 Food and... and Production Aids § 178.3710 Petroleum wax. Petroleum wax may be safely used as a component of nonfood articles in contact with food, in accordance with the following conditions: (a) Petroleum wax is a...

  16. Increased production of wax esters in transgenic tobacco plants by expression of a fatty acid reductase:wax synthase gene fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Selcuk; Hofvander, Per; Dutta, Paresh; Sun, Chuanxin; Sitbon, Folke

    2015-12-01

    Wax esters are hydrophobic lipids consisting of a fatty acid moiety linked to a fatty alcohol with an ester bond. Plant-derived wax esters are today of particular concern for their potential as cost-effective and sustainable sources of lubricants. However, this aspect is hampered by the fact that the level of wax esters in plants generally is too low to allow commercial exploitation. To investigate whether wax ester biosynthesis can be increased in plants using transgenic approaches, we have here exploited a fusion between two bacterial genes together encoding a single wax ester-forming enzyme, and targeted the resulting protein to chloroplasts in stably transformed tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) plants. Compared to wild-type controls, transgenic plants showed both in leaves and stems a significant increase in the total level of wax esters, being eight-fold at the whole plant level. The profiles of fatty acid methyl ester and fatty alcohol in wax esters were related, and C16 and C18 molecules constituted predominant forms. Strong transformants displayed certain developmental aberrations, such as stunted growth and chlorotic leaves and stems. These negative effects were associated with an accumulation of fatty alcohols, suggesting that an adequate balance between formation and esterification of fatty alcohols is crucial for a high wax ester production. The results show that wax ester engineering in transgenic plants is feasible, and suggest that higher yields may become achieved in the near future.

  17. Hydrodynamically driven colloidal assembly in dip coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colosqui, Carlos E; Morris, Jeffrey F; Stone, Howard A

    2013-05-03

    We study the hydrodynamics of dip coating from a suspension and report a mechanism for colloidal assembly and pattern formation on smooth substrates. Below a critical withdrawal speed where the coating film is thinner than the particle diameter, capillary forces induced by deformation of the free surface prevent the convective transport of single particles through the meniscus beneath the film. Capillary-induced forces are balanced by hydrodynamic drag only after a minimum number of particles assemble within the meniscus. The particle assembly can thus enter the thin film where it moves at nearly the withdrawal speed and rapidly separates from the next assembly. The interplay between hydrodynamic and capillary forces produces periodic and regular structures below a critical ratio Ca(2/3)/sqrt[Bo] particles in suspension. The hydrodynamically driven assembly documented here is consistent with stripe pattern formations observed experimentally in dip coating.

  18. Waxes in asphaltenes of crude oils and wax deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia M. Ganeeva

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Composition and molecular mass distribution of n-alkanes in asphaltenes of crude oils of different ages and in wax deposits formed in the borehole equipment were studied. In asphaltenes, n-alkanes from C12 to C60 were detected. The high molecular weight paraffins in asphaltenes would form a crystalline phase with a melting point of 80–90 °C. The peculiarities of the redistribution of high molecular paraffin hydrocarbons between oil and the corresponding wax deposit were detected. In the oils, the high molecular weight paraffinic hydrocarbons C50–C60 were found, which were not practically detected in the corresponding wax deposits.

  19. DipTest: A litmus test for E. coli detection in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunda, Naga Siva Kumar; Dasgupta, Saumyadeb; Mitra, Sushanta K

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a new litmus paper test (DipTest) for detecting Escherichia coli (E. coli) in water samples by performing enzymatic reactions directly on the porous paper substrate. The paper strip consists of a long narrow piece of cellulose blotting paper coated with chemoattractant (at bottom edge), wax hydrophobic barrier (at the top edge), and custom formulated chemical reagents (at reaction zone immediately below the wax hydrophobic barrier). When the paper strip is dipped in water, E. coli in the water sample is attracted toward the paper strip due to a chemotaxic mechanism followed by the ascent along the paper strip toward the reaction zone due to a capillary wicking mechanism, and finally the capillary motion is arrested at the top edge of the paper strip by the hydrophobic barrier. The E. coli concentrated at the reaction zone of the paper strip will react with custom formulated chemical reagents to produce a pinkish-red color. Such a color change on the paper strip when dipped into water samples indicates the presence of E. coli contamination in potable water. The performance of the DipTest device has been checked with different known concentrations of E. coli contaminated water samples using different dip and wait times. The DipTest device has also been tested with different interfering bacteria and chemical contaminants. It has been observed that the different interfering contaminants do not have any impact on the DipTest, and it can become a potential solution for screening water samples for E. coli contamination at the point of source.

  20. Structural analysis of CdS thin films obtained by multiple dips of oscillating chemical bath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez Lazos, C.D.; Rosendo, E.; Ortega, M.; Oliva, A.I.; Tapia, O.; Diaz, T.; Juarez, H.; Garcia, G.; Rubin, M.

    2009-01-01

    Highly oriented CdS thin films with thicknesses greater than 1 μm were deposited by multiple dips, using oscillating chemical bath deposition (OCBD) at the bath temperature of 75 deg. C, and deposition time ranging from 15 to 75 min for a single dip. Samples with different thickness were prepared by repeating the deposition process for two and three times. The films deposited by a single dip have the α-greenockite structure showing the (0 0 2) as preferred orientation, as indicated by the X-ray diffraction measurements. This notable characteristic is preserved in the samples obtained from two or three dips. The crystallite size for the samples deposited by a single dip depends on the deposition time, because it varied from 23 to 37 nm as the deposition time increased. Nevertheless for samples deposited by two and three dips, the grain size shows no noticeable change, being about 22 nm.

  1. Structural analysis of CdS thin films obtained by multiple dips of oscillating chemical bath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez Lazos, C.D. [Seccion de Electronica del Estado Solido, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2508, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07360 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Rosendo, E., E-mail: erosendo@siu.buap.m [Centro de Investigacion en Dispositivos Semiconductores, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, 14 Sur y San Claudio, Col. San Manuel, C.P. 72570, Puebla (Mexico); Ortega, M. [Seccion de Electronica del Estado Solido, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2508, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07360 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Oliva, A.I. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Unidad Merida, A.P. 73 Cordemex, 97310 Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Tapia, O.; Diaz, T.; Juarez, H.; Garcia, G. [Centro de Investigacion en Dispositivos Semiconductores, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, 14 Sur y San Claudio, Col. San Manuel, C.P. 72570, Puebla (Mexico); Rubin, M. [Facultad de Ciencias de la Computacion, 14 Sur y San Claudio, Col. San Manuel, C.P. 72570, Puebla (Mexico)

    2009-11-25

    Highly oriented CdS thin films with thicknesses greater than 1 mum were deposited by multiple dips, using oscillating chemical bath deposition (OCBD) at the bath temperature of 75 deg. C, and deposition time ranging from 15 to 75 min for a single dip. Samples with different thickness were prepared by repeating the deposition process for two and three times. The films deposited by a single dip have the alpha-greenockite structure showing the (0 0 2) as preferred orientation, as indicated by the X-ray diffraction measurements. This notable characteristic is preserved in the samples obtained from two or three dips. The crystallite size for the samples deposited by a single dip depends on the deposition time, because it varied from 23 to 37 nm as the deposition time increased. Nevertheless for samples deposited by two and three dips, the grain size shows no noticeable change, being about 22 nm.

  2. ICE-DIP kicks off

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    Last month, Marie Curie Actions* added a new member to its ranks: ICE-DIP (the Intel-CERN European Doctorate Industrial Program). The programme held its kick-off meeting on 18-19 February in Leixlip near Dublin, Ireland, at Intel’s premises.   Building on CERN’s long-standing relationship with Intel in the CERN openlab project, ICE-DIP brings together CERN and industrial partners, Intel and Xena Networks, to train five Early Stage ICT Researchers. These researchers will be funded by the European Commission and granted a CERN Fellow contract while enrolled in the doctoral programmes at partner universities Dublin City University and National University of Ireland Maynooth. The researchers will go on extended secondments to Intel Labs Europe locations across Europe during their three-year training programme. The primary focus of the ICE-DIP researchers will be the development of techniques for acquiring and processing data that are relevant for the trigger a...

  3. Dip filters; Filtros de echado recursivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrales Vargas, A.; Chavez Perez, S. [Facultad de Ingenieria, UNAM, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-09-01

    In exploration seismology, dip filters are used to enhance subsoil images by attenuating coherent noise and other signals. They can be applied in frequency-wavenumber (f-k), frequency-distance (f-x), time-wavenumber (t-k) or time distance (t-k) domains. Fourier domain assumes constant dips. Recursive dip filters are applied in t-x domain, as they do not have this limitation. However, we have to determine their optimal parameters by trial and error. Recursive dip filters are based on single order Butterworth filters, by adding the wavenumber. Their amplitude spectrum is a surface. We perform a bilinear transform to digitize the filter and pass from the f-k to the t-k domain. We obtain the t-x domain filter by inverse transforming through wavenumber and by using a three-coefficient approximation (leading to a tridiagonal matrix). For the sake of illustration in geophysical engineering, we apply these filters to a shallow field record, to attenuate the air wave and random noise, and to a marine seismic section to enhance a fault zone. Both examples show that these filters are useful and practical to enhance seismic data. Their use is easier and more economical than median filters, utilized nowadays in commercial software for the oil industry. [Spanish] En sismologia de exploracion, los filtros de echado se utilizan para enfatizar imagenes del subsuelo, atenuado ruido coherente y otras senales. Pueden aplicarse en los dominios de frecuencia y numero de onda (f-k), frecuencia y distancia (f-x), tiempo y numero de onda (t-k) o tiempo y distancia (t-x). En el dominio de Fourier suponemos echados constantes. Los filtros de echado recursivos se aplican en el dominio t-x, careciendo de esta limitante. Sin embargo, tenemos que recurrir al ensayo y error para determinar sus parametros optimos. Los filtros de hecho recursivos se basan en filtros de Butterworth de orden uno, anadiendo el numero de onda. Su espectro de amplitud es una superficie. Utilizamos la trasformada

  4. 21 CFR 186.1555 - Japan wax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Japan wax. 186.1555 Section 186.1555 Food and Drugs... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1555 Japan wax. (a) Japan wax (CAS Reg. No. 8001-39-6), also known as Japan... fruits of the oriental sumac, Rhus succedanea (Japan, Taiwan, and Indo-China), R. vernicifera (Japan...

  5. Physical properties of beeswax, sunflower wax, and candelilla wax mixtures and organogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is increased interest in natural waxes as alternatives to partially hydrogenated oils and saturated fats as oil structuring agents. Using relatively low concentrations (0.5-5%), natural waxes are able to form crystalline networks, or organogels, which bind liquid oil. Each natural wax is uniqu...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1978 - Carnauba wax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... from the leaves and buds of the Brazilian wax palm Copernicia cerifera Martius. The wax is hard... fruits and fruit juices as defined in § 170.3(n)(35) of this chapter; and soft candy as defined in § 170...

  7. Fabrication of 5 cm long epitaxial Sm{sub 0.2}Ce{sub 0.8}O{sub 1.9-x} single buffer layer on textured Ni-5%W substrate for YBCO coated conductors via dip-coating PACSD method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, M.; Wang, W.T.; Pu, M.H.; Yang, X.S.; He, L.J. [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education of China), Superconductivity R and D Center (SRDC), Mail Stop 165, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Cheng, C.H. [Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, New South Wales (Australia); Zhao, Y., E-mail: yzhao@home.swjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education of China), Superconductivity R and D Center (SRDC), Mail Stop 165, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China)] [Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, New South Wales (Australia)

    2011-11-15

    Epitaxial Sm{sub 0.2}Ce{sub 0.8}O{sub 1.9-x} single buffer layer for YBCO coated conductors was deposited via fluorine-free dip-coating CSD. Flat, dense and crack-free SCO films with sharp (2 0 0) c-axis texture were obtained by carefully controlling the processing. YBCO thin films with a homogeneous surface microstructure were deposited on the SCO-buffered NiW substrate via CSD approach. Five centimeters long epitaxial Sm{sub 0.2}Ce{sub 0.8}O{sub 1.9-x} (SCO) single buffer layer for YBCO coated conductors was deposited via dip-coating polymer-assisted chemical solution deposition (PACSD) approach on bi-axially textured Ni-5%W (2 0 0) alloy substrate. The film formation and texture evolution were investigated using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Flat, dense and crack-free SCO films with sharp (2 0 0) c-axis texture were obtained by way of carefully controlling the concentration of precursor solution, withdrawing speed, annealing temperature and dwelling time. On consideration of both microstructure and texture, epitaxial SCO single buffer layers were fabricated using precursor solution of 0.3 M cationic concentration, the withdrawing speed of 10 mm/min and heat treatment at 1100 deg. C in Ar-5%H{sub 2} mixture gas for 0.5 h. Epitaxial YBCO thin films with a homogeneous surface microstructure were deposited on the SCO-buffered NiW substrate via dip-coating PACSD approach. The PACSD approach was a promising way to fabricate long and low-cost YBCO coated conductors.

  8. Morphological Symmetry of Maxillary Anterior Teeth before and after Prosthodontic Planning: Comparison between Conventional and Digital Diagnostic Wax-Ups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abduo, Jaafar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of different prosthodontic planning methods on the morphological symmetry of maxillary anterior teeth. In 13 patients receiving fixed prosthodontic treatment, dental models were obtained from the Oral Health Centre of Western Australia. Two forms of diagnostic prosthodontic planning were executed: conventional wax-up and digital wax-up. The asymmetry was evaluated at two levels: tooth morphological asymmetry (TMA) and anterior segment morphological asymmetry (ASMA). For the TMA, the labial surface of each anterior tooth was superimposed on a mirror image of the contralateral tooth. The ASMA involved superimposition of the combined labial surface of all the anterior teeth on one side on the mirror image of the combined labial surface of the contralateral side. For each asymmetry, the discrepancies in the form of 3D Euclidean distances were calculated and statistically evaluated by the Kruskal-Wallis test (p = 0.05). At the TMA level, the digital wax-up models had significantly less asymmetry (p treatment and conventional wax-up models. The pre-treatment and conventional wax-up models had similar asymmetry (p = 0.35). However, at the ASMA level, the difference between the models was insignificant (p > 0.05). In this study, the single tooth symmetry had improved after the digital wax-up. However, the conventional wax-up had a minimal impact on single tooth symmetry. ASMA was minimally affected by the two wax-ups. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. The Effect of Paraffin Wax to Properties of Radiation Vulcanization Natural Rubber Latex (RVNRL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Noorwadi Mat Lazim; Sofian Ibrahim; Muhammad Saiful Omar

    2015-01-01

    Dipping factories often encounter a serious problem with high tackiness of the finish products during storage. The tackiness effect can be lead to rejection of products. This tackiness effect of natural (NR) rubber film originates in the free rubber chain ends at the surface of the film. The tackiness is not depends on the degree of crosslinking (vulcanization), since radiation itself unable to reduce the tackiness effect. The RVNRL requires addition of additive or anti-tack agent into formulation to reduce tackiness effect. In this experiment, paraffin wax manufactured by Emulco Sdn Bhd under the trade name Aquawax 48 was added into RVNRL formulation as anti-tack and the effect of paraffin wax to physical and mechanical properties of RVNRL was study. (author)

  10. Deformation modeling and the strain transient dip test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, W.B.; Rohde, R.W.; Swearengen, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    Recent efforts in material deformation modeling reveal a trend toward unifying creep and plasticity with a single rate-dependent formulation. While such models can describe actual material deformation, most require a number of different experiments to generate model parameter information. Recently, however, a new model has been proposed in which most of the requisite constants may be found by examining creep transients brought about through abrupt changes in creep stress (strain transient dip test). The critical measurement in this test is the absence of a resolvable creep rate after a stress drop. As a consequence, the result is extraordinarily sensitive to strain resolution as well as machine mechanical response. This paper presents the design of a machine in which these spurious effects have been minimized and discusses the nature of the strain transient dip test using the example of aluminum. It is concluded that the strain transient dip test is not useful as the primary test for verifying any micromechanical model of deformation. Nevertheless, if a model can be developed which is verifiable by other experimentts, data from a dip test machine may be used to generate model parameters

  11. DIP and DIP + 2 as glutathione oxidants and radiation sensitizers in cultured Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.W.; Power, J.A.; Kosower, N.S.; Kosower, E.M.

    1975-01-01

    Two diamide analogues, diazene dicarboxylic acid bis (N'-methyl-piperazide) or DIP, and its bis-N'-methyl iodide salt, or DIP + 2, were tested for their ability to penetrate cultured Chinese hamster cells and oxidize intracellular glutathione. DIP penetrated the cells at a reasonable rate at 18 0 C, 160 nmoles being required to oxidize the endogenous glutathione of 2 x 10 6 cells, but it penetrated very slowly at 0 0 C. DIP + 2 did not effectively oxidize glutathione in Chinese hamster cells, possibly because it did not enter the cels. DIP became toxic after about 10 min of exposure, but its toxicity could be moderated by using anoxic conditions. DIP, but not DIP + 2, sensitized anoxic Chinese hamster cells to X-radiation by a factor of 1.5, an effect that was due entirely to removal of the shoulder from the survival curve. (author)

  12. Mantle wedge serpentinization effects on slab dips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eh Tan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical coupling between a subducting slab and the overlying mantle wedge is an important factor in controlling the subduction dip angle and the flow in mantel wedge. This paper investigates the role of the amount of mantle serpentinization on the subduction zone evolution. With numerical thermos-mechanical models with elasto-visco-plastic rheology, we vary the thickness and depth extent of mantle serpentinization in the mantle wedge to control the degree of coupling between the slab and mantle wedge. A thin serpentinized mantle layer is required for stable subduction. For models with stable subduction, we find that the slab dip is affected by the down-dip extent and the mantle serpentinization thickness. A critical down-dip extent exists in mantle serpentinization, determined by the thickness of the overriding lithosphere. If the down-dip extent does not exceed the critical depth, the slab is partially coupled to the overriding lithosphere and has a constant dip angle regardless of the mantle serpentinization thickness. However, if the down-dip extent exceeds the critical depth, the slab and the base of the overriding lithosphere would be separated and decoupled by a thick layer of serpentinized peridotite. This allows further slab bending and results in steeper slab dip. Increasing mantle serpentinization thickness will also result in larger slab dip. We also find that with weak mantle wedge, there is no material flowing from the asthenosphere into the serpentinized mantle wedge. All of these results indicate that serpentinization is an important ingredient when studying the subduction dynamics in the mantle wedge.

  13. Interference of Fano-Rashba conductance dips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelabert, M M; Renart, A; Serra, L, E-mail: llorens.serra@uib.es [Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2011-03-23

    We study the interference of two tunable Rashba regions in a quantum wire with one propagating mode. The transmission dips (Fano-Rashba dips) of the two regions either cross or anti-cross, depending on the distance between the two regions. For large separations we find Fabry-Perot oscillations due to the interference of forwards and backwards propagating modes. At small separations overlapping evanescent modes play a prominent role, leading to an enhanced transmission and destroying the conductance dip. Analytical expressions in scattering matrix theory are given and the relevance of the interference effect in a device is discussed.

  14. 21 CFR 178.3720 - Petroleum wax, synthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Petroleum wax, synthetic. 178.3720 Section 178.3720... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3720 Petroleum wax, synthetic. Synthetic petroleum wax may be safely used in applications and under the same conditions where naturally derived petroleum wax is...

  15. 21 CFR 172.888 - Synthetic petroleum wax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Synthetic petroleum wax. 172.888 Section 172.888... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.888 Synthetic petroleum wax. Synthetic petroleum wax may be safely used in or on foods in accordance with the following conditions: (a) Synthetic petroleum wax is a...

  16. Improve Toolmarks' Impressions in Soft Wax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Nir; Volkov, Nikolai; Tsach, Tsadok

    2017-05-01

    When the forensic toolmarks laboratory receives for examination and comparison a tool that is suspected of having been involved in a crime, the expert performs tests designed to determine whether or not the specific tool generates the same toolmarks as those found at the crime scene. This is performed by testing tool striation on a piece of soft metal, such as lead, and examining the marks left by the tool. Studies have shown that wax may be an optimal material for this purpose. This study examines the use of wax at different temperatures and shows that quality of results is better when the wax is cooled (recommended temperature is -18°C). At this temperature, the wax is flexible enough but does not smear and is not sticky. This makes the obtained marks clearer and of better quality. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  17. 75 FR 17162 - Dipping and Coating Operations (Dip Tanks) Standard; Extension of the Office of Management and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    ...] Dipping and Coating Operations (Dip Tanks) Standard; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's... Standard on Dipping and Coating Operations (Dip Tanks) (29 CFR 1910.126(g)(4)). DATES: Comments must be... of efforts in obtaining information (29 U.S.C. 657). The Standard on Dipping and Coating Operations...

  18. Current trend in latex dipped products manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, W.S.C.

    1996-01-01

    The paper present the activities in dipped products manufacturing in Malaysia; the activities carried out by MARGMA - Malaysian Rubber Glove manufacturer; other issues discussed such as labour, pricing environmental issue, product certification in this activity

  19. Microencapsulation of Flavors in Carnauba Wax

    OpenAIRE

    Milanovic, Jelena; Manojlovic, Verica; Levic, Steva; Rajic, Nevenka; Nedovic, Viktor; Bugarski, Branko

    2010-01-01

    The subject of this study is the development of flavor wax formulations aimed for food and feed products. The melt dispersion technique was applied for the encapsulation of ethyl vanillin in wax microcapsules. The surface morphology of microparticles was investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM), while the loading content was determined by HPLC measurements. This study shows that the decomposition process under heating proceeds in several steps: vanilla evaporation occurs at aroun...

  20. Wax-bonding 3D microfluidic chips

    KAUST Repository

    Gong, Xiuqing

    2013-10-10

    We report a simple, low-cost and detachable microfluidic chip incorporating easily accessible paper, glass slides or other polymer films as the chip materials along with adhesive wax as the recycling bonding material. We use a laser to cut through the paper or film to form patterns and then sandwich the paper and film between glass sheets or polymer membranes . The hot-melt adhesive wax can realize bridge bonding between various materials, for example, paper, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) film, glass sheets, or metal plate. The bonding process is reversible and the wax is reusable through a melting and cooling process. With this process, a three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic chip is achievable by vacuating and venting the chip in a hot-water bath. To study the biocompatibility and applicability of the wax-based microfluidic chip, we tested the PCR compatibility with the chip materials first. Then we applied the wax-paper based microfluidic chip to HeLa cell electroporation (EP ). Subsequently, a prototype of a 5-layer 3D chip was fabricated by multilayer wax bonding. To check the sealing ability and the durability of the chip, green fluorescence protein (GFP) recombinant Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria were cultured, with which the chemotaxis of E. coli was studied in order to determine the influence of antibiotic ciprofloxacin concentration on the E. coli migration.

  1. Coatings and films derived from clay/wax nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiko, David J.; Leyva, Argentina A.

    2006-11-14

    The invention provides methods for making clay/wax nanocomposites and coatings and films of same with improved chemical resistance and gas barrier properties. The invention further provides methods for making and using emulsions of such clay/wax nanocomposites. Typically, an organophillic clay is combined with a wax or wax/polymer blend such that the cohesion energy of the clay matches that of the wax or wax/polymer blend. Suitable organophilic clays include mica and phyllosilicates that have been surface-treated with edge or edge and surface modifying agents. The resulting nanocomposites have applications as industrial coatings and in protective packaging.

  2. Microencapsulation of flavors in carnauba wax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanovic, Jelena; Manojlovic, Verica; Levic, Steva; Rajic, Nevenka; Nedovic, Viktor; Bugarski, Branko

    2010-01-01

    The subject of this study is the development of flavor wax formulations aimed for food and feed products. The melt dispersion technique was applied for the encapsulation of ethyl vanillin in wax microcapsules. The surface morphology of microparticles was investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM), while the loading content was determined by HPLC measurements. This study shows that the decomposition process under heating proceeds in several steps: vanilla evaporation occurs at around 200 °C, while matrix degradation starts at 250 °C and progresses with maxima at around 360, 440 and 520 °C. The results indicate that carnauba wax is an attractive material for use as a matrix for encapsulation of flavours in order to improve their functionality and stability in products.

  3. Microencapsulation of Flavors in Carnauba Wax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branko Bugarski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this study is the development of flavor wax formulations aimed for food and feed products. The melt dispersion technique was applied for the encapsulation of ethyl vanillin in wax microcapsules. The surface morphology of microparticles was investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM, while the loading content was determined by HPLC measurements. This study shows that the decomposition process under heating proceeds in several steps: vanilla evaporation occurs at around 200 °C, while matrix degradation starts at 250 °C and progresses with maxima at around 360, 440 and 520 °C. The results indicate that carnauba wax is an attractive material for use as a matrix for encapsulation of flavours in order to improve their functionality and stability in products.

  4. Identification of In-Chain-Functionalized Compounds and Methyl-Branched Alkanes in Cuticular Waxes of Triticum aestivum cv. Bethlehem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu C Racovita

    Full Text Available In this work, cuticular waxes from flag leaf blades and peduncles of Triticum aestivum cv. Bethlehem were investigated in search for novel wax compounds. Seven wax compound classes were detected that had previously not been reported, and their structures were elucidated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of various derivatives. Six of the classes were identified as series of homologs differing by two methylene units, while the seventh was a homologous series with homologs with single methylene unit differences. In the waxes of flag leaf blades, secondary alcohols (predominantly C27 and C33, primary/secondary diols (predominantly C28 and esters of primary/secondary diols (predominantly C50, combining C28 diol with C22 acid were found, all sharing similar secondary hydroxyl group positions at and around C-12 or ω-12. 7- and 8-hydroxy-2-alkanol esters (predominantly C35, 7- and 8-oxo-2-alkanol esters (predominantly C35, and 4-alkylbutan-4-olides (predominantly C28 were found both in flag leaf and peduncle wax mixtures. Finally, a series of even- and odd-numbered alkane homologs was identified in both leaf and peduncle waxes, with an internal methyl branch preferentially on C-11 and C-13 of homologs with even total carbon number and on C-12 of odd-numbered homologs. Biosynthetic pathways are suggested for all compounds, based on common structural features and matching chain length profiles with other wheat wax compound classes.

  5. Effects of air pollutants on epicuticular wax structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huttunen, S.

    1994-01-01

    In xerophytes, like conifers, the epicuticular wax is well developed. Especially in and around stomatal entrances, a thick wax coating is present. Epicuticular waxes are modified by changes in plant growth conditions such as temperature, relative humidity, irradiance, and wind, or acid rain. The fine structure of epicuticular waxes, their chemistry, and ecophysiological function are modified, especially in evergreen, long-lived conifer needles with characteristic crystalline wax structures. During needle flushing and development, wax structure is easily modified. Acid rain-treated Scots pine needles had 50% less epicuticular waxes in early August. Pollution-induced delayed development, destruction, and disturbances have been identified in many plant species. The structural changes in wax crystals are known. Acid rain or polluted air can destroy the crystalloid epicuticular waxes in a few weeks. In Pinus sylvestris, the first sign of pollution effect is the fusion of wax tubes. In Picea abies and P. sitchensis, modifications of crystalloid wax structure are known. In Californian pine trees phenomena of recrystallization of wax tubes on second-year needles were observed after delayed epicuticular wax development in Pinus ponderosa and P. coulteri. Thus, the effects of air pollutants are modified by climate. Accelerated senescence of leaves and needles have been associated with natural and anthropogenic stresses. The accelerated erosion rate of epicuticular waxes has been measured under air pollution conditions. Many short-term air pollution experiments have failed to show any structural changes in epicuticular wax structures. The quantity and quality of needle waxes grown in open-top chambers, glass houses, or polluted air before treatment, differ from field conditions and make it difficult to detect effects of any treatment. (orig.)

  6. Wax-up and mock-up. A guide for anterior periodontal and restorative treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurrea, Jon; Bruguera, August

    2014-01-01

    When starting a case, having the end result in mind is the basis in any kind of treatment, even more so in those where the anterior teeth morphology, size and proportion will be changed. Here is where a good treatment plan based on a diagnostic wax-up that is tried in with a mock-up and approved by the patient becomes crucial. This case report exemplifies how transferring the information from the diagnostic wax up to the patient's mouth is of help not only to the restorative dentist and the laboratory technician, but also to the surgeon when performing the crown lengthening. This treatment plan cannot be seen as a sequence of isolated procedures but as a single workflow. The wax-up/mock-up binomial is a guide even for the periodontist in a novel approach to surgical crown lengthening.

  7. The composition of wax and oil in green coffee beans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folstar, P.

    1976-01-01

    Methods for the isolation of wax and oil from green coffee beans were studied and a method for the quantitative extraction of coffee oil from the beans was introduced. Coffee wax, coffee oil and wax-free coffee oil as well as the unsaponifiable matter prepared from each were fractionated by column

  8. Investigation of drug release from carnauba wax matrices: a case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was carried out to assess the effect of carnauba wax particle size on sustained release characteristics, the effect of drug loading on release and the kinetics of propranolol hydrochloride release from carnauba wax matrices. The results obtained showed that small particles (180 250 µ m) of carnauba wax had superior ...

  9. Investigation of synthetic spermaceti wax as a potential oral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was aimed at investigating drug release from spermaceti wax matrices. Materials such as ethylcellulose and methylcellulose were incorporated into the spermaceti wax matrices and release was evaluated. Spermaceti wax can form matrices that release drug in a sustained release fashion. Higuchi or first ...

  10. 75 FR 63200 - Petroleum Wax Candles From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-14

    ... COMMISSION Petroleum Wax Candles From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Scheduling of an expedited five-year review concerning the antidumping duty order on petroleum wax candles... whether revocation of the antidumping duty order on petroleum wax candles from China would be likely to...

  11. 75 FR 80843 - Petroleum Wax Candles From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... COMMISSION Petroleum Wax Candles From China Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... antidumping duty order on petroleum wax candles from China would be likely to lead to continuation or... Petroleum Wax Candles from China: Investigation No. 731-TA-282 (Third Review). Issued: December 17, 2010. By...

  12. Morphology and networks of sunflower wax crystals in organogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant waxes are considered as promising alternatives to unhealthy solid fats such as trans fats and saturated fats in structured food products including margarines and spreads. Sunflower wax is of a great interest due to its strong gelling ability. Morphology of sunflower wax crystals formed in soyb...

  13. Epicuticular waxes and glaucousness of Encephalartos leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osborne, R; Stevens, JF

    The epicuticular leaf waxes from four glaucous and four non-glaucous species of Encephalartos were examined by GC-mass spectrometry and SEM techniques. The four glaucous-leaved species, E. horridus, E. lehmannii, E. princeps and E. trispinosus, all occurring in xeric conditions in the Eastern Cape

  14. 21 CFR 184.1976 - Candelilla wax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... practice: in chewing gum as defined in § 170.3(n)(6) of this chapter and in hard candy as defined in § 170... obtained from the candelilla plant. It is a hard, yellowish-brown, opaque-to-translucent wax. Candelilla...

  15. On the dip angle of subducting plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsui, Albert T.; Tang, Xiao-Ming; Toksoz, M. Nafi

    1990-01-01

    A new approximate analytic model is developed for the thermal structure of a subducting plate with a finite length. This model provides the capability of easily examining the thermal and mechanical structure of a subducting plate with different lengths and at different angles. Also, the torque balance of a descending plate can be examined, and effects such as the leading edge effect, the adiabatic compression effect, and the phase change effect can be incorporated. A comparison with observed data indicates that short slabs are likely under torque equilibrium at present, while long slabs are probably dominated by their gravitational torques such that their dip angles are transient, moving toward a steeper dip angle similar to that of the Mariana slab.

  16. Real-Time monitoring of intracellular wax ester metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karp Matti

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wax esters are industrially relevant molecules exploited in several applications of oleochemistry and food industry. At the moment, the production processes mostly rely on chemical synthesis from rather expensive starting materials, and therefore solutions are sought from biotechnology. Bacterial wax esters are attractive alternatives, and especially the wax ester metabolism of Acinetobacter sp. has been extensively studied. However, the lack of suitable tools for rapid and simple monitoring of wax ester metabolism in vivo has partly restricted the screening and analyses of potential hosts and optimal conditions. Results Based on sensitive and specific detection of intracellular long-chain aldehydes, specific intermediates of wax ester synthesis, bacterial luciferase (LuxAB was exploited in studying the wax ester metabolism in Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1. Luminescence was detected in the cultivation of the strain producing wax esters, and the changes in signal levels could be linked to corresponding cell growth and wax ester synthesis phases. Conclusions The monitoring system showed correlation between wax ester synthesis pattern and luminescent signal. The system shows potential for real-time screening purposes and studies on bacterial wax esters, revealing new aspects to dynamics and role of wax ester metabolism in bacteria.

  17. Three cases of desquamative interstitial pneumonia (DIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabatabaie P

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available D.I.P is a rare disease. The etiology is unknown. It is characterized pathologically by massive proliferation and desquamation of alveolar cells and thickening of the alveolar walls. In our studies from 1368-73 we have three patients hospitalized earlier the prognosis would be much better. Corticosteroid and other effective drugs would be helpfull in treatment of these patients.

  18. Dip Process Thermal Barrier Coatings for Superalloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    melting Ce-Co or Ce-Ni alloy, By internally oxidizing these coatings, t is possible to obtain a duplex with a CeO2 -rich oxide scale as the outer layer... Slurry Fusion Coatings......................15 Ultra-Rich Cerium (.- 90%) Dip Coating on IN738 .......... 17 CONCLUSIONS...alloy powder slurried with an organic vehicle, then fired in an inert atmosphere. Our original concept was to selectively oxidize cerium, using CO/CO 2

  19. Effects of air pollutants on epicuticular wax chemical composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percy, K.E.; McQuattie, C.J.; Rebbeck, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    There are numerous reports in the literature of modifications to epicuticular wax structure as a consequence of exposure to air pollutants. Most authors have used scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to describe changes in wax crystallite morphology or distribution. ''Erosion'' or ''weathering'' of crystalline structure into an amorphous state is the most common observation, particularly in the case of conifer needles having the characteristic tube crystallites comprised of nonacosan-10-ol. Wax structure is largely determined by its chemical composition. Therefore, many of the reported changes in wax structure due to air pollutants probably arise from direct interactions between pollutants such as ozone and wax biosynthesis. The literature describing changes in wax composition due to pollutants is briefly reviewed. New evidence is introduced in support of the hypothesis for a direct interaction between air pollutants and epicuticular wax Biosynthesis. (orig.)

  20. WAXS investigation of lanthanide borosilicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouty, O. [DEN/DTEC/SEPE, CEA Marcoule, BP 17171, Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex, 30207 (France); Delaye, J.M.; DeBonfils, J.; Peuget, S. [DEN/DTCD/SECM, CEA Marcoule, BP 17171, Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex, 30207 (France)

    2008-07-01

    Structural characterization of nuclear glasses requires the combination of several experimental and simulation techniques. Experimental ones probe the electronic environment at short distances (EXAFS, NMR) or at medium range distances (WAXS, AWAXS) or the nuclear environment (neutron scattering). We have built a new competence in X Ray Wide Angle Scattering (WAXS) by mounting two based-lab diffractometers with Mo X ray tubes, one of them being located in a shielded glove box, and by writing a new software to easily extract structure factors and radial distribution functions from the experiment. We present here a preliminary study of a simplified borosilicate glass doped with Eu (europium), which is a fission product, and which is often used as a stimulant of trivalent actinides. The WAXS technique has been successfully applied, the structure factor being in good agreement with the one obtained by molecular dynamics simulation. Thus, knowledge of the Eu local environment has been deduced and results compared with data from EXAFS and NMR analysis. (authors)

  1. Cattle dipping practices in the Philippines and the degradation of coumaphos in a simulated cattle dip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calumpang, S.M.F.; Medina, M.J.B.; Tejada, A.W.

    1997-01-01

    A survey of cattle dip facilities and current practices employed was done. Coumaphos and ethion were the commonly used acaricides in the four respondent stock farms. The behavior of coumaphos in a simulated model cattle dip was monitored using radiotracer techniques. Degradation was rapid, resulting in the formation of potasan metabolite and bound residues in the sediment. A rapid field method for the detection of organophosphate pesticides was used in monitoring the degradation of coumaphos in a cattle dip. The sensitivity of the method is comparable to the conventional HPLC method employed. This rapid field method can easily be used by cattle ranch owners to monitor coumaphos content of the vat facility so that recharging could be made in order to prevent the onset of resistance development in cattle tick. (author)

  2. Dip-coating of yield stress fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillard, M.; Bleyer, J.; Andrieux, A. L.; Boujlel, J.; Coussot, P.

    2016-05-01

    We review and discuss the characteristics of dip-coating of yield stress fluids on the basis of theoretical considerations, numerical simulations of the flow in the bath, and experimental data with different materials. We show that in general, due to the yield stress, viscous dissipations are sufficiently large for capillary effects to be negligible in the process. Dip-coating with yield stress fluids is thus essentially governed by an equilibrium between viscous and gravity effects. In contrast with simple liquids, the coated thickness is uniform and remains fixed to the plate. At low velocities, it appears to tend to a value significantly smaller than the Derjaguin and Levi prediction [B. V. Derjaguin and S. M. Levi, Film Coating Theory (The Focal Press, London, 1964)], i.e., critical thickness of stoppage of a free surface flow along a vertical plate. We show that this comes from the fact that in the bath only a relatively small layer of fluid is in its liquid regime along the moving plate, while the rest of the material is in a solid regime. From numerical simulations, we describe the general trends of this liquid layer, and in particular, its thickness as a function of the rheological characteristics and plate velocity. We finally propose a model for the dip-coating of yield stress fluid, assuming that the solid volume of fluid finally fixed to the plate results from the mass flux of the liquid layer in the bath minus a mass flux due to some downward flow under gravity in the transition zone. A good agreement between this model and experimental data is found for a fluid with a yield stress larger than 20 Pa.

  3. Dips and rims in dried colloidal films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parneix, C; Vandoolaeghe, P; Nikolayev, V S; Quéré, D; Li, J; Cabane, B

    2010-12-31

    We describe a spatial pattern arising from the nonuniform evaporation of a colloidal film. Immediately after the film deposition, an obstacle is positioned above its free surface, minimizing evaporation at this location. In a first stage, the film dries everywhere but under the obstacle, where a liquid region remains. Subsequently, this liquid region evaporates near its boundaries with the dry film. This loss of water causes a flow of liquid and particles from the center of the obstructed region to its periphery. The final film has a dip surrounded by a rim whose diameter is set by the obstacle. This turns out to be a simple technique for structuring films of nanometric thickness.

  4. Dental wax decreases calculus accumulation in small dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark M; Smithson, Christopher W

    2014-01-01

    A dental wax was evaluated after unilateral application in 20 client-owned, mixed and purebred small dogs using a clean, split-mouth study model. All dogs had clinical signs of periodontal disease including plaque, calculus, and/or gingivitis. The wax was randomly applied to the teeth of one side of the mouth daily for 30-days while the contralateral side received no treatment. Owner parameters evaluated included compliance and a subjective assessment of ease of wax application. Gingivitis, plaque and calculus accumulation were scored at the end of the study period. Owners considered the wax easy to apply in all dogs. Compliance with no missed application days was achieved in 8 dogs. The number of missed application days had no effect on wax efficacy. There was no significant difference in gingivitis or plaque accumulation scores when comparing treated and untreated sides. Calculus accumulation scores were significantly less (22.1 %) for teeth receiving the dental wax.

  5. Natural oils and waxes: studies on stick bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budai, Lívia; Antal, István; Klebovich, Imre; Budai, Marianna

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present article was to examine the role of origin and quantity of selected natural oils and waxes in the determination of the thermal properties and hardness of stick bases. The natural oils and waxes selected for the study were sunflower, castor, jojoba, and coconut oils. The selected waxes were yellow beeswax, candelilla wax, and carnauba wax. The hardness of the formulations is a critical parameter from the aspect of their application. Hardness was characterized by the measurement of compression strength along with the softening point, the drop point, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It can be concluded that coconut oil, jojoba oil, and carnauba wax have the greatest influence on the thermal parameters of stick bases.

  6. Hyperuricemia and non-dipping blood pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marrone O

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Oreste Marrone,1 Maria Rosaria Bonsignore1,21National Research Council, Institute of Biomedicine and Molecular Immunology, Palermo, Italy; 2Biomedical Department of Internal and Specialistic Medicine, University of Palermo, Palermo, ItalyThe strong association between the metabolic derangements that characterize the metabolic syndrome with arterial hypertension is very well-known, as it is the common finding of hyperuricemia in the patients with the metabolic syndrome. Besides, hyperuricemia has been found to be associated with cardiovascular, renal, and metabolic diseases; including not only gout but also type 2 diabetes mellitus, although its role as a risk factor is still debated.1 We were not aware of previous studies describing an association between uric acid levels and the non-dipping 24-hour blood pressure (BP pattern, and for that reason we were intrigued by Tutal et al’s article, regarding hypertensive patients with the metabolic syndrome.2 The authors explain some possible causes that could determine an increase in uric acid in the metabolic syndrome, and describe some pathogenetic mechanisms of systemic hypertension in their patients. We would like to point out one more possible mechanism that could link hyperuricemia to non-dipping BP.View original paper by Tutal et al

  7. In vivo evaluation of insect wax for hair growth potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinju Ma

    Full Text Available Insect wax is secreted by Ericerus pela Chavanness. It has been traditionally used to treat hair loss in China, but few reports have been published on the hair growth-promoting effect of insect wax. In this work, we examined the hair growth-promoting effects of insect wax on model animals. Different concentrations of insect wax were topically applied to the denuded backs of mice, and 5% minoxidil was applied topically as a positive control. We found that insect wax significantly promoted hair growth in a dose-dependent manner, 45% and 30% insect wax both induced hair to regrow, while less visible hair growth was observed in blank controls on the 16th day. The experimental areas treated with 45% and 30% insect wax exhibited significant differences in hair scores compared to blank controls, and hair lengths in the 45% and 30% insect wax group was significantly longer than in blank controls on the 16th and 20th days. There were no new hair follicles forming in the treated areas, and the hair follicles were prematurely converted to the anagen phase from the telogen phase in experimental areas treated with 45% and 30% insect wax. Both 45% and 30% insect wax upregulated vascular endothelial growth factor expression. The results indicated that 45% and 30% insect wax showed hair growth-promoting potential approximately as potent as 5% minoxidil by inducing the premature conversion of telogen-to-anagen and by prolonging the mature anagen phase rather than increasing the number of hair follicles, which was likely related to the upregulation of VEGF expression. The dissociative policosanol in insect wax was considered the key ingredient most likely responsible for the hair growth promoting potential.

  8. In vivo evaluation of insect wax for hair growth potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jinju; Ma, Liyi; Zhang, Zhongquan; Li, Kai; Wang, Youqiong; Chen, Xiaoming; Zhang, Hong

    2018-01-01

    Insect wax is secreted by Ericerus pela Chavanness. It has been traditionally used to treat hair loss in China, but few reports have been published on the hair growth-promoting effect of insect wax. In this work, we examined the hair growth-promoting effects of insect wax on model animals. Different concentrations of insect wax were topically applied to the denuded backs of mice, and 5% minoxidil was applied topically as a positive control. We found that insect wax significantly promoted hair growth in a dose-dependent manner, 45% and 30% insect wax both induced hair to regrow, while less visible hair growth was observed in blank controls on the 16th day. The experimental areas treated with 45% and 30% insect wax exhibited significant differences in hair scores compared to blank controls, and hair lengths in the 45% and 30% insect wax group was significantly longer than in blank controls on the 16th and 20th days. There were no new hair follicles forming in the treated areas, and the hair follicles were prematurely converted to the anagen phase from the telogen phase in experimental areas treated with 45% and 30% insect wax. Both 45% and 30% insect wax upregulated vascular endothelial growth factor expression. The results indicated that 45% and 30% insect wax showed hair growth-promoting potential approximately as potent as 5% minoxidil by inducing the premature conversion of telogen-to-anagen and by prolonging the mature anagen phase rather than increasing the number of hair follicles, which was likely related to the upregulation of VEGF expression. The dissociative policosanol in insect wax was considered the key ingredient most likely responsible for the hair growth promoting potential.

  9. Modeling of asphaltene and wax precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, F.; Sarathi, P.; Jones, R.

    1991-01-01

    This research project was designed to focus on the development of a predictive technique for organic deposition during gas injection for petroleum EOR. A thermodynamic model has been developed to describe the effects of temperature, pressure, and composition on asphaltene precipitation. The proposed model combines regular solution theory with Flory-Huggins polymer solutions theory to predict maximum volume fractions of asphaltene dissolved in oil. The model requires evaluation of vapor-liquid equilibria, first using an equation of state followed by calculations of asphaltene solubility in the liquid-phase. A state-of-the-art technique for C{sub 7+} fraction characterization was employed in developing this model. The preliminary model developed in this work was able to predict qualitatively the trends of the effects of temperature, pressure, and composition. Since the mechanism of paraffinic wax deposition is different from that of asphaltene deposition, another thermodynamic model based on the solid-liquid solution theory was developed to predict the wax formation. This model is simple and can predict the wax appearance temperature with reasonable accuracy. Accompanying the modeling work, experimental studies were conducted to investigate the solubility of asphaltene in oil land solvents and to examine the effects of oil composition, CO{sub 2}, and solvent on asphaltene precipitation and its properties. This research focused on the solubility reversibility of asphaltene in oil and the precipitation caused by CO{sub 2} injection at simulated reservoir temperature and pressure conditions. These experiments have provided many observations about the properties of asphaltenes for further improvement of the model, but more detailed information about the properties of asphaltenes in solution is needed for the development of more reliable asphaltene characterization techniques. 50 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. Study of phase transition in hard microcrystalline waxes and wax blends by differential scanning calorimetry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kumar, S.; Agrawal, K. M.; Khan, H. U.; Sikora, Antonín

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 22, 3 & 4 (2004), s. 337-345 ISSN 1091-6466 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK4050111 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : phase transition * hard microscrystalline waxes * differential scanning calorimetry Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.312, year: 2004

  11. SIMULASI TEGANGAN DIP PADA JARINGAN TEGANGAN MENENGAH MENGGUNAKAN MODEL EMTP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agung Warsito

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Tegangan dip pada jaringan tegangan menengah (JTM akibat adanya gangguan hubung singkat satu fasa ke tanah disimulasikan dengan menggunakan model EMTP ( Electromagnetic Transient Program . Hasil-hasil gelombang tegangan dip yang ditampilkan untuk selanjutnya dianalisa. Data-data jaringan tegangan menengah sebagai studi kasus diambil dari feeder srondol 1 ( SRL 1 yang menyuplai tenaga listrik ke kampus UNDIP Tembalang. Berdasarkan hasil simulasi, didapatkan tegangan dip di titik gangguan hubung singkat satu fasa ke tanah pada belitan primer transformator DIII Teknik sebesar 61,5 % tegangan fasa-netral. Tegangan dip ini tidak mengganggu operasi beban listrik apabila terjadi kurang dari 0,2 detik. Sementara tegangan dip akibat gangguan hubung singkat satu fasa pada saluran antara percabangan Teknik Kimia dan saluran Teknik Mesin – Fakultas Perikanan dan Ilmu Kelautan sebesar 72,49 % dan tegangan dip ini tidak akan menyebabkan sistem tergganggu apabila terjadi kurang dari 0,5 detik.

  12. Statistical Optimization of Sustained Release Venlafaxine HCI Wax Matrix Tablet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalekar, M R; Madgulkar, A R; Sheladiya, D D; Kshirsagar, S J; Wable, N D; Desale, S S

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to prepare a sustained release drug delivery system of venlafaxine hydrochloride by using a wax matrix system. The effects of bees wax and carnauba wax on drug release profile was investigated. A 3(2) full factorial design was applied to systemically optimize the drug release profile. Amounts of carnauba wax (X(1)) and bees wax (X(2)) were selected as independent variables and release after 12 h and time required for 50% (t(50)) drug release were selected as dependent variables. A mathematical model was generated for each response parameter. Both waxes retarded release after 12 h and increases the t(50) but bees wax showed significant influence. The drug release pattern for all the formulation combinations was found to be approaching Peppas kinetic model. Suitable combination of two waxes provided fairly good regulated release profile. The response surfaces and contour plots for each response parameter are presented for further interpretation of the results. The optimum formulations were chosen and their predicted results found to be in close agreement with experimental findings.

  13. Wax Impaction in Nigerian School Children. | Eziyi | East and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Impacted wax has been classified as an ear disease. It can cause pain, itching, tinnitus hearing loss or otitis externa. The prevalence of cerumen impaction varies. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of impacted ear wax in primary school children and to determine, if there is any association ...

  14. Wax combs mediate nestmate recognition by guard honeybees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Ettorre, Patrizia; Wenseleers, Tom; Dawson, Jenny

    2006-01-01

    Research has shown that the wax combs are important in the acquisition of colony odour in the honeybee, Apis mellifera. However, many of these studies were conducted in the laboratory or under artificial conditions. We investigated the role of the wax combs in nestmate recognition in the natural...

  15. Comparison of different experimental techniques used for wax deposition testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allenson, Stephen; Johnston, Angela [Nalco Energy Services, Sugar Land, TX (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Crude oils consist of various fractions of hydrocarbons, including n-paraffins. The paraffins precipitate out of oil below the temperature called WAT (wax appearance temperature) and accumulate in flow lines and pipelines causing major transport problems. Prediction of paraffin deposition is, therefore, a key element of flow assurance programs. The purpose of this study was to develop a general and reliable approach to prediction of wax deposition based on a critical comparison of several practical lab techniques. Wax deposition study was conducted on five separate crude oils by using a varying protocols and equipment. One experimental technique was a cold stress test of wax deposition combined with ketone precipitation of waxy paraffin crystals. Another set of experiments were carried out for wax deposits formed on the surface of U-tubes and cold fingers of different designs. A comparison of the effectiveness of several wax inhibitors was conducted for these crude oils by using the selected deposition techniques. In each test method the amount of precipitated wax was recorded and compared. The deposits were characterized by melting point, qualitative and quantitative analysis of the wax components using DSC, SARA and HTGC analyses. Efficiency of paraffin inhibitors was correlated with a profile of n-paraffins distribution in the deposits. The limitations and advantages of different deposition techniques were analyzed and discussed. (author)

  16. Characterization of wax deposition by different experimental techniques - a comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindeman, Olga; Allenson, Steve

    2006-03-15

    Crude oils consist of various fractions of hydrocarbons, including n-paraffins. The paraffins precipitate out of oil below the temperature called WAT (wax appearance temperature) and accumulate in flow lines causing major transport problems. Prediction of paraffin deposition is, therefore, a key element of flow assurance programs. The purpose of this study was to develop a general and reliable approach to prediction of wax deposition based on a critical comparison of several practical lab techniques. Wax deposition study was conducted on multiple crude oils using various testing protocols and equipment. One experimental technique was a cold stress test of wax deposition combined with ketone precipitation of waxy paraffin crystals. Another set of experiments was carried out for wax deposits formed on the surface of U-tubes and cold fingers of different designs. A comparison of the effectiveness of several wax inhibitors was conducted for these crude oils by using the selected deposition techniques. In each test method the amount of precipitated wax was recorded and compared. The deposits were characterized by melting point, qualitative and quantitative analysis of the wax components using DSC, SARA and HTGC analyses. Efficiency of paraffin inhibitors was correlated with a profile of n-paraffins distribution in the deposits. The limitations and advantages of different deposition techniques were analyzed and discussed. A new test design designated ''cold tube'' is proposed. (Author) (tk)

  17. Effects of wax treatment on quality and postharvest physiology of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fresh 7055 wax) of pineapple fruits of cultivar'Paris' (a major cultivar for pineapple production) on alleviating chilling injury and their physiological responses during cold storage were examined. Sta-Fresh 2952 wax (60 g/l) was more effective in: ...

  18. Crystal morphology of sunflower wax in soybean oil organogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    While sunflower wax has been recognized as an excellent organogelator for edible oil, the detailed morphology of sunflower wax crystals formed in an edible oil organogel has not been fully understood. In this study, polarized light microscopy, phase contrast microscopy, scanning electron microscopy ...

  19. Geometric accuracy of wax bade models manufactured in silicon moulds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Budzik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the test results of the geometric accuracy of wax blade models manufactured in silicon moulds in the Rapid Tooling process, with the application of the Vacuum Casting technology. In batch production casting waxes are designed for the manufacture of models and components of model sets through injection into a metal die. The objective of the tests was to determine the possibility of using traditional wax for the production of casting models in the rapid prototyping process. Blade models made of five types of casting wax were measured. The definition of the geometric accuracy of wax blade models makes it possible to introduce individual modifications aimed at improving their shape in order to increase the dimensional accuracy of blade models manufactured in the rapid prototyping process.

  20. Detailed characterization of the substrate specificity of mouse wax synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklaszewska, Magdalena; Kawiński, Adam; Banaś, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Wax synthases are membrane-associated enzymes catalysing the esterification reaction between fatty acyl-CoA and a long chain fatty alcohol. In living organisms, wax esters function as storage materials or provide protection against harmful environmental influences. In industry, they are used as ingredients for the production of lubricants, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. Currently the biological sources of wax esters are limited to jojoba oil. In order to establish a large-scale production of desired wax esters in transgenic high-yielding oilseed plants, enzymes involved in wax esters synthesis from different biological resources should be characterized in detail taking into consideration their substrate specificity. Therefore, this study aims at determining the substrate specificity of one of such enzymes -- the mouse wax synthase. The gene encoding this enzyme was expressed heterologously in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the in vitro assays (using microsomal fraction from transgenic yeast), we evaluated the preferences of mouse wax synthase towards a set of combinations of 11 acyl-CoAs with 17 fatty alcohols. The highest activity was observed for 14:0-CoA, 12:0-CoA, and 16:0-CoA in combination with medium chain alcohols (up to 5.2, 3.4, and 3.3 nmol wax esters/min/mg microsomal protein, respectively). Unsaturated alcohols longer than 18°C were better utilized by the enzyme in comparison to the saturated ones. Combinations of all tested alcohols with 20:0-CoA, 22:1-CoA, or Ric-CoA were poorly utilized by the enzyme, and conjugated acyl-CoAs were not utilized at all. Apart from the wax synthase activity, mouse wax synthase also exhibited a very low acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase activity. However, it displayed neither acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase, nor acyl-CoA:sterol acyltransferase activity.

  1. The Inhibitor of wax 1 locus (Iw1) prevents formation of β- and OH-β-diketones in wheat cuticular waxes and maps to a sub-cM interval on chromosome arm 2BS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamski, Nikolai; Bush, Maxwell; Simmonds, James

    2013-01-01

    Glaucousness is described as the scattering effect of visible light from wax deposited on the cuticle of plant aerial organs. In wheat, two dominant genes lead to non-glaucous phenotypes: Inhibitor of wax 1 (Iw1) and Iw2. The molecular mechanisms and the exact extent (beyond visual assessment...... chromosome arm 2BS, which includes a single collinear gene from the corresponding Brachypodium and rice physical maps. The major components of flag leaf and peduncle cuticular waxes included primary alcohols, β-diketones and n-alkanes. Small amounts of C19-C27 alkyl and methylalkylresorcinols that have...

  2. Social support and nocturnal blood pressure dipping: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortmann, Addie L; Gallo, Linda C

    2013-03-01

    Attenuated nocturnal blood pressure (BP) dipping is a better predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality than resting BP measurements. Studies have reported associations between social support, variously defined, and BP dipping. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to investigate associations of functional and structural social support with nocturnal BP dipping assessed over a minimum of 24 hours. A total of 297 articles were identified. Of these, 11 met criteria for inclusion; all studies were cross-sectional in design and included adult participants only (mean age = 19 to 72 years). Evidence was most consistent for an association between functional support and BP dipping, such that 5 of 7 studies reported statistically (or marginally) significant positive associations with BP dipping. Statistically significant functional support-BP dipping associations were moderate (standardized effect size (d) = 0.41) to large (d = 2.01) in magnitude. Studies examining structural support were fewer and relatively less consistent; however, preliminary evidence was observed for associations of marital status and social contact frequency with BP dipping. Statistically significant structural support findings were medium (d = 0.53) to large (d = 1.13) in magnitude. Overall, findings suggest a link between higher levels of functional support and greater nocturnal BP dipping; preliminary evidence was also observed for the protective effects of marriage and social contact frequency. Nonetheless, the relatively small number of studies conducted to date and the heterogeneity of findings across meaningful subgroups suggest that additional research is needed to substantiate these conclusions.

  3. Plant surface wax affects parasitoid's response to host footprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostás, Michael; Ruf, Daniel; Zabka, Vanessa; Hildebrandt, Ulrich

    2008-10-01

    The plant surface is the substrate upon which herbivorous insects and natural enemies meet and thus represents the stage for interactions between the three trophic levels. Plant surfaces are covered by an epicuticular wax layer which is highly variable depending on species, cultivar or plant part. Differences in wax chemistry may modulate ecological interactions. We explored whether caterpillars of Spodoptera frugiperda, when walking over a plant surface, leave a chemical trail (kairomones) that can be detected by the parasitoid Cotesia marginiventris. Chemistry and micromorphology of cuticular waxes of two barley eceriferum wax mutants ( cer-za.126, cer-yp.949) and wild-type cv. Bonus (wt) were assessed. The plants were then used to investigate potential surface effects on the detectability of caterpillar kairomones. Here we provide evidence that C. marginiventris responds to chemical footprints of its host. Parasitoids were able to detect the kairomone on wild-type plants and on both cer mutants but the response to cer-yp.949 (reduced wax, high aldehyde fraction) was less pronounced. Experiments with caterpillar-treated wt and mutant leaves offered simultaneously, confirmed this observation: no difference in wasp response was found when wt was tested against cer-za.126 (reduced wax, wt-like chemical composition) but wt was significantly more attractive than cer-yp.949. This demonstrates for the first time that the wax layer can modulate the detectability of host kairomones.

  4. Rapid Prototyping of wax foundry models in an incremental process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kozik

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an analysis incremental methods of creating wax founding models. There are two methods of Rapid Prototypingof wax models in an incremental process which are more and more often used in industrial practice and in scientific research.Applying Rapid Prototyping methods in the process of making casts allows for acceleration of work on preparing prototypes. It isespecially important in case of element having complicated shapes. The time of making a wax model depending on the size and the appliedRP method may vary from several to a few dozen hours.

  5. Transesterification of Jojoba Oil-Wax Using Microwave Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Labiba I. Hussein; Maher Z. Elsabee; Eid A. Ismail; Hala F. Naguib; Hilda A. Aziz; Moataz A. Elsawy

    2014-01-01

    Jojoba oil-wax is extracted from the seeds of the jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis Link Schneider), a perennial shrub that grows in semi desert areas in Egypt and in some parts of the world. The main uses of jojoba oil-wax are in the cosmetics and pharmaceutical industry, but new uses could arise related to the search of new energetic crops. This paper summarizes a process to convert the jojoba oil-wax to biodiesel by transesterification with ethanol and a series of aliphatic alcohols using a mor...

  6. WAX ActiveLibrary: a tool to manage information overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanka, R; O'Brien, C; Heathfield, H; Buchan, I E

    1999-11-01

    WAX Active-Library (Cambridge Centre for Clinical Informatics) is a knowledge management system that seeks to support doctors' decision making through the provision of electronic books containing a wide range of clinical knowledge and locally based information. WAX has been piloted in several regions in the United Kingdom and formally evaluated in 17 GP surgeries based in Cambridgeshire. The evaluation has provided evidence that WAX Active-Library significantly improves GPs' access to relevant information sources and by increasing appropriate patient management and referrals this might also lead to an improvement in clinical outcomes.

  7. Quantitative trait loci controlling amounts and types of epicuticular waxes in onion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natural variation exists in onion (Allium cepa L.) for amounts and types of epicuticular waxes on leaves. Wild-type waxy onion possesses copious amounts of these waxes, while the foliage of semi-glossy and glossy phenotypes accumulate significantly less wax. Reduced amounts of epicuticular waxes hav...

  8. Structure and Biosynthesis of Branched Wax Compounds on Wild Type and Wax Biosynthesis Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busta, Lucas; Jetter, Reinhard

    2017-06-01

    The cuticle is a waxy composite that protects the aerial organs of land plans from non-stomatal water loss. The chemical make-up of the cuticular wax mixture plays a central role in defining the water barrier, but structure-function relationships have not been established so far, in part due to gaps in our understanding of wax structures and biosynthesis. While wax compounds with saturated, linear hydrocarbon tails have been investigated in detail, very little is known about compounds with modified aliphatic tails, which comprise substantial portions of some plant wax mixtures. This study aimed to investigate the structures, abundances and biosynthesis of branched compounds on the species for which wax biosynthesis is best understood: Arabidopsis thaliana. Microscale derivatization, mass spectral interpretation and organic synthesis identified homologous series of iso-alkanes and iso-alcohols on flowers and leaves, respectively. These comprised approximately 10-15% of wild type wax mixtures. The abundances of both branched wax constituents and accompanying unbranched compounds were reduced on the cer6, cer3 and cer1 mutants but not cer4, indicating that branched compounds are in part synthesized by the same machinery as unbranched compounds. In contrast, the abundances of unbranched, but not branched, wax constituents were reduced on the cer2 and cer26 mutants, suggesting that the pathways to both types of compounds deviate in later steps of chain elongation. Finally, the abundances of branched, but not unbranched, wax compounds were reduced on the cer16 mutant, and the (uncharacterized) CER16 protein may therefore be controlling the relative abundances of iso-alkanes and iso-alcohols on Arabidopsis surfaces. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. The study of importance sampling in Monte-carlo calculation of blocking dips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Zhengying; Zhou Peng

    1988-01-01

    Angular blocking dips around the axis in Al single crystal of α-particles of about 2 Mev produced at a depth of 0.2 μm are calculated by a Monte-carlo simulation. The influence of the small solid angle emission of particles and the importance sampling in the solid angle emission have been investigated. By means of importance sampling, a more reasonable results with high accuracy are obtained

  10. Cucumis sativus L. WAX2 Plays a Pivotal Role in Wax Biosynthesis, Influencing Pollen Fertility and Plant Biotic and Abiotic Stress Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjiao; Liu, Xingwang; Gai, Xinshuang; Ren, Jiaojiao; Liu, Xiaofeng; Cai, Yanling; Wang, Qian; Ren, Huazhong

    2015-07-01

    Cuticular waxes play an important part in protecting plant aerial organs from biotic and abiotic stresses. In previous studies, the biosynthetic pathway of cuticular waxes and relative functional genes has been researched and understood; however, little is known in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.). In this study, we cloned and characterized an AtWAX2 homolog, CsWAX2, in cucumber and found that it is highly expressed in the epidermis, where waxes are synthesized, while subcellular localization showed that CsWAX2 protein is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The transcriptional expression of CsWAX2 was found to be induced by low temperature, drought, salt stress and ABA, while the ectopic expression of CsWAX2 in an Arabidopsis wax2 mutant could partially complement the glossy stem phenotype. Abnormal expression of CsWAX2 in transgenic cucumbers specifically affected both very long chain (VLC) alkanes and cutin biosynthesis. Furthermore, transgenic cucumber plants of CsWAX2 showed significant changes in pollen viability and fruit resistance to water loss and pathogens compared with the wild type. Collectively, these results indicated that CsWAX2 plays a pivotal role in wax biosynthesis, influencing pollen fertility and the plant's response to biotic and abiotic stresses. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Characterization and chemical composition of epicuticular wax from banana leaves grown in Northern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suporn Charumanee

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the physicochemical properties and chemical composition of epicuticular wax extracted from leaves of Kluai Namwa, a banana cultivar which is widely grown in Northern Thailand. Its genotype was identified by a botanist. The wax was extracted using solvent extraction. The fatty acid profiles and physicochemical properties of the wax namely melting point, congealing point, crystal structures and polymorphism, hardness, color, and solubility were examined and compared to those of beeswax, carnauba wax and paraffin wax. The results showed that the genotype of Kluai Namwa was Musa acuminata X M. balbisiana (ABB group cv. Pisang Awak. The highest amount of wax extracted was 274 μg/cm2 surface area. The fatty acid composition and the physicochemical properties of the wax were similar to those of carnauba wax. It could be suggested that the banana wax could be used as a replacement for carnauba wax in various utilizing areas.

  12. Radiation or waxing effect on shelf life of guava fruit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahid, M.; Sattar, A.; Khan, M.N.; Hussain, B.

    1993-01-01

    Red and white guavas were treated with wax emulsion or irradiation (0.25-2.0 kGy) and kept for 12 days at room temperature. Rot attack occurred after 3 days which increased significantly during further storage for all guavas. In the waxed guavas rottage, weight loss and vitamin loss were significantly less than controls and irradiated ones. Sensory scores decreased with storage time and they were 3.7-4.5, 2.1-3.9 and 2.3-2.7 in waxed. irradiated and untreated controls respectively, after 12 days storage. Waxing was found to increase the shelf life of guavas for 3-4 d while irradiation exhibited no beneficial effects

  13. Control of the wax moth Galleria mellonella L. (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae by the male sterile technique (MST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafari Reza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we examined the control of wax moth using the male sterile technique (MST with gamma-rays. To determine the safe and effective dosage of gamma-rays capable of sterilizing male pupae of the wax moth, male pupae were exposed to increasing single doses of gamma-rays (250, 300, 350 and 400 Gy. The release ratio of sterile to normal males was also studied in a similar experiment. Treatments included sterile males, normal males and virgin females at the following ratios: 1:1:1, 2:1:1, 3:1:1, 4:1:1 and 5:1:1. Possible parthenogenetic reproduction of this pest was also examined. The results showed that 350 Gy was the most effective dose capable of sterilizing the male pupae of the wax moth. The best release ratio was established at four sterile males, one normal male for each normal female (4:1:1. Also females were incapable of producing offspring without males.

  14. Biodiesel from Jojoba oil-wax: Transesterification with methanol and properties as a fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canoira, Laureano; Alcantara, Ramon; Garcia-Martinez, Jesus; Carrasco, Jesus [Department of Chemical Engineering and Fuels, School of Mines, Polytechnic University of Madrid, Rios Rosas 21, 28003-Madrid (Spain)

    2006-01-15

    The Jojoba oil-wax is extracted from the seeds of the Jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis Link Schneider), a perennial shrub that grows in semi desert areas in some parts of the world. The main uses of Jojoba oil-wax are in the cosmetics and pharmaceutical industry, but new uses could arise related to the search of new energetic crops. This paper summarizes a process to convert the Jojoba oil-wax to biodiesel by transesterification with methanol, catalysed with sodium methoxide (1wt% of the oil). The transesterification reaction has been carried out in an autoclave at 60 deg C, with a molar ratio methanol/oil 7.5:1, and vigorous stirring (600rpm), reaching a quantitative conversion of the oil after 4h. The separation of the fatty acid methyl esters (the fraction rich in FAME, 79% FAME mixture; 21% fatty alcohols; 51% of methyl cis-11-eicosenoate) from the fatty alcohols rich fraction (72% fatty alcohols; 28% FAME mixture; 26% of cis-11-eicosen-1-ol, 36% of cis-13-docosen-1-ol) has been accomplished in a single crystallization step at low temperature (-18 deg C) from low boiling point petroleum ether. The fraction rich in FAME has a density (at 15 deg C), a kinematic viscosity (at 40 deg C), a cold filter plugging point and a high calorific value in the range of the European standard for biodiesel (EN 14214)

  15. Two Predicted Transmembrane Domains Exclude Very Long Chain Fatty acyl-CoAs from the Active Site of Mouse Wax Synthase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Kawelke

    Full Text Available Wax esters are used as coatings or storage lipids in all kingdoms of life. They are synthesized from a fatty alcohol and an acyl-CoA by wax synthases. In order to get insights into the structure-function relationships of a wax synthase from Mus musculus, a domain swap experiment between the mouse acyl-CoA:wax alcohol acyltransferase (AWAT2 and the homologous mouse acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 2 (DGAT2 was performed. This showed that the substrate specificity of AWAT2 is partially determined by two predicted transmembrane domains near the amino terminus of AWAT2. Upon exchange of the two domains for the respective part of DGAT2, the resulting chimeric enzyme was capable of incorporating up to 20% of very long acyl chains in the wax esters upon expression in S. cerevisiae strain H1246. The amount of very long acyl chains in wax esters synthesized by wild type AWAT2 was negligible. The effect was narrowed down to a single amino acid position within one of the predicted membrane domains, the AWAT2 N36R variant. Taken together, we provide first evidence that two predicted transmembrane domains in AWAT2 are involved in determining its acyl chain length specificity.

  16. Surfactants and Desensitizing Wax Substitutes for TNT-Based Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Association of Pulp and Paper Industry TEA Triethanolamine TNT 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene TNTO A combination of TNT and NTO TPP Triphenylphosphate USP United...Candelilla wax is used in cosmetics. It is extracted from shrubs in Mexico and to a lesser extent in the Big Bend area in Texas. The Mexican government...from the same mine in East Germany. China , USSR and Czech Republic are also known to have deposits of montan waxes. Table 7 shows the estimated

  17. Inhibition of osteoporosis in rats fed with sugar cane wax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Hajime; Man, Sun Li; Ohta, Yutaka; Katsuyama, Naofumi; Chinen, Isao

    2003-02-01

    Rats fed on a restricted, semi-purified diet containing a 50%-reduced level of carbohydrate and oil, but normal levels of protein, minerals and vitamins, exhibited osteoporosis. However, rats fed on this restricted diet, but containing sugar cane wax, did not exhibit this bone disease. Sugar cane wax, containing a long-chain carbohydrate with an OH radical, prevented the development of osteoporosis via a non-estrogenic mechanism.

  18. Nest wax triggers worker reproduction in the bumblebee Bombus terrestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottler-Hoermann, Ann-Marie; Schulz, Stefan; Ayasse, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Social insects are well known for their high level of cooperation. Workers of the primitively eusocial bumblebee Bombus terrestris are able to produce male offspring in the presence of a queen. Nonetheless, they only compete for reproduction, in the so-called competition phase, when the workforce is large enough to support the rearing of reproductives. So far, little is known about the proximate mechanisms underlying the shift between altruism and selfish behaviour in bumblebee workers. In this study, we have examined the influence of chemical cues from the nest wax on the onset of worker reproduction. Chemical analyses of wax extracts have revealed that the patterns and amounts of cuticular lipids change considerably during colony development. These changes in wax scent mirror worker abundance and the presence of fertile workers. In bioassays with queen-right worker groups, wax affects the dominance behaviour and ovarian development of workers. When exposed to wax from a colony in competition phase, workers start to compete for reproduction. We suggest that wax scent enables workers to time their reproduction by providing essential information concerning the social condition of the colony.

  19. 9 CFR 72.13 - Permitted dips and procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... proprietary brands of permitted dips—as well the use of compressed air, vat management techniques, and other... maintained and that under actual field conditions the dipping of cattle with a solution of definite strength...

  20. DiPS: A Unifying Approach for developing System Software

    OpenAIRE

    Michiels, Sam; Matthijs, Frank; Walravens, Dirk; Verbaeten, Pierre

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we unify three essential features for flexible system software: a component oriented approach, self-adaptation and separation of concerns.We propose DiPS (Distrinet Protocol Stack), a component framework, which offers components, an anonymous interaction model and connectors to handle non-functional aspects such as concurrency. DiPS has effectively been used in industrial protocol stacks and device drivers.

  1. How does forest productivity influence river export of plant wax?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feakins, S. J.; West, A. J.; Galy, V.; Malhi, Y.; Girardin, C.; Asner, G. P.; Ponton, C.; Wu, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    How much carbon, fixed in tropical forest photosynthesis, is exported by rivers? From the large biomass held in tropical forests only a small component enters rivers for export. The exported fraction of tropical forest production represents the component removed from the rapid photosynthesis-respiration cycle, with potential for long-term sequestration in downstream sediments. Along the journey downstream, the transported organic matter may be lost to respiration, or stored in deposits before remobilization and later export. Discriminating between carbon sources in rivers presents a challenge to answering the question posed. But, plant waxes are specific tracers of plant biosynthesis that we use to identify sourcing and transport by the river, and that represent a resilient component with sequestration potential. Thus, we quantify the fraction of fresh forest production that goes into plant wax in a series of 9 forest plots in the Madre de Dios River catchment, Peru and set this in the context of catchment scale NPP estimates. Downstream sampling in two seasons captures the suspended particulate load of plant waxes in transit. Paired analyses of carbon and hydrogen isotopes allow for source apportionment by elevation allowing insight into catchment integration processes. Downstream concentrations of plant wax n-alkanes in river are related to discharge to yield estimates of the instantaneous catchment export flux in two contrasting seasons. Ultimately we seek to constrain the flux of plant wax exported by the river, and to estimate what fraction of forest NPP makes that journey from land to sea.

  2. Genetic control of cuticular wax compounds in Eucalyptus globulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosney, Benjamin J; Potts, Brad M; O'Reilly-Wapstra, Julianne M; Vaillancourt, René E; Fitzgerald, Hugh; Davies, Noel W; Freeman, Jules S

    2016-01-01

    Plant cuticular wax compounds perform functions that are essential for the survival of terrestrial plants. Despite their importance, the genetic control of these compounds is poorly understood outside of model taxa. Here we investigate the genetic basis of variation in cuticular compounds in Eucalyptus globulus using quantitative genetic and quantitative trait loci (QTL) analyses. Quantitative genetic analysis was conducted using 246 open-pollinated progeny from 13 native sub-races throughout the geographic range. QTL analysis was conducted using 112 clonally replicated progeny from an outcross F2 population. Nine compounds exhibited significant genetic variation among sub-races with three exhibiting signals of diversifying selection. Fifty-two QTL were found with co-location of QTL for related compounds commonly observed. Notable among these was the QTL for five wax esters, which co-located with a gene from the KCS family, previously implicated in the biosynthesis of cuticular waxes in Arabidopsis. In combination, the QTL and quantitative genetic analyses suggest the variation and differentiation in cuticular wax compounds within E. globulus has a complex genetic origin. Sub-races exhibited independent latitudinal and longitudinal differentiation in cuticular wax compounds, likely reflecting processes such as historic gene flow and diversifying selection acting upon genes that have diverse functions in distinct biochemical pathways. © 2015 University of Tasmania New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. Laboratory Deposition Apparatus to Study the Effects of Wax Deposition on Pipe Magnetic Field Leakage Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Mohd Fauzi Abd

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Accurate technique for wax deposition detection and severity measurement on cold pipe wall is important for pipeline cleaning program. Usually these techniques are validated by conventional techniques on laboratory scale wax deposition flow loop. However conventional techniques inherent limitations and it is difficult to reproduce a predetermine wax deposit profile and hardness at designated location in flow loop. An alternative wax deposition system which integrates modified pour casting method and cold finger method is presented. This system is suitable to reproduce high volume of medium hard wax deposit in pipe with better control of wax deposit profile and hardness.

  4. Protocol for the microbial degradation of coumaphos from cattle dip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulbry, W.; Karns, J.

    1997-01-01

    Insecticide wastes generated from livestock dipping operations are well suited for biodegradation processes since these wastes are concentrated, contained, and have no other significant toxic components. About 400,000 L of cattle dip wastes containing approximately 1500 mg/L of the organophosphate coumaphos are generated yearly along the Mexican border from a USDA program designed to control disease carrying cattle ticks. Use of unlined evaporation pits for the disposal of these wastes has resulted in highly contaminated soils underlying these sites. Previous work has shown that microbial consortia present in selected dip wastes can be induced to mineralize coumaphos. Our laboratory results show that these consortia are able to colonize plastic fibers in trickling biofilters and can be used in these filters to quickly metabolize coumaphos from dip wastes. A field scale biofilter capable of treating 15,000 litre batches of dip waste was used to reduce the coumaphos concentration in two successive 11,000 litre batch trials from 2000 mg/L to 10 mg/L in approximately 14 d. (author)

  5. Unheimlich. From Wax Figures to the Uncanny Valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Conte

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In his pioneering History of Portraiture in Wax, Julius von Schlosser traced back the age-old history of a material which at that time seemed to be already antiquated, if not obsolete. Wax sculptures were rejected and ousted from art history because of their excessive similarity and adherence to models. One hundred years later, however, hyperrealism got its revenge with Maurizio Cattelan’s celebrated hanging children. Moving from that controversial artwork and focusing on the heated polemics over it, my paper will address the question of the well-known Unheimlichkeit of wax figures, investigated by Ernst Jentsch and Sigmund Freud in the early Twentieth Century and nowadays becoming increasingly topical thanks to the recent debate about the existence and nature of the so called Uncanny Valley.

  6. Cannabis-induced psychosis associated with high potency "wax dabs".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Joseph M; Gandal, Michael; Son, Maya

    2016-04-01

    With mounting evidence that the risk of cannabis-induced psychosis may be related to both dose and potency of tetrahydrocannbinol (THC), increasing reports of psychosis associated with cannabinoids containing greater amounts of THC are anticipated. We report two cases of emergent psychosis after using a concentrated THC extract known as cannabis "wax," "oil," or "dabs" raising serious concerns about its psychotic liability. Although "dabbing" with cannabis wax is becoming increasingly popular in the US for both recreational and "medicinal" intentions, our cases raise serious concerns about its psychotic liability and highlight the importance of understanding this risk by physicians recommending cannabinoids for purported medicinal purposes. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Receiver Function Imaging of Dipping Structures - Technique and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.; Niu, F.

    2010-12-01

    CCP Stacking is probably the most common technique in receiver function imaging. In this technique, the conversion points are calculated and binned by assuming horizontal interfaces. However, for dipping structures such as tilted Moho or subducting slab, the horizontal interface assumption breaks down so that the image quality is low and the interfaces are misplaced. In these cases, the CCP stacking is not effective because the true conversion points do not necessarily lie in the vertical planes defined by sources and receivers and the delay time of conversion signals are varying with back azimuth. Although pre-stack time migration is an ideal technique to make correct images, the amount of qualified data it requires is often not available. An alternative way is to gather receiver functions based on conversion points and conversion times calculated from 3D velocity models with dipping structures. A dipping interface is defined by depth (d0) at a fixed geographic location, strike (Φ) and dipping angle (α). For an assumed (d0, Φ, α), we computed the conversion locations and conversion times by 3D ray tracing. We varied the depth (d0) and the dipping geometry (Φ, α) in certain range and determined the optimum value that gives the best coherent stacking signals. Note based on different tectonic setting, one or both of the dipping parameters can be fixed in the grid searching. We applied this technique to the imaging of two different geologic structures. One is a subducting slab case in western Mexico where the Rivera plate is subducting under the North American plate. Receiver functions recorded by fifty broadband seismic stations deployed under the MARS project were used to image the subducting Rivera slab. The second case is a tilted Moho lying underneath the GSN station SDV located at the southern flank of the central Venezuelan Andes. In both cases, we found substantial improvements in the receiver function images using our 3D ray tracing technique.

  8. A case study of an erosion control practice: the broad-based dip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin Bold; Pamela Edwards; Karl Williard

    2007-01-01

    In 2006, 19 gravel haul roads with broad-based dips within the Monongahela National Forest were examined to determine if those dips adhered to Forest specifications for cut depth and dip outslope. Data on the azimuth, contributing road lengths, slopes of the contributing lengths, landscape position of the dip, and soil texture of the road bed materials also were...

  9. Environmental assessment of the hot-dip galvanization processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Karkoszka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Processes of the hot-dip galvanization, refraining from application of dangerous chemical substances together with the necessity of ensuring the high temperatures, both pose a special threat to the environment. Therefore, the subject of analysis was environmental impact of the hot-dip galvanization process. Here has been done the identification and the assessment of the environmental aspects as well as has been pointed at the key-aspects requiring the special supervision. The developed assessment methodology can be applied by each of the organization wanting to master the processes by minimizing their environmental influence.

  10. Variation for epicuticular waxes on onion foliage and impacts on numbers of onion thrips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natural variation exists in onion for amounts of epicuticular waxes on foliage, and plants with lower amounts of these waxes suffer less damage from the insect pest Thrips tabaci (thrips). Wild-type onion possesses copious amounts of epicuticular waxes and is often referred to as “waxy”. The recessi...

  11. Epicuticular waxes on onion leaves and associated resistance to onion thrips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natural variation exists for amounts and types of epicuticular waxes on onion foliage. Wild-type onion possesses copious amounts of these waxes and is often referred to as “waxy”. The recessively inherited “glossy” phenotype has significantly less wax relative to waxy types and shows resistance to o...

  12. ASPHALT-RESIN-WAX DEPOSITS ANALYSIS WITH PETROLEUM REFINERY EQUIPMENT USAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadejda Bondar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The methodology and analysis of wax deposits formed in-water-cooling tower, cistern and tank from wax petroleum were developed. It was shown, that deposits consist of organic (>90% and inorganic components – the first one was enriched by high molecular wax hydrocarbons, the second one – by mechanical impurities. The methods of deposits utilization were proposed

  13. Impact of the Voltage Dips in Shipboard Microgrid Power Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wenzhao; Guerrero, Josep M.; Savaghebi, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Voltage and frequency transient variations are the most common power quality issues in a ship microgrid system. In this paper, the impacts of the voltage dips induced by the sudden-load of ballast pump are analyzed in detail for the ship power systems. Several relevant ship power quality standards...

  14. 9 CFR 73.10 - Permitted dips; substances allowed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Permitted dips; substances allowed. 73.10 Section 73.10 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... flowers of sulphur or sulphur flour to 100 gallons of water; or a specifically permitted proprietary brand...

  15. Dipping Strawberry Plants in Fungicides before Planting to Control Anthracnose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myeong Hyeon Nam

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Anthracnose crown rot (ACR, caused by Colletotrichum fructicola, is a serious disease of strawberry in Korea. The primary inoculums of ACR were symptomless strawberry plants, plant debris, and other host plants. To effectively control anthracnose in symptomless transplanted strawberries, it is necessary to use diseasefree plants, detect the disease early, and apply a fungicide. Therefore, in 2010 and 2011, we evaluated the efficacy of pre-plant fungicide dips by using strawberry transplants infected by C. fructicola for the control of anthracnose. Dipping plants in prochloraz-Mn for 10 min before planting was most effective for controlling anthracnose in symptomless strawberry plants and resulted in more than 76% control efficacy. Azoxystrobin showed a control efficacy of over 40%, but plants treated with pyraclostrobin, mancozeb and iminoctadine tris showed high disease severity. The control efficacy of the dip treatment with prochloraz-Mn did not differ with temperature and time. Treatment with prochloraz-Mn for more than an hour caused growth suppression in strawberry plants. Therefore, the development of anthracnose can be effectively reduced by dipping strawberry plants for 10 min in prochloraz-Mn before planting.

  16. Dip-coated hydrotungstite thin films as humidity sensors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thin films of a hydrated phase of tungsten oxide, viz. hydrotungstite, have been prepared on glass substrates by dip-coating method using ammonium tungstate precursor solution. X-ray diffraction shows the films to have a strong -axis orientation. The resistance of the films is observed to be sensitive to the humidity content ...

  17. Dip-coated hydrotungstite thin films as humidity sensors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Dip-coated hydrotungstite thin films as humidity sensors. G V KUNTE, UJWALA AIL, S A SHIVASHANKAR and A M UMARJI*. Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India. MS received 6 December 2004; revised 28 February 2005. Abstract. Thin films of a hydrated phase of tungsten ...

  18. Novel dip-pen nanolithography strategies for nanopatterning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, C.C.

    2010-01-01

    Dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) is an atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based lithography technique offering the possibility of fabricating patterns with feature sizes ranging from micrometers to tens of nanometers, utilizing either top-down or bottom-up strategies. Although during its early development

  19. 75 FR 38121 - Petroleum Wax Candles From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... paper-cored wicks and containing any amount of petroleum wax, except for candles containing more than 50... investigation. The Commission's designated agency ethics official has advised that a five-year review is not... Office of Government Ethics. Consequently, former employees are not required to seek Commission approval...

  20. Characterization of wax manufactures of historical and artistic interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanella, Luigi; Chicco, Federica; Colapietro, Marcello; Gatta, Tania; Gregori, Emanuela; Panfili, Manuela; Russo, Mario Vincenzo

    2005-01-01

    Purpose of this scientific research is the physic and chemical characterization of two historical wax manufactures, made at the end of XIX century by Francesco Bianchi, a papal engraver. The chemical and analytical investigation was necessary to complete and to confirm the restorer's work. The IR Spectroscopy, X-Ray and GC-MS, the best technique to characterise wax, allowed us to obtain the following results. The two manufactures were made with commercial beeswax: in fact, the relative chromatograms showed unchanged peaks about esters of palmitic acid with C24 to C32 alcohol molecules; using standard beeswax we determined the same amount of hydrocarbons present in the wax manufactures. We found several hydrocarbons in these beeswax materials so that it is reasonable to think about successive modifications. ZnO (white zinc), a pigment, was added, probably due to its colour and covering capacity. Sb2S3, Anthimoniun vermilion, a red-orange pigment, was added to these manufactures to give them a soft pink-orange colour. By all used techniques we determined some modifications in the original beeswax; surely they were made to get a more malleable, mouldable, and then more able to be modelled wax.

  1. Leaf wax biomarkers in transit record river catchment composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponton, Camilo; West, A. Joshua; Feakins, Sarah J.; Galy, Valier

    2014-09-01

    Rivers carry organic molecules derived from terrestrial vegetation to sedimentary deposits in lakes and oceans, storing information about past climate and erosion, as well as representing a component of the carbon cycle. It is anticipated that sourcing of organic matter may not be uniform across catchments with substantial environmental variability in topography, vegetation zones, and climate. Here we analyze plant leaf wax biomarkers in transit in the Madre de Dios River (Peru), which drains a forested catchment across 4.5 km of elevation from the tropical montane forests of the Andes down into the rainforests of Amazonia. We find that the hydrogen isotopic composition of leaf wax molecules (specifically the C28 n-alkanoic acid) carried by this tropical mountain river largely records the elevation gradient defined by the isotopic composition of precipitation, and this supports the general interpretation of these biomarkers as proxy recorders of catchment conditions. However, we also find that leaf wax isotopic composition varies with river flow regime over storm and seasonal timescales, which could in some cases be quantitatively significant relative to changes in the isotopic composition of precipitation in the past. Our results inform on the sourcing and transport of material by a major tributary of the Amazon River and contribute to the spatial interpretation of sedimentary records of past climate using the leaf wax proxy.

  2. Effect of asphaltenes on crude oil wax crystallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kriz, Pavel; Andersen, Simon Ivar

    2005-01-01

    The paper summarizes the experimental work done on asphaltene influenced wax crystallization. Three different asphaltenes (from stable oil, instable oil, and deposit) were mixed at several concentrations or dispersions into the waxy crude oil. These blends were evaluated by viscometry and yield s...

  3. Preparation and Characterization of Sugar Cane Wax Microspheres ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    protect the patients against morning stiffness. [8]. Thus, the development of a controlled release formulation of IM ... initial peak plasma concentrations, protection against morning stiffness, prolonged duration of action, improved ..... sugar cane wax and fatty alcohols on serum and liver lipids in the rats. J Nutr Sci Vitaminol.

  4. Leaf waxes in litter and topsoils along a European transect

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schäfer, I. K.; Lanny, V.; Franke, J.; Eglinton, T. I.; Zech, M.; Vysloužilová, Barbora; Zech, R.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 4 (2016), s. 551-564 ISSN 2199-3971 Institutional support: RVO:67985912 Keywords : leaf waxes * soils Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology http://www.soil-journal.net/2/551/2016/soil-2-551-2016.pdf

  5. Antinutrient and antioxidant quality of waxed and unwaxed pawpaw ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-08-18

    Aug 18, 2008 ... and hydrolysable tannin (HT)) and antioxidant (vitamin C, tocopherol, total phenol and carotenoid) properties. Freshly ... The value of antinutrients of unwaxed sample was lower than that of waxed sample though there was no significant ... the Nigerian diet, but the production of these crops remain ...

  6. Preparation and Characterization of Sugar Cane Wax Microspheres ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and characterize indomethacin (IM) microspheres prepared with sugar cane wax microsperes. Methods: Microspheres were prepared by melt-emulsified dispersion and cooling-induced solidification method. The microspheres were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differntial scanning calorimetry ...

  7. Synthesis of wax in the honeybee (Apis mellifera L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piek, T.

    Newly emerged honeybee workers were fed during 1 or 2 weeks with sucrose containing either heavy water, sodium acetate with deuterium, sodium acetate-1-14C, or uniformly labelled glucose-14C. The various lipid fractions were isolated in order to investigate the origin of the secreted wax components.

  8. Structural characterization of wax esters by electron ionization mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urbanová, Klára; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Valterová, Irena; Háková, Martina; Cvačka, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 1 (2012), s. 204-213 ISSN 0022-2275 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0139 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : interpretation * neutral lipids * spectral database * waxes Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.386, year: 2012

  9. The preservative efficacies of bemul-wax coatings in combination ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All treatments showed significantly increased (p<0.05) pH and -amylase activities but no effects on total sugar levels, pectin esterase activities, taste and flavor of the juice. In conclusion, the combined and bemul-wax treatments preserved the nutritional, biochemical, and sensory qualities of the stored oranges for the four ...

  10. Gourds: Bitter, Bottle, Wax, Snake, Sponge and Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor cucurbits include bitter gourd, bottle gourd, wax gourd, snake gourd, and sponge and ridge gourd, which are significant dietary sources of nutrients such as vitamin A and C, iron and calcium. These cucurbits are cultivated and marketed by smallholder farmers and remain important components of ...

  11. Influence of Different Waxes on the Physical Properties of Linear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    2005-12-22

    Dec 22, 2005 ... Young's modulus depends on the interaction between the crystalline and amorphous regions, due to the elongation energy to be transmitted from the amorphous to the crystalline phase. The interaction between the wax (partially crystallized in the amorphous phase of the polymer) and polyethylene chains.

  12. Release Characteristics of Diltiazem Hydrochloride Wax-Matrix ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to investigate the release characteristics of matrix (non-disintegrating) granules consisting of diltiazem hydrochloride (model drug) and glyceryl behenate (a wax matrix forming polymer) for sustained release application using sintering technique. The granules of diltiazem ...

  13. Variation for epicuticular waxes and thrips resistance in onion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onion thrips (Thrips tabaci) and thrips-vectored Iris Yellow Spot Virus (IYSV) routinely cause significant losses to the bulb and seed crops of onion. Both pests have become more problematic as global temperatures rise. Natural variation exists in onion for amounts and types of epicuticular waxes on...

  14. Wax Spreading in Paper under Controlled Pressure and Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei; Zhou, Jing; Kanungo, Mandakini; Jia, Nancy; Dinsmore, Anthony D

    2018-01-09

    This work describes a novel rapid method to fabricate high-resolution paper-based microfluidic devices using wax-ink-based printing. This study demonstrates that both temperature and pressure are important knobs in controlling the device resolution. High-resolution lines and patterns were obtained by heating the paper asymmetrically from one side up to 110 °C while applying pressure up to 49 kPa. Starting with wax lines with an initial width of 130 μm, we achieve a thorough penetration through a 190 μm-thick paper with lateral spreading on the front as narrow as 90 μm. The role of temperature and pressure are systematically studied and compared with the prediction of the Lucas-Washburn equation. We found that the temperature dependence of spreading can be explained by the viscosity change of the wax, according to the Lucas-Washburn equation. The pressure dependence deviates from Lucas-Washburn behavior because of compression of the paper. An optimal condition for achieving full depth penetration of the wax yet minimizing lateral spreading is suggested after exploring various parameters including temperature, pressure, and paper type. These findings could lead to a rapid roll-to-roll fabrication of high-resolution paper-based diagnostic devices.

  15. Investigation of wax precipitation in crude oil: Experimental and modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taraneh Jafari Behbahani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a series of experiments were carried to investigation of rheological behavior of crude oil using waxy crude oil sample in the absence/presence of flow improver such as ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer. The rheological data covered the temperature range of 5–30 °C. The results indicated that the performance of flow improver was dependent on its molecular weight. Addition of small quantities of flow improver, can improve viscosity and pour point of crude oil. Also, an Artificial Neural Network (ANN model using Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP topology has been developed to account wax appearance temperature and the amount of precipitated wax and the model was verified using experimental data given in this work and reported in the literature. In order to compare the performance of the proposed model based on Artificial Neural Network, the wax precipitation experimental data at different temperatures were predicted using solid solution model and multi-solid phase model. The results showed that the developed model based on Artificial Neural Network can predict more accurately the wax precipitation experimental data in comparison to the previous models such as solid solution and multi-solid phase model with AADs less than 0.5%. Furthermore, the number of parameters required for the Artificial Neural Network (ANN model is less than the studied thermodynamic models.

  16. Influence of Different Waxes on the Physical Properties of Linear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The influence of three different waxes on the thermal and mechanical properties of linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE) was investigated. The samples were prepared through melt blending in a Brabender mixer. The thermal properties of the samples were determined using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and ...

  17. Characterization of Epoxy Composites Reinforced with Wax Encapsulated Microcrystalline Cellulose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanfeng Pan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of paraffin wax encapsulated microcrystalline cellulose (EMC particles on the mechanical and physical properties of EMC/epoxy composites were investigated. It was demonstrated that the compatibility between cellulose and epoxy resin could be maintained due to partial encapsulation resulting in an improvement in epoxy composite mechanical properties. This work was unique because it was possible to improve the physical and mechanical properties of the EMC/epoxy composites while encapsulating the microcrystalline cellulose (MCC for a more homogeneous dispersion. The addition of EMC could increase the stiffness of epoxy composites, especially when the composites were wet. The 1% EMC loading with a 1:2 ratio of wax:MCC demonstrated the best reinforcement for both dry and wet properties. The decomposition temperature of epoxy was preserved up to a 5% EMC loading and for different wax:MCC ratios. An increase in wax encapsulated cellulose loading did increase water absorption but overall this absorption was still low (<1% for all composites.

  18. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling with MeDIP-seq using archived dried blood spots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunstrup, Nicklas H; Starnawska, Anna; Nyegaard, Mette

    2016-01-01

    biobanks. However, availability of this biological material is highly limited as each DBS is made only from a few droplets of blood and storage conditions may be suboptimal for epigenetic studies. Furthermore, as relevant markers may reside outside gene bodies, epigenome-wide interrogation is needed....... RESULTS: Here we demonstrate, as a proof of principle, that genome-wide interrogation of the methylome based on methylated DNA immunoprecipitation coupled with next-generation sequencing (MeDIP-seq) is feasible using a single 3.2 mm DBS punch (60 ng DNA) from filter cards archived for up to 16 years...

  19. Cuticular wax coverage and composition differ among organs of Taraxacum officinale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yanjun; Busta, Lucas; Jetter, Reinhard

    2017-06-01

    Primary plant surfaces are coated with hydrophobic cuticular waxes to minimize non-stomatal water loss. Wax compositions differ greatly between plant species and, in the few species studied systematically so far, also between organs, tissues, and developmental stages. However, the wax mixtures of more species in diverse plant families must be investigated to assess overall wax variability, and ultimately to correlate organ-specific composition with local water barrier properties. Here, we present comprehensive analyses of the waxes covering five organs of Taraxacum officinale (dandelion), to help close a gap in our understanding of wax chemistry in the Asteraceae family. First, novel wax constituents of the petal wax were identified as C 25 6,8- and 8,10-ketols as well as C 27 6,8- and 8,10-ketols. Nine other component classes (fatty acids, primary alcohols, esters, aldehydes, alkanes, triterpenols, triterpene acetates, sterols, and tocopherols) were detected in the wax mixtures covering leaves, peduncles, and petals, as well as fruit beaks and pappi. Wax coverages varied from 5 μg/cm 2 on peduncles to 37 μg/cm 2 on petals. Alcohols predominated in leaf wax, while both alcohols and alkanes were found in similar amounts on peduncles and petals, and mainly alkanes on the fruit beaks and pappi. Chain length distributions within the wax compound classes were similar between organs, centered around C 26 for fatty acids, alcohols, and aldehydes, and C 29 for alkanes. However, the quantities of homologs with longer chain lengths varied substantially between organs, reaching well beyond C 30 on all surfaces except leaves, suggesting differences in elongation enzymes determining the alkyl chain structures. The detailed wax profiles presented here will serve as basis for future investigations into wax biosynthesis in the Asteraceae and into wax functions on different dandelion organs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Epicuticular wax on cherry laurel (Prunus laurocerasus) leaves does not constitute the cuticular transpiration barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeisler, Viktoria; Schreiber, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    Epicuticular wax of cherry laurel does not contribute to the formation of the cuticular transpiration barrier, which must be established by intracuticular wax. Barrier properties of cuticles are established by cuticular wax deposited on the outer surface of the cuticle (epicuticular wax) and in the cutin polymer (intracuticular wax). It is still an open question to what extent epi- and/or intracuticular waxes contribute to the formation of the transpiration barrier. Epicuticular wax was mechanically removed from the surfaces of isolated cuticles and intact leaf disks of cherry laurel (Prunus laurocerasus L.) by stripping with different polymers (collodion, cellulose acetate and gum arabic). Scanning electron microscopy showed that two consecutive treatments with all three polymers were sufficient to completely remove epicuticular wax since wax platelets disappeared and cuticle surfaces appeared smooth. Waxes in consecutive polymer strips and wax remaining in the cuticle after treatment with the polymers were determined by gas chromatography. This confirmed that two treatments of the polymers were sufficient for selectively removing epicuticular wax. Water permeability of isolated cuticles and cuticles covering intact leaf disks was measured using (3)H-labelled water before and after selectively removing epicuticular wax. Cellulose acetate and its solvent acetone led to a significant increase of cuticular permeability, indicating that the organic solvent acetone affected the cuticular transpiration barrier. However, permeability did not change after two subsequent treatments with collodion and gum arabic or after treatment with the corresponding solvents (diethyl ether:ethanol or water). Thus, in the case of P. laurocerasus the epicuticular wax does not significantly contribute to the formation of the cuticular transpiration barrier, which evidently must be established by the intracuticular wax.

  1. Wax ester profiling of seed oil by nano-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iven, Tim; Herrfurth, Cornelia; Hornung, Ellen; Heilmann, Mareike; Hofvander, Per; Stymne, Sten; Zhu, Li-Hua; Feussner, Ivo

    2013-07-06

    Wax esters are highly hydrophobic neutral lipids that are major constituents of the cutin and suberin layer. Moreover they have favorable properties as a commodity for industrial applications. Through transgenic expression of wax ester biosynthetic genes in oilseed crops, it is possible to achieve high level accumulation of defined wax ester compositions within the seed oil to provide a sustainable source for such high value lipids. The fatty alcohol moiety of the wax esters is formed from plant-endogenous acyl-CoAs by the action of fatty acyl reductases (FAR). In a second step the fatty alcohol is condensed with acyl-CoA by a wax synthase (WS) to form a wax ester. In order to evaluate the specificity of wax ester biosynthesis, analytical methods are needed that provide detailed wax ester profiles from complex lipid extracts. We present a direct infusion ESI-tandem MS method that allows the semi-quantitative determination of wax ester compositions from complex lipid mixtures covering 784 even chain molecular species. The definition of calibration prototype groups that combine wax esters according to their fragmentation behavior enables fast quantitative analysis by applying multiple reaction monitoring. This provides a tool to analyze wax layer composition or determine whether seeds accumulate a desired wax ester profile. Besides the profiling method, we provide general information on wax ester analysis by the systematic definition of wax ester prototypes according to their collision-induced dissociation spectra. We applied the developed method for wax ester profiling of the well characterized jojoba seed oil and compared the profile with wax ester-accumulating Arabidopsis thaliana expressing the wax ester biosynthetic genes MaFAR and ScWS. We developed a fast profiling method for wax ester analysis on the molecular species level. This method is suitable to screen large numbers of transgenic plants as well as other wax ester samples like cuticular lipid extracts to

  2. Epicuticular waxes and thrips resistance in onion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Next-generation sequencing of normalized cDNAs from two inbred lines of onion revealed over 3000 well supported single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), of which over 800 have been mapped. This SNP-based map was used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling the amounts and types of epicu...

  3. Studies on Hydrotreating Process of Microcrystalline Wax Produced from Marine Belayim Crude Oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EI Karashi, S.; Marawan, H.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Microcrystalline wax was produced from solvent dewaxing process of vacuum residue raffinate produced from Marine Belayim origin. The untreated microcrystalline wax contains trace amounts of sulfur, oxygen, nitrogen and organometallic compounds as well as heavy aromatics which affect the properties of wax applications in pharmaceutical and technical fields . Microcrystalline wax hydrotreating process was studied using digital controlled unit and Ni O-MoO 3 / Al 2 O 3 catalyst, where operating parameters that controlled the efficiency of the hydrotreated wax were studied separately at different values including reactor temperature, reactor pressure, liquid hourly space velocity and hydrogen to hydrocarbon ratio . Hydrotreated microcrystalline wax at operating conditions (temperature 300 degree C, pressure 73 kg/cm 2 , LHS V 0.52 h-l and H 2 /HC ratio 266.6 Nm 3 /m 3 ) has the best quality to be used as food grade wax

  4. Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax Products from Ultrafine Iron Catalyst Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Amitava Sarkar; Burtron H. Davis

    2006-03-31

    The morphological and chemical nature of ultrafine iron catalyst particles (3-5 nm diameters) during activation/FTS was studied by HRTEM, EELS, and Moessbauer spectroscopy. With the progress of FTS, the carbide re-oxidized to magnetite and catalyst activity gradually decreased. The growth of oxide phase continued and average particle size also increased simultaneously. The phase transformation occurred in a ''growing oxide core'' manner with different nano-zones. The nano-range carbide particles did not show fragmentation or attrition as generally observed in micrometer range particles. Nevertheless, when the dimension of particles reached the micrometer range, the crystalline carbide phase appeared to be sprouted on the surface of magnetite single crystal. In the previous reporting period, a design and operating philosophy was developed for an integrated wax filtration system for a 4 liter slurry bubble column reactor to be used in Phase II of this research program. During the current reporting period, we have started construction of the new filtration system and began modifications to the 4 liter slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) reactor. The system will utilize a primary wax separation device followed by a Pall Accusep or Membralox ceramic cross-flow membrane. As of this writing, the unit is nearly complete except for the modification of a moyno-type pump; the pump was shipped to the manufacturer to install a special leak-free, high pressure seal.

  5. A quartz crystal microbalance characterization of metal-oil interfaces and interactions with wax molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paso, K.; Kompalla, T.; Braathen, B.; Sjoblom, J. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway). Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Ugelstad Laboratory; Aske, N.; Ronningsen, H.P. [StatoilHydro, Stavanger (Norway); Viitala, T. [KSV Instruments, Helsinki (Finland)

    2008-07-01

    This study investigated the solid-liquid interface between stainless steel and model petroleum fluids at isothermal conditions using a quartz crystal microbalance. AISI 316 (Fe/Cr18/Ni10/Mo3) stainless steel was chosen to represent the metal surface, while paraffin components dissolved in dodecane constituted the petroleum model fluid. Commercial macro-crystalline and micro-crystalline waxes provided linear and branched paraffin components, respectively. A van't Hoff relationship was used to establish the paraffin solubility conditions. The well-defined solubility conditions were provided by model fluids prepared with the single-component alkanes n-C36 or n-C30 paraffin. According to the monitored changes in resonance frequency and dissipation factor of the quartz crystal resonator immersed in the model fluids, there was no continual deposition of paraffin components at isothermal conditions. Moreover, solid paraffin crystals dispersed in solution did not adhere to the stainless steel surface. The absence of attractive interactions between the stainless steel surface and dispersed paraffin crystals suggests that an axial transport mechanism exists for incipient wax deposit formation, where gelation kinetics play a key role. These conclusions were supported by QCM measurements performed under a thermal gradient.

  6. Radiotherapic Valuation of Paraffin Wax for Patients with Oral Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Kyung Su; Seo, Seuk Jin; Lee, Je Hee; Yoo, Sook Heun [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hosdital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    This study is designed to investigate radiotherapic valuation of Paraffin Wax, which is newly formed for this study and generally utilized in dentistry, and Mouth Piece and Putty impression, which are commonly used in radiotherapy, for oral cavity as a compensator. Each compensator was formed by 10 x 10 x 1 cm and measured radiation dose attenuation ratio with reference of water phantom which is made of tissue-equivalent materials. Two patients with oral cancer underwent DRR (Digitally Reconstructed Radiogrph) of Offline Review Program of Aria System and Portal vision for 5 times for each material to evaluate reproducibility by each filling materials. Moreover, MU (monitor unit) changes by dose absorption were considered in the case of inevitable implication of an filling materials in the range for radiotherapy. Radiation dose attenuation ratios were shown -0.7{approx}+3.7% for Mouth Piece, +0.21{approx}+0.39% for Paraffin Wax and -2.71{approx}-1.76% for Putty impression. Error ranges of reproducibility of positions were measured {+-}3 mm for Mouth Piece, {+-}2 mm for Paraffin Wax and {+-}2 mm for Putty impression. Difference of prescription MU from dose absorption with an filling material increased +7.8% (250 MU) in Putty impression and -0.9% (230 MU) in Paraffin Wax as converted into a percentage from the standard phantom, Water 232 MU. Dose reduction of boundary between cavity and tissue was observed for Mouth Piece. Mouth Piece also had low reproducibility of positions as it had no reflection of anatomy of oral cavity even though it was a proper material to separate Maxilla and Mandible during therapy. On the other hand, Putty impression was a suitable material to correctly re-position oral cavity as before. However, it risked normal tissues getting unnecessary over irradiation and it caused radiation dose decrease by -2.5% for 1cm volume in comparison of it of water phantom. Dose reduction in Paraffin Wax, Fat Tissue-Equivalent Material, was smaller than other

  7. Radiotherapic Valuation of Paraffin Wax for Patients with Oral Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Kyung Su; Seo, Seuk Jin; Lee, Je Hee; Yoo, Sook Heun

    2011-01-01

    This study is designed to investigate radiotherapic valuation of Paraffin Wax, which is newly formed for this study and generally utilized in dentistry, and Mouth Piece and Putty impression, which are commonly used in radiotherapy, for oral cavity as a compensator. Each compensator was formed by 10 x 10 x 1 cm and measured radiation dose attenuation ratio with reference of water phantom which is made of tissue-equivalent materials. Two patients with oral cancer underwent DRR (Digitally Reconstructed Radiogrph) of Offline Review Program of Aria System and Portal vision for 5 times for each material to evaluate reproducibility by each filling materials. Moreover, MU (monitor unit) changes by dose absorption were considered in the case of inevitable implication of an filling materials in the range for radiotherapy. Radiation dose attenuation ratios were shown -0.7∼+3.7% for Mouth Piece, +0.21∼+0.39% for Paraffin Wax and -2.71∼-1.76% for Putty impression. Error ranges of reproducibility of positions were measured ±3 mm for Mouth Piece, ±2 mm for Paraffin Wax and ±2 mm for Putty impression. Difference of prescription MU from dose absorption with an filling material increased +7.8% (250 MU) in Putty impression and -0.9% (230 MU) in Paraffin Wax as converted into a percentage from the standard phantom, Water 232 MU. Dose reduction of boundary between cavity and tissue was observed for Mouth Piece. Mouth Piece also had low reproducibility of positions as it had no reflection of anatomy of oral cavity even though it was a proper material to separate Maxilla and Mandible during therapy. On the other hand, Putty impression was a suitable material to correctly re-position oral cavity as before. However, it risked normal tissues getting unnecessary over irradiation and it caused radiation dose decrease by -2.5% for 1cm volume in comparison of it of water phantom. Dose reduction in Paraffin Wax, Fat Tissue-Equivalent Material, was smaller than other impressions and

  8. Development of procedures to stabilize chlorfenvinphos in model cattle dips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caceres, Tanya [Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Ecuador, Quito (Ecuador). Dept. de Biologia; University of South Australia (Australia). Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation (CERAR); E-mail: cactp001@students.unisa.edu.au; Pastor, Yolanda; Merino, Ramiro [Comision Ecuatoriana de Energia Atomica, Quito (Ecuador). Dept. de Ecotoxicologia

    2007-07-01

    The environmental fate and dissipation of the acaricide chlorfenvinphos was studied in water and sediment in model cattle dips with monthly recharge and without monthly recharge. Chlorfenvinphos concentration decreased with time in both model dips and the monthly recharge at 10% of the initial concentration was inefficient to maintain the right concentration which would be effective for tick control. Volatilization was the principal factor that influenced the dissipation of the pesticide. The sediment bound residues increased with time. Mineralization of {sup 14}C- chlorfenvinphos due to microbial activity showed that the {sup 14}CO{sub 2} production increased with time in biometers flasks with different amounts of sediment. 2,4 - dichloroacetophenone, and 2,4-dichlorobenzaldehyde were identified as degradation products. Isomerization of chlorfenvinphos from isomer Z to E was influenced by sunlight and it affected the efficiency of the pesticide as Z isomer is more active on tick control than E isomer. (author)

  9. Thermoplastic polymers surfaces for Dip-Pen Nanolithography of oligonucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suriano, Raffaella [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica “Giulio Natta”, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Biella, Serena, E-mail: serena.biella@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica “Giulio Natta”, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Cesura, Federico; Levi, Marinella; Turri, Stefano [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica “Giulio Natta”, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2013-05-15

    Different thermoplastic polymers were spin-coated to prepare smooth surfaces for the direct deposition of end-group modified oligonucleotides by Dip-Pen Nanolithography. A study of the diffusion process was done in order to investigate the dependence of calibration coefficient and quality of deposited features on environmental parameters (temperature, relative humidity) and ink's molecular weight and functionality. The optimization of the process parameters led to the realization of high quality and density nanoarrays on plastics.

  10. Gently dipping normal faults identified with Space Shuttle radar topography data in central Sulawesi, Indonesia, and some implications for fault mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Space-shuttle radar topography data from central Sulawesi, Indonesia, reveal two corrugated, domal landforms, covering hundreds to thousands of square kilometers, that are bounded to the north by an abrupt transition to typical hilly to mountainous topography. These domal landforms are readily interpreted as metamorphic core complexes, an interpretation consistent with a single previous field study, and the abrupt northward transition in topographic style is interpreted as marking the trace of two extensional detachment faults that are active or were recently active. Fault dip, as determined by the slope of exhumed fault footwalls, ranges from 4?? to 18??. Application of critical-taper theory to fault dip and hanging-wall surface slope, and to similar data from several other active or recently active core complexes, suggests a theoretical limit of three degrees for detachment-fault dip. This result appears to conflict with the dearth of seismological evidence for slip on faults dipping less than ~. 30??. The convex-upward form of the gently dipping fault footwalls, however, allows for greater fault dip at depths of earthquake initiation and dominant energy release. Thus, there may be no conflict between seismological and mapping studies for this class of faults. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Parametric cost model for solar space power and DIPS systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisl, C.J.

    1993-01-01

    A detailed cost model has been developed to parametrically determine the program development and production cost of (1) photovoltaic, (2) solar dynamic and (3) dynamic isotope (DIPS) space power systems. The model is applicable in the net electrical power range of 3 to 300 kWe for solar power, and 0.5 to 10 kWe for DIPS. Application of the cost model allows spacecraft or space-based power system architecture and design trade studies or budgetary forecasting and cost benefit analyses. The cost model considers all major power subsystems (i.e., power generation, power conversion, energy storage, thermal management, and power management/distribution/control). It also considers system cost effects such as integration, testing, management, etc. The cost breakdown structure, model assumptions, ground rules, bases, Cost Estimation Relationship (CER) format and rationale are presented, and the application of the cost model to 100-kWe solar space power plants and to a 1.0-kWe DIPS are demonstrated

  12. Phase Transformation of Hot Dipped Aluminium during High Temperature Oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaifol Samsu; Muhammad Daud; Hishamuddin Husain; Mohd Saari Ripin; Rusni Rejab; Zaiton Selamat; Mohd Shariff Sattar

    2014-01-01

    Low alloy carbon steel was coated by hot-dipping into a molten aluminum bath. Isothermal oxidations were carried out at 750 degree Celsius in static air to study the oxidation behaviour of the hot-dipped aluminide steel. The phase transformation in the aluminide layer during diffusion at 750 degree Celsius in static air was analyzed by SEM-EDX and XRD. After hot-dip treatment, the coating layers consisted of three phases, where Al, thinner layer of FeAl 3 , and thicker layer of Fe 2 Al 5 were detected from external topcoat to the aluminide/ steel substrate. After oxidation, the Fe 2 Al 5 formed during the immersion process completely transformed to Fe 2 Al 5 , FeAl 2 , FeAl and Al-Fe(Al) phases because of the composition gradient and the chemical diffusion by oxidation. After oxidation, there are some voids were found at the coating/ substrate interface due to the rapid inter-diffusion of iron and aluminium during oxidation. The FeAl phase kept growing with increasing exposure time at 750 degree Celsius, while the Fe 2 Al 5 was consumed during oxidation. After 168 hrs oxidation, the Fe 2 Al 5 phase was going disappeared as the aluminum layer was consumed. (author)

  13. Study of Plant Waxes Using Low Temperature Method for ESEM

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neděla, Vilém; Tihlaříková, Eva; Schiebertová, P.; Zajícová, I.; Schwarzerová, K.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 22, S3 (2016), s. 1180-1181 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22777S; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LO1211 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : ESEM * plant waxes * low temperature method Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.891, year: 2016

  14. Radiological properties of a wax-gypsum compensator material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plessis, F.C.P. du; Willemse, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the radiological properties of a compensator material consisting of wax and gypsum is presented. Effective attenuation coefficients (EACs) have been determined from transmission measurements with an ion chamber in a Perspex phantom. Measurements were made at 80 and 100 cm source-to-skin distance (SSD) for beam energies of 6, 8, and 15 MV, for field sizes ranging from narrow beam geometries up to 40x40 cm 2 , and at measurement depths of maximum dose build-up, 5 and 10 cm. A parametrization equation could be constructed to predict the EAC values within 4% uncertainty as a function of field size and depth of measurement. The EAC dependence on off-axis position was also quantified at each beam energy and SSD. It was found that the compensator material reduced the required thickness for compensation by 26% at 8 MV when compared to pure paraffin wax for a 10x10 cm 2 field. Relative surface ionization (RSI) measurements have been made to quantify the effect of scattered electrons from the wax-gypsum compensator. Results indicated that for 80 cm SSD the RSI would exceed 50% for fields larger than 15x15 cm 2 . At 100 cm SSD the RSI values were below 50% for all field sizes used

  15. Ultrasound assisted manufacturing of paraffin wax nanoemulsions: process optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, A J; Holkar, C R; Karekar, S E; Pinjari, D V; Pandit, A B

    2015-03-01

    This work reports on the process optimization of ultrasound-assisted, paraffin wax in water nanoemulsions, stabilized by modified sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). This work focuses on the optimization of major emulsification process variables including sonication time, applied power and surfactant concentration. The effects of these variables were investigated on the basis of mean droplet diameter and stability of the prepared emulsion. It was found that the stable emulsion with droplet diameters about 160.9 nm could be formed with the surfactant concentration of 10 mg/ml and treated at 40% of applied power (power density: 0.61 W/ml) for 15 min. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to study the morphology of the emulsion droplets. The droplets were solid at room temperature, showing bright spots under polarized light and a spherical shape under SEM. The electrophoretic properties of emulsion droplets showed a negative zeta potential due to the adsorption of head sulfate groups of the SDS surfactant. For the sake of comparison, paraffin wax emulsion was prepared via emulsion inversion point method and was checked its intrinsic stability. Visually, it was found that the emulsion get separated/creamed within 30 min. while the emulsion prepared via ultrasonically is stable for more than 3 months. From this study, it was found that the ultrasound-assisted emulsification process could be successfully used for the preparation of stable paraffin wax nanoemulsions.

  16. Wax removal for accelerated cotton scouring with alkaline pectinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Pramod B; Nierstrasz, Vincent A; Klug-Santner, Barbara G; Gübitz, Georg M; Lenting, Herman B M; Warmoeskerken, Marijn M C G

    2007-03-01

    A rational approach has been applied to design a new environmentally acceptable and industrially viable enzymatic scouring process. Owing to the substrate specificity, the selection of enzymes depends on the structure and composition of the substrate, i.e. cotton fibre. The structure and composition of the outer layers of cotton fibre has been established on the basis of thorough literature study, which identifies wax and pectin removal to be the key steps for successful scouring process. Three main issues are discussed here, i.e. benchmarking of the existing alkaline scouring process, an evaluation of several selected acidic and alkaline pectinases for scouring, and the effect of wax removal treatment on pectinase performance. It has been found that the pectinolytic capability of alkaline pectinases on cotton pectin is nearly 75% higher than that of acidic pectinases. It is concluded that an efficient wax removal prior to pectinase treatment indeed results in improved performance in terms of hydrophilicity and pectin removal. To evaluate the hydrophilicity, the structural contact angle (theta) was measured using an auto-porosimeter.

  17. Modified paraffin wax for improvement of histological analysis efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jin Ik; Lim, Kook-Jin; Choi, Jin-Young; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2010-08-01

    Paraffin wax is usually used as an embedding medium for histological analysis of natural tissue. However, it is not easy to obtain enough numbers of satisfactory sectioned slices because of the difference in mechanical properties between the paraffin and embedded tissue. We describe a modified paraffin wax that can improve the histological analysis efficiency of natural tissue, composed of paraffin and ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) resin (0, 3, 5, and 10 wt %). Softening temperature of the paraffin/EVA media was similar to that of paraffin (50-60 degrees C). The paraffin/EVA media dissolved completely in xylene after 30 min at 50 degrees C. Physical properties such as the amount of load under the same compressive displacement, elastic recovery, and crystal intensity increased with increased EVA content. EVA medium (5 wt %) was regarded as an optimal composition, based on the sectioning efficiency measured by the numbers of unimpaired sectioned slices, amount of load under the same compressive displacement, and elastic recovery test. Based on the staining test of sectioned slices embedded in a 5 wt % EVA medium by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), Masson trichrome (MT), and other staining tests, it was concluded that the modified paraffin wax can improve the histological analysis efficiency with various natural tissues. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Adhesion force measurements on the two wax layers of the waxy zone in Nepenthes alata pitchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorb, Elena V; Purtov, Julia; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2014-06-03

    The wax coverage of the waxy zone in Nepenthes alata pitchers consists of two clearly distinguishable layers, designated the upper and lower wax layers. Since these layers were reported to reduce insect attachment, they were considered to have anti-adhesive properties. However, no reliable adhesion tests have been performed with these wax layers. In this study, pull-off force measurements were carried out on both wax layers of the N. alata pitcher and on two reference polymer surfaces using deformable polydimethylsiloxane half-spheres as probes. To explain the results obtained, roughness measurements were performed on test surfaces. Micro-morphology of both surface samples and probes tested was examined before and after experiments. Pull-off forces measured on the upper wax layer were the lowest among surfaces tested. Here, contamination of probes by wax crystals detached from the pitcher surface was found. This suggests that low insect attachment on the upper wax layer is caused primarily by the breaking off of wax crystals from the upper wax layer, which acts as a separation layer between the insect pad and the pitcher surface. High adhesion forces obtained on the lower wax layer are explained by the high deformability of probes and the particular roughness of the substrate.

  19. Oil adsorption ability of three-dimensional epicuticular wax coverages in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorb, Elena V.; Hofmann, Philipp; Filippov, Alexander E.; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2017-04-01

    Primary aerial surfaces of terrestrial plants are very often covered with three-dimensional epicuticular waxes. Such wax coverages play an important role in insect-plant interactions. Wax blooms have been experimentally shown in numerous previous studies to be impeding locomotion and reducing attachment of insects. Among the mechanisms responsible for these effects, a possible adsorption of insect adhesive fluid by highly porous wax coverage has been proposed (adsorption hypothesis). Recently, a great decrease in insect attachment force on artificial adsorbing materials was revealed in a few studies. However, adsorption ability of plant wax blooms was still not tested. Using a cryo scanning electron microscopy approach and high-speed video recordings of fluid drops behavior, followed by numerical analysis of experimental data, we show here that the three-dimensional epicuticular wax coverage in the waxy zone of Nepenthes alata pitcher adsorbs oil: we detected changes in the base, height, and volume of the oil drops. The wax layer thickness, differing in samples with untreated two-layered wax coverage and treated one-layered wax, did not significantly affect the drop behavior. These results provide strong evidence that three-dimensional plant wax coverages due to their adsorption capability are in general anti-adhesive for insects, which rely on wet adhesion.

  20. Experimental Modeling of Dynamic Shallow Dip-Slip Faulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uenishi, K.

    2010-12-01

    In our earlier study (AGU 2005, SSJ 2005, JPGU 2006), using a finite difference technique, we have conducted some numerical simulations related to the source dynamics of shallow dip-slip earthquakes, and suggested the possibility of the existence of corner waves, i.e., shear waves that carry concentrated kinematic energy and generate extremely strong particle motions on the hanging wall of a nonvertical fault. In the numerical models, a dip-slip fault is located in a two-dimensional, monolithic linear elastic half space, and the fault plane dips either vertically or 45 degrees. We have investigated the seismic wave field radiated by crack-like rupture of this straight fault. If the fault rupture, initiated at depth, arrests just below or reaches the free surface, four Rayleigh-type pulses are generated: two propagating along the free surface into the opposite directions to the far field, the other two moving back along the ruptured fault surface (interface) downwards into depth. These downward interface pulses may largely control the stopping phase of the dynamic rupture, and in the case the fault plane is inclined, on the hanging wall the interface pulse and the outward-moving Rayleigh surface pulse interact with each other and the corner wave is induced. On the footwall, the ground motion is dominated simply by the weaker Rayleigh pulse propagating along the free surface because of much smaller interaction between this Rayleigh and the interface pulse. The generation of the downward interface pulses and corner wave may play a crucial role in understanding the effects of the geometrical asymmetry on the strong motion induced by shallow dip-slip faulting, but it has not been well recognized so far, partly because those waves are not expected for a fault that is located and ruptures only at depth. However, the seismological recordings of the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, the 2004 Niigata-ken Chuetsu, Japan, earthquakes as well as a more recent one in Iwate-Miyagi Inland

  1. Characterization of a plant leaf cuticle model wax, phase behaviour of model wax–water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fagerström, Anton; Kocherbitov, Vitaly; Westbye, Peter; Bergström, Karin; Mamontova, Varvara; Engblom, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Four individual crystalline phases were discovered in the model wax–water system. • Eutectic melting occurred in both dry and hydrated model wax. • The total transition enthalpy is smaller for the cuticle wax than for the model wax. • Water has a large plasticizing effect on cuticle wax. • The thermotropic transitions of model wax fit in the window of extracted leaf waxes. - Abstract: We investigated the thermotropic phase behaviour of plant leaf intracuticular wax and two representatives of its main components, 1-docosanol (C 22 H 45 OH) and dotriacontane (C 32 H 66 ), in dry and hydrated state. One objective was to obtain a model wax, which can be used to estimate formulations effects on cuticle diffusivity in vitro. The two wax components were chosen based on results from Gas Chromatography coupled to Mass Spectrometry analysis of cuticular wax. The wax was extracted from Clivia Miniata Regel leaves and contained 68% primary alcohols (C 16 –C 32 ) and 16% n-alkanes (C 21 –C 33 ). Differential Scanning Calorimetry, Polarized Light Microscopy and Small- and Wide Angle X-ray Diffraction were used to characterize the cuticular extract and the phase behaviour of the C 22 H 45 OH/C 32 H 66 /H 2 O model system. Four individual crystalline phases were discovered in the model wax–water system and eutectic melting occurred in both dry and hydrated state. The thermotropic transitions of the model wax occur within the broader transition region of the extracted leaf wax

  2. Marginal adaptation of four inlay casting waxes on stone, titanium, and zirconia dies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalakis, Konstantinos X; Kapsampeli, Vassiliki; Kitsou, Aikaterini; Kirmanidou, Yvone; Fotiou, Anna; Pissiotis, Argirios L; Calvani, Pasquale Lino; Hirayama, Hiroshi; Kudara, Yukio

    2014-07-01

    Different inlay casting waxes do not produce copings with satisfactory marginal accuracy when used on different die materials. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the marginal accuracy of 4 inlay casting waxes on stone dies and titanium and zirconia abutments and to correlate the findings with the degree of wetting between the die specimens and the inlay casting waxes. The inlay casting waxes tested were Starwax (Dentaurum), Unterziehwachs (Bredent), SU Esthetic wax (Schuler), and Sculpturing wax (Renfert). The marginal opening of the waxes was measured with a stereomicroscope on high-strength stone dies and on titanium and zirconia abutments. Photographic images were obtained, and the mean marginal opening for each specimen was calculated. A total of 1440 measurements were made. Wetting between die materials and waxes was determined after fabricating stone, titanium, and zirconia rectangular specimens. A calibrated pipette was used to place a drop of molten wax onto each specimen. The contact angle was calculated with software after an image of each specimen had been made with a digital camera. Collected data were subjected to a 2-way analysis of variance (α=.05). Any association between marginal accuracy and wetting of different materials was found by using the Pearson correlation. The wax factor had a statistically significant effect both on the marginal discrepancy (F=158.31, Pdie material factor both on the marginal adaptation (F=503.47, Pdies provided wax copings with the best marginal integrity, followed by titanium and zirconia abutments. Unterziehwachs (Bredent), wax produced the best marginal adaptation on different die materials. A significant correlation was found between the marginal accuracy and the contact angle values. As the contact angle value became smaller, the marginal accuracy improved. All combinations of waxes and stone and titanium dies presented a high wettability. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic

  3. Rheological profiling of organogels prepared at critical gelling concentrations of natural waxes in a triacylglycerol solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ashok R; Babaahmadi, Mehrnoosh; Lesaffer, Ans; Dewettinck, Koen

    2015-05-20

    The aim of this study was to use a detailed rheological characterization to gain new insights into the gelation behavior of natural waxes. To make a comprehensive case, six natural waxes (differing in the relative proportion of chemical components: hydrocarbons, fatty alcohols, fatty acids, and wax esters) were selected as organogelators to gel high-oleic sunflower oil. Flow and dynamic rheological properties of organogels prepared at critical gelling concentrations (Cg) of waxes were studied and compared using drag (stress ramp and steady flow) and oscillatory shear (stress and frequency sweeps) tests. Although, none of the organogels satisfied the rheological definition of a "strong gel" (G″/G' (ω) ≤ 0.1), on comparing the samples, the strongest gel (highest critical stress and dynamic, apparent, and static yield stresses) was obtained not with wax containing the highest proportion of wax esters alone (sunflower wax, SFW) but with wax containing wax esters along with a higher proportion of fatty alcohols (carnauba wax, CRW) although at a comparatively higher Cg (4%wt for latter compared to 0.5%wt for former). As expected, gel formation by waxes containing a high proportion of lower melting fatty acids (berry, BW, and fruit wax, FW) required a comparatively higher Cg (6 and 7%wt, respectively), and in addition, these gels showed the lowest values for plateau elastic modulus (G'LVR) and a prominent crossover point at higher frequency. The gelation temperatures (TG'=G″) for all the studied gels were lower than room temperature, except for SFW and CRW. The yielding-type behavior of gels was evident, with most gels showing strong shear sensitivity and a weak thixotropic recovery. The rheological behavior was combined with the results of thermal analysis and microstructure studies (optical, polarized, and cryo-scanning electron microscopy) to explain the gelation properties of these waxes.

  4. Psychosocial Correlates of Nocturnal Blood Pressure Dipping in African Americans: The Jackson Heart Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruill, Tanya M.; Shallcross, Amanda J.; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Chaplin, William F.; Butler, Mark; Palfrey, Amy; Shimbo, Daichi; Muntner, Paul; Sims, Mario; Sarpong, Daniel F.; Agyemang, Charles; Ravenell, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    African Americans exhibit a lower degree of nocturnal blood pressure (BP) dipping compared with Whites, but the reasons for reduced BP dipping in this group are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to identify psychosocial factors associated with BP dipping in a population-based cohort of

  5. 29 CFR 1910.124 - General requirements for dipping and coating operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General requirements for dipping and coating operations... Dipping and Coating Operations § 1910.124 General requirements for dipping and coating operations. (a... coating operation using flammable or combustible liquids is: (i) Free of any solid particulate that poses...

  6. Reduction of teat skin mastitis pathogen loads: differences between strains, dips, and contact times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enger, B D; Fox, L K; Gay, J M; Johnson, K A

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of these experiments was to (1) assess differences in mastitis pathogen strain sensitivities to teat disinfectants (teat dips), and (2) determine the optimum time for premilking teat dips to remain in contact with teat skin to reduce pathogen loads on teat skin. Two experiments were conducted using the excised teat model. In experiment 1, the differences in mastitis pathogen strain sensitivities to 4 commercially available dips (dip A: 1% H2O2; dip B: 1% chlorine dioxide; dip C: 1% iodophor; and dip D: 0.5% iodophor) were evaluated. Four strains of 11 common mastitis pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Mycoplasma bovis, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus chromogenes, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus hyicus, Staphylococcus xylosus, and Staphylococcus haemolyticus) were tested. In experiment 2, the percentage log reduction of mastitis pathogens (Escherichia coli, Streptococcus uberis, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Klebsiella species, Staphylococcus chromogenes, Staphylococcus haemolyticus, Staphylococcus xylosus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis) on teat skin with 3 commercially available teat dips: dip A; dip D; and dip E: 0.25% iodophor, using dip contact times of 15, 30, and 45 s, was evaluated. Experiment 1 results indicated significant differences in strain sensitivities to dips within pathogen species: Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus chromogenes, and Streptococcus uberis. Species differences were also found where Mycoplasma bovis (97.9% log reduction) was the most sensitive to tested teat dips and Staphylococcus haemolyticus (71.4% log reduction) the most resistant. Experiment 2 results indicated that contact times of 30 and 45 s were equally effective in reducing recovered bacteria for dips D and E and were also significantly more effective than a 15-s contact time. No differences were seen in recovered bacteria between tested contact times after treatment with dip

  7. Solar Filament Longitudinal Oscillations along a Magnetic Field Tube with Two Dips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Yu-Hao; Zhang Li-Yue; Ouyang, Y.; Chen, P. F.; Fang, C., E-mail: chenpf@nju.edu.cn [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2017-04-10

    Large-amplitude longitudinal oscillations of solar filaments have been observed and explored for more than ten years. Previous studies are mainly based on the one-dimensional rigid flux tube model with a single magnetic dip. However, it has been noted that there might be two magnetic dips, and hence two threads, along one magnetic field line. Following previous work, we intend to investigate the kinematics of the filament longitudinal oscillations when two threads are magnetically connected, which is done by solving one-dimensional radiative hydrodynamic equations with the numerical code MPI-AMRVAC. Two different types of perturbations are considered, and the difference from previous works resulting from the interaction of the two filament threads is investigated. We find that even with the inclusion of the thread–thread interaction, the oscillation period is modified weakly, by at most 20% compared to the traditional pendulum model with one thread. However, the damping timescale is significantly affected by the thread–thread interaction. Hence, we should take it into account when applying the consistent seismology to the filaments where two threads are magnetically connected.

  8. Wax esters of different compositions produced via engineering of leaf chloroplast metabolism in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Selcuk; Sun, Chuanxin; Leonova, Svetlana; Dutta, Paresh; Dörmann, Peter; Domergue, Frédéric; Stymne, Sten; Hofvander, Per

    2014-09-01

    In a future bio-based economy, renewable sources for lipid compounds at attractive cost are needed for applications where today petrochemical derivatives are dominating. Wax esters and fatty alcohols provide diverse industrial uses, such as in lubricant and surfactant production. In this study, chloroplast metabolism was engineered to divert intermediates from de novo fatty acid biosynthesis to wax ester synthesis. To accomplish this, chloroplast targeted fatty acyl reductases (FAR) and wax ester synthases (WS) were transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Wax esters of different qualities and quantities were produced providing insights to the properties and interaction of the individual enzymes used. In particular, a phytyl ester synthase was found to be a premium candidate for medium chain wax ester synthesis. Catalytic activities of FAR and WS were also expressed as a fusion protein and determined functionally equivalent to the expression of individual enzymes for wax ester synthesis in chloroplasts. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of sunflower wax coating on physicochemical changes of mangifera indica L. in storage life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soomro, R.K.; Sherazi, S.T.H.

    2013-01-01

    Mango (Mangifera indica L.) fruit has a relatively short storage life due to perishable nature. In order to increases the storage life of langra mangoes, fruits were coated with sunflower wax. Mangoes were stored at room and refrigerated temperature. Sunflower wax coating protects the mangoes in greater proportion to change their color, weight loss, moisture loss, pH and total soluble solids content. The sensorial panel also favors the grander role of sunflower wax coating. Application of sunflower wax coatings had no effect on vitamin C content of mangoes variety and could increases mango storage time around 30 days under regular storage conditions. Sunflower wax coating also inhibited the growth of micro-organisms. The data reveal that by applying a sunflower wax coating effectively prolongs the quality which attributes and extends the shelf life of mango. (author)

  10. Effect of waste wax and chain structure on the mechanical and physical properties of polyethylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. AlMaadeed

    2015-05-01

    The wax dispersion in the matrix strongly depends on the percentage of wax added to the polymer and the molecular structure of the polymer. It was found that increasing the wax content enhances the phase separation. LDPE undergoes less phase separation due to its highly branched structure composed of a network of short and long chain branches. The wax has no pronounced plasticising effect on the polymer. This is clearly manifested in LDPE as no change in the melting temperature occurred. LLDPE and HDPE were slightly affected by a high concentration of wax (30% and 40%. This is due to the non-uniform distribution of short chain branching along the LLDPE and HDPE main chains, which can interact with the wax structure.

  11. Dipping-interface mapping using mode-separated Rayleigh waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Zeng, C.; Miller, R.D.; Liu, Q.

    2009-01-01

    Multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) method is a non-invasive geophysical technique that uses the dispersive characteristic of Rayleigh waves to estimate a vertical shear (S)-wave velocity profile. A pseudo-2D S-wave velocity section is constructed by aligning 1D S-wave velocity profiles at the midpoint of each receiver spread that are contoured using a spatial interpolation scheme. The horizontal resolution of the section is therefore most influenced by the receiver spread length and the source interval. Based on the assumption that a dipping-layer model can be regarded as stepped flat layers, high-resolution linear Radon transform (LRT) has been proposed to image Rayleigh-wave dispersive energy and separate modes of Rayleigh waves from a multichannel record. With the mode-separation technique, therefore, a dispersion curve that possesses satisfactory accuracy can be calculated using a pair of consecutive traces within a mode-separated shot gather. In this study, using synthetic models containing a dipping layer with a slope of 5, 10, 15, 20, or 30 degrees and a real-world example, we assess the ability of using high-resolution LRT to image and separate fundamental-mode Rayleigh waves from raw surface-wave data and accuracy of dispersion curves generated by a pair of consecutive traces within a mode-separated shot gather. Results of synthetic and real-world examples demonstrate that a dipping interface with a slope smaller than 15 degrees can be successfully mapped by separated fundamental waves using high-resolution LRT. ?? Birkh??user Verlag, Basel 2009.

  12. Impedance of the PEP-II DIP screen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, C.-K. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Weiland, T.

    1996-08-01

    The vacuum chamber of a storage ring normally consists of periodically spaced pumping slots. The longitudinal impedance of slots are analyzed in this paper. It is found that although the broad-band impedance is tolerable, the narrow-band impedance, as a consequence of the periodicity of the slots, may exceed the stability limit given by natural damping with no feedback system on. Based on this analysis, the PEP-II distributed-ion-pump (DIP) screen uses long grooves with hidden holes cut halfway to reduce both the broad-band and narrow-band impedances. (author)

  13. Prestack traveltimes for dip-constrained TI media

    KAUST Repository

    Golikov, Pavel

    2012-11-04

    The double-square-root (DSR) formula is an integral part of many wavefield based imaging tools. A transversely isotropic medium with a titled symmetry axis (TI) version of the DSR formula is nearly impossible to obtain analytically. As a result, we develop an approximate version of the DSR formula valid for media with the symmetry axis normal to the dip of the reflector (DTI). The accuracy of this approximate solution is enhanced using Shanks transform to a point where the errors are extremely small for practical anisotropic values. Under this assumption, we also do not need to compute the symmetry axis field as it is inherently included in the formulation.

  14. The use of paraffin wax in a new solar cooker with inner and outer reflectors

    OpenAIRE

    Arabacigil Bihter; Yuksel Numan; Avci Atakan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the potential use and effectiveness of paraffin wax in a new solar cooker was experimentally investigated during daylight and late evening hours. For these experiments, a cooker having an inner reflecting surface was designed, constructed by filling paraffin wax and metal shavings. The side- and sub-surface temperatures of the paraffin wax in the cooker are measured in the summer months of June and July. The thermal efficiency of the cooker w...

  15. Methods for separating boron from borated paraffin wax and its determination by ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeyakumar, S.

    2015-01-01

    Boron compounds are found to be useful in shielding against high-energy neutrons. In radiotherapy treatments, in order to protect occupational workers and patients from the undesirable neutron and gamma doses, paraffin wax containing B 4 C/boric acid is used. Low-level borate wastes generated from the nuclear power plants have been immobilized with paraffin wax using a concentrate waste drying system (CWDS). Borated paraffin waxes are prepared by mixing calculated amounts of either boric acid or boron carbide with the molten wax. This necessitates the determination of boron at different locations in order to check the homogeneous distribution of B over the borated wax. The determination of boron in nuclear materials is inevitable due to its high neutron absorption cross section. For the determination of boron in borated waxes, not many methods have been reported. A method based on the pyrohydrolysis extraction of boron and its quantification with ion chromatography was proposed for paraffin waxes borated with H 3 BO 3 and B 4 C. The B 4 C optimum pyrohydrolysis conditions were identified. Wax samples were mixed with U 3 O 8 , which prevents the sample from flare up, and also accelerates the extraction of boron. Pyrohydrolysis was carried out with moist O 2 at 950℃ for 60 and 90 min for wax with H 3 BO 3 and wax with B 4 C, respectively. Two simple methods of separation based on alkali extraction and melting wax in alkali were also developed exclusively for wax with H 3 BO 3 . In all the separations, the recovery of B was above 98%. During IC separation, B was separated as boron-mannitol anion complex. Linear calibration was obtained between 0.1 and 50 ppm of B, and LOD was calculated as 5 ppb (S/N=3). The reproducibility was better than 5% (RSD)

  16. Biosynthesis of lead epicuticular waxes as influenced by herbicides in two semiarid shrubs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, J.V.S.; Reddy, K.R.; Devi, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of paraquat and 2,4,5-T at 100 and 2000 mg 1 -1 on the levels of leaf surface wax, cuticle, cuticular transpiration and wax biosynthesis was studied in two semiarid shrubs. The herbicides significantly decreased the leaf surface wax, and resulted in increased cuticular transpiration which was associated with increased synthesis of fatty acids and decrease in aldehyde, alcohol and hydrocarbon fractions as evidenced from acetate-1- 14 C studies. (author)

  17. Development and regeneration ability of the wax coverage in Nepenthes alata pitchers: a cryo-SEM approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorb, Elena V; Baum, Martina J; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2013-10-29

    The morphogenesis of the composite epicuticular wax coverage and regeneration ability of the upper wax layer in Nepenthes alata pitchers were studied using a cryo-scanning electron microscopy. Examination of pitchers of different ages revealed six stages in the wax coverage development. In the first stage, wax crystals resemble those found recently in mature pitches of N. dicksoniana and N. ventricosa. Platelets of the upper wax layer originate from broadened tips of stalks during the last developmental stage. Contrary to previous hypotheses, we found that wax crystals of both layers as well as the stalks connecting them are oriented perpendicularly to the pitcher wall. No changes in the height of the wax coverage were detected in 4-8 weeks after mechanical removal of the upper wax layer from mature pitchers on plants. This indicates that the wax coverage in N. alata pitchers is unable to regenerate.

  18. A Case Study Of Turkish Transmission System For VoltageDips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inan, E.; Alboyaci, B.; Bak, Claus Leth

    2009-01-01

    -duration voltage variations. The aim of this paper is to have an idea about voltage dip performance of Turkey Transmission System. Turkey's transmission system has 21 regions. For simulations, 2nd region, which includes Istanbul city's area is heavy loaded, is selected. For purposes of early warning and later...... analysis of voltage dip performance of the whole transmission system, is used to compare with results constructed fault statics from SIMPOW DIPS analysis program real data. SIMPOW DIPS software enables to calculate dip frequency for all busses and lines....

  19. A Study of Dip-Coatable, High-Capacitance Ion Gel Dielectrics for 3D EWOD Device Fabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos E. Clement

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a dip-coatable, high-capacitance ion gel dielectric for scalable fabrication of three-dimensional (3D electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD devices such as an n × n liquid prism array. Due to the formation of a nanometer-thick electric double layer (EDL capacitor, an ion gel dielectric offers two to three orders higher specific capacitance (c ≈ 10 μF/cm2 than that of conventional dielectrics such as SiO2. However, the previous spin-coating method used for gel layer deposition poses several issues for 3D EWOD device fabrication, particularly when assembling multiple modules. Not only does the spin-coating process require multiple repetitions per module, but the ion gel layer also comes in risks of damage or contamination due to handling errors caused during assembly. In addition, it was observed that the chemical formulation previously used for the spin-coating method causes the surface defects on the dip-coated gel layers and thus leads to poor EWOD performance. In this paper, we alternatively propose a dip-coating method with modified gel solutions to obtain defect-free, functional ion gel layers without the issues arising from the spin-coating method for 3D device fabrication. A dip-coating approach offers a single-step coating solution with the benefits of simplicity, scalability, and high throughput for deposition of high-capacitance gel layers on non-planar EWOD devices. An ion gel solution was prepared by combining the [EMIM][TFSI] ionic liquid and the [P(VDF-HFP] copolymer at various wt % ratios in acetone solvent. Experimental studies were conducted to fully understand the effects of chemical composition ratios in the gel solution and how varying thicknesses of ion gel and Teflon layers affects EWOD performance. The effectiveness and potentiality of dip-coatable gel layers for 3D EWOD devices have been demonstrated through fabricating 5 × 1 arrayed liquid prisms using a single-step dip-coating method. Each prism module has

  20. Lost-Wax Casting in Ancient China: New Discussion on Old Debates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weirong; Huang, Wei

    2015-07-01

    The possible use of lost-wax casting in China has long been a matter of controversy. Based on the study of pertinent ancient texts concerning the technical origins of lost-wax casting in China, direct examination of questioned ancient Chinese bronzes as well as definite lost-wax castings from both overseas and China, and modern production of objects using piece-mold casting, the authors point out their own conceptual ideas about ancient lost-wax casting as follows. First, the lost-wax casting technique does not have its earliest origins in ancient China but rather from the Sumerians in Mesopotamia, where it was predominantly used to cast small human and animal figures (statuettes). Next, some essential characteristics of the lost-wax casting technique can be identified from the point of view of a distortable soft starting model. The locally deformed shape of lost-wax castings is found to be variable. Finally, it is improper to consider the ease of extraction from the mold as the criterion for distinguishing lost-wax casting from piece-mold casting. It is therefore incorrect to conclude that the three-dimensional openwork decorations present on Chinese bronzes from the Spring and Autumn Period, and the Warring States Period, are fabricated using lost-wax castings.

  1. Critical Involvement of Environmental Carbon Dioxide Fixation to Drive Wax Ester Fermentation in Euglena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Kazuki; Nakazawa, Masami; Nakamoto, Masatoshi; Okazawa, Atsushi; Kanaya, Shigehiko; Arita, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation profiles of wax esters in Euglena gracilis Z were studied under several environmental conditions. The highest amount of total wax esters accumulated under hypoxia in the dark, and C28 (myristyl-myristate, C14:0-C14:0) was prevalent among all conditions investigated. The wax ester production was almost completely suppressed under anoxia in the light, and supplying exogenous inorganic carbon sources restored wax ester fermentation, indicating the need for external carbon sources for the wax ester fermentation. 13C-labeling experiments revealed specific isotopic enrichment in the odd-numbered fatty acids derived from wax esters, indicating that the exogenously-supplied CO2 was incorporated into wax esters via the propionyl-CoA pathway through the reverse tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. The addition of 3-mercaptopicolinic acid, a phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) inhibitor, significantly affected the incorporation of 13C into citrate and malate as the biosynthetic intermediates of the odd-numbered fatty acids, suggesting the involvement of PEPCK reaction to drive wax ester fermentation. Additionally, the 13C-enrichment pattern of succinate suggested that the CO2 assimilation might proceed through alternative pathways in addition to the PEPCK reaction. The current results indicate that the mechanisms of anoxic CO2 assimilation are an important target to reinforce wax ester fermentation in Euglena. PMID:27669566

  2. THE RÔLE OF THE "WAX" OF THE TUBERCLE BACILLUS IN ESTABLISHING DELAYED HYPERSENSITIVITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffel, Sidney; Arnaud, Louis E.; Dukes, C. Dean; Huang, Jwo S.

    1949-01-01

    Guinea pigs sensitized with egg albumin along with the purified wax fraction of the human tubercle bacillus respond with delayed hypersensitive reactivity to the protein antigen. Previous publications have reported a similar activity of the wax with respect to tuberculoprotein and picryl chloride. The effect is not referable to an ordinary adjuvant activity of the bacillary wax, since antibody titers are not increased in animals which receive it, and since a known adjuvant, water-in-oil emulsion, has no effect with respect to the induction of delayed hypersensitivity. This report further extends the rôle of the tubercle bacillary wax in the induction of delayed hypersensitive states. PMID:18152339

  3. The MIEL1 E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Negatively Regulates Cuticular Wax Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis Stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong Gil; Kim, Juyoung; Suh, Mi Chung; Seo, Pil Joon

    2017-07-01

    Cuticular wax is an important hydrophobic layer that covers the plant aerial surface. Cuticular wax biosynthesis is shaped by multiple layers of regulation. In particular, a pair of R2R3-type MYB transcription factors, MYB96 and MYB30, are known to be the main participants in cuticular wax accumulation. Here, we report that the MYB30-INTERACTING E3 LIGASE 1 (MIEL1) E3 ubiquitin ligase controls the protein stability of the two MYB transcription factors and thereby wax biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. MIEL1-deficient miel1 mutants exhibit increased wax accumulation in stems, with up-regulation of wax biosynthetic genes targeted by MYB96 and MYB30. Genetic analysis reveals that wax accumulation of the miel1 mutant is compromised by myb96 or myb30 mutation, but MYB96 is mainly epistatic to MIEL1, playing a predominant role in cuticular wax deposition. These observations indicate that the MIEL1-MYB96 module is important for balanced cuticular wax biosynthesis in developing inflorescence stems. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Dimensional effects and scalability of Meta-Stable Dip (MSD) memory effect for 1T-DRAM SOI MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, A.; Bawedin, M.; Cristoloveanu, S.; Ernst, T.

    2009-12-01

    The difficult scaling of bulk Dynamic Random Access Memories (DRAMs) has led to various concepts of capacitor-less single-transistor (1T) architectures based on SOI transistor floating-body effects. Amongst them, the Meta-Stable Dip RAM (MSDRAM), which is a double-gate Fully Depleted SOI transistor, exhibits attractive performances. The Meta-Stable Dip effect results from the reduced junction leakage current and the long carrier generation lifetime in thin silicon film transistors. In this study, various devices with different gate lengths, widths and silicon film thicknesses have been systematically explored, revealing the impact of transistor dimensions on the MSD effect. These experimental results are discussed and validated by two-dimensional numerical simulations. It is found that MSD is maintained for small dimensions even in standard SOI MOSFETs, although specific optimizations are expected to enhance MSDRAM performances.

  5. COSMOGENIC NEUTRINOS CHALLENGE THE COSMIC-RAY PROTON DIP MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinze, Jonas; Boncioli, Denise; Winter, Walter [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Bustamante, Mauricio, E-mail: jonas.heinze@desy.de, E-mail: denise.boncioli@desy.de, E-mail: walter.winter@desy.de, E-mail: bustamanteramirez.1@osu.edu [Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics (CCAPP), The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2016-07-10

    The origin and composition of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) remain a mystery. The proton dip model describes their spectral shape in the energy range above 10{sup 9} GeV by pair production and photohadronic interactions with the cosmic microwave background. The photohadronic interactions also produce cosmogenic neutrinos peaking around 10{sup 9} GeV. We test whether this model is still viable in light of recent UHECR spectrum measurements from the Telescope Array experiment and upper limits on the cosmogenic neutrino flux from IceCube. While two-parameter fits have been already presented, we perform a full scan of the three main physical model parameters: source redshift evolution, injected proton maximal energy, and spectral index. We find qualitatively different conclusions compared to earlier two-parameter fits in the literature: a mild preference for a maximal energy cutoff at the sources instead of the Greisen–Zatsepin–Kuzmin cutoff, hard injection spectra, and strong source evolution. The predicted cosmogenic neutrino flux exceeds the IceCube limit for any parameter combination. As a result, the proton dip model is challenged at more than 95% C.L. This is strong evidence against this model independent of mass composition measurements.

  6. Cosmogenic Neutrinos Challenge the Cosmic-ray Proton Dip Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, Jonas; Boncioli, Denise; Bustamante, Mauricio; Winter, Walter

    2016-07-01

    The origin and composition of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) remain a mystery. The proton dip model describes their spectral shape in the energy range above 109 GeV by pair production and photohadronic interactions with the cosmic microwave background. The photohadronic interactions also produce cosmogenic neutrinos peaking around 109 GeV. We test whether this model is still viable in light of recent UHECR spectrum measurements from the Telescope Array experiment and upper limits on the cosmogenic neutrino flux from IceCube. While two-parameter fits have been already presented, we perform a full scan of the three main physical model parameters: source redshift evolution, injected proton maximal energy, and spectral index. We find qualitatively different conclusions compared to earlier two-parameter fits in the literature: a mild preference for a maximal energy cutoff at the sources instead of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin cutoff, hard injection spectra, and strong source evolution. The predicted cosmogenic neutrino flux exceeds the IceCube limit for any parameter combination. As a result, the proton dip model is challenged at more than 95% C.L. This is strong evidence against this model independent of mass composition measurements.

  7. Development of procedures to stabilize chlorfenvinphos in model cattle dips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastor, Y.; Caceres, T.; Merino, R.; Villamar, P.; Castro, R.

    1997-01-01

    The environmental fate and dissipation of chlorfenvinphos acaricide was studied in water and sediment in model cattle dips with recharge, without recharge and with added stabilizers. Chlorfenvinphos concentration decreased with time in all of them, and the monthly recharge at 10% of the initial concentration was inefficient to maintain a concentration that would be effective for tick control. However, the loss of pesticide in the model dip with added phosphate buffer as stabilizer was the least. Volatilization was the principal factor that influenced the dissipation of the pesticide. The sediment bound residues increased with time. Mineralization of 14 C-chlorfenvinphos due to microbial activity showed that the 14 CO 2 production increased with time in biometers flasks with different amounts of sediment. 2,4-Dichloroacetophenone, and 2,4-dichlorobenzaldehyde were identified as degradation products. Isomerization of chlorfenviphos from isomer Z to E was influenced by sunlight. Chlorfenvinphos was stable in aqueous solution for 14 days under pH 4 to 9. Leaching tests demonstrated that the pesticide was not a potential pollutant of ground water. (author)

  8. ICE-DIP closing workshop - Public session | 14 September

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    ICE-DIP, the Intel-CERN European Doctorate Industrial Program (see here), is a European Industrial Doctorate scheme (see here) led by CERN. The focus of the project, which launched in 2013, has been the development of techniques for acquiring and processing data that are relevant for the trigger and data-acquisition systems of the LHC experiments.   The results will be publicly presented in an open session on the afternoon of 14th September. Building on CERN’s long-standing relationship with Intel through CERN openlab, ICE-DIP brings together CERN, Intel and research universities to offer training to five PhD students in advanced information and communication technologies (ICT). These young researchers have been funded by the European Commission as fellows at CERN and enrolled in doctoral programmes at the National University of Ireland Maynooth and Dublin City University. They have each completed 18 month secondments at Intel locations around the world gaining in-depth experience of the v...

  9. Characterization of rice bran wax policosanol and its nanoemulsion formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishaka A

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aminu Ishaka,1,2 Mustapha Umar Imam,1 Rozi Mahamud,3 Abu Bakar Zakaria Zuki,4 Ismail Maznah1 1Laboratory of Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Bioscience, University Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia; 2Department of Medical Biochemistry, College of Health Sciences, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria; 3Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, 4Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia Abstract: Policosanol, a mixture of long-chain alcohols found in animal and plant waxes, has several biological effects; however, it has a bioavailability of less than 10%. Therefore, there is a need to improve its bioavailability, and one of the ways of doing this is by nanoemulsion formulation. Different droplet size distributions are usually achieved when emulsions are formed, which solely depends on the preparation method used. Mostly, emulsions are intended for better delivery with maintenance of the characteristics and properties of the leading components. In this study, policosanol was extracted from rice bran wax, its composition was determined by gas chromatography mass spectrophotometry, nanoemulsion was made, and the physical stability characteristics were determined. The results showed that policosanol nanoemulsion has a nanosize particle distribution below 100 nm (92.56–94.52 nm, with optimum charge distribution (-55.8 to -45.12 mV, pH (6.79–6.92 and refractive index (1.50; these were monitored and found to be stable for 8 weeks. The stability of policosanol nanoemulsion confers the potential to withstand long storage times. Keywords: rice bran wax, policosanol, nanoemulsion, characterization

  10. RDX/Polyethylene Wax Compositions as Pressed Explosive,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-09-01

    method may be described generally as cream coloured , free—flowing granular powders. How- ever the powders vary somewhat in appearance with the amount...granules, and are more yellow in colour . Various RDX/polyethylene wax compositions and, for comparison , RDX Grade 1A were examined using a binocular...Report KAR89. Confidential. 5. Dixon, W.J. and Mood , A.M. (1948) . J. Am. statis. Ass., 43, 109 . 6. Cachia, G.P. and Whitbread, E.G. (1958). Proc. R

  11. Evaluation of Wax Deposition and Its Control During Production of Alaska North Slope Oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao Zhu; Jack A. Walker; J. Liang

    2008-12-31

    Due to increasing oil demand, oil companies are moving into arctic environments and deep-water areas for oil production. In these regions of lower temperatures, wax deposits begin to form when the temperature in the wellbore falls below wax appearance temperature (WAT). This condition leads to reduced production rates and larger pressure drops. Wax problems in production wells are very costly due to production down time for removal of wax. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a solution to wax deposition. In order to develop a solution to wax deposition, it is essential to characterize the crude oil and study phase behavior properties. The main objective of this project was to characterize Alaskan North Slope crude oil and study the phase behavior, which was further used to develop a dynamic wax deposition model. This report summarizes the results of the various experimental studies. The subtasks completed during this study include measurement of density, molecular weight, viscosity, pour point, wax appearance temperature, wax content, rate of wax deposition using cold finger, compositional characterization of crude oil and wax obtained from wax content, gas-oil ratio, and phase behavior experiments including constant composition expansion and differential liberation. Also, included in this report is the development of a thermodynamic model to predict wax precipitation. From the experimental study of wax appearance temperature, it was found that wax can start to precipitate at temperatures as high as 40.6 C. The WAT obtained from cross-polar microscopy and viscometry was compared, and it was discovered that WAT from viscometry is overestimated. From the pour point experiment it was found that crude oil can cease to flow at a temperature of 12 C. From the experimental results of wax content, it is evident that the wax content in Alaskan North Slope crude oil can be as high as 28.57%. The highest gas-oil ratio for a live oil sample was observed to be 619.26 SCF

  12. Conductance dips and spin precession in a nonuniform waveguide with spin–orbit coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malyshev, A. I., E-mail: malyshev@phys.unn.ru; Kozulin, A. S. [Lobachevsky Nizhny Novgorod State University (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    An infinite waveguide with a nonuniformity, a segment of finite length with spin–orbit coupling, is considered in the case when the Rashba and Dresselhaus parameters are identical. Analytical expressions have been derived in the single-mode approximation for the conductance of the system for an arbitrary initial spin state. Based on numerical calculations with several size quantization modes, we have detected and described the conductance dips arising when the waves are localized in the nonuniformity due to the formation of an effective potential well in it. We show that allowance for the evanescent modes under carrier spin precession in an effective magnetic field does not lead to a change in the direction of the average spin vector at the output of the system.

  13. Properties of Cookies Made with Natural Wax-Vegetable Oil Organogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hong-Sik; Singh, Mukti; Lee, Suyong

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the feasibility of cookies in which the conventional margarine is replaced with an organogel of vegetable oil (VO) and natural wax. New cookies from VO organogels contain no trans fats and much less saturated fats than cookies made with a conventional margarine. To understand the effects of different kinds of waxes, organogels were prepared from 4 different waxes including sunflower wax (SW), rice bran wax (RBW), beeswax, and candelilla wax and properties of cookie dough and cookie were evaluated. To investigate the effects of different VOs on the properties of cookies, 3 VOs including olive oil, soybean oil and flaxseed oil representing oils rich in oleic acid (18:1), linoleic acid (18:2), and linolenic acid (18:3), respectively, were used. Both the wax and VO significantly affected properties of organogel such as firmness and melting behavior shown in differential scanning calorimetry. The highest firmness of organogel was observed with SW and flaxseed oil. Properties of dough such as hardness and melting behavior were also significantly affected by wax and VO while trends were somewhat different from those for organogels. SW and RBW provided greatest hardnesses to cookie dough. However, hardness, spread factor, and fracturability of cookie containing the wax-VO organogel were not significantly affected by different waxes and VOs. Several cookies made with wax-VO organogels showed similar properties to cookies made with a commercial margarine. Therefore, this study shows the high feasibility of utilization of the organogel technology in real foods such as cookies rich in unsaturated fats. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  14. Synthesis of oleyl oleate wax esters in Arabidopsis thaliana and Camelina sativa seed oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iven, Tim; Hornung, Ellen; Heilmann, Mareike; Feussner, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Seed oil composed of wax esters with long-chain monoenoic acyl moieties represents a high-value commodity for industry. Such plant-derived sperm oil-like liquid wax esters are biodegradable and can have excellent properties for lubrication. In addition, wax ester oil may represent a superior substrate for biodiesel production. In this study, we demonstrate that the low-input oil seed crop Camelina sativa can serve as a biotechnological platform for environmentally benign wax ester production. Two biosynthetic steps catalysed by a fatty alcohol-forming acyl-CoA reductase (FAR) and a wax ester synthase (WS) are sufficient to achieve wax ester accumulation from acyl-CoA substrates. To produce plant-derived sperm oil-like liquid wax esters, the WS from Mus musculus (MmWS) or Simmondsia chinensis (ScWS) were expressed in combination with the FAR from Mus musculus (MmFAR1) or Marinobacter aquaeolei (MaFAR) in seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana and Camelina sativa. The three analysed enzyme combinations Oleo3:mCherry:MmFAR1∆c/Oleo3:EYFP:MmWS, Oleo3:mCherry:MmFAR1∆c/ScWS and MaFAR/ScWS showed differences in the wax ester molecular species profiles and overall biosynthetic performance. By expressing MaFAR/ScWS in Arabidopsis or Camelina up to 59% or 21% of the seed oil TAGs were replaced by wax esters, respectively. This combination also yielded wax ester molecular species with highest content of monounsaturated acyl moieties. Expression of the enzyme combinations in the Arabidopsis fae1 fad2 mutant background high in oleic acid resulted in wax ester accumulation enriched in oleyl oleate (18:1/18:1 > 60%), suggesting that similar values may be obtained with a Camelina high oleic acid line. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Lattice-matched double dip-shaped BAlGaN/AlN quantum well structures for ultraviolet light emission devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seoung-Hwan; Ahn, Doyeol

    2018-05-01

    Ultraviolet light emission characteristics of lattice-matched BxAlyGa1-x-y N/AlN quantum well (QW) structures with double AlGaN delta layers were investigated theoretically. In contrast to conventional single dip-shaped QW structure where the reduction effect of the spatial separation between electron and hole wave functions is negligible, proposed double dip-shaped QW shows significant enhancement of the ultraviolet light emission intensity from a BAlGaN/AlN QW structure due to the reduced spatial separation between electron and hole wave functions. The emission peak of the double dip-shaped QW structure is expected to be about three times larger than that of the conventional rectangular AlGaN/AlN QW structure.

  16. DipA, a pore-forming protein in the outer membrane of Lyme disease spirochetes exhibits specificity for the permeation of dicarboxylates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Thein

    Full Text Available Lyme disease Borreliae are highly dependent on the uptake of nutrients provided by their hosts. Our study describes the identification of a 36 kDa protein that functions as putative dicarboxylate-specific porin in the outer membrane of Lyme disease Borrelia. The protein was purified by hydroxyapatite chromatography from Borrelia burgdorferi B31 and designated as DipA, for dicarboxylate-specific porin A. DipA was partially sequenced, and corresponding genes were identified in the genomes of B. burgdorferi B31, Borrelia garinii PBi and Borrelia afzelii PKo. DipA exhibits high homology to the Oms38 porins of relapsing fever Borreliae. B. burgdorferi DipA was characterized using the black lipid bilayer assay. The protein has a single-channel conductance of 50 pS in 1 M KCl, is slightly selective for anions with a permeability ratio for cations over anions of 0.57 in KCl and is not voltage-dependent. The channel could be partly blocked by different di- and tricarboxylic anions. Particular high stability constants up to about 28,000 l/mol (in 0.1 M KCl were obtained among the 11 tested anions for oxaloacetate, 2-oxoglutarate and citrate. The results imply that DipA forms a porin specific for dicarboxylates which may play an important role for the uptake of specific nutrients in different Borrelia species.

  17. Identification of chemical components of corn kernel pericarp wax associated with resistance to Aspergillus flavus infection and aflatoxin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gembeh, S V; Brown, R L; Grimm, C; Cleveland, T E

    2001-10-01

    Kernel pericarp wax of the corn breeding population GT-MAS:gk has been associated with resistance to Aspergillus flavus infection and aflatoxin production. GT-MAS:gk wax, previously compared to waxes of three susceptible genotypes, was presently compared to wax of a different, and more numerous, group of susceptible lines. Wax separation by TLC confirmed previous findings, demonstrating a unique GT-MAS:gk band and a unique "susceptible" band. Only GT-MAS:gk wax inhibited the growth of A. flavus; however, no association was established, as before, between kernel wax abundance and resistance. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) analysis of kernel whole wax showed a higher percentage of phenol-like compounds in wax from GT-MAS:gk than in waxes from the susceptible lines. The GT-MAS:gk unique band contained phenol-like compounds and ethyl-hexadecanoate; butyl-hexadecanoate was preeminent in most of the "susceptible bands". Alkylresorcinol (phenolic compounds) content was dramatically higher in GT-MAS:gk wax than in the wax of susceptible lines. An alkylresorcinol, 5-methylresorcinol, also inhibited in vitro growth of A. flavus. These and other phenolic compounds may contribute to kernel wax inhibition of A. flavus infection/aflatoxin production. Further investigation is needed to confirm a role for them in GT-MAS:gk resistance.

  18. Fruit cuticular waxes as a source of biologically active triterpenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szakiel, Anna; Pączkowski, Cezary; Pensec, Flora; Bertsch, Christophe

    2012-06-01

    The health benefits associated with a diet rich in fruit and vegetables include reduction of the risk of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer, that are becoming prevalent in the aging human population. Triterpenoids, polycyclic compounds derived from the linear hydrocarbon squalene, are widely distributed in edible and medicinal plants and are an integral part of the human diet. As an important group of phytochemicals that exert numerous biological effects and display various pharmacological activities, triterpenoids are being evaluated for use in new functional foods, drugs, cosmetics and healthcare products. Screening plant material in the search for triterpenoid-rich plant tissues has identified fruit peel and especially fruit cuticular waxes as promising and highly available sources. The chemical composition, abundance and biological activities of triterpenoids occurring in cuticular waxes of some economically important fruits, like apple, grape berry, olive, tomato and others, are described in this review. The need for environmentally valuable and potentially profitable technologies for the recovery, recycling and upgrading of residues from fruit processing is also discussed.

  19. Composition of epicuticular wax on Prosopis glandulosa leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayeux, H.S. Jr.; Wilkinson, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    Epicuticular wax on leaves of field-grown honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa Torr.) trees consisted of 35% esters, 32% alkanes, 25% free fatty alcohols, and 7% free fatty acids. Aldehydes were present in very low concentrations. The number of carbon atoms (C n ) of alkanes ranged from 25 to 31, with a maximum (57%) at 29. Esters consisted of fatty acids with C n of 16, 18, and 20, with most (70%) at 18 and fatty alcohols with C n of 24-32. The C n of free fatty alcohols and free fatty acids also ranged from 24 to 32. Only primary alcohols were present. Immediately after exposure of glasshouse-grown seedlings to 14 CO 2 for 4 h, 60% of the recovered 14 C was incorporated into free fatty acids; the percentage decreased progressively to 18% 8 h after exposure and remained stable thereafter. The proportion of 14 C in free fatty alcohols increased from ca. 12% immediately after exposure to 14 CO 2 to 55% at 8 h. Little 14 C was associated with other wax components over the 24-h period; 3% or less was incorporated into alkanes

  20. Composition of epicuticular wax on Prosopis glandulosa leaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayeux, H.S. Jr.; Wilkinson, R.E. (USDA-ARS, Temple, TX (USA) Univ. of Georgia Agricultural Experiment Station, Experiment (USA))

    1990-06-01

    Epicuticular wax on leaves of field-grown honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa Torr.) trees consisted of 35% esters, 32% alkanes, 25% free fatty alcohols, and 7% free fatty acids. Aldehydes were present in very low concentrations. The number of carbon atoms (C{sub n}) of alkanes ranged from 25 to 31, with a maximum (57%) at 29. Esters consisted of fatty acids with C{sub n} of 16, 18, and 20, with most (70%) at 18 and fatty alcohols with C{sub n} of 24-32. The C{sub n} of free fatty alcohols and free fatty acids also ranged from 24 to 32. Only primary alcohols were present. Immediately after exposure of glasshouse-grown seedlings to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} for 4 h, 60% of the recovered {sup 14}C was incorporated into free fatty acids; the percentage decreased progressively to 18% 8 h after exposure and remained stable thereafter. The proportion of {sup 14}C in free fatty alcohols increased from ca. 12% immediately after exposure to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} to 55% at 8 h. Little {sup 14}C was associated with other wax components over the 24-h period; 3% or less was incorporated into alkanes.

  1. Inverse gradients in leaf wax δD and δ13C values along grass blades of Miscanthus sinensis: implications for leaf wax reproduction and plant physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li; Huang, Yongsong

    2013-06-01

    Compound specific hydrogen and carbon isotopic ratios of higher plant leaf waxes have been extensively used in paleoclimate and paleoenvironmental reconstructions. However, studies so far have focused on the comparison of leaf wax isotopic differences in bulk leaf samples between different plant species. We sampled three different varieties of tall grasses (Miscanthus sinensis) in six segments from base to tip and determined hydrogen and carbon isotopic ratios of leaf waxes, as well as hydrogen and oxygen isotopic ratios of leaf water samples. We found an increasing, base-to-tip hydrogen isotopic gradient along the grass blades that can probably be attributed to active leaf wax regeneration over the growth season. Carbon isotopic ratios, on the other hand, show opposite trends to hydrogen isotopic ratios along the grass blades, which may reflect different photosynthetic efficiencies at different blade locales.

  2. Liquid-metal dip seal with pneumatic spring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poindexter, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    An improved liquid-metal dip seal for sealing the annulus between rotating plugs in the reactor vessel head of a liquid-metal fast-breeder nuclear reactor has two legs of differing widths communicating under a seal blade; the wide leg is also in communication with cover gas of the reactor and the narrow leg is also in communication with an isolated plug annulus above the seal. The annulus contains inert gas which acts as a pneumatic spring. Upon increasing cover gas pressure which depresses the level in the wide leg and greatly increases the level in the narrow leg, the pneumatic spring is compressed, and resists further level changes, thus preventing radioactive cover gas from bubbling through the seal

  3. Effect of soil moisture management on the quality of wax apple | Lin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wax apple (Syzygium samarngense Merr.et Perry) was one of the economically planted fruits in Taiwan. This research was conducted to evaluate the effects of different soil moisture management on increasing wax apple quality. It was preceded at two different soil properties (shallow soil and alluvial soil) in Pingtung, ...

  4. Changes in Cuticular Wax Composition of Two Blueberry Cultivars during Fruit Ripening and Postharvest Cold Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wenjing; Gao, Haiyan; Chen, Hangjun; Wu, Weijie; Fang, Xiangjun

    2018-03-21

    Cuticular wax plays an important role for the quality of blueberry fruits. In this study, the cuticular wax composition of two blueberry cultivars, 'Legacy' ( Vaccinium corymbosum) and 'Brightwell' ( Vaccinium ashei), was examined during fruit ripening and postharvest cold storage. The results showed that wax was gradually deposited on the epidermis of blueberry fruits and the content of major wax compounds, except that for diketones, increased significantly during fruit ripening. The total wax content was 2-fold greater in 'Brightwell' blueberries than that in 'Legacy' blueberries during fruit ripening. The total wax content of both cultivars decreased during 30 days of storage at 4 °C, and the variation of cuticular wax composition was cultivar-dependent. The content of diketones decreased significantly in 'Legacy' blueberries, while the content of triterpenoids and aliphatic compounds showed different fold changes in 'Brightwell' blueberries after 30 days of storage at 4 °C. Overall, our study provided a quantitative and qualitative overview of cuticular wax compounds of blueberry fruits during ripening and postharvest cold storage.

  5. Skimmiwallinin, an additional skimmiwallinol derivative from the cuticular wax of Cocos nucifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalante-Erosa, Fabiola; Fernández-Concha, Germán Carnevali; Peña-Rodríguez, Luis M

    2009-01-01

    AgNO3-impregnated prep-TLC purification of the wax extract of Cocos nucifera allowed the isolation and identification of skimmiwallinin as an additional skimmiwallinol derivative from the cuticular wax of coconut palms. Identification was based on the comparison of its spectroscopic data with those reported in the literature.

  6. Epicuticular wax on stomata of damaged silver fir trees (Abies alba Mili.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Bačić

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Condition of epistomatal wax on the abaxial surface of the current and previous-year needles of damaged silver fir trees (Abies alba Mill., both from the polluted Risnjak and "clean" Donja Dobra sites in Gorski Kotar region, both influenced by pollutants coming from Europe, during two years, three times a year, were examined with Scanning Electron Microscope. In the course of time the wax tubules on the epistomatal rims of stomata in polluted, but also in "clean" needles surface, become fused and agglomerated rapidly to various extents of morphologically different types of amorphous wax crusts, primarily compact and particulate ones. This process begins very early, especially in polluted Risnjak site, and may be interpreted as a possible result of air pollution. However, the recrystalization, or production of new tubules, also appears relatively quickly in mostly cases. Quantitative estimations indicate a very large total amount of amorphous wax crusts in the current-year needles, and a very high percentage of the same wax in previous-year needles. Amorphous wax crusts cover stomatal pores, as well as the rims, disturbing the normal gas exchange. Statistically there is a signicant tendency of increase in wax degradation in the needles of the polluted site in comparison with those of the unpolluted one, but there is an insignificant wax degradation among the needles of damaged trees within each site. These results confirmed most of the research done in our preliminary report.

  7. Growth, yield and quality responses to gibberellic acid (GA3)of Wax ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-26

    Sep 26, 2011 ... quality of jambu madu fruits under field conditions. Key words: Gibberellin, growth, quality, wax apple, yield. INTRODUCTION. The wax apple or jambu var. jambu air madu is a tropical .... according to Miller and Rice-Evans (1997). Total anthocyanin contents of the hydrophilic extracts were measured by the ...

  8. Morphology and accumulation of epicuticular wax on needles of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constance A. Harrington; William C. Carlson

    2015-01-01

    Past studies have documented differences in epicuticular wax among several tree species but little attention has been paid to changes in accumulation of foliar wax that can occur during the year. We sampled current-year needles from the terminal shoots of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii) in late June/early...

  9. Simple Synthesis Hydrogenated Castor Oil Fatty Amide Wax and Its Coating Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiuzhu; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Rui; Zhao, Zhong

    2017-07-01

    A simple method for incorporating amine groups in hydrogenated castor oil (HCO) to produce wax for beeswax or carnauba wax substitution in packaging and coating was developed. From the conversion rate of the products, HCO was reacted with ethanolamine at 150°C for 5 h, and the molar ratio of HCO and ethanolamine was 1:4. The hardness of the final product was seven times higher than that of beeswax, the cohesiveness of the final product was 1.3 times higher than that of beeswax and approximately one half of that of carnauba wax, and the melting point of the final product is 98°C. The Fourier transform Infrared spectroscopy showed that the amide groups were incorporated to form the amide products. In coating application, the results showed that the force of the final product coating cardboard was higher than that of beeswax and paraffin wax and less than that of carnauba wax. After 24 h soaking, the compression forces were decreased. HCO fatty acid wax can be an alternative wax for carnauba wax and beeswax in coating applications.

  10. Investigations of Properties of Wax Mixtures Used in the Investment Casting Technology – New Investigation Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zych

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The results of testing of the selected group of wax mixtures used in the investment casting technology, are presented in the paper. Themeasurements of the kinetics of the mixtures shrinkage and changes of viscous-plastic properties as a temperature function wereperformed. The temperature influence on bending strength of wax mixtures was determined.

  11. Effects of cuticular wax on the postharvest quality of blueberry fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wenjing; Gao, Haiyan; Chen, Hangjun; Fang, Xiangjun; Zheng, Yonghua

    2018-01-15

    The blueberry fruit has a light-blue appearance because its blue-black skin is covered with a waxy bloom. This layer is easily damaged or removed during fruit harvesting and postharvest handling. We investigated the effects of wax removal on the postharvest quality of blueberry fruit and their possible mechanisms. The removal of natural wax on the fruit was found to accelerate the postharvest water loss and decay, reduce the sensory and nutritional qualities, and shorten the shelf-life. Wax removal decreased the activities of antioxidant enzymes and contents of antioxidants, and accelerated accumulation of ROS and lipid peroxidation, especially at the later period of storage. Moreover, the organellar membrane structure was disrupted in fruit with wax removed. These results indicate that cuticular wax plays an important role in maintaining the postharvest quality and delaying fruit senescence. The results should improve our understanding for better preservation of postharvest quality of blueberry fruit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Phase-angle jump during voltage dips in wind power installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Lazaro, E.; Canas, M.; Pujante, A.J. [Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Albacete (Spain). Renewable Energy Research Inst. and Dept. of Electrical, Electronic and Control Engineering; Fuentes, J.A.; Molina-Garcia, A. [Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena (Spain). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    A voltage dip is a disturbance in the power system that consists in a sudden reduction of voltage level and a recovery in a short period of time, the magnitude and angle of the voltage phasors can be affected by this disturbance. The variation between the pre-fault voltage phasor angle and dip voltage phasor angle is called phase-angle jump. In this paper, it is carried out a study of the characteristics of real voltage dips. The study highlights the phase-angle jumps that appear on voltage dips, analyzing the influence of the voltage dip type, depth or length. Voltage dips have been acquired with power quality analyzers with a 10 MHz sample rate in a Spanish wind farm for 18 months. (orig.)

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa mastitis in two goats associated with an essential oil-based teat dip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, E Jane; Wilson, David J

    2016-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that has been associated with mastitis in dairy animals, including goats. Often, the environmental sources of the bacteria are water-related (such as hoses and muddy pastures). Mastitis attributable to P. aeruginosa was identified in 2 goats in a small herd. Efforts were made to identify environmental sources of the pathogen. Multiple samples from the goats' environment were cultured, including water from the trough, bedding, the hose used to wash udders, and the teat dip and teat dip containers. The bacterium was isolated from the teat dip and the teat dip container. The teat dip consisted of water, liquid soap, and several drops of essential oils (including tea tree, lavender, and peppermint). This case illustrates a potential problem that may arise as a result of the use of unconventional ingredients in teat dips. The use of alternative products by goat producers is likely to increase in the future. © 2016 The Author(s).

  14. Correlation of adjuvant activity and chemical structure of wax D fractions of mycobacteria*

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R. G.; Jollès, P.; Samour, D.; Lederer, E.

    1964-01-01

    By fractionation of wax D from mycobacteria by ultracentrifugation in ether, it is possible to prepare from wax D of human strains peptide-containing and non-peptide-containing compounds. The peptide-containing fractions, like the parent wax D, were able to act as adjuvants by increasing serum anti-ovalbumin levels, by increasing corneal hypersensitivity to ovalbumin, and by inducing encephalomyelitis after homologous guinea-pig brain injection. The peptide—carbohydrate moiety resulting from hydrolysis of the whole wax D was found inactive in all these biological effects. When the same centrifugal technique was applied to several bovine types of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M. avium and to atypical and saprophytic mycobacteria, analogous peptide and non-peptide-containing fractions were obtained. The amino acid patterns of these were of great variety, and in most cases differed from those present in human type wax D. In three instances a small proportion of a peptide-containing fraction was obtained (from M. phlei, M. avium and an atypical mycobacterium), which closely resembled a human type wax D. These fractions were found to have adjuvant activity. All other fractions of wax D of bovine, avian and saprophytic strains were inactive. These facts support the role of a peptide of D- and L-alanine, D-glutamic acid and meso-α,α'-diaminopimelic acid in determining the adjuvant action of wax D fractions and whole mycobacteria. The structure of the peptidoglycolipid of an adjuvant-active mycobacterial wax corresponds closely in amino acid, amino sugar and hexose composition with the mucopeptide of the bacterial cell wall, and evidence is discussed for the concept of wax D fractions as partial replicas of a fundamental cell wall polymer. PMID:14135432

  15. 76 FR 773 - Petroleum Wax Candles From the People's Republic of China: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-06

    ... International Trade Administration Petroleum Wax Candles From the People's Republic of China: Continuation of... the antidumping duty order on petroleum wax candles from the People's Republic of China (``PRC... of initiation of the sunset review of the antidumping duty order on petroleum wax candles from the...

  16. New tools for digital medical image processing implemented in DIP software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Erica A.C.; Santana, Ivan E. [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Fernando R.A., E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.b [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares, (CRCN/NE-CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Viera, Jose W. [Escola Politecnica de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The anthropomorphic models used in computational dosimetry, also called phantoms, are mostly built from stacks of images CT (Computed Tomography) or MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) obtained from scans of patients or volunteers. The construction of voxel phantoms requires computational processing for transforming image formats, dimensional image compression (2D) to form three-dimensional arrays (3D), quantization, resampling, enhancement, restoration and image segmentation, among others. Hardly the computational dosimetry researcher finds all these skills into a single software and often it results in a decreased development of their research or inadequate use of alternative tools. The need to integrate the various tasks of the original digital image processing to obtain an image that can be used in a computational model of exposure led to the development of software DIP (Digital Image Processing). This software reads, writes and edits binary files containing the 3D matrix corresponding to a stack of cross-sectional images of a given geometry that can be a human body or other volume of interest. It can also read any type of computer image and do conversions. When the task involves only one output image, it is saved in the JPEG standard Windows. When it involves a stack of images, the binary output file is called SGI (Interactive Graphic Simulations, a symbol already used in other publications of the Research Group in Numerical Dosimetry). The following paper presents the third version of the DIP software and emphasizes the new tools it implemented. Currently it has the menus Basics, Views, Spatial Domain, Frequency Domain, Segmentations and Study. Each menu contains items and subitems with features that generally require an image as input and produce an image or an attribute in the output. (author)

  17. New tools for digital medical image processing implemented in DIP software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Erica A.C.; Santana, Ivan E.; Lima, Fernando R.A.; Viera, Jose W.

    2011-01-01

    The anthropomorphic models used in computational dosimetry, also called phantoms, are mostly built from stacks of images CT (Computed Tomography) or MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) obtained from scans of patients or volunteers. The construction of voxel phantoms requires computational processing for transforming image formats, dimensional image compression (2D) to form three-dimensional arrays (3D), quantization, resampling, enhancement, restoration and image segmentation, among others. Hardly the computational dosimetry researcher finds all these skills into a single software and often it results in a decreased development of their research or inadequate use of alternative tools. The need to integrate the various tasks of the original digital image processing to obtain an image that can be used in a computational model of exposure led to the development of software DIP (Digital Image Processing). This software reads, writes and edits binary files containing the 3D matrix corresponding to a stack of cross-sectional images of a given geometry that can be a human body or other volume of interest. It can also read any type of computer image and do conversions. When the task involves only one output image, it is saved in the JPEG standard Windows. When it involves a stack of images, the binary output file is called SGI (Interactive Graphic Simulations, a symbol already used in other publications of the Research Group in Numerical Dosimetry). The following paper presents the third version of the DIP software and emphasizes the new tools it implemented. Currently it has the menus Basics, Views, Spatial Domain, Frequency Domain, Segmentations and Study. Each menu contains items and subitems with features that generally require an image as input and produce an image or an attribute in the output. (author)

  18. [For an interdisciplinary museology. The particular case of anatomical waxes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirson, Chloé

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays, the anatomical models in three dimensions are often showed in Museums devoted to the History of Medicine. Due to their historical importance and the major role they played as scientific education tool, they are essentials to understand the heritage of the anatomical knowledge. Historically, within all materials used to cast the body, wax has been the most frequently used, so that the ceroplastical collection has become a part of the medical education before leading to a general public pedagogy. This paper has a double purpose. In one hand, it aims to survey the formal evolution and the uses of this production, from his creation on, in the other, to study this cultural heritage within the museology issue.

  19. Bubble column apparatus for separating wax from catalyst slurry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neathery, James K.; Davis, Burtron H.

    2004-07-13

    Novel methods and devices for production of liquid hydrocarbon products from gaseous reactants are disclosed. In one aspect, a method for separating a liquid hydrocarbon, typically a wax, from a catalyst containing slurry is provided, comprising passing the slurry through at least one downcomer extending from an overhead separation chamber and discharging into the bottom of a slurry bubble column reactor. The downcomer includes a cross-flow filtration element for separating a substantially particle-free liquid hydrocarbon for downstream processing. In another aspect, a method for promoting plug-flow movement in a recirculating slurry bubble column reactor is provided, comprising discharging the recirculating slurry into the reactor through at least one downcomer which terminates near the bottom of the reactor. Devices for accomplishing the above methods are also provided.

  20. Wax inhibitor based on ethylene vinyl acetate with methyl methacrylate and diethanolamine for crude oil pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisuzzaman, S. M.; Abang, S.; Bono, A.; Krishnaiah, D.; Karali, R.; Safuan, M. K.

    2017-06-01

    Wax precipitation and deposition is one of the most significant flow assurance challenges in the production system of the crude oil. Wax inhibitors are developed as a preventive strategy to avoid an absolute wax deposition. Wax inhibitors are polymers which can be known as pour point depressants as they impede the wax crystals formation, growth, and deposition. In this study three formulations of wax inhibitors were prepared, ethylene vinyl acetate, ethylene vinyl acetate co-methyl methacrylate (EVA co-MMA) and ethylene vinyl acetate co-diethanolamine (EVA co-DEA) and the comparison of their efficiencies in terms of cloud point¸ pour point, performance inhibition efficiency (%PIE) and viscosity were evaluated. The cloud point and pour point for both EVA and EVA co-MMA were similar, 15°C and 10-5°C, respectively. Whereas, the cloud point and pour point for EVA co-DEA were better, 10°C and 10-5°C respectively. In conclusion, EVA co-DEA had shown the best % PIE (28.42%) which indicates highest percentage reduction of wax deposit as compared to the other two inhibitors.

  1. Phase Change Insulation for Energy Efficiency Based on Wax-Halloysite Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yafei; Thapa, Suvhashis; Weiss, Leland; Lvov, Yuri

    2014-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCMs) have gained extensive attention in thermal energy storage. Wax can be used as a PCM in solar storage but it has low thermal conductivity. Introducing 10% halloysite admixed into wax yields a novel composite (wax-halloysite) which has a thermal conductivity of 0.5 W/mK. To increase the base conductivity, graphite and carbon nanotubes were added into the PCM composite improving its thermal energy storage. Thermal conductivity of wax-halloysite-graphite (45/45/10%) composite showed increased conductivity of 1.4 W/mK (3 times higher than the base wax-halloysite composite). Wax- halloysite-graphite-carbon nanotubes (45/45/5/5%) composite showed conductivity of 0.85 W/mK while maintaining the original shape perfectly until 91 °C (above the original wax melting point). Thermal conductivity can be further increased with higher doping of carbon nanotubes. This new composites are promising heat storage material due to good thermal stability, high thermal/electricity conductivity and ability to preserve its shape during phase transitions

  2. Molecular and Evolutionary Mechanisms of Cuticular Wax for Plant Drought Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawei Xue

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cuticular wax, the first protective layer of above ground tissues of many plant species, is a key evolutionary innovation in plants. Cuticular wax safeguards the evolution from certain green algae to flowering plants and the diversification of plant taxa during the eras of dry and adverse terrestrial living conditions and global climate changes. Cuticular wax plays significant roles in plant abiotic and biotic stress tolerance and has been implicated in defense mechanisms against excessive ultraviolet radiation, high temperature, bacterial and fungal pathogens, insects, high salinity, and low temperature. Drought, a major type of abiotic stress, poses huge threats to global food security and health of terrestrial ecosystem by limiting plant growth and crop productivity. The composition, biochemistry, structure, biosynthesis, and transport of plant cuticular wax have been reviewed extensively. However, the molecular and evolutionary mechanisms of cuticular wax in plants in response to drought stress are still lacking. In this review, we focus on potential mechanisms, from evolutionary, molecular, and physiological aspects, that control cuticular wax and its roles in plant drought tolerance. We also raise key research questions and propose important directions to be resolved in the future, leading to potential applications of cuticular wax for water use efficiency in agricultural and environmental sustainability.

  3. Assessment of different models to describe wax precipitation in flow assurance problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martos, C.; Coto, B.; Espada, J.J.; Robustillo, M.D. [Rey Juan Carlos Univ., Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Technology; Pena, J.L. [Repsol-YPF, Madrid (Spain). Alfonso Cortina Technology Centre

    2008-07-01

    Paraffinic waxes found in crude oils cause flow assurance problems because these compounds can precipitate when temperature decreases during oil production, transport through pipelines or storage. The key variables involved in the wax precipitation process are the wax appearance temperature (WAT) and the wax precipitation curve (WPC). A good understanding of the liquid-solid equilibrium is required in order to model the precipitation process. However, new experimental data is needed to address this issue, particularly the composition of the raw crude oil, the amount of precipitated waxes against temperature and the nature of such waxes. Most models available in the literature require the knowledge of the n-paraffin distribution of crude oil. This type of determination can be carried out using different chromatographic techniques. In this study, experimental WAT and WPC were determined by means of a recently developed multistage fractional precipitation procedure. The trapped crude oil of the precipitated mixtures at each temperature was determined by the 1H NMR technique to determine the true amount of wax precipitated at each temperature. The n-paraffin distribution for the chosen crude oils was determined by chromatographic techniques. The predictive capabilities of the available models was verified by comparing experimental and predicted results. 3 refs.

  4. Development of formulations and processes to incorporate wax oleogels in ice cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulim Botega, Daniele C; Marangoni, Alejandro G; Smith, Alexandra K; Goff, H Douglas

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of emulsifiers, waxes, fat concentration, and processing conditions on the application of wax oleogel to replace solid fat content and create optimal fat structure in ice cream. Ice creams with 10% or 15% fat were formulated with rice bran wax (RBW), candelilla wax (CDW), or carnauba wax (CBW) oleogels, containing 10% wax and 90% high-oleic sunflower oil. The ice creams were produced using batch or continuous freezing processes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and cryo-scanning electron microscopy were used to evaluate the microstructure of ice cream and the ultrastructure of oleogel droplets in ice cream mixes. Among the wax oleogels, RBW oleogel had the ability to form and sustain structure in 15% fat ice creams when glycerol monooleate (GMO) was used as the emulsifier. TEM images revealed that the high degree of fat structuring observed in GMO samples was associated with the RBW crystal morphology within the fat droplet, which was characterized by the growth of crystals at the outer edge of the droplet. Continuous freezing improved fat structuring compared to batch freezing. RBW oleogels established better structure compared to CDW or CBW oleogels. These results demonstrate that RBW oleogel has the potential to develop fat structure in ice cream in the presence of GMO and sufficiently high concentrations of oleogel. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  5. Removal of wax and stickies from OCC by flotation. Progress report No. 2, April 1--June 30, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doshi, M.R.; Dyer, J. [Doshi and Associates, Inc., Appleton, WI (United States); Heise, O. [Voith Sulzer Papertechnology, Appleton, WI (United States)

    1998-08-01

    During the second quarter of the study the authors examined the conditions necessary for repulping a mixture of wax-coated boards that would be conducive to the flotation of detached wax. Also important for the economic viability of a waxed-board repulping process is adequate defibering of the recovered paper. Several methods for the dewaxing of pulped waxed-boards were investigated. The authors have continued to survey the literature to determine what other efforts are being made to ameliorate the impact of waxed boards during the recycling of OCC.

  6. Polymer nanocomposite patterning by dip-pen nanolithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandemir, Ayse Cagil; Ma, Huan; Reiser, Alain; Spolenak, Ralph; Erdem, Derya

    2016-01-01

    The ultimate aim of this study is to construct polymer nanocomposite patterns by dip-pen nanolithography (DPN). Recent investigations have revealed the effect of the amount of ink (Laplace pressure) on the mechanism of liquid ink writing. In this study it is shown that not only the amount of ink, but also physisorption and surface diffusion are relevant. After a few writing steps, physisorption and surface diffusion outweigh the influence of the amount of ink, allowing consistent patterning governed by dwell times and writing speeds. Polymer matrices can be utilized as a delivery medium to deposit functional particles. DPN patterning of polymer nanocomposites allows for local tuning of the functionality and mechanical strength of the written patterns in high resolution, with the benefit of pattern flexibility. Typically polymer matrices with volatile components are used as a delivery medium for nanoparticle deposition, with subsequent removal of loosely bound matrix material by heating or oxygen plasma. In our study, nanocomposite patterns were constructed, and the differences between polymer and nanocomposite patterning were investigated. Cross-sectional SEM and TEM analysis confirmed that nanoparticles can be deposited with the liquid-polymer ink and are evenly distributed in the polymer matrix. (paper)

  7. Deformation and fatigue behavior of hot dip galvanized coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camurri, Carlos P.; Benavente, Raul G.; Roa, Isidoro S.; Carrasco, Claudia C.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of a study of the effect of static and dynamic stresses on hot dip galvanized coatings on SAE 1020 steel substrates. Galvanizing was performed using baths maintained at 450 deg. C, the zinc containing 0.16% Ti and 0.02% Fe and with Al and Ni in the ranges 0-0.20% and 0-0.30%, respectively. Static three-point bend tests were conducted with applied stresses in the range 428-790 MPa. Dynamic bend-fatigue tests involved stresses in the range 228-578 MPa at a cyclic frequency of 0.25 Hz for up to 700 cycles. The total crack density in the coatings was measured before and after the tests using light optical and electron microscopy. The results showed that the crack density increased as the applied stress increased and crack propagation was promoted perpendicular to the substrate. The number of cycles had no effect on the crack density and propagation at stresses lower than 386 MPa. At higher stresses the number of applied cycles contributed only to crack propagation. It was concluded that the best bath composition for preventing fatigue crack propagation is one that minimized the formation of thinner brittle layers in the galvanized coatings

  8. Heterogeneous Rock Simulation Using DIP-Micromechanics-Statistical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Molladavoodi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Rock as a natural material is heterogeneous. Rock material consists of minerals, crystals, cement, grains, and microcracks. Each component of rock has a different mechanical behavior under applied loading condition. Therefore, rock component distribution has an important effect on rock mechanical behavior, especially in the postpeak region. In this paper, the rock sample was studied by digital image processing (DIP, micromechanics, and statistical methods. Using image processing, volume fractions of the rock minerals composing the rock sample were evaluated precisely. The mechanical properties of the rock matrix were determined based on upscaling micromechanics. In order to consider the rock heterogeneities effect on mechanical behavior, the heterogeneity index was calculated in a framework of statistical method. A Weibull distribution function was fitted to the Young modulus distribution of minerals. Finally, statistical and Mohr–Coulomb strain-softening models were used simultaneously as a constitutive model in DEM code. The acoustic emission, strain energy release, and the effect of rock heterogeneities on the postpeak behavior process were investigated. The numerical results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  9. 7 CFR 305.21 - Hot water dip treatment schedule for mangoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hot water dip treatment schedule for mangoes. 305.21... Hot water dip treatment schedule for mangoes. Mangoes may be treated using schedule T102-a: (a) Fruit... the treatment. (c) Water in the treatment tank must be treated or changed regularly to prevent...

  10. Caffeine and theobromine in epicuticular wax of Ilex paraguariensis A. St.-Hil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athayde, M L; Coelho, G C; Schenkel, E P

    2000-12-01

    Caffeine and theobromine were identified and quantified in leaf epicuticular waxes of Ilex paraguariensis A. St.-Hil. (Aquifoliaceae). The total epicuticular leaf wax content was ca. 0.5% on average of dry leaf weight. Epicuticular caffeine and theobromine contents varied from 0.16 to 127.6 microg/mg and from 0 to 9.5 microg/mg of wax, respectively. For some selected samples, the intracellular methylxanthine concentration was also determined. A positive correlation was found between inner and epicuticular caffeine contents.

  11. Bioinspired Composite Coating with Extreme Underwater Superoleophobicity and Good Stability for Wax Prevention in the Petroleum Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Weitao; Zhu, Liqun; Li, Weiping; Yang, Xin; Xu, Chang; Liu, Huicong

    2015-10-13

    Wax deposition is a detrimental problem that happens during crude oil production and transportation, which greatly reduces transport efficiency and causes huge economic losses. To avoid wax deposition, a bioinspired composite coating with excellent wax prevention and anticorrosion properties is developed in this study. The prepared coating is composed of three films, including an electrodeposited Zn film for improving corrosion resistance, a phosphating film for constructing fish-scale morphology, and a silicon dioxide film modified by a simple spin-coating method for endowing the surface with superhydrophilicity. Good wax prevention performance has been investigated in a wax deposition test. The surface morphology, composition, wetting behaviors, and stability are systematically studied, and a wax prevention mechanism is proposed, which can be calculated from water film theory. This composite coating strategy which shows excellent properties in both wax prevention and stability is expected to be widely applied in the petroleum industry.

  12. Optical Properties and Crystallization of Natural Waxes at Several Annealing Temperatures: a Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lu; Xu, Xinlong

    2018-03-01

    The thermal analysis and optical properties of paraffin wax, beeswax, and liquid paraffin annealed at variable temperatures have been conducted using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) coupled with SEM methods. The characteristic optical properties of natural waxes can be used to analyze natural wax adulteration. The lamellar structure of paraffin wax and beeswax grew by a sheet of chain expansion. Furthermore, the crystallization process of paraffin wax can be assigned: rotator-solid transition and liquid-solid ones. According to the temperature-dependent refractive index curves, the refractive index of paraffin wax varies from large to small followed by rotator-liquid transition, untreated one, and liquid-solid one, respectively. The results indicated that THz-TDS has been proved to be of great potential in identification the crystallization of waxes.

  13. Particulate pollutants are capable to 'degrade' epicuticular waxes and to decrease the drought tolerance of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Juergen; Pariyar, Shyam

    2014-01-01

    Air pollution causes the amorphous appearance of epicuticular waxes in conifers, usually called wax 'degradation' or 'erosion', which is often correlated with tree damage symptoms, e.g., winter desiccation. Previous investigations concentrated on wax chemistry, with little success. Here, we address the hypothesis that both 'wax degradation' and decreasing drought tolerance of trees may result from physical factors following the deposition of salt particles onto the needles. Pine seedlings were sprayed with dry aerosols or 50 mM solutions of different salts. The needles underwent humidity changes within an environmental scanning electron microscope, causing salt expansion on the surface and into the epistomatal chambers. The development of amorphous wax appearance by deliquescent salts covering tubular wax fibrils was demonstrated. The minimum epidermal conductance of the sprayed pine seedlings increased. Aerosol deposition potentially 'degrades' waxes and decreases tree drought tolerance. These effects have not been adequately considered thus far in air pollution research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Purification of a jojoba embryo wax synthase, cloning of its cDNA, and production of high levels of wax in seeds of transgenic arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardizabal, K D; Metz, J G; Sakamoto, T; Hutton, W C; Pollard, M R; Lassner, M W

    2000-03-01

    Wax synthase (WS, fatty acyl-coenzyme A [coA]: fatty alcohol acyltransferase) catalyzes the final step in the synthesis of linear esters (waxes) that accumulate in seeds of jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis). We have characterized and partially purified this enzyme from developing jojoba embryos. A protein whose presence correlated with WS activity during chromatographic fractionation was identified and a cDNA encoding that protein was cloned. Seed-specific expression of the cDNA in transgenic Arabidopsis conferred high levels of WS activity on developing embryos from those plants. The WS sequence has significant homology with several Arabidopsis open reading frames of unknown function. Wax production in jojoba requires, in addition to WS, a fatty acyl-CoA reductase (FAR) and an efficient fatty acid elongase system that forms the substrates preferred by the FAR. We have expressed the jojoba WS cDNA in Arabidopsis in combination with cDNAs encoding the jojoba FAR and a beta-ketoacyl-CoA synthase (a component of fatty acid elongase) from Lunaria annua. (13)C-Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of pooled whole seeds from transgenic plants indicated that as many as 49% of the oil molecules in the seeds were waxes. Gas chromatography analysis of transmethylated oil from individual seeds suggested that wax levels may represent up to 70% (by weight) of the oil present in those seeds.

  15. Nanomechanical properties of dip coated indium tin oxide films on glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, Nilormi; Ghosh, Priyanka; Sarkar, Saswati; Moitra, Debabrata; Biswas, Prasanta Kumar; Jana, Sunirmal; Mukhopadhyay, Anoop Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Nanomechanical properties of indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films dip coated from precursor sols of varying equivalent oxide weight percentage (wt.%) onto commercial soda lime silica (SLS) glass substrate were evaluated by nanoindentation technique at an ultralow load of 50 μN. It was found that the increase in wt.% beyond 6 in the precursor sols, had an adverse effect on nanohardness and Young's modulus of the films. Moreover, relatively thicker triple layered film (about 240 nm) had inferior nanomechanical properties as compared to the single layered film. Interestingly, the ITO foam coating on SLS glass substrate had nanomechanical properties nearly as good as those of the single layered films. These observations are explained in terms of the relative differences in crystallinity, stiffness and elastic deformation ability of the films. - Highlights: • Sol–gel indium tin oxide thin films and foam coating • Crystallinity and nanomechanical property inversely relate to sol oxide content. • Foam coating behaves like the thin films

  16. Comparison of piracetam measured with HPLC-DAD, HPLC-ESI-MS, DIP-APCI-MS, and a newly developed and optimized DIP-ESI-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzen, Claudia; Winterfeld, Gottfried A; Schmitz, Oliver J

    2016-06-01

    The direct inlet probe-electrospray ionization (DIP-ESI) presented here was based on the direct inlet probe-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DIP-APCI) developed by our group. It was coupled to an ion trap mass spectrometer (MS) for the detection of more polar compounds such as degradation products from pharmaceuticals. First, the position of the ESI tip, the gas and solvent flow rates, as well as the gas temperature were optimized with the help of the statistic program Minitab® 17 and a caffeine standard. The ability to perform quantitative analyses was also tested by using different concentrations of caffeine and camphor. Calibration curves with a quadratic calibration regression of R (2) = 0.9997 and 0.9998 for caffeine and camphor, respectively, were obtained. The limit of detection of 2.5 and 1.7 ng per injection for caffeine and camphor were determined, respectively. Furthermore, a solution of piracetam was used to compare established analytical methods for this drug and its impurities such as HPLC-diode array detector (DAD) and HPLC-ESI-MS with the DIP-APCI and the developed DIP-ESI. With HPLC-DAD and 10 μg piracetam on column, no impurity could be detected. With HPLC-ESI-MS, two impurities (A and B) were identified with only 4.6 μg piracetam on column, while with DIP-ESI, an amount of 1.6 μg piracetam was sufficient. In the case of the DIP-ESI measurements, all detected impurities could be identified by MS/MS studies. Graphical Abstract Scheme of the DIP-ESI principle.

  17. First records of tool-set use for ant-dipping by Eastern chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) in the Kalinzu Forest Reserve, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Chie; Isaji, Mina; Koops, Kathelijne; Furuichi, Takeshi

    2015-10-01

    Chimpanzees at numerous study sites are known to prey on army ants by using a single wand to dip into the ant nest or column. However, in Goualougo (Republic of Congo) in Central Africa, chimpanzees use a different technique, use of a woody sapling to perforate the ant nest, then use of a herb stem as dipping tool to harvest the army ants. Use of a tool set has also been found in Guinea, West Africa: at Seringbara in the Nimba Mountains and at nearby Bossou. There are, however, no reports for chimpanzees in East Africa. We observed use of such a tool set in Kalinzu, Uganda, for the first time by Eastern chimpanzees. This behavior was observed among one group of chimpanzees at Kalinzu (S-group) but not among the adjacent group (M-group) with partly overlapping ranging areas despite the fact that the latter group has been under intensive observation since 1997. In Uganda, ant-dipping has not been observed in the northern three sites (Budongo, Semliki, and Kibale) but has been observed or seems to occur in the southern sites (Kalinzu and Bwindi), which suggests that ant-dipping was invented by and spread from the southern region after the northern and southern forest blocks became separated. Use of a tool-set by only one group at Kalinzu further suggests that this behavior was recently invented and has not yet spread to the other group via migrating females.

  18. Morphological and thermal evaluation of blends of polyethylene wax and paraffin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akishino, J.K. [Graduate Program in Engineering and Materials Science, Federal University of Parana, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Institute for the Development of Technology, LACTEC, PO Box 19067, 81531-990 Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Cerqueira, D.P. [Companhia de Eletricidade do Estado da Bahia—COELBA, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Silva, G.C. [Institute for the Development of Technology, LACTEC, PO Box 19067, 81531-990 Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Swinka-Filho, V. [Graduate Program in Engineering and Materials Science, Federal University of Parana, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Institute for the Development of Technology, LACTEC, PO Box 19067, 81531-990 Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Munaro, M., E-mail: marilda@lactec.org.br [Graduate Program in Engineering and Materials Science, Federal University of Parana, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Institute for the Development of Technology, LACTEC, PO Box 19067, 81531-990 Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2016-02-20

    Highlights: • Thermal properties of polyethylene wax and paraffin were investigated. • The blends were characterized by DSC, XRD and DMTA. • The melting temperatures were between those of the pure constituents. • The crystallinity decreased with addition of polyethylene wax. • The softening temperatures did not vary linearly with the composition. - Abstract: The thermal behavior and the morphology of blends of polyethylene wax and paraffin were investigated to evaluate the feasibility of using these materials to obtain a new temperature-indicating device to use in order to indicate failures in electrical connections due to overheating. The samples were evaluated with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). The results showed that the crystallinity decreases as the concentration of polyethylene wax increases. In the compositions tested, the components were not miscible in the crystalline phase, and these compositions exhibited solid/liquid transitions at temperatures between those of the individual components.

  19. Bee waxes: a model of characterization for using as base simulator tissue in teletherapy with photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Rogerio Matias Vidal da; Souza, Divanizia do Nascimento

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a model of characterization and selection of bee waxes which makes possible to certify the usage viability of that base simulator tissue in the manufacture of appropriated objects for external radiotherapy with mega volt photon beams. The work was divide into three stages, where was evaluated physical and chemical properties besides the aspects related to the capacity of beam attenuation. All the process was carefully accompanied related to the wax origin such as the bee specimen and the flora surrounding the beehives. The chemical composition of the waxes is similar to others simulators usually used in radiotherapy. The behavior of mass attenuation coefficient in the radiotherapeutic energy range is comparable to other simulators, and consequently to the soft tissue. The proposed model is efficient and allows the affirmative that the usage of determined bee wax as base simulator tissue is convenient

  20. Research on Application of Wax Deposition Detection in the Nonmetallic Pipeline Based on Electrical Capacitance Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wax deposition detection in nonmetallic pipelines is an important requirement in the oil industry. In this paper, an ECT (electrical capacitance tomography sensor is developed for wax deposition detection in nonmetallic pipelines. Four wax models with different concentrations were established for detection. These models were analyzed through simulations and practical experiments simultaneously and data were compared. A linear back projection algorithm is applied to reconstruct the image with both simulated and experimental data. A comparison of binary images with different concentration of stratified flow was demonstrated; this illustrates that the difference in concentration between the experimental results and profile distribution is less than 1.2%. The experimental results indicate that the ECT system is valid and feasible for detecting the degree of wax deposition in the nonmetallic pipelines.

  1. "Wax bloom" on beeswax cultural heritage objects: exploring the causes of the phenomenon

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartl, B.; Kobera, Libor; Drábková, K.; Ďurovič, M.; Brus, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 7 (2015), s. 509-513 ISSN 0749-1581 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : 13-C NMR * wax bloom * efflorescence Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.226, year: 2015

  2. Effect of matrix granulation and wax coating on the dissolution rates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    disintegrating) granules consisting of paracetamol (drug) and acrylatemethacrylate copolymer, a matrix forming material. The effect of coating the matrix granules with wax on the drug release profiles was also investigated. The objective was to ...

  3. Accurate relief of the die surface of the wax pattern prior to casting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, C G

    1977-06-01

    A quick, simple technique has been described to mark, identify, and remove interferences from the inner surface of a wax pattern. Problems in the seating of simple and complex castings are virtually eliminated.

  4. In search of low cost biological analysis: Wax or acrylic glue bonded paper microfluidic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2011-11-04

    In this body of work we have been developing and characterizing paper based microfluidic fabrication technologies to produce low cost biological analysis. Specifically we investigated the performance of paper microfluidics that had been bonded using wax o

  5. A comparative evaluation of the marginal adaptation of a thermoplastic resin, a light cured wax and an inlay casting wax on stone dies: Anin vitrostudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalan, Reji P; Nair, Vivek V; Harshakumar, K; Ravichandran, R; Lylajam, S; Viswambaran, Prasanth

    2018-01-01

    Different pattern materials do not produce copings with satisfactory, marginal accuracy when used on stone dies at varying time intervals. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the vertical marginal accuracy of patterns formed from three materials, namely, thermoplastic resin, light cured wax and inlay casting wax at three-time intervals of 1, 12, and 24 h. A master die (zirconia abutment mimicking a prepared permanent maxillary central incisor) and metal sleeve (direct metal laser sintering crown #11) were fabricated. A total of 30 stone dies were obtained from the master die. Ten patterns were made each from the three materials and stored off the die at room temperature. The vertical marginal gaps were measured using digital microscope at 1, 12, and 24 h after reseating with gentle finger pressure. The results revealed a significant statistical difference in the marginal adaptation of three materials at all the three-time intervals. Light cured wax was found to be most accurate at all time intervals, followed by thermoplastic resin and inlay casting wax. Furthermore, there was a significant difference between all pairs of materials. The change in vertical marginal gap from 1 to 24 h between thermoplastic resin and light cured wax was not statistically significant. The marginal adaptation of all the three materials used, was well within the acceptable range of 25-70 μm. The resin pattern materials studied revealed significantly less dimensional change than inlay casting wax on storage at 1, 12, and 24 h time intervals. They may be employed in situations where high precision and delayed investing is expected.

  6. Accuracy of Digitally Fabricated Wax Denture Bases and Conventional Completed Complete Dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, Bogna; Lümkemann, Nina; Eichberger, Marlis; Wimmer, Timea

    2017-12-19

    The purpose of this investigation was to analyze the accuracy of digitally fabricated wax trial dentures and conventionally finalized complete dentures in comparison to a surface tessellation language (STL)-dataset. A generated data set for the denture bases and the tooth sockets was used, converted into STL-format, and saved as reference. Five mandibular and 5 maxillary denture bases were milled from wax blanks and denture teeth were waxed into their tooth sockets. Each complete denture was checked on fit, waxed onto the dental cast, and digitized using an optical laboratory scanning device. The complete dentures were completed conventionally using the injection method, finished, and scanned. The resulting STL-datasets were exported into the three-dimensional (3D) software GOM Inspect. Each of the 5 mandibular and 5 maxillary complete dentures was aligned with the STL- and the wax trial denture dataset. Alignment was performed based on a best-fit algorithm. A three-dimensional analysis of the spatial divergences in x -, y - and z -axes was performed by the 3D software and visualized in a color-coded illustration. The mean positive and negative deviations between the datasets were calculated automatically. In a direct comparison between maxillary wax trial dentures and complete dentures, complete dentures showed higher deviations from the STL-dataset than the wax trial dentures. The deviations occurred in the area of the teeth as well as in the distal area of the denture bases. In contrast, the highest deviations in both the mandibular wax trial dentures and the mandibular complete dentures were observed in the distal area. The complete dentures showed higher deviations on the occlusal surfaces of the teeth compared to the wax dentures. Computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM)-fabricated wax dentures exhibited fewer deviations from the STL-reference than the complete dentures. The deviations were significantly greater in the vicinity of the

  7. Accuracy of Digitally Fabricated Wax Denture Bases and Conventional Completed Complete Dentures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lümkemann, Nina; Eichberger, Marlis; Wimmer, Timea

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to analyze the accuracy of digitally fabricated wax trial dentures and conventionally finalized complete dentures in comparison to a surface tessellation language (STL)-dataset. A generated data set for the denture bases and the tooth sockets was used, converted into STL-format, and saved as reference. Five mandibular and 5 maxillary denture bases were milled from wax blanks and denture teeth were waxed into their tooth sockets. Each complete denture was checked on fit, waxed onto the dental cast, and digitized using an optical laboratory scanning device. The complete dentures were completed conventionally using the injection method, finished, and scanned. The resulting STL-datasets were exported into the three-dimensional (3D) software GOM Inspect. Each of the 5 mandibular and 5 maxillary complete dentures was aligned with the STL- and the wax trial denture dataset. Alignment was performed based on a best-fit algorithm. A three-dimensional analysis of the spatial divergences in x-, y- and z-axes was performed by the 3D software and visualized in a color-coded illustration. The mean positive and negative deviations between the datasets were calculated automatically. In a direct comparison between maxillary wax trial dentures and complete dentures, complete dentures showed higher deviations from the STL-dataset than the wax trial dentures. The deviations occurred in the area of the teeth as well as in the distal area of the denture bases. In contrast, the highest deviations in both the mandibular wax trial dentures and the mandibular complete dentures were observed in the distal area. The complete dentures showed higher deviations on the occlusal surfaces of the teeth compared to the wax dentures. Computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM)-fabricated wax dentures exhibited fewer deviations from the STL-reference than the complete dentures. The deviations were significantly greater in the vicinity of the denture

  8. Accuracy of Digitally Fabricated Wax Denture Bases and Conventional Completed Complete Dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogna Stawarczyk

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this investigation was to analyze the accuracy of digitally fabricated wax trial dentures and conventionally finalized complete dentures in comparison to a surface tessellation language (STL-dataset. A generated data set for the denture bases and the tooth sockets was used, converted into STL-format, and saved as reference. Five mandibular and 5 maxillary denture bases were milled from wax blanks and denture teeth were waxed into their tooth sockets. Each complete denture was checked on fit, waxed onto the dental cast, and digitized using an optical laboratory scanning device. The complete dentures were completed conventionally using the injection method, finished, and scanned. The resulting STL-datasets were exported into the three-dimensional (3D software GOM Inspect. Each of the 5 mandibular and 5 maxillary complete dentures was aligned with the STL- and the wax trial denture dataset. Alignment was performed based on a best-fit algorithm. A three-dimensional analysis of the spatial divergences in x-, y- and z-axes was performed by the 3D software and visualized in a color-coded illustration. The mean positive and negative deviations between the datasets were calculated automatically. In a direct comparison between maxillary wax trial dentures and complete dentures, complete dentures showed higher deviations from the STL-dataset than the wax trial dentures. The deviations occurred in the area of the teeth as well as in the distal area of the denture bases. In contrast, the highest deviations in both the mandibular wax trial dentures and the mandibular complete dentures were observed in the distal area. The complete dentures showed higher deviations on the occlusal surfaces of the teeth compared to the wax dentures. Computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM-fabricated wax dentures exhibited fewer deviations from the STL-reference than the complete dentures. The deviations were significantly greater in the

  9. A review of the performance and structural considerations of paraffin wax hybrid rocket fuels with additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, Kirsty; Adali, Sarp; Pitot, Jean; Brooks, Michael

    2017-12-01

    Paraffin wax as a hybrid rocket fuel has not been comprehensively characterised, especially regarding the structural feasibility of the material in launch applications. Preliminary structural testing has shown paraffin wax to be a brittle, low strength material, and at risk of failure under launch loading conditions. Structural enhancing additives have been identified, but their effect on motor performance has not always been considered, nor has any standard method of testing been identified between research institutes. A review of existing regression rate measurement techniques on paraffin wax based fuels and the results obtained with various additives are collated and discussed in this paper. The review includes 2D slab motors that enable visualisation of liquefying fuel droplet entrainment and the effect of an increased viscosity on the droplet entrainment mechanism, which can occur with the addition of structural enhancing polymers. An increased viscosity has been shown to reduce the regression rate of liquefying fuels. Viscosity increasing additives that have been tested include EVA and LDPE. Both these additives increase the structural properties of paraffin wax, where the elongation and UTS are improved. Other additives, such as metal hydrides, aluminium and boron generally offer improvements on the regression rate. However, very little consideration has been given to the structural effects these additives have on the wax grain. A 40% aluminised grain, for example, offers a slight increase in the UTS but reduces the elongation of paraffin wax. Geometrically accurate lab-scale motors have also been used to determine the regression rate properties of various additives in paraffin wax. A concise review of all available regression rate testing techniques and results on paraffin wax based hybrid propellants, as well as existing structural testing data, is presented in this paper.

  10. Kinetics of enzymatic synthesis of liquid wax ester from oleic acid and oleyl alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzi, Salina Mat; Mohamad, Rosfarizan; Basri, Mahiran; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Ariff, Arbakariya; Rahman, Mohammad Basyaruddin Abdul; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abdul

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics of wax ester synthesis from oleic acid and oleyl alcohol using immobilized lipase from Candida antartica as catalyst was studied with different types of impeller (Rushton turbine and AL-hydrofoil) to create different mixing conditions in 2l stirred tank reactor. The effects of catalyst concentration, reaction temperature, and impeller tip speed on the synthesis were also evaluated. Rushton turbine impeller exhibited highest conversion rate at lower impeller tip speed as compared to AL-hydrofoil impeller. A second-order reversible kinetic model from single progress curve for the prediction of fractional conversion at given reaction time was proposed and the corresponding kinetic parameter values were calculated by non-linear regression method. The results from the simulation using the proposed model showed satisfactory agreement with the experimental data. Activation energy shows a value of 21.77 Kcal/mol. The thermodynamic parameters of the process, enthalpy and entropy, were 21.15 Kcal/mol and 52.07 cal/mol.K, respectively.

  11. Wax-Assisted One-Step Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay on Lateral Flow Test Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Masanori; Preechakasedkit, Pattarachaya; Yamada, Kentaro; Chailapakul, Orawon; Suzuki, Koji; Citterio, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Lateral flow tests (LFTs) are widely used analytical tools characterized by portability, operator simplicity and short analysis times. A remaining challenge is their limited analytical sensitivity, which in classical immunoassay formats is overcome by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) formats. The implementation of ELISA to an LFT format however, is hampered by the complexity of the procedure requiring the enzyme substrate addition after sample addition. In this work, a simple method for automation of this procedure without user interference is presented. Originally used sample pads of LFTs have been replaced by hydrophobic wax-modified filter paper-based sample pads to realize a delayed flow a pre-deposited colorimetric ELISA substrate without other alterations to the classical lateral-flow immunoassay format. The performance of the system has been characterized by visualizing flow behavior and final proof-of-concept is provided by a model mouse IgG assay, achieving a limit of detection of 15.8 ng mL -1 from just a single application of the sample solution.

  12. Chitosan dipping or oregano oil treatments, singly or combined on modified atmosphere packaged chicken breast meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrou, S; Tsiraki, M; Giatrakou, V; Savvaidis, I N

    2012-06-01

    The present study examined the effect of natural antimicrobials: chitosan, oregano and their combination, on the shelf-life of modified atmosphere packaged chicken breast meat stored at 4°C. Treatments examined in the present study were the following: M (control samples stored under modified atmosphere packaging), M-O (samples treated with oregano oil 0.25% v/w, stored under MAP), M-CH (samples treated with chitosan 1.5% w/v, stored under MAP) and M-CH-O (treated with chitosan 1.5% w/v and oregano oil 0.25% v/w, stored under MAP). Treatment, M-CH-O, significantly affected mesophilic Total Plate Counts (TPC), lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Brochothrix thermosphacta, Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas spp., and yeasts-moulds during the storage period. Lipid oxidation (as determined by MDA values) of control and treated chicken samples was in general low and below 0.5 mg MDA/kg, showing no oxidative rancidity during the storage period. Addition of chitosan to the chicken samples produced higher (P15 (M-CH and M-CH-O) days. Interestingly, chitosan (M-CH) or chitosan-oregano (M-CH-O) treated chicken samples were sensorially acceptable during the entire refrigerated storage period of 21 days. It is noteworthy that the presence of chitosan in M-CH and M-CH-O samples did not negatively influence the taste of chicken samples, with M-CH samples receiving a higher score (compared to M-CH-O), probably as a result of a distinct and "spicy" lemon taste of chitosan, that was well received by the panelists. Based primarily on sensory data (taste attribute) M-CH and M-O treatments extended the shelf-life of chicken fillets by 6 days, while M-CH-O treatment resulted in a product with a shelf-life of 14 days, maintaining acceptable sensory characteristics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The impact of synthetic pyrethroid and organophosphate sheep dip formulations on microbial activity in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucard, Tatiana K.; McNeill, Charles [Department of Environmental Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom); Bardgett, Richard D. [Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom); Paynter, Christopher D. [Department of Environmental Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom); Semple, Kirk T. [Department of Environmental Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: k.semple@lancaster.ac.uk

    2008-05-15

    Sheep dip formulations containing organophosphates (OPs) or synthetic pyrethroids (SPs) have been widely used in UK, and their spreading onto land has been identified as the most practical disposal method. In this study, the impact of two sheep dip formulations on the microbial activity of a soil was investigated over a 35-d incubation. Microbial utilisation of [1-{sup 14}C] glucose, uptake of {sup 14}C-activity into the microbial biomass and microbial numbers (CFUs g{sup -1} soil) were investigated. In control soils and soils amended with 0.01% sheep dip, after 7 d a larger proportion of added glucose was allocated to microbial biomass rather than respired to CO{sub 2}. No clear temporal trends were found in soils amended with 0.1% and 1% sheep dips. Both sheep dip formulations at 0.1% and 1% concentrations resulted in a significant increase in CFUs g{sup -1} soil and [1-{sup 14}C] glucose mineralisation rates, as well as a decline in microbial uptake of [1-{sup 14}C] glucose, compared to control and 0.01% SP- or OP-amended soils. This study suggests that the growth, activity, physiological status and/or structure of soil microbial community may be affected by sheep dips. - The application of sheep dip formulations can have a profound impact upon microbial activity and substrate utilisation in soil.

  14. DIP1 modulates stem cell homeostasis in Drosophila through regulation of sisR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jing Ting; Akhbar, Farzanah; Ng, Amanda Yunn Ee; Tay, Mandy Li-Ian; Loi, Gladys Jing En; Pek, Jun Wei

    2017-10-02

    Stable intronic sequence RNAs (sisRNAs) are by-products of splicing and regulate gene expression. How sisRNAs are regulated is unclear. Here we report that a double-stranded RNA binding protein, Disco-interacting protein 1 (DIP1) regulates sisRNAs in Drosophila. DIP1 negatively regulates the abundance of sisR-1 and INE-1 sisRNAs. Fine-tuning of sisR-1 by DIP1 is important to maintain female germline stem cell homeostasis by modulating germline stem cell differentiation and niche adhesion. Drosophila DIP1 localizes to a nuclear body (satellite body) and associates with the fourth chromosome, which contains a very high density of INE-1 transposable element sequences that are processed into sisRNAs. DIP1 presumably acts outside the satellite bodies to regulate sisR-1, which is not on the fourth chromosome. Thus, our study identifies DIP1 as a sisRNA regulatory protein that controls germline stem cell self-renewal in Drosophila.Stable intronic sequence RNAs (sisRNAs) are by-products of splicing from introns with roles in embryonic development in Drosophila. Here, the authors show that the RNA binding protein DIP1 regulates sisRNAs in Drosophila, which is necessary for germline stem cell homeostasis.

  15. Spin coated versus dip coated electrochromic tungsten oxide films: Structure, morphology, optical and electrochemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deepa, M.; Saxena, T.K.; Singh, D.P.; Sood, K.N.; Agnihotry, S.A.

    2006-01-01

    A sol-gel derived acetylated peroxotungstic acid sol encompassing 4 wt.% of oxalic acid dihydrate (OAD) has been employed for the deposition of tungsten oxide (WO 3 ) films by spin coating and dip coating techniques, in view of smart window applications. The morphological and structural evolution of the as-deposited spin and dip coated films as a function of annealing temperature (250 and 500 o C) has been examined and compared by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). A conspicuous feature of the dip coated film (annealed at 250 o C) is that its electrochromic and electrochemical properties ameliorate with cycling without degradation in contrast to the spin coated film for which these properties deteriorate under repetitive cycling. A comparative study of spin and dip coated nanostructured thin films (annealed at 250 o C) revealed a superior performance for the cycled dip coated film in terms of higher transmission modulation and coloration efficiency in solar and photopic regions, faster switching speed, higher electrochemical activity as well as charge storage capacity. While the dip coated film could endure 2500 color-bleach cycles, the spin coated film could sustain only a 1000 cycles. The better cycling stability of the dip coated film which is a repercussion of a balance between optimal water content, porosity and grain size hints at its potential for electrochromic window applications

  16. A set of 14 DIP-SNP markers to detect unbalanced DNA mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhizhen; Liu, Jinding; Wang, Jiaqi; Chen, Deqing; Liu, Zidong; Shi, Jie; Li, Zeqin; Li, Wenyan; Zhang, Gengqian; Du, Bing

    2018-03-04

    Unbalanced DNA mixture is still a difficult problem for forensic practice. DIP-STRs are useful markers for detection of minor DNA but they are not widespread in the human genome and having long amplicons. In this study, we proposed a novel type of genetic marker, termed DIP-SNP. DIP-SNP refers to the combination of INDEL and SNP in less than 300bp length of human genome. The multiplex PCR and SNaPshot assay were established for 14 DIP-SNP markers in a Chinese Han population from Shanxi, China. This novel compound marker allows detection of the minor DNA contributor with sensitivity from 1:50 to 1:1000 in a DNA mixture of any gender with 1 ng-10 ng DNA template. Most of the DIP-SNP markers had a relatively high probability of informative alleles with an average I value of 0.33. In all, we proposed DIP-SNP as a novel kind of genetic marker for detection of minor contributor from unbalanced DNA mixture and established the detection method by associating the multiplex PCR and SNaPshot assay. DIP-SNP polymorphisms are promising markers for forensic or clinical mixture examination because they are shorter, widespread and higher sensitive. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Millisecond Dip Events in the 2007 RXTE/PCA Data of Sco X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chih-Yuan; Chang, H.

    2008-03-01

    We report preliminary results of search for millisecond dip events with the new RXTE/PCA data of Sco X-1 taken in year 2007. Adopting the same selection criteria as that in previous study, we found that there are only 3 dip events in about 85 ks data, much fewer than the 107 events found in 560 ks data reported earlier with archival data taken from 1996 to 2002. The new data provide more detailed information of the 'very large event' (VLE). Although the number of VLE does not obviously increase during the occurrence of dip events, all the 3 dip events are coincident in time with VLEs that have no flags set for any of the propane or the 6 main xenon anodes. It is a strong indication for instrumental effect. With only 3 dip events, however, the previously proposed possibility that about 10 percent of the dip events might not be instrumental still cannot be strictly excluded. More properties of these dip events are discussed in this paper. This work was supported by the National Science Council of the Republic of China.

  18. Validity of head-dipping as a measure of exploration in a modified hole-board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    File, S E; Wardill, A G

    1975-10-14

    To determine whether head-dipping could be validated as a measure of exploration a modified hole-board was developed with four holes in the floor, under which novel objects could be placed. Two criteria for considering head-dipping as a measure of exploration were proposed: firstly that it should reflect novel aspects of the environment; secondly, that exposure to the hole-board should result in information storage. That head-dipping reflected novelty was indicated by the longer duration of head-dips on initial exposure if objects were present, and also on a second exposure when objects were introduced for the first time. Information storage was indicated by habituation on re-exposure to the hole-board. A significant positive correlation between head-dipping in the "four" and "sixteen" hole-boards was obtained for rats, but not for mice. This provided some indirect evidence that rat head-dipping in the "sixteen hole-board" also reflects exploration. (+)Amphetamine and alcohol were tested in the modified hole-board, and (+)amphetamine decreased and alcohol increased the frequency and duration of head-dips.

  19. Effects of Wax Coating on the Moisture Loss of Cucumbers at Different Storage Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of wax coating on moisture loss of cucumbers (Cucumis sativus L., cv. Jinglv were investigated at different temperatures. Cucumbers were treated with 10% (volume : volume wax and then stored at 15, 20, 25, or 30°C and 55% relative humidity. The changes in the mass of samples were recorded every 6 h. Results showed that wax coating along with low temperature was very effective in preventing moisture loss of cucumbers during simulated distribution. After 48 h storage, moisture loss in wax treated cucumbers at 15°C was 45% lower than the control at 30°C. Furthermore, a kinetic model was developed to study the influence of temperature on moisture loss based on the Arrhenius law. The model successfully described changes in cucumber moisture loss at different temperatures during storage. The shelf life of cucumber was also predicted using the kinetic model. A synergistic effect was found between wax coating and storage temperature on cucumber shelf life. Wax coating combined with low storage temperature was an effective method to extend the shelf life of cucumber fruit.

  20. Wax extraction from filter Cake with Ethanol 96 ºGL at Laboratory Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inés María San Anastacio-Rebollar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a methodology for the production of wax starting from the sugar cane phlegm, in which aggressive substances to the environment are not used. The wax is extracted from the phlegm, a residue of the sugar industry, by using ethanol (with a purity of 96 ºGL as a solvent. A methodology to achieve the extraction of wax from the filter cake was determined. A filter cake:ethanol ratio, where for every 0,05 kg of filter cake: 1L of ethanol was used. The operation parameters of extraction of temperature of 70 ºC, atmospheric pressure, speed of agitation 700 rpm and extraction time 2,5 hour were defined. Under the above mentioned conditions 86,17 % of extraction was achieved. The obtained wax presented the necessary characteristics to compete in the market of vegetable wax. In order to evaluate the design viability of a demonstrative plant for wax production, a simulation of the complete process with the professional simulation software (Super Pro Design was performed. Laboratory obtained results were used for this simulation.

  1. Prediction of wax buildup in 24 inch cold, deep sea oil loading line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asperger, R.G.; Sattler, R.E.; Tolonen, W.J.; Pitchford, A.C.

    1981-10-01

    When designing pipelines for cold environments, it is important to know how to predict potential problems due to wax deposition on the pipeline's inner surface. The goal of this work was to determine the rate of wax buildup and the maximum, equlibrium wax thickness for a North Sea field loading line. The experimental techniques and results used to evaluate the waxing potential of the crude oil (B) are described. Also, the theoretic model which was used for predicting the maximum wax deposit thickness in the crude oil (B) loading pipeline at controlled temperatures of 40 F (4.4 C) and 100 F (38 C), is illustrated. Included is a recommendation of a procedure for using hot oil at the end of a tanker loading period in order to dewax the crude oil (B) line. This technique would give maximum heating of the pipeline and should be followed by shutting the hot oil into the pipeline at the end of the loading cycle which will provide a hot oil soaking to help soften existing wax. 14 references.

  2. The use of paraffin wax in a new solar cooker with inner and outer reflectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arabacigil Bihter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the potential use and effectiveness of paraffin wax in a new solar cooker was experimentally investigated during daylight and late evening hours. For these experiments, a cooker having an inner reflecting surface was designed, constructed by filling paraffin wax and metal shavings. The side- and sub-surface temperatures of the paraffin wax in the cooker are measured in the summer months of June and July. The thermal efficiency of the cooker was tested on different conditions. The results show that the optimum angle of the outer reflector is 30°. Here, the peak temperature of the paraffin wax in the solar cooker was 83.4 °C. The average solar radiation reflected makes a contribution of 9.26% to the temperature of paraffin wax with the outer reflector. The solar cooker with the outer reflector angle of 30° receives also reflected radiation from the inner reflectors. Besides, the heating time is decreased to approximately 1 hour. The designed solar cooker can be effectively used with 30.3% daily thermal efficiency and paraffin wax due to the amount of energy stored.

  3. Sandpipers (Scolopacidae) switch from monoester to diester preen waxes during courtship and incubation, but why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reneerkens, Jeroen; Piersma, Theunis; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S

    2002-10-22

    Recently, a shift in preen wax composition, from lower molecular weight monoesters to higher molecular weight diesters, was described for individuals of a sandpiper species (red knot, Calidris canutus) that were about to leave for the tundra breeding grounds. The timing of the shift indicated that diester waxes served as a quality signal during mate choice. Here, this hypothesis is evaluated on the basis of a survey of preen wax composition in 19 sandpiper species. All of these species showed the same shift observed in the high-Arctic breeding red knots. As the shift also occurred in temperate breeding species, it is not specific to tundra-breeding sandpipers. Both sexes produced the diester waxes during the incubation period until hatching, in addition to the short period of courtship, indicating that diesters' functions extend beyond that of a sexually selected 'make-up'. The few non-incubating birds examined (males of curlew sandpipers (C. ferruginea) and ruffs (Philomachus pugnax)) had the lowest likelihood of secreting diesters, indicating a functional role for diester preen waxes during incubation. We propose that diester preen waxes enhance olfactory crypticism at the nest.

  4. Expression of annual cycles in preen wax composition in red knots: constraints on the changing phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reneerkens, Jeroen; Piersma, Theunis; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe

    2007-03-01

    Birds living in seasonal environments change physiology and behavior in correspondence to temporally changing environmental supplies, demands and opportunities. We recently reported that the chemical composition of uropygial gland secretions of sandpipers (Scolopacidae, order Charadriformes) changes during the breeding season from mixtures of monoesters to diesters, which fulfill specific functions related to incubation. A proper temporal match between the expression of diester preen waxes and incubation requires a flexible organization of the trait. Here we analyze the possible degrees of flexibility with reference to the functionality of better-understood molt and body mass cycles of free-living and captive red knots (Calidris canutus). The relative flexibility of seasonal cycles in preen wax composition was examined by two experimental perturbations: (1) giving birds restricted access to food and (2) monitoring them long-term under a constant photoperiodic regime. We found that wax type cannot change instantaneously, but that changing the type of wax is under similar organizational time constraints as the replacement of feathers. Just as molt and mass cycles, the seasonal rhythm of diester secretion appeared to be under endogenous control: most birds placed in a constant photoperiod still maintained seasonally changing preen waxes. Diester preen wax secretion was synchronized with the peak in body mass in spring, but became less well expressed under constant photoperiodic conditions and when food availability was limited. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Problems in interpreting effects of air pollutants on spruce epicuticular waxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bermadinger-Stabentheiner, E.

    1994-01-01

    Spruce needles are covered with rod-like crystals, which also fill the antechambers of the stomata with a dense meshwork. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) is very useful for studying epicuticular wax structure; with no intricate or laborious preparation, it is possible to obtain valuable information about the needle surface. Because the epicuticular wax layer forms a barrier between the plant and its environment, all influences that reach the surface from outside impact on this layer and, therefore, changes in epicuticular wax structure serve as diagnostic criteria for damage caused by air pollutants. This pollution influence begins as fusion of wax rods at the tips and results finally in total loss of the crystalline structure. Despite the simplicity of SEM investigations, alterations (artefacts) can occur to wax structures that may be confused with alterations caused by air pollutants (i.e., a too dense layer of twigs and needles, or careless handling with tweezers, results in mechanical damage that often influences the entire surface). Overheating occurring during transport or preparation and/or incorrect storage also produce artefacts. If the occurrence of such artefacts is taken into consideration, several contradictory interpretations of effects of air pollutants on epicuticular waxes can be explained. (orig.)

  6. Electrically conductive carbon nanofiber/paraffin wax composites for electric thermal storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Kun; Han Baoguo; Yu Xun

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Carbon nanofiber (CNF)/paraffin wax composite is found to be a promising electric thermal storage material. ► The thermal storage capacity of CNF/paraffin wax composite is five times of traditional electric thermal storage material. ► CNF is shown to be an effective conductive filler for the composite. - Abstract: The research of electric thermal storage (ETS) has attracted a lot of attention recently, which converts off-peak electrical energy into thermal energy and release it later at peak hours. In this study, new electric thermal storage composites are developed by employing paraffin wax as thermal storage media and carbon nanofiber (CNF) as conductive fillers. Electric heating and thermal energy release performances of the CNF/paraffin wax composites are experimentally investigated. Experimental results show that, when the composites are heated to about 70 °C, the developed electrically conductive CNF/paraffin wax composites present a thermal storage capacity of about 280 kJ/kg, which is five times of that of traditional thermal storage medium such as ceramic bricks (54 kJ/kg). The CNF/paraffin wax composites can also effectively store the thermal energy and release the thermal energy in later hours.

  7. Wax deposition measurement under turbulent flow conditions for a live waxy crude from Turkmenistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbarzadeh, K.; Ratulowski, J.; Davies, T. [Schlumberger, Edmonton, AB (Canada). DBR Technology Center; Norpiah, R.M. [Petronas (Malaysia)

    2008-07-01

    The challenges facing deepwater oil production were discussed, with particular reference to flow assurance problems caused by cold temperatures and long offsets that impact the flow of fluids from the wellbore to the export line. The precipitation and deposition of waxy material is one of the most pervasive flow assurance issues. In order to develop operating strategies that address flow assurance risks while minimizing capital and operating costs, it is important to obtain fluid property data and phase behaviour data. Conventional deposition testing for wax is typically run on dead oil in a low shear environment. However, the flow regime in a production system is turbulent with high wall shears because the oil, gas and water are at elevated pressures. As such, wax deposition data for dead oil taken under laminar flow conditions overpredicts the actual wax deposition rates observed at field conditions. Therefore, a high-pressure deposition cell was used in this study to investigate the deposition tendency of a waxy crude oil from Turkmenistan at field conditions. The study also examined the influence of flow rate, temperature and wax inhibitors on wax deposition. The effect of solution gas was also determined. A method for scaling the deposition cell data to pipe flow was also presented and used in a multiphase flow simulator to predict the wax deposition profile in the field.

  8. [Comparative adaptation of crowns of selective laser melting and wax-lost-casting method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guo-qiang; Shen, Qing-yi; Gao, Jian-hua; Wu, Xue-ying; Chen, Li; Dai, Wen-an

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the marginal adaptation of crowns fabricated by selective laser melting (SLM) and wax-lost-casting method, so as to provide an experimental basis for clinic. Co-Cr alloy full crown were fabricated by SLM and wax-lost-casting for 24 samples in each group. All crowns were cemented with zinc phosphate cement and cut along longitudinal axis by line cutting machine. The gap between crown tissue surface and die was measured by 6-point measuring method with scanning electron microscope (SEM). The marginal adaptation of crowns fabricated by SLM and wax-lost-casting were compared statistically. The gap between SLM crowns were (36.51 ± 2.94), (49.36 ± 3.31), (56.48 ± 3.35), (42.20 ± 3.60) µm, and wax-lost-casting crowns were (68.86 ± 5.41), (58.86 ± 6.10), (70.62 ± 5.79), (69.90 ± 6.00) µm. There were significant difference between two groups (P < 0.05). Co-Cr alloy full crown fabricated by wax-lost-casting method and SLM method provide acceptable marginal adaptation in clinic, and the marginal adaptation of SLM is better than that of wax-lost-casting method.

  9. Testing of sawdust-wax firelogs in an open fireplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelton, J.

    1992-01-01

    A total of 14 emissions tests of sawdust-wax firelogs were conducted in an open fireplace. Twelve tests used a cold-to-cold test cycle (i.e., they included the initial light-up and final charcoal phases which are not included in certification tests for wood stoves). Of these 12 tests, half were with wood and half with firelogs. Firelogs were equivalent to or better than wood in all measured parameters except heat output rate, Specifically, the firelogs had lower PM and CO emission rates by about 66 and 78 percent, respectively, had lower creosote accumulation per hour by about 66 percent, had lower opacity, and had comparable efficiency despite a lower burn rate. The heat output rate from the wood fires rose faster and peaked earlier, but the average heat output for the main load (2 hours) phases was about the same (about 6000 to 7000 BTU/hr) for the large size firelogs. Opacity was measured continuously and never exceeded the limits of 20 and 40 percent in the Washington State 1988 woodburning emissions regulation. All these results are based on using the firelogs as their instructions specify - namely using one log at a time and starting it with a match in a room temperature fireplace

  10. Composition of the epicuticular and intracuticular wax layers on Kalanchoe daigremontiana (Hamet et Perr. de la Bathie) leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Maarseveen, Clare; Jetter, Reinhard

    2009-05-01

    Epicuticular and intracuticular waxes from both adaxial and abaxial surfaces of the leaves of Kalanchoe daigremontiana were analyzed. All wax mixtures were found to contain approximately equal amounts of triterpenoids and very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) derivatives. The triterpenoid fraction consisted of glutinol (8-19% of the total wax) and friedelin (4-9%), together with smaller amounts of glutanol, glutinol acetate, epifriedelanol, germanicol and beta-amyrin. The VLCFA derivatives comprised C27-C35 alkanes (19-37% of the total wax), C32-C34 aldehydes (3-7%), C32 and C34 fatty acids (0.2-3%), C26-C36 primary alcohols (4-8%), and C42-C52 alkyl esters (2-9%). The wax layers were found to differ in triterpenoid amounts, with the intracuticular wax containing higher percentages of most triterpenoids than the epicuticular wax. Friedelin, the only triterpenoid ketone present, showed the opposite distribution with higher proportions in the epicuticular wax. VLCFA derivatives also accumulated to higher percentages in the epicuticular than in the intracuticular wax layer. Epicuticular wax crystals were observed on both the adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces.

  11. Trapping dynamics of diindenoperylene (DIP) in self-assembled monolayers using molecular simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Kaushik, Ananth P.

    2011-07-01

    All-atom Molecular Dynamics simulation methods employing a well-tested intermolecular potential model, MM3 (Molecular Mechanics 3), demonstrate the propensity for diindenoperylene (DIP) molecules to insert between molecules of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) during a deposition process intended to grow a thin film of this organic semiconductor molecule onto the surface of self-assembled monolayers. The tendency to insert between SAM molecules is fairly prevalent at normal growth temperatures and conditions, but is most strongly dependent on the density and the nature of the SAM. We posit the existence of an optimal density to favor surface adsorption over insertion for this system. DIP is less likely to insert in fluorinated SAMs, like FOTS (fluorooctatrichlorosilane), than its unfluorinated analog, OTS (octatrichlorosilane). It is also less likely to insert between shorter SAMs (e.g., less insertion in OTS than ODTS (octadecyltrichlorosilane)). Very short length, surface-coating molecules, like HDMS (hexamethyldisilazane), are more likely to scatter energetic incoming DIP molecules with little insertion on first impact (depending on the incident energy of the DIP molecule). Grazing angles of incidence of the depositing molecules generally favor surface adsorption, at least in the limit of low coverage, but are shown to be dependent on the nature of the SAM. The validity of these predictions is confirmed by comparison of the predicted sticking coefficients of DIP at a variety of incident energies on OTS, ODTS, and FOTS SAMs with results obtained experimentally by Desai et al. (2010) [23]. The simulation predictions of the tendency of DIP to insert can be explained, in large part, in terms of binding energies between SAM and DIP molecules. However, we note that entropic and stochastic events play a role in the deposition outcomes. Preliminary studies of multiple deposition events, emulating growth, show an unexpected diffusion of DIP molecules inserted within the

  12. Efficiency dip observed with InGaN-based multiple quantum well solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Lai, Kunyu

    2014-01-01

    The dip of external quantum efficiency (EQE) is observed on In0.15Ga0.85N/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) solar cells upon the increase of incident optical power density. With indium composition increased to 25%, the EQE dip becomes much less noticeable. The composition dependence of EQE dip is ascribed to the competition between radiative recombination and photocurrent generation in the active region, which are dictated by quantum-confined Stark effect (QCSE) and composition fluctuation in the MQWs.

  13. Assessment of the impact of dipped guideways on urban rail transit systems: Ventilation and safety requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    The ventilation and fire safety requirements for subway tunnels with dipped profiles between stations as compared to subway tunnels with level profiles were evaluated. This evaluation is based upon computer simulations of a train fire emergency condition. Each of the tunnel configurations evaluated was developed from characteristics that are representative of modern transit systems. The results of the study indicate that: (1) The level tunnel system required about 10% more station cooling than dipped tunnel systems in order to meet design requirements; and (2) The emergency ventilation requirements are greater with dipped tunnel systems than with level tunnel systems.

  14. The effect of stratigraphic dip on multiphase flow at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, S.W.; Larson, K.W.

    1995-01-01

    The natural stratigraphic dip at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), although regionally only about 1 degree, has the potential to affect brine inflow and gas migration distances due to buoyancy forces. Brine inflow may increase due to countercurrent flow, and gas may preferentially migrate updip. Analytical and numerical modeling was used to evaluate the impact of the dip on brine inflow and gas migration distances at the WIPP in one, two, and three dimensions. Results show that the effect of dip on brine inflow and gas migration distance may be significant

  15. Preparation of WO3 thin film by successive dip coating for electrochromic and photoelectrochromic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae Hyuk; Kang, Jin Soo; Kim, Jin; Lee, Kyung Jae; Sung, Yung Eun; Cha, In Young

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the superiority of WO 3 thin films prepared by successive dip coating in electrochromic devices. Dip coatings were done on transparent conducting oxide substrates in the WO 3 precursor solution a number of times without drying in between the coating steps. This process enabled the fabrication of WO 3 films with optimum thickness and large roughness, which led to enhanced performance when they were employed as the electrode in electrochromic devices. We made a further observation by applying these electrodes in photoelectrochromic devices and verified the excellent properties of the successively dip-coated WO 3 films

  16. Analysis of Mechanical Stresses Due to Voltage Dips in Fixed-Speed Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veluri, Badrinath; Santos-Martin, David; Jensen, Henrik Myhre

    2011-01-01

    stresses transients that may have a detrimental effect on the fatigue life of drivetrain system due to voltage dips. A rainflow cycle counting method for the stress history during the voltage dip event, analyses mean and amplitudes of the counted cycles, their occurrence moment and time of duration.......Voltage dips due to electrical grid faults generate transients of the generator electromagnetic torque which result in significant high stresses and noticeable vibrations for the wind turbine mechanical system. These events may also have a detrimental effect on the fatigue life of important...

  17. Fabrication of an Anisotropic Superhydrophobic Polymer Surface Using Compression Molding and Dip Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyong-Min Lee

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Many studies of anisotropic wetting surfaces with directional structures inspired from rice leaves, bamboo leaves, and butterfly wings have been carried out because of their unique liquid shape control and transportation. In this study, a precision mechanical cutting process, ultra-precision machining using a single crystal diamond tool, was used to fabricate a mold with microscale directional patterns of triangular cross-sectional shape for good moldability, and the patterns were duplicated on a flat thermoplastic polymer plate by compression molding for the mass production of an anisotropic wetting polymer surface. Anisotropic wetting was observed only with microscale patterns, but the sliding of water could not be achieved because of the pinning effect of the micro-structure. Therefore, an additional dip coating process with 1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-perfluorodecythricholosilanes, and TiO2 nanoparticles was applied for a small sliding angle with nanoscale patterns and a low surface energy. The anisotropic superhydrophobic surface was fabricated and the surface morphology and anisotropic wetting behaviors were investigated. The suggested fabrication method can be used to mass produce an anisotropic superhydrophobic polymer surface, demonstrating the feasibility of liquid shape control and transportation.

  18. Large magnetoresistance dips and perfect spin-valley filter induced by topological phase transitions in silicene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prarokijjak, Worasak; Soodchomshom, Bumned

    2018-04-01

    Spin-valley transport and magnetoresistance are investigated in silicene-based N/TB/N/TB/N junction where N and TB are normal silicene and topological barriers. The topological phase transitions in TB's are controlled by electric, exchange fields and circularly polarized light. As a result, we find that by applying electric and exchange fields, four groups of spin-valley currents are perfectly filtered, directly induced by topological phase transitions. Control of currents, carried by single, double and triple channels of spin-valley electrons in silicene junction, may be achievable by adjusting magnitudes of electric, exchange fields and circularly polarized light. We may identify that the key factor behind the spin-valley current filtered at the transition points may be due to zero and non-zero Chern numbers. Electrons that are allowed to transport at the transition points must obey zero-Chern number which is equivalent to zero mass and zero-Berry's curvature, while electrons with non-zero Chern number are perfectly suppressed. Very large magnetoresistance dips are found directly induced by topological phase transition points. Our study also discusses the effect of spin-valley dependent Hall conductivity at the transition points on ballistic transport and reveals the potential of silicene as a topological material for spin-valleytronics.

  19. Wax on, wax off

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bos, Nicky Peter Maria; Grinsted, Lena; Holman, Luke

    2011-01-01

    for another mechanism of cue exchange: indirect transfer of cuticular hydrocarbons via the nest material. Using a combination of chemical analysis and behavioral experiments with Camponotus aethiops ants, we show that nest soil indirectly transfers hydrocarbons between ants and affects recognition behavior......Social animals use recognition cues to discriminate between group members and non-members. These recognition cues may be conceptualized as a label, which is compared to a neural representation of acceptable cue combinations termed the template. In ants and other social insects, the label consists...... of a waxy layer of colony-specific hydrocarbons on the body surface. Genetic and environmental differences between colony members may confound recognition and social cohesion, so many species perform behaviors that homogenize the odor label, such as mouth-to-mouth feeding and allogrooming. Here, we test...

  20. A comparative evaluation of the marginal adaptation of a thermoplastic resin, a light cured wax and an inlay casting wax on stone dies: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reji P Gopalan

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: The marginal adaptation of all the three materials used, was well within the acceptable range of 25–70 μm. The resin pattern materials studied revealed significantly less dimensional change than inlay casting wax on storage at 1, 12, and 24 h time intervals. They may be employed in situations where high precision and delayed investing is expected.

  1. Numerical performance study of paraffin wax dispersed with alumina in a concentric pipe latent heat storage system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valan Arasu Amirtham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Latent heat energy storage systems using paraffin wax could have lower heat transfer rates during melting/freezing processes due to its inherent low thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of paraffin wax can be enhanced by employing high conductivity materials such as alumina (Al2O3. A numerical analysis has been carried out to study the performance enhancement of paraffin wax with nanoalumina (Al2O3 particles in comparison with simple paraffin wax in a concentric double pipe heat exchanger. Numerical analysis indicates that the charge-discharge rates of thermal energy can be greatly enhanced using paraffin wax with alumina as compared with a simple paraffin wax as PCM.

  2. Evaluation of a new trend in the geotechnology for steeply dipping vein deposits in Kyrgyzstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhogulov, KCh; Ganiev, ZhM

    2017-02-01

    The authors evaluate advancement in the geotechnology for steeply dipping vein deposits. It is proposed to use large-diameter drilling with drilling assembly BGA-2V-02. As a result, the efficiency of mining is enhanced.

  3. Dynamic isotope power system (DIPS) applications study. Volume I. Summary. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-11-01

    The Nuclear Integrated Multimission Spacecraft (NIMS) is designed for communications, surveillance, navigation and meteorelogical missions. This study assesses th attributes of the Dynamic Isotope Power System (DIPS) for this spacecraft. These attributes include cost, system and mission compatibility, and survivability

  4. Dental students' preferences and performance in crown design: conventional wax-added versus CAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, R Duane; Hopp, Christa D; Augustin, Marcus A

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate dental students' perceptions of traditional waxing vs. computer-aided crown design and to determine the effectiveness of either technique through comparative grading of the final products. On one of twoidentical tooth preparations, second-year students at one dental school fabricated a wax pattern for a full contour crown; on the second tooth preparation, the same students designed and fabricated an all-ceramic crown using computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) technology. Projects were graded for occlusion and anatomic form by three faculty members. On completion of the projects, 100 percent of the students (n=50) completed an eight-question, five-point Likert scalesurvey, designed to assess their perceptions of and learning associated with the two design techniques. The average grades for the crown design projects were 78.3 (CAD) and 79.1 (wax design). The mean numbers of occlusal contacts were 3.8 (CAD) and 2.9(wax design), which was significantly higher for CAD (p=0.02). The survey results indicated that students enjoyed designing afull contour crown using CAD as compared to using conventional wax techniques and spent less time designing the crown using CAD. From a learning perspective, students felt that they learned more about position and the size/strength of occlusal contacts using CAD. However, students recognized that CAD technology has limits in terms of representing anatomic contours and excursive occlusion compared to conventional wax techniques. The results suggest that crown design using CAD could be considered as an adjunct to conventional wax-added techniques in preclinical fixed prosthodontic curricula.

  5. Anatomically realistic ultrasound phantoms using gel wax with 3D printed moulds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneas, Efthymios; Xia, Wenfeng; Nikitichev, Daniil I.; Daher, Batol; Manimaran, Maniragav; Wong, Rui Yen J.; Chang, Chia-Wei; Rahmani, Benyamin; Capelli, Claudio; Schievano, Silvia; Burriesci, Gaetano; Ourselin, Sebastien; David, Anna L.; Finlay, Malcolm C.; West, Simeon J.; Vercauteren, Tom; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2018-01-01

    Here we describe methods for creating tissue-mimicking ultrasound phantoms based on patient anatomy using a soft material called gel wax. To recreate acoustically realistic tissue properties, two additives to gel wax were considered: paraffin wax to increase acoustic attenuation, and solid glass spheres to increase backscattering. The frequency dependence of ultrasound attenuation was well described with a power law over the measured range of 3–10 MHz. With the addition of paraffin wax in concentrations of 0 to 8 w/w%, attenuation varied from 0.72 to 2.91 dB cm‑1 at 3 MHz and from 6.84 to 26.63 dB cm‑1 at 10 MHz. With solid glass sphere concentrations in the range of 0.025–0.9 w/w%, acoustic backscattering consistent with a wide range of ultrasonic appearances was achieved. Native gel wax maintained its integrity during compressive deformations up to 60%; its Young’s modulus was 17.4  ±  1.4 kPa. The gel wax with additives was shaped by melting and pouring it into 3D printed moulds. Three different phantoms were constructed: a nerve and vessel phantom for peripheral nerve blocks, a heart atrium phantom, and a placental phantom for minimally-invasive fetal interventions. In the first, nerves and vessels were represented as hyperechoic and hypoechoic tubular structures, respectively, in a homogeneous background. The second phantom comprised atria derived from an MRI scan of a patient with an intervening septum and adjoining vena cavae. The third comprised the chorionic surface of a placenta with superficial fetal vessels derived from an image of a post-partum human placenta. Gel wax is a material with widely tuneable ultrasound properties and mechanical characteristics that are well suited for creating patient-specific ultrasound phantoms in several clinical disciplines.

  6. ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION AND DIP-PHENOMENON IN NARROW OPEN-CHANNEL FLOWS

    OpenAIRE

    Absi, Rafik

    2009-01-01

    International audience; In this study, we present analytical tools for velocity distribution in steady uniform open-channel flows. Simple dip-modified laws are presented. An ordinary differential equation based on an analysis of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations is proposed. Comparisons of predicted velocity profiles with experimental data show good agreement. It is well known that dip-phenomenon depends on aspect ratio Ar (ratio of the channel width b to the water depth h)...

  7. Production and characterization of vaginal suppositories with propolis wax as active agent to prevent and treat Fluor albus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farida, Siti; Azizah, Nurul; Hermansyah, Heri; Sahlan, Muhamad

    2017-02-01

    Based on the content contained in propolis wax especially antimicrobial function, it can be analyzed that propolis wax had superiority for Fluor albus. This research was conducted on two formulation of vaginal suppositories with base, supplementary and active agent as a fixed variable: 2% propolis wax (% w/w). Evaluation of this research were weight variation, melting time, consistency, irritation effect test and physical and chemical stability test (organoleptic, pH and polyphenol content).

  8. Modelling the KIC8462852 light curves: compatibility of the dips and secular dimming with an exocomet interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, M. C.; van Lieshout, R.; Kennedy, G. M.; Boyajian, T. S.

    2018-02-01

    This paper shows how the dips and secular dimming in the KIC8462852 light curve can originate in circumstellar material distributed around a single elliptical orbit (e.g. exocomets). The expected thermal emission and wavelength dependent dimming is derived for different orbital parameters and geometries, including dust that is optically thick to stellar radiation, and for a size distribution of dust with realistic optical properties. We first consider dust distributed evenly around the orbit, then show how to derive its uneven distribution from the optical light curve and to predict light curves at different wavelengths. The fractional luminosity of an even distribution is approximately the level of dimming times stellar radius divided by distance from the star at transit. Non-detection of dust thermal emission for KIC8462852 thus provides a lower limit on the transit distance to complement the 0.6 au upper limit imposed by 0.4 d dips. Unless the dust distribution is optically thick, the putative 16 per cent century-long secular dimming must have disappeared before the WISE 12 μm measurement in 2010, and subsequent 4.5 μm observations require transits at >0.05 au. However, self-absorption of thermal emission removes these constraints for opaque dust distributions. The passage of dust clumps through pericentre is predicted to cause infrared brightening lasting tens of days and dimming during transit, such that total flux received decreases at wavelengths population and may be detected in future transit surveys.

  9. Psychosocial Correlates of Nocturnal Blood Pressure Dipping in African Americans: The Jackson Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruill, Tanya M; Shallcross, Amanda J; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Chaplin, William F; Butler, Mark; Palfrey, Amy; Shimbo, Daichi; Muntner, Paul; Sims, Mario; Sarpong, Daniel F; Agyemang, Charles; Ravenell, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    African Americans exhibit a lower degree of nocturnal blood pressure (BP) dipping compared with Whites, but the reasons for reduced BP dipping in this group are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to identify psychosocial factors associated with BP dipping in a population-based cohort of African Americans. This cross-sectional study included 668 Jackson Heart Study (JHS) participants with valid 24-hour ambulatory BP data and complete data on psychosocial factors of interest including stress, negative emotions, and psychosocial resources (e.g., perceived support). The association of each psychosocial factor with BP dipping percentage and nondipping status (defined as Higher depressive symptoms, higher hostility, and lower perceived social support were associated with a lower BP dipping percentage in unadjusted models and after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, and mean 24-hour systolic BP (P social support as a potentially modifiable determinant of nocturnal BP dipping warrants further investigation. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2016. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Effect of high dose SO2 and ethylene exposure on the structure of epicuticular wax of picea pungens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrie, J.; Berg, V.

    1994-01-01

    Conifers in polluted air generally exhibit accelerated degradation of epicuticular wax, but it is not clear whether the change is due to direct exposure to the pollutant or some other mechanism. Needles from blue spruce (Picea pungens) were exposed to sulfur dioxide or ethylene gas at 0 to 10,000 microliters per liter for 2 to 196 h; samples were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Neither gas caused changes in the wax crystals, although late in the growing season a fungal infestation was associated with degradation of wax structures. This supports hypotheses explaining accelerated epicuticular wax degradation by indirect effects of exposure to air pollutants. (orig.)

  11. A new method for the determination of wax precipitation from non-diluted crude oils by fractional precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudilio Coto; Carmen Martos; Jose L. Pena; Juan J. Espada; Maria D. Robustillo [Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid (Spain). Department of Chemical and Environmental Technology

    2008-08-15

    Wax precipitation is one of the most important flow assurance problems. Unfortunately, experimental data are very scarce to confirm existing models for prediction of such precipitation problem. This work reports a new experimental method. Multistage fractional wax precipitation was carried out by decreasing the temperature of crude oil. No solvent dilution was used, so the effect of solvent on temperature wax precipitation was avoided. The reproducibility of the method was tested with comparable results. The precipitation curve and the wax appearance temperature were obtained for two crude oils with different chemical nature using the reported method. 19 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Effect of hot-dip galvanizing processes on the microstructure and mechanical properties of 600-MPa hot-dip galvanized dual-phase steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Chun-fu; Zheng, Zhi-wang; Wang, Min-li; Xu, Quan; Zhang, Shen-gen

    2017-12-01

    A C-Mn dual-phase steel was soaked at 800°C for 90 s and then either rapidly cooled to 450°C and held for 30 s (process A) or rapidly cooled to 350°C and then reheated to 450°C (process B) to simulate the hot-dip galvanizing process. The influence of the hot-dip galvanizing process on the microstructure and mechanical properties of 600-MPa hot-dip galvanized dual-phase steel (DP600) was investigated using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and tensile tests. The results showed that, in the case of process A, the microstructure of DP600 was composed of ferrite, martensite, and a small amount of bainite. The granular bainite was formed in the hot-dip galvanizing stage, and martensite islands were formed in the final cooling stage after hot-dip galvanizing. By contrast, in the case of process B, the microstructure of the DP600 was composed of ferrite, martensite, bainite, and cementite. In addition, compared with the yield strength (YS) of the DP600 annealed by process A, that for the DP600 annealed by process B increased by approximately 50 MPa because of the tempering of the martensite formed during rapid cooling. The work-hardening coefficient ( n value) of the DP600 steel annealed by process B clearly decreased because the increase of the YS affected the computation result for the n value. However, the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation ( A 80) of the DP600 annealed by process B exhibited less variation compared with those of the DP600 annealed by process A. Therefore, DP600 with excellent comprehensive mechanical properties (YS = 362 MPa, UTS = 638 MPa, A 80 = 24.3%, n = 0.17) was obtained via process A.

  13. Slippery surfaces of carnivorous plants: composition of epicuticular wax crystals in Nepenthes alata Blanco pitchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Michael; Eichner, Anna; Jetter, Reinhard

    2003-11-01

    Plants in the genus Nepenthes obtain a substantial nutrient supply by trapping insects in highly modified leaves. A broad zone of the inner surface of these pitchers is densely covered with wax crystals on which most insects lose their footing. This slippery wax surface, capturing prey and preventing its escape from the trap, plays a pivotal role in the carnivorous syndrome. To understand the mechanism of slipperiness, the present investigation aimed at an ultrastructural and physico-chemical characterization of the wax crystals in pitchers of N. alata Blanco. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that entire platelets protruded perpendicularly from the surface. Methods were developed that allowed the mechanical removal of wax crystals from the pitcher surface. It could be shown that the sampling was selective for the epicuticular wax, relevant for plant-insect interactions. The crystals consisted of a mixture of aliphatic compounds dominated by very-long-chain aldehydes. Triacontanal, at 43% the most abundant constituent, was largely responsible for crystal formation. Solubility data indicate that the Nepenthes crystals contained polymeric forms of this aldehyde. The resulting mechanical properties of the polymer crystals and the mechanism of slipperiness are discussed.

  14. Alignment of graphene sheets in wax composites for electromagnetic interference shielding improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei-Li; Cao, Mao-Sheng; Lu, Ming-Ming; Yang, Jian; Ju, Hong-Fei; Hou, Zhi-Ling; Liu, Jia; Yuan, Jie; Fan, Li-Zhen

    2013-03-22

    Rapid advancements in carbon-based fillers have enabled a new and more promising platform in the development of electromagnetic attenuation composites. Alignment of fillers in composites with specific structures and morphologies has been widely pursued to achieve high performance based on taking advantage of unique filler characteristics. In this work, few-layer graphene (FLG), obtained from direct exfoliation of graphite, was fabricated into paraffin wax to prepare FLG/wax composites and investigate their electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding performance. The as-exfoliated FLG/wax samples have shown much improved EMI performance compared to the commercial graphite/wax ones. For further improvement of EMI shielding performance, split-press-merge approaches were applied to align the FLG fillers to achieve anisotropic characteristics in the plane perpendicular to the pressing direction. Much enhanced EMI shielding performance coupled with an improvement in absorption and reflection was observed in the post-alignment FLG/wax composites. An average interparticle distance model associated with improved electrically conducting interconnection and enlarged effective reflection regions with respect to enhanced reflection efficiency were discussed. The results suggest a platform and promising opportunities for preparing high-performance EMI shielding composites.

  15. Alignment of graphene sheets in wax composites for electromagnetic interference shielding improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Weili; Ju Hongfei; Fan Lizhen; Cao Maosheng; Lu Mingming; Yang Jian; Hou Zhiling; Liu Jia; Yuan Jie

    2013-01-01

    Rapid advancements in carbon-based fillers have enabled a new and more promising platform in the development of electromagnetic attenuation composites. Alignment of fillers in composites with specific structures and morphologies has been widely pursued to achieve high performance based on taking advantage of unique filler characteristics. In this work, few-layer graphene (FLG), obtained from direct exfoliation of graphite, was fabricated into paraffin wax to prepare FLG/wax composites and investigate their electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding performance. The as-exfoliated FLG/wax samples have shown much improved EMI performance compared to the commercial graphite/wax ones. For further improvement of EMI shielding performance, split–press–merge approaches were applied to align the FLG fillers to achieve anisotropic characteristics in the plane perpendicular to the pressing direction. Much enhanced EMI shielding performance coupled with an improvement in absorption and reflection was observed in the post-alignment FLG/wax composites. An average interparticle distance model associated with improved electrically conducting interconnection and enlarged effective reflection regions with respect to enhanced reflection efficiency were discussed. The results suggest a platform and promising opportunities for preparing high-performance EMI shielding composites. (paper)

  16. EFFECT OF OIL TEMPERATURE ON THE WAX DEPOSITION OF CRUDE OIL WITH COMPOSITION ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Quan

    Full Text Available Abstract Wax deposition behavior was investigated in a set of one-inch experiment flow loops, using a local crude oil with high wax content. The temperature of the oil phase is chosen as a variable parameter while the temperature of the coolant media is maintained constant. Detailed composition of the deposit is characterized using High Temperature Gas Chromatography. It was found that the magnitude of the diffusion of the heavier waxy components (C35-C50 decreases when the oil temperature decreases, but the magnitude of the diffusion of the lighter waxy components increases. This result means that the diffusion of wax molecules shifts towards lower carbon number, which further proves the concept of molecular diffusion. Meanwhile, a meaningful phenomenon is that the mass of the deposit increases with the oil temperature decrease, which definitely proves the influence of wax solubility on deposition, while the formation of an incipient gel layer reflects the fact that an increase in the mass of the deposit does not mean a larger wax percentage fraction at lower oil temperature.

  17. Biodegradation of paraffin wax by crude Aspergillus enzyme preparations for potential use in removing paraffin deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junhui; Xue, Quanhong; Gao, Hui; Wang, Ping

    2015-11-01

    Paraffin deposition problems have plagued the oil industry. Whist mechanical and chemical methods are problematic, microbiological method of paraffin removal is considered an alternative. However, studies have mainly investigated the use of bacteria, with little attention to the potential of fungi. The performance of six Aspergillus isolates to degrade paraffin wax was evaluated under laboratory conditions using solid enzyme preparations. The results showed that all the six enzyme preparations efficiently improved the solubility of paraffin wax in n-hexane and degraded n-alkanes in paraffin wax. The degradation process was accompanied by dynamic production of gases (CO2 and H2 ) and organic acids (oxalate and propionate). The shape of wax crystals markedly changed after enzymatic degradation, with a rough surface and a loose structure. This study indicates that extracellular enzymes from Aspergillus spp. can efficiently degrade paraffin wax. These enzyme preparations have the potential for use in oil wells with paraffin deposition problems. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Role of needle surface waxes in dynamic exchange of mono- and sesquiterpenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Joensuu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs produced by plants have a major role in atmospheric chemistry. The different physicochemical properties of BVOCs affect their transport within and out of the plant as well as their reactions along the way. Some of these compounds may accumulate in or on the waxy surface layer of conifer needles and participate in chemical reactions on or near the foliage surface. The aim of this work was to determine whether terpenes, a key category of BVOCs produced by trees, can be found on the epicuticles of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. and, if so, how they compare with the terpenes found in shoot emissions of the same tree. We measured shoot-level emissions of pine seedlings at a remote outdoor location in central Finland and subsequently analysed the needle surface waxes for the same compounds. Both emissions and wax extracts were clearly dominated by monoterpenes, but the proportion of sesquiterpenes was higher in the wax extracts. There were also differences in the terpene spectra of the emissions and the wax extracts. The results, therefore, support the existence of BVOC associated to the epicuticular waxes. We briefly discuss the different pathways for terpenes to reach the needle surfaces and the implications for air chemistry.

  19. [Use of entomopathogenic fungi to degrade wax secreted by Ceroplastes japonicus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhijuan; Xie, Yingping; Xue, Jiaoliang; Fan, Jinhua

    2013-05-04

    We used entomopathogenic fungi to degrade insect wax. We used four fungal strains, Lecanicilliurn lecanii V3. 4504, V3. 4505, Beauveria bassiana FDB01, and Metarhizium anisopliae TSL06. Wax coverings of female adults of Ceroplastes japonicus Green (Insecta: Hemiptera: Coccoidea) were used as the sole carbon source in the mineral medium. All of the 4 strains could grow, reproduce, produce enzymes, and degrade wax. During a 7-day culture, the highest lipase activities of the 4 strains, V3. 4504, V3. 4505, FDB01, and TSL06 were 0.128 +/- 0.017, 0.056 +/- 0.002, 0.124 +/- 0.011, and 0.149 +/- 0.005 U/mL, respectively. The dehydrogenases activities of the 4 strains were 0.075 +/- 0.003, 0.074 +/- 0.003, 0.061 +/- 0.04, and 0. 066 +/- 0. 002 U/mL respectively. The degradation rates of wax by the 4 strains were 18.20 +/- 0.019, 11.00 +/- 0.011, 15.4 +/- 0.017, and 23.10 +/- 0.031%, respectively. The 4 strains could depredate wax of C. japonicus.

  20. Chemical composition of preen wax reflects major histocompatibility complex similarity in songbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, J W G; Watson, M J; Kelly, T R; Gloor, G B; Bernards, M A; MacDougall-Shackleton, E A

    2016-11-16

    In jawed vertebrates, genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) play a key role in immunity by encoding cell-surface proteins that recognize and bind non-self antigens. High variability at MHC suggests that these loci may also function in social signalling such as mate choice and kin recognition. This requires that MHC genotype covaries with some perceptible phenotypic trait. In mammals and fish, MHC is signalled chemically through volatile and non-volatile peptide odour cues, facilitating MHC-dependent mate choice and other behaviours. In birds, despite evidence for MHC-dependent mating, candidate mechanisms for MHC signalling remain largely unexplored. However, feather preen wax has recently been implicated as a potential source of odour cues. We examined whether the chemical composition of preen wax correlates with MHC class IIβ genotypes of wild song sparrows (Melospiza melodia). Pairwise chemical distance reflected amino acid distance at MHC for male-female dyads, although not for same-sex dyads. Chemical diversity did not reflect MHC diversity. We used gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to characterize preen wax compounds, and identified four wax esters that best reflect MHC similarity. Provided songbirds can detect variation in preen wax composition, this cue may allow individuals to assess MHC compatibility of potential mates. © 2016 The Author(s).

  1. Associations of Blood Pressure Dipping Patterns With Left Ventricular Mass and Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Blacks: The Jackson Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Marwah; Caughey, Melissa C; Tanner, Rikki M; Booth, John N; Diaz, Keith M; Anstey, D Edmund; Sims, Mario; Ravenell, Joseph; Muntner, Paul; Viera, Anthony J; Shimbo, Daichi

    2017-04-05

    Abnormal diurnal blood pressure (BP), including nondipping patterns, assessed using ambulatory BP monitoring, have been associated with increased cardiovascular risk among white and Asian adults. We examined the associations of BP dipping patterns (dipping, nondipping, and reverse dipping) with cardiovascular target organ damage (left ventricular mass index and left ventricular hypertrophy), among participants from the Jackson Heart Study, an exclusively black population-based cohort. Analyses included 1015 participants who completed ambulatory BP monitoring and had echocardiography data from the baseline visit. Participants were categorized based on the nighttime to daytime systolic BP ratio into 3 patterns: dipping pattern (≤0.90), nondipping pattern (>0.90 to ≤1.00), and reverse dipping pattern (>1.00). The prevalence of dipping, nondipping, and reverse dipping patterns was 33.6%, 48.2%, and 18.2%, respectively. In a fully adjusted model, which included antihypertensive medication use and clinic and daytime systolic BP, the mean differences in left ventricular mass index between reverse dipping pattern versus dipping pattern was 8.3±2.1 g/m 2 ( P pattern versus dipping pattern was -1.0±1.6 g/m 2 ( P =0.536). Compared with participants with a dipping pattern, the prevalence ratio for having left ventricular hypertrophy was 1.65 (95% CI, 1.05-2.58) and 0.96 (95% CI, 0.63-1.97) for those with a reverse dipping pattern and nondipping pattern, respectively. In this population-based study of blacks, a reverse dipping pattern was associated with increased left ventricular mass index and a higher prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy. Identification of a reverse dipping pattern on ambulatory BP monitoring may help identify black at increased risk for cardiovascular target organ damage. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  2. Analysis of the constituents in jojoba wax used as a food additive by LC/MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Atsuko; Jin, Zhe-Long; Sugimoto, Naoki; Sato, Kyoko; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Tanamoto, Kenichi

    2005-10-01

    Jojoba wax is a natural gum base used as a food additive in Japan, and is obtained from jojoba oil with a characteristically high melting point. Although the constituents of jojoba oil have been reported, the quality of jojoba wax used as a food additive has not yet been clarified. In order to evaluate its quality as a food additive and to obtain basic information useful for setting official standards, we investigated the constituents and their concentrations in jojoba wax. LC/MS analysis of the jojoba wax showed six peaks with [M+H]+ ions in the range from m/z 533.6 to 673.7 at intervals of m/z 28. After isolation of the components of the four main peaks by preparative LC/MS, the fatty acid and long chain alcohol moieties of the wax esters were analyzed by methanolysis and hydrolysis, followed by GC/MS. The results indicated that the main constituents in jojoba wax were various kinds of wax esters, namely eicosenyl octadecenoate (C20:1-C18:1) (1), eicosenyl eicosenoate (C20:1-C20:1) (II), docosenyl eicosenoate (C22:1-C20:1) (III), eicosenyl docosenoate (C20:1-C22:1) (IV) and tetracosenyl eiosenoate (C24:1-C20:1) (V). To confirm and quantify the wax esters in jojoba wax directly, LC/MS/MS analysis was performed. The product ions corresponding to the fatty acid moieties of the wax esters were observed, and by using the product ions derived from the protonated molecular ions of wax esters the fatty acid moieties were identified by MRM analysis. The concentrations of the wax esters I, II and III, in jojoba wax were 5.5, 21.4 and 37.8%, respectively. In summary, we clarified the main constituents of jojoba wax and quantified the molecular species of the wax esters without hydrolysis by monitoring their product ions, using a LC/MS/MS system.

  3. Cuticular waxes in alpine meadow plants: climate effect inferred from latitude gradient in Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yanjun; Guo, Na; He, Yuji; Gao, Jianhua

    2015-09-01

    Alpine meadow ecosystems are susceptible to climate changes. Still, climate impact on cuticular wax in alpine meadow plants is poorly understood. Assessing the variations of cuticular wax in alpine meadow plants across different latitudes might be useful for predicting how they may respond to climate change. We studied nine alpine meadows in a climate gradient in the east side of Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, with mean annual temperature ranging from -7.7 to 3.2°C. In total, 42 plant species were analyzed for cuticular wax, averaged 16 plant species in each meadow. Only four plant species could be observed in all sampling meadows, including Kobresia humilis,Potentilla nivea,Anaphalis lacteal, and Leontopodium nanum. The amounts of wax compositions and total cuticular wax in the four plant species varied among sampling meadows, but no significant correlation could be observed between them and temperature, precipitation, and aridity index based on plant species level. To analyze the variations of cuticular wax on community level, we averaged the amounts of n-alkanes, aliphatic acids, primary alcohols, and total cuticular wax across all investigated plant species in each sampling site. The mean annual temperature, mean temperature in July, and aridity index were significantly correlated with the averaged amounts of wax compositions and total cuticular wax. The average chain length of n-alkanes in both plant and soil linearly increased with increased temperature, whereas reduced with increased aridity index. No significant correlation could be observed between mean annual precipitation and mean precipitation from June to August and the cuticular wax amounts and average chain length. Our results suggest that the survival of some alpine plants in specific environments might be depended on their abilities in adjusting wax deposition on plant leaves, and the alpine meadow plants as a whole respond to climate change, benefiting the stability of alpine meadow ecosystem.

  4. Preparation and properties of polystyrene encapsulated paraffin wax as possible phase change material in a polypropylene matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochane, M.J. [Department of Chemistry, University of the Free State (Qwaqwa Campus), Phuthaditjhaba (South Africa); Luyt, A.S., E-mail: LuytAS@qwa.ufs.ac.za [Department of Chemistry, University of the Free State (Qwaqwa Campus), Phuthaditjhaba (South Africa)

    2012-09-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polystyrene microcapsules containing about 30 wt% soft paraffin wax were successfully prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The presence of microcapsules in polypropylene influenced the morphology and properties of the matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SEBS modifier had little influence on the interaction between polypropylene and microcapsules. - Abstract: The study deals with the preparation and characterization of polystyrene (PS) capsules containing Fischer-Tropsch paraffin wax (PS:wax) as phase change material (PCM) for thermal energy storage embedded in a polypropylene (PP) matrix. Blends of PP/PS:wax were prepared without and with polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-ran-butylene)-block-polystyrene (SEBS) as a modifier. The influence of PS:wax microcapsules on the morphology, as well as thermal and mechanical properties of the PP was investigated. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the microencapsulated PCM show that the capsules were grouped in irregular spherical agglomerates of size 16-24 {mu}m. However, after melt-blending with PP smaller, perfectly spherical microcapsules were well dispersed in the PP matrix. There was fairly good interaction between the microcapsules and the matrix, even in the absence of SEBS modification. The FTIR spectrum of the microcapsules is almost exactly the same as that of polystyrene, which indicates that the microcapsules were mostly intact and that the FTIR only detected the polystyrene shell. The amount of wax in the PS:wax microcapsules was determined as 20-30% by weight. An increase in PS:wax content resulted in a decrease in the melting peak temperatures of PP. The thermal stability of the blends decreased with an increase in PS:wax microcapsules content as a consequence of the lower thermal stability of both the wax and PS. There was a drop in storage modulus with increasing PS:wax microcapsules content.

  5. GC-MS Metabolomics to Evaluate the Composition of Plant Cuticular Waxes for Four Triticum aestivum Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent D. Lavergne

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. is an important food crop, and biotic and abiotic stresses significantly impact grain yield. Wheat leaf and stem surface waxes are associated with traits of biological importance, including stress resistance. Past studies have characterized the composition of wheat cuticular waxes, however protocols can be relatively low-throughput and narrow in the range of metabolites detected. Here, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS metabolomics methods were utilized to provide a comprehensive characterization of the chemical composition of cuticular waxes in wheat leaves and stems. Further, waxes from four wheat cultivars were assayed to evaluate the potential for GC-MS metabolomics to describe wax composition attributed to differences in wheat genotype. A total of 263 putative compounds were detected and included 58 wax compounds that can be classified (e.g., alkanes and fatty acids. Many of the detected wax metabolites have known associations to important biological functions. Principal component analysis and ANOVA were used to evaluate metabolite distribution, which was attributed to both tissue type (leaf, stem and cultivar differences. Leaves contained more primary alcohols than stems such as 6-methylheptacosan-1-ol and octacosan-1-ol. The metabolite data were validated using scanning electron microscopy of epicuticular wax crystals which detected wax tubules and platelets. Conan was the only cultivar to display alcohol-associated platelet-shaped crystals on its abaxial leaf surface. Taken together, application of GC-MS metabolomics enabled the characterization of cuticular wax content in wheat tissues and provided relative quantitative comparisons among sample types, thus contributing to the understanding of wax composition associated with important phenotypic traits in a major crop.

  6. The analysis of the wax foundry models fabrication process for the CPX3000 device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Budzik

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents possibilities of creating wax founding models by means of CPX3000 device. The device is used for Rapid Prototypingof models made of foundry wax in an incremental process. The paper also presents problems connected with choosing technologicalparameters for incremental shaping which influence the accuracy of created models. Issues connected with post-processing are alsodescribed. This process is of great importance for obtaining geometrically correct models. The analysis of parameters of cleaning models from supporting material is also presented. At present CPX3000 printer is the first used in Poland device by 3D Systems firm for creating wax models. The printer is at The Faculty of Mechanical Engineering at Rzeszów University of Technology.

  7. Printed wax masks for 254 nm deep-UV pattering of PMMA-based microfluidics

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Yiqiang

    2012-01-13

    This paper reports a new technique for masking deep-UV exposure of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) using a printed wax mask. This technique provides an inexpensive and bulk fabrication method for PMMA structures. The technique involves the direct printing of the mask onto a polymer sheet using a commercial wax printer. The wax layer was then transferred to a PMMA substrate using a thermal laminator, exposed using deep-UV (with a wavelength of 254 nm), developed in an IPA:water solution, and completed by bonding on a PMMA cap layer. A sample microfluidic device fabricated with this method is also presented, with the microchannel as narrow as 50 μm. The whole process is easy to perform without the requirement for any microfabrication facilities. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  8. Procedures for extraction and purification of leaf wax biomarkers from peats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.E. Nichols

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Palaeoecological and palaeoclimate reconstruction, using leaf wax biomarkers, is a relatively new sub-discipline of peatland science. The ability to process large numbers of samples rapidly for biomarkers makes this type of analysis particularly appealing. This review is a guide to the preparation of leaf waxes for analysis by gas chromatography. The main phases of preparation are extraction of soluble organic compounds from sediment, separation of the total extract into fractions of differing polarity, and the derivatisation of polar functional groups. The procedures described here are not meant be exhaustive of all organic geochemical possibilities in peatlands, but a distillation of methods for the preparation of leaf waxes that are commonly and increasingly being used in palaeoecological and palaeoclimatological studies.

  9. Gamma irradiation testing of montan wax for use in waste management systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soo, P.; Heiser, J.; Hart, A.

    1996-01-01

    A field demonstration was funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to quantify the potential use of montan wax as a subsurface barrier material for nuclear waste management applications. As part of that demonstration, a study was completed to address some of the characteristics of the wax. Of particular interest is its resistance to chemical and structural changes that would influence its integrity as a barrier to minimize the migration of contaminants from their storage or disposal locations. Properties that were evaluated included hardness, melting point, molecular weight, and biodegradation as a function of gamma radiation dose. Based on the data obtained to date the wax is extremely resistant to radiation-induced change. Coupled with low permeability, the material shows promise as a subsurface barrier material

  10. Development of a Parafin Wax deposition Unit for Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Angelo, Greta; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Pedersen, David Bue

    2014-01-01

    . This project illustrates the redesign of an extrusion unit for the deposition of paraffin wax in Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) instead of the conventional polymeric materials. Among the benefits and brought by the use of paraffin wax in such system are: the possibility to make highly complex and precise...... the technology and opening to new challenges. The design presented in this paper represents a step towards the development of a multi material deposition unit, able to selectively depose specific materials on demand in the same product, according to needs. In order to achieve that, waxes and respectivedesigns...... extruder principles of modularity and reconfigurability are also taken into account in order to ease up a subsequent integration with a more complex system....

  11. Effects of irradiation in combination with waxing on the essential oils in orange peel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussaid, M.; Lacroix, M.; Nketsia-Tabiri, J.; Boubekri, C.

    2000-01-01

    The study evaluated the effects of waxing and irradiation dose on the essential oils in orange peel. Mature oranges (Maroc late) waxed or unwaxed were treated with 0-2 kGy radiation. Volatiles in the peel were extracted and analyzed by G.C. D-limonene was significantly lower (P≤0.05) in waxed oranges; levels in samples treated with 2 kGy were higher than those treated with 0 or 1 kGy. Linalool, methyl anthranilate and 3.7-dimethyl-2.6-octadienal decreased as the dose increased. The analysis of variance indicates that only linalool was influenced by post-irradiation storage time. The level of this compound increased with storage time. (author)

  12. Effects of irradiation in combination with waxing on the essential oils in orange peel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moussaid, M.; Lacroix, M.; Nketsia-Tabiri, J.; Boubekri, C

    2000-03-01

    The study evaluated the effects of waxing and irradiation dose on the essential oils in orange peel. Mature oranges (Maroc late) waxed or unwaxed were treated with 0-2 kGy radiation. Volatiles in the peel were extracted and analyzed by G.C. D-limonene was significantly lower (P{<=}0.05) in waxed oranges; levels in samples treated with 2 kGy were higher than those treated with 0 or 1 kGy. Linalool, methyl anthranilate and 3.7-dimethyl-2.6-octadienal decreased as the dose increased. The analysis of variance indicates that only linalool was influenced by post-irradiation storage time. The level of this compound increased with storage time. (author)

  13. Retained bone wax on CT at one year after dacryocystorhinostomy: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Hyun; Park, Dong Woo; Jeong, Jin Yeok; Lee, Jong Ah; Lee, Young Jun

    2015-01-01

    A 71-year-old man with chronic rhinosinusitis presented with a purulent, foul-smelling nasal discharge and obstruction. One year earlier he had been treated with a dacryocystorhinostomy for nasolacrimal duct obstruction. During the procedure, bone wax had been used to control bleeding in the anterior upper nasal cavity. On computed tomographic imaging, a fat-density lesion was seen in the anterior upper sinonasal cavity and was found to be hypointense or signal-void on all magnetic resonance imaging sequences. The lesion, which proved to consist of bone wax, was surgically removed. Here, we present the imaging features of retained bone wax in a patient with clinically diagnosed chronic rhinosinusitis after dacryocystorhinostomy

  14. Leaf-surface wax extracted from different pines as green additives exhibiting excellent tribological properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xin; Cao, Zhengfeng; Xia, Yanqiu

    2017-11-01

    Given the increasing attention on the topic of the ‘Green chemical’, it is imperative to explore new environmental friendly and biodegradable lubricants to meet the tribological performances and environmental needs. In this work, three types of leaf-surface wax were extracted from different pines as green lubricant additives and their chemical compositions, friction reduction and anti-wear abilities were investigated in detail. The results show that the leaf-surface wax extracted from different pines as additives in synthetic ester exhibit superior friction reduction and anti-wear abilities for steel/steel and steel/aluminum pairs. Based on the scanning electron microscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy analysis, the preferable tribological performances are ascribed to the physical adsorption film and tribo-chemical reaction film generated by the leaf-surface wax on the worn surfaces during the sliding process.

  15. Hydrogen apparent fractionation between source water and epicuticular waxes of Pinus sylvestris in North East Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newberry, S. L.; Grace, J.; Pedentchouk, N.

    2010-12-01

    Hydrogen isotopic composition of plant biomass provides crucial information about plant ecophysiology and local hydrology. Little is known about the apparent fractionation between hydrogen in source water and epicuticular leaf waxes of coniferous tree species that dominate the boreal forest ecosystem exposed to prolonged periods of sunlight during the growing season. In this study, single rope canopy access techniques were used to harvest needle and twig material from the upper, middle and lower crown of north and south facing branches of Pinus sylvestris within the subarctic forest of North East Finland. Samples were collected towards the beginning of the growing season in July and repeated in late September 2010. Leaf and twig waters were extracted cryogenically and analysed for D-enrichment. Individual n-alkanes are currently being quantified and analyzed for 13C/12C and D/H compositions. The molecular and isotopic data are supplemented by long-term in-situ cuvette photosynthetic assimilation measurements as well as relative humidity (RH), air temperature, precipitation and wind speed data collected by Helsinki University (SMEAR I). In addition RH, air temperature, wind speed and incoming solar radiation measurements were made at each individual sample point at the time of harvesting to quantify meteorological and microclimatological variation within individual trees. The outcome of this investigation will provide important insights into plant biochemistry and physiology of a crucial climate sensitive higher plant species subjected to continuous low light throughout the season. Furthermore, this work will expand our understanding of modern and palaeo-hydrology not only in northern Finland but also in other boreal forests around the world.

  16. Waxing and Waning of Forests: Late Quaternary Biogeography of Lake Malawi, Southeast Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivory, S.; Lézine, A. M.; Vincens, A.; Cohen, A. S.

    2014-12-01

    African ecosystems are at great risk due to climate and land-use change. Despite the status of several of these regions as biodiversity hotspots, long-standing ideas about African ecology and biogeography have been unable to be tested until now due to lack of sufficiently long records. Here, we present the first long, continuous terrestrial record of vegetation from Lake Malawi, East Africa which goes back to the early Late Quaternary, permitting us to investigate changes in physiognomy and forest composition over many transitions. In this record, we observe eight phases of forest expansion and collapse. Although diversity is much greater during forest phases, composition varies little from phase to phase. Very high abundances of afromontane taxa suggest frequent widespread colonization of the lowlands by modern high elevation trees. Although there are clear successional stages within each forest such that turnover is great within a single phase, among forest samples between phases, there is little dissimilarity. Each forest phase is interrupted by rapid decline of arboreal taxa and expansion of semi-arid grasslands or woodlands whose composition varies greatly from phase to phase. The variable composition of the more open phases, all occurring during arid periods, is likely dynamically linked to thresholds in regional hydrology associated with lake level and moisture recycling within the watershed. This vegetation is unlike any found at Malawi today, with assemblages suggesting strong Somali-Masai affinities. Furthermore, nearly all semi-arid assemblages contain small abundances of forest taxa typically growing in areas with wetter edaphic conditions, suggesting that moist lowland gallery forests were present but restricted to waterways during exceptionally arid times. The waxing and waning of forests throughout this interval has important implications for early human biogeography across Africa as well as disturbance regimes that are crucial for the maintenance of

  17. The deformation of wax patterns and castings in investment casting technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Herman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The dimensional accuracy of the final casting of Inconel alloy 738 LC is affected by many aspects. One of them is the choice of method and time of cooling wax model for precision investment casting. The main objective was to study the initial deformation of the complex shape of the casting of the rotor blades. Various approaches have been tested for cooling wax pattern. When wax models are cooling on the air, without clamping in jig for cooling, deviations from the ideal shape of the casting are very noticeable (up to 8 mm and most are in extreme positions of the model. When blade is cooled in fixing jig in water environment, the resulting deviations compared with cooling in air are significantly larger, sometimes up to 10 mm. This itself does not mean that the final shape of the casting is dimensionally more accurate with usage of wax models, which have deviations from the ideal position smaller. Another deformation occurs when shell mould is produced around wax pattern and furthermore deformations emerge while casting of blade is cooling. This paper demonstrates first steps in describing complex process of deformations of Inconel alloy blades produced with investment casting technology by comparing results from thermal imagery, simulations in foundry simulation software ProCAST 2010 and measurements from CNC scanning system Carl Zeiss MC 850. Conclusions are so far not groundbreaking, but it seems deformations of wax pattern and deformations of castings do in some cases cancel each other by having opposite directions. Describing entirely whole process of deformations will help increase precision of blade castings so that models at the beginning and blades in the end are the same.

  18. Effect of gamma radiation and entomopathogenic nematodes on greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella (Linnaeus) [Lep., Pyralidae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, R.M.S.

    2008-01-01

    The greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella (L.), is a lepidoptera insect; its larval stage, feeds on wax and pollen stored in combs of active honey bee colonies (Milam, 1970). It does not attack adult bees but destructs combs of a weak colony by chewing the comb; spinning silk-lined tunnels through the cell wall and over the face of the comb, which prevent the bees to emerge by their abdomen from their cell, so they die by starvation as they unable to escape from their cell. They also eat out a place to spin their cocoons in the soft wood of the bee hive. Galleria mellonella can also destroy stored honey combs. Therefore, it is considered a major pest of the honeybee. Damage will vary with the level of infestation and the time that has elapsed since the infestation first began. In time, stored combs may be completely destroyed and the frames and combs become filled with a mass of tough, silky web. In ideal conditions for wax moth development, a box (super) of combs may be rendered useless in about a week. Damage occurs mainly in the warm and hot months of the year when wax moths are most active. However, considerable damage can still occur during the cool part of late autumn and early spring as greater wax moth can produce a large amount of metabolic heat which can raise the immediate temperature around them by up to 25 degree C above the normal environment temperature. At the time of storage, combs that are apparently free of wax moth may contain eggs that will hatch later. They should be monitored

  19. Review of data on the dermal penetration of mineral oils and waxes used in cosmetic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, T; Bury, D; Fautz, R; Hauser, M; Huber, B; Markowetz, A; Mishra, S; Rettinger, K; Schuh, W; Teichert, T

    2017-10-05

    Mineral oils and waxes used in cosmetic products, also referred to as "personal care products" outside the European Union, are mixtures of predominantly saturated hydrocarbons consisting of straight-chain, branched and ring structures with carbon chain lengths greater than C16. They are used in skin and lip care cosmetic products due to their excellent skin tolerance as well as their high protecting and cleansing performance and broad viscosity options. Recently, concerns have been raised regarding potential adverse health effects of mineral oils and waxes from dermal application of cosmetics. In order to be able to assess the risk for the consumer the dermal penetration potential of these ingredients has to be evaluated. The scope and objective of this review are to identify and summarize publicly available literature on the dermal penetration of mineral oils and waxes as used in cosmetic products. For this purpose, a comprehensive literature search was conducted. A total of 13 in vivo (human, animal) and in vitro studies investigating the dermal penetration of mineral oils and waxes has been identified and analysed. The majority of the substances were dermally adsorbed to the stratum corneum and only a minor fraction reached deeper skin layers. Overall, there is no evidence from the various studies that mineral oils and waxes are percutaneously absorbed and become systemically available. Thus, given the absence of dermal uptake, mineral oils and waxes as used in cosmetic products do not present a risk to the health of the consumer. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Co-metabolism of DDT by the newly isolated bacterium, Pseudoxanthomonas sp. wax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangli Wang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbial degradation of 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenylethane (DDT is the most promising way to clean up DDT residues found in the environment. In this paper, a bacterium designated as wax, which was capable of co-metabolizing DDT with other carbon sources, was isolated from a long-term DDT-contaminated soil sample by an enrichment culture technique. The new isolate was identified as a member of the Pseudoxanthomonas sp., based on its morphological, physiological and biochemical properties, as well as by 16S rRNA gene analysis. In the presence of 100 mg l-1 glucose, the wax strain could degrade over 95% of the total DDT, at a concentration of 20 mg l-1, in 72 hours, and could degrade over 60% of the total DDT, at a concentration of 100 mg l-1, in 144 hours. The wax strain had the highest degradation efficiency among all of the documented DDT-degrading bacteria. The wax strain could efficiently degrade DDT at temperatures ranging from 20 to 37ºC, and with initial pH values ranging from 7 to 9. The bacterium could also simultaneously co-metabolize 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenylethane (DDD, 2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl-1,1-dichlorethylene (DDE, and other organochlorine compounds. The wax strain could also completely remove 20 mg kg-1 of DDT from both sterile and non-sterile soils in 20 days. This study demonstrates the significant potential use of Pseudoxanthomonas sp. wax for the bioremediation of DDT in the environment.

  1. Oral cancer diagnostics based on infrared spectral markers and wax physisorption kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Li-Fang; Huang, Pei-Yu; Chiang, Wei-Fan; Wong, Tung-Yiu; Lin, Sheng-Hsiang; Lee, Yao-Chang; Shieh, Dar-Bin

    2013-02-01

    Infrared microspectroscopy is an emerging approach for disease analysis owing to its capability for in situ chemical characterization of pathological processes. Synchrotron-based infrared microspectroscopy (SR-IMS) provides ultra-high spatial resolution for profiling biochemical events associated with disease progression. Spectral alterations were observed in cultured oral cells derived from healthy, precancerous, primary, and metastatic cancers. An innovative wax-physisorption-based kinetic FTIR imaging method for the detection of oral precancer and cancer was demonstrated successfully. The approach is based on determining the residual amount of paraffin wax (C(25)H(52)) or beeswax (C(46)H(92)O(2)) on a sample surface after xylene washing. This amount is used as a signpost of the degree of physisorption that altered during malignant transformation. The results of linear discriminant analysis (LDA) of oral cell lines indicated that the methylene (CH(2)) and methyl group (CH(3)) stretching vibrations in the range of 3,000-2,800 cm(-1) have the highest accuracy rate (89.6 %) to discriminate the healthy keratinocytes (NHOK) from cancer cells. The results of wax-physisorption-based FTIR imaging showed a stronger physisorption with beeswax in oral precancerous and cancer cells as compared with that of NHOK, which showed a strong capability with paraffin wax. The infrared kinetic study of oral cavity tissue showed a consistency in the wax physisorption of the cell lines. On the basis of our findings, these results show the potential use of wax-physisorption-based kinetic FTIR imaging for the early screening of oral cancer lesions and the chemical changes during oral carcinogenesis.

  2. Thermal characterizations of the paraffin wax/low density polyethylene blends as a solid fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soojong; Moon, Heejang; Kim, Jinkon

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Regression rate of blends fuel is higher than polymer fuel. • LDPE is an effective mixing ingredient for the combustion efficiency. • Blends fuel is a uniform mixture with two degradation steps. • LDPE plays a positive role for the low sensitivity to the thermal deformation • Blends with low LDPE content can be an effective fuel for hybrid rocket application. - Abstract: Thermal characterizations of a novel solid fuel for hybrid rocket application, based on the paraffin wax blends with low density polyethylene (LDPE) concentration of 5% (SF-5) and 10% (SF-10) were conducted. Both the increased regression rate in comparison with the polymeric fuel, and the improved combustion efficiency in comparison with the pure paraffin fuel reveal that the blend fuels achieve higher combustion performance. The morphology of the shape stabilized paraffin wax/LDPE blends was characterized by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Although the SEM observation indicated the blends have uniform mixtures, they showed two degradation steps confirming the immiscibility of components in the crystalline phase from thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) results showed that the melting temperature of LDPE in the blends decreased with an increase of paraffin wax content. The decreasing total specific melting enthalpy of blended fuels with decreasing paraffin wax content is in fairly good agreement with the additive rule. In thermomechanical analysis (TMA), the linear coefficient of thermal expansion (LCTE) seems to decrease with an increase of LDPE loading, however, the loaded LDPE do merely affect the LCTE in case of the blends with low LDPE concentration. It was found that a blend of low concentration of LDPE with a relatively high concentration of paraffin wax can lead to a potential novel fuel for rocket application, a contrary case with respect to the field of phase change materials (PCM) where a blend of high concentration

  3. Molecular and Biochemical Characterization of Cotton Epicuticular Wax in Defense Against Cotton Leaf Curl Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Azmat Ullah; Shahid, Ahmad Ali; Rao, Abdul Qayyum; Bajwa, Kamran Shehzad; Samiullah, Tahir Rehman; Muzaffar, Adnan; Nasir, Idrees Ahmad; Husnain, Tayyab

    2015-12-01

    Gossypium arboreumis resistant to Cotton leaf curl Burewala virus and its cognate Cotton leaf curl Multan beta satellite ( CLCuBuV and CLCuMB ). However, the G. arboreum wax deficient mutant (GaWM3) is susceptible to CLCuV . Therefore, epicuticular wax was characterized both quantitatively and qualitatively for its role as physical barrier against whitefly mediated viral transmission and co-related with the titer of each viral component (DNA-A, alphasatellite and betasatellite) in plants. The hypothesis was the CLCuV titer in cotton is dependent on the amount of wax laid down on plant surface and the wax composition. Analysis of the presence of viral genes, namely alphasatellite, betasatellite and DNA-A, via real-time PCR in cotton species indicated that these genes are detectable in G. hirsutum , G. harknessii and GaWM3, whereas no particle was detected in G. arboreum . Quantitative wax analysis revealed that G. arboreum contained 183 μg.cm -2 as compared to GaWM3 with only 95 μg.cm -2 . G. hirsutum and G. harknessii had 130 μg.cm -2 and 146 μg.cm -2 , respectively. The GCMS results depicted that Lanceol, cis was 45% in G. harknessii . Heptadecanoic acid was dominant in G. arboreum with 25.6%. GaWM3 had 18% 1,2,-Benenedicarboxylic acid. G. hirsutum contained 25% diisooctyl ester. The whitefly feeding assay with Nile Blue dye showed no color in whiteflies gut fed on G. arboreum . In contrast, color was observed in the rest of whiteflies. From results, it was concluded that reduced quantity as well as absence of (1) 3-trifluoroacetoxytetradecane, (2) 2-piperidinone,n-|4-bromo-n-butyl|, (3) 4-heptafluorobutyroxypentadecane, (4) Silane, trichlorodocosyl-, (5) 6- Octadecenoic acid, methyl ester, and (6) Heptadecanoicacid,16-methyl-,methyl ester in wax could make plants susceptible to CLCuV , infested by whiteflies.

  4. The effects of surgicel and bone wax hemostatic agents on bone healing: An experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Nooh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The biological effects of hemostatic agends on the physiological healing process need to be tested. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of oxidized cellulose (surgicel and bone wax on bone healing in goats′ feet. Materials and Methods: Three congruent circular bone defects were created on the lateral aspects of the right and left metacarpal bones of ten goats. One defect was left unfilled and acted as a control; the remaining two defects were filled with bone wax and surgicel respectively. The 10 animals were divided into two groups of 5 animals each, to be sacrificed at the 3rd and 5th week postoperatively. Histological analysis assessing quality of bone formed and micro-computed tomography (MCT measuring the quantities of bone volume (BV and bone density (BD were performed. The results of MCT analysis pertaining to BV and BD were statistically analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and posthoc least significant difference tests. Results: Histological analysis at 3 weeks showed granulation tissue with new bone formation in the control defects, active bone formation only at the borders for surgicel filled defects and fibrous encapsulation with foreign body reaction in the bone wax filled defects. At 5 weeks, the control and surgicel filled defects showed greater bone formation; however the control defects had the greatest amount of new bone. Bone wax filled defects showed very little bone formation. The two-way ANOVA for MCT results showed significant differences for BV and BD between the different hemostatic agents during the two examination periods. Conclusion: Surgicel has superiority over bone wax in terms of osseous healing. Bone wax significantly hinders osteogenesis and induces inflammation.

  5. Cuticular wax accumulation is associated with drought tolerance in wheat near-isogenic lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmin Song

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that wheat grain yield is seriously affected by drought stress, and leaf cuticular wax is reportedly associated with drought tolerance. However, most studies have focused on cuticular wax biosynthesis and model species. The effects of cuticular wax on wheat drought tolerance have rarely been studied. The aims of the current study were to study the effects of leaf cuticular wax on wheat grain yield under drought stress using the above-mentioned wheat NILs and to discuss the possible physiological mechanism of cuticular wax on high grain yield under drought stress. Compared to water-irrigated (WI conditions, the cuticular wax content (CWC in glaucous and non-glaucous NILs under drought-stress (DS conditions both increased; mean increase values were 151.1% and 114.4%, respectively, which was corroborated by scanning electronic microscopy images of large wax particles loaded on the surfaces of flag leaves. The average yield of glaucous NILs was higher than that of non-glaucous NILs under DS conditions in 2014 and 2015; mean values were 7368.37 kg·ha-1 and 7103.51 kg·ha-1. This suggested that glaucous NILs were more drought-tolerant than non-glaucous NILs (P = 0.05, which was supported by the findings of drought tolerance indices TOL and SSI in both years, the relatively high water potential and relative water content, and the low ELWL. Furthermore, the photosynthesis rate (Pn of glaucous and non-glaucous wheat NILs under DS conditions decreased by 7.5% and 9.8%, respectively; however, glaucous NILs still had higher mean values of Pn than those of non-glaucous NILs, which perhaps resulted in the higher yield of glaucous NILs. This could be explained by the fact that glaucous NILs had a smaller Fv/Fm reduction, a smaller PI reduction and a greater ABS/RC increase than non-glaucous NILs under DS conditions. This is the first report to show that wheat cuticular wax accumulation is associated with drought tolerance. Moreover

  6. In search of low cost biological analysis: Wax or acrylic glue bonded paper microfluidic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2011-01-22

    In this body of work we have been developing and characterizing paper based microfluidic fabrication technologies to produce low cost biological analysis. Specifically we investigated the performance of paper microfluidics that had been bonded using wax or acrylic glue, and characterized the affect of these and other microfluidic materials on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We report a simple, low-cost and detachable microfluidic chip incorporating easily accessible paper, glass slides or other polymer films as the chip materials along with adhesive wax or cyanoacrylate-based resin as the recycling bonding material. We use a laser to cut through the paper or film to form patterns and then sandwich the paper and film between glass sheets or polymer membranes. The hot-melt adhesive wax or simple cyanoacrylate-based resin can realize bridge bonding between various materials, for example, paper, polymethylmethacrylate film, glass sheets, or metal plate. The wax bonding process is reversible and the wax is reusable through a melting and cooling process. With this process, a three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic chip is achievable by evacuating the channels of adhesive material in a hot-water. We applied the wax-paper based microfluidic chip to HeLa cell electroporation. Subsequently, a prototype of a 5-layer 3D chip was fabricated by multilayer wax bonding. To check the sealing ability and the durability of the chip, green fluorescence protein recombinant E. coli bacteria were cultured, with which the chemotaxis of E. coli was studied in order to determine the influence of antibiotic ciprofloxacin concentration on the E. coli migration. The chip bonded with cyanoacrylate-based resin was tested by measuring protein concentration and carrying out DNA capillary electrophoresis. To study the biocompatibility and applicability of our microfluidic chip fabrication technology, we tested the PCR compatibility of our chip materials along with various other common materials

  7. Nanostructure evolution during thermal treatment of polyimide–fullerene composites as revealed by WAXS and SAXS

    OpenAIRE

    Cagiao, M. E.; Pozdnyakov, A. O.; Krumova, M.; Kudryavtsev, V. V.; Baltá Calleja, Francisco José

    2007-01-01

    The nanostructure formation in polyimide–fullerene composites during thermal treatment was investigated ‘‘in situ’’, by means of wide-angle (WAXS) and small-angle X-ray scattering techniques. The WAXS patterns of the PI composites do not reveal the presence of C60 reflections. However, the PI/C60 composite, obtained by adding the C60 solution to the diamines-solution during the first step of the reaction (preparation of the polyamic acid, PAA), shows a maximum at small X-ray scattering angles...

  8. Monitoring Acid–Base Titrations on Wax Printed Paper Microzones Using a Smartphone

    OpenAIRE

    Sandro A. Nogueira; Lucas R. Sousa; Nathália K. L. Silva; Pedro H. F. Rodrigues; Wendell K. T. Coltro

    2017-01-01

    This study describes the use of a smartphone for monitoring acid–base titrations on wax printed paper microzones. An array of twelve microzones of 5 mm diameter each was wax printed on filter paper. The analytical performance of the proposed devices was explored with acid–base titrations examples, where jaboticaba peel extract was used as a natural pH indicator. The color intensity was captured using a smartphone and analyzed through a free App named Photometrix®. Before titrations, color int...

  9. Gamma irradiation testing of montan wax barrier materials for in-situ waste containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soo, P.; Heiser, J.

    1996-02-01

    A scoping study was carried out to quantify the potential use of a montan wax as a barrier material for subsurface use. If it possesses resistance to chemical and structural change, it could be used in a barrier to minimize the migration of contaminants from their storage or disposal locations. Properties that were evaluated included hardness, melting point, molecular weight, and biodegradation as a function of gamma radiation dose. The main emphasis was to quantify the wax's long-term ability to withstand radiation-induced mechanical, chemical, and microbial degradation

  10. Release kinetics of salbutamol sulphate from wax coated microcapsules and tableted microcapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuvanshi, R S; Tripathi, K P; Jayaswal, S B; Singh, J

    1992-01-01

    Microcapsules of salbutamol sulphate were prepared using beeswax and carnauba wax as coating materials. In vitro release kinetics were studied following the zero order, first order and Higuchi equations. Beeswax alone was not effective but beeswax and carnauba wax combinations were suitable in controlling the in vitro release of the drug. Microcapsules were compressed into tablets to get a controlled release oral dosage form. Release from tableted microcapsules was significantly more prolonged than the respective batches of the microcapsules. Best data fit with the highest correlation coefficient for the tableted microcapsules was obtained for first order.

  11. Chamber for in situ WAXS, SAXS and GISAXS studies: application to plasma induced transformations in steels

    CERN Document Server

    Kellermann, G; Feugeas, J; Craievich, A F

    2001-01-01

    A chamber for in situ WAXS, SAXS and GISAXS studies of polycrystalline and amorphous materials was designed and constructed. It is used under vacuum or filled with a gas mixture to operate as a reactor where a plasma for materials surface treatment is produced. The WAXS intensity is recorded by an external imaging plate moving parallel to the chamber axis, making it possible to obtain successive patterns during in situ studies of structural transformations. The chamber is also used for classical SAXS and GISAXS studies of thin films.

  12. Evaluation of experimental data for wax and diamondoids solubility in gaseous systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohammadi, Amir H.; Gharagheizi, Farhad; Eslamimanesh, Ali

    2012-01-01

    The Leverage statistical approach is herein applied for evaluation of experimental data of the paraffin waxes/diamondoids solubility in gaseous systems. The calculation steps of this algorithm consist of determination of the statistical Hat matrix, sketching the Williams Plot, and calculation......-Santiago and Teja correlations are used to calculate/estimate the solubility of paraffin waxes (including n-C24H50 to n-C33H68) and diamondoids (adamantane and diamantane) in carbon dioxide/ethane gases, respectively. It can be interpreted from the obtained results that the applied equations for calculation...

  13. Setaria viridis floral-dip: A simple and rapid Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polyana Kelly Martins

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Setaria viridis was recently described as a new monocotyledonous model species for C4 photosynthesis research and genetic transformation. It has biological attributes (rapid life cycle, small genome, diploid, short stature and simple growth requirements that make it suitable for use as a model plant. We report an alternative method of S. viridis transformation using floral dip to circumvent the necessity of tissue culture phase for transgenic plant regeneration. S. viridis spikes at boot stage were selected to be immersed in Agrobacterium suspension. T1 seeds could be identified in 1.5–2 months after floral dipping. We demonstrated through molecular analysis and RFP expression that seeds and resulting plants from dipped inflorescences were transformed. Our results suggest the feasibility of S. viridis floral dip transformation as a time-saving and cost-effective compared with traditional methods. To our knowledge, this is the first report using floral dip in S. viridis as an Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method.

  14. Seismological constraints on the down-dip shape of normal faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Kirsty; Copley, Alex

    2018-04-01

    We present a seismological technique for determining the down-dip shape of seismogenic normal faults. Synthetic models of non-planar source geometries reveal the important signals in teleseismic P and SH waveforms that are diagnostic of down-dip curvature. In particular, along-strike SH waveforms are the most sensitive to variations in source geometry, and have significantly more complex and larger-amplitude waveforms for curved source geometries than planar ones. We present the results of our forward-modelling technique for 13 earthquakes. Most continental normal-faulting earthquakes that rupture through the full seismogenic layer are planar and have dips of 30°-60°. There is evidence for faults with a listric shape from some of the earthquakes occurring in two regions; Tibet and East Africa. These ruptures occurred on antithetic faults, or minor faults within the hanging walls of the rifts affected, which may suggest a reason for the down-dip curvature. For these earthquakes, the change in dip across the seismogenic part of the fault plane is ≤30°.

  15. Migration velocity analysis using a transversely isotropic medium with tilt normal to the reflector dip

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, T.

    2010-06-13

    A transversely isotropic model in which the tilt is constrained to be normal to the dip (DTI model) allows for simplifications in the imaging and velocity model building efforts as compared to a general TTI model. Though this model, in some cases, can not be represented physically like in the case of conflicting dips, it handles all dips with the assumption of symmetry axis normal to the dip. It provides a process in which areas that meet this feature is handled properly. We use efficient downward continuation algorithms that utilizes the reflection features of such a model. For lateral inhomogeneity, phase shift migration can be easily extended to approximately handle lateral inhomogeneity, because unlike the general TTI case the DTI model reduces to VTI for zero dip. We also equip these continuation algorithms with tools that expose inaccuracies in the velocity. We test this model on synthetic data of general TTI nature and show its resilience even couping with complex models like the recently released anisotropic BP model.

  16. Enhanced ethanol production by removal of cutin and epicuticular waxes of wheat straw by plasma assisted pretreatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kádár, Zsófia; Schultz-Jensen, Nadja; Jensen, J. S.

    2015-01-01

    as with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) imaging. Compounds resulting from wax degradation were analyzed in the washing water of PAP wheat straw. The wax removal enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis yield and, consequently, the efficiency of wheat straw conversion into ethanol. In total, PAP increased the conversion...

  17. Molecular analysis of intact preen waxes of Calidris Canutus (Aves: Scolopacidae) by GC/MS and GC/MS/MS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Dekker, M.H.A.; Piersma, T.

    2000-01-01

    The intact preen wax esters of the red knot Calidris canutus were studied with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and GC/MS/MS. In this latter technique, transitions from the molecular ion to fragment ions representing the fatty acid moiety of the wax esters were measured, providing

  18. Molecular analysis of intact preen waxes of Calidris canutus (Aves : Scolopacidae) by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, MHA; Piersma, T; Damste, JSS; Dekker, Marlèn H.A.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    The intact preen wax esters of the red knot Calidris canutus were studied with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and GC/MS/MS. In this latter technique, transitions from the molecular ion to fragment ions representing the fatty acid moiety of the wax esters were measured, providing

  19. Influence of dipping cycles on physical, optical, and electrical properties of Cu 2 NiSnS 4 : Direct solution dip coating for photovoltaic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokurala, Krishnaiah; Mallick, Sudhanshu; Bhargava, Parag; Siol, Sebastian; Klein, Talysa R.; van Hest, Maikel F. A. M.

    2017-11-01

    Direct solution coating technique has emerged as a promising economically viable process for earth abundant chalcogenide absorber materials for photovoltaic applications. Here, direct ethanol based dip coating of earth abundant Cu2NiSnS4 (CNTS) films on soda lime glass (SLG), molybdenum coated glass (Mo), and fluorine doped tin oxide coated glass (FTO) substrates is investigated. The structural and morphological properties of pre-annealed and sulfurized CNTS films coated on SLG, FTO, and Mo substrates are reported. The influence of dipping cycles on composition and optoelectronic properties of pre-annealed and sulfurized CNTS films deposited on SLG substrate is presented. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis reveal how changes in thickness and elemental composition affect morphology and optoelectronic properties. The obtained absorption coefficient, optical bandgap, resistivity and mobility of pre - annealed and sulfurized films are found to be 104 cm-1, 1.5 eV, 0.48 Ocm, 3.4 cm2/Vs and 104 cm-1, 1.29 eV, 0.14 Ocm, 11.0 cm2/Vs, respectively. These properties are well suited for photovoltaic applications and lead to the conclusion that the direct ethanol based dip coating can be an alternative economically viable process for the fabrication of earth abundant CNTS absorber layers for thin film solar cells.

  20. Bees wax and its unsaponifiables as natural preservative for butter and cottonseed oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farag, R. S.

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available Simple model systems consisting of butter oil or refined cottonseed oil mixed with melted bees wax and its unsaponifiables were designated to study their hydrolytic and oxidative rancidity during storage. Whole bees wax at 0,5 and 1% levels possessed significant pro-hydrolytic activity whilst its unsaponifiables at 0,25 and 0,5% exhibited antihydrolytic effect on butter oil. The addition of whole bees wax at 0,5 and 1 % caused no effect on peroxide and thiobarbituric acid values of butter oil. However, bees wax unsaponifiables significantly reduced both peroxide and thiobarbituric acid values of stored butter oil. Bees wax unsaponifiables added to refined cottonseed oil had no effect on the acid value, whilst whole bees wax possessed significant prohydrolytic activity. The data for peroxide and thiobarbituric acid values of refined cottonseed oil demonstrated that both whole bees wax and its unsaponifiables had approximately the same antioxidant efficacy. The effectiveness of the added materials on the secondary oxidation products of refined cottonseed oil can be ranked according to its inhibition activity as follows: BHT (200 ppm > bees wax (1% > bees wax (0,5% > bees wax unsaponifiables (0,5% > bees wax unsaponifiables (0,25% > control.

    aceites de semilla de algodón Sistemas modelo simples consistentes en aceite de mantequilla o aceite de semilla de algodón refinado mezclado con cera de abeja derretida y su insaponificable fueron diseñados para estudiar su rancidez oxidativa e hidrolítica durante el almacenamiento. La cera de abeja íntegra a niveles del 0,5 y 1% tuvo una actividad pro-hidrolítica significativa, mientras que su insaponificable al 0,25 y 0,5% exhibió efecto antihidrolítico sobre el aceite de mantequilla. La adición de cera de abeja íntegra al 0,5 y 1% no causó efecto sobre el índice de peróxido y ácido tiobarbitúrico del aceite de mantequilla. Sin embargo, el insaponificable de cera de abeja redujo

  1. Nocturnal antihypertensive treatment in patients with type 1 diabetes with autonomic neuropathy and non-dipping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortkjær, Henrik Øder; Jensen, Tonny; Kofoed, Klaus F

    2016-01-01

    and non-dipping were included, consisting of mixed gender and Caucasian origin. Mean±SD age, glycosylated haemoglobin and diabetes duration were 60±7 years, 7.9±0.7% (62±7 mmol/mol) and 36±11 years. INTERVENTIONS: In this randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind cross-over study, the patients were.......1% to 4.5%; p=0.07)). No difference was found on measures of LVF (p≥0.15). No adverse events were registered during the study. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrated that patients with T1D with CAN and non-dipping can be treated with an ACE inhibitor at night as BD as opposed to MD increased BP dipping, thereby...

  2. The adhesion of epoxy cataphoretic coating on phosphatized hot-dip galvanized steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajat Jelena B.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of hot-dip galvanized steel surface pretreatment on the adhesion of epoxy cataphoretic coating was investigated. Phosphate coatings were deposited on hot-dip galvanized steel and the influence of fluoride ions in the phosphating plating bath, as well as the deposition temperature of the plating bath, were investigated. The dry and wet adhesion of epoxy coating were measured by a standard pull-off method. The surface roughness of phosphatized galvanized steel was determined, as well as the wettability of the metal surface by emulsion of the epoxy resin in water. The adhesion of epoxy coatings on phosphatized hot-dip galvanized steel was investigated in 3wt.%NaCI.

  3. Transformation of intermetallic layer due to oxidation heat treatment on hot-dipped aluminium coated steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishamuddin Husain; Abdul Razak Daud; Muhamad Daud; Nadira Kamarudin

    2013-01-01

    Heat treatment was introduced onto the aluminum coated low carbon steel to promote the formation of thin layer of oxide for enhancement of oxidation protection of steel. This process has transformed the existing intermetallic layer formed during hot dip aluminising process. Experiment was conducted on the low carbon steel substrates with 10 mm x 10 mm x 2 mm dimension. Hot dip aluminising of low carbon steel was carried out at 750 degree Celsius dipping temperature in a molten pure aluminum for 5 minutes. Aluminized samples were heat treated at 600, 700, 800, and 900 degree Celsius for 1 hour. X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and EDAX were used in investigation. From the observation, it showed the intermetallic thickness increased with the increase in temperature. The result of EDAX analysis revealed the existence of oxide phase and the intermetallics. The XRD identified the intermetallics as Fe 2 Al 5 and FeAl 3 . (Author)

  4. Detecting Power Voltage Dips using Tracking Filters - A Comparison against Kalman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STANCIU, I.-R.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Due of its significant economical impact, Power-Quality (PQ analysis is an important domain today. Severe voltage distortions affect the consumers and disturb their activity. They may be caused by short circuits (in this case the voltage drops significantly or by varying loads (with a smaller drop. These two types are the PQ currently issues. Monitoring these phenomena (called dips or sags require powerful techniques. Digital Signal Processing (DSP algorithms are currently employed to fulfill this task. Discrete Wavelet Transforms, (and variants, Kalman filters, and S-Transform are currently proposed by researchers to detect voltage dips. This paper introduces and examines a new tool to detect voltage dips: the so-called tracking filters. Discovered and tested during the cold war, they can estimate a parameter of interest one-step-ahead based on the previously observed values. Two filters are implemented. Their performance is assessed by comparison against the Kalman filter?s results.

  5. Molecular analysis of intact preen waxes of Calidris canutus (Aves: Scolopacidae) by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, M H; Piersma, T; Damsté, J S

    2000-05-01

    The intact preen wax esters of the red knot Calidris canutus were studied with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and GC/MS/MS. In this latter technique, transitions from the molecular ion to fragment ions representing the fatty acid moiety of the wax esters were measured, providing additional resolution to the analysis of wax esters. The C21-C32 wax esters are composed of complex mixtures of hundreds of individual isomers. The odd carbon-numbered wax esters are predominantly composed of even carbon-numbered n-alcohols (C14, C16, and C18) esterified predominantly with odd carbon-numbered 2-methyl fatty acids (C7, C9, C11, and C13), resulting in relatively simple distributions. The even carbon-numbered wax esters show a far more complex distribution due to a number of factors: (i) Their n-alcohol moieties are not dominated by even carbon-numbered n-alcohols esterified with odd carbon-numbered 2-methyl fatty acids, but odd and even carbon-numbered n-alcohols participate in approximately equal amounts; (ii) odd carbon-numbered methyl-branched alcohols participate abundantly in these wax ester clusters; and (iii) with increasing molecular weight, various isomers of the 2,6-, 2,8-, and 2,10-dimethyl branched fatty acids also participate in the even carbon-numbered wax esters. The data demonstrate that there is a clear biosynthetic control on the wax ester composition although the reasons for the complex chemistry of the waxes are not yet understood.

  6. Geomagnetic and sunspot activity associations and ionospheric effects of lightning phenomena at Trivandrum near dip equator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girish, T. E.; Eapen, P. E.

    2008-12-01

    From a study of thunder/lightning observations in Trivandrum (near dip equator) for selected years between 1853 and 2005, we could find an inverse relation of the same with sunspot activity and associations with enhancements in diurnal range of local geomagnetic declination. The results seem to suggest lightning-associated modulation of E-region dynamo currents in the equatorial ionosphere and the thunderstorm activity near dip equator probably acts as a moderator to regulate electric potential gradient changes in the global electric circuit due to solar activity changes.

  7. Mitigation of Voltage Dip and Voltage Flickering by Multilevel D-STATCOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Ballal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic power quality problems in the distribution network are voltage sag (dip, voltage flickering, and the service interruptions. STATCOM is a Flexible AC Transmission Systems (FACTS technology device which can independently control the flow of reactive power. This paper presents the simulation and analysis of a STATCOM for voltage dip and voltage flickering mitigation. Simulations are carried out in MATLAB/Simulink to validate the performance of the STATCOM. A comparison between the six-pulse inverter and the five-level diode-clamped inverter is carried out for the performance of 66/11 KV distribution system.

  8. Analysis of cuticular wax constituents and genes that contribute to the formation of 'glossy Newhall', a spontaneous bud mutant from the wild-type 'Newhall' navel orange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dechun; Yang, Li; Zheng, Qiong; Wang, Yuechen; Wang, Minli; Zhuang, Xia; Wu, Qi; Liu, Chuanfu; Liu, Shanbei; Liu, Yong

    2015-08-01

    Navel orange (Citrus sinensis [L.] Osbeck) fruit surfaces contain substantial quantities of cuticular waxes, which have important eco-physiological roles, such as water retention and pathogen defense. The wax constituents of ripe navel orange have been studied in various reports, while the wax changes occurring during fruit development and the molecular mechanism underlying their biosynthesis/export have not been investigated. Recently, we reported a spontaneous bud mutant from the wild-type (WT) 'Newhall' Navel orange. This mutant displayed unusual glossy fruit peels and was named 'glossy Newhall' (MT). In this study, we compared the developmental profiles of the epicuticular and intracuticular waxes on the WT and MT fruit surfaces. The formation of epicuticular wax crystals on the navel orange surface was shown to be dependent on the accumulation of high amounts of aliphatic wax components with trace amounts of terpenoids. In sharp contrast, the underlying intracuticular wax layers have relatively low concentrations of aliphatic wax components but high concentrations of cyclic wax compounds, especially terpenoids at the late fruit developmental stages. Our work also showed that many genes that are involved in wax biosynthesis and export pathways were down-regulated in MT fruit peels, leading to a decrease in aliphatic wax component amounts and the loss of epicuticular wax crystals, ultimately causing the glossy phenotype of MT fruits.

  9. Increased accumulation of cuticular wax and expression of lipid transfer protein in response to periodic drying events in leaves of tree tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Kimberly D; Teece, Mark A; Smart, Lawrence B

    2006-01-01

    Cuticular wax deposition and composition affects drought tolerance and yield in plants. We examined the relationship between wax and dehydration stress by characterizing the leaf cuticular wax of tree tobacco (Nicotiana glauca L. Graham) grown under periodic dehydration stress. Total leaf cuticular wax load increased after each of three periods of dehydration stress using a CH2Cl2 extraction process. Overall, total wax load increased 1.5- to 2.5-fold, but composition of the wax was not altered. Homologous series of wax components were classified into organic groups; n-hentriacontane was the largest component (>75%) with alcohols and fatty acids representing drying event. Leaves excised from plants subjected to multiple drying events were more resistant to water loss compared to leaves excised from well-watered plants, indicating that there is a negative relationship between total wax load and epidermal conductance. Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are thought to be involved in the transfer of lipids through the extracellular matrix for the formation of cuticular wax. Using northern analysis, a 6-fold increase of tree tobacco LTP gene transcripts was observed after three drying events, providing further evidence that LTP is involved in cuticle deposition. The simplicity of wax composition and the dramatic wax bloom displayed by tree tobacco make this an excellent species in which to study the relationship between leaf wax deposition and drought tolerance.

  10. Thermodynamics Prediction of Wax Precipitation in Black Oil Using Regular Solution Model and Plus Fraction Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The precipitation of wax/solid paraffin during production, transportation, and processing of crude oil is a serious problem. It is essential to have a reliable model to predict the wax appearance temperature and the amount of solid precipitated at different conditions. This paper presents a work to predict the solid precipitation based on solid-liquid equilibrium with regular solution-molecular thermodynamic theory and characterization of the crude oil plus fraction. Due to the differences of solubility characteristics between solid and liquid phase, the solubility parameters of liquid and solid phase are calculated by a modified model. The heat capacity change between solid and liquid phase is considered and estimated in the thermodynamic model. An activity coefficient based thermodynamic method combined with two characteristic methods to calculate wax precipitation in crude oil, especially heavy oil, has been tested with experimental data. The results show that the wax appearance temperature and the amount of weight precipitated can be predicted well with the experimental data.

  11. Plumage reflectance is not affected by preen wax composition in red knots Calidris canutus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reneerkens, J; Korsten, P

    It has recently been shown that sandpipers (Scolopacidae) abruptly switch the chemical composition of their preen gland secretions from mono- to diester waxes just before the period of courtship. The timing and context of the shift suggested that diesters could provide a visible quality signal

  12. Mechanism for Tuning the Hydrophobicity of Microfibrillated Cellulose Films by Controlled Thermal Release of Encapsulated Wax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibhore Kumar Rastogi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Although films of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC have good oxygen barrier properties due to its fine network structure, properties strongly deteriorate after absorption of water. In this work, a new approach has been followed for actively tuning the water resistance of a MFC fiber network by the inclusion of dispersed organic nanoparticles with encapsulated plant wax. The modified pulp suspensions have been casted into films and were subsequently cured at 40 to 220 °C. As such, static water contact angles can be specifically tuned from 120 to 150° by selection of the curing temperature in relation with the intrinsic transition temperatures of the modified pulp, as determined by thermal analysis. The appearance of encapsulated wax after curing was followed by a combination of morphological analysis, infrared spectroscopy and Raman mapping, showing balanced mechanisms of progressive release and migration of wax into the fiber network controlling the surface properties and water contact angles. Finally, the appearance of nanoparticles covered with a thin wax layer after complete thermal release provides highest hydrophobicity.

  13. Wax co-cracking synergism of high density polyethylene to alternative fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdy Motawie

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Attempts have been made to understand the thermal degradation of high density polyethylene (HDPE and their combined co-cracking using different ratios of HDPE and petroleum wax under nitrogen atmosphere. We have conducted the experiments using HDPE as the raw material and petroleum wax as co-feed by at 400 and 450 °C reaction temperatures. The product distribution was noted along with reaction time of 0.5–3 h for the degradation. Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA technique was used to measure the weight change of the feedstock as a function of temperature and time. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC was used to determine the degradation temperature. Products were characterized using gas chromatography (GC and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, some other standard physical methods were used to determine the main properties of the liquid products. Results show that the mixed plastic-wax samples could be converted into gases, gasoline, and middle distillate depending upon the composition of feed polymer/wax ratio. It was found that the products mostly consisted of paraffin and olefin compounds, with carbon numbers of C1–C4, C5–C9 and C10–C19 in the case of gases, gasoline and middle distillate respectively.

  14. Morphology evaluation of biodegradable copolyesters based on dimerized fatty acid studied by DSC, SAXS and WAXS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kozlowska, A.; Gromadzki, Daniel; El Fray, M.; Štěpánek, Petr

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 6 (2008), s. 85-88 ISSN 1230-3666 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : multiblock copolymers * DSC * WAXS Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.439, year: 2008

  15. 21 CFR 178.3770 - Polyhydric alcohol esters of oxidatively refined (Gersthofen process) montan wax acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Drug Administration, 5100 Paint Branch Pkwy., College Park, MD 20740, or available for inspection at... solution should not exceed 0.02 per centimeter pathlength in the 280 mµ-400 mµ range. (Note: Difficulty in... mixture and shake, making sure it remains in solution. If the wax comes out of solution during these...

  16. Separation and partial purification of wax and fatty alcohol from Okinawan sugar cane rind lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sho, H; Chinen, I; Uchihara, K

    1983-06-01

    A composition analysis of Okinawan sugar cane rind materials was conducted, and it was found that the main components were lipids, crude fiber and water indicating about 27%, 19.6% and 14.6%, respectively. The lipids were effectively extracted from rind materials by benzene. Wax (18%) and fatty alcohol (8%) were found to be the main components, totaling up to 96% of the lipids. Separation and partial purification of wax and fatty alcohol were attempted by means of silica gel column chromatography, thin-layer chromatography (TLC), infrared (IR) absorption spectra and gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The major components of the wax were considered to be two compounds with the molecular weights of 408 (C-26) and 436 (C-28), and those of fatty alcohol were di-ol with molecular weights of 440 (C-29) and 468 (C-31). Both wax and fatty alcohol were purified by rechromatography on a silica gel column and the samples obtained seemed to be satisfactory for use in experimental rats' diets.

  17. New MALDI matrices based on lithium salts for the analysis of hydrocarbons and wax esters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horká, Petra; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Hanus, Robert; Pecková, K.; Cvačka, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 7 (2014), s. 628-638 ISSN 1076-5174 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0139 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : cuticular hydrocarbons * lipids * lithium attachment * MALDI matrix * waxes Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.379, year: 2014

  18. Role of epicuticular waxes in the susceptibility of cotton leaf curl ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cotton leaf curl virus (CLCuV) is the causal agent of the damaging disease of cotton that is caused by number of begomaviruses and vectored by silver leaf whitefly. In the present study, an attempt was made by infecting Gossypium arboreum variety 786, its wax mutant GaWM3 along with Gossypium hirsutum MNH-93 with ...

  19. GROWTH, YIELD AND POSTHARVEST QUALITY OF WAX APPLE AS AFFECTED BY NAPHTHALENE ACETIC ACID APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMMAD MONERUZZAMAN KHANDAKER

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Results of this study represent the first report of the effect of Naphthalene Acetic Acid (NAA on the pre and post harvest quality of wax apple fruit. The wax apple trees were spray treated with 0, 5, 10 and 20 mg L-1 NAA under field conditions during 2008 to 2011. The experiments were carried out in Completely Randomized Design (CRD with six replications. Leaf chlorophyll content, chlorophyll fluorescence, photosynthetic yield, net photosynthetic rate, drymatter content of leaves and total soluble solids and K+content of wax apple fruits were significantly increased after treatments with 10 mg L-1. Polygalacturonase activity significantly decreased with NAA treatments. The application of 5 mg L-1 NAA increased 27% more bud and reduced 42% less fruit drop compared to the control. In addition, higher protein and phosphate synthase activity of leaves, fruit set, fruit growth, larger fruit size and yield were recorded in NAA treated plants. In storage, treated fruits exhibited higher TSS and firmness and less weight loss, browning, titratable acidity, respiration and ethylene production than the control. It is concluded that spraying with 5 and 10 mg L-1 NAA once a week under field conditions produced better fruit growth and yield of the wax apple and maintained better fruit quality in postharvest storage.

  20. A prediction method for the wax deposition rate based on a radial basis function neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Xie

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The radial basis function neural network is a popular supervised learning tool based on machinery learning technology. Its high precision having been proven, the radial basis function neural network has been applied in many areas. The accumulation of deposited materials in the pipeline may lead to the need for increased pumping power, a decreased flow rate or even to the total blockage of the line, with losses of production and capital investment, so research on predicting the wax deposition rate is significant for the safe and economical operation of an oil pipeline. This paper adopts the radial basis function neural network to predict the wax deposition rate by considering four main influencing factors, the pipe wall temperature gradient, pipe wall wax crystal solubility coefficient, pipe wall shear stress and crude oil viscosity, by the gray correlational analysis method. MATLAB software is employed to establish the RBF neural network. Compared with the previous literature, favorable consistency exists between the predicted outcomes and the experimental results, with a relative error of 1.5%. It can be concluded that the prediction method of wax deposition rate based on the RBF neural network is feasible.

  1. In vitro and In vivo Characterisation of Piroxicam-Loaded Dika Wax ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To formulate piroxicam-loaded lipospheres and evaluate their in vitro and in vivo properties. Method: Piroxicam-loaded lipospheres were prepared by hot homogenization technique using dika wax and Phospholipon® 90G (1:1, 1:2 and 2:1) as the lipid matrix. Characterisation, based on particle size

  2. Characterization of a Soil Metagenome-Derived Gene Encoding Wax Ester Synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam Hee; Park, Ji-Hye; Chung, Eunsook; So, Hyun-Ah; Lee, Myung Hwan; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Hwang, Eul Chul; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2016-02-01

    A soil metagenome contains the genomes of all microbes included in a soil sample, including those that cannot be cultured. In this study, soil metagenome libraries were searched for microbial genes exhibiting lipolytic activity and those involved in potential lipid metabolism that could yield valuable products in microorganisms. One of the subclones derived from the original fosmid clone, pELP120, was selected for further analysis. A subclone spanning a 3.3 kb DNA fragment was found to encode for lipase/esterase and contained an additional partial open reading frame encoding a wax ester synthase (WES) motif. Consequently, both pELP120 and the full length of the gene potentially encoding WES were sequenced. To determine if the wes gene encoded a functioning WES protein that produced wax esters, gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy was conducted using ethyl acetate extract from an Escherichia coli strain that expressed the wes gene and was grown with hexadecanol. The ethyl acetate extract from this E. coli strain did indeed produce wax ester compounds of various carbon-chain lengths. DNA sequence analysis of the full-length gene revealed that the gene cluster may be derived from a member of Proteobacteria, whereas the clone does not contain any clear phylogenetic markers. These results suggest that the wes gene discovered in this study encodes a functional protein in E. coli and produces wax esters through a heterologous expression system.

  3. Wax barrier for use with in situ processes for treating formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Carter, Ernest E.; Son, Jaime Santos; Bai, Taixu; Khoda Verdian, Mohamad Fereydoon

    2010-04-27

    Methods for forming a barrier around at least a portion of a treatment area in a subsurface formation are described herein. A material including wax may be introduced into one or more wellbores. The material introduced into two or more wells may mix in the formation and congeal to form a barrier to fluid flow.

  4. Hearing and evasive behavior in the greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella (Pyralidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skals, Niels; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2000-01-01

    Greater wax moths (Galleria mellonella L., Pyraloidea) use ultrasound sensitive ears to detect clicking conspeci®cs and echolocating bats. Pyralid ears have four sensory cells, A1±4. The audiogram of G. mellonella has best frequency at 60 kHz with a threshold around 47 dB sound pressure level. A1...

  5. Structural identification of the diester preen gland wax in the Red Knot (Calidris canutus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Dekker, M.; Dongen, B.E. van; Schouten, S.; Piersma, T.

    2000-01-01

    The intact C32-C48 diester wax esters of the preen gland of the migrating bird Calidris canutus are shown, using synthesized standards, to comprise predominantly C12-C16 alkane-1,2-diols esterified with octanoic, decanoic, and dodecanoic acid at one position, and with predominantly even-numbered

  6. Structural identification of the diester preen-gland waxes of the red knot (Calidris canutus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J S; Dekker, M; van Dongen, B E; Schouten, S; Piersma, T

    2000-03-01

    The intact C(32)-C(48) diester wax esters of the preen gland of the migrating bird Calidris canutus are shown, using synthesized standards, to comprise predominantly C(12)-C(16) alkane-1,2-diols esterified with octanoic, decanoic, and dodecanoic acid at one position, and with predominantly even-numbered carbon fatty acids at the other position.

  7. Structural identification of the diester preen-gland waxes of the red knot (Calidris canutus)

    OpenAIRE

    Damste, JSS; Dekker, M; van Dongen, BE; Piersma, T; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Dongen, Bart E. van

    2000-01-01

    The intact C-32-C-48 diester wax esters of the preen gland of the migrating bird Calidris canutus are shown, using synthesized standards, to comprise predominantly C-12-C-16 alkane-1,2-diols esterified with octanoic, decanoic, and dodecanoic acid at one position, and with predominantly even-numbered carbon fatty acids at the other position.

  8. Structural identification of the diester preen-gland waxes of the red knot (Calidris canutus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damste, JSS; Dekker, M; van Dongen, BE; Piersma, T; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Dongen, Bart E. van

    The intact C-32-C-48 diester wax esters of the preen gland of the migrating bird Calidris canutus are shown, using synthesized standards, to comprise predominantly C-12-C-16 alkane-1,2-diols esterified with octanoic, decanoic, and dodecanoic acid at one position, and with predominantly even-numbered

  9. Role of epicuticular waxes in the susceptibility of cotton leaf curl ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-05

    Dec 5, 2011 ... on Gossypium arboreum -786 plants, while lane 16,17 and 18 shows whiteflies on Gossypium hirsutum MNH-93. amplified from RCA product of whiteflies, G. hirsutum. MNH-93 plants and wax mutant GaWM3 plants but no amplification was observed in G. arboreum variety 786 as shown in Figure 5.

  10. Clustering of comb and propolis waxes based on the distribution of aliphatic constituents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Custodio Angela R.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical composition data for 41 samples of propolis waxes and 9 samples of comb waxes of Apis mellifera collected mainly in Brazil were treated using Principal Component Analysis (PCA and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA. For chemometrical analysis, the distribution of hydrocarbons and residues of alcohols and carboxylic acids of monoesters were considered. The clustering obtained revealed chemical affinities and differences not previously grasped by simple eye-inspection of the data. No consistent differences were detected between comb and propolis waxes. These and previous results suggest that hydrocarbons, carboxylic acids, aliphatic alcohols and esters from both comb and propolis waxes are bee-produced compounds and, hence, the differences detected between one and another region are dependent on genetic factors related to the insects rather than the local flora. The samples analyzed were split into two main clusters, one of them comprising exclusively material collected in the State of São Paulo. The results are discussed with respect to the africanization of honeybees that first took place in that State and therefrom irradiated to other parts of Brazil.

  11. Antibacterial and antifungal effect of high pH and paraffin wax ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antibacterial and antifungal effects of high pH (9, 10) and paraffin wax were determined. Determination of antibacterial and antifungal activity of the combined treatments was achieved by aerobic mesophilic count of bacteria and fungi on the surface of the tomatoes, peppers and oranges using serial dilution and pour ...

  12. Investigation of Carnuba Wax as Matrix in the Formulation of Solid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to investigate the drug entrapment efficiency, release potential and drug release mechanisms of solid lipid microparticles (SLMs) prepared with different concentrations of two non ionic surfactants using carnauba wax as the lipid matrix. SLMs were prepared by melt dispersion technique, whereby ...

  13. Effect of Sorbitol Templates on the Preferential Crystallographic Growth of Isotactic Polypropylene Wax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe V. Quiñones-Jurado

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The crystallization of isotactic polypropylene wax (iPP in the presence of different sorbitol structures was studied. Dibenzylidene Sorbitol (DBS, as well as two of its derivatives with one or two methyl groups in the DBS molecule (MDBS and DMDBS, respectively, were tested as nanometer-size fibrillar templates. The early nucleation stage and crystal morphology were analyzed in Real-Time Wide-Angle X-ray Scattering (WAXS and polarized optical microscopy (POM. It was found that the iPP crystals showed an α-phase unit cell for the three different sorbitols. However, a preferential crystal growth in the plane (040 was observed for iPP–MDBS. The macrostructure morphology of the iPP–DBS and iPP–DMDBS wax compounds was spherulitic, while nodular macrocrystals were observed for the iPP–MDBS compound. It was concluded that the MDBS template promoted a lower interface energy because of its match with the c-axis of the iPP wax crystals, whereas, in the case of the DBS and DMDBS templates, the preferential plane was the (110, characteristic of the iPP spherulitic arrangement.

  14. Biochemical analysis of leaf waxes and thrips resistance in onion selections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrips (Thrips tabaci) is a serious insect pest of onion and is a vector for Iris yellow spot virus (IYSV). Lower amounts of epicuticular waxes on onion leaves have been associated with fewer thrips, less feeding damage, and lower incidence of IYSV. In this study, 10 onion selections that showed les...

  15. In vitro and In vivo Characterisation of Piroxicam-Loaded Dika Wax ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    Purpose: To formulate piroxicam-loaded lipospheres and evaluate their in vitro and in vivo properties. Method: Piroxicam-loaded lipospheres were prepared by hot homogenization technique using dika wax and Phospholipon® 90G (1:1, 1:2 and 2:1) as the lipid matrix. Characterisation, based on particle size.

  16. The influence of vegetation on the transport pathways and residence time of surface water on the deltaic islands of Wax Lake Delta, LA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olliver, E. A.; Edmonds, D. A.; Shaw, J.

    2017-12-01

    The coastal deltas of the world are vital ecosystems that disproportionately support the world's population and biological productivity. Recent studies indicate vegetation may have significant influence on the development and structure of the deltaic islands composing these deltas. However, there is little convincing data drawn from natural systems. Here we present a 2D numerical modeling study of the interaction of surface water flow and vegetation on Wax lake Delta, LA, USA. We use a seamless digital elevation model (DEM) of the Wax Lake Delta (WLD) as the initial topographic condition. The deltaic island elevation data for the DEM is derived from LiDAR data, while the channel and delta front bathymetry is derived from single and multi-beam data. The upstream boundary conditions are set by discharge data from the USGS gauge located in the Wax Lake Outlet at Calumet, LA and the downstream water level boundary condition comes from tidal data from the NOAA gauge located in the Atchafalaya Delta at Amerada Pass, LA. The deltaic islands in our seamless DEM are populated by two general vegetation communities of different canopy density and height: a subaerial-intermediate community and a subaqueous community. In our study we explore how variations in discharge coming into the delta and extent of the general vegetation communities at different times of the year influence the transport pathways and residence time of surface water on the levees and within the interdistributary wetlands of the deltaic islands. A better understanding of vegetation's influence on these elements of deltaic island development and organization could prove valuable for informing design of wetland restoration projects.

  17. Spontaneous formation of nanopatterns in velocity-dependent dip-coated organic films: from dragonflies to stripes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, Tomas P; Bai, Mengjun; del Campo, Valeria; Homm, Pia; Ferrari, Piero; Diama, Armand; Wagner, Christian; Taub, Haskell; Knorr, Klaus; Deutsch, Moshe; Retamal, Maria Jose; Volkmann, Ulrich G; Huber, Patrick

    2014-10-28

    We present an experimental study of the micro- and mesoscopic structure of thin films of medium length n-alkane molecules on the native oxide layer of a silicon surface, prepared by dip-coating in a n-C32H66/n-heptane solution. Electron micrographs reveal two distinct adsorption morphologies depending on the substrate withdrawal speed v. For small v, dragonfly-shaped molecular islands are observed. For a large v, stripes parallel to the withdrawal direction are observed. These have lengths of a few hundred micrometers and a few micrometer lateral separation. For a constant v, the stripes' quality and separation increase with the solution concentration. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy show that both patterns are 4.2 nm thick monolayers of fully extended, surface-normal-aligned alkane molecules. With increasing v, the surface coverage first decreases then increases for v > v(cr) ∼ 0.15 mm/s. The critical v(cr) marks a transition between the evaporation regime, where the solvent's meniscus remains at the bulk's surface, and the entrainment (Landau-Levich-Deryaguin) regime, where the solution is partially dragged by the substrate, covering the withdrawn substrate by a homogeneous film. The dragonflies are single crystals with habits determined by dendritic growth in prominent 2D crystalline directions of randomly seeded nuclei assumed to be quasi-hexagonal. The stripes' strong crystalline texture and the well-defined separation are due to an anisotropic 2D crystallization in narrow liquid fingers, which result from a Marangoni flow driven hydrodynamic instability in the evaporating dip-coated films, akin to the tears of wine phenomenology.

  18. Rapid atmospheric transport and large-scale deposition of recently synthesized plant waxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Daniel B.; Ladd, S. Nemiah; Schubert, Carsten J.; Kahmen, Ansgar

    2018-02-01

    Sedimentary plant wax 2H/1H ratios are important tools for understanding hydroclimate and environmental changes, but large spatial and temporal uncertainties exist about transport mechanisms from ecosystem to sediments. To assess atmospheric pathways, we collected aerosol samples for two years at four locations within a ∼60 km radius in northern Switzerland. We measured n-alkane distributions and 2H/1H ratios in these samples, and from local plants, leaf litter, and soil, as well as surface sediment from six nearby lakes. Increased concentrations and 2H depletion of long odd chain n-alkanes in early summer aerosols indicate that most wax aerosol production occurred shortly after leaf unfolding, when plants synthesize waxes in large quantities. During autumn and winter, aerosols were characterized by degraded n-alkanes lacking chain length preferences diagnostic of recent biosynthesis, and 2H/1H values that were in some cases more than 100‰ higher than growing season values. Despite these seasonal shifts, modeled deposition-weighted average 2H/1H values of long odd chain n-alkanes primarily reflected summer values. This was corroborated by n-alkane 2H/1H values in lake sediments, which were similar to deposition-weighted aerosol values at five of six sites. Atmospheric deposition rates for plant n-alkanes on land were ∼20% of accumulation rates in lakes, suggesting a role for direct deposition to lakes or coastal oceans near similar production sources, and likely a larger role for deposition on land and transport in river systems. This mechanism allows mobilization and transport of large quantities of recently produced waxes as fine-grained material to low energy sedimentation sites over short timescales, even in areas with limited topography. Widespread atmospheric transfer well before leaf senescence also highlights the importance of the isotopic composition of early season source water used to synthesize waxes for the geologic record.

  19. Altitude effect on leaf wax carbon isotopic composition in humid tropical forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mong Sin; Feakins, Sarah J.; Martin, Roberta E.; Shenkin, Alexander; Bentley, Lisa Patrick; Blonder, Benjamin; Salinas, Norma; Asner, Gregory P.; Malhi, Yadvinder

    2017-06-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of plant leaf wax biomarkers is commonly used to reconstruct paleoenvironmental conditions. Adding to the limited calibration information available for modern tropical forests, we analyzed plant leaf and leaf wax carbon isotopic compositions in forest canopy trees across a highly biodiverse, 3.3 km elevation gradient on the eastern flank of the Andes Mountains. We sampled the dominant tree species and assessed their relative abundance in each tree community. In total, 405 sunlit canopy leaves were sampled across 129 species and nine forest plots along the elevation profile for bulk leaf and leaf wax n-alkane (C27-C33) concentration and carbon isotopic analyses (δ13C); a subset (76 individuals, 29 species, five forest plots) were additionally analyzed for n-alkanoic acid (C22-C32) concentrations and δ13C. δ13C values display trends of +0.87 ± 0.16‰ km-1 (95% CI, r2 = 0.96, p families, suggesting the biochemical response to environment is robust to taxonomic turnover. We calculate fractionations and compare to adiabatic gradients, environmental variables, leaf wax n-alkane concentrations, and sun/shade position to assess factors influencing foliar chemical response. For the 4 km forested elevation range of the Andes, 4-6‰ higher δ13C values are expected for upland versus lowland C3 plant bulk leaves and their n-alkyl lipids, and we expect this pattern to be a systematic feature of very wet tropical montane environments. This elevation dependency of δ13C values should inform interpretations of sedimentary archives, as 13C-enriched values may derive from C4 grasses, petrogenic inputs or upland C3 plants. Finally, we outline the potential for leaf wax carbon isotopes to trace biomarker sourcing within catchments and for paleoaltimetry.

  20. A review on wax printed microfluidic paper-based devices for international health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altundemir, S; Uguz, A K; Ulgen, K

    2017-07-01

    Paper-based microfluidics has attracted attention for the last ten years due to its advantages such as low sample volume requirement, ease of use, portability, high sensitivity, and no necessity to well-equipped laboratory equipment and well-trained manpower. These characteristics have made paper platforms a promising alternative for a variety of applications such as clinical diagnosis and quantitative analysis of chemical and biological substances. Among the wide range of fabrication methods for microfluidic paper-based analytical devices ( μ PADs), the wax printing method is suitable for high throughput production and requires only a commercial printer and a heating source to fabricate complex two or three-dimensional structures for multipurpose systems. μ PADs can be used by anyone for in situ diagnosis and analysis; therefore, wax printed μ PADs are promising especially in resource limited environments where people cannot get sensitive and fast diagnosis of their serious health problems and where food, water, and related products are not able to be screened for toxic elements. This review paper is focused on the applications of paper-based microfluidic devices fabricated by the wax printing technique and used for international health. Besides presenting the current limitations and advantages, the future directions of this technology including the commercial aspects are discussed. As a conclusion, the wax printing technology continues to overcome the current limitations and to be one of the promising fabrication techniques. In the near future, with the increase of the current interest of the industrial companies on the paper-based technology, the wax-printed paper-based platforms are expected to take place especially in the healthcare industry.

  1. Experimental analysis, modeling and simulation of a solar energy accumulator with paraffin wax as PCM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, A.; Henríquez-Vargas, L.; Aravena, R.; Sepúlveda, F.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Enhancement of paraffin wax thermal conductivity using soft drink can stripes. • Thermal analysis and simulations results agree well with experimental data. • Increase in accumulator thermal efficiencies through addition of external aluminum stripes. • Proposed accumulator allows up to 13,000 kJ of energy storage. - Abstract: Soft drink cans filled with paraffin wax mixed with 7.5% aluminum stripes, obtained from disposable cans, doubled the thermal conductivity of cans filled only with paraffin wax. Promising results obtained in a prototype heat exchanger encouraged the construction of this unit 6 times bigger. We experimentally evaluated and model a heat exchanger for solar energy accumulation, composed by 300 disposable soft drink cans filled with a total of 59.25 kg of paraffin wax mixed with 7.5% aluminum stripes. The effect of adding 2.75 kg of aluminum fins for enhancing heat transfer from the outer surface of the cans to the circulant air was experimentally analyzed. In sunny days, the wax melted completely in about 4 h. The accumulated energy in form of latent heat (about 13,000 kJ) allowed to increase the temperature of 0.040 kg/s of circulant air in at least 20 °C during a period of 2.5 h. For an air mass rate of 0.018 kg/s the period was extended practically to 5 h. The accumulator thermal analysis was presented and a subsequent numerical simulation with Matlab was performed to compare with the experimental results obtaining good agreement specially for higher air mass flow rates. The low cost accumulator presented is of simple construction and will allow extended use of solar energy for applications such as drying processes or household calefaction system.

  2. Control of Listeria monocytogenes on frankfurters by dipping in hops beta acids solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Cangliang; Geornaras, Ifigenia; Kendall, Patricia A; Sofos, John N

    2009-04-01

    Hops beta acids (HBA) are parts of hops flowers used in beer brewing and have shown antilisterial activity in bacteriological broth. The U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service has approved HBA for use to control Listeria monocytogenes on ready-to-eat meat products. This study evaluated the effects of HBA as dipping solutions to control L. monocytogenes during storage of frankfurters. Frankfurters (two replicates and three samples each) were inoculated (1.9 +/- 0.1 log CFU/cm2) with L. monocytogenes (10-strain mixture), dipped (2 min, 25 +/- 2 degrees C) in HBA solutions (0.03, 0.06, and 0.10%) or distilled water, and then vacuum packaged and stored at 4 or 10 degrees C for up to 90 and 48 days, respectively. Samples were periodically analyzed for microbial survival and growth on tryptic soy agar plus 0.6% yeast extract and PALCAM agar. Dipping in HBA solutions caused immediate L. monocytogenes reductions (P model confirmed that the lag-phase duration of the pathogen was extended, and the growth rate was decreased on samples dipped in HBA solutions. Therefore, HBA may be considered for use to improve the microbial safety of ready-to-eat meat products, provided that future studies show no adverse effects on sensory qualities and that their use is economically feasible.

  3. Effect of Nicotine on Audio and Visual Reaction Time in Dipping ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dipping tobacco is a form of smokeless tobacco. Smokeless tobacco usage in the Indian subcontinent has increased markedly than that of the smoking tobacco users. Global adult tobacco survey conducted in 2009-10 by WHO reported this emerging population of smokeless tobacco users in India. Nicotine through blood is ...

  4. Plateaus, Dips, and Leaps: Where to Look for Inventions and Discoveries during Skilled Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Wayne D.; Lindstedt, John K.

    2017-01-01

    The framework of "plateaus, dips, and leaps" shines light on periods when individuals may be inventing new methods of skilled performance. We begin with a review of the role "performance plateaus" have played in (a) experimental psychology, (b) human-computer interaction, and (c) cognitive science. We then reanalyze two classic…

  5. Static deformation due to a long buried dip-slip fault in an isotropic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Closed-form analytical expressions for the displacements and the stresses at any point of a two-phase medium consisting of a homogeneous, isotropic, perfectly elastic half-space in welded contact with a homogeneous, orthotropic, perfectly elastic half-space due to a dip-slip fault of finite width located at an.

  6. Influence of joint dip angle on seismic behaviors of rock foundation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Lei; Gao, Yang; Jiang, Yujing; Li, Bo; Li Shucai

    2012-01-01

    The seismic response of rock foundation to seismic loads is an important issue to the stability and safety of nuclear power plants. Due to the fact that the discontinuities like joints existing in the rock mass govern principally the deformation and failure behaviors of the rock mass, the influence of discontinuities on the seismic behaviors of rock mass remains as one of the fundamental problems in the safety assessment of nuclear power plants. In this study, the distinct element method (DEM) and finite element method (FEM) were adopted to investigate the seismic responses of rock foundation to a real seismic wave, taking into account the effect of joint dip angle on the deformation and dynamic behaviors of rock foundation. In the DEM simulations, the intact rock has an amplification effect on the amplitudes of seismic waves, while the joints exhibit an attenuation effect on the seismic waves. In the FEM simulations, however, the attenuation effect of joints is not obvious. The dip angle of joints has strong effects on the deformation and dynamic behaviors of rock foundation, in terms that different dip angles lead to obviously different deformation and horizontal stress in the rock foundation when subjected to seismic load. When the dip angle of joints is around 60deg, the seismic velocity, displacement and stress reach the maximums. Therefore, attentions need to be paid on this factor during the seismic design of nuclear power plants. (author)

  7. Cultural differences in ant-dipping tool length between neighbouring chimpanzee communities at Kalinzu, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koops, Kathelijne; Schöning, Caspar; Isaji, Mina; Hashimoto, Chie

    2015-07-22

    Cultural variation has been identified in a growing number of animal species ranging from primates to cetaceans. The principal method used to establish the presence of culture in wild populations is the method of exclusion. This method is problematic, since it cannot rule out the influence of genetics and ecology in geographically distant populations. A new approach to the study of culture compares neighbouring groups belonging to the same population. We applied this new approach by comparing ant-dipping tool length between two neighbouring communities of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) in the Kalinzu Forest, Uganda. Ant-dipping tool length varies across chimpanzee study sites in relation to army ant species (Dorylus spp.) and dipping location (nest vs. trail). We compared the availability of army ant species and dipping tool length between the two communities. M-group tools were significantly longer than S-group tools, despite identical army ant target species availabilities. Moreover, tool length in S-group was shorter than at all other sites where chimpanzees prey on epigaeic ants at nests. Considering the lack of ecological differences between the two communities, the tool length difference appears to be cultural. Our findings highlight how cultural knowledge can generate small-scale cultural diversification in neighbouring chimpanzee communities.

  8. Structural modification and band gap engineering of sol–gel dip

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of vacuum annealing on the structural and optical properties of sol–gel dip-coated thin films of Zn 0.75 Mg 0.25 O alloy. XRD studies revealed that all these films werepolycrystalline with hexagonal wurtzite structure and there was no trace of additional phases other than ZnO.

  9. Voltage dip caused by the sequential energization of wind turbine transformers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arana Aristi, Iván; Holbøll, Joachim; Sørensen, T.

    2009-01-01

    THIS paper presents the results from electromagnetic transient (emt) simulations using PSCAD, where the model of Nysted Offshore Wind Farm (NOWF) was created to simulate the voltage dips due to wind turbine transformer energization. Four different sequences energizing different numbers of wind tu...

  10. Corrosion behaviour of hot dip zinc and zinc-aluminium coatings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A comparative investigation of hot dip Zn–25Al alloy, Zn–55Al–Si and Zn coatings on steel was performed with attention to their corrosion performance in seawater. The results of 2-year exposure testing of these at Zhoushan test site are reported here. In tidal and immersion environments, Zn–25Al alloy coating is several ...

  11. Control of the Lance Nematode, Hoplolaimus galeatus, on 'Tifdwarf' Bermudagrass by Chemical Dips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A W

    1970-04-01

    Dipping of bare-rooted 'Tifdwarf' bermudagrass sprigs in 1000 ppm of the 2,4-dichlorophenyl ester of methanesulfonic acid plus 2150 ppm 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane or in 1000 ppm ethyl 4-(methylthio)-m-tolyl isopropyl phosphoramidate for 30 min eliminated Hoplolaimus galeatus (Cobb) Thorne. No phytotoxic effect was observed and bermudagrass growth was improved.

  12. The hyperbolic sine relation and dip test data in constant strain rate compression experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kruml, Tomáš; Coddet, O.; Martin, J. L.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 240, - (2010), 012028 ISSN 1742-6588. [ICSMA-15 (15th International Conference on the Strength of Materials). Dresden, 16.08.2009-21.08.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : dip test * effective stress * compression Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials

  13. Construction of a Dip Tank for Finishing Wood Siding or Decking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Knaebe

    2013-01-01

    Dipping new siding or decking pieces before installation is faster than finishing after installation, and it gets finish on the backside and ends of the pieces, thereby extending their service life. This method is appropriate for any penetrating finish, such as waterrepellent preservatives or semitransparent stains. It may also be used to pre-treat siding with water-...

  14. A facile two-step dipping process based on two silica systems for a superhydrophobic surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoguang; Shen, Jun

    2011-10-14

    A silica microsphere suspension and a silica sol are employed in a two-step dipping process for the preparation of a superhydrophobic surface. It's not only a facile way to achieve the lotus effect, but can also create a multi-functional surface with different wetabilities, adhesive forces and transparencies. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  15. Plateaus, Dips, and Leaps: Where to Look for Inventions and Discoveries During Skilled Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Wayne D; Lindstedt, John K

    2017-09-01

    The framework of plateaus, dips, and leaps shines light on periods when individuals may be inventing new methods of skilled performance. We begin with a review of the role performance plateaus have played in (a) experimental psychology, (b) human-computer interaction, and (c) cognitive science. We then reanalyze two classic studies of individual performance to show plateaus and dips which resulted in performance leaps. For a third study, we show how the statistical methods of Changepoint Analysis plus a few simple heuristics may direct our focus to periods of performance change for individuals. For the researcher, dips become the marker of exploration where performance suffers as new methods are invented and tested. Leaps mark the implementation of a successful new method and an incremental jump above the path plotted by smooth and steady log-log performance increments. The methods developed during these dips and leaps are the key to surpassing one's teachers and acquiring extreme expertise. Copyright © 2016 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  16. A dip-slide test for bacteriuria in protein-calorie malnutrition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A simple dip-slide test was used to determine the incidence of bacteriuria in children suffering from protein-calorie malnutrition. Bacteriuria was found to be equally common in patients suffering from kwashiorkor and atrophic malnutrition and in a control group with normal nutritional status. The test is inexpensive and has a ...

  17. Fine structures in Fe3Al alloy layer of a new hot dip aluminized steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    structure and performance in the coating can be improved and service life of the aluminized steel can significantly be enhanced. 2. Experimental. The base metal of the aluminized steel used in this inves- tigation was mild steel (0⋅18%C), which was aluminized by the hot dip aluminizing technology (HDA). In order to.

  18. Comparison of control strategies for DFIG under symmetrical grid voltage dips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Wenjie; Xu, Dehong; Chen, Min

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a series of current control strategies for the DFIG under symmetrical grid voltage dips. The controllable range, the damping time constant of the stator natural flux and the torque fluctuations of six control strategies are analyzed and compared. The control strategies which...

  19. UV spectroscopy of Z Chamaeleontis. I - Time dependent dips in superoutburst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlaftis, E. T.; Hassall, B. J. M.; Naylor, T.; Charles, P. A.; Sonneborn, G.

    1992-01-01

    Extensive IUE observations of the dwarf nova Z Cha during the 1987 April superoutburst and IUE-Exosat observations during the 1985 July superoutburst are presented. The UV light curve shows two dips when folded on the orbital period. One dip, at orbital phase 0.8 becomes shallower as the superoutburst progresses and can be associated with decreasing mass transfer rate from the secondary star. The other dip, at orbital phase 0.15, appears after the development of the superhump and some days after the occurrence of the largest dip at phase 0.8. The continuum flux distribution during superoutbursts is fainter and redder than in low-inclination dwarf novae during superoutbursts. This is interpreted in terms of the extended vertical disk structure which occults the hot inner parts of the disk with the development of a 'cool' bulge on the edge of the disk at orbital phase 0.75. Details of the behaviour of the UV emission lines during eclipse and away from eclipse are discussed.

  20. Relation between microstructure and adhesion of hot dip galvanized zinc coatings on dual phase steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, G. M.; Vystavel, T.; De Hosson, J. Th M.; Sloof, W. G.; van der Pers, N.M.

    The microstructure of hot dip galvanized zinc coatings on dual phase steel was investigated by electron microscopy and the coating adhesion characterized by tensile testing. The zinc coating consists of a zinc layer and columnar zeta-FeZn13 particles on top of a thin inhibition layer adjacent to the

  1. Migration using a transversely isotropic medium with symmetry normal to the reflector dip

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2011-01-01

    A transversely isotropic (TI) model in which the tilt is constrained to be normal to the dip (DTI model) allows for simplifications in the imaging and velocity model building efforts as compared to a general TI (TTI) model. Although this model cannot be represented physically in all situations, for example, in the case of conflicting dips, it handles arbitrary reflector orientations under the assumption of symmetry axis normal to the dip. Using this assumption, we obtain efficient downward continuation algorithms compared to the general TTI ones, by utilizing the reflection features of such a model. Phase-shift migration can be easily extended to approximately handle lateral inhomogeneity using, for example, the split-step approach. This is possible because, unlike the general TTI case, the DTI model reduces to VTI for zero dip. These features enable a process in which we can extract velocity information by including tools that expose inaccuracies in the velocity model in the downward continuation process. We test this model on synthetic data corresponding to a general TTI medium and show its resilience. 2011 Tariq Alkhalifah and Paul Sava.

  2. Structural modification and band gap engineering of sol–gel dip ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of vacuum annealing on the structural and optical properties of sol–gel dip-coated thin films of Zn 0.75 Mg 0.25 O alloy. XRD studies revealed that all these films werepolycrystalline with hexagonal wurtzite structure and there was no trace of additional phases other than ZnO.

  3. Dip-Coating Process Engineering and Performance Optimization for Three-State Electrochromic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lu; Yang, Dejiang; Fei, Lixun; Huang, Yue; Wu, Fang; Sun, Yiling; Shi, Jiayuan; Xiang, Yong

    2017-06-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles were modified onto fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) via dip-coating technique with different nanoparticle sizes, lifting speeds, precursor concentrations, and dipping numbers. Electrodeposition-based electrochromic device with reversible three-state optical transformation (transparent, mirror, and black) was fabricated subsequently by sandwiching a suitable amount of gel electrolyte between modified FTO electrode and flat FTO electrode. Correlation between dip-coating process engineering, morphological features of TiO2 thin films, i.e., thickness and roughness, as well as performance of electrochromic devices, i.e., optical contrast, switching time, and cycling stability, were investigated. The modified device exhibits high optical contrast of 57%, the short coloration/bleaching switching time of 6 and 20 s, and excellent cycling stability after 1500 cycles of only 27% decrement rate by adjusting dip-coating processes engineering. The results in this study will provide valuable guidance for rational design of the electrochromic device with satisfactory performance.

  4. High silicon steel production through hot-dipping in Al-Si-alloy and diffusion annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ros-Yanez, T.; Houbaert, Y.; Schneeweis, O.; Asensio-Lozano, J.; Prado-Garcia, M.

    2000-01-01

    It is difficult to process steel sheet with a high Si content (>3,5%Si), mainly because of its brittleness and the appearance of cracks during rolling and oxidation. However, there is a market for this steel in electrical applications because of the favourable influence of Si on magnetostriction and electrical resistivity. As an alternative process, 3% Si-steel substrates were coated with hypereutectic Al-Si-alloys in a hot-dip simulator using different preheating and dipping times. The obtained layers were characterised by SEM and EDS analysis. Diffusion annealing experiments were performed to obtain sufficient amount of Si in the steel. It was observed that: Intermetallic phases appear in the coating layers as according to the ternary Fe-Si-Al diagram. With a double dipping primary silicon crystals are formed in the surface layer. the ordered DO 3 structure is present if the dipping and/or diffusion time is long enough. Homogeneous silicon gradients in the whole substrate thickness have not yet been achieved. Theoretic calculations show that Si-gradient, also have beneficial effects on magnetic behaviour. (Author) 17 refs

  5. Root dipping: a technique to supply P to low land rice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sreenivasa Raju, A.; Murali Mohan Rao, G.V.; Sathe, A.; Subba Rao, I.V. (Andhra Pradesh Agricultural Univ., Hyderabad (India). Radio Tracer Lab.)

    1980-12-01

    Employing tracer technique it was found that in a vertisol soil containing medium available P/sub 2/O/sub 5/, dipping the roots of rice seedlings in solutions of 2 percent KH/sub 2/PO/sub 4/ or 1 or 2 percent monoammonium phosphate (MAP) or diammonium phosphate (DAP) increased the grain yields significantly over no P, although the yields were less than 60 kg P/sub 2/O/sub 5//ha applied to soil. Seedling root dip in the slurry made of ammophos (30 kg P/sub 2/O/sub 5//ha) was as good as soil application of 60 kg P/sub 2/O/sub 5//ha. The percent P derived from fertilizer Psub(dff) and P utilization were greater under root dip in 2 percent solutions of MAP or KH/sub 2/PO/sub 4/ compared to soil application of 30 or 60 kg P/sub 2/O/sub 5//ha. In terms of grain yield, Psub(dff) and percent P utilization, root dipping in 2 percent KH/sub 2/PO/sub 4/, 1 or 2 percent MAP was as effective as 30 kg P/sub 2/O/sub 5//ha applied to soil.

  6. Static deformation due to a long buried dip-slip fault in an isotropic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Closed-form analytical expressions for the displacements and the stresses at any point of a two-phase medium consisting of a homogeneous, isotropic, perfectly elastic half-space in welded contact with a homogeneous, orthotropic, perfectly elastic half-space due to a dip-slip fault of finite width located at an arbitrary ...

  7. Corrosion behaviour of hot dip zinc and zinc–aluminium coatings on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A comparative investigation of hot dip Zn–25Al alloy, Zn–55Al–Si and Zn coatings on steel was performed with attention to their corrosion performance in seawater. The results of 2-year exposure testing of these at Zhoushan test site are reported here. In tidal and immersion environments, Zn–25Al alloy coating is several ...

  8. Static deformation due to a long buried dip-slip fault in an isotropic

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Closed-form analytical expressions for the displacements and the stresses at any point of a two-phase medium consisting of a homogeneous, isotropic, perfectly elastic half-space in welded contact with a homogeneous, orthotropic, perfectly elastic half-space due to a dip-slip fault of finite width located at an arbitrary ...

  9. Chemical composition of epicuticular wax crystals on the slippery zone in pitchers of five Nepenthes species and hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Michael; Eichner, Anna; Meimberg, Harald; Jetter, Reinhard

    2007-05-01

    Plants of the carnivorous genus Nepenthes efficiently trap insects in leaf pitchers, mostly employing epicuticular wax crystals on the pitcher walls to make them slippery for the prey. In the present study, the compositions and micromorphologies of the wax crystals of five Nepenthes species and hybrids were analysed in order to test whether the chemical principles underlying this ecological function are widespread within the genus. Three wax layers could be distinguished within the Nepenthes pitcher cuticles: (1) the outermost part of the crystals forming the platelets visible in standard scanning electron microscopy, (2) the bottom portion of the epicuticular wax crystals, and (3) an intracuticular wax layer. The composition of the intracuticular wax differed significantly from that of the neighbouring epicuticular layer. The compositions of corresponding wax mixtures from all five Nepenthes species and hybrids were very similar, with almost equal amounts of very long chain aldehydes and primary alcohols. While triacontanal (C(30) aldehyde) was prevailing in the epicuticular crystals of Nepenthes albomarginata and Nepenthes x intermedia, Nepenthes x superba and Nepenthes x henriana were found to have especially high percentages of dotriacontanal (C(32) aldehyde). Nepenthes "khasiana" had an intermediate aldehyde composition with almost equal amounts of both chain lengths.

  10. Compound-Specific Radiocarbon Dating Reveals the Age Distribution of Plant-Wax Biomarkers Exported to the Bengal Fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galy, V.; French, K. L.; Hein, C. J.; Haghipour, N.; Wacker, L.; Kudrass, H.; Eglinton, T. I.

    2017-12-01

    The stable isotope composition of leaf-wax compounds preserved in lacustrine and marine sediments has been widely used to reconstruct terrestrial paleo-environments. However, the timescales of plant-wax storage in continental reservoirs before riverine export are not well known, representing a key uncertainty in paleo-environment studies. We couple numerical models with bulk and leaf-wax fatty acid organic 13C and 14C signatures hosted in a high-deposition-rate sediment core from the Bengal shelf canyon in order to estimate storage timescales within the Ganges-Brahmaputra catchment area. The fatty acid 14C record reveals a muted nuclear weapons bomb spike, requiring that the Ganges-Brahmaputra river system exports a mixture of young and old (pre-aged) leaf-wax compounds. According to numerical simulations, 79-83% of the leaf-wax fatty acids in this core are sourced from continental reservoirs that store organic carbon on an average of 1000-1200 calendar years, while the remainder has an average age of 15 years. These results demonstrate that a majority of the leaf-wax compounds produced in the Ganges-Brahmaputra river basin was stored in soils, floodplains, and wetlands prior to its export to the Bengal Fan. We will discuss the implications of these findings for plant-wax based paleoenvironmental records.

  11. Effect of new type of synthetic waxes on reduced production and compaction temperature of asphalt mixture with reclaimed asphalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentová, Tereza; Benešová, Lucie; Mastný, Jan; Valentin, Jan

    2017-09-01

    Lower mixing and paving temperatures of asphalt mixtures, which are an important issue in recent years, with respect to increased energy demand of civil engineering structures during their processing, allow reduction of this demand and result in minimized greenhouse gas production. In present time, there are many possibilities how to achieve reduction of production temperature during the mixing and paving of an asphalt mixture. The existing solutions distinguish in target operating temperature behaviour which has to be achieved in terms of good workability. This paper is focused on technical solutions based on use of new types of selected synthetic and bio-based waxes. In case of bio-based additive sugar cane wax was used, which is free of paraffins and is reclaimed as waste product during processing of sugar cane. The used waxes are added to bituminous binder in form of free-flowing granules or fine-grained powder. Synthetic waxes are represented by new series of Fischer-Tropsch wax in form of fine granules as well as by polyethylene waxes in form of fine-grained powder or granules. Those waxes were used to modify a standard paving grade bitumen dosed into asphalt mixture of ACsurf type containing up to 30 % of reclaimed asphalt (RA).

  12. Non-dipping blood pressure patterns and arterial stiffness parameters in patients with Behcet's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Gulperi; Yilmaz, Sema; Ergulu Esmen, Serpil

    2015-12-01

    Behcet's disease is a multisystemic vasculitis involving veins and arteries of various sizes. Non-dipping status, augmentation index and pulse wave velocity are important determinants of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. We investigated the non-dipping status and arterial stiffness in patients with Behcet's disease. In this cross-sectional study, we examined the vascular parameters of 96 patients with Behcet's disease (53% female) and 60 age- and sex-matched control subjects. The non-dipping status and arterial distensibility were assessed using a Mobil-O-Graph Arteriograph, an automatic oscillometric device. In total, 65.6% of 96 patients were systolic non-dippers, and 34.4% exhibited high augmentation indices. Ten percent of the control subjects were systolic non-dippers, and 11.7% exhibited high augmentation indices. Nocturnal decreases in systolic blood pressure correlated with central systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure, as well as nocturnal decreases in diastolic blood pressure. Furthermore, non-dipper patients with Behcet's disease exhibited higher nocturnal cardiac outputs than did dipper patients with Behcet's disease. Augmentation index correlated negatively with C-reactive protein and correlated positively with both 24 h and nocturnal peripheral resistance, as well as 24 h pulse wave velocity. The patients with high augmentation indices exhibited lower creatinine clearance, as well as lower nocturnal cardiac outputs, higher 24 h peripheral resistance and higher 24 h pulse wave velocities. Non-dipping status and arterial stiffness may exacerbate the harmful cardiovascular effects of the other. In addition to conventional risk factors, non-dipping status and arterial stiffness should be examined during the follow-up evaluations of patients with Behcet's disease.

  13. Neutral Lipid Biosynthesis in Engineered Escherichia coli: Jojoba Oil-Like Wax Esters and Fatty Acid Butyl Esters

    OpenAIRE

    Kalscheuer, Rainer; Stöveken, Tim; Luftmann, Heinrich; Malkus, Ursula; Reichelt, Rudolf; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Wax esters are esters of long-chain fatty acids and long-chain fatty alcohols which are of considerable commercial importance and are produced on a scale of 3 million tons per year. The oil from the jojoba plant (Simmondsia chinensis) is the main biological source of wax esters. Although it has a multitude of potential applications, the use of jojoba oil is restricted, due to its high price. In this study, we describe the establishment of heterologous wax ester biosynthesis in a recombinant E...

  14. Experimental investigations of thermophysical properties of some paraffin waxes industrially manufactured in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbińkowski, Piotr; Zmywaczyk, Janusz; Koniorczyk, Piotr

    2017-07-01

    Phase-change materials (PCM) can be applied as a heat absorbing/releasing medium in passive cooling systems. Such systems can be used in cooling and temperature stabilization of electronic components, i.e., Li-ion batteries, photovoltaic modules or light emitting diodes (LED). In order to optimize heat transfer in passive cooling systems experimental studies of PCM thermophysical properties are necessary. A good PCM candidate for passive cooling systems may be paraffin waxes due to their relatively high latent heat of fusion (L 200 J.g-1), suitable for working of electronic devices range of melting temperatures (22 °C - 68 °C) and a reasonable price. However, their main drawback is a relatively low thermal conductivity k ranging from 0.148 W.m-1.K-1 to 0.358 W.m-1.K-1. In this paper were presented results of experimentally determined temperature characteristics of thermophysical parameters of four paraffin waxes industrially manufactured in Jasło/Poland by POLWAX. The density ρ of the test paraffin waxes determined at room temperature (20 °C) using a laboratory balance RADWAG X/60/220 comprised from 0.82 g.cm-3 to 0.94 g.cm-3. The thermal diffusivity κ of paraffin waxes was tested within temperature range from -50 °C to 30 °C every 20 °C interval using the NETZSCH LFA 467 HyperFlash. The test specimens having form of cylinder were 12.7 mm in diameter and 2.15 - 2.20 mm in height. Prior to the experiment the face and the back surface of each specimen were coated with a thin layer of graphite 33 having a thickness of several micrometers in accordance with the recommendation given by NETZSCH. The thermal diffusivity of the test paraffin waxes within temperature interval -40 °C - 20 °C was determined to be 0.083 mm2.s-1 to 0.216 mm2.s-1. Thermal effects and the apparent heat capacity cp of the tested materials were measured in the temperature range from -10 °C to 100 °C using the NETZSCH DSC 404 F1 Pegasus at 10 K.min-1 heating/cooling rates in an

  15. Changes to subaqueous delta bathymetry following a high river flow event, Wax Lake Delta, LA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whaling, A. R.; Shaw, J.

    2017-12-01

    Sediment transport capacity is increased during high river flow (flood) events which are characterized by discharges that exceed the 15 year median daily statistic. The Wax Lake Delta (WLD) in coastal Louisiana has experienced 19 of these high flow events in the past 20 years, yet the depositional patterns of single floods are rarely measured in a field-scale deltaic setting. We characterize flood deposition and erosion patterns on the subaqueous portion of the WLD by differencing two Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) constructed from bathymetric surveys before and after the third largest flood in the WLD's recorded history. The total suspended sediment discharge for the 496 day inter-survey period was 2.14x107 cubic meters measured 21 km upstream of the delta apex. The difference map showed 1.06x107 cubic meters of sediment was deposited and 8.2x106 cubic meters was eroded, yielding 2.40x106 cubic meters of net deposition in the survey area ( 79.7 km2 ). Therefore the average deposition rate was 0.061 mm/day. Channel planform remained relatively unchanged for five out of six distributary passes however Gadwall Pass experienced a maximum channel displacement of 166 m ( 1 channel width) measured from the thalweg centerline. Channel tip extension was negligible. In addition, channel displacement was not concentrated at any portion along the channel centerline. Maximum erosion occurred within channel margins and increased upstream whereas maximum deposition occurred immediately outside the channel margins. Sediment eroded from the survey area was either subsequently re-deposited or transported out of the system. Our results show that up to 77.4% of deposition in the survey area originated from sediment eroded during the flood. Surprisingly, only 11.2% of the total suspended sediment discharge was retained in the subaqueous portion of the delta after the flood. We conclude that a high flow event does not produce channel progradation. Rather, high flow causes delta

  16. D-003, a potential antithrombotic compound isolated from sugar cane wax with effects on arachidonic acid metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, V; Arruzazabala, M L; Carbajal, D; Más, R

    2002-07-01

    D-003 is a natural mixture of higher primary saturated aliphatic acids purified from sugar cane wax, whose main component is octacosanoic acid followed by triacontanoic, dotriacontanoic, and tetratriacontanoic acids. D-003 inhibits platelet aggregation and arterial thrombosis experimentally induced in a dose-dependent fashion. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of D-003 (25 and 200 mg/kg) in experimental models of venous thrombosis and on plasma levels of two metabolites from arachidonic acid (AA) : thromboxane A(2) (TxA(2)) and prostacyclin (PgI(2)). D-003 orally administered as single doses of 200 mg/kg, but not at 25 mg/kg, significantly increased plasma levels of 6 keto PgF1alpha levels, a stable metabolite of PgI(2) in PPP obtained from collagen-stimulated blood (4 microg/ml) compared with control group. Nevertheless, levels of 6 keto PgF1alpha levels determined after 10 days of oral treatment with both doses of D-003 were significantly larger than those of the controls. Likewise, single and repeated oral doses of D-003 (25 and 200 g/kg) significantly reduced the TxB(2) and MDA plasma levels obtained from whole blood stimulated by collagen. Hence, TxB(2)/6 keto PgF1alpha ratio significantly decreased in animals treated with D-003. Single and repeated oral doses of D-003 (25 and 200 mg/kg) significantly reduced the weight of venous thrombus experimentally induced in rats. D-003 at single doses (400 mg/kg but not 200 mg/kg) significantly protected from death induced by endovenous infusion of collagen plus epinephrine in mice. The present results support that these effects of D-003 on AA metabolites could explain, at least partially, its antiplatelet and antithrombotic effects. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  17. The potential influence of subduction zone polarity on overriding plate deformation, trench migration and slab dip angle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, W. P.

    2007-01-01

    A geodynamic model exists, the westward lithospheric drift model, in which the variety of overriding plate deformation, trench migration and slab dip angles is explained by the polarity of subduction zones. The model predicts overriding plate extension, a fixed trench and a steep slab dip for

  18. 2-D Deformation analysis of a half-space due to a long dip-slip fault at

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Closed form analytical expressions of stresses and displacements at any field point due to a very long dip-slip fault of finite width buried in a homogeneous, isotropic elastic half-space, are presented. Airy stress function is used to derive the expressions of stresses and displacements which depend on the dip angle and ...

  19. 2-D Deformation analysis of a half-space due to a long dip-slip fault ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Closed form analytical expressions of stresses and displacements at any field point due to a very long dip-slip fault of finite width buried in a homogeneous, isotropic elastic half-space, are presented. Airy stress function is used to derive the expressions of stresses and displacements which depend on the dip angle and ...

  20. Study on process development of solvent extraction of montan wax from lignite particles in a continuous fluidised bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Tiejun; Zhao Lianzhong; Di Weiquan; Huang Zhe; Chen Dabao; Zhang Ruiying; Yuan Huiru; Yang Guilin

    1985-12-01

    A new process of continuous solvent extraction for production of montan wax based on particulate fluidization technology was developed. Experimental results obtained in the pilot plant show that the fluidised bed extraction process is successful. The extraction rate is about 65-70% and benzene consumption is 0.46 t per ton of wax. Xun Dian lignite with particle size of 0.2-3 mm was used, which gave the following analysis data: wax content 7.15%, water content about 23%, ash content 12%. The quality of the montan wax product is specified as follows: water content 1.12%., insolubles (in benzene) 0.61%, ash content 0.3%, melting point 84 C, resin 21.16%, asphalts content 11.54%, acid value 35-50, saponification value 102.25.

  1. MEDITERRANEAN FOREST TREE DECLINE IN ITALY: RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN DROUGHT, POLLUTANTS AND THE WAX STRUCTURE OF LEAVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. RADDI

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available After presenting the situation of forest decline in Italy and analyzing the factors that play a contributing role, tbis paper studies the response of the epicuticular wax structures and the stomata in ten broadleaf species and one conifer to fog-like treatments with acids andlor surfactants and to severe water stress. The main results are that wax structure alterations vary in intensity in the different species studied and that the microstructural alterations observed in field conditions cannot be attributed only to severe drought. since sample trccs put through water stress simulations do nol differ significantly from controls. In the artificial surfactant treatment, a positive relationship between structural damage to tbe stomata and transpiration suggests possible synergies between the effects of drought and those of pollutants in inducing stress conditions in Mediterranean vegetation.

  2. Efficient and selective degradation of polyethylenes into liquid fuels and waxes under mild conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiangqing; Qin, Chuan; Friedberger, Tobias; Guan, Zhibin; Huang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Polyethylene (PE) is the largest-volume synthetic polymer, and its chemical inertness makes its degradation by low-energy processes a challenging problem. We report a tandem catalytic cross alkane metathesis method for highly efficient degradation of polyethylenes under mild conditions. With the use of widely available, low-value, short alkanes (for example, petroleum ethers) as cross metathesis partners, different types of polyethylenes with various molecular weights undergo complete conversion into useful liquid fuels and waxes. This method shows excellent selectivity for linear alkane formation, and the degradation product distribution (liquid fuels versus waxes) can be controlled by the catalyst structure and reaction time. In addition, the catalysts are compatible with various polyolefin additives; therefore, common plastic wastes, such as postconsumer polyethylene bottles, bags, and films could be converted into valuable chemical feedstocks without any pretreatment. PMID:27386559

  3. Designing maleic anhydride-{alpha}-olifin copolymeric combs as wax crystal growth nucleators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soni, Hemant P. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara-390 002 (India); Kiranbala; Bharambe, D.P. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Technology and Engineering, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara-390 001 (India); Agrawal, K.S. [Department of Petrochemical Technology, Polytechnic, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara-390 002 (India); Nagar, A. [MH ASSET, ONGC, Mumbai (India)

    2010-09-15

    Modification of the wax crystal habit is of great practical interest during transportation and processing of crude oil at low temperature. Various pour point depressant (PPD) additives can facilitate this modification by different mechanisms. Comb shaped polymer additives are known to depress the pour point of crude oil by providing different nucleation sites for the precipitation of wax. This paper describes performance based design, synthesis, characterization and evaluation of comb shaped polymeric diesters. Copolymers of maleic anhydride with different unsaturated C{sub 22} esters were synthesized and copolymers then reacted with two unsaturated fatty alcohols. All products were characterized by Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectroscopy and Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC). Rheological properties of crude (with and without additive) were studied by Advance Rheometer AR-500. In this study the additive based on oleic acid was evaluated as good PPD and rheology modifier. (author)

  4. Evaluation of Physical Properties of Wax Mixtures Obtained From Recycling of Patterns Used in Precision Casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biernacki R.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the properties of selected certified mixtures used to make wax patterns for the production of precision castings for the aerospace industry. In addition, an assessment of the recycled mixtures consisting of certified wax materials recovered during autoclaving was carried out. Hardness was tested via a proposed method based on penetration, creep related deformation, bending strength and linear contraction. The hardness was studied on laboratory specimens and patterns made with the use of injection molding equipment. For these patterns, linear contraction was estimated at variable pressure and for different temperature injection parameters. Deformations connected with creep and resistance were evaluated on cylindrical specimens. Differences in creep resistance in relation to the hardness were observed depending on the type of pattern mixtures. Recycled mixture has a greater resistance and smaller linear contraction than certified mixtures used for making sprue, raisers and other parts of filler system.

  5. Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax Products from Ultrafine Iron Catalyst Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amitava Sarkar; James K. Neathery; Burtron H. Davis

    2006-12-31

    A fundamental filtration study was started to investigate the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids from iron-based catalyst particles. Slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems is the preferred mode of operation since the reaction is highly exothermic. Consequently, heavy wax products in one approach may be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. Achieving an efficient wax product separation from iron-based catalysts is one of the most challenging technical problems associated with slurry-phase iron-based FTS and is a key factor for optimizing operating costs. The separation problem is further compounded by attrition of iron catalyst particles and the formation of ultra-fine particles.

  6. MEDITERRANEAN FOREST TREE DECLINE IN ITALY: RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN DROUGHT, POLLUTANTS AND THE WAX STRUCTURE OF LEAVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. PAOLETTI

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available After presenting the situation of forest decline in Italy and analyzing the factors that play a contributing role, tbis paper studies the response of the epicuticular wax structures and the stomata in ten broadleaf species and one conifer to fog-like treatments with acids andlor surfactants and to severe water stress. The main results are that wax structure alterations vary in intensity in the different species studied and that the microstructural alterations observed in field conditions cannot be attributed only to severe drought. since sample trccs put through water stress simulations do nol differ significantly from controls. In the artificial surfactant treatment, a positive relationship between structural damage to tbe stomata and transpiration suggests possible synergies between the effects of drought and those of pollutants in inducing stress conditions in Mediterranean vegetation.

  7. Determination of quality attributes in wax jambu fruit using NIRS and PLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, Thayna R; Mata, Ana L M L; Duarte, Márcia M L; Lima, Kássio M G

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop an analytical method to predict total anthocyanins content (TAC) and total phenolic compounds (TPC) in intact wax jambu fruit [Syzygium malaccense (L.) Merryl et Perry] using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and partial least squares (PLS). The estimation accuracy was based on parameters such as root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP), correlation coefficients [calibration (rc) and prediction (rp) set] and ratio of performance to deviation (RPD). TAC, rp = 0.98, RMSEP = 9.0 mg L(-1) and RPD = 5.19 were attained using second derivative pre-treatment. TPC, rp = 0.94, RMSEP = 22.18 (mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/100g) and RPD = 3.27 (excellent accuracy) were also obtained using second derivative pre-treatment. These findings suggest that the NIRS and PLS algorithms can be used to determine TCA and TPC in intact wax jambu fruit. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Real-time monitoring and measurement of wax deposition in pipelines via non-invasive electrical capacitance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock Sow Mei, Irene; Ismail, Idris; Shafquet, Areeba; Abdullah, Bawadi

    2016-02-01

    Tomographic analysis of the behavior of waxy crude oil in pipelines is important to permit appropriate corrective actions to be taken to remediate the wax deposit layer before pipelines are entirely plugged. In this study, a non-invasive/non-intrusive electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) system has been applied to provide real-time visualization of the formation of paraffin waxes and to measure the amount of wax fraction from the Malay Basin waxy crude oil sample under the static condition. Analogous expressions to estimate the wax fraction of the waxy crude oil across the temperatures range of 30-50 °C was obtained by using Otsu’s and Kuo’s threshold algorithms. Otsu’s method suggested that the wax fraction can be estimated by the correlation coefficient β =0.0459{{T}3}-5.3535{{T}2}+200.36T-2353.7 while Kuo’s method provides a similar correlation with β =0.0741{{T}3}-8.4915{{T}2}+314.96T-3721.2 . These correlations show good agreements with the results which are obtained from the conventional weighting method. This study suggested that Kuo’s threshold algorithm is more promising when integrated into the ECT system compared to Otsu’s algorithm because the former provides higher accuracy wax fraction measurement results below the wax appearance temperature for waxy crude oil. This study is significant because it serves as a preliminary investigation for the application of ECT in the oil and gas industry for online measurement and detection of wax fraction without causing disturbance to the process flow.

  9. De novo assembly and characterization of the transcriptome, and development of SSR markers in wax gourd (Benicasa hispida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biao Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wax gourd is a widely used vegetable of Cucuribtaceae, and also has important medicinal and health values. However, the genomic resources of wax gourd were scarcity, and only a few nucleotide sequences could be obtained in public databases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we examined transcriptome in wax gourd. More than 44 million of high quality reads were generated from five different tissues of wax gourd using Illumina paired-end sequencing technology. Approximately 4 Gbp data were generated, and de novo assembled into 65,059 unigenes, with an N50 of 1,132 bp. Based on sequence similarity search with known protein database, 36,070 (55.4% showed significant similarity to known proteins in Nr database, and 24,969 (38.4% had BLAST hits in Swiss-Prot database. Among the annotated unigenes, 14,994 of wax gourd unigenes were assigned to GO term annotation, and 23,977 were found to have COG classifications. In addition, a total of 18,713 unigenes were assigned to 281 KEGG pathways. Furthermore, 6,242 microsatellites (simple sequence repeats were detected as potential molecular markers in wax gourd. Two hundred primer pairs for SSRs were designed for validation of the amplification and polymorphism. The result showed that 170 of the 200 primer pairs were successfully amplified and 49 (28.8% of them exhibited polymorphisms. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study enriches the genomic resources of wax gourd and provides powerful information for future studies. The availability of this ample amount of information about the transcriptome and SSRs in wax gourd could serve as valuable basis for studies on the physiology, biochemistry, molecular genetics and molecular breeding of this important vegetable crop.

  10. The Extended Community-Level Effects of Genetic Variation in Foliar Wax Chemistry in the Forest Tree Eucalyptus globulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosney, Benjamin; O'Reilly-Wapstra, Julianne; Forster, Lynne; Whiteley, Carmen; Potts, Brad

    2017-05-01

    Genetic variation in foundation trees can influence dependent communities, but little is known about the mechanisms driving these extended genetic effects. We studied the potential chemical drivers of genetic variation in the dependent foliar community of the focal tree Eucalyptus globulus. We focus on the role of cuticular waxes and compare the effects to that of the terpenes, a well-studied group of secondary compounds known to be bioactive in eucalypts. The canopy community was quantified based on the abundance of thirty-nine distinctive arthropod and fungal symptoms on foliar samples collected from canopies of 246 progeny from 13 E. globulus sub-races grown in a common garden trial. Cuticular waxes and foliar terpenes were quantified using gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MC). A total of 4 of the 13 quantified waxes and 7 of the 16 quantified terpenes were significantly associated with the dependent foliar community. Variation in waxes explained 22.9% of the community variation among sub-races, which was equivalent to that explained by terpenes. In combination, waxes and terpenes explained 35% of the genetic variation among sub-races. Only a small proportion of wax and terpene compounds showing statistically significant differences among sub-races were implicated in community level effects. The few significant waxes have previously shown evidence of divergent selection in E. globulus, which signals that adaptive variation in phenotypic traits may have extended effects. While highlighting the role of the understudied cuticular waxes, this study demonstrates the complexity of factors likely to lead to community genetic effects in foundation trees.

  11. Effect of expanded graphite on the phase change materials of high density polyethylene/wax blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AlMaadeed, M.A., E-mail: m.alali@qu.edu.qa [Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, 2713 Doha (Qatar); Labidi, Sami [Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, 2713 Doha (Qatar); Krupa, Igor [QAPCO Polymer Chair, Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, P.O. Box 2713, Doha (Qatar); Karkri, Mustapha [Université Paris-Est CERTES, 61 avenue du Général de Gaulle, 94010 Créteil (France)

    2015-01-20

    Highlights: • Expanded graphite (EG) and low melting point (42.3 °C) wax were added to HDPE to form phase change material. • EG was well dispersed in the composites and did not affect the melting or crystallization of the HDPE matrix. • EG increased the thermal stability of the composites by reducing chain mobility and inhibiting degradation. • The addition of a relatively small quantity of EG enhances the heat conduction in the composite. • HDPE/40% RT42 that contained up to 15% EG demonstrated excellent mechanical and thermal properties and can be used as PCM. - Abstract: Phase change materials fabricated from high density polyethylene (HDPE) blended with 40 or 50 wt% commercial wax (melting point of 43.08 °C) and up to 15 wt% expanded graphite (EG) were studied. Techniques including scanning electron microscope (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and an experimental device to measure diffusivity and conductivity (DICO) were used to determine the microstructural, mechanical and thermal properties of the composites. The composites possessed good mechanical properties. Additionally, no leaching was observed during material processing or characterization. Although the Young’s modulus increased with the addition of EG, no significant changes in tensile strength were detected. The maximum Young’s modulus achieved was 650 MPa for the HDPE/40% wax composite with 15 wt% EG. The EG was well dispersed within the composites and did not affect the melting or crystallization of the HDPE matrix. The incorporation of EG increased the thermal stability of the composites by reducing chain mobility and inhibiting degradation. The intensification of thermal conductivity occurred with increasing fractions of EG, which was attributed to the high thermal conductivity of graphite. The maximum quantity of heat stored by latent heat was found for the HDPE/40% wax composite with EG. The addition of a relatively small quantity

  12. Sequences of epicuticular wax structures along stems in four selected tree species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaszewski Dominik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Wax layer formation accompanies the processes of epidermis and cuticle formation. To examine these changes, observationsalong current-year long shoots of four woody species (Acer negundo, A. rufinerve, Gymnocladus dioica, and Gingko biloba were made. Long shoots are suitable objects for such observations, because from the same stem, several samples can be obtained that represent a well-defined sequence of fragments of different ages.

  13. Variations of the composition of the leaf cuticular wax among Chinese populations of Plantago major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yanjun; He, Yuji; Guo, Na; Gao, Jianhua; Ni, Yu

    2015-04-01

    Plantago major L. grows in a very wide range of regions in China and exhibits great variations among populations. The analysis of the cuticular-wax composition provides a potential approach to classify populations of P. major confronting different environmental conditions. Twelve populations of P. major and five populations of P. depressa Willd., distributed over regions with average annual temperatures ranging from -2.0 to 18.4°, were sampled, the variation of the composition of their cuticular waxes was analyzed, and their values of average chain length (ACL) and carbon preference index (CPI) were calculated. Great intra- and interspecies variations were observed for the total wax contents. The average annual temperature of the habitats was significantly correlated with the relative contents of the dominant n-alkanes with an odd number of C-atoms, but not with the wax contents. With an increasing average annual temperature, the relative contents of n-alkanes C29 and C31 decreased, whereas those of C33 and C35 as well as the values of ACLtotal and ACL27-33 increased. Cluster analysis based on the pattern of the n-alkane distribution allowed to clearly separate the populations of P. major according to the average annual temperature of their habitats, but not to separate the populations of the two species. Hence, the pattern of the n-alkane distribution might be a good taxonomic marker for P. major at the intraspecies level, but not at the interspecies level. Nevertheless, a small difference between the populations of the two species was observed concerning the values of ACLtotal and CPItotal , implying the potential use of these indices for the classification of the populations of the two species at the interspecies level. Copyright © 2015 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  14. SEPARATION OF FISCHER-TROPSCH WAX PRODUCTS FROM ULTRAFINE IRON CATALYST PARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Burtron H. Davis

    2004-09-30

    In this reporting period, a fundamental filtration study was continued to investigate the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids from iron-based catalyst particles. The overall focus of the program is with slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems. Hydrocarbon products must be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. An efficient wax product/catalyst separation system is a key factor for optimizing operating costs for iron-based slurry-phase FTS. Previous work has focused on catalyst particle attrition and the formation of ultra-fine iron carbide and/or carbon particles. With the current study, we are investigating how the filtration properties are affected by these chemical and physical changes of the catalyst slurry during activation/synthesis. The shakedown phase of the pilot-scale filtration platform was completed at the end of the last reporting period. A study of various molecular weight waxes was initiated to determine the effect of wax physical properties on the permeation rate without catalyst present. As expected, the permeation flux was inversely proportional to the nominal average molecular weight of the polyethylene wax. Even without catalyst particles present in the filtrate, the filtration membranes experience fouling during an induction period on the order of days on-line. Another long-term filtration test was initiated using a batch of iron catalyst that was previously activated with CO to form iron carbide in a separate continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) system. The permeation flux stabilized more rapidly than that experienced with unactivated catalyst tests.

  15. Time-resolved SAXS/WAXS study of phase behaviour and crystallization in polymer blends

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Baldrian, Josef; Steinhart, Miloš; Vlček, Petr; Horký, M.; Laggner, P.; Amenitsch, H.; Bernstorff, S.

    B41, 4-6 (2002), s. 1023-1032 ISSN 0022-2348 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/99/0557 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : time-resolved SAXS/WAXS * poly(ethylene oxide)/poly(methyl methacrylate) blends * phase separation Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials Impact factor: 0.677, year: 2002

  16. Effect of expanded graphite on the phase change materials of high density polyethylene/wax blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlMaadeed, M.A.; Labidi, Sami; Krupa, Igor; Karkri, Mustapha

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Expanded graphite (EG) and low melting point (42.3 °C) wax were added to HDPE to form phase change material. • EG was well dispersed in the composites and did not affect the melting or crystallization of the HDPE matrix. • EG increased the thermal stability of the composites by reducing chain mobility and inhibiting degradation. • The addition of a relatively small quantity of EG enhances the heat conduction in the composite. • HDPE/40% RT42 that contained up to 15% EG demonstrated excellent mechanical and thermal properties and can be used as PCM. - Abstract: Phase change materials fabricated from high density polyethylene (HDPE) blended with 40 or 50 wt% commercial wax (melting point of 43.08 °C) and up to 15 wt% expanded graphite (EG) were studied. Techniques including scanning electron microscope (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and an experimental device to measure diffusivity and conductivity (DICO) were used to determine the microstructural, mechanical and thermal properties of the composites. The composites possessed good mechanical properties. Additionally, no leaching was observed during material processing or characterization. Although the Young’s modulus increased with the addition of EG, no significant changes in tensile strength were detected. The maximum Young’s modulus achieved was 650 MPa for the HDPE/40% wax composite with 15 wt% EG. The EG was well dispersed within the composites and did not affect the melting or crystallization of the HDPE matrix. The incorporation of EG increased the thermal stability of the composites by reducing chain mobility and inhibiting degradation. The intensification of thermal conductivity occurred with increasing fractions of EG, which was attributed to the high thermal conductivity of graphite. The maximum quantity of heat stored by latent heat was found for the HDPE/40% wax composite with EG. The addition of a relatively small quantity

  17. Dimensional Precision Research of Wax Molding Rapid Prototyping based on Droplet Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingji, Huang; Geng, Wu; yan, Shan

    2017-11-01

    The traditional casting process is complex, the mold is essential products, mold quality directly affect the quality of the product. With the method of rapid prototyping 3D printing to produce mold prototype. The utility wax model has the advantages of high speed, low cost and complex structure. Using the orthogonal experiment as the main method, analysis each factors of size precision. The purpose is to obtain the optimal process parameters, to improve the dimensional accuracy of production based on droplet injection molding.

  18. Development of a Parafin Wax deposition Unit for Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM)

    OpenAIRE

    D'Angelo, Greta; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Pedersen, David Bue

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade Additive Manufacturing (AM) witnessed a big development in terms of technologies, processes and possibilities. However of materials and their use still represents a big challenge. In fact availability of materials is rather limited if compared to conventional manufacturing. This project illustrates the redesign of an extrusion unit for the deposition of paraffin wax in Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) instead of the conventional polymeric materials. Among the benefits a...

  19. Effects of Aridity and Vegetation on Plant-wax δD in Modern Lake Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polissar, P. J.; Freeman, K. H.

    2010-12-01

    Plant waxes are preserved over geologic timescales, and are found in diverse ancient sediments and soils. Observations that these molecules have hydrogen isotopic signatures that can be systematically related to that of modern precipitation have fueled aspirations to reconstruct ancient precipitation δD values. However, molecular isotopic signatures also reflect climate and plant physiological factors, and until better understood, these limit our ability to quantitatively interpret sedimentary lipid records. To advance our understanding of the influence of both ecosystem flora and climate (especially aridity) at the field scale, we analyzed the deuterium content of plant-waxes from sediments in 28 modern lakes located in watersheds which receive precipitation with a wide range of δD values, and are characterized by distinct vegetation types and regional climates. We found that the apparent isotopic fractionation (ɛa) between plant-wax n-alkanes and precipitation differs with watershed ecosystem type and structure, and decreases with increasing regional aridity as measured by enrichment of 2H and 18O associated with evaporation of lake waters. The most negative ɛa values represent signatures least affected by aridity; these values were: -125 ± 5 ‰ for tropical evergreen and dry forests, -130 ‰ for a temperate broadleaf forest, -120 ± 9 ‰ for the high-altitude tropical páramo (herbs, shrubs and grasses), and -98 ± 6 ‰ for North American montane gymnosperm forests. Minimum ɛa values reflect ecosystem-dependent differences in leaf water enrichment and soil evaporation. Slopes of lipid/lakewater isotopic enrichments differ slightly with ecosystem structure (i.e. open shrublands vs. forests) and overall are quite small (slopes = 0 to 2), indicating low sensitivity of lipid δD variations to aridity compared with coexisting lake waters. This finding provides an approach for reconstructing ancient precipitation signatures based on plant-wax

  20. Controls on the D/H ratios of plant leaf waxes in an arid ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feakins, Sarah J.; Sessions, Alex L.

    2010-04-01

    The extent to which leaf water D-enrichment (transpiration) and soil water D-enrichment (evaporation) affect the D/H ratio of plant leaf waxes remains a contentious issue, with important implications for paleohydrologic reconstructions. In this study we measure δD values of precipitation ( δD p), groundwater ( δD gw), plant xylem water ( δD xw) and leaf water ( δD lw) to understand their impact on the δD values of plant leaf wax n-alkanes ( δD wax) in an arid ecosystem. Our survey includes multiple species at four sites across an aridity gradient (80-30% relative humidity) in southern California. We find that many species take up groundwater or precipitation without significant fractionation. D-enriched soil water is a minor source even in species known to perform and utilize waters from hydraulic lift, such as Larrea tridentata (+10‰). Measurements of leaf water isotopic composition demonstrate that transpiration is an important mechanism for D-enrichment of leaf waters (+74 ± 20‰, 1 σ), resulting in the smallest net fractionation yet reported between source water and leaf waxes ( L. tridentata -41‰; multi-species mean value is -94 ± 21‰, 1 σ). We find little change in leaf water D-enrichment or net fractionation across the climatic gradient sampled by our study, suggesting that a net fractionation of ca. -90‰ may be appropriate for paleohydrologic reconstructions in semi-arid to arid environments. Large interspecies offsets in net fractionations (1 σ = 21‰) are potentially troublesome, given the observed floristic diversity and the likelihood of species assemblage changes with climate shifts.

  1. Characterization of solid wastes from two different hot-dip galvanizing processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delvasto, P.; Casal-Ramos, J. a.; Gonzalez-Jordan, O.; Duran-Rodriguez, N. C.; Dominguez, J. R.; Moncada, P.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc dust and zinc ash from hot-dip galvanizing industries located in Venezuela were characterized using atomic spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-Ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. Dust was formed during the high-pressure drying process of the galvanized pieces, in a plant that uses a steel kettle to hold the molten zinc. Ash identified as A came from the same plant as the dust, while ash identified as B came from a hot-dip galvanizing plant which use a ceramic lined galvanizing furnace. Dust contained 98 wt % Zn, in metallic form. Both ash samples contained: Zn and ZnO, while Zn 5 (OH) 8 Cl 2 xH 2 O and ZnCl 2 were only found in ash B. Globally, ash ''A'' and ash ''B'' contain 71 and 75 wt % Zn, respectively. (Author)

  2. Mitigation of voltage dip and power system oscillations damping using dual STATCOM for grid connected DFIG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.V.N. Ananth

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available During grid fault, transmission lines reach its thermal limit and lose its capability to transfer. If this fault current enters generator terminals, it will lead to dip in stator voltage and consequently produces torque and real power oscillations. This further affects in the form of internal heat in rotor windings and finally damages the generator. A new control strategy is proposed to limit fault current using dual STATCOM, which will damp power oscillations and mitigate the voltage dip due to a severe symmetrical fault. It is achieved by diverting the fault current to the capacitor using the dual-STATCOM controller. It is best suitable to maintain power system stability with uninterrupted power supply, effective power transfer capability and rapid reactive power support and to damp inter-area oscillations. The effectiveness of SG and DFIG due to the transmission line short circuit symmetrical fault was studied.

  3. Filmes de titânio-silício preparados por "spin" e "dip-coating"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nassar Eduardo J.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The conditions for the preparation of luminescent materials, consisting of Eu3+ ions entrapped in a titanium matrix, in the forma of a thin film, using the sol-gel process, are described. The films were obtained from sols prepared with TEOS and TEOT, in the presence of acetylacetone as the hidrolysis-retarding agent, using the dip-coating and spin-coating techniques. The influence of these techniques on the films based on titanium and silicon are presented. The Eu3+ was used as a luminescent probe. The films have been characterized by luminescence, reflection and transmittance. The thickness of the films could be related to the preparation procedure. Transparent thin films have been prepared by dip-coating technique.

  4. Steep-dip seismic imaging of the shallow San Andreas fault near Parkfield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hole, J A; Catchings, R D; St Clair, K C; Rymer, M J; Okaya, D A; Carney, B J

    2001-11-16

    Seismic reflection and refraction images illuminate the San Andreas Fault to a depth of 1 kilometer. The prestack depth-migrated reflection image contains near-vertical reflections aligned with the active fault trace. The fault is vertical in the upper 0.5 kilometer, then dips about 70 degrees to the southwest to at least 1 kilometer subsurface. This dip reconciles the difference between the computed locations of earthquakes and the surface fault trace. The seismic velocity cross section shows strong lateral variations. Relatively low velocity (10 to 30%), high electrical conductivity, and low density indicate a 1-kilometer-wide vertical wedge of porous sediment or fractured rock immediately southwest of the active fault trace.

  5. Integrating dental data in missing persons and unidentified remains investigations: the RESOLVE INITIATIVE and DIP3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogon, S; Arnold, J; Wood, R; Merner, L

    2010-04-15

    DIP3, a computerized aid to assist in dental identification, was integrated into the RESOLVE INITIATIVE, a joint endeavour by the Ontario Provincial Police and the Office of the Chief Coroner for Ontario, to resolve cases of missing persons (MP) and unidentified remains (UNID). Dental data, from the UNID, collected by the coroner and the dental records of MP, provided by investigating police, are streamed separately for input into a dedicated computer program. All dental management is provided by forensic dentists. The advantage of having experienced dentists managing this data is explained. A description of the RESOLVE INITIATIVE and DIP3, including the method used for record transmission is provided. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Titanium-silicon films prepared by spin and dip-coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassar, Eduardo J.; Ciuffi, Katia J.; Goncalves, Rogeria R.; Messaddeq, Younes; Ribeiro, Sidney J.L.

    2003-01-01

    The conditions for the preparation of luminescent materials, consisting of Eu 3+ ions entrapped in a titanium matrix, in the form of a thin film, using the sol-gel process, are described. The films were obtained from sols prepared with TEOS and TEOT, in the presence of acetylacetone as the hydrolysis-retarding agent, using the dip-coating and spin-coating techniques. The influence of these techniques on the films based on titanium and silicon are presented. The Eu 3+ was used as a luminescent probe. The films have been characterized by luminescence, reflection and transmittance. The thickness of the films could be related to the preparation procedure. Transparent thin films have been prepared by dip-coating technique. (author)

  7. Control of Polychaetes by Dipping Infected Pearl Oyster on Different Salinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yani Hadiroseyani

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Dip treatment on pearl oysters (Pinctada maxima was conducted in different concentrations of saline water to eliminate boring polychaetes. Results shows that polychaetes leave the osyters which treated on saline water at 0 ppt, 45 ppt, and 60 ppt as long as 15 minutes each. It also shows that the oysters got high survival rate 7 days after the treatment. Key words : Polychaetes, pearl oyster, dipping, salinity   ABSTRAK Pengendalian polikaeta pengebor dengan menggunakan berbagai konsentrasi larutan garam telah dilakukan pada tiram mutiara (Pinctada maxima. Berdasarkan jumlah polikaeta yang keluar, hasil percobaan ini menunjukkan bahwa perendaman dengan konsentrasi garam 0 ppt. 45 ppt, dan 60 ppt selama 15 menit lebih efektif dibandingkan pada konsentrasi 15 dan 30 ppt. Tingkat kelangsungan hidup tiram mutiara yang diamati 7 hari setelah perendaman dalam larutan garam mencapai 100%. Kata kunci : Polikaeta. tiram mutiara, perendaman. salinitas

  8. Slippery surfaces of pitcher plants: Nepenthes wax crystals minimize insect attachment via microscopic surface roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, I; Bückins, M; Dolge, L; Erlinghagen, T; Weth, A; Hischen, F; Mayer, J; Hoffmann, S; Riederer, M; Riedel, M; Baumgartner, W

    2010-04-01

    Pitcher plants of the genus Nepenthes efficiently trap and retain insect prey in highly specialized leaves. Besides a slippery peristome which inhibits adhesion of insects they employ epicuticular wax crystals on the inner walls of the conductive zone of the pitchers to hamper insect attachment by adhesive devices. It has been proposed that the detachment of individual crystals and the resulting contamination of adhesive organs is responsible for capturing insects. However, our results provide evidence in favour of a different mechanism, mainly based on the stability and the roughness of the waxy surface. First, we were unable to detect a large quantity of crystal fragments on the pads of insects detached from mature pitcher surfaces of Nepenthes alata. Second, investigation of the pitcher surface by focused ion beam treatment showed that the wax crystals form a compact 3D structure. Third, atomic force microscopy of the platelet-shaped crystals revealed that the crystals are mechanically stable, rendering crystal detachment by insect pads unlikely. Fourth, the surface profile parameters of the wax layer showed striking similarities to those of polishing paper with low grain size. By measuring friction forces of insects on this artificial surface we demonstrate that microscopic roughness alone is sufficient to minimize insect attachment. A theoretical model shows that surface roughness within a certain length scale will prevent adhesion by being too rough for adhesive pads but not rough enough for claws.

  9. Insecticidal Properties of a Highly Potent Wax Isolated from Dolichandra cynanchoides Cham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Napal, Georgina; Carpinella, María C; Palacios, Sara M

    2016-08-11

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of an ethanolic extract of the aerial parts of Dolichandra cynanchoides Cham. (Bignoniaceae) led to the isolation of a natural wax with anti-insect activity against Spodoptera frugiperda (Noctuidae) and Epilachna paenulata (Coleptera). The compound was identified spectroscopically as an ester of a C27 fatty acid and a C25 alcohol, pentacosyl heptacosanoate (1). The effective doses of 1 for 50% feeding inhibition (ED50) of S. frugiperda and E. paenulata were 0.82 and 8.53 µg/cm², respectively, in a choice test, while azadirachtin showed ED50 of 0.10 and 0.59 µg/cm², respectively. In a no-choice test, both insects refused to feed on leaves treated with 1 at doses of 0.1 µg/cm² or greater inhibiting larval growth and dramatically reducing survival. The lethal doses 50 (LD50) of 1 were 0.39 and 0.68 µg/cm² for S. frugiperda and E. paenulata, respectively. These results indicate that 1 has potential for development as botanical insecticides. Similar esters might be obtainable in large quantities as many edible crops produce wax esters that are discarded during food processing. Research on these materials could lead to the detection of similar waxes with insecticidal activity.

  10. Gel wax-based tissue-mimicking phantoms for multispectral photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneas, Efthymios; Xia, Wenfeng; Ogunlade, Olumide; Fonseca, Martina; Nikitichev, Daniil I; David, Anna L; West, Simeon J; Ourselin, Sebastien; Hebden, Jeremy C; Vercauteren, Tom; Desjardins, Adrien E

    2018-03-01

    Tissue-mimicking phantoms are widely used for the calibration, evaluation and standardisation of medical imaging systems, and for clinical training. For photoacoustic imaging, tissue-mimicking materials (TMMs) that have tuneable optical and acoustic properties, high stability, and mechanical robustness are highly desired. In this study, gel wax is introduced as a TMM that satisfies these criteria for developing photoacoustic imaging phantoms. The reduced scattering and optical absorption coefficients were independently tuned with the addition of TiO 2 and oil-based inks. The frequency-dependent acoustic attenuation obeyed a power law; for native gel wax, it varied from 0.71 dB/cm at 3 MHz to 9.93 dB/cm at 12 MHz. The chosen oil-based inks, which have different optical absorption spectra in the range of 400 to 900 nm, were found to have good photostability under pulsed illumination with photoacoustic excitation light. Optically heterogeneous phantoms that comprised of inclusions with different concentrations of carbon black and coloured inks were fabricated, and multispectral photoacoustic imaging was performed with an optical parametric oscillator and a planar Fabry-Pérot sensor. We conclude that gel wax is well suited as a TMM for multispectral photoacoustic imaging.

  11. Micro- and nanoscale structures of mesiodens dentin: Combined study of FTIR and SAXS/WAXS techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgun, Ozlem Marti; Bayari, Sevgi Haman; Ide, Semra; Polat, Günseli Guven; Kalkhoran, Ilghar Orujalipoor

    2015-01-01

    A mesiodens is the most common type of supernumerary tooth present in conjunction to normal dentition. A mesiodens may commonly occur in the central region of the upper or lower jaw. A mesiodens is different from normal teeth in terms of structure and shape. The aim of this study is to evaluate the micro- and nanoscale structural properties of mesiodens dentin by combined small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Five freshly extracted, noncarious mesiodens and five normal dentin disks prepared from human incisor teeth were compared. Using FTIR, the phosphate-to-amide I, carbonate-to-phosphate, and carbonate-to-amide I band area ratios and the crystallinity index were quantified. SAXS/WAXS were used to study the nanostructure of mesiodens. An increase in the mineral content in the mesiodens dentin with respect to the normal group was found. Crystallinity was also significantly increased and the protein content decreased in the mesiodens dentin compared with that of normal dentin. SAXS/WAXS results revealed that mesiodens dentin has a more calcified tissue. Further, SAXS analysis revealed a nonuniform distribution of dentin fibrils in mesiodens. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Extraction and characterization of wax from sugarcane bagasse and the enzymatic hydrolysis of dewaxed sugarcane bagasse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Gaoxiang; Peng, Fen; Xiong, Lian; Lin, Xiaoqing; Huang, Chao; Li, Hailong; Chen, Xuefang; Chen, Xinde

    2017-03-16

    Extraction of high-value products from agricultural wastes is an important component for sustainable bioeconomy development. In this study, wax extraction from sugarcane bagasse was performed and the beneficial effect of dewaxing pretreatment on the enzymatic hydrolysis was investigated. About 1.2% (w/w) of crude sugarcane wax was obtained from the sugarcane bagasse using the mixture of petroleum ether and ethanol (mass ratio of 1:1) as the extraction agent. Results of Fourier-transform infrared characterization and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry qualitative analysis showed that the crude sugarcane wax consisted of fatty fractions (fatty acids, fatty aldehydes, hydrocarbons, and esters) and small amount of lignin derivatives. In addition, the effect of dewaxing pretreatment on the enzymatic hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse was also investigated. The digestibilities of cellulose and xylan in dewaxed sugarcane bagasse were 18.7 and 10.3%, respectively, compared with those of 13.1 and 8.9% obtained from native sugarcane bagasse. The dewaxed sugarcane bagasse became more accessible to enzyme due to the disruption of the outermost layer of the waxy materials.

  13. Surfactant-free dispersion of Montan wax and Montan resin; Tensidfreie Dispersion von Montanwachs und Montanharz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wollenberg, R.; Naundorf, W. [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany); Abraham, J. [ROMONTA GmbH, Amsdorf (Germany)

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this research project was the surfactant-free dispersion of lignite wax products in water in order to avoid the use of expensive surfactants that are employed in conventional process methods and some of which are harmful to the environment, and in some cases also impair the useful properties of the dispersed system. Based on experimental investigations, the wet grinding process at low temperatures below the melting point of the lignite wax products was developed. The products are surfactant-free watery dispersions of lignite wax or lignite resin. The new dispersed systems can be produced at low cost and have very good properties of use. (orig.) [German] Das Ziel der Forschung war die tensidfreie Dispergierung von Montanwachsprodukten in Wasser, um die in herkoemmlicher Verfahrensweise einzusetzenden teuren und teilweise umweltschaedlichen Tenside einzusparen, die in einigen Faellen auch die Anwendungseigenschaften des dispersen Systems beeintraechtigen. Auf der Basis von experimentellen Untersuchungen wurde das Nassmahlverfahren bei tiefen Temperaturen unter dem Schmelzpunkt der Montanwachsprodukte entwickelt. Die Produkte sind tensidfreie waessrige Dispersionen aus Montanwachs oder Montanharz. Die neuen dispersen Systeme sind kostenguenstig herstellbar und haben sehr gute Anwendungseigenschaften. (orig.)

  14. Insecticidal Properties of a Highly Potent Wax Isolated from Dolichandra cynanchoides Cham

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina Díaz Napal

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bioassay-guided fractionation of an ethanolic extract of the aerial parts of Dolichandra cynanchoides Cham. (Bignoniaceae led to the isolation of a natural wax with anti-insect activity against Spodoptera frugiperda (Noctuidae and Epilachna paenulata (Coleptera. The compound was identified spectroscopically as an ester of a C27 fatty acid and a C25 alcohol, pentacosyl heptacosanoate (1. The effective doses of 1 for 50% feeding inhibition (ED50 of S. frugiperda and E. paenulata were 0.82 and 8.53 µg/cm2, respectively, in a choice test, while azadirachtin showed ED50 of 0.10 and 0.59 µg/cm2, respectively. In a no-choice test, both insects refused to feed on leaves treated with 1 at doses of 0.1 µg/cm2 or greater inhibiting larval growth and dramatically reducing survival. The lethal doses 50 (LD50 of 1 were 0.39 and 0.68 µg/cm2 for S. frugiperda and E. paenulata, respectively. These results indicate that 1 has potential for development as botanical insecticides. Similar esters might be obtainable in large quantities as many edible crops produce wax esters that are discarded during food processing. Research on these materials could lead to the detection of similar waxes with insecticidal activity.

  15. Physical Properties, Volatiles Compositions and Sensory Descriptions of the Aromatized Hazelnut Oil-Wax Organogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Emin; Öğütcü, Mustafa; Yüceer, Yonca Karagül

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the physicochemical, thermal and sensorial features of vitamin enriched and aromatized hazelnut oil-beeswax and sunflower wax organogels. Another objective was to monitor the influence of storage on textural and oxidative stability and volatile composition of the organogels. The results show that organogels with beeswax had lower levels of solid fat content, melting point and firmness than sunflower wax counterparts. The microphotographs revealed that beeswax organogels had spherical crystals while sunflower wax organogels continued need-like crystals, but both organogels continued crystallized β' polymorph. All organogels maintained their oxidative stability during storage. Quantitative descriptive analysis results were consistent with these findings that the organogel structure and properties were similar to breakfast margarine. The main volatile components of the organogels with added strawberry aroma were ethyl acetate, ethyl butanoate, ethyl-2-methyl butanoate, D-limonene, ethyl caproate; banana-aroma were isoamyl acetate, isoamyl valerianate, ethyl acetate; and butter-aroma were 2,3-butanedione, 3-hydroxy-2-butanone. These volatile components were not only detected in the fresh samples but also at the end of the storage period. Sensory definition terms were matched with the sensory descriptors of the detected volatiles. In conclusion, the new organogels were shown to be suitable for food product applications. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  16. The effect of microwax composition on the staining quality of Klowong Batik Wax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik Abdul

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Batik is one of the most highly developed Indonesian art forms that had been designated by UNESCO as a Masterpiece of Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity. Batik wax is considered as the main material to make Batik, especially for handmade Batik in which the pattern and carve applied directly by the artisans. Melted wax (Malam is made from a mixture of melted damar mata kucing, gondorukem, beeswax, and paraffin. This study aimed to substitute the beeswax which was difficult to find into microwax made from paraffin which is available in huge amount as well as easily searchable. Microwax varied as many as four samples with the equal variable. The samples were then tested used Spectrophotometer to test the colour difference, colour ageing test, rub test (wet, dry, and endurance soap. The results showed that microwax can be used to substitute the function of beeswax with appropriate composition. It is highly expected that the increasing of melted wax quality can increase the quality of Batik itself as well as the preservation of Indonesian Batik as a cultural heritage.

  17. The resistance of surfaces treated with oils and waxes to the action of dry heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaić Milan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface treatment of wood can be done with different coatings, and the choice of the appropriate system of processing depends on several factors, such as technological, aesthetic, economic and ecological. Raising awareness of the need to preserve the living and working environment has had a crucial impact on the increase in the use of natural materials for surface treatment of wood - oil and wax. The application of oils and waxes allows surface treated wood to keep the natural look, while protecting it from different influences, which can cause degradation and deterioration of the final product. The paper presents the results of testing the resistance of beech surface (Fagus silvatica L. processed with linseed oil and beeswax to the action of dry heat. In order to compare the quality of surface treated with oil and/or wax, beech wood treated with 2K-polyurethane coating is taken as a reference of surface treatment of wood. Surfaces treated with beeswax are less resistant to dry heat than those treated with linseed oil, and both showed significantly less resistance than surface treated with 2K-polyurethane coating.

  18. Gel wax-based tissue-mimicking phantoms for multispectral photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneas, Efthymios; Xia, Wenfeng; Ogunlade, Olumide; Fonseca, Martina; Nikitichev, Daniil I.; David, Anna L.; West, Simeon J.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Hebden, Jeremy C.; Vercauteren, Tom; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2018-01-01

    Tissue-mimicking phantoms are widely used for the calibration, evaluation and standardisation of medical imaging systems, and for clinical training. For photoacoustic imaging, tissue-mimicking materials (TMMs) that have tuneable optical and acoustic properties, high stability, and mechanical robustness are highly desired. In this study, gel wax is introduced as a TMM that satisfies these criteria for developing photoacoustic imaging phantoms. The reduced scattering and optical absorption coefficients were independently tuned with the addition of TiO2 and oil-based inks. The frequency-dependent acoustic attenuation obeyed a power law; for native gel wax, it varied from 0.71 dB/cm at 3 MHz to 9.93 dB/cm at 12 MHz. The chosen oil-based inks, which have different optical absorption spectra in the range of 400 to 900 nm, were found to have good photostability under pulsed illumination with photoacoustic excitation light. Optically heterogeneous phantoms that comprised of inclusions with different concentrations of carbon black and coloured inks were fabricated, and multispectral photoacoustic imaging was performed with an optical parametric oscillator and a planar Fabry-Pérot sensor. We conclude that gel wax is well suited as a TMM for multispectral photoacoustic imaging. PMID:29541509

  19. Phase Change Material Trade Study: A Comparison Between Wax and Water for Manned Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Gregory; Hodgson, Ed; Stephan, Ryan A,

    2011-01-01

    Phase change material heat sinks have been recognized as an important tool in optimizing thermal control systems for space exploration vehicles and habitats that must deal with widely varying thermal loads and environments. In order to better focus technology investment in this arena, NASA has supported a trade study with the objective of identifying where the best potential pay-off can be found among identified aqueous and paraffin wax phase change materials and phase change material heat sink design approaches. The study used a representative exploration mission with well understood parameters to support the trade. Additional sensitivity studies were performed to ensure the applicability of study results across varying systems and destinations. Results from the study indicate that replacing a wax PCM heat sink with a water ice PCM heat sink has the potential to decrease the equivalent system mass of the mission s vehicle through a combination of a smaller heat sink and a slight 5% increase in radiator size or the addition of a lightweight heat pump. An evaluation of existing and emerging PCM heat sink technologies indicates that further mass savings should be achievable through continued development of those technologies. The largest mass savings may be realized by eliminating the melting and freezing pressure of wax and water, respectively.

  20. Influence of putrescine and carnauba wax on functional and sensory quality of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) fruits during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Kalyan; Asrey, Ram; Pal, R K; Kaur, Charanjit; Jha, S K

    2014-01-01

    Functional properties (anthocyanins, antioxidant, ascorbic acid and tannin) and sensory score were determined in pomegranate fruits at two storage temperatures (3 and 5 °C) after treatment with 2 mM putrescine and 1 : 10 carnauba wax (carnauba wax : water). The treatments (putrescine and carnauba wax) were given by immersion method followed by storage up to 60 days. Both treatments retained significantly higher anthocyanins, antioxidant, ascorbic acid, tannin and sensory qualities as compared with control fruits under both the storage conditions. Combined application of putrescine + carnauba wax showed better response in retaining functional properties than putrescine treated or nontreated fruits. The impacts of putrescine and carnauba wax treatments were found more pronounced after 30 days at 3-5 °C storage temperature in retaining functional and sensory qualities. After 60 days of storage, putrescine + carnauba wax retained about 25% higher antioxidant activity both at 3 and 5 °C storage temperatures.

  1. Evaluation of methods for wax determination in crude oil; Avaliacao de metodos de determinacao de parafinas em petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Julio Cesar M.; Silva, Maria do Socorro A.J. da; Vasconcellos, Rosa C.U. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas; Tamanqueira, Juliana B. [Fundacao Gorceix, Ouro Preto, MG (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Determining the wax content of crude oil is of great importance for petroleum industry, especially for production, storage and transportation of crude oils. Many different methodologies of wax determining are available in the technical literature. However, the selection of the most suitable method must be in accordance with the aim of the analysis and observing the specificities of each technique. The purpose of this work was to determine the performance of different techniques of wax determining applied to characterization of precipitation properties of waxy compounds in crude oils. Twelve samples of crude oils proceeding from the main Brazilian oil producing sedimentary basins were selected for this study. These samples were analyzed by three important analytical techniques of wax determining: precipitation by cooled solvent; liquid chromatography with precipitation by cooled solvent; and liquid chromatography followed by gas chromatography. Differential scanning calorimetry data related to the wax crystallization in these oils were used as parameters of validation. The results obtained in this study indicate that the liquid chromatography followed by gas chromatography method has the best performance for wax determining in crude oils. (author)

  2. A new experimental method to prevent paraffin - wax formation on the crude oil wells: A field case study in Libya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elhaddad Elnori E.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wax formation and deposition is one of the most common problems in oil producing wells. This problem occurs as a result of the reduction of the produced fluid temperature below the wax appearance temperature (range between 46°C and 50°C and the pour point temperature (range between 42°C and 44°C. In this study, two new methods for preventing wax formation were implemented on three oil wells in Libya, where the surface temperature is, normally, 29°C. In the first method, the gas was injected at a pressure of 83.3 bar and a temperature of 65°C (greater than the pour point temperature during the gas-lift operation. In the second method, wax inhibitors (Trichloroethylene-xylene (TEX, Ethylene copolymers, and Comb polymers were injected down the casings together with the gas. Field observations confirmed that by applying these techniques, the production string was kept clean and no wax was formed. The obtained results show that the wax formation could be prevented by both methods.

  3. Flow and linear coefficient of thermal expansion of four types of Base Plate waxes compared with ADA standard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monzavi A

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Waxes have a lot of applications in dentistry. Such materials are of thermoplastic type that undergoes deformation in different temperatures. Two important properties of base plate waxes are flow and their coefficient of linear thermal expansion. Recently, different institutions, inside the country, produce dentistry waxes, while they have not been standardized. Consequently, consumers' dissatisfaction are observed. In this research, the two above- mentioned factors were compared between three kinds of Iranian waxes with Cavex that is foreign production, based on test number 24 of ADA. To measure the flow rate in the temperatures of 23, 37 and 45°c, Wilcoxon statistical analysis was used. The results showed that in 23°c, the flow rate of Cavex and Azardent waxes met ADA standards; however, it was not true for two others types. In 37°c, the flow of none of the waxes was standardized and in 45°c their flow was acceptable, moreover, thermal expansion coefficient, for Cavex and Azardent types, was based on ADA standard.

  4. Development of the cuticular wax during growth of Kalanchoe daigremontiana (Hamet et Perr. de la Bathie) leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Maarseveen, Clare; Han, Hong; Jetter, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to monitor cuticular wax accumulation during leaf development of Kalanchoe daigremontiana. Leaves expanded linearly until they were 40-60 d old. Wax coverages of leaves on the third node increased steadily during initial leaf development, from 6.5 microg x cm(-2) on day 22 to 15.3 microg x cm(-2) on day 53, and then levelled off. Triterpenoids dominated the wax mixture throughout leaf development, but decreased from 74 to 40-45% in mature leaves, while very long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA) derivatives increased from 19 to 39-44%. The major VLCFA derivatives were alkanes, accompanied by fatty acids, primary alcohols, aldehydes and alkyl esters. In all compound classes, either C(34) or C(33) homologs predominated during leaf development. Eight different triterpenoids were identified, with glutinol constituting 70% of the fraction, and friedelin (20%) and germanicol (10%) as further major components of the young leaf wax. The glutinol percentage decreased, while the relative amounts of epifriedelanol and glutanol increased during development. Various leaf pairs upwards from the third node showed similar growth patterns and developmental time courses of cuticular wax amounts and composition. Based on these surface chemical analyses, the relative activities of biosynthetic pathways leading to various wax components can be assessed.

  5. Postharvest decay reduction of fig fruit (Ficus carica) by hot water sodium carbonate solutions dip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinu, M G; Venditti, T; Dore, A; D'Hallewin, G; Serusi, A; Del Caro, A; Agabbio, M

    2006-01-01

    Treatments as hot water dips or high temperature conditioning have been proven to be effective to control postharvest decay on various horticultural crops. These treatments reduce chilling injury and rot losses without causing detrimental effects on fruit firmness, flavour, taste or peel appearance. These technologies, aimed to control postharvest pathogens, can be easily matched with the use of "Generally Recognized as Safe" (G.R.A.S.) compounds and employed alternatively to pesticides, known to be harmful to health and environment. In this respect we studied the combined effect of sodium carbonate (SC) and hot water on the storability of black fig fruit cultivar 'Niedda Longa' of Sardinian germplasm. Second crop fig fruit, harvested in the middle of September, was dipped for one minute in water solutions containing 0, 0.05, 0.5, and 1% (w/v) of SC at 25 or 60 degrees C and then stored at 5 degrees C and 90% relative humidity (RH) for two weeks. After one and two weeks of storage decay, weight loss were monitored and visual assessment was scored. Treatments with hot solutions were more effective in controlling decay compared to cold ones and the best results were achieved with 0.5% of SC at 60 degrees C. This combination reduced the decay rate from 26% (control) to 0% after 1 week and from 50% to 14% after two weeks of storage, respectively. Lower or higher SC concentrations applied at 60 degrees C were less effective and, after two weeks of storage, decay percentages were 38 and 43.6%, respectively. Water dip at 60 degrees C did not affect the weight loss as compared to dips at 25 degrees C either after one or two weeks of storage. At the same time, a significant reduction was found only with 1% of SC at 25 degrees C. The fruit treated with 0.5% of SC at 60 degrees C also had the best visual assessment up to two weeks of storage.

  6. Mechanisms of pulse pressure amplification dipping pattern during sleep time: the SAFAR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyris, Antonios A; Nasothimiou, Efthimia; Aissopou, Evaggelia; Papaioannou, Theodoros G; Zhang, Yi; Blacher, Jacques; Safar, Michel E; Sfikakis, Petros P; Protogerou, Athanase D

    2018-02-01

    The difference in pulse pressure (PP) between peripheral arteries and the aorta, called pulse pressure amplification (PPamp), is a well-described physiological phenomenon independently associated with cardiovascular events. Recent studies suggest that it exhibits circadian variability. Our aim was to detect the factors associated with the circadian variability of PPamp. In 497 consecutive subjects (aged 54 years, 56.7% male, 79.7% hypertensives), we assessed the circadian pattern of peripheral and central arterial hemodynamics by 24-hour evaluation of brachial and aortic blood pressure (BP), augmentation index (AI), and pulse wave velocity (PWV) using a validated oscillometric device (Mobil-O-Graph). All parameters exhibited a circadian variation. Sleep dipping (decrease) pattern was observed for PPamp, brachial and aortic systolic BP, mean BP, and PWV, whereas a rising pattern (higher sleep than wake values) was observed for brachial PP, aortic PP, and AI. The factors independently associated with the less sleep dipping in PPamp were older age, lower height, the use of antihypertensive medication, and sleep decrease in arterial stiffness (PWV), whereas female gender, the presence of hypertension, sleep increase of pressure wave reflections (AI), sleep decrease in heart rate, and mean BP were associated with a greater sleep-dipping in PPamp. These data provide further pathophysiological understanding of the mechanisms leading to PPamp dipping. Several implications regarding the clinical use of the aortic and brachial BP, especially during sleep time, are raised that should be addressed in future research. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ion dip spectroscopy of cold molecules and ions. Progress report and renewal proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessel, J.

    1987-08-13

    A research program is underway with the objective of developing techniques of high resolution multiphoton spectroscopy for selective, ultrasensitive molecular detection. Methods under study include various forms of ion dip spectroscopy and new methods of ion fragmentation spectroscopy. The studies are providing a new understanding of the fundamental spectroscopy and photophysics of large molecular ions. Dimer and cluster ions of polynuclear aromatics and related species are also being investigated, with potential detection applications.

  8. Performance of Doubly-Fed Wind Power Generators During Voltage Dips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aparicio, N.; Chen, Zhe; Beltran, H.

    The growing of wind generation in Spain has forced its Transmission System Operator (TSO) to release new requirements that establish the amount of reactive power that a wind turbine has to supply to the grid during a voltage dip. Wind turbines equipped with doubly-fed induction generators (DFIG) ...... acting as STATCOM helps to improve the voltage profile sufficiently to permit rotor-side converter reconnection....

  9. ?Non-dipping? is equally frequent in narcoleptic patients and in patients with insomnia

    OpenAIRE

    Sieminski, Mariusz; Partinen, Markku

    2015-01-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC) is a neurological sleep disorder characterized by very low or undetectable concentration of hypocretin-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid. It has been recently found that patients with NC have disturbed circadian pattern of blood pressure, with more frequent non-dipping, compared to healthy controls. It has been hypothesized that lack of hypocretin may lead to increase in nocturnal blood pressure. This increase may result also from disturbed sleep architecture regardl...

  10. Numerical modeling of the productivity of vertical to shallowly dipping fractured zones in crystalline rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leray, S.; de Dreuzy, J.-R.; Bour, O.; Bresciani, E.

    2013-02-01

    SummaryGroundwater resources in crystalline rock are typically associated with the weathered zone and regional sub-vertical faults that are well connected to the surface. However, some sub-horizontal and shallowly dipping fractured zones can also be highly-productive aquifers. In this paper, numerical simulations of a conceptual hydrogeological model show that the flow to such strongly transmissive fractured zones is controlled by their transmissivity or by their deepening structure. While leakage through the overlying rock units is generally the limiting factor, recharge always occurs at least close to the outcrop of the fractured zone where the overlying rock is thinner and guarantees the availability of some groundwater. At small dip angles, recharge extends spatially and the flow within the fractured zone may even become the limiting factor when the hydraulic conductivity of the overlying rock is not less than two orders of magnitude smaller than the fractured zone transmissivity. This is precisely the case of the Plœmeur aquifer (Brittany, France) located in a crystalline rock geologic setting, where groundwater in a shallowly dipping fractured zone is used as the source of water supply for a nearby city of 20,000 people. Simulation results show that the fractured zones may represent potential aquifers under a large variety of hydrogeological conditions. Aquifers in shallowly dipping structures differ strongly from those located in regional sub-vertical fault zones in terms of flow patterns, and thus supposedly in terms of management of the groundwater resource. They are more local than regional in scale, and consequently do not require regional fracture connectivity. The leakage through the overlying rock unit enhances water quality. Finally, we argue that the potential widespread occurrence of these alternative and possibly less accessible resources should promote the development of appropriate identification methods.

  11. Electrochemical behaviour of silica basic hybrid coatings deposited on stainless steel by dipping and EPD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Y.; Duran, A.; Damborenea, J.J.; Conde, A.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work is the characterisation of the corrosion behaviour of stainless steel (AISI 304) substrates coated by dipping and electrophoretic deposition (EPD) from a sol-gel basic sol. Particulate silica sols (labelled NaSi) were prepared by basic catalysis from ethyltriethoxysilane (TEOS), methyltriethoxysilane (MTES) and sodium hydroxide. Coatings between 2 and 10 μm were prepared by using concentrated and diluted sols by dipping and EPD process and the corrosion behaviour of the coated substrates were studied through potentiodynamic and impedance spectroscopy measurements (EIS). Potentiodynamic studies of coatings produced by dipping reveal a strong dependence of the protective properties with the concentration of the sol. This behaviour was confirmed by EIS showing that only the coatings obtained from concentrated sol present enough protective properties. On the contrary, EPD coatings prepared from diluted NaSi sol showed an excellent corrosion resistance, maintaining a pure capacitive behaviour for long periods of immersion. EPD deposition is thus proposed as a good alternative method for obtaining thicker and denser coatings with good protective properties from dilute and stable sols

  12. Influence of hot water dip and gamma irradiation on postharvest fungal decay of Galia melons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkai-Golan, R.; Padova, R.; Ross, I.; Lapidot, M.; Copel, A.; Davidson, H.

    1993-01-01

    Dipping Galia melons in hot water at 52 deg C for 5 min or at 55 deg for 2 min resulted in 12-15% decay (caused by Alternaria alternata, Fusarium spp. and Trichothecium roseum) during prolonged storage (12 d at 6 deg plus 3 d at 18 deg ) compared with 75% decay in untreated fruit or 60% decay in cold-water-dipped fruit. Irradiation at 0.5 or 1 kGy had no significant effect on decay development. However, combination of heat treatment with a 0.5 kGy dose prevented fungal growth, resulting in 5% decay during storage. Combinations of heating with 1 kGy irradiation gave no improvement in anti-fungal effect over treatment with 0.5 kGy and sometimes resulted in a decreased suppressive effect. Reducing the duration of dipping at 55 deg from 2 to 0.5 min, applied alone or in combination with irradiation, considerably reduced the anti-fungal effect of the treatment. The effective combined treatment resulted in 12-15% of slight peel damage, but all the fruits were regarded as marketable. No differences in fruit firmness were recorded among the treatments

  13. Impact of the Converter Control Strategies on the Drive Train of Wind Turbine during Voltage Dips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenglin Miao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The impact of converter control strategies on the drive train of wind turbines during voltage dips is investigated in this paper using a full electromechanical model. Aerodynamics and tower vibration are taken into consideration by means of a simulation program, named FAST. Detailed gearbox and electrical subsystems are represented in MATLAB. The dynamic response of electromagnetic torque and its impact on the mechanical variables are the concern in this paper and the response of electrical variables is less discussed. From the mechanical aspects, the effect of rising power recovery speed and unsymmetrical voltage dips are analyzed on the basis of the dynamic response of the high-speed shaft (HSS. A comparison of the impact on the drive train is made for two converter control strategies during small voltage dips. Through the analysis of torque, speed and tower vibration, the results indicate that both power recovery speed and the sudden torque sag have a significant impact on drive trains, and the effects depend on the different control strategies. Moreover, resonance might be excited on the drive train by an unbalanced voltage.

  14. Effect of soil properties on arsenic fractionation and bioaccessibility in cattle and sheep dipping vat sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, D; Makris, K C; Parra-Noonan, M T; Datta, R

    2007-02-01

    Historical use of high arsenic (As) concentrations in cattle/sheep dipping vat sites to treat ticks has resulted in severe contamination of soil and groundwater with this Group-A human carcinogen. In the absence of a universally applicable soil As bioaccessibility model, baseline risk assessment studies have traditionally used the extremely conservative estimate of 100% soil As bioaccessibility. Several in-vitro, as well as, in-vivo animal studies suggest that As bioaccessibility in soil can be lower than that in water. Arsenic in soils exists in several geochemical forms with varying degree of dissolution in the human digestive system, and thus, with highly varying As bioaccessibility. Earlier batch incubation studies with As-spiked soils have shown that As bioaccessibility is a function of soil physicochemical properties. We selected 12 dipping vat soils collected from USA and Australia to test the hypothesis that soil properties exert a significant effect on As bioaccessibility in As-contaminated sites. The 12 soils varied widely in terms of soil physico-chemical properties. They were subject to an As sequential fractionation scheme and two in-vitro tests (IVGS and IVGIA) to simulate soil As bioavailability in the human gastrointestinal system. Sequential As fractionation results showed that the majority of the As measured in the dipping vat soils resided either in the Fe/Al hydroxide fraction, or the Ca/Mg fractions, or in the residual fraction. Water-extractable As fraction of the 12 soils was typically vat site soils.

  15. Environmental impact assessment for steeply dipping coal beds: North Knobs site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-11-08

    The US Department of Energy is funding an underground coal gasification (UCG) project in steeply dipping coal beds (SDB), at North Knobs, about 8 miles west of Rawlins, Carbon County, Wyoming. The project is being conducted to determine the technical, economic and environmental viability of such a technology. The development of SDB is an interesting target for UCG since such beds contain coals not normally mineable economically by ordinary techniques. Although the underground gasification of SDB has not been attempted in the US, Soviet experience and theoretical work indicate that the gasification of SDB in place offers all the advantages of underground gasification of horizontal coal seams plus some unique characteristics. The steep angle of dip helps to channel the produced gases up dip to offtake holes and permits the ash and rubble to fall away from the reaction zone helping to mitigate the blocking of the reaction zone in swelling coals. The intersection of SDB with the surface makes the seam accessible for drilling and other preparation. The tests at the North Knobs site will consist of three tests, lasting 20, 80 and 80 days, respectively. A total of 9590 tons of coal is expected to be gasified, with surface facilities utilizing 15 acres of the total section of land. The environmental effects of the experiment are expected to be very small. The key environmental impact is potential groundwater contamination by reaction products from coal gasification. There is good evidence that the surrounding coal effectively blocks the migration of these contaminants.

  16. Viscous dipping, application to the capture of fluids in living organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechantre, Amandine; Michez, Denis; Damman, Pascal

    Some insects, birds and mammals use flower nectar as their energy resources. For this purpose, they developed specific skills to ingest viscous fluids. Depending on the sugar content, i.e., the viscosity, different strategies are observed in vivo. Indeed, butterflies use simple suction for low viscosity nectars; hummingbirds have a tongue made from two thin flexible sheets that bend to form a tube when immersed in a fluid; other animals exhibit in contrast complex papillary structures. We focus on this last method generally used for very viscous nectars. More specifically, bees and bats possess a tongue decorated with microstructures that, according to biologists, would be optimized for fluid capture by viscous dipping. In this talk, we will discuss this assumption by comparing physical models of viscous dipping to in vivo measurements. To mimic the tongue morphology, we used various rod shapes obtained by 3D printing. The influence of the type and size of lateral microstructures was then investigated and used to build a global framework describing viscous dipping for structured rods/tongues.

  17. The Association of Pediatric Obesity With Nocturnal Non-Dipping on 24-Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macumber, Ian R; Weiss, Noel S; Halbach, Susan M; Hanevold, Coral D; Flynn, Joseph T

    2016-05-01

    Obesity has been linked with abnormal nocturnal dipping of blood pressure (BP) in adults, which in turn is associated with poor cardiovascular outcomes. There are few data regarding abnormal dipping status in the obese pediatric population. The goal of this study was to further describe the relationship between obesity and non-dipping status on ambulatory blood pressure monitor (ABPM) in children. We conducted a cross-sectional study using a database of patients aged 5-21 years who had undergone 24-hour ABPM at Seattle Children's Hospital from January 2008 through May 2014. Subjects were grouped by body mass index (BMI) into lean (BMI 15th-85th percentile) and obese (BMI >95th percentile) groups. Compared to lean subjects (n = 161), obese subjects (n = 247) had a prevalence ratio (PR) for non-dipping of 2.15, adjusted for race (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.25-3.42). Increasing severity of obesity was not further associated with nocturnal non-dipping. Nocturnal non-dipping was not associated with left ventricular hypertrophy (PR = 1.01, 95% CI = 0.71-1.44). These results suggest that in children, just as in adults, obesity is related to a relatively decreased dipping in nocturnal BP. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2015. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Ethnic differences in the effects of the DASH diet on nocturnal blood pressure dipping in individuals with high blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Aric A; Blumenthal, James A; Hinderliter, Alan L; Sherwood, Andrew

    2011-12-01

    Ethnic differences in nocturnal blood pressure (BP) dipping may contribute to the increased risk for adverse cardiovascular events noted in African Americans (AAs). The DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet has been shown to be efficacious in lowering clinic and ambulatory BP; however, the effect of the DASH diet on BP dipping is unclear. One hundred and eighteen men and women with high clinic BP (systolic BP (SBP) 130-159; diastolic BP 85-99) and above ideal body weight were randomized to a DASH diet intervention or to a usual diet control (UC) condition. Measures of 24-h ambulatory BP were obtained at baseline and at the end of the 4-month intervention period. At baseline, AAs (n = 43) displayed blunted nocturnal SBP dipping compared to Caucasians (CAs; n = 75) and were more likely to be categorized as nondippers (DASH diet intervention showed a significant improvement in SBP dipping postintervention compared to AAs in the UC condition (P = 0.04), whereas there was no appreciable change in SBP dipping in CAs (P = 0.72). Following the intervention, ethnic differences in SBP dipping were no longer statistically significant (nondipper status: AAs: 44% vs. CAs: 32%; P = 0.19). Our study provides preliminary evidence suggesting that in overweight men and women with high BP, AAs may be especially likely to benefit from augmented SBP dipping associated with consumption of the DASH diet.

  19. 40 CFR 428.100 - Applicability; description of the latex-dipped, latex-extruded, and latex-molded rubber subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... latex-dipped, latex-extruded, and latex-molded rubber subcategory. 428.100 Section 428.100 Protection of... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Latex-Dipped, Latex-Extruded, and Latex-Molded Rubber Subcategory § 428.100 Applicability; description of the latex-dipped, latex-extruded, and latex-molded rubber subcategory. The...

  20. Design and evaluation of a heat exchanger that uses paraffin wax and recycled materials as solar energy accumulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, Alejandro; Negrete, Daniela; Mahn, Andrea; Sepúlveda, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal conductivity of paraffin wax was improved with aluminum wool. • Aluminum wool surrounding the cans favored the energy recuperation from the wax. • The heat exchanger accumulated 3000 kJ energy. • The accumulated energy can be easily increased with larger units. • COMSOL simulated adequately the energy removal process from the cans. - Abstract: Soft drink cans filled with paraffin wax mixed with 5% w/w aluminum wool, obtained from disposable cans, doubled the thermal conductivity of cans filled only with paraffin wax. Thermal conductivity of the systems was determined by two ways: directly using a thermal conductivimeter, and indirectly based on temperature profiles and on the analytical solution of a cylinder. We designed, built and evaluated a heat exchanger for solar energy accumulation, composed by 48 disposable soft drink cans filled with a total of 9.5 kg of paraffin wax mixed with 5% w/w aluminum wool. In sunny days, the wax melted completely in 3 h. The accumulated energy of 3000 kJ, allowed increasing the temperature of 3.5 m 3 /h air flow rate from 20 to 40 °C during a period of 2 h. This application will allow extending the use of solar energy in drying processes or could be used as household calefaction system. The progress of the phase change front in time during the energy discharge period was simulated with COMSOL, whereas the effect of the number of cans and thermal conductivity of the paraffin wax on the air temperature increase was simulated with MATLAB

  1. Hair growth promoting effect of white wax and policosanol from white wax on the mouse model of testosterone-induced hair loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhan-di; Feng, Ying; Ma, Li-Yi; Li, Xian; Ding, Wei-Feng; Chen, Xiao-Ming

    2017-05-01

    White wax (WW) has been traditionally used to treat hair loss in China. However there has been no reporter WW and its extract responsible for hair growth-promoting effect on androgenetic alopecia. In this paper, we examined the hair growth-promoting effects of WW and policosanol of white wax (WWP) on model animal of androgenetic alopecia and the potential target cell of WW and WWP. WW (1, 10 and 20%) and WWP (0.5, 1 and 2%) were applied topically to the backs of mice. Finasteride (2%) was applied topically as a positive control. MTS assays were performed to evaluate cell proliferation in culture human follicle dermal papilla cells (HFDPCs). The inhibition of WW and WWP for 5α- reductase were tested in Vitro. Results showed more lost hairs were clearly seen in mice treated with TP only and TP plus vehicle. Mice which received TP plus WW and WWP showed less hair loss. WW and WWP showed an outstanding hair growth-promoting activity as reflected by the follicular length, follicular density, A/T ratio, and hair bulb diameter. The optimal treatment effect was observed at 10% WW and 1% WWP, which were better than 2% finasteride treatment. MTS assay results suggested that WW and WWP remarkably increased the proliferation of HFDPCs. Inhibitor assay of 5α- reductase showed that WW and WWP inhibited significantly the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotesterone, and the IC 50 values of WW and WWP were higher than that of finasteride. In Conclusion, WW and WWP could act against testosterone-induced alopecia in mice, and they promoted hair growth by inhibiting 5α-reductase activity and HFDPCs proliferation. DPCs is the target cell of WW and WWP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of stratigraphic dip on brine inflow and gas migration at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, S.W.; Larson, K.W.

    1996-02-01

    The natural dip of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), although regionally only about 111, has the potential to affect brine inflow and gas-migration distances due to buoyancy forces. Current models, including those in WIPP Performance Assessment calculations, assume a perfectly horizontal repository and stratigraphy. With the addition of buoyancy forces due to the dip, brine and gas flow patterns can be affected. Brine inflow may increase due to countercurrent flow, and gas may preferentially migrate up dip. This scoping study has used analytical and numerical modeling to evaluate the impact of the dip on brine inflow and gas-migration distances at the WIPP in one, two, and three dimensions. Sensitivities to interbed permeabilities, two-phase curves, gas-generation rates, and interbed fracturing were studied

  3. Ultrastructure of Wax-Producing Structures on the Integument of the Melaleuca Psyllid Boreioglycaspis melaleucae (Hemiptera: Psyllidae, with Honeydew Excretion Behavior in Males and Females.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Desouky Ammar

    Full Text Available The melaleuca psyllid, Boreioglycaspis melaleucae (Hemiptera: Psyllidae, was introduced to Florida as a biological control agent against Melaleuca quinquenervia, an invasive evergreen tree that has invaded large areas of Florida Everglades. Colonies of B. melaleucae nymphs are normally covered by white waxy secretions, and nymphs of various instars produce long bundles of white waxy filaments extending laterally and posteriorly from their abdomen. Scanning electron microscopy of 'naturally waxed' and 'dewaxed' nymphs (cleaned from wax revealed two types of wax pore plates located dorsally and laterally on the integument of posterior abdominal segments starting with the 4th segment. Type-1 wax pore plates, with raised rim, peripheral groove, slits and pits, produce long ribbons and filaments of waxy secretions that are wound together forming long wax bundles, whereas type-2 wax pore plates, with slits only, produce shorter wax curls. Additionally, in both nymphs and adult females, the circumanal ring contained ornate rows of wax pores that produce wax filaments covering their honeydew excretions. Video recordings with stereomicroscopy showed that adult females produce whitish honeydew balls, powerfully propelled away from their body, probably to get these sticky excretions away from their eggs and newly hatched nymphs. Adult males, however, produce clear droplets of honeydew immediately behind them, simply by bending the posterior end of the abdomen downward. The possible role(s of waxy secretions by nymphs and adults of B. melaleucae in reducing contamination of their colonies with honeydew, among other possibilities, are discussed.

  4. With the best intentions. Wax-resin lining of Danish Golden Age paintings (early 19th century) on canvas and changed response to RH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Cecil K.; Mecklenburg, Marion F.; Scharff, Mikkel

    2014-01-01

    Wax-resin lining treatments in the 20th century were chosen specifically for many of the 19th century Danish Golden Age paintings on canvas to counteract their suspected response to moisture. This is a study of the response of painting samples and mock-ups to changing relative humidity (RH) before...... and after wax-resin lining using tests of uniaxially restrained samples in cycled RH. Contrary to the usual assumptions, both new wax-resin lined samples and a 47-year-old lining showed markedly increased force levels at high levels of RH, suggesting that the effects of wax-resin linings have not been fully...

  5. Evaluating the effects of post dip-treatment laser marking on resistance to feeding by subterranean termites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachel A. Arango; Bessie Woodward; Stan Lebow

    2016-01-01

    Dip-treatment of wood packing materials is often used instead of pressure treatment mainly because of issues relating to simplicity and cost. Packaging boxes fabricated for the United States Army are required to be dip-treated for at least one minute in an approved preservative solution prior to use. These boxes are expected to have a service life of up to 20 years in...

  6. 2-D deformation of two welded half-spaces due to a blind dip-slip fault

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The solution of two-dimensional problem of an interface breaking long inclined dip-slip fault in two welded half-spaces is well known.The purpose of this note is to obtain the corresponding solution for a blind fault.The solution is valid for arbitrary values of the fault-depth and the dip angle.Graphs showing the variation of the ...

  7. Controlling Listeria monocytogenes Scott A on Surfaces of Fully Cooked Turkey Deli Product Using Organic Acid-Containing Marinades as Postlethality Dips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casco, Gerardo; Johnson, Jennifer L; Taylor, T Matthew; Gaytán, Carlos N; Brashears, Mindy M; Alvarado, Christine Z

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of organic acids applied singly or in combination as postlethality dips to sliced uncured turkey deli loaves to inhibit the growth of Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) Scott A. Treatments consisted of sodium lactate (SL; 3.6%), potassium lactate (PL; 3.6%), sodium citrate (SC; 0.75%), a combination of SL and sodium diacetate (SDA; 0.25%), and a combination of SL/PL/SDA, alongside appropriate negative and positive controls. Products were inoculated with 10(4)-10(5) CFU/mL streptomycin-resistant (1500 μg/mL) Lm Scott A prior to treatment. Products were then stored at ~4°C and sampled at 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, 42, and 56 d. The SL/SDA combination applied to turkey slices extended the lag phase through 21 days of refrigerated storage. Numbers of Lm Scott A rose by 0.7 log10 CFU/g through the 56 d storage period. The application of the SL/PL/SDA treatment to turkey product surfaces extended the lag phase through 42 d, with pathogen numbers declining after 21 d. Combination organic acid dips prolonged the lag phase for 2 to 6 wk on turkey product surfaces and can be useful as antimicrobial agents for Lm control on postlethality exposed sliced deli products.

  8. Growth and characterization of magnetite-maghemite thin films by the dip coating method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velásquez, A. A., E-mail: avelas26@eafit.edu.edu.co; Arnedo, A. [Universidad EAFIT, Grupo de Electromagnetismo Aplicado (Colombia)

    2017-11-15

    We present the process of growth and characterization of magnetite-maghemite thin films obtained by the dip coating method. The thin films were deposited on glass substrates, using a ferrofluid of nanostructured magnetite-maghemite particles as precursor solution. During the growth of the films the following parameters were controlled: number of dips of the substrates, dip velocity of the substrates and drying times. The films were characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy, Scanning Elelectron Microscopy, four-point method for resistance measurement, Room Temperature Mössbauer Spectroscopy and Hall effect. Mössbauer measurements showed the presence of a sextet attributed to maghemite (γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and two doublets attributed to superparamagnetic magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}), indicating a distribution of oxidation states of the iron as well as a particle size distribution of the magnetic phases in the films. Atomic force microscopy measurements showed that the films cover quasi uniformly the substrates, existing in them some pores with sub-micron size. Scanning Electron Microscopy measurements showed a uniform structure in the films, with spherical particles with size around 10 nm. Voltage versus current measurements showed an ohmic response of the films for currents between 0 and 100 nA. On the other hand, Hall effect measurements showed a nonlinear response of the Hall voltage with the magnetic flux density applied perpendicular to the plane of the films, however the response is fairly linear for magnetic flux densities between 0.15 and 0.35 T approximately. The results suggest that the films are promising for application as magnetic flux density sensors.

  9. Morphology control in thin films of PS:PLA homopolymer blends by dip-coating deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vital, Alexane [Interfaces, Confinement, Matériaux et Nanostructures (ICMN), CNRS-Université d’Orléans, UMR 7374, 1B Rue de la Férollerie, C.S. 40059, 45071 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Groupe de recherches sur l’énergétique des milieux ionisés (GREMI), CNRS-Université d’Orléans, UMR 7344, 14 rue d' Issoudun, B.P. 6744, F45067 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Vayer, Marylène [Interfaces, Confinement, Matériaux et Nanostructures (ICMN), CNRS-Université d’Orléans, UMR 7374, 1B Rue de la Férollerie, C.S. 40059, 45071 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Tillocher, Thomas; Dussart, Rémi [Groupe de recherches sur l’énergétique des milieux ionisés (GREMI), CNRS-Université d’Orléans, UMR 7344, 14 rue d' Issoudun, B.P. 6744, F45067 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Boufnichel, Mohamed [STMicroelectronics, 16, rue Pierre et Marie Curie, B.P. 7155, 37071 Tours Cedex 2 (France); and others

    2017-01-30

    Highlights: • A process to control the morphology of polymer blends thin film is described. • It is based on the use of dip-coating at various withdrawal speeds. • The process is examined within the capillary and the draining regimes. • The final dried morphology is controlled by the regime of deposition. • This study is of high interest for the preparation of advanced functional surfaces. - Abstract: In this work, smooth polymer films of PS, PLA and their blends, with thicknesses ranging from 20 nm up to 400 nm and very few defects on the surface were obtained by dip-coating. In contrast to the process of spin-coating which is conventionally used to prepare thin films of polymer blends, we showed that depending on the deposition parameters (withdrawal speed and geometry of the reservoir), various morphologies such as layered films and laterally phase-separated domains could be formed for a given blend/solvent pair, offering much more opportunities compared to the spin-coating process. This diversity of morphologies was explained by considering the superposition of different phenomena such as phase separation process, dewetting and vitrification in which parameters such as the drying time, the compatibility of the polymer/solvent pairs and the affinity of the polymer towards the interfaces were suspected to play a significant role. For that purpose, the process of dip-coating was examined within the capillary and the draining regimes (for low and high withdrawal speed respectively) in order to get a full description of the thickness variation and evaporation rate as a function of the deposition parameters.

  10. Morphology control in thin films of PS:PLA homopolymer blends by dip-coating deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vital, Alexane; Vayer, Marylène; Tillocher, Thomas; Dussart, Rémi; Boufnichel, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A process to control the morphology of polymer blends thin film is described. • It is based on the use of dip-coating at various withdrawal speeds. • The process is examined within the capillary and the draining regimes. • The final dried morphology is controlled by the regime of deposition. • This study is of high interest for the preparation of advanced functional surfaces. - Abstract: In this work, smooth polymer films of PS, PLA and their blends, with thicknesses ranging from 20 nm up to 400 nm and very few defects on the surface were obtained by dip-coating. In contrast to the process of spin-coating which is conventionally used to prepare thin films of polymer blends, we showed that depending on the deposition parameters (withdrawal speed and geometry of the reservoir), various morphologies such as layered films and laterally phase-separated domains could be formed for a given blend/solvent pair, offering much more opportunities compared to the spin-coating process. This diversity of morphologies was explained by considering the superposition of different phenomena such as phase separation process, dewetting and vitrification in which parameters such as the drying time, the compatibility of the polymer/solvent pairs and the affinity of the polymer towards the interfaces were suspected to play a significant role. For that purpose, the process of dip-coating was examined within the capillary and the draining regimes (for low and high withdrawal speed respectively) in order to get a full description of the thickness variation and evaporation rate as a function of the deposition parameters.

  11. Assessment of Optimum Value for Dip Angle and Locking Rate Parameters in Makran Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, A.; Abolghasem, A. M.; Abedini, N.; Mousavi, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Makran subduction zone is one of the convergent areas that have been studied by spatial geodesy. Makran zone is located in the South Eastern of Iran and South of Pakistan forming the part of Eurasian-Arabian plate's border where oceanic crust in the Arabian plate (or in Oman Sea) subducts under the Eurasian plate ( Farhoudi and Karig, 1977). Due to lack of historical and modern tools in the area, a sampling of sparse measurements of the permanent GPS stations and temporary stations (campaign) has been conducted in the past decade. Makran subduction zone from different perspectives has unusual behaviour: For example, the Eastern and Western parts of the region have very different seismicity and also dip angle of subducted plate is in about 2 to 8 degrees that this value due to the dip angle in other subduction zone is very low. In this study, we want to find the best possible value for parameters that differs Makran subduction zone from other subduction zones. Rigid block modelling method was used to determine these parameters. From the velocity vectors calculated from GPS observations in this area, block model is formed. These observations are obtained from GPS stations that a number of them are located in South Eastern Iran and South Western Pakistan and a station located in North Eastern Oman. According to previous studies in which the locking depth of Makran subduction zone is 38km (Frohling, 2016), in the preparation of this model, parameter value of at least 38 km is considered. With this function, the amount of 2 degree value is the best value for dip angle but for the locking rate there is not any specified amount. Because the proposed model is not sensitive to this parameter. So we can not expect big earthquakes in West of Makran or a low seismicity activity in there but the proposed model definitely shows the Makran subduction layer is locked.

  12. Rupture Dynamics along Thrust Dipping Fault: Inertia Effects due to Free Surface Wave Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilotte, J. P.; Scala, A.; Festa, G.

    2017-12-01

    We numerically investigate the dynamic interaction between free surface and up-dip, in-plane rupture propagation along thrust faults, under linear slip-weakening friction. With reference to shallow along-dip rupture propagation during large subduction earthquakes, we consider here low dip-angle fault configurations with fixed strength excess and depth-increasing initial stress. In this configuration, the rupture undergoes a break of symmetry with slip-induced normal stress perturbations triggered by the interaction with reflected waves from the free surface. We found that both body-waves - behind the crack front - and surface waves - at the crack front - can trigger inertial effects. When waves interact with the rupture before this latter reaches its asymptotic speed, the rupture can accelerate toward the asymptotic speed faster than in the unbounded symmetric case, as a result of these inertial effects. Moreover, wave interaction at the crack front also affects the slip rate generating large ground motion on the hanging wall. Imposing the same initial normal stress, frictional strength and stress drop while varying the static friction coefficient we found that the break of symmetry makes the rupture dynamics dependent on the absolute value of friction. The higher the friction the stronger the inertial effect both in terms of rupture acceleration and slip amount. When the contact condition allows the fault interface to open close to the free surface, the length of the opening zone is shown to depend on the propagation length, the initial normal stress and the static friction coefficient. These new results are shown to agree with analytical results of rupture propagation in bounded media, and open new perspectives for understanding the shallow rupture of large subduction earthquakes and tsunami sources.

  13. Study on conditional probability of surface rupture: effect of fault dip and width of seismogenic layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, N.

    2017-12-01

    The conditional probability of surface ruptures is affected by various factors, such as shallow material properties, process of earthquakes, ground motions and so on. Toda (2013) pointed out difference of the conditional probability of strike and reverse fault by considering the fault dip and width of seismogenic layer. This study evaluated conditional probability of surface rupture based on following procedures. Fault geometry was determined from the randomly generated magnitude based on The Headquarters for Earthquake Research Promotion (2017) method. If the defined fault plane was not saturated in the assumed width of the seismogenic layer, the fault plane depth was randomly provided within the seismogenic layer. The logistic analysis was performed to two data sets: surface displacement calculated by dislocation methods (Wang et al., 2003) from the defined source fault, the depth of top of the defined source fault. The estimated conditional probability from surface displacement indicated higher probability of reverse faults than that of strike faults, and this result coincides to previous similar studies (i.e. Kagawa et al., 2004; Kataoka and Kusakabe, 2005). On the contrary, the probability estimated from the depth of the source fault indicated higher probability of thrust faults than that of strike and reverse faults, and this trend is similar to the conditional probability of PFDHA results (Youngs et al., 2003; Moss and Ross, 2011). The probability of combined simulated results of thrust and reverse also shows low probability. The worldwide compiled reverse fault data include low fault dip angle earthquake. On the other hand, in the case of Japanese reverse fault, there is possibility that the conditional probability of reverse faults with less low dip angle earthquake shows low probability and indicates similar probability of strike fault (i.e. Takao et al., 2013). In the future, numerical simulation by considering failure condition of surface by the source

  14. The molecular signatures of Taxodiaceae / Cupressaceae / Taxaceae (TCT) leaf waxes in modern and ancient samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, M.; Zinniker, D.; Green Nylen, N.; Moldowan, J. M.; Denisevich, P.

    2005-12-01

    Members of the Taxodiaceae/Cupressaceae/Taxaceae (TCT) complex of conifers originated sometime before the late Jurassic. Since that time the group has diverged to fill diverse ecological niches in desert, marsh, tundra, alpine, and coastal habitats and a variety of forest types. 175 species from 35 genera are now found across 6 continents. The aims of this research project are 1) to analyze and describe cuticular isoprenoid and acetogenic lipids from a diverse group of living members of the TCT complex and 2) to begin a search for these compounds and their diagenetic products in geological samples with known contributions from ancient TCT members. Hexane extracts of several hundred modern conifer specimens from more than 25 genera were studied in an attempt to find phylogenetic trends in the distribution and abundance of wax components. Diverse skeletal types of bicyclic, tricyclic, and tetracyclic diterpenes were found throughout the TCT complex. These compounds were found to have the highest absolute and relative abundance in several temperate rainforest and marsh endemics and the lowest relative abundance in desert adapted species. Large scale phylogenetic patterns in the distribution of individual diterpenes were not evident. Some species showed little intraspecific variation in diterpenes, while others showed considerable variability in diterpene products from one tree to another. The waxes of many members of the TCT complex are dominated by uniquely long-chain normal alkanes, with peak abundance at 33 and/or 35 carbons. This character is found within a phylogenetically distinct group of TCT -- including the genera Austrocedrus, Callitris, Calocedrus, Chamaecyparis, Cryptomeria, Cupressus, Diselma, Fitzroya, Juniperus, Libocedrus, Platycladus, Taxodium, Tetraclinis, Thuja, and Thujopsis -- and is seen in plants from extremely different habitats. We postulate that this group within the TCT complex shares a conserved very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) elongase

  15. Hydrogen isotope fractionation in leaf waxes in the Alaskan Arctic tundra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, William C.; Russell, James M.; Giblin, Anne E.; Welker, Jeffrey M.; Klein, Eric S.; Huang, Yongsong

    2017-09-01

    Leaf wax hydrogen isotopes (δDwax) are increasingly utilized in terrestrial paleoclimate research. Applications of this proxy must be grounded by studies of the modern controls on δDwax, including the ecophysiological controls on isotope fractionation at both the plant and landscape scales. Several calibration studies suggest a considerably smaller apparent fractionation between source water and waxes (εapp) at high latitudes relative to temperate or tropical locations, with major implications for paleoclimatic interpretations of sedimentary δDwax. Here we investigate apparent fractionation in the Arctic by tracing the isotopic composition of leaf waxes from production in modern plants to deposition in lake sediments using isotopic observations of precipitation, soil and plant waters, living leaf waxes, and waxes in sediment traps in the Brooks Range foothills of northern Alaska. We also analyze a lake surface sediment transect to compare present-day vegetation assemblages to εapp at the watershed scale. Source water and εapp were determined for live specimens of Eriophorum vaginatum (cottongrass) and Betula nana (dwarf birch), two dominant tundra plants in the Brooks Range foothills. The δD of these plants' xylem water closely tracks that of surface soil water, and reflects a summer-biased precipitation source. Leaf water is enriched by 23 ± 15‰ relative to xylem water for E. vaginatum and by 41 ± 19‰ for B. nana. Evapotranspiration modeling indicates that this leaf water enrichment is consistent with the evaporative enrichment expected under the climate conditions of northern Alaska, and that 24-h photosynthesis does not cause excessive leaf water isotope enrichment. The εapp determined for our study species average -89 ± 14‰ and -106 ± 16‰ for B. nana n-alkanes and n-acids, respectively, and -182 ± 10‰ and -154 ± 26‰ for E. vaginatum n-alkanes and n-acids, which are similar to the εapp of related species in temperate and tropical

  16. Epicuticular waxes from caatinga and cerrado species and their efficiency against water loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio F. M. Oliveira

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the contents and chemical composition of the foliar epicuticular waxes of species from the caatinga (Aspidosperma pyrifolium, Capparis yco, Maytenus rigida and Ziziphus joazeiro and cerrado (Aristolochia esperanzae, Didymopanax vinosum, Strychnos pseudoquina and Tocoyena formosa were evaluated as to the resistance to water loss by means of an experimental device constructed for this purpose. In general, the waxes of the caatinga species investigated were more efficient against water loss than cerrado species. Increase of the thickness of the waxy deposits from 40 to 90m g.cm-2 had no significant effect on the resistance to water loss. The chemistry of the wax constituents was shown to be an important factor to determine the degree of resistance to evaporation. n-Alkanes and alcoholic triterpenes were the most efficient barriers, while hentriacontan-16-one (a ketone and ursolic acid (an acid triterpene revealed lowefficiency. The higher efficiency of the waxes of the leaves from caatinga species (mainly those of C. yco and Z. joazeiro is probably accounted for the predominance of n-alkanes in their composition. The lower efficiency of the waxes of A. pyrifolium (caatinga, T. formosa and A. esperanzae (both species from the cerrado is probably a consequence of the predominance of triterpenoids in the waxes of the two former species and hentriacontan-16-one in the latter.A influência do teor e da composição química das ceras epicuticulares foliares de espécies da caatinga (Aspidosperma pyrifolium, Capparis yco, Maytenus rigida e Ziziphus joazeiro e do cerrado (Aristolochia esperanzae, Didymopanax vinosum, Strychnos pseudoquina e Tocoyena formosa foram avaliadas em relação à resistência à perda de água, através de um dispositivo experimental construído para essa finalidade. Em geral, as ceras das espécies da caatinga foram mais eficientes contra a perda de água que as das espécies do cerrado. O aumento da espessura dos

  17. Surfactant-free carnauba wax dispersion and its use for layer-by-layer assembled protective surface coatings on wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozhechnikova, Alina [Department of Forest Products Technology, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16300, FI-00076, Aalto (Finland); Bellanger, Hervé; Michen, Benjamin; Burgert, Ingo [Institute for Building Materials (IfB), Wood Materials Science, ETH Zürich, Stefano-Franscini-Platz 3, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Applied Wood Materials Laboratory, Empa − Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Testing and Research, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Österberg, Monika, E-mail: monika.osterberg@aalto.fi [Department of Forest Products Technology, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16300, FI-00076, Aalto (Finland)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • A facile sonication route to produce aqueous wax dispersions is developed. • The wax dispersion is naturally stable and free of surfactants or stabilizers. • Wax and ZnO particles are coated onto wood using layer-by-layer assembly. • The coating brings superhydrophobicity while preserving moisture buffering. • ZnO improves the color stability of wood to UV light. - Abstract: Protection from liquid water and UV radiation are equally important, and a sophisticated approach is needed when developing surface coatings that preserve the natural and well-appreciated aesthetic appearance of wood. In order to prevent degradation and prolong the service life of timber, a protective coating was assembled using carnauba wax particles and zinc oxide nanoparticles via layer-by-layer deposition in water. For this purpose, a facile sonication route was developed to produce aqueous wax dispersion without any surfactants or stabilizers. The suspension was stable above pH 4 due to the electrostatic repulsion between the negatively charged wax particles. The particle size could be controlled by the initial wax concentration with average particle sizes ranging from 260 to 360 nm for 1 and 10 g/L, respectively. The deposition of wax particles onto the surface of spruce wood introduced additional roughness to the wood surface at micron level, while zinc oxide provided nano roughness and UV-absorbing properties. In addition to making wood superhydrophobic, this novel multilayer coating enhanced the natural moisture buffering capability of spruce. Moreover, wood surfaces prepared in this fashion showed a significant reduction in color change after exposure to UV light. A degradation of the wax through photocatalytic activity of the ZnO particles was measured by FTIR, indicating that further studies are required to achieve long-term stability. Nevertheless, the developed coating showed a unique combination of superhydrophobicity and excellent moisture buffering

  18. Development of radiation sterilized dip slides for enumerating lactic acid bacteria and total count in foodstuffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, E.; Padova, R.; Kirsch, E.; Weissman, Sh.; Hirshfeld, T.; Shenfeld, A.

    APT agar (APT) used for enumeration of lactic acid bacteria and Plate Count agar (PCA) applied for total count were sterilized by gamma radiation using radiation dose of 10-15 kGy. Radiosterilized PCA and APT modified by adding catalase prior to irradiation, or APT with increased content of yeast extract performed, as well as, the heat sterilized commercial media. Growth performance was evaluated on several strains of microorganisms, as well as, by enumeration of bacteria in food products. Radiosterilization of culture media in final packaging, can be applied to produce dip slide kits containing PCA or APT.

  19. Development of radiation sterilized dip slides for enumerating lactic acid bacteria and total count in foodstuffs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenberg, E.; Padova, R.; Kirsch, E.; Weissman, Sh.; Hirshfeld, T.; Shenfeld, A.

    1988-01-01

    APT agar (APT) used for enumeration of lactic acid bacteria and Plate Count agar (PCA) applied for total count were sterilized by gamma radiation using radiation dose of 10-15 kGy. Radiosterilized PCA and APT modified by adding catalase prior to irradiation, or APT with increased content of yeast extract performed, as well as, the heat sterilized commercial media. Growth performance was evaluated on several strains of microorganisms, as well as, by enumeration of bacteria in food products. Radiosterilization of culture media in final packaging, can be applied to produce dip slide kits containing PCA or APT.

  20. Heat-pump performance: voltage dip/sag, under-voltage and over-voltage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J.B. Heffernan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Reverse cycle air-source heat-pumps are an increasingly significant load in New Zealand and in many other countries. This has raised concern over the impact wide-spread use of heat-pumps may have on the grid. The characteristics of the loads connected to the power system are changing because of heat-pumps. Their performance during under-voltage events such as voltage dips has the potential to compound the event and possibly cause voltage collapse. In this study, results from testing six heat-pumps are presented to assess their performance at various voltages and hence their impact on voltage stability.