WorldWideScience

Sample records for single trap induces

  1. Single-atom lasing induced atomic self-trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salzburger, T.; Ritsch, H.

    2004-01-01

    We study atomic center of mass motion and field dynamics of a single-atom laser consisting of a single incoherently pumped free atom moving in an optical high-Q resonator. For sufficient pumping, the system starts lasing whenever the atom is close to a field antinode. If the field mode eigenfrequency is larger than the atomic transition frequency, the generated laser light attracts the atom to the field antinode and cools its motion. Using quantum Monte Carlo wave function simulations, we investigate this coupled atom-field dynamics including photon recoil and cavity decay. In the regime of strong coupling, the generated field shows strong nonclassical features like photon antibunching, and the atom is spatially confined and cooled to sub-Doppler temperatures. (author)

  2. Intensity-gradient induced Sisyphus cooling of a single atom in a localized hollow-beam trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Yaling; Xia, Yong; Ren, Ruimin; Du, Xiangli; Yin, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    In order to realize a convenient and efficient laser cooling of a single atom, we propose a simple and promising scheme to cool a single neutral atom in a blue-detuned localized hollow-beam trap by intensity-gradient induced Sisyphus cooling, and study the dynamic process of the intensity-gradient cooling of a single 87 Rb atom in the localized hollow-beam trap by using Monte-Carlo simulations. Our study shows that a single 87 Rb atom with a temperature of 120 μK from a magneto-optical trap (MOT) can be directly cooled to a final temperature of 4.64 μK in our proposed scheme. We also investigate the dependences of the cooling results on the laser detuning δ of the localized hollow-beam, the power RP 0 of the re-pumping laser beam, the sizes of both the localized hollow-beam and the re-pumping beam, and find that there is a pair of optimal cooling parameters (δ and RP 0 ) for an expected lowest temperature, and the cooling results strongly depend on the size of the re-pumping beam, but weakly depend on the size of the localized hollow-beam. Finally, we further study the cooling potential of our localized hollow-beam trap for the initial temperature of a single atom, and find that a single 87 Rb atom with an initial temperature of higher than 1 mK can also be cooled directly to about 6.6 μK. (paper)

  3. Single-molecule dynamics in nanofabricated traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Adam

    2009-03-01

    The Anti-Brownian Electrokinetic trap (ABEL trap) provides a means to immobilize a single fluorescent molecule in solution, without surface attachment chemistry. The ABEL trap works by tracking the Brownian motion of a single molecule, and applying feedback electric fields to induce an electrokinetic motion that approximately cancels the Brownian motion. We present a new design for the ABEL trap that allows smaller molecules to be trapped and more information to be extracted from the dynamics of a single molecule than was previously possible. In particular, we present strategies for extracting dynamically fluctuating mobilities and diffusion coefficients, as a means to probe dynamic changes in molecular charge and shape. If one trapped molecule is good, many trapped molecules are better. An array of single molecules in solution, each immobilized without surface attachment chemistry, provides an ideal test-bed for single-molecule analyses of intramolecular dynamics and intermolecular interactions. We present a technology for creating such an array, using a fused silica plate with nanofabricated dimples and a removable cover for sealing single molecules within the dimples. With this device one can watch the shape fluctuations of single molecules of DNA or study cooperative interactions in weakly associating protein complexes.

  4. Atomization efficiency and photon yield in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of single nanoparticles in an optical trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Pablo; Fortes, Francisco J.; Laserna, J. Javier

    2017-04-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was employed for investigating the influence of particle size on the dissociation efficiency and the absolute production of photons per mass unit of airborne solid graphite spheres under single-particle regime. Particles of average diameter of 400 nm were probed and compared with 2 μm particles. Samples were first catapulted into aerosol form and then secluded in an optical trap set by a 532 nm laser. Trap stability was quantified before subjecting particles to LIBS analysis. Fine alignment of the different lines comprising the optical catapulting-optical trapping-laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument and tuning of excitation parameters conditioning the LIBS signal such as fluence and acquisition delay are described in detail with the ultimate goal of acquiring clear spectroscopic data on masses as low as 75 fg. The atomization efficiency and the photon yield increase as the particle size becomes smaller. Time-resolved plasma imaging studies were conducted to elucidate the mechanisms leading to particle disintegration and excitation.

  5. Characteristics of trapped electrons and electron traps in single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budzinski, E.E.; Potter, W.R.; Potienko, G.; Box, H.C.

    1979-01-01

    Two additional carbohydrates are reported whose crystal structures trap electrons intermolecularly in single crystals x irradiated at low temperature, namely sucrose and rhamnose. Five carbohydrate and polyhydroxy compounds are now known which exhibit this phenomenon. The following characteristics of the phenomenon were investigated: (1) the hyperfine couplings of the electron with protons of the polarized hydroxy groups forming the trap; (2) the distances between these protons and the trapped electron; (3) the spin density of the electron at the protons and (4) the relative stabilities of the electron trapped in various crystal structures

  6. Trap-induced photoconductivity in singlet fission pentacene diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Xianfeng, E-mail: qiaoxianfeng@hotmail.com; Zhao, Chen; Chen, Bingbing; Luan, Lin [WuHan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics and School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wu Han 430074 (China)

    2014-07-21

    This paper reports a trap-induced photoconductivity in ITO/pentacene/Al diodes by using current-voltage and magneto-conductance measurements. The comparison of photoconductivity between pentacene diodes with and without trap clearly shows that the traps play a critical role in generating photoconductivity. It shows that no observable photoconductivity is detected for trap-free pentacene diodes, while significant photoconductivity is observed in diodes with trap. This is because the initial photogenerated singlet excitons in pentacene can rapidly split into triplet excitons with higher binding energy prior to dissociating into free charge carriers. The generated triplet excitons react with trapped charges to release charge-carriers from traps, leading to a trap-induced photoconductivity in the single-layer pentacene diodes. Our studies elucidated the formation mechanisms of photoconductivity in pentacene diodes with extremely fast singlet fission rate.

  7. Laser induced fluorescence of trapped molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grieman, F.J.

    1979-10-01

    An experimental apparatus for obtaining the optical spectra of molecular ions is described. The experimental technique includes the use of three dimensional ion trapping, laser induced fluorescence, and gated photon counting methods. The ions, which are produced by electron impact, are confined in a radio-frequency quadrupole ion trap of cylindrical design. Because the quadrupole ion trap allows mass selection of the molecular ion desired for study, the analysis of the spectra obtained is greatly simplified. The ion trap also confines the ions to a region easily probed by a laser beam. 18 references

  8. Laser induced fluorescence of trapped molecular ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grieman, F.J.

    1979-10-01

    An experimental apparatus for obtaining the optical spectra of molecular ions is described. The experimental technique includes the use of three dimensional ion trapping, laser induced fluorescence, and gated photon counting methods. The ions, which are produced by electron impact, are confined in a radio-frequency quadrupole ion trap of cylindrical design. Because the quadrupole ion trap allows mass selection of the molecular ion desired for study, the analysis of the spectra obtained is greatly simplified. The ion trap also confines the ions to a region easily probed by a laser beam. 18 references.

  9. Analysis of a single-atom dipole trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Markus; Volz, Juergen; Saucke, Karen; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Weinfurter, Harald

    2006-01-01

    We describe a simple experimental technique which allows us to store a single 87 Rb atom in an optical dipole trap. Due to light-induced two-body collisions during the loading stage of the trap the maximum number of captured atoms is locked to one. This collisional blockade effect is confirmed by the observation of photon antibunching in the detected fluorescence light. The spectral properties of single photons emitted by the atom were studied with a narrow-band scanning cavity. We find that the atomic fluorescence spectrum is dominated by the spectral width of the exciting laser light field. In addition we observe a spectral broadening of the atomic fluorescence light due to the Doppler effect. This allows us to determine the mean kinetic energy of the trapped atom corresponding to a temperature of 105 μK. This simple single-atom trap is the key element for the generation of atom-photon entanglement required for future applications in quantum communication and a first loophole-free test of Bell's inequality

  10. Spectroscopy and nonclassical fluorescence properties of single trapped Ba+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolle, J.

    1998-06-01

    This thesis reports on the setup and application of an experimental apparatus for spectroscopic and quantum optical investigations of a single Barium ion in a Paul trap. The realization of the apparatus, which consists of the ion trap in ultra high vacuum, two laser systems, and a photon counting detection system, is described in detail, with particular consideration of the noise sources like stray light and laser frequency instabilities. The two lasers at 493 nm and 650 nm needed to continuously excite resonance fluorescence from the Barium ion have been realized using diode lasers only. The preparation of a single localized Barium ion is described, in particular its optical cooling with the laser light and the minimization of induced vibration in the trapping potential. The purely quantum mechanical property of antibunching is observed by measuring the intensity correlation function of resonance fluorescence from the trapped and cooled ion. Interference properties of the single ion resonance fluorescence are investigated with a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. From the measured high-contrast interference signal it is proven that each individual fluorescence photon interferes with itself. The fluorescence excitation spectrum, on varying one laser frequency, is also measured and exhibits dark resonances. These measurements are compared to calculations based on optical Bloch equations for the 8 atomic levels involved. Future experiments, in particular the detection of reduced quantum fluctuations (squeezing) in one quadrature component of the resonance fluorescence, are discussed. (author)

  11. Single qubit manipulation in a microfabricated surface electrode ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, Emily; Baek, So-Young; Blain, Matthew; Stick, Daniel; Gaultney, Daniel; Crain, Stephen; Noek, Rachel; Kim, Taehyun; Maunz, Peter; Kim, Jungsang

    2013-09-01

    We trap individual 171Yb+ ions in a surface trap microfabricated on a silicon substrate, and demonstrate a complete set of high fidelity single qubit operations for the hyperfine qubit. Trapping times exceeding 20 min without laser cooling, and heating rates as low as 0.8 quanta ms-1, indicate stable trapping conditions in these microtraps. A coherence time of more than 1 s, high fidelity qubit state detection and single qubit rotations are demonstrated. The observation of low heating rates and demonstration of high quality single qubit gates at room temperature are critical steps toward scalable quantum information processing in microfabricated surface traps.

  12. Single qubit manipulation in a microfabricated surface electrode ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mount, Emily; Baek, So-Young; Gaultney, Daniel; Crain, Stephen; Noek, Rachel; Kim, Taehyun; Maunz, Peter; Kim, Jungsang; Blain, Matthew; Stick, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    We trap individual 171 Yb + ions in a surface trap microfabricated on a silicon substrate, and demonstrate a complete set of high fidelity single qubit operations for the hyperfine qubit. Trapping times exceeding 20 min without laser cooling, and heating rates as low as 0.8 quanta ms −1 , indicate stable trapping conditions in these microtraps. A coherence time of more than 1 s, high fidelity qubit state detection and single qubit rotations are demonstrated. The observation of low heating rates and demonstration of high quality single qubit gates at room temperature are critical steps toward scalable quantum information processing in microfabricated surface traps. (paper)

  13. Characterization of photoactivated singlet oxygen damage in single-molecule optical trap experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Markita P; McCall, Patrick M; Qi, Zhi; Chemla, Yann R

    2009-10-21

    Optical traps or "tweezers" use high-power, near-infrared laser beams to manipulate and apply forces to biological systems, ranging from individual molecules to cells. Although previous studies have established that optical tweezers induce photodamage in live cells, the effects of trap irradiation have yet to be examined in vitro, at the single-molecule level. In this study, we investigate trap-induced damage in a simple system consisting of DNA molecules tethered between optically trapped polystyrene microspheres. We show that exposure to the trapping light affects the lifetime of the tethers, the efficiency with which they can be formed, and their structure. Moreover, we establish that these irreversible effects are caused by oxidative damage from singlet oxygen. This reactive state of molecular oxygen is generated locally by the optical traps in the presence of a sensitizer, which we identify as the trapped polystyrene microspheres. Trap-induced oxidative damage can be reduced greatly by working under anaerobic conditions, using additives that quench singlet oxygen, or trapping microspheres lacking the sensitizers necessary for singlet state photoexcitation. Our findings are relevant to a broad range of trap-based single-molecule experiments-the most common biological application of optical tweezers-and may guide the development of more robust experimental protocols.

  14. Parameter Screening in Microfluidics Based Hydrodynamic Single-Cell Trapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Deng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidic cell-based arraying technology is widely used in the field of single-cell analysis. However, among developed devices, there is a compromise between cellular loading efficiencies and trapped cell densities, which deserves further analysis and optimization. To address this issue, the cell trapping efficiency of a microfluidic device with two parallel micro channels interconnected with cellular trapping sites was studied in this paper. By regulating channel inlet and outlet status, the microfluidic trapping structure can mimic key functioning units of previously reported devices. Numerical simulations were used to model this cellular trapping structure, quantifying the effects of channel on/off status and trapping structure geometries on the cellular trapping efficiency. Furthermore, the microfluidic device was fabricated based on conventional microfabrication and the cellular trapping efficiency was quantified in experiments. Experimental results showed that, besides geometry parameters, cellular travelling velocities and sizes also affected the single-cell trapping efficiency. By fine tuning parameters, more than 95% of trapping sites were taken by individual cells. This study may lay foundation in further studies of single-cell positioning in microfluidics and push forward the study of single-cell analysis.

  15. Single florescent nanodiamond in a three dimensional ABEL trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayci, Metin; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional single particle trapping and manipulation is an outstanding challenge in various fields ranging from basic physics to life sciences. By monitoring the response of a trapped particle to a designed environment one can extract its characteristics. In addition, quantum dynamics of a spatially scanned well-known particle can provide environmental information. Precise tracking and positioning of such a particle in aqueous environment is crucial task for achieving nano-scale resolution. Here we experimentally demonstrate three dimensional ABEL trap operating at high frequency by employing a hybrid approach in particle tracking. The particle location in the transverse plane is detected via a scanning laser beam while the axial position is determined by defocused imaging. The scanning of the trapped particle is accomplished through a nano positioning stage integrated to the trap platform. PMID:26559890

  16. Single Ion Trapping for the Enriched Xenon Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldman, Samuel J.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2006-03-28

    In the last decade, a variety of neutrino oscillation experiments have established that there is a mass difference between neutrino flavors, without determining the absolute neutrino mass scale. The Enriched Xenon Observatory for neutrinoless double beta decay (EXO) will search for the rare decays of xenon to determine the absolute value of the neutrino mass. The experiment uses a novel technique to minimize backgrounds, identifying the decay daughter product in real time using single ion spectroscopy. Here, we describe single ion trapping and spectroscopy compatible with the EXO detector. We extend the technique of single ion trapping in ultrahigh vacuum to trapping in xenon gas. With this technique, EXO will achieve a neutrino mass sensitivity of {approx_equal} .010 eV.

  17. Trapped electrons in irradiated single crystals of polyhydroxy compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Box, H.C.; Budzinski, E.E.; Freund, H.G.; Potter, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    The intermolecular trapping of electrons has been observed in single crystals of dulcitol and L(+) arabinose x-irradiated at 4.2 0 K. Attribution of a major component of the ESR absorption to trapped electrons is based upon the character of the hyperfine pattern, which arises from multiple anisotropic hyperfine interactions with exchangeable protons, and on the g value of the absorption, which is always less than the free spin value. The removal of the trapped electron absorption upon irradiation with visible light has also been demonstrated. In these experiments all of the electrons are trapped in identical sites. This circumstance provides some important advantages in the study of the factors affecting the stabilization of charge in an environment of polarizable molecules

  18. Construction of a single atom trap for quantum information protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Margaret E.; Baker, Paul M.; Gauthier, Daniel J.; Duke Physics Department Team

    2016-05-01

    The field of quantum information science addresses outstanding problems such as achieving fundamentally secure communication and solving computationally hard problems. Great progress has been made in the field, particularly using photons coupled to ions and super conducting qubits. Neutral atoms are also interesting for these applications and though the technology for control of neutrals lags behind that of trapped ions, they offer some key advantages: primarily coupling to optical frequencies closer to the telecom band than trapped ions or superconducting qubits. Here we report progress on constructing a single atom trap for 87 Rb. This system is a promising platform for studying the technical problems facing neutral atom quantum computing. For example, most protocols destroy the trap when reading out the neutral atom's state; we will investigate an alternative non-destructive state detection scheme. We detail the experimental systems involved and the challenges addressed in trapping a single atom. All of our hardware components are off the shelf and relatively inexpensive. Unlike many other systems, we place a high numerical aperture lens inside our vacuum system to increase photon collection efficiency. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the ARO through Grant # W911NF1520047.

  19. Radiation induced leakage due to stochastic charge trapping in isolation layers of nanoscale MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebrev, G. I.; Gorbunov, M. S.; Pershenkov, V. S.

    2008-03-01

    The sensitivity of sub-100 nm devices to microdose effects, which can be considered as intermediate case between cumulative total dose and single event errors, is investigated. A detailed study of radiation-induced leakage due to stochastic charge trapping in irradiated planar and nonplanar devices is developed. The influence of High-K insulators on nanoscale ICs reliability is discussed. Low critical values of trapped charge demonstrate a high sensitivity to single event effect.

  20. New apparatus of single particle trap system for aerosol visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Hidenori; Fujioka, Tomomi; Endo, Tetsuo; Kitayama, Chiho; Seto, Takafumi; Otani, Yoshio

    2014-08-01

    Control of transport and deposition of charged aerosol particles is important in various manufacturing processes. Aerosol visualization is an effective method to directly observe light scattering signal from laser-irradiated single aerosol particle trapped in a visualization cell. New single particle trap system triggered by light scattering pulse signal was developed in this study. The performance of the device was evaluated experimentally. Experimental setup consisted of an aerosol generator, a differential mobility analyzer (DMA), an optical particle counter (OPC) and the single particle trap system. Polystylene latex standard (PSL) particles (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 μm) were generated and classified according to the charge by the DMA. Singly charged 0.5 and 1.0 μm particles and doubly charged 2.0 μm particles were used as test particles. The single particle trap system was composed of a light scattering signal detector and a visualization cell. When the particle passed through the detector, trigger signal with a given delay time sent to the solenoid valves upstream and downstream of the visualization cell for trapping the particle in the visualization cell. The motion of particle in the visualization cell was monitored by CCD camera and the gravitational settling velocity and the electrostatic migration velocity were measured from the video image. The aerodynamic diameter obtained from the settling velocity was in good agreement with Stokes diameter calculated from the electrostatic migration velocity for individual particles. It was also found that the aerodynamic diameter obtained from the settling velocity was a one-to-one function of the scattered light intensity of individual particles. The applicability of this system will be discussed.

  1. Observation of Spin Flips with a Single Trapped Proton

    CERN Document Server

    Ulmer, S.; Blaum, K.; Kracke, H.; Mooser, A.; Quint, W.; Walz, J.

    2011-01-01

    Spin transitions of an isolated trapped proton are observed for the first time. The spin quantum jumps are detected via the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect which is used in an experiment with a single proton stored in a cryogenic Penning trap. This opens the way for a direct high-precision measurement of the magnetic moment of the proton and a new test of the matter-antimatter symmetry in the baryon sector. This method can also be applied to other light atomic nuclei.

  2. Modeling of the effect of intentionally introduced traps on hole transport in single-crystal rubrene

    KAUST Repository

    Dacuñ a, Javier; Desai, Amit; Xie, Wei; Salleo, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Defects have been intentionally introduced in a rubrene single crystal by means of two different mechanisms: ultraviolet ozone (UVO) exposure and x-ray irradiation. A complete drift-diffusion model based on the mobility edge (ME) concept, which takes into account asymmetries and nonuniformities in the semiconductor, is used to estimate the energetic and spatial distribution of trap states. The trap distribution for pristine devices can be decomposed into two well defined regions: a shallow region ascribed to structural disorder and a deeper region ascribed to defects. UVO and x ray increase the hole trap concentration in the semiconductor with different energetic and spatial signatures. The former creates traps near the top surface in the 0.3-0.4 eV region, while the latter induces a wider distribution of traps extending from the band edge with a spatial distribution that peaks near the top and bottom interfaces. In addition to inducing hole trap states in the transport gap, both processes are shown to reduce the mobility with respect to a pristine crystal. © 2014 American Physical Society.

  3. Modeling of the effect of intentionally introduced traps on hole transport in single-crystal rubrene

    KAUST Repository

    Dacuña, Javier

    2014-06-05

    Defects have been intentionally introduced in a rubrene single crystal by means of two different mechanisms: ultraviolet ozone (UVO) exposure and x-ray irradiation. A complete drift-diffusion model based on the mobility edge (ME) concept, which takes into account asymmetries and nonuniformities in the semiconductor, is used to estimate the energetic and spatial distribution of trap states. The trap distribution for pristine devices can be decomposed into two well defined regions: a shallow region ascribed to structural disorder and a deeper region ascribed to defects. UVO and x ray increase the hole trap concentration in the semiconductor with different energetic and spatial signatures. The former creates traps near the top surface in the 0.3-0.4 eV region, while the latter induces a wider distribution of traps extending from the band edge with a spatial distribution that peaks near the top and bottom interfaces. In addition to inducing hole trap states in the transport gap, both processes are shown to reduce the mobility with respect to a pristine crystal. © 2014 American Physical Society.

  4. Evidence for shallow positron traps in a neutron-irradiated Al single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, P.J.; MacKenzie, I.K.; Lynn, K.G.; West, R.N.; Snead, C.L. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Variable energy positrons have been used to determine the dependence on temperature of positron diffusion out of a neutron-irradiated single crystal of Al. The results are interpreted in the context of a one-dimensional diffusion model which includes bulk annihilations as well as trapping at voids and other microstructural defects in the bulk material by way of a removal rate kappa/sub eff/ of freely diffusing positrons. The data show a strongly negative dependence on temperature below 125 0 K for kappa/sub eff/, indicating the presence of some additional phenomenon which we attribute to positron localization in shallow, presumably radiation-induced, traps in the crystal

  5. Cavity QED with single trapped Ca+-ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundt, A.B.

    2003-02-01

    This thesis reports on the design and setup of a vacuum apparatus allowing the investigation of cavity QED effects with single trapped 40 Ca + ions. The weak coupling of ion and cavity in the 'bad cavity limit' may serve to inter--convert stationary and flying qubits. The ion is confined in a miniaturized Paul trap and cooled via the Doppler effect to the Lamb--Dicke regime. The extent of the atomic wave function is less than 30 nm. The ion is enclosed by a high finesse optical cavity. The technically--involved apparatus allows movement of the trap relative to the cavity and the trapped ion can be placed at any position in the standing wave. By means of a transfer lock the cavity can be resonantly stabilized with the S 1/2 ↔ D 5/2 quadrupole transition at 729 nm (suitable as a qubit) without light at that wavelength being present in the cavity. The coupling of the cavity field to the S 1/2 ↔ D 5/2 quadrupole transition is investigated with various techniques in order to determine the spatial dependence as well as the temporal dynamics. The orthogonal coupling of carrier and first--order sideband transitions at field nodes and antinodes is explored. The coherent interaction of the ion and the cavity field is confirmed by exciting Rabi oscillations with short resonant pulses injected into the cavity. Finally, first experimental steps towards the observation of cavity enhanced spontaneous emission have been taken. (author)

  6. Characteristics of single-atom trapping in a magneto-optical trap with a high magnetic-field gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Seokchan; Choi, Youngwoon; Park, Sangbum; Ji, Wangxi; Lee, Jai-Hyung; An, Kyungwon

    2007-01-01

    A quantitative study on characteristics of a magneto-optical trap with a single or a few atoms is presented. A very small number of 85 Rb atoms were trapped in a micron-size magneto-optical trap with a high magnetic-field gradient. In order to find the optimum condition for a single-atom trap, we have investigated how the number of atoms and the size of atomic cloud change as various experimental parameters, such as a magnetic-field gradient and the trapping laser intensity and detuning. The averaged number of atoms was measured very accurately with a calibration procedure based on the single-atom saturation curve of resonance fluorescence. In addition, the number of atoms in a trap could be controlled by suppressing stochastic loading events by means of a real-time active feedback on the magnetic-field gradient

  7. Simplified atom trap using a single microwave modulated diode laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newbury, N.R.; Myatt, C.J.; Wieman, C.E.

    1993-01-01

    We have demonstrated microwave modulation of a diode laser which is operated with optical feedback from a diffraction grating. By directly modulating the diode laser current at frequencies up to 6.8 GHz, we observed 2-30% of the laser power in a single sideband for 20mW of microwave power. Using such a diode laser modulated at 6.6GHz, we have trapped 87 Rb in a vapor cell. With 10mW of microwave power, the number of trapped atoms was only 15% smaller than the number obtained using two lasers in the conventional manner. A microwave modulated diode laser should also be useful for driving stimulated Raman transitions between the hyperfine levels of Rb or Cs

  8. Inverse scaling trends for charge-trapping-induced degradation of FinFETs performance

    OpenAIRE

    Amoroso, Salvatore Maria; Georgiev, Vihar P.; Gerrer, Louis; Towie, Ewan; Wang, Xingsheng; Riddet, Craig; Brown, Andrew Robert; Asenov, Asen

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the impact of a single discrete charge trapped at the top oxide interface on the performance of scaled nMOS FinFET transistors. The charge-trapping-induced gate voltage shift is simulated as a function of the device scaling and for several regimes of conduction-from subthreshold to ON-state. Contrary to what is expected for planar MOSFETs, we show that the trap impact decreases with scaling down the FinFET size and the applied gate voltage. By comparing drift-dif...

  9. Photoacoustic measurements of photokinetics in single optically trapped aerosol droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covert, Paul; Cremer, Johannes; Signorell, Ruth; Thaler, Klemens; Haisch, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    It is well established that interaction of light with atmospheric aerosols has a large impact on the Earth's climate. However, uncertainties in the magnitude of this impact remain large, due in part to broad distributions of aerosol size, composition, and chemical reactivity. In this context, photoacoustic spectroscopy is commonly used to measure light absorption by aerosols. Here, we present photoacoustic measurements of single, optically-trapped nanodroplets to reveal droplet size-depencies of photochemical and physical processes. Theoretical considerations have pointed to a size-dependence in the magnitude and phase of the photoacoustic response from aerosol droplets. This dependence is thought to originate from heat transfer processes that are slow compared to the acoustic excitation frequency. In the case of a model aerosol, our measurements of single particle absorption cross-section versus droplet size confirm these theoretical predictions. In a related study, using the same model aerosol, we also demonstrate a droplet size-dependence of photochemical reaction rates [1]. Within sub-micron sized particles, photolysis rates were observed to be an order of magnitude greater than those observed in larger droplets. [1] J. W. Cremer, K. M. Thaler, C. Haisch, and R. Signorell. Photoacoustics of single laser-trapped nanodroplets for the direct observation of nanofocusing in aerosol photokinetics. Nat. Commun., 7:10941, 2016.

  10. Single trapped cold ions: a testing ground for quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniscalco, S

    2005-01-01

    In this article I review some results obtained during my PhD work in the group of Professor Messina, at the University of Palermo. I discuss some proposals aimed at exploring fundamental issues of quantum theory, e.g. entanglement and quantum superpositions, in the context of single trapped ions. This physical context turns out to be extremely well suited both for studying fundamental features of quantum mechanics, such as the quantum-classical border, and for technological applications such as quantum logic gates and quantum registers. I focus on some procedures for engineering nonclassical states of the vibrational motion of the centre of mass of the ion. I consider both the case in which the ion interacts with classical laser beams and the case of interaction with a quantized mode of light. In particular, I discuss the generation of Schroedinger cat-like states, Bell states and Greenberger-Horn-Zeilinger states. The schemes for generating nonclassical states stem from two different quantum processes: the parity effect and the quantum state manipulation via quantum non-demolition measurement. Finally, I consider a microscopic theory of the interaction of a quantum harmonic oscillator (the centre of mass of the ion in the trapped ion context) with a bosonic thermal environment. Using an exact approach to the dynamics, I discuss a quantum theory of heating of trapped ions able to describe both the short time non-Markovian regime and the thermalization process. I conclude showing briefly how the trapped ion systems can be used as simulators of key models of open quantum systems such as the Caldeira-Leggett model. (phd tutorial)

  11. Ripple induced trapped particle loss in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.B.

    1996-05-01

    The threshold for stochastic transport of high energy trapped particles in a tokamak due to toroidal field ripple is calculated by explicit construction of primary resonances, and a numerical examination of the route to chaos. Critical field ripple amplitude is determined for loss. The expression is given in magnetic coordinates and makes no assumptions regarding shape or up-down symmetry. An algorithm is developed including the effects of prompt axisymmetric orbit loss, ripple trapping, convective banana flow, and stochastic ripple loss, which gives accurate ripple loss predictions for representative Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor equilibria. The algorithm is extended to include the effects of collisions and drag, allowing rapid estimation of alpha particle loss in tokamaks

  12. Particle trapping induced by the interplay between coherence and decoherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi Sangyong; Choi, Mahn-Soo; Kim, Sang Wook

    2009-01-01

    We propose a novel scheme to trap a particle based on a delicate interplay between coherence and decoherence. If the decoherence occurs as a particle is located in the scattering region and subsequently the appropriate destructive interference takes place, the particle can be trapped in the scattering area. We consider two possible experimental realizations of such trapping: a ring attached to a single lead and a ring attached to two leads. Our scheme has nothing to do with a quasi-bound state of the system, but has a close analogy with the weak localization phenomena in disordered conductors.

  13. Simultaneous diamagnetic and magnetic particle trapping in ferrofluid microflows via a single permanent magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yilong; Kumar, Dhileep Thanjavur; Lu, Xinyu; Kale, Akshay; DuBose, John; Song, Yongxin; Wang, Junsheng; Li, Dongqing; Xuan, Xiangchun

    2015-07-01

    Trapping and preconcentrating particles and cells for enhanced detection and analysis are often essential in many chemical and biological applications. Existing methods for diamagnetic particle trapping require the placement of one or multiple pairs of magnets nearby the particle flowing channel. The strong attractive or repulsive force between the magnets makes it difficult to align and place them close enough to the channel, which not only complicates the device fabrication but also restricts the particle trapping performance. This work demonstrates for the first time the use of a single permanent magnet to simultaneously trap diamagnetic and magnetic particles in ferrofluid flows through a T-shaped microchannel. The two types of particles are preconcentrated to distinct locations of the T-junction due to the induced negative and positive magnetophoretic motions, respectively. Moreover, they can be sequentially released from their respective trapping spots by simply increasing the ferrofluid flow rate. In addition, a three-dimensional numerical model is developed, which predicts with a reasonable agreement the trajectories of diamagnetic and magnetic particles as well as the buildup of ferrofluid nanoparticles.

  14. Simultaneous diamagnetic and magnetic particle trapping in ferrofluid microflows via a single permanent magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yilong; Kumar, Dhileep Thanjavur; Lu, Xinyu; Kale, Akshay; DuBose, John; Song, Yongxin; Wang, Junsheng; Li, Dongqing; Xuan, Xiangchun

    2015-01-01

    Trapping and preconcentrating particles and cells for enhanced detection and analysis are often essential in many chemical and biological applications. Existing methods for diamagnetic particle trapping require the placement of one or multiple pairs of magnets nearby the particle flowing channel. The strong attractive or repulsive force between the magnets makes it difficult to align and place them close enough to the channel, which not only complicates the device fabrication but also restricts the particle trapping performance. This work demonstrates for the first time the use of a single permanent magnet to simultaneously trap diamagnetic and magnetic particles in ferrofluid flows through a T-shaped microchannel. The two types of particles are preconcentrated to distinct locations of the T-junction due to the induced negative and positive magnetophoretic motions, respectively. Moreover, they can be sequentially released from their respective trapping spots by simply increasing the ferrofluid flow rate. In addition, a three-dimensional numerical model is developed, which predicts with a reasonable agreement the trajectories of diamagnetic and magnetic particles as well as the buildup of ferrofluid nanoparticles. PMID:26221197

  15. Precision tests of CPT invariance with single trapped antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulmer, Stefan [RIKEN, Ulmer Initiative Research Unit, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Collaboration: BASE-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The reason for the striking imbalance of matter and antimatter in our Universe has yet to be understood. This is the motivation and inspiration to conduct high precision experiments comparing the fundamental properties of matter and antimatter equivalents at lowest energies and with greatest precision. According to theory, the most sensitive tests of CPT invariance are measurements of antihydrogen ground-state hyperfine splitting as well as comparisons of proton and antiproton magnetic moments. Within the BASE collaboration we target the latter. By using a double Penning trap we performed very recently the first direct high precision measurement of the proton magnetic moment. The achieved fractional precision of 3.3 ppb improves the currently accepted literature value by a factor of 2.5. Application of the method to a single trapped antiproton will improve precision of the particles magnetic moment by more than a factor of 1000, thus providing one of the most stringent tests of CPT invariance. In my talk I report on the status and future perspectives of our efforts.

  16. Physical and chemical study of single aerosol particles using optical trapping cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-30

    scope that views the trapped particle walking through the ringdown beam step by step. (b) An image that shows the traces of the particle (MWCNT... walking through the RD beam . 5 a b c Fig.3 The OT-CRDS single particle scope views oscillations of a trapped particle. (a) Image of a trapped...and walking single carbon- nanotube particles of ?50 µm in size and viewing those properties via changes of ringdown time. This single- aerosol

  17. Study of a Microfluidic Chip Integrating Single Cell Trap and 3D Stable Rotation Manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Huang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Single cell manipulation technology has been widely applied in biological fields, such as cell injection/enucleation, cell physiological measurement, and cell imaging. Recently, a biochip platform with a novel configuration of electrodes for cell 3D rotation has been successfully developed by generating rotating electric fields. However, the rotation platform still has two major shortcomings that need to be improved. The primary problem is that there is no on-chip module to facilitate the placement of a single cell into the rotation chamber, which causes very low efficiency in experiment to manually pipette single 10-micron-scale cells into rotation position. Secondly, the cell in the chamber may suffer from unstable rotation, which includes gravity-induced sinking down to the chamber bottom or electric-force-induced on-plane movement. To solve the two problems, in this paper we propose a new microfluidic chip with manipulation capabilities of single cell trap and single cell 3D stable rotation, both on one chip. The new microfluidic chip consists of two parts. The top capture part is based on the least flow resistance principle and is used to capture a single cell and to transport it to the rotation chamber. The bottom rotation part is based on dielectrophoresis (DEP and is used to 3D rotate the single cell in the rotation chamber with enhanced stability. The two parts are aligned and bonded together to form closed channels for microfluidic handling. Using COMSOL simulation and preliminary experiments, we have verified, in principle, the concept of on-chip single cell traps and 3D stable rotation, and identified key parameters for chip structures, microfluidic handling, and electrode configurations. The work has laid a solid foundation for on-going chip fabrication and experiment validation.

  18. Shot-noise-limited monitoring and phase locking of the motion of a single trapped ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushev, P; Hétet, G; Slodička, L; Rotter, D; Wilson, M A; Schmidt-Kaler, F; Eschner, J; Blatt, R

    2013-03-29

    We perform a high-resolution real-time readout of the motion of a single trapped and laser-cooled Ba+ ion. By using an interferometric setup, we demonstrate a shot-noise-limited measurement of thermal oscillations with a resolution of 4 times the standard quantum limit. We apply the real-time monitoring for phase control of the ion motion through a feedback loop, suppressing the photon recoil-induced phase diffusion. Because of the spectral narrowing in the phase-locked mode, the coherent ion oscillation is measured with a resolution of about 0.3 times the standard quantum limit.

  19. Laser induced fluorescence of trapped molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winn, J.S.

    1980-10-01

    Laser induced fluoresence (LIF) spectra (laser excitation spectra) are conceptually among the most simple spectra to obtain. One need only confine a gaseous sample in a suitable container, direct a laser along one axis of the container, and monitor the sample's fluorescence at a right angle to the laser beam. As the laser wavelength is changed, the changes in fluorescence intensity map the absorption spectrum of the sample. (More precisely, only absorption to states which have a significant radiative decay component are monitored.) For ion spectroscopy, one could benefit in many ways by such an experiment. Most optical ion spectra have been observed by emission techniques, and, aside from the problems of spectral analysis, discharge emission methods often produce the spectra of many species, some of which may be unknown or uncertain. Implicit in the description of LIF given above is certainty as to the chemical identity of the carrier of the spectrum. This article describes a method by which the simplifying aspects of LIF can be extended to molecular ions

  20. Numerical Analysis of Hydrodynamic Flow in Microfluidic Biochip for Single-Cell Trapping Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Ahmad Khalili

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Single-cell analysis has become the interest of a wide range of biological and biomedical engineering research. It could provide precise information on individual cells, leading to important knowledge regarding human diseases. To perform single-cell analysis, it is crucial to isolate the individual cells before further manipulation is carried out. Recently, microfluidic biochips have been widely used for cell trapping and single cell analysis, such as mechanical and electrical detection. This work focuses on developing a finite element simulation model of single-cell trapping system for any types of cells or particles based on the hydrodynamic flow resistance (Rh manipulations in the main channel and trap channel to achieve successful trapping. Analysis is carried out using finite element ABAQUS-FEA™ software. A guideline to design and optimize single-cell trapping model is proposed and the example of a thorough optimization analysis is carried out using a yeast cell model. The results show the finite element model is able to trap a single cell inside the fluidic environment. Fluid’s velocity profile and streamline plots for successful and unsuccessful single yeast cell trapping are presented according to the hydrodynamic concept. The single-cell trapping model can be a significant important guideline in designing a new chip for biomedical applications.

  1. Raman Spectroscopy of Optically Trapped Single Biological Micro-Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redding, Brandon; Schwab, Mark J.; Pan, Yong-le

    2015-01-01

    The combination of optical trapping with Raman spectroscopy provides a powerful method for the study, characterization, and identification of biological micro-particles. In essence, optical trapping helps to overcome the limitation imposed by the relative inefficiency of the Raman scattering process. This allows Raman spectroscopy to be applied to individual biological particles in air and in liquid, providing the potential for particle identification with high specificity, longitudinal studies of changes in particle composition, and characterization of the heterogeneity of individual particles in a population. In this review, we introduce the techniques used to integrate Raman spectroscopy with optical trapping in order to study individual biological particles in liquid and air. We then provide an overview of some of the most promising applications of this technique, highlighting the unique types of measurements enabled by the combination of Raman spectroscopy with optical trapping. Finally, we present a brief discussion of future research directions in the field. PMID:26247952

  2. A quantitative study of quasiparticle traps using the single-Cooper-pair-transistor

    OpenAIRE

    Court, N. A.; Ferguson, A. J.; Lutchyn, Roman; Clark, R. G.

    2007-01-01

    We use radio-frequency reflectometry to measure quasiparticle tunneling rates in the single-Cooper-pair-transistor. Devices with and without quasiparticle traps in proximity to the island are studied. A $10^2$ to $10^3$-fold reduction in the quasiparticle tunneling rate onto the island is observed in the case of quasiparticle traps. In the quasiparticle trap samples we also measure a commensurate decrease in quasiparticle tunneling rate off the island.

  3. Strong coupling between a single nitrogen-vacancy spin and the rotational mode of diamonds levitating in an ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delord, T.; Nicolas, L.; Chassagneux, Y.; Hétet, G.

    2017-12-01

    A scheme for strong coupling between a single atomic spin and the rotational mode of levitating nanoparticles is proposed. The idea is based on spin readout of nitrogen-vacancy centers embedded in aspherical nanodiamonds levitating in an ion trap. We show that the asymmetry of the diamond induces a rotational confinement in the ion trap. Using a weak homogeneous magnetic field and a strong microwave driving we then demonstrate that the spin of the nitrogen-vacancy center can be strongly coupled to the rotational mode of the diamond.

  4. Nested Penning Trap as a Source of Singly Charged Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordonez, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    In the work reported, the possibility of using a nested Penning trap as a high purity source of low-charge-state ions is studied. For the configuration considered, a relatively dense ion plasma is confined by a three-dimensional electric potential well. The three-dimensional well is produced by the electric field generated by both the trap electrodes and a trapped electron plasma. The ion and electron plasmas are each considered to have Maxwellian velocity distributions. However, it is shown that the electron plasma must have a temperature that is higher than that of the ion plasma when the ions have low charge states. The work reported includes a self-consistent prediction of a possible plasma equilibrium

  5. Integrated microfluidic device for single-cell trapping and spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Liberale, Carlo

    2013-02-13

    Optofluidic microsystems are key components towards lab-on-a-chip devices for manipulation and analysis of biological specimens. In particular, the integration of optical tweezers (OT) in these devices allows stable sample trapping, while making available mechanical, chemical and spectroscopic analyses.

  6. Integrated microfluidic device for single-cell trapping and spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Liberale, Carlo; Cojoc, G.; Bragheri, F.; Minzioni, P.; Perozziello, G.; La Rocca, R.; Ferrara, L.; Rajamanickam, V.; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Cristiani, I.

    2013-01-01

    Optofluidic microsystems are key components towards lab-on-a-chip devices for manipulation and analysis of biological specimens. In particular, the integration of optical tweezers (OT) in these devices allows stable sample trapping, while making available mechanical, chemical and spectroscopic analyses.

  7. Effect of Single-Electron Interface Trapping in Decanano MOSFETs: A 3D Atomistic Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asenov, Asen; Balasubramaniam, R.; Brown, A. R.; Davies, J. H.

    2000-01-01

    We study the effect of trapping/detrapping of a single-electron in interface states in the channel of n-type MOSFETs with decanano dimensions using 3D atomistic simulation techniques. In order to highlight the basic dependencies, the simulations are carried out initially assuming continuous doping charge, and discrete localized charge only for the trapped electron. The dependence of the random telegraph signal (RTS) amplitudes on the device dimensions and on the position of the trapped charge in the channel are studied in detail. Later, in full-scale, atomistic simulations assuming discrete charge for both randomly placed dopants and the trapped electron, we highlight the importance of current percolation and of traps with strategic position where the trapped electron blocks a dominant current path.

  8. Influence of modulation method on using LC-traps with single-phase voltage source converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiongfei; Min, Huang; Bai, Haofeng

    2015-01-01

    The switching-frequency LC-trap filter has recently been employed with high-order passive filters for Voltage Source Inverters (VSIs). This paper investigates the influence of modulation method on using the LC-traps with single-phase VSIs. Two-level (bipolar) and three-level (unipolar) modulations...... that include phase distortion and alternative phase opposition distortion methods are analyzed. Harmonic filtering performances of four LC-trap-based filters with different locations of LC-traps are compared. It is shown that the use of parallel-LC-traps in series with filter inductors, either grid...... or converter side, has a worse harmonic filtering performance than using series-LC-trap in the shunt branch. Simulations and experimental results are presented for verifications....

  9. Quantum sensing of the phase-space-displacement parameters using a single trapped ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Peter A.; Vitanov, Nikolay V.

    2018-03-01

    We introduce a quantum sensing protocol for detecting the parameters characterizing the phase-space displacement by using a single trapped ion as a quantum probe. We show that, thanks to the laser-induced coupling between the ion's internal states and the motion mode, the estimation of the two conjugated parameters describing the displacement can be efficiently performed by a set of measurements of the atomic state populations. Furthermore, we introduce a three-parameter protocol capable of detecting the magnitude, the transverse direction, and the phase of the displacement. We characterize the uncertainty of the two- and three-parameter problems in terms of the Fisher information and show that state projective measurement saturates the fundamental quantum Cramér-Rao bound.

  10. Gap-related trapped magnetic flux dependence between single and combined bulk superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Z.; Miki, M.; Felder, B.; Tsuzuki, K.; Shinohara, N.; Uetake, T.; Izumi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Rectangular YBCO bulks to realize a compact combination. → The gap effect was added to consider in the trapped flux density mapping. → The trapped-flux dependence between single and combined bulks is gap related. → It is possible to estimate the total magnetic flux of bulk combinations. - Abstract: Aiming at examining the trapped-flux dependence between single and combined bulk superconductors for field-pole applications, three rectangular Y 1.65 Ba 2 Cu 3 O 7-x (YBCO) bulks with a possibly compact combination were employed to investigate the trapped-flux characteristics of single and combined bulks with a field-cooling magnetization (FCM) method. A gap-related dependence was found between them. At lower gaps of 1 mm and 5 mm, the peak trapped fields and total magnetic flux of combined bulks are both smaller than the additive values of each single bulk, which can be ascribed to the demagnetization influences of the field around the bulk generated by the adjacent ones. While, at larger gaps like 10 mm, the situation becomes reversed. The combined bulks can attain bigger peak trapped fields as well as total magnetic flux, which indicates that the magnetic field by the bulk combination can reach higher gaps, thanks to the bigger magnetic energy compared with the single bulk. The presented results show that, on one hand, it is possible to estimate the total trapped magnetic flux of combined bulks by an approximate additive method of each single bulk while considering a demagnetization factor; on the other hand, it also means that the performance of combined bulks will be superior to the addition of each single bulk at larger gaps, thus preferable for large-scaled magnet applications.

  11. Gap-related trapped magnetic flux dependence between single and combined bulk superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Z., E-mail: zgdeng@gmail.co [Laboratory of Applied Physics, Department of Marine Electronics and Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Tokyo 135-8533 (Japan); Miki, M.; Felder, B.; Tsuzuki, K.; Shinohara, N.; Uetake, T.; Izumi, M. [Laboratory of Applied Physics, Department of Marine Electronics and Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Tokyo 135-8533 (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: {yields} Rectangular YBCO bulks to realize a compact combination. {yields} The gap effect was added to consider in the trapped flux density mapping. {yields} The trapped-flux dependence between single and combined bulks is gap related. {yields} It is possible to estimate the total magnetic flux of bulk combinations. - Abstract: Aiming at examining the trapped-flux dependence between single and combined bulk superconductors for field-pole applications, three rectangular Y{sub 1.65}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} (YBCO) bulks with a possibly compact combination were employed to investigate the trapped-flux characteristics of single and combined bulks with a field-cooling magnetization (FCM) method. A gap-related dependence was found between them. At lower gaps of 1 mm and 5 mm, the peak trapped fields and total magnetic flux of combined bulks are both smaller than the additive values of each single bulk, which can be ascribed to the demagnetization influences of the field around the bulk generated by the adjacent ones. While, at larger gaps like 10 mm, the situation becomes reversed. The combined bulks can attain bigger peak trapped fields as well as total magnetic flux, which indicates that the magnetic field by the bulk combination can reach higher gaps, thanks to the bigger magnetic energy compared with the single bulk. The presented results show that, on one hand, it is possible to estimate the total trapped magnetic flux of combined bulks by an approximate additive method of each single bulk while considering a demagnetization factor; on the other hand, it also means that the performance of combined bulks will be superior to the addition of each single bulk at larger gaps, thus preferable for large-scaled magnet applications.

  12. Gap-related trapped magnetic flux dependence between single and combined bulk superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Z.; Miki, M.; Felder, B.; Tsuzuki, K.; Shinohara, N.; Uetake, T.; Izumi, M.

    2011-05-01

    Aiming at examining the trapped-flux dependence between single and combined bulk superconductors for field-pole applications, three rectangular Y 1.65Ba 2Cu 3O 7-x (YBCO) bulks with a possibly compact combination were employed to investigate the trapped-flux characteristics of single and combined bulks with a field-cooling magnetization (FCM) method. A gap-related dependence was found between them. At lower gaps of 1 mm and 5 mm, the peak trapped fields and total magnetic flux of combined bulks are both smaller than the additive values of each single bulk, which can be ascribed to the demagnetization influences of the field around the bulk generated by the adjacent ones. While, at larger gaps like 10 mm, the situation becomes reversed. The combined bulks can attain bigger peak trapped fields as well as total magnetic flux, which indicates that the magnetic field by the bulk combination can reach higher gaps, thanks to the bigger magnetic energy compared with the single bulk. The presented results show that, on one hand, it is possible to estimate the total trapped magnetic flux of combined bulks by an approximate additive method of each single bulk while considering a demagnetization factor; on the other hand, it also means that the performance of combined bulks will be superior to the addition of each single bulk at larger gaps, thus preferable for large-scaled magnet applications.

  13. Trapping effects and acoustoelectric current saturation in ZnO single crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosekilde, Erik

    1970-01-01

    Measurements of current-voltage characteristics for ZnO single crystals at temperatures between 77 and 640 °K are reported. Because of the buildup of an intense acoustic flux, a strong current saturation sets in when the trap-controlled electron drift velocity is equal to the velocity of sound....... The temperature dependence of the saturated current is discussed in terms of a trapping model which includes nonlinear trapping effects. Our results indicate the presence of a shallow-donor level with an ionization energy of 50 meV and a deep-donor level approximately 230 meV below the conduction-band edge...

  14. Mass sensors with mechanical traps for weighing single cells in different fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Yaochung; Delgado, Francisco Feijó; Son, Sungmin; Burg, Thomas P; Wasserman, Steven C; Manalis, Scott R

    2011-12-21

    We present two methods by which single cells can be mechanically trapped and continuously monitored within the suspended microchannel resonator (SMR) mass sensor. Since the fluid surrounding the trapped cell can be quickly and completely replaced on demand, our methods are well suited for measuring changes in cell size and growth in response to drugs or other chemical stimuli. We validate our methods by measuring the density of single polystyrene beads and Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells with a precision of approximately 10(-3) g cm(-3), and by monitoring the growth of single mouse lymphoblast cells before and after drug treatment.

  15. Continuous imaging of a single neutral atom in a variant magneto-optical trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Tian; Zhou Shuyu; Chen Peng; Li Lin; Hong Tao; Wang Yuzhu

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate continuous imaging of a single 87 Rb atom confined in a steep magneto-optical trap with an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera and realize a one-dimensional micro-optical trap array with a Dammann grating. We adopt several methods to reduce the noise in the fluorescence signal we obtain with the EMCCD. Step jumping characteristics of the fluorescence demonstrate capturing and losing of individual atoms. (authors)

  16. Mode division multiplexing technology for single-fiber optical trapping axial-position adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihai; Wang, Lei; Liang, Peibo; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Libo

    2013-07-15

    We demonstrate trapped yeast cell axial-position adjustment without moving the optical fiber in a single-fiber optical trapping system. The dynamic axial-position adjustment is realized by controlling the power ratio of the fundamental mode beam (LP01) and the low-order mode beam (LP11) generated in a normal single-core fiber. In order to separate the trapping positions produced by the two mode beams, we fabricate a special fiber tapered tip with a selective two-step method. A yeast cell of 6 μm diameter is moved along the optical axis direction for a distance of ~3 μm. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the trapping position adjustment without moving the fiber for single-fiber optical tweezers. The excitation and utilization of multimode beams in a single fiber constitutes a new development for single-fiber optical trapping and makes possible more practical applications in biomedical research fields.

  17. First observation of spin flips with a single proton stored in a cryogenic Penning trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulmer, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis the very first observation of spin transitions of a single proton stored in a cryogenic double-Penning trap is presented. The experimental observation of spin transitions is based on the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect, which couples the spin of the single trapped proton to its axial eigenfrequency, by means of an inhomogeneous magnetic field. A spin transition causes a change of the axial frequency, which can be measured non-destructively. Due to the tiny magnetic moment of the proton, the direct detection of proton spin-flips is an exceeding challenge. To achieve spin-flip resolution, the proton was stored in the largest magnetic field inhomogeneity, which has ever been superimposed to a Penning trap, and its axial frequency was detected non-destructively. Therefore, superconducting detection systems with ultrahigh-sensitivity were developed, allowing the direct observation of the single trapped proton, as well as the high-precision determination of its eigenfrequencies. Based on novel experimental methods, which were developed in the framework of this thesis, the axial frequency of the particle was stabilized to a level, where the observation of single-proton spin-flips is possible, which was demonstrated. This experimental success is one of the most important steps towards the high-precision determination of the magnetic moment of the free proton. With the very first observation of spin transitions with a single trapped proton, a highly exciting perspective opens. All experimental techniques which were developed in this thesis can be directly applied to the antiproton. Thus, the first high-precision measurement of the magnetic moment of the antiproton becomes possible. This will provide a new high-precision test of the matterantimatter symmetry. (orig.)

  18. Single-atom trapping and transport in DMD-controlled optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Dustin; Kuhn, Axel

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate the trapping and manipulation of single neutral atoms in reconfigurable arrays of optical tweezers. Our approach offers unparalleled speed by using a Texas instruments digital micro-mirror device as a holographic amplitude modulator with a frame rate of 20 000 per second. We show the trapping of static arrays of up to 20 atoms, as well as transport of individually selected atoms over a distance of 25 μm with laser cooling and 4 μm without. We discuss the limitations of the technique and the scope for technical improvements.

  19. Dynamics of a single ion in a perturbed Penning trap: Octupolar perturbation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lara, Martin; Salas, J. Pablo

    2004-01-01

    Imperfections in the design or implementation of Penning traps may give rise to electrostatic perturbations that introduce nonlinearities in the dynamics. In this paper we investigate, from the point of view of classical mechanics, the dynamics of a single ion trapped in a Penning trap perturbed by an octupolar perturbation. Because of the axial symmetry of the problem, the system has two degrees of freedom. Hence, this model is ideal to be managed by numerical techniques like continuation of families of periodic orbits and Poincare surfaces of section. We find that, through the variation of the two parameters controlling the dynamics, several periodic orbits emanate from two fundamental periodic orbits. This process produces important changes (bifurcations) in the phase space structure leading to chaotic behavior

  20. Modeling of radiation-induced charge trapping in MOS devices under ionizing irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petukhov, M. A., E-mail: m.a.petukhov@gmail.com; Ryazanov, A. I. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The numerical model of the radiation-induced charge trapping process in the oxide layer of a MOS device under ionizing irradiation is developed; the model includes carrier transport, hole capture by traps in different states, recombination of free electrons and trapped holes, kinetics of hydrogen ions which can be accumulated in the material during transistor manufacture, and accumulation and charging of interface states. Modeling of n-channel MOSFET behavior under 1 MeV photon irradiation is performed. The obtained dose dependences of the threshold voltage shift and its contributions from trapped holes and interface states are in good agreement with experimental data.

  1. Direct exchange between silicon nanocrystals and tunnel oxide traps under illumination on single electron photodetector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatbouri, S., E-mail: Samir.chatbouri@yahoo.com; Troudi, M.; Sghaier, N.; Kalboussi, A. [Avenue de I’environnement, Université de Monastir, Laboratoire de Micro électronique et Instrumentation (LR13ES12), Faculté des Sciences de Monastir (Tunisia); Aimez, V. [Université de Sherbrooke, Laboratoire Nanotechnologies et Nanosystémes (UMI-LN2 3463), Université de Sherbrooke—CNRS—INSA de Lyon-ECL-UJF-CPE Lyon, Institut Interdisciplinaire d’Innovation Technologique (Canada); Drouin, D. [Avenue de I’environnement, Université de Monastir, Laboratoire de Micro électronique et Instrumentation (LR13ES12), Faculté des Sciences de Monastir (Tunisia); Souifi, A. [Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon—site INSA de Lyon, UMR CNRS 5270 (France)

    2016-09-15

    In this paper we present the trapping of photogenerated charge carriers for 300 s resulted by their direct exchange under illumination between a few silicon nanocrystals (ncs-Si) embedded in an oxide tunnel layer (SiO{sub x} = 1.5) and the tunnel oxide traps levels for a single electron photodetector (photo-SET or nanopixel). At first place, the presence of a photocurrent limited in the inversion zone under illumination in the I–V curves confirms the creation of a pair electron/hole (e–h) at high energy. This photogenerated charge carriers can be trapped in the oxide. Using the capacitance-voltage under illumination (the photo-CV measurements) we show a hysteresis chargement limited in the inversion area, indicating that the photo-generated charge carriers are stored at traps levels at the interface and within ncs-Si. The direct exchange of the photogenerated charge carriers between the interface traps levels and the ncs-Si contributed on the photomemory effect for 300 s for our nanopixel at room temperature.

  2. Disorder-induced trapping versus Anderson localization in Bose-Einstein condensates expanding in disordered potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Palencia, L; Clement, D; Lugan, P; Bouyer, P; Aspect, A

    2008-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the localization of an expanding Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) with repulsive atom-atom interactions in a disordered potential. We focus on the regime where the initial inter-atomic interactions dominate over the kinetic energy and the disorder. At equilibrium in a trapping potential and for the considered small disorder, the condensate shows a Thomas-Fermi shape modified by the disorder. When the condensate is released from the trap, a strong suppression of the expansion is obtained in contrast to the situation in a periodic potential with similar characteristics. This effect crucially depends on both the momentum distribution of the expanding BEC and the strength of the disorder. For strong disorder as in the experiments reported by Clement et al 2005 Phys. Rev. Lett. 95 170409 and Fort et al 2005 Phys. Rev. Lett. 95 170410, the suppression of the expansion results from the fragmentation of the core of the condensate and from classical reflections from large modulations of the disordered potential in the tails of the condensate. We identify the corresponding disorder-induced trapping scenario for which large atom-atom interactions and strong reflections from single modulations of the disordered potential play central roles. For weak disorder, the suppression of the expansion signals the onset of Anderson localization, which is due to multiple scattering from the modulations of the disordered potential. We compute analytically the localized density profile of the condensate and show that the localization crucially depends on the correlation function of the disorder. In particular, for speckle potentials the long-range correlations induce an effective mobility edge in 1D finite systems. Numerical calculations performed in the mean-field approximation support our analysis for both strong and weak disorder

  3. Observation of Entanglement of a Single Photon with a Trapped Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volz, Juergen; Weber, Markus; Schlenk, Daniel; Rosenfeld, Wenjamin; Vrana, Johannes; Saucke, Karen; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Weinfurter, Harald

    2006-01-01

    We report the observation of entanglement between a single trapped atom and a single photon at a wavelength suitable for low-loss communication over large distances, thereby achieving a crucial step towards long range quantum networks. To verify the entanglement, we introduce a single atom state analysis. This technique is used for full state tomography of the atom-photon qubit pair. The detection efficiency and the entanglement fidelity are high enough to allow in a next step the generation of entangled atoms at large distances, ready for a final loophole-free Bell experiment

  4. The temporal evolution process from fluorescence bleaching to clean Raman spectra of single solid particles optically trapped in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhiyong; Pan, Yong-Le; Videen, Gorden; Wang, Chuji

    2017-12-01

    We observe the entire temporal evolution process of fluorescence and Raman spectra of single solid particles optically trapped in air. The spectra initially contain strong fluorescence with weak Raman peaks, then the fluorescence was bleached within seconds, and finally only the clean Raman peaks remain. We construct an optical trap using two counter-propagating hollow beams, which is able to stably trap both absorbing and non-absorbing particles in air, for observing such temporal processes. This technique offers a new method to study dynamic changes in the fluorescence and Raman spectra from a single optically trapped particle in air.

  5. Optical trapping and Raman spectroscopy of single nanostructures using standing-wave Raman tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mu-ying; He, Lin; Chen, Gui-hua; Yang, Guang; Li, Yong-qing

    2017-08-01

    Optical tweezers integrated with Raman spectroscopy allows analyzing a single trapped micro-particle, but is generally less effective for individual nano-sized objects in the 10-100 nm range. The main challenge is the weak gradient force on nanoparticles that is insufficient to overcome the destabilizing effect of scattering force and Brownian motion. Here, we present standing-wave Raman tweezers for stable trapping and sensitive characterization of single isolated nanostructures with a low laser power by combining a standing-wave optical trap (SWOT) with confocal Raman spectroscopy. This scheme has stronger intensity gradients and balanced scattering forces, and thus is more stable and sensitive in measuring nanoparticles in liquid with 4-8 fold increase in the Raman signals. It can be used to analyze many nanoparticles that cannot be measured with single-beam Raman tweezers, including individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), graphene flakes, biological particles, polystyrene beads (100 nm), SERS-active metal nanoparticles, and high-refractive semiconductor nanoparticles with a low laser power of a few milliwatts. This would enable sorting and characterization of specific SWCNTs and other nanoparticles based on their increased Raman fingerprints.

  6. Dielectrophoretic trapping of multilayer DNA origami nanostructures and DNA origami-induced local destruction of silicon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Boxuan; Linko, Veikko; Dietz, Hendrik; Toppari, J Jussi

    2015-01-01

    DNA origami is a widely used method for fabrication of custom-shaped nanostructures. However, to utilize such structures, one needs to controllably position them on nanoscale. Here we demonstrate how different types of 3D scaffolded multilayer origamis can be accurately anchored to lithographically fabricated nanoelectrodes on a silicon dioxide substrate by DEP. Straight brick-like origami structures, constructed both in square (SQL) and honeycomb lattices, as well as curved "C"-shaped and angular "L"-shaped origamis were trapped with nanoscale precision and single-structure accuracy. We show that the positioning and immobilization of all these structures can be realized with or without thiol-linkers. In general, structural deformations of the origami during the DEP trapping are highly dependent on the shape and the construction of the structure. The SQL brick turned out to be the most robust structure under the high DEP forces, and accordingly, its single-structure trapping yield was also highest. In addition, the electrical conductivity of single immobilized plain brick-like structures was characterized. The electrical measurements revealed that the conductivity is negligible (insulating behavior). However, we observed that the trapping process of the SQL brick equipped with thiol-linkers tended to induce an etched "nanocanyon" in the silicon dioxide substrate. The nanocanyon was formed exactly between the electrodes, that is, at the location of the DEP-trapped origami. The results show that the demonstrated DEP-trapping technique can be readily exploited in assembling and arranging complex multilayered origami geometries. In addition, DNA origamis could be utilized in DEP-assisted deformation of the substrates onto which they are attached. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Vortex trapping in Pb-alloy Josephson junctions induced by strong sputtering of the base electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, M.; Nakano, J.; Yanagawa, F.

    1985-01-01

    It is observed that strong rf sputtering of the Pb-alloy base electrodes causes the junctions to trap magnetic vortices and thus induces Josephson current (I/sub J/) suppression. Trapping begins to occur when the rf sputtering that removes the native thermal oxide on the base electrode is carried out prior to rf plasma oxidation. Observed large I/sub J/ suppression is presumably induced by the concentration of vortices into the sputtered area upon cooling the sample below the transition temperature. This suggests a new method of the circumvention of the vortex trapping by strongly rf sputtering the areas of the electrode other than the junction areas

  8. Effects of point defect trapping and solute segregation on irradiation-induced swelling and creep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansur, L.K.

    1978-01-01

    The theory of irradiation swelling and creep, generalized to include impurity trapping of point defects and impurity-induced changes in sink efficiencies for point defects, is reviewed. The mathematical framework is developed and significant results are described. These include the relation between vacancy and interstitial trapping and the effectiveness of trapping as compared to segregation-induced changes in sink efficiencies in modifying void nucleation, void growth, and creep. Current understanding is critically assessed. Several areas requiring further development are identified. In particular those given special attention are the treatment of nondilute solutions and the consequences of current uncertainties in fundamental materials properties whose importance has been identified using the theory

  9. A generalized Jaynes-Cummings model: The relativistic parametric amplifier and a single trapped ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojeda-Guillén, D., E-mail: dojedag@ipn.mx [Escuela Superior de Cómputo, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Av. Juan de Dios Bátiz esq. Av. Miguel Othón de Mendizábal, Col. Lindavista, Delegación Gustavo A. Madero, C.P. 07738 Ciudad de México (Mexico); Mota, R. D. [Escuela Superior de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, Unidad Culhuacán, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Av. Santa Ana No. 1000, Col. San Francisco Culhuacán, Delegación Coyoacán, C.P. 04430 Ciudad de México (Mexico); Granados, V. D. [Escuela Superior de Física y Matemáticas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Ed. 9, Unidad Profesional Adolfo López Mateos, Delegación Gustavo A. Madero, C.P. 07738 Ciudad de México (Mexico)

    2016-06-15

    We introduce a generalization of the Jaynes-Cummings model and study some of its properties. We obtain the energy spectrum and eigenfunctions of this model by using the tilting transformation and the squeezed number states of the one-dimensional harmonic oscillator. As physical applications, we connect this new model to two important and novelty problems: the relativistic parametric amplifier and the quantum simulation of a single trapped ion.

  10. Particle trapping in 3-D using a single fiber probe with an annular light distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, R; Hnatovsky, C

    2003-10-20

    A single optical fiber probe has been used to trap a solid 2 ìm diameter glass bead in 3-D in water. Optical confinement in 2-D was produced by the annular light distribution emerging from a selectively chemically etched, tapered, hollow tipped metalized fiber probe. Confinement of the bead in 3-D was achieved by balancing an electrostatic force of attraction towards the tip and the optical scattering force pushing the particle away from the tip.

  11. Effects of impurity trapping on irradiation-induced swelling and creep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansur, L. K.; Yoo, M. H.

    1977-12-01

    A general theory of the effects of point defect trapping on radiation-induced swelling and creep deformation rates is developed. The effects on the fraction of defects recombining, and on void nucleation, void growth and creep due to the separate processes of dislocation climb-glide and dislocation climb (the so-called SIPA mechanism) are studied. Trapping of vacancies or interstitials increases total recombination and decreases the rates of deformation processes. For fixed trapping parameters, the reduction is largest for void nucleation, less for void growth and creep due to dislocation climb-glide, and least for creep due to dislocation climb. With this formation, the effects of trapping at multiple vacancy and interstitial traps and of spatial and temporal variation in trap concentrations may be determined. Alternative pictures for viewing point defect trapping in terms of effective recombination and diffusion coefficients are derived. It is shown that previous derivations of these coefficients are incorrect. A rigorous explanation is given of the well-known numerical result that interstitial trapping is significant only if the binding energy exceeds the difference between the vacancy and interstitial migration energies, while vacancy trapping is significant even at small binding energies. Corrections which become necessary at solute concentrations above about 0.1% are described. Numerical results for a wide range of material and irradiation parameters are presented.

  12. A microfluidic device integrating plasmonic nanodevices for Raman spectroscopy analysis on trapped single living cells

    KAUST Repository

    Perozziello, Gerardo

    2013-11-01

    In this work we developed a microfluidic device integrating nanoplasmonic devices combined with fluidic trapping regions. The microfuidic traps allow to capture single cells in areas where plasmonic sensors are placed. In this way it is possible to perform Enhanced Raman analysis on the cell membranes. Moreover, by changing direction of the flux it is possible to change the orientation of the cell in the trap, so that it is possible to analyze different points of the membrane of the same cell. We shows an innovative procedure to fabricate and assembly the microfluidic device which combine photolithography, focused ion beam machining, and hybrid bonding between a polymer substrate and lid of Calcium fluoride. This procedure is compatible with the fabrication of the plasmonic sensors in close proximity of the microfluidic traps. Moreover, the use of Calcium fluoride as lid allows full compatibility with Raman measurements producing negligible Raman background signal and avoids Raman artifacts. Finally, we performed Raman analysis on cells to monitor their oxidative stress under particular non physiological conditions. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A microfluidic device integrating plasmonic nanodevices for Raman spectroscopy analysis on trapped single living cells

    KAUST Repository

    Perozziello, Gerardo; Catalano, Rossella; Francardi, Marco; Rondanina, Eliana; Pardeo, Francesca; De Angelis, Francesco De; Malara, Natalia Maria; Candeloro, Patrizio; Morrone, Giovanni; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.

    2013-01-01

    In this work we developed a microfluidic device integrating nanoplasmonic devices combined with fluidic trapping regions. The microfuidic traps allow to capture single cells in areas where plasmonic sensors are placed. In this way it is possible to perform Enhanced Raman analysis on the cell membranes. Moreover, by changing direction of the flux it is possible to change the orientation of the cell in the trap, so that it is possible to analyze different points of the membrane of the same cell. We shows an innovative procedure to fabricate and assembly the microfluidic device which combine photolithography, focused ion beam machining, and hybrid bonding between a polymer substrate and lid of Calcium fluoride. This procedure is compatible with the fabrication of the plasmonic sensors in close proximity of the microfluidic traps. Moreover, the use of Calcium fluoride as lid allows full compatibility with Raman measurements producing negligible Raman background signal and avoids Raman artifacts. Finally, we performed Raman analysis on cells to monitor their oxidative stress under particular non physiological conditions. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Trapping, manipulation and rapid rotation of NBD-C8 fluorescent single microcrystals in optical tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GALAUP, Jean-Pierre; RODRIGUEZ-OTAZO, Mariela; AUGIER-CALDERIN, Angel; LAMERE; Jean-Francois; FERY-FORGUES, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    We have built an optical tweezers experiment based on an inverted microscope to trap and manipulate single crystals of micro or sub-micrometer size made from fluorescent molecules of 4-octylamino-7-nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBD-C8). These single crystals have parallelepiped shapes and exhibit birefringence properties evidenced through optical experiments between crossed polarizers in a polarizing microscope. The crystals are uniaxial with their optical axis oriented along their largest dimension. Trapped in the optical trap, the organic micro-crystals are oriented in such a way that their long axis is along the direction of the beam propagation, and their short axis follows the direction of the linear polarization. Therefore, with linearly polarized light, simply rotating the light polarization can orient the crystal. When using circularly or only elliptically polarized light, the crystal can spontaneously rotate and reach rotation speed of several hundreds of turns per second. A surprising result has been observed: when the incident power is growing up, the rotation speed increases to reach a maximum value and then decreases even when the power is still growing up. Moreover, this evolution is irreversible. Different possible explanations can be considered. The development of a 3D control of the crystals by dynamical holography using liquid crystal spatial modulators will be presented and discussed on the basis of the most recent results obtained. (Author)

  15. Preparation of single rice chromosome for construction of a DNA library using a laser microbeam trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaohui; Wang, Haowei; Li, Yinmei; Tang, Yesheng; Liu, Yilei; Hu, Xin; Jia, Peixin; Ying, Kai; Feng, Qi; Guan, Jianping; Jin, Chaoqing; Zhang, Lei; Lou, Liren; Zhou, Zhuan; Han, Bin

    2004-04-29

    We report the development of a laser micromanipulation system and its application in the isolation of individual rice chromosomes directly from a metaphase cell. Microdissection and flow sorting are two major methods for the isolation of single chromosome. These methods are dependent on the techniques of chromosome spread and chromosome suspension, respectively. In the development of this system, we avoided using chromosome spread and cell suspension was used instead. The cell wall of metaphase rice cell was cut by optical scissors. The released single chromosome was captured by an optical trap and transported to an area without cell debris. The isolated single chromosome was then collected and specific library was constructed by linker adaptor PCR. The average insert size of the library was about 300 bp. Two hundred inserts of chromosome 4 library were sequenced, and 96.5% were aligned to the corresponding sequences of rice chromosome 4. These results suggest the possible application of this method for the preparation of other subcellular structures and for the cloning of single macromolecule through a laser microbeam trap.

  16. Low trap-state density and long carrier diffusion in organolead trihalide perovskite single crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Dong

    2015-01-29

    The fundamental properties and ultimate performance limits of organolead trihalide MAPbX3(MA = CH3NH3 +; X = Br- or I- ) perovskites remain obscured by extensive disorder in polycrystalline MAPbX3 films. We report an antisolvent vapor-assisted crystallization approach that enables us to create sizable crack-free MAPbX3 single crystals with volumes exceeding 100 cubic millimeters. These large single crystals enabled a detailed characterization of their optical and charge transport characteristics.We observed exceptionally low trap-state densities on the order of 109 to 1010 per cubic centimeter in MAPbX3 single crystals (comparable to the best photovoltaic-quality silicon) and charge carrier diffusion lengths exceeding 10 micrometers. These results were validated with density functional theory calculations.

  17. Low trap-state density and long carrier diffusion in organolead trihalide perovskite single crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Dong; Adinolfi, Valerio; Comin, Riccardo; Yuan, Mingjian; Alarousu, Erkki; Buin, Andrei K.; Chen, Yin; Hoogland, Sjoerd H.; Rothenberger, Alexander; Katsiev, Khabiboulakh; Losovyj, Yaroslav B.; Zhang, Xin; Dowben, Peter A.; Mohammed, Omar F.; Sargent, E. H.; Bakr, Osman

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental properties and ultimate performance limits of organolead trihalide MAPbX3(MA = CH3NH3 +; X = Br- or I- ) perovskites remain obscured by extensive disorder in polycrystalline MAPbX3 films. We report an antisolvent vapor-assisted crystallization approach that enables us to create sizable crack-free MAPbX3 single crystals with volumes exceeding 100 cubic millimeters. These large single crystals enabled a detailed characterization of their optical and charge transport characteristics.We observed exceptionally low trap-state densities on the order of 109 to 1010 per cubic centimeter in MAPbX3 single crystals (comparable to the best photovoltaic-quality silicon) and charge carrier diffusion lengths exceeding 10 micrometers. These results were validated with density functional theory calculations.

  18. Near-field acoustic microbead trapping as remote anchor for single particle manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Jae Youn [Department of Information and Communication Engineering, Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Cheon, Dong Young; Shin, Hyunjune; Kim, Hyun Bin; Lee, Jungwoo, E-mail: jwlee@kw.ac.kr [Department of Electronic Engineering, Kwangwoon University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-04

    We recently proposed an analytical model of a two-dimensional acoustic trapping of polystyrene beads in the ray acoustics regime, where a bead diameter is larger than the wavelength used. As its experimental validation, this paper demonstrates the transverse (or lateral) trapping of individual polystyrene beads in the near field of focused ultrasound. A 100 μm bead is immobilized on the central beam axis by a focused sound beam from a 30 MHz single element lithium niobate transducer, after being laterally displaced through hundreds of micrometers. Maximum displacement, a longest lateral distance at which a trapped bead can be directed towards the central axis, is thus measured over a discrete frequency range from 24 MHz to 36 MHz. The displacement data are found to be between 323.7 μm and 470.2 μm, depending on the transducer's driving frequency and input voltage amplitude. The experimental results are compared with their corresponding model values, and their relative errors lie between 0.9% and 3.9%. The results suggest that this remote maneuvering technique may be employed to manipulate individual cells through solid microbeads, provoking certain cellular reactions to localized mechanical disturbance without direct contact.

  19. Near-field acoustic microbead trapping as remote anchor for single particle manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Cheon, Dong Young; Shin, Hyunjune; Kim, Hyun Bin; Lee, Jungwoo

    2015-05-01

    We recently proposed an analytical model of a two-dimensional acoustic trapping of polystyrene beads in the ray acoustics regime, where a bead diameter is larger than the wavelength used. As its experimental validation, this paper demonstrates the transverse (or lateral) trapping of individual polystyrene beads in the near field of focused ultrasound. A 100 μm bead is immobilized on the central beam axis by a focused sound beam from a 30 MHz single element lithium niobate transducer, after being laterally displaced through hundreds of micrometers. Maximum displacement, a longest lateral distance at which a trapped bead can be directed towards the central axis, is thus measured over a discrete frequency range from 24 MHz to 36 MHz. The displacement data are found to be between 323.7 μm and 470.2 μm, depending on the transducer's driving frequency and input voltage amplitude. The experimental results are compared with their corresponding model values, and their relative errors lie between 0.9% and 3.9%. The results suggest that this remote maneuvering technique may be employed to manipulate individual cells through solid microbeads, provoking certain cellular reactions to localized mechanical disturbance without direct contact.

  20. A robust single-beam optical trap for a gram-scale mechanical oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altin, P A; Nguyen, T T-H; Slagmolen, B J J; Ward, R L; Shaddock, D A; McClelland, D E

    2017-11-06

    Precise optical control of microscopic particles has been mastered over the past three decades, with atoms, molecules and nano-particles now routinely trapped and cooled with extraordinary precision, enabling rapid progress in the study of quantum phenomena. Achieving the same level of control over macroscopic objects is expected to bring further advances in precision measurement, quantum information processing and fundamental tests of quantum mechanics. However, cavity optomechanical systems dominated by radiation pressure - so-called 'optical springs' - are inherently unstable due to the delayed dynamical response of the cavity. Here we demonstrate a fully stable, single-beam optical trap for a gram-scale mechanical oscillator. The interaction of radiation pressure with thermo-optic feedback generates damping that exceeds the mechanical loss by four orders of magnitude. The stability of the resultant spring is robust to changes in laser power and detuning, and allows purely passive self-locking of the cavity. Our results open up a new way of trapping and cooling macroscopic objects for optomechanical experiments.

  1. Radiation induced traps of zinc phosphate and phosphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murali, K.R.; Rao, D.R.

    1980-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve (TGC) method has been used to study the traps produced by X-irradiation in Zn 3 (PO 4 ) 2 and Zn 3 P 2 . Prominent TL glow peaks were observed at 100 0 and 360 0 C for zinc phosphate while for zinc phosphide only one glow peak at 245 0 C was observed, and in the latter case the TL output was in general quite low compared to zinc phosphate. The TL spectra for both the glow peaks of zinc phosphate indicated emission band in the region around 560 nm, while for zinc phosphide the emission occurred at 575 nm (in the temperature region 200-270 0 C). The low temperature glow peaks below 270 0 C were less stable compared to those above 300 0 C and were completely destroyed when the irradiated samples were stored in darkness for 24 hr at room temperature. Shining by 470 nm light however produced preferential bleaching of the two TL peaks at 100 and 360 0 C with no effect on the 245 0 C glow peak of zinc phosphide. It is concluded that during heat treatment large numbers of Zn-vacancies are formed due to which complexes like Zn-P are produced by irradiation and the TL traps destroyed in a radiative recombination process are related with these complexes. (author)

  2. Manipulation and light-induced agglomeration of carbon nanotubes through optical trapping of attached silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Chao; Zhang Yi; Gu, Claire; Seballos, Leo; Zhang, Jin Z

    2008-01-01

    A simple experimental method has been demonstrated for manipulating multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) bundles through the optical trapping of attached silver nanoparticles (SNPs). In our experiments, without the SNPs, the MWCNTs cannot be trapped due to their irregular shapes and large aspect ratio. However, when mixed with SNPs, the MWCNTs can be successfully trapped along with the SNPs using a TEM 00 mode laser at 532 nm. This is attributed to the optical trapping of the SNPs and attractive interaction or binding between the SNPs and MWCNTs due to electrostatic and van der Waals forces. Therefore, optical manipulation of MWCNT bundles is achieved through the manipulation of the attached silver nanoparticles/aggregates. In addition, we have observed the phenomenon of light-induced further agglomeration of SNPs/MWCNTs which could potentially be exploited for fabricating patterned MWCNT films for future nanoscale devices and other applications

  3. Enhancement in the photodetection of ZnO nanowires by introducing surface-roughness-induced traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Woojin; Jo, Gunho; Hong, Woong-Ki; Yoon, Jongwon; Choe, Minhyeok; Ji, Yongsung; Kim, Geunjin; Kahng, Yung Ho; Lee, Kwanghee; Lee, Takhee; Lee, Sangchul; Wang, Deli

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the enhanced photoresponse of ZnO nanowire transistors that was introduced with surface-roughness-induced traps by a simple chemical treatment with isopropyl alcohol (IPA). The enhanced photoresponse of IPA-treated ZnO nanowire devices is attributed to an increase in adsorbed oxygen on IPA-induced surface traps. The results of this study revealed that IPA-treated ZnO nanowire devices displayed higher photocurrent gains and faster photoswitching speed than transistors containing unmodified ZnO nanowires. Thus, chemical treatment with IPA can be a useful method for improving the photoresponse of ZnO nanowire devices.

  4. Thermoluminescent and dosimetric properties of anion-defective a-Al2O3 single crystals with filled deep traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kortov, V.S.; Milman, I.I.; Nikiforov, S.V.

    2002-01-01

    Some new experimental results illustrating the effect of deep traps on luminescent and dosimetric properties of anion-defective single crystals of a-Al 2 O 3 have been described. It was found that deep traps had an electronic origin. They were filled thanks to the photoionisation of F-centres and their filling was accompanied by the conversion of FF+ centres. The experiments revealed an interactive interaction of deep trapping centres. A model taking into account the thermal ionisation of excited states of F-centres was proposed. This model describes the trap filling process and mechanisms of the radio-, photo- and thermoluminescence, TSC and TSEE of the crystals under study. The sensitivity of TLD-500 detectors based on anion-defective a-Al 2 O 3 equalised when deep trapping centres were filled. (author)

  5. Electrical trapping mechanism of single-microparticles in a pore sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihide Arima

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanopore sensing via resistive pulse technique are utilized as a potent tool to characterize physical and chemical property of single –molecules and –particles. In this article, we studied the influence of particle trajectory to the ionic conductance through a pore. We performed the optical/electrical simultaneous sensing of electrophoretic capture dynamics of single-particles at a pore using a microchannel/nanopore system. We detected ionic current drops synchronous to a fluorescently dyed particle being electrophoretically drawn and become immobilized at a pore in the optical imaging. We also identified anomalous trapping events wherein particles were captured at nanoscale pin-holes formed unintentionally in a SiN membrane that gave rise to relatively small current drops. This method is expected to be a useful platform for testing novel nanopore sensor design wherein current behaves in unpredictable manner.

  6. Photoacoustics of single laser-trapped nanodroplets for the direct observation of nanofocusing in aerosol photokinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Johannes W.; Thaler, Klemens M.; Haisch, Christoph; Signorell, Ruth

    2016-03-01

    Photochemistry taking place in atmospheric aerosol droplets has a significant impact on the Earth's climate. Nanofocusing of electromagnetic radiation inside aerosols plays a crucial role in their absorption behaviour, since the radiation flux inside the droplet strongly affects the activation rate of photochemically active species. However, size-dependent nanofocusing effects in the photokinetics of small aerosols have escaped direct observation due to the inability to measure absorption signatures from single droplets. Here we show that photoacoustic measurements on optically trapped single nanodroplets provide a direct, broadly applicable method to measure absorption with attolitre sensitivity. We demonstrate for a model aerosol that the photolysis is accelerated by an order of magnitude in the sub-micron to micron size range, compared with larger droplets. The versatility of our technique promises broad applicability to absorption studies of aerosol particles, such as atmospheric aerosols where quantitative photokinetic data are critical for climate predictions.

  7. Electrical and optical 3D modelling of light-trapping single-photon avalanche diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Tianzhe; Zang, Kai; Morea, Matthew; Xue, Muyu; Lu, Ching-Ying; Jiang, Xiao; Zhang, Qiang; Kamins, Theodore I.; Harris, James S.

    2018-02-01

    Single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) have been widely used to push the frontier of scientific research (e.g., quantum science and single-molecule fluorescence) and practical applications (e.g., Lidar). However, there is a typical compromise between photon detection efficiency and jitter distribution. The light-trapping SPAD has been proposed to break this trade-off by coupling the vertically incoming photons into a laterally propagating mode while maintaining a small jitter and a thin Si device layer. In this work, we provide a 3D-based optical and electrical model based on practical fabrication conditions and discuss about design parameters, which include surface texturing, photon injection position, device area, and other features.

  8. Experimental Verification of a Jarzynski-Related Information-Theoretic Equality by a Single Trapped Ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, T P; Yan, L L; Zhou, F; Rehan, K; Liang, D F; Chen, L; Yang, W L; Ma, Z H; Feng, M; Vedral, V

    2018-01-05

    Most nonequilibrium processes in thermodynamics are quantified only by inequalities; however, the Jarzynski relation presents a remarkably simple and general equality relating nonequilibrium quantities with the equilibrium free energy, and this equality holds in both the classical and quantum regimes. We report a single-spin test and confirmation of the Jarzynski relation in the quantum regime using a single ultracold ^{40}Ca^{+} ion trapped in a harmonic potential, based on a general information-theoretic equality for a temporal evolution of the system sandwiched between two projective measurements. By considering both initially pure and mixed states, respectively, we verify, in an exact and fundamental fashion, the nonequilibrium quantum thermodynamics relevant to the mutual information and Jarzynski equality.

  9. Long-Distance Single Photon Transmission from a Trapped Ion via Quantum Frequency Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Thomas; Miyanishi, Koichiro; Ikuta, Rikizo; Takahashi, Hiroki; Vartabi Kashanian, Samir; Tsujimoto, Yoshiaki; Hayasaka, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Takashi; Imoto, Nobuyuki; Keller, Matthias

    2018-05-01

    Trapped atomic ions are ideal single photon emitters with long-lived internal states which can be entangled with emitted photons. Coupling the ion to an optical cavity enables the efficient emission of single photons into a single spatial mode and grants control over their temporal shape. These features are key for quantum information processing and quantum communication. However, the photons emitted by these systems are unsuitable for long-distance transmission due to their wavelengths. Here we report the transmission of single photons from a single 40Ca+ ion coupled to an optical cavity over a 10 km optical fiber via frequency conversion from 866 nm to the telecom C band at 1530 nm. We observe nonclassical photon statistics of the direct cavity emission, the converted photons, and the 10 km transmitted photons, as well as the preservation of the photons' temporal shape throughout. This telecommunication-ready system can be a key component for long-distance quantum communication as well as future cloud quantum computation.

  10. Gamma ray induced sensitization in CaSO4:Dy and competing trap model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagpal, J.S.; Kher, R.K.; Gangadharan, P.

    1979-01-01

    Gamma ray induced sensitization in CaSO 4 :Dy has been compared (by measurement of TL glow curves) for different temperatures during irradiation (25 0 , 120 0 and 250 0 C). Enhanced sensitization at elevated temperatures seems to support the competing trap model for supralinearity and sensitization in CaSO 4 :Dy. (author)

  11. A combined electrochemical and optical trapping platform for measuring single cell respiration rates at electrode interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, Benjamin J.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2015-01-01

    Metal-reducing bacteria gain energy by extracellular electron transfer to external solids, such as naturally abundant minerals, which substitute for oxygen or the other common soluble electron acceptors of respiration. This process is one of the earliest forms of respiration on earth and has significant environmental and technological implications. By performing electron transfer to electrodes instead of minerals, these microbes can be used as biocatalysts for conversion of diverse chemical fuels to electricity. Understanding such a complex biotic-abiotic interaction necessitates the development of tools capable of probing extracellular electron transfer down to the level of single cells. Here, we describe an experimental platform for single cell respiration measurements. The design integrates an infrared optical trap, perfusion chamber, and lithographically fabricated electrochemical chips containing potentiostatically controlled transparent indium tin oxide microelectrodes. Individual bacteria are manipulated using the optical trap and placed on the microelectrodes, which are biased at a suitable oxidizing potential in the absence of any chemical electron acceptor. The potentiostat is used to detect the respiration current correlated with cell-electrode contact. We demonstrate the system with single cell measurements of the dissimilatory-metal reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, which resulted in respiration currents ranging from 15 fA to 100 fA per cell under our measurement conditions. Mutants lacking the outer-membrane cytochromes necessary for extracellular respiration did not result in any measurable current output upon contact. In addition to the application for extracellular electron transfer studies, the ability to electronically measure cell-specific respiration rates may provide answers for a variety of fundamental microbial physiology questions

  12. A combined electrochemical and optical trapping platform for measuring single cell respiration rates at electrode interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Benjamin J; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y

    2015-06-01

    Metal-reducing bacteria gain energy by extracellular electron transfer to external solids, such as naturally abundant minerals, which substitute for oxygen or the other common soluble electron acceptors of respiration. This process is one of the earliest forms of respiration on earth and has significant environmental and technological implications. By performing electron transfer to electrodes instead of minerals, these microbes can be used as biocatalysts for conversion of diverse chemical fuels to electricity. Understanding such a complex biotic-abiotic interaction necessitates the development of tools capable of probing extracellular electron transfer down to the level of single cells. Here, we describe an experimental platform for single cell respiration measurements. The design integrates an infrared optical trap, perfusion chamber, and lithographically fabricated electrochemical chips containing potentiostatically controlled transparent indium tin oxide microelectrodes. Individual bacteria are manipulated using the optical trap and placed on the microelectrodes, which are biased at a suitable oxidizing potential in the absence of any chemical electron acceptor. The potentiostat is used to detect the respiration current correlated with cell-electrode contact. We demonstrate the system with single cell measurements of the dissimilatory-metal reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, which resulted in respiration currents ranging from 15 fA to 100 fA per cell under our measurement conditions. Mutants lacking the outer-membrane cytochromes necessary for extracellular respiration did not result in any measurable current output upon contact. In addition to the application for extracellular electron transfer studies, the ability to electronically measure cell-specific respiration rates may provide answers for a variety of fundamental microbial physiology questions.

  13. A combined electrochemical and optical trapping platform for measuring single cell respiration rates at electrode interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, Benjamin J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southern California, 920 Bloom Walk, Los Angeles, California 90089-0484 (United States); El-Naggar, Mohamed Y., E-mail: mnaggar@usc.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southern California, 920 Bloom Walk, Los Angeles, California 90089-0484 (United States); Molecular and Computational Biology Section, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0484 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0484 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Metal-reducing bacteria gain energy by extracellular electron transfer to external solids, such as naturally abundant minerals, which substitute for oxygen or the other common soluble electron acceptors of respiration. This process is one of the earliest forms of respiration on earth and has significant environmental and technological implications. By performing electron transfer to electrodes instead of minerals, these microbes can be used as biocatalysts for conversion of diverse chemical fuels to electricity. Understanding such a complex biotic-abiotic interaction necessitates the development of tools capable of probing extracellular electron transfer down to the level of single cells. Here, we describe an experimental platform for single cell respiration measurements. The design integrates an infrared optical trap, perfusion chamber, and lithographically fabricated electrochemical chips containing potentiostatically controlled transparent indium tin oxide microelectrodes. Individual bacteria are manipulated using the optical trap and placed on the microelectrodes, which are biased at a suitable oxidizing potential in the absence of any chemical electron acceptor. The potentiostat is used to detect the respiration current correlated with cell-electrode contact. We demonstrate the system with single cell measurements of the dissimilatory-metal reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, which resulted in respiration currents ranging from 15 fA to 100 fA per cell under our measurement conditions. Mutants lacking the outer-membrane cytochromes necessary for extracellular respiration did not result in any measurable current output upon contact. In addition to the application for extracellular electron transfer studies, the ability to electronically measure cell-specific respiration rates may provide answers for a variety of fundamental microbial physiology questions.

  14. Laser-Induced Fluorescence diagnostic of barium ion plasmas in the Paul Trap Simulator Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Moses; Gilson, Erik P.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Efthimion, Philip C.; Majeski, Richard; Startsev, Edward A.

    2005-01-01

    The Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) is a cylindrical Paul trap whose purpose is to simulate the nonlinear dynamics of intense charged particle beam propagation in alternating-gradient magnetic transport systems. To investigate the ion plasma microstate in PTSX, including the ion density profile and the ion velocity distribution function, a laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic system is being developed as a nondestructive diagnostic. Instead of cesium, which has been used in the initial phase of the PTSX experiment, barium has been selected as the preferred ion for the laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic. A feasibility study of the laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic using barium ions is presented with the characterization of a tunable dye laser. The installation of the barium ion source and the development of the laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic system are also discussed

  15. Trapped-ion anomalous diffusion coefficient on the basis of single mode saturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshi, Yuji; Hatayama, Akiyoshi; Ogasawara, Masatada.

    1982-03-01

    Expressions of the anomalous diffusion coefficient due to the dissipative trapped ion instability (DTII) are derived for the case with and without the effect of magnetic shear. Derivation is made by taking into account of the single mode saturation of the DTII previously obtained numerically. In the absence of the shear effect, the diffusion coefficient is proportional to #betta#sub(i)a 2 (#betta#sub(i) is the effective collision frequency of the trapped ions and a is the minor radius of a torus) and is much larger than the neoclassical ion heat conductivity. In the presence of the shear effect, the diffusion coefficient is much smaller than the Kadomtsev and Pogutse's value and is the same order of magnitude as the neoclassical ion heat conductivity. Dependences of the diffusion coefficient on the temperature and on the total particle number density are rather complicated due to the additional spectral cut-off, which is introduced to regularize the short wavelength modes in the numerical analysis. (author)

  16. Evidence for charge-trapping inducing polymorphic structural-phase transition in pentacene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Masahiko; Kehoe, Tom B; Yoneya, Makoto; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Duffy, Claudia M; Minakata, Takashi; Phillips, Richard T; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2015-01-07

    Trapped-charge-induced transformation of pentacene polymorphs is observed by using in situ Raman spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the charge should be localized in pentacene molecules at the interface with static intermolecular disorder along the long axis. Quantum chemical calculations of the intermolecular transfer integrals suggest the disorder to be large enough to induce Anderson-type localization. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Correlation induced localization of lattice trapped bosons coupled to a Bose–Einstein condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiler, Kevin; Krönke, Sven; Schmelcher, Peter

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the ground state properties of a lattice trapped bosonic system coupled to a Lieb–Liniger type gas. Our main goal is the description and in depth exploration and analysis of the two-species many-body quantum system including all relevant correlations beyond the standard mean-field approach. To achieve this, we use the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method for mixtures (ML-MCTDHX). Increasing the lattice depth and the interspecies interaction strength, the wave function undergoes a transition from an uncorrelated to a highly correlated state, which manifests itself in the localization of the lattice atoms in the latter regime. For small interspecies couplings, we identify the process responsible for this cross-over in a single-particle-like picture. Moreover, we give a full characterization of the wave function’s structure in both regimes, using Bloch and Wannier states of the lowest band, and we find an order parameter, which can be exploited as a corresponding experimental signature. To deepen the understanding, we use an effective Hamiltonian approach, which introduces an induced interaction and is valid for small interspecies interaction. We finally compare the ansatz of the effective Hamiltonian with the results of the ML-MCTDHX simulations.

  18. Extending the applicability of an open-ring trap to perform experiments with a single laser-cooled ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornejo, J. M.; Colombano, M.; Doménech, J.; Rodríguez, D., E-mail: danielrodriguez@ugr.es [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain); Block, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Institut für Kernchemie, University of Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Delahaye, P. [Grand Accélérateur National d’Ions Lourds, 14000 Caen (France)

    2015-10-15

    A special ion trap was initially built up to perform β-ν correlation experiments with radioactive ions. The trap geometry is also well suited to perform experiments with laser-cooled ions, serving for the development of a new type of Penning trap, in the framework of the project TRAPSENSOR at the University of Granada. The goal of this project is to use a single {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ion as detector for single-ion mass spectrometry. Within this project and without any modification to the initial electrode configuration, it was possible to perform Doppler cooling on {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ions, starting from large clouds and reaching single ion sensitivity. This new feature of the trap might be important also for other experiments with ions produced at radioactive ion beam facilities. In this publication, the trap and the laser system will be described, together with their performance with respect to laser cooling applied to large ion clouds down to a single ion.

  19. Detection of individual spin transitions of a single proton confined in a cryogenic Penning trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kracke, Holger

    2013-02-27

    The presented experiment for the determination of the magnetic moment of the proton is based on the measurement of the ratio of cyclotron frequency and Larmor frequency of a single proton confined in a cryogenic double-Penning trap. In the course of this thesis, the simultaneous non-destructive measurement of two of the three eigenfrequencies of the proton in thermal equilibrium with corresponding detection systems was demonstrated, which reduces the measurement time of the cyclotron frequency by a factor of two. Furthermore, this thesis presents the first detection of individual spin transitions of a single proton, which allows for the determination of the Larmor frequency. The continuous Stern-Gerlach effect is utilized to couple the magnetic moment to the axial mode of the trapped proton by means of a magnetic bottle. Thus, a spin flip causes a jump of the axial frequency, which can be measured non-destructively with highly-sensitive detection systems. However, not only the spin momentum is coupled to the axial motion but also the angular momentum. Thus, the main experimental challenge is the elimination of energy fluctuations in the radial modes in order to maintain spin flip resolution. Due to systematic studies on the stability of the axial frequency and a complete revision of the experimental setup, this goal was achieved. The spin state of the proton can be determined with very high fidelity for the very first time. Thus, this thesis represents an important step towards a high-precision determination of the magnetic moment of the proton.

  20. Single and dual fiber nano-tip optical tweezers: trapping and analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Decombe , Jean-Baptiste; Huant , Serge; Fick , Jochen

    2013-01-01

    International audience; An original optical tweezers using one or two chemically etched fiber nano-tips is developed. We demonstrate optical trapping of 1 micrometer polystyrene spheres at optical powers down to 2 mW. Harmonic trap potentials were found in the case of dual fiber tweezers by analyzing the trapped particle position fluctuations. The trap stiffness was deduced using three different models. Consistent values of up to 1 fN/nm were found. The stiffness linearly decreases with decre...

  1. Soft-type trap-induced degradation of MoS2 field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young-Hoon; Ryu, Min-Yeul; Lee, Kook Jin; Park, So Jeong; Choi, Jun Hee; Lee, Byung-Chul; Kim, Wungyeon; Kim, Gyu-Tae

    2018-06-01

    The practical applicability of electronic devices is largely determined by the reliability of field effect transistors (FETs), necessitating constant searches for new and better-performing semiconductors. We investigated the stress-induced degradation of MoS2 multilayer FETs, revealing a steady decrease of drain current by 56% from the initial value after 30 min. The drain current recovers to the initial state when the transistor is completely turned off, indicating the roles of soft-traps in the apparent degradation. The noise current power spectrum follows the model of carrier number fluctuation–correlated mobility fluctuation (CNF–CMF) regardless of stress time. However, the reduction of the drain current was well fitted to the increase of the trap density based on the CNF–CMF model, attributing the presence of the soft-type traps of dielectric oxides to the degradation of the MoS2 FETs.

  2. Photoionization of radiation-induced traps in quartz and alkali feldspars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hütt, G; Jaek, I; Vasilchenko, V

    2001-01-01

    For the optimization of luminescence dating and dosimetry techniques on the basis of the optically stimulated luminescence, the stimulation spectra of quartz and alkali feldspars were measured in the spectral region of 250-1100 nm using optically stimulated afterglow. Optically stimulated luminescence in all studied spectral regions is induced by the same kind of deep traps, that produce thermoluminescence in the regions of palaeodosimetric peaks for both minerals. The mechanism for photoionization of deep traps was proposed as being due to delocalization of the excited state of the corresponding lattice defects. The excited state overlaps the zone states; i.e. is situated in the conduction band. Because of the high quantum yield of deep electron trap ionization in the UV spectral region, the present aim was to study the possibility of using UV-stimulation for palaeodose reconstruction.

  3. Photoionization of radiation-induced traps in quartz and alkali feldspars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huett, G.; Jaek, I.; Vasilchenko, V.

    2001-01-01

    For the optimization of luminescence dating and dosimetry techniques on the basis of the optically stimulated luminescence, the stimulation spectra of quartz and alkali feldspars were measured in the spectral region of 250-1100 nm using optically stimulated afterglow. Optically stimulated luminescence in all studied spectral regions is induced by the same kind of deep traps, that produce thermoluminescence in the regions of palaeodosimetric peaks for both minerals. The mechanism for photoionization of deep traps was proposed as being due to delocalization of the excited state of the corresponding lattice defects. The excited state overlaps the zone states; i.e. is situated in the conduction band. Because of the high quantum yield of deep electron trap ionization in the UV spectral region, the present aim was to study the possibility of using UV-stimulation for palaeodose reconstruction

  4. Photoionization of radiation-induced traps in quartz and alkali feldspars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huett, G. E-mail: hutt@pdos.gi.ee; Jaek, I.; Vasilchenko, V

    2001-01-15

    For the optimization of luminescence dating and dosimetry techniques on the basis of the optically stimulated luminescence, the stimulation spectra of quartz and alkali feldspars were measured in the spectral region of 250-1100 nm using optically stimulated afterglow. Optically stimulated luminescence in all studied spectral regions is induced by the same kind of deep traps, that produce thermoluminescence in the regions of palaeodosimetric peaks for both minerals. The mechanism for photoionization of deep traps was proposed as being due to delocalization of the excited state of the corresponding lattice defects. The excited state overlaps the zone states; i.e. is situated in the conduction band. Because of the high quantum yield of deep electron trap ionization in the UV spectral region, the present aim was to study the possibility of using UV-stimulation for palaeodose reconstruction.

  5. Estimation of the spatial distribution of traps using space-charge-limited current measurements in an organic single crystal

    KAUST Repository

    Dacuña, Javier

    2012-09-06

    We used a mobility edge transport model and solved the drift-diffusion equation to characterize the space-charge-limited current of a rubrene single-crystal hole-only diode. The current-voltage characteristics suggest that current is injection-limited at high voltage when holes are injected from the bottom contact (reverse bias). In contrast, the low-voltage regime shows that the current is higher when holes are injected from the bottom contact as compared to hole injection from the top contact (forward bias), which does not exhibit injection-limited current in the measured voltage range. This behavior is attributed to an asymmetric distribution of trap states in the semiconductor, specifically, a distribution of traps located near the top contact. Accounting for a localized trap distribution near the contact allows us to reproduce the temperature-dependent current-voltage characteristics in forward and reverse bias simultaneously, i.e., with a single set of model parameters. We estimated that the local trap distribution contains 1.19×1011 cm -2 states and decays as exp(-x/32.3nm) away from the semiconductor-contact interface. The local trap distribution near one contact mainly affects injection from the same contact, hence breaking the symmetry in the charge transport. The model also provides information of the band mobility, energy barrier at the contacts, and bulk trap distribution with their corresponding confidence intervals. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  6. Dependence of trapped-flux-induced surface resistance of a large-grain Nb superconducting radio-frequency cavity on spatial temperature gradient during cooldown through Tc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shichun; Kubo, Takayuki; Geng, R. L.

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies by Romanenko et al. revealed that cooling down a superconducting cavity under a large spatial temperature gradient decreases the amount of trapped flux and leads to reduction of the residual surface resistance. In the present paper, the flux expulsion ratio and the trapped-flux-induced surface resistance of a large-grain cavity cooled down under a spatial temperature gradient up to 80 K /m are studied under various applied magnetic fields from 5 to 20 μ T . We show the flux expulsion ratio improves as the spatial temperature gradient increases, independent of the applied magnetic field: our results support and enforce the previous studies. We then analyze all rf measurement results obtained under different applied magnetic fields together by plotting the trapped-flux-induced surface resistance normalized by the applied magnetic field as a function of the spatial temperature gradient. All the data can be fitted by a single curve, which defines an empirical formula for the trapped-flux-induced surface resistance as a function of the spatial temperature gradient and applied magnetic field. The formula can fit not only the present results but also those obtained by Romanenko et al. previously. The sensitivity rfl of surface resistance from trapped magnetic flux of fine-grain and large-grain niobium cavities and the origin of d T /d s dependence of Rfl/Ba are also discussed.

  7. Development of Laser-Induced Fluorescence Diagnostic for the Paul Trap Simulator Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, Moses; Efthimion, Philip; Gilson, Erik P; Majeski, Richard; Startsev, Edward

    2005-01-01

    The Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) is a cylindrical Paul trap whose purpose is to simulate the nonlinear dynamics of intense charged particle beam propagation in alternating-gradient magnetic transport systems. For the in-situ measurement of the transverse ion density profile in the PTSX device, which is essential for the study of beam mismatch and halo particle production, a laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic system is being developed. Instead of cesium, which has been used in the initial phase of the PTSX experiment, barium has been selected as the preferred ion for the laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic. The installation of the barium ion source and the characterization of the tunable dye laser system are discussed. The design of the collection optics with an intensified CCD camera system is also discussed. Finally, initial test results using the laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic will be presented.

  8. A sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) sex pheromone mixture increases trap catch relative to a single synthesized component in specific environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas S.; Tix, John A.; Hlina, Benjamin L.; Wagner, C. Michael; Siefkes, Michael J.; Wang, Huiyong; Li, Weiming

    2015-01-01

    Spermiating male sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) release a sex pheromone, of which a component, 7α, 12α, 24-trihydoxy-3-one-5α-cholan-24-sulfate (3kPZS), has been identified and shown to induce long distance preference responses in ovulated females. However, other pheromone components exist, and when 3kPZS alone was used to control invasive sea lamprey populations in the Laurentian Great Lakes, trap catch increase was significant, but gains were generally marginal. We hypothesized that free-ranging sea lamprey populations discriminate between a partial and complete pheromone while migrating to spawning grounds and searching for mates at spawning grounds. As a means to test our hypothesis, and to test two possible uses of sex pheromones for sea lamprey control, we asked whether the full sex pheromone mixture released by males (spermiating male washings; SMW) is more effective than 3kPZS in capturing animals in traditional traps (1) en route to spawning grounds and (2) at spawning grounds. At locations where traps target sea lampreys en route to spawning grounds, SMW-baited traps captured significantly more sea lampreys than paired 3kPZS-baited traps (~10 % increase). At spawning grounds, no difference in trap catch was observed between 3kPZS and SMW-baited traps. The lack of an observed difference at spawning grounds may be attributed to increased pheromone competition and possible involvement of other sensory modalities to locate mates. Because fishes often rely on multiple and sometimes redundant sensory modalities for critical life history events, the addition of sex pheromones to traditionally used traps is not likely to work in all circumstances. In the case of the sea lamprey, sex pheromone application may increase catch when applied to specifically designed traps deployed in streams with low adult density and limited spawning habitat.

  9. Localization of ionization-induced trapping in a laser wakefield accelerator using a density down-ramp

    CERN Document Server

    Hansson, M.; Ekerfelt, H.; Aurand, B.; Gallardo Ganzalez, I.; Desforges, F. G.; Davoine, X.; Maitrallain, A.; Reymond, S.; Monot, P.; Persson, A.; Dobosz Dufrénoy S.; Wahlström C-G.; Cros, B.; Lundh, O.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a study on controlled trapping of electrons, by field ionization of nitrogen ions, in laser wakefield accelerators in variable length gas cells. In addition to ionization-induced trapping in the density plateau inside the cells, which results in wide, but stable, electron energy spectra, a regime of ionization-induced trapping localized in the density down-ramp at the exit of the gas cells, is found. The resulting electron energy spectra are peaked, with 10% shot-to-shot fluctuations in peak energy. Ionization-induced trapping of electrons in the density down-ramp is a way to trap and accelerate a large number of electrons, thus improving the efficiency of the laser-driven wakefield acceleration.

  10. Radial diffusion of toroidally trapped particles induced by lower hybrid and fast waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krlin, L.

    1992-10-01

    The interaction of RF field with toroidally trapped particles (bananas) can cause their intrinsic stochastically diffusion both in the configuration and velocity space. In RF heating and/or current drive regimes, RF field can interact with plasma particles and with thermonuclear alpha particles. The aim of this contribution is to give some analytical estimates of induced radial diffusion of alphas and of ions. (author)

  11. Influence of resistivity on energetic trapped particle-induced internal kink modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biglari, H.; Chen, L.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of resistivity on energetic trapped particle-induced internal kink modes, dubbed ''fishbones'' in the literature, is explored. A general dispersion relation, which recovers the ideal theory in its appropriate limit, is derived and analyzed. An important implication of the theory for present generation fusion devices such as the Joint European Torus [Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research (IAEA, London, 1984), Vol I, p.11] is that they will be stable to fishbone activity

  12. An efficient single-step scheme for manipulating quantum information of two trapped ions beyond the Lamb-Dicke limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, L.F.; Nori, Franco

    2003-01-01

    Based on the exact conditional quantum dynamics for a two-ion system, we propose an efficient single-step scheme for coherently manipulating quantum information of two trapped cold ions by using a pair of synchronous laser pulses. Neither the auxiliary atomic level nor the Lamb-Dicke approximation are needed

  13. Single and dual fiber nano-tip optical tweezers: trapping and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decombe, Jean-Baptiste; Huant, Serge; Fick, Jochen

    2013-12-16

    An original optical tweezers using one or two chemically etched fiber nano-tips is developed. We demonstrate optical trapping of 1 micrometer polystyrene spheres at optical powers down to 2 mW. Harmonic trap potentials were found in the case of dual fiber tweezers by analyzing the trapped particle position fluctuations. The trap stiffness was deduced using three different models. Consistent values of up to 1 fN/nm were found. The stiffness linearly decreases with decreasing light intensity and increasing fiber tip-to-tip distance.

  14. Effects of cigarette smoke on methacholine- and AMP-induced air trapping in asthmatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Luis; Palop, Julio; Llusar, Ruth; Herrera, Susana; Perez-Frances, Carmen; Lanuza, Amparo; Aguilar, Daniela

    2015-02-01

    Abstract Objective: No information is available on the effect of cigarette smoke on bronchoconstrictor-induced air trapping in asthma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the additional influence of smoking on methacholine- and adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-induced air trapping in subjects with asthma. Airway responsiveness to methacholine and AMP, bronchial (J'awNO) and alveolar (CANO) nitric oxide (NO) and exhaled breath condensate pH were measured in 68 adults (23 current smokers with asthma, 23 non-smokers with asthma and 22 current or former smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; COPD). The degree of air trapping induced by each bronchoconstrictor agent was expressed by the percent fall in forced vital capacity (FVC) at a 20% fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 s relative to FVC after saline inhalation (ΔFVC%). The ΔFVC% for AMP was higher in both smokers with asthma and patients with COPD than in non-smokers with asthma (p<0.001). By contrast, ΔFVC% for methacholine was similar in the three groups of subjects (p=0.69). In smokers with asthma, but not in the other two groups, there was a correlation between the residual volume/total lung capacity at baseline and the ΔFVC% induced by each bronchoconstrictor agent. Mean values for J'awNO were higher in non-smokers with asthma than in the other two groups (p<0.05). The results of this study suggest that factors underlying bronchoconstriction induced by indirect agonists are different in smokers and non-smokers with asthma. These observations might be clinically relevant, because triggers that frequently induce bronchial obstruction in the real world act by an indirect mechanism.

  15. Transparent Flash Memory using Single Ta2O5 Layer for both Charge Trapping and Tunneling Dielectrics

    KAUST Repository

    Hota, Mrinal Kanti

    2017-06-08

    We report reproducible multibit transparent flash memory in which a single solution-derived Ta2O5 layer is used simultaneously as charge trapping and tunneling layer. This is different from conventional flash cells, where two different dielectric layers are typically used. Under optimized programming/erasing operations, the memory device shows excellent programmable memory characteristics with a maximum memory window of ~10 V. Moreover, the flash memory device shows a stable 2-bit memory performance, good reliability, including data retention for more than 104 sec and endurance performance for more than 100 cycles. The use of a common charge trapping and tunneling layer can simplify advanced flash memory fabrication.

  16. Transparent Flash Memory using Single Ta2O5 Layer for both Charge Trapping and Tunneling Dielectrics

    KAUST Repository

    Hota, Mrinal Kanti; Alshammari, Fwzah H.; Salama, Khaled N.; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2017-01-01

    We report reproducible multibit transparent flash memory in which a single solution-derived Ta2O5 layer is used simultaneously as charge trapping and tunneling layer. This is different from conventional flash cells, where two different dielectric layers are typically used. Under optimized programming/erasing operations, the memory device shows excellent programmable memory characteristics with a maximum memory window of ~10 V. Moreover, the flash memory device shows a stable 2-bit memory performance, good reliability, including data retention for more than 104 sec and endurance performance for more than 100 cycles. The use of a common charge trapping and tunneling layer can simplify advanced flash memory fabrication.

  17. Nanomechanical investigation of ion implanted single crystals - Challenges, possibilities and pitfall traps related to nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurpaska, Lukasz

    2017-10-01

    Nanoindentation technique have developed considerably over last thirty years. Nowadays, commercially available systems offer very precise measurement in nano- and microscale, environmental noise cancelling (or at least noise suppressing), in situ high temperature indentation in controlled atmosphere and vacuum conditions and different additional options, among them dedicated indentation is one of the most popular. Due to its high precision, and ability to measure mechanical properties from very small depths (tens of nm), this technique become quite popular in the nuclear society. It is known that ion implantation (to some extent) can simulate the influence of neutron flux. However, depth of the material damage is very limited resulting in creation of thin layer of modified material over unmodified bulk. Therefore, only very precise technique, offering possibility to control depth of the measurement can be used to study functional properties of the material. For this reason, nanoindentation technique seems to be a perfect tool to investigate mechanical properties of ion implanted specimens. However, conducting correct nanomechanical experiment and extracting valuable mechanical parameters is not an easy task. In this paper a discussion about the nanoindentation tests performed on ion irradiated YSZ single crystal is presented. The goal of this paper is to discuss possible traps when studying mechanical properties of such materials and thin coatings.

  18. Collective excitations in circular atomic configurations and single-photon traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, Hanno

    2004-01-01

    Correlated excitations in a plane circular configuration of identical atoms with parallel dipole moments are investigated. The collective energy eigenstates, which are formally identical to Frenkel excitons, can be computed together with their level shifts and decay rates by decomposing the atomic state space into carrier spaces for the irreducible representations of the symmetry group Z N of the circle. It is shown that the index p of these representations can be used as a quantum number analogously to the orbital angular momentum quantum number l in hydrogenlike systems. Just as the hydrogen s states are the only electronic wave functions which can occupy the central region of the Coulomb potential, the quasiparticle corresponding to a collective excitation of the atoms in the circle can occupy the central atom only for vanishing Z N quantum number p. If a central atom is present, the p=0 state splits into two and shows level crossing at certain radii; in the regions between these radii, damped quantum beats between two 'extreme' p=0 configurations occur. The physical mechanisms behind super- and subradiance at a given radius are discussed. It is shown that, beyond a certain critical number of atoms in the circle, the lifetime of the maximally subradiant state increases exponentially with the number of atoms in the configuration, making the system a natural candidate for a single-photon trap

  19. Optical trapping and binding of particles in an optofluidic stable Fabry-Pérot resonator with single-sided injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaber, Noha; Malak, Maurine; Marty, Frédéric; Angelescu, Dan E; Richalot, Elodie; Bourouina, Tarik

    2014-07-07

    In this article, microparticles are manipulated inside an optofluidic Fabry-Pérot cylindrical cavity embedding a fluidic capillary tube, taking advantage of field enhancement and multiple reflections within the optically-resonant cavity. This enables trapping of suspended particles with single-side injection of light and with low optical power. A Hermite-Gaussian standing wave is developed inside the cavity, forming trapping spots at the locations of the electromagnetic field maxima with a strong intensity gradient. The particles get arranged in a pattern related to the mechanism affecting them: either optical trapping or optical binding. This is proven to eventually translate into either an axial one dimensional (1D) particle array or a cluster of particles. Numerical simulations are performed to model the field distributions inside the cavity allowing a behavioral understanding of the phenomena involved in each case.

  20. Characterizing physical properties and heterogeneous chemistry of single particles in air using optical trapping-Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Z.; Wang, C.; Pan, Y. L.; Videen, G.

    2017-12-01

    Heterogeneous reactions of solid particles in a gaseous environment are of increasing interest; however, most of the heterogeneous chemistry studies of airborne solids were conducted on particle ensembles. A close examination on the heterogeneous chemistry between single particles and gaseous-environment species is the key to elucidate the fundamental mechanisms of hydroscopic growth, cloud nuclei condensation, secondary aerosol formation, etc., and reduce the uncertainty of models in radiative forcing, climate change, and atmospheric chemistry. We demonstrate an optical trapping-Raman spectroscopy (OT-RS) system to study the heterogeneous chemistry of the solid particles in air at single-particle level. Compared to other single-particle techniques, optical trapping offers a non-invasive, flexible, and stable method to isolate single solid particle from substrates. Benefited from two counter-propagating hollow beams, the optical trapping configuration is adaptive to trap a variety of particles with different materials from inorganic substitution (carbon nanotubes, silica, etc.) to organic, dye-doped polymers and bioaerosols (spores, pollen, etc.), with different optical properties from transparent to strongly absorbing, with different sizes from sub-micrometers to tens of microns, or with distinct morphologies from loosely packed nanotubes to microspheres and irregular pollen grains. The particles in the optical trap may stay unchanged, surface degraded, or optically fragmented according to different laser intensity, and their physical and chemical properties are characterized by the Raman spectra and imaging system simultaneously. The Raman spectra is able to distinguish the chemical compositions of different particles, while the synchronized imaging system can resolve their physical properties (sizes, shapes, morphologies, etc.). The temporal behavior of the trapped particles also can be monitored by the OT-RS system at an indefinite time with a resolution from

  1. Hidden in the light: Magnetically induced afterglow from trapped chameleon fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gies, Holger; Mota, David F.; Shaw, Douglas J.

    2008-01-01

    We propose an afterglow phenomenon as a unique trace of chameleon fields in optical experiments. The vacuum interaction of a laser pulse with a magnetic field can lead to a production and subsequent trapping of chameleons in the vacuum chamber, owing to their mass dependence on the ambient matter density. Magnetically induced reconversion of the trapped chameleons into photons creates an afterglow over macroscopic timescales that can conveniently be searched for by current optical experiments. We show that the chameleon parameter range accessible to available laboratory technology is comparable to scales familiar from astrophysical stellar energy-loss arguments. We analyze quantitatively the afterglow properties for various experimental scenarios and discuss the role of potential background and systematic effects. We conclude that afterglow searches represent an ideal tool to aim at the production and detection of cosmologically relevant scalar fields in the laboratory

  2. Gene trapping identifies a putative tumor suppressor and a new inducer of cell migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guardiola-Serrano, Francisca; Haendeler, Judith; Lukosz, Margarete; Sturm, Karsten; Melchner, Harald von; Altschmied, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) is a pleiotropic cytokine involved in apoptotic cell death, cellular proliferation, differentiation, inflammation, and tumorigenesis. In tumors it is secreted by tumor associated macrophages and can have both pro- and anti-tumorigenic effects. To identify genes regulated by TNFα, we performed a gene trap screen in the mammary carcinoma cell line MCF-7 and recovered 64 unique, TNFα-induced gene trap integration sites. Among these were the genes coding for the zinc finger protein ZC3H10 and for the transcription factor grainyhead-like 3 (GRHL3). In line with the dual effects of TNFα on tumorigenesis, we found that ZC3H10 inhibits anchorage independent growth in soft agar suggesting a tumor suppressor function, whereas GRHL3 strongly stimulated the migration of endothelial cells which is consistent with an angiogenic, pro-tumorigenic function

  3. Biexciton emission from single isoelectronic traps formed by nitrogen-nitrogen pairs in GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamiya, Kengo; Fukushima, Toshiyuki; Yagi, Shuhei; Hijikata, Yasuto; Yaguchi, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku , Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Mochizuki, Toshimitsu; Yoshita, Masahiro; Akiyama, Hidefumi [Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Kuboya, Shigeyuki; Onabe, Kentaro [Department of Advanced Materials Science, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Katayama, Ryuji [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2013-12-04

    We have studied photoluminescence (PL) from individual isoelectronic traps formed by nitrogen-nitrogen (NN) pairs in GaAs. Sharp emission lines due to exciton and biexciton were observed from individual isoelectronic traps in nitrogen atomic-layer doped (ALD) GaAs. The binding energy of biexciton bound to individual isoelectronic traps was approximately 8 meV. Both the exciton and biexciton luminescence lines show completely random polarization and no fine-structure splitting. These results are desirable to the application to the quantum cryptography used in the field of quantum information technology.

  4. Single-well experimental design for studying residual trapping of superciritcal carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.; Freifeld, B.; Finsterle, S.; Leahy, M.; Ennis-King, J.; Paterson, L.; Dance, T.

    2010-06-15

    The objective of our research is to design a single-well injection-withdrawal test to evaluate residual phase trapping at potential CO{sub 2} geological storage sites. Given the significant depths targeted for CO{sub 2} storage and the resulting high costs associated with drilling to those depths, it is attractive to develop a single-well test that can provide data to assess reservoir properties and reduce uncertainties in the appraisal phase of site investigation. The main challenges in a single-well test design include (1) difficulty in quantifying the amount of CO{sub 2} that has dissolved into brine or migrated away from the borehole; (2) non-uniqueness and uncertainty in the estimate of the residual gas saturation (S{sub gr}) due to correlations among various parameters; and (3) the potential biased S{sub gr} estimate due to unaccounted heterogeneity of the geological medium. To address each of these challenges, we propose (1) to use a physical-based model to simulation test sequence and inverse modeling to analyze data information content and to quantify uncertainty; (2) to jointly use multiple data types generated from different kinds of tests to constrain the Sgr estimate; and (3) to reduce the sensitivity of the designed tests to geological heterogeneity by conducting the same test sequence in both a water-saturated system and a system with residual gas saturation. To perform the design calculation, we build a synthetic model and conduct a formal analysis for sensitivity and uncertain quantification. Both parametric uncertainty and geological uncertainty are considered in the analysis. Results show (1) uncertainty in the estimation of Sgr can be reduced by jointly using multiple data types and repeated tests; and (2) geological uncertainty is essential and needs to be accounted for in the estimation of S{sub gr} and its uncertainty. The proposed methodology is applied to the design of a CO{sub 2} injection test at CO2CRC's Otway Project Site, Victoria

  5. Feedback-controlled electro-kinetic traps for single-molecule ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-11

    Jan 11, 2014 ... limited residence time of a given molecule within the detection volume. A common ... information on individual folding pathways, as well as to the internal dynamics between ..... Essentials for building an electro-kinetic trap.

  6. Spectroscopy of Charge Carriers and Traps in Field-Doped Single Crystal Organic Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaoyang [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Frisbie, Daniel [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2017-03-31

    The proposed research aims to achieve quantitative, molecular level understanding of charge carriers and traps in field-doped crystalline organic semiconductors via in situ linear and nonlinear optical spectroscopy, in conjunction with transport measurements and molecular/crystal engineering.

  7. Raman spectroscopy of individual monocytes reveals that single-beam optical trapping of mononuclear cells occurs by their nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fore, Samantha; Chan, James; Taylor, Douglas; Huser, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    We show that laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy of eukaryotic cells with a significantly larger diameter than the tight focus of a single-beam laser trap leads to optical trapping of the cell by its optically densest part, i.e. typically the cell's nucleus. Raman spectra of individual optically trapped monocytes are compared with location-specific Raman spectra of monocytes adhered to a substrate. When the cell's nucleus is stained with a fluorescent live cell stain, the Raman spectrum of the DNA-specific stain is observed only in the nucleus of individual monocytes. Optically trapped monocytes display the same behavior. We also show that the Raman spectra of individual monocytes exhibit the characteristic Raman signature of cells that have not yet fully differentiated and that individual primary monocytes can be distinguished from transformed monocytes based on their Raman spectra. This work provides further evidence that laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy of individual cells provides meaningful biochemical information in an entirely non-destructive fashion that permits discerning differences between cell types and cellular activity

  8. Correlated motion of two atoms trapped in a single-mode cavity field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asboth, Janos K.; Domokos, Peter; Ritsch, Helmut

    2004-01-01

    We study the motion of two atoms trapped at distant positions in the field of a driven standing-wave high-Q optical resonator. Even without any direct atom-atom interaction the atoms are coupled through their position dependent influence on the intracavity field. For sufficiently good trapping and low cavity losses the atomic motion becomes significantly correlated and the two particles oscillate in their wells preferentially with a 90 deg. relative phase shift. The onset of correlations seriously limits cavity cooling efficiency, raising the achievable temperature to the Doppler limit. The physical origin of the correlation can be traced back to a cavity mediated crossfriction, i.e., a friction force on one particle depending on the velocity of the second particle. Choosing appropriate operating conditions allows for engineering these long range correlations. In addition this cross-friction effect can provide a basis for sympathetic cooling of distant trapped clouds

  9. Thermally induced structural modifications and O2 trapping in highly porous silica nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alessi, A.; Agnello, S.; Iovino, G.; Buscarino, G.; Melodia, E.G.; Cannas, M.; Gelardi, F.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we investigate by Raman spectroscopy the effect of isochronal (2 h) thermal treatments in air in the temperature range 200–1000 °C of amorphous silicon dioxide porous nanoparticles with diameters ranging from 5 up to 15 nm and specific surface 590–690 m 2 /g. Our results indicate that the amorphous structure changes similarly to other porous systems previously investigated, in fact superficial SiOH groups are removed, Si–O–Si linkages are created and the ring statistic is modified, furthermore these data evidence that the three membered rings do not contribute significantly to the Raman signal detected at about 495 cm −1 . In addition, after annealing at 900 and 1000 °C we noted the appearance of the O 2 emission at 1272 nm, absent in the not treated samples. The measure of the O 2 emission has been combined with electron paramagnetic resonance measurements of the γ irradiation induced HO · 2 radicals to investigate the O 2 content per mass unit of thin layers of silica. Our data reveal that the porous nanoparticles have a much lower ability to trap O 2 molecules per mass units than nonporous silica supporting a model by which O 2 trapping inside a surface layer of about 1 nm of silica is always limited. - Highlights: • O 2 emission and HO · 2 electron paramagnetic resonance signals are investigated. • Silica surface ability to trap O 2 molecules is explored by thermal treatments. • Raman study of thermally induced structural changes in porous silica nanoparticles. • Raman signal attributable to the three membered rings in silica

  10. Thermally induced structural modifications and O{sub 2} trapping in highly porous silica nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alessi, A., E-mail: antonino.alessi@unipa.it; Agnello, S.; Iovino, G.; Buscarino, G.; Melodia, E.G.; Cannas, M.; Gelardi, F.M.

    2014-12-15

    In this work we investigate by Raman spectroscopy the effect of isochronal (2 h) thermal treatments in air in the temperature range 200–1000 °C of amorphous silicon dioxide porous nanoparticles with diameters ranging from 5 up to 15 nm and specific surface 590–690 m{sup 2}/g. Our results indicate that the amorphous structure changes similarly to other porous systems previously investigated, in fact superficial SiOH groups are removed, Si–O–Si linkages are created and the ring statistic is modified, furthermore these data evidence that the three membered rings do not contribute significantly to the Raman signal detected at about 495 cm{sup −1}. In addition, after annealing at 900 and 1000 °C we noted the appearance of the O{sub 2} emission at 1272 nm, absent in the not treated samples. The measure of the O{sub 2} emission has been combined with electron paramagnetic resonance measurements of the γ irradiation induced HO{sup ·}{sub 2} radicals to investigate the O{sub 2} content per mass unit of thin layers of silica. Our data reveal that the porous nanoparticles have a much lower ability to trap O{sub 2} molecules per mass units than nonporous silica supporting a model by which O{sub 2} trapping inside a surface layer of about 1 nm of silica is always limited. - Highlights: • O{sub 2} emission and HO{sup ·}{sub 2} electron paramagnetic resonance signals are investigated. • Silica surface ability to trap O{sub 2} molecules is explored by thermal treatments. • Raman study of thermally induced structural changes in porous silica nanoparticles. • Raman signal attributable to the three membered rings in silica.

  11. Persistent photoconductivity due to trapping of induced charges in Sn/ZnO thin film based UV photodetector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Harish Kumar; Sreenivas, K.; Gupta, Vinay

    2010-01-01

    Photoconductivity relaxation in rf magnetron sputtered ZnO thin films integrated with ultrathin tin metal overlayer is investigated. Charge carriers induced at the ZnO-metal interface by the tin metal overlayer compensates the surface lying trap centers and leads to the enhanced photoresponse. On termination of ultraviolet radiation, recombination of the photoexcited electrons with the valence band holes leaves the excess carriers deeply trapped at the recombination center and holds the dark conductivity level at a higher value. Equilibrium between the recombination centers and valence band, due to trapped charges, eventually stimulates the persistent photoconductivity in the Sn/ZnO photodetectors.

  12. Persistent photoconductivity due to trapping of induced charges in Sn/ZnO thin film based UV photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Harish Kumar; Sreenivas, K.; Gupta, Vinay

    2010-05-01

    Photoconductivity relaxation in rf magnetron sputtered ZnO thin films integrated with ultrathin tin metal overlayer is investigated. Charge carriers induced at the ZnO-metal interface by the tin metal overlayer compensates the surface lying trap centers and leads to the enhanced photoresponse. On termination of ultraviolet radiation, recombination of the photoexcited electrons with the valence band holes leaves the excess carriers deeply trapped at the recombination center and holds the dark conductivity level at a higher value. Equilibrium between the recombination centers and valence band, due to trapped charges, eventually stimulates the persistent photoconductivity in the Sn/ZnO photodetectors.

  13. Reversible photo-induced trap formation in mixed-halide hybrid perovskites for photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoke, Eric T; Slotcavage, Daniel J; Dohner, Emma R; Bowring, Andrea R; Karunadasa, Hemamala I; McGehee, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    We report on reversible, light-induced transformations in (CH 3 NH 3 )Pb(Br x I 1- x ) 3 . Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of these perovskites develop a new, red-shifted peak at 1.68 eV that grows in intensity under constant, 1-sun illumination in less than a minute. This is accompanied by an increase in sub-bandgap absorption at ∼1.7 eV, indicating the formation of luminescent trap states. Light soaking causes a splitting of X-ray diffraction (XRD) peaks, suggesting segregation into two crystalline phases. Surprisingly, these photo-induced changes are fully reversible; the XRD patterns and the PL and absorption spectra revert to their initial states after the materials are left for a few minutes in the dark. We speculate that photoexcitation may cause halide segregation into iodide-rich minority and bromide-enriched majority domains, the former acting as a recombination center trap. This instability may limit achievable voltages from some mixed-halide perovskite solar cells and could have implications for the photostability of halide perovskites used in optoelectronics.

  14. New macroscopic theory of anamalous diffusion induced by the dissipative trapped-ion instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wimmel, H.K.

    1975-03-01

    For an axisymmetric toroidal plasma of the TOKAMAK type a new set of dissipative trapped-fluid equations is established. In addition to E vector x B vector drifts and collisions of the trapped particles, these equations take full account of the effect of Esub(//) (of the trapped ion modes) on free and trapped particles, and of the effect of grad delta 0 (delta 0 = equilibrium fraction of trapped particles). From the new equations the linear-mode properties of the dissipative trapped-ion instability and the anomalous diffusion flux of the trapped particles are derived. (orig.) [de

  15. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-09-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  16. Canine neutrophil extracellular traps release induced by the apicomplexan parasite Neospora Caninum in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengkai Wei

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Neosporosis is considered as one of the main causes of abortion and severe economic losses in dairy industry. The Canis genus serving as one of the confirmed definitive hosts of the apicomplexan parasite Neospora caninum (N. caninum plays a critical role in its life cycle. However, the effects of N. caninum on its definitive hosts of neutrophils extracellular traps (NETs formation remain unclear. In the present study, N. caninum tachyzoite-induced canine NETs formation was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Visualization of DNA decorated with H3, NE and MPO within N. caninum tachyzoite-induced NETs were examined using fluorescence confocal microscopy analyses. Furthermore, the formation of canine NETs was quantified using Sytox Green staining, and the LDH levels in supernatants were examined by an LDH Cytotoxicity Assay® kit. The results clearly showed that NETs-like structures were induced by N. caninum tachyzoites, and the major components within these structures induced by N. caninum tachyzoite were further confirmed by fluorescence confocal microscopy visualization. These results suggest that N. caninum tachyzoites strongly induced NETs formation in canine PMN. In functional inhibition assays, the blockings of NADPH oxidase, NE, MPO, SOCE, ERK 1/2 and p38 MAPK signaling pathways significantly inhibited N. caninum tachyzoite-induced NETs formation, which suggests that N. caninum tachyzoite-induced NETs formation is a NADPH oxidase-, NE-, MPO-, SOCE-, ERK 1/2- and p38 MAPK-dependent cell death process. To our knowledge, this study is the first to report the formation of NETs in canine PMN against N. caninum infection.

  17. A Single-Molecule Propyne Trap: Highly Efficient Removal of Propyne from Propylene with Anion-Pillared Ultramicroporous Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lifeng; Cui, Xili; Yang, Qiwei; Qian, Siheng; Wu, Hui; Bao, Zongbi; Zhang, Zhiguo; Ren, Qilong; Zhou, Wei; Chen, Banglin; Xing, Huabin

    2018-03-01

    Propyne/propylene (C 3 H 4 /C 3 H 6 ) separation is a critical process for the production of polymer-grade C 3 H 6 . However, optimization of the structure of porous materials for the highly efficient removal of C 3 H 4 from C 3 H 6 remains challenging due to their similar structures and ultralow C 3 H 4 concentration. Here, it is first reported that hybrid ultramicroporous materials with pillared inorganic anions (SiF 6 2- = SIFSIX, NbOF 5 2- = NbOFFIVE) can serve as highly selective C 3 H 4 traps for the removal of trace C 3 H 4 from C 3 H 6 . Especially, it is revealed that the pyrazine-based ultramicroporous material with square grid structure for which the pore shape and functional site disposition can be varied in 0.1-0.5 Å scale to match both the shape and interacting sites of guest molecule is an interesting single-molecule trap for C 3 H 4 molecule. The pyrazine-based single-molecule trap enables extremely high C 3 H 4 uptake under ultralow concentration (2.65 mmol g -1 at 3000 ppm, one C 3 H 4 per unit cell) and record selectivity over C 3 H 6 at 298 K (>250). The single-molecule binding mode for C 3 H 4 within ultramicroporous material is validated by X-ray diffraction experiments and modeling studies. The breakthrough experiments confirm that anion-pillared ultramicroporous materials set new benchmarks for the removal of ultralow concentration C 3 H 4 (1000 ppm on SIFSIX-3-Ni, and 10 000 ppm on SIFSIX-2-Cu-i) from C 3 H 6 . © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Laser induced single spot oxidation of titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jwad, Tahseen, E-mail: taj355@bham.ac.uk; Deng, Sunan; Butt, Haider; Dimov, S.

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • A new high resolution laser induced oxidation (colouring) method is proposed (single spot oxidation). • The method is applied to control oxide films thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates in micro-scale. • The method enable imprinting high resolution coloured image on Ti substrate. • Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots using the proposed method. • Colour coding of two colours into one field is presented. - Abstract: Titanium oxides have a wide range of applications in industry, and they can be formed on pure titanium using different methods. Laser-induced oxidation is one of the most reliable methods due to its controllability and selectivity. Colour marking is one of the main applications of the oxidation process. However, the colourizing process based on laser scanning strategies is limited by the relative large processing area in comparison to the beam size. Single spot oxidation of titanium substrates is proposed in this research in order to increase the resolution of the processed area and also to address the requirements of potential new applications. The method is applied to produce oxide films with different thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates. High resolution colour image is imprinted on a sheet of pure titanium by converting its pixels’ colours into laser parameter settings. Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots and then analysed. Two colours have been coded into one field and the dependencies of the reflected colours on incident and azimuthal angles of the light are discussed. The findings are of interest to a range of application areas, as they can be used to imprint optical devices such as diffusers and Fresnel lenses on metallic surfaces as well as for colour marking.

  19. Laser induced single spot oxidation of titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jwad, Tahseen; Deng, Sunan; Butt, Haider; Dimov, S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new high resolution laser induced oxidation (colouring) method is proposed (single spot oxidation). • The method is applied to control oxide films thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates in micro-scale. • The method enable imprinting high resolution coloured image on Ti substrate. • Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots using the proposed method. • Colour coding of two colours into one field is presented. - Abstract: Titanium oxides have a wide range of applications in industry, and they can be formed on pure titanium using different methods. Laser-induced oxidation is one of the most reliable methods due to its controllability and selectivity. Colour marking is one of the main applications of the oxidation process. However, the colourizing process based on laser scanning strategies is limited by the relative large processing area in comparison to the beam size. Single spot oxidation of titanium substrates is proposed in this research in order to increase the resolution of the processed area and also to address the requirements of potential new applications. The method is applied to produce oxide films with different thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates. High resolution colour image is imprinted on a sheet of pure titanium by converting its pixels’ colours into laser parameter settings. Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots and then analysed. Two colours have been coded into one field and the dependencies of the reflected colours on incident and azimuthal angles of the light are discussed. The findings are of interest to a range of application areas, as they can be used to imprint optical devices such as diffusers and Fresnel lenses on metallic surfaces as well as for colour marking.

  20. Differential Use of Human Neutrophil Fcγ Receptors for Inducing Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemán, Omar Rafael; Mora, Nancy; Cortes-Vieyra, Ricarda; Uribe-Querol, Eileen; Rosales, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils (PMN) are the most abundant leukocytes in the blood. PMN migrate from the circulation to sites of infection, where they are responsible for antimicrobial functions. PMN use phagocytosis, degranulation, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) to kill microbes. NETs are fibers composed of chromatin and neutrophil-granule proteins. Several pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, and parasites, and also some pharmacological stimuli such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) are efficient inducers of NETs. Antigen-antibody complexes are also capable of inducing NET formation. However the particular Fcγ receptor involved in triggering this function is a matter of controversy. In order to provide some insight into what Fcγ receptor is responsible for NET formation, each of the two human Fcγ receptors was stimulated individually by specific monoclonal antibodies and NET formation was evaluated. FcγRIIa cross-linking did not promote NET formation. Cross-linking other receptors such as integrins also did not promote NET formation. In contrast FcγRIIIb cross-linking induced NET formation similarly to PMA stimulation. NET formation was dependent on NADPH-oxidase, PKC, and ERK activation. These data show that cross-linking FcγRIIIb is responsible for NET formation by the human neutrophil.

  1. Differential Use of Human Neutrophil Fcγ Receptors for Inducing Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Rafael Alemán

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils (PMN are the most abundant leukocytes in the blood. PMN migrate from the circulation to sites of infection, where they are responsible for antimicrobial functions. PMN use phagocytosis, degranulation, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs to kill microbes. NETs are fibers composed of chromatin and neutrophil-granule proteins. Several pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, and parasites, and also some pharmacological stimuli such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA are efficient inducers of NETs. Antigen-antibody complexes are also capable of inducing NET formation. However the particular Fcγ receptor involved in triggering this function is a matter of controversy. In order to provide some insight into what Fcγ receptor is responsible for NET formation, each of the two human Fcγ receptors was stimulated individually by specific monoclonal antibodies and NET formation was evaluated. FcγRIIa cross-linking did not promote NET formation. Cross-linking other receptors such as integrins also did not promote NET formation. In contrast FcγRIIIb cross-linking induced NET formation similarly to PMA stimulation. NET formation was dependent on NADPH-oxidase, PKC, and ERK activation. These data show that cross-linking FcγRIIIb is responsible for NET formation by the human neutrophil.

  2. Neutrophil extracellular traps contribute to the pathogenesis of acid-aspiration-induced ALI/ARDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haitao; Zhou, Xiaoting; Tan, Hongyi; Hu, Yongbin; Zhang, Lemeng; Liu, Shuai; Dai, Minhui; Li, Yi; Li, Qian; Mao, Zhi; Pan, Pinhua; Su, Xiaoli; Hu, Chengpin

    2018-01-05

    Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) is a manifestation of systemic inflammation in the lungs, but the factors that trigger inflammation in ALI/ARDS are unclear. We hypothesized that neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) contribute to the pathogenesis of acid aspiration-induced ALI/ARDS. Analysis of bronchial aspirates from ARDS patients showed that NETs were significantly correlated with the degree of ARDS (r = -0.5846, p = 0.0359). NETs in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of acid-aspiration mice were significantly higher (141.6 ± 23.08) at 3 h after injury than those in the sham group (1234 ± 101.9; p = 0.003, n = 5 per group). Exogenous NETs aggravated lung injury, while alvelestat and DNase markedly attenuated the intensity of ARDS. We investigated whether NETs are involved in the severity of gastric aspiration-induced ARDS. Then, a hydrochloric acid aspiration-induced ALI murine model was used to assess whether NETs are pathogenic and whether targeting NETs is protective. Exogenous NETs were administered to mice. Alvelestat can inhibit neutrophil elastase (NE), which serves an important role in NET formation, so we investigated whether alvelestat could protect against ALI in cell and mouse models. NETs may contribute to ALI/ARDS by promoting tissue damage and systemic inflammation. Targeting NETs by alvelestat may be a potential therapeutic strategy.

  3. Cryogenic surface ion traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedermayr, M.

    2015-01-01

    Microfabricated surface traps are a promising architecture to realize a scalable quantum computer based on trapped ions. In principle, hundreds or thousands of surface traps can be located on a single substrate in order to provide large arrays of interacting ions. To this end, trap designs and fabrication methods are required that provide scalable, stable and reproducible ion traps. This work presents a novel surface-trap design developed for cryogenic applications. Intrinsic silicon is used as the substrate material of the traps. The well-developed microfabrication and structuring methods of silicon are utilized to create simple and reproducible traps. The traps were tested and characterized in a cryogenic setup. Ions could be trapped and their life time and motional heating were investigated. Long ion lifetimes of several hours were observed and the measured heating rates were reproducibly low at around 1 phonon per second at a trap frequency of 1 MHz. (author) [de

  4. Integration of laser trapping for continuous and selective monitoring of photothermal response of a single microparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Srivathsan; Chen, George C K; Ahluwalia, Balpreet Singh

    2008-12-01

    Photothermal response (PTR) is an established pump and probe technique for real-time sensing of biological assays. Continuous and selective PTR monitoring is difficult owing to the Brownian motion changing the relative position of the target with respect to the beams. Integration of laser trapping with PTR is proposed as a solution. The proposed method is verified on red polystyrene microparticles. PTR is continuously monitored for 30 min. Results show that the mean relaxation time variation of the acquired signals is less than 5%. The proposed method is then applied to human red blood cells for continuous and selective PTR.

  5. CysLT2 receptor activation is involved in LTC4-induced lung air-trapping in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekioka, Tomohiko; Kadode, Michiaki; Yonetomi, Yasuo; Kamiya, Akihiro; Fujita, Manabu; Nabe, Takeshi; Kawabata, Kazuhito

    2017-01-05

    CysLT 1 receptors are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of asthma. However, the functional roles of CysLT 2 receptors in this condition have not been determined. The purpose of this study is to develop an experimental model of CysLT 2 receptor-mediated LTC 4 -induced lung air-trapping in guinea pigs and use this model to clarify the mechanism underlying response to such trapping. Because LTC 4 is rapidly converted to LTD 4 by γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (γ-GTP) under physiological conditions, S-hexyl GSH was used as a γ-GTP inhibitor. In anesthetized artificially ventilated guinea pigs with no S-hexyl GSH treatment, i.v. LTC 4 -induced bronchoconstriction was almost completely inhibited by montelukast, a CysLT 1 receptor antagonist, but not by BayCysLT 2 RA, a CysLT 2 receptor antagonist. The inhibitory effect of montelukast was diminished by treatment with S-hexyl GSH, whereas the effect of BayCysLT 2 RA was enhanced with increasing dose of S-hexyl GSH. Macroscopic and histological examination of lung tissue isolated from LTC 4 -/S-hexyl-GSH-treated guinea pigs revealed air-trapping expansion, particularly at the alveolar site. Inhaled LTC 4 in conscious guinea pigs treated with S-hexyl GSH increased both airway resistance and airway hyperinflation. On the other hand, LTC 4 -induced air-trapping was only partially suppressed by treatment with the bronchodilator salmeterol. Although montelukast inhibition of LTC 4 -induced air-trapping was weak, treatment with BayCysLT 2 RA resulted in complete suppression of this air-trapping. Furthermore, BayCysLT 2 RA completely suppressed LTC 4 -induced airway vascular hyperpermeability. In conclusion, we found in this study that CysLT 2 receptors mediate LTC 4 -induced bronchoconstriction and air-trapping in S-hexyl GSH-treated guinea pigs. It is therefore believed that CysLT 2 receptors contribute to asthmatic response involving air-trapping. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Single Particle Differentiation through 2D Optical Fiber Trapping and Back-Scattered Signal Statistical Analysis: An Exploratory Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Joana S; Ribeiro, Rita S R; Cunha, João P S; Rosa, Carla C; Jorge, Pedro A S

    2018-02-27

    Recent trends on microbiology point out the urge to develop optical micro-tools with multifunctionalities such as simultaneous manipulation and sensing. Considering that miniaturization has been recognized as one of the most important paradigms of emerging sensing biotechnologies, optical fiber tools, including Optical Fiber Tweezers (OFTs), are suitable candidates for developing multifunctional small sensors for Medicine and Biology. OFTs are flexible and versatile optotools based on fibers with one extremity patterned to form a micro-lens. These are able to focus laser beams and exert forces onto microparticles strong enough (piconewtons) to trap and manipulate them. In this paper, through an exploratory analysis of a 45 features set, including time and frequency-domain parameters of the back-scattered signal of particles trapped by a polymeric lens, we created a novel single feature able to differentiate synthetic particles (PMMA and Polystyrene) from living yeasts cells. This single statistical feature can be useful for the development of label-free hybrid optical fiber sensors with applications in infectious diseases detection or cells sorting. It can also contribute, by revealing the most significant information that can be extracted from the scattered signal, to the development of a simpler method for particles characterization (in terms of composition, heterogeneity degree) than existent technologies.

  7. Integration of single oocyte trapping, in vitro fertilization and embryo culture in a microwell-structured microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chao; Zhang, Qiufang; Ma, Rui; Xie, Lan; Qiu, Tian; Wang, Lei; Mitchelson, Keith; Wang, Jundong; Huang, Guoliang; Qiao, Jie; Cheng, Jing

    2010-11-07

    In vitro fertilization (IVF) therapy is an important treatment for human infertility. However, the methods for clinical IVF have only changed slightly over decades: culture medium is held in oil-covered drops in Petri dishes and manipulation occurs by manual pipetting. Here we report a novel microwell-structured microfluidic device that integrates single oocyte trapping, fertilization and subsequent embryo culture. A microwell array was used to capture and hold individual oocytes during the flow-through process of oocyte and sperm loading, medium substitution and debris cleaning. Different microwell depths were compared by computational modeling and flow washing experiments for their effectiveness in oocyte trapping and debris removal. Fertilization was achieved in the microfluidic devices with similar fertilization rates to standard oil-covered drops in Petri dishes. Embryos could be cultured to blastocyst stages in our devices with developmental status individually monitored and tracked. The results suggest that the microfluidic device may bring several advantages to IVF practices by simplifying oocyte handling and manipulation, allowing rapid and convenient medium changing, and enabling automated tracking of any single embryo development.

  8. Soliton Trains Induced by Adaptive Shaping with Periodic Traps in Four-Level Ultracold Atom Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djouom Tchenkoue, M. L.; Welakuh Mbangheku, D.; Dikandé, Alain M.

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that an optical trap can be imprinted by a light field in an ultracold-atom system embedded in an optical cavity, and driven by three different coherent fields. Of the three fields coexisting in the optical cavity there is an intense control field that induces a giant Kerr nonlinearity via electromagnetically-induced transparency, and another field that creates a periodic optical grating of strength proportional to the square of the associated Rabi frequency. In this work elliptic-soliton solutions to the nonlinear equation governing the propagation of the probe field are considered, with emphasis on the possible generation of optical soliton trains forming a discrete spectrum with well defined quantum numbers. The problem is treated assuming two distinct types of periodic optical gratings and taking into account the negative and positive signs of detunings (detuning above or below resonance). Results predict that the competition between the self-phase and cross-phase modulation nonlinearities gives rise to a rich family of temporal soliton train modes characterized by distinct quantum numbers. (paper)

  9. Soliton Trains Induced by Adaptive Shaping with Periodic Traps in Four-Level Ultracold Atom Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djouom Tchenkoue, M. L.; Welakuh Mbangheku, D.; Dikandé, Alain M.

    2017-06-01

    It is well known that an optical trap can be imprinted by a light field in an ultracold-atom system embedded in an optical cavity, and driven by three different coherent fields. Of the three fields coexisting in the optical cavity there is an intense control field that induces a giant Kerr nonlinearity via electromagnetically-induced transparency, and another field that creates a periodic optical grating of strength proportional to the square of the associated Rabi frequency. In this work elliptic-soliton solutions to the nonlinear equation governing the propagation of the probe field are considered, with emphasis on the possible generation of optical soliton trains forming a discrete spectrum with well defined quantum numbers. The problem is treated assuming two distinct types of periodic optical gratings and taking into account the negative and positive signs of detunings (detuning above or below resonance). Results predict that the competition between the self-phase and cross-phase modulation nonlinearities gives rise to a rich family of temporal soliton train modes characterized by distinct quantum numbers.

  10. Swimming Motility Mediates the Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Induced by Flagellated Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madison Floyd

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen causing severe infections often characterized by robust neutrophilic infiltration. Neutrophils provide the first line of defense against P. aeruginosa. Aside from their defense conferred by phagocytic activity, neutrophils also release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs to immobilize bacteria. Although NET formation is an important antimicrobial process, the details of its mechanism are largely unknown. The identity of the main components of P. aeruginosa responsible for triggering NET formation is unclear. In this study, our focus was to identify the main bacterial factors mediating NET formation and to gain insight into the underlying mechanism. We found that P. aeruginosa in its exponential growth phase promoted strong NET formation in human neutrophils while its NET-inducing ability dramatically decreased at later stages of bacterial growth. We identified the flagellum as the primary component of P. aeruginosa responsible for inducing NET extrusion as flagellum-deficient bacteria remained seriously impaired in triggering NET formation. Purified P. aeruginosa flagellin, the monomeric component of the flagellum, does not stimulate NET formation in human neutrophils. P. aeruginosa-induced NET formation is independent of the flagellum-sensing receptors TLR5 and NLRC4 in both human and mouse neutrophils. Interestingly, we found that flagellar motility, not flagellum binding to neutrophils per se, mediates NET release induced by flagellated bacteria. Immotile, flagellar motor-deficient bacterial strains producing paralyzed flagella did not induce NET formation. Forced contact between immotile P. aeruginosa and neutrophils restored their NET-inducing ability. Both the motAB and motCD genetic loci encoding flagellar motor genes contribute to maximal NET release; however the motCD genes play a more important role. Phagocytosis of P. aeruginosa and superoxide production by neutrophils were also

  11. Dependence of trapped-flux-induced surface resistance of a large-grain Nb superconducting radio-frequency cavity on spatial temperature gradient during cooldown through T_{c}

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shichun Huang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies by Romanenko et al. revealed that cooling down a superconducting cavity under a large spatial temperature gradient decreases the amount of trapped flux and leads to reduction of the residual surface resistance. In the present paper, the flux expulsion ratio and the trapped-flux-induced surface resistance of a large-grain cavity cooled down under a spatial temperature gradient up to 80  K/m are studied under various applied magnetic fields from 5 to 20  μT. We show the flux expulsion ratio improves as the spatial temperature gradient increases, independent of the applied magnetic field: our results support and enforce the previous studies. We then analyze all rf measurement results obtained under different applied magnetic fields together by plotting the trapped-flux-induced surface resistance normalized by the applied magnetic field as a function of the spatial temperature gradient. All the data can be fitted by a single curve, which defines an empirical formula for the trapped-flux-induced surface resistance as a function of the spatial temperature gradient and applied magnetic field. The formula can fit not only the present results but also those obtained by Romanenko et al. previously. The sensitivity r_{fl} of surface resistance from trapped magnetic flux of fine-grain and large-grain niobium cavities and the origin of dT/ds dependence of R_{fl}/B_{a} are also discussed.

  12. Direct observation of a single proton in a Penning trap. Towards a direct measurement of the proton g-factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreim, Susanne Waltraud

    2009-08-25

    This PhD thesis presents experiments performed on a single proton stored in a Penning trap. The eigenmotion of an isolated, free proton could be detected electronically via a coupling to a resonance circuit. This represents a non-destructive measurement, i.e. the particle is not lost during the measurement. The free cyclotron frequency emerging from the measured eigenfrequencies is one of the two frequencies required for the determination of the magnetic moment. This enables a direct determination of the g-factor contrary to already existing works. Design, developing, and commissioning of the experimental setup have been accomplished within the scope of this work leading to a measuring accuracy of 10{sup -7}. The technical challenges for the determination of the second frequency (the Larmor frequency) arising from the smallness of the magnetic moment were mastered. Since the spin state required for this measurement is an internal degree of freedom, it can only be accessed through a coupling of the magnetic moment to the eigenmotion. A novel, hybrid penning trap is presented in this work, which imprints the spin information onto the eigenmotion, thus, realizing a quantum jump spectrometer. Therewith, the frequency shift of the two spin states resulting from the magnetic coupling reaches for the first time an electronically detectable range. (orig.)

  13. Direct observation of a single proton in a Penning trap. Towards a direct measurement of the proton g-factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreim, Susanne Waltraud

    2009-01-01

    This PhD thesis presents experiments performed on a single proton stored in a Penning trap. The eigenmotion of an isolated, free proton could be detected electronically via a coupling to a resonance circuit. This represents a non-destructive measurement, i.e. the particle is not lost during the measurement. The free cyclotron frequency emerging from the measured eigenfrequencies is one of the two frequencies required for the determination of the magnetic moment. This enables a direct determination of the g-factor contrary to already existing works. Design, developing, and commissioning of the experimental setup have been accomplished within the scope of this work leading to a measuring accuracy of 10 -7 . The technical challenges for the determination of the second frequency (the Larmor frequency) arising from the smallness of the magnetic moment were mastered. Since the spin state required for this measurement is an internal degree of freedom, it can only be accessed through a coupling of the magnetic moment to the eigenmotion. A novel, hybrid penning trap is presented in this work, which imprints the spin information onto the eigenmotion, thus, realizing a quantum jump spectrometer. Therewith, the frequency shift of the two spin states resulting from the magnetic coupling reaches for the first time an electronically detectable range. (orig.)

  14. Equivalent properties of single event burnout induced by different sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Shiyu; Cao Zhou; Da Daoan; Xue Yuxiong

    2009-01-01

    The experimental results of single event burnout induced by heavy ions and 252 Cf fission fragments in power MOSFET devices have been investigated. It is concluded that the characteristics of single event burnout induced by 252 Cf fission fragments is consistent to that in heavy ions. The power MOSFET in the 'turn-off' state is more susceptible to single event burnout than it is in the 'turn-on' state. The thresholds of the drain-source voltage for single event burnout induced by 173 MeV bromine ions and 252 Cf fission fragments are close to each other, and the burnout cross section is sensitive to variation of the drain-source voltage above the threshold of single event burnout. In addition, the current waveforms of single event burnouts induced by different sources are similar. Different power MOSFET devices may have different probabilities for the occurrence of single event burnout. (authors)

  15. Nonlinear dynamics in a trapped atomic Bose-Einstein condensate induced by an oscillating Gaussian potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Kazuya; Tsubota, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    We consider a trapped atomic Bose-Einstein condensate penetrated by a repulsive Gaussian potential and theoretically investigate the dynamics induced by oscillating the Gaussian potential. Our study is based on the numerical calculation of the two-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Our calculation reveals the dependence of the characteristic behavior of the condensate on the amplitude and frequency of the oscillating potential. These dynamics are deeply related to the nucleation and dynamics of quantized vortices and solitons. When the potential oscillates with a large amplitude, it nucleates many vortex pairs that move away from the potential. When the amplitude of the oscillation is small, it nucleates solitons through an annihilation of vortex pairs. We discuss three issues concerning the nucleation of vortices. The first is the phase diagram for the nucleation of vortices and solitons near the oscillating potential. The second is the mechanism and critical velocity of the nucleation. The critical velocity of the nucleation is an important issue in quantum fluids, and we propose an expression for the velocity containing both the coherence length and the size of the potential. The third is the divergence of the nucleation time, which is the time it takes for the potential to nucleate vortices, near the critical parameters for vortex nucleation.

  16. Neutrophil Extracellular DNA Traps Induce Autoantigen Production by Airway Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngwoo Choi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The hypothesis of autoimmune involvement in asthma has received much recent interest. Autoantibodies, such as anti-cytokeratin (CK 18, anti-CK19, and anti-α-enolase antibodies, react with self-antigens and are found at high levels in the sera of patients with severe asthma (SA. However, the mechanisms underlying autoantibody production in SA have not been fully determined. The present study was conducted to demonstrate that neutrophil extracellular DNA traps (NETs, cytotoxic molecules released from neutrophils, are a key player in the stimulation of airway epithelial cells (AECs to produce autoantigens. This study showed that NETs significantly increased the intracellular expression of tissue transglutaminase (tTG but did not affect that of CK18 in AECs. NETs induced the extracellular release of both tTG and CK18 in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, NETs directly degraded intracellular α-enolase into small fragments. However, antibodies against neutrophil elastase (NE or myeloperoxidase (MPO attenuated the effects of NETs on AECs. Furthermore, each NET isolated from healthy controls (HC, nonsevere asthma (NSA, and SA had different characteristics. Taken together, these findings suggest that AECs exposed to NETs may exhibit higher autoantigen production, especially in SA. Therefore, targeting of NETs may represent a new therapy for neutrophilic asthma with a high level of autoantigens.

  17. Trap-induced mass declines in small mammals: Mass as a population index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean E. Pearson; Yvette K. Ortega; Leonard F. Ruggiero

    2003-01-01

    Body mass is routinely used as an index of physical condition for comparing small-mammal populations. However, trapping effects on animals may undermine the effectiveness of body mass as an index of population health. We examined the effects of live-trapping on body mass of 3 small-mammal species: deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), southern red-...

  18. Estimation of the spatial distribution of traps using space-charge-limited current measurements in an organic single crystal

    KAUST Repository

    Dacuñ a, Javier; Xie, Wei; Salleo, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    bias), which does not exhibit injection-limited current in the measured voltage range. This behavior is attributed to an asymmetric distribution of trap states in the semiconductor, specifically, a distribution of traps located near the top contact

  19. High-Q energy trapping of temperature-stable shear waves with Lamé cross-sectional polarization in a single crystal silicon waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizian, R.; Daruwalla, A.; Ayazi, F.

    2016-03-01

    A multi-port electrostatically driven silicon acoustic cavity is implemented that efficiently traps the energy of a temperature-stable eigen-mode with Lamé cross-sectional polarization. Dispersive behavior of propagating and evanescent guided waves in a ⟨100⟩-aligned single crystal silicon waveguide is used to engineer the acoustic energy distribution of a specific shear eigen-mode that is well known for its low temperature sensitivity when implemented in doped single crystal silicon. Such an acoustic energy trapping in the central region of the acoustic cavity geometry and far from substrate obviates the need for narrow tethers that are conventionally used for non-destructive and high quality factor (Q) energy suspension in MEMS resonators; therefore, the acoustically engineered waveguide can simultaneously serve as in-situ self-oven by passing large uniformly distributed DC currents through its body and without any concern about perturbing the mode shape or deforming narrow supports. Such a stable thermo-structural performance besides large turnover temperatures than can be realized in Lamé eigen-modes make this device suitable for implementation of ultra-stable oven-controlled oscillators. 78 MHz prototypes implemented in arsenic-doped single crystal silicon substrates with different resistivity are transduced by in- and out-of-plane narrow-gap capacitive ports, showing high Q of ˜43k. The low resistivity device shows an overall temperature-induced frequency drift of 200 ppm over the range of -20 °C to 80 °C, which is ˜15× smaller compared to overall frequency drift measured for the similar yet high resistivity device in the same temperature range. Furthermore, a frequency tuning of ˜2100 ppm is achieved in high resistivity device by passing 45 mA DC current through its body. Continuous operation of the device under such a self-ovenizing current over 10 days did not induce frequency instability or degradation in Q.

  20. Trapping a single atom with a fraction of a photon using a photonic crystal nanocavity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oosten, D.; Kuipers, L.

    2011-01-01

    We consider the interaction between a single rubidium atom and a photonic crystal nanocavity. Because of the ultrasmall mode volume of the nanocavity, an extremely strong coupling regime can be achieved in which the atom can shift the cavity resonance by many cavity linewidths. We show that this

  1. Infrared laser dissociation of single megadalton polymer ions in a gated electrostatic ion trap: the added value of statistical analysis of individual events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Mohammad A; Clavier, Christian; Dagany, Xavier; Kerleroux, Michel; Dugourd, Philippe; Dunbar, Robert C; Antoine, Rodolphe

    2018-05-07

    In this study, we report the unimolecular dissociation mechanism of megadalton SO 3 -containing poly(2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid) (PAMPS) polymer cations and anions with the aid of infrared multiphoton dissociation coupled to charge detection ion trap mass spectrometry. A gated electrostatic ion trap ("Benner trap") is used to store and detect single gaseous polymer ions generated by positive and negative polarity in an electrospray ionization source. The trapped ions are then fragmented due to the sequential absorption of multiple infrared photons produced from a continuous-wave CO 2 laser. Several fragmentation pathways having distinct signatures are observed. Highly charged parent ions characteristically adopt a distinctive "stair-case" pattern (assigned to the "fission" process) whereas low charge species take on a "funnel like" shape (assigned to the "evaporation" process). Also, the log-log plot of the dissociation rate constants as a function of laser intensity between PAMPS positive and negative ions is significantly different.

  2. Single-cell mRNA cytometry via sequence-specific nanoparticle clustering and trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labib, Mahmoud; Mohamadi, Reza M.; Poudineh, Mahla; Ahmed, Sharif U.; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Huang, Ching-Lung; Moosavi, Maral; Sargent, Edward H.; Kelley, Shana O.

    2018-05-01

    Cell-to-cell variation in gene expression creates a need for techniques that can characterize expression at the level of individual cells. This is particularly true for rare circulating tumour cells, in which subtyping and drug resistance are of intense interest. Here we describe a method for cell analysis—single-cell mRNA cytometry—that enables the isolation of rare cells from whole blood as a function of target mRNA sequences. This approach uses two classes of magnetic particles that are labelled to selectively hybridize with different regions of the target mRNA. Hybridization leads to the formation of large magnetic clusters that remain localized within the cells of interest, thereby enabling the cells to be magnetically separated. Targeting specific intracellular mRNAs enablescirculating tumour cells to be distinguished from normal haematopoietic cells. No polymerase chain reaction amplification is required to determine RNA expression levels and genotype at the single-cell level, and minimal cell manipulation is required. To demonstrate this approach we use single-cell mRNA cytometry to detect clinically important sequences in prostate cancer specimens.

  3. Trapped Bose-Einstein condensates with Planck-scale induced deformation of the energy-momentum dispersion relation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briscese, F.

    2012-01-01

    We show that harmonically trapped Bose-Einstein condensates can be used to constrain Planck-scale physics. In particular we prove that a Planck-scale induced deformation of the Minkowski energy-momentum dispersion relation δE≃ξ 1 mcp/2M p produces a shift in the condensation temperature T c of about ΔT c /T c 0 ≃10 -6 ξ 1 for typical laboratory conditions. Such a shift allows to bound the deformation parameter up to |ξ 1 |≤10 4 . Moreover we show that it is possible to enlarge ΔT c /T c 0 and improve the bound on ξ 1 lowering the frequency of the harmonic trap. Finally we compare the Planck-scale induced shift in T c with similar effects due to interboson interactions and finite size effects.

  4. A gene-trap strategy identifies quiescence-induced genes in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR G

    and Walsh 1996). The balance between proliferation and ... In three lines, insertion occurred in genes previously implicated in the control of quiescence, i.e. ...... arrest-specific traps fall into different functional classes, such as cytoskeletal ...

  5. OptEase and TrapEase Vena Cava Filters: A Single-Center Experience in 258 Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onat, Levent; Ganiyusufoglu, Ali Kursat; Mutlu, Ayhan; Sirvanci, Mustafa; Duran, Cihan; Ulusoy, Onur Levent; Hamzaoglu, Azmi

    2009-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the OptEase and TrapEase (both from Cordis, Roden, Netherlands) vena cava filters in the prevention of pulmonary embolism (PE). Between May 2004 and December 2008, OptEase (permanent/retrievable; n = 228) or TrapEase (permanent; n = 30) vena cava filters were placed in 258 patients (160 female and 98 male; mean age 62 years [range 22 to 97]). Indications were as follows: prophylaxis for PE (n = 239), contraindication for anticoagulation in the presence of PE or DVT (n = 10), and development of PE or DVT despite anticoagulation (n = 9). Medical records were retrospectively reviewed for indications, clinical results, and procedure-related complications during placement and retrieval. Clinical PE did not develop in any of the patients. However, radiologic signs of segmental PE were seen in 6 of 66 patients with follow-up imaging data. Migration or fracture of the filter or cava perforation was not seen in any of the patients. Except for a single case of asymptomatic total cava thrombosis, no thrombotic occlusion was observed. One hundred forty-one patients were scheduled to undergo filter removal; however, 17 of them were not suitable for such based on venography evaluation. Removal was attempted in 124 patients and was successful in 115 of these (mean duration of retention 11 days [range 4 to 23]). Nine filters could not be removed. Permanent/retrievable vena cava filters are safe and effective devices for PE prophylaxis and for the management of venous thromboembolism by providing the option to be left in place.

  6. Excess electron is trapped in a large single molecular cage C60F60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yin-Feng; Li, Zhi-Ru; Wu, Di; Sun, Chia-Chung; Gu, Feng-Long

    2010-01-15

    A new kind of solvated electron systems, sphere-shaped e(-)@C60F60 (I(h)) and capsule-shaped e(-)@C60F60 (D6h), in contrast to the endohedral complex M@C60, is represented at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) + dBF (diffusive basis functions) density functional theory. It is proven, by examining the singly occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) and the spin density map of e(-)@C60F60, that the excess electron is indeed encapsulated inside the C60F60 cage. The shape of the electron cloud in SOMO matches with the shape of C60F60 cage. These cage-like single molecular solvated electrons have considerably large vertical electron detachment energies VDE of 4.95 (I(h)) and 4.67 eV (D6h) at B3LYP/6-31+G(3df) + dBF level compared to the VDE of 3.2 eV for an electron in bulk water (Coe et al., Int Rev Phys Chem 2001, 20, 33) and that of 3.66 eV for e(-)@C20F20 (Irikura, J Phys Chem A 2008, 112, 983), which shows their higher stability. The VDE of the sphere-shaped e(-)@C60F60 (I(h)) is greater than that of the capsule-shaped e(-)@C60F60 (D6h), indicating that the excess electron prefers to reside in the cage with the higher symmetry to form the more stable solvated electron. It is also noticed that the cage size [7.994 (I(h)), 5.714 and 9.978 A (D6h) in diameter] is much larger than that (2.826 A) of (H2O)20- dodecahedral cluster (Khan, Chem Phys Lett 2005, 401, 85). Copyright 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Quantitative measurement of damage caused by 1064-nm wavelength optical trapping of Escherichia coli cells using on-chip single cell cultivation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayano, Satoru; Wakamoto, Yuichi; Yamashita, Shinobu; Yasuda, Kenji

    2006-01-01

    We quantitatively examined the possible damage to the growth and cell division ability of Escherichia coli caused by 1064-nm optical trapping. Using the synchronous behavior of two sister E. coli cells, the growth and interdivision times between those two cells, one of which was trapped by optical tweezers, the other was not irradiated, were compared using an on-chip single cell cultivation system. Cell growth stopped during the optical trapping period, even with the smallest irradiated power on the trapped cells. Moreover, the damage to the cell's growth and interdivision period was proportional to the total irradiated energy (work) on the cell, i.e., irradiation time multiplied by irradiation power. The division ability was more easily affected by a smaller energy, 0.36 J, which was 30% smaller than the energy that adversely affected growth, 0.54 J. The results indicate that the damage caused by optical trapping can be estimated from the total energy applied to cells, and furthermore, that the use of optical trapping for manipulating cells might cause damage to cell division and growth mechanisms, even at wavelengths under 1064 nm, if the total irradiation energy is excessive

  8. The effect of dopant-induced electron traps on spectrum evolution of doped organic light-emitting devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhan, Y.Q. [Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key Laboratory), Lab of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)]. E-mail: yqzhan@fudan.edu.cn; Zhou, J. [Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key Laboratory), Lab of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Zhou, Y.C. [Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key Laboratory), Lab of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Wu, Y. [Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key Laboratory), Lab of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Yang, H. [Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key Laboratory), Lab of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Li, F.Y. [Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key Laboratory), Lab of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Ding, X.M. [Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key Laboratory), Lab of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Hou, X.Y. [Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key Laboratory), Lab of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)]. E-mail: xyhou@fudan.edu.cn

    2007-05-07

    A prototype of light emitting device with two symmetrically located Al/LiF electrodes is fabricated to study the voltage dependence of emission spectra. 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6- (pdimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran doped tris-(8-hydroxy-quinolinato) aluminum thin film is the emitting layer of the device. Experiments show that with increasing applied voltage the emission intensity of the device decreases, of which the dopant emission intensity decreases more steeply than that of the host. Based on the theory of space-charge-limited current in insulator with a single shallow trap level it is deduced that the photoluminescence intensity of the dopant emission decreases linearly with applied voltage, in good agreement with experimental measurements. The evolution of the emission spectra can be well explained by the suggested mechanism that the electrons are trapped in the dopant molecules, which blocks the energy transfer from the host, and leads to more excitons in the host to emit light.

  9. The effect of dopant-induced electron traps on spectrum evolution of doped organic light-emitting devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhan, Y.Q.; Zhou, J.; Zhou, Y.C.; Wu, Y.; Yang, H.; Li, F.Y.; Ding, X.M.; Hou, X.Y.

    2007-01-01

    A prototype of light emitting device with two symmetrically located Al/LiF electrodes is fabricated to study the voltage dependence of emission spectra. 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6- (pdimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran doped tris-(8-hydroxy-quinolinato) aluminum thin film is the emitting layer of the device. Experiments show that with increasing applied voltage the emission intensity of the device decreases, of which the dopant emission intensity decreases more steeply than that of the host. Based on the theory of space-charge-limited current in insulator with a single shallow trap level it is deduced that the photoluminescence intensity of the dopant emission decreases linearly with applied voltage, in good agreement with experimental measurements. The evolution of the emission spectra can be well explained by the suggested mechanism that the electrons are trapped in the dopant molecules, which blocks the energy transfer from the host, and leads to more excitons in the host to emit light

  10. Charge generation and trapping in bisphenol-A-polycarbonate/N-isopropylcarbazole mixture: A study by electron bombardment-induced conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, S.; Caraballo, D.

    2007-01-01

    Electron bombardment-induced conductivity measurements were carried out on cast films of N-isopropylcarbazole (NIPC) dispersed into an amorphous matrix of bisphenol-A-polycarbonate. The charge generation was studied by estimating the hole yield (g), the fraction of charge escaping recombination, as a function of electric field and concentration of NIPC at room temperature. The hole yield, besides increasing by increasing the content of NIPC, was observed to increase with the electric field in the manner predicted by the Onsager theory of geminate recombination. Deep trapping levels were studied by filling under electron bombardment and observing transients. The deep traps were neutral in nature with a concentration on the order of 8.0x10 14 cm -3 , which was low enough not to degrade transport under normal conditions

  11. Theory of energetic trapped particle-induced resistive interchange-ballooning modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biglari, H.; Chen, L.

    1986-02-01

    A theory describing the influence of energetic trapped particles on resistive interchange-ballooning modes in tokamaks is presented. It is shown that a population of hot particles trapped in the region of adverse curvature can resonantly interact with and destabilize the resistive interchange mode, which is stable in their absence because of favorable average curvature. The mode is different from the usual resistive interchange mode not only in its destabilization mechanism, but also in that it has a real component to its frequency comparable to the precessional drift frequency of the rapidly circulating energetic species. Corresponding growth rate and threshold conditions for this trapped-particle-driven instability are derived and finite banana width effects are shown to have a stabilizing effect on the mode. Finally, the ballooning/tearing dispersion relation is generalized to include hot particles, so that both the ideal and the resistive modes are derivable in the appropriate limits. 23 refs., 7 figs

  12. Numerical comparison between Maxwell stress method and equivalent multipole approach for calculation of the dielectrophoretic force in single-cell traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Carlos; Lim, Kian Meng

    2005-06-01

    This paper presents detailed numerical calculations of the dielectrophoretic force in traps designed for single-cell trapping. A trap with eight planar electrodes is studied for spherical and ellipsoidal particles using the boundary element method (BEM). Multipolar approximations of orders one to three are compared with the full Maxwell stress tensor (MST) calculation of the electrical force on spherical particles. Ellipsoidal particles are also studied, but in their case only the dipolar approximation is available for comparison with the MST solution. The results show that a small number of multipolar terms need to be considered in order to obtain accurate results for spheres, even in the proximity of the electrodes, and that the full MST calculation is only required in the study of non-spherical particles.

  13. Neutrophil extracellular traps in the host defense against sepsis induced by Burkholderia pseudomallei (melioidosis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Hanna K.; Koh, Gavin C. K. W.; Achouiti, Ahmed; van der Meer, Anne J.; Bulder, Ingrid; Stephan, Femke; Roelofs, Joris J. T. H.; Day, Nick P. J.; Peacock, Sharon J.; Zeerleder, Sacha; Wiersinga, W. Joost

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are a central player in the host response to bacteria: neutrophils release extracellular DNA (nucleosomes) and neutrophil elastase to entrap and kill bacteria. We studied the role of NETs in Burkholderia pseudomallei infection (melioidosis), an important cause

  14. Magnetic multipole induced zero-rotation frequency bounce-resonant loss in a Penning–Malmberg trap used for antihydrogen trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bray, C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jørgensen, L V; Kerrigan, S J; Keller, J; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2009-01-01

    In many antihydrogen trapping schemes, antiprotons held in a short-well Penning–Malmberg trap are released into a longer well. This process necessarily causes the bounce-averaged rotation frequency $\\overline{\\Omega}_r$ of the antiprotons around the trap axis to pass through zero. In the presence of a transverse magnetic multipole, experiments and simulations show that many antiprotons (over 30% in some cases) can be lost to a hitherto unidentified bounce-resonant process when $\\overline{\\Omega}_r$ is close to zero.

  15. Trapping induced Neff and electrical field transformation at different temperatures in neutron irradiated high resistivity silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eremin, V.; Li, Z.; Iljashenko, I.

    1994-02-01

    The trapping of both non-equilibrium electrons and holes by neutron induced deep levels in high resistivity silicon planar detectors have been observed. In the experiments Transient Current and Charge Techniques, with short laser light pulse excitation have been applied at temperature ranges of 77--300 k. Light pulse illumination of the front (p + ) and back (n + ) contacts of the detectors showed effective trapping and detrapping, especially for electrons. At temperatures lower than 150 k, the detrapping becomes non-efficient, and the additional negative charge of trapped electrons in the space charge region (SCR) of the detectors leads to dramatic transformations of the electric field due to the distortion of the effective space charge concentration N eff . The current and charge pulses transformation data can be explained in terms of extraction of electric field to the central part of the detector from the regions near both contacts. The initial field distribution may be recovered immediately by dropping reverse bias, which injects both electrons and holes into the space charge region. In the paper, the degree of the N eff distortions among various detectors irradiated by different neutron fluences are compared

  16. Heavy ion and proton-induced single event multiple upset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, R.A.; Carts, M.A.; Marshall, P.W.

    1997-01-01

    Individual ionizing heavy ion events are shown to cause two or more adjacent memory cells to change logic states in a high density CMOS SRAM. A majority of the upsets produced by normally incident heavy ions are due to single-particle events that causes a single cell to upset. However, for grazing angles a majority of the upsets produced by heavy-ion irradiation are due to single-particle events that cause two or more cells to change logic states. Experimental evidence of a single proton-induced spallation reaction that causes two adjacent memory cells to change logic states is presented. Results from a dual volume Monte-Carlo simulation code for proton-induced single-event multiple upsets are within a factor of three of experimental data for protons at normal incidence and 70 degrees

  17. Entanglement and quantum superposition induced by a single photon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Xin-You; Zhu, Gui-Lei; Zheng, Li-Li; Wu, Ying

    2018-03-01

    We predict the occurrence of single-photon-induced entanglement and quantum superposition in a hybrid quantum model, introducing an optomechanical coupling into the Rabi model. Originally, it comes from the photon-dependent quantum property of the ground state featured by the proposed hybrid model. It is associated with a single-photon-induced quantum phase transition, and is immune to the A2 term of the spin-field interaction. Moreover, the obtained quantum superposition state is actually a squeezed cat state, which can significantly enhance precision in quantum metrology. This work offers an approach to manipulate entanglement and quantum superposition with a single photon, which might have potential applications in the engineering of new single-photon quantum devices, and also fundamentally broaden the regime of cavity QED.

  18. Universal Expression of Efficiency at Maximum Power: A Quantum-Mechanical Brayton Engine Working with a Single Particle Confined in a Power-Law Trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Zhuo-Lin; Li Wei-Sheng; Lai Yi-Ming; He Ji-Zhou; Wang Jian-Hui

    2015-01-01

    We propose a quantum-mechanical Brayton engine model that works between two superposed states, employing a single particle confined in an arbitrary power-law trap as the working substance. Applying the superposition principle, we obtain the explicit expressions of the power and efficiency, and find that the efficiency at maximum power is bounded from above by the function: η_+ = θ/(θ + 1), with θ being a potential-dependent exponent. (paper)

  19. Radiation-induced transient absorption in single mode optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Looney, L.D.; Lyons, P.B.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reviews the measurements conducted by the Los Alamos National Laboratory in support of these NATO efforts wherein radiation-induced transient absorption was measured over time ranges from a few ns to several μs for two single mode fibers. Experimental conditions were varied to provide data for future development of standarized test conditions for single mode fibers. 8 refs., 11 figs

  20. Biotic and abiotic factors influencing growth rate and production of traps by the nematode-trapping fungus Duddingtonia flagrans when induced by Cooperia oncophora larvae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønvold, J.; Wolstrup, J.; Nansen, P.

    1999-01-01

    A series of experiments on corn meal agar was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of the nematode-trapping fungus Duddingtonia flagrans in different abiotic and biotic conditions which occur in cow pats. Above a concentration of 50 parasitic larvae (L-3) cm(-2) the fungus produced a maximum...... of between 500 and 600 nets cm(-2) at 20 degrees C in 2 days on the surface of corn meal agar. There were no differences in the trap-producing capacity of three strains of D. flagrans (CIII4, CI3 and Trol A). On agar at 30 degrees and 20 degrees C, the fungus responded to Coaperia oncophora L-3 very quickly...... anaerobically. On agar, D. flagrans (CI3) did not produce trapping nets in an anaerobic atmosphere. Moreover, C. oncophora L-3 stopped migration under anaerobic conditions. When the fungal cultures were transferred to a normal aerobic atmosphere, after 1 and 2 weeks under anaerobic conditions, the C. oncophora...

  1. Induced Magnetic Moment in Defected Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hong

    2006-01-01

    The existence of a large induced magnetic moment in defect single-walled carbon nanotube(SWNT) is predicted using the Green's function method. Specific to this magnetic moment of defect SWNT is its magnitude which is several orders of magnitude larger than that of perfect SWNT. The induced magnetic moment also shows certain remarkable features. Therefore, we suggest that two pair-defect orientations in SWNT can be distinguished in experiment through the direction of the induced magnetic moment at some Specific energy points

  2. Launch and capture of a single particle in a pulse-laser-assisted dual-beam fiber-optic trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zhenhai; She, Xuan; Li, Nan; Hu, Huizhu

    2018-06-01

    The rapid loading and manipulation of microspheres in optical trap is important for its applications in optomechanics and precision force sensing. We investigate the microsphere behavior under coaction of a dual-beam fiber-optic trap and a pulse laser beam, which reveals a launched microsphere can be effectively captured in a spatial region. A suitable order of pulse duration for launch is derived according to the calculated detachment energy threshold of pulse laser. Furthermore, we illustrate the effect of structural parameters on the launching process, including the spot size of pulse laser, the vertical displacement of beam waist and the initial position of microsphere. Our result will be instructive in the optimal design of the pulse-laser-assisted optical tweezers for controllable loading mechanism of optical trap.

  3. Relaxation oscillations induced by amplitude-dependent frequency in dissipative trapped electron mode turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, P.W.; Ware, A.S.; Newman, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    A nonlinear frequency shift in dissipative trapped electron mode turbulence is shown to give rise to a relaxation oscillation in the saturated power density spectrum. A simple non-Markovian closure for the coupled evolution of ion momentum and electron density response is developed to describe the oscillations. From solutions of a nonlinear oscillator model based on the closure, it is found that the oscillation is driven by the growth rate, as modified by the amplitude-dependent frequency shift, with inertia provided by the memory of the growth rate of prior amplitudes. This memory arises from time-history integrals common to statistical closures. The memory associated with a finite time of energy transfer between coupled spectrum components does not sustain the oscillation in the simple model. Solutions of the model agree qualitatively with the time-dependent numerical solutions of the original dissipative trapped electron model, yielding oscillations with the proper phase relationship between the fluctuation energy and the frequency shift, the proper evolution of the wave number spectrum shape and particle flux, and a realistic period

  4. Current-Induced Spin Polarization at a Single Heterojunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silov, A.; Blajnov, P.; Wolter, J.H.; Hey, R.; Ploog, K.; Averkiev, N.S.; Menendez, J.; Walle, van der C.G.

    2005-01-01

    We have experimentally achieved spin-polarization by a lateral current in a single non-magnetic semiconductor heterojunction. The effect does not require an applied magnetic field or ferromagnetic contacts. The current-induced spin orientation can be seen as the inverse of the circular

  5. Signatures of nonlinearity in single cell noise-induced oscillations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, P.; Straube, A.V.; Timmer, J.; Fleck, C.; Grima, R.

    2013-01-01

    A class of theoretical models seeks to explain rhythmic single cell data by postulating that they are generated by intrinsic noise in biochemical systems whose deterministic models exhibit only damped oscillations. The main features of such noise-induced oscillations are quantified by the power

  6. Oxidative Stress Facilitates IFN-γ-Induced Mimic Extracellular Trap Cell Death in A549 Lung Epithelial Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiou-Feng; Chen, Chia-Ling; Chien, Shun-Yi; Tseng, Po-Chun; Wang, Yu-Chih; Tsai, Tsung-Ting

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that IFN-γ induces an autophagy-regulated mimic extracellular trap cell death (ETosis) in A549 human lung cancer cells. Regarding reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in ETosis, this study investigated the role of oxidative stress. After IFN-γ stimulation, a necrosis-like cell death mimic ETosis occurred accompanied by the inhibition of cell growth, aberrant nuclear staining, and nucleosome release. ROS were generated in a time-dependent manner with an increase in NADPH oxidase component protein expression. STAT1-mediated IFN regulatory factor-1 activation was essential for upregulating ROS production. By genetically silencing p47phox, IFN-γ-induced ROS and mimic ETosis were significantly attenuated. This mechanistic study indicated that ROS may mediate DNA damage followed by histone H3 citrullination. Furthermore, ROS promoted IFN-γ-induced mimic ETosis in cooperation with autophagy. These findings further demonstrate that ROS regulates IFN-γ-induced mimic ETosis in lung epithelial malignancy.

  7. Incomplete Thermalization from Trap-Induced Integrability Breaking: Lessons from Classical Hard Rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiangyu; Bulchandani, Vir B.; Moore, Joel E.

    2018-04-01

    We study a one-dimensional gas of hard rods trapped in a harmonic potential, which breaks integrability of the hard-rod interaction in a nonuniform way. We explore the consequences of such broken integrability for the dynamics of a large number of particles and find three distinct regimes: initial, chaotic, and stationary. The initial regime is captured by an evolution equation for the phase-space distribution function. For any finite number of particles, this hydrodynamics breaks down and the dynamics becomes chaotic after a characteristic timescale determined by the interparticle distance and scattering length. The system fails to thermalize over the timescale studied (1 04 natural units), but the time-averaged ensemble is a stationary state of the hydrodynamic evolution. We close by discussing logical extensions of the results to similar systems of quantum particles.

  8. Enhanced vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell responses to malaria antigen ME-TRAP by fusion to MHC class ii invariant chain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra J Spencer

    Full Text Available The orthodox role of the invariant chain (CD74; Ii is in antigen presentation to CD4+ T cells, but enhanced CD8+ T cells responses have been reported after vaccination with vectored viral vaccines encoding a fusion of Ii to the antigen of interest. In this study we assessed whether fusion of the malarial antigen, ME-TRAP, to Ii could increase the vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell response. Following single or heterologous prime-boost vaccination of mice with a recombinant chimpanzee adenovirus vector, ChAd63, or recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA, higher frequencies of antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were observed, with the largest increases observed following a ChAd63-MVA heterologous prime-boost regimen. Studies in non-human primates confirmed the ability of Ii-fusion to augment the T cell response, where a 4-fold increase was maintained up to 11 weeks after the MVA boost. Of the numerous different approaches explored to increase vectored vaccine induced immunogenicity over the years, fusion to the invariant chain showed a consistent enhancement in CD8+ T cell responses across different animal species and may therefore find application in the development of vaccines against human malaria and other diseases where high levels of cell-mediated immunity are required.

  9. Induced dual EIT and EIA resonances with optical trapping phenomenon in near/far fields in the N-type four-level system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Kariman I.; Joshi, Amitabh

    2017-01-01

    The optical trapping phenomenon is investigated in the probe absorptive susceptibility spectra, during the interaction of four-level N-type atomic system with three transverse Gaussian fields, in a Doppler broadened medium. The system was studied under different temperature settings of 87Rb atomic vapor as well as different non-radiative decay rate. The system exhibits a combination of dual electromagnetically induced transparency with electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) or transparency (EIT) resonances simultaneously in near/far field. Also, the optical trapping phenomenon is considerably affected by the non-radiative decay rate.

  10. Characterisation of irradiation-induced defects in ZnO single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prochazka, I; Cizek, J; Lukac, F; Melikhova, O; Valenta, J; Havranek, V; Anwand, W; Skuratov, V A; Strukova, T S

    2016-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) combined with optical methods was employed for characterisation of defects in the hydrothermally grown ZnO single crystals irradiated by 167 MeV Xe 26+ ions to fluences ranged from 3×10 12 to 1×10 14 cm -2 . The positron lifetime (LT), Doppler broadening as well as slow-positron implantation spectroscopy (SPIS) techniques were involved. The ab-initio theoretical calculations were utilised for interpretation of LT results. The optical transmission and photoluminescence measurements were conducted, too. The virgin ZnO crystal exhibited a single component LT spectrum with a lifetime of 182 ps which is attributed to saturated positron trapping in Zn vacancies associated with hydrogen atoms unintentionally introduced into the crystal during the crystal growth. The Xe ion irradiated ZnO crystals have shown an additional component with a longer lifetime of ≈ 360 ps which comes from irradiation-induced larger defects equivalent in size to clusters of ≈10 to 12 vacancies. The concentrations of these clusters were estimated on the basis of combined LT and SPIS data. The PAS data were correlated with irradiation induced changes seen in the optical spectroscopy experiments. (paper)

  11. Characterisation of irradiation-induced defects in ZnO single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochazka, I.; Cizek, J.; Lukac, F.; Melikhova, O.; Valenta, J.; Havranek, V.; Anwand, W.; Skuratov, V. A.; Strukova, T. S.

    2016-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) combined with optical methods was employed for characterisation of defects in the hydrothermally grown ZnO single crystals irradiated by 167 MeV Xe26+ ions to fluences ranged from 3×1012 to 1×1014 cm-2. The positron lifetime (LT), Doppler broadening as well as slow-positron implantation spectroscopy (SPIS) techniques were involved. The ab-initio theoretical calculations were utilised for interpretation of LT results. The optical transmission and photoluminescence measurements were conducted, too. The virgin ZnO crystal exhibited a single component LT spectrum with a lifetime of 182 ps which is attributed to saturated positron trapping in Zn vacancies associated with hydrogen atoms unintentionally introduced into the crystal during the crystal growth. The Xe ion irradiated ZnO crystals have shown an additional component with a longer lifetime of ≈ 360 ps which comes from irradiation-induced larger defects equivalent in size to clusters of ≈10 to 12 vacancies. The concentrations of these clusters were estimated on the basis of combined LT and SPIS data. The PAS data were correlated with irradiation induced changes seen in the optical spectroscopy experiments.

  12. Collision induced dissociation of protonated N-nitrosodimethylamine by ion trap mass spectrometry: Ultimate carcinogens in gas phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikova, Natalia; Baker, Michael; Gabryelski, Wojciech

    2009-12-01

    Collision induced dissociation of protonated N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and isotopically labeled N-nitrosodimethyl-d6-amine (NDMA-d6) was investigated by sequential ion trap mass spectrometry to establish mechanisms of gas phase reactions leading to intriguing products of this potent carcinogen. The fragmentation of (NDMA + H+) occurs via two dissociation pathways. In the alkylation pathway, homolytic cleavage of the N-O bond of N-dimethyl, N'-hydroxydiazenium ion generates N-dimethyldiazenium distonic ion which reacts further by a CH3 radical loss to form methanediazonium ion. Both methanediazonium ion and its precursor are involved in ion/molecule reactions. Methanediazonium ion showed to be capable of methylating water and methanol molecules in the gas phase of the ion trap and N-dimethyldiazenium distonic ion showed to abstract a hydrogen atom from a solvent molecule. In the denitrosation pathway, a tautomerization of N-dimethyl, N'-hydroxydiazenium ion to N-nitrosodimethylammonium intermediate ion results in radical cleavage of the N-N bond of the intermediate ion to form N-dimethylaminium radical cation which reacts further through [alpha]-cleavage to generate N-methylmethylenimmonium ion. Although the reactions of NDMA in the gas phase are different to those for enzymatic conversion of NDMA in biological systems, each activation method generates the same products. We will show that collision induced dissociation of N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) and N-nitrosodipropylamine (NDPA) is also a feasible approach to gain information on formation, stability, and reactivity of alkylating agents originating from NDEA and NDPA. Investigating such biologically relevant, but highly reactive intermediates in the condensed phase is hampered by the short life-times of these transient species.

  13. Laser induced single-crystal transition in polycrystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitali, G.; Bertolotti, M.; Foti, G.; Rimini, E.

    1978-01-01

    Transition to single crystal of polycrystalline Si material underlying a Si crystal substrate of 100 orientation was obtained via laser irradiation. The changes in the structure were analyzed by reflection high energy electron diffraction and by channeling effect technique using 2.0 MeV He Rutherford scattering. The power density required to induce the transition in a 4500 A thick polycrystalline layer is about 70 MW/cm 2 (50ns). The corresponding amorphous to single transition has a threshold of about 45 MW/cm 2 . (orig.) 891 HPOE [de

  14. IFN-γ Induces Mimic Extracellular Trap Cell Death in Lung Epithelial Cells Through Autophagy-Regulated DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiou-Feng; Chien, Shun-Yi; Chen, Chia-Ling; Hsieh, Chia-Yuan; Tseng, Po-Chun; Wang, Yu-Chih

    2016-02-01

    Treatment of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) causes cell growth inhibition and cytotoxicity in lung epithelial malignancies. Regarding the induction of autophagy related to IFN-γ signaling, this study investigated the link between autophagy and IFN-γ cytotoxicity. In A549 human lung cancer cells, IFN-γ treatment induced concurrent apoptotic and nonapoptotic events. Unexpectedly, the nonapoptotic cells present mimic extracellular trap cell death (ETosis), which was regulated by caspase-3 and by autophagy induction through immunity-related GTPase family M protein 1 and activating transcription factor 6. Furthermore, IFN-γ signaling controlled mimic ETosis through a mechanism involving an autophagy- and Fas-associated protein with death domain-controlled caspase-8/-3 activation. Following caspase-mediated lamin degradation, IFN-γ caused DNA damage-associated ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein (ATR)/ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-regulated mimic ETosis. Upon ATR/ATM signaling, peptidyl arginine deiminase 4 (PAD4)-mediated histone 3 citrullination promoted mimic ETosis. Such IFN-γ-induced effects were defective in PC14PE6/AS2 human lung cancer cells, which were unsusceptible to IFN-γ-induced autophagy. Due to autophagy-based caspase cascade activation, IFN-γ triggers unconventional caspase-mediated DNA damage, followed by ATR/ATM-regulated PAD4-mediated histone citrullination during mimic ETosis in lung epithelial malignancy.

  15. Electron Spin Resonance study of charge trapping in α-ZnMoO.sub.4./sub. single crystal scintillator

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buryi, Maksym; Spassky, D.A.; Hybler, Jiří; Laguta, Valentyn; Nikl, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 47, Sep (2015), 244-250 ISSN 0925-3467 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1409; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029; GA ČR GAP204/12/0805 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Electron Spin Resonance * scintillator * charge traps * zinc molybdate Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.183, year: 2015

  16. Trap-induced charge transfer/transport at energy harvesting assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seongeun; Paik, Hanjong; Kim, Tae Wan; Park, Byoungnam

    2017-02-01

    Understanding interfacial electronic properties between electron donors and acceptors in hybrid optoelectronic solar cells is crucial in governing the device parameters associated with energy harvesting. To probe the electronic localized states at an electron donor/acceptor interface comprising a representative hybrid solar cell, we investigated the electrical contact properties between Al-doped zinc oxide (AZO) and poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) using AZO as the source and drain electrodes, pumping carriers from AZO into P3HT. The injection efficiency was evaluated using the transmission line method (TLM) in combination with field effect transistor characterizations. Highly conductive AZO films worked as the source and drain electrodes in the devices for TLM and field effect measurements. A comparable contact resistance difference between AZO/P3HT/AZO and Au/P3HT/Au structures contradicts the fact that a far larger energy barrier exists for electrons and holes between AZO and P3HT compared with between P3HT and Au based on the Schottky-Mott model. It is suggested that band to band tunneling accounts for the contradiction through the initial hop from AZO to P3HT for hole injection. The involvement of the tunneling mechanism in determining the contact resistance implies that there is a high density of electronic traps in the organic side.

  17. Ion implantation induced blistering of rutile single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Bing-Xi [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Jiao, Yang [College of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Guan, Jing [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Wang, Lei [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)

    2015-07-01

    The rutile single crystals were implanted by 200 keV He{sup +} ions with a series fluence and annealed at different temperatures to investigate the blistering behavior. The Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, optical microscope and X-ray diffraction were employed to characterize the implantation induced lattice damage and blistering. It was found that the blistering on rutile surface region can be realized by He{sup +} ion implantation with appropriate fluence and the following thermal annealing.

  18. Single molecule insights on conformational selection and induced fit mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatzakis, Nikos

    2014-01-01

    . To describe the molecular basis of this behavior, two main mechanisms have been advanced: 'induced fit' and 'conformational selection'. Our understanding of these models relies primarily on NMR, computational studies and kinetic measurements. These techniques report the average behavior of a large ensemble...... of unsynchronized molecules, often masking intrinsic dynamic behavior of proteins and biologically significant transient intermediates. Single molecule measurements are emerging as a powerful tool for characterizing protein function. They offer the direct observation and quantification of the activity, abundance...

  19. Influence of complement on neutrophil extracellular trap release induced by bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmer, Lisa Joanne; Damgaard, Christian; Holmstrup, Palle

    2016-01-01

    by Staphylococcus aureus and three oral bacteria: Actinomyces viscosus, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. vincettii. Material and Methods Bacteria-stimulated NET release from the neutrophils of healthy donors was measured fluorometrically. Various complement containing...... In conclusion, complement opsonization promotes NET release induced by a variety of bacteria, including A. actinomycetemcomitans, and CR1 plays a dominant role in the process. Complement consumption or deficiency may compromise NETosis induced by some bacterial species, including A. actinomycetemcomitans....... Within biofilms, the complement-inactivating abilities of some bacteria may protect other species against NETosis, while these are more vulnerable when adopting a planktonic lifestyle....

  20. Deuterium trapping in tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Michael

    Tungsten is one of the primary material candidates being investigated for use in the first-wall of a magnetic confinement fusion reactor. An ion accelerator was used to simulate the type of ion interaction that may occur at a plasma-facing material. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was the primary tool used to analyze the effects of the irradiation. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to determine the distribution of trapped D in the tungsten specimen. The tritium migration analysis program (TMAP) was used to simulate thermal desorption profiles from the D depth distributions. Fitting of the simulated thermal desorption profiles with the measured TDS results provided values of the D trap energies. Deuterium trapping in single crystal tungsten was studied as a function of the incident ion fluence, ion flux, irradiation temperature, irradiation history, and surface impurity levels during irradiation. The results show that deuterium was trapped at vacancies and voids. Two deuterium atoms could be trapped at a tungsten vacancy, with trapping energies of 1.4 eV and 1.2 eV for the first and second D atoms, respectively. In a tungsten void, D is trapped as atoms adsorbed on the inner walls of the void with a trap energy of 2.1 eV, or as D2 molecules inside the void with a trap energy of 1.2 eV. Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten was also studied as a function of the incident fluence, irradiation temperature, and irradiation history. Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten also occurs primarily at vacancies and voids with the same trap energies as in single crystal tungsten; however, the presence of grain boundaries promotes the formation of large surface blisters with high fluence irradiations at 500 K. In general, D trapping is greater in polycrystalline tungsten than in single crystal tungsten. To simulate mixed materials comprising of carbon (C) and tungsten, tungsten specimens were pre-irradiated with carbon ions prior to D

  1. Deuterium trapping in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poon, M.

    2004-01-01

    Tungsten is one of the primary material candidates being investigated for use in the first-wall of a magnetic confinement fusion reactor. An ion accelerator was used to simulate the type of ion interaction that may occur at a plasma-facing material. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was the primary tool used to analyze the effects of the irradiation Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to determine the distribution of trapped D in the tungsten specimen. The tritium migration analysis program (TMAP) was used to simulate thermal desorption profiles from the D depth distributions. Fitting of the simulated thermal desorption profiles with the measured TDS results provided values of the D trap energies. . Deuterium trapping in single crystal tungsten was studied as a function of the incident ion fluence, ion flux, irradiation temperature, irradiation history, and surface impurity levels during irradiation The results show that deuterium was trapped at vacancies and voids. Two deuterium atoms could be trapped at a tungsten vacancy, with trapping energies of 1.4 eV and 1.2 eV for the first and second D atoms, respectively. In a tungsten void, D is trapped as atoms adsorbed on the inner walls of the void with a trap energy of 2.1 eV, or as D 2 molecules inside the void with a trap energy of 1.2 eV. . Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten was also studied as a function of the incident fluence, irradiation temperature, and irradiation history. Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten also occurs primarily at vacancies and voids with the same trap energies as in single crystal tungsten; however, the presence of grain boundaries promotes the formation of large surface blisters with high fluence irradiations at 500 K. In general, D trapping is greater in polycrystalline tungsten than in single crystal tungsten. To simulate mixed materials comprising of carbon (C) and tungsten, tungsten specimens were pre-irradiated with carbon ions prior to D

  2. Deuterium trapping in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poon, M

    2004-07-01

    Tungsten is one of the primary material candidates being investigated for use in the first-wall of a magnetic confinement fusion reactor. An ion accelerator was used to simulate the type of ion interaction that may occur at a plasma-facing material. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was the primary tool used to analyze the effects of the irradiation Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to determine the distribution of trapped D in the tungsten specimen. The tritium migration analysis program (TMAP) was used to simulate thermal desorption profiles from the D depth distributions. Fitting of the simulated thermal desorption profiles with the measured TDS results provided values of the D trap energies. . Deuterium trapping in single crystal tungsten was studied as a function of the incident ion fluence, ion flux, irradiation temperature, irradiation history, and surface impurity levels during irradiation The results show that deuterium was trapped at vacancies and voids. Two deuterium atoms could be trapped at a tungsten vacancy, with trapping energies of 1.4 eV and 1.2 eV for the first and second D atoms, respectively. In a tungsten void, D is trapped as atoms adsorbed on the inner walls of the void with a trap energy of 2.1 eV, or as D{sub 2} molecules inside the void with a trap energy of 1.2 eV. . Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten was also studied as a function of the incident fluence, irradiation temperature, and irradiation history. Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten also occurs primarily at vacancies and voids with the same trap energies as in single crystal tungsten; however, the presence of grain boundaries promotes the formation of large surface blisters with high fluence irradiations at 500 K. In general, D trapping is greater in polycrystalline tungsten than in single crystal tungsten. To simulate mixed materials comprising of carbon (C) and tungsten, tungsten specimens were pre-irradiated with carbon ions prior to D

  3. Green method for ultrasensitive determination of Hg in natural waters by electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry following sono-induced cold vapor generation and 'in-atomizer trapping'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, Sandra; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    Sono-induced cold vapor generation (SI-CVG) has been used for the first time in combination with a graphite furnace atomizer for determination of Hg in natural waters by electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry after in situ trapping onto a noble metal-pretreated platform (Pd, Pt or Rh) inserted into a graphite tube. The system allows 'in-atomizer trapping' of Hg without the use of conventional reduction reactions based on sodium borohydride or tin chloride in acid medium for cold vapor generation. The sono-induced reaction is accomplished by applying ultrasound irradiation to the sample solution containing Hg(II) in the presence of an organic compound such as formic acid. As this organic acid is partly degraded upon ultrasound irradiation to yield CO, CO 2 , H 2 and H 2 O, the amount of lab wastes is minimized and a green methodology is achieved. For this purpose, experimental variables influencing the generation/trapping process are fully investigated. The limit of detection for a 10 min trapping time and 10 mL sample volume was 0.03 μg L -1 (Integrated absorbance) and the repeatability expressed as relative standard deviation was about 3%. Carbonates and chlorides at 100 mg L -1 level caused a signal depression by 20-30%. The enhanced trapping efficiency observed with the sono-induced cold vapor generation as compared with 'in-atomizer trapping' methods employing chemical vapor generation is discussed. A reaction pathway for SI-CVG is proposed on the basis of the current knowledge for synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles by ultrasound

  4. Accurate and rapid modeling of iron-bleomycin-induced DNA damage using tethered duplex oligonucleotides and electrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsch, A; Marzilli, L A; Bunt, R C; Stubbe, J; Vouros, P

    2000-05-01

    Bleomycin B(2)(BLM) in the presence of iron [Fe(II)] and O(2)catalyzes single-stranded (ss) and double-stranded (ds) cleavage of DNA. Electrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometry was used to monitor these cleavage processes. Two duplex oligonucleotides containing an ethylene oxide tether between both strands were used in this investigation, allowing facile monitoring of all ss and ds cleavage events. A sequence for site-specific binding and cleavage by Fe-BLM was incorporated into each analyte. One of these core sequences, GTAC, is a known hot-spot for ds cleavage, while the other sequence, GGCC, is a hot-spot for ss cleavage. Incubation of each oligo-nucleotide under anaerobic conditions with Fe(II)-BLM allowed detection of the non-covalent ternary Fe-BLM/oligonucleotide complex in the gas phase. Cleavage studies were then performed utilizing O(2)-activated Fe(II)-BLM. No work-up or separation steps were required and direct MS and MS/MS analyses of the crude reaction mixtures confirmed sequence-specific Fe-BLM-induced cleavage. Comparison of the cleavage patterns for both oligonucleotides revealed sequence-dependent preferences for ss and ds cleavages in accordance with previously established gel electrophoresis analysis of hairpin oligonucleotides. This novel methodology allowed direct, rapid and accurate determination of cleavage profiles of model duplex oligonucleotides after exposure to activated Fe-BLM.

  5. Signatures of nonlinearity in single cell noise-induced oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Philipp; Straube, Arthur V; Timmer, Jens; Fleck, Christian; Grima, Ramon

    2013-10-21

    A class of theoretical models seeks to explain rhythmic single cell data by postulating that they are generated by intrinsic noise in biochemical systems whose deterministic models exhibit only damped oscillations. The main features of such noise-induced oscillations are quantified by the power spectrum which measures the dependence of the oscillatory signal's power with frequency. In this paper we derive an approximate closed-form expression for the power spectrum of any monostable biochemical system close to a Hopf bifurcation, where noise-induced oscillations are most pronounced. Unlike the commonly used linear noise approximation which is valid in the macroscopic limit of large volumes, our theory is valid over a wide range of volumes and hence affords a more suitable description of single cell noise-induced oscillations. Our theory predicts that the spectra have three universal features: (i) a dominant peak at some frequency, (ii) a smaller peak at twice the frequency of the dominant peak and (iii) a peak at zero frequency. Of these, the linear noise approximation predicts only the first feature while the remaining two stem from the combination of intrinsic noise and nonlinearity in the law of mass action. The theoretical expressions are shown to accurately match the power spectra determined from stochastic simulations of mitotic and circadian oscillators. Furthermore it is shown how recently acquired single cell rhythmic fibroblast data displays all the features predicted by our theory and that the experimental spectrum is well described by our theory but not by the conventional linear noise approximation. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Radiation-induced energy migration within solid DNA: The role of misonidazole as an electron trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Kazwini, A.T.; O'Neill, P.; Adams, G.E.; Fielden, E.M.

    1990-01-01

    The in-pulse luminescence emission from solid DNA produced upon irradiation with electron pulses of energy below 260 keV has been investigated in vacuo at 293 K to gain an insight into the existence of radiation-induced charge/energy migration within DNA. The DNA samples contained misonidazole in the range 3 to 330 base pairs per misonidazole molecule. Under these conditions greater than 90% of the total energy is deposited in the DNA. The in-pulse radiation-induced luminescence spectrum of DNA was found to be critically dependent upon the misonidazole content of DNA. The luminescence intensity from the mixtures decreases with increasing content of misonidazole, and at the highest concentration, the intensity at 550 nm is reduced to 50% of that from DNA only. In the presence of 1 atm of oxygen, the observed emission intensity from DNA in the wavelength region 350-575 was reduced by 35-40% compared to that from DNA in vacuo. It is concluded that electron migration can occur in solid mixtures of DNA over a distance of up to about 100 base pairs

  7. Laser-induced single point nanowelding of silver nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Shuowei; Li, Qiang; Liu, Guoping; Yang, Hangbo; Yang, Yuanqing; Zhao, Ding; Wang, Wei; Qiu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Nanowelding of nanomaterials opens up an emerging set of applications in transparent conductors, thin-film solar cells, nanocatalysis, cancer therapy, and nanoscale patterning. Single point nanowelding (SPNW) is highly demanded for building complex nanostructures. In this letter, the precise control of SPNW of silver nanowires is explored in depth, where the nanowelding is laser-induced through the plasmonic resonance enhanced photothermal effect. It is shown that the illumination position is a critical factor for the nanowelding process. As an example of performance enhancement, output at wire end can be increased by 65% after welding for a plasmonic nanocoupler. Thus, single point nanowelding technique shows great potentials for high-performance electronic and photonic devices based on nanowires, such as nanoelectronic circuits and plasmonic nanodevices.

  8. Laser-induced single point nanowelding of silver nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Shuowei; Li, Qiang, E-mail: qiangli@zju.edu.cn; Liu, Guoping; Yang, Hangbo; Yang, Yuanqing; Zhao, Ding; Wang, Wei; Qiu, Min, E-mail: minqiu@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Modern Optical Instrumentation, College of Optical Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2016-03-21

    Nanowelding of nanomaterials opens up an emerging set of applications in transparent conductors, thin-film solar cells, nanocatalysis, cancer therapy, and nanoscale patterning. Single point nanowelding (SPNW) is highly demanded for building complex nanostructures. In this letter, the precise control of SPNW of silver nanowires is explored in depth, where the nanowelding is laser-induced through the plasmonic resonance enhanced photothermal effect. It is shown that the illumination position is a critical factor for the nanowelding process. As an example of performance enhancement, output at wire end can be increased by 65% after welding for a plasmonic nanocoupler. Thus, single point nanowelding technique shows great potentials for high-performance electronic and photonic devices based on nanowires, such as nanoelectronic circuits and plasmonic nanodevices.

  9. Electron-beam-induced fracture of Kevlar single fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickinson, J.T.; Jensen, L.C.; Klakken, M.L.

    1986-01-01

    We examine the unique situation involving the exposure of polymers to both electron bombardment and mechanical stress. Under certain conditions, crack formation, crack growth, and fracture can occur due to this combination of stimuli. These studies relate to the performance of a number of materials under hostile environments such as space, plasma, and propulsion systems. In this paper we present our initial measurements on the response of single Kevlar fibers loaded in tension to bombardment by 3-keV electrons. We present evidence that the resulting electron-beam-induced fracture is due to bond breaking

  10. Multimode electromagnetically induced transparency on a single atomic line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, Geoff; Ordog, Anna; Lvovsky, A I

    2009-01-01

    We experimentally investigate electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) created on an inhomogeneously broadened 5S 1/2 -5P 1/2 transition in rubidium vapor using a control field of a complex temporal shape. A comb-shaped transparency spectrum enhances the delay-bandwidth product and the light storage capacity for a matched probe pulse by a factor of about 50 compared to a single EIT line (Yavuz 2007 Phys. Rev. A 75 031801). If the temporal mode of the control field is slowly changed while the probe is propagating through the EIT medium, the probe will adiabatically follow, providing a means to perform frequency conversion and optical routing.

  11. Correlation of proton irradiation induced threshold voltage shifts to deep level traps in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z.; Cardwell, D.; Sasikumar, A.; Arehart, A. R.; Ringel, S. A., E-mail: ringel.5@osu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Kyle, E. C. H.; Speck, J. S. [Department of Materials, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States); Chen, J.; Zhang, E. X.; Fleetwood, D. M.; Schrimpf, R. D. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States)

    2016-04-28

    The impact of proton irradiation on the threshold voltage (V{sub T}) of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures is systematically investigated to enhance the understanding of a primary component of the degradation of irradiated high electron mobility transistors. The value of V{sub T} was found to increase monotonically as a function of 1.8 MeV proton fluence in a sub-linear manner reaching 0.63 V at a fluence of 1 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −2}. Silvaco Atlas simulations of V{sub T} shifts caused by GaN buffer traps using experimentally measured introduction rates, and energy levels closely match the experimental results. Different buffer designs lead to different V{sub T} dependences on proton irradiation, confirming that deep, acceptor-like defects in the GaN buffer are primarily responsible for the observed V{sub T} shifts. The proton irradiation induced V{sub T} shifts are found to depend on the barrier thickness in a linear fashion; thus, scaling the barrier thickness could be an effective way to reduce such degradation.

  12. Correlation of proton irradiation induced threshold voltage shifts to deep level traps in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Cardwell, D.; Sasikumar, A.; Kyle, E. C. H.; Chen, J.; Zhang, E. X.; Fleetwood, D. M.; Schrimpf, R. D.; Speck, J. S.; Arehart, A. R.; Ringel, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    The impact of proton irradiation on the threshold voltage (VT) of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures is systematically investigated to enhance the understanding of a primary component of the degradation of irradiated high electron mobility transistors. The value of VT was found to increase monotonically as a function of 1.8 MeV proton fluence in a sub-linear manner reaching 0.63 V at a fluence of 1 × 1014 cm-2. Silvaco Atlas simulations of VT shifts caused by GaN buffer traps using experimentally measured introduction rates, and energy levels closely match the experimental results. Different buffer designs lead to different VT dependences on proton irradiation, confirming that deep, acceptor-like defects in the GaN buffer are primarily responsible for the observed VT shifts. The proton irradiation induced VT shifts are found to depend on the barrier thickness in a linear fashion; thus, scaling the barrier thickness could be an effective way to reduce such degradation.

  13. Correlation of proton irradiation induced threshold voltage shifts to deep level traps in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Z.; Cardwell, D.; Sasikumar, A.; Arehart, A. R.; Ringel, S. A.; Kyle, E. C. H.; Speck, J. S.; Chen, J.; Zhang, E. X.; Fleetwood, D. M.; Schrimpf, R. D.

    2016-01-01

    The impact of proton irradiation on the threshold voltage (V T ) of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures is systematically investigated to enhance the understanding of a primary component of the degradation of irradiated high electron mobility transistors. The value of V T was found to increase monotonically as a function of 1.8 MeV proton fluence in a sub-linear manner reaching 0.63 V at a fluence of 1 × 10 14  cm −2 . Silvaco Atlas simulations of V T shifts caused by GaN buffer traps using experimentally measured introduction rates, and energy levels closely match the experimental results. Different buffer designs lead to different V T dependences on proton irradiation, confirming that deep, acceptor-like defects in the GaN buffer are primarily responsible for the observed V T shifts. The proton irradiation induced V T shifts are found to depend on the barrier thickness in a linear fashion; thus, scaling the barrier thickness could be an effective way to reduce such degradation.

  14. Crossover from band-like to thermally activated charge transport in organic transistors due to strain-induced traps

    KAUST Repository

    Mei, Yaochuan

    2017-08-02

    The temperature dependence of the charge-carrier mobility provides essential insight into the charge transport mechanisms in organic semiconductors. Such knowledge imparts critical understanding of the electrical properties of these materials, leading to better design of high-performance materials for consumer applications. Here, we present experimental results that suggest that the inhomogeneous strain induced in organic semiconductor layers by the mismatch between the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) of the consecutive device layers of field-effect transistors generates trapping states that localize charge carriers. We observe a universal scaling between the activation energy of the transistors and the interfacial thermal expansion mismatch, in which band-like transport is observed for similar CTEs, and activated transport otherwise. Our results provide evidence that a high-quality semiconductor layer is necessary, but not sufficient, to obtain efficient charge-carrier transport in devices, and underline the importance of holistic device design to achieve the intrinsic performance limits of a given organic semiconductor. We go on to show that insertion of an ultrathin CTE buffer layer mitigates this problem and can help achieve band-like transport on a wide range of substrate platforms.

  15. Crossover from band-like to thermally activated charge transport in organic transistors due to strain-induced traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Yaochuan; Diemer, Peter J; Niazi, Muhammad R; Hallani, Rawad K; Jarolimek, Karol; Day, Cynthia S; Risko, Chad; Anthony, John E; Amassian, Aram; Jurchescu, Oana D

    2017-08-15

    The temperature dependence of the charge-carrier mobility provides essential insight into the charge transport mechanisms in organic semiconductors. Such knowledge imparts critical understanding of the electrical properties of these materials, leading to better design of high-performance materials for consumer applications. Here, we present experimental results that suggest that the inhomogeneous strain induced in organic semiconductor layers by the mismatch between the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) of the consecutive device layers of field-effect transistors generates trapping states that localize charge carriers. We observe a universal scaling between the activation energy of the transistors and the interfacial thermal expansion mismatch, in which band-like transport is observed for similar CTEs, and activated transport otherwise. Our results provide evidence that a high-quality semiconductor layer is necessary, but not sufficient, to obtain efficient charge-carrier transport in devices, and underline the importance of holistic device design to achieve the intrinsic performance limits of a given organic semiconductor. We go on to show that insertion of an ultrathin CTE buffer layer mitigates this problem and can help achieve band-like transport on a wide range of substrate platforms.

  16. Light-Induced Switching of Tunable Single-Molecule Junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Sendler, Torsten

    2015-04-16

    A major goal of molecular electronics is the development and implementation of devices such as single-molecular switches. Here, measurements are presented that show the controlled in situ switching of diarylethene molecules from their nonconductive to conductive state in contact to gold nanoelectrodes via controlled light irradiation. Both the conductance and the quantum yield for switching of these molecules are within a range making the molecules suitable for actual devices. The conductance of the molecular junctions in the opened and closed states is characterized and the molecular level E 0, which dominates the current transport in the closed state, and its level broadening Γ are identified. The obtained results show a clear light-induced ring forming isomerization of the single-molecule junctions. Electron withdrawing side-groups lead to a reduction of conductance, but do not influence the efficiency of the switching mechanism. Quantum chemical calculations of the light-induced switching processes correlate these observations with the fundamentally different low-lying electronic states of the opened and closed forms and their comparably small modification by electron-withdrawing substituents. This full characterization of a molecular switch operated in a molecular junction is an important step toward the development of real molecular electronics devices.

  17. Light-Induced Switching of Tunable Single-Molecule Junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Sendler, Torsten; Luka-Guth, Katharina; Wieser, Matthias; Lokamani; Wolf, Jannic Sebastian; Helm, Manfred; Gemming, Sibylle; Kerbusch, Jochen; Scheer, Elke; Huhn, Thomas; Erbe, Artur

    2015-01-01

    A major goal of molecular electronics is the development and implementation of devices such as single-molecular switches. Here, measurements are presented that show the controlled in situ switching of diarylethene molecules from their nonconductive to conductive state in contact to gold nanoelectrodes via controlled light irradiation. Both the conductance and the quantum yield for switching of these molecules are within a range making the molecules suitable for actual devices. The conductance of the molecular junctions in the opened and closed states is characterized and the molecular level E 0, which dominates the current transport in the closed state, and its level broadening Γ are identified. The obtained results show a clear light-induced ring forming isomerization of the single-molecule junctions. Electron withdrawing side-groups lead to a reduction of conductance, but do not influence the efficiency of the switching mechanism. Quantum chemical calculations of the light-induced switching processes correlate these observations with the fundamentally different low-lying electronic states of the opened and closed forms and their comparably small modification by electron-withdrawing substituents. This full characterization of a molecular switch operated in a molecular junction is an important step toward the development of real molecular electronics devices.

  18. Capturing microRNA targets using an RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC)-trap approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambronne, Xiaolu A; Shen, Rongkun; Auer, Paul L; Goodman, Richard H

    2012-12-11

    Identifying targets is critical for understanding the biological effects of microRNA (miRNA) expression. The challenge lies in characterizing the cohort of targets for a specific miRNA, especially when targets are being actively down-regulated in miRNA- RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC)-messengerRNA (mRNA) complexes. We have developed a robust and versatile strategy called RISCtrap to stabilize and purify targets from this transient interaction. Its utility was demonstrated by determining specific high-confidence target datasets for miR-124, miR-132, and miR-181 that contained known and previously unknown transcripts. Two previously unknown miR-132 targets identified with RISCtrap, adaptor protein CT10 regulator of kinase 1 (CRK1) and tight junction-associated protein 1 (TJAP1), were shown to be endogenously regulated by miR-132 in adult mouse forebrain. The datasets, moreover, differed in the number of targets and in the types and frequency of microRNA recognition element (MRE) motifs, thus revealing a previously underappreciated level of specificity in the target sets regulated by individual miRNAs.

  19. Plastic Flow Induced by Single Ion Impacts on Gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birtcher, R.C.; Donnelly, S.E.

    1996-01-01

    The formation of holes in thin gold foils as a result of single ion impacts by 200keV Xe ions has been followed using transmission electron microscopy. Video recording provided details of microstructure evolution with a time resolution of 1/30th sec. Hole formation involves the movement by plastic flow of massive amounts of material, on the order of tens of thousands of Au atoms per ion impact. Plastic flow, as a consequence of individual ion impacts, results in a continual filling of both holes and craters as well as a thickening of the gold foil. Changes in morphology during irradiation is attributed to a localized, thermal-spike induced melting, coupled with plastic flow of effected material under the influence of surface forces. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  20. Trapping and Probing Antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurtele, Jonathan [UC Berkeley and LBNL

    2013-03-27

    Precision spectroscopy of antihydrogen is a promising path to sensitive tests of CPT symmetry. The most direct route to achieve this goal is to create and probe antihydrogen in a magnetic minimum trap. Antihydrogen has been synthesized and trapped for 1000s at CERN by the ALPHA Collaboration. Some of the challenges associated with achieving these milestones will be discussed, including mixing cryogenic positron and antiproton plasmas to synthesize antihydrogen with kinetic energy less than the trap potential of .5K. Recent experiments in which hyperfine transitions were resonantly induced with microwaves will be presented. The opportunity for gravitational measurements in traps based on detailed studies of antihydrogen dynamics will be described. The talk will conclude with a discussion future antihydrogen research that will use a new experimental apparatus, ALPHA-I.

  1. Photon-Induced Magnetization Reversal in Single Molecule Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Mustafa

    2005-03-01

    Single-molecule magnets (SMM) have been the subject of intensive research for more than a decade now because of their unique properties such as macroscopic quantum tunneling. Recent work in this area is focused on whether SMM are potential qubits, as proposed theoretically [1]. We use continuous millimeter wave radiation to manipulate the populations of the energy levels of a single crystal molecular magnet Fe8 [2]. When radiation is in resonance with the transitions between energy levels, the steady state magnetization exhibits dips. As expected, the magnetic field locations of these dips vary linearly with the radiation frequency. We will describe our experimental results, which provide a lower bound of 0.17 ns for transverse relaxation time. Transitions between excited states are found even though these states have negligible population at the experimental temperature. We find evidence that the sample heating is significant when the resonance condition is satisfied. Recent experiments are concentrated on the spin dynamics of Fe8 induced by pulsed radiation and results of these studies will also be presented. [1] Leuenberger, M. N. and Loss, D., Nature 410, 789 (2001). [2] M. Bal et al., Phys. Rev. B 70, 100408(R) (2004).

  2. The mechanism of persistent photoconductivity induced by minority carrier trapping effect in ultraviolet photo-detector made of polycrystalline diamond film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lanxi; Chen Xuekang; Wu Gan; Guo Wantu; Cao Shengzhu; Shang Kaiwen; Han Weihua

    2011-01-01

    Performances of long persistent photoconductivity, high responsivity and high photoconductive gain were observed in a metal–semiconductor–metal ultraviolet photo-detector fabricated on a microcrystalline diamond film. Charge-based deep level transient spectroscopy measurement confirmed that a shallow level with activation energy of 0.21 eV and capture cross section of 9.9 × 10 −20 cm 2 is presented in the band gap of the diamond film. The shallow level may not act as effective recombination center due to the so small activation energy according to Schockly-Read-Hall statistics. The persistent photoconductivity relaxation fits in with the so called “barrier-limited recombination” model, which may be a minority carrier trapping effect related recombination process. The photo-induced minority carriers (electrons in this paper) may be trapped by the shallow level during light irradiation process and then de-trap slowly via thermal excitation or tunneling effect after removing the light source, which contributes to the persistent photoconductivity. The trapping effect can also reduce the probability of carrier recombination, resulting in the high responsivity and the high gain.

  3. The drift-diffusion interpretation of the electron current within the organic semiconductor characterized by the bulk single energy trap level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvikl, B.

    2010-01-01

    The closed solution for the internal electric field and the total charge density derived in the drift-diffusion approximation for the model of a single layer organic semiconductor structure characterized by the bulk shallow single trap-charge energy level is presented. The solutions for two examples of electric field boundary conditions are tested on room temperature current density-voltage data of the electron conducting aluminum/tris(8-hydroxyquinoline aluminum/calcium structure [W. Brütting et al., Synth. Met. 122, 99 (2001)] for which jexp∝Va3.4, within the interval of bias 0.4 V≤Va≤7. In each case investigated the apparent electron mobility determined at given bias is distributed within a given, finite interval of values. The bias dependence of the logarithm of their lower limit, i.e., their minimum values, is found to be in each case, to a good approximation, proportional to the square root of the applied electric field. On account of the bias dependence as incorporated in the minimum value of the apparent electron mobility the spatial distribution of the organic bulk electric field as well as the total charge density turn out to be bias independent. The first case investigated is based on the boundary condition of zero electric field at the electron injection interface. It is shown that for minimum valued apparent mobilities, the strong but finite accumulation of electrons close to the anode is obtained, which characterize the inverted space charge limited current (SCLC) effect. The second example refers to the internal electric field allowing for self-adjustment of its boundary values. The total electron charge density is than found typically to be of U shape, which may, depending on the parameters, peak at both or at either Alq3 boundary. It is this example in which the proper SCLC effect is consequently predicted. In each of the above two cases, the calculations predict the minimum values of the electron apparent mobility, which substantially

  4. Analysis of single-cell differences by use of an on-chip microculture system and optical trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakamoto, Y; Inoue, I; Moriguchi, H; Yasuda, K

    2001-09-01

    A method is described for continuous observation of isolated single cells that enables genetically identical cells to be compared; it uses an on-chip microculture system and optical tweezers. Photolithography is used to construct microchambers with 5-microm-high walls made of thick photoresist (SU-8) on the surface of a glass slide. These microchambers are connected by a channel through which cells are transported, by means of optical tweezers, from a cultivation microchamber to an analysis microchamber, or from the analysis microchamber to a waste microchamber. The microchambers are covered with a semi-permeable membrane to separate them from nutrient medium circulating through a "cover chamber" above. Differential analysis of isolated direct descendants of single cells showed that this system could be used to compare genetically identical cells under contamination-free conditions. It should thus help in the clarification of heterogeneous phenomena, for example unequal cell division and cell differentiation.

  5. Investigating degradation behavior of InGaZnO thin-film transistors induced by charge-trapping effect under DC and AC gate bias stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, Tien-Yu; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chen, Te-Chih; Tsai, Ming-Yen; Chen, Yu-Te

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the degradation mechanism of amorphous InGaZnO thin-film transistors under DC and AC gate bias stress. Comparing the degradation behavior at equal accumulated effective stress time, more pronounced threshold voltage shift under AC positive gate bias stress in comparison with DC stress indicates extra electron-trapping phenomenon that occurs in the duration of rising/falling time in pulse. Contrarily, illuminated AC negative gate bias stress exhibits much less threshold voltage shift than DC stress, suggesting that the photo-generated hole does not have sufficient time to drift to the interface of IGZO/gate insulator and causes hole-trapping under AC operation. Since the evolution of threshold voltage fits the stretched-exponential equation well, the different degradation tendencies under DC/AC stress can be attributed to the different electron- and hole-trapping efficiencies, and this is further verified by varying pulse waveform. - Highlights: ► Static and dynamic gate bias stresses are imposed on InGaZnO TFTs. ► Dynamic positive gate bias induces more pronounced threshold voltage shift. ► Static negative-bias illumination stress induces more severe threshold voltage shift. ► Evolution of threshold voltage fits the stretched-exponential equation well

  6. An energy signature scheme for steam trap assessment and flow rate estimation using pipe-induced acoustic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olama, Mohammed M.; Allgood, Glenn O.; Kuruganti, Teja P.; Lake, Joe E.

    2012-06-01

    The US Congress has passed legislation dictating that all government agencies establish a plan and process for improving energy efficiencies at their sites. In response to this legislation, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has recently conducted a pilot study to explore the deployment of a wireless sensor system for a real-time measurement-based energy efficiency optimization framework within the steam distribution system within the ORNL campus. We make assessments on the real-time status of the distribution system by observing the state measurements of acoustic sensors mounted on the steam pipes/traps/valves. In this paper, we describe a spectral-based energy signature scheme that interprets acoustic vibration sensor data to estimate steam flow rates and assess steam traps health status. Experimental results show that the energy signature scheme has the potential to identify different steam trap health status and it has sufficient sensitivity to estimate steam flow rate. Moreover, results indicate a nearly quadratic relationship over the test region between the overall energy signature factor and flow rate in the pipe. The analysis based on estimated steam flow and steam trap status helps generate alerts that enable operators and maintenance personnel to take remedial action. The goal is to achieve significant energy-saving in steam lines by monitoring and acting on leaking steam pipes/traps/valves.

  7. Association of single nucleotide polymorphisms with radiation-induced esophagitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Wang Lvhua; Yang Ming; Ji Wei; Zhao Lujun; Yang Weizhi; Zhou Zongmei; Ou Guangfei; Lin Dongxin

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphism(SNP) of candidate genes and radiation-induced esophagitis (RIE) in patients with lung cancer. Methods: Between Jan. 2004 and Aug. 2006, 170 patients with pathologically diagnosed lung cancer were enrolled in this study. The total target dose was 45-70 Gy (median 60 Gy). One hundred and thirty-two patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy(3DCRT) and 38 with two-dimensional radiotherapy(2DRT). Forty-one patients received radiotherapy alone, 78 received sequential chemoradiotherapy and 51 received concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Thirty-seven SNPs in 20 DNA repair genes were analyzed by using PCR- based restricted fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). These genes were apoptosis and inflammatory cytokine genes including ATM, ERCC1, XRCC3, XRCCI, XPD, XPC, XPG, NBS1, STK15, ZNF350, ADPRT, TP53, FAS, FASL, CYP2D6*4, CASPASE8, COX2,TGF-β, CD14 and ACE. The endpoint was grade ≥2 R I E. Results: Forty of the 170 patients developed grade ≥2 R I E, including 36 in grade 2 and 4 in grade 3. Univariate analysis revealed that radiation technique and concurrent chemoradiotherapy were statistically significant relatives to the incidence of R I E (P=0.032, 0.049), and both of them had the trend associating with the esophagitis (P=0.072, 0.094). An increased incidence of esophagitis was observed associating with the TGF-β 1 -509T and XPD 751Lys/Lys genotypes (χ 2 =5.65, P=0.017; χ 2 =3.84, P=0.048) in multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Genetic polymorphisms in TGF-β 1 gene and XPD gene have a significant association with radiation-induced esophagitis. (authors)

  8. Trapped-ion quantum logic gates based on oscillating magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ospelkaus, Christian; Langer, Christopher E.; Amini, Jason M.; Brown, Kenton R.; Leibfried, Dietrich; Wineland, David J.

    2009-05-01

    Oscillating magnetic fields and field gradients can be used to implement single-qubit rotations and entangling multiqubit quantum gates for trapped-ion quantum information processing. With fields generated by currents in microfabricated surface-electrode traps, it should be possible to achieve gate speeds that are comparable to those of optically induced gates for realistic distances between the ions and the electrode surface. Magnetic-field-mediated gates have the potential to significantly reduce the overhead in laser-beam control and motional-state initialization compared to current QIP experiments with trapped ions and will eliminate spontaneous scattering decoherence, a fundamental source of decoherence in laser-mediated gates. A potentially beneficial environment for the implementation of such schemes is a cryogenic ion trap, because small length scale traps with low motional heating rates can be realized. A cryogenic ion trap experiment is currently under construction at NIST.

  9. Characterization of deep level defects in Tl6I4S single crystals by photo-induced current transient spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, J A; Liu, Z; Sebastian, M; Wessels, B W; Im, J; Freeman, A J; Nguyen, S; Kanatzidis, M G

    2015-01-01

    Defect levels in semi-insulating Tl 6 I 4 S single crystals grown by the horizontal Bridgman technique have been characterized using photo-induced current transient spectroscopy (PICTS). These measurements revealed six electron traps located at (0.059  ±  0.007), (0.13  ±  0.012), (0.31  ±  0.074), (0.39  ±  0.019), (0.62  ±  0.110), and (0.597  ±  0.105). These defect levels are attributed to vacancies (V I , V S ) and antisite defects (I S , Tl S , Tl I ) upon comparison to calculations of native defect energy levels using density functional theory and defects recently reported from photoluminescence and photoconductivity measurements. (paper)

  10. Extracellular Sphingomyelinase Rv0888 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Contributes to Pathological Lung Injury of Mycobacterium smegmatis in Mice via Inducing Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Guanghui; Cui, Yingying; Wang, Lei; Li, Tiantian; Cui, Ziyin; Song, Ningning; Chen, Liping; Pang, Hai; Liu, Siguo

    2018-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), which mainly causes pulmonary injury and tubercles. Although macrophages are generally considered to harbor the main cells of M. tuberculosis , new evidence suggests that neutrophils are rapidly recruited to the infected lung. M. tuberculosis itself, or its early secreted antigenic target protein 6 (ESAT-6), can induce formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). However, NETs trap mycobacteria but are unable to kill them. The role of NETs' formation in the pathogenesis of mycobacteria remains unclear. Here, we report a new M. tuberculosis extracellular factor, bifunctional enzyme Rv0888, with both nuclease and sphingomyelinase activities. Rv0888 sphingomyelinase activity can induce NETs' formation in vitro and in the lung of the mice and enhance the colonization ability of Mycobacterium smegmatis in the lungs of mice. Mice infected by M. smegmatis harboring Rv0888 sphingomyelinase induced pathological injury and inflammation of the lung, which was mainly mediated by NETs, induced by Rv0888 sphingomyelinase, associated protein (myeloperoxidase) triggered caspase-3. In summary, the study sheds new light on the pathogenesis of mycobacteria and reveals a novel target for TB treatment.

  11. Combining Single-Molecule Optical Trapping and Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering Measurements to Compute the Persistence Length of a Protein ER/K alpha-Helix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivaramakrishnan, S.; Sung, J.; Ali, M.

    2009-01-01

    as a force transducer, rigid spacer, or flexible linker in proteins. In this study, we quantity this flexibility in terms of persistence length, namely the length scale over which it is rigid. We use single-molecule optical trapping and small-angle x-ray scattering, combined with Monte Carlo simulations...

  12. Trapped antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, E., E-mail: eoin.butler@cern.ch [CERN, Physics Department (Switzerland); Andresen, G. B. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Ashkezari, M. D. [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Baquero-Ruiz, M. [University of California, Department of Physics (United States); Bertsche, W. [Swansea University, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Bowe, P. D. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Cesar, C. L. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Fisica (Brazil); Chapman, S. [University of California, Department of Physics (United States); Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S. [Swansea University, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Fajans, J. [University of California, Department of Physics (United States); Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C. [University of Calgary, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Gill, D. R. [TRIUMF (Canada); Gutierrez, A. [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Hangst, J. S. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Hardy, W. N. [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Hayden, M. E. [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Humphries, A. J. [Swansea University, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Collaboration: ALPHA Collaboration; and others

    2012-12-15

    Precision spectroscopic comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen holds the promise of a sensitive test of the Charge-Parity-Time theorem and matter-antimatter equivalence. The clearest path towards realising this goal is to hold a sample of antihydrogen in an atomic trap for interrogation by electromagnetic radiation. Achieving this poses a huge experimental challenge, as state-of-the-art magnetic-minimum atom traps have well depths of only {approx}1 T ({approx}0.5 K for ground state antihydrogen atoms). The atoms annihilate on contact with matter and must be 'born' inside the magnetic trap with low kinetic energies. At the ALPHA experiment, antihydrogen atoms are produced from antiprotons and positrons stored in the form of non-neutral plasmas, where the typical electrostatic potential energy per particle is on the order of electronvolts, more than 10{sup 4} times the maximum trappable kinetic energy. In November 2010, ALPHA published the observation of 38 antiproton annihilations due to antihydrogen atoms that had been trapped for at least 172 ms and then released-the first instance of a purely antimatter atomic system confined for any length of time (Andresen et al., Nature 468:673, 2010). We present a description of the main components of the ALPHA traps and detectors that were key to realising this result. We discuss how the antihydrogen atoms were identified and how they were discriminated from the background processes. Since the results published in Andresen et al. (Nature 468:673, 2010), refinements in the antihydrogen production technique have allowed many more antihydrogen atoms to be trapped, and held for much longer times. We have identified antihydrogen atoms that have been trapped for at least 1,000 s in the apparatus (Andresen et al., Nature Physics 7:558, 2011). This is more than sufficient time to interrogate the atoms spectroscopically, as well as to ensure that they have relaxed to their ground state.

  13. Sample Size Induced Brittle-to-Ductile Transition of Single-Crystal Aluminum Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    ARL-RP-0528 ● AUG 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Sample Size Induced Brittle-to- Ductile Transition of Single-Crystal Aluminum...originator. ARL-RP-0528 ● AUG 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Sample Size Induced Brittle-to- Ductile Transition of Single-Crystal...Sample Size Induced Brittle-to- Ductile Transition of Single-Crystal Aluminum Nitride 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  14. Towards a wire-mediated coupling of trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Robert; Lee, Tony; Daniilidis, Nikos; Sankaranarayanan, S.; Häffner, Hartmut

    2008-03-01

    Most schemes for ion trap quantum computation rely upon the exchange of information between ion-qubits in the same trap region, mediated by their shared vibrational mode. An alternative way to achieve this coupling is via the image charges induced in a conducting wire that connects different traps. This was shown to be theoretically possible by Heinzen and Wineland in 1990, but some important practical questions have remained unaddressed. Among these are how the presence of such a wire modifies the motional frequencies and heating rates of trapped ions. We thus have realized this system as a 1 mm-scale planar segmented rf ion trap combined with an electrically floating gold wire of 25 microns diameter and length 1 cm. This wire is placed close to trapped ions using a set of piezoelectric nanopositioners. We present here experimental measurements of the motional frequencies and heating rates of a single trapped calcium ion as the wire is moved from 3.0 mm to 0.2 mm away from the ion. We discuss the implications of these results for achieving wire-mediated coupling in the present apparatus, as well as in future improved setups.

  15. Reactions of nitroxide radicals in aqueous solutions exposed to non-thermal plasma: limitations of spin trapping of the plasma induced species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbanev, Yury; Stehling, Nicola; O'Connell, Deborah; Chechik, Victor

    2016-10-01

    Low temperature (‘cold’) atmospheric pressure plasmas have gained much attention in recent years due to their biomedical effects achieved through the interactions of plasma-induced species with the biological substrate. Monitoring of the radical species in an aqueous biological milieu is usually performed via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy using various nitrone spin traps, which form persistent radical adducts with the short-lived radicals. However, the stability of these nitroxide radical adducts in the plasma-specific environment is not well known. In this work, chemical transformations of nitroxide radicals in aqueous solutions using a model nitroxide 4-oxo-TEMPO were studied using EPR and LC-MS. The kinetics of the nitroxide decay when the solution was exposed to plasma were assessed, and the reactive pathways proposed. The use of different scavengers enabled identification of the types of reactive species which cause the decay, indicating the predominant nitroxide group reduction in oxygen-free plasmas. The 2H adduct of the PBN spin trap (PBN-D) was shown to decay similarly to the model molecule 4-oxo-TEMPO. The decay of the spin adducts in plasma-treated solutions must be considered to avoid rendering the spin trapping results unreliable. In particular, the selectivity of the decay indicated the limitations of the PTIO/PTI nitroxide system in the detection of nitric oxide.

  16. Swift heavy-ion induced trap generation and mixing at Si/SiO{sub 2} interface in depletion n-MOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinde, N. [Ecotopia Science Institute, Division of Energy Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan) and Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India)]. E-mail: nss@nucl.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Bhoraskar, V.N. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India); Dhole, S.D. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2006-01-15

    Large channel depletion n-channel MOSFET (Metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor) is a basic Si-SiO{sub 2} structure to understand irradiation-induced modifications. The contribution of interface and oxide states denoted as {delta}N {sub IT} and {delta}N {sub OT}, respectively, was separated out by using I {sub D}-V {sub DS}, I {sub D}-V {sub GS} measurements. The threshold voltage shift {delta}V {sub T} (V {sub T-irrad} - V {sub T-virgin}) increased for all ions (50 MeV Li, B, F, P and Ni) over the fluence of 2 x 10{sup 11}-2 x 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. The increase in {delta}N {sub IT} was associated to trap generation at Si-SiO{sub 2} interface, but a small change in {delta}N {sub OT} indicate less charge trapping in oxide. The electronic energy loss S {sub e} induced increase in {delta}N {sub IT} is not adequate to explain the large shift in threshold voltage. A rough estimate shows that the channel width, W should decrease by 40% for a large increase in {delta}N {sub IT}. Thus, the possible factor affecting reduction of W may be ion beam mixing induced broadening of Si-SiO{sub 2} interface.

  17. Synergistic effect of single-electron-trapped oxygen vacancies and carbon species on the visible light photocatalytic activity of carbon-modified TiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Xue, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Xiaogang; Xing, Xing; Li, Qiuye; Yang, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-modified TiO 2 (CT) nanoparticles were prepared via a two-step method of heat treatment without the resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) polymer. As-prepared CT nanoparticles were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV–Vis/DRS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), N 2 adsorption–desorption isotherms, thermal analysis (TA), electron spin resonance (ESR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The visible light photocatalytic activities were evaluated on the basis of the degradation of methyl orange (MO). The synergistic effect of single-electron-trapped oxygen vacancies (SETOVs) and the carbon species on the visible light photocatalytic activities of the CT nanoparticles were discussed. It was found that the crystalline phase, the morphology, and particle size of the CT nanoparticles depended on the second heat-treatment temperature instead of the first heat-treatment temperature. The visible light photocatalytic activities were attributed to the synergistic effect of SETOVs and the carbon species, and also depended on the specific surface area of the photocatalysts. - Highlights: • Carbon-modified TiO 2 particles have been prepared without RF polymer. • The visible light photocatalytic activities of the particles have been evaluated. • The band gap energy structure of the carbon-modified TiO 2 has been proposed. • Synergistic effect of SETOVs and carbon species has been discussed. • The activities also depend on the specific surface area of the catalysts

  18. Accurate and rapid modeling of iron–bleomycin-induced DNA damage using tethered duplex oligonucleotides and electrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometric analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Harsch, Andreas; Marzilli, Lisa A.; Bunt, Richard C.; Stubbe, Joanne; Vouros, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Bleomycin B2 (BLM) in the presence of iron [Fe(II)] and O2 catalyzes single-stranded (ss) and double-stranded (ds) cleavage of DNA. Electrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometry was used to monitor these cleavage processes. Two duplex oligonucleotides containing an ethylene oxide tether between both strands were used in this investigation, allowing facile monitoring of all ss and ds cleavage events. A sequence for site-specific binding and cleavage by Fe–BLM was incorporated into each an...

  19. Temperature dependence of photoluminescence spectra of bilayer two-dimensional electron gases in LaAlO3/SrTiO3 superlattices: coexistence of Auger recombination and single-carrier trapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Harsan Ma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We report emerging photoluminescence (PL of bilayer two-dimensional electron gases (2DEG in LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO systems. A strong blue PL emerges in bilayer-2DEGs in LAO/STO/LAO/STO which doesn’t show in LAO/STO. PL band in bilayer-2DEGs includes both nearly temperature independent Auger recombination and temperature dependent free electron trapping while it crossovers from Auger recombination to single carrier trapping in LAO/STO. The PL signal of free electron trapping appears at high temperatures and it is much stronger than Auger recombination in the conducting channel in bilayer 2DEGs. This observation shows that high mobility carriers dominate the carrier dynamics in bilayer-2DEGs in LAO/STO superlattices.

  20. Enhanced light trapping by focused ion beam (FIB) induced self-organized nanoripples on germanium (100) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaliya, Bhaveshkumar; Mote, Rakesh G.; Aslam, Mohammed; Fu, Jing

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate enhanced light trapping by self-organized nanoripples on the germanium surface. The enhanced light trapping leading to high absorption of light is confirmed by the experimental studies as well as the numerical simulations using the finite-difference time-domain method. We used gallium ion (Ga+) focused ion beam to enable the formation of the self-organized nanoripples on the germanium (100) surface. During the fabrication, the overlap of the scanning beam is varied from zero to negative value and found to influence the orientation of the nanoripples. Evolution of nanostructures with the variation of beam overlap is investigated. Parallel, perpendicular, and randomly aligned nanoripples with respect to the scanning direction are obtained via manipulation of the scanning beam overlap. 95% broadband absorptance is measured in the visible electromagnetic region for the nanorippled germanium surface. The reported light absorption enhancement can significantly improve the efficiency of germanium-silicon based photovoltaic systems.

  1. Severe signal loss in diamond beam loss monitors in high particle rate environments by charge trapping in radiation-induced defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassel, Florian; Boer, Wim de [Institute for Experimental Nuclear Physics (IEKP), KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Guthoff, Moritz; Dabrowski, Anne [CERN, Meyrin (Switzerland)

    2016-10-15

    The beam condition monitoring leakage (BCML) system is a beam monitoring device in the compact muon solenoid (CMS) experiment at the large hadron collider (LHC). As detectors 32 poly-crystalline (pCVD) diamond sensors are positioned in rings around the beam pipe. Here, high particle rates occur from the colliding beams scattering particles outside the beam pipe. These particles cause defects, which act as traps for the ionization, thus reducing the charge collection efficiency (CCE). However, the loss in CCE was much more severe than expected from low rate laboratory measurements and simulations, especially in single-crystalline (sCVD) diamonds, which have a low initial concentration of defects. After an integrated luminosity of a few fb{sup -1} corresponding to a few weeks of LHC operation, the CCE of the sCVD diamonds dropped by a factor of five or more and quickly approached the poor CCE of pCVD diamonds. The reason why in real experiments the CCE is much worse than in laboratory experiments is related to the ionization rate. At high particle rates the trapping rate of the ionization is so high compared with the detrapping rate, that space charge builds up. This space charge reduces locally the internal electric field, which in turn increases the trapping rate and recombination and hence reduces the CCE in a strongly non-linear way. A diamond irradiation campaign was started to investigate the rate-dependent electrical field deformation with respect to the radiation damage. Besides the electrical field measurements via the transient current technique (TCT), the CCE was measured. The experimental results were used to create an effective deep trap model that takes the radiation damage into account. Using this trap model, the rate-dependent electrical field deformation and the CCE were simulated with the software SILVACO TCAD. The simulation, tuned to rate-dependent measurements from a strong radioactive source, was able to predict the non-linear decrease of the

  2. Severe signal loss in diamond beam loss monitors in high particle rate environments by charge trapping in radiation-induced defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassel, Florian; Boer, Wim de; Guthoff, Moritz; Dabrowski, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The beam condition monitoring leakage (BCML) system is a beam monitoring device in the compact muon solenoid (CMS) experiment at the large hadron collider (LHC). As detectors 32 poly-crystalline (pCVD) diamond sensors are positioned in rings around the beam pipe. Here, high particle rates occur from the colliding beams scattering particles outside the beam pipe. These particles cause defects, which act as traps for the ionization, thus reducing the charge collection efficiency (CCE). However, the loss in CCE was much more severe than expected from low rate laboratory measurements and simulations, especially in single-crystalline (sCVD) diamonds, which have a low initial concentration of defects. After an integrated luminosity of a few fb -1 corresponding to a few weeks of LHC operation, the CCE of the sCVD diamonds dropped by a factor of five or more and quickly approached the poor CCE of pCVD diamonds. The reason why in real experiments the CCE is much worse than in laboratory experiments is related to the ionization rate. At high particle rates the trapping rate of the ionization is so high compared with the detrapping rate, that space charge builds up. This space charge reduces locally the internal electric field, which in turn increases the trapping rate and recombination and hence reduces the CCE in a strongly non-linear way. A diamond irradiation campaign was started to investigate the rate-dependent electrical field deformation with respect to the radiation damage. Besides the electrical field measurements via the transient current technique (TCT), the CCE was measured. The experimental results were used to create an effective deep trap model that takes the radiation damage into account. Using this trap model, the rate-dependent electrical field deformation and the CCE were simulated with the software SILVACO TCAD. The simulation, tuned to rate-dependent measurements from a strong radioactive source, was able to predict the non-linear decrease of the CCE in

  3. Ripple Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    3 April 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the margin of a lava flow on a cratered plain in the Athabasca Vallis region of Mars. Remarkably, the cratered plain in this scene is essentially free of bright, windblown ripples. Conversely, the lava flow apparently acted as a trap for windblown materials, illustrated by the presence of the light-toned, wave-like texture over much of the flow. That the lava flow surface trapped windblown sand and granules better than the cratered plain indicates that the flow surface has a rougher texture at a scale too small to resolve in this image. Location near: 10.7oN, 204.5oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Winter

  4. Tritium trapping states induced by lithium-depletion in Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Makoto, E-mail: kobayashi.makoto@LHD.nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science (Japan); Oya, Yasuhisa; Okuno, Kenji [Radioscience Research Laboratory, Faculty of Science, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Identifications of tritium trapping states in neutron-irradiated Li{sub 1.8}TiO{sub 2.9} (lithium-depleted Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}) were carried out by the out-of-pile tritium release behavior. Tritium release behaviors for neutron-irradiated Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} and tritium gas-exposed TiO{sub 2} were also measured for comparison. Among the tritium release spectra for these samples, three tritium release peaks were appeared. By the kinetic analyses of tritium release behaviors, the Arrhenius parameters for three peaks were evaluated. Especially for Li{sub 1.8}TiO{sub 2.9}, there were two tritium release peaks, and the peak in lower temperature region was assigned to the tritium release controlled by the diffusion process in Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} structure. The other tritium release peak, which was hardly appeared for Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}, was assigned to the release of tritium trapped as hydroxyl groups in Li{sub 1.8}TiO{sub 2.9}, indicating that lithium-depletion would result in the formation of hydroxyl groups in Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}. Lithium vacancies existed in Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} crystal structure would promote the tritium trapping as hydroxyl groups due to the decreased charge repulsion between lithium ions and tritium ion, resulting in the difficulty of recovering tritium from Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} effectively.

  5. Trapped antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, E; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jonsell, S; Jørgensen, L V; Kemp, S L; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif el Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki,Y

    2012-01-01

    Precision spectroscopic comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen holds the promise of a sensitive test of the Charge-Parity-Time theorem and matter-antimatter equivalence. The clearest path towards realising this goal is to hold a sample of antihydrogen in an atomic trap for interrogation by electromagnetic radiation. Achieving this poses a huge experimental challenge, as state-of-the-art magnetic-minimum atom traps have well depths of only ∼1 T (∼0.5 K for ground state antihydrogen atoms). The atoms annihilate on contact with matter and must be ‘born’ inside the magnetic trap with low kinetic energies. At the ALPHA experiment, antihydrogen atoms are produced from antiprotons and positrons stored in the form of non-neutral plasmas, where the typical electrostatic potential energy per particle is on the order of electronvolts, more than 104 times the maximum trappable kinetic energy. In November 2010, ALPHA published the observation of 38 antiproton annihilations due to antihydrogen atoms that had been ...

  6. Free radical generation induced by ultrasound in red wine and model wine: An EPR spin-trapping study

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Quing An; Shen, Yuan; Fan, Xue-Hui; García-Martín, Juan Francisco; Wang, Xi; Song, Yun

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Published by Elsevier B.V. Direct evidence for the formation of 1-hydroxylethyl radicals by ultrasound in red wine and air-saturated model wine is presented in this paper. Free radicals are thought to be the key intermediates in the ultrasound processing of wine, but their nature has not been established yet. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping with 5,5-dimethyl-l-pyrrolin N-oxide (DMPO) was used for the detection of hydroxyl free radicals and 1-hydroxylethyl free radic...

  7. Single photon SWAP gate using electromagnetically induced transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavuz, D.D.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a scheme that performs a SWAP gate between two photons at different wavelengths with near 100% fidelity. The essential idea is the preparation of a near-maximal atomic coherence using electromagnetically induced transparency

  8. Trapped-ion quantum logic gates based on oscillating magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ospelkaus, C; Langer, C E; Amini, J M; Brown, K R; Leibfried, D; Wineland, D J

    2008-08-29

    Oscillating magnetic fields and field gradients can be used to implement single-qubit rotations and entangling multiqubit quantum gates for trapped-ion quantum information processing (QIP). With fields generated by currents in microfabricated surface-electrode traps, it should be possible to achieve gate speeds that are comparable to those of optically induced gates for realistic distances between the ion crystal and the electrode surface. Magnetic-field-mediated gates have the potential to significantly reduce the overhead in laser-beam control and motional-state initialization compared to current QIP experiments with trapped ions and will eliminate spontaneous scattering, a fundamental source of decoherence in laser-mediated gates.

  9. Interface charge trapping induced flatband voltage shift during plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition in through silicon via

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunlong; Suhard, Samuel; Van Huylenbroeck, Stefaan; Meersschaut, Johan; Van Besien, Els; Stucchi, Michele; Croes, Kristof; Beyer, Gerald; Beyne, Eric

    2017-12-01

    A Through Silicon Via (TSV) is a key component for 3D integrated circuit stacking technology, and the diameter of a TSV keeps scaling down to reduce the footprint in silicon. The TSV aspect ratio, defined as the TSV depth/diameter, tends to increase consequently. Starting from the aspect ratio of 10, to improve the TSV sidewall coverage and reduce the process thermal budget, the TSV dielectric liner deposition process has evolved from sub-atmospheric chemical vapour deposition to plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD). However, with this change, a strong negative shift in the flatband voltage is observed in the capacitance-voltage characteristic of the vertical metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) parasitic capacitor formed between the TSV copper metal and the p-Si substrate. And, no shift is present in planar MOS capacitors manufactured with the same PE-ALD oxide. By comparing the integration process of these two MOS capacitor structures, and by using Elastic Recoil Detection to study the elemental composition of our films, it is found that the origin of the negative flatband voltage shift is the positive charge trapping at the Si/SiO2 interface, due to the positive PE-ALD reactants confined to the narrow cavity of high aspect ratio TSVs. This interface charge trapping effect can be effectively mitigated by high temperature annealing. However, this is limited in the real process due to the high thermal budget. Further investigation on liner oxide process optimization is needed.

  10. Behavioral changes induced by single and multiple electron beam pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pease, V.P.; McNulty, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of single, and low-dose, high-dose-rate and multiple electron beam pulses on passive avoidance behavior in mice were studied. Passive avoidance was measured by recording the time that an animal took to enter a chamber from a narrow platform. There were four conditions in the experiment: (1) no shock no radiation-control, (2) radiation only, (3) shock only, and (4) radiation plus shock. Forty animals were run for each data point. Dose rate was held constant at 9 x 10/sup 7/ rads/sec. Average doses for the two single pulses were 7.18 and 8.72 rads. The average total dose for a 25 pulse per second condition was 324.0 rads. The differences between the single versus multiple pulse radiation-only conditions were significant with longer avoidance latencies in the multiple pulse condition. Avoidance latencies were also significantly longer in the shock plus radiation condition for the multiple beam pulse than the single pulse. It is concluded that single and multiple electron beam pulses significantly effect behavior, in this case producing avoidance

  11. Electromagnetic trapping of neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalf, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    Cooling and trapping of neutral atoms is a new branch of applied physics that has potential for application in many areas. The authors present an introduction to laser cooling and magnetic trapping. Some basic ideas and fundamental limitations are discussed, and the first successful experiments are reviewed. Trapping a neutral object depends on the interaction between an inhomogeneous electromagnetic field and a multiple moment that results in the exchange of kinetic for potential energy. In neutral atom traps, the potential energy must be stored as internal atomic energy, resulting in two immediate and extremely important consequences. First, the atomic energy levels will necessarily shift as the atoms move in the trap, and, second, practical traps for ground state neutral atoms atr necessarily very shallow compared to thermal energy. This small depth also dictates stringent vacuum requirements because a trapped atom cannot survive a single collision with a thermal energy background gas molecule. Neutral trapping, therefore, depends on substantial cooling of a thermal atomic sample and is inextricably connected with the cooling process

  12. Single neuron dynamics during experimentally induced anoxic depolarization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandt, B.; Stigen, Tyler; ten Haken, Bernard; Netoff, Theoden; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria

    2013-01-01

    We studied single neuron dynamics during anoxic depolarizations, which are often observed in cases of neuronal energy depletion. Anoxic and similar depolarizations play an important role in several pathologies, notably stroke, migraine, and epilepsy. One of the effects of energy depletion was

  13. Severe signal loss in diamond beam loss monitors in high particle rate environments by charge trapping in radiation-induced defects

    CERN Document Server

    Kassel, Florian; Dabrowski, Anne; de Boer, Wim

    2016-01-01

    The beam condition monitoring leakage (BCML) system is a beam monitoring device in the compact muon solenoid (CMS) experiment at the large hadron collider (LHC). As detectors 32 poly-crystalline (pCVD) diamond sensors are positioned in rings around the beam pipe. Here, high particle rates occur from the colliding beams scattering particles outside the beam pipe. These particles cause defects, which act as traps for the ionization, thus reducing the charge collection efficiency (CCE). However, the loss in CCE was much more severe than expected from low rate laboratory measurements and simulations, especially in single-crystalline (sCVD) diamonds, which have a low initial concentration of defects. The reason why in real experiments the CCE is much worse than in laboratory experiments is related to the ionization rate. At high particle rates the trapping rate of the ionization is so high compared with the detrapping rate, that space charge builds up. This space charge reduces locally the internal electric field,...

  14. Low voltage stress-induced leakage current and traps in ultrathin oxide (1.2 2.5 nm) after constant voltage stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, C.; Zander, D.

    2007-10-01

    It has been shown that the low voltage gate current in ultrathin oxide metal-oxide-semiconductor devices is very sensitive to electrical stresses. Therefore, it can be used as a reliability monitor when the oxide thickness becomes too small for traditional electrical measurements to be used. In this work, we present a study on n-MOSCAP devices at negative gate bias in the direct tunneling (DT) regime. If the low voltage stress-induced leakage current (LVSILC) depends strongly on the low sense voltages, it also depends strongly on the stress voltage magnitude. We show that two LVSILC peaks appear as a function of the sense voltage in the LVSILC region and that their magnitude, one compared to the other, depends strongly on the stress voltage magnitude. One is larger than the other at low stress voltage and smaller at high stress voltage. From our experimental results, different conduction mechanisms are analyzed. To explain LVSILC variations, we propose a model of the conduction through the ultrathin gate oxide based on two distinctly different trap-assisted tunneling mechanisms: inelastic of gate electron (INE) and trap-assisted electron (ETAT).

  15. Self-induced coherence in a single pair of quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitek, Anna; Machnikowski, Pawel [Institute of Physics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wybrzeze Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2011-04-15

    We study self-induced coherence (SIC) in a system composed of two coupled quantum dots (QDs). SIC consists in a coherent transfer of excitation between two systems (atoms or QDs) resulting from their collective interaction with the quantum electromagnetic vacuum. This leads to population trapping in a delocalized, optically inactive state. We focus on the effect of a difference in transition energies and coupling between the two emitters on the evolution of exciton occupation in the two QD system. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Group B Streptococcus Induces Neutrophil Recruitment to Gestational Tissues and Elaboration of Extracellular Traps and Nutritional Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothary, Vishesh; Doster, Ryan S.; Rogers, Lisa M.; Kirk, Leslie A.; Boyd, Kelli L.; Romano-Keeler, Joann; Haley, Kathryn P.; Manning, Shannon D.; Aronoff, David M.; Gaddy, Jennifer A.

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae, or Group B Streptococcus (GBS), is a gram-positive bacterial pathogen associated with infection during pregnancy and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in neonates. Infection of the extraplacental membranes surrounding the developing fetus, a condition known as chorioamnionitis, is characterized histopathologically by profound infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs, neutrophils) and greatly increases the risk for preterm labor, stillbirth, or neonatal GBS infection. The advent of animal models of chorioamnionitis provides a powerful tool to study host-pathogen relationships in vivo and ex vivo. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the innate immune response elicited by GBS and evaluate how antimicrobial strategies elaborated by these innate immune cells affect bacteria. Our work using a mouse model of GBS ascending vaginal infection during pregnancy reveals that clinically isolated GBS has the capacity to invade reproductive tissues and elicit host immune responses including infiltration of PMNs within the choriodecidua and placenta during infection, mirroring the human condition. Upon interacting with GBS, murine neutrophils elaborate DNA-containing extracellular traps, which immobilize GBS and are studded with antimicrobial molecules including lactoferrin. Exposure of GBS to holo- or apo-forms of lactoferrin reveals that the iron-sequestration activity of lactoferrin represses GBS growth and viability in a dose-dependent manner. Together, these data indicate that the mouse model of ascending infection is a useful tool to recapitulate human models of GBS infection during pregnancy. Furthermore, this work reveals that neutrophil extracellular traps ensnare GBS and repress bacterial growth via deposition of antimicrobial molecules, which drive nutritional immunity via metal sequestration strategies. PMID:28217556

  17. Group B Streptococcus Induces Neutrophil Recruitment to Gestational Tissues and Elaboration of Extracellular Traps and Nutritional Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothary, Vishesh; Doster, Ryan S; Rogers, Lisa M; Kirk, Leslie A; Boyd, Kelli L; Romano-Keeler, Joann; Haley, Kathryn P; Manning, Shannon D; Aronoff, David M; Gaddy, Jennifer A

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae , or Group B Streptococcus (GBS), is a gram-positive bacterial pathogen associated with infection during pregnancy and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in neonates. Infection of the extraplacental membranes surrounding the developing fetus, a condition known as chorioamnionitis, is characterized histopathologically by profound infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs, neutrophils) and greatly increases the risk for preterm labor, stillbirth, or neonatal GBS infection. The advent of animal models of chorioamnionitis provides a powerful tool to study host-pathogen relationships in vivo and ex vivo . The purpose of this study was to evaluate the innate immune response elicited by GBS and evaluate how antimicrobial strategies elaborated by these innate immune cells affect bacteria. Our work using a mouse model of GBS ascending vaginal infection during pregnancy reveals that clinically isolated GBS has the capacity to invade reproductive tissues and elicit host immune responses including infiltration of PMNs within the choriodecidua and placenta during infection, mirroring the human condition. Upon interacting with GBS, murine neutrophils elaborate DNA-containing extracellular traps, which immobilize GBS and are studded with antimicrobial molecules including lactoferrin. Exposure of GBS to holo- or apo-forms of lactoferrin reveals that the iron-sequestration activity of lactoferrin represses GBS growth and viability in a dose-dependent manner. Together, these data indicate that the mouse model of ascending infection is a useful tool to recapitulate human models of GBS infection during pregnancy. Furthermore, this work reveals that neutrophil extracellular traps ensnare GBS and repress bacterial growth via deposition of antimicrobial molecules, which drive nutritional immunity via metal sequestration strategies.

  18. Calculation of cosmic ray induced single event upsets: Program CRUP (Cosmic Ray Upset Program)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, P.

    1983-09-01

    This report documents PROGRAM CRUP, COSMIC RAY UPSET PROGRAM. The computer program calculates cosmic ray induced single-event error rates in microelectronic circuits exposed to several representative cosmic-ray environments.

  19. Single-walled carbon nanotube-induced mitotic disruption⋆

    OpenAIRE

    Sargent, L.M.; Hubbs, A.F.; Young, S.-H.; Kashon, M.L.; Dinu, C.Z.; Salisbury, J.L.; Benkovic, S.A.; Lowry, D.T.; Murray, A.R.; Kisin, E.R.; Siegrist, K.J.; Battelli, L.; Mastovich, J.; Sturgeon, J.L.; Bunker, K.L.

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes were among the earliest products of nanotechnology and have many potential applications in medicine, electronics, and manufacturing. The low density, small size, and biological persistence of carbon nanotubes create challenges for exposure control and monitoring and make respiratory exposures to workers likely. We have previously shown mitotic spindle aberrations in cultured primary and immortalized human airway epithelial cells exposed to 24, 48 and 96 μg/cm2 single-walled c...

  20. Separation of effects of oxide-trapped charge and interface-trapped charge on mobility in irradiated power MOSFETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zupac, D.; Galloway, K.F.; Khosropour, P.; Anderson, S.R.; Schrimpf, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    An effective approach to separating the effects of oxide-trapped charge and interface-trapped charge on mobility degradation in irradiated MOSFETs is demonstrated. It is based on analyzing mobility data sets which have different functional relationships between the radiation-induced-oxide-trapped charge and interface-trapped charge. Separation of effects of oxide-trapped charge and interface-trapped charge is possible only if these two trapped charge components are not linearly dependent. A significant contribution of oxide-trapped charge to mobility degradation is demonstrated and quantified

  1. Giant piezoresistance of p-type nano-thick silicon induced by interface electron trapping instead of 2D quantum confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yongliang; Li Xinxin

    2011-01-01

    The p-type silicon giant piezoresistive coefficient is measured in top-down fabricated nano-thickness single-crystalline-silicon strain-gauge resistors with a macro-cantilever bending experiment. For relatively thicker samples, the variation of piezoresistive coefficient in terms of silicon thickness obeys the reported 2D quantum confinement effect. For ultra-thin samples, however, the variation deviates from the quantum-effect prediction but increases the value by at least one order of magnitude (compared to the conventional piezoresistance of bulk silicon) and the value can change its sign (e.g. from positive to negative). A stress-enhanced Si/SiO 2 interface electron-trapping effect model is proposed to explain the 'abnormal' giant piezoresistance that should be originated from the carrier-concentration change effect instead of the conventional equivalent mobility change effect for bulk silicon piezoresistors. An interface state modification experiment gives preliminary proof of our analysis.

  2. Status and outlook of CHIP-TRAP: The Central Michigan University high precision Penning trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redshaw, M.; Bryce, R. A.; Hawks, P.; Gamage, N. D.; Hunt, C.; Kandegedara, R. M. E. B.; Ratnayake, I. S.; Sharp, L.

    2016-06-01

    At Central Michigan University we are developing a high-precision Penning trap mass spectrometer (CHIP-TRAP) that will focus on measurements with long-lived radioactive isotopes. CHIP-TRAP will consist of a pair of hyperbolic precision-measurement Penning traps, and a cylindrical capture/filter trap in a 12 T magnetic field. Ions will be produced by external ion sources, including a laser ablation source, and transported to the capture trap at low energies enabling ions of a given m / q ratio to be selected via their time-of-flight. In the capture trap, contaminant ions will be removed with a mass-selective rf dipole excitation and the ion of interest will be transported to the measurement traps. A phase-sensitive image charge detection technique will be used for simultaneous cyclotron frequency measurements on single ions in the two precision traps, resulting in a reduction in statistical uncertainty due to magnetic field fluctuations.

  3. Dependence of hydrogen-induced lattice defects and hydrogen embrittlement of cold-drawn pearlitic steels on hydrogen trap state, temperature, strain rate and hydrogen content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doshida, Tomoki; Takai, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    The effects of the hydrogen state, temperature, strain rate and hydrogen content on hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility and hydrogen-induced lattice defects were evaluated for cold-drawn pearlitic steel that absorbed hydrogen in two trapping states. Firstly, tensile tests were carried out under various conditions to evaluate hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility. The results showed that peak 2 hydrogen, desorbed at temperatures above 200 °C as determined by thermal desorption analysis (TDA), had no significant effect on hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility. In contrast, hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility increased in the presence of peak 1 hydrogen, desorbed from room temperature to 200 °C as determined by TDA, at temperatures higher than −30 °C, at lower strain rates and with higher hydrogen content. Next, the same effects on hydrogen-induced lattice defects were also evaluated by TDA using hydrogen as a probe. Peak 2 hydrogen showed no significant effect on either hydrogen-induced lattice defects or hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility. It was found that hydrogen-induced lattice defects formed under the conditions where hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility increased. This relationship indicates that hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility was higher under the conditions where the formation of hydrogen-induced lattice defects tended to be enhanced. Since hydrogen-induced lattice defects formed by the interaction between hydrogen and strain were annihilated by annealing at a temperature of 200 °C, they were presumably vacancies or vacancy clusters. One of the common atomic-level changes that occur in cold-drawn pearlitic steel showing higher hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility is the formation of vacancies and vacancy clusters

  4. Deterministic nonlinear phase gates induced by a single qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kimin; Marek, Petr; Filip, Radim

    2018-05-01

    We propose deterministic realizations of nonlinear phase gates by repeating a finite sequence of non-commuting Rabi interactions between a harmonic oscillator and only a single two-level ancillary qubit. We show explicitly that the key nonclassical features of the ideal cubic phase gate and the quartic phase gate are generated in the harmonic oscillator faithfully by our method. We numerically analyzed the performance of our scheme under realistic imperfections of the oscillator and the two-level system. The methodology is extended further to higher-order nonlinear phase gates. This theoretical proposal completes the set of operations required for continuous-variable quantum computation.

  5. Orientation and thickness dependence of magnetic levitation force and trapped magnetic field of single grain YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-y} bulk superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Y.; Go, S. J.; Joo, H. T. [Korea Science Academy of Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Y. J.; Park, S. D.; Jun, B. H.; KIm, C. J. [Neutron Utilization Technology Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The effects of the crystallographic orientation and sample thickness on the magnetic levitation forces (F) and trapped magnetic field (B) of single grain YBCO bulk superconductors were examined. Single grain YBCO samples with a (001), (110) or (100) surface were used as the test samples. The samples used for the force-distance (F-d) measurement were cooled at 77 K without a magnetic field (zero field cooling, ZFC), whereas the samples used for the B measurement were cooled under the external magnetic field of a Nd-B-Fe permanent magnet (field cooling, FC). It was found that F and B of the (001) surface were higher than those of the (110) or (100) surface, which is attributed to the higher critical current density (J{sub c}) of the (001) surface. For the (001) samples with t=5–18 mm, the maximum magnetic levitation forces (F{sub max}s) of the ZFC samples were larger than 40 N. About 80% of the applied magnetic field was trapped in the FC samples. However, the F and B decreased rapidly as t decreased below 5 mm. There exists a critical sample thickness (t=5 mm for the experimental condition of this study) for maintaining the large levitation/trapping properties, which is dependent on the material properties and magnitude of the external magnetic fields.

  6. Trace detection of organic compounds in complex sample matrixes by single photon ionization ion trap mass spectrometry: real-time detection of security-relevant compounds and online analysis of the coffee-roasting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Elisabeth; Kürten, Andreas; Hölzer, Jasper; Mitschke, Stefan; Mühlberger, Fabian; Sklorz, Martin; Wieser, Jochen; Ulrich, Andreas; Pütz, Michael; Schulte-Ladbeck, Rasmus; Schultze, Rainer; Curtius, Joachim; Borrmann, Stephan; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2009-06-01

    An in-house-built ion trap mass spectrometer combined with a soft ionization source has been set up and tested. As ionization source, an electron beam pumped vacuum UV (VUV) excimer lamp (EBEL) was used for single-photon ionization. It was shown that soft ionization allows the reduction of fragmentation of the target analytes and the suppression of most matrix components. Therefore, the combination of photon ionization with the tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) capability of an ion trap yields a powerful tool for molecular ion peak detection and identification of organic trace compounds in complex matrixes. This setup was successfully tested for two different applications. The first one is the detection of security-relevant substances like explosives, narcotics, and chemical warfare agents. One test substance from each of these groups was chosen and detected successfully with single photon ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (SPI-ITMS) MS/MS measurements. Additionally, first tests were performed, demonstrating that this method is not influenced by matrix compounds. The second field of application is the detection of process gases. Here, exhaust gas from coffee roasting was analyzed in real time, and some of its compounds were identified using MS/MS studies.

  7. Relationship between lung function and quantitative computed tomographic parameters of airway remodeling, air trapping, and emphysema in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A single-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Ruth A; Barker, Bethan L; Newby, Chris; Pakkal, Mini; Baldi, Simonetta; Kajekar, Radhika; Kay, Richard; Laurencin, Marie; Marshall, Richard P; Sousa, Ana R; Parmar, Harsukh; Siddiqui, Salman; Gupta, Sumit; Brightling, Chris E

    2016-05-01

    There is a paucity of studies comparing asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) based on thoracic quantitative computed tomographic (QCT) parameters. We sought to compare QCT parameters of airway remodeling, air trapping, and emphysema between asthmatic patients and patients with COPD and explore their relationship with airflow limitation. Asthmatic patients (n = 171), patients with COPD (n = 81), and healthy subjects (n = 49) recruited from a single center underwent QCT and clinical characterization. Proximal airway percentage wall area (%WA) was significantly increased in asthmatic patients (62.5% [SD, 2.2]) and patients with COPD (62.7% [SD, 2.3]) compared with that in healthy control subjects (60.3% [SD, 2.2], P Emphysema assessed based on lung density measured by using Hounsfield units below which 15% of the voxels lie (Perc15) was a feature of COPD only (patients with COPD: mean, -964 [SD, 19.62] vs asthmatic patients: mean, -937 [SD, 22.7] and healthy subjects: mean, -937 [SD, 17.1], P < .001). Multiple regression analyses showed that the strongest predictor of lung function impairment in asthmatic patients was %WA, whereas in the COPD and asthma subgrouped with postbronchodilator FEV1 percent predicted value of less than 80%, it was air trapping. Factor analysis of QCT parameters in asthmatic patients and patients with COPD combined determined 3 components, with %WA, air trapping, and Perc15 values being the highest loading factors. Cluster analysis identified 3 clusters with mild, moderate, or severe lung function impairment with corresponding decreased lung density (Perc15 values) and increased air trapping. In asthmatic patients and patients with COPD, lung function impairment is strongly associated with air trapping, with a contribution from proximal airway narrowing in asthmatic patients. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Trapped Ion Qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maunz, Peter Lukas Wilhelm

    2017-04-01

    Qubits can be encoded in clock states of trapped ions. These states are well isolated from the environment resulting in long coherence times [1] while enabling efficient high-fidelity qubit interactions mediated by the Coulomb coupled motion of the ions in the trap. Quantum states can be prepared with high fidelity and measured efficiently using fluorescence detection. State preparation and detection with 99.93% fidelity have been realized in multiple systems [1,2]. Single qubit gates have been demonstrated below rigorous fault-tolerance thresholds [1,3]. Two qubit gates have been realized with more than 99.9% fidelity [4,5]. Quantum algorithms have been demonstrated on systems of 5 to 15 qubits [6–8].

  9. Stacking fault tetrahedron induced plasticity in copper single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Liang, E-mail: lz592@uowmail.edu.au [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Lu, Cheng, E-mail: chenglu@uow.edu.au [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Tieu, Kiet; Su, Lihong; Zhao, Xing [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Pei, Linqing [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2017-01-05

    Stacking fault tetrahedron (SFT) is the most common type of vacancy clustered defects in fcc metals and alloys, and can play an important role in the mechanical properties of metallic materials. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out to investigate the incipience of plasticity and the underlying atomic mechanisms in copper single crystals with SFT. Different deformation mechanisms of SFT were reported due to the crystal orientations and loading directions (compression and tension). The results showed that the incipient plasticity in crystals with SFT resulted from the heterogeneous dislocation nucleation from SFT, so the stress required for plastic deformation was less than that needed for perfect single crystals. Three crystal orientations ([1 0 0], [1 1 0] and [1 1 1]) were specified in this study because they can represent most of the typical deformation mechanisms of SFT. MD simulations revealed that the structural transformation of SFT was frequent under the applied loading; a metastable SFT structure and the collapse of SFT were usually observed. The structural transformation resulted in a different reduction of yield stress in compression and tension, and also caused a decreased or reversed compression/tension asymmetry. Compressive stress can result in the unfaulting of Frank loop in some crystal orientations. According to the elastic theory of dislocation, the process of unfaulting was closely related to the size of the dislocation loop and the stacking fault energy.

  10. Malaria induced acute renal failure: A single center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KV Kanodia; AV Vanikar

    2010-01-01

    Malaria has protean clinical manifestations and renal complications, particularly acute renal failure that could be life threatening. To evaluate the incidence, clinical profile, ou come and predictors of mortality in patients with malarial acute renal failure, we retrospectively studied the last two years records of malaria induced acute renal failure in patients with peripheral smear positive for malarial parasites. One hundred (10.4%) (63 males, 37 females) malaria induced acute renal failure amongst 958 cases of acute renal failure were evaluated. Plasmodium (P). falciparum was reported in 85%, P. vivax in 2%, and both in 13% patients. The mean serum creatinine was 9.2 ± 4.2 mg%, and oligo/anuria was present in 82%; 78% of the patients required hemodialysis. Sixty four percent of the patients recovered completely, 10% incompletely, and 5% developed chronic kidney failure; mortality occurred in 21% of the patients. Low hemoglobin, oligo/anuria on admission, hyperbilirubinemia, cerebral malaria, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and high serum creatinine were the main predictors of mortality. We conclude that malaria is associated with acute renal failure, which occurs most commonly in plasmodium falciparum infected patients. Early diagnosis and prompt dialysis with supportive management can reduce morality and enhance recovery of renal function (Author).

  11. Single event effects induced by 15.14 MeV/u 136Xe ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Mingdong; Zhang Qingxiang; Liu Jie; Wang Zhiguang; Jin Yunfan; Zhu Zhiyong; Zhen Honglou; Liu Changlong; Chen Xiaoxi; Wei Xinguo; Zhang Lin; Fan Youcheng; Zhu Zhourong; Zhang Yiting

    2002-01-01

    Single event effects induced by 15.14 MeV/u 136 Xe ions in different batches of 32k x 8 bits static random access memory are studied. The incident angle dependences of the cross sections for single event upset and single event latch up are presented. The SEE cross sections are plotted versus energy loss instead of linear energy transfer value in sensitive region. The depth of sensitive volume and thickness of 'dead' layer above the sensitive volume are estimated

  12. α-Tocopherol impact on oxy-radical induced free radical decomposition of DMSO: Spin trapping EPR and theoretical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerzykiewicz, Maria; Cwielag-Piasecka, Irmina; Witwicki, Maciej; Jezierski, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: α-Tocopherol inhibits the oxidation of ·CH 3 to ·OCH 3 . Display Omitted Highlights: → α-Tocopherol does not inhibit the oxidation of DMSO to ·CH 3 . → α-Tocopherol inhibits the oxidation of ·CH 3 to ·OCH 3 . → α-Tocopherol does not inhibit the oxidation of PBN. → The structures of observed spin adducts were theoretically confirmed. - Abstract: EPR spin trapping and theoretical methods such as density functional theory (DFT) as well as combined DFT and quadratic configuration interaction approach (DFT/QCISD) were used to identify the radicals produced in the reaction of oxy-radicals and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in the presence and absence of α-tocopherol. Additionally, the mixtures of α-tocopherol with linolenic acid and glyceryl trilinoleate as well as bioglycerols (glycerol fractions from biodiesel production) were tested. α-Tocopherol inhibited oxidation of the main decomposition product of DMSO, ·CH 3 to ·OCH 3 but did not prevent the transformation process of N-t-butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN) into 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP). Theoretical investigations confirmed the structures of proposed spin adducts and allowed to correlate the EPR parameters observed in the experiment with the spin adducts electronic structure.

  13. {alpha}-Tocopherol impact on oxy-radical induced free radical decomposition of DMSO: Spin trapping EPR and theoretical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerzykiewicz, Maria, E-mail: Mariaj@wchuwr.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, Wroclaw University, 14 F. Joliot-Curie St., 50-383 Wroclaw (Poland); Cwielag-Piasecka, Irmina; Witwicki, Maciej; Jezierski, Adam [Faculty of Chemistry, Wroclaw University, 14 F. Joliot-Curie St., 50-383 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2011-05-26

    Graphical abstract: {alpha}-Tocopherol inhibits the oxidation of {center_dot}CH{sub 3} to {center_dot}OCH{sub 3}. Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} {alpha}-Tocopherol does not inhibit the oxidation of DMSO to {center_dot}CH{sub 3}. {yields} {alpha}-Tocopherol inhibits the oxidation of {center_dot}CH{sub 3} to {center_dot}OCH{sub 3}. {yields} {alpha}-Tocopherol does not inhibit the oxidation of PBN. {yields} The structures of observed spin adducts were theoretically confirmed. - Abstract: EPR spin trapping and theoretical methods such as density functional theory (DFT) as well as combined DFT and quadratic configuration interaction approach (DFT/QCISD) were used to identify the radicals produced in the reaction of oxy-radicals and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in the presence and absence of {alpha}-tocopherol. Additionally, the mixtures of {alpha}-tocopherol with linolenic acid and glyceryl trilinoleate as well as bioglycerols (glycerol fractions from biodiesel production) were tested. {alpha}-Tocopherol inhibited oxidation of the main decomposition product of DMSO, {center_dot}CH{sub 3} to {center_dot}OCH{sub 3} but did not prevent the transformation process of N-t-butyl-{alpha}-phenylnitrone (PBN) into 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP). Theoretical investigations confirmed the structures of proposed spin adducts and allowed to correlate the EPR parameters observed in the experiment with the spin adducts electronic structure.

  14. Investigation of trapped thickness-twist waves induced by functionally graded piezoelectric material in an inhomogeneous plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Peng; Jin, Feng; Cao, Xiao-Shan

    2013-01-01

    The effect of functional graded piezoelectric materials on the propagation of thickness-twist waves is investigated through equations of the linear theory of piezoelectricity. The elastic and piezoelectric coefficients, dielectric permittivity, and mass density are assumed to change in a linear form but with different graded parameters along the wave propagation direction. We employ the power-series technique to solve the governing differential equations with variable coefficients attributed to the different graded parameters and prove the correction and convergence of this method. As a special case, the functional graded middle layer resulting from piezoelectric damage and material bonding is investigated. Piezoelectric damaged material can facilitate energy trapping, which is impossible in perfect materials. The increase in the damaged length and the reduction in the piezoelectric coefficient decrease the resonance frequency but increase the number of modes. Higher modes of thickness-twist waves appear periodically along the damaged length. Moreover, the displacement of the center of the damaged portion is neither symmetric nor anti-symmetric, unlike the non-graded plate. The conclusions are theoretically and practically significant for wave devices. (paper)

  15. Free radical generation induced by ultrasound in red wine and model wine: An EPR spin-trapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-An; Shen, Yuan; Fan, Xue-Hui; Martín, Juan Francisco García; Wang, Xi; Song, Yun

    2015-11-01

    Direct evidence for the formation of 1-hydroxylethyl radicals by ultrasound in red wine and air-saturated model wine is presented in this paper. Free radicals are thought to be the key intermediates in the ultrasound processing of wine, but their nature has not been established yet. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping with 5,5-dimethyl-l-pyrrolin N-oxide (DMPO) was used for the detection of hydroxyl free radicals and 1-hydroxylethyl free radicals. Spin adducts of hydroxyl free radicals were detected in DMPO aqueous solution after sonication while 1-hydroxylethyl free radical adducts were observed in ultrasound-processed red wine and model wine. The latter radical arose from ethanol oxidation via the hydroxyl radical generated by ultrasound in water, thus providing the first direct evidence of the formation of 1-hydroxylethyl free radical in red wine exposed to ultrasound. Finally, the effects of ultrasound frequency, ultrasound power, temperature and ultrasound exposure time were assessed on the intensity of 1-hydroxylethyl radical spin adducts in model wine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Induced defects in neutron irradiated GaN single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, I. W.; Koh, E. K.; Kim, Y. M.; Choh, S. H.; Park, S. S.; Kim, B. G.; Sohn, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    The local structure of defects in undoped, Si-doped, and neutron irradiated free standing GaN bulk crystals, grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy, has been investigated by employing Raman scattering and cathodoluminescence. The GaN samples were irradiated to a dose of 2 x 10 17 neutrons in an atomic reactor at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. There was no appreciable change in the Raman spectra for undoped GaN samples before and after neutron irradiation. However, a forbidden transition, A 1 (TO) mode, appeared for a neutron irradiated Si-doped GaN crystal. Cathodoluminescence spectrum for the neutron irradiated Si-doped GaN crystal became much more broadened than that for the unirradiated one. The experimental results reveal the generation of defects with locally deformed structure in the wurtzite Si-doped GaN single crystal

  17. Sputtering of Au induced by single Xe ion impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birtcher, R. C.; Donnelly, S. E.

    1999-01-01

    Sputtering of Au thin films has been determined for Xe ions with energies between 50 and 600 keV. In-situ transmission electron microscopy was used to observe sputtered Au during deposition on a carbon foil near the specimen. Total reflection and transmission sputtering yields for a 62 nm thick Au thin film were determined by ex-situ measurement of the total amount of Au on the carbon foils. In situ observations show that individual Xe ions eject Au nanoparticles as large as 7 nm in diameter with an average diameter of approximately 3 nm. Particle emission correlates with crater formation due to single ion impacts. Nanoparticle emission contributes significantly to the total sputtering yield for Xe ions in this energy range in either reflection or transmission geometry

  18. Trapping a Knot into Tight Conformations by Intra-Chain Repulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Dai

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Knots can occur in biopolymers such as DNA and peptides. In our previous study, we systematically investigated the effects of intra-chain interactions on knots and found that long-range repulsions can surprisingly tighten knots. Here, we use this knowledge to trap a knot into tight conformations in Langevin dynamics simulations. By trapping, we mean that the free energy landscape with respect to the knot size exhibits a potential well around a small knot size in the presence of long-range repulsions, and this potential can well lead to long-lived tight knots when its depth is comparable to or larger than thermal energy. We tune the strength of intra-chain repulsion such that a knot is weakly trapped. Driven by thermal fluctuations, the knot can escape from the trap and is then re-trapped. We find that the knot switches between tight and loose conformations—referred to as “knot breathing”. We use a Yukawa potential to model screened electrostatic interactions to explore the relevance of knot trapping and breathing in charged biopolymers. We determine the minimal screened length and the minimal strength of repulsion for knot trapping. We find that Coulomb-induced knot trapping is possible to occur in single-stranded DNA and peptides for normal ionic strengths.

  19. Globalisation Trapped

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Caraça

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The promise of making society progress through the direct applications of science was finally fulfilled in the mid-20th century. Science progressed immensely, propelled by the effects of the two world wars. The first science-based technologies saw the daylight during the 1940s and their transformative power was such that neither the military, nor subsequently the markets, allowed science to return intact to its curiosity-driven nest. Technoscience was born then and (being progressively pulled away from curiosity-driven science was able to grow enormously, erecting a formidable structure of networks of institutions that impacted decisively on the economy. It is a paradox, or maybe a trap, that the fulfillment of science’s solemn promise of ‘transforming nature’ means seeing ourselves and our Western societies entangled in crises after crises with no clear outcome in view. A redistribution of geopolitical power is under way, along with the deployment of information and communication technologies, forcing dominant structures to oscillate, as knowledge about organization and methods, marketing, design, and software begins to challenge the role of technoscience as the main vector of economic growth and wealth accumulation. What ought to be done?

  20. Diffusion to finite-size traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, P.M.

    1986-01-01

    The survival probability of a random-walking particle is derived for hopping in a random distribution of traps of arbitrary radius and concentration. The single-center approximation is shown to be valid for times of physical interest even when the fraction of volume occupied by traps approaches unity. The theory is based on computation of the number of different potential trap regions sampled in a random walk and is confirmed by simulations on a simple-cubic lattice

  1. Low-energy neutron-induced single-event upsets in static random access memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xiaoqiang; Guo Hongxia; Wang Guizhen; Ling Dongsheng; Chen Wei; Bai Xiaoyan; Yang Shanchao; Liu Yan

    2009-01-01

    The visual analysis method of data process was provided for neutron-induced single-event upset(SEU) in static random access memory(SRAM). The SEU effects of six CMOS SRAMs with different feature size(from 0.13 μm to 1.50 μm) were studied. The SEU experiments were performed using the neutron radiation environment at Xi'an pulsed reactor. And the dependence of low-energy neutron-induced SEU cross section on SRAM's feature size was given. The results indicate that the decreased critical charge is the dominant factor for the increase of single event effect sensitivity of SRAM devices with decreased feature size. Small-sized SRAM devices are more sensitive than large-sized ones to single event effect induced by low-energy neutrons. (authors)

  2. Repair of X-ray-induced single-strand breaks by a cell-free system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Shuji; Ikeda, Shogo; Tsutui, Ken; Teraoka, Hirobumi

    1990-01-01

    Repair of X-ray-induced single-strand breaks of DNA was studied in vitro using an exonuclease purified from mouse ascites sarcoma (SR-C3H/He) cells. X-ray-dose-dependent unscheduled DNA synthesis was primed by the exonuclease. Repair of X-ray-induced single-strand breaks in pUC19 plasmid DNA was demonstrated by agarose gel electrophoresis after incubating the damaged DNA with the exonuclease, DNA polymerase (Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I or DNA polymerase β purified from SR-C3H/He cells), four deoxynucleoside triphosphates, ATP and DNA ligase (T4 DNA ligase or DNA ligase I purified from calf thymus). The present results suggested that the exonuclease is involved in the initiation of repair of X-ray-induced single-strand breaks in removing 3' ends of X-ray-damaged DNA. (author)

  3. Status of THe-trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketter, Jochen; Eronen, Tommi; Hoecker, Martin; Streubel, Sebastian; Blaum, Klaus [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Van Dyck, Robert S. Jr. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Originally developed at the University of Washington and relocated to the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik in 2008, the Penning-trap spectrometer THe-Trap is specially tailored for a {sup 3}H/{sup 3}He mass-ratio measurement, from which the Q-value of the beta-decay of {sup 3}H to {sup 3}He can be derived. Improving the current best value by at least an order of magnitude will provide an important independent test parameter for the determination of the electron-antineutrino's mass by the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino Experiment (KATRIN). However, Penning-trap mass spectrometry has to be pushed to its limits in a dedicated experiment for a sufficiently accurate mass-ratio measurement with a relative uncertainty of 10{sup -11}. Unlike the closed-envelope, single-trap predecessor, the new spectrometer features an external ion source, owing to the radioactive nature of tritium, and two traps in order to speed up the measurement cycle. While the double-trap technique holds great promise, it also calls for more intricate procedures, such as ion transfer. Details about the recent progress of the experiment are given.

  4. Origin of the defects-induced ferromagnetism in un-doped ZnO single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Peng; Xie, Zheng; Li, Zhengcao; Wang, Weipeng; Zhang, Zhengjun; Li, Zhuoxin; Cheng, Guodong; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Baoyi; Cao, Xingzhong

    2013-02-01

    We clarified, in this Letter, that in un-doped ZnO single crystals after thermal annealing in flowing argon, the defects-induced room-temperature ferromagnetism was originated from the surface defects and specifically, from singly occupied oxygen vacancies denoted as F+, by the optical and electrical properties measurements as well as positron annihilation analysis. In addition, a positive linear relationship was observed between the ferromagnetism and the F+ concentration, which is in support with the above clarification.

  5. Device intended for measurement of induced trapped charge in insulating materials under electron irradiation in a scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkorissat, R; Benramdane, N; Jbara, O; Rondot, S; Hadjadj, A; Belhaj, M

    2013-01-01

    A device for simultaneously measuring two currents (i.e. leakage and displacement currents) induced in insulating materials under electron irradiation has been built. The device, suitably mounted on the sample holder of a scanning electron microscope (SEM), allows a wider investigation of charging and discharging phenomena that take place in any type of insulator during its electron irradiation and to determine accurately the corresponding time constants. The measurement of displacement current is based on the principle of the image charge due to the electrostatic influence phenomena. We are reporting the basic concept and test results of the device that we have built using, among others, the finite element method for its calibration. This last method takes into account the specimen chamber geometry, the geometry of the device and the physical properties of the sample. In order to show the possibilities of the designed device, various applications under different experimental conditions are explored. (paper)

  6. Collective excitations of harmonically trapped ideal gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Schaeybroeck, B.; Lazarides, A.

    2009-01-01

    We theoretically study the collective excitations of an ideal gas confined in an isotropic harmonic trap. We give an exact solution to the Boltzmann-Vlasov equation; as expected for a single-component system, the associated mode frequencies are integer multiples of the trapping frequency. We show

  7. Hydrodynamic properties and distribution of bait downstream of a zooplankton trap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selander, Erik; Heuschele, Jan; Larsson, Ann I.

    2017-01-01

    The flow regime around a chemically baited trap is crucial for the trapping process and distribution of bait downstream of traps. We measured the flow field downstream of a trap prototype in flume experiments and mapped the distribution of bait using laser induced fluorescence. The trap produced ...

  8. Effects of trap-assisted tunneling on gate-induced drain leakage in silicon-germanium channel p-type FET for scaled supply voltages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vishal A.; Divakaruni, Rama; Hook, Terence B.; Nair, Deleep R.

    2016-04-01

    Silicon-germanium is considered as an alternative channel material to silicon p-type FET (pFET) for the development of energy efficient high performance transistors for 28 nm and beyond in a high-k metal gate technology because of its lower threshold voltage and higher mobility. However, gate-induced drain leakage (GIDL) is a concern for high threshold voltage device design because of tunneling at reduced bandgap. In this work, the trap-assisted tunneling and band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) effects on GIDL is analyzed and modeled for SiGe pFETs. Experimental results and Monte Carlo simulation results reveal that the pre-halo germanium pre-amorphization implant used to contain the short channel effects contribute to GIDL at the drain sidewall in addition to GIDL due to BTBT in SiGe devices. The results are validated by comparing the experimental observations with the numerical simulation and a set of calibrated models are used to describe the GIDL mechanisms for various drain and gate bias.

  9. Gamma-radiation-induced change in the activation energy of TL traps in LiRbSO[sub 4]:Tl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassem, M.E.; El-Kolaly, M.A.; Al-Houty, L.I. (Qatar Univ., Doha (Qatar). Dept. of Physics)

    1994-06-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) measurements were carried out for pure and doped LiRbSO[sub 4], with different concentrations of thallium (Tl). The glow-curve range of measurement is between room temperature up to 300[sup o]C. The radiation absorbed dose is in the range 56-3.2 x 10[sup 5] Gy. The results show that both pure and doped samples have glow peak temperatures that are dose dependent, and vary between 70-80[sup o]C and 140-170[sup o]C for pure and doped samples respectively. Doped samples display double peaks that increase with dopant concentration up to about 0.7% wt. The second peak which occurs at high temperature increases linearly with dose up to 4500 Gy. From the results it is proposed that LiRbSO[sub 4] doped with 0.7% Tl can be used for dosimetric purposes in this range. The activation energies of structural transitions are estimated and the results are discussed on the basis of radiation-induced stable dipoles in the random field system. (Author).

  10. Optical macro-tweezers: trapping of highly motile micro-organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thalhammer, G; Steiger, R; Bernet, S; Ritsch-Marte, M

    2011-01-01

    Optical micromanipulation stands for contact-free handling of microscopic particles by light. Optical forces can manipulate non-absorbing objects in a large range of sizes, e.g., from biological cells down to cold atoms. Recently much progress has been made going from the micro- down to the nanoscale. Less attention has been paid to going the other way, trapping increasingly large particles. Optical tweezers typically employ a single laser beam tightly focused by a microscope objective of high numerical aperture to stably trap a particle in three dimensions (3D). As the particle size increases, stable 3D trapping in a single-beam trap requires scaling up the optical power, which eventually induces adverse biological effects. Moreover, the restricted field of view of standard optical tweezers, dictated by the use of high NA objectives, is particularly unfavorable for catching actively moving specimens. Both problems can be overcome by traps with counter-propagating beams. Our 'macro-tweezers' are especially designed to trap highly motile organisms, as they enable three-dimensional all-optical trapping and guiding in a volume of 2 × 1 × 2 mm 3 . Here we report for the first time the optical trapping of large actively swimming organisms, such as for instance Euglena protists and dinoflagellates of up to 70 µm length. Adverse bio-effects are kept low since trapping occurs outside high intensity regions, e.g., focal spots. We expect our approach to open various possibilities in the contact-free handling of 50–100 µm sized objects that could hitherto not be envisaged, for instance all-optical holding of individual micro-organisms for taxonomic identification, selective collecting or tagging

  11. HPN-07, a free radical spin trapping agent, protects against functional, cellular and electrophysiological changes in the cochlea induced by acute acoustic trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ning; Du, Xiaoping; Li, Wei; West, Matthew B.; Choi, Chul-Hee; Floyd, Robert; Kopke, Richard D.

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress is considered a major cause of the structural and functional changes associated with auditory pathologies induced by exposure to acute acoustic trauma AAT). In the present study, we examined the otoprotective effects of 2,4-disulfophenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (HPN-07), a nitrone-based free radical trap, on the physiological and cellular changes in the auditory system of chinchilla following a six-hour exposure to 4 kHz octave band noise at 105 dB SPL. HPN-07 has been shown to suppress oxidative stress in biological models of a variety of disorders. Our results show that administration of HPN-07 beginning four hours after acoustic trauma accelerated and enhanced auditory/cochlear functional recovery, as measured by auditory brainstem responses (ABR), distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE), compound action potentials (CAP), and cochlear microphonics (CM). The normally tight correlation between the endocochlear potential (EP) and evoked potentials of CAP and CM were persistently disrupted after noise trauma in untreated animals but returned to homeostatic conditions in HPN-07 treated animals. Histological analyses revealed several therapeutic advantages associated with HPN-07 treatment following AAT, including reductions in inner and outer hair cell loss; reductions in AAT-induced loss of calretinin-positive afferent nerve fibers in the spiral lamina; and reductions in fibrocyte loss within the spiral ligament. These findings support the conclusion that early intervention with HPN-07 following an AAT efficiently blocks the propagative ototoxic effects of oxidative stress, thereby preserving the homeostatic and functional integrity of the cochlea. PMID:28832600

  12. Effects of oxide traps, interface traps, and ''border traps'' on metal-oxide-semiconductor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleetwood, D.M.; Winokur, P.S.; Reber, R.A. Jr.; Meisenheimer, T.L.; Schwank, J.R.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Riewe, L.C.

    1993-01-01

    We have identified several features of the 1/f noise and radiation response of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices that are difficult to explain with standard defect models. To address this issue, and in response to ambiguities in the literature, we have developed a revised nomenclature for defects in MOS devices that clearly distinguishes the language used to describe the physical location of defects from that used to describe their electrical response. In this nomenclature, ''oxide traps'' are simply defects in the SiO 2 layer of the MOS structure, and ''interface traps'' are defects at the Si/SiO 2 interface. Nothing is presumed about how either type of defect communicates with the underlying Si. Electrically, ''fixed states'' are defined as trap levels that do not communicate with the Si on the time scale of the measurements, but ''switching states'' can exchange charge with the Si. Fixed states presumably are oxide traps in most types of measurements, but switching states can either be interface traps or near-interfacial oxide traps that can communicate with the Si, i.e., ''border traps'' [D. M. Fleetwood, IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. NS-39, 269 (1992)]. The effective density of border traps depends on the time scale and bias conditions of the measurements. We show the revised nomenclature can provide focus to discussions of the buildup and annealing of radiation-induced charge in non-radiation-hardened MOS transistors, and to changes in the 1/f noise of MOS devices through irradiation and elevated-temperature annealing

  13. Shrew trap efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gambalemoke, Mbalitini; Mukinzi, Itoka; Amundala, Drazo

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the efficiency of four trap types (pitfall, Sherman LFA, Victor snap and Museum Special snap traps) to capture shrews. This experiment was conducted in five inter-riverine forest blocks in the region of Kisangani. The total trapping effort was 6,300, 9,240, 5,280 and 5,460 trap......, our results indicate that pitfall traps are the most efficient for capturing shrews: not only do they have a higher efficiency (yield), but the taxonomic diversity of shrews is also higher when pitfall traps are used....

  14. Quantized motion of trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbach, J.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with a theoretical and numerical study of the preparation and coherent manipulation of quantum states in the external and internal degrees of freedom of trapped ions. In its first part, this thesis proposes and investigates schemes for generating several nonclassical states for the quantized vibrational motion of a trapped ion. Based on dark state preparation specific laser excitation configurations are presented which, given appropriately chosen initial states, realize the desired motional states in the steady-state, indicated by the cessation of the fluorescence emitted by the ion. The focus is on the SU(1,1) intelligent states in both their single- and two-mode realization, corresponding to one- and two-dimensional motion of the ion. The presented schemes are also studied numerically using a Monte-Carlo state-vector method. The second part of the thesis describes how two vibrational degrees of freedom of a single trapped ion can be coupled through the action of suitably chosen laser excitation. Concentrating on a two-dimensional ion trap with dissimilar vibrational frequencies a variety of quantized two-mode couplings are derived. The focus is on a linear coupling that takes excitations from one mode to another. It is demonstrated how this can result in a state rotation, in which it is possible to coherently transfer the motional state of the ion between orthogonal directions without prior knowledge of that motional state. The third part of this thesis presents a new efficient method for generating maximally entangled internal states of a collection of trapped ions. The method is deterministic and independent of the number of ions in the trap. As the essential element of the scheme a mechanism for the realization of a controlled NOT operation that can operate on multiple ions is proposed. The potential application of the scheme for high-precision frequency standards is explored. (author)

  15. A Computer Model of Insect Traps in a Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoukis, Nicholas C.; Hall, Brian; Geib, Scott M.

    2014-11-01

    Attractant-based trap networks are important elements of invasive insect detection, pest control, and basic research programs. We present a landscape-level, spatially explicit model of trap networks, focused on detection, that incorporates variable attractiveness of traps and a movement model for insect dispersion. We describe the model and validate its behavior using field trap data on networks targeting two species, Ceratitis capitata and Anoplophora glabripennis. Our model will assist efforts to optimize trap networks by 1) introducing an accessible and realistic mathematical characterization of the operation of a single trap that lends itself easily to parametrization via field experiments and 2) allowing direct quantification and comparison of sensitivity between trap networks. Results from the two case studies indicate that the relationship between number of traps and their spatial distribution and capture probability under the model is qualitatively dependent on the attractiveness of the traps, a result with important practical consequences.

  16. Ultraviolet laser-induced voltages in LaSrAlO4 single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhi-Qing, Lü; Kun, Zhao; Song-Qing, Zhao; Hui, Zhao; Qing-Li, Zhou

    2009-01-01

    Laser-induced ultrafast photovoltaic effect is observed in LaSrAlO 4 single crystal at ambient temperature without any applied bias. An open-circuit photovoltage is obtained when the wafer is irradiated by a 248-nm-KrF laser pulse of 20 ns duration. The response time and full width at half maximum of the photovoltage pulse are 6 ns and 19 ns, respectively, indicating that LaSrAlO 4 single crystal has potential application in ultraviolet detector. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  17. Improved single particle potential for transport model simulations of nuclear reactions induced by rare isotope beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Chang; Li Baoan

    2010-01-01

    Taking into account more accurately the isospin dependence of nucleon-nucleon interactions in the in-medium many-body force term of the Gogny effective interaction, new expressions for the single-nucleon potential and the symmetry energy are derived. Effects of both the spin (isospin) and the density dependence of nuclear effective interactions on the symmetry potential and the symmetry energy are examined. It is shown that they both play a crucial role in determining the symmetry potential and the symmetry energy at suprasaturation densities. The improved single-nucleon potential will be useful for more accurate simulation of nuclear reactions induced by rare-isotope beams within transport models.

  18. Single-step reinforced microextraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from soil samples using an inside needle capillary adsorption trap with electropolymerized aniline/multi-walled carbon nanotube sorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiasvand, Ali Reza; Yazdankhah, Fatemeh

    2017-03-03

    A polyaniline/multi-wall carbon nanotubes (PANI/MWCNT) composite was electrodeposited on the interior surface of a platinized stainless steel capillary needle and used to prepare an inside needle capillary adsorption trap (INCAT) device. The platinization expanded the interior adsorbing surface of the needle and made it more porous and cohesive for nanocomposite film. The nanocomposite was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The fabricated INCAT was fixed into a cooling capsule to fabricate a cooling-assisted INCAT (CA-INCAT) system. The CA-INCAT device was used to extract polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from solid samples followed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID) determination. To obtain the best extraction efficiency, the important experimental variables were studied and optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the limits of detection (LODs) for the studied PAHs were in the range of 0.002-0.02ngg -1 . Linear dynamic ranges (LDRs) for the calibration curves were found to be 0.1-30,000ngg -1 . Relative standard deviations (RSDs%) for six replicated analysis of 1ngg -1 PAHs were obtained 7.7-11%. The CA-INCAT-GC-FID method was successfully applied for the extraction and determination of PAHs in contaminated soil samples. The results were in agreement with those obtained by a validated ultrasound-assisted solvent extraction (UA-SE) method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Photoionization and cold collision studies using trapped atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, P.L.

    1996-01-01

    The authors have used laser cooling and trapping techniques to investigate photoionization and cold collisions. With laser-trapped Rb, they have measured the photoionization cross section from the first excited (5P) level by observing the photoionization-induced loss rate of neutral atoms from the trap. This technique has the advantage that it directly measures the photoionization rate per atom. Knowing the ionizing laser intensity and the excited-state fraction, the measured loss rate gives the absolute cross section. Using this technique, the Rb 5P photoionization cross section at ∼400 nm has been determined with an uncertainty of 9%. The authors are currently attempting to extend this method to the 5D level. Using time-ordered pulses of diode-laser light (similar to the STIRAP technique), they have performed very efficient two-photon excitation of trapped Rb atoms to 5D. Finally, they will present results from a recent collaboration which combines measurements form conventional molecular spectroscopy (single photon and double resonance) with photoassociation collisions of ultracold Na atoms to yield a precise (≤1 ppm) value for the dissociation energy of the X Σ g+ ground state of the Na 2 molecule

  20. Optical Trapping of Ion Coulomb Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Julian; Lambrecht, Alexander; Weckesser, Pascal; Debatin, Markus; Karpa, Leon; Schaetz, Tobias

    2018-04-01

    The electronic and motional degrees of freedom of trapped ions can be controlled and coherently coupled on the level of individual quanta. Assembling complex quantum systems ion by ion while keeping this unique level of control remains a challenging task. For many applications, linear chains of ions in conventional traps are ideally suited to address this problem. However, driven motion due to the magnetic or radio-frequency electric trapping fields sometimes limits the performance in one dimension and severely affects the extension to higher-dimensional systems. Here, we report on the trapping of multiple barium ions in a single-beam optical dipole trap without radio-frequency or additional magnetic fields. We study the persistence of order in ensembles of up to six ions within the optical trap, measure their temperature, and conclude that the ions form a linear chain, commonly called a one-dimensional Coulomb crystal. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, we access the collective motion and perform spectrometry of the normal modes in the optical trap. Our system provides a platform that is free of driven motion and combines advantages of optical trapping, such as state-dependent confinement and nanoscale potentials, with the desirable properties of crystals of trapped ions, such as long-range interactions featuring collective motion. Starting with small numbers of ions, it has been proposed that these properties would allow the experimental study of many-body physics and the onset of structural quantum phase transitions between one- and two-dimensional crystals.

  1. St. Croix trap study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data set contains detailed information about the catch from 600 trap stations around St. Croix. Data fields include species caught, size data, trap location...

  2. Angular trap for macroparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksyonov, D.S.

    2013-01-01

    Properties of angular macroparticle traps were investigated in this work. These properties are required to design vacuum arc plasma filters. The correlation between trap geometry parameters and its ability to absorb macroparticles were found. Calculations allow one to predict the behaviour of filtering abilities of separators which contain such traps in their design. Recommendations regarding the use of angular traps in filters of different builds are given.

  3. Particle trapping by nonlinear resonances and space charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franchetti, G.; Hofmann, I.

    2006-01-01

    In the FAIR [C.D.R. http://www.gsi.de/GSI Future/cdr/] facility planned at GSI high space charge effects and nonlinear dynamics may play an important role for limiting nominal machine performance. The most relevant interplay of these two effects on the single particle dynamics has been proposed in terms of trapping of particles into stable islands [G. Franchetti, I. Hofmann, AIP Conf. Proc. 642 (2002) 260]. Subsequent numerical studies and dedicated experiments have followed [G. Franchetti et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 6 (2003) 124201; G. Franchetti et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 773 (2005) 137]. We present here the effect of the chromaticity on the mechanisms of halo formation induced by particle trapping into resonances

  4. The Effect of a Single Bout of Surfing on Exercise-Induced Affect

    OpenAIRE

    PITTSINGER, RYAN; KRESS, JEFF; CRUSSEMEYER, JILL

    2017-01-01

    Exercise-induced affect (EIA) has been well documented and is often composed of positive affect, negative affect, tranquility, and fatigue. Research on EIA has focused on mainstream sports such as running, walking, or cycling; however, no research has evaluated the influence of action sports participation in activities such surfing on EIA. The current study examined the effect of a single 30-min surfing bout on EIA in 107 adult volunteers. An additional purpose was if change in affect was sim...

  5. Hydrostatic-pressure induced phase transition of phonons in single-walled nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Peng; Meng Qingchao

    2009-01-01

    We study the effect of the hydrostatic pressure on the phonons in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in a magnetic field. We calculate the magnetic moments of the phonons using a functional integral technique, and find that the phonons in SWNTs undergo a pressure-induced phase transition from the paramagnetic phase to the diamagnetic phase under hydrostatic pressure 2 GPa. We explain the mechanism of generating this phase transition.

  6. Electromagnetically induced transparency and reduced speeds for single photons in a fully quantized model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purdy, Thomas; Ligare, Martin

    2003-01-01

    We introduce a simple model for electromagnetically induced transparency in which all fields are treated quantum mechanically. We study a system of three separated atoms at fixed positions in a one-dimensional multimode optical cavity. The first atom serves as the source for a single spontaneously emitted photon; the photon scatters from a three-level 'Λ'-configuration atom which interacts with an additional single-mode field coupling two of the atomic levels; the third atom serves as a detector of the total transmitted field. We find an analytical solution for the quantum dynamics. From the quantum amplitude describing the excitation of the detector atom we extract information that provides exact single-photon analogues to wave delays predicted by semi-classical theories. We also find complementary information in the expectation value of the electric field intensity operator

  7. Systematic investigation of resonance-induced single-harmonic enhancement in the extreme-ultraviolet range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganeev, R. A.; Bom, L. B. Elouga; Kieffer, J.-C.; Ozaki, T.

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate the intensity enhancement of single harmonics in high-order harmonic generation from laser plasma. We identified several targets (In, Sn, Sb, Cr, and Mn) that demonstrate resonance-induced enhancement of single harmonic, that are spectrally close to ionic transitions with strong oscillator strengths. We optimized and obtained enhancements of the 13th, 17th, 21st, 29th, and 33rd harmonics from the above targets, by varying the chirp of the 800 nm wavelength femtosecond laser. We also observe harmonic enhancement by using frequency-doubled pump laser (400 nm wavelength). For Mn plasma pumped by the 400 nm wavelength laser, the maximum order of the enhanced harmonic observed was the 17th order (λ=23.5 nm), which corresponds to the highest photon energy (52.9 eV) reported for an enhanced single harmonic

  8. Antimicrobial Peptide Lactoferricin B-Induced Rapid Leakage of Internal Contents from Single Giant Unilamellar Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moniruzzaman, Md; Alam, Jahangir Md; Dohra, Hideo; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2015-09-29

    Enzymatic digestion of bovine lactoferrin generates lactoferricin B (Lfcin B), a 25-mer peptide with strong antimicrobial activity of unknown mechanism. To elucidate the mechanistic basis of Lfcin B bactericidal activity, we investigated the interaction of Lfcin B with Escherichia coli and liposomes of lipid membranes. Lfcin B induced the influx of a membrane-impermeant fluorescent probe, SYTOX green, from the outside of E. coli into its cytoplasm. Lfcin B induced gradual leakage of calcein from large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) of dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol (DOPG)/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) membranes. To clarify the cause of Lfcin B-induced leakage of calcein from the LUVs, we used the single giant unilamellar vesicle (GUV) method to investigate the interaction of Lfcin B with calcein-containing DOPG/DOPC-GUVs. We observed that a rapid leakage of calcein from a GUV started stochastically; statistical analysis provided a rate constant for Lfcin B-induced pore formation, kp. On the other hand, phase-contrast microscopic images revealed that Lfcin B induced a rapid leakage of sucrose from the single GUVs with concomitant appearance of a spherical GUV of smaller diameter. Because of the very fast leakage, and at the present time resolution of the experiments (33 ms), we could not follow the evolution of pore nor the process of the structural changes of the GUV. Here we used the term "local rupture" to express the rapid leakage of sucrose and determined the rate constant of local rupture, kL. On the basis of the comparison between kp and kL, we concluded that the leakage of calcein from single GUVs occurred as a result of a local rupture in the GUVs and that smaller pores inducing leakage of calcein were not formed before the local rupture. The results of the effect of the surface charge density of lipid membranes and that of salt concentration in buffer on kp clearly show that kp increases with an increase in the extent of electrostatic interactions due to

  9. Stress-induced martensitic transformation and ferroelastic deformation adjacent microhardness indents in tetragonal zirconia single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chien, F.R.; Ubic, F.J.; Prakash, V.; Heuer, A.H.

    1998-01-01

    The stress-induced tetragonal to monoclinic (t → m) martensitic transformation, stress-induced ferroelastic domain switching, and dislocation slip were induced by Vickers microindentation at elevated temperatures in polydomain single crystals of 3 mol%-Y 2 O 3 -stabilized tetragonal ZrO 2 single crystals (3Y-TZS). Chemical etching revealed traces along t directions adjacent to indentations, and Raman spectroscopy and TEM have shown that these traces are caused by products of the martensitic transformation, i.e. the monoclinic product phase forms primarily as thin, long plates with a habit plane approximately on (bar 301) m . This habit plane and the associated shear strain arising from the transformation, visible in TEM micrographs at the intersection of crystallographically equivalent martensite plates, were successfully predicted using the observed lattice correspondence and the phenomenological invariant plane strain theory of martensitic transformations. The extent of the martensitic transformation increased with increasing temperature from room temperature up to 300 C, but then decreased at higher temperatures. Ferroelastic deformation of tetragonal ZrO 2 has been observed at all temperatures up to 1,000 C. At the highest temperature, only ferroelastic domain switching and dislocation slip occurred during indentation-induced deformation

  10. Single-strand breaks induced in Bacillus subtilis DNA by ultraviolet light: action spectrum and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peak, M.J.; Peak, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    The induction of single-strand breaks (alkali-labile bonds plus frank breaks) in the DNA of Bacillus subtilis irradiated in vivo by monochromatic UV light at wavelengths from 254 to 434nm was measured. The spectrum consists of a major far-UV (below 320nm) component and a minor near-UV shoulder. A mutant deficient in DNA polymerase I accumulates breaks caused by near-UV (above 320nm) wavelengths faster than the wild-type strain proficient in polymerase I. Measurable breaks in extracted DNA are induced at a higher frequency than those induced in vivo. Anoxia, glycerol, and diazobicyclo (2.2.2.) octane inhibit break formation in extracted DNA. Alkali-labile bonds induced by 365-nm UV radiation are largely (78%) covalent bond chain breaks, the remainder consists of true alkali-labile bonds, probably apurinic and apyrimidinic sites. (author)

  11. Effect of OFF-state stress induced electric field on trapping in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors on Si (111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, M. J.; Ng, G. I.; Arulkumaran, S.; Manoj Kumar, C. M.; Ranjan, K.; Vicknesh, S.; Foo, S. C.; Syamal, B.; Zhou, X.

    2015-02-01

    The influence of electric field (EF) on the dynamic ON-resistance (dyn-RDS[ON]) and threshold-voltage shift (ΔVth) of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors on Si has been investigated using pulsed current-voltage (IDS-VDS) and drain current (ID) transients. Different EF was realized with devices of different gate-drain spacing (Lgd) under the same OFF-state stress. Under high-EF (Lgd = 2 μm), the devices exhibited higher dyn-RDS[ON] degradation but a small ΔVth (˜120 mV). However, at low-EF (Lgd = 5 μm), smaller dyn-RDS[ON] degradation but a larger ΔVth (˜380 mV) was observed. Our analysis shows that under OFF-state stress, the gate electrons are injected and trapped in the AlGaN barrier by tunnelling-assisted Poole-Frenkel conduction mechanism. Under high-EF, trapping spreads towards the gate-drain access region of the AlGaN barrier causing dyn-RDS[ON] degradation, whereas under low-EF, trapping is mostly confined under the gate causing ΔVth. A trap with activation energy 0.33 eV was identified in the AlGaN barrier by ID-transient measurements. The influence of EF on trapping was also verified by Silvaco TCAD simulations.

  12. Ball-grid array architecture for microfabricated ion traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guise, Nicholas D.; Fallek, Spencer D.; Stevens, Kelly E.; Brown, K. R.; Volin, Curtis; Harter, Alexa W.; Amini, Jason M.; Higashi, Robert E.; Lu, Son Thai; Chanhvongsak, Helen M.; Nguyen, Thi A.; Marcus, Matthew S.; Ohnstein, Thomas R.; Youngner, Daniel W.

    2015-05-01

    State-of-the-art microfabricated ion traps for quantum information research are approaching nearly one hundred control electrodes. We report here on the development and testing of a new architecture for microfabricated ion traps, built around ball-grid array (BGA) connections, that is suitable for increasingly complex trap designs. In the BGA trap, through-substrate vias bring electrical signals from the back side of the trap die to the surface trap structure on the top side. Gold-ball bump bonds connect the back side of the trap die to an interposer for signal routing from the carrier. Trench capacitors fabricated into the trap die replace area-intensive surface or edge capacitors. Wirebonds in the BGA architecture are moved to the interposer. These last two features allow the trap die to be reduced to only the area required to produce trapping fields. The smaller trap dimensions allow tight focusing of an addressing laser beam for fast single-qubit rotations. Performance of the BGA trap as characterized with 40Ca+ ions is comparable to previous surface-electrode traps in terms of ion heating rate, mode frequency stability, and storage lifetime. We demonstrate two-qubit entanglement operations with 171Yb+ ions in a second BGA trap.

  13. Ball-grid array architecture for microfabricated ion traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guise, Nicholas D.; Fallek, Spencer D.; Stevens, Kelly E.; Brown, K. R.; Volin, Curtis; Harter, Alexa W.; Amini, Jason M.; Higashi, Robert E.; Lu, Son Thai; Chanhvongsak, Helen M.; Nguyen, Thi A.; Marcus, Matthew S.; Ohnstein, Thomas R.; Youngner, Daniel W.

    2015-01-01

    State-of-the-art microfabricated ion traps for quantum information research are approaching nearly one hundred control electrodes. We report here on the development and testing of a new architecture for microfabricated ion traps, built around ball-grid array (BGA) connections, that is suitable for increasingly complex trap designs. In the BGA trap, through-substrate vias bring electrical signals from the back side of the trap die to the surface trap structure on the top side. Gold-ball bump bonds connect the back side of the trap die to an interposer for signal routing from the carrier. Trench capacitors fabricated into the trap die replace area-intensive surface or edge capacitors. Wirebonds in the BGA architecture are moved to the interposer. These last two features allow the trap die to be reduced to only the area required to produce trapping fields. The smaller trap dimensions allow tight focusing of an addressing laser beam for fast single-qubit rotations. Performance of the BGA trap as characterized with 40 Ca + ions is comparable to previous surface-electrode traps in terms of ion heating rate, mode frequency stability, and storage lifetime. We demonstrate two-qubit entanglement operations with 171 Yb + ions in a second BGA trap

  14. The Aarhus Ion Micro-Trap Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miroshnychenko, Yevhen; Nielsen, Otto; Poulsen, Gregers

    As part of our involvement in the EU MICROTRAP project, we have designed, manufactured and assembled a micro-scale ion trap with integrated optical fibers. These prealigned fibers will allow delivering cooling laser light to single ions. Therefore, such a trap will not require any direct optical...... and installed in an ultra high vacuum chamber, which includes an ablation oven for all-optical loading of the trap [2]. The next steps on the project are to demonstrate the operation of the micro-trap and the cooling of ions using fiber delivered light. [1] D. Grant, Development of Micro-Scale Ion traps, Master...... Thesis (2008). [2] R.J. Hendricks, D.M. Grant, P.F. Herskind, A. Dantan and M. Drewsen, An all-optical ion-loading technique for scalable microtrap architectures, Applied Physics B, 88, 507 (2007)....

  15. Characterization of Wet-Heat Inactivation of Single Spores of Bacillus Species by Dual-Trap Raman Spectroscopy and Elastic Light Scattering▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Kong, Lingbo; Setlow, Peter; Li, Yong-qing

    2010-01-01

    Dual-trap laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) and elastic light scattering (ELS) were used to investigate dynamic processes during high-temperature treatment of individual spores of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus megaterium, and Bacillus subtilis in water. Major conclusions from these studies included the following. (i) After spores of all three species were added to water at 80 to 90°C, the level of the 1:1 complex of Ca2+ and dipicolinic acid (CaDPA; ∼25% of the dry weight of the spore core) in individual spores remained relatively constant during a highly variable lag time (Tlag), and then CaDPA was released within 1 to 2 min. (ii) The Tlag values prior to rapid CaDPA release and thus the times for wet-heat killing of individual spores of all three species were very heterogeneous. (iii) The heterogeneity in kinetics of wet-heat killing of individual spores was not due to differences in the microscopic physical environments during heat treatment. (iv) During the wet-heat treatment of spores of all three species, spore protein denaturation largely but not completely accompanied rapid CaDPA release, as some changes in protein structure preceded rapid CaDPA release. (v) Changes in the ELS from individual spores of all three species were strongly correlated with the release of CaDPA. The ELS intensities of B. cereus and B. megaterium spores decreased gradually and reached minima at T1 when ∼80% of spore CaDPA was released, then increased rapidly until T2 when full CaDPA release was complete, and then remained nearly constant. The ELS intensity of B. subtilis spores showed similar features, although the intensity changed minimally, if at all, prior to T1. (vi) Carotenoids in B. megaterium spores' inner membranes exhibited two changes during heat treatment. First, the carotenoid's two Raman bands at 1,155 and 1,516 cm−1 decreased rapidly to a low value and to zero, respectively, well before Tlag, and then the residual 1,155-cm−1 band disappeared, in parallel

  16. Luminescence and charge trapping in Cs.sub.2./sub.HfCl.sub.6./sub. single crystals: optical and magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Král, Robert; Babin, Vladimir; Mihóková, Eva; Buryi, Maksym; Laguta, Valentyn; Nitsch, Karel; Nikl, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 22 (2017), s. 12375-12382 ISSN 1932-7447 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1409; GA ČR GA17-09933S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Cs2HfCl6 * single crystal * luminescence * temperature dependence * EPR spectroscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 4.536, year: 2016

  17. Oxalic acid induced hydrothermal synthesis of single crystalline tungsten oxide nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, V.B.; Adhyapak, P.V.; Suryavanshi, S.S.; Mulla, I.S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We report synthesis of 1D tungsten oxide using a hydrothermal route at 170 °C. • Oxalic acid plays an important role in the formation of 1D nanostructure. • Monoclinic transforms to hexagonal phase with increment in reaction duration. -- Abstract: One-dimensional single-crystalline tungsten oxide nanorods have been synthesized by the hydrothermal technique. The controlled morphology of tungsten oxide was obtained by using sodium tungstate and oxalic acid as an organic inducer. The reaction was carried out at 170 °C for 24, 48 and 72 h. The obtained tungsten oxides were investigated by using XRD, SEM and HRTEM techniques. In order to understand the role of organic inducer on the shape, size and phase formation of WO 3 was prepared with and without organic inducer. On heating of sodium tungstate without organic inducer for 72 h at 170 °C in the hydrothermal unit we obtain nanoparticles of monoclinic WO 3 , however, on addition of oxalic acid a single phase hexagonal WO 3 with distinct nanorods was formed. On addition of oxalic acid a systematic emergence of nanorod-like morphology was obtained with incrementing reaction times from 24 h to 48 h. The 72 h reaction generates self-assembled 20–30 nm diameter and 4–5 μm long h-WO 3 bundles of nanorods. The XRD studies show hexagonal structure of tungsten oxide, while SAED reveals its single crystalline nature. The photoluminescence (PL) emission spectrum shows a characteristic blue emission peak at 3 eV (410 nm). Raman spectra provide the evidence of hexagonal structure with stretching vibrations (830 cm −1 ) for 72 h of heating at 170 °C

  18. Oxalic acid induced hydrothermal synthesis of single crystalline tungsten oxide nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, V.B. [School of Physical Sciences, Solapur University, Solapur 413255 (India); Adhyapak, P.V. [Centre for Materials for Electronic Technology (C-MET), Pune 411008 (India); Suryavanshi, S.S., E-mail: sssuryavanshi@rediffmail.com [School of Physical Sciences, Solapur University, Solapur 413255 (India); Mulla, I.S., E-mail: ismulla2001@gmail.com [Emeritus Scientist (CSIR), Centre for Materials for Electronic Technology (C-MET), Pune 411008 (India)

    2014-03-25

    Highlights: • We report synthesis of 1D tungsten oxide using a hydrothermal route at 170 °C. • Oxalic acid plays an important role in the formation of 1D nanostructure. • Monoclinic transforms to hexagonal phase with increment in reaction duration. -- Abstract: One-dimensional single-crystalline tungsten oxide nanorods have been synthesized by the hydrothermal technique. The controlled morphology of tungsten oxide was obtained by using sodium tungstate and oxalic acid as an organic inducer. The reaction was carried out at 170 °C for 24, 48 and 72 h. The obtained tungsten oxides were investigated by using XRD, SEM and HRTEM techniques. In order to understand the role of organic inducer on the shape, size and phase formation of WO{sub 3} was prepared with and without organic inducer. On heating of sodium tungstate without organic inducer for 72 h at 170 °C in the hydrothermal unit we obtain nanoparticles of monoclinic WO{sub 3}, however, on addition of oxalic acid a single phase hexagonal WO{sub 3} with distinct nanorods was formed. On addition of oxalic acid a systematic emergence of nanorod-like morphology was obtained with incrementing reaction times from 24 h to 48 h. The 72 h reaction generates self-assembled 20–30 nm diameter and 4–5 μm long h-WO{sub 3} bundles of nanorods. The XRD studies show hexagonal structure of tungsten oxide, while SAED reveals its single crystalline nature. The photoluminescence (PL) emission spectrum shows a characteristic blue emission peak at 3 eV (410 nm). Raman spectra provide the evidence of hexagonal structure with stretching vibrations (830 cm{sup −1}) for 72 h of heating at 170 °C.

  19. Confinement in a cryogenic Penning trap of highest charge state ions from EBIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, D.

    1994-01-01

    The retrapping of highly charged Xe 44+ and Th 68+,72+ ions extracted from an open-quotes Electron Beam Ion Trapclose quotes (EBIT) is demonstrated after injection of the ions into RETRAP, a cryogenic Penning trap (up to 6 Tesla magnetic field) currently with an open cylinder design. Ion extraction in a short pulse (5-20 μsec) from EBIT, essential for efficient retrapping, is employed. The ions are slowed down upon entering a deceleration tube mounted above the trap within the magnetic field. The potential is then rapidly (100 ns) decreased, enabling low energy ions to enter the trap. Capture efficiencies up to 25% are observed via detection of the delayed ion release pulse with a detector below the trap. Signal voltages induced in a tuned circuit due to single and multiple ions have been observed by tuning the ion resonant axial oscillation frequencies for different ions. Results from transporting and retrapping of the ions, as well as their detection, are described and the trapping efficiency is discussed, The motivation for these studies is to cool the trapped very highly charged ions to low temperatures (< 4 K) in order to perform ultrahigh resolution precision spectroscopy, collision studies at ultra low energies and to observe phase transitions in Coulomb clusters of highly charged ions

  20. Targeted mutations induced by a single acetylaminofluorene DNA adduct in mammalian cells and bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moryia, M.; Takeshita, M.; Johnson, F.; Peden, K.; Will, S.; Grollman, A.P.

    1988-01-01

    Mutagenic specificity of 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF) has been established in mammalian cells and several strains of bacteria by using a shuttle plasmid vector containing a single N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)acetylaminofluorene (C8-dG-AAF) adduct. The nucleotide sequence of the gene conferring tetracycline resistance was modified by conservative codon replacement so as to accommodate the sequence d(CCTTCGCTAC) flanked by two restriction sites, Bsm I and Xho I. The corresponding synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide underwent reaction with 2-(N-acetoxy-N-acetylamino)-fluorene (AAAF), forming a single dG-AAF adduct. This modified oligodeoxynucleotide was hybridized to its complementary strand and ligated between the Bsm I and Xho I sites of the vector. Plasmids containing the C8-dG-AAF adduct were used to transfect simian virus 40-transformed simian kidney (COS-1) cells and to transform several AB strains of Escherichia coli. Colonies containing mutant plasmides were detected by hybridization to 32 P-labeled oligodeoxynucleotides. Presence of the single DNA adduct increased the mutation frequency by 8-fold in both COS cells and E. coli. Over 80% of mutations detected in both systems were targeted and represented G x C → C x G or G x C → T x A transversions or single nucleotide deletions. The authors conclude that modification of a deoxyguanosine residue with AAF preferentially induces mutations targeted at this site when a plasmid containing a single C8-dG-AAF adduct is introduced into mammalian cells or bacteria

  1. Pulsed laser manipulation of an optically trapped bead: Averaging thermal noise and measuring the pulsed force amplitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindballe, Thue Bjerring; Kristensen, Martin V. G.; Keiding, Søren Rud

    2013-01-01

    An experimental strategy for post-eliminating thermal noise on position measurements of optically trapped particles is presented. Using a nanosecond pulsed laser, synchronized to the detection system, to exert a periodic driving force on an optically trapped 10 polystyrene bead, the laser pulse-bead...... interaction is repeated hundreds of times. Traces with the bead position following the prompt displacement from equilibrium, induced by each laser pulse, are averaged and reveal the underlying deterministic motion of the bead, which is not visible in a single trace due to thermal noise. The motion of the bead...... is analyzed from the direct time-dependent position measurements and from the power spectrum. The results show that the bead is on average displaced 208 nm from the trap center and exposed to a force amplitude of 71 nanoNewton, more than five orders of magnitude larger than the trapping forces. Our...

  2. Single d(ApG)/cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) adduct-induced mutagenesis in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnouf, D.; Fuchs, R.P.P.; Gauthier, C.; Chottard, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    The mutation spectrum induced by the widely used antitumor drug cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP) showed that cisDDP[d(ApG)] adducts, although they account for only 25% of the lesions formed are ∼5 times more mutagenic than the major GG adduct. The authors report the construction of vectors bearing a single cisDDP[d(ApG)] lesion and their use in mutagenesis experiments in Escherichia coli. The mutagenic processing of the lesion is found to depend strictly on induction of the SOS system of the bacterial host cells. In SOS-induced cells, mutation frequencies of 1-2% were detected. All these mutations are targeted to the 5' base of the adduct. Single A → T transversions are mainly observed (80%), whereas A → G transitions account for 10% of the total mutations. Tandem base-pair substitutions involving the adenine residue and the thymine residue immediately 5' to the adduct occur at a comparable frequency (10%). No selective loss of the strand bearing the platinum adduct was seen, suggesting that, in vivo, cisDDP[d(ApG)] adducts are not blocking lesions. The high mutation specificity of cisDDP-[d(ApG)]-induced mutagenesis is discussed in relation to structural data

  3. HPLC-ESR techniques for detection of complex trapped radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu Tiecheng; Dong Jirong; Lin Nianyun; Xie Leidong; Liu Rengzhong

    1992-01-01

    High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and ESR combined examination of radical species is an advanced techniques for separation and identification of complex radical species. At SRCL, Waters 990 HPLC has been used to separate the complex trapped radicals and Varian E-112 ESR spectrometer to record the spectra of single trapped radicals after HPLC separation. The advantages of the combined techniques are described as bellow: HPLC is used to separate the long-lived complex trapped radicals derived from reaction of short-lived radicals with spin trap. ESR spectra from single trapped radicals, obtained following HPLC separation of complex trapped radicals, are recorded one by one and well resolved. The structures of short-lived radicals can be inferred from the ESR spectra of the long-lived trapped radicals

  4. Traps in Zirconium Alloys Oxide Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmar Frank

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxide films long-time grown on tubes of three types of zirconium alloys in water and in steam were investigated, by analysing I-V characteristic measured at constant voltages with various temperatures. Using theoretical concepts of Rose [3] and Gould [5], ZryNbSn(Fe proved to have an exponential distribution of trapping centers below the conduction band edge, wheras Zr1Nb and IMP Zry-4 proved to have single energy trap levels.

  5. Effect of OFF-state stress induced electric field on trapping in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors on Si (111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anand, M. J., E-mail: anand2@e.ntu.edu.sg, E-mail: eging@ntu.edu.sg; Ng, G. I., E-mail: anand2@e.ntu.edu.sg, E-mail: eging@ntu.edu.sg; Syamal, B.; Zhou, X. [School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Arulkumaran, S.; Manoj Kumar, C. M.; Ranjan, K.; Vicknesh, S.; Foo, S. C. [Temasek Laboratories@NTU, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Drive, Research Techno Plaza, Singapore 637553 (Singapore)

    2015-02-23

    The influence of electric field (EF) on the dynamic ON-resistance (dyn-R{sub DS[ON]}) and threshold-voltage shift (ΔV{sub th}) of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors on Si has been investigated using pulsed current-voltage (I{sub DS}-V{sub DS}) and drain current (I{sub D}) transients. Different EF was realized with devices of different gate-drain spacing (L{sub gd}) under the same OFF-state stress. Under high-EF (L{sub gd} = 2 μm), the devices exhibited higher dyn-R{sub DS[ON]} degradation but a small ΔV{sub th} (∼120 mV). However, at low-EF (L{sub gd} = 5 μm), smaller dyn-R{sub DS[ON]} degradation but a larger ΔV{sub th} (∼380 mV) was observed. Our analysis shows that under OFF-state stress, the gate electrons are injected and trapped in the AlGaN barrier by tunnelling-assisted Poole-Frenkel conduction mechanism. Under high-EF, trapping spreads towards the gate-drain access region of the AlGaN barrier causing dyn-R{sub DS[ON]} degradation, whereas under low-EF, trapping is mostly confined under the gate causing ΔV{sub th}. A trap with activation energy 0.33 eV was identified in the AlGaN barrier by I{sub D}-transient measurements. The influence of EF on trapping was also verified by Silvaco TCAD simulations.

  6. Effect of OFF-state stress induced electric field on trapping in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors on Si (111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anand, M. J.; Ng, G. I.; Syamal, B.; Zhou, X.; Arulkumaran, S.; Manoj Kumar, C. M.; Ranjan, K.; Vicknesh, S.; Foo, S. C.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of electric field (EF) on the dynamic ON-resistance (dyn-R DS[ON] ) and threshold-voltage shift (ΔV th ) of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors on Si has been investigated using pulsed current-voltage (I DS -V DS ) and drain current (I D ) transients. Different EF was realized with devices of different gate-drain spacing (L gd ) under the same OFF-state stress. Under high-EF (L gd  = 2 μm), the devices exhibited higher dyn-R DS[ON] degradation but a small ΔV th (∼120 mV). However, at low-EF (L gd  = 5 μm), smaller dyn-R DS[ON] degradation but a larger ΔV th (∼380 mV) was observed. Our analysis shows that under OFF-state stress, the gate electrons are injected and trapped in the AlGaN barrier by tunnelling-assisted Poole-Frenkel conduction mechanism. Under high-EF, trapping spreads towards the gate-drain access region of the AlGaN barrier causing dyn-R DS[ON] degradation, whereas under low-EF, trapping is mostly confined under the gate causing ΔV th . A trap with activation energy 0.33 eV was identified in the AlGaN barrier by I D -transient measurements. The influence of EF on trapping was also verified by Silvaco TCAD simulations

  7. A Locked Nucleic Acid Probe Based on Selective Salt-Induced Effect Detects Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Detection of single based genetic mutation by using oligonucleotide probes is one of the common methods of detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms at known loci. In this paper, we demonstrated a hybridization system which included a buffer solution that produced selective salt-induced effect and a locked nucleic acid modified 12 nt oligonucleotide probe. The hybridization system is suitable for hybridization under room temperature. By using magnetic nanoparticles as carriers for PCR products, the SNPs (MDR1 C3435T/A from 45 volunteers were analyzed, and the results were consistent with the results from pyrophosphoric acid sequencing. The method presented in this paper differs from the traditional method of using molecular beacons to detect SNPs in that it is suitable for research institutions lacking real-time quantitative PCR detecting systems, to detect PCR products at room temperature.

  8. Modelling of Vortex-Induced Loading on a Single-Blade Installation Setup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrzypinski, Witold Robert; Gaunaa, Mac; Heinz, Joachim Christian

    2016-01-01

    the same procedure. The reference time series were significantly different, depending on the inflow angle. This made the modelling of all the time series with a single and relatively simple engineering model challenging. In order to find model parameters, optimizations were carried out, based on the root-mean-square......Vortex-induced integral loading fluctuations on a single suspended blade at various inflow angles were modeled in the presents work by means of stochastic modelling methods. The reference time series were obtained by 3D DES CFD computations carried out on the DTU 10MW reference wind turbine blade...... varied depending on the inflow angle. None the less, the modelled and reference time series showed a satisfactory general agreement in terms of their visual and frequency characteristics. This indicated that the proposed method is suitable to model loading fluctuations on suspended blades....

  9. The effects of radioprotective agents on the radiation-induced DNA single strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhiu, Sung Ryul; Ko, Kyung Hwan; Jung, In Yong; Cho, Chul Ku; Kim, Tae Hwan; Park, Woo Wiun; Kim, Sung Ho; Ji, Young Hoon; Kim, Kyung Jung; Bang, Hio Chang; Jung, Young Suk; Choi, Moon Sik

    1992-04-01

    With the increased use of atomic energy in science, industry, medicine and public power production, the probability of nuclear accidents certainly appears to be on the increase. Therefore, early medical diagnosis and first-aid are needed urgently to establish an efficient treatment. We carried out the studies of radiation protector such as DDC, MEA, WR-2721 and variety of decontaminator with a view to establishing the protective measure and diagnostic standards for safety of worker and neighbors living around the radiation area in case of occurring the accidental contamination. In this experiment, we examined radiation-induced DNA single strand breaks as one of the study on molecular biology of the response of cells to radiation because an understanding of the radiation-induced damage in molecular level would add to our knowledge of radiation protection and treatment. (Author)

  10. Anisotropic exchange interaction induced by a single photon in semiconductor microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappe, G.; Fernández-Rossier, J.; Louis, E.; Anda, E. V.

    2005-12-01

    We investigate coupling of localized spins in a semiconductor quantum dot embedded in a microcavity. The lowest cavity mode and the quantum dot exciton are coupled and close in energy, forming a polariton. The fermions forming the exciton interact with localized spins via exchange. Exact diagonalization of a Hamiltonian in which photons, spins, and excitons are treated quantum mechanically shows that a single polariton induces a sizable indirect anisotropic exchange interaction between spins. At sufficiently low temperatures strong ferromagnetic correlations show up without an appreciable increase in exciton population. In the case of a (Cd,Mn)Te quantum dot, Mn-Mn ferromagnetic coupling is still significant at 1 K : spin-spin correlation around 3 for exciton occupation smaller than 0.3. We find that the interaction mediated by photon-polaritons is 10 times stronger than the one induced by a classical field for equal Rabi splitting.

  11. Neutron-induced single event upsets in static RAMS observed at 10 km flight altitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, J.; Becher, P.E.; Fynbo, P.B.; Raaby, P. Schultz, J.

    1993-01-01

    Neutron induced single event upsets (SEUs) in static memory devices (SRAMs) have so far been seen only in laboratory environments. The authors report observations of 14 neutron induced SEUs at commercial aircraft flight altitudes as well. The observed SEU rate at 10 km flight altitude based on exposure of 160 standard 256 Kbit CMOS SRAMs is 4.8 · 10 -8 upsets/bit/day. In the laboratory 117 SRAMs of two different brands were irradiated with fast neutrons from a Pu-Be source. A total of 176 SEUs have been observed, among these are two SEU pairs. The upset rates from the laboratory tests are compared to those found in the airborne SRAMS

  12. Single-vesicle detection and analysis of peptide-induced membrane permeabilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Ehrlich, Nicky; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager

    2015-01-01

    The capability of membrane-active peptides to disrupt phospholipid membranes is often studied by investigating peptide-induced leakage of quenched fluorescent molecules from large unilamellar lipid vesicles. In this article, we explore two fluorescence microscopy-based single-vesicle detection...... methods as alternatives to the quenching-based assays for studying peptide-induced leakage from large unilamellar lipid vesicles. Specifically, we use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to study the leakage of fluorescent molecules of different sizes from large unilamellar lipid vesicles...... dispersed in aqueous solution, and we use confocal imaging of surface-immobilized large unilamellar lipid vesicles to investigate whether there are heterogeneities in leakage between individual vesicles. Of importance, we design an experimental protocol that allows us to quantitatively correlate the results...

  13. Frequency and spectrum of mutations induced by gamma irradiation in single, double and triple dwarf wheats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhonukshe, B.L.

    1981-01-01

    Induced mutation studies were carried with three dwarf wheat varieties viz., ''Sonalika'', ''Chhoti Lerma'' and ''Hira'', considered to be single, double and trible dwarfs, respectively. Gamma-rays were used as a source of irradiation. Frequency of chlorophyll mutations were comparatively low and the spectrum was narrow. Chlorophyll mutations were altogether absent in the variety ''Sonalika''. A very wide spectrum of viable mutations affecting stem, leaf, ear growth habit, maturity and fertility characteristics was observed in the M 2 . The cumulative frequency of all the mutants together was quite high, which varied with the varieties. There were varietal differences in the composition and width of the spectrum induced by gamma-rays. The dwarf mutants having desirable leaf and spike characters were isolated in all the three varieties. (author)

  14. Pressure-induced phase transitions in single-crystalline Cu4Bi4S9 nanoribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Jing-Yu; Li Jing; Zhao Qing; Shi Li-Jie; Zou Bing-Suo; Zhang Si-Jia; Zhao Hao-Fei; Zhang Qing-Hua; Yao Yuan; Zhu Ke; Liu Yu-Long; Jin Chang-Qing; Yu Ri-Cheng; Li Yan-Chun; Li Xiao-Dong; Liu Jing

    2013-01-01

    In situ angle dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering measurements under pressure are employed to study the structural evolution of Cu 4 Bi 4 S 9 nanoribbons, which are fabricated by using a facile solvothermal method. Both experiments show that a structural phase transition occurs near 14.5 GPa, and there is a pressure-induced reversible amorphization at about 25.6 GPa. The electrical transport property of a single Cu 4 Bi 4 S 9 nanoribbon under different pressures is also investigated

  15. Microwave-induced electrophilic addition of single-walled carbon nanotubes with alkylhalides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Yang [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Wang Xianbao [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Ministry-of-Education, Key Laboratory for the Synthesis and Application of Organic Functional Molecules, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China)], E-mail: wxb@hubu.edu.cn; Tian Rong; Li Shaoqing; Wan Li; Li Mingjian; You Haijun; Li Qin [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Wang Shimin [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Ministry-of-Education, Key Laboratory for the Synthesis and Application of Organic Functional Molecules, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China)

    2008-02-15

    We report the microwave-induced electrophilic addition of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with alkylhalides using Lewis acid as a catalyst followed by hydrolysis. The reaction results in the attachment of alkyl and hydroxyl groups to the surface of the nanotubes. This rapid and high-energy microwave radiation is found to be highly efficient for this reaction, which only needs as low as several minutes. The resulting nanotubes were characterized with FTIR, UV-vis-NIR, Raman, TGA, TEM and AFM. It demonstrates that iodo-alkanes show higher reaction activity with SWNTs than chloro- and bromo-alkanes.

  16. Comparative study of pressure-induced polymerization in C60 nanorods and single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Yuanyuan; Liu Bingbing; Wang Lin; Yu Shidan; Yao Mingguang; Chen Ao; Liu Dedi; Zou Yonggang; Li Zepeng; Zou Bo; Cui Tian; Zou Guangtian; Iwasiewicz-Wabnig, Agnieszka; Sundqvist, Bertil

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we report a comparative study of pressure-induced polymerization in C 60 nanorods and bulk single crystals, treated simultaneously under various pressures and temperatures in the same experiment. For both materials, orthorhombic, tetragonal and rhombohedral phases have been produced under high pressure and high temperature. The structures have been identified and compared between the two sample types by Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy. There are differences between the Raman and photoluminescence spectra from the two types of materials for all polymeric phases, but especially for the tetragonal phase. From the comparison between nanorods and bulk samples, we tentatively assign photoluminescence peaks for various polymeric phases

  17. Calculation of neutron-induced single-event upset cross sections for semiconductor memory devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeuchi, Taketo; Watanabe, Yukinobu; Nakashima, Hideki; Sun, Weili

    2001-01-01

    Neutron-induced single-event upset (SEU) cross sections for semiconductor memory devices are calculated by the Burst Generation Rate (BGR) method using LA150 data and QMD calculation in the neutron energy range between 20 MeV and 10 GeV. The calculated results are compared with the measured SEU cross sections for energies up to 160 MeV, and the validity of the calculation method and the nuclear data used is verified. The kind of reaction products and the neutron energy range that have the most effect on SEU are discussed. (author)

  18. Analysis of cosmic ray neutron-induced single-event phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tukamoto, Yasuyuki; Watanabe, Yukinobu; Nakashima, Hideki

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a database of cross sections for the n+ 28 Si reaction in the energy range between 2 MeV and 3 GeV in order to analyze single-event upset (SEU) phenomena induced by cosmic-ray neutrons in semiconductor memory devices. The data are applied to calculations of SEU cross sections using the Burst Generation Rate (BGR) model including two parameters, critical charge and effective depth. The calculated results are compared with measured SEU cross-sections for energies up to 160 MeV, and the reaction products that provide important effects on SEU are mainly investigated. (author)

  19. Bias voltage induced resistance switching effect in single-molecule magnets' tunneling junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengzhong; Jiang, Liang

    2014-09-12

    An electric-pulse-induced reversible resistance change effect in a molecular magnetic tunneling junction, consisting of a single-molecule magnet (SMM) sandwiched in one nonmagnetic and one ferromagnetic electrode, is theoretically investigated. By applying a time-varying bias voltage, the SMM's spin orientation can be manipulated with large bias voltage pulses. Moreover, the different magnetic configuration at high-resistance/low-resistance states can be 'read out' by utilizing relative low bias voltage. This device scheme can be implemented with current technologies (Khajetoorians et al 2013 Science 339 55) and has potential application in molecular spintronics and high-density nonvolatile memory devices.

  20. Current-Induced Switching of a Single-Molecule Magnet with Arbitrary Oriented Easy Axis

    OpenAIRE

    Misiorny, Maciej; Barnas, Józef

    2007-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to investigate theoretically how tilting of an easy axis of a single-molecule magnet (SMM) from the orientation collinear with magnetic moments of the leads affects the switching process induced by current flowing through the system. To do this we consider a model system that consists of a SMM embedded in the nonmagnetic barrier of a magnetic tunnel junction. The anisotropy axis of the SMM forms an arbitrary angle with magnetic moments of the leads (the latt...

  1. Bias voltage induced resistance switching effect in single-molecule magnets’ tunneling junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengzhong; Jiang, Liang

    2014-09-01

    An electric-pulse-induced reversible resistance change effect in a molecular magnetic tunneling junction, consisting of a single-molecule magnet (SMM) sandwiched in one nonmagnetic and one ferromagnetic electrode, is theoretically investigated. By applying a time-varying bias voltage, the SMM's spin orientation can be manipulated with large bias voltage pulses. Moreover, the different magnetic configuration at high-resistance/low-resistance states can be ‘read out’ by utilizing relative low bias voltage. This device scheme can be implemented with current technologies (Khajetoorians et al 2013 Science 339 55) and has potential application in molecular spintronics and high-density nonvolatile memory devices.

  2. Laser-induced forward transfer of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla-Papavlu, A.; Dinescu, M.; Wokaun, A.; Lippert, T.

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this work is the application of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) for the fabrication of chemiresistor sensors. The receiver substrate is an array with metal electrodes and the active materials placed by LIFT are single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). The functionality of such sensors depends on the geometry of the active material onto the metallic electrodes. First the best geometry for the sensing materials and electrodes was determined, including the optimization of the process parameters for printing uniform pixels of SWCNT onto the sensor electrodes. The sensors were characterized in terms of their sensing characteristics, i.e., upon exposure to ammonia, proving the feasibility of LIFT.

  3. Quantitation of ultraviolet-induced single-strand breaks using oligonucleotide chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, Sukdeb; Kim, Min Jung; Choo, Jaebum; Kang, Seong Ho; Lee, Kyeong-Hee; Song, Joon Myong

    2008-01-01

    A simple, accurate and robust methodology was established for the direct quantification of ultraviolet (UV)-induced single-strand break (SSB) using oligonucleotide chip. Oligonucleotide chips were fabricated by covalently anchoring the fluorescent-labeled ssDNAs onto silicon dioxide chip surfaces. Assuming that the possibility of more than one UV-induced SSB to be generated in a small oligonucleotide is extremely low, SSB formation was investigated quantifying the endpoint probe density by fluorescence measurement upon UV irradiation. The SSB yields obtained based on the highly sensitive laser-induced fluorometric determination of fluorophore-labeled oligonucleotides were found to coincide well with that predicted from a theoretical extrapolation of the results obtained for plasmid DNAs using conventional agarose gel electrophoresis. The developed method has the potential to serve as a high throughput, sample-thrifty, and time saving tool to realize more realistic, and direct quantification of radiation and chemical-induced strand breaks. It will be especially useful for determining the frequency of SSBs or lesions convertible to SSBs by specific cleaving reagents or enzymes

  4. Experimental gingivitis induces systemic inflammatory markers in young healthy individuals: a single-subject interventional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhard, Jörg; Grote, Karsten; Luchtefeld, Maren; Heuer, Wieland; Schuett, Harald; Divchev, Dimitar; Scherer, Ralph; Schmitz-Streit, Ruth; Langfeldt, Daniela; Stumpp, Nico; Staufenbiel, Ingmar; Schieffer, Bernhard; Stiesch, Meike

    2013-01-01

    We here investigated whether experimental gingivitis enhances systemic markers of inflammation which are also known as surrogate markers of atherosclerotic plaque development. Gingivitis is a low-level oral infection induced by bacterial deposits with a high prevalence within Western populations. A potential link between the more severe oral disease periodontitis and cardiovascular disease has already been shown. 37 non-smoking young volunteers with no inflammatory disease or any cardiovascular risk factors participated in this single-subject interventional study with an intra-individual control. Intentionally experimental oral inflammation was induced by the interruption of oral hygiene for 21 days, followed by a 21-days resolving phase after reinitiation of oral hygiene. Primary outcome measures at baseline, day 21 and 42 were concentrations of hsCRP, IL-6, and MCP-1, as well as adhesion capacity and oxLDL uptake of isolated blood monocytes. The partial cessation of oral hygiene procedures was followed by the significant increase of gingival bleeding (34.0%, Pgingivitis. Bacterial-induced gingival low-level inflammation induced a systemic increase in inflammatory markers. Dental hygiene almost completely reversed this experimental inflammatory process, suggesting that appropriate dental prophylaxis may also limit systemic markers of inflammation in subjects with natural gingivitis. International Clinical Trials Register Platform of the World Health Organization, registry number: DRKS00003366, URL: http://apps.who.int/trialsearch/Default.aspx.

  5. Single Prazosin Infusion in Prelimbic Cortex Fosters Extinction of Amphetamine-Induced Conditioned Place Preference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele C. Latagliata

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to drug-associated cues to induce extinction is a useful strategy to contrast cue-induced drug seeking. Norepinephrine (NE transmission in medial prefrontal cortex has a role in the acquisition and extinction of conditioned place preference induced by amphetamine. We have reported recently that NE in prelimbic cortex delays extinction of amphetamine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP. A potential involvement of α1-adrenergic receptors in the extinction of appetitive conditioned response has been also suggested, although their role in prelimbic cortex has not been yet fully investigated. Here, we investigated the effects of the α1-adrenergic receptor antagonist prazosin infusion in the prelimbic cortex of C57BL/6J mice on expression and extinction of amphetamine-induced CPP. Acute prelimbic prazosin did not affect expression of amphetamine-induced CPP on the day of infusion, while in subsequent days it produced a clear-cut advance of extinction of preference for the compartment previously paired with amphetamine (Conditioned stimulus, CS. Moreover, prazosin-treated mice that had extinguished CS preference showed increased mRNA expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and post-synaptic density 95 (PSD-95 in the nucleus accumbens shell or core, respectively, thus suggesting that prelimbic α1-adrenergic receptor blockade triggers neural adaptations in subcortical areas that could contribute to the extinction of cue-induced drug-seeking behavior. These results show that the pharmacological blockade of α1-adrenergic receptors in prelimbic cortex by a single infusion is able to induce extinction of amphetamine-induced CPP long before control (vehicle animals, an effect depending on contingent exposure to retrieval, since if infused far from or after reactivation it did not affect preference. Moreover, they suggest strongly that the behavioral effects depend on post-treatment neuroplasticity changes in corticolimbic

  6. Single pyruvate intake induces blood alkalization and modification of resting metabolism in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olek, Robert A; Luszczyk, Marcin; Kujach, Sylwester; Ziemann, Ewa; Pieszko, Magdalena; Pischel, Ivo; Laskowski, Radoslaw

    2015-03-01

    Three separate studies were performed with the aim to 1) determine the effect of a single sodium pyruvate intake on the blood acid-base status in males and females; 2) compare the effect of sodium and calcium pyruvate salts and establish their role in the lipolysis rate; and 3) quantify the effect of single pyruvate intake on the resting energy metabolism. In all, 48 individuals completed three separate studies. In all the studies, participants consumed a single dose of pyruvate 0.1 g/kg 60 min before commencing the measurements. The whole blood pH, bicarbonate concentration, base excess or plasma glycerol, free fatty acids, glucose concentrations, or resting energy expenditure and calculated respiratory exchange ratio were determined. The analysis of variance for repeated measurements was performed to examine the interaction between treatment and time. The single dose of sodium pyruvate induced blood alkalization, which was more marked in the male than in the female participants. Following the ingestion of sodium or calcium pyruvate, the blood acid-base parameters were higher than in the placebo trial. Furthermore, 3-h postingestion glycerol was lower in both pyruvate trials than in placebo. Resting energy expenditure did not differ between the trials; however, carbohydrate oxidation was increased after sodium pyruvate ingestion. Pyruvate intake induced mild alkalization in a sex-dependent fashion. Moreover, it accelerated carbohydrate metabolism and delayed the rate of glycerol appearance in the blood, but had no effect on the resting energy expenditure. Furthermore, sodium salt seems to have had a greater effect on the blood buffering level than calcium salt. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Basal cardiomyopathy develops in rabbits with ventricular tachyarrhythmias induced by a single injection of adrenaline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Terunao; Takato, Tetsuya; Matsuzaki, Gen; Seko, Yoshinori; Fujii, Jun; Kawai, Sachio

    2014-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that basal cardiomyopathy develops in rabbits with ventricular tachyarrhythmias that have been induced by electrical stimulation of the cervical vagus. This study investigated whether similar basal cardiomyopathy would develop in rabbits with ventricular tachyarrhythmias induced by a single injection of adrenaline. Adrenaline was intravenously infused for 10-360 seconds in anesthetized rabbits. Colloidal carbon was injected after adrenaline infusion. Wall movement velocity of the left ventricular base was assessed by tissue Doppler echocardiography. Animals were killed either 1 week or 3-4 weeks later. Pathological lesions were identified by deposits of carbon particles. Animals were divided into two groups according to the infused dose of adrenaline. The small-dose group (group S, n = 15) received 1-10 μg and the large-dose group (group L, n = 23) received 15-60 μg of adrenaline. Adrenaline infusion induced premature ventricular contractions followed by monomorphic ventricular tachycardias in 22 of 23 animals in group L, but in only 1 of 15 animals in group S. Wall movement velocity of the left ventricular base decreased just after adrenaline infusion, remained low after 1 week, and recovered to near-baseline levels after 3-4 weeks in group L. Unique cardiac lesions identified by deposits of carbon particles were frequently observed on the left ventricular basal portion, almost always associated with the mitral valve and papillary muscles, but were never observed in the apical area. Lesions involving all areas of the left ventricular basal portion were observed in 22 of 23 animals in group L, but in only 2 of 15 animals in group S. Basal cardiomyopathy developed in rabbits with ventricular tachycardias induced by a single injection of adrenaline.

  8. Ion Trap Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    variations of ion traps, including (1) the cylindrically symmetric 3D ring trap; (2) the linear trap with a combination of cavity QED; (#) the symmetric...concepts of quantum information. The major demonstration has been the test of a Bell inequality as demonstrated by Rowe et al. [50] and a decoherence...famous physics experiment [62]. Wolfgang Paul demonstrated a similar apparatus during his Nobel Prize speech [63]. This device is hyperbolic- parabolic

  9. Trapping of quantum particles and light beams by switchable potential wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonkin, Eduard; Malomed, Boris A.; Granot, Er'El; Marchewka, Avi

    2010-09-01

    We consider basic dynamical effects in settings based on a pair of local potential traps that may be effectively switched on and off, or suddenly displaced, by means of appropriate control mechanisms, such as scanning tunneling microscopy or photo-switchable quantum dots. The same models, based on the linear Schrödinger equation with time-dependent trapping potentials, apply to the description of optical planar systems designed for the switching of trapped light beams. The analysis is carried out in the analytical form, using exact solutions of the Schrödinger equation. The first dynamical problem considered in this work is the retention of a particle released from a trap which was suddenly turned off, while another local trap was switched on at a distance—immediately or with a delay. In this case, we demonstrate that the maximum of the retention rate is achieved at a specific finite value of the strength of the new trap, and at a finite value of the temporal delay, depending on the distance between the two traps. Another problem is retrapping of the bound particle when the addition of the second trap transforms the single-well setting into a double-well potential (DWP). In that case, we find probabilities for the retrapping into the ground or first excited state of the DWP. We also analyze effects entailed by the application of a kick to a bound particle, the most interesting one being a kick-induced transition between the DWP’s ground and excited states. In the latter case, the largest transition probability is achieved at a particular strength of the kick.

  10. Trapping of quantum particles and light beams by switchable potential wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonkin, Eduard; Malomed, Boris A.; Granot, Er'el; Marchewka, Avi

    2010-01-01

    We consider basic dynamical effects in settings based on a pair of local potential traps that may be effectively switched on and off, or suddenly displaced, by means of appropriate control mechanisms, such as scanning tunneling microscopy or photo-switchable quantum dots. The same models, based on the linear Schroedinger equation with time-dependent trapping potentials, apply to the description of optical planar systems designed for the switching of trapped light beams. The analysis is carried out in the analytical form, using exact solutions of the Schroedinger equation. The first dynamical problem considered in this work is the retention of a particle released from a trap which was suddenly turned off, while another local trap was switched on at a distance--immediately or with a delay. In this case, we demonstrate that the maximum of the retention rate is achieved at a specific finite value of the strength of the new trap, and at a finite value of the temporal delay, depending on the distance between the two traps. Another problem is retrapping of the bound particle when the addition of the second trap transforms the single-well setting into a double-well potential (DWP). In that case, we find probabilities for the retrapping into the ground or first excited state of the DWP. We also analyze effects entailed by the application of a kick to a bound particle, the most interesting one being a kick-induced transition between the DWP's ground and excited states. In the latter case, the largest transition probability is achieved at a particular strength of the kick.

  11. Towards trapped antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Jorgensen, L V; Bertsche, W; Boston, A; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page, R D; Povilus, A; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in the last few years in the nascent field of antihydrogen physics. The next big step forward is expected to be the trapping of the formed antihydrogen atoms using a magnetic multipole trap. ALPHA is a new international project that started to take data in 2006 at CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator facility. The primary goal of ALPHA is stable trapping of cold antihydrogen atoms to facilitate measurements of its properties. We discuss the status of the ALPHA project and the prospects for antihydrogen trapping.

  12. High-resolution phenotypic profiling of natural products-induced effects on the single-cell level

    KAUST Repository

    Kremb, Stephan Georg; Voolstra, Christian R.

    2017-01-01

    Natural products (NPs) are highly evolved molecules making them a valuable resource for new therapeutics. Here we demonstrate the usefulness of broad-spectrum phenotypic profiling of NP-induced perturbations on single cells with imaging-based High

  13. Radiation-induced defects in LiAlO{sub 2} crystals: Holes trapped by lithium vacancies and their role in thermoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holston, M.S.; McClory, J.W.; Giles, N.C. [Department of Engineering Physics, Air Force Institute of Technology, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 (United States); Halliburton, L.E., E-mail: Larry.Halliburton@mail.wvu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is used to identify the primary hole trap in undoped lithium aluminate (LiAlO{sub 2}) crystals. Our interest in this material arises because it is a candidate for radiation detection applications involving either optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) or thermoluminescence (TL). During an x-ray irradiation at room temperature, holes are trapped at oxygen ions adjacent to lithium vacancies. Large concentrations of these lithium vacancies are introduced into the crystal during growth. With the magnetic field along the [001] direction, the EPR spectrum from these trapped-hole centers consists of eleven lines, evenly spaced but with varying intensities, caused by nearly equal hyperfine interactions with two {sup 27}Al nuclei (I=5/2, 100% abundant). The g matrix is determined from the angular dependence of the EPR spectrum and has principal values of 2.0130, 2.0675, and 2.0015. These g shifts strongly support the model of a hole in a p orbital on an oxygen ion. The adjacent lithium vacancy stabilizes the hole on the oxygen ion. A sequence of pulsed thermal anneals above room temperature shows that the EPR spectrum from the holes trapped adjacent to the lithium vacancies disappears in the 90–120 °C range. The thermal decay of these hole centers directly correlates with an intense TL peak near 105 °C. Signals at lower magnetic field in the 9.4 GHz EPR spectra suggest that the electron trap associated with this TL peak at 105 °C may be a transition-metal-ion impurity, most likely Fe, located at a cation site. Additional less intense TL peaks are observed near 138, 176, and 278 °C. - Highlights: • Undoped LiAlO{sub 2} crystals are irradiated at room temperature with x-rays. • EPR is used to identify holes trapped at oxygen ions adjacent to lithium vacancies. • Thermal decay of the EPR spectrum correlates with an intense TL peak at 105 °C.

  14. [Induced abortion: a comparison between married and single women residing in the city of São Paulo in 2008].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza e Silva, Rebeca; Andreoni, Solange

    2012-07-01

    The scope of this study was to evaluate the association between having had an induced abortion and marital status (being single or legally married) in women residing in the city of São Paulo. This analysis is derived from a broader population survey on abortion conducted in 2008. In this study we focus on the subset of 389 single and legally married women between 15 and 49 years of age. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association between induced abortion and being single or married, monitoring age, education, income, number of live births, contraceptive use and acceptance of the practice of abortion. Being single was the only characteristic associated with having had an induced abortion, in other words, when faced with a pregnancy single women were four times more likely to have an abortion than married women (OR=3.9; p=0.009).

  15. Optical trapping for analytical biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, Praveen C; Dholakia, Kishan

    2012-02-01

    We describe the exciting advances of using optical trapping in the field of analytical biotechnology. This technique has opened up opportunities to manipulate biological particles at the single cell or even at subcellular levels which has allowed an insight into the physical and chemical mechanisms of many biological processes. The ability of this technique to manipulate microparticles and measure pico-Newton forces has found several applications such as understanding the dynamics of biological macromolecules, cell-cell interactions and the micro-rheology of both cells and fluids. Furthermore we may probe and analyse the biological world when combining trapping with analytical techniques such as Raman spectroscopy and imaging. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Reduction of charge trapping and electron tunneling in SIMOX by supplemental implantation of oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahlbush, R.E.; Hughes, H.L.; Krull, W.A.

    1993-01-01

    Silicon-on-insulator, SOI, technologies are being aggressively pursued to produce high density, high speed, radiation tolerant electronics. The dielectric isolation of the buried oxide makes it possible to design integrated circuits that greatly minimize single event upset and eliminate dose-rate induced latchup and upset. The reduction of excess-silicon related defects in SIMOX by the supplemental implantation of oxygen has been examined. The supplemental implant is 6% of the oxygen dose used to form the buried oxide, and is followed by a 1,000 C anneal, in contrast to the >1,300 C anneal used to form the buried oxide layer of SIMOX. The defects examined include shallow electron traps, deep hole traps, and silicon clusters. The radiation-induced shallow electron and deep hole trapping are measured by cryogenic detrapping and isothermal annealing techniques. The low-field (3 to 6 MV/cm) electron tunneling is interpreted as due to a two phase mixture of stoichiometric SiO 2 and Si clusters a few nm in size. Single and triple SIMOS samples have been examined. All of the defects are reduced by the supplemental oxygen processing. Shallow electron trapping is reduced by an order of magnitude. Because of the larger capture cross section for hole trapping, hole trapping is not reduced as much. The low-field electron tunneling due to Si clusters is also significantly reduced. Both uniform and nonuniform electron tunneling have been observed in SIMOX samples without supplement processing. In samples exhibiting only uniform tunneling, electron capture at holes has been observed. The nonuniform tunneling is superimposed upon the uniform tunneling and is characterized by current spiking

  17. Single and multi-band electromagnetic induced transparency-like metamaterials with coupled split ring resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagci, Fulya; Akaoglu, Baris

    2017-08-01

    We present a metamaterial configuration exhibiting single and multi-band electromagnetic induced transparency (EIT)-like properties. The unit cell of the single band EIT-like metamaterial consists of a multi-split ring resonator surrounded by a split ring resonator. The multi-split ring resonator acts as a quasi-dark or dark resonator, depending on the polarization of the incident wave, and the split ring resonator serves as the bright resonator. Combination of these two resonators results in a single band EIT-like transmission inside the stop band. EIT-like transmission phenomenon is also clearly observed in the measured transmission spectrum at almost the same frequencies for vertical and horizontal polarized waves, and the numerical results are verified for normal incidence. Moreover, multi-band transmission windows are created within a wide band by combining the two slightly different single band EIT-like metamaterial unit cells that exhibit two different coupling strengths inside a supercell configuration. Group indices as high as 123 for single band and 488 for tri-band transmission, accompanying with high transmission rates (over 80%), are achieved, rendering the metamaterial very suitable for multi-band slow light applications. It is shown that the group delay of the propagating wave can be increased and dynamically controlled by changing the polarization angle. Multi-band EIT-like transmission is also verified experimentally, and a good agreement with simulations is obtained. The proposed novel methodology for obtaining multi-band EIT, which takes advantage of a supercell configuration by hosting slightly different configured unit cells, can be utilized for easily formation and manipulation of multi-band transmission windows inside a stop band.

  18. High-fidelity operations in microfabricated surface ion traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maunz, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Trapped ion systems can be used to implement quantum computation as well as quantum simulation. To scale these systems to the number of qubits required to solve interesting problems in quantum chemistry or solid state physics, the use of large multi-zone ion traps has been proposed. Microfabrication enables the realization of surface electrode ion traps with complex electrode structures. While these traps may enable the scaling of trapped ion quantum information processing (QIP), microfabricated ion traps also pose several technical challenges. Here, we present Sandia's trap fabrication capabilities and characterize trap properties and shuttling operations in our most recent high optical access trap (HOA-2). To demonstrate the viability of Sandia's microfabricated ion traps for QIP we realize robust single and two-qubit gates and characterize them using gate set tomography (GST). In this way we are able to demonstrate the first single qubit gates with a diamond norm of less than 1 . 7 ×10-4 , below a rigorous fault tolerance threshold for general noise of 6 . 7 ×10-4. Furthermore, we realize Mølmer-Sørensen two qubit gates with a process fidelity of 99 . 58(6) % also characterized by GST. These results demonstrate the viability of microfabricated surface traps for state of the art quantum information processing demonstrations. This research was funded, in part, by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA).

  19. Electron trapping during irradiation in reoxidized nitrided oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallik, A.; Vasi, J.; Chandorkar, A.N.

    1993-01-01

    Isochronal detrapping experiments have been performed following irradiation under different gate biases in reoxidized nitrided oxide (RNO) MOS capacitors. These show electron trapping by the nitridation-induced electron traps at low oxide fields during irradiation. A difference in the detrapping behavior of trapped holes and electrons is observed, with trapped holes being detrapped at relatively lower temperatures compared to trapped electrons. Electron trapping shows a strong dependence on tile magnitude of the applied gate bias during irradiation but is independent of its polarity. Conventional oxide devices, as expected, do not show any electron trapping during irradiation by the native electron traps. Finally, a comparison of the isochronal detrapping behavior following irradiation and following avalanche injection of electrons has been made to estimate the extent of electron trapping. The results show that electron trapping by the nitridation-induced electron traps does not play the dominant role in improving radiation performance of RNO, though its contribution cannot be completely neglected for low oxide field irradiations

  20. Normal formation and repair of γ-radiation-induced single and double strand DNA breaks in Down syndrome fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, M.E.; Woods, W.G.

    1982-01-01

    Fibroblasts from patients with Down syndrome (Trisomy 21) were examined for repair capability of γ-radiation-induced single strand and double strand DNA breaks. Formation and repair of DNA breaks were determined by DNA alkaline and non-denaturing elution techniques. Down syndrome fibroblasts were found to repair single strand and double strand breaks as well as fibroblasts from normal controls. (orig.)

  1. Hepatoprotective and antioxidant effects of single clove garlic against CCl4-induced hepatic damage in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naji, Khalid Mohammed; Al-Shaibani, Elham Shukri; Alhadi, Fatima A; Al-Soudi, Safa'a Abdulrzaq; D'souza, Myrene R

    2017-08-17

    The increase in demand and consumption of single clove garlic or 'Solo garlic' (Allium sativum) has resulted in an increase in research on its therapeutic properties. The present study aims to evaluate the antioxidant activities, oxidant-scavenging efficiency and preventive effects of SCG (single clove garlic) and MCG (multi clove garlic) on CCl 4 -induced acute hepatotoxicity in male rabbits. For this purpose, rabbits were orally administered with 3 ml of CCl 4 /kg of body weight, followed by 0.8 g of MCG or SCG/kg twice a week for three successive weeks. Oxidative hepatotoxicity was then assessed. SCG extracts exhibited higher antioxidant capacity than the MCG extract. Scavenging ability of SCG showed significant (p garlic storage constituents varies with the number of cloves present. CCl 4 -induced hepatotoxicity demonstrated histological changes including severe damage in the structure of liver tissues which correlated well to oxidative stress levels. Simultaneously, administration of SCG resulted in a significant reduction of serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and total bilirubin (TB) levels in addition to improvement in some histological parameters. Low levels of lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde, MDA) (p < 0.001), along with a huge reduction in peroxidase (POx) (p < 0.001) revealed protection against oxidative toxicity in the liver homogenate. Higher levels of catalase (CAT) (p < 0.001) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) (p < 0.05) when compared to the MCG test (TM) group indicates that removal of H 2 O 2 is based on CAT activity in SCG test (TS) group rather than the POx activity demonstrated in the former group. The present study indicates that SCG possesses more protective ability than MCG against CCl 4 -induced liver injury and might be an effective alternative medicine against acute oxidative liver toxicity.

  2. Versatile electrostatic trap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veldhoven, J.; Bethlem, H.L.; Schnell, M.; Meijer, G.

    2006-01-01

    A four electrode electrostatic trap geometry is demonstrated that can be used to combine a dipole, quadrupole, and hexapole field. A cold packet of ND315 molecules is confined in both a purely quadrupolar and hexapolar trapping field and additionally, a dipole field is added to a hexapole field to

  3. Liquid metal cold trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hundal, R.

    1976-01-01

    A cold trap assembly for removing impurities from a liquid metal is described. A hole between the incoming impure liquid metal and purified outgoing liquid metal acts as a continuous bleed means and thus prevents the accumulation of cover gases within the cold trap assembly

  4. Delay-induced wave instabilities in single-species reaction-diffusion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Andereas; Wang, Jian; Radons, Günter

    2017-11-01

    The Turing (wave) instability is only possible in reaction-diffusion systems with more than one (two) components. Motivated by the fact that a time delay increases the dimension of a system, we investigate the presence of diffusion-driven instabilities in single-species reaction-diffusion systems with delay. The stability of arbitrary one-component systems with a single discrete delay, with distributed delay, or with a variable delay is systematically analyzed. We show that a wave instability can appear from an equilibrium of single-species reaction-diffusion systems with fluctuating or distributed delay, which is not possible in similar systems with constant discrete delay or without delay. More precisely, we show by basic analytic arguments and by numerical simulations that fast asymmetric delay fluctuations or asymmetrically distributed delays can lead to wave instabilities in these systems. Examples, for the resulting traveling waves are shown for a Fisher-KPP equation with distributed delay in the reaction term. In addition, we have studied diffusion-induced instabilities from homogeneous periodic orbits in the same systems with variable delay, where the homogeneous periodic orbits are attracting resonant periodic solutions of the system without diffusion, i.e., periodic orbits of the Hutchinson equation with time-varying delay. If diffusion is introduced, standing waves can emerge whose temporal period is equal to the period of the variable delay.

  5. Squeezing survival and transfer in single and double electromagnetically induced transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, J L; Hou, B P; Wang, S J

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the propagation and storage of a squeezed vacuum as the probe light in a collection of N four-level tripod configuration atoms under the condition of single or double electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). The squeezing of the probe light is well preserved in both the single transparency channel and the double transparency one. On the other hand, the effects of the ground state dephasing rates on the propagation and storage of the squeezed vacuum are investigated. It is found that the maximum squeezing at the transparency points is suppressed by the dephasing rates in single or double EIT. Meanwhile, the mapping of the squeezing of the probe light onto the atomic ground coherences or onto the two atomic dark-state polaritons is also studied. In the absence of the Langevin atomic noise, the quasi-ideal squeezing transfer between the squeezed vacuum and the atomic ground coherences or the dark-state polaritons can be realized in such a system. When considering the Langevin atomic noise, the quantum characteristics of the atomic coherences at resonance are submerged by the Langevin noise, while in the scenario of the dark-state polariton, it is found that squeezing transfer onto one polariton is damaged, but the squeezing transfer onto the other polariton survives even in the presence of the Langevin noise.

  6. Influence of DNA conformation on radiation-induced single-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barone, F.; Belli, M.; Mazzei, F.

    1994-01-01

    We performed experiments on two DNA fragments of about 300 bp having different conformation to test whether radiation-induced single-strand breakage is dependent on DNA conformation. Breakage analysis was carried out by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, which allows determination of the broken site at single nucleotide resolution. We found uniform cutting patterns in B-form regions. On the contrary, X- or γ-irradiation of curved fragments of kinetoplast DNA showed that the distribution of single-strand breaks was not uniform along the fragment, as the cleavage pattern was modulated in phase with the runs of A-T pairs. This modulation likely reflected the reduced accessibility of the sites which on hydroxyl-radical attack give rise to strand breaks. The cleavage pattern was phased with the runs of A-T pairs. Moreover, the overall yield of strand breaks was considerably lower in curved DNA fragments than in those with extended straight regions. The conformation effect found here indicates that the cleavage pattern reflects the fine structural features of DNA. (orig./MG)

  7. Bubble dynamics and bubble-induced turbulence of a single-bubble chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joohyoung; Park, Hyungmin

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, the bubble dynamics and liquid-phase turbulence induced by a chain of bubbles injected from a single nozzle have been experimentally investigated. Using a high-speed two-phase particle image velociemtry, measurements on the bubbles and liquid-phase velocity field are conducted in a transparent tank filled with water, while varying the bubble release frequency from 0.1 to 35 Hz. The tested bubble size ranges between 2.0-3.2 mm, and the corresponding bubble Reynolds number is 590-1100, indicating that it belongs to the regime of path instability. As the release frequency increases, it is found that the global shape of bubble dispersion can be classified into two regimes: from asymmetric (regular) to axisymmetric (irregular). In particular, at higher frequency, the wake vortices of leading bubbles cause an irregular behaviour of the following bubble. For the liquid phase, it is found that a specific trend on the bubble-induced turbulence appears in a strong relation to the above bubble dynamics. Considering this, we try to provide a theoretical model to estimate the liquid-phase turbulence induced by a chain of bubbles. Supported by a Grant funded by Samsung Electronics, Korea.

  8. Generation of Induced Neuronal Cells by the Single Reprogramming Factor ASCL1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soham Chanda

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Direct conversion of nonneural cells to functional neurons holds great promise for neurological disease modeling and regenerative medicine. We previously reported rapid reprogramming of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs into mature induced neuronal (iN cells by forced expression of three transcription factors: ASCL1, MYT1L, and BRN2. Here, we show that ASCL1 alone is sufficient to generate functional iN cells from mouse and human fibroblasts and embryonic stem cells, indicating that ASCL1 is the key driver of iN cell reprogramming in different cell contexts and that the role of MYT1L and BRN2 is primarily to enhance the neuronal maturation process. ASCL1-induced single-factor neurons (1F-iN expressed mature neuronal markers, exhibited typical passive and active intrinsic membrane properties, and formed functional pre- and postsynaptic structures. Surprisingly, ASCL1-induced iN cells were predominantly excitatory, demonstrating that ASCL1 is permissive but alone not deterministic for the inhibitory neuronal lineage.

  9. Viral single-strand DNA induces p53-dependent apoptosis in human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Matthew L; Fagan, B Matthew; Dumitru, Raluca; Bower, Jacquelyn J; Yadav, Swati; Porteus, Matthew H; Pevny, Larysa H; Samulski, R Jude

    2011-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are primed for rapid apoptosis following mild forms of genotoxic stress. A natural form of such cellular stress occurs in response to recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) single-strand DNA genomes, which exploit the host DNA damage response for replication and genome persistence. Herein, we discovered a unique DNA damage response induced by rAAV transduction specific to pluripotent hESCs. Within hours following rAAV transduction, host DNA damage signaling was elicited as measured by increased gamma-H2AX, ser15-p53 phosphorylation, and subsequent p53-dependent transcriptional activation. Nucleotide incorporation assays demonstrated that rAAV transduced cells accumulated in early S-phase followed by the induction of apoptosis. This lethal signaling sequalae required p53 in a manner independent of transcriptional induction of Puma, Bax and Bcl-2 and was not evident in cells differentiated towards a neural lineage. Consistent with a lethal DNA damage response induced upon rAAV transduction of hESCs, empty AAV protein capsids demonstrated no toxicity. In contrast, DNA microinjections demonstrated that the minimal AAV origin of replication and, in particular, a 40 nucleotide G-rich tetrad repeat sequence, was sufficient for hESC apoptosis. Our data support a model in which rAAV transduction of hESCs induces a p53-dependent lethal response that is elicited by a telomeric sequence within the AAV origin of replication.

  10. Viral single-strand DNA induces p53-dependent apoptosis in human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L Hirsch

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are primed for rapid apoptosis following mild forms of genotoxic stress. A natural form of such cellular stress occurs in response to recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV single-strand DNA genomes, which exploit the host DNA damage response for replication and genome persistence. Herein, we discovered a unique DNA damage response induced by rAAV transduction specific to pluripotent hESCs. Within hours following rAAV transduction, host DNA damage signaling was elicited as measured by increased gamma-H2AX, ser15-p53 phosphorylation, and subsequent p53-dependent transcriptional activation. Nucleotide incorporation assays demonstrated that rAAV transduced cells accumulated in early S-phase followed by the induction of apoptosis. This lethal signaling sequalae required p53 in a manner independent of transcriptional induction of Puma, Bax and Bcl-2 and was not evident in cells differentiated towards a neural lineage. Consistent with a lethal DNA damage response induced upon rAAV transduction of hESCs, empty AAV protein capsids demonstrated no toxicity. In contrast, DNA microinjections demonstrated that the minimal AAV origin of replication and, in particular, a 40 nucleotide G-rich tetrad repeat sequence, was sufficient for hESC apoptosis. Our data support a model in which rAAV transduction of hESCs induces a p53-dependent lethal response that is elicited by a telomeric sequence within the AAV origin of replication.

  11. Single-Shot, Volumetrically Illuminated, Three-Dimensional, Tomographic Laser-Induced-Fluorescence Imaging in a Gaseous Free Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-28

    Single-shot, volumetrically illuminated, three- dimensional, tomographic laser-induced- fluorescence imaging in a gaseous free jet Benjamin R. Halls...acquisition; (110.6955) Tomographic imaging ; (110.6960) Tomography; (280.2490) Flow diagnostics; (300.2530) Fluorescence , laser-induced...84 (1983). 2. I. van Cruyningen, A. Lozano, and R. K. Hanson, “Quantitative imaging of concentration by planar laser-induced fluorescence ,” Exp

  12. Reversible air-induced optical and electrical modulation of methylammonium lead bromide (MAPbBr3) single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huotian; Liu, Yiting; Lu, Haizhou; Deng, Wan; Yang, Kang; Deng, Zunyi; Zhang, Xingmin; Yuan, Sijian; Wang, Jiao; Niu, Jiaxin; Zhang, Xiaolei; Jin, Qingyuan; Feng, Hongjian; Zhan, Yiqiang; Zheng, Lirong

    2017-09-01

    The photoluminescence (PL) variations of organic-inorganic hybrid lead halide perovskites in different atmospheres are well documented, while the fundamental mechanism still lacks comprehensive understandings. This study reports the reversible optical and electrical properties of methylammonium lead bromide (MAPbBr3 or CH3NH3PbBr3) single crystals caused by air infiltration. With the change in the surrounding atmosphere from air to vacuum, the PL intensity of perovskite single crystals decreases, while the conductivity increases. By means of first-principles computational studies, the shallow trap states are considered as key elements in PL and conductivity changes. These results have important implications for the characterization and application of organic-inorganic hybrid lead halide perovskites in vacuum.

  13. Trapping radioactive ions

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, Heinz-Jürgen

    2004-01-01

    Trapping devices for atomic and nuclear physics experiments with radioactive ions are becoming more and more important at accelerator facilities. While about ten years ago only one online Penning trap experiment existed, namely ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN, meanwhile almost every radioactive beam facility has installed or plans an ion trap setup. This article gives an overview on ion traps in the operation, construction or planing phase which will be used for fundamental studies with short-lived radioactive nuclides such as mass spectrometry, laser spectroscopy and nuclear decay spectroscopy. In addition, this article summarizes the use of gas cells and radiofrequency quadrupole (Paul) traps at different facilities as a versatile tool for ion beam manipulation like retardation, cooling, bunching, and cleaning.

  14. Trapping radioactive ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluge, H.-J.; Blaum, K.

    2004-01-01

    Trapping devices for atomic and nuclear physics experiments with radioactive ions are becoming more and more important at accelerator facilities. While about ten years ago only one online Penning trap experiment existed, namely ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN, meanwhile almost every radioactive beam facility has installed or plans an ion trap setup. This article gives an overview on ion traps in the operation, construction or planing phase which will be used for fundamental studies with short-lived radioactive nuclides such as mass spectrometry, laser spectroscopy and nuclear decay spectroscopy. In addition, this article summarizes the use of gas cells and radiofrequency quadrupole (Paul) traps at different facilities as a versatile tool for ion beam manipulation like retardation, cooling, bunching, and cleaning

  15. Phase-controlled coherent population trapping in superconducting quantum circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Guang-Ling; Wang Yi-Ping; Chen Ai-Xi

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the influences of the-applied-field phases and amplitudes on the coherent population trapping behavior in superconducting quantum circuits. Based on the interactions of the microwave fields with a single Δ-type three-level fluxonium qubit, the coherent population trapping could be obtainable and it is very sensitive to the relative phase and amplitudes of the applied fields. When the relative phase is tuned to 0 or π, the maximal atomic coherence is present and coherent population trapping occurs. While for the choice of π/2, the atomic coherence becomes weak. Meanwhile, for the fixed relative phase π/2, the value of coherence would decrease with the increase of Rabi frequency of the external field coupled with two lower levels. The responsible physical mechanism is quantum interference induced by the control fields, which is indicated in the dressed-state representation. The microwave coherent phenomenon is present in our scheme, which will have potential applications in optical communication and nonlinear optics in solid-state devices. (paper)

  16. Defect trapping of deuterium implanted in aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kido, Y.; Kakeno, M.; Yamada, K.; Hioki, T.; Kawamoto, J.

    1982-01-01

    The behaviour of deuterium implanted in Al was studied by the D( 3 He,p) 4 He and the D(d,p)T nuclear reactions. Changes of the depth profiles of the deuterium after heat treatments indicated that the implanted deuterium was trapped by the defect produced during the deuterium implantation and the release probability of the trapped deuterium increased as the specimen temperature was raised. Assuming a thermal equilibrium locally in the region of high defect concentration, the trapping energy of deuterium in Al was determined to be 0.12eV. Since the release probability for the single crystal was considerably larger than that for the polycrystal specimens, the deuterium was considered to be strongly trapped in the grain boundaries. Distributions of displaced Al atoms and the recovery of the lattice damage by annealing were measured by the channelling technique. (author)

  17. Line-Trapping of Codling Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae): A Novel Approach to Improving the Precision of Capture Numbers in Traps Monitoring Pest Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, C G; McGhee, P S; Schenker, J H; Gut, L J; Miller, J R

    2017-08-01

    This field study of codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), response to single versus multiple monitoring traps baited with codlemone demonstrates that precision of a given capture number is alarmingly poor when the population is held constant by releasing moths. Captures as low as zero and as high as 12 males per single trap are to be expected where the catch mode is three. Here, we demonstrate that the frequency of false negatives and overestimated positives for codling moth trapping can be substantially reduced by employing the tactic of line-trapping, where five traps were deployed 4 m apart along a row of apple trees. Codling moth traps spaced closely competed only slightly. Therefore, deploying five traps closely in a line is a sampling technique nearly as good as deploying five traps spaced widely. But line trapping offers a substantial savings in time and therefore cost when servicing aggregated versus distributed traps. As the science of pest management matures by mastering the ability to translate capture numbers into estimates of absolute pest density, it will be important to employ a tactic like line-trapping so as to shrink the troublesome variability associated with capture numbers in single traps that thwarts accurate decisions about if and when to spray. Line-trapping might similarly increase the reliability and utility of density estimates derived from capture numbers in monitoring traps for various pest and beneficial insects. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  18. Novel Ion Trap Design for Strong Ion-Cavity Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Márquez Seco

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel ion trap design which facilitates the integration of an optical fiber cavity into the trap structure. The optical fibers are confined inside hollow electrodes in such a way that tight shielding and free movement of the fibers are simultaneously achievable. The latter enables in situ optimization of the overlap between the trapped ions and the cavity field. Through numerical simulations, we systematically analyze the effects of the electrode geometry on the trapping characteristics such as trap depths, secular frequencies and the optical access angle. Additionally, we simulate the effects of the presence of the fibers and confirm the robustness of the trapping potential. Based on these simulations and other technical considerations, we devise a practical trap configuration that isviable to achieve strong coupling of a single ion.

  19. Regions of tunneling dynamics for few bosons in an optical lattice subjected to a quench of the imposed harmonic trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistakidis, Simeon; Koutentakis, Georgios; Schmelcher, Peter; Theory Group of Fundamental Processes in Quantum Physics Team

    2016-05-01

    Recent experimental advances have introduced an interplay in the trapping length scales of the lattice and the harmonic confinement. This fact motivates the investigation to prepare atomic gases at certain quantum states by utilizing a composite atomic trap consisting of a lattice potential that is embedded inside an overlying harmonic trap. In the present work, we examine how frequency modulations of the overlying harmonic trap stimulate the dynamics of an 1D few-boson gas. The gas is initially prepared at a highly confined state, and the subsequent dynamics induced by a quench of the harmonic trap frequency to a lower value is examined. It is shown that a non-interacting gas always diffuses to the outer sites. In contrast the response of the interacting system is more involved and is dominated by a resonance, which is induced by the bifurcation of the low-lying eigenstates. Our study reveals that the position of the resonance depends both on the atom number and the interaction coupling, manifesting its many body nature. The corresponding mean field treatment as well as the single-band approximation have been found to be inadequate for the description of the tunneling dynamics in the interacting case. Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, SFB 925 ``Light induced dynamics and control of correlated quantum systems''.

  20. Measurement of Secular Motion Frequency in Miniature Paul Trap to Ascertain the Stability Parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bin, Guo; Hua, Guan; Qu, Liu; Yao, Huang; Xue-Ren, Huang; Ke-Lin, Gao

    2010-01-01

    40 Ca + ions are trapped and laser cooled in a miniature Paul trap. The secular motion was observed by the radio-frequency resonance of the ion cloud and Zeeman profile sidebands of a single ion experimentally. The trap stability parameters a and q are determined with an uncertainty under 1 % by the secular motion frequency measurement. The trap efficiency is 0.75. A practicable suggestion is given for the benefits of a new trap design. (atomic and molecular physics)

  1. Optical Trapping of Ion Coulomb Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Schmidt

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The electronic and motional degrees of freedom of trapped ions can be controlled and coherently coupled on the level of individual quanta. Assembling complex quantum systems ion by ion while keeping this unique level of control remains a challenging task. For many applications, linear chains of ions in conventional traps are ideally suited to address this problem. However, driven motion due to the magnetic or radio-frequency electric trapping fields sometimes limits the performance in one dimension and severely affects the extension to higher-dimensional systems. Here, we report on the trapping of multiple barium ions in a single-beam optical dipole trap without radio-frequency or additional magnetic fields. We study the persistence of order in ensembles of up to six ions within the optical trap, measure their temperature, and conclude that the ions form a linear chain, commonly called a one-dimensional Coulomb crystal. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, we access the collective motion and perform spectrometry of the normal modes in the optical trap. Our system provides a platform that is free of driven motion and combines advantages of optical trapping, such as state-dependent confinement and nanoscale potentials, with the desirable properties of crystals of trapped ions, such as long-range interactions featuring collective motion. Starting with small numbers of ions, it has been proposed that these properties would allow the experimental study of many-body physics and the onset of structural quantum phase transitions between one- and two-dimensional crystals.

  2. Nematode-Trapping Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiangzhi; Xiang, Meichun; Liu, Xingzhong

    2017-01-01

    Nematode-trapping fungi are a unique and intriguing group of carnivorous microorganisms that can trap and digest nematodes by means of specialized trapping structures. They can develop diverse trapping devices, such as adhesive hyphae, adhesive knobs, adhesive networks, constricting rings, and nonconstricting rings. Nematode-trapping fungi have been found in all regions of the world, from the tropics to Antarctica, from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems. They play an important ecological role in regulating nematode dynamics in soil. Molecular phylogenetic studies have shown that the majority of nematode-trapping fungi belong to a monophyletic group in the order Orbiliales (Ascomycota). Nematode-trapping fungi serve as an excellent model system for understanding fungal evolution and interaction between fungi and nematodes. With the development of molecular techniques and genome sequencing, their evolutionary origins and divergence, and the mechanisms underlying fungus-nematode interactions have been well studied. In recent decades, an increasing concern about the environmental hazards of using chemical nematicides has led to the application of these biological control agents as a rapidly developing component of crop protection.

  3. Force-induced chemical reactions on the metal centre in a single metalloprotein molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Peng; Arantes, Guilherme M.; Field, Martin J.; Li, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    Metalloproteins play indispensable roles in biology owing to the versatile chemical reactivity of metal centres. However, studying their reactivity in many metalloproteins is challenging, as protein three-dimensional structure encloses labile metal centres, thus limiting their access to reactants and impeding direct measurements. Here we demonstrate the use of single-molecule atomic force microscopy to induce partial unfolding to expose metal centres in metalloproteins to aqueous solution, thus allowing for studying their chemical reactivity in aqueous solution for the first time. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate two chemical reactions for the FeS4 centre in rubredoxin: electrophilic protonation and nucleophilic ligand substitution. Our results show that protonation and ligand substitution result in mechanical destabilization of the FeS4 centre. Quantum chemical calculations corroborated experimental results and revealed detailed reaction mechanisms. We anticipate that this novel approach will provide insights into chemical reactivity of metal centres in metalloproteins under biologically more relevant conditions. PMID:26108369

  4. Xe ion beam induced rippled structures on differently oriented single-crystalline Si surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanisch, Antje; Grenzer, Joerg; Facsko, Stefan [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institut fuer Ionenstrahlphysik und Materialforschung, PO Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Biermanns, Andreas; Pietsch, Ullrich, E-mail: A.Hanisch@fzd.d [Universitaet Siegen, Festkoerperphysik, 57068 Siegen (Germany)

    2010-03-24

    We report on Xe{sup +} induced ripple formation at medium energy on single-crystalline silicon surfaces of different orientations using substrates with an intentional miscut from the [0 0 1] direction and a [1 1 1] oriented wafer. The ion beam incidence angle with respect to the surface normal was kept fixed at 65{sup 0} and the ion beam projection was parallel or perpendicular to the [1 1 0] direction. By a combination of atomic force microscopy, x-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy we found that the features of the surface and subsurface rippled structures such as ripple wavelength and amplitude and the degree of order do not depend on the surface orientation as assumed in recent models of pattern formation for semiconductor surfaces. (fast track communication)

  5. The effect of incidence angle on ion bombardment induced surface topography development on single crystal copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, G.; Nobes, M.J.; Lewis, G.W.; Whitton, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    The fluence dependence of development of microscopic surface features, particularly etch pits, during 9 keV Ar + ion bombardment of (11,3,1) oriented Cu single crystals has been studied employing quasi-dynamic irradiation and observation techniques in a scanning electron microscope-accelerator system. 9 keV ions are observed not to produce crystallographic pyramids under all irradiation conditions for this surface, a very different result from our earlier studies with higher energy ions. The bombardment does elaborate etch pits however, the habits and growth kinetics of which depend upon both polar and azimuthal angles of ion incidence to the surface. The results are explained in terms of differential erosion of crystal planes modified by the presence of pre-existing and irradiation induces extended defects. (orig.)

  6. Temperature effects on drift of suspended single-domain particles induced by the Magnus force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisov, S. I.; Lyutyy, T. V.; Reva, V. V.; Yermolenko, A. S.

    2018-03-01

    We study the temperature dependence of the drift velocity of single-domain ferromagnetic particles induced by the Magnus force in a dilute suspension. A set of stochastic equations describing the translational and rotational dynamics of particles is derived, and the particle drift velocity that depends on components of the average particle magnetization is introduced. The Fokker-Planck equation for the probability density of magnetization orientations is solved analytically in the limit of strong thermal fluctuations for both the planar rotor and general models. Using these solutions, we calculate the drift velocity and show that the out-of-plane fluctuations of magnetization, which are not accounted for in the planar rotor model, play an important role. In the general case of arbitrary fluctuations, we investigate the temperature dependence of the drift velocity by numerically simulating a set of effective stochastic differential equations for the magnetization dynamics.

  7. Evaluation method for acoustic trapping performance by tracking motion of trapped microparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hae Gyun; Ham Kim, Hyung; Yoon, Changhan

    2018-05-01

    We report a method to evaluate the performances of a single-beam acoustic tweezer using a high-frequency ultrasound transducer. The motion of a microparticle trapped by a 45-MHz single-element transducer was captured and analyzed to deduce the magnitude of trapping force. In the proposed method, the motion of a trapped microparticle was analyzed from a series of microscopy images to compute trapping force; thus, no additional equipment such as microfluidics is required. The method could be used to estimate the effective trapping force in an acoustic tweezer experiment to assess cell membrane deformability by attaching a microbead to the surface of a cell and tracking the motion of the trapped bead, which is similar to a bead-based assay that uses optical tweezers. The results showed that the trapping force increased with increasing acoustic intensity and duty factor, but the force eventually reached a plateau at a higher acoustic intensity. They demonstrated that this method could be used as a simple tool to evaluate the performance and to optimize the operating conditions of acoustic tweezers.

  8. Quantum information processing with trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeffner, H.; Haensel, W.; Rapol, U.; Koerber, T.; Benhelm, J.; Riebe, M.; Chek-al-Kar, D.; Schmidt-Kaler, F.; Becher, C.; Roos, C.; Blatt, R.

    2005-01-01

    Single Ca + ions and crystals of Ca + ions are confined in a linear Paul trap and are investigated for quantum information processing. Here we report on recent experimental advancements towards a quantum computer with such a system. Laser-cooled trapped ions are ideally suited systems for the investigation and implementation of quantum information processing as one can gain almost complete control over their internal and external degrees of freedom. The combination of a Paul type ion trap with laser cooling leads to unique properties of trapped cold ions, such as control of the motional state down to the zero-point of the trapping potential, a high degree of isolation from the environment and thus a very long time available for manipulations and interactions at the quantum level. The very same properties make single trapped atoms and ions well suited for storing quantum information in long lived internal states, e.g. by encoding a quantum bit (qubit) of information within the coherent superposition of the S 1/2 ground state and the metastable D 5/2 excited state of Ca + . Recently we have achieved the implementation of simple algorithms with up to 3 qubits on an ion-trap quantum computer. We will report on methods to implement single qubit rotations, the realization of a two-qubit universal quantum gate (Cirac-Zoller CNOT-gate), the deterministic generation of multi-particle entangled states (GHZ- and W-states), their full tomographic reconstruction, the realization of deterministic quantum teleportation, its quantum process tomography and the encoding of quantum information in decoherence-free subspaces with coherence times exceeding 20 seconds. (author)

  9. Investigation of HIV-1 infected and uninfected cells using the optical trapping technique

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ombinda-Lemboumba, Saturnin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Optical trapping has emerged as an essential tool for manipulating single biological material and performing sophisticated spectroscopy analysis on individual cell. The optical trapping technique has been used to grab and immobilize cells from a...

  10. Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) co-transcriptional scanning at single-molecule resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senavirathne, Gayan; Bertram, Jeffrey G.; Jaszczur, Malgorzata; Chaurasiya, Kathy R.; Pham, Phuong; Mak, Chi H.; Goodman, Myron F.; Rueda, David

    2015-12-01

    Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) generates antibody diversity in B cells by initiating somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) during transcription of immunoglobulin variable (IgV) and switch region (IgS) DNA. Using single-molecule FRET, we show that AID binds to transcribed dsDNA and translocates unidirectionally in concert with RNA polymerase (RNAP) on moving transcription bubbles, while increasing the fraction of stalled bubbles. AID scans randomly when constrained in an 8 nt model bubble. When unconstrained on single-stranded (ss) DNA, AID moves in random bidirectional short slides/hops over the entire molecule while remaining bound for ~5 min. Our analysis distinguishes dynamic scanning from static ssDNA creasing. That AID alone can track along with RNAP during transcription and scan within stalled transcription bubbles suggests a mechanism by which AID can initiate SHM and CSR when properly regulated, yet when unregulated can access non-Ig genes and cause cancer.

  11. Kink structures induced in nickel-based single crystal superalloys by high-Z element migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Fei; Zhang, Jianxin [Key Laboratory for Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Mao, Shengcheng [Institute of Microstructure and Property of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Jiang, Ying [Center of Electron Microscopy and State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Feng, Qiang [National Center for Materials Service Safety, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Shen, Zhenju; Li, Jixue; Zhang, Ze [Center of Electron Microscopy and State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Han, Xiaodong [Institute of Microstructure and Property of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China)

    2015-01-05

    Highlights: • Innovative kink structures generate at the γ/γ′ interfaces in the crept superalloy. • Clusters of heavy elements congregate at the apex of the kinks. • Dislocation core absorbs hexagonal structural high-Z elements. - Abstract: Here, we investigate a new type of kink structure that is found at γ/γ′ interfaces in nickel-based single crystal superalloys. We studied these structures at the atomic and elemental level using aberration corrected high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM). The core of the dislocation absorbs high-Z elements (i.e., Co and Re) that adopt hexagonal arrangements, and it extrudes elements (i.e., Ni and Al) that adopt face centered cubic (fcc) structures. High-Z elements (i.e., Ta and W) and Cr, which is a low-Z element, are stabilized in body centered cubic (bcc) arrangements; Cr tends to behave like Re. High-Z elements, which migrate and adopt a hexagonal structure, induce kink formation at γ/γ′ interfaces. This process must be analyzed to fully understand the kinetics and dynamics of creep in nickel-based single crystal superalloys.

  12. Few single nucleotide variations in exomes of human cord blood induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Jun Su

    Full Text Available The effect of the cellular reprogramming process per se on mutation load remains unclear. To address this issue, we performed whole exome sequencing analysis of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs reprogrammed from human cord blood (CB CD34(+ cells. Cells from a single donor and improved lentiviral vectors for high-efficiency (2-14% reprogramming were used to examine the effects of three different combinations of reprogramming factors: OCT4 and SOX2 (OS, OS and ZSCAN4 (OSZ, OS and MYC and KLF4 (OSMK. Five clones from each group were subject to whole exome sequencing analysis. We identified 14, 11, and 9 single nucleotide variations (SNVs, in exomes, including untranslated regions (UTR, in the five clones of OSMK, OS, and OSZ iPSC lines. Only 8, 7, and 4 of these, respectively, were protein-coding mutations. An average of 1.3 coding mutations per CB iPSC line is remarkably lower than previous studies using fibroblasts and low-efficiency reprogramming approaches. These data demonstrate that point nucleotide mutations during cord blood reprogramming are negligible and that the inclusion of genome stabilizers like ZSCAN4 during reprogramming may further decrease reprogramming-associated mutations. Our findings provide evidence that CB is a superior source of cells for iPSC banking.

  13. Gamma radiation-induced Impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis, comparison of single and fractionated dose regimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoshbin khoshnazar, A. R; Jahanshahi, M; Azami, N. S

    2012-01-01

    Radiation therapy of the brain is associated with many consequences, including cognitive disorders. Pathogenesis of radiation induced cognitive disorder is not clear, but reduction of neurogenesis in hippocampus may be an underlying reason. 24 adult male rats entered to study. Radiation absorbed dose to midbrain was 10 Gy, delivered by routine cobalt radiotherapy machine which its output was measured 115.24 cGy/min. The rats were divided in four groups of sixes, including groups of control, single fraction 10 Gy, fractionated 10 Gy and finally anaesthesia sham group. Number of pyramidal nerve cells was counted in two regions of hippocampus formation (CA1 and CA3). The radiation could reduce the number of cells in two regions of hippocampus significantly (p=0.000). It seems fractionated 10 Gy irradiation to more efficient than single fraction, while role of anaesthesia drug should be cautiously assessed. Moreover the rate of neurogenesis reduction was determined the same in these regions of hippocampus meaning the same radiosensitivity of cells

  14. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Based on Single Beam Splitting and Geometric Configuration for Effective Signal Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Lin, Qingyu; Ding, Yu; Tian, Di; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-01-01

    A new laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) based on single-beam-splitting (SBS) and proper optical geometric configuration has been initially explored in this work for effective signal enhancement. In order to improve the interaction efficiency of laser energy with the ablated material, a laser beam operated in pulse mode was divided into two streams to ablate/excite the target sample in different directions instead of the conventional one beam excitation in single pulse LIBS (SP-LIBS). In spatial configuration, the laser beam geometry plays an important role in the emission signal enhancement. Thus, an adjustable geometric configuration with variable incident angle between the two splitted laser beams was constructed for achieving maximum signal enhancement. With the optimized angles of 60° and 70° for Al and Cu atomic emission lines at 396.15 nm and 324.75 nm respectively, about 5.6- and 4.8-folds signal enhancements were achieved for aluminum alloy and copper alloy samples compared to SP-LIBS. Furthermore, the temporal analysis, in which the intensity of atomic lines in SP-LIBS decayed at least ten times faster than the SBS-LIBS, proved that the energy coupling efficiency of SBS-LIBS was significantly higher than that of SP-LIBS. PMID:25557721

  15. Temperature induced Spin Switching in SmFeO3 Single Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shixun; Zhao, Huazhi; Kang, Baojuan; Zhang, Jincang; Ren, Wei

    2014-08-01

    The prospect of controlling the magnetization (M) of a material is of great importance from the viewpoints of fundamental physics and future applications of emerging spintronics. A class of rare-earth orthoferrites RFeO3 (R is rare-earth element) materials exhibit striking physical properties of spin switching and magnetization reversal induced by temperature and/or applied magnetic field. Furthermore, due to the novel magnetic, magneto-optic and multiferroic properties etc., RFeO3 materials are attracting more and more interests in recent years. We have prepared and investigated a prototype of RFeO3 materials, namely SmFeO3 single-crystal. And we report magnetic measurements upon both field cooling (FC) and zero-field cooling (ZFC) of the sample, as a function of temperature and applied magnetic field. The central findings of this study include that the magnetization of single-crystal SmFeO3 can be switched by temperature, and tuning the magnitude of applied magnetic field allows us to realize such spin switching even at room temperature.

  16. BEND-INDUCED LOSSES IN A SINGLE-MODE MICROSTRUCTURED FIBER WITH A LARGE CORE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. A. Gatchin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A study of bend-induced losses in a silica-based single-mode microstructured fiber with a core diameter ranging from 20 to 35 microns and increased relative air content in the holey cladding has been conducted. With the use of the equivalent step-index profile method in approximation of waveguide parameters of microstructured fiber (normalized frequency and normalized transverse attenuation constant the effect of bending on the spectral position of the fundamentalmode short-wavelength leakage boundary has been analyzed. Upon measurement of spectral characteristics of attenuation in the considered fibers good accordance of numerical and experimental data has been found out. It is shown that increase of the air content in the holey cladding leads to expansion of the mentioned boundary to lower wavelengths for the value from 150 to 800 nm depending on the core size and bending conditions. A single-transverse-mode propagation is achieved on fiber length of 5-10 meters due to a substantial difference in losses of fundamental and higher-order guided modes attained by bending. Optical losses in all studied samples are less than 10 dB/km at the wavelength λ = 1550 nm. The results of the study can be applied in the design of high-power laser systems having such basic requirements as a relatively large mode spot and high beam quality.

  17. Single-step fabrication of electrodes with controlled nanostructured surface roughness using optically-induced electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, N.; Li, M.; Liu, L.; Yang, Y.; Mai, J.; Pu, H.; Sun, Y.; Li, W. J.

    2018-02-01

    The customized fabrication of microelectrodes from gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has attracted much attention due to their numerous applications in chemistry and biomedical engineering, such as for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and as catalyst sites for electrochemistry. Herein, we present a novel optically-induced electrodeposition (OED) method for rapidly fabricating gold electrodes which are also surface-modified with nanoparticles in one single step. The electrodeposition mechanism, with respect to the applied AC voltage signal and the elapsed deposition time, on the resulting morphology and particle sizes was investigated. The results from SEM and AFM analysis demonstrated that 80-200 nm gold particles can be formed on the surface of the gold electrodes. Simultaneously, both the size of the nanoparticles and the roughness of the fabricated electrodes can be regulated by the deposition time. Compared to state-of-the-art methods for fabricating microelectrodes with AuNPs, such as nano-seed-mediated growth and conventional electrodeposition, this OED technique has several advantages including: (1) electrode fabrication and surface modification using nanoparticles are completed in a single step, eliminating the need for prefabricating micro electrodes; (2) the patterning of electrodes is defined using a digitally-customized, projected optical image rather than using fixed physical masks; and (3) both the fabrication and surface modification processes are rapid, and the entire fabrication process only requires less than 6 s.

  18. Current-induced magnetic switching of a single molecule magnet on a spin valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Zheng-Chuan; Zheng, Qing-Rong; Zhu, Zheng-Gang; Su, Gang

    2015-01-01

    The current-induced magnetic switching of a single-molecule magnet (SMM) attached on the central region of a spin valve is explored, and the condition for the switching current is derived. Electrons flowing through the spin valve will interact with the SMM via the s–d exchange interaction, producing the spin accumulation that satisfies the spin diffusion equation. We further describe the spin motion of the SMM by a Heisenberg-like equation. Based on the linear stability analysis, we obtain the critical current from two coupled equations. The results of the critical current versus the external magnetic field indicate that one can manipulate the magnetic state of the SMM by an external magnetic field. - Highlights: • We theoretically study the current-induced magnetic switching of the SMM. • We describe the spin motion of the SMM by a Heisenberg-like equation. • We describe the spin accumulation by the spin diffusion equation. • We obtain the critical current by the linear stability analysis. • Our approach can be easily extended to other SMMs

  19. Current-induced magnetic switching of a single molecule magnet on a spin valve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiao [Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics and Computational Materials Physics Laboratory, School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, Zheng-Chuan, E-mail: wangzc@ucas.ac.cn [Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics and Computational Materials Physics Laboratory, School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zheng, Qing-Rong [Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics and Computational Materials Physics Laboratory, School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhu, Zheng-Gang [Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics and Computational Materials Physics Laboratory, School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); School of Electronics, Electric and Communication Engineering, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Su, Gang, E-mail: gsu@ucas.ac.cn [Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics and Computational Materials Physics Laboratory, School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2015-04-17

    The current-induced magnetic switching of a single-molecule magnet (SMM) attached on the central region of a spin valve is explored, and the condition for the switching current is derived. Electrons flowing through the spin valve will interact with the SMM via the s–d exchange interaction, producing the spin accumulation that satisfies the spin diffusion equation. We further describe the spin motion of the SMM by a Heisenberg-like equation. Based on the linear stability analysis, we obtain the critical current from two coupled equations. The results of the critical current versus the external magnetic field indicate that one can manipulate the magnetic state of the SMM by an external magnetic field. - Highlights: • We theoretically study the current-induced magnetic switching of the SMM. • We describe the spin motion of the SMM by a Heisenberg-like equation. • We describe the spin accumulation by the spin diffusion equation. • We obtain the critical current by the linear stability analysis. • Our approach can be easily extended to other SMMs.

  20. Modelling and numerical simulation of vortex induced vibrations of single cylinder or cylinder arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jus, Y.

    2011-01-01

    This research thesis fits into the frame of researches achieved in the nuclear field in order to optimize the predictive abilities of sizing models of nuclear plant components. It more precisely addresses the modelling of the action exerted by the flowing fluid and the induced feedback by the structure dynamics. The objective is herein to investigate the interaction between the turbulence at the wall vicinity and the effects of non-conservative and potentially destabilizing unsteady coupling. The peculiar case of a single cylinder in infinite environment, and submitted to a transverse flow, is studied statically and then dynamically. The influence of flow regimes on dynamic response is characterized, and the quantification of fluid-structure interaction energy is assessed. The author then addresses the case of an array of cylinders, and highlights the contribution of three-dimensional macro-simulations for the analysis of flow-induced structure vibrations in subcritical regime within a High Performance Calculation (HPC) framework, and the interest of a CFD/CSM (computational fluid dynamics/computational structure mechanics) coupling in the case of turbulent flows in an industrial environment

  1. Single Silver Nanoparticle Instillation Induced Early and Persisting Moderate Cortical Damage in Rat Kidneys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Roda

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The potential toxic effects of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs, administered by a single intratracheal instillation (i.t, was assessed in a rat model using commercial physico-chemical characterized nanosilver. Histopathological changes, overall toxic response and oxidative stress (kidney and plasma protein carbonylation, paralleled by ultrastructural observations (TEM, were evaluated to examine renal responses 7 and 28 days after i.t. application of a low AgNP dose (50 µg/rat, compared to an equivalent dose of ionic silver (7 µg AgNO3/rat. The AgNPs caused moderate renal histopathological and ultrastructural alteration, in a region-specific manner, being the cortex the most affected area. Notably, the bulk AgNO3, caused similar adverse effects with a slightly more marked extent, also triggering apoptotic phenomena. Specifically, 7 days after exposure to both AgNPs and AgNO3, dilatation of the intercapillary and peripheral Bowman’s space was observed, together with glomerular shrinkage. At day 28, these effects still persisted after both treatments, accompanied by an additional injury involving the vascular component of the mesangium, with interstitial micro-hemorrhages. Neither AgNPs nor AgNO3 induced oxidative stress effects in kidneys and plasma, at either time point. The AgNP-induced moderate renal effects indicate that, despite their benefits, novel AgNPs employed in consumer products need exhaustive investigation to ensure public health safety.

  2. Single-molecule FRET unveils induced-fit mechanism for substrate selectivity in flap endonuclease 1

    KAUST Repository

    Rashid, Fahad

    2017-02-23

    Human flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) and related structure-specific 5\\'nucleases precisely identify and incise aberrant DNA structures during replication, repair and recombination to avoid genomic instability. Yet, it is unclear how the 5\\'nuclease mechanisms of DNA distortion and protein ordering robustly mediate efficient and accurate substrate recognition and catalytic selectivity. Here, single-molecule sub-millisecond and millisecond analyses of FEN1 reveal a protein-DNA induced-fit mechanism that efficiently verifies substrate and suppresses off-target cleavage. FEN1 sculpts DNA with diffusion-limited kinetics to test DNA substrate. This DNA distortion mutually \\'locks\\' protein and DNA conformation and enables substrate verification with extreme precision. Strikingly, FEN1 never misses cleavage of its cognate substrate while blocking probable formation of catalytically competent interactions with noncognate substrates and fostering their pre-incision dissociation. These findings establish FEN1 has practically perfect precision and that separate control of induced-fit substrate recognition sets up the catalytic selectivity of the nuclease active site for genome stability.

  3. Long-term Evaluation of Radiation-Induced Optic Neuropathy After Single-Fraction Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leavitt, Jacqueline A.; Stafford, Scott L.; Link, Michael J.; Pollock, Bruce E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the long-term risk of radiation-induced optic neuropathy (RION) in patients having single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for benign skull base tumors. Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of 222 patients having Gamma Knife radiosurgery for benign tumors adjacent to the anterior visual pathway (AVP) between 1991 and 1999. Excluded were patients with prior or concurrent external beam radiation therapy or SRS. One hundred twenty-nine patients (58%) had undergone previous surgery. Tumor types included confirmed World Health Organization grade 1 or presumed cavernous sinus meningioma (n=143), pituitary adenoma (n=72), and craniopharyngioma (n=7). The maximum dose to the AVP was ≤8.0 Gy (n=126), 8.1-10.0 Gy (n=39), 10.1-12.0 Gy (n=47), and >12 Gy (n=10). Results: The mean clinical and imaging follow-up periods were 83 and 123 months, respectively. One patient (0.5%) who received a maximum radiation dose of 12.8 Gy to the AVP developed unilateral blindness 18 months after SRS. The chance of RION according to the maximum radiation dose received by the AVP was 0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0-3.6%), 0 (95% CI 0-10.7%), 0 (95% CI 0-9.0%), and 10% (95% CI 0-43.0%) for patients receiving ≤8 Gy, 8.1-10.0 Gy, 10.1-12.0 Gy, and >12 Gy, respectively. The overall risk of RION in patients receiving >8 Gy to the AVP was 1.0% (95% CI 0-6.2%). Conclusions: The risk of RION after single-fraction SRS in patients with benign skull base tumors who have no prior radiation exposure is very low if the maximum dose to the AVP is ≤12 Gy. Physicians performing single-fraction SRS should remain cautious when treating lesions adjacent to the AVP, especially when the maximum dose exceeds 10 Gy

  4. Long-term Evaluation of Radiation-Induced Optic Neuropathy After Single-Fraction Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leavitt, Jacqueline A., E-mail: leavitt.jacqueline@mayo.edu [Department of Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Stafford, Scott L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Link, Michael J. [Department of Neurosurgery, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Pollock, Bruce E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Department of Neurosurgery, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the long-term risk of radiation-induced optic neuropathy (RION) in patients having single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for benign skull base tumors. Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of 222 patients having Gamma Knife radiosurgery for benign tumors adjacent to the anterior visual pathway (AVP) between 1991 and 1999. Excluded were patients with prior or concurrent external beam radiation therapy or SRS. One hundred twenty-nine patients (58%) had undergone previous surgery. Tumor types included confirmed World Health Organization grade 1 or presumed cavernous sinus meningioma (n=143), pituitary adenoma (n=72), and craniopharyngioma (n=7). The maximum dose to the AVP was ≤8.0 Gy (n=126), 8.1-10.0 Gy (n=39), 10.1-12.0 Gy (n=47), and >12 Gy (n=10). Results: The mean clinical and imaging follow-up periods were 83 and 123 months, respectively. One patient (0.5%) who received a maximum radiation dose of 12.8 Gy to the AVP developed unilateral blindness 18 months after SRS. The chance of RION according to the maximum radiation dose received by the AVP was 0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0-3.6%), 0 (95% CI 0-10.7%), 0 (95% CI 0-9.0%), and 10% (95% CI 0-43.0%) for patients receiving ≤8 Gy, 8.1-10.0 Gy, 10.1-12.0 Gy, and >12 Gy, respectively. The overall risk of RION in patients receiving >8 Gy to the AVP was 1.0% (95% CI 0-6.2%). Conclusions: The risk of RION after single-fraction SRS in patients with benign skull base tumors who have no prior radiation exposure is very low if the maximum dose to the AVP is ≤12 Gy. Physicians performing single-fraction SRS should remain cautious when treating lesions adjacent to the AVP, especially when the maximum dose exceeds 10 Gy.

  5. Carboplatin enhances the production and persistence of radiation-induced DNA single-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, L.; Douple, E.B.; O'Hara, J.A.; Wang, H.J.

    1995-01-01

    Fluorometric analysis of DNA unwinding and alkaline elution were used to investigate the production and persistence of DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs) in Chinese hamster V79 and xrs-5 cells treated with the chemotherapeutic agent carboplatin in combination with radiation. Carboplatin was administered to cells before irradiation in hypoxic conditions, or the drug was added immediately after irradiation during the postirradiation recovery period in air. The results of DNA unwinding studies suggest that carboplatin enhances the production of radiation-induced SSBs in hypoxic V79 cells and xrs-5 cells by a factor of 1.86 and 1.83, respectively, when combined with radiation compared to the SSBs produced by irradiation alone. Carboplatin alone did not produce a measureable number of SSBs. Alkaline elution profiles also indicated that the rate of elution of SSBs was higher in cells treated with the carboplatin is present after irradiation and during the postirradiation recovery period, the rejoining of radiation-induced SSBs by a factor of 1.46 in V79 cells with 20 Gy irradiation and by a factor of 2.02 in xrs-5 cells with 20 Gy irradiation. When carboplatin is present after irradiation and during the postirradiation recovery period, the rejoining of radiation-induced SSBs is inhibited during this postirradiation incubation period (radiopotentiation) with a relative inhibition factor at 1 h postirradiation of 1.25 in V79 cells and 1.15 in xrs-5 cells. An increased production and persistence of SSBs resulting from the interaction of carboplatin with radiation may be an important step in the mechanism responsible for the potentiated cell killing previously from studies in animal tumors and in cultured cells. 31 refs., 7 figs

  6. Decoded fMRI neurofeedback can induce bidirectional confidence changes within single participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, Aurelio; Amano, Kaoru; Koizumi, Ai; Lau, Hakwan; Kawato, Mitsuo

    2017-04-01

    Neurofeedback studies using real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) have recently incorporated the multi-voxel pattern decoding approach, allowing for fMRI to serve as a tool to manipulate fine-grained neural activity embedded in voxel patterns. Because of its tremendous potential for clinical applications, certain questions regarding decoded neurofeedback (DecNef) must be addressed. Specifically, can the same participants learn to induce neural patterns in opposite directions in different sessions? If so, how does previous learning affect subsequent induction effectiveness? These questions are critical because neurofeedback effects can last for months, but the short- to mid-term dynamics of such effects are unknown. Here we employed a within-subjects design, where participants underwent two DecNef training sessions to induce behavioural changes of opposing directionality (up or down regulation of perceptual confidence in a visual discrimination task), with the order of training counterbalanced across participants. Behavioral results indicated that the manipulation was strongly influenced by the order and the directionality of neurofeedback training. We applied nonlinear mathematical modeling to parametrize four main consequences of DecNef: main effect of change in confidence, strength of down-regulation of confidence relative to up-regulation, maintenance of learning effects, and anterograde learning interference. Modeling results revealed that DecNef successfully induced bidirectional confidence changes in different sessions within single participants. Furthermore, the effect of up- compared to down-regulation was more prominent, and confidence changes (regardless of the direction) were largely preserved even after a week-long interval. Lastly, the effect of the second session was markedly diminished as compared to the effect of the first session, indicating strong anterograde learning interference. These results are interpreted in the framework

  7. EBIT trapping program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, S.R.; Beck, B.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Church, D.; DeWitt, D.; Knapp, D.K.; Marrs, R.E.; Schneider, D.; Schweikhard, L.

    1993-01-01

    The LLNL electron beam ion trap provides the world's only source of stationary highly charged ions up to bare U. This unique capability makes many new atomic and nuclear physics experiments possible. (orig.)

  8. Microfabricated Waveguide Atom Traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    A nanoscale , microfabricated waveguide structure can in - principle be used to trap atoms in well - defined locations and enable strong photon-atom interactions . A neutral - atom platform based on this microfabrication technology will be prealigned , which is especially important for quantum - control applications. At present, there is still no reported demonstration of evanescent - field atom trapping using a microfabricated waveguide structure. We described the capabilities established by our team for future development of the waveguide atom - trapping technology at SNL and report our studies to overcome the technical challenges of loading cold atoms into the waveguide atom traps, efficient and broadband optical coupling to a waveguide, and the waveguide material for high - power optical transmission. From the atomic - physics and the waveguide modeling, w e have shown that a square nano-waveguide can be utilized t o achieve better atomic spin squeezing than using a nanofiber for first time.

  9. Dynamic tunneling force microscopy for characterizing electronic trap states in non-conductive surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, R.; Williams, C. C., E-mail: clayton@physics.utah.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Dynamic tunneling force microscopy (DTFM) is a scanning probe technique for real space mapping and characterization of individual electronic trap states in non-conductive films with atomic scale spatial resolution. The method is based upon the quantum mechanical tunneling of a single electron back and forth between a metallic atomic force microscopy tip and individual trap states in completely non-conducting surface. This single electron shuttling is measured by detecting the electrostatic force induced on the probe tip at the shuttling frequency. In this paper, the physical basis for the DTFM method is unfolded through a physical model and a derivation of the dynamic tunneling signal as a function of several experimental parameters is shown. Experimental data are compared with the theoretical simulations, showing quantitative consistency and verifying the physical model used. The experimental system is described and representative imaging results are shown.

  10. Search For Trapped Antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, Gorm B.; Baquero-Ruiz, Marcelo; Bertsche, William; Bowe, Paul D.; Bray, Crystal C.; Butler, Eoin; Cesar, Claudio L.; Chapman, Steven; Charlton, Michael; Fajans, Joel; Friesen, Tim; Fujiwara, Makoto C.; Gill, David R.; Hangst, Jeffrey S.; Hardy, Walter N.; Hayano, Ryugo S.; Hayden, Michael E.; Humphries, Andrew J.; Hydomako, Richard; Jonsell, Svante; Jorgensen, Lars V.; Kurchaninov, Lenoid; Lambo, Ricardo; Madsen, Niels; Menary, Scott; Nolan, Paul; Olchanski, Konstantin; Olin, Art; Povilus, Alexander; Pusa, Petteri; Robicheaux, Francis; Sarid, Eli; Nasr, Sarah Seif El; Silveira, Daniel M.; So, Chukman; Storey, James W.; Thompson, Robert I.; van der Werf, Dirk P.; Wilding, Dean; Wurtele, Jonathan S.; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of an experiment to search for trapped antihydrogen atoms with the ALPHA antihydrogen trap at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator. Sensitive diagnostics of the temperatures, sizes, and densities of the trapped antiproton and positron plasmas have been developed, which in turn permitted development of techniques to precisely and reproducibly control the initial experimental parameters. The use of a position-sensitive annihilation vertex detector, together with the capability of controllably quenching the superconducting magnetic minimum trap, enabled us to carry out a high-sensitivity and low-background search for trapped synthesised antihydrogen atoms. We aim to identify the annihilations of antihydrogen atoms held for at least 130 ms in the trap before being released over ~30 ms. After a three-week experimental run in 2009 involving mixing of 10^7 antiprotons with 1.3 10^9 positrons to produce 6 10^5 antihydrogen atoms, we have identified six antiproton annihilation events that are consist...

  11. Evaluation of double-decker traps for emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Therese M; McCullough, Deborah G; Anulewicz, Andrea C

    2011-04-01

    Improved detection tools are needed for the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive forest insect from Asia that has killed millions of ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees in North America since its discovery in Michigan in 2002. We evaluated attraction of adult A. planipennis to artificial traps incorporating visual (e.g., height, color, silhouette) and olfactory cues (e.g., host volatiles) at field sites in Michigan. We developed a double-decker trap consisting of a 3-m-tall polyvinyl pipe with two purple prisms attached near the top. In 2006, we compared A. planipennis attraction to double-decker traps baited with various combinations of manuka oil (containing sesquiterpenes present in ash bark), a blend of four ash leaf volatiles (leaf blend), and a rough texture to simulate bark. Significantly more A. planipennis were captured per trap when traps without the rough texture were baited with the leaf blend and manuka oil lures than on traps with texture and manuka oil but no leaf blend. In 2007, we also tested single prism traps set 1.5 m above ground and tower traps, similar to double-decker traps but 6 m tall. Double-decker traps baited with the leaf blend and manuka oil, with or without the addition of ash leaf and bark extracts, captured significantly more A. planipennis than similarly baited single prism traps, tower traps, or unbaited double-decker traps. A baited double-decker trap captured A. planipennis at a field site that was not previously known to be infested, representing the first detection event using artificial traps and lures. In 2008, we compared purple or green double-decker traps, single prisms suspended 3-5 m above ground in the ash canopy (canopy traps), and large flat purple traps (billboard traps). Significantly more A. planipennis were captured in purple versus green traps, baited traps versus unbaited traps, and double-decker versus canopy traps, whereas billboard traps were intermediate. At sites

  12. Improved atom number with a dual color magneto—optical trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Qiang; Luo Xin-Yu; Gao Kui-Yi; Wang Xiao-Rui; Wang Ru-Quan; Chen Dong-Min

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel dual color magneto—optical trap (MOT), which uses two sets of overlapping laser beams to cool and trap 87 Rb atoms. The volume of cold cloud in the dual color MOT is strongly dependent on the frequency difference of the laser beams and can be significantly larger than that in the normal MOT with single frequency MOT beams. Our experiment shows that the dual color MOT has the same loading rate as the normal MOT, but much longer loading time, leading to threefold increase in the number of trapped atoms. This indicates that the larger number is caused by reduced light induced loss. The dual color MOT is very useful in experiments where both high vacuum level and large atom number are required, such as single chamber quantum memory and Bose—Einstein condensation (BEC) experiments. Compared to the popular dark spontaneous-force optical trap (dark SPOT) technique, our approach is technically simpler and more suitable to low power laser systems. (rapid communication)

  13. Performance and regeneration of a pellet-packed-bed diesel-particulate trap; Ryutai jutenso diesel biryushi trap no seino oyobi saisei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shioji, M; Nakai, S; Ikegami, M [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Hori, Y [Yamaha Motor Co. Ltd., Shizuoka (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    This paper demonstrates with the feasibility of a pellet-packed bed for trapping diesel particulates. After making pellets loose from the packed condition, regeneration is established by a circulation of pellets in the trap and collected particulates are efficiently dropped out through the wire mesh on the bottom of the trap. An experimental trap with the pellet-circulation system using a spiral feeder is tested on a single-cylinder test engine to show the trap and regeneration efficiencies. In addition, the condition of pellet circulation is observed using the transparent cylinder, based on which the design of pellet and trap sizes are discussed. 6 refs., 10 figs.

  14. Inducing Strong Non-Linearities in a Phonon Trapping Quartz Bulk Acoustic Wave Resonator Coupled to a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Goryachev

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A quartz Bulk Acoustic Wave resonator is designed to coherently trap phonons in such a way that they are well confined and immune to suspension losses so they exhibit extremely high acoustic Q-factors at low temperature, with Q × f products of order 10 18 Hz. In this work we couple such a resonator to a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID amplifier and investigate effects in the strong signal regime. Both parallel and series connection topologies of the system are investigated. The study reveals significant non-Duffing response that is associated with the nonlinear characteristics of Josephson junctions. The nonlinearity provides quasi-periodic structure of the spectrum in both incident power and frequency. The result gives an insight into the open loop behaviour of a future Cryogenic Quartz Oscillator in the strong signal regime.

  15. A Rotating-Bears Optical Dipole Trap for Cold Aatoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, N.; Ozeri, R.; Khaykovich, L.; Davidson, N.

    1999-01-01

    In the last few years, several optical dipole traps for cold atoms were demonstrated and used to study cold atomic collisions, long atomic coherence times and quantum collective effects. Blue-detuned dipole traps, where repulsive light forces confines atoms mostly in dark, offer long storage, and photon-scattering times, combined with strong confinement forces. Unfortunately, such blue-detuned dipole traps involve complicated light intensity distributions that require either multiple laser beams or complicated phase elements. Here, we propose and demonstrate a novel configuration for a single-beam blue-detuned dipole trap, which enables larger trapping volume, and fast temporal changes in the trap size and shape. Our trap consists of a tightly-focused laser beam which is rapidly rotated (with rotation frequency up to 400 khz) with two orthogonal acousto optical scanners. For very high rotation frequencies the atoms feel a time-averaged static dipole potential. Therefore, when the radius of rotation is larger than the beam size, a dark volume which is completely surrounded by light is obtained around the focal region. By changing the rotation radius and the trapping laser intensity and detuning, the trap dimensions and oscillation frequency could be changed over a large parameter range. In particular trap diameters were changed between 50 to 220 microns and trap length was changed between 3.5 to 16 mm. ∼10 6 atoms were loaded into the rotating-beam dipole trap from a magneto optical trap. The density of the trapped atoms was 4x10 10 atoms/cm 3 ,their temperature was -6 pK. and the trap (1/e) lifetime was 0.65 sec, limited by collisions with background atoms. When the rotation frequency was decreased below the oscillation frequency of the atoms in the trap, the trap became unstable, and a sharp reduction of the trap lifetime was observed, in agreement with our theoretical analysis. Finally, we demonstrated adiabatic compression of atoms in the trap by decreasing

  16. Brilliant glyconanocapsules for trapping of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xibo; Sivignon, Adeline; Alcouffe, Pierre; Burdin, Béatrice; Favre-Bonté, Sabine; Bilyy, Rostyslav; Barnich, Nicolas; Fleury, Etienne; Ganachaud, François; Bernard, Julien

    2015-08-28

    Nanoprecipitation of miglyol into droplets surrounded by a functional glycopolymer generates nanocapsules of biointerest. Fluorophores are trapped in situ or post-grafted onto the crosslinked polymer shell for efficient imaging. The resulting colloids induce aggregation of bacteria through strong specific interactions and promote their facile removal.

  17. Brilliant glyconanocapsules for trapping of bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Xibo; Sivignon, Adeline; Alcouffe, Pierre; Burdin, Béatrice; Favre-Bonté, Sabine; Bilyy, Rostyslav; Barnich, Nicolas; Fleury, Etienne; Ganachaud, François; Bernard, Julien

    2015-01-01

    Nanoprecipitation of miglyol into droplets surrounded by a functional glycopolymer generates nanocapsules of biointerest. Fluorophores are trapped in situ or post-grafted onto the crosslinked polymer shell for efficient imaging. The resulting colloids induce aggregation of bacteria through strong specific interactions and promote their facile removal.

  18. Frequency and characteristics of induced abortion among married and single women in São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza e Silva, Rebeca de; Vieira, Elisabeth Meloni

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the results of a study in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, aimed at estimating the frequency of induced abortion among women 15 to 49 years of age. The objective was to characterize the occurrence of induced abortion by comparing the ideal number of children, age, and contraceptive use between married and single women. Based on random sampling, 1,749 interviews were held, including 764 married women, 658 single women, and 327 with other marital status. The analysis included: mean number of abortions per woman by analysis of variance and proportions of abortions and pregnancy, using the chi-square test. The mean abortion rate for married women (45 per thousand) did not differ statistically from that of single women. However, the pregnancy rate was much lower in single women, and when single women became pregnant they used abortion more frequently; while fewer than 2% of pregnancies in married women ended in induced abortions, among single women the abortion rate exceeded 18%. Therefore, the priority in the reproductive health field should be to invest in the supply and dissemination of appropriate contraceptive methods for women's early sexually active life.

  19. Measurement of muon neutrino and antineutrino induced single neutral pion production cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Colin E. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Elucidating the nature of neutrino oscillation continues to be a goal in the vanguard of the efforts of physics experiment. As neutrino oscillation searches seek an increasingly elusive signal, a thorough understanding of the possible backgrounds becomes ever more important. Measurements of neutrino-nucleus interaction cross sections are key to this understanding. Searches for νμ → νe oscillation - a channel that may yield insight into the vanishingly small mixing parameter θ13, CP violation, and the neutrino mass hierarchy - are particularly susceptible to contamination from neutral current single π0 (NC 1π0) production. Unfortunately, the available data concerning NC 1π0 production are limited in scope and statistics. Without satisfactory constraints, theoretical models of NC 1π0 production yield substantially differing predictions in the critical Eν ~ 1 GeV regime. Additional investigation of this interaction can ameliorate the current deficiencies. The Mini Booster Neutrino Experiment (MiniBooNE) is a short-baseline neutrino oscillation search operating at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). While the oscillation search is the principal charge of the MiniBooNE collaboration, the extensive data (~ 106 neutrino events) offer a rich resource with which to conduct neutrino cross section measurements. This work concerns the measurement of both neutrino and antineutrino NC 1π0 production cross sections at MiniBooNE. The size of the event samples used in the analysis exceeds that of all other similar experiments combined by an order of magnitude. We present the first measurements of the absolute NC 1π0 cross section as well as the first differential cross sections in both neutrino and antineutrino mode. Specifically, we measure single differential cross sections with respect to pion momentum and pion angle. We find the

  20. The Effect of a Single Bout of Surfing on Exercise-Induced Affect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittsinger, Ryan; Kress, Jeff; Crussemeyer, Jill

    2017-01-01

    Exercise-induced affect (EIA) has been well documented and is often composed of positive affect, negative affect, tranquility, and fatigue. Research on EIA has focused on mainstream sports such as running, walking, or cycling; however, no research has evaluated the influence of action sports participation in activities such surfing on EIA. The current study examined the effect of a single 30-min surfing bout on EIA in 107 adult volunteers. An additional purpose was if change in affect was similar based on surfing history, surfing frequency, and surfing skill level. To assess EIA, each participant completed the Physical Activity Affect Scale (PAAS) prior to and immediately following the 30-min surf session. Dependent t -tests were used to examine differences between pre- and post-test EIA. For the secondary purpose, a change score (PAAS posttest-PAAS pretest) was computed for each subscale. One-way ANOVAs were performed to determine differences among comparisons of surfing history, surfing frequency, and surfing skill level, and the change score for each of the 4 subscales. EIA was significantly altered by surfing, with significant improvements in positive affect and tranquility, and significant reductions in negative affect and fatigue. There were no significant differences among surfing history, surfing frequency, and surfing skill level, and positive affect, negative affect or tranquility. However, there were significant differences between fatigue and surfing history, surfing frequency, and surfing skill level. The results indicate that a single 30-min surfing bout may provide positive benefits for the participant. Implications for future surfing research and EIA are discussed.

  1. The Effect of a Single Bout of Surfing on Exercise-Induced Affect

    Science.gov (United States)

    PITTSINGER, RYAN; KRESS, JEFF; CRUSSEMEYER, JILL

    2017-01-01

    Exercise-induced affect (EIA) has been well documented and is often composed of positive affect, negative affect, tranquility, and fatigue. Research on EIA has focused on mainstream sports such as running, walking, or cycling; however, no research has evaluated the influence of action sports participation in activities such surfing on EIA. The current study examined the effect of a single 30-min surfing bout on EIA in 107 adult volunteers. An additional purpose was if change in affect was similar based on surfing history, surfing frequency, and surfing skill level. To assess EIA, each participant completed the Physical Activity Affect Scale (PAAS) prior to and immediately following the 30-min surf session. Dependent t-tests were used to examine differences between pre- and post-test EIA. For the secondary purpose, a change score (PAAS posttest-PAAS pretest) was computed for each subscale. One-way ANOVAs were performed to determine differences among comparisons of surfing history, surfing frequency, and surfing skill level, and the change score for each of the 4 subscales. EIA was significantly altered by surfing, with significant improvements in positive affect and tranquility, and significant reductions in negative affect and fatigue. There were no significant differences among surfing history, surfing frequency, and surfing skill level, and positive affect, negative affect or tranquility. However, there were significant differences between fatigue and surfing history, surfing frequency, and surfing skill level. The results indicate that a single 30-min surfing bout may provide positive benefits for the participant. Implications for future surfing research and EIA are discussed. PMID:29170700

  2. Laser induced densification of cerium gadolinium oxide: Application to single-chamber solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariño, Mariana [École Nationale Supérieure des Mines, SPIN-EMSE, CNRS: UMR 5307, LGF, F-42023 Saint-Étienne (France); Rieu, Mathilde, E-mail: rieu@emse.fr [École Nationale Supérieure des Mines, SPIN-EMSE, CNRS: UMR 5307, LGF, F-42023 Saint-Étienne (France); Viricelle, Jean-Paul [École Nationale Supérieure des Mines, SPIN-EMSE, CNRS: UMR 5307, LGF, F-42023 Saint-Étienne (France); Garrelie, Florence [Université Jean Monnet, Laboratoire Hubert Curien, CNRS: UMR 5516, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France)

    2016-06-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • CGO surface densifications were induced by UV and IR laser irradiations. • Grain growth or densified cracked surfaces were observed by SEM. • UV laser treatments allow a decrease of gas permeation through electrolyte layer. • Electrical conductivity of the electrolyte was modified by laser treatments. • Grain growth of electrolyte induced by UV laser improved cell performances. - Abstract: In single-chamber solid oxide fuel cells (SC-SOFC), anode and cathode are placed in a gas chamber where they are exposed to a fuel/air mixture. Similarly to conventional dual-chamber SOFC, the anode and the cathode are separated by an electrolyte. However, as in the SC-SOFC configuration the electrolyte does not play tightness role between compartments, this one can be a porous layer. Nevertheless, it is necessary to have a diffusion barrier to prevent the transportation of hydrogen produced locally at the anode to the cathode that reduces fuel cell performances. This study aims to obtain directly a diffusion barrier through the surface densification of the electrolyte Ce{sub 0.9}Gd{sub 0.1}O{sub 1.95} (CGO) by a laser treatment. KrF excimer laser and Yb fiber laser irradiations were used at different fluences and number of pulses to modify the density of the electrolyte coating. Microstructural characterizations confirmed the modifications on the surface of the electrolyte for appropriate experimental conditions showing either grain growth or densified but cracked surfaces. Gas permeation and electrical conductivities of the modified electrolyte were evaluated. Finally SC-SOFC performances were improved for the cells presenting grain growth at the electrolyte surface.

  3. Systems and Methods for Ejection of Ions from an Ion Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooks, Robert Graham (Inventor); Snyder, Dalton (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    The invention generally relates to systems and methods for ejection of ions from an ion trap. In certain embodiments, systems and methods of the invention sum two different frequency signals into a single summed signal that is applied to an ion trap. In other embodiments, an amplitude of a single frequency signal is modulated as the single frequency signal is being applied to the ion trap. In other embodiments, a first alternating current (AC) signal is applied to an ion trap that varies as a function of time, while a constant radio frequency (RF) signal is applied to the ion trap.

  4. Secondary plasma formation after single pulse laser ablation underwater and its advantages for laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilović, M R; Cvejić, M; Lazic, V; Jovićević, S

    2016-06-07

    In this work we present studies of spatial and temporal plasma evolution after single pulse ablation of an aluminium target in water. The laser ablation was performed using 20 ns long pulses emitted at 1064 nm. The plasma characterization was performed by fast photography, the Schlieren technique, shadowgraphy and optical emission spectroscopy. The experimental results indicate the existence of two distinct plasma stages: the first stage has a duration of approximately 500 ns from the laser pulse, and is followed by a new plasma growth starting from the crater center. The secondary plasma slowly evolves inside the growing vapor bubble, and its optical emission lasts over several tens of microseconds. Later, the hot glowing particles, trapped inside the vapor cavity, were detected during the whole cycle of the bubble, where the first collapse occurs after 475 μs from the laser pulse. Differences in the plasma properties during the two evolution phases are discussed, with an accent on the optical emission since its detection is of primary importance for LIBS. Here we demonstrate that the LIBS signal quality in single pulse excitation underwater can be greatly enhanced by detecting only the secondary plasma emission, and also by applying long acquisition gates (in the order of 10-100 μs). The presented results are of great importance for LIBS measurements inside a liquid environment, since they prove that a good analytical signal can be obtained by using nanosecond pulses from a single commercial laser source and by employing cost effective, not gated detectors.

  5. COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND INDUCED POLARIZATION FROM SINGLE SCATTERING BY CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES AND FILAMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Elsa P. R. G.; Da Silva, Antonio J. C. [Centro de Astrofisica, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Liu, Guo-Chin, E-mail: eramos@astro.up.pt [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui District, New Taipei City 251, Taiwan (China)

    2012-09-20

    We present light-cone-integrated simulations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization signal induced by a single scattering in the direction of clusters of galaxies and filaments. We characterize the statistical properties of the induced polarization signals from the presence of the CMB quadrupole component (pqiCMB) and as the result of the transverse motion of ionized gas clouds with respect to the CMB rest frame (p{beta}{sup 2}{sub t}SZ). From adiabatic N-body/hydrodynamic simulations, we generated 28 random sky patches integrated along the light cone, each with about 0.86 deg{sup 2} and angular resolution of 6''. Our simulation method involves a box-stacking scheme that allows to reconstruct the CMB quadrupole component and the gas physical properties along the line of sight. We find that the linear polarization degree in the logarithmic scale of both effects follows approximately a Gaussian distribution and the mean total signal is about 10{sup -8} and 10{sup -10} for the pqiCMB and p{beta}{sup 2}{sub t}SZ effects, respectively. The polarization angle is consistent with a flat distribution in both cases. From the mean distributions of the polarization degree with redshift, the highest peak is found at z {approx_equal} 1 for the induced CMB quadrupole and at z {approx_equal} 0.5 for the kinematic component. Our results suggest that most of the contribution for the total polarization signal arises from z {approx}< 4 for the pqiCMB and z {approx}< 3 for p{beta}{sup 2}{sub t}SZ. The spectral dependency of both integrated signals is strong, increasing with the frequency, especially in the case of the p{beta}{sup 2}{sub t}SZ signal, which increases by a factor of 100 from 30 GHz to 675 GHz. The maxima values found at the highest frequency are about 3 {mu}K and 13 {mu}K for the pqiCMB and p{beta}{sup 2}{sub t}SZ, respectively. The angular power spectra of these effects peak at large multipoles l > 10{sup 4}, being of the order of 10{sup -5} {mu

  6. Neuroethologic differences in sleep deprivation induced by the single- and multiple-platform methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Medeiros

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that the multiple-platform method (MP for desynchronized sleep (DS deprivation eliminates the stress induced by social isolation and by the restriction of locomotion in the single-platform (SP method. MP, however, induces a higher increase in plasma corticosterone and ACTH levels than SP. Since deprivation is of heuristic value to identify the functional role of this state of sleep, the objective of the present study was to determine the behavioral differences exhibited by rats during sleep deprivation induced by these two methods. All behavioral patterns exhibited by a group of 7 albino male Wistar rats submitted to 4 days of sleep deprivation by the MP method (15 platforms, spaced 150 mm apart and by 7 other rats submitted to sleep deprivation by the SP method were recorded in order to elaborate an ethogram. The behavioral patterns were quantitated in 10 replications by naive observers using other groups of 7 rats each submitted to the same deprivation schedule. Each quantification session lasted 35 min and the behavioral patterns presented by each rat over a period of 5 min were counted. The results obtained were: a rats submitted to the MP method changed platforms at a mean rate of 2.62 ± 1.17 platforms h-1 animal-1; b the number of episodes of noninteractive waking patterns for the MP animals was significantly higher than that for SP animals (1077 vs 768; c additional episodes of waking patterns (26.9 ± 18.9 episodes/session were promoted by social interaction in MP animals; d the cumulative number of sleep episodes observed in the MP test (311 was significantly lower (chi-square test, 1 d.f., P<0.05 than that observed in the SP test (534; e rats submitted to the MP test did not show the well-known increase in ambulatory activity observed after the end of the SP test; f comparison of 6 MP and 6 SP rats showed a significantly shorter latency to the onset of DS in MP rats (7.8 ± 4.3 and 29.0 ± 25.0 min, respectively

  7. Single event effects induced by 15.14 MeV/u sup 1 sup 3 sup 6 Xe ions

    CERN Document Server

    Hou Ming Dong; LiuJie; Wang Zhi Guang; Jin Yun Fan; Zhu Zhi Yong; Zhen Hong Lou; Liu Chang Long; Chen Xiao Xi; Wei Xin Guo; Zhang Li; Fan You Cheng; Zhu Zhou Rong; Zhang Yiting

    2002-01-01

    Single event effects induced by 15.14 MeV/u sup 1 sup 3 sup 6 Xe ions in different batches of 32k x 8 bits static random access memory are studied. The incident angle dependences of the cross sections for single event upset and single event latch up are presented. The SEE cross sections are plotted versus energy loss instead of linear energy transfer value in sensitive region. The depth of sensitive volume and thickness of 'dead' layer above the sensitive volume are estimated

  8. Metastable self-trapping of positrons in MgO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monge, M. A.; Pareja, R.; González, R.; Chen, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Low-temperature positron annihilation measurements have been performed on MgO single crystals containing either cation or anion vacancies. The temperature dependence of the S parameter is explained in terms of metastable self-trapped positrons which thermally hop through the crystal lattice. The experimental results are analyzed using a three-state trapping model assuming transitions from both delocalized and self-trapped states to deep trapped states at vacancies. The energy level of the self-trapped state was determined to be (62+/-5) meV above the delocalized state. The activation enthalpy for the hopping process of self-trapped positrons appears to depend on the kind of defect present in the crystals.

  9. Stability of Trapped Electrons in SiO(2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleetwood, D.M.; Winokur, P.S.

    1999-01-01

    Thermally stimulated current and capacitance voltage methods are used to investigate the thermal stability of trapped electrons associated with radiation-induced trapped positive charge in metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors. The density of deeply trapped electrons in radiation-hardened 45 nm oxides exceeds that of shallow electrons by a factor of ∼3 after radiation exposure, and by up to a factor of 10 or more during biased annealing. Shallow electron traps anneal faster than deep traps, and seem to be at least qualitatively consistent with the model of Lelis et al. Deeper traps maybe part of a fundamentally distinct dipole complex, and/or have shifted energy levels that inhibit charge exchange with the Si

  10. Mismatched single stranded antisense oligonucleotides can induce efficient dystrophin splice switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kole Ryszard

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antisense oligomer induced exon skipping aims to reduce the severity of Duchenne muscular dystrophy by redirecting splicing during pre-RNA processing such that the causative mutation is by-passed and a shorter but partially functional Becker muscular dystrophy-like dystrophin isoform is produced. Normal exons are generally targeted to restore the dystrophin reading frame however, an appreciable subset of dystrophin mutations are intra-exonic and therefore have the potential to compromise oligomer efficiency, necessitating personalised oligomer design for some patients. Although antisense oligomers are easily personalised, it remains unclear whether all patient polymorphisms within antisense oligomer target sequences will require the costly process of producing and validating patient specific compounds. Methods Here we report preclinical testing of a panel of splice switching antisense oligomers, designed to excise exon 25 from the dystrophin transcript, in normal and dystrophic patient cells. These patient cells harbour a single base insertion in exon 25 that lies within the target sequence of an oligomer shown to be effective at removing exon 25. Results It was anticipated that such a mutation would compromise oligomer binding and efficiency. However, we show that, despite the mismatch an oligomer, designed and optimised to excise exon 25 from the normal dystrophin mRNA, removes the mutated exon 25 more efficiently than the mutation-specific oligomer. Conclusion This raises the possibility that mismatched AOs could still be therapeutically applicable in some cases, negating the necessity to produce patient-specific compounds.

  11. RPA Stabilization of Single-Stranded DNA Is Critical for Break-Induced Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, Patrick; Donnianni, Roberto A; Glancy, Eleanor; Oh, Julyun; Symington, Lorraine S

    2016-12-20

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are cytotoxic lesions that must be accurately repaired to maintain genome stability. Replication protein A (RPA) plays an important role in homology-dependent repair of DSBs by protecting the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) intermediates formed by end resection and by facilitating Rad51 loading. We found that hypomorphic mutants of RFA1 that support intra-chromosomal homologous recombination are profoundly defective for repair processes involving long tracts of DNA synthesis, in particular break-induced replication (BIR). The BIR defects of the rfa1 mutants could be partially suppressed by eliminating the Sgs1-Dna2 resection pathway, suggesting that Dna2 nuclease attacks the ssDNA formed during end resection when not fully protected by RPA. Overexpression of Rad51 was also found to suppress the rfa1 BIR defects. We suggest that Rad51 binding to the ssDNA formed by excessive end resection and during D-loop migration can partially compensate for dysfunctional RPA. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiation-induced segregation on defect clusters in single-phase concentrated solid-solution alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Chenyang; Yang, Taini; Jin, Ke; Gao, Ning; Xiu, Pengyuan; Zhang, Yanwen; Gao, Fei; Bei, Hongbin; Weber, William J.; Sun, Kai; Dong, Yan; Wang, Lumin

    2017-01-01

    A group of single-phase concentrated solid-solution alloys (SP-CSAs), including NiFe, NiCoFe, NiCoFeCr, as well as a high entropy alloy NiCoFeCrMn, was irradiated with 3 MeV Ni"2"+ ions at 773 K to a fluence of 5 × 10"1"6 ions/cm"2 for the study of radiation response with increasing compositional complexity. Advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) was used to characterize the dislocation loop distribution and radiation-induced segregation (RIS) on defect clusters in the SP-CSAs. The results show that a higher fraction of faulted loops exists in the more compositionally complex alloys, which indicate that increasing compositional complexity can extend the incubation period and delay loop growth. The RIS behaviors of each element in the SP-CSAs were observed as follows: Ni and Co tend to enrich, but Cr, Fe and Mn prefer to deplete near the defect clusters. RIS level can be significantly suppressed by increasing compositional complexity due to the sluggish atom diffusion. According to molecular static (MS) simulations, “disk” like segregations may form near the faulted dislocation loops in the SP-CSAs. Segregated elements tend to distribute around the whole faulted loop as a disk rather than only around the edge of the loop.

  13. Modification of mechanical properties of single crystal aluminum oxide by ion beam induced structural changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ensinger, W.; Nowak, R.; Horino, Y.; Baba, K.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanical behaviour of ceramics is essentially determined by their surface qualities. As a surface modification technique, ion implantation provides the possibility to modify the mechanical properties of ceramics. Highly energetic ions are implanted into the near-surface region of a material and modify its composition and structure. Ions of aluminum, oxygen, nickel and tantalum were implanted into single-crystal α-aluminum oxide. Three-point bending tests showed that an increase in flexural strength of up to 30% could be obtained after implantation of aluminum and oxygen. Nickel and tantalum ion implantation increased the fracture toughness. Indentation tests with Knoop and Vickers diamonds and comparison of the lengths of the developed radial cracks showed that ion implantation leads to a reaction in cracking. The observed effects are assigned to radiation induced structural changes of the ceramic. Ion bombardment leads to radiation damage and formation of compressive stress. In case of tantalum implantation, the implanted near-surface zone becomes amorphous. These effects make the ceramic more resistant to fracture. (orig.)

  14. Heterogeneously Nd3+ doped single nanoparticles for NIR-induced heat conversion, luminescence, and thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciniak, Lukasz; Pilch, Aleksandra; Arabasz, Sebastian; Jin, Dayong; Bednarkiewicz, Artur

    2017-06-22

    The current frontier in nanomaterials engineering is to intentionally design and fabricate heterogeneous nanoparticles with desirable morphology and composition, and to integrate multiple functionalities through highly controlled epitaxial growth. Here we show that heterogeneous doping of Nd 3+ ions following a core-shell design already allows three optical functions, namely efficient (η > 72%) light-to-heat conversion, bright NIR emission, and sensitive (S R > 0.1% K -1 ) localized temperature quantification, to be built within a single ca. 25 nm nanoparticle. Importantly, all these optical functions operate within the transparent biological window of the NIR spectral region (λ exc ∼ 800 nm, λ emi ∼ 860 nm), in which light scattering and absorption by tissues and water are minimal. We find NaNdF 4 as a core is efficient in absorbing and converting 808 nm light to heat, while NaYF 4 :1%Nd 3+ as a shell is a temperature sensor based on the ratio-metric luminescence reading but an intermediate inert spacer shell, e.g. NaYF 4 , is necessary to insulate the heat convertor and thermometer by preventing the possible Nd-Nd energy relaxation. Moreover, we notice that while temperature sensitivity and luminescence intensity are optically stable, increased excitation intensity to generate heat above room temperature may saturate the sensing capacity of temperature feedback. We therefore propose a dual beam photoexcitation scheme as a solution for possible light-induced hyperthermia treatment.

  15. Ligand-Induced Dynamics of Neurotrophin Receptors Investigated by Single-Molecule Imaging Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Laura; Luin, Stefano; Bonsignore, Fulvio; de Nadai, Teresa; Beltram, Fabio; Cattaneo, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    Neurotrophins are secreted proteins that regulate neuronal development and survival, as well as maintenance and plasticity of the adult nervous system. The biological activity of neurotrophins stems from their binding to two membrane receptor types, the tropomyosin receptor kinase and the p75 neurotrophin receptors (NRs). The intracellular signalling cascades thereby activated have been extensively investigated. Nevertheless, a comprehensive description of the ligand-induced nanoscale details of NRs dynamics and interactions spanning from the initial lateral movements triggered at the plasma membrane to the internalization and transport processes is still missing. Recent advances in high spatio-temporal resolution imaging techniques have yielded new insight on the dynamics of NRs upon ligand binding. Here we discuss requirements, potential and practical implementation of these novel approaches for the study of neurotrophin trafficking and signalling, in the framework of current knowledge available also for other ligand-receptor systems. We shall especially highlight the correlation between the receptor dynamics activated by different neurotrophins and the respective signalling outcome, as recently revealed by single-molecule tracking of NRs in living neuronal cells. PMID:25603178

  16. Can Constraint Induced Movement Therapy Improve In-Hand Manipulation Skills: A Single Subject Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somaye Kavousipor

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study describes a single subject design (ABA that shows the effective use of constraint induced movement therapy in improvement of quality and performance of in-hand manipulation skills for a 10 year old boy and a 9 years old girl with hemiplegic cerebral palsy, as Dickerson (2007 showed it in arm movement and function. Methods: To determine the effectiveness of CIMT by the use of C-statistic analysis and visual analysis. Approach: The first step was to design a child friendly group activity and home based intervention program through occupation. The possible effectiveness of CIMT was evaluated by daily measurements and video recording of 6 sub skills of in-hand manipulation according to Pont category (2009 in defined activity. Results: For making the treatment more cost effective, families can produce a simple clinical setting at home and participate in their child treatment plan actively. Discussion: A client center intervention will facilitate the use and quality of fingers and hand motion. Also a group activity can motivate participants to participate more and better.

  17. Single- and Multilayered Nanostructures via Laser-Induced Block Copolymer Self-Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Pawel; Yager, Kevin; Rahman, Atikur; Black, Charles

    We present a novel method of accelerated self-assembly of block copolymer thin films utilizing laser light, called Laser Zone Annealing (LZA). In our approach, steep temperature transients are induced in block copolymer films by rastering narrowly focused laser line over the light-absorbing substrate. Extremely steep temperature gradients accelerate the process of self-assembly by several orders-of-magnitude compared to conventional oven annealing, and, when coupled to photo-thermal shearing, lead to global alignment of block copolymer domains assessed by GISXAS diffraction studies and real-space SEM imaging. We demonstrate monolithic alignment of various block-copolymer thin films including PS-b-PMMA, PS-b-PEO, PS-b-P2VP, PS-b-PI and observe different responsiveness to the shearing rate depending on the characteristic relaxation timescale of the particular material. Subsequently, we use the aligned polymeric films as templates for synthesis of single- and multi-layered arrays of inorganic, metallic or semiconducting nanowires and nanomeshes and investigate their anisotropic electro-optical properties. Research carried out in part at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, which is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  18. Line-edge roughness induced single event transient variation in SOI FinFETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Weikang; An Xia; Jiang Xiaobo; Chen Yehua; Liu Jingjing; Zhang Xing; Huang Ru

    2015-01-01

    The impact of process induced variation on the response of SOI FinFET to heavy ion irradiation is studied through 3-D TCAD simulation for the first time. When FinFET biased at OFF state configuration (V gs = 0, V ds = V dd ) is struck by a heavy ion, the drain collects ionizing charges under the electric field and a current pulse (single event transient, SET) is consequently formed. The results reveal that with the presence of line-edge roughness (LER), which is one of the major variation sources in nano-scale FinFETs, the device-to-device variation in terms of SET is observed. In this study, three types of LER are considered: type A has symmetric fin edges, type B has irrelevant fin edges and type C has parallel fin edges. The results show that type A devices have the largest SET variation while type C devices have the smallest variation. Further, the impact of the two main LER parameters, correlation length and root mean square amplitude, on SET variation is discussed as well. The results indicate that variation may be a concern in radiation effects with the down scaling of feature size. (paper)

  19. Pulsed x-ray induced attenuation measurements of single mode optical fibers and coupler materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johan, A.; Charre, P.

    1994-01-01

    Pulsed X-ray induced transient radiation attenuation measurements of single mode optical fibers have been performed versus total dose, light wavelength, optical power and fiber coil diameter in order to determine the behavior of parameters sensitive to ionizing radiation. The results did not show any photobleaching phenomenon and the attenuation was found independent of the spool diameter. As expected, transient attenuation was lower for higher wave-lengths. The recovery took place in the millisecond range and was independent of total dose, light wavelength and optical power. In optical modules and devices a large range of behaviors was observed according to coupler material i.e., Corning coupler showed a small peak attenuation that remained more than one day later; on the other hand LiTaO 3 material experienced an order of magnitude higher peak attenuation and a recovery in the millisecond range. For applications with optical fibers and integrated optics devices the authors showed that in many cases the optical fiber (length above 100 m) is the most sensitive device in a transient ionizing radiation field

  20. Terahertz probes of magnetic field induced spin reorientation in YFeO{sub 3} single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Xian; Jiang, Junjie; Ma, Guohong, E-mail: ghma@staff.shu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Jin, Zuanming [Department of Physics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Wang, Dongyang; Tian, Zhen; Han, Jiaguang [Center for Terahertz Waves and College of Precision Instrument and Optoelectronics Engineering, Key Laboratory of Optoelectronics Information and Technology (Ministry of Education), Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Cheng, Zhenxiang [Department of Physics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia)

    2015-03-02

    Using the terahertz time-domain spectroscopy, we demonstrate the spin reorientation of a canted antiferromagnetic YFeO{sub 3} single crystal, by evaluating the temperature and magnetic field dependence of resonant frequency and amplitude for the quasi-ferromagnetic (FM) and quasi-antiferromagnetic modes (AFM), a deeper insight into the dynamics of spin reorientation in rare-earth orthoferrites is established. Due to the absence of 4f-electrons in Y ion, the spin reorientation of Fe sublattices can only be induced by the applied magnetic field, rather than temperature. In agreement with the theoretical predication, the frequency of FM mode decreases with magnetic field. In addition, an obvious step of spin reorientation phase transition occurs with a relatively large applied magnetic field of 4 T. By comparison with the family members of RFeO{sub 3} (R = Y{sup 3+} or rare-earth ions), our results suggest that the chosen of R would tailor the dynamical rotation properties of Fe ions, leading to the designable spin switching in the orthoferrite antiferromagnetic systems.

  1. Stress-induced martensite variant reorientation in magnetic shape memory Ni–Mn–Ga single crystal studied by neutron diffraction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Molnár, Peter; Šittner, Petr; Lukáš, Petr; Hannula, S.-P.; Heczko, Oleg

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 3 (2008), 035014/1-035014/4 ISSN 0964-1726 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : NiMnGa single crystal * neutron diffraction * stress induced martensite reorientation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.743, year: 2008

  2. Physics with Trapped Antihydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Michael

    2017-04-01

    For more than a decade antihydrogen atoms have been formed by mixing antiprotons and positrons held in arrangements of charged particle (Penning) traps. More recently, magnetic minimum neutral atom traps have been superimposed upon the anti-atom production region, promoting the trapping of a small quantity of the antihydrogen yield. We will review these advances, and describe some of the first physics experiments performed on anrtihydrogen including the observation of the two-photon 1S-2S transition, invesigation of the charge neutrailty of the anti-atom and studies of the ground state hyperfine splitting. We will discuss the physics motivations for undertaking these experiments and describe some near-future initiatives.

  3. Theoretical and experimental studies of single event effect induced by atmospheric muons on nano-metric technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Cavoli, P.

    2016-01-01

    This study concerns the domain of the microelectronics. It consists in the study of the impact of the 3D morphology of the energy deposit on the Single Event Effect (SEE) modeling, induced by atmospheric muons. Over a first phase, the approach has consisted in the modeling of the energy deposit induced by protons in nano-metric volumes. For that purpose the use of the Monte Carlo code GEANT4 has allowed us to simulate and stock in a database the tracks characteristics of the energy deposit induced by protons. Once the approach validated for the protons, simulations of the energy deposit induced by muons have been realized. A CCD camera has been used in order to measure the radiative atmospheric environment and to constrain the modeling of the energy deposit induced by muons. This study highlights and quantify the contribution of the radial distribution of the energy deposit induced by protons in nano-metric volumes for the SEE prediction. On the other hand, the study shows that the contribution of the radial distribution of the energy deposit induced by muons in nano-metric volumes has a negligible impact on the SEE modeling. It will be interesting to realize measurements of the energy deposit induced by muons in nano-metric technologies under particle accelerator. This will allow to bring experimental data still nonexistent necessary to the development of new physical models more accurate on the modeling of the energy deposit induced by muons. (author)

  4. Measuring sunscreen protection against solar-simulated radiation-induced structural radical damage to skin using ESR/spin trapping: development of an ex vivo test method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, Rachel; Volkov, Arsen; Andrady, Carima; Sayer, Robert

    2012-03-01

    The in vitro star system used for sunscreen UVA-testing is not an absolute measure of skin protection being a ratio of the total integrated UVA/UVB absorption. The in vivo persistent-pigment-darkening method requires human volunteers. We investigated the use of the ESR-detectable DMPO protein radical-adduct in solar-simulator-irradiated skin substitutes for sunscreen testing. Sunscreens SPF rated 20+ with UVA protection, reduced this adduct by 40-65% when applied at 2 mg/cm(2). SPF 15 Organic UVA-UVB (BMDBM-OMC) and TiO(2)-UVB filters and a novel UVA-TiO(2) filter reduced it by 21, 31 and 70% respectively. Conventional broad-spectrum sunscreens do not fully protect against protein radical-damage in skin due to possible visible-light contributions to damage or UVA-filter degradation. Anisotropic spectra of DMPO-trapped oxygen-centred radicals, proposed intermediates of lipid-oxidation, were detected in irradiated sunscreen and DMPO. Sunscreen protection might be improved by the consideration of visible-light protection and the design of filters to minimise radical leakage and lipid-oxidation.

  5. Stable and Efficient Organo-Metal Halide Hybrid Perovskite Solar Cells via π-Conjugated Lewis Base Polymer Induced Trap Passivation and Charge Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ping-Li; Yang, Guang; Ren, Zhi-Wei; Cheung, Sin Hang; So, Shu Kong; Chen, Li; Hao, Jianhua; Hou, Jianhui; Li, Gang

    2018-03-01

    High-quality pinhole-free perovskite film with optimal crystalline morphology is critical for achieving high-efficiency and high-stability perovskite solar cells (PSCs). In this study, a p-type π-conjugated polymer poly[(2,6-(4,8-bis(5-(2-ethylhexyl) thiophen-2-yl)-benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b'] dithiophene))-alt-(5,5-(1',3'-di-2-thienyl-5',7'-bis(2-ethylhexyl) benzo[1',2'-c:4',5'-c'] dithiophene-4,8-dione))] (PBDB-T) is introduced into chlorobenzene to form a facile and effective template-agent during the anti-solvent process of perovskite film formation. The π-conjugated polymer PBDB-T is found to trigger a heterogeneous nucleation over the perovskite precursor film and passivate the trap states of the mixed perovskite film through the formation of Lewis adducts between lead and oxygen atom in PBDB-T. The p-type semiconducting and hydrophobic PBDB-T polymer fills in the perovskite grain boundaries to improve charge transfer for better conductivity and prevent moisture invasion into the perovskite active layers. Consequently, the PSCs with PBDB-T modified anti-solvent processing leads to a high-efficiency close to 20%, and the devices show excellent stability, retaining about 90% of the initial power conversion efficiency after 150 d storage in dry air. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Ion trap device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-01-26

    An ion trap device is disclosed. The device includes a series of electrodes that define an ion flow path. A radio frequency (RF) field is applied to the series of electrodes such that each electrode is phase shifted approximately 180 degrees from an adjacent electrode. A DC voltage is superimposed with the RF field to create a DC gradient to drive ions in the direction of the gradient. A second RF field or DC voltage is applied to selectively trap and release the ions from the device. Further, the device may be gridless and utilized at high pressure.

  7. Asymmetric ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Stephan E.; Alexander, Michael L.; Follansbee, James C.

    1997-01-01

    An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity.

  8. Spectroscopy of a Synthetic Trapped Ion Qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hucul, David; Christensen, Justin E.; Hudson, Eric R.; Campbell, Wesley C.

    2017-09-01

    133Ba+ has been identified as an attractive ion for quantum information processing due to the unique combination of its spin-1 /2 nucleus and visible wavelength electronic transitions. Using a microgram source of radioactive material, we trap and laser cool the synthetic A =133 radioisotope of barium II in a radio-frequency ion trap. Using the same, single trapped atom, we measure the isotope shifts and hyperfine structure of the 62P1 /2↔62S1 /2 and 62P1 /2↔52D3 /2 electronic transitions that are needed for laser cooling, state preparation, and state detection of the clock-state hyperfine and optical qubits. We also report the 62P1 /2↔52D3 /2 electronic transition isotope shift for the rare A =130 and 132 barium nuclides, completing the spectroscopic characterization necessary for laser cooling all long-lived barium II isotopes.

  9. On-chip particle trapping and manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, Kaelyn Danielle

    model and predict a sorting method which combines fluid flow with a single optical source to automatically sort dielectric particles by size in waveguide networks. These simulations were shown to be accurate when repeated on-chip. Lastly I introduce a particle trapping technique that uses Multimode Interference(MMI) patterns in order to trap multiple particles at once. The location of the traps can be adjusted as can the number of trapping location by changing the input wavelength. By changing the wavelength back and forth between two values this MMI can be used to pass a particle down the channel like a conveyor belt.

  10. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in Ulcerative Colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg Bennike, Tue; Carlsen, Thomas Gelsing; Ellingsen, Torkell

    2015-01-01

    microscopy and confocal microscopy. RESULTS: We identified and quantified 5711 different proteins with proteomics. The abundance of the proteins calprotectin and lactotransferrin in the tissue correlated with the degree of tissue inflammation as determined by histology. However, fecal calprotectin did...... not correlate. Forty-six proteins were measured with a statistically significant differences in abundances between the UC colon tissue and controls. Eleven of the proteins with increased abundances in the UC biopsies were associated with neutrophils and neutrophil extracellular traps. The findings were...... validated by microscopy, where an increased abundance of neutrophils and the presence of neutrophil extracellular traps by extracellular DNA present in the UC colon tissue were confirmed. CONCLUSIONS: Neutrophils, induced neutrophil extracellular traps, and several proteins that play a part in innate...

  11. Optimising camera traps for monitoring small mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair S Glen

    Full Text Available Practical techniques are required to monitor invasive animals, which are often cryptic and occur at low density. Camera traps have potential for this purpose, but may have problems detecting and identifying small species. A further challenge is how to standardise the size of each camera's field of view so capture rates are comparable between different places and times. We investigated the optimal specifications for a low-cost camera trap for small mammals. The factors tested were 1 trigger speed, 2 passive infrared vs. microwave sensor, 3 white vs. infrared flash, and 4 still photographs vs. video. We also tested a new approach to standardise each camera's field of view. We compared the success rates of four camera trap designs in detecting and taking recognisable photographs of captive stoats (Mustelaerminea, feral cats (Felis catus and hedgehogs (Erinaceuseuropaeus. Trigger speeds of 0.2-2.1 s captured photographs of all three target species unless the animal was running at high speed. The camera with a microwave sensor was prone to false triggers, and often failed to trigger when an animal moved in front of it. A white flash produced photographs that were more readily identified to species than those obtained under infrared light. However, a white flash may be more likely to frighten target animals, potentially affecting detection probabilities. Video footage achieved similar success rates to still cameras but required more processing time and computer memory. Placing two camera traps side by side achieved a higher success rate than using a single camera. Camera traps show considerable promise for monitoring invasive mammal control operations. Further research should address how best to standardise the size of each camera's field of view, maximise the probability that an animal encountering a camera trap will be detected, and eliminate visible or audible cues emitted by camera traps.

  12. d(− Lactic Acid-Induced Adhesion of Bovine Neutrophils onto Endothelial Cells Is Dependent on Neutrophils Extracellular Traps Formation and CD11b Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Alarcón

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bovine ruminal acidosis is of economic importance as it contributes to reduced milk and meat production. This phenomenon is mainly attributed to an overload of highly fermentable carbohydrate, resulting in increased d(− lactic acid levels in serum and plasma. Ruminal acidosis correlates with elevated acute phase proteins in blood, along with neutrophil activation and infiltration into various tissues leading to laminitis and aseptic polysynovitis. Previous studies in bovine neutrophils indicated that d(− lactic acid decreased expression of L-selectin and increased expression of CD11b to concentrations higher than 6 mM, suggesting a potential role in neutrophil adhesion onto endothelia. The two aims of this study were to evaluate whether d(− lactic acid influenced neutrophil and endothelial adhesion and to trigger neutrophil extracellular trap (NET production (NETosis in exposed neutrophils. Exposure of bovine neutrophils to 5 mM d(− lactic acid elevated NET release compared to unstimulated neutrophil negative controls. Moreover, this NET contains CD11b and histone H4 citrullinated, the latter was dependent on PAD4 activation, a critical enzyme in DNA decondensation and NETosis. Furthermore, NET formation was dependent on d(− lactic acid plasma membrane transport through monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1. d(− lactic acid enhanced neutrophil adhesion onto endothelial sheets as demonstrated by in vitro neutrophil adhesion assays under continuous physiological flow conditions, indicating that cell adhesion was a NET- and a CD11b/ICAM-1-dependent process. Finally, d(− lactic acid was demonstrated for the first time to trigger NETosis in a PAD4- and MCT1-dependent manner. Thus, d(− lactic acid-mediated neutrophil activation may contribute to neutrophil-derived pro-inflammatory processes, such as aseptic laminitis and/or polysynovitis in animals suffering acute ruminal acidosis.

  13. Dependence of enhanced asymmetry-induced transport on collision frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleston, D. L.

    2014-07-01

    A single-particle code with collisional effects is used to study how asymmetry-induced radial transport in a non-neutral plasma depends on collision frequency. For asymmetries of the form ϕ1(r) cos(kz) cos(ωt-lθ), two sources for the transport have been identified: resonant particles and axially trapped particles. The simulation shows that this latter type, which occurs near the radius where ω matches the azimuthal rotation frequency ωR, is usually dominant at low collision frequency ν but becomes negligible at higher ν. This behavior can be understood by noting that axially trapped particles have a lower trapping frequency than resonant particles. In the low ν (banana) regime, the radial oscillations have amplitude Δr ≈ vr/ωT, so axially trapped particles dominate, and the transport may even exceed the resonant particle plateau regime level. As ν increases, collisions start to interrupt the slower axially trapped particle oscillations, while the resonant particles are still in the banana regime, so the axially trapped particle contribution to the transport decreases. At the largest ν values, axially trapped particle transport is negligible and the observed diffusion coefficient matches that given by plateau regime resonant particle theory. Heuristic models based on these considerations give reasonable agreement with the observed scaling laws for the value of the collision frequency where axially trapped particle transport starts to decrease and for the enhancement of the diffusion coefficient produced by axially trapped particles.

  14. Dependence of enhanced asymmetry-induced transport on collision frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggleston, D. L.

    2014-01-01

    A single-particle code with collisional effects is used to study how asymmetry-induced radial transport in a non-neutral plasma depends on collision frequency. For asymmetries of the form ϕ 1 (r) cos(kz) cos(ωt−lθ), two sources for the transport have been identified: resonant particles and axially trapped particles. The simulation shows that this latter type, which occurs near the radius where ω matches the azimuthal rotation frequency ω R , is usually dominant at low collision frequency ν but becomes negligible at higher ν. This behavior can be understood by noting that axially trapped particles have a lower trapping frequency than resonant particles. In the low ν (banana) regime, the radial oscillations have amplitude Δr ≈ v r /ω T , so axially trapped particles dominate, and the transport may even exceed the resonant particle plateau regime level. As ν increases, collisions start to interrupt the slower axially trapped particle oscillations, while the resonant particles are still in the banana regime, so the axially trapped particle contribution to the transport decreases. At the largest ν values, axially trapped particle transport is negligible and the observed diffusion coefficient matches that given by plateau regime resonant particle theory. Heuristic models based on these considerations give reasonable agreement with the observed scaling laws for the value of the collision frequency where axially trapped particle transport starts to decrease and for the enhancement of the diffusion coefficient produced by axially trapped particles

  15. Swift heavy ion induced single event upsets in high density UV-EPROM's

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahiwale, S.S. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 7 (India); Shinde, N.S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Mie University (Japan); Kanjilal, D. [Inter University Accelerator Center, New Delhi (India); Bhoraskar, V.N. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 7 (India); Dhole, S.D. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 7 (India)], E-mail: sanjay@physics.unipune.ernet.in

    2008-04-15

    A few high density UV-EPROM's (32Kb x 8) were irradiated with 5.41 MeV energy {alpha}-particles with fluences from 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 8} alphas/cm{sup 2} and 100 MeV nickel, iodine and silver ions for low fluences between 5 x 10{sup 7} and 10{sup 8} ions/cm{sup 2}. The energy and ion species was selected on the basis of predicted threshold values of linear energy transfer (LET) in silicon. The program which was stored in the memory found to be changed from 0 to 1 and 1 to 0 state, respectively. On the basis of changed states, the cross-sections ({sigma}) were calculated to investigate the single event effects/upsets. No upset was observed in case of {alpha}-particle since it has very low LET, but the SEU cross-section found to be more in case of Iodine i.e. 2.29 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 2} than that of nickel, 2.12 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 2} and silver, 2.26 x 10{sup -3}. This mainly attributes that LET for iodine is more as compared to silver and nickel ions, which deposits large amount of energy near the sensitive node of memory cell in the form of electron-hole pairs required to change the state. These measured SEU cross-section were also compared with theoretically predicted values along with the Weibull distribution fit to the ion induced experimental SEU data. The theoretical predicted SEU cross-section 3.27 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 2} found to be in good agreement with the measured SEU cross-section.

  16. NOX2 Inhibition Impairs Early Muscle Gene Expression Induced by a Single Exercise Bout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henríquez-Olguín, Carlos; Díaz-Vegas, Alexis; Utreras-Mendoza, Yildy; Campos, Cristian; Arias-Calderón, Manuel; Llanos, Paola; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Espinosa, Alejandra; Altamirano, Francisco; Jaimovich, Enrique; Valladares, Denisse M

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) participate as signaling molecules in response to exercise in skeletal muscle. However, the source of ROS and the molecular mechanisms involved in these phenomena are still not completely understood. The aim of this work was to study the role of skeletal muscle NADPH oxidase isoform 2 (NOX2) in the molecular response to physical exercise in skeletal muscle. BALB/c mice, pre-treated with a NOX2 inhibitor, apocynin, (3 mg/kg) or vehicle for 3 days, were swim-exercised for 60 min. Phospho-p47(phox) levels were significantly upregulated by exercise in flexor digitorum brevis (FDB). Moreover, exercise significantly increased NOX2 complex assembly (p47(phox)-gp91(phox) interaction) demonstrated by both proximity ligation assay and co-immunoprecipitation. Exercise-induced NOX2 activation was completely inhibited by apocynin treatment. As expected, exercise increased the mRNA levels of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), citrate synthase (CS), mitochondrial transcription factor A (tfam) and interleukin-6 (IL-I6) in FDB muscles. Moreover, the apocynin treatment was associated to a reduced activation of p38 MAP kinase, ERK 1/2, and NF-κB signaling pathways after a single bout of exercise. Additionally, the increase in plasma IL-6 elicited by exercise was decreased in apocynin-treated mice compared with the exercised vehicle-group (p < 0.001). These results were corroborated using gp91-dstat in an in vitro exercise model. In conclusion, NOX2 inhibition by both apocynin and gp91dstat, alters the intracellular signaling to exercise and electrical stimuli in skeletal muscle, suggesting that NOX2 plays a critical role in molecular response to an acute exercise.

  17. NOX2 inhibition impairs early muscle gene expression induced by a single exercise bout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henríquez-Olguín

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS participate as signaling molecules in response to exercise in skeletal muscle. However, the source of ROS and the molecular mechanisms involved in these phenomena are still not completely understood. The aim of this work was to study the role of skeletal muscle NADPH oxidase isoform 2 (NOX2 in the molecular response to physical exercise in skeletal muscle. BALB/c mice, pre-treated with a NOX2 inhibitor, apocynin, (3 mg/kg or vehicle for 3 days, were swim-exercised for 60 min. Phospho-p47phox levels were significantly upregulated by exercise in flexor digitorum brevis (FDB. Moreover, exercise significantly increased NOX2 complex assembly (p47phox-gp91phox interaction demonstrated by both proximity ligation assay and co-immunoprecipitation. Exercise-induced NOX2 activation was completely inhibited by apocynin treatment. As expected, exercise increased the mRNA levels of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, citrate synthase (CS, mitochondrial transcription factor A (tfam and interleukin-6 (IL-6 in FDB muscles. Moreover, the apocynin treatment was associated to a reduced activation of p38 MAP kinase, ERK 1/2, and NF-κB signaling pathways after a single bout of exercise. Additionally, the increase in plasma IL-6 elicited by exercise was decreased in apocynin-treated mice compared with the exercised vehicle-group (p<0.001. These results were corroborated using gp91-dstat in an in-vitro exercise model. In conclusion, NOX2 inhibition by both apocynin and gp91dstat, alters the intracellular signaling to exercise and electrical stimuli in skeletal muscle, suggesting that NOX2 plays a critical role in molecular response to an acute exercise.

  18. Loop induced single top partner production and decay at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Han; Lewis, Ian M.

    2018-05-01

    Most searches for top partners, T , are concerned with top partner pair production. However, as these bounds become increasingly stringent, the LHC energy will saturate and single top partner production will become more important. In this paper we study the novel signature of the top partner produced in association with the SM top, pp\\to T\\overline{t}+t\\overline{T} , in a model where the Standard Model (SM) is extended by a vector-like SU(2) L singlet fermion top partner and a real, SM gauge singlet scalar, S. In this model, pp\\to T\\overline{t}+t\\overline{T} production is possible through loops mediated by the scalar singlet. We find that, with reasonable coupling strengths, the production rate of this channel can dominate top partner pair production at top partner masses of m T ≳ 1 .5 TeV. In addition, this model allows for the exotic decay modes T → tg, T → tγ, and T → tS. In much of the parameter space the loop induced decay T → tg dominates and the top partner is quite long lived. New search strategies are necessary to cover these decay modes. We project the the sensitivity of the high luminosity LHC to pp\\to T\\overline{t}+t\\overline{T} via a realistic collider study. We find with 3 ab-1, the LHC is sensitive to this process for masses m T ≲ 2 TeV. In addition, we provide appendices detailing the renormalization of this model.

  19. The Initial Rise Method in the case of multiple trapping levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furetta, C.; Guzman, S.; Cruz Z, E.

    2009-10-01

    The aim of the paper is to extent the well known Initial Rise Method (IR) to the case of multiple trapping levels. The IR method is applied to the minerals extracted from Nopal herb and Oregano spice because the thermoluminescent glow curves shape suggests a trap distribution instead of a single trapping level. (Author)

  20. The Initial Rise Method in the case of multiple trapping levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furetta, C. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, IPN, Av. Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Guzman, S.; Cruz Z, E. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, A. P. 70-543, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2009-10-15

    The aim of the paper is to extent the well known Initial Rise Method (IR) to the case of multiple trapping levels. The IR method is applied to the minerals extracted from Nopal herb and Oregano spice because the thermoluminescent glow curves shape suggests a trap distribution instead of a single trapping level. (Author)

  1. WATER-TRAPPED WORLDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menou, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Although tidally locked habitable planets orbiting nearby M-dwarf stars are among the best astronomical targets to search for extrasolar life, they may also be deficient in volatiles and water. Climate models for this class of planets show atmospheric transport of water from the dayside to the nightside, where it is precipitated as snow and trapped as ice. Since ice only slowly flows back to the dayside upon accumulation, the resulting hydrological cycle can trap a large amount of water in the form of nightside ice. Using ice sheet dynamical and thermodynamical constraints, I illustrate how planets with less than about a quarter the Earth's oceans could trap most of their surface water on the nightside. This would leave their dayside, where habitable conditions are met, potentially dry. The amount and distribution of residual liquid water on the dayside depend on a variety of geophysical factors, including the efficiency of rock weathering at regulating atmospheric CO 2 as dayside ocean basins dry up. Water-trapped worlds with dry daysides may offer similar advantages as land planets for habitability, by contrast with worlds where more abundant water freely flows around the globe

  2. Redesigning octopus traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduarda Gomes

    2014-06-01

    In order to minimise the identified problems in the actual traps, the present work proposes a new design with the aim of reducing the volume and weight during transport, and also during onshore storage. Alternative materials to avoid corrosion and formation of encrustations were also proposed.

  3. WATER-TRAPPED WORLDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menou, Kristen [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Although tidally locked habitable planets orbiting nearby M-dwarf stars are among the best astronomical targets to search for extrasolar life, they may also be deficient in volatiles and water. Climate models for this class of planets show atmospheric transport of water from the dayside to the nightside, where it is precipitated as snow and trapped as ice. Since ice only slowly flows back to the dayside upon accumulation, the resulting hydrological cycle can trap a large amount of water in the form of nightside ice. Using ice sheet dynamical and thermodynamical constraints, I illustrate how planets with less than about a quarter the Earth's oceans could trap most of their surface water on the nightside. This would leave their dayside, where habitable conditions are met, potentially dry. The amount and distribution of residual liquid water on the dayside depend on a variety of geophysical factors, including the efficiency of rock weathering at regulating atmospheric CO{sub 2} as dayside ocean basins dry up. Water-trapped worlds with dry daysides may offer similar advantages as land planets for habitability, by contrast with worlds where more abundant water freely flows around the globe.

  4. Single Low-Dose Radiation Induced Regulation of Keratinocyte Differentiation in Calcium-Induced HaCaT Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Hyung Jin; Youn, Hae Jeong; Cha, Hwa Jun; Kim, Karam; An, Sungkwan

    2016-01-01

    Background We are continually exposed to low-dose radiation (LDR) in the range 0.1 Gy from natural sources, medical devices, nuclear energy plants, and other industrial sources of ionizing radiation. There are three models for the biological mechanism of LDR: the linear no-threshold model, the hormetic model, and the threshold model. Objective We used keratinocytes as a model system to investigate the molecular genetic effects of LDR on epidermal cell differentiation. Methods To identify keratinocyte differentiation, we performed western blots using a specific antibody for involucrin, which is a precursor protein of the keratinocyte cornified envelope and a marker for keratinocyte terminal differentiation. We also performed quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We examined whether LDR induces changes in involucrin messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation. Results Exposure of HaCaT cells to LDR (0.1 Gy) induced p21 expression. p21 is a key regulator that induces growth arrest and represses stemness, which accelerates keratinocyte differentiation. We correlated involucrin expression with keratinocyte differentiation, and examined the effects of LDR on involucrin levels and keratinocyte development. LDR significantly increased involucrin mRNA and protein levels during calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation. Conclusion These studies provide new evidence for the biological role of LDR, and identify the potential to utilize LDR to regulate or induce keratinocyte differentiation. PMID:27489424

  5. Telomerase Repeated Amplification Protocol (TRAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mender, Ilgen; Shay, Jerry W

    2015-11-20

    Telomeres are found at the end of eukaryotic linear chromosomes, and proteins that bind to telomeres protect DNA from being recognized as double-strand breaks thus preventing end-to-end fusions (Griffith et al. , 1999). However, due to the end replication problem and other factors such as oxidative damage, the limited life span of cultured cells (Hayflick limit) results in progressive shortening of these protective structures (Hayflick and Moorhead, 1961; Olovnikov, 1973). The ribonucleoprotein enzyme complex telomerase-consisting of a protein catalytic component hTERT and a functional RNA component hTR or hTERC - counteracts telomere shortening by adding telomeric repeats to the end of chromosomes in ~90% of primary human tumors and in some transiently proliferating stem-like cells (Shay and Wright, 1996; Shay and Wright, 2001). This results in continuous proliferation of cells which is a hallmark of cancer. Therefore, telomere biology has a central role in aging, cancer progression/metastasis as well as targeted cancer therapies. There are commonly used methods in telomere biology such as Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF) (Mender and Shay, 2015b), Telomere Repeat Amplification Protocol (TRAP) and Telomere dysfunction Induced Foci (TIF) analysis (Mender and Shay, 2015a). In this detailed protocol we describe Telomere Repeat Amplification Protocol (TRAP). The TRAP assay is a popular method to determine telomerase activity in mammalian cells and tissue samples (Kim et al. , 1994). The TRAP assay includes three steps: extension, amplification, and detection of telomerase products. In the extension step, telomeric repeats are added to the telomerase substrate (which is actually a non telomeric oligonucleotide, TS) by telomerase. In the amplification step, the extension products are amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using specific primers (TS upstream primer and ACX downstream primer) and in the detection step, the presence or absence of telomerase is

  6. Matrigel Mattress: A Method for the Generation of Single Contracting Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feaster, Tromondae K; Cadar, Adrian G; Wang, Lili; Williams, Charles H; Chun, Young Wook; Hempel, Jonathan E; Bloodworth, Nathaniel; Merryman, W David; Lim, Chee Chew; Wu, Joseph C; Knollmann, Björn C; Hong, Charles C

    2015-12-04

    The lack of measurable single-cell contractility of human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac myocytes (hiPSC-CMs) currently limits the utility of hiPSC-CMs for evaluating contractile performance for both basic research and drug discovery. To develop a culture method that rapidly generates contracting single hiPSC-CMs and allows quantification of cell shortening with standard equipment used for studying adult CMs. Single hiPSC-CMs were cultured for 5 to 7 days on a 0.4- to 0.8-mm thick mattress of undiluted Matrigel (mattress hiPSC-CMs) and compared with hiPSC-CMs maintained on a control substrate (method enables the rapid generation of robustly contracting hiPSC-CMs and enhances maturation. This new method allows quantification of contractile performance at the single-cell level, which should be valuable to disease modeling, drug discovery, and preclinical cardiotoxicity testing. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Analysis of flow induced valve operation and pressure wave propagation for single and two-phase flow conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagel, H.

    1986-01-01

    The flow induced valve operation is calculated for single and two-phase flow conditions by the fluid dynamic computer code DYVRO and results are compared to experimental data. The analysis show that the operational behaviour of the valves is not only dependent on the condition of the induced flow, but also the pipe flow can cause a feedback as a result of the induced pressure waves. For the calculation of pressure wave propagation in pipes of which the operation of flow induced valves has a considerable influence it is therefore necessary to have a coupled analysis of the pressure wave propagation and the operational behaviour of the valves. The analyses of the fast transient transfer from steam to two-phase flow show a good agreement with experimental data. Hence even these very high loads on pipes resulting from such fluid dynamic transients can be calculated realistically. (orig.)

  8. Optical trapping assembling of clusters and nanoparticles in solution by CW and femtosecond lasers

    KAUST Repository

    Masuhara, Hiroshi

    2015-02-01

    Laser trapping of molecular systems in solution is classified into three cases: JUST TRAPPING, EXTENDED TRAPPING, and NUCLEATION and GROWTH. The nucleation in amino acid solutions depends on where the 1064-nm CW trapping laser is focused, and crystallization and liquid–liquid phase separation are induced by laser trapping at the solution/air surface and the solution/glass interface, respectively. Laser trapping crystallization is achieved even in unsaturated solution, on which unique controls of crystallization are made possible. Crystal size is arbitrarily controlled by tuning laser power for a plate-like anhydrous crystal of l-phenylalanine. The α- or γ-crystal polymorph of glycine is selectively prepared by changing laser power and polarization. Further efficient trapping of nanoparticles and their following ejection induced by femtosecond laser pulses are introduced as unique trapping phenomena and finally future perspective is presented.

  9. Optical trapping assembling of clusters and nanoparticles in solution by CW and femtosecond lasers

    KAUST Repository

    Masuhara, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Teruki; Yuyama, Kenichi; Usman, Anwar

    2015-01-01

    Laser trapping of molecular systems in solution is classified into three cases: JUST TRAPPING, EXTENDED TRAPPING, and NUCLEATION and GROWTH. The nucleation in amino acid solutions depends on where the 1064-nm CW trapping laser is focused, and crystallization and liquid–liquid phase separation are induced by laser trapping at the solution/air surface and the solution/glass interface, respectively. Laser trapping crystallization is achieved even in unsaturated solution, on which unique controls of crystallization are made possible. Crystal size is arbitrarily controlled by tuning laser power for a plate-like anhydrous crystal of l-phenylalanine. The α- or γ-crystal polymorph of glycine is selectively prepared by changing laser power and polarization. Further efficient trapping of nanoparticles and their following ejection induced by femtosecond laser pulses are introduced as unique trapping phenomena and finally future perspective is presented.

  10. Trapping and interactions of an ultracold gas of Cs2 molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, M.; Kraemer, T.; Herbig, J.; Waldburger, P.; Naegerl, H.C.; Chin, C.; Grimm, R.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We investigate dynamics and interactions of Cs 2 dimers in a CO2-laser dipole trap. Starting with a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of 2.2 x 10 5 Cs atoms, we create ultracold molecules in a single, weakly bound quantum state by sweeping the magnetic field across a narrow Feshbach resonance. When the molecules are created in free space, the conversion efficiency exceeds 30 %, yielding up to 50000 molecules. In our trapping experiments, about 6000 ultracold Cs 2 dimers are prepared in the optical trap at a temperature of 200 nK. We transfer the trapped molecules from the initial molecular state to other molecular states by following avoided crossings. We find two magnetically tunable resonances in collisions between the molecules for one of the molecular states. We interpret these Feshbach-liKEX resonances as being induced by Cs 4 bound states near the molecular scattering continuum. Further, we have discovered a new molecular state with very large orbital angular momentum of l = 8. This state is very weakly coupled to one of the initial molecular states. We use the associated avoided crossing as a molecular beam splitter to realize a molecular Ramsey-type interferometer. Refs. 2 (author)

  11. Tightly confined atoms in optical dipole traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, M.

    2002-12-01

    This thesis reports on the design and setup of a new atom trap apparatus, which is developed to confine few rubidium atoms in ultrahigh vacuum and make them available for controlled manipulations. To maintain low background pressure, atoms of a vapour cell are transferred into a cold atomic beam by laser cooling techniques, and accumulated by a magneto-optic trap (MOT) in a separate part of the vacuum system. The laser cooled atoms are then transferred into dipole traps made of focused far-off-resonant laser fields in single- or crossed-beam geometry, which are superimposed with the center of the MOT. Gaussian as well as hollow Laguerre-Gaussian (LG$ ( 01)$) beam profiles are used with red-detuned or blue-detuned light, respectively. Microfabricated dielectric phase objects allow efficient and robust mode conversion of Gaussian into Laguerre-Gaussian laser beams. Trap geometries can easily be changed due to the highly flexible experimental setup. The dipole trap laser beams are focused to below 10 microns at a power of several hundred milliwatts. Typical trap parameters, at a detuning of several ten nanometers from the atomic resonance, are trag depths of few millikelvin, trap frequencies near 30-kHz, trap light scattering rates of few hundred photons per atom and second, and lifetimes of several seconds. The number of dipole-trapped atoms ranges from more than ten thousand to below ten. The dipole-trapped atoms are detected either by a photon counting system with very efficient straylight discrimination, or by recapture into the MOT, which is imaged onto a sensitive photodiode and a CCD-camera. Due to the strong AC-Stark shift imposed by the high intensity trapping light, energy-selective resonant excitation and detection of the atoms is possible. The measured energy distribution is consistent with a harmonic potential shape and allows the determination of temperatures and heating rates. In first measurements, the thermal energy is found to be about 10 % of the

  12. [Trapping techniques for Solenopsis invicta].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao-song; Zhang, Qiang; Zhuang, Yiong-lin; Li, Gui-wen; Ji, Lin-peng; Wang, Jian-guo; Dai, Hua-guo

    2007-06-01

    A field study was made to investigate the trapping effects of different attractants, traps, and wind directions on Solenopsis invicta. The results showed that among the test attractants, TB1 (50 g fishmeal, 40 g peptone, 10 ml 10% sucrose water solution and 20 ml soybean oil) had the best effect, followed by TB2 (ham), TB6 (100 g cornmeal and 20 ml soybean oil) and TB4 (10 ml 10% sucrose water solution, 100 g sugarcane powder and 20 ml soybean oil), with a mean capture efficiency being 77.6, 58.7, 29 and 7.7 individuals per trap, respectively. No S. invicta was trapped with TB3 (10 ml 10% sucrose water solution, 100 g cornmeal and 20 ml soybean oil) and TB5 (honey). Tube trap was superior to dish trap, with a trapping efficiency of 75.2 and 35 individuals per trap, respectively. The attractants had better effects in leeward than in windward.

  13. Optical trapping of gold aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Regina K.; Pedersen, Liselotte Jauffred; Taheri, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Aerosol trapping has proven challenging and was only recently demonstrated.1 This was accomplished by utilizing an air chamber designed to have a minimum of turbulence and a laser beam with a minimum of aberration. Individual gold nano-particles with diameters between 80 nm and 200 nm were trapped...... in air using a 1064 nm laser. The positions visited by the trapped gold nano-particle were quantified using a quadrant photo diode placed in the back focal plane. The time traces were analyzed and the trapping stiffness characterizing gold aerosol trapping determined and compared to aerosol trapping...... of nanometer sized silica and polystyrene particles. Based on our analysis, we concluded that gold nano-particles trap more strongly in air than similarly sized polystyrene and silica particles. We found that, in a certain power range, the trapping strength of polystyrene particles is linearly decreasing...

  14. Effect of free radical spin trap N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone (PBN) on seizures induced in immature rats by homocysteic acid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Folbergrová, Jaroslava; Druga, Rastislav; Otáhal, Jakub; Haugvicová, Renata; Mareš, Pavel; Kubová, Hana

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 201, č. 1 (2006), s. 105-119 ISSN 0014-4886 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/05/2015; GA ČR(CZ) GA309/02/1238 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : DL-homocysteic acid induced seizures * neuronal damage * protection Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.156, year: 2006

  15. Repair and gamma radiation-induced single- and double-strand breaks in DNA of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, S.I.

    1981-01-01

    Studies in the kinetics of repair of γ-radiation-induced single- and double-strand breaks in DNA of E. coli cells showed that double-strand DNA breaks are rejoined by the following two ways. The first way is conditioned by repair of single-strand breaks and represents the repair of ''oblique'' double-strand breaks in DNA, whereas the second way is conditioned by functioning of the recombination mechanisms and, to all appearance, represents the repair of ''direct'' double-strand breaks in DNA

  16. Spin-glass polyamorphism induced by a magnetic field in LaMnO3 single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremenko, V. V.; Sirenko, V. A.; Baran, A.; Čižmár, E.; Feher, A.

    2018-05-01

    We present experimental evidence of field-driven transition in spin-glass state, similar to pressure-induced transition between amorphous phases in structural and metallic glasses, attributed to the polyamorphism phenomena. Cusp in temperature dependences of ac magnetic susceptibility of weakly disordered LaMnO3 single crystal is registered below the temperature of magnetic ordering. Frequency dependence of the cusp temperature proves its spin-glass origin. The transition induced by a magnetic field in spin-glass state, is manifested by peculiarity in dependence of cusp temperature on applied magnetic field. Field dependent maximum of heat capacity is observed in the same magnetic field and temperature range.

  17. Investigation of electrically-active deep levels in single-crystalline diamond by particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kada, W., E-mail: kada.wataru@gunma-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Science and Technology, Gunma University, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Kambayashi, Y.; Ando, Y. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Gunma University, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Onoda, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Umezawa, H.; Mokuno, Y. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan); Shikata, S. [Kwansei Gakuin Univ., 2-1, Gakuen, Mita, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan); Makino, T.; Koka, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Hanaizumi, O. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Gunma University, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Kamiya, T.; Ohshima, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2016-04-01

    To investigate electrically-active deep levels in high-resistivity single-crystalline diamond, particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy (QTS) techniques were performed using 5.5 MeV alpha particles and 9 MeV carbon focused microprobes. For unintentionally-doped (UID) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond, deep levels with activation energies of 0.35 eV and 0.43 eV were detected which correspond to the activation energy of boron acceptors in diamond. The results suggested that alpha particle and heavy ion induced QTS techniques are the promising candidate for in-situ investigation of deep levels in high-resistivity semiconductors.

  18. Comparative research on “high currents” induced by single event latch-up and transient-induced latch-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Rui; Han Jian-Wei; Zheng Han-Sheng; Yu Yong-Tao; Shangguang Shi-Peng; Feng Guo-Qiang; Ma Ying-Qi

    2015-01-01

    By using the pulsed laser single event effect facility and electro-static discharge (ESD) test system, the characteristics of the “high current”, relation with external stimulus and relevance to impacted modes of single event latch-up (SEL) and transient-induced latch-up (TLU) are studied, respectively, for a 12-bit complementary metal–oxide semiconductor (CMOS) analog-to-digital converter. Furthermore, the sameness and difference in physical mechanism between “high current” induced by SEL and that by TLU are disclosed in this paper. The results show that the minority carrier diffusion in the PNPN structure of the CMOS device which initiates the active parasitic NPN and PNP transistors is the common reason for the “high current” induced by SEL and for that by TLU. However, for SEL, the minority carrier diffusion is induced by the ionizing radiation, and an underdamped sinusoidal voltage on the supply node (the ground node) is the cause of the minority carrier diffusion for TLU. (paper)

  19. Escaping the tolerance trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammoudeh, S.; Madan, V.

    1994-01-01

    In order to examine the implications of the weakening of OPEC's responsiveness in adjusting its production levels, this paper explicitly incorporates rigidity in the quantity adjustment mechanism, thereby extending previous research which assumed smooth quantity adjustments. The rigidity is manifested in a tolerance range for the discrepancy between the declared target price and that of the market. This environment gives rise to a 'tolerance trap' which impedes the convergence process and inevitably brings the market to a standstill before its reaches the targeted price and revenue objectives. OPEC's reaction to the standstill has important implications for the achievement of the target-based equilibrium and for the potential collapse of the market price. This paper examines OPEC's policy options in the tolerance trap and reveals that the optional policy in order to break this impasse and move closer to the equilibrium point is gradually to reduce output and not to flood the market. (Author)

  20. High-resolution phenotypic profiling of natural products-induced effects on the single-cell level

    KAUST Repository

    Kremb, Stephan Georg

    2017-03-15

    Natural products (NPs) are highly evolved molecules making them a valuable resource for new therapeutics. Here we demonstrate the usefulness of broad-spectrum phenotypic profiling of NP-induced perturbations on single cells with imaging-based High-Content Screening to inform on physiology, mechanisms-of-actions, and multi-level toxicity. Our technology platform aims at broad applicability using a comprehensive marker panel with standardized settings streamlined towards an easy implementation in laboratories dedicated to natural products research.

  1. Sediment Trapping in Estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchard, Hans; Schuttelaars, Henk M.; Ralston, David K.

    2018-01-01

    Estuarine turbidity maxima (ETMs) are generated by a large suite of hydrodynamic and sediment dynamic processes, leading to longitudinal convergence of cross-sectionally integrated and tidally averaged transport of cohesive and noncohesive suspended particulate matter (SPM). The relative importance of these processes for SPM trapping varies substantially among estuaries depending on topography, fluvial and tidal forcing, and SPM composition. The high-frequency dynamics of ETMs are constrained by interactions with the low-frequency dynamics of the bottom pool of easily erodible sediments. Here, we use a transport decomposition to present processes that lead to convergent SPM transport, and review trapping mechanisms that lead to ETMs at the landward limit of the salt intrusion, in the freshwater zone, at topographic transitions, and by lateral processes within the cross section. We use model simulations of example estuaries to demonstrate the complex concurrence of ETM formation mechanisms. We also discuss how changes in SPM trapping mechanisms, often caused by direct human interference, can lead to the generation of hyperturbid estuaries.

  2. Radiation- and phonon-bottleneck--induced tunneling in the Fe8 single-molecule magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, M.; Friedman, Jonathan R.; Chen, W.; Tuominen, M. T.; Beedle, C. C.; Rumberger, E. M.; Hendrickson, D. N.

    2008-04-01

    We measure magnetization changes in a single crystal of the single-molecule magnet Fe8 when exposed to intense, short (spin dynamics, allowing observation of thermally assisted resonant tunneling between spin states at the 100 ns time scale. Detailed numerical simulations quantitatively reproduce the data and yield a spin-phonon relaxation time T1~40 ns.

  3. Screening the Hanford tanks for trapped gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitney, P.

    1995-10-01

    The Hanford Site is home to 177 large, underground nuclear waste storage tanks. Hydrogen gas is generated within the waste in these tanks. This document presents the results of a screening of Hanford's nuclear waste storage tanks for the presence of gas trapped in the waste. The method used for the screening is to look for an inverse correlation between waste level measurements and ambient atmospheric pressure. If the waste level in a tank decreases with an increase in ambient atmospheric pressure, then the compressibility may be attributed to gas trapped within the waste. In this report, this methodology is not used to estimate the volume of gas trapped in the waste. The waste level measurements used in this study were made primarily to monitor the tanks for leaks and intrusions. Four measurement devices are widely used in these tanks. Three of these measure the level of the waste surface. The remaining device measures from within a well embedded in the waste, thereby monitoring the liquid level even if the liquid level is below a dry waste crust. In the past, a steady rise in waste level has been taken as an indicator of trapped gas. This indicator is not part of the screening calculation described in this report; however, a possible explanation for the rise is given by the mathematical relation between atmospheric pressure and waste level used to support the screening calculation. The screening was applied to data from each measurement device in each tank. If any of these data for a single tank indicated trapped gas, that tank was flagged by this screening process. A total of 58 of the 177 Hanford tanks were flagged as containing trapped gas, including 21 of the 25 tanks currently on the flammable gas watch list

  4. Changes in the biomechanical properties of a single cell induced by nonthermal atmospheric pressure micro-dielectric barrier discharge plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyeongwon; Choi, Eun Ha; Kim, Kyung Sook

    2017-10-01

    Mechanical properties of a single cell are closely related to the fate and functions of the cell. Changes in mechanical properties may cause diseases or cell apoptosis. Selective cytotoxic effects of nonthermal atmospheric pressure micro-dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma have been demonstrated on cancer cells. In this work, changes in the mechanical properties of a single cell induced by nonthermal atmospheric pressure micro-DBD plasma were investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Two cervical cancer cell lines (HeLa and SiHa) and normal human fibroblast cells (HFBs) were exposed to micro-DBD plasma for various exposure times. The elasticity of a single cell was determined by force-distance curve measurement using AFM. Young's modulus was decreased by plasma treatment for all cells. The Young's modulus of plasma-treated HeLa cells was decreased by 75% compared to nontreated HeLa cells. In SiHa cells and HFBs, elasticity was decreased slightly. Chemical changes induced by the plasma treatment, which were observed by Raman spectroscopy, were also significant in HeLa cells compared to SiHa cells and HFBs. These results suggested that the molecular changes induced by micro-DBD plasma were related to cell mechanical changes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Gravity Affects the Closure of the Traps in Dionaea muscipula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Pandolfi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula Ellis is a carnivorous plant known for its ability to capture insects thanks to the fast snapping of its traps. This fast movement has been long studied and it is triggered by the mechanical stimulation of hairs, located in the middle of the leaves. Here we present detailed experiments on the effect of microgravity on trap closure recorded for the first time during a parabolic flight campaign. Our results suggest that gravity has an impact on trap responsiveness and on the kinetics of trap closure. The possible role of the alterations of membrane permeability induced by microgravity on trap movement is discussed. Finally we show how the Venus flytrap could be an easy and effective model plant to perform studies on ion channels and aquaporin activities, as well as on electrical activity in vivo on board of parabolic flights and large diameter centrifuges.

  6. Thermal stability of radiation-induced free radicals in γ-irradiated l-alanine single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maltar-Strmecki, N.; Rakvin, B.

    2005-01-01

    Decay of the radiation-induced stable free radicals in l-alanine single crystals and powders at the temperatures from 379 to 476K was examined by electron paramagnetic resonance. For single crystals, the calculated activation energy of the radical decay is 104.3±1.7kJ/mol (i.e. 12 538+/-202K) and the frequency factor lnν 0 is 24.1±0.4min -1 . The lifetime of the radical in single crystals at 296K is 162 years. The results confirm the long-term stability of the radicals, but the decay was found to be faster in large crystals than in powders

  7. Single Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Induces Genotoxicity in Adult Zebrafish and its Non-Irradiated Progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, J; Neuparth, T; Trigo, M; Costa, P; Vieira, D; Cunha, L; Ponte, F; Costa, P S; Metello, L F; Carvalho, A P

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated to what extent a single exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation can induce genotoxic damage in irradiated adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) and its non-irradiated F1 progeny. Four groups of adult zebrafish were irradiated with a single dose of X-rays at 0 (control), 100, 500 and 1000 mGy, respectively, and couples of each group were allowed to reproduce following irradiation. Blood of parental fish and whole-body offspring were analysed by the comet assay for detection of DNA damage. The level of DNA damage in irradiated parental fish increased in a radiation dose-dependent manner at day 1 post-irradiation, but returned to the control level thereafter. The level of DNA damage in the progeny was directly correlated with the parental irradiation dose. Results highlight the genotoxic risk of a single exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation in irradiated individuals and also in its non-irradiated progeny.

  8. Single molecule manipulation at low temperature and laser scanning tunnelling photo-induced processes analysis through time-resolved studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedel, Damien

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes, firstly, the statistical analysis used to determine the processes that occur during the manipulation of a single molecule through electronically induced excitations with a low temperature (5 K) scanning tunnelling microscope (STM). Various molecular operation examples are described and the ability to probe the ensuing molecular manipulation dynamics is discussed within the excitation context. It is, in particular, shown that such studies can reveal reversible manipulation for tuning dynamics through variation of the excitation energy. Secondly, the photo-induced process arising from the irradiation of the STM junction is also studied through feedback loop dynamics analysis, allowing us to distinguish between photo-thermally and photo-electronically induced signals.

  9. Single-strand breaks in supercoiled DNA induced by vacuum-UV radiation in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takakura, Kaoru; Ishikawa, Mitsuo; Hieda, Kotaro; Kobayashi, Katsumi; Ito, Atsushi; Ito, Takashi

    1986-09-01

    The induction of single-strand breaks in the DNA of plasmid pBR 322 by vacuum-UV radiation above 145 nm in aqueous solutions was studied in relation to the production of OH-radicals in water. The similarity and dissimilarity were examined on the wavelength dependence between the two effects. The maximum of single strand breaks at 150 nm could be explained by the action of OH-radicals derived from direct water photolysis: the maximum at 180 nm remains unexplained. There was no indication that the direct absorption of photon by the DNA molecule plays an important role in the production of single-strand breaks.

  10. Single-strand breaks in supercoiled DNA induced by vacuum-UV radiation in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takakura, Kaoru; Ishikawa, Mitsuo; Hieda, Kotaro; Kobayashi, Katsumi; Ito, Atsushi; Ito, Takashi

    1986-01-01

    The induction of single-strand breaks in the DNA of plasmid pBR 322 by vacuum-UV radiation above 145 nm in aqueous solutions was studied in relation to the production of OH-radicals in water. The similarity and dissimilarity were examined on the wavelength dependence between the two effects. The maximum of single strand breaks at 150 nm could be explained by the action of OH-radicals derived from direct water photolysis: the maximum at 180 nm remains unexplained. There was no indication that the direct absorption of photon by the DNA molecule plays an important role in the production of single-strand breaks. (author)

  11. Trapping and breaking of in vivo nicked DNA during pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sharik R.; Kuzminov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) offers a high-resolution approach to quantify chromosomal fragmentation in bacteria, measured as percent of chromosomal DNA entering the gel. The degree of separation in PFG depends upon the size of DNA, as well as various conditions of electrophoresis, such as electric field strength (FS), time of electrophoresis, switch time and buffer composition. Here we describe a new parameter, the structural integrity of the sample DNA itself, that influences its migration through PFGs. We show that sub-chromosomal fragments containing both spontaneous and DNA damage-induced nicks are prone to breakage during PFGE. Such breakage at single strand interruptions results in artefactual decrease in molecular weight of linear DNA making accurate determination of the number of double strand breaks difficult. While breakage of nicked sub-chromosomal fragments is FS-independent, some high molecular weight sub-chromosomal fragments are also trapped within wells under the standard PFGE conditions. This trapping can be minimized by lowering the field strength and increasing the time of electrophoresis. We discuss how breakage of nicked DNA may be mechanistically linked to trapping. Our results suggest how to optimize conditions for PFGE when quantifying chromosomal fragmentation induced by DNA damage. PMID:23770235

  12. A single social defeat induces short-lasting behavioral sensitization to amphetamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, JG; Wasilewski, M; van der Vegt, BJ; Buwalda, B; Koolhaas, Jacob

    2005-01-01

    Repeated, intermittent exposure to psychostimulants or stressors results in long-lasting, progressive sensitization of the behavioral effects of a subsequent amphetamine (AMPH) challenge. Although behavioral sensitization has also been observed following a single drug pretreatment, the sensitizing

  13. Phototransformation-Induced Aggregation of Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: The Importance of Amorphous Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with proper functionalization are desirable for applications that require dispersion in aqueous and biological environments, and functionalized SWCNTs also serve as building blocks for conjugation with specific molecules in these applicatio...

  14. Stereoelectronic Effect-Induced Conductance Switching in Aromatic Chain Single-Molecule Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Na; Wang, Jinying; Jia, Chuancheng; Liu, Zitong; Zhang, Xisha; Yu, Chenmin; Li, Mingliang; Wang, Shuopei; Gong, Yao; Sun, Hantao; Zhang, Guanxin; Liu, Zhirong; Zhang, Guangyu; Liao, Jianhui; Zhang, Deqing; Guo, Xuefeng

    2017-02-08

    Biphenyl, as the elementary unit of organic functional materials, has been widely used in electronic and optoelectronic devices. However, over decades little has been fundamentally understood regarding how the intramolecular conformation of biphenyl dynamically affects its transport properties at the single-molecule level. Here, we establish the stereoelectronic effect of biphenyl on its electrical conductance based on the platform of graphene-molecule single-molecule junctions, where a specifically designed hexaphenyl aromatic chain molecule is covalently sandwiched between nanogapped graphene point contacts to create stable single-molecule junctions. Both theoretical and temperature-dependent experimental results consistently demonstrate that phenyl twisting in the aromatic chain molecule produces different microstates with different degrees of conjugation, thus leading to stochastic switching between high- and low-conductance states. These investigations offer new molecular design insights into building functional single-molecule electrical devices.

  15. Can camera traps monitor Komodo dragons a large ectothermic predator?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achmad Ariefiandy

    Full Text Available Camera trapping has greatly enhanced population monitoring of often cryptic and low abundance apex carnivores. Effectiveness of passive infrared camera trapping, and ultimately population monitoring, relies on temperature mediated differences between the animal and its ambient environment to ensure good camera detection. In ectothermic predators such as large varanid lizards, this criterion is presumed less certain. Here we evaluated the effectiveness of camera trapping to potentially monitor the population status of the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis, an apex predator, using site occupancy approaches. We compared site-specific estimates of site occupancy and detection derived using camera traps and cage traps at 181 trapping locations established across six sites on four islands within Komodo National Park, Eastern Indonesia. Detection and site occupancy at each site were estimated using eight competing models that considered site-specific variation in occupancy (ψand varied detection probabilities (p according to detection method, site and survey number using a single season site occupancy modelling approach. The most parsimonious model [ψ (site, p (site survey; ω = 0.74] suggested that site occupancy estimates differed among sites. Detection probability varied as an interaction between site and survey number. Our results indicate that overall camera traps produced similar estimates of detection and site occupancy to cage traps, irrespective of being paired, or unpaired, with cage traps. Whilst one site showed some evidence detection was affected by trapping method detection was too low to produce an accurate occupancy estimate. Overall, as camera trapping is logistically more feasible it may provide, with further validation, an alternative method for evaluating long-term site occupancy patterns in Komodo dragons, and potentially other large reptiles, aiding conservation of this species.

  16. Can camera traps monitor Komodo dragons a large ectothermic predator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariefiandy, Achmad; Purwandana, Deni; Seno, Aganto; Ciofi, Claudio; Jessop, Tim S

    2013-01-01

    Camera trapping has greatly enhanced population monitoring of often cryptic and low abundance apex carnivores. Effectiveness of passive infrared camera trapping, and ultimately population monitoring, relies on temperature mediated differences between the animal and its ambient environment to ensure good camera detection. In ectothermic predators such as large varanid lizards, this criterion is presumed less certain. Here we evaluated the effectiveness of camera trapping to potentially monitor the population status of the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis), an apex predator, using site occupancy approaches. We compared site-specific estimates of site occupancy and detection derived using camera traps and cage traps at 181 trapping locations established across six sites on four islands within Komodo National Park, Eastern Indonesia. Detection and site occupancy at each site were estimated using eight competing models that considered site-specific variation in occupancy (ψ)and varied detection probabilities (p) according to detection method, site and survey number using a single season site occupancy modelling approach. The most parsimonious model [ψ (site), p (site survey); ω = 0.74] suggested that site occupancy estimates differed among sites. Detection probability varied as an interaction between site and survey number. Our results indicate that overall camera traps produced similar estimates of detection and site occupancy to cage traps, irrespective of being paired, or unpaired, with cage traps. Whilst one site showed some evidence detection was affected by trapping method detection was too low to produce an accurate occupancy estimate. Overall, as camera trapping is logistically more feasible it may provide, with further validation, an alternative method for evaluating long-term site occupancy patterns in Komodo dragons, and potentially other large reptiles, aiding conservation of this species.

  17. Can Camera Traps Monitor Komodo Dragons a Large Ectothermic Predator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariefiandy, Achmad; Purwandana, Deni; Seno, Aganto; Ciofi, Claudio; Jessop, Tim S.

    2013-01-01

    Camera trapping has greatly enhanced population monitoring of often cryptic and low abundance apex carnivores. Effectiveness of passive infrared camera trapping, and ultimately population monitoring, relies on temperature mediated differences between the animal and its ambient environment to ensure good camera detection. In ectothermic predators such as large varanid lizards, this criterion is presumed less certain. Here we evaluated the effectiveness of camera trapping to potentially monitor the population status of the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis), an apex predator, using site occupancy approaches. We compared site-specific estimates of site occupancy and detection derived using camera traps and cage traps at 181 trapping locations established across six sites on four islands within Komodo National Park, Eastern Indonesia. Detection and site occupancy at each site were estimated using eight competing models that considered site-specific variation in occupancy (ψ)and varied detection probabilities (p) according to detection method, site and survey number using a single season site occupancy modelling approach. The most parsimonious model [ψ (site), p (site*survey); ω = 0.74] suggested that site occupancy estimates differed among sites. Detection probability varied as an interaction between site and survey number. Our results indicate that overall camera traps produced similar estimates of detection and site occupancy to cage traps, irrespective of being paired, or unpaired, with cage traps. Whilst one site showed some evidence detection was affected by trapping method detection was too low to produce an accurate occupancy estimate. Overall, as camera trapping is logistically more feasible it may provide, with further validation, an alternative method for evaluating long-term site occupancy patterns in Komodo dragons, and potentially other large reptiles, aiding conservation of this species. PMID:23527027

  18. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of cathepsin S and the risks of asthma attack induced by acaroid mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chaopin; Chen, Qi; Jiang, Yuxin; Liu, Zhiming

    2015-01-01

    To investigate association between the three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, rs146456111, rs143154304 and rs147260142) in cathepsin S (Cat S) and the risks of allergic asthma attack induced by the acaroid mites in the Chinese population. A case-control study was performed in 412 cases and 454 volunteers/controls to evaluate the effects of three SNPs in Cat S on the risks of asthma attack. The genotypes were determined using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cleaved amplification polymorphism sequence-tagged sites (PCR-RFLP). The frequencies of genotypes and alleles in these SNPs in the asthmatic group were also analyzed between the two groups. The locus of rs146456111 in Cat S gene, the allele frequency of A and C in asthmatic group were significantly different from the control group (χ(2) = 184.425, P = 0.000), and the difference was significant regarding the distribution of the genotypes (AA, AC, and CC) between asthmatic subjects and normal controls (χ(2) = 177.915, P = 0.000). Logistic regression analysis revealed that the AC, CC, and AC + CC genotypes were significantly increased with the risk of asthma (AC vs. AA, OR = 4.013, 95% CI = 2.989-4.751, P = 0.000; CC vs. AA, OR = 3.167, 95% CI = 2.483-3.785, P = 0.000; AC + CC vs. AA, OR = 3.418, 95% CI = 2.381-4.214, P = 0.000, respectively), compared with AA genotype. Moreover, by comparison with allele A, allele C (OR = 2.187, 95% CI = 1.743-2.281, P asthma; For the locus of rs143154304, compared with the allele frequency G with A in control group, there was no difference (χ(2) = 1.434, P = 0.231) in that of asthmatic group, as well as the distributions of the genotypes (AA, AG, and GG) between asthmatic subjects and normal controls (χ(2) = 1.997, P = 0.369); Logistic regression analysis showed that the AG, GG, and AG + GG genotypes were no risk to asthma (AG vs. AA, OR = 0.991, 95% CI = 0.625-1.507, P = 0.968; GG vs. AA, OR = 0.812, 95% CI = 0.525-1.258, P = 0.352; AG + GG vs. AA, OR = 0.914, 95

  19. Radiation-induced base substitution mutagenesis in single-stranded DNA phage M13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandenburger, A.; Godson, G.N.; Glickman, B.W.; Sluis, C.A. van

    1981-01-01

    To elucidate the relative contributions of targeted and untargeted mutations to γ and UV radiation mutagenesis, the DNA sequences of 174 M13 revertant phages isolated from stocks of irradiated or unirradiated amber mutants grown in irradiated (SOS-induced) or unirradiated (non-induced) host bacteria, have been determined. Differences in the spectra of base change mutations induced in the various conditions were apparent, but no obvious specificity of mutagenesis was detected. In particular, under the present conditions, pyrimidine dimers did not seem to be the principal sites of UV-induced base substitution mutagenesis, suggesting that such mutagenesis occurs at the sites of lesions other than pyrimidine dimers, or is untargeted. (U.K.)

  20. Solar light-induced production of reactive oxygen species by single walled carbon nanotubes in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photosensitizing processes of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) which include photo-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) convert light energy into oxidizing chemical energy that mediates transformations of nanomaterials. The oxidative stress associated with ROS may p...