WorldWideScience

Sample records for single tooth implants

  1. Flapless single-tooth immediate implant placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Breno Carnevalli Franco; de Carvalho, Elaine Manso Oliveira Franco; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek

    2013-01-01

    This 15-year prospective study evaluated the success rate and preservation of the gingival margin of single implants placed in a flapless procedure loaded immediately after extraction or after a healing period. Immediate flapless implant placement was performed in patients who fulfilled specified inclusion criteria. Implants were either immediately restored with a provisional crown or left unloaded (received healing abutment only). Implant success and gingival margin levels were evaluated after implant placement and after 1 to 15 years. A total of 305 healthy nonsmoking subjects (90 men, 215 women) were treated with 430 immediate implants during a 15-year period (December 1994 to December 2009) and monitored for 1 to 15 years. Two hundred seventy-five implants received an immediate provisional crown, and 155 received a healing abutment. The implant survival rate was 93.03% (± 3.74%). The immediate provisional helped to maintain the original gingival margin, although the implant survival rate was higher for implants that were not immediately restored (96.78%) than for the implants that were immediately restored with a provisional (90.9%). This 15-year prospective study showed a favorable implant success rate related to the flapless immediate implant placement protocol with healing abutment placement or an immediate provisional crown to replace a single missing tooth.

  2. Endodontic therapy or single tooth implant? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabinejad, Mahmoud; Lozada, Jaime; Puterman, Israel; White, Shane N

    2008-06-01

    Should a tooth with pulpal involvement be saved through endodontic therapy, or extracted and replaced with a single tooth implant? Within the limitations of the existing literature, this systematic review of treatment outcomes found that initial endodontic treatment had a high long-term survival rate, equivalent to replacement of a missing tooth with an implant-supported restoration. Single tooth implants should be considered as the first treatment option for patients requiring extraction and tooth replacement.

  3. Patient Discomfort Following Single-Tooth Implant Placement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spin-Neto, Rubens; Pontes, Ana Emília Farias; Wenzel, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Evaluate postoperative discomfort (pain, bleeding and swelling) in single-tooth implant patients submitted to immediate or conventional tooth restoration together with assessment of treatment time. Methods: Twenty-four patients who received single-tooth maxillary dental implants were randomly...... assigned to an IR (Immediate Restoration) or CR (Conventional Restoration) group. In IR, an implant was inserted and a provisional tooth crown was delivered within the same session, while in CR it was delivered three months after implantation. Pain (first three days), bleeding (first day) and swelling...

  4. Fracture resistance of single-tooth implant-supported

    OpenAIRE

    Piloto, P.A.G.; Piloto, Joana F.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify and compare the fracture behaviour of the ceramic used in a single-tooth implant-supported. This type of prosthesis is mainly used when a single tooth replacement is needed. Two different materials are tested for the abutment (ceramic and titanium), assuming fully connection to the crown. The implant is made of Titanium. The numerical simulations used the concept of continuous damage mechanics to predict crack pattern when loading the tooth in the vert...

  5. Factors associated with implant recommendation for single-tooth replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shammari, Khalaf F; Al-Ansari, Jassem M; Al-Khabbaz, Areej K; Nociti, Francisco H; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2005-06-01

    The use of dental implants for single-tooth replacement has been established as a predictable treatment option; yet, limited data are available as to how frequently this option is recommended to patients. The aim of the present study was to examine the frequency of implant recommendation by general dental practitioners after single-tooth extraction and factors influencing their decision to recommend an implant. All single-tooth extractions performed in 26 general dental practice clinics in Kuwait over a 30-day period were examined. Dentists in these centers used the study form to record demographic data, the type of tooth extracted, reason for extraction, and replacement options presented to the patients. Univariate and logistic regression analyses were used to examine associations between background factors and decisions to recommend implant therapy. A total of 1367 patients (mean age, 37.9 +/- 11.8 years) had an extraction of one tooth during the study period. Forty-three patients were offered implants as a replacement option (3.3% of the total sample; 8.6% of patients who were offered tooth replacement options). Factors associated significantly with the recommendation of an implant by Kuwaiti dentists to their patients included younger age, regular dental maintenance visits, and adequate oral hygiene practices (P single-tooth replacement in the present sample of dentists was low. Factors associated significantly with dentist recommendation of an implant for single-tooth replacement included age, history of dental maintenance, and oral hygiene practices.

  6. An alternative method for restoring single-tooth implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArdle, B F; Clarizio, L F

    2001-09-01

    Having laboratory technicians prepare soft-tissue casts and implant abutments with or without concomitant removable temporary prostheses during the restorative phase of single-tooth replacement is an accepted practice. It can, however, result in functional and esthetic intraoral discrepancies. Single-tooth implants can be restored with crowns (like those for natural teeth) fabricated at a dental laboratory on casts obtained from final impressions of prepared implant abutments. In the case reported, the restorative dentist restored the patient's single-tooth implant after taking a transfer impression. He constructed a cast simulating the peri-implant soft tissue with final impression material and prepared the abutment on this model. His dental assistant then fabricated a fixed provisional restoration on the prepared abutment. At the patient's next visit, the dentist torqued the prepared abutment onto the implant, took a final impression and inserted the provisional restoration. A crown was made conventionally at the dental laboratory and cemented in place at the following visit. This alternative method for restoring single-tooth implants enhances esthetics by more accurately simulating marginal gingival architecture. It also improves function by preloading the implant through fixed temporization after the dentist, rather than the laboratory technician, prepares the abutment to the dentist's preferred contours.

  7. Tactile sensibility of single-tooth implants and natural teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enkling, Norbert; Nicolay, Claudia; Utz, Karl-Heinz; Jöhren, Peter; Wahl, Gerhard; Mericske-Stern, Regina

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this randomized split-mouth clinical trial was to determine the active tactile sensibility between single-tooth implants and opposing natural teeth and to compare it with the tactile sensibility of pairs of natural teeth on the contralateral side in the same mouth (intraindividual comparison). The hypothesis was that the active tactile sensibilities of the implant side and control side are equivalent. Sixty two subjects (n=36 from Bonn, n=26 from Bern) with single-tooth implants (22 anterior and 40 posterior dental implants) were asked to bite on narrow copper foil strips varying in thickness (5-200 microm) and to decide whether or not they were able to identify a foreign body between their teeth. Active tactile sensibility was defined as the 50% threshold of correct answers estimated by means of the Weibull distribution. The results obtained for the interocclusal perception sensibility differed between subjects far more than they differed between natural teeth and implants in the same individual [implant/natural tooth: 16.7+/-11.3 microm (0.6-53.1 microm); natural tooth/natural tooth: 14.3+/-10.6 microm (0.5-68.2 microm)]. The intraindividual differences only amounted to a mean value of 2.4+/-9.4 microm (-15.1 to 27.5 microm). The result of our statistical calculations showed that the active tactile sensibility of single-tooth implants, both in the anterior and posterior region of the mouth, in combination with a natural opposing tooth is similar to that of pairs of opposing natural teeth (double t-test, equivalence margin: +/-8 microm, P80%). Hence, the implants could be integrated in the stomatognathic control circuit.

  8. Guided tissue healing for single-tooth implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, G W; Reeves, G W; Duncan, J D

    1999-06-01

    The emergence profile of a single-tooth implant abutment has a significant effect on the esthetics of the final restoration. Most healing abutments are cylindrical, unlike the nonround contours of the natural teeth being replaced. The resulting peri-implant sulcus is round rather than having the correct anatomic cross-sectional shape. This disparity may compromise the ideal emergence profile of the final restoration. This article presents a technique in which a custom abutment and provisional crown or the definitive restoration can be placed at second-stage surgery to guide tissue healing to optimum form and esthetics.

  9. Single-tooth replacement by osseointegrated Astra Tech dental implants: a 2-year report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, U; Gotfredsen, K; Olsson, C

    1998-01-01

    This study presents the outcome of single-tooth restorations supported by Astra Tech single-tooth implants followed for 2 years. Forty-seven implants were placed in the same number of patients. Forty-three patients attended the second recall visit, and none of the evaluated implants have been...

  10. Patient Discomfort Following Single-Tooth Implant Placement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spin-Neto, Rubens; Pontes, Ana Emília Farias; Wenzel, Ann

    2014-01-01

    assigned to an IR (Immediate Restoration) or CR (Conventional Restoration) group. In IR, an implant was inserted and a provisional tooth crown was delivered within the same session, while in CR it was delivered three months after implantation. Pain (first three days), bleeding (first day) and swelling...

  11. Immediate implant therapy in clinical practice: single-tooth replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugazzotto, Paul A; Baker, Richard; Lightfoot, Scott

    2007-01-01

    Once viewed as an esoteric treatment option, implant therapy has demonstrated long-term predictability at least equal to that of more "conventional" treatment modalities. The continued evolution of implant surface technology and restorative options has made implant therapy the treatment modality of choice in many if not most, clinical situations. It is, therefore, only natural that the role of immediate implant therapy continues to expand. Proponents of immediate implant therapy advocate its use at the time of tooth removal or, in a partially or fully edentulous arch, to meet a variety of clinical challenges.

  12. Immediate provisional restoration of postextraction implants for maxillary single-tooth replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Alberto; Galli, Carlo; Mauro, Giovanni; Macaluso, Guido Maria

    2006-08-01

    The timing of implant placement and loading following tooth extraction has recently undergone substantial reconsideration. The authors tested a protocol of immediate loading of single implants placed at the time of tooth extraction in a consecutive case series. Thirty-three patients received a single implant-supported crown to replace a maxillary anterior tooth at the time of extraction. Regular recalls were planned for the following 4 years. One implant did not integrate, and another became unstable secondary to facial trauma. Overall patient satisfaction and clinical and radiographic parameters were good.

  13. A 10-Year Prospective Study of Single Tooth Implants Placed in the Anterior Maxilla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to evaluate the biological and technical outcomes of early and delayed placed single tooth implants after 10 years of follow-up. Materials and Methods: Twenty consecutive patients who needed a single tooth replacement in the anterior maxilla were included...... in this study. Ten implants were placed with an early placement protocol, that is, 4 weeks after tooth extraction, whereas the other 10 implants were placed with a conventional delayed placement protocol, for example, 12 weeks after tooth extraction. At the baseline and at the annual re-examinations, pain from...... and delayed implant placement. Patient satisfaction with the implant-supported single crowns reduced with time....

  14. The autogenous immediate implant supported single-tooth restoration: a 5-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelnuovo, Jacopo; Sönmez, Ayse Burçin

    2012-01-01

    When replacing a missing tooth in the esthetic zone, the implant supported single tooth restoration can result in a very natural and pleasing solution for the patient, being also a conservative procedure that preserves the adjacent remaining dentition. Immediate implant placement with an immediate provisional crown can avoid stressful and uncomfortable healing time for the patient who no longer has to wear an interim removable appliance. In selected clinical situations, excellent tooth esthetics for implant supported single tooth restorations can be achieved by using the natural extracted tooth as both provisional and final restoration. No longterm data is available today as far as the survival rate of such restorations and the predictability of such a treatment modality. This case report describes a technique for utilizing the patient's extracted tooth for the fabrication of an inconspicuous final anterior restoration, reporting a 5-year follow-up.

  15. Tooth retention through endodontic microsurgery or tooth replacement using single implants: a systematic review of treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabinejad, Mahmoud; Landaez, Maria; Milan, Marites; Sun, Chun Xiao; Henkin, Jeffrey; Al-Ardah, Aladdin; Kattadiyil, Mathew; Bahjri, Khaled; Dehom, Salem; Cortez, Elisa; White, Shane N

    2015-01-01

    Clinicians are regularly confronted with difficult choices. Should a tooth that has not healed through nonsurgical root canal treatment be treated through endodontic microsurgery or be replaced using a single implant? Acquiring complete, unbiased information to help clinicians and their patients make these choices requires a systematic review of the literature on treatment outcomes. The purpose of this systematic review was to compare the outcomes of tooth retention through endodontic microsurgery to tooth replacement using an implant supported single crown. Searches performed in PubMed, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and EMBASE databases were enriched by citation mining. Inclusion criteria were defined. Sentinel articles were identified and included in the final selection of studies. Weighted survival and success rates for single implants and endodontic microsurgery were calculated. The quality of the articles reporting on single implants and endodontic microsurgery was moderate. Data for single implants were much more plentiful than for endodontic microsurgery, but the endodontic microsurgery studies had a slightly higher quality rating. Single implants and endodontic microsurgery were not directly compared in the literature. Outcomes criteria were often unclear. At 4-6 years, single implants had higher survival rates than teeth treated with endodontic microsurgery. Qualitatively different success criteria precluded valid comparison of success rates. Survival rates for single implants and endodontic microsurgery were both high (higher for single implants). Appraisal was limited by a lack of direct treatment comparisons. Long-term studies with a broad range of carefully defined outcomes criteria are needed. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Single tooth immediate provisional restoration of dental implants: technique and early results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Michael; Finger, Israel; Castellon, Paulino; Lirettle, Denise

    2004-09-01

    Patients desire efficient restoration of missing teeth. Immediate provisionalization of implants at the time of placement can provide the patient with a tooth-like restoration. Our hypothesis is that preoperative fabrication of the implant abutment and provisional restoration can provide successful immediate provisionalization of implants, if specific diagnostic criteria are used for patient selection. This hypothesis is evaluated by prospectively following 74 implants thus treated for 6 months to 2 years. A technique is presented to illustrate a simple and reliable method to provisionally restore a single tooth restoration. The method involves preoperative placement of an implant analog into a model, preparation of the abutment on the model, and fabrication of a provisional crown out of occlusion. At the time of surgery, the implant is placed according to the prescription of the restorative dentist, the surgeon places the abutment and provisional crown, and the final restoration is fabricated after the implant integrates. Seventy of 74 (94.6%) restorations have been successful with up to 2-year follow-up, which is similar to single tooth implants treated using a 2-stage protocol. Single tooth immediate provisionalization implants are effective techniques when specific diagnostic criteria are used.

  17. Patient satisfaction with single-tooth implant therapy in the esthetic zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hartog, Laurens; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Santing, Hendrik J.; Vissink, Arjan; Raghoebar, Gerry M.

    2014-01-01

    This prospective study assessed patient satisfaction before and after single-tooth implant therapy in the esthetic zone. Before implant therapy, patients wore an acrylic resin tissue-supported removable partial denture (RPD). A total of 153 patients were included. Self-administered questionnaires

  18. Economic evaluation of single-tooth replacement: dental implant versus fixed partial denture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Younhee; Park, Joo-Yeon; Park, Sun-Young; Oh, Sung-Hee; Jung, YeaJi; Kim, Ji-Min; Yoo, Soo-Yeon; Kim, Seong-Kyun

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the cost-effectiveness from a societal perspective of a dental implant compared with a three-unit tooth-supported fixed partial denture (FPD) for the replacement of a single tooth in 2010. A decision tree was developed to estimate cost-effectiveness over a 10-year period. The survival rates of single-tooth implants and FPDs were extracted from a meta-analysis of single-arm studies. Medical costs included initial treatment costs, maintenance costs, and costs to treat complications. Patient surveys were used to obtain the costs of the initial single-tooth implant or FPD. Maintenance costs and costs to treat complications were based on surveys of seven clinical experts at dental clinics or hospitals. Transportation costs were calculated based on the number of visits for implant or FPD treatment. Patient time costs were estimated using the number of visits and time required, hourly wage, and employment rate. Future costs were discounted by 5% to convert to present values. The results of a 10-year period model showed that a single dental implant cost US $261 (clinic) to $342 (hospital) more than an FPD and had an average survival rate that was 10.4% higher. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $2,514 in a clinic and $3,290 in a hospital for a prosthesis in situ for 10 years. The sensitivity analysis showed that initial treatment costs and survival rate influenced the cost-effectiveness. If the cost of an implant were reduced to 80% of the current cost, the implant would become the dominant intervention. Although the level of evidence for effectiveness is low, and some aspects of single-tooth implants or FPDs, such as satisfaction, were not considered, this study will help patients requiring single-tooth replacement to choose the best treatment option.

  19. Clinical application of single-tooth replacement with ankylos implant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xu; Liu Xue; Zhang Heng; Deng Yan; Guo Zhaozhong; Zhang Yufeng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical effects of Ankylos implant system to restore the loss of single-tooth. Methods: 90 cases with loss of single-tooth were selected and treated with routinely two-stage surgery. When the patients presented with deficient alveolar ridge, guided bone regeneration (GBR), osteotome sinus floor elevation, lateral antrostomy surgery with simultaneous placement of implant were applied. They were restored with platinum ceramic crown. All the implants were followed up, and the records were kept about stability of the implant and abutment, the status of surrounding soft tissue, sealability of implant abutment junction and the marginal bone lossing through X-ray checking,and satisfaction of the patients to mastication and aspect of the restorations. The follow-up time was 1-2.5 years. Results: Among the cases,one case had peri-implant inflammation, and one case had porcelain dropped. No loosening occurred in the other implants and abuments. Implant abutment junction was sealed well. The marginal bone loss 1 year after final restoration was less than 1 mm. Soft tissue surrounding implants was healthy. The satisfaction rate was 98.9% (89/90). According to standard of implant success, 88 cases were successful, the 2.5-year cumulative success rate was 97.8%, 2 cases failed, and the failure rate was 2.2 %. Conclusion: A satisfactory treatment effects could be gotten by using Ankylos implant system to restore the loss of single-tooth. (authors)

  20. Implant-supported single-tooth restorations: a 5-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennström, Jan L; Ekestubbe, Annika; Gröndahl, Kerstin; Karlsson, Stig; Lindhe, Jan

    2005-06-01

    Comparatively few studies are available reporting at least 5 years of follow-up data of implant-supported single-tooth replacements. To evaluate prospectively the 5-year outcome of implant-supported single-tooth prosthetic restorations. Forty subjects (mean age 41 years), 23 males and 17 females, who required single-tooth prosthetic replacement for a missing tooth were recruited. A total of 45 self-tapping implants (Astra Tech ST-implants)--40 in the maxilla and five in the mandible--were installed in a two-stage procedure. Abutment connection was performed 3-6 months after implant installation. Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed at the completion of the prosthetic treatment and once a year during a 5-year follow-up period. The analysis of peri-implant bone level alteration was performed on subject and implant levels and by the use of analysis of variance and binary logistic regression. Three patients were lost during the 5 years of follow-up. One implant was lost after 2.5 years in function and another four implants could not be accounted for at the 5-year follow-up examination. The overall failure rate at 5 years was 2.6% (subject level) and 2.3% (implant level). The mean loss of marginal bone at the implants during the first year in function was 0.06 mm (SD 0.67) on the subject level and 0.02 mm (0.65) on the implant level. During the subsequent 4 years the annual change in peri-implant bone level amounted to -0.02 mm (0.22) on both subject and implant levels. Thus, the mean total bone level change over the 5-year interval was -0.14 mm (1.04) on subject level and -0.11 mm (1.00) on the implant level of analysis (p>0.05). The frequency of implants with a 5-year bone loss of > or =1 mm was 13%. Approximately 50% of the implants demonstrated no bone loss. The present clinical trial on single-tooth replacements with the Astra Tech implant system demonstrated that the bone loss during the first year of function as well as annually thereafter was

  1. A 10-year prospective study of single tooth implants placed in the anterior maxilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the biological and technical outcomes of early and delayed placed single tooth implants after 10 years of follow-up. Twenty consecutive patients who needed a single tooth replacement in the anterior maxilla were included in this study. Ten implants were placed with an early placement protocol, that is, 4 weeks after tooth extraction, whereas the other 10 implants were placed with a conventional delayed placement protocol, for example, 12 weeks after tooth extraction. At the baseline and at the annual re-examinations, pain from implant regions, mobility, plaque, mucositis, and marginal bone levels were recorded. Biological and technical complications were registered. The patients evaluated the functional and aesthetic outcomes subjectively on a visual analogue scale after 3 and 10 years. All implants were still in situ after 10 years. The cumulative implant survival rate was 100%. Two implant-supported crowns were remade because of ceramic fractures. The 10-year crown survival rate was 90%. No significant differences in implant survival rates were found between the early and delayed protocols, regarding plaque retention, mucositis, or marginal bone levels. After 10 years, the mean marginal bone loss at both sides of the implants was less than 1.0 mm in the two groups. During the 10-year interval, 1 patient lost more than 1.5 mm of marginal bone, 3 patients lost between 1.0 mm and 1.4 mm of bone, and 16 patients lost less than 1.0 mm of bone as an average of the mesial and distal bone loss. This 10-year prospective clinical trial demonstrated a 100% implant survival and a 90% crown survival. The average marginal bone level change was less than 1 mm, and there was no difference between early and delayed implant placement. Patient satisfaction with the implant-supported single crowns reduced with time. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Immediate loading of single-tooth implants in the posterior region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Marcus; Koeck, Bernd; Stark, Helmut; Wahl, Gerhard; Paillon, Roswitha

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical response and safety of immediately loaded single-tooth implants placed in the posterior region of the maxilla and mandible. Single-tooth implants were placed in healed extraction sites in 20 adult patients. Temporary pre-fabricated acrylic resin crowns were prepared and adjusted. The crown occlusion was adjusted to obtain minimal contacts in maximum intercuspation. After 6 weeks a ceramometal or all-ceramic crown was cemented. Radiographic and clinical examinations were made at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months. Cortical bone response and peri-implant mucosal responses were evaluated. The marginal bone level at the time of implant placement was preserved. The mean change in marginal bone level was 0.01 mm at 12 months. The mean Periotest value after 360 days was -4. The peri-implant mucosal adaptation to the anatomic form of the provisional crown resulted in a natural esthetic outcome, and a gain in papilla length was observed. One implant failure was recorded because of provisional luting cement impaction. Clinical research has shown that immediate loading is a possible treatment modality. The immediate functional loading of implants placed in this study resulted in bone adaptation to loading. A satisfactory success rate with positive tissue responses was achieved. The results of this limited investigation indicated that immediate loading of unsplinted single-tooth implants in the posterior region may be a viable treatment option with an esthetic outcome.

  3. Clinical outcomes of zirconia-based implant- and tooth-supported single crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejatidanesh, Farahnaz; Moradpoor, Hedayat; Savabi, Omid

    2016-01-01

    Zirconia-based restorations have been increasingly used on implant and teeth abutments, but the evidence about clinical outcomes of these restorations is limited. The aim of this study was to assess up to 7-year clinical outcomes of implant- and tooth-supported zirconia-based single crowns. In this retrospective study, 261 patients with 556 single crowns supported by either teeth (324) or implants (232) were examined during 3- to 7-year follow-up (mean observation of 60.70 months for tooth and 59.20 months for implant-supported crowns). California Dental Association (CDA) quality evaluation system was used to evaluate the restorations. Soft tissue status was assessed using plaque and gingival index scores, bleeding on probing, and pocket depth. Patient and professional satisfaction were evaluated by visual analog scale (VAS). The 5-year Kaplan-Meier survival probability was 98.3 and 97.3 for implant- and tooth-supported crowns, respectively. In regard to CDA rating, most of the crowns were ranked as either excellent or acceptable (99.5 %). The recorded failures were replacement of the crown due to porcelain chipping (3), implant failure (1), and teeth extraction (5). Soft tissue parameters were not affected by the restorations compare to control teeth. The VAS was high for both patients and clinicians. Zirconia-based single crowns on both tooth and implant abutments showed promising clinical performance in this up to 7-year follow-up. The zirconia-based single crowns can be used clinically for tooth- and implant-supported restorations.

  4. In patients requiring single-tooth replacement, what are the outcomes of implant- as compared to tooth-supported restorations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Thomas J; Eckert, Steven E

    2007-01-01

    The study provides a systematic review of the literature to determine the long-term survival characteristics of single implant-supported crowns and fixed partial dentures. A search of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Collaboration databases was conducted to identify articles that compared survival and success of fixed partial dentures and single implant-supported crowns. In addition to comparative cohort studies, articles that pertained specifically to single implant-supported crowns or fixed partial dentures were included in this review. Inclusion criteria for implant and fixed partial denture articles included a minimum 2-year study, primary publication in the English language, a minimum of 12 implants, implants designed to osseointegrate, and inclusion of data regarding implant and prosthetic performance. Data were analyzed using cumulative proportions of survival and success for both prosthetic types and for individual implants. Wilson score method was used to establish 95% confidence intervals for each population. The chi-square test for homogeneity was performed. The literature search failed to identify any articles that directly compared survival or success of single implant-supported restorations with fixed partial dentures. Following the search criteria, and independent analysis by reviewers, 51 articles were identified in the implant literature (agreement, 95.42%; kappa coefficient, 0.8976), and 41 were identified in the fixed partial denture literature (agreement, 90.97%; kappa coefficient, 0.7524). Pooled success of single-implant restorations at 60 months was 95.1% (CI: 92.2%-98.0%), while fixed partial dentures of all designs exhibited an 84.0% success rate (CI: 79.1%-88.9%). This systematic review of the scientific literature failed to demonstrate any direct comparative studies assessing clinical performance of single implant-supported crowns and tooth-supported fixed partial dentures. The analysis suggested differences at 60 months between survival

  5. Endodontic treatment options after unsuccessful initial root canal treatment: Alternatives to single-tooth implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabinejad, Mahmoud; White, Shane N

    2016-03-01

    Initial root canal treatment is highly successful, appreciated by patients, and cost-effective, but failures occur. Should a tooth with unsuccessful initial root canal treatment be treated by means of other endodontic procedures or be replaced by a single-tooth implant? Results from systematic reviews of the outcomes of nonsurgical retreatment, apical surgery, replantation, and autotransplantation show high tooth survival rates. Nonsurgical retreatment generally is prioritized before surgical endodontic treatment. Microsurgical endodontic treatment is superior to traditional surgical endodontic treatment and has high survival rates. Intentional replantation remains a viable alternative to extraction. Autotransplantation has a place, particularly in growing patients with an appropriate donor tooth. Single-tooth implants have higher survival rates, but the natural state has intrinsic value. The first-line treatment option after failure of initial root canal treatment is nonsurgical retreatment. Endodontic surgery, intentional replantation, and autotransplantation should be considered before extraction and replacement by a single-tooth implant. Comprehensive case assessment, evaluation of all endodontic options, and risk assessment for caries and periodontal disease are always necessary when choosing the optimal treatment for a patient when initial root canal treatment has failed to heal. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Immediate functional loading of implants in single tooth replacement: a prospective clinical multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, Mauro; La Scala, Vincenzo; Billi, Mauro; Di Dino, Biagio; Torrisi, Paolo; Berglundh, Tord

    2008-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the outcome of immediate functional loading of implants in single-tooth replacement using two different installation procedures. One hundred and fifty-one subjects, who required single-tooth rehabilitation in the area of 15-25 and 35-45, were enrolled in eight private clinics in Italy. The implant sites were randomly allocated to one of the following treatment groups. In the control group, in which a standard preparation procedure for implant placement and submerged healing of the implant was used, abutment connection and loading of the implants were performed 3 months after installation. In the test group 1, a standard preparation procedure for the implant placement and immediate functional loading of implant was carried out. In the test 2 group, however, a modified implant installation procedure (osteotome technique) was used followed by immediate functional loading of the implant. Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed at 3 and 12 months of follow-up at all sites. Three implants (5.5%) from the test 2 group (osteotome preparation) and one (2%) from the test 1 group (conventional drill preparation) failed to integrate and were removed one and three months after implant installation. The mean marginal bone loss assessed at 12 months was 0.31 mm (test 1), 0.25 mm (test 2) and 0.38 mm (control) (no statistically significant differences were found between the three treatment groups.) It is suggested that immediate functional loading of implants that are placed with a conventional installation technique and with sufficient primary stability may be considered as a valid treatment alternative in a single-tooth replacement.

  7. Implant-supported single-tooth restorations. A 12-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, Mauro; Ekestubbe, Annika; Lindhe, Jan; Wennström, Jan L

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate prospectively the 12-year outcome of implant-supported single-tooth restorations. Originally 45 self-tapping Astra Tech TiOblast ® ST-implants were installed by a two-stage protocol in 40 subjects requiring single-tooth prosthetic replacement for a missing tooth. Clinical and radiologic examinations were performed at completion of the prosthetic treatment 4-7 months after implant installation surgery and after 5 and 12 years in function. At 12 years 31 patients and 35 implants were available for evaluation. The overall failure rate after 12 years was 10.3% on the subject level and 9.1% on the implant level. The mean bone loss amounted to 0.67 mm (SD 2.20) on a subject level and 0.47 mm (1.72) on an implant level. Three subjects (10%) and three implants (8.6%) were diagnosed with peri-implantitis. Five subjects had experienced technical complications; three incidences of loosening of the abutment retention screw during the first 5 years and two minor porcelain fracture of the crown (two patients) between 5- and 12-years of follow-up. The findings reported in this 12-year prospective case series suggest that the use of the Astra Tech dental implants may be a valid treatment alternative for single-tooth replacement prostheses. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Immediate single tooth replacement with subepithelial connective tissue graft using platform switching implants: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Seunghwan; Rungcharassaeng, Kitichai; Kan, Joseph Y K; Roe, Phillip; Lozada, Jaime L

    2011-10-01

    This case series evaluated the facial gingival stability following single immediate tooth replacement in conjunction with subepithelial connective tissue graft (SCTG). Implant success rate and peri-implant tissue response were also reported. Ten patients (6 male, 4 female), with a mean age of 52.1 (range = 22.7 to 67.1) years, underwent immediate implant placement and provisionalization with SCTG and were evaluated clinically and radiographically at presurgery (T0), at the time of immediate tooth replacement and SCTG (T1), and 3 months (T2), 6 months (T3), and 12 months (T4) after surgery. Data were analyzed using the Friedman and Wilcoxon signed-ranks tests at the significance level of α = .05. At 1 year, 9 of 10 implants remained osseointegrated with the overall mean marginal bone change of -0.31 mm and a mean facial gingival level change of -0.05 mm. The modified plaque index scores showed that patients were able to maintain a good level of hygiene throughout the study. The papilla index score indicated that at T4, more than 50% of the papilla fill was observed in 89% of all sites. When proper 3-dimensional implant position is achieved and bone graft is placed into the implant-socket gap, favorable success rate and peri-implant tissue response of platform switching implants can be achieved following immediate tooth replacement in conjunction with subepithelial connective tissue graft.

  9. Local sinus lift for single-tooth implant. I: clinical and radiographic follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahnberg, Karl-Erik; Wallström, Mats; Rasmusson, Lars

    2011-09-01

    For single-tooth implant replacement in the posterior maxilla, it is often necessary to do an augmentation of the alveolar process because of post-extraction resorption and include part of the maxillary sinus. The purpose of this study is to present a technique for a local sinus lift with autogenous bone in a one-stage procedure. Additionally, volume changes of the grafted area were evaluated radiographically up to 2 years. Twenty patients, 12 female and 8 males, were included in the study. Single-tooth replacement was made in the second premolar area in 7 cases and in the molar area in 13 cases. Local sinus lift and implant installation were made simultaneously. Abutment connection was made after 6 months of healing. Two years of clinical and radiographic follow-ups have been made in all patients. The survival rate was 100%. The residual bone volume in the actual area was 2-5 mm preoperatively, after sinus lifting in mean 13 mm, after 1 year in mean 11.4 mm, and 2 years postoperatively in mean 10.6 mm. Local sinus lift with simultaneous bone augmentation and single-tooth replacement in the posterior maxilla is a predictable method although a certain bone volume reduction around the implant was evident at the 2-year follow-up. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Clinical evaluation and prosthetic complications of single tooth replacements by non-submerged implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mericske-Stern, R; Grütter, L; Rösch, R; Mericske, E

    2001-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate single tooth replacements by non-submerged implants. In the time period from 1990 to 1998, 72 patients were consecutively admitted for treatment with a total of 109 solid screw ITI-implants supporting single crowns. All crowns were ceramic to metal fused with a ceramic occlusal surface and mounted to the octa-abutment. The mean observation time was 4.3 years, ranging from >1 to 9 years. The implants were monitored regularly by periimplant parameters. Periapical radiographs using the parallel technique were taken after the healing period and in 1999 for comparative measurements. No implant was lost during the healing phase, while 3 failures occurred after a loaded period of 2.5 and >5 years, respectively. The 5-year cumulative survival rate was 99.1%. In the course of the study, only 2 implants exhibited marginal inflammation that required treatment. The radiographically measured distance (DIB) from the implant shoulder to the first implant-bone contact was significantly increased in 1999 and different between the two readings. However, this difference in DIB was not significant between implants with a short (1 year) and long (>5 years) observation period. It was concluded that changes in the crestal bone level occur mostly in the first postsurgical year. Prosthetic complications were rare, mostly encountered in the first year after loading and often limited to re-tightening of the occlusal screw.

  11. Anterior single-tooth dental implant restorations: now is the perfect time to recall significant contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Daniel Y

    2003-01-01

    Significant contributions by clinicians, researchers, and manufacturers have brought us to a previously almost unimaginable point in time, where it is possible to place and restore a single dental implant in the esthetic zone with a success rate above 96% and with the probability that it will look very much like a natural tooth. In addition, in select cases it is possible to do the extraction, implant placement, and provisional restoration on the same day. There is very little trauma at the implant site, which results in greater comfort for the patient and ultimately greater tissue preservation long-term. We have now observed single-tooth anterior implant cases for 15 years and have every belief that these implants will continue to function in health for many years. So what is next? We will have to wait and see, but it is this clinician's hope that the next 15 years will bring us more of these cooperative efforts that have so dramatically improved our patients' lives.

  12. Immediate, non-submerged, root-analogue zirconia implant in single tooth replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirker, W; Kocher, A

    2008-03-01

    This report demonstrates the successful clinical use of a modified root-analogue zirconia implant for immediate single tooth replacement. A right maxillary premolar was removed and a custom-made, root-analogue, roughened zirconia implant with macro-retentions in the interdental space was fabricated and placed into the extraction socket 4 days later. Four months after root implantation a composite crown was cemented. No complications occurred during the healing period. An excellent esthetic and functional result was achieved with the composite crown. No clinically noticeable bone resorption or soft-tissue recession was observed at 26 months follow up. Significant modifications such as macro-retentions seem to indicate that primary stability and excellent osseointegration of immediate root-analogue zirconia implants can be achieved, while preventing unesthetic bone resorption. The macro-retentions must be limited to the interdental space to avoid fracture of the thin buccal cortex. This successful case warrants further clinical research in well controlled trials.

  13. Esthetic evaluation of single-tooth implants in the anterior mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hof, Markus; Tepper, Gabor; Koller, Barbara; Krainhöfner, Martin; Watzek, Georg; Pommer, Bernhard

    2014-09-01

    Single-tooth replacement of anterior mandibular teeth is frequently complicated by insufficient bucco-lingual bone width and limited mesio-distal space available for implant placement. The aim of the present study was to assess implant esthetics in the partially edentulous anterior mandible. Esthetic evaluation of 43 anterior mandibular single-tooth implants in 15 women and 28 men was performed using esthetic indices (PES = Pink Esthetic Score, PI = Papilla Index, SES = Subjective Esthetic Score) as well as subjective patients' Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) ratings. Clinical and radiological parameters (implant and crown dimensions, pocket depth, bleeding on probing, plaque, keratinized mucosa, marginal bone level, and distance to adjacent teeth) were tested for influence. Implant esthetics were judged satisfactory (PES ≤10) in 42% of implants compared with a patient satisfaction rate of 87%. Correlation between objective indices (PES/PI: rs  = 0.62, PES/SES: rs  = -0.73, PI/SES: rs  = -0.48) was highly significant (P ≤ 0.001); however, no association to subjective patients' ratings could be observed. Type of prosthetic restoration (single crown vs. tulip-shaped double crowns), mesio-distal crown width as well as anatomic crown length significantly affected esthetic scores. Patients' judgment, by contrast, could not be associated to any prognostic factor. Subjective patient satisfaction with implant esthetics in the partially edentulous anterior mandible is high, however, remains hard to predict or objectively quantify. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Immediate loading of post-extractive single-tooth implants: a 1-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristalli, Maria Paola; Marini, Roberta; La Monaca, Gerardo; Sepe, Claudio; Tonoli, Federica; Annibali, Susanna

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this prospective clinical trial was to assess clinical, radiological, and esthetic outcomes of immediate-loaded post-extractive implants after 1 year of follow-up. Twenty-four consecutive patients (15 females and nine males) with a mean age of 47.27 years (range 35-65) requiring single-tooth extraction in the maxillary or mandibular anterior or premolar areas were enrolled. Twenty-five NobelActive implants (Nobel Biocare, Göteborg, Sweden) were placed and loaded immediately after tooth extraction. The definitive prosthetic restoration was delivered 6 months later. Clinical parameters, marginal bone loss, as well as, pink and white esthetic scores (PES and WES) were evaluated at 3, 6, and 12 months after implant placement. After 12-month follow-up period, a success rate of 91.67% was reported: Two of the 25 initially placed implants were lost after 4 weeks due to lack of osseointegration. The mean marginal bone loss after 1-year follow-up was 0.383 (SD ± 0.749) at mesial site and 0.278 (SD ± 0.595) at distal site. No statistically significant changes in the full-mouth plaque score (FMPS) and in the full-mouth bleeding score (FMBS) were observed from baseline to 12 months. The mean total PES/WES was 17.13 ± 1.91 (range: 13-20). None of 23 implants had an overall score immediate placement and loading of a single NobelActive(™) implant in a fresh extraction socket may be considered a valuable and predictable option in terms of implant success as well as hard and soft tissues stability. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. A 5-year prospective study of single-tooth replacements supported by the Astra Tech implant: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Implant-supported single-tooth replacements are an increasingly used method to replace teeth, especially in young patients. Therefore, long-term validation of different treatment modalities with different implant systems is of great importance. PURPOSE: The aim of the present study...... was to make a biologic, technical, and aesthetic evaluation of single-tooth replacement supported by the Astra Tech implant (Astra Tech AB, Mölndal, Sweden) during a 5-year period. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty patients were divided into two consecutively treated groups. In group A the implants were placed...... "early" in the extraction sockets, and standard single-tooth abutments were used. In group B the implants were placed "delayed," and preparable abutments were used. Clinical examinations including registration of plaque, bleeding, crown lengths, soft tissue marginal level, papilla height, complications...

  16. Replacement of missing posterior tooth with off-center placed single implant: Long-term follow-up outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitua, Eduardo; Murias-Freijo, Alia; Flores, Javier; Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan

    2015-07-01

    The distal offset placement of a single implant to replace a single tooth would overcome the shortcomings of the placement of a single wide implant in the posterior region. However, long-term evaluation is still-lacking. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term outcomes of patients treated with a single tooth restoration supported by a distal-offset placed implant. Thirty-one patients with a single restoration supported by an off-center placed implant were evaluated. The patients' demographic data were described. The known implant length was used as a reference to calibrate the linear measurements on digital periapical radiographs. Implant details, survival, and prosthetic complications were analyzed. The implant survival rate was analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier method. Thirty-four implants were placed with a distal offset to support single-tooth restorations. Twenty patients were women, and patient age was 56 ± 12 years. The implants had a follow-up time from loading up to 10 years (average: 4 ± 3 years). Most of the implants were inserted in type II bone, and 85% were placed in the molar region. The distal offset placement of the implant and the selection of a wide-diameter implant resulted in a mesial bone loss of 0.85 ± 0.57 mm and distal bone loss of 0.83 ± 0.68 mm. One implant failed after 4 months from insertion, resulting in a cumulative survival rate of 97.1%. No prosthetic complications were registered. The distal offset placement of an implant is an efficient option for restoring a single missing posterior tooth when mesiodistal space is limited. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Single tooth replacement utilizing implants in the esthetic zone: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbert, Nicholas; Ahuja, Swati; Brandt, Robert; Jain, Vinay; Wicks, Russell

    2013-07-01

    Replacing a single tooth with an implant has become a common dental procedure; however, careful evaluation is necessary before placing one in the esthetic zone. Thorough diagnosis and planning - including the use of transposed diagnostic casts and cone beam computed tomography scans - can help dentists predict the final esthetic result prior to treatment, and help inform the patient of the potential result prior to performing any irreversible therapy. In the present case, the primary concern was the presurgical location of the facial free gingival margin (FGM) of the implant-supported crown, in relation to the adjacent teeth. Steps taken to correct the position of the facial FGM prior to implant placement led to a successful esthetic result.

  18. Long-term cumulative survival and mechanical complications of single-tooth Ankylos Implants: focus on the abutment neck fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Shim, Hye Won; Yang, Byoung-Eun

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the cumulative survival rate (CSR) and mechanical complications of single-tooth Ankylos? implants. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a retrospective clinical study that analyzed 450 single Ankylos? implants installed in 275 patients between December 2005 and December 2012. The main outcomes were survival results CSR and implant failure) and mechanical complications (screw loosening, fracture, and cumulative fracture rate [CFR]). The main outcomes were analyzed according to ag...

  19. Patient satisfaction and esthetic outcome after immediate placement and provisionalization of single-tooth implants involving a definitive individual abutment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartlev, Jens; Kohberg, Peter; Ahlmann, Søren; Andersen, Niels T; Schou, Søren; Isidor, Flemming

    2014-11-01

    To assess patient satisfaction and esthetic outcome after immediate placement and provisionalization of single-tooth implants involving a definitive individual abutment and a provisional crown followed by later placement of a definitive crown. In private practice, a single-tooth implant was placed immediately after tooth extraction in the esthetic zone of 54 patients. A definitive individual abutment and a provisional crown were mounted in the same visit. The definitive crown was placed after a mean period of 7 months. After a mean follow-up period of 33 months, the subjective and professional evaluation of the total implant treatment, peri-implant soft tissues, and implant crown were assessed on a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS). The professional esthetic treatment outcome was also evaluated using pink esthetic score (PES), white esthetic score (WES), and total score of PES/WES. The evaluation of total implant treatment, peri-implant soft tissues, and implant crown demonstrated a significantly higher subjective than professional score for all 3 parameters (P provisionalization of single-tooth implants involving a definitive individual abutment and provisional crown followed by later placement of a definitive crown demonstrated high subjective and professional satisfaction. Generally, the professionals seem to be more critical than the patients. A strong correlation was observed between the professional VAS scores and the PES and WES scoring systems. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Dimensions of hard and soft tissue around adjacent, compared with single-tooth, zirconia implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniha, K; Modabber, A; Kniha, H; Möhlhenrich, S C; Hölzle, F; Milz, S

    2018-01-01

    Preservation or regeneration of the papilla has always been a challenge around consecutive implants or with implants next to teeth, and many studies have evaluated the papilla's behaviour and patterns based on surgical technique and prosthetic design, though evidence about its behaviour around zirconia implants is scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate papilla behaviour between implants and teeth (tooth-implant group) and between consecutive implants (implant-implant group). Ninety patients with 122 zirconia implants (Straumann ® PURE Ceramic Implant) were examined at the one-year follow up. We measured the effect of the distance: first from the base of the contact point of the crowns to the contact with bone at the implant site (D1); secondly, to the contact with the bone at the neighbouring tooth or implant site (D2); and thirdly on the papillary deficit (D3). In both the tooth-implant group and the implant-implant group, D1 and D2 correlated significantly with the papillary deficit (D3), whereas D2 was the major determinant factor (Spearman's rho=0.60). In both groups, when D1 and D2 were implant group than in the implant-implant group (p=0.048). We conclude that the ideal distance from the base of the contact point to the bone contact at the implant and to the bone contact at the adjacent tooth in both groups is implants has a significant impact on that of the papilla. Copyright © 2017 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Tactile sensibility of single-tooth implants and natural teeth under local anesthesia of the natural antagonistic teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enkling, Norbert; Heussner, Stefan; Nicolay, Claudia; Bayer, Stefan; Mericske-Stern, Regina; Utz, Karl-Heinz

    2012-04-01

    The term osseoperception describes the capability of developing a subtle tactile sensibility over dental implants. The present clinical study aims at clarifying the question of how far tactile sensibility is to be attributed to the periodontium of the natural opposing tooth of the implant. Thirty-two subjects with single-tooth implants with natural opposing teeth were included in this clinical, single-blind, split-mouth study. The natural antagonistic tooth of the implant and the corresponding natural contralateral tooth were anesthetized with a locally infiltrated articaine anesthetic. In a computer-assisted and randomized way, copper foils of varying thickness (0-100 µm) were placed interocclusally between the single-tooth implant and the natural opposing tooth, and between the contralateral pair of natural opposing teeth in order to investigate the active tactile sensibility according to the psychophysical method of constant stimuli and evaluate it statistically by the Weibull distribution. The average tactile sensibility of the implants with anesthetized antagonists at the 50% value calculated by means of the Weibull distribution was 20 ± 11 µm with a support area (90%-10% value) of 77 ± 89 µm. For the pair of natural teeth, the tactile sensibility at the 50% value was 16 ± 9 µm with a support area of 48.4 ± 93 µm. This resulted in an average intraindividual difference of 3.5 ± 7 µm at the 50% value and 29 ± 93 µm in the support area. The statistical calculations demonstrated an equivalent tactile sensibility (50% value) of the single-tooth implant and the contralateral natural control tooth with the natural antagonists being anesthetized in each case (double t-test, equivalence limit ± 8 µm, P 80%). Apparently, the active tactile sensibility of single-tooth implants with natural opposing teeth is not only to be attributed to the periodontium of the opposing tooth but also to a perception over the implant itself. This could support the hypothesis

  2. Immediate placement and provisionalization of single-tooth implants involving a definitive individual abutment: a clinical and radiographic retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartlev, Jens; Kohberg, Peter; Ahlmann, Søren; Gotfredsen, Erik; Andersen, Niels Trolle; Isidor, Flemming; Schou, Søren

    2013-06-01

    To assess with a mean follow-up period of 33 months (median: 31 month, range: 11-89 month) the treatment outcome after immediate placement and provisionalization of single-tooth oral implants involving a definitive individual abutment and a provisional crown followed by later placement of a definitive crown. 68 patients with 68 single-tooth implants in the esthetic zone were consecutively treated; 55 of these patients were included in the study. The treatment involved tooth extraction, implant placement, placement of a definitive individual abutment, and a provisional crown in the same visit in private practice. The definitive crown was placed after a mean period of 7 months. The primary outcome measures included implant survival, definitive implant crown survival, and overall treatment survival. The secondary outcome measures included probing depth, bleeding on probing, peri-implant marginal bone level, marginal bone level of the neighboring tooth surfaces, biological complications, and technical complications. Of the inserted implants 98% survived and of the definitive crowns mounted a survival of 100% was observed. Consequently, the overall treatment survival was 98%. The mean probing depth was 2.9 mm at implant level and 63% of the implants were characterized by no bleeding on probing. The mean peri-implant marginal bone level was 2 mm. A significant mean peri-implant marginal bone level gain of 0.5 mm was observed from implant placement to the follow-up (95% CI: 0.07-0.89 mm, P = 0.022). No significant changes of the marginal bone level at the neighboring tooth surfaces were seen. Four episodes of peri-implant inflammation were identified in three patients, while 46 incidents of loosening of the provisional crown occurred in 33 patients. One abutment screw loosened before placement of the definitive crown. Finally, loosening of four definitive crowns occurred in four patients. Immediate placement and provisionalization of single-tooth oral implants

  3. CAD/CAM glass ceramics for single-tooth implant crowns: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akça, Kvanç; Cavusoglu, Yeliz; Sagirkaya, Elcin; Aybar, Buket; Cehreli, Murat Cavit

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the load distribution of CAD/CAM mono-ceramic crowns supported with single-tooth implants in functional area. A 3-dimensional numerical model of a soft tissue-level implant was constructed with cement-retained abutment to support glass ceramic machinable crown. Implant-abutment complex and the retained crown were embedded in a Ø 1.5 × 1.5 cm geometric matrix for evaluation of mechanical behavior of mono-ceramic CAD/CAM aluminosilicate and leucite glass crown materials. Laterally positioned axial load of 300 N was applied on the crowns. Resulting principal stresses in the mono-ceramic crowns were evaluated in relation to different glass ceramic materials. The highest compressive stresses were observed at the cervical region of the buccal aspect of the crowns and were 89.98 and 89.99 MPa, for aluminosilicate and leucite glass ceramics, respectively. The highest tensile stresses were observed at the collar of the lingual part of the crowns and were 24.54 and 25.39 MPa, respectively. Stresses induced upon 300 N static loading of CAD/CAM aluminosalicate and leucite glass ceramics are below the compressive strength of the materials. Impact loads may actuate the progress to end failure of mono-ceramic crowns supported by metallic implant abutments.

  4. Clinical Outcomes After Immediate and Late Implant Loading for a Single Missing Tooth in the Anterior Maxilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Pnar; Zortuk, Mustafa; Kiliç, Erdem; Dinçel, Mehmet; Albayrak, Haydar

    2016-08-01

    This study compared the clinical outcomes of 1-year follow-up of immediate and late implant loading after implant restoration of a single tooth in the anterior maxilla. Thirty-three patients with missing teeth in the anterior maxilla were included in this study (18 immediate loading and 15 late loading). Standard periapical radiographs were obtained to evaluate the vertical bone loss around the implant. For both implant groups, periimplant parameters (probing depth, gingival bleeding index, gingival index (GI), modified plaque index, width of keratinized gingiva) were evaluated. There were no significant differences in bone loss, the widths of keratinized gingiva, the GI, and modified plaque index between the immediate implant loading and late implant loading groups (P > 0.05). A significant difference in the probing depth was observed between these groups at the initial and 1-month evaluations (P replacement of a missing tooth in anterior maxilla.

  5. A prospective clinical study to evaluate the performance of zirconium dioxide dental implants in single-tooth gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahlert, Michael; Kniha, Heinz; Weingart, Dieter; Schild, Sabine; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Bormann, Kai-Hendrik

    2016-12-01

    Dental implants have traditionally been made from titanium or its alloys, but recently full-ceramic implants have been developed with comparable osseointegration properties and functional strength properties to titanium. These ceramic implants may have advantages in certain patients and situations, for example, where esthetic outcomes are particularly important. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the performance of a newly developed full-ceramic ZrO 2 monotype implant design (PURE Ceramic Implant; Institut Straumann AG, Basel, Switzerland) in single-tooth gaps in the maxilla and mandible. This was a prospective, open-label, single-arm study in patients requiring implant rehabilitation in single-tooth gaps. Full-ceramic implants were placed, with provisional and final prostheses inserted after 3 and 6 months, respectively. Crestal bone level was measured at implant placement and after 6 and 12 months. Implant survival and success were evaluated after 6 and 12 months. Further evaluations are planned after 24 and 36 months. Forty-six patients were screened for potential study participation, of whom 44 (17 men and 27 women, mean age 48 ± 14 years) were recruited into the study. The majority of implants (90.9%) were placed in the maxilla. The implant survival and implant success rate after 12 months were 97.6%. A minor change of the mean bone level occurred between implant loading (final prosthesis insertion after 6 months) and 12 months (-0.14 mm) after initial bone remodeling was observed between implant placement and loading (-0.88 mm). The results indicated that monotype ceramic implants can achieve clinical outcomes comparable to published outcomes of equivalent titanium implants. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Functional and esthetic considerations for single-tooth Ankylos implant-crowns: 8 years of clinical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döring, Katrin; Eisenmann, Eduard; Stiller, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Following the loss of an anterior natural tooth, the mucogingival complex begins to collapse. The early placement of endosseous dental implants can prevent or reduce the extent of this collapse. If there is a long interval between the loss of the natural tooth and the placement of the implant prosthetic replacement, this collapse tends to increase significantly. This paper will report on the clinical success of this implant product in the fabrication of esthetic, functional, and harmonious replacements for missing single, natural teeth for a period of 8 years. A total of 275 single Ankylos implant tooth restorations in the anterior and posterior jaw regions were placed and monitored for 8 years. Of these, 264 implants were restored using the titanium Balance abutments, and only 11 were restored using ceramic abutments. The final restorations were either metal-ceramic or full-ceramic crowns and were cemented with glass ionomer cement. The survival rate was 98.2%, with only 5 implants being lost during the healing phase. There were no other implant losses in the postloading period that averaged 3.2 years. To date, there have been no mechanical complications associated with the prosthetic components (ie, screw loosening, screw breaking, or crown breaking) for either the titanium or the ceramic abutments. Experience with the Ankylos system with single-tooth replacement indications may be considered positive with regard to the esthetic and functional results of the treatment. The lack of mechanical complications and problems with the hard and soft tissue in the loading phase of the implants suggests the functional safety of the tapered connection between implant and abutment.

  7. Immediate Loading of Anterior Single Tooth Implants Placed in Healed Sites : Five-Year Results of a Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hartog, Laurens; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Stellingsma, Kees; Vissink, Arjan; Meijer, Henny J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the 5-year outcome of immediate loading with that of conventional loading for anterior single-tooth implants placed in healed sites. It was hypothesized that immediate loading is not inferior to conventional loading. Materials and Methods: A total of 62

  8. Comparing pink and white esthetic scores to layperson perception in the single-tooth implant patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Adam R; Martin, William

    2014-01-01

    The pink esthetic score (PES) and white esthetic score (WES) are tools utilized to objectively evaluate single-tooth implant restorations (STIR) in the esthetic zone.1 A questionnaire study was developed to address two objectives: (1) establish a total PES/WES score that is clinically acceptable based on layperson perception and (2) report outcomes in laypeople's perceptions of pink and white deficiencies. A presentation book of 27 color-calibrated photographs of a STIR in the esthetic zone (canine to canine) surrounded by virgin teeth and one photograph without a STIR (control) was presented to three prosthodontists (evaluators) to conduct a PES/WES evaluation. The same 27 photographs were presented to 101 laypeople. The laypeople were instructed to identify which tooth was the STIR. The laypeople were also instructed to record, based on pink or white esthetics, what factors influenced their decision on the selection of the STIR. For the evaluator's scores of the 27 cases, the mean PES score was 5.7 (range, 3 to 10). The mean WES score was 6.2 (range, 3 to 10). The mean total PES/WES score was 11.9 (range, 6 to 20). The mean percentage of laypeople unable to correctly identify the STIR was 59.1% (range, 13.9% to 89.2%). When the evaluator's PES/WES score was greater than 12, 79% of the layperson population was not able to identify a STIR (ρ = -0.86). In addition, when the PES score was 6, 90% of the laypeople were not able to perceive a pink deficiency (ρ = -0.65), and when the WES score was 6, 83% of the laypeople were not able to perceive a white deficiency (ρ = -0.57). Within the limitations of this study, in single-tooth implant restorations, a total PES/WES score greater than 12 would provide a STIR that would be clinically acceptable in the majority of situations. This study also concluded that laypeople identify white esthetic deficiencies more easily than pink esthetic deficiencies.

  9. Evaluation of single-tooth replacement by an immediate implant covered with connective tissue graft as a biologic barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyothi, S G; Triveni, M G; Mehta, D S; Nandakumar, K

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the survival rate of Screw-Vent(®) immediate implants augmented with sub epithelial connective tissue graft for single-tooth replacement for 1 year. Ten patients (five men and five women), with the mean age of 25.3 years, were consecutively treated on the out-patient basis by the placement of Screw-Vent(®) dental implants in to the fresh extraction sockets in association of augmentation with sub epithelial connective tissue graft harvested from the palate, supporting single crowns. The clinical and radiographic parameters were recorded to evaluate the peri-implant soft tissue health and marginal bone loss, respectively, for each patient at baseline and at every 3 months interval for 1 year. The 1 year cumulative survival rate of Screw-Vent(®) dental implants was 100% for all 10 patients. Statistical analysis demonstrated highly significant values indicating an improvement in peri-implant soft tissue parameters in terms of peri-implant aesthetic parameters, which estimated the keratinized mucosa width. Statistically, non-significant marginal bone loss or gain indicated stable condition in hard tissue parameters. Single-tooth replacement by Screw-Vent(®) dental implants in to a fresh extraction socket, in association with guided bone regeneration using autologous connective tissue graft is a predictable treatment as demonstrated by the 100% implant survival rates and appreciable increase in the width of the keratinized mucosa at 1 year follow up.

  10. Cemented versus screw-retained implant-supported single-tooth crowns: a 10-year randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigolo, Paolo; Mutinelli, Sabrina; Givani, Andrea; Stellini, Edoardo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this randomised controlled trial was to compare the long-term clinical outcome of cemented and screw-retained implant-supported single-tooth crowns. Eighteen consecutive patients presenting with single-tooth bilateral edentulous sites in the canine/molar region with adequate bone width, similar bone height at the implant sites, and an occlusal scheme that allowed for the establishment of identical occlusal cusp/fossa contacts were treated. Each patient received two identical implants according to a split-mouth design. One side was randomly selected to be restored with a cemented implant-supported single crown, and the other was restored with a screw-retained implant-supported single crown. Outcome measures were implant success, complications, marginal bone levels and peri-implant soft tissue health. Ten years after initial loading, 2 patients moved away and were lost to follow-up. Two implants placed in the same patient failed 5 years after their insertion; the remaining 30 implants survived, resulting in a cumulative implant success rate of 93.7%. No complication occurred. The mean marginal bone resorption at 10 years after implant placement, measured on intraoral radiographs, was 1.1 ± 0.2 mm for both types of restorations. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups with respect to peri-implant marginal bone level at the 10-year follow-up appointment (T2) (P = 0.58); at the 4-year follow-up appointment (T1) a statistically significant difference was observed (P = 0.01), but this was not considered clinically relevant (mean difference: -0.06 mm). The status of the soft tissue around the implants remained stable over the evaluation period. No statistically significant difference was identified for the facial keratinised gingiva between the two groups at T1 (P = 0.10) or at T2 (P = 0.07). Within the limitations of this study, the results indicate that there was no evidence of a significant difference in the clinical

  11. Posterior implant single-tooth replacement and status of adjacent teeth during a 10-year period: a retrospective report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misch, Carl E; Misch-Dietsh, Francine; Silc, Jennifer; Barboza, Eliane; Cianciola, Louis J; Kazor, Christopher

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this case series study was to evaluate posterior single-tooth implant survival and the long-term conditions of the adjacent teeth. A retrospective evaluation of 1,162 consecutive patients with a single missing posterior tooth treated with 1,377 external hex implants supporting 1,365 restorations surrounded by natural teeth over a 1- to 10-year period was reviewed from four private offices. Implant survival data were collected relative to stage I to stage II healing, stage II to prosthesis delivery, and prosthesis delivery to up to 10 years of follow-up. Long-term adjacent tooth conditions were assessed, including decay, endodontic therapy (root canal therapy [RCT]), and/or extraction during the follow-up period. Of the 1,377 implants inserted, there were 11 surgical failures from stage I to stage II healing. There was one failure from stage II healing to prosthesis delivery. There were two prosthetic-phase failures. The surgical success rate was 99.2%, whereas the overall survival rate was 98.9% at an average of 61 months of follow-up (range, 12 to 125 months). A total of 2,589 adjacent teeth were followed during the study. No natural adjacent tooth was lost during this period. Interproximal decay developed in 129 adjacent teeth (5%), and nine adjacent teeth required RCT (0.4%) as a result of decay or restoration. The use of single-tooth implants as replacements for posterior missing teeth is a viable long-term treatment. Adjacent natural teeth complications are minimal for as long as 10 years after implant insertion.

  12. Zirconia and titanium implant abutments for single-tooth implant prostheses after 5 years of function in posterior regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lops, Diego; Bressan, Eriberto; Chiapasco, Matteo; Rossi, Alessandro; Romeo, Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    To verify, in a medium-term follow-up, whether or not zirconia (Zr) abutments show similar survival outcomes as titanium (Ti) abutments in posterior areas. A two-stage surgical protocol was used. Each patient was followed for 5 years after the definitive prosthesis insertion. Clinical and radiographic parameters were assessed at the yearly follow-up visit, and prosthetic complications were recorded. Statistical analysis (Wilcoxon signed rank test) was used to compare any difference in biologic and radiographic parameters between implants and the natural contralateral teeth. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the changes over time (from baseline to the last follow-up) of clinical and radiographic parameters. A total of 85 patients with a single posterior tooth gap were treated with 85 implants supporting 47 Ti and 38 Zr abutments, respectively. All-ceramic (38) and metal-ceramic (47) single crowns were fabricated. Four patients were classified as dropouts. Eighty-one implants supporting 44 Ti and 37 Zr abutments completed the 5-year follow-up examination. No implant, reconstruction, or abutment failures were recorded. Therefore, the prosthetic survival after 5 years of function was 100% for all the abutments and restorations. No significant differences in biologic and radiographic indexes were found between Ti and Zr abutments when compared with each other and with the natural teeth after 5 years. No significant marginal bone loss was found between the baseline and the last follow-up, both for Zr and Ti abutments. The medium-term survival of Zr abutments in posterior regions was comparable with that of Ti abutments. Long-term evaluations are needed to confirm this finding.

  13. Effect of immediate functional loading on osseointegration of implants used for single tooth replacement. A human histological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, Mauro; Botticelli, Daniele; La Scala, Vincenzo; Tomasi, Cristiano; Berglundh, Tord

    2013-07-01

    To analyze hard tissue reactions to immediate functionally loaded single implants that were installed either with a conventional drill preparation procedure or with an osteotome preparation technique. Thirteen subjects with two sites requiring single tooth rehabilitation by means of implants volunteered for the study. Each subject received one test (immediate functionally loaded) and one control (non-loaded) implant. In six subjects (group 1) the implants were placed using a conventional drilling procedure, whereas in the remaining seven subjects (group 2) an osteotome preparation procedure was performed. Block biopsies containing test and control implants and peri-implant bone tissues were collected at 1 month in four of the subjects in group 1 and in five subjects of group 2. The remaining implant sites were sampled at 3 months after implant placement. The biopsies were prepared for histological examination. Two implants of the test-2 group (osteotome preparation) representing 1 month of healing and another test-2 implant representing 3 months of healing failed to integrate. A multilevel multivariate statistical analysis demonstrated that no differences in bone-to-implant contact (BIC)% were found in between test and control implants, the density of newly formed peri-implant bone was significantly higher around test than control implants at 1 and 3 months of healing. Sections representing osteotome technique sites showed fractured trabeculae and large amounts of bone particles. It is suggested that immediate loading of implants does not influence the osseointegration process, whereas the density of newly formed peri-implant bone at such sites appears to be increased in relation to unloaded control implants. The use of an osteotome preparation technique during installation results in damage of peri-implant bone and enhances the risk for failure in osseointegration. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. A 3-year prospective study of implant-supported, single-tooth restorations of all-ceramic and metal-ceramic materials in patients with tooth agenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Mandana; Worsaae, Nils; Schiødt, Morten

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this clinical study was to describe outcome variables of all-ceramic and metal-ceramic implant-supported, single-tooth restorations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 59 patients (mean age: 27.9 years) with tooth agenesis and treated with 98 implant-supported single...... abutment materials. The frequency of biological complications was higher at restorations with all-ceramic restorations than metal-ceramic crowns. Loss of retention, which was only observed at metal-ceramic crowns, was the most frequent technical complication, and the marginal adaptations of all-ceramic...... restoration materials were registered. After 3 years, the patient-reported outcome variables at different restoration materials were not significantly different. CONCLUSION: The biological outcomes at the zirconia and metal abutments were comparable. All-ceramic crowns demonstrated better colour match...

  15. Innovative Single-Tooth Replacement with an Individual Root-Analog Hybrid Implant in the Esthetic Zone: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidi Pour, Reza; Randelzhofer, Peter; Edelhoff, Daniel; Prandtner, Otto; Rafael, Caroline Freitas; Liebermann, Anja

    The goal of this study was to explore an innovative approach to single-tooth replacement using an individually custom-fabricated, root-analog, hybrid dental implant, in the esthetic zone, to avoid the microgap and micromovements between the implant and abutment. Moreover, the use of burs to prepare the implant recipient site is not necessary in this technique, reducing the bone removal, heating, and trauma. The process requires capturing accurate root geometry through combined computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) and a three-dimensional (3D) visualization (digital volume tomography [DVT]) of the tooth in situ, which might result in reduced remodeling after insertion. A good esthetic and functional outcome was obtained. The use of a root-shaped tooth analog implant might be in selected cases a viable alternative to current threaded cylindrical and cone-shaped implants. The new concept avoids the microgap between the implant and the abutment and reduces the trauma to the tissue and bone.

  16. Case presentation of two patients using diagonal platform-switched double implants for maxillary single-first-molar replacement as the alternative of a single-tooth implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Yasunori; Ito, Koji; Komatsu, Shinichi; Saito, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    A single-tooth implant restoration is generally performed for maxillary single-first-molar replacement. If the interdental space between the second premolar and the second molar is large enough, a double-implant placement can be performed to avoid creating mesiodistal cantilever and to distribute occlusal loading forces.If there is not adequate space for a double-implant placement to be performed mesiodistally along the crest of the alveolar ridge line, they should be placed along a diagonal line offset lingually to increase the space. This procedure has two primary advantages. First, greater stability is provided by a double-implant placement. Resistance to lateral forces (palatal-buccal) is much stronger than two implants placed along the alveolar crest ridge line. Residual palatal and buccal bone can provide support against occlusal forces, provided that there is adequate residual bone in these regions.If anatomical conditions are favorable, the placement of two diagonal implants in the palatal and buccal residual bones can be a rational procedure.We report on two typical patients. The progress of these patients was followed using computed tomography for 7 and 6 years, respectively.

  17. The Impact of Buccal Bone Defects and Immediate Placement on the Esthetic Outcome of Maxillary Anterior Single-Tooth Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamperos, Georgios; Zambara, Ioanna; Petsinis, Vassileios; Zambaras, Dimitrios

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of buccal bone defects and immediate placement on the esthetic outcome of maxillary anterior single-tooth implants. The archives of the Department of Dental Implants & Tissue Regeneration at Hygeia Hospital during a 5-year period (2010-2014) were retrospectively analyzed, in search of patients treated with a single-tooth implant after extraction of a maxillary incisor. The status of the buccal bone plate and the time of implant placement were recorded. The pink esthetic score (PES) of each case was evaluated, with a maximum score of 14. In total, 91 patients were included in the study. The mean PES was 10.5. The outcome was considered satisfactory (PES ≥ 8) in 89% and (almost) perfect (PES ≥ 12) in 35% of the cases. Immediate implant placement had no impact on PES (P > .05), even though it demonstrated slightly greater variability. On the other hand, buccal bone defects had a negative effect on PES (P implants in the anterior maxilla. The presence of buccal bone defects is considered a negative prognostic factor, whereas immediate implant placement does not affect the esthetic outcome.

  18. One-piece zirconia oral implants: one-year results from a prospective cohort study. 1. Single tooth replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohal, Ralf-Joachim; Knauf, Marko; Larsson, Birgitta; Sahlin, Herman; Butz, Frank

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the clinical and radiographic outcome of a one-piece zirconia oral implant for single tooth replacement after 1 year. A total of 65 patients received a one-stage implant surgery with immediate temporization. Standardized radiographs were taken at implant insertion and after 1 year to monitor peri-implant bone loss. A univariate analysis of the influence of different baseline parameters on marginal bone loss from implant insertion to 12 months was performed. Soft tissue parameters were evaluated at prosthesis insertion and at the 1-year follow-up. After 1 year, three implants were lost, giving a cumulative survival rate of 95.4%. The marginal bone loss after 1 year was 1.31 mm. Thirty-four per cent of the implants lost at least 2 mm bone, and 14% more than 3 mm. The univariate analysis could not depict any parameter influencing marginal bone loss. Probing depth, Clinical Attachment Level, Bleeding and Plaque Index decreased over 1 year. The cumulative survival rate of the presented ceramic implant was comparable to the reported survival rate of titanium implants when immediately restored. However, the frequency of increased radiographic bone loss (>2 mm) after 1 year was considerably higher as compared to conventional two-piece titanium implants. The presented zirconia implant can therefore not be recommended for clinical usage. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Clinical and radiographic outcome following immediate loading and delayed loading of single-tooth implants: Randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjelvold, Björn; Kisch, Jenö; Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Albrektsson, Tomas; Wennerberg, Ann

    2017-06-01

    Immediate loading of single implants is generally considered a reliable procedure. The objective of the present prospective randomized clinical study was to compare the overall treatment outcome following immediate loading (IL) and delayed loading (DL) of single implants after 1 year of follow-up. Patients with a missing maxillary tooth (15-25) were randomly assigned to IL or DL. The protocol included implant installation in healed sites, immediate loading, delayed loading, temporary screw-retained restoration, and replacement with a permanent single implant crown. Outcome measures were implant survival, marginal bone level, soft tissue changes, papillae index, pink, and white esthetic score (PES and WES), patient judged aesthetics, and oral health impact profile (OHiP-14). Implant survival rate was 100% and 96% for IL and DL, respectively. Implant success rate was 96% and 88% for IL and DL, respectively. Statistically significant lower papilla index scores were found in the IL group at temporary crown and definitive crown placement. An overall statistically significant improvement after 12 months for PES, WES and OHIP-14 was found. This prospective randomized study showed that single implants in the maxilla can present satisfactory results with respect to either immediate loading or delayed loading after 12 months. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Immediate provisional restoration of a single-tooth implant in the esthetic zone: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Sung Fu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Immediate implant restoration of single implants may demonstrate a positive effect on peri-implant soft tissue. Placement of a provisional restoration following implant surgery can create soft tissue contours that resemble normal gingival topography before placement of the definitive prosthesis. This article describes a staged approach of the mandibular permanent right central incisor, which was congenital missing. The proper space for restoration of the missing incisor was created through orthodontic treatment. The scheduled implant site was reconstructed using autogenous bone harvested from the chin region. After a healing period of four months, an implant was installed with the connection of a fixed provisional crown to a prefabricated temporary abutment. The soft tissue around the implant healed according to the contours of the provisional restoration and the emergence profile was used to duplicate the definitive restoration. Peri-implant esthetics was achieved through the staged approach and immediate restoration of the implant.

  1. A 1-year randomised controlled trial comparing zirconia versus metal-ceramic implant supported single-tooth restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Mandana; Worsaae, Nils; Schiødt, Morten

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the biological, technical and aesthetic outcomes of single implant-supported all-ceramic versus metal-ceramic crowns. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-six patients with premolar agenesis were randomly treated with 38 all-ceramic (AC) and 37 metal-ceramic (MC) implant......-supported single-tooth restorations. A quasi-randomisation of consecutively included restorations in patients with one or more implants was used, i.e. a combination of parallel group (for 13 patients with one restoration) and split-mouth (for 23 patients with =2 restorations). All patients were recalled......, by blinded assessors. RESULTS: One-year after loading, no patient dropped out and no implant failed, though one MC restoration had to be remade. The marginal bone loss was not significantly different between AC and MC restorations (AC: mean 0.08 mm, SD 0.25; MC: mean 0.10 mm, SD 0.17). Seven out of 10...

  2. Placement of single tooth implant in healed socket with immediate temporization: Clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeevan Lata

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Edentulous condition inadequately compensated for, by dentures, impair oral function and is accompanied by reduced self–confidence. In a continued effort to achieve these goals, implant dentistry was introduced. Immediate temporization is somehow a recent concept, which allows the maintenance of soft tissue contours, along with interdental alveolar contours. Aims and Obectives: Aims of the present study were to study the placement of implant in the post-extracted healed tooth socket of anterior maxilla and to evaluate the feasibility of early function on implants placed. Materials and Methods: In the present study, HI-TECH IMPLANTS TRX-OP one-piece immediate loading implant system with the built on abutment has been used.Immediate temporisation has been done and results have been evaluated in terms of stability, gingival health, esthetics, marginal bone loss, patient′s psychological attitude, and satisfaction.
Results: Out of eight implants, 6 successfully healed whereas 2 implants suffered failure
Conclusion: Overall conclusion drawn from the study is, immediate temporization is a successful method providing psychological, financial and emotional benefits to the patient.

  3. Immediate placement and loading of maxillary single-tooth implants: a 3-year prospective study of marginal bone level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berberi, Antoine N; Noujeim, Ziad N; Kanj, Wasf H; Mearawi, Rita J; Salameh, Ziad A

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate marginal bone level around single-tooth implants placed in anterior maxilla and immediately restored. Twenty implants were placed in 20 patients (8 men and 12 women) that were selected for this study. Following atraumatic non-surgical extraction of tooth, all patients immediately received implants and the definitive prefabricated abutment was placed. Implant position was transferred to the scanning unit of the CAD/CAM system using prefabricated surgical guide. Temporary crowns were immediately fabricated and cemented. Eight weeks later final crowns were luted. Outcome assessment as implant survival and level of marginal bone radiographic evaluations were performed at 8 weeks, 1 and 3 years time period after loading. All implants placed osseointegrated successfully after 3 years of functional loading. The mean marginal bone loss was 0.16 mm (SD, 0.167 mm), 0.275 mm (SD, 0.171 mm) and 0.265 mm (SD, 0.171 mm) at 8 weeks, 1 and 3 years time period respectively. Four out of the 20 implants showed no bone loss. Immediate loading technique using the final abutment directly eliminated the need for a second stage surgery and prevented interruption of soft and hard tissue at implant neck, which resulted in better soft tissue response and reduced marginal bone loss. Clinical significance: Immediately loaded implants, in fresh extraction sockets by insertion of a provisional restoration on the titanium abutment without any later manipulation, helped to protect the initially forming blood clot and presented a template for soft tissue contouring that resulted in significant reduction of marginal bone resorption and maintenance of soft tissue architecture.

  4. Single-Tooth Implant Versus Three-Unit Fixed Partial Denture: A Study of Oral Health-Related Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun-Young; Oh, Sung-Hee; Kim, Jimin; Jung, Yea Ji; Park, Joo-Yeon; Lee, Eui-Kyung; Kim, Seong-Kyun; Kim, Younhee

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have investigated the impact of prosthetic treatment on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). However, most of these have been performed among fully or partially edentulous patients. Studies involving patients with a single missing tooth are limited. The purpose of this study was to compare the OHRQoL between patients treated by single-tooth implants and three-unit fixed partial dentures (FPDs) for single missing tooth restoration. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Korea with patients drawn by stratified purposive sampling based on age. OHRQoL was measured using the Korean version of the 14-item Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14K) questionnaire. Pre- and posttreatment OHIP-14K scores were compared by paired t test. Single-tooth implants and three-unit FPDs were compared by two-sample t test. In addition, multiple regression analysis was used to evaluate the impact of treatment mode on OHIP-14K total score after adjusting the effect of demographics and clinical factors. Thirty-five patients with single-tooth implants and 36 patients with three-unit FPDs were included. All participants had a significant improvement in OHRQoL compared with before the treatment (P single-tooth implants and three-unit FPDs for single missing tooth replacement resulted in significant and similar improvement of OHRQoL.

  5. Single-tooth replacement in the anterior maxilla by means of immediate implantation and provisionalization: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rouck, Tim; Collys, Kristiaan; Cosyn, Jan

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess to what extent the outcome of immediate implantation and provisionalization for replacing single maxillary teeth in the esthetic zone is favorable and predictable from biologic and esthetic points of view. An electronic search (MEDLINE and Cochrane Oral Health Group Specialized Trials Register) and a manual search were performed to detect studies concerning maxillary single-tooth replacements by means of dental implants immediately placed into fresh extraction sockets and provisionalized within the first 24 hours. Only full-text reports on clinical studies published in English up to June 2006 were included. Case reports and reviews on the topic of interest were excluded. Eleven studies were selected. Based on a qualitative data analysis, implant survival and even management of papilla levels seem predictable following immediate implantation and provisionalization. However, maintaining the midfacial gingival margin may be more problematic, since postextraction bone remodeling and therefore marginal gingival changes will occur irrespective of the timing of the placement of an implant. The long-term impact of this remodeling is currently unclear and needs to be elucidated in future research. The clinician is recommended to be reserved when considering immediate implant placement and provisionalization for replacing single maxillary teeth in the anterior zone. At the very least, a number of guidelines and prerequisites need to be taken into consideration.

  6. Early survival of single-tooth implants in the esthetic zone may be predictable despite timing of implant placement or loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoernschild, Kent L

    2012-09-01

    -up, survival data were stratified by intervention type. Results were weighted for study size and stratified based upon timing of implant placement and loading. Esthetics, and patient satisfaction, and complications were reported, but heterogeneity of study design and reported outcomes excluded the results from meta-analysis. Approximately two-thirds of patients received implants in healed edentulous sites. Survival of single-tooth implants one year in function was 95.5% [95% CI: 93.0 -97.1]. Meta-analysis identified no difference in survival rate at one year when the results were weighted for study size and stratified based upon timing of implant placement and loading. Survival of single-tooth implants more than one year in function ranged from 92.4% [95% CI: 84.4 -96.4] for conventional placement with immediate loading to 97.5% [95% CI: 88.399.5] for immediate placement with immediate loading. The third meta-analysis identified 0.20-mm [95% CI: 0.034-0.36] marginal bone loss for implants one year in function. Qualitative interpretation of other esthetic, patient satisfaction, and complication outcomes revealed no difference in immediate, early, or conventional therapy approaches. The authors concluded that implant-supported single-tooth replacement in the aesthetic zone with adjacent natural teeth can lead to short-term, favorable outcomes with regard to implant survival and marginal bone level change with early/immediate or conventional surgical placement and loading strategies. Copyright © 2012. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Fatigue resistance of 2 different CAD/CAM glass-ceramic materials used for single-tooth implant crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çavuşoğlu, Yeliz; Sahin, Erdal; Gürbüz, Riza; Akça, Kivanç

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the fatigue resistance of 2 different CAD/CAM in-office monoceramic materials with single-tooth implant-supported crowns in functional area. A metal experimental model with a dental implant was designed to receive in-office CAD/CAM-generated monoceramic crowns. Laterally positioned axial dynamic loading of 300 N at 2 Hz was applied to implant-supported crowns machined from 2 different glass materials for 100,000 cycle. Failures in terms of fracture, crack formation, and chipping were macroscopically recorded and microscopically evaluated. Four of 10 aluminasilicate glass-ceramic crowns fractured at early loading cycles, the rest completed loading with a visible crack formation. Crack formation was recorded for 2 of 10 leucite glass-ceramic crowns. Others completed test without visible damage but fractured upon removal. Lack in chemical adhesion between titanium abutment and dental cement likely reduces the fatigue resistance of machinable glass-ceramic materials. However, relatively better fractural strength of leucite glass-ceramics could be taken into consideration. Accordingly, progress on developmental changes in filler composition of glass-ceramics may be promising. Machinable glass-ceramics do not possess sufficient fatigue resistance for single-tooth implant crowns in functional area.

  8. Long-term cumulative survival and mechanical complications of single-tooth Ankylos Implants: focus on the abutment neck fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Hye Won; Yang, Byoung-Eun

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the cumulative survival rate (CSR) and mechanical complications of single-tooth Ankylos® implants. This was a retrospective clinical study that analyzed 450 single Ankylos® implants installed in 275 patients between December 2005 and December 2012. The main outcomes were survival results CSR and implant failure) and mechanical complications (screw loosening, fracture, and cumulative fracture rate [CFR]). The main outcomes were analyzed according to age, sex, implant length or diameter, bone graft, arch, and position. The 8-year CSR was 96.9%. Thirteen (2.9%) implants failed because of early osseointegration failure in 3, marginal bone loss in 6, and abutment fracture in 4. Screw loosening occurred in 10 implants (2.2%), and 10 abutment fractures occurred. All abutment fractures were located in the neck, and concurrent screw fractures were observed. The CSR and rate of screw loosening did not differ significantly according to factors. The CFR was higher in middle-aged patients (5.3% vs 0.0% in younger and older patients); for teeth in a molar position (5.8% vs 0.0% for premolar or 1.1% for anterior position); and for larger-diameter implants (4.5% for 4.5 mm and 6.7% for 5.5 mm diameter vs 0.5% for 3.5 mm diameter) (all Ptooth restoration in Koreans. However, relatively frequent abutment fractures (2.2%) were observed and some fractures resulted in implant failures. Middle-aged patients, the molar position, and a large implant diameter were associated with a high incidence of abutment fracture.

  9. Cost-effectiveness of endodontic molar retreatment compared with fixed partial dentures and single-tooth implant alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sahng G; Solomon, Charles

    2011-03-01

    One of the most challenging situations in dentistry is a failed root canal treatment case. Should a failed root canal-treated tooth be retreated nonsurgically or surgically, or should the tooth be extracted and replaced with an implant-supported restoration or fixed partial denture? These four treatment alternatives were compared from the perspective of cost-effectiveness on the basis of the current best available evidence. The costs of the four major treatment modalities were calculated using the national fee averages from the 2009 American Dental Association survey of dental fees. The outcome data of all treatment modalities were retrieved from meta-analyses after electronic and manual searches were undertaken in the database from MEDLINE, Cochrane, ISI Web of Knowledge, and Scopus up to April 2010. The treatment strategy model was built and run with TreeAge decision analysis software (TreeAge Software, Inc, Williamstown, MA). Endodontic microsurgery was the most cost-effective approach followed by nonsurgical retreatment and crown, then extraction and fixed partial denture, and finally extraction and single implant-supported restoration. The cost-effectiveness analysis showed that endodontic microsurgery was the most cost-effective among all the treatment modalities for a failed endodontically treated first molar. A single implant-supported restoration, despite its high survival rate, was shown to be the least cost-effective treatment option based on current fees. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Active tactile sensibility of single-tooth implants versus natural dentition: a split-mouth double-blind randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Mahmoud; Geramipanah, Farideh; Negahdari, Ramin; Rakhshan, Vahid

    2014-12-01

    Unlike passive sensitivity of implants/teeth that is assessed more, only three controversial studies have compared active tactile sensibility (ATS) of implants and teeth. We aimed to explore the difference between the ATS of teeth and single-tooth implants. The ATS of single-tooth implants and contralateral teeth was measured in 25 patients after they bit on gold and placebo foils 0- to 70-μm thick, each for five times, in a random order blinded to patients and assessor, carried out at two sessions. Based on the experimental range of 0 μm (mock trials) to 70 μm, the sigmoid shape of psychometric curve was estimated to locate the 50% values as the ATS thresholds for each tooth or implant. ATS Data were analyzed using paired and unpaired t-tests and multiple linear regression (α = 0.05, β ≤ 0.1). Also, equivalence testing approach was used to assess semi-objectively the clinical significance. Average ATS values for teeth and implants were 21.4 ± 6.55 μm and 30.0 ± 7.55 μm, respectively (p = .0001 [paired t-test]). None of the geometric characteristics of implants nor duration of implant in function were correlated with the ATS (p > .4 [regression]). Age was positively associated with the ATS of both implants and teeth (p ≤ .019 [regression]). Tooth ATS (but not implant ATS) was significantly higher in males compared with females (p = .050 [unpaired t-test]), which contributed to a generalizable tooth-implant difference higher than 8-μm clinical equivalence margin in females. The ATS was not significantly different between arches or between anterior/posterior regions (p > .6). There was a slight but statistically significant difference between implant and tooth tactile sensitivities. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. A 3-year prospective study of implant-supported, single-tooth restorations of all-ceramic and metal-ceramic materials in patients with tooth agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Mandana; Worsaae, Nils; Schiødt, Morten; Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this clinical study was to describe outcome variables of all-ceramic and metal-ceramic implant-supported, single-tooth restorations. A total of 59 patients (mean age: 27.9 years) with tooth agenesis and treated with 98 implant-supported single-tooth restorations were included in this study. Two patients did not attend baseline examination, but all patients were followed for 3 years. The implants supported 52 zirconia, 21 titanium and 25 gold alloy abutments, which retained 64 all-ceramic and 34 metal-ceramic crowns. At baseline and 3-year follow-up examinations, the biological outcome variables such as survival rate of implants, marginal bone level, modified Plaque Index (mPlI), modified Sulcus Bleeding Index (mBI) and biological complications were registered. The technical outcome variables included abutment and crown survival rate, marginal adaptation of crowns, cement excess and technical complications. The aesthetic outcome was assessed by using the Copenhagen Index Score, and the patient-reported outcomes were recorded using the OHIP-49 questionnaire. The statistical analyses were mainly performed by using mixed model of ANOVA for quantitative data and PROC NLMIXED for ordinal categorical data. The 3-year survival rate was 100% for implants and 97% for abutments and crowns. Significantly more marginal bone loss was registered at gold-alloy compared to zirconia abutments (P = 0.040). The mPlI and mBI were not significantly different at three abutment materials. The frequency of biological complications was higher at restorations with all-ceramic restorations than metal-ceramic crowns. Loss of retention, which was only observed at metal-ceramic crowns, was the most frequent technical complication, and the marginal adaptations of all-ceramic crowns were significantly less optimal than metal-ceramic crowns (P = 0.020). The professional-reported aesthetic outcome demonstrated significantly superior colour match of all-ceramic over metal

  12. Fracture resistance of single-tooth implant-supported zirconia-based indirect composite-layered molar restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Kohei; Komine, Futoshi; Fushiki, Ryosuke; Blatz, Markus B; Kamio, Shingo; Matsumura, Hideo

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluated the fracture resistance of single-tooth implant-supported zirconia-based indirect composite-layered molar restorations. Forty-four titanium abutments (GingiHue Post) were placed on dental implants (Osseotite Implant). Standardized single-tooth cement-retained implant-supported mandibular molar restorations were fabricated for each of four test groups (n = 11) as follows: porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns (PFM), zirconia-based all-ceramic crowns (ZAC), zirconia-based indirect composite-layered crowns primed with Estenia Opaque Primer for zirconia frameworks (ZIC-E), and zirconia-based indirect composite-layered crowns (ZIC). The crowns were luted with a glass-ionomer cement (Ketac Cem Easymix). Fracture resistance (N) was determined by force application of a perpendicular load to the crowns with a universal testing machine. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey's HSD test were used to assess differences in fracture resistance values (α = 0.05). Mean fracture resistances (SD) were 3.09 (0.22) kN, 3.11 (0.34) kN, 2.84 (0.21) kN, and 2.50 (0.36) kN for the PFM, ZAC, ZIC-E, and ZIC groups, respectively. Fracture resistance in the ZIC specimens was significantly lower (P zirconia-based indirect composite-layered molar crowns primed with Estenia Opaque Primer for zirconia frameworks (ZIC-E) is comparable to that of porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) and zirconia-based all-ceramic (ZAC) restorations. Application of Estenia Opaque Primer to zirconia ceramic framework provides superior fracture resistance in implant-supported zirconia-based indirect composite-layered molar crowns. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Tissue Dimensional Changes in Single-Tooth Immediate Extraction Implant Placement in the Esthetic Zone: A Retrospective Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Francesco; Polara, Giorgio; Spedicato, Giorgio Alfredo

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the buccopalatal volumetric tissue change that occurs following flapless single-tooth immediate extraction placement in the esthetic area and to analyze the role of four different variables. Patients in need of a single-tooth replacement in the anterior maxillary or mandibular area (premolar to premolar) were recruited for the study. Patients were treated using four different therapeutic modalities: group 1 (healing abutment), group 2 (healing abutment + bone graft), group 3 (provisional restoration), and group 4 (provisional + bone graft). Alginate impressions were taken the day of implant insertion before tooth extraction (T0), at 1 month (T1), at 3 months (T2), and at 6 months (T3). Buccopalatal dimension (BPD) was measured on the study casts at 1, 3, and 5 mm apical to the free gingival margin and compared between T0 and T1 and T2 and T3. Seventy-seven patients were included in the study, 29 men and 48 women with a mean age of 54 years (range: 24 to 76 years), and 80 implants were inserted. Thirteen implants were inserted in group 1, 13 in group 2, 20 in group 3, and 34 in group 4. The BPD contraction was more evident for group 1, smaller in group 2 and group 3, and minimal in group 4. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc tests were used. The data analyzed were considered statistically significant with a level of α = .05. The interaction effect P value was numerically zero. The results of this study seem to indicate that volumetric tissue changes after immediate extraction placement in the esthetic area can be minimized if a provisional is immediately connected and a bone graft is inserted simultaneously.

  14. Comparison of implant versus tooth-supported zirconia-based single crowns in a split-mouth design: a 4-year clinical follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güncü, Mustafa Barış; Cakan, Umut; Aktas, Guliz; Güncü, Güliz Nigar; Canay, Şenay

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to evaluate the 4-year clinical performance of tooth versus implant-supported single-unit zirconia crowns (LAVA™) placed on posterior region. Twenty-four patients (10 men and 14 women) who had received 48 single crowns (24 implant-supported and 24 tooth-supported) from January 2007 to December 2009, were included. California Dental Association (CDA) quality assessment system, plaque and gingival index scores were used to evaluate the performance of the crowns at baseline and at all follow-up examinations. During the follow-up period, no fracture of zirconia coping has occurred. Major complication was chipping in three patients that required a new crown fabrication. Except for the failure ones, all crowns in both groups were rated as satisfactory at the follow-up examinations based on the CDA quality assessment criteria. There were no statistically significant differences between tooth and implant-supported crowns in terms of periodontal parameters. The present 4-year follow-up clinical study demonstrates that single-unit tooth- and implant-supported zirconia crowns have similar prosthetic and periodontal outcomes. Single-unit implant or tooth-supported zirconia crowns may be considered acceptable treatment modalities for restoration of either missing or compromised posterior teeth.

  15. Temporización inmediata de implantes unitarios en la maxila posterior Immediate temporization of posterior maxilla single tooth implant

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    Y Leighton

    2011-04-01

    clinical study observed 21 partially edentulous subjects with lip scar and antagonistic natural teeth in the posterior maxilla for a period of 6 months in which conical threaded internal implant connections were inserted with a surface treatment and timed immediately after being inserted into the jawbone by producing an acrylic resin crown on a temporary titanium abutment screwed directly into the implant and left without tooth contacts during the Maximal Intercuspal (MIC and mandibular eccentric movements. All restorations were observed over a period of 6 months evaluating implant success rate and biological and mechanical complications. Results: 25 implants were inserted into 21 patients yielding an average surgical insertion torque of 45.6 Nt. During the clinical observation there was 100% success of implant survival. No biological complications were detected, but there were mechanical complications - a buccal cusp fracture of an acrylic provisional restoration and two screws loosening. Conclusions: The unit temporization by temporary screwing is a predictable and reliable protocol that allows osseointegration and the coexistence in the health of peri-implant tissue and its prosthetic system.

  16. Esthetics of Flapless Single-Tooth Implants in the Anterior Maxilla Using Guided Surgery: Association of Three-Dimensional Accuracy and Pink Esthetic Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürhauser, Rudolf; Mailath-Pokorny, Georg; Haas, Robert; Busenlechner, Dieter; Watzek, Georg; Pommer, Bernhard

    2015-10-01

    Flapless implant placement using surgical templates may guarantee predictable and esthetic results provided that preplanned implant positions are transfered precisely into surgical reality. The study aims to investigate the effect of three-dimensional accuracy in guided implant surgery on the esthetic outcome of single-tooth implants in the anterior maxilla. Single-tooth implants for delayed replacement of upper incisors were inserted in 27 patients using stereolithographic templates. Superimposition of postoperative cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans allowed assessment of positional inaccuracy at the implant shoulder and apex, as well as angular deviation. Objective evaluation of implant esthetics was performed after a mean follow-up of 2.3 years using the Pink Esthetic Score (PES). Mean deviation between planned and actual implant position was 0.84 mm at the implant shoulder and significantly correlated to average PES of 12 (p = .031). Inaccuracy toward the buccal side was most frequent (70%). Deviations  ≥  0.8  mm resulted in significantly worse implant esthetics (median PES: 9.5, interquartile range [IQR]: 8-11) compared with more accurate implant positions (median PES: 13, IQR: 12-13, p = .039). Positional inaccuracy is low in guided implant surgery, but may however significantly compromise implant esthetics in the anterior maxilla. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Feasibility of immediate placement of single-tooth implants in the aesthetic zone : a1-year randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slagter, Kirsten W.; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Bakker, Nicolaas A.; Vissink, Arjan; Raghoebar, Gerry M.

    AimTo assess whether outcome of immediate implant placement and immediate provisionalization after 1year was non-inferior to immediate implant placement and delayed provisionalization regarding Marginal Bone Level (MBL). Materials and MethodsForty patients with a failing tooth in the aesthetic zone

  18. Esthetic Assessment of Implants Placed into Fresh Extraction Sockets for Single-Tooth Replacements Using a Flapless Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolerman, Roni; Mijiritsky, Eitan; Barnea, Eitan; Dabaja, Areeje; Nissan, Joseph; Tal, Haim

    2017-04-01

    To validate the concept of immediate implant placement and nonfunctional loading for use in the esthetically sensitive anterior maxilla, clinical trials should ideally include objective esthetic criteria. This study analyzed procedural results as graded by the pink esthetic score and white esthetic score (PES/WES). Thirty-nine suitable patients (mean follow-up 44.82 ± 28 months) were evaluated. Thirty-eight implants fulfilled stringent criteria for successful osseointegration: absence of peri-implant radiolucency, implant mobility, suppuration, and pain. The mean total PES/WES was 15.50 ± 2.67 (range: 10-20). The mean total PES of 7.92 ± 1.60 (range: 5-10) indicated favorable overall peri-implant soft-tissue conditions. Root convexity and texture (1.63 ± 0.54) and curvature of the facial mucosa (1.68 ± 0.47) and distal papilla (1.66 ± 0.48) had the highest mean values, whereas acceptable levels of facial tissue (1.53 ± 0.73) and mesial papilla (1.42 ± 0.64) were the most difficult to fully achieve. The mean mesial and distal bone loss at data collection was, was 1.19 ± 0.54 and 1.15 ± 0.51, respectively. Periodontal disease severity (advanced chronic and aggressive periodontitis) was significantly associated with a low total PES (p = .048). Objective PES/WES assessment validated immediate anterior maxillary single-tooth replacement and restoration as being a successful and esthetically predictable treatment modality in sites where the buccal bone had been preserved during the extraction at 1 year of follow-up. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Compatible CAD-CAM titanium abutments for posterior single-implant tooth replacement: A retrospective case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Kuang-Wei; Shen, Yu-Fu; Wei, Pein-Chi

    2017-03-01

    In addition to the original abutments provided by implant companies, compatible computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) abutments are also available from different manufacturers. However, the combination of abutments and implant systems from different manufacturers may lead to mechanical problems between components. Little has been reported on the clinical performance of this treatment option. The purpose of this retrospective case series was to evaluate the outcome of compatible CAD-CAM titanium abutments (TiAs) for posterior single-implant tooth replacement (PSITR) up to 6 years after insertion. Eighty-one patients (34 men, 47 women) who received PSITR restored with compatible CAD-CAM TiAs and had a final recall examination between May 2014 and April 2015 were included in this study. Clinical and radiographic examinations were documented. Retrospective evaluation of the patient records was also performed. Correlations between bone-level changes and variables were calculated using the Spearman correlation. Implant and prosthesis survival rates were 100%. Twenty technical complications were observed, including 9 decementations of the crown, 6 screw loosenings, and 5 ceramic fractures. Periimplant mucositis was diagnosed in 36 patients (44.4%) and periimplantitis in 6 patients (7.4%). Correlation analysis showed a significant effect of the extent of periodontal bone loss of the remaining teeth on the marginal bone-level changes around implants (r=0.548, P<.001). Compatible CAD-CAM TiAs provide a viable treatment option for PSITR. However, in light of relatively high screw-loosening and decementation rates, choosing appropriate cements and abutment manufacturers is essential to improve the clinical performance of this treatment option. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of aesthetics of implant-supported single-tooth replacements using different bone augmentation procedures : A prospective randomized clinical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijndert, Leo; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Stellingsma, Kees; Stegenga, Boudewijn; Raghoebar, Gerry M.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the aesthetics of implant-supported single-tooth replacements using different augmentation procedures in a prospective study with the use of an objective rating index and with a subjective patient questionnaire, and to compare the results with each

  1. Immediate Loading of Anterior Single-Tooth Implants Placed in Healed Sites: Five-Year Results of a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hartog, Laurens; Raghoebar, Gerry M; Stellingsma, Kees; Vissink, Arjan; Meijer, Henny Ja

    The aim of this study was to compare the 5-year outcome of immediate loading with that of conventional loading for anterior single-tooth implants placed in healed sites. It was hypothesized that immediate loading is not inferior to conventional loading. A total of 62 patients with a missing maxillary anterior tooth were included. At random, patients were treated with an implant that was restored either with a nonoccluding temporary crown within 24 hours after implant placement (immediate group) or according to a two-stage procedure after 3 months (conventional group). All implants were placed in healed sites. Follow-up visits were performed after definitive crown delivery and 1 and 5 years thereafter. Outcome measures were radiographic marginal bone level changes, implant survival, complications, soft tissue aspects (probing depth, plaque, bleeding, soft tissue level changes), esthetic outcome, and patient satisfaction. Three patients in each study group were lost to follow-up. No significant differences were found in terms of marginal bone loss (1.16 ± 0.93 mm in the immediate group and 1.20 ± 1.10 mm in the conventional group), survival (one implant lost in the immediate group), complications, soft tissue aspects, esthetic outcome, and patient satisfaction. For anterior single-tooth implants placed in healed sites, the outcome of immediate loading is not inferior to conventional loading.

  2. Clinical Outcome of Inter-Proximal Papilla between a Tooth and a Single Implant Treated with CAD/CAM Abutments: a Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Borges

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the clinical outcomes achieved with Computer-Assisted Design/Computer-Assisted Manufacturing implant abutments in the anterior maxilla.Material and Methods: Nineteen patients with a mean age of 41 (range form 26 to 63 years, treated with 21 single tooth implants and 21 Computer-Assisted Design/Computer-Assisted Manufacturing (CAD/CAM abutments in the anterior maxillary region were included in this study. The patients followed 4 criteria of inclusion: (1 had a single-tooth implant in the anterior maxilla, (2 had a CAD/CAM abutment, (3 had a contralateral natural tooth, (4 the implant was restored and in function for at least 6 months up to 2 years. Cases without contact point were excluded. Presence/absence of the interproximal papilla, inter tooth-implant distance (ITD and distance from the base of the contact point to dental crest bone of adjacent tooth (CPB were accessed. Results: Forty interproximal spaces were evaluated, with an average mesial CPB of 5.65 (SD 1.65 mm and distal CPB of 4.65 (SD 1.98 mm. An average mesial ITD of 2.49 (SD 0.69 mm and an average distal ITD of 1.89 (SD 0.63 mm were achieved. Papilla was present in all the interproximal spaces accessed. Conclusions: The restoration of dental implants using CAD/CAM abutments is a predictable treatment with improved aesthetic results. These type of abutments seem to help maintaining a regular papillary filling although the variations of the implant positioning or the restoration teeth relation.

  3. Peri-implant tissue response following connective tissue and bone grafting in conjunction with immediate single-tooth replacement in the esthetic zone: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Hirotaka; Rungcharassaeng, Kitichai; Kan, Joseph Y K; Roe, Phillip; Lozada, Jaime L; Zimmerman, Grenith

    2011-01-01

    This case series evaluated the peri-implant tissue response following extraction and immediate placement and restoration of an implant in conjunction with subepithelial connective tissue grafting (SCTG) and bone grafting in the esthetic zone. Implant success rates and the peri-implant tissue response were also reported. Ten patients (four men, six women) with a mean age of 48 years (range, 35 to 70) underwent extraction and immediate tooth replacement with SCTG and were evaluated clinically and radiographically presurgically (T0), immediately after immediate tooth replacement and SCTG (T1), and at 3 months (T2), 6 months (T3), and 12 months (T4) after surgery. Data was analyzed using Friedman and Wilcoxon signed-ranks tests at the significance level of a = .05. At 1 year, all implants remained osseointegrated, with an overall mean marginal bone change of +0.10 mm and a mean facial gingival level change of -0.05 mm. Modified Plaque Index scores showed that patients were able to maintain a good level of hygiene throughout the study. Papilla Index scores indicated that at T4, more than 50% papilla fill was observed in 80% of all sites. The results of this case series suggest that, in addition to a favorable implant success rate and peri-implant tissue response, the facial gingival level around single immediately placed implants can also be maintained following connective tissue grafting when proper three-dimensional implant positioning is achieved and bone is grafted into the implant-socket gap.

  4. An in vitro study to compare the accuracy of the master cast fabricated by four different transfer impression techniques for single-tooth implant replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahori, Manesh; Nagrath, Rahul; Agrawal, Prateek

    2014-03-01

    Single tooth implant retained crowns have become a recognized technique for the replacement of the missing teeth. With the predictable integration of implants, the emphasis is shifted towards precise prosthesis. Minor movement of the impression coping retained inside the impression material can occur during all the procedures, leading to the three-dimensional spatial inaccuracies in the master casts. Therefore, the present study was undertaken with the purpose to evaluate the accuracy of single-tooth implant impression techniques using four different impression copings, so as to obtain a precise definitive cast for a single-unit implant restoration. A maxillary acrylic resin model with a standard single implant in the first molar region was used to simulate a clinical situation. A total of 60 impressions were made with polyvinylsiloxane impression material, which were divided into four groups of 15 impressions each. Group I used non-modified square impression coping, while in group II, III and IV square impression coping were modified differently. Master casts fabricated for all the groups were analyzed to detect rotational position change of the hexagon on the implant replicas in the master casts in reference to the resin model. The master casts obtained with the roughened and adhesive-coated impression copings showed a lower amount of rotational movement than the masters casts achieved with the non-modified impression copings. Hence, the clinician should use sandblasted and adhesive coated impression copings to achieve a more accurate and precise orientation of the implant replicas in the laboratory master casts in single-tooth implant restorations.

  5. A 1-year randomised controlled trial comparing zirconia versus metal-ceramic implant supported single-tooth restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Mandana; Worsaae, Nils; Schiodt, Morten; Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    To compare the biological, technical and aesthetic outcomes of single implant-supported all-ceramic versus metal-ceramic crowns. Thirty-six patients with premolar agenesis were randomly treated with 38 all-ceramic (AC) and 37 metal-ceramic (MC) implant-supported single-tooth restorations. A quasi-randomisation of consecutively included restorations in patients with one or more implants was used, i.e. a combination of parallel group (for 13 patients with one restoration) and split-mouth (for 23 patients with ≥2 restorations). All patients were recalled for baseline and 1-year followup examinations. Biological and technical outcomes, including complications, were clinically and radiographically registered. The Copenhagen Index Score and visual analogue scale (VAS) score were used to assess professional and patient-reported aesthetic outcomes, respectively, by blinded assessors. One-year after loading, no patient dropped out and no implant failed, though one MC restoration had to be remade. The marginal bone loss was not significantly different between AC and MC restorations (AC: mean 0.08 mm, SD 0.25; MC: mean 0.10 mm, SD 0.17). Seven out of 10 inflammatory reactions were registered at AC restorations. Two technical complications, one loss of retention and one chipping of veneering porcelain were recorded at two metal-ceramic crowns. The marginal adaptation of the all-ceramic crowns was significantly less optimal than the metal-ceramic crowns (P = 0.014). The professional-reported colour match of all-ceramic crowns was significantly better than metal-ceramic crowns (P = 0.031), but other aesthetic parameters as well as the VAS scores demonstrated no statistically significant difference between AC and MC restorations. Marginal bone loss and the aesthetic outcomes were not significantly different between AC and MC restorations in this short-term follow-up study, though inflammatory reactions in the peri-implant mucosa as well as less optimal marginal adaptation were

  6. Optimizing anterior esthetics of a single-tooth implant through socket augmentation and immediate provisionalization: A case report with 7-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Sung Fu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Tooth extraction inevitably accompanies alveolar ridge resorption with loss of pre-existing tissue morphology. Replacing missing teeth with dental implants has become popular, but restoring anterior teeth with implant-supported restorations is a technique-sensitive task and poses challenges for dentists. With the progress of implant dentistry, the demand for optimal esthetics has become linked with the desire for faster, easier techniques that shorten treatment time and also satisfy patients. Immediate provisionalization of a single-tooth implant provides significant benefits compared with traditional delayed protocols, such as aiding the contouring of peri-implant soft tissue and enhancing patient comfort and satisfaction. This article describes a meticulous approach to a hopeless maxillary central incisor with root fracture. The defect in the extraction socket was reconstructed using autogenous bone harvested from the chin. Four months later, an implant was installed and immediately restored. After another healing period of 6 months, the peri-implant soft tissue had been shaped and matured according to the contours of the provisional restoration. The emergence profile was used to duplicate the definitive restoration. Peri-implant esthetics was achieved through socket augmentation and immediate provisionalization of the implant. This treatment modality attained predictable and maintainable outcomes, both functionally and esthetically.

  7. Single-Tooth Morse Taper Connection Implant Placed in Grafted Site of the Anterior Maxilla: Clinical and Radiographic Evaluation

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    Francesco Guido Mangano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to achieve aesthetically pleasing soft tissue contours in a severely compromised tooth in the anterior region of the maxilla. For a right-maxillary central incisor with localized advanced chronic periodontitis a tooth extraction followed by reconstructive procedures and delayed implant placement was proposed and accepted by the patient. Guided bone regeneration (GBR technique was employed, with a biphasic calcium-phosphate (BCP block graft placed in the extraction socket in conjunction with granules of the same material and a resorbable barrier membrane. After 6 months of healing, an implant was installed. The acrylic provisional restoration remained in situ for 3 months and then was substituted with the definitive crown. This ridge reconstruction technique enabled preserving both hard and soft tissues and counteracting vertical and horizontal bone resorption after tooth extraction and allowed for an ideal three-dimensional implant placement. Localized severe alveolar bone resorption of the anterior maxilla associated with chronic periodontal disease can be successfully treated by means of ridge reconstruction with GBR and delayed implant insertion; the placement of an early-loaded, Morse taper connection implant in the grafted site was effective to create an excellent clinical aesthetic result and to maintain it along time.

  8. Intraoral Scanning for Single-Tooth Implant Prosthetics: Rationale for a Digital Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duello, George V

    2018-01-01

    Conventional and implant prosthetics have benefited from recent advances in digital dentistry. Intraoral scanning devices can generate files that can be used for the design and milling of implant prosthetics both in the office and out of the office in the dental laboratory. This article will discuss the rationale for clinicians to consider the benefits of using intraoral scanners in their offices to provide patients with a unique experience in contrast to conventional elastomeric impression techniques.

  9. One-piece internal zirconia abutments for single-tooth restorations on narrow and regular diameter implants: A 5-year prospective follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Andrée; Johansson, Lars-Åke; Lindh, Christina; Ekfeldt, Anders

    2017-10-01

    Studies have reported an increased risk for fractures of zirconia abutments compared with titanium abutments. The aim of this study was to evaluate single-tooth implant restorations with one-piece yttria-stabilized internal zirconia abutments on narrow and regular diameter implants up to 6 years after insertion. This study comprises 52 consecutively treated patients, with a median age of 19 years. In total, 59 narrow (3.3 mm) and 10 regular (4.1 mm) diameter implants were installed. Sixty-five all-ceramic crowns were cemented on implant-supported one-piece internal zirconia abutments and 4 restorations were screw-retained. Thirty-five patients with 48 implant restorations participated in the final examination and another 14 patients with 16 implant restorations were possible to reach and could be interviewed. The implant survival was 100% but the survival rate for the implant-supported ceramic restorations was lower, 87.5%. Three crowns (4.7%) were remade for different reasons. Five restorations (7.8%) were remade due to fracture of the internal one-piece zirconia abutment. Four of these fractures occurred in 3.3 mm implant abutments. Narrow diameter implants offer an opportunity to restore small single-tooth edentulous gaps. For esthetical reasons the choice of an abutment in zirconia can be favorable, but at least with the used implant system, there seems to be an increased risk for fracture. Most patients were very satisfied with the esthetics and function of their implant restorations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Evaluation of a one-piece ceramic implant used for single-tooth replacement and three-unit fixed partial dentures: a prospective cohort clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ronald E; Grohmann, Philipp; Sailer, Irena; Steinhart, Yann-Niclas; Fehér, Aurel; Hämmerle, Christoph; Strub, Jörg Rudolf; Kohal, Ralf

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this clinical trial was to evaluate the safety and efficiency of a one-piece zirconia oral implant after 1 year of function. Two centers included 60 subjects in need of implant-supported single-tooth restorations or three-unit bridges. A total of 71 zirconia one-piece implants were placed and immediately restored with a temporary reconstruction for at least 2 months. The final veneered zirconia restorations were then cemented and followed for 6 months and 1 year after insertion of the restorations. At each visit, a clinical evaluation was performed to analyze biological parameters of the implants and the neighboring teeth. A standardized periapical radiograph was taken at implant insertion, at the placement of the restorations and at the 1-year follow-up. Sixty patients with 71 implants (48 in the mandible, 23 in the maxilla) were included in this study and provided with 11 bridges and 49 crowns. Two patients with three implants (one bridge and one single crown) could not be evaluated. One patient lost his implant 5 weeks after implant insertion. Based on 58 patients, the mean survival rate was 98.3% after one year when the implants of the two patients that did not show up were not counted as lost. The mean marginal bone loss from implant insertion to the 1-year follow-up after the final prosthetic restoration was 0.78 mm with a standard deviation of 0.79 mm. The probing depth around the implants increased from 2.7 mm at insertion of the prosthetic reconstruction to 3.5 mm one year after insertion. The probing depth around the adjacent teeth remained stable at 2.5 mm. At the 1-year recall, the difference was significant. The clinical attachment levels at implants and teeth were not different at the 1-year follow-up with 3.1 mm at tooth and implant sites. The presently tested one-piece ceramic implant was successful in replacing single tooth and three-unit gaps after one year of function. Further long-term data are necessary to verify these

  11. Soft tissue modeling for the esthetic single-tooth implant restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potashnick, S R

    1998-01-01

    The ability of the restorative dentist to understand and control the relation of the implant to its associated gingival tissues is extremely important in achieving the maximum esthetic result in the final restoration. The position of the gingival margin following stage-two surgery represents collapse of the gingival tissues until it finds support by the component against which it comes to rest. This component may be a healing abutment, final abutment, or provisional restoration, if placed at the same time of implant exposure. Generally, it will be a healing abutment. There is complex relation between implant position, gingival management at stage-one and stage-two surgery, the position of the gingival margin over the buccal surface of the implant compared to the adjacent natural teeth, component selection, and lip line esthetics. The therapist who understands these relations will know how to mold the gingival tissue around implants to maximize the esthetic result. This article focuses on these relations and the technique of tissue modeling with subgingival contours to create a restoration with the illusion of reality.

  12. Papillary fill response in single-tooth implants using abutments of different geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patil, Ratnadeep; den Hartog, Laurens; Dilbaghi, Anjali; de Jong, Bart; Kerdijk, Wouter; Cune, Marco S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the influence of abutment geometry on papillary fill in the esthetic zone in a delayed crown protocol. Materials and methods: Twenty-six subjects received two non-adjacent endosseous implants in the esthetic zone. Functional temporary crowns were installed 17-19 weeks later,

  13. When is an implant ready for a tooth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupac, Robert G

    2003-12-01

    The capability of placing an osseointegrated implant at the time of tooth extraction and immediately placing a restoration on the implant depends upon a number of factors. This paper describes the traditional Brånemark protocol, the evolution of single-stage surgery, the guidelines for immediate placement, the measurement of implant stability, and the considerations critical to immediately loading.

  14. Evaluation of soft tissues around single tooth implants in the anterior maxilla restored with cemented and screw-retained crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutrim, Emerson Souza; Peruzzo, Daiane Cristina; Benatti, Bruno

    2012-12-01

    Implant-supported restorations can be attached as screw-retained or cemented prostheses. In both situations, the characteristics of the soft tissues around the implants are crucial for oral rehabilitation and patient satisfaction. Therefore, this study uses the Pink Esthetic Score (PES), which allows evaluation of gingival esthetics around implants, to evaluate the soft tissues around implants in the anterior maxilla rehabilitated with cemented prostheses (CP) and screw-retained prostheses (SP). Forty implants placed in the anterior maxilla were evaluated, and these had been rehabilitated with prosthetic crowns for a minimum of 1 year. Periodontal examination was performed to evaluate probing depth (PD) and bleeding on probing (BOP) of the implant and the corresponding natural tooth. The total mean (±SD) PES for SP was 10.73 (±1.98) and 10.41 (±2.67) for CP, which was not statistically significant (P ≥ .05). Periodontal examination revealed that CP and SP showed no difference for BOP (P ≥ .05). Differences were only detected in PD when comparing the reference teeth of both groups to CP and SP (P ≤ .05). The present study demonstrates that the PES proved to be an efficient index to assess peri-implant tissues, and that the type of crown retention does not influence the health and quality of the soft tissues around implants.

  15. Esthetic outcome evaluation of maxillary anterior single-tooth bone-level implants with metal or ceramic abutments and ceramic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanlıoğlu, Burçin Akoğlu; Kahramanoğlu, Erkut; Yıldız, Coşkun; Ozkan, Yaşar; Kulak-Özkan, Yasemin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the treatment outcome of implants placed in the maxillary anterior segment. Patients were treated with bone-level implants (Straumann Bone Level Implant, Institut Straumann) that supported all-ceramic single crowns and were followed for 2 to 4 years. Titanium or ceramic abutments were used according to the quality of the soft tissue at each site. Esthetic parameters were recorded to assess treatment outcomes. Pink esthetic scores (PES) and white esthetic scores (WES) were used to evaluate the esthetic outcome of anterior single-tooth implant-supported crowns. Patient satisfaction was also evaluated by means of a questionnaire. Fifty-five implants were placed in 47 patients. At the recall examinations, all implants were confirmed to have successfully integrated and demonstrated healthy peri-implant soft tissues, as documented by generally accepted clinical parameters. Overall, the esthetic results were considered favorable, and there were no significant differences between restorations with ceramic or titanium abutments. WES values were slightly superior to PES values. None of the implants had mucosal recession. Objective and subjective evaluation of maxillary bone-level implants in the esthetic zone yielded satisfactory results. Pleasing esthetic outcomes and stable facial soft tissues were achieved.

  16. A 5-year comparison of marginal bone level following immediate loading of single-tooth implants placed in healed alveolar ridges and extraction sockets in the maxilla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berberi, Antoine N.; Sabbagh, Joseph M.; Aboushelib, Moustafa N.; Noujeim, Ziad F.; Salameh, Ziad A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of present investigation was to evaluate marginal bone level after 5-year follow-up of implants placed in healed ridges and fresh extraction sockets in maxilla with immediate loading protocol. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six patients in need of a single-tooth replacement in the anterior maxilla received 42 Astra Tech implants (Astra Tech Implant system™, Dentsply Implants, Mölndal, Sweden). Implants were placed either in healed ridges (group I) or immediately into fresh extraction sockets (group II). Implants were restored and placed into functional loading immediately by using a prefabricated abutment. Marginal bone level relative to the implant reference point was recorded at implant placement, crown cementation, 12, 36, and 60 months following loading using intra-oral radiographs. Measurements were made on the mesial and distal sides of each implant. Results: Overall, two implants were lost from the group II, before final crown cementation: they were excluded from the study. The mean change in marginal bone loss (MBL) after implant placement was 0.26 ± 0.161 mm for 1 year, and 0.26 ± 0.171 mm for 3 years, and 0.21 ± 0.185 mm for 5 years in extraction sockets and was 0.26 ± 0.176 mm for 1 year and 0.21 ± 0.175 mm for 3 years, and 0.19 ± 0.172 mm for 5 years in healed ridges group. Significant reduction of marginal bone was more pronounced in implants inserted in healed ridges (P implant after cementation of the provisional (P immediately loaded implants placed either in extraction sockets or healed ridges were similar. Functional loading technique by using prefabricated abutment placed during the surgery time seems to maintain marginal bone around implant in both healed and fresh extraction sites. PMID:24550840

  17. A 5-year comparison of marginal bone level following immediate loading of single-tooth implants placed in healed alveolar ridges and extraction sockets in the maxilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berberi, Antoine N; Sabbagh, Joseph M; Aboushelib, Moustafa N; Noujeim, Ziad F; Salameh, Ziad A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of present investigation was to evaluate marginal bone level after 5-year follow-up of implants placed in healed ridges and fresh extraction sockets in maxilla with immediate loading protocol. Thirty-six patients in need of a single-tooth replacement in the anterior maxilla received 42 Astra Tech implants (Astra Tech Implant system™, Dentsply Implants, Mölndal, Sweden). Implants were placed either in healed ridges (group I) or immediately into fresh extraction sockets (group II). Implants were restored and placed into functional loading immediately by using a prefabricated abutment. Marginal bone level relative to the implant reference point was recorded at implant placement, crown cementation, 12, 36, and 60 months following loading using intra-oral radiographs. Measurements were made on the mesial and distal sides of each implant. Overall, two implants were lost from the group II, before final crown cementation: they were excluded from the study. The mean change in marginal bone loss (MBL) after implant placement was 0.26 ± 0.161 mm for 1 year, and 0.26 ± 0.171 mm for 3 years, and 0.21 ± 0.185 mm for 5 years in extraction sockets and was 0.26 ± 0.176 mm for 1 year and 0.21 ± 0.175 mm for 3 years, and 0.19 ± 0.172 mm for 5 years in healed ridges group. Significant reduction of marginal bone was more pronounced in implants inserted in healed ridges (P implant after cementation of the provisional (P immediately loaded implants placed either in extraction sockets or healed ridges were similar. Functional loading technique by using prefabricated abutment placed during the surgery time seems to maintain marginal bone around implant in both healed and fresh extraction sites.

  18. A 1-year randomised controlled trial comparing zirconia versus metal-ceramic implant supported single-tooth restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Mandana; Worsaae, Nils; Schiodt, Morten

    2011-01-01

    To compare the biological, technical and aesthetic outcomes of single implant-supported all-ceramic versus metal-ceramic crowns.......To compare the biological, technical and aesthetic outcomes of single implant-supported all-ceramic versus metal-ceramic crowns....

  19. Clinician assessments and patient perspectives of single-tooth implant restorations in the esthetic zone of the maxilla: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunyanak, Sirikarn P; Pollini, Adrien; Ntounis, Athanasios; Morton, Dean

    2017-07-01

    Esthetic outcomes associated with implant dentistry are important to both clinicians and patients. However, esthetic satisfaction may vary between the 2 groups. In order to evaluate the current publications relating to this topic, the following focused question was developed, "what are the quantitative and qualitative differences between clinician evaluations and patient perspectives in the assessment of single-tooth implant outcomes in the esthetic zone?" The purpose of this systematic review was to identify differences in esthetic satisfaction between clinicians and patients when evaluating single-tooth implant-supported restorations. An electronic search of the Medline database and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (2000 to 2014) was performed. The search was supplemented by a manual search of specific journals. A quality assessment of full-text articles was performed according to Cochrane Collaboration's tool and Newcastle-Ottawa scale for risk of bias assessment. Information regarding outcomes was collected and compared. The search term combinations identified 555 titles. Subsequent to further review, 11 publications, including 2 randomized controlled trials, were selected for inclusion. Because of the heterogeneity of the study designs, study interventions, and esthetic assessment methods, no meta-analysis was performed. The clinicians identified a satisfactory outcome in 51% to 100% for peri-implant soft tissue and 62% to 90% for implant restorations. Patients showed a mean range score of 43% to 93% for peri-implant soft tissue and 81% to 96% for implant restorations. The visual analog scale score of the dentists was always lower than that of the patients. The review identified correlations between subjective and objective assessments for the Pink Esthetic Score (PES), the Papilla Index (PI), the Implant Crown Aesthetic Index (ICAI), and the modified (mod-ICAI) indices. Clinicians are more critical of esthetic outcomes than patients. The PES and

  20. Fracture mode during cyclic loading of implant-supported single-tooth restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Mandana; Kleven, Erik; Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    restorations of zirconia abutment-retained crowns with zirconia copings veneered with glass-ceramics (n=8) and feldspathic ceramics (n=8). The control group was composed of 16 metal ceramic restorations of titanium abutment-retained crowns with gold alloy copings veneered with glass (n=8) and feldspathic......STATEMENT OF PROBLEM: Fracture of veneering ceramics in zirconia-based restorations has frequently been reported. Investigation of the fracture mode of implant-supported ceramic restorations by using clinically relevant laboratory protocols is needed. PURPOSE: This study compared the mode...... and resisted more cyclic loads than the ceramic restorations, particularly when the metal ceramic crowns were veneered with glass-ceramics....

  1. Effect of surface topography of implant abutments on retention of cemented single-tooth crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos, Tomie Nakakuki; Adachi, Lena Katekawa; Miashiro, Karen; Yoshida, Hideki; Shinkai, Rosemary Sadami; Neto, Pedro Tortamano; Frigerio, Maria Luiza Moreira Arantes

    2010-08-01

    This study investigated whether surface topography affects the retentive strength of cemented full crowns, comparing the effects of standard machined, sandblasted, and grooved implant abutments. Five metallic crowns per abutment type were cast and cemented with zinc phosphate. After 24 hours, the specimens were submitted to a tensile test. The retentive strength of the cemented crowns was affected by abutment surface topography. The sandblasted and grooved surface groups had approximately 2.4 times greater mean uniaxial retentive strength than the machined surface group (P < .001). The retentive strength of the sandblasted and grooved abutments was similar, despite marked differences in surface profiles and roughness parameters.

  2. Papilla height in relation to the distance between bone crest and interproximal contact point at single-tooth implants: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roccuzzo, Mario; Roccuzzo, Andrea; Ramanuskaite, Ausra

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to investigate the tooth-implant papilla formation in correlation with the distance between the interproximal bone level and the prosthetic contact point. A comprehensive search of the current literature (01/01/2000-01/01/2017) was performed to identify human trials that included 10 patients or more, with at least 12 months follow-up, in need of the replacement of one single tooth in the anterior maxillary region with an implant-supported single crown. To meet the inclusion criteria, studies had to provide both radiographic and clinical data regarding the distance between the interproximal bone level and the prosthetic contact point. The search yielded 136 records. After evaluation of abstracts and full texts, 12 papers were included in the final review, even though various reference points, for the comparison between the vertical distance and the papilla height, were used. The vertical distance between the interproximal bone level and prosthetic contact point ranged between 2 and 11 mm, and the partial or complete papilla fill (Jemt's score 2-3) ranged between 56.5% and 100% of cases. There is limited evidence that the vertical distance from the base of the interproximal contact point to the crestal bone level seems to affect the interproximal papilla height; that is, the lower is the distance the higher is the percentage of papilla fill. Complete embrasure fill between an implant restoration and the adjacent tooth seems to be correlated with the integrity of the periodontal ligament of the tooth. To reduce the risk of aesthetic failures, interproximal probing on the adjacent teeth should be encouraged before implant placement. © 2018 The Authors. Clinical Oral Implants Research Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Randomized-controlled clinical trial of customized zirconia and titanium implant abutments for single-tooth implants in canine and posterior regions: 3-year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zembic, Anja; Sailer, Irena; Jung, Ronald Ernst; Hämmerle, Christoph Hans Franz

    2009-08-01

    The aim was to test whether or not zirconia abutments exhibit the same survival and technical/biological outcome as titanium abutments. Twenty-two patients receiving 40 single-tooth implants in canine and posterior regions were included. The implant sites were randomly assigned to 20 zirconia and 20 titanium abutments. All-ceramic and metal-ceramic crowns were fabricated. At baseline, 6, 12 and 36 months, the reconstructions were examined for technical and biological problems. Probing pocket depth (PPD), plaque control record (PCR) and bleeding on probing (BOP) were assessed at abutments (test) and analogous contralateral teeth (control). Standardized radiographs of the implants were made and the bone level (BL) was measured referring to the implant shoulder on mesial (mBL) and distal sides (dBL). The difference of color (DeltaE) of the peri-implant mucosa and the gingiva of control teeth was assessed with a spectrophotometer. The data were statistically analyzed with Mann-Whitney Rank and Student's unpaired t-tests. Eighteen patients with 18 zirconia and 10 titanium abutments were examined at a mean follow-up of 36 months (range 31.5-53.3 months). No fracture of an abutment or loss of a reconstruction was found. Hence, both exhibited 100% survival. At two metal-ceramic crowns supported by titanium abutments chipping of the veneering ceramic occurred. No difference of the biological outcome of zirconia and titanium abutments was observed: PPD (meanPPD(ZrO(2)) 3.2 +/- 1 mm, mPPD(Ti) 3.4 +/- 0.5 mm), PCR (mPCR(ZrO(2)) 0.1 +/- 0.2, mPCR(Ti) 0.1 +/- 0.2) and BOP (mBOP(ZrO(2)) 0.4 +/- 0.4, mBOP(Ti) 0.2 +/- 0.3). Furthermore, the BL was similar at implants supporting zirconia and titanium abutments (mBL(ZrO(2)) 1.7 +/- 1, dBL(ZrO(2)) 1.6 +/- 1; mBL(Ti) 2 +/- 1, dBL(Ti) 2.1 +/- 1). Both, zirconia and titanium abutments induced a similar amount of discoloration of the mucosa compared with the gingiva at natural teeth (DeltaE(ZrO(2)) 9.3 +/- 3.8, DeltaE(Ti) 6.8 +/- 3.8). At

  4. Method for developing an optimal emergence profile using heat-polymerized provisional restorations for single-tooth implant-supported restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macintosh, Daniel C T; Sutherland, Mark

    2004-03-01

    This article describes a method for creating an improved emergence profile with single-tooth, implant-supported restorations. An easily trimmed silicone gingival substitute is used to allow polymerization of acrylic resin provisional restorations to achieve control of the emergence profile. Gingival trauma is minimized by eliminating intraoral use of monomer and minimizing surgical procedures. Provisional restorations can be assessed to ensure the contour is acceptable and the trimmed gingival substitute can be used to fabricate a similar profile in the definitive prosthesis. The provisional restorations may be used instead of standard prefabricated healing abutments to guide the healing contours of the peri-implant gingival tissue.

  5. Retrospective clinical study of 988 dual acid-etched implants placed in grafted and native bone for single-tooth replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesma, Newton; Pannuti, Cláudio Mendes; Cardaropoli, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of sex, implant characteristics, and bone grafting on the survival rate of dual acid-etched (DAE) implants. Patients treated with internal-hex DAE implants for single tooth replacement in a military dental clinic between January 2005 and December 2010 were included in this study. Clinical data related to implant characteristics, implant location, presence of grafted bone, and implant failures were collected. The primary outcome was implant loss. The survival rate was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox regression modeling was used to determine which factors would predict implant failure. DAE implants were evaluated in a total of 988 patients (80.3% men). Twenty-four (2.4%) implants failed, most were cylindric (54.2%) with regular platforms (70.8%) and were 10 mm long (58.3%). The failure rate was 2.4% for the anterior maxilla, 3.3% for the posterior maxilla, 1.6% for the anterior mandible, and 2.0% for posterior mandible. The cumulative survival rate was 97.6%. The failure rate was 8.8% in implants placed after sinus augmentation, 7.3% in bone block-grafted areas, and 1.6% in native bone. Based on multivariable analysis (Cox regression), sinus augmentation and bone block grafting had a statistically significant effect on implant failure; the hazard ratios were 5.5 and 4.6, respectively. The results revealed that DAE implants had high survival rates, and no influence of sex, location, shape, diameter, or length on failure rates could be observed. However, a significant association was observed between failure and presence of bone graft in the implant area.

  6. Single-tooth replacement in the anterior maxilla by means of immediate implantation and early loading: clinical and aesthetic results at 5 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnieri, Renzo; Ceccherini, Alessandro; Grande, Maurizio

    2015-04-01

    The hypothesis of the present study was that the early loading of single implants-supported restorations, replacing single extracting teeth in the anterior region of the maxilla in case of fresh extraction sockets with residual hard and soft tissue preservation, could be a successful procedure. Twenty-one implants were placed into maxillary anterior fresh extraction sockets using a flapless technique. Temporary restorations, which were fabricated from the impression taken immediately after implant placement, were connected within 2 weeks. These temporary restorations were adjusted in order to avoid any direct occlusive contacts. Six months after implantation, the implants were restored with single-teeth all-ceramic prostheses. Patients were followed for 5 years. Radiographic and clinical examinations were made at baseline, at time of definitive crowns delivery, and each subsequent year. Survival rate, cortical bone responses, and peri-implant mucosal responses were evaluated. One implant was lost at 6 months. Clinical osseointegration of 20 implants was achieved (95.2% implant survival rate after 5 years) with minimal gingival recession and papillae preservation. The mean change in marginal cortical bone level was 0.40 mm at 6 months and 0.83 mm at 5 years. Within the limit of the present study, the data indicate that, under a strictly controlled oral hygienic regimen, single-tooth implants, with immediate placement and early loading protocol, may be used in anterior maxillary fresh extraction sockets with residual hard and soft tissues preservation, if patients are selected carefully and if high primary stability is strictly followed. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A 5- Year Comparison of Marginal Bone Level Following Immediate Loading of Single-Tooth Implants Placed in Healed Alveolar Ridges and Extraction Sockets in the Maxilla.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Nicolas Berberi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractPurpose: The aim of present investigation was to evaluate marginal bone level after 5-year follow-up of implants placed in healed ridges and fresh extraction sockets in maxilla with immediate loading protocol.Materials and Methods: Thirty-six patients in need of a single tooth replacement in the anterior maxilla received 42 Astra Tech implants (Astra Tech Implant system™, Dentsply Implants, Mölndal, Sweden. Implants were placed in healed ridges (group I or immediately into extraction sockets (group II. Implants were restored and placed into functional loading immediately by using a prefabricated abutment. Marginal bone level relative to the implant reference point was recorded at implant placement, crown cementation, 12, 36 and 60 months following loading using intra-oral radiographs. Measurements were made on the mesial and distal sides of each implantResults: Overall, two implants were lost from the group II, before final crown cementation: they were excluded from the study and all remaining implants osseointegrated successfully after 5 years of functional loading. The mean change in marginal bone loss after implant placement was 0.267±0.161 for one year, and 0.265±0.171 for three years and 0.213±0.185 for five years in extraction sockets and was 0.266±0.176 for one year and 0.219±0.175 for three years and 0.194±0.172 for five years in healed ridges group. Significant reduction of marginal bone loss was more pronounced in implants inserted in healed ridges (P

  8. Tooth Retained Implant: No More an Oxymoron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Bhat

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Periodontally af-fected teeth are treated in one of the two ways. (1 Tooth retention after periodontal surgery, in which the degree of regeneration achieved is unpredictable. (2 Tooth extrac-tion and implant placement. Implants have an osseointegrated surface which does not provide adequate shock absorption. Regeneration can be achieved by resecting the crown of the affected tooth and submerging the root. This technique has not had a clinical application so far as the tooth becomes difficult to restore. Placing an implant within the root can make the retained root restorable. At the same time, as the implant is placed within the root surface it achieves a periodontal integration which dampens occlusal forces better than osseointegration. Therefore, such a “tooth retained implant” may serve as an additional treatment option with significant benefits over tooth retention and implant placement alone. The hypothesis: Implants placed within retained roots have shown cementum deposition and attachment of periodontal ligament fibers over their surface. This periodontal attachment may be able to dam-pen forces better than in an osseointegrated implant. Moreover, since an implant is being placed, the crown of the tooth can be resected and submerged. This prevents epithelial migration, allows for the periodontal ligament cells to populate the wound and favors regeneration.Evaluation of the hypothesis: The technique of placing implants within cavities prepared in the root and then submerging them are simple for any practitioner placing implants routinely.

  9. One-piece zirconia oral implants for single-tooth replacement: Three-year results from a long-term prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohal, Ralf-Joachim; Spies, Benedikt C; Bauer, Annalena; Butz, Frank

    2018-01-01

    This 3-year report of a prospective long-term cohort investigation aimed to evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcomes of a one-piece zirconia oral implant for single-tooth replacement. Sixty-five patients received a 1-stage implant surgery with immediate temporization. Standardized radiographs were taken at implant insertion, after 1 year, and after 3 years to monitor peri-implant bone levels. A univariate analysis of the association of different baseline parameters on marginal bone loss from implant insertion to 36 months was performed. Soft-tissue parameters were evaluated at prosthesis insertion, after 6 months, after 1 year, and at the 3-year follow-up. After 3 years, six posterior site implants were lost, giving a cumulative survival rate of 90.8%. The mean marginal bone loss was 1.45 mm; 35% of the implants lost at least 2 mm bone, and 22% more than 3 mm. The univariate analysis did not identify any parameter associated with marginal bone loss. Probing depth, clinical attachment level, and bleeding index increased over 3 years, and plaque index decreased. The low survival rate of the presented ceramic implant and especially the high frequency of advanced bone loss are noticeable but remain unexplained. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Single-Tooth Rehabilitations Supported by Dental Implants Used in an Immediate-Provisionalization Protocol: Report on Long-Term Outcome with Retrospective Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maló, Paulo; de Araújo Nobre, Miguel; Lopes, Armando; Ferro, Ana; Gravito, Inês

    2015-10-01

    There is a need for long-term studies evaluating the outcome of single-tooth rehabilitations supported by dental implants in immediate loading. To report the long-term outcome (in excess of 5 years) of single-tooth rehabilitations supported by dental implants in an immediate-provisionalization protocol. This retrospective cohort study included 332 consecutive patients (189 females and 143 males) with an average age of 47 years (range: 16 to 82 years) who were rehabilitated between 1996 and 2006 with 594 single crowns supported by dental implants in immediate loading. Implant success rates were calculated based on implant function and using life tables. Marginal bone levels were measured at 5 and 10 years. Mechanical and biological complications were calculated for the follow-up period between implant insertion and 5 years and every 6 months thereafter. Fifty-four patients dropped out of the study (16.5%). Nineteen patients lost a total of 25 implants (n = 23 in the maxilla; n = 2 in the mandible), rendering a cumulative survival rate of 95.7% at both 5 and 10 years of follow-up. The mean marginal bone levels were 1.56 mm (standard deviation 0.78 mm) and 1.75 mm (standard deviation 0.29 mm) at 5 and 10 years of follow-up. Mechanical complications occurred in 83 patients and 116 implants (19.5%) up to the 10-year follow-up, namely prosthetic screw loosening (2.4%), abutment complications (4.4%), fracture of provisional crowns (9.6%), and fracture of definitive ceramic crowns (3.5%). Biological complications occurred in 58 patients and 79 implants (13.3%) up to the 10-year follow-up, with the majority consisting in peri-implant pathology. Considering the high survival rates and stable marginal bone levels after 10 years, it can be concluded within the limitations of the present study that replacement of single teeth with dental implants in an immediate-provisionalization protocol is a viable and safe treatment option for both maxilla and mandible.

  11. Experimental zirconia abutments for implant-supported single-tooth restorations in esthetically demanding regions: 4-year results of a prospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glauser, Roland; Sailer, Irena; Wohlwend, Arnold; Studer, Stephan; Schibli, Monica; Schärer, Peter

    2004-01-01

    This prospective clinical study evaluated an experimental implant abutment made of densely sintered zirconia with respect to peri-implant hard and soft tissue reaction as well as fracture resistance over time. Twenty-seven consecutively treated patients with 54 single-tooth implants were included. Zirconia abutment ingots were individually shaped and set on the implants with gold screws. All-ceramic (Empress I) crowns were cemented using a composite cement. At the 1- and 4-year examinations, reconstructions were evaluated for technical problems (fracture of abutment or crown, loosening of abutment screw). Modified Plaque and simplified Gingival Indices were recorded at implants and neighboring teeth, and peri-implant bone levels were radiographically determined. All but 1 of the 27 patients with 53 restorations could be evaluated at 1 year, and 36 restorations in 18 patients were evaluated 4 years after abutment and crown insertion. The median observation period for the reconstructions was 49.2 months. No abutment fractures occurred. Abutment screw loosening was reported for 2 restorations at 8 months and 27 months, respectively. Mean Plaque Index was 0.4 (SD 0.6) at abutments and 0.5 (SD 0.6) at teeth; mean Gingival Index was 0.7 (SD 0.5) at abutments and 0.9 (SD 0.5) at teeth. Mean marginal bone loss measured 1.2 mm (SD 0.5) after 4 years of functional loading. Zirconia abutments offered sufficient stability to support implant-supported single-tooth reconstructions in anterior and premolar regions. The soft and hard tissue reaction toward zirconia was favorable.

  12. Three-year analysis of zirconia implants used for single-tooth replacement and three-unit fixed dental prostheses: A prospective multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmer, Marc; Spies, Benedikt C; Vach, Kirstin; Kohal, Ralf-Joachim; Hämmerle, Christoph H F; Jung, Ronald E

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate clinically and radiographically the outcome of zirconia oral implants after 3 years in function. In 60 patients in need of either a single-tooth replacement or a three-unit fixed dental prosthesis (FDP), a total of 71 one-piece zirconia implants were placed and immediately restored with temporary fixed prostheses. After a period of at least 2 months in the mandible and at least 4 months in the maxilla, zirconia-based reconstructions were cemented. The implants were clinically and radiologically examined at implant insertion, prosthetic delivery, at 6 months and then yearly up to 3 years. A linear mixed model was used to analyze statistically the influence of prognostic factors on changes in the marginal bone level. Seventy-one implants (48 in the mandible, 23 in the maxilla) inserted in 60 patients were restored with 49 crowns and 11 FDP. One patient lost his implant after 5 weeks. Five patients with one implant each could not be evaluated after 3 years. Based on 55 patients with a total of 66 implants, the mean survival rate was 98.5% after 3 years in function. A statistically significant mean marginal bone loss (0.70 mm ± 0.72 mm) has been detected from implant insertion to the 3-year follow-up. The largest marginal bone loss occurred between implantation and prosthetic delivery (0.67 mm ± 0.56 mm). After delivery, no statistically significant bone level change was observed (0.02 mm ± 0.59 mm). None of the investigated prognostic factors had a significant influence on changes in the marginal bone level. After 3 years in function, the investigated one-piece zirconia implant showed a high survival rate and a low marginal bone loss. The implant system was successful for single-tooth replacement and three-unit FDPs. Further investigations with long-term data are needed to confirm these findings. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Facial bone alterations on maxillary anterior single implants for immediate placement and provisionalization following tooth extraction: a superimposed cone beam computed tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Taichiro; Tsukiyama, Yoshihiro; Morimoto, Keizo; Koyano, Kiyoshi

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) study was to describe the facial bone changes around single implants for immediate placement and provisionalization following tooth extraction in the maxillary anterior. The data between 2008 and 2013 were collected retrospectively. Superimposed facio-palatal cross-sectional CBCT images for the implants were derived from preoperative and postoperative radiographs via standardized CBCT processes. Horizontal and vertical facial measurements on the implants were identified at preoperative and approximately 1-year postoperative follow-ups. Correlation coefficient for those parameters was evaluated. A total of 12 single implants in 12 patients were included in this study. The mean loading period was 13.3 months (range 12-15 months). The median data of preoperative bone thickness 0.54 mm (A), preoperative vertical bone level 1.46 mm (B), postoperative bone thickness 1.77 mm (C), postoperative vertical bone level 1.08 mm (D), horizontal distance from outer surface of preoperative facial bone to implant surface 2.08 mm (E), horizontal gap distance 1.41 mm (E-A), horizontal bone resorption -0.26 mm (E-C), and vertical bone resorption -0.25 mm (B-D) were obtained. The data at the implant platform level (IPL) were selected for the horizontal measurements. Spearman's analysis demonstrated statistically significant correlations between B and D, C and E, E and E-A, and B and E-C (P Immediate placement and provisionalization of single implants procedure in the maxillary anterior showed excellent outcomes with the small facial bone alterations around the implants. Neither preoperative facial bone thickness nor horizontal gap distance influenced the amount of facial bone resorptions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Influence of Laser-Lok surface on immediate functional loading of implants in single-tooth replacement: a 2-year prospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farronato, Davide; Mangano, Francesco; Briguglio, Francesco; Iorio-Siciliano, Vincenzo; Riccitiello, Francesco; Guarnieri, Renzo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of a Laser-Lok microtexturing surface on clinical attachment level and crestal bone remodeling around immediately functionally loaded implants in single-tooth replacement. Seventy-seven patients were included in a prospective, randomized study and divided into two groups. Group 1 (control) consisted of non-Laser-Lok type implants (n = 39), while in group 2 (test), Laser-Lok type implants were used (n = 39). Crestal bone loss (CBL) and clinical parameters including clinical attachment level (CAL), Plaque Index (PI), and bleeding on probing were recorded at baseline examinations and at 6, 12, and 24 months after loading with the final restoration. One implant was lost in the control group and one in the test group, giving a total survival rate of 96.1% after 2 years. PI and BOP outcomes were similar for both implant types without statistical differences. A mean CAL loss of 1.10 ± 0.51 mm was observed during the first 2 years in group 1, while the mean CAL loss observed in group 2 was 0.56 ± 0.33 mm. Radiographically, group 1 implants showed a mean crestal bone loss of 1.07 ± 0.30 mm compared with 0.49 ± 0.34 mm for group 2. The type of implant did not influence the survival rate, whereas Laser-Lok implants resulted in greater CAL and in shallower radiographic peri-implant CBL than non-Laser-Lok implants.

  15. Immediate, Non Submerged Root Analog Zirconia Implant in Single Rooted Tooth Replacement: Case Report with 2 years Follow Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patankar, Amod; Kshirsagar, Rajesh; Patankar, Swapna; Pawar, Sudhir

    2016-07-01

    This report demonstrates the clinical use of a modified, truly anatomic, root analogue zirconia implant for immediate replacement of a right mandibular first premolar. A 22-year-old female patient with chronic apical periodontitis of the right mandibular first premolar was referred and the tooth was carefully extracted. A truly anatomical, root identical, roughened zirconia implant modified by macro-retentions was manufactured and placed into the extraction socket by tapping 3 days later. After 4 months a composite crown was cemented in place. No complications occurred during the healing period. A good functional and aesthetic result was achieved with minimal bone resorption and soft tissue recession at 18 months follow-up. This report describes the successful clinical use of an immediate, single stage, truly anatomical root-analogue zirconia implant for replacement of a single rooted tooth. Significant modifications such as macro-retentions yielded primary stability and excellent osseointegration. This novel approach is minimally invasive, respects the underlying anatomy and aids socket prevention. In addition the procedure saves time and cost, has good patient acceptance as there is no need for osteotomy, sinus lift or bone augmentation.

  16. Soft and Hard Tissue Changes Following Immediate Placement or Immediate Restoration of Single-Tooth Implants in the Esthetic Zone: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qi; Xiao, Li-Qun; Su, Mei-Ying; Mei, Yan; Shi, Bin

    This systematic review aimed to compare immediate protocols with conventional protocols of single-tooth implants in terms of changes in the surrounding hard and soft tissue in the esthetic area. Electronic and manual searches were performed in PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane, and other data systems for research articles published between January 2001 and December 2014. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) reporting on hard and or soft tissue characteristics following a single-tooth implant were included. Based on the protocol used in each study, the included studies were categorized into three groups to assess the relationships between the factors and related esthetic indexes. Variables such as marginal bone level changes (mesial, distal, and mean bone level), peri-implant soft tissue changes (papilla level, midbuccal mucosa, and probing depth), and other esthetic indices were taken into consideration. The data were analyzed using RevMan version 5.3, Stata 12, and GRADEpro 3.6.1 software. A total of 13 RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Four studies examined immediate implant placement, five studies examined immediate implant restoration, and four studies examined immediate loading. Comparing the bone level changes following immediate and conventional restoration, no significant differences were found in the bone level of the mesial site (standard mean difference [SMD] = -0.04 mm; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.25 to 0.17 mm), the distal site (SMD = -0.15 mm; 95% CI: -0.38 to 0.09 mm), and the mean bone level changes (SMD = 0.05 mm; 95% CI: -0.18 to 0.27 mm). The difference in the marginal bone level changes between immediate and conventional loading was also not statistically significant (SMD = -0.05 mm; 95% CI: -0.15 to 0.06 mm for the mesial site and SMD = -0.02 mm; 95% CI: -0.09 to 0.05 mm for the distal site). Soft tissue changes following immediate and conventional restoration reported no significant differences in the papillae level of the mesial site (SMD = 0

  17. Clinical evaluation of submerged and non-submerged implants for posterior single-tooth replacements: a randomized split-mouth clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemli, S K; Güngör, M B; Aydın, C; Yılmaz, H; Türkcan, I; Demirköprülü, H

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical and radiographic results of submerged and non-submerged implants for posterior single-tooth replacements and to assess patient-based outcomes. Twenty patients were included in the study. A split-mouth design was used; implants inserted using a submerged technique were compared to those inserted with a non-submerged technique. Implants were restored with metal-ceramic crowns after 3 months. Reconstructions were examined at baseline, 6, 12, and 24 months. Standardized radiographs were made. Radiographic crestal bone level changes were calculated, as well as soft tissue parameters, including pocket probing depth, bleeding on probing, plaque index, and gingival index. Results were analyzed by two-way repeated measures of variance (ANOVA). To evaluate patient-based outcomes, patients were asked to complete a questionnaire at the 6-month follow-up; the Wilcoxon paired signed rank test was used to compare scores. The data of 18 patients were reviewed. During 24 months, non-submerged implants (0.57 ± 0.21 mm) showed significantly lower bone loss than submerged implants (0.68 ± 0.22 mm) (P<0.01). Patient satisfaction with non-submerged implants (median 87.5) was significantly higher than with submerged implants (median 81.5) (P<0.01). Non-submerged implants showed comparable clinical results to submerged implants and resulted in higher patient satisfaction due to decreased surgical intervention. Copyright © 2014 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Functional aspects of treatment with implant-supported single crowns: a quality control study in subjects with tooth agenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goshima, Kenichi; Lexner, Michala O; Thomsen, Carsten Eckhart

    2010-01-01

    after implant placement shortly before crown cementation, and again 1 month after cementation. It consisted of questionnaires [including Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-49)] and functional examination with plastic strips, the Dental Prescale Film and the Occluzer system, Xylitol color-changeable gum......BACKGROUND: No comprehensive patient-centered and clinical evaluations of the functional effect of treatment with implant-supported single crowns (ISSC) have been reported previously. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether and how treatment with ISSC affects masticatory function and Oral Health...

  19. Pre-fabricated zirconium dioxide implant abutments for single-tooth replacement in the posterior region: success and failure after 3 years of function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothdurft, Frank P; Nonhoff, Joerg; Pospiech, Peter R

    2014-07-01

    Zirconia implant abutments have gained a much broader clinical use over the past few years. The aim of the present study was to assess the clinical performance of a pre-fabricated zirconium dioxide implant abutment for single-tooth replacement in the posterior region. Forty implants of the XiVE(®) S plus screw type (DENTSPLY Friadent, Mannheim, Germany) were inserted in the posterior region of 24 patients and provided with zirconium dioxide abutments (FRIADENT(®) CERCON(®) Abutment, DENTSPLY Friadent). The following parameters were used to document the state of soft tissue: modified plaque index, modified sulcus bleeding index and pocket depth. Mesial and distal bone levels were determined on radiographs during the prosthetic treatment and at the 36-month recall. Thirty-seven implants could be followed up after 36 months in function. One patient wearing two abutments was lost to follow-up. One abutment exhibited a rotational misfit after 2 years in function. A further abutment showed the same failure at the 36-months recall appointment. In the remaining 36 implants the soft and hard tissue parameters were indicative of a low inflammatory status. Compared to the baseline situation, a partly significant bone apposition could be observed. Chipping of parts of the veneering ceramic was registered in 22% of the remaining implant restorations. The use of zirconia abutments in this study lead to mainly healthy peri-implant hard and soft tissue conditions but, considering the observed failures after 3 years in function, clinical long-term results should be awaited before recommending full zirconia implant abutments in a posterior indication.

  20. Performance of the Straumann Bone Level Implant system for anterior single-tooth replacements in augmented and nonaugmented sites: a prospective cohort study with 60 consecutive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santing, Hendrik J; Raghoebar, Gerry M; Vissink, Arjan; den Hartog, Laurens; Meijer, Henny J A

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate radiographic, clinical and aesthetic outcomes and patient satisfaction of cases treated with platform-switched single implant restorations in the aesthetic region of the maxilla. Furthermore, the influence of an augmentation procedure 3 months before implant placement and the type of restoration (screw-retained vs. cement-retained) was evaluated. Sixty patients with a missing anterior tooth in the maxilla were treated with a Straumann Bone Level Implant. Bone augmentation was performed in 29 patients at 3 months before implant placement. Implants were loaded after 3 months of submerged healing. Follow-up was conducted at 7 and 18 months after implant placement. Peri-implant mucosa and implant crown aesthetic outcomes were determined using the Implant Crown Aesthetic Index (ICAI) and the Pink Esthetic Score-White Esthetic Score (PES-WES). No implants were lost. At 18 months after implant placement, mean bone level change was -0.10 ± 0.27 mm and mean probing pocket depth was 2.57 mm. No differences were found between augmented and nonaugmented sites (P = 0.28). The ICAI indicated satisfactory mucosa and crown aesthetics in 67% and 75% of the cases, respectively, while the PES score was 14.4. ICAI mucosa (P = 0.004) and PES (P = 0.02) scores were significantly less favourable for augmented sites compared with nonaugmented sites. Patient satisfaction was high (8.9 ± 1.1 on VAS-score). From the present prospective, clinical study, it can be concluded that the Straumann Bone Level Implant shows an excellent survival rate, marginal bone stability and good clinical and aesthetic results. Bone augmentation before implant placement does not lead to more marginal bone loss. However, less favourable pink aesthetic outcomes were found in augmented sites compared with nonaugmented sites, while no differences were found between cement-retained and screw-retained restorations. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Socket seal surgery: Clinical uses in implant dentistry and guided bone regeneration procedures for single tooth replacement in the esthetic zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negri, Bruno; Zuhr, Otto; Fickl, Stefan; Ciurana, Xavier Rodríguez; Navarro Martínez, José Manuel; Blanco, Víctor Méndez

    2016-02-01

    Restoring failing anterior teeth with a dental implant is considered a complex treatment even with thorough biologic knowledge of the situation. The goal is to produce a result in which the labial soft tissues and the papillae remain stable over time. Treatment of the fresh extraction socket in the alveolar ridge presents a challenge in everyday clinical practice. Regardless of the subsequent treatment, maintenance of the ridge contour will frequently facilitate all further therapeutic steps. Socket seal surgery and socket preservation in combination with immediate, early, or delayed implant placement can be valuable procedures for single tooth replacement. However, their potential as ridge preservation techniques in these different situations still needs to be demonstrated. The use of these procedures is illustrated in three consecutive cases.

  2. Performance of zirconia abutments for implant-supported single-tooth crowns in esthetic areas: a retrospective study up to 12-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Sheila Pestana; Linke, Bernie; Larjava, Hannu; French, David

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this clinical study was to assess complications, success, and survival rates of zirconia abutments from different implant designs. Anterior implant-supported single-tooth restorations, after 1-12 years of clinical function, were evaluated. One hundred and fifty-eight zirconia implant abutments placed in 141 patients were evaluated. Mechanical complications were observed, such as presence or absence of abutment fractures and loss of retention. In addition, the peri-implant parameters were observed. Statistical analysis was performed using Fisher's exact tests, and bone level was analyzed using the nonparametric Mann-Whitney U-test for non-normally distributed data. Sixteen restorations exhibited different complications. However, no significant difference was observed between the standard and platform switching. The standard platforms exhibited higher marginal bone loss than platform switching design followed up to 5 years. Platform switching has a potentially higher risk of fracture in some designs. In our study, one standard platform as well as two-platform switch designs seem to withstand fracture in the anterior area, regardless of the implant width. Survival and success rates were 93.8% and 81.2% (up to >7 years ≤12), respectively, for standard platform; and 90 and 84% (up to >2 years ≤5), respectively, for platform switching. In general, standard platform implants restored with zirconia abutments were successful for the longest periods of observation and are a viable treatment alternative in anterior areas. Some of the studied designs of platform switching implants with zirconia abutments performed well for up to 5 years. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial of All-Ceramic Single Tooth Implant Reconstructions Using Modified Zirconia Abutments: Radiographic and Prosthetic Results at 1 Year of Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Daniel S; Brandenberg, Francine; Fehmer, Vincent; Büchi, Dominik L E; Hämmerle, Christoph H F; Sailer, Irena

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to test whether or not veneering of the submucosal part of zirconia abutments with pink dental ceramic affects radiographic and technical outcomes of implant-supported single crowns (ISSC). Single tooth implants were randomly restored with either pink-veneered zirconia abutments (test; n = 10) or non-veneered zirconia abutments (control group; n = 10) and all-ceramic crowns. At baseline (crown insertion), and 6- and 12-month radiographic and technical evaluations were performed including standardized x-rays and modified United States Public Health Service criteria (technical). Survival and complication rates were assessed for implants and restorations. Robust linear mixed model analysis was performed to investigate the effect of group and time-point on radiographic outcomes. At 1 year, the survival rate for implants was 100% and 95% for ISSC. Most of the implants were placed subcrestally. Therefore, mean marginal bone levels decreased in both groups between implant insertion and baseline (p  .005). At 6 months, one minor chipping occurred in the test group. At 1 year, three crowns (control) exhibited occlusal roughness. In addition, one abutment fracture occurred (test). The differences between test and control group were not statistically significantly different for any of the evaluated outcome measures (p > .05). Veneering of the submucosal part of zirconia abutments did not affect biological and technical outcomes of ISSCs. Technical complications of the reconstructions, however, were frequent, resulting in a rate of 75% of the crowns being complication free. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Comparative evaluation of soft tissue characteristics around implant and tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paknejad M.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Soft tissue condition around dental implant is an essential part for long term healthy and esthetic outcome. The aim of this study was to compare soft tissue dimensions between implant supported single  tooth replacement and the contra-lateral natural tooth. "nMaterials and Methods: This retrospective study was performed on dentate patients treated with anterior single  tooth implant at least 1 year ago. Of twenty eight, fourteen patients had been treated with one stasge method and others with two stage method. Biologic width (BW, papilla index (PI, and mucosal thickness (MT were evaluated around implants and contra-lateral teeth clinically and compared with each other. The Wilcoxon test, Mann-Whitney test, and Student pair t-test were used to assess the differences between one stasge and two stage implants, and implant and tooth groups. "nResults: The mean BW around one stasge implants, two stage implants, and contra-lateral teeth were 1.42±0.48 mm, 1.67±0.48 mm, and 1.47±0.60 mm, respectively. The mean PI adjacent to one stasge implants, Two stage implants, and contra-lateral teeth were 2.50±0.52, 2.53±0.55, and 2.72±0.47, correspondingly. The mean MT around one stasge implants, two stage implants, and contra-lateral teeth were 3.10±0.48, 3.09±0.75, and 2.57±0.88, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference among one stasge implants, two stage implants, and contra-lateral teeth with regard to measured variables. "nConclusion: Based on the results of this investigation, in standard condition, it seems that there is no noticeable difference in indicators of; biologic width, papilla index, and mucosal thickness around one stasge implants, two stage implants, and contra-lateral teeth.

  5. Treatment outcome of immediate, early and conventional single-tooth implants in the aesthetic zone : a systematic review to survival, bone level, soft-tissue, aesthetics and patient satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hartog, Laurens; Huddleston Slater, James J. R.; Vissink, Arjan; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Raghoebar, Gerry M.

    2008-01-01

    den Hartog L, Huddleston Slater JJR, Vissink A, Meijer HJA, Raghoebar GM. Treatment outcome of immediate, early and conventional single-tooth implants in the aesthetic zone: a systematic review to survival, bone level, soft-tissue, aesthetics and patient satisfaction. J Clin Periodontol 2008; 35:

  6. Immediate loading versus immediate provisionalization of maxillary single-tooth replacements: a prospective randomized study with BioComp implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeboom, Jerome A.; Frenken, Joost W.; Dubois, Leander; Frank, Michael; Abbink, Ingmar; Kroon, Frans H.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this prospective randomized study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of immediately loaded solid plasma sprayed (TPS) BioComp (BioComp Industries BV, Vught, The Netherlands) implants versus immediate provisionalized but non-loaded BioComp implants in the anterior and premolar

  7. Immediate placement or immediate restoration/loading of single implants for molar tooth replacement: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atieh, Momen A; Payne, Alan G T; Duncan, Warwick J; de Silva, Rohana K; Cullinan, Mary P

    2010-01-01

    This systematic review and meta-analysis assessed the survival of immediately placed single implants in fresh molar extraction sites and immediately restored/loaded single molar implants in healed molar sites. A search of the main electronic databases, including the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, was conducted up to November 1, 2008. The meta-analysis was prepared in accordance with the guidelines of the Academy of Osseointegration Workshop on the State of the Science on Implant Dentistry. The data were analyzed with statistical software. For immediately placed molar implants, nine studies describing 1,013 implants were included to support a survival rate of 99.0%. There were no significant differences between immediate and delayed loading/restoration in molar sites (relative risk of 0.30, 95% confidence interval 0.05 to 1.61; P = .16). For immediate restoration/loading of single implants in healed molar sites, seven studies with 188 single implants were identified. In this case, the implant survival rate was 97.9%, with no difference between immediate and delayed loading (relative risk of 3.0, 95% confidence interval: 0.33 to 27.16; P = .33). Favorable marginal bone level changes in the immediate loading group were detected at 12 months (mean difference of -0.31, 95% confidence interval: -0.53 to -0.096; P = .005). The protocols of immediate placement and immediate restoration/loading of single implants in mandibular molar regions showed encouraging results.

  8. Prospective evaluation of immediate and delayed provisional single tooth restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Michael S; Mercante, Donald E; Lirette, Denise; Mohamed, Waheed; Ryser, Mark; Castellon, Paulino

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was 2-fold: to determine whether there is a significant difference in the hard and soft tissue response comparing immediate with delayed implant placement after tooth removal, with immediate provisionalization, in maxillary anterior sites; and to determine and compare the crestal bone levels as the primary endpoint variable for implants placed and immediately temporized in extraction sites, to implants placed into extraction sites after the extraction site has been grafted and healed for 4 months, all immediately restored with an anatomic provisional restoration. This aim was to be evaluated by measuring crestal bone levels on standardized digital radiographs of the implants, using implant threads as a monitor of magnification and a pre-extraction reference. Secondary endpoint variables include soft tissue measures compared with method. A total of 76 patients were recruited and randomized into treatment groups. Group 1 had a maxillary tooth (premolar, canine, lateral or central incisor) removed, with immediate socket grafting, followed by implant placement and provisionalization 4 months later with a single tooth. Group 2 had immediate implant placement and provisionalization. Standardized radiograph holders were used to expose digital radiographs every 6 months from baseline to up to 2 years restored. Soft tissue measures were made from standardized reference points. Data collected were analyzed by a statistician to test the hypotheses. A total of 55 patients completed their follow-up. Twenty-one patients were lost to follow-up because of implant loss (n = 5), 1 treated out of protocol because of labial bone loss found at the time of tooth removal (n = 1), geographic relocation (n = 11), dropped for noncompliance (n = 3), or medical problems (n = 1). The analyses showed no significant differences between groups in implant integration or crestal interdental bone movement on either the implant or the adjacent tooth. The bone level on the

  9. All-ceramic single-tooth implant reconstructions using modified zirconia abutments: a prospective randomized controlled clinical trial of the effect of pink veneering ceramic on the esthetic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büchi, Dominik L E; Sailer, Irena; Fehmer, Vincent; Hämmerle, Christoph H F; Thoma, Daniel S

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test whether veneering of the submucosal part of zirconia abutments using pink veneering ceramic positively influences the color of the peri-implant mucosa. Single-tooth implants were restored with either white zirconia abutments (control group) or pink-veneered zirconia abutments and all-ceramic crowns. Esthetic outcome measurements included a spectrophotometric evaluation of the peri-implant mucosal color. Test and control groups induced a visible discoloration of the peri-implant mucosa after the insertion of the abutments and following cementation of the crowns compared to natural teeth. The calculated color differences were above the clinically visible threshold value and were more favorable for the control group, although not statistically significant. It is concluded that veneering of zirconia abutments with pink veneering ceramic failed to positively influence the esthetic outcome, mostly due to a decrease of the brightness compared with the control group.

  10. Esthetic Evaluation of Anterior Single-Tooth Implants with Different Abutment Designs - Patients' Satisfaction Compared to Dentists' Observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patil, Ratnadeep; Gresnigt, Marco M M; Mahesh, Kavita; Dilbaghi, Anjali; Cune, Marco S

    Purpose: To correlate patients' satisfaction and dentists' observations regarding two abutment designs used for single crowns in the esthetic zone: a divergent one (control) and a curved one (experimental), with special emphasis on muco-gingival esthetics. Materials and Methods: Twenty-six patients

  11. Comparison of procedures for immediate reconstruction of large osseous defects resulting from removal of a single tooth to prepare for insertion of an endosseous implant after healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raghoebar, G. M.; Slater, J. J. H.; den Hartog, L.; Meijer, H. J. A.; Vissink, A.

    This study evaluated the treatment outcome of immediate reconstruction of 45 large osseous defects resulting from removal of a single tooth with a 1:2 mixture of Bio-Oss(R) and autologous tuberosity bone, and three different procedures for soft tissue closing (Bio-Gide(R) membrane, connective tissue

  12. Immediate Placement and Occlusal Loading of Single-Tooth Restorations on Partially Threaded, Titanium-Tantalum Combined Dental Implants: 1-Year Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peron, Cristian; Romanos, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Single nonrestorable teeth were atraumatically extracted and hybrid titanium implants with tantalum-based midsections (TM) were placed in fresh extraction sockets. Provisional acrylic crowns were delivered (in occlusion) immediately after surgery. Occlusal contacts were present in the maximal intercuspation but not in the lateral movements of the mandible. Two weeks after placement, the implants were finally restored with screw-retained or cemented lithium disilicate crowns. A total of 25 patients were treated (26 implants). Most implants were placed in maxillary premolar locations and in lower-density bone. Mean crestal bone loss was 0.58 ± 0.34 mm. Implant survival and success rates were 100%, respectively (follow-up: 14.1 ± 1.5 months). Within the limitations of this study, immediate placement and loading of TM implants resulted in predictable clinical, functional, and esthetic outcomes.

  13. Use of short implants (6 mm) in a single-tooth replacement: a 5-year follow-up prospective randomized controlled multicenter clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Fabio; Botticelli, Daniele; Cesaretti, Gianfranco; De Santis, Enzo; Storelli, Stefano; Lang, Niklaus P

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate prospectively clinical and radiographic outcomes of 6- or 10 mm-long implants with moderately rough surface (SLA(®) ) loaded within 7 weeks from installation and supporting single crowns in the posterior regions in the course of 5 years of loading. Sixty implants with a moderately rough surface, 30 tests (6 mm long, 4.1 mm in diameter) and 30 controls (10 mm long, 4.1 mm in diameter), were placed in posterior regions in 45 patients. After 6 weeks, impressions were taken and the implants were restored with a single fixed prosthesis made with gold-palladium alloy and porcelain. Survival rate and marginal bone loss were evaluated yearly. The clinical crown/implant ratio was calculated. During the follow-up period, five implants, four tests and one control, were lost. Of the four test implants, one was lost before loading, two between the 2nd and the 3rd years, and one during the 4th year of the follow-up period. The control implant was lost during the first year of function. Consequently, after 5 years of follow-up, a survival rate of 86.7% and 96.7% was observed at the test and control sites, respectively. The results of this study showed that 6-mm-long implants supporting single crowns loaded within 7 weeks from installation lose a small amount of marginal bone during 5 years of functional loading, similar to that of 10-mm-long implants. However, a higher degree of implant loss was recorded at the short implants, probably due to the fracturing of the surrounding bone. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Randomized controlled clinical trial of customized zirconia and titanium implant abutments for canine and posterior single-tooth implant reconstructions: preliminary results at 1 year of function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailer, Irena; Zembic, Anja; Jung, Ronald Ernst; Siegenthaler, David; Holderegger, Claudia; Hämmerle, Christoph Hans Franz

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to test whether or not customized zirconia abutments exhibit the same survival rates in canine and posterior regions as titanium abutments, and to compare the esthetic result of the two abutment types. Twenty-two patients with 40 implants in posterior regions were included and the implant sites were randomly assigned to 20 customized zirconia and 20 customized titanium abutments. All-ceramic (AC) and metal-ceramic (MC) crowns were fabricated. In all except two cases, the crowns were cemented on the abutments using resin or glass-ionomer cements. Two zirconia reconstructions were screw retained. At baseline, 6 and 12 months, the reconstructions were examined for technical and biological problems. Probing pocket depth (PPD), plaque (Pl) and bleeding on probing (BOP) were assessed and compared with natural control teeth. Furthermore, the difference of color (DeltaE) of the peri-implant mucosa and the gingiva of control teeth was evaluated by means of a spectrophotometer (Spectroshade). The data were analyzed with Student's unpaired t-test, ANOVA and regression analyses. Twenty patients with 19 zirconia and 12 titanium abutments were examined at a mean follow-up of 12.6+/-2.7 months. The survival rate for reconstructions and abutments was 100%. No technical or biological problems were found at the test and control sites. Two chippings (16.7%) occurred at crowns supported by titanium abutments. No difference was found regarding PPD (meanPPD(ZrO2) 3.4+/-0.7 mm, mPPD(Ti) 3.3+/-0.6 mm), Pl (mPl(ZrO2) 0.2+/-0.3, mPl(Ti) 0.1+/-1.8) and BOP (mBOP(ZrO2) 60+/-30%, mBOP(Ti) 30+/-40%) between the two groups. Both crowns on zirconia and titanium abutments induced a similar amount of discoloration of the soft tissue compared with the gingiva at natural teeth (DeltaE(ZrO2) 8.1+/-3.9, DeltaE(Ti) 7.8+/-4.3). At 1 year, zirconia abutments exhibited the same survival and a similar esthetic outcome as titanium abutments.

  15. Replacement of missing tooth in esthetic zone with implant-supported fixed prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Mishra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the anterior region, the common reason for tooth loss is due to traumatic injury or congenital anomaly. Loss of a single tooth may cause functional and esthetic deficits to the patient. There are different treatment options available for replacing a missing incisor. Implant dentistry should be considered as first treatment alternative for replace a missing tooth. This case report presents the replacement of a missing maxillary left central incisor in a compromised site with dental implants along with bone graft followed by frenectomy to obtain a good clinical result and for better function and esthetics of the patient.

  16. Influence of a Laser-Lok Surface on Immediate Functional Loading of Implants in Single-Tooth Replacement: Three-Year Results of a Prospective Randomized Clinical Study on Soft Tissue Response and Esthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnieri, Renzo; Grande, Maurizio; Ippoliti, Stefano; Iorio-Siciliano, Vincenzo; Riccitiello, Francesco; Farronato, Davide

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present prospective randomized study was to evaluate the influence of Laser-Lok microtextured surface on soft tissue peri-implant parameters and esthetics around immediate, functionally loaded implants for single-tooth replacement in the esthetic zone. This study included 77 patients divided into two groups based on different implants used: the control group had BioHorizons tapered internal non-Laser-Lok-type implants (NLL; n = 39) and the test group had BioHorizons tapered internal Laser-Lok-type implants (LL; n = 39). Outcome measures were survival, radiographic marginal bone-level changes, soft tissue parameters, and esthetics. One implant was lost in the test group and one in the control group, for a total survival rate of 96.1% after 3 years. Radiographically, mean crestal bone loss ± standard deviation was 0.59 ± 0.27 mm in the LL group compared with 1.17 ± 0.31 mm in the NLL group. A mean gain in papilla level of 0.41 ± 0.34 mm and 0.17 ± 0.36 mm was observed in the LL and the NLL groups, respectively, while the level of the midfacial peri-implant mucosa remained stable in both groups with no statistically significant differences (0.08 ± 0.42 mm for the LL group vs 0.06 ± 0.36 mm for the NLL group). The mean probing depth values in the LL and NLL groups were 0.58 ± 0.2 mm and 1.89 ± 0.3 mm, respectively. Within the limitations of this study, it was demonstrated that the clinical and esthetic outcome of immediate functional loading was more favorable for LL implants than for NLL implants.

  17. Feasibility of immediate placement of single-tooth implants in the aesthetic zone: a 1-year randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagter, Kirsten W; Meijer, Henny J A; Bakker, Nicolaas A; Vissink, Arjan; Raghoebar, Gerry M

    2015-06-26

    To assess whether outcome of immediate implant placement and immediate provisionalization after 1 year was non-inferior to immediate implant placement and delayed provisionalization regarding Marginal Bone Level (MBL). Forty patients with a failing tooth in the aesthetic zone were randomly assigned for immediate implant placement with immediate (n = 20) or delayed (n = 20) provisionalization. Follow-up was at 1 month and after 1 year. The study was powered to detect a difference in MBL of implant parameters, aesthetic indexes and patient satisfaction were assessed. After 1 year, MBL changes were -0.75 ± 0.69 mesially and -0.68 ± 0.65 distally mm for the immediate group and -0.70 ± 0.64 and -0.68 ± 0.64 mm for the delayed group respectively (NS). Regarding differences in means, non-inferiority was observed after 1 year (mesially: Group A versus B: difference in mean 0.08 mm (95% CI -0.38 to 0.53, p = 0.71 distally: Group A versus B: difference in mean 0.09 mm (95% CI -0.37 to 0.56 mm, p = 0.66).No significant differences in the other outcome variables were observed. This study showed that immediate placement and immediate provisionalization was non-inferior to immediate placement with delayed provisionalization. In addition, although not powered for these outcome variables, no clinically relevant differences in other outcomes were observed (www.isrtcn.com: ISRCTN57251089). © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Performance of the Straumann Bone Level Implant system for anterior single-tooth replacements in augmented and nonaugmented sites : A prospective cohort study with 60 consecutive patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santing, Hendrik J.; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Vissink, Arjan; den Hartog, Laurens; Meijer, Henny J. A.

    Aim The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate radiographic, clinical and aesthetic outcomes and patient satisfaction of cases treated with platform-switched single implant restorations in the aesthetic region of the maxilla. Furthermore, the influence of an augmentation procedure 3months

  19. Photoelastic stress analysis of implant-tooth connected prostheses with segmented and nonsegmented abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Kent T; Ozawa, Shogo; Caputo, Angelo A; Nishimura, Russell D

    2003-05-01

    There is some question about whether implant abutment selection affects the transfer of load between connected implants and natural teeth. The purpose of this study was to compare stress transfer patterns with either 1 or 2 posterior implants connected to a single anteriorly located simulated natural tooth with either 1 or 2 segmented and nonsegmented implant abutments under relevant functional loads by use of the photoelastic stress analysis technique. A model of a human left mandible, edentulous posterior to the first premolar, with two 3.75-mm x 13-mm screw-type implants embedded within the edentulous area, was fabricated from photoelastic materials. The implants were in the first and second molar positions. Two fixed partial denture prosthetic restorations were fabricated with either segmented conical abutments or nonsegmented UCLA abutments. Vertical occlusal loads were applied at fixed locations on the restorations. The photoelastic stress fringes that developed in the supporting mandible were monitored visually and recorded photographically. The stress intensity (number of fringes), stress concentrations (closeness of fringes), and their locations were subjectively compared. Loading on the restoration over the simulated tooth generated apical stresses of similar intensity (fringe order) at the tooth and the first molar implant for both abutment types. Low-level stress was transferred to the second molar implant. Loading directed on the implant-supported region of the restoration demonstrated low transfer of stress to the simulated tooth. Nonvertical stress transfer with slightly higher intensity was observed for the nonsegmented abutment. Within the limitations of this simulation study, stress distribution and intensity for the 2 implant conditions was similar for segmented and nonsegmented abutment designs. Magnitude of stresses observed for both abutment designs was similar for the single implant condition. Vertical loading produced more nonaxial stresses

  20. [A tooth or an implant--literature based decision making].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar On, H; Sharon, E; Lipovezky-Adler, M; Haramaty, O; Smidt, A

    2014-07-01

    The common use of dental implants in the daily practice led to a profound change in the available treatment strategies. The option of replacing a diagnosed doubtful tooth with an implant has become widely accepted and often used. The prognosis systems in use today are based on the three major disciplines: endodontics, periodontics and prosthodontics. Combining these three may impair and bias the decision making process and increase the tendency to base it on subjective clinical experience and personal preference. Reading and reviewing the relevant literature gives no clear tool for use. Root canal treatment is considered a highly predictable treatment procedure and a treated tooth is affected mainly by the quality and type of the fabricated restoration and the risk of caries. Periodontal treatment followed by a suitable maintenance regimen will likely allow long term tooth survival. When comparing the success rates of natural teeth rehabilitation versus implant supported restorations, it appears that with implants an additional treatment is demanded along the years. This coincides with the fact that to date there is no consensus regarding the extent of perimplantitis and perimucositis that is to be expected around a restored implant. In addition, a peri implant tissue problem or a failure of a dental implant may prove to be more challenging than a failure of a tooth. It is important to remember that a dental implant is made to substitute a missing tooth and it is a treatment modality with known and clear indications for rehabilitation of an edentulous space. The aim of this paper is to review and discuss the various aspects of whether to maintain a compromised or a doubtful tooth or to prefer a treatment modality using dental implants. In conclusion it is advised here, to incorporate the discussed issues in the decision making process towards the most suitable treatment plan.

  1. A retrospective radiographic study on the effect of natural tooth-implant proximity and an introduction to the concept of a bone-loading platform switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdaneta, Rainer A; Seemann, Rudolf; Dragan, Irina-Florentina; Lubelski, William; Leary, Joseph; Chuang, Sung-Kiang

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of tooth-implant proximity using an implant system with a double platform shift that was designed to load bone coronal to the implant-abutment cohort study was conducted between January 2008 and December 2009. The sample was composed of patients who had received at least one 5-mm-wide hydroxyapatite-coated single-tooth Bicon implant that had been placed adjacent to at least one natural tooth. Descriptive statistics and univariate and multivariate linear mixed-effects regression models, adjusted for multiple implants in the same patient, were utilized. The primary predictor variable was the horizontal distance between implant and adjacent tooth, and the primary outcome variable was the change in peri-implant bone levels over time. Two hundred six subjects who received 235 plateau root-form implants were followed for an average of 42 months. Tooth-implant distance ranged between 0 and 14.6 mm. Out of 235 implants, 43 implants were placed tooth on mesial and/or distal sides. The proximity of a plateau root-form implant was not associated with complications on the adjacent tooth such as bone loss, root resorption, endodontic treatment, pain, or extraction. The proximity of an adjacent tooth was not a risk factor for the failure of a plateau root-form implant. After adjusting for other covariates in a multivariate model, the proximity of a natural tooth did not have a statistically significant effect on peri-implant bone levels (P = .13). The extraction of an adjacent tooth was associated with a significant increase in peri-implant bone loss (P = .008). The placement of a plateau root-form implant with a sloping shoulder in close proximity to an adjacent tooth did not cause damage to that tooth or lead to bone loss or the failure of the implant.

  2. Surgical Tooth Implants, Combat and Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-15

    isolated from occlusal loads by orthodontic stay wires attached to adjacent dentition and a methacrylare resin cap over the top of the implant. A third...were performed using orthodontic devices to stabilize the implant to adjacent teeth. Orthodontic bands were * fitted to adjacent teeth and connected by... wires . An acrylic cap was fitted * over the top of the implant to support and protect the implant. The patients were implanted in the posterior

  3. Complex single-tooth restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trushkowsky, Richard D; Burgess, John O

    2002-04-01

    There are many options for restoring the decimated dentition. [43] Excellent results can be obtained with many of the materials currently available. The restorative option will depend on the size and location of the lesion, adequate isolation for adhesive restorations, caries rate, the patient's age, the aesthetic needs of the patient, occlusal habits, maintenance of maximum tooth structure, the skill of the dentist, and the longevity desired for the restoration. Amalgam is a cost-effective material, and when used properly, it can provide many years of service. Aesthetic demands, the desire to strengthen teeth, [44] and concern about the safety of mercury in amalgam have increased the use of direct composites, ceramic material, and indirect composites. The main drawback with these materials, however, is their increased technique sensitivity and concerns about their longevity. Gold continues to be a cost-effective and predictable material if placed properly. Full-coverage gold or porcelain fused to metal provides long-term predictability but is more destructive and not as aesthetically appealing. The wide varieties of materials available provide both a challenge and an opportunity to place the most effective material for a particular patient. A thorough understanding of the available materials and their appropriate use is needed to achieve a long-lasting restoration that serves the patient's needs.

  4. Single-Tooth Replacement Using Dental Implants Supporting All-Ceramic and Metal-Based Reconstructions: Results at 18 Months of Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bösch, Adrian; Jung, Ronald Ernst; Sailer, Irena; Goran, Benic; Hämmerle, Christoph Hans; Thoma, Daniel Stefan

    The aim of this study was to compare customized zirconia and titanium abutments with respect to survival rates and technical, biologic, and esthetic outcomes. A total of 28 patients with single implants were randomly assigned to 12 customized zirconia (test, AC) and 16 customized titanium (control, MC) abutments. Technical, biologic, and esthetic outcomes were assessed after a mean follow-up time of 18 months. No biologic complications were observed, and no statistical difference for the bone-to-implant distance was found at 18 months (AC -0.05 ± 0.51 mm vs MC -0.28 ± 0.77 mm; P = .40). A similar discoloration of the peri-implant mucosa was observed (ΔE AC 9.6 ± 5.4, ΔE MC 7.6 ± 5.3; P = .46). The mean papilla score values evaluation presented no statistically significant differences between the test and control groups (AC 2.07 ± 0.94, MC 1.96 ± 0.84). At 18 months, reconstructions based on zirconia and titanium abutments exhibited similar survival rates and similar clinical outcomes.

  5. Hydroxyapatite-coated tooth implants by laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelinek, Miroslav; Dostalova, Tatjana; Himmlova, Lucia; Grivas, Christos

    1996-09-01

    Thin films of biocompatible ceramic were fabricated by pulsed laser deposition on cylindrical implants. Diamond- like carbon films were deposited in vacuum on titanium alloy prostheses, heated to 90 degrees C. Coated prostheses were implanted into legs of rats and osseointegration higher than 60 percent was determined. Thin films of hydroxyapatite were created on real dental implants at 500 degrees C in Ar-water vapor atmosphere. Coated implants were implanted into mandibula of minipigs to study load free osseointegration. Results and experiences are presented and discussed.

  6. Surgical Tooth Implants, Combat and Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    irritation is seen in baboons. This drawback has not led to the loss of any implant to date. The poor gingival health and/or the approximation of gold...tively poor oral hygiene of the baboon. Infection has never been a causa- tive factor in the loss of an implant. Apparently, the environment in 9 the... oral cavity allows the implant to survive even though there is no attachment of gingiva to the ceramic root. Fortunately, the mild gingival irritation

  7. Single-tooth replacement: factors affecting different prosthetic treatment modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Quran, Firas A; Al-Ghalayini, Raed F; Al-Zu'bi, Bashar N

    2011-12-21

    The choice between several treatment options for replacing a single missing tooth is influenced by clinical, dentist- and patient-immanent factors. This study aimed to determine the patient factors that would affect the treatment decision to replace a single missing tooth and to assess the satisfaction with several options. 200 volunteers involved (121 females and 79 males) divided into four groups, Group A: consisted of patients with conventional fixed partial dentures or patients with resin bonded fixed partial dentures. Group B: consisted of patients who received removable partial dentures while Group C: consisted of patients who received a single implant supported crown, and a control group D: consisted of patients who received no treatment. Data were collected using a questionnaire. The highest percentage of males within groups (58%) was within the removable prostheses category. The majority of the subjects in the study reported that the main reason for replacing a missing tooth was for esthetic and function. Most important factor affecting the choice between treatment modalities was damaging the neighboring teeth. Pain, post operative sensitivity and dental phobia were important factors in choosing the prosthesis type and affected the control group patients not to have any treatment. The highest satisfaction percentage among groups studied was recorded for dental implants then FPD groups, while the least percentage were in both the control and RPD groups, for all aspects of function, esthetic and speech efficiency. The final choice between FPD, RPD and implant depended on several factors which affected the decision making; among these is cost and patients' awareness of the different treatment options.

  8. Single-tooth replacement: factors affecting different prosthetic treatment modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Quran Firas A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The choice between several treatment options for replacing a single missing tooth is influenced by clinical, dentist- and patient-immanent factors. This study aimed to determine the patient factors that would affect the treatment decision to replace a single missing tooth and to assess the satisfaction with several options. Method 200 volunteers involved (121 females and 79 males divided into four groups, Group A: consisted of patients with conventional fixed partial dentures or patients with resin bonded fixed partial dentures. Group B: consisted of patients who received removable partial dentures while Group C: consisted of patients who received a single implant supported crown, and a control group D: consisted of patients who received no treatment. Data were collected using a questionnaire. Results The highest percentage of males within groups (58% was within the removable prostheses category. The majority of the subjects in the study reported that the main reason for replacing a missing tooth was for esthetic and function. Most important factor affecting the choice between treatment modalities was damaging the neighboring teeth. Pain, post operative sensitivity and dental phobia were important factors in choosing the prosthesis type and affected the control group patients not to have any treatment. The highest satisfaction percentage among groups studied was recorded for dental implants then FPD groups, while the least percentage were in both the control and RPD groups, for all aspects of function, esthetic and speech efficiency. Conclusions The final choice between FPD, RPD and implant depended on several factors which affected the decision making; among these is cost and patients' awareness of the different treatment options.

  9. Surgical Tooth Implants, Combat and Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-11-15

    were fabricated from Reynolds RC-HP-DBM alumina, bisque ground and sintered. The surface finish was also ground and sintered. Flexural strenghts average...firing preform rods at 11200C for 2 hours (3) Contour grinding tooth roots (roots were made in 1 millimeter sizes from 4 x 4 to 8 x 10) (4) Hand ...placed in a low-speed contra-angle air turbine hand - piece with sterile saline cooling. Over the period of clinical study, a series of specialized

  10. Immediate loading of tooth-implant-supported telescopic mandibular prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanos, George E; May, Stephan; May, Dittmar

    2012-01-01

    Extractions in partially edentulous patients often lead to insufficient stability of an existing partial prosthesis and a need for additional anchorage. Implants may therefore be placed as supplementary abutments to increase patient comfort and satisfaction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term clinical outcome of implants combined with teeth to support telescopic abutment-retained removable full-arch prostheses under an immediate functional loading protocol. The present retrospective study included implants placed and connected via removable prostheses with periodontally healthy teeth immediately postplacement using prefabricated abutments. Secondary copings, precisely fit to the abutments, were placed and the partial dentures were relined chairside. The prosthetic restorations were not removed for 10 days. Clinical and radiographic evaluations of implants loaded for at least 2 years were performed. One hundred ten implants with a progressive thread design (Ankylos, Dentsply) were placed in 55 patients (mean age, 63.51±9.95 years). Twenty-five implants were placed in fresh extraction sockets (22.73%) and 85 implants were placed in healed ridges. All implants were placed 2 to 3 mm subcrestally (measured from the midfacial bone level). After a mean follow-up of 61.58±28.47 months (range, 24 to 125 months), there were only three failures (2.73%); another six implants (5.45%) displayed crestal bone loss greater than 2 mm but remained stable. Therefore, the failure rate was 8.18% for the entire observation period of 5.13 years. The success rate was 91.82% and the cumulative survival rate was 97.27%. All patients were satisfied with the stability of their prostheses, and no prosthetic, peri-implant, or abutment tooth problems were observed. Telescopic tooth-implant-supported mandibular restorations with immediate loading present an alternative prosthetic solution for partially edentulous patients, providing a long-term predictable clinical outcome.

  11. An Up-to-15-Year Comparison of the Survival and Complication Burden of Three-Unit Tooth-Supported Fixed Dental Prostheses and Implant-Supported Single Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Terry R

    2015-01-01

    To assess and compare the outcomes and economic complication burden of three-unit tooth-supported fixed dental prostheses (TFDPs) and implant-supported single crowns (ISCs) provided to a sequential cohort in a specialist prosthodontic practice over a 15-year period. Sequential patients requiring replacement of a single missing tooth between 1996 and 2010 with a metal-ceramic three-unit TFDP (n = 145 patients, n = 174 prostheses) or ISC (n = 174 patients, n = 220 prostheses) were included. Prostheses subjectively judged at insertion to have an unfavorable 10-year prognosis (17 TFDPs, 0 ISCs) were removed from statistical analyses. The estimated cumulative survival (ECS) was calculated with the life table actuarial method and standard errors calculated with the Greenwood formula. Differences in outcomes between all prostheses and those replacing only anterior or only posterior teeth were assessed with the log rank test. Complication incidence, severity, and economic burden, measured in time/cost accounting units (TAUs), were tallied and compared descriptively. The 15-year ECS did not differ for 112 TFDPs (92.75% ± 3.28%) and 81 ISCs (95.95% ± 2.92%) replacing posterior teeth. However, the 15-year ECS was significantly greater for 139 ISCs (93.33% ± 6.44%) than for 45 TFDPs (82.82% ± 6.50%) replacing anterior teeth. The economic burden of nonterminal complications for both prostheses was low (mean = 0.3 and 0.2 TAUs per prosthesis for TFDPs and ISCs, respectively). This equated to 3 TAUs/100 years in clinical service and 4 TAUs/100 years in clinical service for the TFDPs and ISCs, respectively. The survival of three-unit TFDPs and ISCs over 15 years was not statistically different when replacing posterior teeth, but ISCs survived significantly better when replacing anterior teeth. The complication rates of the TFDPs and ISCs were similar, but the economic burden for the TFDPs was greater.

  12. Immediate placement and immediate provisional abutment modeling in anterior single-tooth implant restorations using a CAD/CAM application: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tselios, Nikolaos; Parel, Stephen M; Jones, John D

    2006-03-01

    A patient underwent immediate implant placement and immediate provisional restoration with nonocclusal loading in the right central incisor area. A provisional custom abutment and a cemented provisional restoration were fabricated. At the impression appointment, an implant level impression was made and the provisional abutment was scanned for fabrication of the definitive custom abutment. This clinical report describes how CAD/CAM technology can facilitate the definitive restoration of immediately placed and loaded implants by allowing the fabrication of the definitive abutment as an exact duplicate of the provisional abutment.

  13. Implant-supported single tooth replacement in the aesthetic zone : a prospective, randomized clinical trial comparing the treatment outcome of three augmentation strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijndert, Leendert

    2007-01-01

    The strive for perfection in dental implantology has moved the focus of attention from mere implant survival to predictability and perfection of the hard and soft tissues in the aesthetic area of the dentition. In particular the identification and the understanding of the relevant biological

  14. A Comparative Analysis of Master Casts Obtained using Different Surface Treatments on Impression Copings for Single Tooth Implant Replacement -An In vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrol, Surbhi; Nagpal, Archana; Kaur, Rupandeep; Verma, Ramit; Katna, Vishal; Gupt, Parikshit

    2017-08-01

    Minor rotation of impression coping secured in the impression is an avoidable error that needs to be minimized to ensure precise positioning of implant analog in master cast. The aim of the study was to compare the precision in obtaining master casts by improving the stability of impression copings in the impression with the use of tray adhesive along various surface treatments to increase surface area and by mechanical locking. A total of 60 samples were made (15 samples for each group). A total of 15 samples for Group I were prepared with untreated impression copings, 15 samples for Group II with impression copings treated and modified by application of tray adhesive only. Group III includes 15 samples which were fabricated with impression copings modified by making four vertical grooves on surface of impression coping and coated with adhesive. Group IV had 15 samples which were fabricated with impression copings sandblasted with 50 μm aluminum oxide powder and coated with adhesive. Profile projector was used to evaluate the rotational accuracy of the implant analogs by comparing Molar Implant Angle (MIA) and Premolar Implant Angle (PIA) of test samples with reference model. One-way ANOVA and Student t-test were used to analyze the data. One-way ANOVA didn't show any significant differences for both MIA and PIA between the Groups I, II, III and IV. Student's unpaired t-test revealed no significant difference in the mean MIA and mean PIA. Conclusion: Though results were statistically non-significant, all types of surface treatments of the impression copings showed more accurate transfer than those with no treatment. Sandblasted and adhesive coated impression copings showed minimum amount of rotation followed by those with vertical slots and adhesive coated impression copings.

  15. Management of a Congenitally Missing Lateral Incisor with Orthodontics, Bone Grafting (a New Method and Single-Tooth Implant: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Arab

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Careful treatment planning, space management, augmentation of bone and attention to the details of implant surgical and prosthetic techniques are important factors when treating anterior maxilla specially replacement of missing teeth. This case report addresses a chair-side ridge augmentation procedure using autograft bone harvested with trephine drills and placed without using screws and the fundamental considerations related to replacement of a congenitally missing lateral incisor by a team approach

  16. The Clinical Outcomes of Immediate Versus Delayed Restoration Procedures on Immediate Implants: A Comparative Cohort Study for Single-Tooth Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Antonio; Toti, Paolo; Quaranta, Alessandro; Derchi, Giacomo; Covani, Ugo

    2015-12-01

    Immediate implant placement into fresh extraction sockets is generally considered a reliable procedure that offers several clinical advantages. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the overall clinical outcomes of immediate and delayed restoration procedures for implants placed in fresh extraction sockets by means of a flapless technique and resorbable membrane stabilizing a xenograft. Total costs and operating times were also compared. In this prospective cohort study, changes of marginal bone level, facial soft tissue (ΔFST), and width of keratinized gingiva (ΔWKG), in addition to the papilla index, underwent a pairwise comparison; correlations with pristine buccal bone thickness were also investigated. Although similar results were recorded for the two procedures, with a bone loss of -1.0 ± 0.5 mm and -0.9 ± 0.7 mm, respectively, for immediate and delayed restoration, negative remodeling in the delayed restoration procedure was seen to occur from 4 to 12 months after implant placement. No significant differences were recorded between the two procedures in terms of ΔFST and ΔWKG. A loss of the papillary soft tissues before restoration, followed by a reestablishment after restoration, seemed to be verified for the delayed group, for which the papilla index went from the minimum of 0 at 4 months to a value of 2 at 24 months. Moreover, the immediate restoration procedure seemed to be more promising in terms of healing times and costs. Immediate restoration of implants installed in fresh extraction sockets was at least as effective and safe as delayed restoration. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Fatigue resistance and failure mode of novel-design anterior single-tooth implant restorations: influence of material selection for type III veneers bonded to zirconia abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magne, Pascal; Paranhos, Maria Paula Gandolfi; Burnett, Luiz Henrique; Magne, Michel; Belser, Urs Christoph

    2011-02-01

    This study assessed the fatigue resistance and failure mode of type III porcelain and composite resin veneers bonded to custom zirconia implant abutments. Twenty-four standardized zirconia implant abutments were fabricated. Using the CEREC 3 machine, type III veneers of standardized shape were milled in ceramic Vita Mark II or in composite resin Paradigm MZ100. The intaglio surfaces of the restorations were hydrofluoric acid etched and silanated (Mark II) or airborne-particle abraded and silanated (MZ100). The fitting surface of the abutments was airborne-particle abraded, cleaned, and inserted into a bone level implant (BLI RC SLActive 10 mm). All veneers (n=24) were adhesively luted with a zirconia primer (Z-Prime Plus), adhesive resin (Optibond FL) and a pre-heated light-curing composite resin (Filtek Z100). Cyclic isometric chewing (5 Hz) was simulated, starting with a load of 40 N, followed by stages of 80, 120, 160, 200, 240, and 280 N (20,000 cycles each). Samples were loaded until fracture or to a maximum of 140,000 cycles. Groups were compared using the life table survival analysis (Logrank test at P=.05). Mark II and MZ100 specimens fractured at an average load of 216 N and 229 N (survival rate of 17% and 8%), respectively, with no difference in survival probability (P=.18). Among the fractured samples, 40% of the failures were at the abutment level for Mark II and 27% were at the abutment level for MZ100. No exclusive adhesive failures were observed. Type III Mark II and Paradigm MZ100 veneers showed similar fatigue resistance when bonded to custom non-retentive zirconia implant abutments. The bond was strong enough to induce abutment fractures. MZ100 presented a higher percentage of "friendly" failures, i.e. maintaining the restoration-abutment adhesive interface and the abutment itself intact. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. [Clinical application of individualized three-dimensional printing implant template in multi-tooth dental implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lie; Chen, Zhi-Yuan; Liu, Rong; Zeng, Hao

    2017-08-01

    To study the value and satisfaction of three-dimensional printing implant template and conventional implant template in multi-tooth dental implantation. Thirty cases (83 teeth) with missing teeth needing to be implanted were randomly divided into conventional implant template group (CIT group, 15 cases, 42 teeth) and 3D printing implant template group (TDPIT group, 15 cases, 41 teeth). Patients in CIT group were operated by using conventional implant template, while patients in TDPIT group were operated by using three-dimensional printing implant template. The differences of implant neck and tip deviation, implant angle deviation and angle satisfaction between the two groups were compared. The difference of probing depth and bone resorption of implant were compared 1 year after operation between the two groups. The difference of success rate and satisfaction of dental implantation were compared 1 year after operation between the two groups. SPSS19.0 software package was used for statistical analysis. The deviation direction of the neck and the tip in disto-mesial, bucco-palatal, vertical direction and angle of implants in disto-mesial and bucco-palatal direction in TDPIT group were significantly lower than in CIT group (P0.05). The difference of the cumulative success rate in dental implantation at 3 months and 6 months between the two groups were not significant (P>0.05), but the cumulative success rate of TDPIT group was significantly higher than CIT group at 9 months and 1 year (90.48% vs 100%,P=0.043). The patients' satisfaction rate of dental implantation in TDPIT group was significantly higher than in CIT group (86.67% vs 53.33%, P=0.046). Using three-dimensional printing implant template can obtain better accuracy of implant, higher implant success rate and better patients' satisfaction than using conventional implant template. It is suitable for clinical application.

  19. Immediate implants following tooth extraction. A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pascual, Tania; Mareque-Bueno, Santiago; Hernández-Alfaro, Federico; Ferrés-Padró, Eduard

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this article is to review the current state of immediate implants, with their pros and contras, and the clinical indications and contraindications. Material and Methods: An exhaustive literature search has been carried out in the COCHRANE library and MEDLINE electronic databases from 2004 to November 2009. Randomized clinical trials and clinical trials focused on single implants placed in fresh extraction sockets were included and compared. A meta-analysis could not be performed due to heterogeneity of the data. Results: Twenty studies out of 135 articles from the initial search were finally included, which summed up a total of 1139 immediate implants with at least a 12-month follow-up. Our results have been compared with other current available papers in the literature reviewed that obtained similar outcomes. Discussion: Immediate implants have predictable results with several advantages over delayed implant placement. However, technical complications have been described regarding this technique. Also, biomaterials may be needed when the jumping distance is greater than 1mm or any bone defect is present. Conclusions: Few studies report on success rates rather than survival rates in the literature reviewed. Short-term clinical results were described and results were comparable to those obtained with delayed implant placement. Further long-term, randomized clinical trials are needed to give scientific evidence on the benefits of immediate implants over delayed implant placement. Key words:Immediate implants, fresh socket, dental implants, gap, jumping distance, implant stability. PMID:22143704

  20. Marginal bone preservation in single-tooth replacement: a 5-year prospective clinical multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, Mauro; La Scala, Vincenzo; Di Raimondo, Rosario; Speroni, Stefano; Testi, Massimo; Berglundh, Tord

    2015-06-01

    Few long-term studies are available comparing immediate and conventional loading protocols of implant-supported single-tooth replacement. The aim of the present randomized controlled clinical trial was to evaluate prospectively the 5-year clinical and radiological outcome of immediate functional loading implants used in single-tooth replacement. One hundred fifty-one subjects, who required single-tooth rehabilitation in the area from position 15 to 25 and from 35 to 45, were enrolled in eight private clinics in Italy. A randomization protocol was applied to allocate the implants in three treatment groups: one control group and two test groups. In the control group, implant placement was performed according to a conventional drilling procedure, and the implants were submerged for 3 months before abutment connection and loading. Implants allocated in the test group 1 and 2 followed an immediate functional loading protocol. While in test group 1, implant placement was performed according to conventional drilling procedure, in test group 2, a modified implant installation procedure (osteotome technique) was applied. Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed during the 5-year follow-up, and technical and biological complications were registered. Although four implants (three in the test group 2 and one in the test group 1) were lost in the immediate functional loading groups in the first year of follow-up, no further implant loss occurred in any of the treatment groups in the following monitoring period up to 5 years. No significant differences on marginal bone level changes were observed between the treatment groups. About 52% of all implants showed bone gain in the period from 1-year to 5-year follow-up. The percentage of all implants that in the same interval of time showed bone loss was about 28%. Although few technical complications were recorded in the period of time up to 5 years, implants showing biological complication were 5.7%. It is suggested

  1. Two-year prospective clinical comparison of immediate replacement vs. immediate restoration of single tooth in the esthetic zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palattella, Piermario; Torsello, Ferruccio; Cordaro, Luca

    2008-11-01

    To compare the immediate restoration of single implants in the esthetic zones performed on implants placed immediately after tooth extraction or 8 weeks later (immediate replacement vs. immediate restoration). Sixteen patients (10 women and 6 men) with a mean age of 35 years (ranging from 21 to 49 years old) were treated from 2004 to 2005 for single-tooth replacement in the upper arch. The patients were randomly divided into two groups: in the test group patients received implants placed and restored (non-occlusal loading) at the time of tooth extraction; in the control group implants were placed 8 weeks after tooth extraction and immediately restored. All the patients received tapered effect (TE) implants from the Straumann Dental Implant System. The following parameters were evaluated at the moment of provisional restoration (within 48 h after implant placement) and at the 2 years follow-up visit: marginal bone resorption, papilla index, position of the mucosal margin. The implant stability quotient was measured at the moment of implant placement and at the moment of the delivery of the definitive restoration. No statistically significant differences were found in any of the studied parameters between the test and the control groups (P>0.05). The implant stability quotient values between the test and control groups were significant (P0.05). The results of the present study suggest that immediate replacement without functional loading may be considered a valuable therapeutic option for selected cases of single-tooth replacement in the esthetic area when TE implants are used. Implant stability at the moment of implant placement is slightly inferior in the immediate replacement group, but it does not affect the treatment result.

  2. Immediate functional loading of single-tooth TiO2 grit-blasted implant restoration. A controlled prospective study in a porcine model. Part II: Histology and histomorphometry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousdras, V.A.; Walboomers, F.; Jansen, J.A.; Cunningham, J.L.; Blunn, G.; Petrie, A.; Jaecques, S.V.; Naert, I.E.; Sindet-Pedersen, S.; Goodship, A.E.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidently, there is a fast-moving shift from delayed to immediate implant loading. The hypothesis to be tested was that bone reactions adjacent to single TiO2-microthreaded implants exposed to immediate masticatory loading for 10 weeks after placement would modulate osseointegration.

  3. Maxillary single-tooth replacement utilizing a novel ceramic restorative system: results to 30 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormianer, Zeev; Schiroli, Guido

    2006-01-01

    This study reports on the first longitudinal results of an alumina (70%)-zirconia (30%) ceramic restorative system for implant-supported, single-tooth replacement in the anterior maxillary jaw. Eighteen patients (9 men, 9 women, mean age = 42.4 years) were treated with 22 implants placed into 19 extraction sockets and 3 residual ridges. Eight implants were immediately loaded with nonoccluding provisional prostheses. All implants were definitively loaded with fully occluding ceramic restorations after osseointegration and soft tissue maturation. Patients were monitored from 7 to 30 months (mean = 18.1 months) after loading. All implants osseointegrated and were successfully restored. One case of abutment screw loosening occurred because of patient parafunction (bruxing), and another patient reported chewing pain attributed to malocclusion. Both problems were successfully resolved without further incidence. Within the context of this study, single-tooth replacement in the anterior maxillary jaw was successfully achieved with alumina-zirconia ceramic single-tooth restorations with up to 30 months of clinical function.

  4. Replacement of a single missing tooth in maxilla : factors to consider

    OpenAIRE

    Skogekker, Vegard Haug; Sørensen, Karoline; Hustad, Kyrre Aas; Skogen, Katrine Horn

    2013-01-01

    Background: In dentistry when replacing a single missing tooth in the maxilla, the choice of treatment is often between either a fixed partial denture (FPD) or a single dental implant. The challenge is to utilize relevant factors in treatment planning, achieving benefit for the patient. This article focuses on the factors that should be taken into consideration in decision-making. The investigation provides an attempted to further understand the importance of the factors studied. Method: A q...

  5. Clinical evaluation of implant survival based on size and site of placement: A retrospective study of immediate implants at single rooted teeth sites

    OpenAIRE

    Ramalingam, Sundar; Al-Hindi, Maryam; Al-Eid, Raniah Abdullah; Nooh, Nasser

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This retrospective clinical study sought to evaluate the survival of immediate implants placed at maxillary and mandibular single-rooted tooth extraction sites and to determine the relationship among implant size, placement site, and implant survival. Methods: Between January 2010 and June 2011, 85 patients (33 males, 52 females; mean age: 45 years) underwent immediate implant placement after extraction of single-rooted teeth. All implants were restored between 12 and 14 weeks ...

  6. A multidisciplinary esthetic approach to single-tooth replacement and diastema closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyssova, Valentina; Estafan, Denise; Cunnigham, Ralph P

    2008-05-01

    Anterior tooth replacement has always posed an esthetic challenge for dentists. A multidisciplinary approach makes it possible to provide patients with esthetics and function. Treatment planning should involve other specialists when clinicians are faced with the additional esthetic concerns of the patient (such as anterior spatial anomalies and esthetically unpleasant existing restorations). Metal-ceramic fixed partial dentures have been used to allow the replacement of missing teeth for many years, providing both strength and esthetics. Several other options also are available, including implant placement. Dental implants in the esthetic zone are well-documented in the literature; numerous controlled clinical trials have shown overall implant survival and success rates. This article illustrates a step-by-step analysis and treatment option for a single-tooth replacement and maxillary anterior spatial dilemma using Captek crowns.

  7. Regeneración ósea guiada con implante unitario con nanosuperficie y betafosfato tricálcico Guided bone regeneration with nanosurface single-tooth implant and beta-tricalcium phosphate

    OpenAIRE

    J. Pato Mourelo; A. Jiménez Guerra; L. Monsalve Guil; J.J. Segura Egea; E. Velasco Ortega

    2010-01-01

    Introducción. El objetivo del presente caso clínico era mostrar los resultados del tratamiento con implantes dentales mediante regeneración ósea guiada. Caso clínico. Un varón de 32 años es valorado para tratamiento implantológico del incisivo central superior derecho perdido. El plan de tratamiento comprende la eliminación de un quiste periapical residual, inserción de forma sumergida de un implante unitario con nanosuperficie Galimplant® y regeneración ósea guiada con membrana de colágeno r...

  8. Predictable periimplant gingival esthetics: use of the natural tooth as a provisional following implant placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margeas, Robert C

    2006-01-01

    Maintaining the interdental papilla and bone height following implant placement has been a challenge for the restorative dentist. Bone resorption following anterior tooth extraction is common and often compromises the esthetics of the final restoration. The tissue must be maintained during the surgical and healing phases to achieve an esthetic outcome. Using the patient's natural tooth as a provisional can help maintain the volume and support the papilla. This article describes a technique to achieve maximum esthetics and preservation of tissue following tooth extraction and implant placement. By using the patient's extracted natural tooth, the tissue should maintain itself with minimal recession. This will allow for a more esthetic outcome.

  9. Immediate implant placement and provisionalization of maxillary anterior single implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Joseph Yun Kwong; Rungcharassaeng, Kitchai; Deflorian, Matteo; Weinstein, Tommaso; Wang, Hom-Lay; Testori, Tiziano

    2018-02-25

    An inevitable loss of soft and hard tissue after tooth extraction often results in a compromised site for anterior implant esthetics in both vertical and horizontal dimensions. Immediate implant placement and provisionalization has been a viable option for replacing failing maxillary anterior teeth as it preserves the vertical existing osseous and gingival architecture. With the simultaneous addition of soft- and hard-tissue grafts, the peri-implant horizontal tissue topography can also be maintained. The esthetic success of immediate implant placement and provisionalization procedures is influenced by a number of factors that can be identified as patient-dependent or clinician-dependent. This article describes in detail the process of patient selection, indications, contraindications, diagnosis, treatment planning and treatment execution required to achieve functional and esthetic success with immediate implant placement and provisionalization. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. An introduction to single implant abutments.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Warreth, Abdulhadi

    2013-01-01

    This article is an introduction to single implant abutments and aims to provide basic information about abutments which are essential for all dental personnel who are involved in dental implantology. Clinical Relevance: This article provides a basic knowledge of implants and implant abutments which are of paramount importance, as replacement of missing teeth with oral implants has become a well-established clinical procedure.

  11. Restoration of the maxillary anterior tooth using immediate implantation with simultaneous ridge augmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Jun-Beom

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrophy is most severe during the first month of post-extraction in the anterior maxilla with the degree of horizontal bone resorption being nearly twice as high as that of vertical bone resorption. The loss of the buccal alveolar plate following tooth extraction may lead to palatal implant positioning of the implants. Thus, immediate or early implant placement in the extraction socket has been suggested, because it would reduce the time period and the number of surgical intervention and yield higher patient satisfaction compared with delayed placed implants. However, placement of an implant immediately after tooth extraction may result in a gap between the occlusal portion of the implant and the surrounding alveolar bone crest. In this case report, an implant-supported restoration which is in harmony with the surrounding hard and soft tissue was created by the immediate implant placement with ridge augmentation in anterior region with high satisfaction from the patient.

  12. Single implants with different neck designs in the aesthetic zone : a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hartog, Laurens; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Stegenga, Boudewijn; Tymstra, Nynke; Vissink, Arjan; Raghoebar, Gerry M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To compare single implants in the aesthetic zone with different neck designs for marginal bone-level changes and clinical outcome measures. Materials and methods: Ninety-three patients with a missing anterior tooth in the maxilla were randomly assigned to be treated with an implant with

  13. Endodontics, Endodontic Retreatment, and Apical Surgery Versus Tooth Extraction and Implant Placement: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chércoles-Ruiz, Anna; Sánchez-Torres, Alba; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to answer the following clinical question: Which is the best treatment option for a pulpally involved tooth? An electronic search was conducted in the Cochrane, PubMed (MEDLINE), and ScienceDirect databases between December 2015 and February 2016. A manual search was also performed. The inclusion criteria were randomized clinical trials, prospective or retrospective cohort studies, and cross-sectional studies performed on humans with at least 1 year of follow-up and published within the last 10 years. Two researchers independently screened the title and abstract of every article identified in the search in order to establish its eligibility. The selected articles were classified into different levels of evidence by means of the Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy criteria. Sixty articles met the inclusion criteria for this systematic review. The survival rate of single-tooth implants was greater than the success rate of the distinct conservative treatments. However, among comparative studies, no important differences between both treatments were observed until at least 8 years later. The endodontic treatment and the implant placement are both valid and complementary options for planning oral rehabilitation. Although a level B recommendation can be stated, these results come from retrospective comparative studies because there is a lack of randomized clinical studies comparing both types of therapeutic options. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Varanoid Tooth Eruption and Implantation Modes in a Late Cretaceous Mosasaur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min eLiu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Erupting teeth are some of the oldest witnesses of developmental processes in the vertebrate fossil record and provide an important resource for vertebrate cladistics. Here we have examined a mosasaur jaw fragment from central Texas using ultrathin ground section histology and 3D tomographic imaging to assess features critical for the cladistic placement of mosasaurs among varanoids versus snakes: (i the orientation of replacement teeth compared to the major tooth axis, (ii the occurrence of resorption pits, and (iii the mode of tooth implantation/attachment to the tooth bearing element. The replacement tooth studied here developed in an inclined position slightly distal of the deciduous parent tooth, similar to another varanoid squamate, the Gila monster Heloderma suspectum. Ground sections and tomographs also demonstrated that the replacement tooth attachment apparatus was entirely intact and that there was no evidence of mechanical deformation. Sections and tomographs further illustrated that the replacement tooth was located within a bony crypt and the inclination of the crypt matched the inclination of the replacement tooth. These preparations also revealed the presence of a resorption pit within the boundaries of the deciduous tooth that surrounded the developing replacement tooth. This finding suggests that developing mosasaur teeth developed within the walls of resorption pits similar to varanoid tooth germs and unlike developing snake teeth which are surrounded by fibrous connective tissue integuments. Finally, mosasaurs featured pseudo-thecodont tooth implantation with teeth anchored within a socket of mineralized tissue by means of a mineralized periodontal ligament. Together, these data indicate that the moderate inclination of the erupting mosasaur tooth studied here is neither a result of postmortem displacement nor a character representative of snakes, but rather a shared character between Mosasaurs and other varanoids such as

  15. Varanoid Tooth Eruption and Implantation Modes in a Late Cretaceous Mosasaur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Reed, David A.; Cecchini, Giancarlo M.; Lu, Xuanyu; Ganjawalla, Karan; Gonzales, Carol S.; Monahan, Richard; Luan, Xianghong

    2016-01-01

    Erupting teeth are some of the oldest witnesses of developmental processes in the vertebrate fossil record and provide an important resource for vertebrate cladistics. Here, we have examined a mosasaur jaw fragment from central Texas using ultrathin ground section histology and 3D tomographic imaging to assess features critical for the cladistic placement of mosasaurs among varanoids vs. snakes: (i) the orientation of replacement teeth compared to the major tooth axis, (ii) the occurrence of resorption pits, and (iii) the mode of tooth implantation/attachment to the tooth bearing element (TBE). The replacement tooth studied here developed in an inclined position slightly distal of the deciduous parent tooth, similar to another varanoid squamate, the Gila monster Heloderma suspectum. Ground sections and tomographs also demonstrated that the replacement tooth attachment apparatus was entirely intact and that there was no evidence of mechanical deformation. Sections and tomographs further illustrated that the replacement tooth was located within a bony crypt and the inclination of the crypt matched the inclination of the replacement tooth. These preparations also revealed the presence of a resorption pit within the boundaries of the deciduous tooth that surrounded the developing replacement tooth. This finding suggests that developing mosasaur teeth developed within the walls of resorption pits similar to varanoid tooth germs and unlike developing snake teeth which are surrounded by fibrous connective tissue integuments. Finally, mosasaurs featured pseudo-thecodont tooth implantation with teeth anchored within a socket of mineralized tissue by means of a mineralized periodontal ligament. Together, these data indicate that the moderate inclination of the erupting mosasaur tooth studied here is neither a result of postmortem displacement nor a character representative of snakes, but rather a shared character between Mosasaurs and other varanoids such as Heloderma. In

  16. Practice-based clinical evaluation of zirconia abutments for anterior single-tooth restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinke, Sven; Lattke, Anja; Eickholz, Peter; Kramer, Katharina; Ziebolz, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the survival rate and prevalence of biologic and technical complications associated with single-tooth implants with all-ceramic abutments in the anterior region. A total of 33 patients were restored with 50 anterior implants and temporarily luted all-ceramic crowns on prefabricated zirconia abutments. All of the patients subsequently received annual supportive maintenance; 27 patients (18 women, 22-74 years) with 42 implants participated in the final maintenance visit and were included in the study (follow-up 78.1 ± 27.0 months). The time-dependent survival rate (Kaplan-Meier) and the frequency of prosthetic complications (abutment fracture [AF], screw loosening [SL], fracture of veneering ceramics [VF], retention loss [RL]) and biologic complications (peri-implantitis) were calculated to determine the success rates. No implant loss (implant-related survival rate 100%) but one abutment fracture occurred throughout the entire observation period; therefore, the survival rate of the superstructures (in situ criterion) was 97.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.930- 1.000) after 7 years. Eleven restorations were affected by prosthetic complications: RL (n = 4), VF (n = 5), and SL (n = 2). Peri-implantitis was diagnosed for two implants (probing depth > 5 mm, bleeding on probing [BOP]/suppuration, and bone loss > 3 mm) (implant-related peri-implantitis rate 4.8%). No restoration required replacement due to complications. The success rate (event-free restoration) was 75.9% (95% CI 0.636- 0.882) after 7 years. Considering the calculated survival rate, the application of all-ceramic zirconia implant abutments in the anterior region can be recommended as a reliable therapy in private practice. Fractures of veneering ceramics were the most common prosthetic complication.

  17. Autogenous tooth transplantation for replacing a lost tooth: case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Youn Kang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The autogenous tooth transplantation is an alternative treatment replacing a missing tooth when a suitable donor tooth is available. It is also a successful treatment option to save significant amount of time and cost comparing implants or conventional prosthetics. These cases, which required single tooth extraction due to deep caries and severe periodontal disease, could have good results by transplanting non-functional but sound donor tooth to the extraction site.

  18. Effect of connective tissue grafting on peri-implant tissue in single immediate implant sites : A RCT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuiderveld, Elise G; Meijer, Henny J A; den Hartog, Laurens; Vissink, Arjan; Raghoebar, Gerry M

    AimTo assess the effect of connective tissue grafting on the mid-buccal mucosal level (MBML) of immediately placed and provisionalized single implants in the maxillofacial aesthetic zone. Materials and methodsSixty patients with a failing tooth were provided with an immediately placed and

  19. Conduction in ion implanted single crystal diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunn, J.D.; Parikh, N.R.; Swanson, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    We have implanted sodium, phosphorus and arsenic into single crystal type IIa diamond as possible n-type dopants. Particular emphasis was applied to the implantation of sodium at different temperatures and doses; combined implantation energies of 55,80 and 120 keV were used to provide a uniformly doped layer over approximately 100 nm depth. The implanted layers exhibited semiconducting behavior with a single exponential activation energy between 0.40 and 0.48 eV, as determined by temperature dependent resistance measurements. A sample implanted to a concentration of 5.10 19 Na + /cm 3 at 550 degrees C exhibited a single activation energy of 0.415 eV over a temperature range from 25 to 500 degrees C. Thermal annealing above 900 degrees C was found to remove implantation damage as measured by optical absorption and RBS/channeling. However, concomitant increases in the resistance and the activation energy were observed. Implantation of 22 Ne was used to introduce a damage density equivalent to the 23 Na implant, while not introducing an electrically active species. The activation energy and electrical resistance were similar but higher than those produced by implantation with sodium. We conclude that the electrical properties of the Na-implanted samples were at least partly due to electrically active Na, but that residual implantation damage was still important

  20. Survival and complication rates of combined tooth-implant-supported fixed partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickenig, Hans-Joachim; Schäfer, Corinna; Spiekermann, Hubertus

    2006-10-01

    The objective of this study has been to review the incidence of biological and technical complications in case of tooth-implant-supported fixed partial denture (FPD) treatments on the basis of survival data regarding clinical cases. Based on the treatment documentations of a Bundeswehr dental clinic (Cologne-Wahn German Air Force Garrison), the medical charts of 83 patients with tooth-implant-supported FPDs were completely recorded. The median follow-up time was 4.73 (time range: 2.2-8.3) years. In the process, survival curves according to Kaplan and Meier were applied in addition to frequency counts. A total of 84 tooth-implant (83 patients) connected prostheses were followed (132 abutment teeth, 142 implant abutments (Branemark, Straumann). FPDs: the time-dependent illustration reveals that after 5 years, as many as 10% of the tooth-implant-supported FPDs already had to be subjected to a technical modification (renewal (n=2), reintegration (n=4), veneer fracture (n=5), fracture of frame (n=2)). In contrast to non-rigid connection of teeth and implants, technical modification measures were rarely required in case of tooth-implant-supported FPDs with a rigid connection. There was no statistical difference between technical complications and the used implant system. Abutment teeth and implants: during the observation period, none of the functionally loaded implants (n=142) had to be removed. Three of the overall 132 abutment teeth were lost because of periodontal inflammation. The time-dependent illustration reveals, that after 5 years as many as 8% of the abutment teeth already required corresponding therapeutic measures (periodontal treatment (5%), filling therapy (2.5%), endodontic treatment (0.5%)). After as few as 3 years, the connection related complications of implant abutments (abutment or occlusal screw loosening, loss of cementation) already had to be corrected in approximately 8% of the cases. In the utilization period there was no screw or abutment

  1. Prognosis of implants and abutment teeth under combined tooth-implant-supported and solely implant-supported double-crown-retained removable dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammelsberg, Peter; Bernhart, Gunda; Lorenzo Bermejo, Justo; Schmitter, Marc; Schwarz, Stefanie

    2014-07-01

    Objective of this study was to evaluate the incidence of complications in dental implants and abutment teeth used for combined tooth-implant- and solely implant-supported double crown-retained removable dental prostheses (RDPs). Patients were selected from a prospective clinical study. Seventy-three RDPs retained by 234 implants and 107 abutment teeth were placed in 39 men and 22 women with a mean age of 65 years. Forty-five RDPs were located in the maxilla and 28 in the mandible. Thirty-four RDPs were solely implant-supported and 39 were combined tooth-implant-supported. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate success defined as survival without severe abutment-related complications, and Cox regression was used to isolate the most relevant prognostic risk factors. After a median observation period of 2.7 years for the RDPs, six implants failed and eleven implants were diagnosed with peri-implantitis. Four abutment teeth were extracted, and three abutment teeth showed severe complications requiring extended interventions. For both abutment teeth and implants, Kaplan-Meier analyses revealed a 5-year probability of success of 85% for solely implant-supported RDPs and 92% for combined tooth-implant-supported RDPs. Multiple Cox regression identified RDP location (P = 0.01), age (P = 0.01), and gender (P = 0.04) as prognostic risk factors for severe implant-related complications. Solely implant-supported RPDs showed a poorer prognosis, but the risk difference did not reach statistical significance. Preliminary data suggest that the combination of teeth and implants to support double crown-retained RDPs may result in a prognostic advantage. The present findings should be validated in independent studies. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Bone-level implants placed in the anterior maxilla: an open-label, single-arm observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, EnFeng; Hei, Wei-Hong; Park, Jong-Chul; Pang, KangMi; Kim, Sun Kyung; Kim, Bongju; Kim, Soung-Min; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study assessed marginal bone remodeling and soft tissue esthetics after the loading of single bone-level implants in the anterior maxilla. Methods An open, single-arm observational clinical trial with 3 years of follow-up was performed, including 22 implants. The patients presented with a single tooth gap in the anterior maxilla (tooth positions 14–24), with natural or restored adjacent teeth. An implant was placed at least 8 weeks post-extraction and healed submerged for 6 weeks...

  3. Clinical application of accelerated osteogenic orthodontics and partially osseointegrated mini-implants for minor tooth movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong-Hun; Kook, Yoon-Ah; Jeong, Do-Min; Lee, Won; Chung, Kyu-Rhim; Nelson, Gerald

    2009-09-01

    This article illustrates a new treatment system combining accelerated osteogenic orthodontics and osseointegrated mini-implants for minor tooth movement in severely compromised conditions. The procedures, advantages, efficacy, and indications of this method are discussed. Three patients who needed minor tooth movement and orthodontic mini-implant treatment were recruited to use this combined technique; 1 required molar intrusion, and 2 required molar uprighting. C-Implant (diameter, 1.8 mm; length, 8.5 mm) were placed, and, after 5 weeks of healing, decortication of bone was performed near the malpositioned teeth by using a low-speed round bur. Bleeding was controlled, and the bone graft material was placed into the decorticated area. After the flap was secured, an immediate strong orthodontic force from the C-implant was applied to the teeth to start rapid tooth movement. Only a few orthodontic attachments were necessary, and the teeth moved rapidly to a good occlusal relationship without root resorption. The combination of accelerated osteogenic orthodontics and a partially osteointegrated mini-implant (C-Implant) was a safe and effective treatment choice. The C-implant's surface allows partial osseointegration, so it can resist a force moment without loosening and withstand the heavy forces associated with the accelerated osteogenic orthodontics protocol.

  4. Fracture behavior of all-ceramic, implant-supported, and tooth-implant-supported fixed dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkharrat, Abdul Rahman; Schmitter, Marc; Rues, Stefan; Rammelsberg, Peter

    2017-12-02

    In vitro investigation of the effects of fixed dental prosthesis (FDP) support and loading conditions on the fracture behavior of all-ceramic, zirconia-based FDP veneered with computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM)-manufactured lithium disilicate ceramic. Based on a model for a 3-unit FDP in the molar region (tooth in region 15, implant in region 17), 16 identical zirconia frameworks were fabricated and veneered with milled lithium disilicate ceramic. Another 16 FDPs were manufactured similarly, using a model in which the tooth was replaced by an implant. The specimens underwent 10,000 thermal cycles between 6.5 and 60 °C and 1,200,000 chewing cycles with a force magnitude of 100 N. All were then subsequently loaded until fracture in a universal testing device. Half of the FDPs were subjected to centric and axial loading on the pontic, the others to eccentric and oblique loading on one cusp of the pontic. No failures were observed after artificial aging. Fracture loads of tooth-implant-supported restorations were 1636 ± 158 and 1086 ± 156 N for axial and oblique loading, respectively; implant-supported FDPs fractured at 1789 ± 202 and 1200 ± 68 N, respectively. Differences were significant for load application (P veneered implant-supported all-ceramics restorations might be reduced by use of CAD/CAM-manufactured lithium disilicate veneers. FDPs veneered with lithium disilicate resist occlusal forces of 500 N, irrespective of load application and support type. The fracture resistance of implant-supported FDPs was, however, higher than that of combined tooth-implant-supported FDPs. Their clinical use seems to be justified.

  5. An Investigation of Three types of Tooth Implant Supported Fixed Prosthesis Designs with 3D Finite Element Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Koosha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Tooth/implant supported fixed prostheses may present biomechanical design problems, as the implant is rigidly anchored within the alveolus, whereas the tooth is attached by the periodontal ligament to the bone allowing movement. Many clinicians prefer tooth/implant supported fixed prosthesis designs with rigid connectors. However, there are some doubts about the effect of attachment placement in different prosthesis designs. The purpose of this study was to examine the stresses accumulated around the implant and natural teeth under occlusal forces using three dimensional finite element analysis (3D FEA.Materials and Methods: In this study, different connection designs of tooth/implant fixed prosthesis in distal extension situations were investigated by 3D FEA. Three models with various connection designs were studied; in the first model an implant rigidly connected to an abutment, in the second and third models an implant connected to abutment tooth with nonrigid connector in the distal part of the tooth and mesial part of the implant. In each model, a screw type implant (5×11mm and a mandibular second premolar were used. The stress values of these models loaded with vertical forces (250N were analyzed.Results: There was no difference in stress distribution around the bone support of the implant. Maximum stress values were observed at the crestal bone of the implant. In all models, tooth movement was higher than implant movement.Conclusion: There is no difference in using a rigid connector, non rigid connector in the distal surface of the tooth or in the mesial surface of an implant.

  6. Tooth-implant-supported posterior fixed dental prostheses with zirconia frameworks: 3-year clinical result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuer, Florian; Sachs, Caroline; Groesser, Julian; Gueth, Jan-Frederik; Stimmelmayr, Michael

    2016-06-01

    This case series compared the clinical survival of tooth-implant-supported (TI-S) and tooth-supported (T-S) three-unit fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) with zirconia frameworks and described the incidence of biological and technical complications. Forty-four patients received 27 TI-S FDPs and 22 T-S FDPs. Twenty-seven titanium screw implants were inserted at the dislodged position of two missing posterior teeth. All implants were provided with customized zirconia abutments. Zirconia frameworks were fabricated by a CAD/CAM system and veneered in powder build-up technique. All restorations were cemented with glass ionomer. Baseline evaluation was performed 2 weeks after cementation with recall examinations performed at 6, 12, 24 and 36 months by calibrated investigators. Survival probabilities according to Kaplan-Meier were calculated. Gingival parameters and bone loss were assessed and statistically evaluated. The mean service time of the FDPs was 35 months (±6). Two technical complications (fracture of veneering porcelain) were observed. One biological complication was recorded. The Kaplan-Meier survival probability was 93.9 % for all types of complications and 100 % related to restorations in service. The type of abutment support (TI-S vs. T-S) had no significant influence on the survival probability (p = 0.412, log rank test). No difference of the gingival parameters was detected between implants and natural teeth. Tooth-implant-supported zirconia-based FDPs showed similar clinical performance compared to tooth-supported zirconia-based FDPs. Within the limitations of this case series, tooth-implant-supported FDPs with zirconia frameworks seem to be a reliable treatment option.

  7. Influence of implant position on clinical crown length and peri-implant soft tissue dimensions at implant-supported single crowns replacing maxillary central incisors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Min; Fei, Wei; Hosseini, Mandana

    2013-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to evaluate the influence of implant position on clinical crown length and marginal soft tissue dimensions at implant-supported single crowns of maxillary central incisors, and to validate the papilla index score (PIS). Twenty-five patients, who had lost one...... as controls. Paired sample t-testand Pearson´s correlation analysis were used to analyze implant position, dimension of crownand papilla fill.Cohen’s ¿ andSpearman correlation were used to validate the PIS.The implant-supported crown was statistically longer than the contra-lateral tooth......, and there was significant correlation between the oro-facial position of the implant and the crown length difference (r=.607, p=.001). The distalpapilla was significantly shorter than the mesialpapilla at implant-supported crowns (ptooth (p=.415...

  8. Immediate loading and customized restoration of a single implant in the maxillary esthetic zone : A clinical report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hartog, Laurens; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Stellingsma, Kees; Meijer, Henny J. A.

    2009-01-01

    The replacement of a single missing anterior tooth with an implant-supported crown Is a demanding therapy. This report describes a treatment in which an anterior maxillary implant was immediately restored with a provisional restoration. During the provisional phase, an optimal emergence profile was

  9. Facial gingival tissue stability after connective tissue graft with single immediate tooth replacement in the esthetic zone: consecutive case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Joseph Y K; Rungcharassaeng, Kitichai; Morimoto, Taichiro; Lozada, Jaime

    2009-11-01

    The present consecutive case report evaluated facial gingival tissue stability after immediate tooth replacement with connective tissue grafting in the esthetic zone. The implant success rate and peri-implant tissue response were also recorded. A total of 20 consecutive patients with a mean age of 52.3 years (range 28 to 71), who had undergone 20 single immediate tooth replacement with connective tissue grafting, were evaluated clinically and radiographically at the preoperative examination, immediately after implant placement and provisionalization with connective tissue grafting, and at the latest follow-up appointment. The data were analyzed using the t test and Wilcoxon signed rank test at a significance level of alpha = .05. At the preoperative examination, a thick gingival biotype was observed in 8 patients and a thin gingival biotype in 12. At a mean follow-up of 2.15 years (range 1 to 4), all implants were functioning and exhibited a thick biotype. At the latest follow-up appointment, no significant differences (P > .05) were found between the initially thick and thin gingival biotypes in the mean mesial marginal bone level changes (-0.53 versus -0.55 mm), the mean distal marginal bone level changes (-0.50 versus -0.44 mm), and the mean facial gingival level changes (+0.23 mm versus +0.06 mm). The frequency distribution of the papilla index score showed that peri-implant papillae were well preserved at the latest follow-up visit. With proper 3-dimensional implant positioning and bone grafting into the implant-socket gap, the facial gingival level can be maintained after connective tissue grafting with single immediate tooth replacement, regardless of the initial gingival biotype, indicating that the thin gingival biotype can be converted to the thick gingival biotype morphologically and behaviorally with this procedure. Nevertheless, careful patient selection and treatment planning, as well as immaculate execution by skillful clinicians, are required to

  10. Peri-implant bone changes following tooth extraction, immediate placement and loading of implants in the edentulous maxilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Lieven; Abeloos, Johan; De Clercq, Calix; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to clinically and radiographically evaluate peri-implant bone level changes after rehabilitation of a fully edentulous maxilla by placement of six implants in either fresh extraction sites or healed edentulous ridges up till 18 months after implant placement. Twenty patients with a terminal dentition in the maxillae (11 men, 9 women) received a total of 120 OsseoSpeed implants; 118 implants could be loaded immediately of which 59 were placed in extraction sockets and 59 were placed in healed sites. Within 24 h after surgery, all patients received a chairside-assembled, fibre-reinforced temporary fixed prosthetic reconstruction in occlusion. Six months post-surgery, final screw-retained CoCr (15) or Ti (5) computer numerical control-milled and acrylic-veneered frameworks were placed directly at implant level without interposing abutments. Intraoral radiographs were taken 6 and 18 months after implant placement. Implant survival rate was 100%. Mean marginal bone level was located on average -0.35 mm below the reference point (standard deviation 0.29, range -1.20 to +0.02 mm) 18 months after loading. Whether implants were placed in healed bone sites or fresh extraction sockets did not significantly affect the bone level changes. Furthermore, the use of either CoCr or Ti at the implant level did not significantly affect marginal bone loss. Within the limits of this prospective clinical trial, results seem to indicate that immediate placement and occlusal loading of five to six implants in the edentulous maxilla can be carried out successfully. Whether or not those implants are placed in fresh extraction sockets does not seem to alter the outcome. The present data show a successful 1-year outcome of a treatment protocol involving tooth extraction immediately combined with implant placement and loading.

  11. Single-tooth implant restorations in the esthetic zone--contemporary concepts for optimization and maintenance of soft tissue esthetics in the replacement of failing teeth in compromised sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankoo, Tidu

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, implant dentistry has undergone a profound shift in emphasis. The focus evolved first from a surgically driven approach to a prosthetically driven approach and now to a more biologically driven approach with the goal of optimizing and maintaining esthetics. While traditional implant protocols are well established for management of implants placed in healed edentulous sites, the data available offer little clarity on the factors and procedures for long-term esthetic success, particularly in terms of maintained stable soft tissue outcomes around implant restorations in the esthetic zone. Unfortunately, the 90%+ success rates indicated in most studies of dental implant systems today do not represent the success of the esthetic outcome. This has created a demand--certainly among clinicians in private practice focused on the ongoing maintenance of esthetic outcomes--for clear treatment protocols to achieve esthetic results that are not only predictable and consistent but that can withstand the test of time.

  12. Evidence-based decision making: replacement of the single missing tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugazzotto, Paul A

    2009-01-01

    Single-tooth replacement may be effected through various methods, including the use of a resin-bonded fixed partial denture, a conventional fixed partial denture, and a single implant-supported crown. Although the introduction of newer therapeutic modalities, surgical and restorative techniques, and restorative materials has significantly expanded available treatment options, a greater demand is now placed on the diagnostic and treatment planning acumen of the clinician. The questions confronting each clinician are when to apply each treatment modality and how to use these therapeutic approaches to their maximum benefit for the patient. This article focuses on the factors that should be considered when making such clinical decisions and offers a framework within which to formulate appropriate treatment algorithms.

  13. Ability of Mini-Implant Facilitated Micro-osteoperforations to Accelerate Tooth Movement in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Tracy; Park, Juyoung; Lee, Deborah; Kim, Catherine; Olson, Jeffrey; Javadi, Shadi; Lawson, Gregory; McCabe, James; Moon, Won; Ting, Kang; Hong, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction While current techniques for accelerated tooth movement (ATM) often involve invasive surgical procedures, micro-osteoperforations (MOPs) using mini-implants (MI) may facilitate orthodontic tooth movement without raising flaps, reducing surgical risks and increasing patient acceptance. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of MI-facilitated MOPs in inducing ATM and investigated potential risks for root resorption. Methods Five MOPs were placed on the left side around the maxillary first molars in six rats using an automated MI driver, while the right side received no MOPs as a control. Closed-coiled springs were secured from incisors to first molars for orthodontic tooth movement. Tooth movement was measured and samples underwent radiological and histological analyses. Results The MOP side exhibited a 1.86-fold increase in the rate of tooth movement with decreased bone density and decreased bone volume around first molars compared to the control. H&E and TRAP analysis showed increased numbers of osteoclasts as well as new bone formation. Three dimensional volumetric analysis of all five roots of maxillary first molars demonstrated no statistically significant difference in root volumes. Conclusions MI-facilitated MOPs accelerated tooth movement without increased risk for root resorption, and therefore may become a readily available and efficient treatment option to shorten orthodontic treatment time with improved patient acceptance. PMID:27894545

  14. Microbial changes after full-mouth tooth extraction, followed by 2-stage implant placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirynen, Marc; Van Assche, Nele

    2011-06-01

    Recent studies showed that qPCR could detect bacteria related to periodontitis and peri-implantitis in a low concentration after full-mouth tooth extraction. This study monitored the microbiota from tooth extraction, over 9 months of full edentulism, up to 1 year after abutment connection. Ten patients with severe periodontitis were recruited. Six months after tooth extraction, implants were inserted. Three to 6 months later, they were connected to abutments. Plaque samples were collected from the tongue dorsum, saliva, and subgingival area (teeth/implants) before extraction up to 1 year after abutment connection, and analysed via culture, qPCR, and checkerboard technology. A reduction in the total amount of aerobic and anaerobic CFU/ml was observed. The concentration of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia (qPCR and checkerboard) in the saliva and, to a lower extent, on the tongue dorsum reduced. For Prevotella intermedia, changes were negligible and no changes could be detected for Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. The pristine subgingival niches were quickly colonized by key pathogens. Their final concentration remained low, while the detection frequencies remained very high over time. Complete edentulation results in a significant reduction of bacteria related to periodontitis and peri-implantitis, with the exception of A. actinomycetemcomitans, which might indicate that key pathogens can survive without pockets. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Triple dens invaginatus in a single tooth: Rarest of rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhina, Amandeep; Chhina, Kamalpreet; Kaushal, Nitin; Walia, Ira

    2017-01-01

    Dens invaginatus is a rare malformation affecting the teeth. The teeth that are most commonly affected are the permanent maxillary lateral incisors. The mandibular posterior teeth are rarely affected by dens invaginatus. In most of the cases, a single dens invaginatus is seen affecting the tooth. Cases of double dens invaginatus affecting a single tooth are rare, and those of triple dens invaginatus in a single tooth are even rarer. Here, we present a case of a 14-year-old where three dens invaginatus were seen in the mandibular second premolar. This is the fourth case of three dens invaginatus in a single tooth as only three have been reported previously.

  16. Use of Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Tooth Extractions, Dental Implants, and Periodontal Surgical Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Katie J; Henschel, Heather; Patel, Ursula; Fitzpatrick, Margaret A; Evans, Charlesnika T

    2018-01-01

    Guidelines for antibiotics prior to dental procedures for patients with specific cardiac conditions and prosthetic joints have changed, reducing indications for antibiotic prophylaxis. In addition to guidelines focused on patient comorbidities, systematic reviews specific to dental extractions and implants support preprocedure antibiotics for all patients. However, data on dentist adherence to these recommendations are scarce. This was a cross-sectional study of veterans undergoing tooth extractions, dental implants, and periodontal procedures. Patients receiving antibiotics for oral or nonoral infections were excluded. Data were collected through manual review of the health record. Of 183 veterans (mean age, 62 years; 94.5% male) undergoing the included procedures, 82.5% received antibiotic prophylaxis (mean duration, 7.1 ± 1.6 days). Amoxicillin (71.3% of antibiotics) and clindamycin (23.8%) were prescribed most frequently; 44.7% of patients prescribed clindamycin were not labeled as penicillin allergic. Of those who received prophylaxis, 92.1% received postprocedure antibiotics only, 2.6% received preprocedural antibiotics only, and 5.3% received pre- and postprocedure antibiotics. When prophylaxis was indicated, 87.3% of patients received an antibiotic. However, 84.9% received postprocedure antibiotics when preprocedure administration was indicated. While the majority of antibiotics were indicated, only 8.2% of patients received antibiotics appropriately. The primary reason was secondary to prolonged duration. Three months postprocedure, there were no occurrences of Clostridium difficile infection, infective endocarditis, prosthetic joint infections, or postprocedure oral infections. The majority of patients undergoing a dental procedure received antibiotic prophylaxis as indicated. Although patients for whom antibiotic prophylaxis was indicated should have received a single preprocedure dose, most antibiotics were prescribed postprocedure. Dental stewardship

  17. Tooth morphology, implantation and replacement system of Hoplias malabaricus (Teleostei, Characiformes, Erythrinidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RM. Hassunuma

    Full Text Available The oropharyngeal cavity of Hoplias malabaricus, an ichthyophagous freshwater fish, is anatomically adapted to predation. Macroscopic and microscopic analyses were conducted in order to study the morphology and system of implantation and replacement of teeth. The results showed that this teleost has conical and caniniform teeth, with an orthodentin crown covered by an enameloid cap and a vascularised orthodentin in the root. With regard to the implantation system, there is a junction between the tooth and the bone tissue, as a typical physiological dental ankylosis. The teeth are replaced by a resorption process of multinucleated giant cells that actively eliminate the dentin and bone tissue.

  18. Immediate Loading of Single Implants: A 2-Year Prospective Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangano, Carlo; Raes, Filiep; Lenzi, Carolina; Eccellente, Tammaro; Ortolani, Michele; Luongo, Giuseppe; Mangano, Francesco

    The aim of this prospective multicenter study was to evaluate the outcomes of single implants subjected to immediate functional loading. Inclusion criteria were single-tooth placement in postextraction sockets or fully healed sites, and sufficient bone height and width to place an implant of at least 3.5 × 10.0 mm. All implants were functionally loaded immediately after placement and followed for 2 years. Outcome measures were implant survival, complications, and peri-implant marginal bone loss (MBL). A total of 57 implants (38 maxilla, 19 mandible) were placed in 46 patients (23 men, 23 women, aged 18-73 years). Of these, 10 implants were placed in postextraction sockets. One implant failed, in a healed site, giving a patient-based overall 2-year survival rate of 97.6%. The incidence of biologic complications was 1.8%; prosthetic complications amounted to 7.5%. The peri-implant MBL was 0.37 ± 0.22 mm (healed sites: 0.4 mm ± 0.22; postextraction sockets: 0.3 mm ± 0.22). The immediate functional loading of single implants seems to represent a safe and successful procedure. Long-term follow-up studies on a larger sample of patients are needed to confirm these results.

  19. Comparative evaluation of stresses in tooth implant connected fixed partial denture by varying the implant design and position: A 3D finite element study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K V Pratheep

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aims at evaluating stresses generated in a fixed tooth to implant connected fixed partial denture (FPD by finite element method by varying implant design and position, in unilateral distal extension cases, i.e. for replacing mandibular 1 st and 2 nd molars. Materials and Methods: Four models were created, Model 1-A finite element model (FEA model of a crestal implant-tooth connected metal ceramic FPD with pontic in 36 region. The 35 region simulated the second premolar. Model 2-A FEA model of a basal implant-tooth connected metal ceramic FPD. Model 3-A FEA model of a crestal implant in 36 region connected to tooth 35 and cantilevered posteriorly with pontic in 37 region, made of metal ceramic. Model 4-A FEA model of a basal implant in 36 region connected to tooth 35 and cantilevered posteriorly with pontic in 37 region, made of metal ceramic. A vertical force of 100N directed evenly on the nodes on the occlusal surface of each of the three crowns. The models displayed stress both numerically and by color coding. Results: On comparing models 1 and 2, the model 1 showed comparatively more stresses in crestal bone area of the implant. On comparing models 3 and 4, model 3 showed lesser von misses stress values. Conclusion: In case of tooth implant connected FPDs without any cantilevers, basal implants show better stress distribution when compared to crestal implants. In case of cantilever designs, crestal implant design showed lower stress values, but the difference in stresses were less.

  20. Single anterior tooth replacement by a cast lingual loop connector - a conservative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandekeri, Shilpa Sudesh; Dandekeri, Savita

    2014-09-01

    One of the most challenging and complex treatment modality is replacement of single anterior tooth. This can be overcome by different treatment options such as implant-supported restorations as well as conventional porcelain-fused-to-metal and resin-bonded fixed partial dentures. Drifting of teeth into the edentulous area may reduce the available pontic space; whereas a diastema existing before an extraction may result in excessive mesiodistal dimension to the pontic space. Loop connector fixed partial denture (FPD) may be the simplest and best solution to maintain the diastema and provide optimum restoration of aesthetics. This article describes the procedure for the fabrication of a loop connector FPD to restore an excessively wide anterior edentulous space in a patient with existing spacing between the maxillary anterior teeth.

  1. Tooth loss and implant outcomes in patients refractory to treatment in a periodontal practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardal, Øystein; Linden, Gerard James

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the factors associated with continued significant tooth loss due to periodontal reasons during maintenance following periodontal therapy in a specialist periodontal practice in Norway. A case-control design was used. Refractory cases were patients who lost multiple teeth during a maintenance period of 13.4 (range 8-19) years following definitive periodontal treatment in a specialist practice. Controls were age- and gender-matched maintenance patients from the same practice. Characteristics and treatment outcomes were assessed, and all teeth classified as being lost due to periodontal disease during follow-up were identified. The use of implants in refractory cases and any complications relating to such a treatment were recorded. Only 27 (2.2%) patients who received periodontal treatment between 1986 and 1998 in a specialist practice met the criteria for inclusion in the refractory to treatment group. Each refractory subject lost 10.4 (range 4-16) teeth, which represented 50% of the teeth present at baseline. The rate of tooth loss in the refractory group was 0.78 teeth per year, which was 35 times greater than that in the control group. Multivariate analysis indicated that being in the refractory group was predicted by heavy smoking (p=0.026), being stressed (p=0.016) or having a family history of periodontitis (p=0.002). Implants were placed in 14 of the refractory patients and nine (64%) of these lost at least one implant. In total, 17 (25%) of the implants placed in the refractory group were lost during the study period. A small number of periodontal maintenance patients are refractive to treatment and go on to experience significant tooth loss. These subjects also have a high level of implant complications and failure. Heavy smoking, stress and a family history of periodontal disease were identified as factors associated with a refractory outcome.

  2. A Comparison of Zirconia CAD/CAM to Conventionally Fabricated Single Implant Restorations in the Esthetic Zone

    OpenAIRE

    Borzangy, Sary

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This project aimed to determine whether single tooth implant restorations fabricated with CAD/CAM zirconia abutments/porcelain fused to zirconia crowns reveal different biological and esthetic outcomes compared with prefabricated anatomic titanium abutments/porcelain fused to metal crowns in the esthetic zone. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients who needed a single implant restoration in the esthetic zone were included in the study. Twenty-nine patients completed screening, b...

  3. Use of an implant o-ring attachment for the tooth supported mandibular overdenture: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttal, Satyabodh S; Tavargeri, Anand K; Nadiger, Ramesh K; Thakur, Srinath L

    2011-07-01

    Retention of a mandibular denture can be achieved by an implant-retained or natural tooth-retained bar and stud attachment in the anterior segment of the mandible. The same design principles holds true for both implant-retained and tooth-retained methods of anchoring the bar and stud attachment. A simple and cost effective treatment for more complex implant overdenture is the concept of conventional tooth-retained overdentures. When few firm teeth still remain in a compromised dentition, preservation of these teeth for overdentures can improve retention and stability. The authors present a clinical report of a patient treated with a mandibular tooth-borne overdenture with bar and O-ring attachment. A splinted bar supported the prosthesis and an O-ring retained the denture.

  4. Implant-tooth-supported fixed partial prostheses: correlations between in vivo occlusal bite forces and marginal bone reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akça, Kivanç; Uysal, Serdar; Cehreli, Murat Cavit

    2006-06-01

    To evaluate maximal occlusal bite forces (MOF) and marginal bone level (MBL) changes in patients with implant-tooth-supported fixed partial prostheses (FPP). Twenty nine partially edentulous patients consecutively who received 34 three-occlusal unit FPP with terminal implant and tooth support were subjected to quantification of MOFs using a sub-miniature load cell connected to a data acquisition system and measurement of the MBL changes around implants in digitalized periapical radiographs obtained at prostheses delivery and 24-month follow-up. MOFs for implant support (mean: 353.61 N) significantly differed from tooth support (mean: 275.48 N) (P 0.05). MBL changes at mesial and distal sites of the implants at 24 months of functional loading were 0.28 and 0.097 mm respectively. Although MOFs under functional loading might indicate an increase in load participation for supporting implant, the rigid connection between implant and natural tooth via three-occlusal unit FPP does not jeopardize the time-dependent MBL stability of the implant under functional loads.

  5. Timing of implant placement after tooth extraction: immediate, immediate-delayed or delayed implants? A Cochrane systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Marco; Grusovin, Maria Gabriella; Polyzos, Ilias P; Felice, Pietro; Worthington, Helen V

    2010-01-01

    the patient. Results were expressed as fixed effects models using mean differences for continuous outcomes and risk ratios (RR) for dichotomous outcomes with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Fourteen eligible RCTs were identified but only seven trials could be included. Four RCTs evaluated implant placement timing. Two RCTs compared immediate versus delayed implants in 126 patients and found no statistically significant differences. One RCT compared immediate-delayed versus delayed implants in 46 patients. After 2 years, patients in the immediate-delayed group perceived the time to functional loading significantly shorter, were more satisfied and an independent blinded assessor judged the level of the peri-implant marginal mucosa in relation to that of the adjacent teeth as more appropriate (RR = 1.68; 95% CI 1.04 to 2.72). These differences disappeared 5 years after loading, and significantly more complications occurred in the immediate-delayed group (RR = 4.20; 95% CI 1.01 to 17.43). One RCT compared immediate with immediately delayed implants in 16 patients for 2 years and found no differences. Three RCTs evaluated different techniques of bone grafting for implants immediately placed in extraction sockets. No statistically significant differences were observed when evaluating whether autogenous bone is needed in post-extractive sites (one trial with 26 patients) or which was the most effective augmentation technique (two trials with 56 patients). There is insufficient evidence to determine the possible advantages or disadvantages of immediate, immediate-delayed or delayed implants, therefore these preliminary conclusions are based on few underpowered trials often judged to be at high risk of bias. There is a suggestion that immediate and immediate-delayed implants may be at a higher risk of implant failure and complications than delayed implants, on the other hand the aesthetic outcome might be better when placing implants just after tooth extraction. There is not

  6. Cigarette smoking and dental implant tooth replacement therapy: A questionnaire survey among patients receiving implant prosthetic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubic-Filiks Beata

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic nicotinism has negative effects, both local and systemic. Its local effects are related to both the immediate thermal influence, as well as the toxic action of the substances contained in the smoke. In addition, the microflora colonizing dental plague is changed. The damage and the inflammatory processes that are incurred, affect the bone tissue of the alveolar processes, the mucosa, gums, and the tooth enamel. In this study, the tobacco smoking-related profile of patients being treated by way of implants was determined. Moreover, the relationship between cigarette smoking and pain sensation was assessed in patients undergoing surgical and prosthetic procedures in the oral cavity. The questionnaire survey covered 464 patients receiving prosthetic treatment at the “Dental” Non-Public Health Care Centre in Tomaszow Mazowiecki. The patients answered questions concerning their sex, age, the period of smoking, number of cigarettes smoked per day and the sensation of pain during bone reconstruction, implant placement and prosthetic procedures. The most numerous group of patients treated with implants were women: either non-smoking or smoking for less than 20 years at a level of less than 20 cigarettes a day, and men aged 40-60 years who have been smoking for over 20 years, at more than 20 cigarettes a day. The results of the survey reveal that non-smoking patients felt pain during bone reconstruction, implant placement and prosthetic procedures more frequently.

  7. Evaluation of Bone Change by Digital Subtraction Radiography After Implantation of Tooth ash-plaster Mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Duk; Kim, Kwang Won; Cho, Young Gon; Kim, Dong Kie; Choi, Eui Hwan [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chosun University and Oral Biology Research Center, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-08-15

    To assess the methods for the clinical evaluation of the longitudinal bone changes after implantation of tooth ash-plaster mixture into the defect area of human jaws. Tooth ash-plaster mixtures were implanted into the defects of 8 human jaws. 48 intraoral radiograms taken with copper step wedge as reference at soon, 1st, 2nd, 4th, and 6th week after implantation of mixture were used. X-ray taking was standardized by using Rinn XCP device customized directly to the individual dentition with resin bite block. The images inputted by Quick scanner were digitized and analyzed by NIH image program. Cu-equivalent values were measured at the implanted sites from the periodic digital images. Analysis was performed by the bidirectional subtraction with color enhancement and the surface plot of resliced contiguous image. The obtained results by the two methods were compared with Cu-equivalent value changes. The average determination coefficient of Cu-equivalent equations was 0.9988 and the coefficient of variation of measured Cu values ranged from 0.08-0.10. The coefficient of variation of Cu-equivalent values measured at the areas of the mixture and the bone by the conversion equation ranged from 0.06-0.09. The analyzed results by the bidirectional subtraction with color enhancement were coincident with the changes of Cu-equivalent values. The surface plot of the resliced contiguous image showed the three dimensional view of the longitudinal bone changes on one image and also coincident with Cu-equivalent value changes after implantation. The bidirectional subtraction with color enhancement and the surface plot of the resliced contiguous image was very effective and reasonable to analyze clinically and qualitatively the longitudinal bone change. These methods are expected to be applicable to the non-destructive test in other fields.

  8. Positional changes of maxillary central incisors following orthodontic treatment using single-crown implants as fixed reference markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brahem Ben, Elissa; Holm, Bente; Sonnesen, L

    2017-01-01

    . MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-seven patients - thirty-seven with (test group) and twenty without pre-implant orthodontic treatment (control group) - were rehabilitated with 89 single-crown implants in the upper maxilla. Clinical and radiographic data, clinical photographs, and dental casts were collected......OBJECTIVES: This follow-up study (1) compares tooth displacement of central incisors in patients with and without pre-implant orthodontic treatment and (2) investigates whether sex, age, or orthodontic retention have an effect on tooth displacement after the insertion of single-crown implants...... during baseline examinations after prosthetic rehabilitation and at the final follow-up examination at least 5 years later. A total of 114 dental casts were digitalized and aligned using a software program to measure changes in the positions of the central incisors. RESULTS: After a follow-up period...

  9. Esthetic potential of single-implant provisional restorations: selection criteria of available alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, George

    2006-01-01

    Provisional implant restorations are essential tools used to optimize the esthetic outcomes for single-tooth implant restorations. This article describes three groups of available alternatives and the specific options within each group including removable prostheses (interim removable partial denture, vacuum-formed appliance), tooth-supported prostheses (bonded extracted or denture teeth, cast metal or fiber-reinforced resin-bonded fixed partial denture [FPD], wire-retained resin-bonded FPD, acrylic resin provisional FPD), and implant-supported fixed prostheses (implant-retained provisional restoration). Advantages and disadvantages as well as fabrication guidelines for each option are provided. The author proposes that the restorative dentist consider eight criteria in selecting the most appropriate type of provisional prosthesis for a specific patient situation including the esthetic potential, patient comfort, treatment time, laboratory cost, occlusal clearance, ease of removal, durability, and ease of modification. The patient's esthetic expectations are critical in determining the most suitable type of provisional restoration. Esthetically pleasing provisional restorations are part of the evolving implant continuum, making implant dentistry more appealing to practicing dentists and potential patients. Provisional restorations for single implants have evolved from temporary expedients during osseous and soft tissue integration to critical therapeutic tools used to assess patient expectations, communicate with the laboratory, and optimize definitive implant treatment. The selection of the type of provisional restoration may significantly influence esthetics during the period of implant integration and soft tissue healing. However, it is unlikely that there is a direct correlation between the type of provisional restoration used and the esthetic outcome of the definitive prosthesis.

  10. Keys to Achieving Predictable Single-Unit Implant Esthetics in the Smile Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marongiu, Nicholas

    2018-03-01

    When planned and implemented appropriately, single-unit implant dentistry in the smile zone can be an excellent alternative to attempting to save a failing natural tooth. Historically, implant success has revolved around assessment of osseointegration and the healing of bone around the implant, without much regard for esthetics upon completion. As implant dentistry has evolved, the expectations of both restoring clinicians and patients have expanded to emphasize the esthetic outcome as well as faster treatment with immediate implant placement. Advancements in dental radiography have increased the accuracy of diagnosing and planning, enabling more timely recognition of potential inadequacies and providing more predictable results. Even with the advances in implant dentistry over the past several decades, however, it is virtually impossible to reproduce nature; therefore, every effort should be made to preserve natural dentition. This article, which presents two case reports, will discuss differentiation between surgical success and restorative success of implants in the smile zone, identify key predictive factors associated with restorative implant success, and identify benefits of immediate implant placement.

  11. Triple dens invaginatus in a single tooth: Rarest of rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandeep Chhina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dens invaginatus is a rare malformation affecting the teeth. The teeth that are most commonly affected are the permanent maxillary lateral incisors. The mandibular posterior teeth are rarely affected by dens invaginatus. In most of the cases, a single dens invaginatus is seen affecting the tooth. Cases of double dens invaginatus affecting a single tooth are rare, and those of triple dens invaginatus in a single tooth are even rarer. Here, we present a case of a 14-year-old where three dens invaginatus were seen in the mandibular second premolar. This is the fourth case of three dens invaginatus in a single tooth as only three have been reported previously.

  12. 3D finite element analysis of immediate loading of single wide versus double implants for replacing mandibular molar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikar R Desai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this finite element study was to compare the stresses, strains, and displacements of double versus single implant in immediate loading for replacing mandibular molar. Materials and Methods: Two 3D FEM (finite element method models were made to simulate implant designs. The first model used 5-mm-wide diameter implant to support a single molar crown. The second model used 3.75-3.75 double implant design. Anisotropic properties were assigned to bone model. Each model was analyzed with single force magnitude (100 N in vertical axis. Results: This FEM study suggested that micromotion can be controlled better for double implants compared to single wide-diameter implants. The Von Mises stress for double implant showed 74.44% stress reduction compared to that of 5-mm implant. The Von Mises elastic strain was reduced by 61% for double implant compared to 5-mm implant. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the study, when the mesiodistal space for artificial tooth is more than 12.5 mm, under immediate loading, the double implant support should be considered.

  13. 3D finite element analysis of immediate loading of single wide versus double implants for replacing mandibular molar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Shrikar R.; Karthikeyan, I.; Gaddale, Reetika

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this finite element study was to compare the stresses, strains, and displacements of double versus single implant in immediate loading for replacing mandibular molar. Materials and Methods: Two 3D FEM (finite element method) models were made to simulate implant designs. The first model used 5-mm-wide diameter implant to support a single molar crown. The second model used 3.75-3.75 double implant design. Anisotropic properties were assigned to bone model. Each model was analyzed with single force magnitude (100 N) in vertical axis. Results: This FEM study suggested that micromotion can be controlled better for double implants compared to single wide-diameter implants. The Von Mises stress for double implant showed 74.44% stress reduction compared to that of 5-mm implant. The Von Mises elastic strain was reduced by 61% for double implant compared to 5-mm implant. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the study, when the mesiodistal space for artificial tooth is more than 12.5 mm, under immediate loading, the double implant support should be considered. PMID:24554890

  14. Bone-level implants placed in the anterior maxilla: an open-label, single-arm observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, EnFeng; Hei, Wei-Hong; Park, Jong-Chul; Pang, KangMi; Kim, Sun Kyung; Kim, Bongju; Kim, Soung-Min; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2017-10-01

    This study assessed marginal bone remodeling and soft tissue esthetics after the loading of single bone-level implants in the anterior maxilla. An open, single-arm observational clinical trial with 3 years of follow-up was performed, including 22 implants. The patients presented with a single tooth gap in the anterior maxilla (tooth positions 14-24), with natural or restored adjacent teeth. An implant was placed at least 8 weeks post-extraction and healed submerged for 6 weeks. After the second-stage operation, a fixed provisional prosthesis was provided. The final restoration was placed 6 months after the provisional restoration. The time of the provisional crown connection was considered to be the baseline in this study. Esthetic parameters and the marginal bone level were assessed at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months. All implants were well integrated in the bone. A statistically significant increase was found in the mean implant stability quotient between the time of the provisional prosthesis and the time of the final prosthesis. Most implants (95.5%) revealed marginal bone resorption (implant (4.5%) showed a change of 2.12 mm from baseline to 36 months (mean 0.07±0.48 mm), while the crestal bone level decreased significantly, from 2.34±0.93 mm at baseline to 1.70±1.10 mm at 36 months. The facial gingival margin and papilla were stable and the esthetic scores indicated high patient and dentist satisfaction. Platform-switching bone-level implants placed in maxillary single-tooth gaps resulted in successful osseointegration with minimal marginal bone resorption. The peri-implant soft tissue was also esthetically satisfying and stable.

  15. Bone-level implants placed in the anterior maxilla: an open-label, single-arm observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study assessed marginal bone remodeling and soft tissue esthetics after the loading of single bone-level implants in the anterior maxilla. Methods An open, single-arm observational clinical trial with 3 years of follow-up was performed, including 22 implants. The patients presented with a single tooth gap in the anterior maxilla (tooth positions 14–24), with natural or restored adjacent teeth. An implant was placed at least 8 weeks post-extraction and healed submerged for 6 weeks. After the second-stage operation, a fixed provisional prosthesis was provided. The final restoration was placed 6 months after the provisional restoration. The time of the provisional crown connection was considered to be the baseline in this study. Esthetic parameters and the marginal bone level were assessed at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months. Results All implants were well integrated in the bone. A statistically significant increase was found in the mean implant stability quotient between the time of the provisional prosthesis and the time of the final prosthesis. Most implants (95.5%) revealed marginal bone resorption (<0.5 mm), and just 1 implant (4.5%) showed a change of 2.12 mm from baseline to 36 months (mean 0.07±0.48 mm), while the crestal bone level decreased significantly, from 2.34±0.93 mm at baseline to 1.70±1.10 mm at 36 months. The facial gingival margin and papilla were stable and the esthetic scores indicated high patient and dentist satisfaction. Conclusions Platform-switching bone-level implants placed in maxillary single-tooth gaps resulted in successful osseointegration with minimal marginal bone resorption. The peri-implant soft tissue was also esthetically satisfying and stable. PMID:29093988

  16. Optimizing Maxillary Aesthetics of a Severe Compromised Tooth through Orthodontic Movement and Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Scaf de Molon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of severe compromised tooth in the maxillary anterior area still poses great challenge to the clinicians. Several treatment modalities have been proposed to restore the function and aesthetics in teeth with advanced periodontal disease. The present study aims to report a case of traumatic injury of a left-maxillary central incisor with ridge preservation, orthodontic movement, and implant therapy. A 45-year-old woman underwent the proposed treatment for her left central incisor: basic periodontal therapy, xenogenous bone graft, and guided bone regeneration (GBR. Six months after the graft procedure, orthodontic movement by means of alignment and leveling was made and a coronal displacement of the gingival margin and vertical bone apposition could be observed after 13 months of active movement. Afterwards, a dental implant was placed followed by a connective tissue graft and immediate provisionalization of the crown. In conclusion, orthodontic movement was effective to improve the gingival tissue and alveolar bone prior to implant placement favoring the aesthetic results. Six years postoperatively, the results revealed height and width alveolar bone gain indicating that the treatment proposed was able to restore all the functional and aesthetic parameters.

  17. Positional changes of maxillary central incisors following orthodontic treatment using single-crown implants as fixed reference markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahem, E B; Holm, B; Sonnesen, L; Worsaae, N; Gotfredsen, K

    2017-12-01

    This follow-up study (1) compares tooth displacement of central incisors in patients with and without pre-implant orthodontic treatment and (2) investigates whether sex, age, or orthodontic retention have an effect on tooth displacement after the insertion of single-crown implants. Fifty-seven patients - thirty-seven with (test group) and twenty without pre-implant orthodontic treatment (control group) - were rehabilitated with 89 single-crown implants in the upper maxilla. Clinical and radiographic data, clinical photographs, and dental casts were collected during baseline examinations after prosthetic rehabilitation and at the final follow-up examination at least 5 years later. A total of 114 dental casts were digitalized and aligned using a software program to measure changes in the positions of the central incisors. After a follow-up period of at least five years, 87% of the central incisors measured in the test group were displaced >0.25 mm vertically compared with 70% in the control group. Seventy-eight percent of the test group teeth had moved >0.25 mm horizontally compared with 55% in the control group. These differences were not significant, and there were no significant correlations with patient age or sex. The majority of patients had minor vertical (60%) or horizontal (67%) tooth displacement of the central incisors (0.25-0.75 mm) after a minimum follow-up period of 5 years. This study found no significant differences in tooth displacement comparing patients with and without pre-implant orthodontic treatment. No significant effect of sex, age, orthodontic retention, or implant location was observed on tooth displacement. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Considerations for single tooth replacement in an esthetic zone-review of conservative treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Raghuwar Dayal; Singh, Saumyendra V; Chand, Pooran; Ramashanker

    2011-01-01

    This literature review aimed to identify and assess the conservative treatment options for replacing a single missing anterior tooth, for patients who cannot afford implants or traditional bridges. The evidence was obtained using MEDLINE searches. A total of 19 studies met the inclusion criteria. None of these studies scored higher than 10 of 17, suggesting that all studies did not have strong evidence. Three of the studies examined resin-bonded bridges (RBBs), whereas the other three investigated removable partial dentures (RPDs). None of the studies had random patient selection. Three of these studies had controlled allocation of patients. The other three allowed new patients to enter the study throughout the study period. Placement of the prosthesis was only conducted in one study, whereas the rest of the studies examined patients with preexisting prostheses. In general, all 19 studies were weak due to poor study design, no acceptable controls, no direct comparison between RBBs and RPDs, lack of longitudinal studies and no differentiation between the anterior and posterior prostheses. Therefore, no definitive treatment conclusion can be made until studies of stronger design are conducted.

  19. Early Loading of Single-Piece Implant for Partially Edentulous Posterior Arch: A Prospective One-Year Case Report

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    Amol Beldar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Implant therapy is now well established, and there is an increasing need for shorter rehabilitation time. Original prerequisites of osseointegration have been reassessed to satisfy continuously increasing patient's expectation of reduced treatment time, improved esthetics, and increased comfort. Shorter healing time may be appropriate in some circumstances, and examples of early loading have been reported in animal and human studies. However, to date there are insufficient data to determine a universally acceptable opinion on early loading of implants for single-tooth replacement. This case report involves early loading, combined with construction of a restoration, inserted directly after 6 weeks of implant surgery and followup of one year.

  20. Early Loading of Single-Piece Implant for Partially Edentulous Posterior Arch: A Prospective One-Year Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beldar, Amol; Bhongade, Manohar L.; Byakod, Girish; Buregoni, Chandrashekar

    2013-01-01

    Implant therapy is now well established, and there is an increasing need for shorter rehabilitation time. Original prerequisites of osseointegration have been reassessed to satisfy continuously increasing patient's expectation of reduced treatment time, improved esthetics, and increased comfort. Shorter healing time may be appropriate in some circumstances, and examples of early loading have been reported in animal and human studies. However, to date there are insufficient data to determine a universally acceptable opinion on early loading of implants for single-tooth replacement. This case report involves early loading, combined with construction of a restoration, inserted directly after 6 weeks of implant surgery and followup of one year. PMID:23710375

  1. Prosthetic restoration in the single-tooth gap: patient preferences and analysis of the WTP index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augusti, Davide; Augusti, Gabriele; Re, Dino

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the preference of a patients' population, according to the index of willingness to pay (WTP), against two treatments to restore a single-tooth gap: the implant-supported crown (ISC) and the 3-unit fixed partial denture prosthesis (FPDP) on natural teeth. Willingness to pay values were recorded on 107 subjects by asking the WTP from a starting bid of €2000 modifiable through monetary increases or decreases (€100). Data were collected through an individually delivered questionnaire. The characteristics of the population and choices made, the median values and WTP associations with socio-demographic parameters (Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests), correlations between variables (chi-square test in contingency tables) and significant parameters for predicting WTP values obtained in a multiple linear regression model were revealed. The 64% of patients expressed a preference for ISC, while the remaining 36% of the population chose the FPDP. The current therapeutic choice and those carried out in the past were generally in agreement (>70% of cases, P = 0.0001); a relationship was discovered between the anterior and posterior area to the same method of rehabilitation (101 of 107 cases, 94.4%). The WTP median values for ISC were of €3000 and of €2500 in the anterior and posterior areas, respectively. The smallest amount of money has been allocated for FPDP in posterior region (median of €1500). The "importance of oral care" for the patient was a significant predictor, in the regression model analysis, for the estimation of both anterior (P = 0.0003) and posterior (P replacement of a single missing tooth, showing a higher WTP index in the anterior area. Among investigated socio-demographic variables, the importance assigned by the patient to oral care appeared to influence WTP values of the rehabilitation, regardless the location of the single gap in the mouth. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John

  2. [Clinical and histopathological observation of CaO-P2O5-MgO-SiO2-CaF system glass ceramic tooth implants in monkeys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, O; Mukainakano, Y; Asano, M; Kawanami, M; Kato, H

    1989-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the biocompatibility of a newly-developed CaO-P2O5-MgO-SiO2-CaF system glass ceramic tooth implant. Two adult male monkeys were selected and 12 weeks after extraction of M1 and P1, 8 glass ceramic teeth were implanted into alveolar bone. At 1 week after implantation, 6 teeth were allowed occlusal function, and 2 teeth were left free from occlusion as control teeth. The implants were observed for 4-12 weeks and examined histopathologically. The results were as follows: 1. Seven implanted teeth were well maintained clinically, and only one tooth was lost after 5 weeks. 2. In histopathological observation, implanted teeth were surrounded by bone, and connected by bonyankylosis. At cervix of dental implant, connective tissue as also attached firmly to implanted tooth surfaces and epithelial attachment was observed. 3. Although these implants were allowed occlusal function at an early stage (1 week after implantation), osteogenesis around implants was not disturbed. These results suggest that the new glass ceramic implant has good biocompatibility and is useful as an implant tooth.

  3. Immediate Loading of Single Implants in the Anterior Maxilla: A 1-Year Prospective Clinical Study on 34 Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Miguel; Jordao, Beatriz Mota

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To present the outcomes of immediately loaded single implants placed in the anterior maxilla. Methods Over a 2-year period, all patients referred to a private clinic were considered for enrolment in this study. Inclusion criteria were single-tooth placement in postextraction sockets or healed sites of the anterior maxilla. All implants were immediately loaded and followed for a period of 1 year after the placement of definitive crowns. The outcome measures were implant stability, survival, and success. Results 34 patients were selected and 43 tapered implants with a knife-edge thread design and a nanostructured, calcium-incorporated surface (Anyridge®, Megagen, Gyeongsang, Korea) were installed. Two implants were not sufficiently stable at placement (ISQ immediate loading; 41 implants had an ISQ ≥ 60 at placement and were immediately loaded. One year after the placement of definitive crowns, no implant failures were reported, for a survival rate of 100%. No biological complications were found, but 2 implants had their prosthetic abutments loosened: the implant success rate was 95.2%. Conclusions In the present study on the immediate loading of single implants in the anterior maxilla, positive outcomes were reported, with high survival (100%) and success (95.2%) rates (the present study has been registered in the ISRCTN registry, a publicly available trial register recognized by WHO and ICMJE, with number ISRCTN12935478). PMID:28611844

  4. Immediate Loading of Single Implants in the Anterior Maxilla: A 1-Year Prospective Clinical Study on 34 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Stanley

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To present the outcomes of immediately loaded single implants placed in the anterior maxilla. Methods. Over a 2-year period, all patients referred to a private clinic were considered for enrolment in this study. Inclusion criteria were single-tooth placement in postextraction sockets or healed sites of the anterior maxilla. All implants were immediately loaded and followed for a period of 1 year after the placement of definitive crowns. The outcome measures were implant stability, survival, and success. Results. 34 patients were selected and 43 tapered implants with a knife-edge thread design and a nanostructured, calcium-incorporated surface (Anyridge®, Megagen, Gyeongsang, Korea were installed. Two implants were not sufficiently stable at placement (ISQ < 60 and were considered failed for immediate loading; 41 implants had an ISQ ≥ 60 at placement and were immediately loaded. One year after the placement of definitive crowns, no implant failures were reported, for a survival rate of 100%. No biological complications were found, but 2 implants had their prosthetic abutments loosened: the implant success rate was 95.2%. Conclusions. In the present study on the immediate loading of single implants in the anterior maxilla, positive outcomes were reported, with high survival (100% and success (95.2% rates (the present study has been registered in the ISRCTN registry, a publicly available trial register recognized by WHO and ICMJE, with number ISRCTN12935478.

  5. Immediate Loading of Single Implants in the Anterior Maxilla: A 1-Year Prospective Clinical Study on 34 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Miguel; Braga, Filipa Calheiros; Jordao, Beatriz Mota

    2017-01-01

    To present the outcomes of immediately loaded single implants placed in the anterior maxilla. Over a 2-year period, all patients referred to a private clinic were considered for enrolment in this study. Inclusion criteria were single-tooth placement in postextraction sockets or healed sites of the anterior maxilla. All implants were immediately loaded and followed for a period of 1 year after the placement of definitive crowns. The outcome measures were implant stability, survival, and success. 34 patients were selected and 43 tapered implants with a knife-edge thread design and a nanostructured, calcium-incorporated surface (Anyridge®, Megagen, Gyeongsang, Korea) were installed. Two implants were not sufficiently stable at placement (ISQ immediate loading; 41 implants had an ISQ ≥ 60 at placement and were immediately loaded. One year after the placement of definitive crowns, no implant failures were reported, for a survival rate of 100%. No biological complications were found, but 2 implants had their prosthetic abutments loosened: the implant success rate was 95.2%. In the present study on the immediate loading of single implants in the anterior maxilla, positive outcomes were reported, with high survival (100%) and success (95.2%) rates (the present study has been registered in the ISRCTN registry, a publicly available trial register recognized by WHO and ICMJE, with number ISRCTN12935478).

  6. Tooth replacements in young adults with severe hypodontia: Orthodontic space closure, dental implants, and tooth-supported fixed dental prostheses. A follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvaring, Christina L; Øgaard, Bjørn; Birkeland, Kari

    2016-10-01

    Children with severe hypodontia have a substantial impairment of their dental health starting early in life. The purpose of this study was to describe types and locations of substitutes for missing teeth in patients with severe hypodontia and to compare the crown and soft tissue morphologies of orthodontic space closure, dental implants, and tooth-supported fixed dental prostheses for replacing teeth in the anterior region. Fifty patients missing 6 or more teeth and aged 18 years or older (mean age, 25.6 years) took part in a follow-up study. The patients were examined clinically with panoramic radiographs and clinical photographs. Crown and soft tissue variables (mucosal discoloration, crown morphology, color, and papilla index) were compared for orthodontic space closure, dental implant fixtures, and fixed dental prostheses. Dental implants, orthodontic space closure, and retaining deciduous teeth were the most commonly prescribed treatments. Persisting deciduous teeth showed a good survival rate at the follow-up examination. Mucosal discoloration was seen only for implant fixtures and was evident for almost all fixtures in the anterior mandible and two thirds of those in the anterior maxilla. The papilla index scored poorer for both implant fixtures and fixed dental prostheses compared with orthodontic space closure. Dental implants in the anterior region proved to be an inadequate treatment modality in patients with severe hypodontia because of pronounced mucosal discoloration. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Immediate implants placed in infected and noninfected sites after atraumatic tooth extraction and placement with ultrasonic bone surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blus, Cornelio; Szmukler-Moncler, Serge; Khoury, Paul; Orrù, Germano

    2015-01-01

    Only a few reports deal with implants placed in infected postextraction sites. Survival rates of a cohort of immediate implants cases placed in acute and chronically infected sites were compared with a cohort of noninfected ones while (1) tooth extraction and osteotomy sites were prepared with a piezosurgery device and (2) ultrasonication was applied to abate the bacterial charge at infected sites. Eighty-six patients received 168 immediate implants distributed into three groups: noninfected (85), acute (36), and chronically (47) infected sites. Atraumatic extraction and implant osteotomy were performed with an ultrasonic surgery device without flap elevation. All sites received the same medication and surgical protocol; infected sites were ultrasonicated during 30 seconds at 72 W. Kaplan-Meyer survival rates were calculated at 1 year. The 1-year survival rates of the noninfected, chronically, and acute infected groups were 98.8, 100, and 94.4%, respectively. The differences were not statistically significant. No implant was lost after loading. All teeth and roots could be extracted in one piece. Drilling at extraction sockets was uncomplicated, without skidding. Implant survival rates might be similar in infected and noninfected sites when infected sites receive standard medical and surgical treatment and are ultrasonicated. Atraumatic tooth/root extraction and implant placement can be reliably performed with piezoelectric surgery. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Effect of connective tissue grafting on peri-implant tissue in single immediate implant sites: A RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuiderveld, Elise G; Meijer, Henny J A; den Hartog, Laurens; Vissink, Arjan; Raghoebar, Gerry M

    2018-02-01

    To assess the effect of connective tissue grafting on the mid-buccal mucosal level (MBML) of immediately placed and provisionalized single implants in the maxillofacial aesthetic zone. Sixty patients with a failing tooth were provided with an immediately placed and provisionalized implant. During implant placement, patients randomly received either a connective tissue graft from the maxillary tuberosity (n = 30, test group) or no graft (n = 30, control group). Follow-up visits were at one (T 1 ) and twelve months (T 12 ) after final crown placement. The primary outcome measure was any change in MBML compared to the pre-operative situation. In addition, gingival biotype, aesthetics (using the Pink Esthetic Score-White Esthetic Score), marginal bone level, soft tissue peri-implant parameters and patient satisfaction were assessed. The mean MBML change at T 12 was -0.5 ± 1.1 mm in the control group and 0.1 ± 0.8 mm in the test group (p = .03). No significant differences regarding other outcome variables were observed, neither was gingival biotype associated with a gain or loss in MBML. This one-year study shows that connective tissue grafting in single, immediately placed and provisionalized implants leads to less recession of the peri-implant soft tissue at the mid-buccal aspect, irrespective of the gingival biotype (www.trialregister.nl: TC3815). © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Rationale for esthetic tissue preservation of a fresh extraction socket by an implant treatment concept simulating a tooth replantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimpou, Georgia; Weigl, Paul; Krebs, Mischa; Parvini, Puria; Nentwig, Georg-Hubertus

    2010-02-01

    In cases of an immediate insertion and loading of implants after a traumatic loss of the patient's own dentition or due to an inevitable extraction of an anterior tooth, it is essential to provide the patient with an adequate provisional crown. A soft-tissue recession must be avoided, whether it is due to a compression of the peri-implant soft-tissue caused by an over-dimensioned restoration in the cervical collar of the provisional crown or to a too small dimensioned sulcus former. A simulation of the exact dimension of the lost tooth - especially on the cervical part of the new provisional restoration - is expected to preserve all relevant information and allows the design of a naturally looking emergence profile. Based on theoretical considerations and a case report, the authors intend to demonstrate that a near-naturally dimensioned sealing of the dento-gingival soft-tissue collar may initiate a tissue-maintaining healing process, similar to a tooth replantation. The natural dental crown, connected to an implant instead of the root, is applied for a tight sealing of the wound. If due to traumatic impact the tooth is no longer available, a naturally dimensioned crown restoration will serve as an alternative wound sealant.

  10. Clinical evaluation of implant survival based on size and site of placement: A retrospective study of immediate implants at single rooted teeth sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, Sundar; Al-Hindi, Maryam; Al-Eid, Raniah Abdullah; Nooh, Nasser

    2015-04-01

    This retrospective clinical study sought to evaluate the survival of immediate implants placed at maxillary and mandibular single-rooted tooth extraction sites and to determine the relationship among implant size, placement site, and implant survival. Between January 2010 and June 2011, 85 patients (33 males, 52 females; mean age: 45 years) underwent immediate implant placement after extraction of single-rooted teeth. All implants were restored between 12 and 14 weeks after implant placement. The implant survival and its relationship with implant size and implantation site were evaluated by odds ratios (ORs). Implants were placed at the following sites: upper central incisor (UCI, n = 35), upper lateral incisor (ULI, n = 27), upper second premolar (U2ndP, n = 36), lower incisor (LI, n = 53), and lower premolar (LP, n = 22). Implants of the following sizes were used: 5 × 10 mm (n = 24), 5 × 8 mm (n = 21), 4.3 × 10 mm (n = 77), 4.3 × 8 mm (n = 36), 3.5 × 10 mm (n = 12), and 3.5 × 8 mm (n = 3). After a mean follow-up time of 47 months, the overall implant survival rate was 96%. Survival rate was highest at the LI site (98.1%) and lowest at the ULI site (92.6%). All of the 5-mm implants survived (100%), as did most of the 4.3 × 10 mm implants (96.1%). Implants of 4.3 × 8 mm and 3.5 × 10 mm were the least successful (91.7%). Mandibular implants had a better survival rate (97.3%) than maxillary implants (94.9%). There was no significant OR of increased survival for any particular implant size or site. Immediate implant placement in fresh extraction sockets can give predictable clinical outcomes, regardless of the implant size and site of placement.

  11. Influence of different flask systems on tooth displacement and framework misfit in mandibular fixed implant-supported complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Conrado Reinoldes; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Bacchi, Ataís; Correr, Américo Bortolazzo; Dos Santos, Mateus Bertolini Fernandes

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the influence of different metallic flask systems for acrylic resin denture processing on tooth displacement and framework misfit of mandibular fixed implant-supported complete dentures. Standard mandibular implant-supported complete dentures in five implants were waxed and randomly assigned to three groups: G1 - conventional flask, G2 - double flask, and G3 - occlusion flask. Framework misfit in all the implants and the linear distances between teeth (I-I - incisor-to-incisor; P-P - premolar-to-premolar; M-M - molar-to-molar; RI-RM - right-incisor-to-right-molar; and LI-LM - left-incisor-to-left-molar) were measured before and after denture processing using an optical microscope. Dentures were processed by hot water curing cycle (9h/74°C). Collected data were analyzed by paired Student's t-test and one-way ANOVA (α=0.05). All the measured distances presented changes in tooth displacement after denture processing. However, the M-M distance for G1 (p=0.003) and the P-P (p=0.042) and LI-LM (p=0.044) distances for G3 showed statistically significant differences. Differences between the flask systems were not statistically significant. Statistically significant differences in the framework misfit due to denture processing were found for all the implants and groups, with the exception of right median implant for G2 and right distal implant for G3. A comparison of the flask systems found statistically significant differences in which G1 presented an increase in the misfit values and G2 and G3 a decrease. Different flask systems did not cause significant changes in tooth displacement. Frameworks misfit values were influenced by the different flask systems. The conventional flask presented an increase in the framework misfit, while the experimental flasks showed a decrease. Copyright © 2013 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mechanical design, analysis, and laboratory testing of a dental implant with axial flexibility similar to natural tooth with periodontal ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pektaş, Ömer; Tönük, Ergin

    2014-11-01

    At the interface between the jawbone and the roots of natural teeth, a thin, elastic, shock-absorbing tissue, called the periodontal ligament, forms a cushion which provides certain flexibility under mechanical loading. The dental restorations supported by implants, however, involve comparatively rigid connections to the jawbone. This causes overloading of the implant while bearing functional loading together with neighboring natural teeth, which leads to high stresses within the implant system and in the jawbone. A dental implant, with resilient components in the upper structure (abutment) in order to mimic the mechanical behavior of the periodontal ligament in the axial direction, was designed, analyzed in silico, and produced for mechanical testing. The aims of the design were avoiding high levels of stress, loosening of the abutment connection screw, and soft tissue irritations. The finite element analysis of the designed implant revealed that the elastic abutment yielded a similar axial mobility with the natural tooth while keeping stress in the implant at safe levels. The in vitro mechanical testing of the prototype resulted in similar axial mobility predicted by the analysis and as that of a typical natural tooth. The abutment screw did not loosen under repeated loading and there was no static or fatigue failure. © IMechE 2014.

  13. [Evaluation of the stress distribution in tooth implant-supported fixed partial prostheses on different bone types under dynamic loads].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Xiaonan; Xu, Ling

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to evaluate the influence of different bone types on the stress distribution in tooth implant-supported fixed partial prostheses by using finite element (FE) analysis. Four FE models of mandibular arch containing one implant splinted to the mandibular second premolar were built according to bone types I, II, III, and IV. Dynamic loads of 250 N were applied to the buccal and lingual cusps of the prostheses in different directions to simulate the masticatory cycle. The maximum Von Mises stresses were calculated using the FE analysis software. The maximum Von Mises stresses of the cortical bones were 89.229, 91.860, 125.840, and 158.420 MPa, increasing from type I to type IV, respectively. The maximum Von Mises stresses of the trabecular bone were 58.584, 43.645, 21.688, and 18.249 MPa, decreasing from type I to type IV, respectively. During the process of dynamic loading, the maximum Von Mises stresses of the cortical and trabecular bones followed the order buccal to tongue loading>tongue to buccal loading>vertical loading. The results showed that bone type significantly influenced the stress distribution in bones, and that for tooth implant-supported fixed partial prostheses, bone types I and II were a better choice than bone types III and IV. More caution should be exercised when restoring missing teeth using tooth implant-supported fixed partial prostheses in softer bone regions.

  14. Clinical performance of Rochette bridges used as immediate provisional restorations for single unit implants in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerji, S; Sethi, A; Dunne, S M; Millar, B J

    2005-12-24

    A retrospective clinical audit of the role and survival of 69 Rochette bridges used as immediate provisional restorations for single tooth, implant-retained crowns was carried out over the period between February 1991 and May 2001. In each case the extracted tooth was immediately temporised using a Rochette bridge with a single wing and pontic and cemented to the abutment tooth without any tooth preparation (Phase I). This bridge was removed at the time of implant placement and recemented (Phase II). At the implant exposure stage the bridge was removed and discarded. In Phase I, 15.9% of the bridges required recementation and 27.5% of the bridges required recementations in phase 2; 7.2% of the bridges required recementations in both phases. An 80% probability of survival was noted after an interval of 200 days for phase I and a 78% probability of survival over the same time interval was observed for Phase II. A significant debond rate was observed when the retainer was a canine in comparison to the other bridges in Phase I. In Phase I the spring cantilever debond rate was significantly higher than that observed on the other bridges. More debondings were observed in males (25.8%) compared with females (7.9%) in Phase I. More debondings were noted in the maxilla than in the mandible in Phase II. The performance characteristics of the metal acrylic Rochette bridge observed in this report supports the conclusion that this type of restoration is an effective means of immediate temporisation for patients undergoing single tooth implant retained restorations.

  15. Oral Abstract Session 3: Orthognathic/Implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartlev, Jens

    Immediate Placement And Provisionalization Of Single-tooth Implants Involving A Final Individual Abutment. A 3-year Clinical And Radiographic Retrospektive Study......Immediate Placement And Provisionalization Of Single-tooth Implants Involving A Final Individual Abutment. A 3-year Clinical And Radiographic Retrospektive Study...

  16. Immediate provisionalisation of single post-extractive implants versus implants placed in healed sites in the anterior maxilla: 1-year results from a multicentre controlled cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandi, Tommaso; Guazzi, Paolo; Samarani, Rawad; Grandi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the clinical and aesthetic outcome of single post-extractive implants versus implants placed in a preserved socket after 4 months of healing in the anterior maxilla. All of the implants were immediately non-occlusally loaded. A total of 50 patients were treated in the two groups of study. The Delayed Group had a maxillary tooth (premolar, canine, lateral or central incisor) removed, with immediate socket grafting, followed by implant placement and provisionalisation 4 months later. The Immediate Group had immediate implant placement and provisionalisation. Outcome measures were implant failures, biological and biomechanical complications, peri-implant radiographic bone level changes, and gingival aesthetics. At the 12-month follow-up, two implants failed in the Immediate Group (8%) versus one in the Delayed Group (4%), with a comparable rate of implant failure (P = 0.55). No complications occurred for either group. The 12-month peri-implant bone resorption was similar in both groups (P = 0.23): 0.71 mm (95% CI 0.45, 0.97) in the Immediate Group versus 0.60 mm (95% CI 0.38, 0.82) in the Delayed Group. The mean difference in bone resorption was 0.13 mm (95% CI -0.21, 0.47). An ideal gingival marginal level was reached most frequently in the Delayed Group (83.3% versus 52.1%, P = 0.04). Rates of full closure of the papilla were similar between the two groups (82.6% for the Immediate Group versus 62.5% for the Delayed Group, P = 0.12). Given the limitation that this was not a randomised controlled trial, there were no differences in complications or crestal bone response at immediate post-extractive implants when compared to delayed implants. A delayed protocol might be considered in the aesthetic zone due to the gingival recession that occurs after post-extractive implant placement.

  17. Synthesis and ultrastructure of plate-like apatite single crystals as a model for tooth enamel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Zhi, E-mail: zhuang@meiji.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science and Technology, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Yoshimura, Hideyuki, E-mail: hyoshi@isc.meiji.ac.jp [Department of Physics, School of Science and Technology, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Aizawa, Mamoru, E-mail: mamorua@isc.meiji.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science and Technology, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) is an inorganic constituent compound of human bones and teeth, with superior biocompatibility and bioactivity characteristics. Its crystal structure is hexagonal, characterized by a(b)- and c-planes. In vertebrate long bones, HAp crystals have a c-axis orientation, while in tooth enamel, they have an a(b)-axis orientation. Many methods can be used to synthesize c-axis oriented HAp single crystals; however, to the best of our knowledge, there have been no reports on a synthesis method for a(b)-axis oriented HAp single crystals. In this study, we successfully synthesized plate-like HAp crystals at the air–liquid interface of a starting solution via an enzyme reaction of urea with urease. Crystal phase analysis and ultrastructure observations were carried out, and the results indicated that the particles were single crystals, with almost the same a(b)-axis orientation as tooth enamel. It is hoped that by utilizing their unique surface charge and atomic arrangement, the resulting particles can be used as a high-performance biomaterial, capable of adsorbing bio-related substances and a model for tooth enamel. - Highlights: ► Synthesis of plate-like hydroxyapatite crystals at air–liquid interface ► Ultrastructural analysis of plate-like hydroxyapatite crystals ► Plate-like hydroxyapatite single crystals with a high a(b)-axis orientation ► Plate-like hydroxyapatite single crystals as a model for tooth enamel.

  18. Immediate loading of single SLA implants: drilling vs. osteotomes for the preparation of the implant site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavropoulos, Andreas; Nyengaard, Jens R; Lang, Niklaus P; Karring, Thorkild

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate whether or not preparation of the implant site with osteotomes instead of drilling may improve peri-implant bone density and/or osseointegration, and whether or not this further improves the predictability of immediate loading of SLA implants. The second, third, and fourth premolars were extracted in both sides of the mandible in six dogs, and after at least 3 months four SLA implants were inserted into each side of the jaw. In three animals, the implant sites were prepared by means of osteotomes, while standard stepwise drilling was used in the remaining animals. In each side of the jaw, two non-adjacent implants were restored with single crowns 4 days after installation, while the remaining two implants were left without crowns to serve as non-loaded controls. After 2, 4, or 12 weeks of loading, specimens including the implants and surrounding tissues were obtained and processed for histologic analysis of undecalcified sections. All implants placed with osteotomes were lost (five before delivery of the crowns and the rest during the first week after loading). None of the conventionally inserted implants, however, was lost, and histomorphometrical analysis revealed similar soft- and hard peri-implant tissue characteristics at immediately loaded and non-loaded implants at all observation times. Average bone-to-implant contact was 59-72% at immediately loaded implants vs. 60-63% at non-loaded ones. Preparation of the implant site by means of osteotomes had a deleterious effect on osseointegration, while immediate loading of single, free-standing, SLA implants following a conventional surgical protocol did not jeopardize their osseointegration.

  19. Ion implantation induced blistering of rutile single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Bing-Xi [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Jiao, Yang [College of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Guan, Jing [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Wang, Lei [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)

    2015-07-01

    The rutile single crystals were implanted by 200 keV He{sup +} ions with a series fluence and annealed at different temperatures to investigate the blistering behavior. The Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, optical microscope and X-ray diffraction were employed to characterize the implantation induced lattice damage and blistering. It was found that the blistering on rutile surface region can be realized by He{sup +} ion implantation with appropriate fluence and the following thermal annealing.

  20. Clinical, esthetic, and radiographic evaluation of small-diameter (3.0-mm) implants supporting single crowns in the anterior region: a 3-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieri, Francesco; Siroli, Lucia; Forlivesi, Caterina; Corinaldesi, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Fifty patients underwent single-tooth replacement in the maxillary and mandibular incisor area using two-piece 3.0-mm-diameter implants. Clinical and radiographic measurements of soft and hard tissue levels and esthetic parameters (pink esthetic score/white esthetic score [PES/WES]) were assessed at 3 years. No implant failed (success rate: 100%), and facial soft tissues and marginal bone levels remained stable throughout the study period. The mean total PES/WES was high (14.1 ± 1.75), and only one implant demonstrated an unfavorable esthetic outcome (PES/WES = 10). The use of 3.0-mm-diameter implants appears to be a viable treatment procedure in the medium term for single-tooth anterior restorations with limited dimensions.

  1. A simplified method to develop optimal gingival contours for the single implant-supported, metal-ceramic crown in the aesthetic zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsel, Richard P; Capoferri, Daniele

    2008-05-01

    Prosthetic replacement of the missing single maxillary central incisor with an implant-supported crown represents a profound aesthetic challenge for the restorative dentist, laboratory technician, and surgeon. In addition to the visual fidelity of color, translucency, contour, and surface texture, the proper soft tissue outline is sacrosanct to the illusion of a natural tooth. The contrast between the uniformly round shoulder of the implant and the tooth's curvilinear cementoenamel junction is particularly problematic. This clinical report demonstrates a simplified method that precisely controls the facial gingival and proximal soft tissue contours for implant-supported, metal-ceramic crowns in the aesthetic zone, using the cervical anatomy of the maxillary incisor tooth as a guide. A new role for the provisional crown that is intended to maximize the volume of keratinized tissue is also described.

  2. Altered vertical dimension of occlusion: a comparative retrospective pilot study of tooth- and implant-supported restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormianer, Zeev; Palty, Ady

    2009-01-01

    Altering the vertical dimension of occlusion (VDO) by increasing the interarch distance is common in oral rehabilitation, but little is known about the ability of implant patients, who lack sensory perception in implanted regions, to adapt to such changes. This study sought to evaluate the outcome of increasing VDO in patients restored with implant-supported fixed restorations opposed by restored natural teeth or implant-supported restorations. VDO was increased by 3 to 5 mm to address the individual prosthetic needs of 30 patients. Group A (control) consisted of 10 patients with fixed restorations on natural dentition that opposed the natural dentition in a new VDO relationship. Two test groups consisted of 10 patients each, with fixed implant-supported restorations opposing either the restored natural dentition (group B) or fixed implant-supported restorations (group C). After an average follow-up of 66 months, marginal bone changes were calculated using standardized periapical radiographs, and mechanical prosthetic maintenance data were collected from patient files. The results were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance to identify significant differences between the groups. All patients successfully adapted to the new VDO. Two patients in group B and four in group C reported tooth clenching or grinding, which abated after 2 to 3 months (P<.05). More bone loss and tooth failures were observed in group A, and more mechanical complications, such as porcelain fractures, were observed in group C (P<.05). Within the limitations of this study, alteration of VDO was an acceptable procedure in patients with implant-supported fixed restorations, but precautions should be taken to prevent mechanical problems.

  3. Esthetic outcome and alterations of soft tissue around single implant crowns: a 2-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ying-Xin; Shi, Jun-Yu; Zhuang, Long-Fei; Qiao, Shi-Chong; Xu, You-You; Lai, Hong-Chang

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to assess the esthetic outcome and alterations of peri-implant soft tissue using tissue-level implants. Furthermore, the influencing factors, including grafting and gingival biotype, of esthetic outcome of peri-implant soft tissue were also evaluated. Of 38 patients with single missing anterior tooth in maxilla were treated with a Straumann (®) Standard Plus SLA implant. Bone augmentation was performed in 24 patients. Follow-up was conducted at 12 and 24 months after definitive crowns placement. Esthetic outcome using the pink esthetic score/white esthetic score (PES/WES) and clinical parameters were evaluated. The mean PES/WES value at baseline, 1-year, and 2-year examination was 13.79, 14.87, and 14.96. Significant improvement was found between baseline and 1-year examination (P crowns placement (P = 0.03). Graft procedure had an unfavorable effect on mean PES value both at baseline and at follow-up (P crowns in esthetic area. Favorable short-term esthetic outcome and stability of soft tissue around single implant crowns can be expected in patients with or without graft. However, graft procedures might have an unfavorable effect on the esthetic outcome. Gingival biotype can be considered as prognostic factor for esthetic outcome. RCTs with long-term follow-up are needed to provide evidence for the long-term stability of peri-implant soft tissue using tissue-level implant systems. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Cochlear implantation for single-sided deafness and tinnitus suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, Jourdan T; O'Connell, Brendan; Hedley-Williams, Andrea; Wanna, George

    To quantify the potential effectiveness of cochlear implantation for tinnitus suppression in patients with single-sided deafness using the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory. The study included 12 patients with unilateral tinnitus who were undergoing cochlear implantation for single-sided deafness. The Tinnitus Handicap Inventory was administered at the patient's cochlear implant candidacy evaluation appointment prior to implantation and every cochlear implant follow-up appointment, except activation, following implantation. Patient demographics and speech recognition scores were also retrospectively recorded using the electronic medical record. A significant reduction was found when comparing Tinnitus Handicap Inventory score preoperatively (61.2±27.5) to the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory score after three months of cochlear implant use (24.6±28.2, p=0.004) and the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory score beyond 6months of CI use (13.3±18.9, p=0.008). Further, 45% of patients reported total tinnitus suppression. Mean CNC word recognition score improved from 2.9% (SD 9.4) pre-operatively to 40.8% (SD 31.7) by 6months post-activation, which was significantly improved from pre-operative scores (p=0.008). The present data is in agreement with previously published studies that have shown an improvement in tinnitus following cochlear implantation for the large majority of patients with single-sided deafness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. 3D Printing/Additive Manufacturing Single Titanium Dental Implants: A Prospective Multicenter Study with 3 Years of Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunchel, Samy; Blay, Alberto; Kolerman, Roni; Mijiritsky, Eitan; Shibli, Jamil Awad

    2016-01-01

    This prospective 3-year follow-up clinical study evaluated the survival and success rates of 3DP/AM titanium dental implants to support single implant-supported restorations. After 3 years of loading, clinical, radiographic, and prosthetic parameters were assessed; the implant survival and the implant-crown success were evaluated. Eighty-two patients (44 males, 38 females; age range 26-67 years) were enrolled in the present study. A total of 110 3DP/AM titanium dental implants (65 maxilla, 45 mandible) were installed: 75 in healed alveolar ridges and 35 in postextraction sockets. The prosthetic restorations included 110 single crowns (SCs). After 3 years of loading, six implants failed, for an overall implant survival rate of 94.5%; among the 104 surviving implant-supported restorations, 6 showed complications and were therefore considered unsuccessful, for an implant-crown success of 94.3%. The mean distance between the implant shoulder and the first visible bone-implant contact was 0.75 mm (±0.32) and 0.89 (±0.45) after 1 and 3 years of loading, respectively. 3DP/AM titanium dental implants seem to represent a successful clinical option for the rehabilitation of single-tooth gaps in both jaws, at least until 3-year period. Further, long-term clinical studies are needed to confirm the present results.

  6. Plasma-implantation-based surface modification of metals with single-implantation mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, X. B.; Cui, J. T.; Yang, S. Q.; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K.

    2004-12-01

    Plasma ion implantation has proven to be an effective surface modification technique. Its biggest advantage is the capability to treat the objects with irregular shapes without complex manipulation of target holder. Many metal materials such as aluminum, stainless steel, tool steel, titanium, magnesium etc, has been treated using this technique to improve their wear-resistance, corrosion-resistance, fatigue-resistance, oxidation-resistance, bio-compatiblity etc. However in order to achieve thicker modified layers, hybrid processes combining plasma ion implantation with other techniques have been frequently employed. In this paper plasma implantation based surface modification of metals using single-implantation mode is reviewed.

  7. Relationship between indication for tooth extraction and outcome of immediate implants: A retrospective study with 5 years of follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarazona, Beatriz; Tarazona-Álvarez, Pablo; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Peñarrocha-Diago, Maria

    2014-10-01

    The aims of this retrospective study were to evaluate the survival rate of a series of immediate implants after 3 years of follow-up and to study the relationship between survival and indication for tooth extraction. A retrospective study of patients treated with immediate implants between January 2003 and December 2008 was carried out. All patients receiving at least one post-extraction implant and a minimum follow-up of 5 years were included. After 60 months, 30 immediate implants had been lost in 17 patients, yielding a total implant success rate of 93.8%. None of the implants placed failed after the extraction of included canines (100% success rate). In 20 failed implants the reason for extraction had been severe periodontal disease (91.8% SR), in 4 endodontic failure (88.6%SR), in 3 unrestorable caries (95.9% SR), in 1 untreatable fracture (95.2% SR) and in 2 improvement of prosthetic design (98.1% SR). No statistically significant influence was found between immediate implant failure and the reason for tooth extraction (p=0.11). The use of immediate implants is a successful alternative to replace missing teeth for severe periodontal disease, periapical pathology or by decay or untreatable fractures. Some reasons, such as periodontal disease itself is associated with a success rate significantly below the overall average. Similarly, the prosthetic design is associated with a better prognosis than all other reasons. Key words:Tooth extraction, immediate implants, success rate.

  8. Single implant restorations: prosthetically induced soft tissue topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichacho, N; Landsberg, C J

    1997-09-01

    An aesthetic transition from the smaller diameter of the implant to the prosthetic restoration that resembles the size of the natural tooth has presented an ongoing challenge to the implant restorative dentists. The appearance of the surrounding soft tissue is of major importance, and various techniques have been developed to guide and optimize its topography. The learning objective of this article is to present a cervical contouring concept, whereby the soft tissue topography is optimally determined already in the laboratory phase. Using a custom abutment and provisional crown as components of the transmucosal prosthetic unit (TPU), the topography is transferred to the vital intraoral tissues, which predictably adapt to the enhanced aesthetic configuration. Clinical cases are presented to demonstrate the sequence of the technique in treating the anterior region of the maxilla.

  9. Factors Influencing the Soft Tissue Changes Around Single Laser Microtextured Implants-Abutments in the Anterior Maxilla: A 5-Year Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnieri, Renzo; Savio, Luca; Bermonds des Ambrois, Alessandro; Ippoliti, Stefano; Zuffetti, Francesco; Stefanelli, Luigi Vito; Di Carlo, Stefano; Pompa, Giorgio

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible factors that influenced the periimplant soft tissue changes around single implants-abutments with laser-microtextured surface (LMS) in the esthetic zone. Thirty-nine units, formed by implant-abutment with LMS were studied. Variables possibly associated with the periimplant soft tissue changes were obtained from clinical measurements (plaque [present/absent], periimplant biotype [thin/thick], and probing depth); intrasurgical measurements (vertical height in millimeters of the keratinized gingiva in the vestibular part of the implant site vestibular keratinized gingiva [VKG], implant vestibular crestal exposition, vestibular crestal level, and vestibular bone width); cast models (implant position [buccal/palatal], implant abutments angle); periapical radiographs (distance from the contact point to the interproximal bone crest of the adjacent tooth [CP-BC], distance from the contact point to the implant platform [CP-P], distance from the contact point to the first bone to implant contact [CP-IB]); and digital clinical photographs. Fisher exact test was used to determine the influence of each factor on the papilla level and on the facial marginal mucosal level. The papillae level at the implant sites was significantly associated with the distance from the contact point to the alveolar bone crest, whereas no association was found with other variables. Periimplant biotype, differences in the VKG, CP-BC, and CP-IB were found associated with the different facial marginal mucosal level groups. This study showed that the papilla level at single-tooth implants-abutments with LMS in the anterior maxilla was mainly influenced by the interproximal bone crest level of the adjacent tooth, whereas the marginal mucosal level was affected by periimplant biotype, facial bone crest level, and crestal implant exposition.

  10. The abutment seating jig: a prosthodontic implant adjunct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judy, K W

    1997-01-01

    Rapid, accurate seating of screw-retained implant abutment heads, where timing is controlled by internal or external hex designs, can be readily accomplished with individual, custom-cast abutment head location devices. The devices are especially useful when the abutment head-implant body complex is to be permanently cemented. The use and design of abutment seating jigs for single tooth implants and completely implant or implant and natural tooth-supported prostheses are described.

  11. Immediate loading with single-piece implant following extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemlata Dwivedi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Although dental implantology had evolved over a number of years, many dental surgeons are unaware of the concept of immediate loading with the use of one-piece implant that began in the early 1960s. The goal of successful prosthodontics rehabilitation is to provide function, esthetics, and comfort to the patient. The aim of this literature is to provide an overview of one-piece implant, with its advantages and disadvantages over conventional two-piece implant. Immediate prosthetic of a one-piece system allows for a better tissue healing and better adhesion of gingival mucosa to form a collar which is healthy and adherent to the implant, avoiding a second surgical procedure, and also includes a very important aspect esthetics. This article describes a case report of immediate loading with single-piece implant following extraction.

  12. Short (8-mm) locking-taper implants supporting single crowns in posterior region: a prospective clinical study with 1-to 10-years of follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangano, Francesco Guido; Shibli, Jamil Awad; Sammons, Rachel Lilian; Iaculli, Flavia; Piattelli, Adriano; Mangano, Carlo

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term outcome of short (8-mm) locking-taper implants supporting single crowns in the posterior regions and to analyze the influence of different factors on implant survival and implant-crown success rates. Between June 2002 and September 2011, all patients referred to two private practices for treatment with short (8-mm) implants supporting single tooth restorations in posterior areas of both jaws were considered for inclusion in this study. At each annual follow-up session, clinical and radiographic parameters were assessed. Implant-crown success criteria included absence of pain, suppuration, mobility, and peri-implant radiolucency, distance between the implant shoulder and the first visible bone-to-implant contact (DIB) implant-crown success were assessed using the Kaplan-Meier survival estimator; Chi-square test was applied to evaluate correlations between the study variables. The statistical analysis was performed at the patient and at the implant level. Two hundred and fifteen implants (124 maxilla; 91 mandible) were placed in 194 patients (104 men; 90 women). Three implants failed (2 maxilla; 1 mandible). The 10-year cumulative survival rate was 98.4% (patient-based) and 98.5% (implant-based). Among the surviving implants, the mean DIB was 0.31 (±0.24), 0.43 (±0.29), and 0.62 (±0.31) mm at the 1-, 5-, and 10-year follow-up session; two biologic and three prosthetic complications were reported, for a 10-year cumulative implant-crown success rate of 95.8% (patient-based) and 95.9% (implant-based). The implant survival and implant-crown success rates did not differ significantly with respect to patients' gender, age, smoking habit, parafunctional habit, implant location, implant diameter, and bone type. The use of short (8-mm) locking-taper implants is a predictable treatment modality for the restoration of single tooth gaps of posterior segments of dentition. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John

  13. Stress distribution difference between Lava Ultimate full crowns and IPS e.max CAD full crowns on a natural tooth and on tooth-shaped implant abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejci, Ivo; Daher, René

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this short communication is to present finite element analysis comparison of the stress distribution between CAD/CAM full crowns made of Lava Ultimate and of IPS e.max CAD, adhesively luted to natural teeth and to implant abutments with the shape of natural teeth. Six 3D models were prepared using a 3D content-creating software, based on a micro-CT scan of a human mandibular molar. The geometry of the full crown and of the abutment was the same for all models representing Lava Ultimate full crowns (L) and IPS e.max CAD full crowns (E) on three different abutments: prepared natural tooth (n), titanium abutment (t) and zirconia abutment (z). A static load of 400 N was applied on the vestibular and lingual cusps, and fixtures were applied to the base of the models. After running the static linear analysis, the post-processing data we analyzed. The stress values at the interface between the crown and the abutment of the Lt and Lz groups were significantly higher than the stress values at the same interface of all the other models. The high stress concentration in the adhesive at the interface between the crown and the abutment of the Lava Ultimate group on implants might be one of the factors contributing to the reported debondings of crowns.

  14. Soft tissue preservation and pink aesthetics around single immediate implant restorations: a 1-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosyn, Jan; De Bruyn, Hugo; Cleymaet, Roberto

    2013-12-01

    (1) To document soft tissue aspects using a specific protocol for immediate implant treatment (IIT) following single-tooth removal; (2) to evaluate whether this protocol allows preservation of pink aesthetics as objectively assessed. Patients with a thick gingival biotype and intact buccal bone wall upon extraction of a single tooth in the aesthetic zone (15-25) were consecutively treated. The protocol included flapless extraction and implant surgery, socket grafting, immediate nonocclusal loading with a screw-retained provisional crown, and replacement by a permanent crown 6 months thereafter. The outcome was assessed after 3, 6, and 12 months. Cases demonstrating major alveolar process remodeling and/or advanced midfacial recession (>1 mm) at 3 months were additionally treated with a connective tissue graft (CTG). The emergence profile of the provisional crown was replicated for all permanent crowns. Twenty-two patients (12 men, 10 women; mean age 50) were treated after tooth extraction for nonperiodontal reasons using a novel bone condensing implant with variable-thread design, conical connection, and platform switch (NobelActive®, Nobel Biocare, Göteborg, Sweden). One implant failed and mean marginal bone loss was 0.1 mm (p = .059). Temporary mesial papilla reduction occurred, whereas distal papilla reduction was permanent (mean 0.5 mm; p = .001). At 3 months, five cases demonstrated major alveolar process remodeling and two advanced midfacial recession. Hence, slight initial decline in the pink esthetic score (PES) (p = .053) was observed. CTG resulted in a steady improvement of the PES after 3 months (p ≤ .037). At 12 months, pink aesthetics (mean PES 12.15) was comparable to the preoperative status (mean PES 11.86; p = .293). Distal papillae had significantly deteriorated (p = .020) in this time span, whereas midfacial contour had significantly improved (p = .005). Preservation of pink aesthetics is possible following

  15. Placement of replace select Ti-Unite-coated type implants using a combination of immediate and submerge techniques after tooth extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coen Pramono D

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The high success rate of immediate implant placement both in the anterior and posterior regions were reported by many authors, therefore applying this techniques can be considered as a safe surgical procedure and minimizing the dental office visit for patient satisfaction. This paper reports the outcome of immediate placement of implants following extraction of anterior maxillary teeth. Combination technique of immediate and submerge implant placements including bone grafting procedure were used. Four implants with TiUnite surface type were placed immediately in two patients with the short-term result indicated that this technique may serve as a simple and safe procedure for immediate implant placement. It was concluded that immediate implant placement technique combined with TiUnite implant surface was successful in treating region directly after tooth extraction therefore this technique can be use as an alternative surgical method for dental implant rehabilitation.

  16. Single-tooth anesthesia: pressure-sensing technology provides innovative advancement in the field of dental local anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochman, Mark N

    2007-04-01

    This article will review standard techniques for intraligamentary injection and describe the technology and technique behind a new single-tooth anesthesia system. This system and technique represents a technological advancement and a greater understanding of intraligamentary anesthesia.

  17. Outcome of bonded vs all-ceramic and metal- ceramic fixed prostheses for single tooth replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The conventional treatment of a single missing tooth is most frequently based on the provision of a fixed dental prosthesis (FDPs). A variety of designs and restorative materials are available which have an impact on the treatment outcome. Consequently, it was the aim of this review to compare resin-bonded, all-ceramic and metal-ceramic FDPs based on existing evidence. An electronic literature search using "metal-ceramic" AND "fixed dental prosthesis" AND "clinical, all-ceramic" AND "fixed dental prosthesis" AND "clinical, resin-bonded" AND "fixed dental prosthesis" AND "clinical, fiber reinforced composite" AND "clinical, monolithic" AND "zirconia" AND "clinical" was conducted and supplemented by the manual searching of bibliographies from articles already included. A total of 258 relevant articles were identified. Metal-ceramic FDPs still show the highest survival rates of all tooth-supported restorations. Depending on the ceramic system used, all-ceramic restorations may reach comparable survival rates while the technical complications, i.e. chipping fractures of veneering materials in particular, are more frequent. Resin-bonded FDPs can be seen as long-term provisional restorations with the survival rate being higher in anterior locations and when a cantilever design is applied. Inlay-retained FDPs and the use of fiber-reinforced composites overall results in a compromised long-term prognosis. Recently advocated monolithic zirconia restorations bear the risk of low temperature degradation. Several variables affect treatment planning for a given patient situation, with survival and success rates of different restorative options representing only one factor. The broad variety of designs and materials available for conventional tooth-supported restorations should still be considered as a viable treatment option for single tooth replacement.

  18. Clinical and Radiographic Evaluation of a Small-Diameter Dental Implant Used for the Restoration of Patients with Permanent Tooth Agenesis (Hypodontia) in the Maxillary Lateral Incisor and Mandibular Incisor Regions: A 36-Month Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Paul; Maiorana, Carlo; Luthardt, Ralph G; Sondell, Katarina; Øland, Jesper; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Nilsson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    For patients with narrow, single-tooth edentulous ridges as a result of permanent tooth agenesis (hypodontia) in the maxillary lateral and mandibular incisor regions, dental implant treatment may present a reliable and predictable restorative treatment solution. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical reliability and outcome of small-diameter dental implants placed in a one-stage procedure with early loading replacing maxillary lateral or mandibular incisor teeth. Patients with hypodontia in the maxillary lateral incisor or mandibular incisor region analyzed in this report were selected from a larger prospective multicenter study. Small-diameter dental implants (AstraTech OsseoSpeed TX 3.0 S, Dentsply) of different lengths were placed using a one-stage surgical protocol with a 6- to 10-week healing period before loading. Probing pocket depth, bleeding on probing, and gingival zenith score were assessed after 6, 12, 24, and 36 months. Radiographic examination was assessed at 6, 12, and 36 months. In total, 38 patients were included in this analysis and 62 small-diameter implants were placed. The mean distance between adjacent teeth was 6.30 mm (SD: 1.36). All patients received a titanium transmucosal abutment and cement-retained ceramic crown after 6 to 10 weeks of healing. Two implants were lost during the healing period before loading, providing a total implant survival rate of 96.8%. No implant fractures were reported. Mean marginal bone level change from surgery to follow-up visits at 6, 12, and 36 months were 0.39 mm, 0.22 mm, and 0.23 mm, respectively. The condition of soft tissue was stable at all follow-up visits with clinically insignificant changes in probing depth, bleeding on probing, and gingival zenith score. This study evaluated the behavior over 36 months of AstraTech Osseospeed TX 3.0 S dental implants placed into narrow one-tooth defect edentulous ridges as a result of hypodontia. The data collected highlighted the stability of

  19. Brace modification improves aerobic performance in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: a single-subject design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, J; Walsh, A; Frontera, W

    2001-08-01

    Ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs) can lower energy expenditure in patients with hemiplegia by 10%-13%. Review of the lower motor injury literature reveals insufficient physiologic evidence supporting the use or modification of AFOs in patients with lower motor neuron injury and, specifically, progressive conditions such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. We sought to test the hypothesis that optimal AFOs would improve submaximal aerobic performance and submaximal perceived exertion, while producing no change in maximal aerobic capacity. In an individual with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, a single-subject design study was used. An A-B-A design was used, with "A" corresponding to use of the patient's old AFOs and "B" corresponding to the newly prescribed AFOs. The subject underwent treadmill exercise tolerance testing using a modified Balke protocol. Indirect calorimetry was used to measure oxygen consumption per unit time (VO2), and the Borg scale was used to measure perceived exertion. At the same submaximal exercise intensities, VO2, rate-pressure product, and perceived exertion were all reduced when using the modified AFOs. Additionally, these conditions allowed the subject to conduct the treadmill exercise test 20% longer. Maximal VO2 remained constant under all conditions. Optimizing the AFO prescription in a patient with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease can enhance physiologic performance and perceived exertion at submaximal activity levels. Larger controlled trials are necessary to further demonstrate such benefits in patients with progressive neuropathy and other causes of lower motor neuron injury.

  20. Immediate tooth replacement using fiber-reinforced composite and natural tooth pontic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermanshah, Hamid; Motevasselian, Fariba

    2010-01-01

    The loss and replacement of anterior maxillary teeth poses several challenges. In patients refusing implant surgery, when minimal tooth reduction is desired, a fiber-reinforced composite fixed-partial denture may be used as a conservative alternative to a conventional fixed-partial denture for replacement of a single missing tooth. This article describes a clinical technique and six-year follow-up. The patient presented with a missing maxillary central incisor due to localized juvenile periodontitis. The abutment teeth were clinically stable. The advantage of supragingival margins and minimal tooth structure removal made the bonded bridge with a natural tooth pontic a viable procedure for this compromised restorative situation.

  1. A retrospective analysis of episodes of single tooth extraction under general anaesthesia for adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, B; Birnie, A

    2016-01-15

    To investigate the provision of adult dental extraction under general anaesthesia (DGA) at the Royal Cornwall Hospitals NHS Trust (RCHT)-- specifically adult single tooth DGA episodes in regards to numbers, demographics, justifications, and appropriateness regarding the use of resources. Data were collected retrospectively from the patient case notes and electronic records for the complete study cohort. This study included all episodes of adult single tooth DGA in all RCHT sites during 2014, except for mandibular third molar and impacted teeth. Each case was tested against the DGA case selection criteria empirically devised for this study. In 2014, 106 episodes of adult single tooth DGA were carried out in RCHT that met the inclusion criteria. Younger females from more socio-economically deprived areas of Cornwall were increasingly likely to have this procedure. Mental disorders were the most prevalent co-morbidity (21.7%) in this cohort. The vast majority of patients (93.4%) had previously tolerated dental treatment without the need for general anaesthesia (GA). Many referrals (46.2%) and listings (30.2%) specifically stated patient demand-driven reasons. None of the cohort had DGA due to failure of sedation. There were potentially 11 episodes that met the DGA case selection criteria. Patients waited for 126 days (median) from the referral date for an operation which took seven minutes (median) to complete. The majority (83%) of the cases were simple exodontia. Twenty patients (18.9%) had previous DGA. Potentially a considerable proportion of GA prescription appeared to be driven by patient demand rather than clinical need. This study poses a fundamental question--what drives the demand for DGA? National data collection and specific DGA case selection criteria are recommended.

  2. A fixed partial appliance approach towards treatment of anterior single tooth crossbite: Report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Gawthaman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Crossbite can be treated using both removable and fixed appliances. This paper describes the report of two cases by a method of treating anterior single tooth in crossbite which is locked out of arch form with a simple fixed partial appliance. Orthodontic treatment was initiated by creating space for the locked out incisor using open coil spring and further corrected using MBT brackets and nitinol archwire for alignment. Treatment goals were achieved, and esthetics and occlusion were maintained postoperatively. Treatment objectives were obtained within a short duration using this technique, and there was an improvement in patients' smile.

  3. Develop mono-block tooth implants using automate design and FEM analysis

    OpenAIRE

    J.P. Alister; J. Moller,; F. Alister; R. Hunter

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Purpose of this paper is present a new approach to modelling and design the low cost mono-block dental implants based on the integration of the computer aided techniques. This approach provides the automation of the design process of the mono-block dental implants.Design/methodology/approach: The approach used to develop the modelling and design of the mono-block dental implants are based on the parametrization of the main geometric features of the implants. This approach allows to ...

  4. Single tooth anesthesia versus conventional anesthesia: a cross-over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanella, Vincenzo; Libonati, Antonio; Nardi, Roberto; Angotti, Vincenzo; Gallusi, Gianni; Montemurro, Edoardo; D'Amario, Maurizio; Marzo, Giuseppe

    2018-03-10

    The aim of the present study was to compare an electronic device, the Wand Injection System (Milestone Scientific Livingstone), with conventional anesthesia in terms of the following: pain sensation during anesthetic injection; effectiveness in achieving adequate anesthesia for a complete painless dental treatment; post-operative discomfort; and patient's anxiety toward dental treatment. Eighty adults from 18 to 70 years were enrolled in this cross-over study. Each patient served as his/her own control being subject to two anesthesia techniques: conventional and Single Tooth Anesthesia (STA) performed with the Wand. A split-mouth design was adopted in which each tooth undergoing conservative restorative or endodontic treatment received anesthesia with both techniques at 1-week interval. Before anesthetic administration, the patients' anxiety levels were determined. Physiological parameteres were measured before, during, and after the two injection procedures, and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) was used to assess pain of injection, discomfort, and anesthetic efficacy. Differences in assessment of pain's injection, discomfort, anesthetic efficacy, vital parameters (heart rate, blood pressure, and oxygen saturation), and state anxiety levels were analyzed using Student's t test (p value < 0.001). The mean injection pain and post-operative discomfort ratings with Wand were lower than those with conventional syringe (p = 0.022 and p < 0.001, respectively). No differences were found in the assessment of anesthetic efficacy. Blood pressure and heart rate mean values were lower during the anesthesia performed with the Wand than with the conventional syringe (p < 0.001). The anxiety level was higher during the first appointment, independently from the device used for the injections. The STA technique resulted in lower pain, discomfort, and lower intensity of physiological parameters. Single Tooth Anesthesia could be an efficacious alternative to

  5. Long-term neuroplasticity of the face primary motor cortex and adjacent somatosensory cortex induced by tooth loss can be reversed following dental implant replacement in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avivi-Arber, Limor; Lee, Jye-Chang; Sood, Mandeep; Lakschevitz, Flavia; Fung, Michelle; Barashi-Gozal, Maayan; Glogauer, Michael; Sessle, Barry J

    2015-11-01

    Tooth loss is common, and exploring the neuroplastic capacity of the face primary motor cortex (face-M1) and adjacent primary somatosensory cortex (face-S1) is crucial for understanding how subjects adapt to tooth loss and their prosthetic replacement. The aim was to test if functional reorganization of jaw and tongue motor representations in the rat face-M1 and face-S1 occurs following tooth extraction, and if subsequent dental implant placement can reverse this neuroplasticity. Rats (n = 22) had the right maxillary molar teeth extracted under local and general anesthesia. One month later, seven rats had dental implant placement into healed extraction sites. Naive rats (n = 8) received no surgical treatment. Intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) and recording of evoked jaw and tongue electromyographic responses were used to define jaw and tongue motor representations at 1 month (n = 8) or 2 months (n = 7) postextraction, 1 month postimplant placement, and at 1-2 months in naive rats. There were no significant differences across study groups in the onset latencies of the ICMS-evoked responses (P > 0.05), but in comparison with naive rats, tooth extraction caused a significant (P tooth loss and their replacement with dental implants. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Single Visit Apexification Procedure of a Traumatically Injured Tooth with a Novel Bioinductive Material (Biodentine)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingarwar, Mahesh Madhukar; Pathak, Anuradha

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim of this article is to present a case wherein single visit apexification of a traumatically injured tooth was done with a bioactive material–Biodentine. An injury sustained between the ages of 6 and 14 can adversely affect pulpal health and interrupt root development. In these instances, apexification is generally the preferred treatment. A 10 years old male patient presented with coronal fracture of the left upper central incisor. Clinical and radiographic assessment showed negative pulpal sensibility and arrested apical root development. Artificial apical barrier induction with Biodentine followed by endodontic treatment and prosthetic rehabilitation was decided as the line of treatment. To conclude, this bioactive and biocompatible calcium-based cement can regenerate damaged dental tissues and represents a promising alternative to the conventional multivisit apexification technique. Clinical significance: Biodentine which is a biologically active cement can be an efficient alternative to the conventional apexification materials which were hitherto recommended. How to cite this article: Bajwa NK, Jingarwar MM, Pathak A. Single Visit Apexification Procedure of a Traumatically Injured Tooth with a Novel Bioinductive Material (Biodentine). Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(1):58-61. PMID:26124583

  7. Modification of ion implanted or irradiated single crystal sapphire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Yin; Zhang Chonghong; Wang Zhiguang; Zhao Zhiming; Yao Cunfeng; Zhou Lihong; Jin Yunfan

    2006-01-01

    Single crystal sapphire (Al 2 O 3 ) samples were implanted at 600 K by He, Ne and Ar ions with energy of 110 keV to doses ranging from 5 x 10 16 to 2 x 10 17 ion/cm 2 or irradiated at 320 K by 208 Pb 27+ ion with energy of 1.1 MeV/u to the fluences ranging from 1 x 10 12 to 5 x 10 14 ion/cm 2 . The modification of structure and optical properties induced by ion implantation or irradiation were analyzed by using photoluminescence (PL) and Fourier transformation infrared spectrum (FTIR) spectra and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements. The PL measurements showed that absorption peaks located at 375, 413 and 450 nm appeared in all the implanted or irradiated samples, the PL intensities reached up to the maximum for the 5 x 10 16 ion/cm 2 implanted samples. After Pb-ion irradiation, a new peak located at 390 nm formed. TEM analyses showed that small size voids (1-2 nm) with high density were formed in the region from the surface till to about 100 nm in depth and also large size Ne-bubble formed in the Ne-doped region. Form the obtained FTIR spectra, it was found that Pb-ion irradiation induced broadening of the absorption band in 460-510 cm -1 and position shift of the absorption band in 1000-1300 cm -1 towards to high wavenumber. The possible damage mechanism in single crystal sapphire induced by energetic ion implantation or irradiation was briefly discussed. (authors)

  8. Spiral Computed Tomography Based Maxillary Sinus Imaging in Relation to Tooth Loss, Implant Placement and Potential Grafting Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhilde Jacobs

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of the present study was to explore the maxillary sinus anatomy, its variations and volume in patients with a need for maxillary implant placement.Materials and Methods: Maxillary sinus data of 101 consecutive patients who underwent spiral computed tomography (CT scans for preoperative implant planning in the maxilla at the Department of Periodontology, University Hospital, Catholic University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium were retrospectively evaluated. The alveolar bone height was measured on serial cross-sectional images between alveolar crest and sinus floor, parallel to the tooth axis. In order to describe the size of the maxillary sinus anteroposterior (AP and mediolateral (ML diameters of the sinus were measured.Results: The results indicated that the alveolar bone height was significantly higher in the premolar regions in comparison to the molar region (n = 46, P 4 mm mucosal thickening mostly at the level of the sinus floor. The present sample did not allow revealing any significant difference (P > 0.05 in maxillary sinus dimensions for partially dentate and edentulous subjects.Conclusions: Cross-sectional imaging can be used in order to obtain more accurate information on the morphology, variation, and the amount of maxillary bone adjacent to the maxillary sinus.

  9. Sinus Floor Elevation with Modified Crestal Approach and Single Loaded Short Implants: A Case Report with 4 Years of Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Perelli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tooth extraction is usually followed by bone reduction. In the maxillary posterior region, this remodelling combined with sinus pneumatisation and periodontal defects may lead to a reduced basal bone height available for implant placement. Sinus floor elevation can be performed with different surgical techniques. Crestal approach has demonstrated to be effective, less invasive, and associated with a reduced morbidity. This article reports a modified sinus floor elevation by means of rotary, noncutting instruments, addition of xenograft, and 2 short-threaded implant placements. The aim of the study was to evaluate the implant’s success and intrasinus radiographical bone gain after 4 years of functional loading. The premolar implant site presented a starting basal bone height of 6 mm, while the molar site was of 2 mm. In the first surgical step, sinus floor elevation was performed mesially and the implant was inserted, and distally only sinus floor elevation was performed. After 6 months, the mesial implant was uncovered and the second implant was inserted; 4 months later, the second fixture was uncovered, and both fixtures were loaded with single provisional screw-retained crowns and later with single screw-retained porcelain fused to metal crowns. Implants integrated successfully, and crestal bone remodelling did not exceed the smooth collar. Bone gain was 3 mm for the mesial implant and more than 5 mm for the distal one.

  10. Histomorphometric analysis of bone formation in bony defects around implants in adult dogs: a comparison of grafts of low and high heat-treated autogenous tooth ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Ha; Kim, Su-Gwan; Lim, Sung-Chul; Oh, Ji-Su; You, Jae-Seek; Jeong, Mi-Ae

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the bone formation of autogenous tooth ash treated with different temperatures. Heat treatment was rendered by powder after extraction of teeth from dogs. The bony defects were made at iliac and resorbable blast medium surfaced implant placement and bone graft was performed; no bone graft group (control group), low heat-treated tooth ash group (group 1), high heat-treated tooth ash group (group 2). Right side had healing periods of 12 weeks, and the left side had 6 weeks. Histomorphometrical analysis was performed at 12 weeks. The control group had poor bone formation and showed large loose connective tissue. Group 1 displayed good healing and bone formation. Group 2 showed higher rate of bone formation than group 1 and the control group. The high heat-treated tooth ash group showed a statistically significant increase in the rate of bone formation in the early stage. The heat-treated autogenous tooth ash powder showed excellent new bone formation. The temperature of heat treatment is an important factor in new bone formation. The high heat treatment was the optimal treatment method for making tooth ash than the low heat treatment.

  11. Alveolar dimensional changes relevant to implant placement after minimally traumatic tooth extraction with primary closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Nelson; Bonta, Hernan; Gualtieri, Ariel F; Rojas, Mariana A; Galli, Federico G; Caride, Facundo

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dimensional changes that occur in the alveolar ridge after minimally traumatic tooth extraction by means of computed tomography (CT), with special focus on the portion of bone supporting the gingival zenith. Twenty subjects with indication for singlerooted tooth extraction and preserved alveolar walls were selected for this study. After a minimally traumatic extraction, two CT scans were performed; the first within 24 hours postextraction (TC1) and the second 6 months (TC2) later. A radiographic guide with a radiopaque marker was used to obtain references that enabled accurate measurements over time, in both vertical and horizontal directions. The bone crest immediately apical to the gingival zenith was identified and termed "osseous zenith". The displacement of the osseous zenith in horizontal and vertical direction was analyzed and correlated with several alveolar anatomical variables with the aim of identifying possible predictors for bone remodeling. Dimensional changes that occur in postextraction sockets within a 6month period showed significant vertical and horizontal displacement of the osseous zenith (p 3 mm) should be expected. The present study suggests that the width of the alveolar crest at its midlevel, rather than crestal width, may be correlated with the displacement of the osseous zenith. Sociedad Argentina de Investigación Odontológica.

  12. Accuracy of implant transfer with open-tray and closed-tray impression techniques and surface detail reproduction of the tooth during impression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakimeh Siadat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Accurate recording of implant location is required to achieve passive fit and have the implants without stress concentration. The aim of this in-vitro study was to evaluate the dimensional and angular accuracy of open-tray and closed-tray impression techniques using polyether impression material and also to assess the surface detail reproduction of the tooth while impression making.Materials and Methods: One reference metal model with 2 implants (Implantium on the position of the maxillary second premolar and first molar and one molar tooth for evaluation of surface details was prepared. 27 polyether impressions of these models were made (9 using open-tray, 9 using closed-tray techniques and 9 were made just of the surface of the teeth without any implants. Impressions were poured with ADA type IV stone. Coordinate Measuring Machine was used for measuring the dimensional accuracy and video measuring machine for surface detail reproduction. All of these measurements were compared with the measurements on the reference model. Data were analyzed by and compared by T-test and One-way ANOVA.Results: There was a significant statistical difference between open-tray and closed-tray techniques (P0.05.Conclusion: The accuracy of open-tray impression technique was more than closed-tray technique. The surface detail reproduction of the tooth was not affected by impression technique.

  13. Complications in implant dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanif, Ayesha; Qureshi, Saima; Sheikh, Zeeshan; Rashid, Haroon

    2017-01-01

    After tooth loss, an individual may seek tooth replacement so that his/her function and esthetics could be restored. Clinical prosthodontics, during the past decade, has significantly improved and developed according to the advancements in the science and patient's demands and needs. Conventional options in prosthodontics for substituting a missing single tooth include the removable partial denture, partial and full coverage bridgework, and resin-bonded bridgework. Dental implants have gained increasing popularity over the years as they are capable of restoring the function to near normal in both partial and completely edentulous arches. With substantial evidence available, fixed implant-supported prosthesis are fully acknowledged as a reliable treatment option for the replacement of single or multiple missing teeth nowadays. While dental implants are increasingly becoming the choice of replacement for missing teeth, the impediments associated with them are progressively emerging too.

  14. The Overall Survival, Complication-Free Survival, and Related Complications of Combined Tooth-Implant Fixed Partial Dentures: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Borg

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the literature regarding possible complications, complication-free survival, and overall survival of fixed dental prostheses that use both implants and natural teeth as abutments. The paper also provides clinical guidelines for treatment based on this literature review. An electronic search utilizing the MEDLINE, BIOSIS Citation Index, and Web of Science™ Core Collection databases was undertaken, and a review of the 25 selected texts studying 22 different patient cohorts was carried out. From a total of 1610 implants reviewed, 40 were lost (33 due to loss of integration and 7 due to fracture, whereas, out of a total of 1301 teeth, 38 were lost, of which 16 were due to fracture. Seventy-three cases of tooth intrusion were detected. From a total of 676 frameworks reviewed (metal n = 645, Zirconia n = 31, 7 fractured, while veneer material fracture occurred in 70 out of 672 bridges. Overall, 502 out of 531 tooth-implant fixed prostheses (TIPFs remained functional, and 336 out of 439 prostheses showed no technical or biological complications and remained functional. Rigid TIFPs permanently cemented to teeth with sufficient coronal structure and with limited use of prosthetic attachments offer a good long-term treatment option to patients with good oral hygiene following sound implant placement. This mode of treatment should be used when free-standing implant-supported options may not be possible. Larger randomized control studies and other clinical studies comparing tooth-to-implant-connected treatment with other forms of treatment are needed to better understand the place of TIFP treatment in oral rehabilitation.

  15. The effect of systemically administered bisphosphonates on bony healing after tooth extraction and osseointegration of dental implants in the rabbit maxilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, InSoo; Ki, HyungChun; Lee, Won; Kim, Heesung; Park, Jun-Beom

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of bisphosphonates on bone healing after tooth extraction and osseointegration of dental implants in a rabbit model. Twenty-four rabbits were divided into four groups; one control and three experimental. The experimental were treated with intravenous zoledronic acid (ZA, 0.1 mg/kg) twice per week starting 4 (Z4 group) and 8 (Z8 group) weeks before surgery until the end of the experiments. The experimental ZD4 group was treated with intravenous ZA (0.01 mg/kg) and intramuscular dexamethasone (1 mg/kg) twice per week starting 4 weeks before surgery until the end of the experiments. The maxillary first premolar was extracted, and an implant with a diameter of 1.5 mm was placed between the incisor and the premolar of each maxilla. Healing of the extraction socket was evaluated and histomorphometric analysis around the implant was performed, using the bone-to-implant contact ratio (BIC) and bone area ratio (BA) 4 and 8 weeks after the surgery. The control group underwent a normal healing process, but all experimental groups showed necrotic bone with hollow lacunae. BIC and BA in the control group increased from the 4- to 8-week evaluations, but decreased in the experimental groups from 4 to 8 weeks. BIC and BA of the Z8 and ZD4 groups were higher than those of the control group at the 4-week evaluation, but were lower than the control at the the 8-week evaluation. This study showed that administration of bisphosphonates interferes with normal bone remodeling after tooth extraction. The experimental groups showed good initial stability, but long-term healing around the implants was impaired. Within the limits of this study, it may be suggested that patients taking bisphosphonates should be treated with caution when performing tooth extraction or placing dental implants.

  16. Short implants supporting single crowns in atrophic jaws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ansari, Asim

    2014-09-01

    PubMed-Medline, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, LILACS, Ebsco-Dentistry and Oral Sciences Source, Scirus, Embase, Scopus and Journal Ovid databases were searched. In addition hand searching of 14 relevant journals was undertaken along with screening of the reference lists of screened article and reviews. Randomised controlled clinical trials (RCTs), controlled clinical trials (CCTs), prospective cohort studies and case series were included. Studies where short (biological failure proportion (BFP), prosthetic failure proportion (PFP) and radiographic marginal bone loss (MBL) were 5.9% (95% CI: 3.7-9.2%), 3.8% (95%CI: 1.9-7.4%), 2.8% (95%CI: 1.4-5.7%) and 0.83 mm (95%CI: 0.54-1.12 mm) respectively. Quantitative analysis showed that placement in the mandible (p = 0.0002) and implants with length ≤ 8 mm (p = 0.01) increased FP, BFP and MBL, whereas qualitative assessment revealed that crown-to-implant ratio did not influence MBL. Within the limitations of the present systematic review with meta-analysis, it is suggested that single crowns supported by short implants are an acceptable and predictable option in the short- and long-term treatment of the atrophic jaws.

  17. Evaluation of stress distributions in peri-implant and periodontal bone tissues in 3- and 5-unit tooth and implant-supported fixed zirconia restorations by finite elements analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guven, Sedat; Beydemir, Koksal; Dundar, Serkan; Eratilla, Veysel

    2015-01-01

    In this study, it is aimed to compare the distribution of stress on periodontal and peri-implant bone tissues in 3- and 5-unit-dental and implant-supported zirconia restorations using finite element analysis. Stress distribution formed in periodontal and peri-implant bone tissues as a result of chewing forces was analyzed in dental and implant-supported three-dimensional (3D) finite element models of zirconia restoration with 5-unit placed on the numbers of 43, 44, 45, 46, and 47 and with 3-unit placed on the number of 45, 46, and 47. Four different loading conditions were used. 200 N force was applied in 30° from the buccal inclination of number 43, 45, and 47 restorations separately and totally 850 N force was applied in 30° from the buccal inclination of whole restoration. The study was performed through static nonlinear analysis with the 3D finite element analysis method. Stress accumulation in bone tissues in the tooth-supported model was found less than in implant-supported models. Stress accumulation was observed in the cervical portion of the implant in implant-supported models, and stress accumulation was observed surrounding bone of roots in tooth-supported models. The highest stress values were occurred in 5 unit implant-supported model in all loadings. In posterior restorations increased in the number of supported teeth and implant can reduce the destructive forces on periodontal and peri-implant bone tissues and may allow longer period retention of the restorations in the mouth.

  18. Influence of crown-to-implant ratio on stress around single short-wide implants: a photoelastic stress analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotto-Maior, Bruno Salles; Senna, Plinio Mendes; da Silva-Neto, João Paulo; de Arruda Nóbilo, Mauro Antônio; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the photoelastic fringe patterns around two short-wide implants supporting single crowns with different crown-to-implant (C/I) ratios. External hexagon (EH) cylindrical implants (5 × 7 mm) or Morse Taper (MT) conical implants (5 × 6 mm) were embedded individually into photoelastic resin blocks. Each implant received a single metal-ceramic crown, with a C/I ratio of 1:1 or 2:1 (n = 10). Each set was positioned in a polariscope and submitted to a 0.5 kgf compressive load, applied axially or obliquely (30°). The polariscope images were digitally recorded, and based on isoclinal and isochromatic fringes, the shear stress was calculated at 5 predetermined points around each implant. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA (α = 0.05). Under axial loading, the stress was concentrated at the crestal region, and there were no differences between C/I ratio or implant types. In contrast, under oblique loading, EH implants showed lower stress values than the MT group and the 2:1 C/I ratio showed higher stress concentration for both implant types (p implants showed stress distribution through a higher area than the EH implant did, with a tendency to direct the stress toward the implant's apex under oblique loading. MT conical short-wide implants showed higher stress values that were distributed through a higher area directed to the implant apex. The C/I ratio influences the stress distribution only under oblique loading. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  19. A technique for fabricating single screw-retained implant-supported interim crowns in conjunction with implant surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRory, M Eric; Cagna, David R

    2014-06-01

    This article presents an intraoral technique for fabricating single screw-retained implant-supported interim crowns immediately after surgical implant placement in extraction sites. The technique may be used with any implant system that provides a provisional abutment or an open-tray impression coping that can be modified for use as a provisional abutment. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Metal-reinforced single implant mandibular overdenture retained by an attachment: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grageda, Edgar; Rieck, Bastian

    2014-01-01

    Results of studies have shown that a single implant mandibular overdenture significantly increases the satisfaction and quality of life of patients with edentulism. The single implant-retained overdenture has the additional advantage of being less expensive and invasive than a 2-implant supported overdenture but has a high incidence of fracture of the acrylic resin base at the point of the implant. The treatment, design, and fabrication of a metal-reinforced single-implant mandibular overdenture with the Locator attachment as a retention device is described. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Two-stage IMZ implants and ITI implants inserted in a single-stage procedure : A prospective comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heydenrijk, Kees; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Meijer, Henny J.A.; Reijden, Willy A. van der; Winkelhoff, Arie Jan van; Stegenga, Boudewijn

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using a two-stage implant system in a single-stage procedure and to study the impact of the microgap at crestal level and to monitor the microflora in the peri-implant area. Forty edentulous patients (Cawood & Howell class V–VI) participated

  2. Two-stage IMZ implants and ITI implants inserted in a single-stage procedure - A prospective comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heydenrijk, K; Raghoebar, GM; Meijer, HJA; van der Reijden, WA; van Winkelhoff, AJ; Stegenga, B

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using a two-stage implant system in a single-stage procedure and to study the impact of the microgap at crestal level and to monitor the microflora in the peri-implant area. Forty edentulous patients (Cawood & Howell class V-VI) participated

  3. In Vivo Tooth-Supported Implant Surgical Guides Fabricated With Desktop Stereolithographic Printers: Fully Guided Surgery Is More Accurate Than Partially Guided Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencharit, Sompop; Staffen, Adam; Yeung, Matthew; Whitley, Daniel; Laskin, Daniel M; Deeb, George R

    2018-02-21

    Desktop stereolithographic printers combined with intraoral scanning and implant planning software promise precise and cost-effective guided implant surgery. The purpose of the present study was to determine the overall range of accuracy of tooth-supported guided implant surgery using desktop printed stereolithographic guides. A cross-sectional study comparing fully and partially guided implant surgery was conducted. Preoperative cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and intraoral scans were used to plan the implant sites. Surgical guides were then fabricated using a desktop stereolithographic 3-dimensional printer. Postoperative CBCT was used to evaluate the accuracy of placement. Deviations from the planned positions were used as the primary outcome variables. The planning software used, implant systems, and anterior/posterior positions were the secondary outcome variables. The differences between the planned and actual implant positions in the mesial, distal, buccal, and lingual dimensions and buccolingual angulations were determined, and the accuracy was compared statistically using the 1-tail F-test (P = .01), box plots, and 95% confidence intervals for the mean. Sixteen partially edentulous patients requiring placement of 31 implants were included in the present study. The implant deviations from the planned positions for mesial, distal, buccal, and lingual dimensions and buccolingual angulations with the fully guided protocol (n = 20) were 0.17 ± 0.78 mm, 0.44 ± 0.78 mm, 0.23 ± 1.08 mm, -0.22 ± 1.44 mm, and -0.32° ± 2.36°, respectively. The corresponding implant deviations for the partially guided protocol (n = 11) were 0.33 ± 1.38 mm, -0.03 ± 1.59 mm, 0.62 ± 1.15 mm, -0.27 ± 1.61 mm, and 0.59° ± 6.83°. The difference between the variances for fully and partially guided surgery for the distal and angulation dimensions was statistically significant (P = .006 and P guided implant surgery is more accurate than

  4. Analysis of the distribution of stress and deformation in single implant-supported prosthetic units in implants of different diameters

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    Francesco Salvatore MANNARINO

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction When stress and strain levels in the bone-implant system exceed It's capacity, a mechanical fatigue occurs, resulting in collapse and loss of osseointegration. Objective Analyze biomechanical behavior in single implant-supported prosthesis with implants of different diameters in the posterior mandible. Material and method Three different finite element models of Cone-Morse implants with the same height were created, varying the diameter (3.3 mm, 4.1 mm and 4.8 mm. The mandibular first molar area was the location of the implant, with It´s component and overlying prosthetic crown. The jawbone was composed of cortical and cancellous bone. Refined mesh of 0.5 mm was created in the critical interfaces to be analyzed. The loading of the models was performed at the point of occlusal contact with an occlusal load of 400 N. Result Maximum stress and strain occurred in the cervical regions of the implants in all groups, either in the implants or in components as well as in the analysis of cortical bone. The greater the diameter, the lower the stress and strain found in the implant. The 3.3 mm group had the highest strain in peri-implant cortical bone, and the 4.1 mm group had the smallest deformation, significantly lower than in the 4.8 mm group. Conclusion Although the biggest implant diameter (4.8 mm appears to have lower values of stress and strain, the group of intermediate implant diameter (4.1 mm showed less deformation rate in the cortical peri-implant bone. Therefore it is concluded that the 4.1 mm implant platform presented a more biomechanically effective peri-implant bone maintenance.

  5. Monolithic lithium-disilicate single crowns supported by zirconia oral implants: three-year results of a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spies, Benedikt Christopher; Patzelt, Sebastian Berthold Maximilian; Vach, Kirstin; Kohal, Ralf-Joachim

    2016-09-01

    To determine the survival and success rate of CAD/CAM-fabricated monolithic lithium-disilicate crowns supported by zirconia oral implants after 3 years. Twenty-four patients in need of a single tooth replacement received a zirconia implant and were finally restored with 24 single crowns (SCs) ground out of pre-crystallized lithium-disilicate blanks. The restorations were adhesively cemented and evaluated using modified United States Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria. In case of clinically relevant defects that could be repaired to an acceptable level, SCs were regarded as surviving. Restorations with minor chippings, a small-area roughness (ø esthetics, sense, and speech. Monolithic lithium-disilicate SCs supported by zirconia implants showed promising survival and success rates after an observation period of 3 years. It remains to be seen whether the further observation period confirms this positive results. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Assessment of parental tooth-brushing following instruction with single-headed and triple-headed toothbrushes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telishevesky, Yoel S; Levin, Liran; Ashkenazi, Malka

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of toothbrush design on the ability of parents to effectively brush their children's teeth. Parents of children (mean age=5.1±0.75 years old) from 4 kindergarten schools were randomly assigned to receive instruction in brushing their children's teeth using a manual single-headed toothbrush (2 schools) or a triple-headed toothbrush (2 schools). The parents' ability to brush their children's teeth was evaluated according to a novel toothbrush performing skill index (Ashkenazi Index), based on 2 criteria: (1) placement of the toothbrush on each tooth segment to be brushed ("reach"); and (2) completion of enough strokes on each segment ("stay"). One month after instruction, tooth-brushing ability was re-evaluated and plaque index of the children's teeth was assessed. One month after instruction, parents using the triple-headed toothbrush received significantly higher scores on the tooth-brushing performance index (~86%), than did those in the single-headed group (~61%; P=.001). The plaque index was significantly higher in the single-headed group (0.97±0.38) vs the triple-headed group (0.72±0.29; Pbrushing performance index correlated negatively with the plaque index (Pbrushing by parents than does a single-headed toothbrush.

  7. Two-stage IMZ implants and ITI implants inserted in a single-stage procedure. A prospective comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydenrijk, Kees; Raghoebar, Gerry M; Meijer, Henny J A; van der Reijden, Willy A; van Winkelhoff, Arie Jan; Stegenga, Boudewijn

    2002-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using a two-stage implant system in a single-stage procedure and to study the impact of the microgap at crestal level and to monitor the microflora in the peri-implant area. Forty edentulous patients (Cawood & Howell class V-VI) participated in this study. After randomisation, 20 patients received two IMZ implants inserted in a single-stage procedure and 20 patients received two ITI implants. After 3 months, overdentures were fabricated, supported by a bar and clip attachment. A standardised clinical and radiographic evaluation was performed immediately after denture insertion and 6 and 12 months later. Twelve months after loading, peri-implant samples were collected with sterile paper points and analysed for the presence of putative periodontal pathogens using culture techniques. One IMZ implant was lost due to insufficient osseointegration. With regard to the clinical parameters at the 12 months evaluation, significant differences for plaque score and probing pocket depth (IMZ: mean 3.3 mm, ITI: mean 2.9 mm) were found between the two groups. The mean bone loss in the first year of functioning was 0.6 mm for both groups. Prevotella intermedia was detected more often in the ITI group (12 implants) than in the IMZ group (three implants). Porphyromonas gingivalis was found in three patients. In one of these patients an implant showed bone loss of 1.6 mm between T0 and T12. Some associations were found between clinical parameters and the target microorganisms in the ITI group. These associations were not present in the IMZ group. The short-term results indicate that two-stage implants inserted in a single-stage procedure may be as predictable as one-stage implants. The microgap at crestal level in nonsubmerged IMZ implants seems to have no adverse influence on the peri-implant microbiological colonisation and of crestal bone loss in the first year of functioning. The peri-implant sulcus can and does harbour

  8. Systematic Review of Soft Tissue Alterations and Esthetic Outcomes Following Immediate Implant Placement and Restoration of Single Implants in the Anterior Maxilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khzam, Nabil; Arora, Himanshu; Kim, Paul; Fisher, Anthony; Mattheos, Nikos; Ivanovski, Saso

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this review is to assess the outcome of single-tooth immediate implant placement and restoration (IPR) in the maxillary anterior region, with a particular emphasis on soft tissue and esthetic outcomes. An electronic search in Medline, EBSCOhost, and Ovid (PubMed) was performed to identify studies that reported on soft tissue outcomes following immediate placement and restoration of implants in the maxillary esthetic region with a mean follow-up of ≥1 year. Nineteen studies on single implants inserted immediately into fresh extraction sockets and provisionally restored in the maxillary esthetic region were included. Soft tissue changes were found to be acceptable, with most studies reporting mean gingival recession of 0.27 ± 0.38 mm and mean papillary height loss of 0.23 ± 0.27 mm after follow-up of ≥1 year. Advanced buccal recession (>1 mm) occurred in 11% of cases. Long-term follow-up studies (>2 years) reported that the interdental papillae, in particular, showed a tendency to rebound over time. The few studies that reported on patient-centered outcomes showed a high level of patient satisfaction with the outcomes of IPR treatment. The IPR protocol resulted in generally acceptable soft tissue and esthetic outcomes, with suboptimal results reported in ≈11% of low-risk cases. Factors such as preoperative tissue biotype or use of a flap or connective tissue graft did not significantly influence soft tissue and esthetic outcomes. Long-term prospective controlled clinical trials are necessary to identify factors that may influence the esthetic outcomes associated with IPR.

  9. Alveolar bone resorption after primary tooth loss has a negative impact on straightforward implant installation in patients with agenesis of the lower second premolar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertl, Kristina; Bertl, Michael H; Heimel, Patrick; Burt, Maria; Gahleitner, André; Stavropoulos, Andreas; Ulm, Christian

    2018-02-01

    To compare the alveolar bone dimensions in patients with lower second premolar (P2) agenesis prior to and after primary molar loss on CT scans, and assess the possibility for straightforward implant placement. Alveolar bone dimensions were evaluated on 150 mandibular CT scans in three groups: (i) agenesis of P2, with the primary tooth in situ, and regularly erupted first premolar (P1) and molar (M1) (AW); (ii) agenesis of P2, without the primary tooth in situ for ≥3 m, but regularly erupted P1 and M1 (AWO); and (iii) P1, P2, and M1 regularly erupted (CTR). The possibility of straightforward placement of an implant 3.5 or 4.3 mm in Ø × 10 mm long was digitally simulated and compared to the actually performed treatment. Buccolingual width (7.3 ± 2.0 mm) at the coronal aspect of the ridge in the AWO group was statistically significantly smaller comparing with both the AW (9.2 ± 1.4 mm) and the CTR (9.5 ± 1.1 mm) group; width reduction appeared to be mainly due to "collapse" of the buccal aspect of the ridge. Simulated straightforward placement of implants with a diameter of 3.5 or 4.3 mm was possible in 62% and 56% of the cases in the AWO vs. 86% and 84% in the AW group (p = .006 and .002, respectively). Straightforward implant placement was actually possible in all patients (22) in the AW group, while 28% (11 of 39) of the patients in the AWO group needed additional hard tissue augmentation. Significant dimensional differences exist in the alveolar ridge, especially in the coronal part, at lower P2 agenesis sites missing the primary tooth for ≥3 m, when compared to P2 agenesis sites with the primary tooth in situ. It seems thus reasonable to advise that the primary second molar should be kept as long as possible, in order to facilitate straightforward implant installation and reduce the probability of additional bone augmentation procedures. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Impact of Crown-Implant Ratio of Single Restorations Supported by 6-mm Implants : A Short-Term Case Series Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gulje, Felix L.; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Erkens, Ward A. L.; Meijer, Henny J. A.

    PURPOSE: High crown-implant ratios might affect the biologic and technical performance of a reconstruction. The aim of this study was to assess whether a higher crown-implant ratio of single restorations on 6-mm implants resulted in more peri-implant bone loss and more prosthetic complications

  11. Implant placement and immediate loading in aesthetic zone- A report of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Deshmukh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Single teeth replaced by implants in the aesthetic zone are one of the most challenging situations faced by a clinician. Recent studies have encouraged a progressive shortening of the healing period for single-tooth implants with immediate implantation and immediate loading being proposed for the aesthetic zone in the maxilla. The present report describes three cases with single tooth replacement in the anterior maxillary region by implant therapy with flapless technique followed by immediate provisionalization of the implant with all-ceramic crown. The patients exhibited no clinical or radiologic complications 1 year after loading. Implant placement and immediate loading of single tooth can provide an attractive treatment option in the aesthetic zone. Careful assessment must be made of mucosal and bone volumes in relation to implant placement for optimum aesthetic outcome.

  12. Ferromagnetism induced in rutile single crystals by argon and nitrogen implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, M M; Godinho, M [CFMC-Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Ed. C8, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Da Silva, R C; Franco, N [LFI, Departamento de Fisica, ITN, E.N.10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)], E-mail: mmcruz@fc.ul.pt

    2009-05-20

    The magnetic properties of Ar- and N-implanted single crystalline TiO{sub 2} rutile were studied and correlated with the induced disorder in order to clarify the influence of defects in the magnetic behaviour. Nominal fluences of 1 x 10{sup 17} and 2 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} and an implantation energy of 100 keV were used. The as-implanted single crystals exhibited ferromagnetic behaviour up to 380 K. Annealing at 1073 K induced recovery of the lattice structure and the decrease of the ferromagnetic moment in the case of Ar-implanted samples, but the magnetic moment did not change significantly for the samples implanted with nitrogen. No impurities, other than the implanted species were detected and consequently the ferromagnetic behaviour is attributed to defects created during implantation, which in the case of nitrogen remained in the lattice even after partial recovery of the structure.

  13. Occlusal rehabilitation in patients with congenitally missing teeth-dental implants, conventional prosthetics, tooth autotransplants, and preservation of deciduous teeth-a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terheyden, Hendrik; Wüsthoff, Falk

    2015-12-01

    Implant patients with congenitally missing teeth share some common charateristics and deserve special attention. The PICO question was "In patients with congenitally missing teeth, does an early occlusal rehabilitation with dental implants in comparison to tooth autotransplants, conventional prosthetics on teeth or preservation of deciduous teeth have better general outcomes in terms of survival, success and better patient centered outcomes in terms of quality of life, self-esteem, satisfaction, chewing function?" After electronic database search, a total of 63 relevant studies were eligible, of which 42 qualified for numerical data synthesis, 26 being retrospective studies. A data synthesis was performed by weighted means for survival/success/annual failure rates. The mean survival of implants was 95.3 % (prosthesis survival 97.8 %), autotransplants 94.4 %, deciduous teeth 89.6 %, and conventional prostheses 60.2 %. The implant survival in children, adolescents, and adults was 72.4, 93.0, and 97.4 %. Annual failure rates of implants 3.317 %, autotransplants 1.061 %, deciduous teeth 0.908 %, and conventional prostheses 5.144 % indicated better results for natural teeth and more maintenance needs for the both prosthetic treatments. The mean OHIP score was 27.8 at baseline and a mean improvement of 14.9 score points was reported after implant prosthetics. The mean satisfaction rates were 93.4 (implants), 76.6 (conventional prostheses), 72.0 (autotransplants), and 65.5 % (orthodontic space closure). In synopsis of general and patient-centered outcomes, implants yielded the best results, however, not in children prosthetics had lower survival/success rates than the other options. Due to heterogeneity and low number of studies, patient-reported outcomes in this review have to be interpreted with caution.

  14. Temporary Piggyback Intraocular Lens Implantation Versus Single Intraocular Lens Implantation in Congenital Cataracts: Long-Term Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sungsoon; Lim, Dong Hui; Lee, Soomin; Choi, Daye Diana; Chung, Eui-Sang; Chung, Tae-Young

    2018-04-01

    To report the long-term results of temporary piggyback IOL implantation in congenital cataract and to compare the clinical outcomes of temporary piggyback IOL with those of single IOL implantation. This is a retrospective, comparative, interventional study. The medical records of all consecutive patients who underwent cataract extraction and single or temporary piggyback IOL implantation within the first 3 years of life from 1999 to 2013 at Samsung Medical Center were reviewed. Twenty-eight eyes from 18 patients underwent single IOL implantation (monopseudophakia group), and 32 eyes of 20 patients underwent temporary piggyback IOL implantation in congenital cataract surgery (polypseudophakia group). The mean age at initial cataract surgery was 15.8 months in the monopseudophakia group and 11.1 months in the polypseudophakia group (P = 0.144). The average follow-up duration was 133 months in the monopseudophakia group and 120 months in the polypseudophakia group (P = 0.391). The best-corrected visual acuity at the last visit was 0.36 logMAR in the monopseudophakia group and 0.55 logMAR in the polypseudophakia group (P = 0.044). Four (14%) and 14 (44%) reoperations for complications within the anterior segment were performed in the monopseudophakia group and polypseudophakia group, respectively (P = 0.042). Four cases (14.3%) in the monopseudophakia group and 13 cases (40.6%) in the polypseudophakia group had a glaucoma-related adverse event (P = 0.086). Compared with primary single IOL implantation in congenital cataract, temporary piggyback IOL implantation produced worse visual acuity, higher reoperation rate, and higher risk of secondary glaucoma. Temporary piggyback IOL implantation does not have benefit in congenital cataract.

  15. The relationship between smile attractiveness and esthetic parameters of patients with lateral agenesis treated with tooth recontouring or implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Marchi LM

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Luciana Manzotti De-Marchi,1 Núbia Inocencya Pavesi Pini,2 Renata Corrêa Pascotto31Department of Dentistry, University Center of Maringá-CESUMAR, Maringá-PR/Brazil; 2Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, Piracicaba-SP/Brazil; 3Department of Dentistry, State University of Maringá, Maringá-PR/BrazilBackground: The purpose of this study was to associate smile esthetic judgment with dentofacial attributes of patients with unilateral and bilateral agenesis of maxillary lateral incisors treated with recontouring of canines or implants and patients with no agenesis (control.Material and methods: Forty-six participants were divided into two groups: those treated with recontouring (N = 26 and those treated with implants (N = 20. The participants in the control group (N = 22 were selected among dentistry students at the State University of Maringá, Brazil. Photographs of posed smiles (17 cm × 10 cm were evaluated with a 100-mm Visual Analog Scale. Smile attractiveness was judged by two groups: laypersons and dentists (N = 20 in each group. Judgment was classified into Unpleasant and Pleasant. Measurements of 11 smile attributes were done with ImageTool Version 3.0. These measurements were correlated with the type of judgment using the Pearson correlation coefficient.Results: The two groups of evaluators showed no rating difference (analysis of variance, P = 0.64, thus they were placed into a single group. No significant correlation was found between esthetic judgment and six smile attributes (incisor exposure, interlabial gap, width 3 to 3, smile index, right buccal corridor, and buccal corridor ratio. The control group showed more correlations with the unpleasant judgment type than the other groups.Conclusion: Some correlations between smile attributes and esthetic judgment were found, but other features of smiles not evaluated in this study may interfere in smile attractiveness.Keywords: esthetic, dental agenesis

  16. Immediate, immediate-delayed (6 weeks) and delayed (4 months) post-extractive single implants: 1-year post-loading data from a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Marco; Zucchelli, Giovanni; Cannizzaro, Gioacchino; Checchi, Luigi; Barausse, Carlo; Trullenque-Eriksson, Anna; Felice, Pietro

    To compare the clinical outcome of single implants placed immediately after tooth extraction with implants placed 6 weeks after tooth extraction (immediate-delayed placement), and with implants placed after 4-month extraction and socket healing (delayed placement). Two-hundred and ten (210) patients requiring a single implant-supported crown to replace a tooth to be extracted were randomised to receive immediate post-extractive implants (70 patients), immediate-delayed implants at 6 weeks (70 patients), and delayed implants after 4 months of healing (70 patients) according to a parallel group design. When needed, patients of the immediate and immediate-delayed group had the socket grafted with a bone substitute and covered with a resorbable membrane at implant placement. Sockets randomised to delayed implants were grafted in the same manner if poorly preserved or in the aesthetic areas (from second upper to second upper premolars). Implants inserted with at least 25 Ncm torque were left to heal unloaded for 4 months, whereas those inserted with less than 25 Ncm were left to heal unloaded for 6 months. Temporary crowns were delivered and were to be replaced by definitive ones after 4 months. Outcome measures were crown and implant failures, complications, peri-implant marginal bone level changes, aesthetically assessed using the pink esthetic score (PES), and patient satisfaction recorded by blinded assessors. Patients were followed up to 1 year post-loading. One year after loading, three patients dropped out from the immediate group, five from the immediate-delayed group, and six from the delayed group. Four implants (6%) failed in the immediate, four (6.2%) in the immediate-delayed, and one (1.6%) from the delayed group (P (chi-square test) = 0.369). Apart from the crowns (which failed due to implant losses), no other crown had to be remade. Six immediate, six immediate-delayed and four delayed implants were affected by one complication each (P

  17. Immediate, immediate-delayed (6 weeks) and delayed (4 months) post-extractive single implants: 4-month post-loading data from a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felice, Pietro; Zucchelli, Giovanni; Cannizzaro, Gioacchino; Barausse, Carlo; Diazzi, Michele; Trullenque-Eriksson, Anna; Esposito, Marco

    To compare the clinical outcome of single implants placed immediately after tooth extraction with implants placed 6 weeks after tooth extraction (immediate-delayed placement), and with implants placed after 4 months of extraction and socket healing (delayed placement). Two hundred and ten patients requiring a single implant-supported crown to replace a tooth to be extracted were randomised to receive immediate post-extractive implants (70 patients), immediate-delayed implants at 6 weeks (70 patients), and delayed implants after 4 months of healing (70 patients), according to a parallel group design. When needed, patients of the immediate and immediate-delayed group had the socket grafted with a bone substitute and covered with a resorbable membrane at implant placement. Sockets randomised to delayed implants were grafted in the same manner if poorly preserved or in the aesthetic areas (from second upper to second upper premolars). Implants inserted with at least 25 Ncm torque were left to heal unloaded for 4 months, whereas those inserted with less than 25 Ncm were left to heal unloaded for 6 months. Temporary crowns were delivered and were to be replaced by definitive ones after 4 months. Outcome measures were crown and implant failures, complications, peri-implant marginal bone level changes, aesthetics assessed using the pink esthetic score (PES) and patient satisfaction recorded by blinded assessors. Three patients dropped out from the immediate, five from the immediate-delayed and six from the delayed group up to 4-months post-loading. Four implants (6.0%) failed in the immediate, four (6.2%) in the immediate-delayed and one (1.6%) from the delayed group (P (chi-square test) = 0.369). Apart from the crown failures due to implant losses, no other crown had to be remade. Five immediate, six immediate-delayed and three delayed implants were affected by one complication each (P (chi-square test) = 0.601). Mean peri-implant marginal bone

  18. Miniscrew Supported Interim Tooth Replacement: A Temporary Alternative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurkeerat Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Replacement of congenitally missing anterior tooth poses special problems in growing patients. Because an adolescent is typically self- conscious about removing an appliance and revealing a large edentulous space, a removable single tooth partial denture or retainer is an undesirable option. The temporary anchorage devices are invasive and the best recommended for malocclusion that cannot be effectively managed with conventional mechanics. The use of orthodontic miniscrews for interim restorations before the completion of skeletal growth has been used successfully unlike osseointegrated implants lacking the compensatory growth mechanisms of the natural dentition. The following case reports show an esthetic alternative to temporary tooth replacement using miniscrews.

  19. Tissue stability of implants placed in fresh extraction sockets: a 5-year prospective single-cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covani, Ugo; Canullo, Luigi; Toti, Paolo; Alfonsi, Fortunato; Barone, Antonio

    2014-09-01

    Several materials have been used for ridge preservation after tooth extraction. This 5-year prospective single-cohort study is aimed at evaluating the success rate, marginal bone level (MBL), soft tissue stability, and subjective patient evaluation of implants placed in fresh extraction sockets with the use of a flapless technique and a xenograft to treat the peri-implant bone defect. Patients requiring a single implant in fresh extraction sockets were selected. After flapless extraction and implant insertion, the peri-implant bone defect was grafted with porcine bone. Collagen membrane was used to stabilize the graft. Four months later, a second surgery and prosthetic procedures were performed. Clinical parameters (width of keratinized gingiva [WKG], facial soft tissue level [FST], papilla index, plaque index, and bleeding on probing) were measured, and periapical radiographs were taken at the time of implant placement (baseline) and then at 1, 3, and 5 years thereafter. Image analysis software was applied to measure changes in the marginal bone level (ΔMBL). Additionally, patient satisfaction regarding the implant treatment was evaluated. All analyses were collected and measured by an independent, trained observer. Together with descriptive statistics, for each of the outcome variables, pairwise comparisons were performed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test for matched samples. The level of statistical significance was set at 0.01 for all analyses. Forty-seven consecutive patients were treated, with an implant survival rate at 5 years of 95.7%. ΔMBL showed statistically significant differences: mean values were -0.68 ± 0.39, -0.94 ± 0.44, and -1.08 ± 0.43 mm at the 1, 3, and 5-year follow-up, respectively. Changes in WKG (ΔWKG) and FST (ΔFST) decreased from the 1-year point of the survey (0.80 ± 0.79 and 0.71 ± 0.73 mm for ΔWKG and ΔFST, respectively) to the last follow-up check at 5 years (0.67 ± 0.74 and 0.56 ± 0.69 mm for ΔWKG and

  20. Coexistence of two talon cusps and two dens invaginatus in a single tooth with associated radicular cyst-a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasat, Vikrant O; Singh, Mukund; Saluja, Harish; Ladda, Ruchi

    2014-10-01

    Talon cusp (TC) and dens invaginatus (DI) are relatively rare developmental anomalies which affect the shape of teeth. TC is an additional cusp that projects predominately from the lingual surface of anterior teeth. DI is a deep surface invagination of the crown or root which is commonly detected on routine radiographic examination. Both of these anomalies are observed more frequently in permanent maxillary lateral incisor. Isolated cases of single TC and DI are extensively reported in dental literature. Occasionally two talon cusps (TCs) in the same tooth as well as double and triple invaginations in one tooth are reported separately. Coexistence of these two anomalies in a single tooth is considered extremely rare, but still there are few reported cases. However, coexistence of two TCs and double DI in a single tooth is not reported till date. We hereby report the first case of coexistence of two TCs and double DI in a single tooth of a 23 year old female and use of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) in the management of associated radicular cyst. Also, literature on coexistence of these two anomalies in a single tooth is reviewed. Key words:Coexistence, dens invaginatus, radicular cyst, talon cusp.

  1. Immediate restoration of single tapered implants with nonoccluding provisional crowns: a 5-year clinical prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Lisa A; Turkyilmaz, Ilser; Edgin, Wendell A; Verrett, Ronald; Garcia, Lily T

    2014-04-01

    Dental literature has limited number of publications regarding long-term outcome data of immediate restoration of single missing teeth with an implant-supported provisional crown. This 5-year study evaluated hard and soft tissue responses to the immediate placement of single implant-supported provisional crowns. Twenty patients received one dental implant restored immediately with a provisional acrylic resin screw-retained crown. Crestal bone loss was evaluated from standardized periapical radiographs collected at 3-month intervals for the first 21 months followed by a 5-year evaluation. Historical controls acquired from available dental literature were used for comparison. One implant failed within 2 months of surgical placement, presenting with pain and mobility. The remaining implants demonstrated no infection, pain, or radiolucencies. Nineteen implants were clinically immobile, osseointegrated, and asymptomatic at 21 months. At 5 years, one patient died, three patients were noncompliant, and 15 implants were evaluated as functional. Mean bone loss (MBL) at 1 year and 21 months was approximately 0.5 ± 0.5 mm and 0.70 ± 0.26 mm at 5 years. There was no statistically significant difference between MBLs at p provisionalization of single dental implants compares favorably with conventional loading protocols. Long-term data suggest that immediate provisionalization of single dental implants is a viable treatment option. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Significance of buccopalatal implant position, biotype, platform switching, and pre-implant bone augmentation on the level of the midbuccal mucosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuiderveld, Elise G; den Hartog, Laurens; Vissink, Arjan; Raghoebar, Gerry M; Meijer, Henny J A

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed whether buccopalatal implant position, biotype, platform switching, and pre-implant bone augmentation affects the level of the midbuccal mucosa (MBM). Ninety patients with a single-tooth implant in the esthetic zone were included. The level of the MBM was measured on photographs

  3. Action of age-hardening on the copper single crystals after ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kul'ment'eva, O.P.; Kul'ment'ev, A.I.

    2007-01-01

    High-dose implantation (up to (1-5)·10 17 cm -2 ) of tantalum ions into a copper single crystal of (100), (110) and (111) orientation has been investigated. Modified properties just after ion implantation and subsequent age-hardening during ten years were studied. It was shown that ion implantation and subsequent masstransfer process results in sufficient long-term stable changes of the microhardness. (authors)

  4. Single Tooth Replacement Using InCeram Resin Bonded Fixed Partial Denture: A Clinical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslehifard, Elnaz; Farid, Farzaneh

    2014-01-01

    This clinical report describes a treatment option for replacement of a missing mandibular anterior tooth using InCeram resin bonded fixed partial denture (RBFPD). The conventional approach for replacing mandibular incisors dictates the placement of either a conventional porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) bridge, Maryland bridge, or fiber-reinforced composite veneer bridge and several appearance-related disadvantages have been reported in the use of a prosthesis that incorporates a metal substructure. The InCeram bridge is a minimally invasive restoration and eliminates undesirable incisal graying frequently observed in metal RBFPDs. This method was successfully clinically applied to overcome shortcomings of other approaches that may require a minimal invasive technique to preserve lasting sound tooth structure.

  5. Single Tooth Replacement Using InCeram Resin Bonded Fixed Partial Denture: A Clinical Report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elnaz Moslehifard

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This clinical report describes a treatment option for replacement of a missing mandibular anterior tooth using InCeram resin bonded fixed partial denture (RBFPD. The conventional approach for replacing mandibular incisors dictates the placement of either a conventional porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM bridge, Maryland bridge, or fiber-reinforced composite veneer bridge and several appearance-related disadvantages have been reported in the use of a prosthesis that incorporates a metal substructure. The InCeram bridge is a minimally invasive restoration and eliminates undesirable incisal graying frequently observed in metal RBFPDs. This method was successfully clinically applied to overcome shortcomings of other approaches that may require a minimal invasive technique to preserve lasting sound tooth structure.

  6. The effect of resorbable membranes on one-stage ridge augmentation in anterior single-tooth replacement: A randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonker, Brend P; Wolvius, Eppo B; van der Tas, Justin T; Pijpe, Justin

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of resorbable membranes on one-stage ridge augmentation procedures in small (2-4 mm) buccal bony dehiscences in anterior maxillary single-tooth replacement. Patients with a buccal bony dehiscence after implant placement in the esthetic zone were randomly allocated to one-stage ridge augmentation with (M+) or without a membrane (M-). Second-phase surgery was performed after 8 weeks, and follow-up was performed 1, 6, and ≥12 months after loading. Outcomes included implant survival and success, complications, clinical and radiographic parameters, esthetic results and patient satisfaction. Fifty-two patients were randomized to one-stage ridge augmentation with (n = 25) or without use of a membrane (n = 27). No significant differences in implant survival and success have been observed. The risk of having a small mucosal dehiscence was more than six times higher in the M+ group than in the M- group (RR 6.24, 95% CI 0.81 to 48.21). At the last follow-up, the bleeding index (BI) was marginally higher in the M+ group (14/9/2/0) compared to the M- group (24/2/0/0) (U = 205, Z = -2.97, p = .003, r = .42). The median change in marginal bone level was statistically lower in the M+ group (0.06 mm) than the M- group (0.60 mm) at last follow-up (U = 120, Z = -2.73 a p = .006 r = .42). Total pink esthetic index (PES) and white esthetic score (WES) and combined PES/WES were not significantly different between treatment groups at more than 12 months after loading. Only the subcategory root convexity/soft tissue color scored significantly lower in the M+ group (1.5) compared to the M- group (2.0) at the last follow-up (U = 172, Z = -2.34, p = .019 r = .34). No differences were found in patient satisfaction. The use of a resorbable membrane in small buccal bony dehiscences in anterior maxillary single-tooth replacement resulted in less marginal bone loss, but showed more mucosal dehiscences, higher bleeding scores and lower

  7. Advanced single tooth torquing plier with high precision: A clinical innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Raghuwanshi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Torque is the force which gives the operator control over the movements of roots of teeth in bilateral direction. There are various pliers available to apply torque in individual tooth, but none of the pliers are capable of measuring accurately the degrees of torque incorporated, so we have attempted to make a modified torquing plier to incorporate and measure the degrees of incorporated torque precisely.

  8. Single Tooth Replacement Using InCeram Resin Bonded Fixed Partial Denture: A Clinical Report.

    OpenAIRE

    Elnaz Moslehifard; Farzaneh Farid

    2014-01-01

    This clinical report describes a treatment option for replacement of a missing mandibular anterior tooth using InCeram resin bonded fixed partial denture (RBFPD). The conventional approach for replacing mandibular incisors dictates the placement of either a conventional porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) bridge, Maryland bridge, or fiber-reinforced composite veneer bridge and several appearance-related disadvantages have been reported in the use of a prosthesis that incorporates a metal substruct...

  9. Immediate, single stage, truly anatomic zirconia implant in lower molar replacement: a case report with 2.5 years follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirker, W; Wiedemann, D; Lidauer, A; Kocher, A A

    2011-02-01

    This report demonstrates the clinical use of a modified, truly anatomic, root-analogue zirconia implant for immediate replacement of a two-rooted, left first mandibular molar. A 50-year-old female patient with chronic apical periodontitis of the left mandibulary first molar was referred and the tooth was extracted. The mesial root had to be removed surgically due to a root fracture. A truly anatomical, root identical, roughened zirconia implant modified by macro-retentions was manufactured and placed into the extraction socket by tapping 7 days later. After 4 months a composite crown was cemented in place. No complications occurred during the healing period. A good functional and aesthetic result was achieved with minimal bone resorption and soft tissue recession at 30 months follow-up. This report describes the successful clinical use of an immediate, single stage, truly anatomical root-analogue zirconia implant for replacement of a two-rooted tooth. Significant modifications such as macro-retentions yielded primary stability and excellent osseointegration. This novel approach is minimally invasive, respects the underlying anatomy, aids socket prevention, is time- and cost-saving with good patient acceptance as there is no need for bone drilling, sinus lift, bone augmentation or other traumatic procedures. Copyright © 2010 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Anterior single implants with different neck designs : 5 Year results of a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hartog, Laurens; Meijer, Henny J A; Vissink, Arjan; Raghoebar, Gerry M

    BACKGROUND: The design of the implant neck might be significant for preservation of marginal bone. PURPOSE: To compare the 5-year radiographic and clinical outcome of single anterior implants provided with a smooth neck, a rough neck or a scalloped rough neck. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 93 Patients with

  11. Rutherford backscattering, nuclear reaction and channeling studies of nitrogen implanted single-crystal stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, M.M.; Ewan, G.T.; Mitchell, I.V.; Plattner, H.H.

    1983-01-01

    The three different methods were used to investigate a single crystal of stainless steel implanted to different doses by 40 keV 15 N 2 + ions. Conclusions are drawn on the position of nitrogen; comparison is made with implantation of deuterium and neon. (G.Q.)

  12. Reliability testing of indirect composites as single implant restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Marcelo; Bonfante, Estevam; Silva, Nelson Rfa; Coelho, Paulo G

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the reliability and failure modes of indirect composites as single-unit implant crowns. Thirty-eight custom-milled titanium alloy locking-taper abutments were divided into two groups (n = 19 each), and crown build-up of a mandibular molar was accomplished using two indirect composite systems (Ceramage, Shofu, Kyoto, Japan; Diamond Crown, DRM, Branford, CT). Three crowns of each material were loaded until failure for determination of the step-stress profiles. Reliability testing started at a load 30% of the mean load to failure and used three profiles with increasing fatigue loading (step stress). Weibull curves with 300 N stress and 90% confidence intervals were calculated and plotted using a power-law relationship. Weibull modulus "Beta" and characteristic strength "Eta" were identified, and a contour plot was used (Beta vs. Eta) for examining differences between groups. Specimens were inspected in polarized light and scanning electron microscope for fracture analysis. Use level Weibull probability showed fatigue being a damage factor only for the Ceramage group (β= 3.39) but not for the Diamond Crown group (β= 0.40). Overlap in the confidence bounds resulted in no statistical difference. Irrespective of composite system, fracture initiated in the region immediately below the contact between the indenter and the cusp, with the crack propagating toward the margins of cohesive failure. No significant differences were observed in life and Weibull probability calculations for Ceramage and Diamond Crown veneered onto Ti alloy abutments. Failure modes comprised composite veneer chippings. © 2011 by The American College of Prosthodontists.

  13. Single molar replacement with a progressive thread design implant system: a retrospective clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanos, G E; Nentwig, G H

    2000-01-01

    Many clinical studies have shown that replacement of molars with only 1 implant is commonly associated with various functional complications, such as implant fracture and screw loosening. Thus, multiple implants have been recommended to withstand the high occlusal forces present in the molar region. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the clinical response to the use of single implants with a progressive thread design (Ankylos) in the replacement of molar teeth. Fifty-eight implants (10 in the maxilla and 48 in the mandible) were placed in 51 patients. The implants were in situ for 29.30 +/- 16.52 months and in function for 20.60 +/- 16.64 months. All crowns were cemented to the abutments. The crown occlusion was adjusted to obtain minimal normal contacts in the centric occlusion and eccentric positions. Implants were clinically and radiographically evaluated, and clinical indices (Plaque Index, Sulcus Bleeding Index, probing pocket depth, keratinized mucosa width, Perio-test) were recorded immediately before the placement of the prosthesis and once annually. Vertical and horizontal bone loss were also examined radiographically. Two implants were lost (1 because of fracture in a patient who was a bruxer and another because of abutment fracture in the endosseous part of the implant). All clinical and radiographic parameters of most of the implants were comparable to the values found for the same type of implant in other clinical indications. The reduced incidence of failure (96.55% survival rate) found in this study with the Ankylos implant system compared to the results reported in the literature indicate that this system can be used for the replacement of molars using single-implant-supported restorations.

  14. Immediate occlusal loading of single lower molars using Brånemark System Wide-Platform TiUnite implants: an interim report of a prospective open-ended clinical multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calandriello, Roberto; Tomatis, Massimiliano; Vallone, Roberto; Rangert, Bo; Gottlow, Jan

    2003-01-01

    First and second molars in the lower jaw are the most commonly missing teeth. As in other jaw regions with tooth loss, implant therapy is an attractive concept. Owing to the wide dimension of the molar teeth, wide implants seem to be a natural choice. However, wide implants in posterior mandibular regions sometimes present a problem. As an oxidized surface seems to facilitate implant integration and to result in a stronger fixation to bone, it was hypothesized that this surface would improve the performance of wide implants in posterior mandibles. As high initial stability most often is achieved in this region, it was hypothesized that the load per se is not a problem. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate immediate loading of Brånemark System TiUnite Wide-Platform implants (Nobel Biocare AB, Gothenburg, Sweden) supporting single molar crowns in the lower jaw. The study includes 44 patients treated in three separate private dental offices between March 2001 and June 2002. A total of 50 implants were placed, and all implants have passed the 6-month follow-up; 24 have been followed up for 1 year. All implants were provided with provisional crowns in centric occlusion at the time of surgery. No implant has been lost. Marginal bone levels were found in accordance with normal biologic width requirements. Resonance frequency analysis showed high and consistent implant stability. No biomechanical problems were found associated with the use of wide implants, and the potential physiologic problem in dense mandibular bone was eliminated. Although limited by being a short-term study, the result encourages immediate loading of single Brånemark System TiUnite Wide-Platform implants placed in the molar regions in the lower jaw.

  15. Effect of misfit of cement-retained implant single crowns on crestal bone changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Jung; Papaspyridakos, Panos; Guze, Kevin; Singh, Medha; Weber, Hans-Peter; Gallucci, German O

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this clinical study was to compare peri-implant crestal bone levels between misfitting (overhanging/open margin) cement-retained implant single crowns (SCs) vs accurately fitted implant SCs. Seventeen subjects were divided into two groups: test group (misfitting crowns, n = 10) and control group (accurately fitted crowns, n = 7). Crestal bone level changes were assessed using digital software. The average differences in mean bone loss within and between the two groups were statistically significant. Cement-retained implant SCs with marginal misfit resulted in more crestal bone loss than accurately fitted crowns after a mean of 3 years in function.

  16. Immediate loading of post-extractive versus delayed placed single implants in the anterior maxilla: outcome of a pragmatic multicenter randomised controlled trial 1-year after loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Marco; Barausse, Carlo; Pistilli, Roberto; Jacotti, Michele; Grandi, Giovanni; Tuco, Lorenzo; Felice, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of immediate post-extractive single implants with delayed implants, placed in preserved sockets after 4 months of healing. Implants that achieved an insertion torque of at least 35 Ncm were immediately non-occlusally loaded. Just after tooth extraction, and in the presence of less than 4 mm of vertical loss of the buccal bone in relation to the palatal wall, 106 patients requiring a single immediate post-extractive implant in the maxilla from second to second premolar were randomly allocated to immediate implant placement (immediate group; 54 patients) or to socket preservation using anorganic bovine bone covered by a resorbable collagen barrier (delayed group; 52 patients), according to a parallel group design at three different centres. Bone-to-implant gaps were to be filled with anorganic bovine bone, however this was not carried out in 17 patients (corresponding to 40% of those who should have been grafted). Four months after socket preservation, delayed implants were placed. Implants inserted with an insertion torque of at least 35 Ncm were immediately loaded with non-occluding provisional single crowns, then replaced after 4 months by definitive crowns. Patients were followed up to 1 year after loading. Outcome measures were implant failures, complications, aesthetics assessed using the pink esthetic score (PES), peri-implant marginal bone level changes and patient satisfaction recorded by blinded assessors. Nineteen (35%) implants were not immediately loaded in the immediate group versus 39 (75%) implants in the delayed placement group because an insertion torque superior to 35 Ncm could not be obtained. Six patients dropped out 4 months after loading from the delayed group versus none in the immediate group. Two implants failed in the immediate group (6%) versus none in the delayed group, with the difference showing no statistical significance (difference in proportions = 0.04; 95% CI: -0.03 to 0.11; P = 0.187). Eight minor

  17. Does crown/implant ratio influence the survival and marginal bone level of short single implants in the mandibular molar? A preliminary investigation consisting of 12 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghariani, L; Segaan, L; Rayyan, M M; Galli, S; Jimbo, R; Ibrahim, A

    2016-02-01

    Crown/implant (C/I) ratio has been proven to not affect the survival of the implants; however, it is also a fact that no evidence exists with regard to the use of single short implants in the mandibular molar. The aim of this study was to determine whether the crown/implant ratios of single implant-supported fixed restorations on implants of 6-8 mm in the mandibular molar have an impact on the implant survival and marginal bone maintenance. Twelve short dental implants (6-8 mm) were installed and restored with single crowns, loaded after 3 months of healing. The restorations were divided according to crown-to-implant ratio into two groups: Group 1: C/I implant placement and after 12 months follow-up from loading. Reduced implant/crown ratio shown no statistic significant differences on implant survival and the alveolar bone level compared with recommended implant/crown ratio. Within the limitation of this study, it can be concluded that reduced C/I ratio could be used as a substitute for recommended C/I ratio in severely mandibular atrophic residual alveolar ridges. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Clinical Results and Technical Complications of Posterior Implant-Supported Modified Monolithic Zirconia Single Crowns and Short-Span Fixed Dental Prostheses: A 2-Year Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chih-Wen; Chien, Chia-Hui; Chen, Chun-Jung; Papaspyridakos, Panos

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this clinical trial was to investigate the clinical outcomes of implant-supported modified monolithic zirconia single crowns (SCs) and short-span fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) after a follow-up of 2 years. Twenty-seven patients in need of implant-supported SCs or 3-unit FDPs in the posterior maxilla or mandible were consecutively selected for this study. A total of 56 modified monolithic zirconia prostheses including 44 SCs (8 screw-retained, 36 cement-retained) and twelve 3-unit FDPs (5 screw-retained, 7 cement-retained) were included in this study. All patients were followed at 6 months, 12 months, 18 months, and 2 years after placement of the modified monolithic zirconia prostheses. During the follow-up period, all prostheses were evaluated with clinical and radiographic examinations. The following technical parameters were assessed: framework fracture, fracture of veneering porcelain, screw loosening, loss of retention because of prosthesis de-cementation and opposing tooth fracture. No implant was lost during the follow-up period, yielding a 2-year implant survival of 100%. One FDP failed because of framework fracture. The overall prosthesis survival rate was 98.2% after 2 years of clinical service. During the study, 5 complication events were observed in 3 SCs and one FDP, including one fracture of veneering porcelain and 2 screw loosenings in 3 SCs, and loss of retention and opposing tooth fracture in the same FDP. Therefore, the complication-free rate of prostheses was 91.1%. According to the results of this study, the modified monolithic zirconia design used in this study resulted in a favorable short-term outcome for posterior implant-supported SCs and 3-unit FDPs. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  19. Esthetic outcome of single implant crowns following type 1 and type 3 implant placement: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jun-Yu; Wang, Ren; Zhuang, Long-Fei; Gu, Ying-Xin; Qiao, Shi-Chong; Lai, Hong-Chang

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the current review was to systematically appraise the esthetic outcome of soft tissue around single implant crowns following type 1 and type 3 implants placement in published dental literature. A PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials search up to March 2013 was conducted for articles published in the dental literature and limited to human trials with no language restricted. Furthermore, the reference lists of related articles were systematically screened, and additional manual searches were also performed. The primary outcome was pink esthetics score (PES). The electronic search in the database of PubMed, Embase, and the Cohrane Central Register of Controlled Trials resulted in the identification of 463 titles. These titles were initially screened by the two independent reviewers for possible inclusion. Screening the abstracts and titles led to 28 articles for future full-text consideration. From these articles, 18 studies were excluded. Manual search identified one article. After quality assessment, eight studies were included in this review. This review showed that no significant difference of PES index could be found between type 1 and type 3 implant placement. According to the current evidence, short-term esthetic outcomes of peri-implant soft tissue did not show significant difference following type 1 and type 3 implants placement with well-selected patients. However, caution should be taken for clinicians to extrapolate this result to all types of patients, as more randomized clinical trials are needed for long-term soft-tissue esthetic outcome in patients with high esthetic risk following type 1 implant placement. PES frequency, peri-implant condition and other risk factors for peri-implantitis are recommended to be reported for future studies. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Cost estimation of single-implant treatment in the periodontally healthy patient after 16-22 years of follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierens, M; Vandeweghe, S; Kisch, J; Nilner, K; Cosyn, J; De Bruyn, H

    2015-11-01

    Costs for single-implant treatment are mostly described for the initial treatment. Information on the additional cost related to aftercare is scarce. To make an estimation of complication costs of single implants in periodontally healthy patients after 16-22 years and to compare costs for various prosthetic designs. Patients with a single implant were recalled for a clinical examination and file investigation. Prosthetic designs included single-tooth (ST) and CeraOne (CO) abutments supporting a porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM), all-ceramic (CER), or gold-acrylic (ACR) crown. Costs related to failures or technical, biologic, and aesthetic complications were retrieved from patient's records. Total and yearly additional complication costs were calculated as a percentage relative to the initial cost. Chair time needed to solve the complication was recorded and prosthetic designs were compared by Kruskal-Wallis tests. Fifty patients with 59 surviving implants were clinically investigated. Additional complication costs after a mean follow-up of 18.5 years amounted to 23% (range 0-110%) of the initial treatment cost. In total, 39% of implants presented with no costs, whereas 22% and 8% encountered additional costs over 50% and 75%, respectively. In 2%, the complication costs exceeded the initial cost. The mean yearly additional cost was 1.2% (range 0-6%) and mean complication time per implant was 67 min (range 0-345 min). Differences between prosthetic designs (CO, ST-PFM, ST-ACR) were statistically significant for total cost (P = 0.011), yearly cost (P = 0.023), and time (P = 0.023). Pairwise comparison revealed significant lower costs for CO compared with ST-ACR reconstructions. Patients should be informed about additional costs related to complications with single implants. The mean additional cost spent on complications was almost one-quarter of the initial treatment price. A majority of implants presented with lower additional costs, whereas the highest complication

  1. A systematic approach to definitive planning and designing single and multiple unit implant abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunagaran, Sanjay; Markose, Sony; Paprocki, Gregory; Wicks, Russell

    2014-12-01

    With an increase in the availability of implant restorative components, the selection of an appropriate implant abutment for a given clinical situation has become more challenging. This article describes a systematic protocol to help the practitioner more thoughtfully select abutments for single and multiple unit fixed implant prostheses. The article examines the evaluation, planning, design, and fabrication processes for the definitive restoration. It includes an assessment of a variety of factors, namely restorative space, soft and hard tissues, the location of the implant platform, the type of platform connection, platform switching indications, tissue collar heights, emergence profile, implant angulation, and finally the design and esthetic options for the final implant abutment. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  2. Bone grafting of cleft lip and palate patients for placement of endosseous implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansma, J; Raghoebar, GM; Batenburg, RHK; Stellingsma, C; van Oort, RP

    Objective: Fixation of a prosthesis or single tooth replacement using osseointegrated implants has the potential to overcome functional and psychological inconveniences that many patients experience from such appliances. However, the dimensions of the recipient site are relatively often inadequate

  3. Esthetic outcome for maxillary anterior single implants assessed by different dental specialists

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Dosari, Abdullah; Al-Rowis, Ra'ed; Moslem, Feras; Alshehri, Fahad; Ballo, Ahmed M.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to assess the esthetic outcome of maxillary anterior single implants by comparing the esthetic perception of dental professionals and patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty-three patients with single implants in the esthetic zone were enrolled in this study. Dentists of four different dental specialties (Three orthodontists, three oral surgeons, three prosthodontists, and three periodontists) evaluated the pink esthetic score (PES)/white esthetic score (WES) ...

  4. Aesthetic Surgical Approach for Bone Dehiscence Treatment by Means of Single Implant and Interdental Tissue Regeneration: A Case Report with Five Years of Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Lombardo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The replacement of single anterior teeth by means of endosseous implants implies the achievement of success in restoring both aesthetic and function. However, the presence of wide endoperiodontal lesions can lead to horizontal hard and soft tissues defects after tooth extraction, making it impossible to correctly place an implant in the compromised alveolar socket. Vertical augmentation procedures have been proposed to solve these clinical situations, but the amount of new regenerated bone is still not predictable. Furthermore, bone augmentation can be complicated by the presence of adjacent teeth, especially if they bring with them periodontal defects. Therefore, it is used to restore periodontal health of adjacent teeth before making any augmentation procedures and to wait a certain healing period before placing an implant in vertically augmented sites, otherwise risking to obtain a nonsatisfactory aesthetic result. All of these procedures, however, lead to an expansion of treatment time which should affect patient compliance. For this reason, this case report suggests a surgical technique to perform vertical bone augmentation at a single gap left by a central upper incisor while placing an implant and simultaneously to regenerate the periodontal attachment of an adjacent lateral incisor, without compromising the aesthetic result.

  5. Aesthetic Surgical Approach for Bone Dehiscence Treatment by Means of Single Implant and Interdental Tissue Regeneration: A Case Report with Five Years of Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Giorgio; Pighi, Jacopo; Corrocher, Giovanni; Mascellaro, Anna; Lehrberg, Jeffrey; Marincola, Mauro; Nocini, Pier Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The replacement of single anterior teeth by means of endosseous implants implies the achievement of success in restoring both aesthetic and function. However, the presence of wide endoperiodontal lesions can lead to horizontal hard and soft tissues defects after tooth extraction, making it impossible to correctly place an implant in the compromised alveolar socket. Vertical augmentation procedures have been proposed to solve these clinical situations, but the amount of new regenerated bone is still not predictable. Furthermore, bone augmentation can be complicated by the presence of adjacent teeth, especially if they bring with them periodontal defects. Therefore, it is used to restore periodontal health of adjacent teeth before making any augmentation procedures and to wait a certain healing period before placing an implant in vertically augmented sites, otherwise risking to obtain a nonsatisfactory aesthetic result. All of these procedures, however, lead to an expansion of treatment time which should affect patient compliance. For this reason, this case report suggests a surgical technique to perform vertical bone augmentation at a single gap left by a central upper incisor while placing an implant and simultaneously to regenerate the periodontal attachment of an adjacent lateral incisor, without compromising the aesthetic result. PMID:27119031

  6. The alveolar process following single-tooth extraction: a study of maxillary incisor and premolar sites in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misawa, Mônica; Lindhe, Jan; Araújo, Mauricio G

    2016-07-01

    The present investigation was performed to determine some dimensional alterations that occur in the alveolar process of the incisor and premolar sites of the maxilla following tooth removal. Computer-assisted cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans were obtained from the maxilla using an iCAT unit, and involved edentulous and contralateral tooth sites. For each site included in the study, parasagittal and axial reconstructions, 1 mm apart, were made and measurements of different variables (cross-sectional area, height, and width) performed. The study involved 69 subjects and disclosed that the cross-sectional area and the height and width of the alveolar process of the lateral incisor site were the smallest and those of the second premolar the largest. All parameters had been significantly reduced after the completion of the ≥1 year of healing. Thus, the overall (i) cross-sectional area was reduced from 99.1 to 65.0 mm(2) , (ii) the height from 11.5 to 9.5 mm, and (iii) the width from 8.5 to 3.2 mm (marginal 1/3(rd) ), 8.9 to 4.8 mm (middle portion), and 9.0 to 5.7 mm (apical portion). The removal of single tooth caused marked hard tissue diminution. The loss of hard tissue was most pronounced in the buccal and marginal portions of the edentulous ridge that in most sites had acquired a triangular shape. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Temporización inmediata de implantes unitarios en la maxila posterior Immediate temporization of posterior maxilla single tooth implant

    OpenAIRE

    Y Leighton; JC Carvajal; A Wolnitzky; R Silva; A Von Marttens

    2011-01-01

    Propósito: El presente artículo es un estudio prospectivo de las tasas de éxito implantaria y de las complicaciones mecánicas y biológicas en el tratamiento rehabilitador implanto-asistido del sector posterior de la maxila, mediante provisionalización inmediata. Material y Método: El estudio clínico observó a 21 sujetos desdentados parciales unitarios del sector posterior maxilar, con reborde cicatrizado y antagonista dentario natural, por un período de 6 meses, en los que se insertaron impla...

  8. Single Word and Sentence Intelligibility in Children with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khwaileh, Fadwa A.; Flipsen, Peter, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the intelligibility of speech produced by 17 children (aged 4-11 years) with cochlear implants. Stimulus items included sentences from the Beginners' Intelligibility Test (BIT) and words from the Children Speech Intelligibility Measure (CSIM). Naive listeners responded by writing sentences heard or with two types of responses…

  9. Mandibular single-implant overdentures: preliminary results of a randomised-control trial on early loading with different implant diameters and attachment systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsabeeha, Nabeel H M; Payne, Alan G T; De Silva, Rohana K; Thomson, W Murray

    2011-03-01

    To determine surgical and prosthodontic outcomes of mandibular single-implant overdentures, opposing complete maxillary dentures, using a wide diameter implant and large ball attachment system compared with different regular diameter implants with standard attachment systems. Thirty-six edentulous participants (mean age 68 years, SD 9.2) were randomly assigned into three treatment groups (n=12). A single implant was placed in the mandibular midline of participants to support an overdenture using a 6-week loading protocol. The control group received Southern regular implants and standard ball attachments. One group received Southern 8-mm-wide implants and large ball attachments. Another group received Neoss regular implants and Locator attachments. Parametric and non-parametric tests of a statistical software package (SPSS) were used to determine between groups differences in marginal bone loss, implant stability, implant, and prosthodontic success (PImplant success after 1 year was 75% for Southern regular implant (control) group; and 100% for the Southern wide and Neoss regular implant groups (P=0.038). Mean marginal bone loss at 1 year was 0.19 mm (SD 0.39) without significant differences observed. Implant stability quotient (ISQ) at baseline was significantly lower for the Southern regular (control) group than the other two groups (P=0.001; P=0.009). At 1 year, no significant difference in implant stability was observed (mean ISQ 74.6, SD 6.1). The change in implant stability from baseline to 1 year was significant for the control group (P=0.025). Prosthodontic success was comparable between the groups but the maintenance (41 events overall, mean 1.2) was greater for the Locator and the standard ball attachments. Mandibular single-implant overdentures are a successful treatment option for older edentulous adults with early loading protocol using implants of different diameters and with different attachment systems. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Retrospective analysis of 56 edentulous dental arches restored with 344 single-stage implants using an immediate loading fixed provisional protocol: statistical predictors of implant failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsel, Richard P; Liss, Mindy

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the effects of implant dimensions, surface treatment, location in the dental arch, numbers of supporting implant abutments, surgical technique, and generally recognized risk factors on the survival of a series of single-stage Straumann dental implants placed into edentulous arches using an immediate loading protocol. Each patient received between 4 and 18 implants in one or both dental arches. Periapical radiographs were obtained over a 2- to 10-year follow-up period to evaluate crestal bone loss following insertion of the definitive metal-ceramic fixed prostheses. Univariate tests for failure rates as a function of age ( or = 60 years), gender, smoking, bone grafting, dental arch, surface type, anterior versus posterior, number of implants per arch, and surgical technique were made using Fisher exact tests. The Cochran-Armitage test for trend was used to evaluate the presence of a linear trend in failure rates regarding implant length and implant diameter. Logistic regression modeling was used to determine which, if any, of the aforementioned factors would predict patient and implant failure. A significance criterion of P = .05 was utilized. Data were collected for 344 single-stage implants placed into 56 edentulous arches (39 maxillae and 17 mandibles) of 43 patients and immediately loaded with a 1-piece provisional fixed prosthesis. A total of 16 implants failed to successfully integrate, for a survival rate of 95.3%. Increased rates of failure were associated with reduced implant length, placement in the posterior region of the jaw, increased implant diameter, and surface treatment. Implant length emerged as the sole significant predictor of implant failure. In this retrospective analysis of 56 consecutively treated edentulous arches with multiple single-stage dental implants loaded immediately, reduced implant length was the sole significant predictor of failure.

  11. A Current Perspective on Screw-Retained Single-Implant Restorations: A Review of Pertinent Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, George

    2017-05-06

    There is a trend toward increased use of screw-retained single-implant restorations. A comprehensive literature review was undertaken to examine the data related to screw- and cement-retention and to objectively evaluate the innovations in implant dentistry that have led to this resurgence. When comparing the two options, survival and complication rates are similar, bone and soft-tissue levels are comparable, and zirconia offers esthetic advantages for both selections. Zirconia abutments with bonded titanium inserts provide esthetic alternatives to titanium abutments for both choices. Bone- and soft-tissue responses are similar, but residual cement of cement-retained restorations is associated with significant soft- and hard-tissue complications. The potential weakness of ceramic discontinuity of screw-access openings can be lessened by the incorporation of stronger ceramic materials such as zirconia and lithium disilicate. The overriding remaining indication for cement-retained restorations is to compensate for angled implants. Screw-retained single-implant crowns should be reconsidered for many clinical situations for the following reasons: Predictable retention and retrievability No potential for the biologic consequences associated with residual cement As with cement-retained restorations, the choice between metal ceramics or all ceramics Only one margin, at the implant/abutment interface A single abutment/crown ceramic margin that can extend gingivally to the implant interface Nearly imperceptible blend of a composite resin in ceramic abutment access openings One component instead of two, which may simplify the restorative process CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Innovations in implant and ceramic technology now give screw-retained prostheses the potential for esthetic, functional, and biologic outcomes that are comparable to those for cement-retained prostheses, while providing the advantages of predictable retrievability and avoidance of residual cement. Angled

  12. Clinical evaluation of 209 all-ceramic single crowns cemented on natural and implant-supported abutments with different luting agents: a 6-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Roberto; Galasso, Luigi; Tetè, Stefano; De Simone, Giorgio; Zarone, Fernando

    2012-04-01

    The Procera AllCeram™ system (Nobel Biocare AB, Göteborg, Sweden) is a valid alternative to metal-ceramic restorations. However, limited long-term data of its use for single crowns on natural and implant-supported abutments are available. The present study aimed at evaluating the clinical performances of Procera AllCeram single crowns in both anterior and posterior regions of the oral cavity either on natural tooth or implant abutments over a period of 6 years. Two hundred nine single crowns were fabricated and used in 112 patients. Zinc phosphate and resin luting agents were used to cement the restorations. The crowns were evaluated according to the California Dental Association's quality assessment system. Three crowns were lost at follow-up. Of the 206 restorations, which completed the 6-year follow-up, 9 crowns were affected by mechanical complications and 7 crowns failed. All surviving crowns were ranked as either excellent or acceptable. Cumulative survival and success rates of 95.2 and 90.9%, respectively, were recorded. Within the limitations of the present study, Procera AllCeram crowns proved to be a reliable clinical option to restore both anterior and posterior missing teeth either on natural or implant abutments. The resin cement used in the present study performed better than the zinc phosphate luting agent. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Immediate implant placement and provisionalisation in the aesthetic zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Nimwegen, W. G.; Goene, R. J.; Van Daelen, A. C. L.; Stellingsma, K.; Raghoebar, G. M.; Meijer, H. J. A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the outcome of immediate single-tooth implant placement and provisionalisation in the aesthetic zone regarding hard and soft peri-implant tissue parameters and patient-related outcome measures in a private practice. All consecutively treated patients

  14. Immediate Nonfunctional Loading of Two Single-Maxillary Postextractive Implants: 6-Year Postloading Results of Two Case Reports

    OpenAIRE

    Ariano, Vincenzo; Mancini, Manuele; Cardi, Andrea; Cond?, Roberta; Cerroni, Loredana; Pasquantonio, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare crestal bone loss of single-maxillary immediate postextractive implants and immediate nonfunctional loading (INFL) during 72 months of follow-up. Material and Methods. Two single titanium implants (Certain Prevail, Biomet 3I, USA) were placed in two patients using INFL technique. Implant stability and crestal bone level were measured on periapical radiographs at 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery. Results. All osseointegrated implants...

  15. Heavy doping of CdTe single crystals by Cr ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovych, Volodymyr D.; Böttger, Roman; Heller, Rene; Zhou, Shengqiang; Bester, Mariusz; Cieniek, Bogumil; Mroczka, Robert; Lopucki, Rafal; Sagan, Piotr; Kuzma, Marian

    2018-03-01

    Implantation of bulk CdTe single crystals with high fluences of 500 keV Cr+ ions was performed to achieve Cr concentration above the equilibrium solubility limit of this element in CdTe lattice. The structure and composition of the implanted samples were studied using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) to characterize the incorporation of chromium into the host lattice and to investigate irradiation-induced damage build-up. It was found that out-diffusion of Cr atoms and sputtering of the targets alter the depth distribution and limit concentration of the projectile ions in the as-implanted samples. Appearance of crystallographically oriented, metallic α-Cr nanoparticles inside CdTe matrix was found after implantation, as well as a strong disorder at the depth far beyond the projected range of the implanted ions.

  16. Evaluation of single implants placed in the posterior mandibular area under immediate loading: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidetti, L G C; Monnazzi, M S; Piveta, A C G; Gabrielli, M A C; Gabrielli, M F R; Pereira Filho, V A

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the survival of single dental implants subjected to immediate function. Twelve patients with edentulous areas in the posterior mandible were included in the study. All received at least one regular platform dental implant (3.75mm×11mm or 3.75mm×13mm). Clinical and radiographic parameters were evaluated. The survival rate after 12 months was 83.3%. The implants showed no clinical mobility, had implant stability quotient values (ISQ; Osstell) around 70, bone loss of up to 2mm, and a probing depth of ≤3mm. Although the posterior mandible is an area in which the immediate loading of dental implants should be performed with caution, this treatment presented a good success rate in the present study sample. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Iridium 192 nomogram system for single plane implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, D.J. Jr.; Memula, N.; Doss, L.L.

    1986-01-01

    Nomograms for square planar arrays spanning the range from 3 X 3 cm to 10 X 10 cm were developed. The nomograms are intended to be used for pretreatment planning of implant geometry, so that the therapist may enter the operating room with a plan for the optimal implant in mind. We show that clinically useful implants are those in which the reference isodoses are fully coupled. Decoupling occurs when ribbon spacing exceeds approximately 1.2 cm and leads to undesirable ''cold spots'' within the treatment volume. Ribbon spacing of 1.0 cm is recommended. This represents a trade-off between adequate ribbon coupling and minimum tissue damage from trocar placement. For clinically useful arrays, the area enclosed by the reference isodose contour (85% of the maximum dose rate) is approximately 50% of the array area. Reference isodose contour and its enclosed area are independent of seed strength for a given array, as long as all seeds within the array are of equal strength

  18. Effects of different loading protocols on the secondary stability and peri-implant bone density of the single implants in the posterior maxilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoğlan, Mücahide; Tatli, Ufuk; Kurtoğlu, Cem; Salimov, Fariz; Kürkçü, Mehmet

    2017-08-01

    Immediate or early loading of dental implants becomes a clinically feasible concept. The aim was to evaluate the effects of different loading protocols (immediate, early, and delayed) on secondary stability and peri-implant bone density of single implants in the posterior maxilla. Thirty-nine implants (Dentium, South-Korea) were placed in 39 patients. After placement, implant stability values (ISQ) and baseline peri-implant bone density values derived from cone-beam computed tomography were recorded. Thirteen implants were included randomly in each loading groups. The secondary ISQ values were recorded during follow-up visits. Peri-implant bone density values were measured 1 year after placement again. Data was statistically analyzed. Immediate-loaded group showed the lowest ISQ values, 1 month after placement. During the next follow-up visits, delayed-loaded group showed the lowest ISQ values while other groups showed comparable results. Early loading increased the peri-implant bone density greater than the other groups. The peri-implant bone of early-loaded implants was significantly denser than that of immediate- and delayed-loaded implants, 1 year after placement. Density increment can be judged as the radiological findings of loaded-bone, which may also reduce the need for histomorphometric analysis of human biopsy to evaluate the bone reaction around the implants. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Development of a keV single-ion-implanter for nanofabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, C.; Jamieson, D.N.; Hopf, T.; Tamanyan, G.; Spizziri, P.; Pakes, C.; Andresen, S.E.; Hudson, F.; Gauja, E.; Dzurak, A.; Clark, R.G.

    2005-01-01

    Traditional methods of doping semiconductors have a difficulty meeting the demand for high precision doping due to large statistical fluctuations in the numbers of dopant atoms introduced in the ever shrinking volume in micro- and nano-electronics devices, especially when the fabrication process approaches the nanometre scale. The statistical fluctuations in doping semiconductors for the fabrication of devices with a very small feature size may lead to inconsistent and unreliable performance. This paper describes the adaptation of a commercial ion implanter into a single-ion-implantation system for the accurate delivery of dopants into a nanometre or micrometre area in a silicon substrate. All the implanted ions can be accurately counted with near 100% certainty through online detection using the silicon substrate itself as an ion detector. A variety of ion species including B + , N + , P + at the energy range of 10-15 keV can be delivered in the single ion implantation system. (author). 6 refs., 6 figs

  20. Immediate Replacement of Single Teeth With Immediately Loaded Implants: Retrospective Analysis of a Clinical Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Ashok; Kaus, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this retrospective analysis of clinical data was to evaluate the predictability of replacing failing single teeth with immediately placed implants loaded via a transitional (provisional) restoration. Implants were placed immediately at the time of extraction of failing single teeth that met predetermined inclusion criteria. A detailed protocol was followed to enable immediate loading of the implant with the use of prefabricated abutments in combination with transitional restorations. A total of 375 immediate implants had been placed in 274 patients and loaded immediately. With the certainty of 95%, an estimated overall mean survival rate better than 97.6% was observed after a mean observation period of 36 months. The maximum observation period was 142 months. Four implants had been lost in function. Immediate loading of immediately placed implants is a possible treatment option that might be predictably and successfully achieved. Implants of adequate primary stability coupled with a range of prefabricated abutments permit function to be achieved using transitional restorations. The preliminary results of this clinical case series are very promising.

  1. Biomaterial Selection for Tooth Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhenglin; Nie, Hemin; Wang, Shuang; Lee, Chang Hun; Li, Ang; Fu, Susan Y.; Zhou, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Biomaterials are native or synthetic polymers that act as carriers for drug delivery or scaffolds for tissue regeneration. When implanted in vivo, biomaterials should be nontoxic and exert intended functions. For tooth regeneration, biomaterials have primarily served as a scaffold for (1) transplanted stem cells and/or (2) recruitment of endogenous stem cells. This article critically synthesizes our knowledge of biomaterial use in tooth regeneration, including the selection of native and/or synthetic polymers, three-dimensional scaffold fabrication, stem cell transplantation, and stem cell homing. A tooth is a complex biological organ. Tooth loss represents the most common organ failure. Tooth regeneration encompasses not only regrowth of an entire tooth as an organ, but also biological restoration of individual components of the tooth including enamel, dentin, cementum, or dental pulp. Regeneration of tooth root represents perhaps more near-term opportunities than the regeneration of the whole tooth. In the adult, a tooth owes its biological vitality, arguably more, to the root than the crown. Biomaterials are indispensible for the regeneration of tooth root, tooth crown, dental pulp, or an entire tooth. PMID:21699433

  2. PAC studies of implanted $^{111}\\!$Ag in single-crystalline ZnO

    CERN Document Server

    Rita, E; Wahl, Ulrich; Alves, E; Lima-Lopes, Armandina Maria; Carvalho-Soares, João

    2005-01-01

    The local environment of implanted $^{111}\\!$Ag ( t$_{1/2}$=7.45d ) in single-crystalline [0001] ZnO was evaluated by means of the perturbed angular correlation (PAC) technique. Following the 60 keV low dose ($1\\!\\times\\!10^{13}$ cm$^{-2}$) $^{111}\\!$Ag implantation, the PAC measurements were performed for the as-implanted state and following 30 min in vacuum annealing steps, at temperatures ranging from 200 ºC to 1050 ºC. The results revealed that 42% of the probes are located at defect-free S$\\scriptstyle_\\textrm{Zn}$ sites ($\

  3. Effects of implant diameter and prosthesis retention system on the reliability of single crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfante, Estevam A; Almeida, Erika O; Lorenzoni, Fabio C; Coelho, Paulo G

    2015-01-01

    The probability of survival of implant-supported prostheses may be affected by the interplay between different implant diameters supporting screwed or cemented crowns. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of implant diameter and prosthesis retention system on the reliability and failure modes of single crowns. Internal-hexagon implants were divided into six groups (n = 21 each) according to implant diameter (3.3, 4.0, or 5.0 mm) and crown retention system (screwed or cemented). Abutments were torqued to the implants, and crowns were then fixed and subjected to step-stress accelerated life testing in water. Use-level probability Weibull curves and reliability for missions of 50,000 cycles at 100, 150, and 200 N were calculated. Failure analysis was performed. Cemented systems presented higher reliability than screwed ones, except between 3.3-mm-diameter cemented and screwed systems at a load of 100 or 150 N. Failure modes were restricted to the abutment screw and varied with implant diameter only in the cement-retained groups. Higher reliability was observed for cement-retained crowns and implants of larger diameter compared to screw-retained and smaller diameter. Failure modes differed between groups.

  4. [TRENDS OF PERMANENT PACEMAKER IMPLANTATION IN A SINGLE CENTER OVER A 20-YEAR PERIOD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelli, Dante; Ilan, Limor Bushar; Freedberg, Nahum A; Feldman, Alexander; Turgeman, Yoav

    2015-05-01

    To review the changes in permanent pacemaker implantation indications, pacing modes and patients' demographics over a 20-year period. We retrospectively retrieved data on patients who underwent first implantation of the pacemaker between 1-1-1991 and 31-12-2010. One thousand and nine (1,009) patients underwent a first pacemaker implantation during that period; 535 were men (53%), their mean age was 74.6±19.5 years; the highest rate of implanted pacemaker was in patients ranging in age from 70-79 years, however there was an increasing number of patients aged over 80 years. The median survival time after initial pacemaker implantation was 8 years. Syncope was the most common symptom (62.5%) and atrioventricular block was the most common electrocardiographic indication (56.4%) leading to pacemaker implantation. There was increased utilization of dual chamber and rate responsive pacemakers over the years. There was no difference regarding mode selection between genders. Pacemaker implantation rates have increased over a 20-year period. Dual chamber replaced most of the single ventricular chamber pacemaker and rate responsive pacemakers became the norm. The data of a small volume center are similar to those reported in pacemaker surveys of high volume pacemaker implantation centers. They confirm adherence to the published guidelines for pacing.

  5. Formation of oriented nickel aggregates in rutile single crystals by Ni implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, M.M., E-mail: mmcruz@fc.ul.pt [CFMC, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Dep. Física, Fac. Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Silva, R.C. da [IST/ITN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, E.N.10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); CFNUL, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Pinto, J.V. [CFMC, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); CFNUL, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Borges, R.P. [CFMC, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Franco, N. [IST/ITN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, E.N.10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); CFNUL, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Casaca, A. [CFMC, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa—ISEL, R. Cons. Emídio Navarro 1, 1959-007 Lisboa (Portugal); Alves, E. [IST/ITN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, E.N.10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); CFNUL, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Godinho, M. [CFMC, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Dep. Física, Fac. Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2013-08-15

    The magnetic and electrical properties of Ni implanted single crystalline TiO{sub 2} rutile were studied for nominal implanted fluences between 0.5×10{sup 17} cm{sup −2} and 2.0×10{sup 17} cm{sup −2} with 150 keV energy, corresponding to maximum atomic concentrations between 9 at% and 27 at% at 65 nm depth, in order to study the formation of metallic oriented aggregates. The results indicate that the as implanted crystals exhibit superparamagnetic behavior for the two higher fluences, which is attributed to the formation of nanosized nickel clusters with an average size related with the implanted concentration, while only paramagnetic behavior is observed for the lowest fluence. Annealing at 1073 K induces the aggregation of the implanted nickel and enhances the magnetization in all samples. The associated anisotropic behavior indicates preferred orientations of the nickel aggregates in the rutile lattice consistent with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry—channelling results. Electrical conductivity displays anisotropic behavior but no magnetoresistive effects were detected. - Author-Highlights: • Ni nano-aggregates were grown on TiO{sub 2} using Ni implantation with different fluences. • In the as implanted state, the aggregates size is a function of the implanted fluence. • Ni aggregates are oriented within the rutile structure-2 orientations are proposed.

  6. One abutment-one time versus a provisional abutment in immediately loaded post-extractive single implants: a 1-year follow-up of a multicentre randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandi, Tommaso; Guazzi, Paolo; Samarani, Rawad; Maghaireh, Hassan; Grandi, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    To compare immediately loaded post-extractive single implants using a definitive abutment versus provisional abutment later replaced by custom-made abutment. In two private clinics, 28 patients in need of one single post-extractive implant in the maxilla or mandible from the left second premolar to the right second premolar area were randomised shortly before tooth extraction to provisional abutment (PA) and definitive abutment (DA) groups. Three patients had to be excluded for buccal wall fracture after tooth extraction. In the PA group, implants were immediately restored using a platform-switched provisional titanium abutment and definitive platform-switched titanium abutments were used in the DA group. In both groups, a non-occluding provisional single crown was provided. Implants were definitively restored after 4 months. In the PA group, the abutment was removed and the impression was made directly on the implant platform. In the DA group an impression of the abutment was made using a retraction cord. Outcome measures were: implant failures; complications; and marginal peri-implant bone level changes. Patients were followed up to 1 year after loading. Twelve patients were randomised to the DA group and 13 patients to the PA group. At the 12-month follow-up, no implant failed. One biological complication occurred in the DA group and one mechanical complication occurred in the PA group. All complications were successfully treated. One year after loading, implants in the DA group lost an average of 0.11 mm (SD: 0.06) of periimplant bone and implants in PA group about 0.58 mm (SD: 0.11). At the 12-month follow-up, there was a statistically significant difference in bone level change between groups (mean difference: 0.48 mm, CI 95% 0.40; 0.55, P < 0.0001). Within the limits of this study, the non-removal of abutments placed at the time of surgery resulted in the maintenance of 0.5 mm more bone levels around immediately restored postextractive single implants than

  7. Speech intelligibility and subjective benefit in single-sided deaf adults after cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, Mareike; Strauß-Schier, Angelika; Kludt, Eugen; Büchner, Andreas; Illg, Angelika

    2017-05-01

    Treatment with cochlear implants (CIs) in single-sided deaf individuals started less than a decade ago. CIs can successfully reduce incapacitating tinnitus on the deaf ear and allow, so some extent, the restoration of binaural hearing. Until now, systematic evaluations of subjective CI benefit in post-lingually single-sided deaf individuals and analyses of speech intelligibility outcome for the CI in isolation have been lacking. For the prospective part of this study, the Bern Benefit in Single-Sided Deafness Questionnaire (BBSS) was administered to 48 single-sided deaf CI users to evaluate the subjectively perceived CI benefit across different listening situations. In the retrospective part, speech intelligibility outcome with the CI up to 12 month post-activation was compared between 100 single-sided deaf CI users and 125 bilaterally implanted CI users (2nd implant). The positive median ratings in the BBSS differed significantly from zero for all items suggesting that most individuals with single-sided deafness rate their CI as beneficial across listening situations. The speech perception scores in quiet and noise improved significantly over time in both groups of CI users. Speech intelligibility with the CI in isolation was significantly better in bilaterally implanted CI users (2nd implant) compared to the scores obtained from single-sided deaf CI users. Our results indicate that CI users with single-sided deafness can reach open set speech understanding with their CI in isolation, encouraging the extension of the CI indication to individuals with normal hearing on the contralateral ear. Compared to the performance reached with bilateral CI users' second implant, speech reception threshold are lower, indicating an aural preference and dominance of the normal hearing ear. The results from the BBSS propose good satisfaction with the CI across several listening situations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A Conservative Treatment Approach to Replacing a Missing Anterior Tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunwarjeet Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An implant-supported crown or conventionally fixed partial denture is the most common treatment modality to replace a missing anterior tooth but a more conservative approach, with a fiber reinforced composite resin FPD, can be used to replace a missing anterior tooth in young patients or when the patient does not agree for an implant, or conventional FPD or RPD therapy. It is an esthetic, conservative single sitting chairside procedure which can be used as a definitive treatment alternative in certain clinical situations for esthetic and functional replacement of a missing anterior tooth. To achieve desirable results, putty matrix was used for proper positioning of the pontic during direct fabrication of FRCFPD.

  9. Comparison of migration behavior between single and dual lag screw implants for intertrochanteric fracture fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katonis Pavlos G

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lag screw cut-out failure following fixation of unstable intertrochanteric fractures in osteoporotic bone remains an unsolved challenge. This study tested if resistance to cut-out failure can be improved by using a dual lag screw implant in place of a single lag screw implant. Migration behavior and cut-out resistance of a single and a dual lag screw implant were comparatively evaluated in surrogate specimens using an established laboratory model of hip screw cut-out failure. Methods Five dual lag screw implants (Endovis, Citieffe and five single lag screw implants (DHS, Synthes were tested in the Hip Implant Performance Simulator (HIPS of the Legacy Biomechanics Laboratory. This model simulated osteoporotic bone, an unstable fracture, and biaxial rocking motion representative of hip loading during normal gait. All constructs were loaded up to 20,000 cycles of 1.45 kN peak magnitude under biaxial rocking motion. The migration kinematics was continuously monitored with 6-degrees of freedom motion tracking system and the number of cycles to implant cut-out was recorded. Results The dual lag screw implant exhibited significantly less migration and sustained more loading cycles in comparison to the DHS single lag screw. All DHS constructs failed before 20,000 cycles, on average at 6,638 ± 2,837 cycles either by cut-out or permanent screw bending. At failure, DHS constructs exhibited 10.8 ± 2.3° varus collapse and 15.5 ± 9.5° rotation around the lag screw axis. Four out of five dual screws constructs sustained 20,000 loading cycles. One dual screw specimens sustained cut-out by medial migration of the distal screw after 10,054 cycles. At test end, varus collapse and neck rotation in dual screws implants advanced to 3.7 ± 1.7° and 1.6 ± 1.0°, respectively. Conclusion The single and double lag screw implants demonstrated a significantly different migration resistance in surrogate specimens under gait loading simulation with

  10. Immediate implant placement following minimally invasive extraction: A case report with a 6-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Sung Fu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Single tooth replacement with a dental implant has become an increasingly favored treatment option in the anterior maxilla; however, bone resorption following maxillary anterior tooth extraction is very common and often compromises gingival tissue for the implant restoration. Achieving predictable peri-implant esthetics requires a proper understanding and preservation of the osseous and gingival tissue surrounding the failing tooth. Therefore, the key to maintaining the interproximal papillae is to preserve the osseous support with minimally invasive extraction. An immediate implant insertion after tooth extraction may maintain the crest bone and the interdental papillae, thus achieving peri-implant esthetics. This article describes the detailed treatment planning and meticulous techniques in immediate implant placement that reduce treatment time and maintain functional as well as esthetic results through a 6-year follow-up.

  11. SU-E-T-458: Radiobiological Comparison of Single and Dual-Isotope Prostate Seed Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaup, C; Mavroidis, P; Esquivel, C; Stathakis, S; Swanson, G; Papanikolaou, N

    2012-06-01

    Several isotopes are available for low dose-rate brachytherapy of the prostate. Currently, most implants use a single isotope. However, the use of dual-isotope implants may yield an advantageous combination of characteristics such as half-life and relative biological effectiveness. However, the use of dual-isotope implants complicates treatment planning and quality assurance. Do the benefits of dual-isotope implants outweigh the added difficulty? The goal of this work was to use a linear-quadratic model to compare single and dual-isotope implants. Ten patients were evaluated in this study. For each patient, six treatment plans were created with single or dual-isotope combinations of 1251, 103Pd and 131Cs. For each plan the prostate, urethra, rectum and bladder were contoured by a physician. The biologically effective dose was used to determine the tumor control probability and normal tissue complication probabilities for each plan. Each plan was evaluated using favorable, intermediate and unfavorable radiobiological parameters. The results of the radiobiological analysis were used to compare the single and dual-isotope treatment plans. Iodine-125 only implants were seen to be most affected by changes in tumor aggressiveness. Significant differences in organ response probabilities were seen at common dose levels. It was recognized that these differences were likely a result of suboptimal initial seed strengths. After adjusting the initial seed strength to maximize complication-free tumor control the differences between isotope combinations were minimal. This result was true even for unfavorable tumors. The objective of this work was to perform a radiobiologically based comparison of single and dual-isotope prostate seed implant plans. For all isotope combinations, the plans were improved by varying the initial seed strength. For the minimally-optimized treatment plans, no substantial differences in predicted treatment outcomes were seen among the different isotope

  12. Loading protocols for single-implant crowns: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benic, Goran I; Mir-Mari, Javier; Hämmerle, Christoph H F

    2014-01-01

    To test whether or not immediate loading of single-implant crowns renders different results from early and conventional loading with respect to implant survival, marginal bone loss, stability of peri-implant soft tissue, esthetics, and patient satisfaction. An electronic search of Medline and Embase databases including studies published prior to August 1, 2012, was performed and complemented by a manual search. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing different loading protocols of single-implant crowns with a follow-up after restoration of at least 1 year were included. A meta-analysis yielded odds ratios (OR) and standardized mean differences (SMD) together with the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). The search provided 10 RCTs comparing immediate and conventional loading and 1 RCT comparing immediate and early loading. When assessing the implant survival at 1 year of loading, the meta-analysis of 10 studies found no significant differences between immediate and conventional loading (OR = 0.75; 95% CI: 0.32 to 1.76). The total difference of marginal bone loss during the first year of function between immediate and conventional loading protocols in 7 RCTs did not reach statistical significance (SMD = -0.05 mm; 95% CI: -0.41 to 0.31 mm). There were no significant differences between immediate and conventional loading regarding implant survival and marginal bone loss at 2, 3, and 5 years of loading. Three RCTs comparing the change of papilla level between immediate and conventional loading identified no significant differences. One study investigated the recession of the buccal mucosa after implant placement and found significantly inferior soft tissue loss for immediate loading as compared to conventional loading. Two RCTs investigated the recession of the buccal mucosa after insertion of the definitive crown and found no differences between immediate and conventional loading. The esthetics and the patient satisfaction were assessed in one and

  13. 90 nm device validation of the use of a single-wafer, high-current implanter for high tilt halo implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felch, S.B.; Foad, M.A.; Olsen, C.; Nouri, F.; Matsunaga, Y.; Natsuaki, N.

    2005-01-01

    As CMOS device dimensions shrink, the depths of the halo regions are shrinking and the implant doses used to form these regions are increasing to minimize short-channel effects. Shallow implant depths require lower implant energies, so the beam currents and wafer throughputs on the traditionally used medium-current implanters are starting to drop and become a concern for device manufacturers. In addition, halo implants are typically performed with a high tilt angle of 20-30 deg. and require tight angle control. All of these requirements are leading to increased interest in use of single-wafer, high-current implanters for halo implants. This paper reports the results of a study where 90 nm CMOS transistors had halo implants performed on the Applied Materials' Quantum[reg] X implanter. A comparison with device wafers whose halos were implanted on a medium-current implanter was also conducted. In addition, the sensitivity of the device parameters to the implant dose and angle was evaluated

  14. Scanning probe microscopy of single Au ion implants in Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vines, L.; Monakhov, E.; Maknys, K.; Svensson, B.G.; Jensen, J.; Hallen, A.; Kuznetsov, A. Yu.

    2006-01-01

    We have studied 5 MeV Au 2+ ion implantation with fluences between 7 x 10 7 and 2 x 10 8 cm -2 in Si by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM). The DLTS measurements show formation of electrically active defects such as the two negative charge states of the divacancy (V 2 (=/-) and V 2 (-/0)) and the vacancy-oxygen (VO) center. It is observed that the intensity of the V 2 (=/-) peak is lower compared to that of V 2 (-/0) by a factor of 5. This has been attributed to a highly localized distribution of the defects along the ion tracks, which results in trapping of the carriers at V 2 (-/0) and incomplete occupancy of V 2 (=/-). The SCM measurements obtained in a plan view show a random pattern of regions with a reduced SCM signal for the samples implanted with fluence above 2 x 10 8 cm -2 . The reduced SCM signal is attributed to extra charges associated with acceptor states, such as V 2 (-/0), formed along the ion tracks in the bulk Si. Indeed, the electron emission rate from the V 2 (-/0) state is in the range of 10 kHz at room temperature, which is well below the probing frequency of the SCM measurements, resulting in 'freezing' of electrons at V 2 (-/0)

  15. Efficacy of progressive addition lenses in the treatment of ametropia after the single eye's IOL implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin Xing; Zeng, Ying Yu; Zeng, Jun Wen; He, Ming Guang

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the efficacy of progressive addition lenses on the treatment of ametropia and loss of accomodation after the single eye's IOL implantation. Eighty four patients undergoing IOL implantation in single eyes were prescribed with progressive addition lenses for ametropia correction and regularly followed up to observe subsequent correction effect. Among these 84 patients, 72 could comfortably adapt to the use of progressive addition lenses to improve visual acuity and accomondation, while the remaining 12 patients failed to accomodate the usage of progressive addition lenses. Wearing progressive addition lenses acts as a relatively feasible approach to improve visual acuity and alleviate disorders of accomodation for patients who underwent IOL implantation in single eyes. The patients should be prescribed with progressive lenses under professional instructions and guidance.

  16. Achieving the Optimal Peri-implant Soft Tissue Profile by the Selective Pressure Method via Provisional Restorations in the Esthetic Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jung; Aranyarachkul, Prasit

    2015-01-01

    For the successful single-tooth implant therapy in the esthetics zone, achieving an ideal peri-implant soft tissue profile is paramount. It can achieve by the manipulation of the provisional restorations. This clinical report demonstrate the selective pressure method and concave transmucosal profile of the provisional restorations to achieve the ideal and stable gingival profile in esthetic single tooth implant restorations. The selective pressure method and the concave transmucosal profile in implant provisional restorations facilitate stable and harmonized peri-implant gingival tissue in the esthetic zone. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Zirconia- versus metal-based, implant-supported abutments and crowns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Mandana

    was to test the reliability and validity of six aesthetic parameters used at the Copenhagen Dental School to assess the aesthetic outcome of implant-supported restorations. The aims of study III and IV were to compare the influence of different abutment and crown materials on biological, biomechanical......To restore oral functions in patients with missing teeth, single-tooth implants are a well-documented treatment option. Along with high survival rates, aesthetic factors have become an important clinical outcome variable for evaluating treatment success of implant-supported restorations. Thus...... studies have reported on aesthetic, biological, biomechanical and patient-reported outcomes of implant-supported single-tooth restorations of various biomaterials. The aim of the present thesis was to investigate the clinical performance of zirconia-based implant-supported single-tooth restorations...

  18. A SINGLE VISIT IMMEDIATE TEMPORIZATION WITH NATURAL TOOTH PONTIC FOR PERIODONTALLY INVOLVED ANTERIOR TEETH : ANESTHETIC AND INNOVATIVE APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilofer Sultan Sheikh, Neelima S. Rajhans, Preeti Mundhe, Gabriela Jude Fernandez, Nilkanth Mhaske, Nikesh Moolya, Sudeep HM

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim and Objectives: Sudden loss of anterior tooth is a dreadful situation. It can be as a result of trauma, endodontic failure or periodontal disease which is a true aesthetic emergency for a patient. Along with the patient, the dentist also emphasizes on saving an anterior tooth for the primary reason of aesthetics. If the tooth crown is intact, is not grossly decayed, broken down or discoloured, it can be used as a natural tooth pontic in designing an interim prosthesis. Case: A chair side technique for replacing the missing tooth using the patient’s own natural tooth as a pontic in the three dimensional original position using a fibre reinforced composite resin splint thus restoring the aesthetics and relieving the apprehension of the patient, as described in this case report. Conclusion: The concept of Natural tooth pontic placement is a simple, economical, minimal intervention, viable and an easy to handle treatment option and promises an excellent transient aesthetic solution for a lost tooth as well as require minimal or no tooth preparation, thus is a reversible technique and avoids the laboratory cost.

  19. A SINGLE VISIT IMMEDIATE TEMPORIZATION WITH NATURAL TOOTH PONTIC FOR PERIODONTALLY INVOLVED ANTERIOR TEETH : ANESTHETIC AND INNOVATIVE APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    Nilofer Sultan Sheikh, Neelima S. Rajhans, Preeti Mundhe, Gabriela Jude Fernandez, Nilkanth Mhaske, Nikesh Moolya, Sudeep HM

    2015-01-01

    Aim and Objectives: Sudden loss of anterior tooth is a dreadful situation. It can be as a result of trauma, endodontic failure or periodontal disease which is a true aesthetic emergency for a patient. Along with the patient, the dentist also emphasizes on saving an anterior tooth for the primary reason of aesthetics. If the tooth crown is intact, is not grossly decayed, broken down or discoloured, it can be used as a natural tooth pontic in designing an interim prosthesis. Case: A chair side ...

  20. Hydroxyapatite ceramic implants for cranioplasty in children: a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccaria, Laura; Tharakan, Sasha Job; Altermatt, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    The use of hydroxyapatite ceramic (HAC) implants for the treatment of skull defects in pediatric patients started 2010 at our institution. Ceramic implants facilitate osteoblast migration and therefore optimize osteointegration with the host bone. The purpose of this study is to report a single-center experience with this treatment modality. A retrospective review of all patients from July 2010 through June 2014 undergoing a cranioplasty using hydroxyapatite ceramic implant and managed at a single institution was performed. Indication for cranioplasty, the hospital course, and follow-up were reviewed. Bone density was measured in Hounsfield Units (HU) and osteointegration was calculated using Mimics Software® (Mimics Innovation Suite v17.0 Medical, Materialize, Leuven, Belgium). Over the 4-year period, six patients met criteria for the study. Five patients had an osteointegration of nearly 100%. One patient had an incomplete osteointegration with a total bone-implant contact area of 69%. The mean bone density was 2800 HU (2300-3000 HU). Bone density alone is estimated to have a Hounsfield value between 400 and 2000 HU depending on the body region and bone quality. There were no major complications, and the patients were highly satisfied with the esthetical result. Hydroxyapatite ceramic implants for cranioplasty in pediatric patients are a good choice for different indications. The implants show excellent osteointegration and esthetical results.

  1. Cochlear Implantation and Single-sided Deafness: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabral Junior, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Current data show that binaural hearing is superior to unilateral hearing, specifically in the understanding of speech in noisy environments. Furthermore, unilateral hearing reduce onés ability to localize sound. Objectives This study provides a systematic review of recent studies to evaluate the outcomes of cochlear implantation in patients with single-sided deafness (SSD with regards to speech discrimination, sound localization and tinnitus suppression. Data Synthesis We performed a search in the PubMed, Cochrane Library and Lilacs databases to assess studies related to cochlear implantation in patients with unilateral deafness. After critical appraisal, eleven studies were selected for data extraction and analysis of demographic, study design and outcome data. Conclusion Although some studies have shown encouraging results on cochlear implantation and SSD, all fail to provide a high level of evidence. Larger studies are necessary to define the tangible benefits of cochlear implantation in patients with SSD.

  2. Creating a Single-Visit, Fibre-Reinforced, Composite Resin Bridge by Using a Natural Tooth Pontic: A Viable Alternative to a PFM Bridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khetarpal, Ambica; Talwar, Sangeeta; Verma, Mahesh

    2013-04-01

    The rehabilitation of an anterior tooth space presents a confronting situation. Several modalities are presently available to address the challenge of an immediate replacement of a missing anterior tooth. These include a removable temporary acrylic prosthesis or resin-bonded bridges. Fibre-Reinforced Composite (FRC) bridges are preferable if they are fixed and if a cost-effective tooth replacement is desired. Also, they provide an aesthetic and a conservative treatment choice as the abutment teeth require a minimal or no preparation. This article is describing two cases with an immediate replacement of the maxillary incisor teeth by a single visit technique, with the use of FRC Resin (Ribbond) bridges and natural tooth crowns as pontics. The procedure was completed at the chair side, thereby avoiding the laboratory costs. A two year follow up of the cases has shown a successful outcome. Creating an adhesive FRC bridge by using a natural tooth pontic is a successful treatment option for the direct aesthetic replacement of missing anterior teeth.

  3. Patients' expectations of and satisfaction with implant-supported fixed partial dentures and single crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Elis Andrade; dos Santos, Mateus Bertolini Fernandes; Marchini, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    Patient variables and expectations may influence patients' evaluations of treatment outcomes, which are essential to the success of therapy. The main objective of this study was to compare patients' expectations before and satisfaction after receiving implant-supported fixed partial dentures (FPDs) and single crowns. A secondary objective was to evaluate other variables that may affect patient satisfaction. The sample comprised 52 volunteers (mean age: 51.2 ± 10.6 years) who had received implant-supported FPDs (n = 25) and single crowns (n = 27). A visual analog scale (VAS) was used to assess their expectations before and satisfaction after therapy with regard to mastication, esthetics, comfort, and phonetics. Patients also completed a questionnaire concerning other variables involved in the treatment and their evaluation of their clinician's conduct. Patient expectations before treatment were higher than satisfaction after treatment, but this difference was significant only for esthetics in patients who had received implant-supported FPDs. Negative correlations were found between satisfaction and age and between number of absent teeth and number of post delivery adjustments, but only for implant-supported FPDs. A positive relationship was found for the majority of questions concerning patients' evaluations of clinician conduct and VAS scores. Patients' evaluation of clinician conduct appears to be an important factor that influences their expectations before and satisfaction after receiving implant-supported FPDs and single crowns.

  4. Oral health-related quality of life changes after placement of immediately loaded single implants in healed alveolar ridges or extraction sockets: a 5-year prospective follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raes, Stefanie; Raes, Filiep; Cooper, Lyndon; Giner Tarrida, Luis; Vervaeke, Stijn; Cosyn, Jan; De Bruyn, Hugo

    2017-06-01

    The impact of single implants on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) is scarcely investigated, especially when combined with immediate placement and loading in extraction sockets. The aim was to describe prospectively the changes of OHRQoL with single implants placed in the esthetic zone in healed ridges or in extraction sockets after 5 years. Ninety-six patients, enrolled at three clinical centers, received 102 single implants placed in a healed ridge (n = 54 implants/50 patients) or in extraction sockets (n = 48 implants/46 patients). Implants were immediately provisionalized, and permanent crowns were cemented after 12 weeks. Oral health impact profile questionnaires (OHIP-14) were completed before surgery, after 1 (provisional crown), 6 (permanent crown), 12 and 60 months, respectively. The overall OHIP-14 score pertains to seven domains with two items each and was assessed on a Likert scale of 0-4 (0 = never and 4 = very often). The evolution of the total OHIP-14 score and changes within all OHIP domains over time and between groups were assessed with a linear mixed-effect model analysis. After 5 years, overall implant survival was 98%. The total OHIP-14 score for both groups combined decreased from 0.50 at baseline to 0.17 at 6 months (P < 0.001), indicative of improvement. For both groups, this remained stable up to 5 years (P = 0.41). However, after 5 years, the total OHIP-14 score revealed a statistically significantly higher improvement in the healed group compared with the extraction group (P = 0.027). Missing a single tooth in the maxillary esthetic zone leads to limited OHRQoL problems as reflected by a low overall OHIP score. However, OHRQoL improves less in the extraction group, reflecting that replacing a missing tooth is perceived as more beneficial than replacing a present tooth. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Comparison of tooth displacement between buccal mini-implants and palatal plate anchorage for molar distalization: a finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Il-Jun; Kook, Yoon-Ah; Sung, Sang-Jin; Lee, Kee-Joon; Chun, Youn-Sic; Mo, Sung-Seo

    2014-08-01

    The purposes of this study were to mechanically evaluate distalization modalities through the application of skeletal anchorage using finite element analysis. Base models were constructed from commercial teeth models. A finite element model was created and three treatment modalities were modified to make 10 models. Modalities 1 and 2 placed mini-implants in the buccal side, and modality 3 placed a plate on the palatal side. Distalization with the palatal plate in modality 3 showed bodily molar movement and insignificant displacement of the incisors. Placing mini-implants on the buccal side in modalities 1 and 2 caused the first molar to be distally tipped and extruded, while the incisors were labially flared and intruded. Distalization with the palatal plate rather than mini-implants on the buccal side provided bodily molar movement without tipping or extrusion. It is recommended to use our findings as a clinical guide for the application of skeletal anchorage devices for molar distalization. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Immediate non-occlusal loading of immediate post-extractive versus delayed placement of single implants in preserved sockets of the anterior maxilla: 4-month post-loading results from a pragmatic multicentre randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felice, Pietro; Soardi, Elisa; Piattelli, Maurizio; Pistilli, Roberto; Jacotti, Michele; Esposito, Marco

    2011-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of immediate post-extractive single implants with delayed implants placed in preserved sockets after 4 months of healing. Implants that achieved an insertion torque of at least 35 Ncm were immediately non-occlusally loaded. Just after tooth extraction and in the presence of a loss of the buccal plate bone less than 4 mm, compared to the palatal wall, 106 patients requiring a single immediate postextractive implant in the maxilla from second premolar to second premolar were randomly allocated to immediate implant placement (immediate group; 54 patients) or to socket preservation using anorganic bovine bone covered by a resorbable collagen barrier (delayed group; 52 patients) according to a parallel group design at three different centres. Bone-to-implant gaps were to be filled with anorganic bovine bone, however this was not done in 17 patients (corresponding to 40% of those who should have been grafted). Four months after socket preservation, delayed implants were placed. Implants placed with an insertion torque >35 Ncm were immediately loaded with non-occluding provisional single crowns, replaced, after 4 months, by definitive crowns. Outcome measures were implant failures, complications, aesthetics assessed using the pink esthetic score (PES), and patient satisfaction, recorded by blinded assessors. All patients were followed up to 4 months after loading. Nineteen (35%) implants were not immediately loaded in the immediate group versus 39 (75%) implants in the delayed placement group because an insertion torque >35 Ncm could not be obtained. No patient dropped out. Two implants failed in the immediate group (4%) versus none in the delayed group. More minor complications occurred in the immediate group (8) than the in the delayed group (1) and this was statistically significant (P = 0.032). At delivery of definitive crowns, 4 months after loading, aesthetics were scored as 12.8 and 12.6 in the immediate and delayed groups, respectively

  7. Implant-supported single crowns predictably survive to five years with limited complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Thomas; Eckert, Steven

    2012-09-01

    An electronic MEDLINE search was conducted to identify cohort studies, prospective or retrospective, describing clinical performance of implant-supported single crowns. Manual searches of bibliographies from full-text articles and related reviews were conducted using numerous scientific journals. Studies were included if the mean follow-up time was at least 5 years, if articles were published in the English or German language, if patients were physically examined, and if study details were sufficient for data extraction. Of the initial 3601 studies identified, only 26 were selected. No randomized control trials were identified. The 5-year survival and complications of implant-supported single crowns. The primary outcome measure in this study was survival of endosseous implants when used to support single crowns. In addition, the clinical performance of soft tissue (peri-implantitis) and hard tissue (bone level) was documented. Clinical complications of a biomechanical nature were recorded relative to fracture of restorative materials. Poisson's regression models were used to estimate failure and complication rates at 5 years. A systematic review of the scientific literature identified 26 studies from which data were extracted (1558 placed implants). Meta-analysis identified survival of implants used to support and retain single crowns at 96.8% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 95.9%-97.6% after 5 years). The survival rate of the single crown restorations documented in 13 studies was 94.5% (95% 92.5%-95.9%) with a significantly higher survival rate when metal ceramic crowns were used in comparison with all ceramic crowns (95.4% 93.6%-96.7%; 91.2% CI: 86.8%-94.2%). Soft tissue complications, including peri-implantitis, were observed in 9.7% of the single crowns, whereas bone loss exceeding 2 mm was identified on 6.3% of the implants over the 5-year study. Prosthetic or abutment screw loosening was observed in 12.7% of the restoration and screw fracture occurred in 0

  8. Effect of H + ion implantation on structural, morphological, optical and dielectric properties of L-arginine monohydrochloride monohydrate single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeetha, K.; Babu, R. Ramesh; Kumar, P.; Bhagvannarayana, G.; Ramamurthi, K.

    2011-06-01

    L-arginine monohydrochloride monohydrate (LAHCl) single crystals have been implanted with 100 keV H + ions at different ion fluence ranging from 10 12 to 10 15 ions/cm 2. Implanted LAHCl single crystals have been investigated for property changes. Crystal surface and crystalline perfection of the pristine and implanted crystals were analyzed by atomic force microscope and high-resolution X-ray diffraction studies, respectively. Optical absorption bands induced by colour centers, refractive index and birefringence, mechanical stability and dielectric constant of implanted crystals were studied at different ion fluence and compared with that of pristine LAHCl single crystal.

  9. Influence of the Diameter of Dental Implants Replacing Single Molars: 3- to 6-Year Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Jose Alfredo; Senna, Plinio Mendes; Francischone, Carlos Eduardo; Francischone Junior, Carlos Eduardo; Sotto-Maior, Bruno Salles

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the implant diameter on marginal bone remodeling around dental implants replacing single molars after a follow-up period of 3 to 6 years. Patients who received dental implants with an external hexagon platform in healed sites to support a single metal-ceramic crown in the molar region were recalled to the office. The implantation sites and implant length information were recorded, and the implants were divided according to the implant diameter: regular (RP) or wide (WP). Each implant was assessed by digital periapical radiography, using a sensor holder for the paralleling technique. The marginal bone remodeling was determined as the distance from the implant platform to the first bone-to-implant contact, and the known implant length was used to calibrate the images in the computer software. The follow-up measurements were compared with those obtained from the radiograph taken at the time of prosthetic loading to determine the late bone remodeling. The independent t test was used to compare data. A total of 67 implants from 46 patients were evaluated with a mean follow-up period of 4.5 ± 1.0 years. The RP group comprised 36 implants from 29 patients (mean age: 58.3 ± 10.6 years), while 31 implants from 17 patients (mean age: 56.9 ± 11.5 years) were included in the WP group. The RP group presented lower survival rates (86.1%) than the WP group (100.0%). Similar marginal bone loss (P implants exhibited lower incidence failures, the bone levels were similar after the prosthetic loading around regular- and wide-diameter implants supporting single molar crowns.

  10. Dental regenerative therapy: Stem cell transplantation and bioengineered tooth replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhisa Nakao

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available For clinical treatment of tooth defects and tooth loss, nonbiotechnological approaches, such as the use of prostheses and implants, have generally been employed. Dental regenerative therapies which restore or replace defective teeth using autologous explants are being investigated using current understandings of developmental biology, stem cell biology, and regenerative medicine. Recently, dental tissue stem/progenitor cells, which can differentiate into dental cell lineages, have been identified in both impacted and erupted human teeth, and these cells can be used to regenerate some dental tissues. Tissue engineering using scaffold and cell aggregate methods may also be used to produce bioengineered teeth from dissociated cells for therapeutic applications of whole tooth replacement. Recent breakthroughs in single cell manipulation methods for the reconstitution of bioengineered tooth germ and the investigation of in vivo development of artificial tooth germ in the adult oral environment have been reported. These researches and developments will ultimately lead to the realization of dental regenerative therapies for partial repair by stem cell transplantation and for whole tooth replacement using bioengineered tooth germ.

  11. Formation of oriented nitrides by N{sup +} ion implantation in iron single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, A.R.G. [CFMC, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); IST/IPFN, Universidade de Lisboa, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, E.N.10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Silva, R.C. da [IST/IPFN, Universidade de Lisboa, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, E.N.10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Ferreira, L.P. [CFMC, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Dep. Física, Fac. Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade de Coimbra, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Carvalho, M.D. [CCMM/Dep. Química e Bioquímica, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Silva, C. [CFMC, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Dep. Física, Fac. Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Franco, N. [IST/IPFN, Universidade de Lisboa, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, E.N.10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Godinho, M. [CFMC, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Dep. Física, Fac. Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); and others

    2014-01-15

    Iron single crystals were implanted with nitrogen at room temperature, with a fluence of 5×10{sup 17} cm{sup −2} and 50 keV energy, to produce iron nitride phases and characterize the influence of the crystal orientation. The stability and evolution of the nitride phases and diffusion of implanted nitrogen were studied as a function of successive annealing treatments at 250 °C in vacuum. The composition, structure and magnetic properties were characterized using RBS/channeling, X-Ray Diffraction, Magnetic Force Microscopy, Magneto-optical Kerr Effect and Conversion Electron Mössbauer Spectroscopy. In the as-implanted state the formation of Fe{sub 2}N phase was clearly identified in all single crystals. This phase is not stable at 250 °C and annealing at this temperature promotes the formation of ε-Fe{sub 3}N, or γ′-Fe{sub 4}N, depending on the orientation of the substrate. - Highlights: • Oriented magnetic iron nitrides were obtained by nitrogen implantation into iron single crystals. • The stable magnetic nitride phase at 250 °C depends on the orientation of the host single crystal, being γ'-Fe{sub 4}N or ε-Fe{sub 3}N. • The easy magnetization axis was found to lay in the (100) plane for cubic γ'-Fe{sub 4}N and out of (100) plane for hexagonal ε-Fe{sub 3}N.

  12. Immediate non-occlusal loading of single implants in the aesthetic zone : A randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hartog, Laurens; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Stellingsma, Kees; Vissink, Arjan; Meijer, Henny J. A.

    P>Aim This study compared the outcome of immediate non-occlusal loading with conventional loading for single implants in the maxillary aesthetic zone. It was hypothesized that immediate non-occlusal loading is not inferior to conventional loading. Materials and Methods Sixty-two patients with a

  13. Formation of oriented nitrides by N+ ion implantation in iron single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, A.R.G.; Silva, R.C. da; Ferreira, L.P.; Carvalho, M.D.; Silva, C.; Franco, N.; Godinho, M.

    2014-01-01

    Iron single crystals were implanted with nitrogen at room temperature, with a fluence of 5×10 17 cm −2 and 50 keV energy, to produce iron nitride phases and characterize the influence of the crystal orientation. The stability and evolution of the nitride phases and diffusion of implanted nitrogen were studied as a function of successive annealing treatments at 250 °C in vacuum. The composition, structure and magnetic properties were characterized using RBS/channeling, X-Ray Diffraction, Magnetic Force Microscopy, Magneto-optical Kerr Effect and Conversion Electron Mössbauer Spectroscopy. In the as-implanted state the formation of Fe 2 N phase was clearly identified in all single crystals. This phase is not stable at 250 °C and annealing at this temperature promotes the formation of ε-Fe 3 N, or γ′-Fe 4 N, depending on the orientation of the substrate. - Highlights: • Oriented magnetic iron nitrides were obtained by nitrogen implantation into iron single crystals. • The stable magnetic nitride phase at 250 °C depends on the orientation of the host single crystal, being γ'-Fe 4 N or ε-Fe 3 N. • The easy magnetization axis was found to lay in the (100) plane for cubic γ'-Fe 4 N and out of (100) plane for hexagonal ε-Fe 3 N

  14. In Vitro Assessment of Single-Retainer Tooth-Colored Adhesively Fixed Partial Dentures for Posterior Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tissiana Bortolotto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper was to investigate, by means of marginal adaptation and fracture strength, three different types of single retainer posterior fixed partial dentures (FPDs for the replacement of a missing premolar. Two-unit cantilever FPDs were fabricated from composite resin, feldspathic porcelain, and fiber-reinforced composite resin. After luting procedures and margin polishing, all specimens were subjected to a Scanning Electron Microscopic marginal evaluation both prior to and after thermomechanical loading with a custom made chewing simulator comprising both thermal and mechanical loads. The results indicated that the highest score of marginal adaptation, that is, the closest score to 100% of continuous margins, at the tooth-composite resin interface was attained by the feldspathic porcelain group (88.1% median, followed by the fiber-reinforced composite resin group (78.9% median. The worse results were observed in the composite resin group (58.05% median. Fracture strength was higher in feldspathic porcelain (196N median when compared to resin composite (114.9 N median. All the fixed prostheses made of fiber-reinforced composite resin detached from the abutment teeth before fracturing, suggesting that the adhesive surface's retainer should be increased.

  15. Tooth extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... several teeth using the methods above. For an impacted tooth , the surgeon may have to cut a flap ... loosens or damages teeth Tooth injury from trauma Impacted teeth that are causing problems, such as wisdom teeth ( ...

  16. Tooth anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002214.htm Tooth anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... upper jawbone is called the maxilla. Images Tooth anatomy References Chan S, Alessandrini EA. Dental injuries. In: Selbst ...

  17. Assessment of Marginal Peri-implant Bone-Level Short-Length Implants Compared with Standard Implants Supporting Single Crowns in a Controlled Clinical Trial: 12-Month Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Azpur, Gerardo; Lau, Miguel; Valdivia, Erick; Rojas, Jorge; Muñoz, Henry; Nevins, Myron

    In oral rehabilitation, crown-to-root ratio is accepted as an indicator of bone loss, and this concept was transferred to implants. Recent studies have indicated that there is no significant difference between short and standard implants. The aim of this study was to compare marginal bone-level alteration through radiographic evaluation and clinical parameters between short and standard implants supporting single crowns. This prospective clinical trial study included 82 systemically healthy, nonsmoking subjects. Patients were divided into two groups: one group for short dental implants measuring 5.5 or 7 mm, and one group for standard dental implants measuring 10 or 12 mm, in accordance with the individual needs of the patient. A clinical dental history was taken for each subject, including model casts, dental radiography, and cone beam computed tomography. A periapical analysis was also performed using ImageJ computer software to establish the initial bone measurement and periapical bone loss. A statistically significant difference was found in favor of the standard-length implants after 12 months, with greater gingival recession around the implant; however, bone loss in the short implants did not exceed 0.53 mm. The treatment with 5.5- to 7-mm-length implants is as reliable as treatment with 10- or 12-mm implants. Peri-implant bone loss is minimal, and therefore use of short implants can be recommended as treatment for the restoration of partially edentulous patients without the need for splinted crowns.

  18. A zirconia implant-crown system: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohal, Ralf J; Klaus, Gerold

    2004-04-01

    Exposed metal crown margins in the porcelain-fused-to-metal technique might be an esthetic problem. Therefore, all-ceramic crown systems are used for restoring teeth and dental implants. In addition, the gray color of a titanium implant might hamper the esthetic appearance of the entire reconstruction in cases of thin peri-implant soft tissue or tissue retraction. To further improve the esthetic aspect of dental implants, efforts are undertaken to develop implant systems fabricated out of tooth-colored materials that are biocompatible and able to withstand masticatory forces. One such material may be zirconia. The present article presents a case in which an all-ceramic custom-made zirconia implant-crown system was used for the replacement of a single tooth.

  19. Redesigning Existing Provisional Restorations While Maintaining Established Transmucosal Anatomy in a Multi-Implant System/Natural Tooth, Full-Arch Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Michael A; Levin, Barry P; Green, Kevan S

    Redesigning existing provisional restorations when a combination of two different implant systems and natural teeth exist in the same arch can be challenging. Problems such as acrylic locking into undercuts and loss of spatial landmarks both subgingivally and supragingivally are common concerns for the practitioner. Two techniques, presented herein, offer treatment options to retain the previously developed transmucosal anatomies of implant-level provisional abutments while allowing for redesign of the clinical crown component of the same long-term provisional restorations. By modifying only the supragingival aspect of the provisional prosthesis, the previously developed transmucosal areas remain intact. Use of a segmented matrix from an approved wax-up offers greater control versus a single matrix of the entire arch.

  20. Lattice location of platinum ions implanted into single crystal zirconia and their annealing behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, D.X. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia); Sood, D.K. [Academia Sinica, Shanghai, SH (China). Shanghai Inst. of Nuclear Research; Brown, I.G. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Single crystal samples of (100) oriented cubic zirconia stabilised with 9.5 mol % yttria were implanted with platinum ions, using a metal vapour vacuum arc (MEVVA) high current ion implanter, to a nominal dose of 1x10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2}. The implanted samples were annealed isothermally in air ambient at 1200 deg C, from 1-24 hours. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry and Channeling (RBSC) of 2 MeV He ions are employed to determine depth distributions of ion damage, Pt ions and substitutionality of Pt ions before and after annealing. The damage behaviour, Pt migration and lattice location are discussed in terms of metastable phase formation and solid solubility considerations. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Retrospective Study of Tapered One-Piece Implants Placed Over a Ten-Year Period in a Single Private Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minichetti, John C; D'Amore, Joseph C; Hong, Anna Y-J

    2018-04-01

    Today, clinicians have a variety of treatment modalities available to address the increasing number of implant procedures performed each year. Single-stage implant surgery is now commonly used in implant dentistry. With patients' demands for immediate restoration, the utilization of 1-piece implants is gaining acceptance. This article reports the results of tapered 1-piece implants (Zimmer Biomet) placed in a single practice over a 10-year period. A total of 33 1-piece dental implants were placed in 24 patients and provisionally restored out of occlusion at the time of surgery. All 33 implants were definitively restored with ceramometal crowns after 3 months of provisionalization. Implant survival and success rates were 100% after 2.6-10 years of follow-up. Only 1 minor complication of crestal bone remodeling occurred among the 33 implants placed. Adequately stabilized tapered 1-piece implants can be successfully restored out of occlusion at the time of implant placement and definitively loaded in occlusion 3 months without adversely affecting function or esthetics. Additional long-term controlled studies are recommended to further understand these findings.

  2. Impact of extracorporeal shockwave therapy on tooth mobility in adult orthodontic patients: a randomized single-center placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkensammer, Frank; Rausch-Fan, Xiaohui; Schaden, Wolfgang; Kivaranovic, Danijel; Freudenthaler, Josef

    2015-03-01

    This RCT investigated the effect of non-invasive extracorporeal shockwaves on tooth mobility in orthodontic patients after active treatment. Seventy-two adult patients were included in the study. Immediately after active orthodontic treatment, patients were assigned to a treatment or a placebo group based on block randomization. The orthodontic patients were required to be otherwise healthy. The region of interest was the anterior portion of the mandible. The treatment group received a single shockwave treatment with 1000 impulses while the placebo group was treated with an acoustic sham. Tooth mobility was evaluated over a period of 6 months using a Periotest and manual testing. Pocket probing depths, bleeding on probing and the irregularity index were also assessed. Tooth mobility reduced significantly over 6 months in both groups, but shockwaves achieved significantly more rapid reduction on manual testing. Probing depth was significantly reduced while the irregularity index remained stable. Bleeding on probing was significantly reduced in the treatment group. No anti-inflammatory effect could be derived due to possible initial group differences. The mobility of teeth aligned by orthodontic treatment reduces over time. Shockwave treatment appeared to reduce tooth mobility more rapidly. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Single post-extractive ultra-wide 7 mm-diameter implants versus implants placed in molar healed sites after socket preservation for molar replacement: 6-month post-loading results from a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallarico, Marco; Xhanari, Erta; Pisano, Milena; De Riu, Giacomo; Tullio, Antonio; Meloni, Silvio Mario

    To test the hypothesis that there is no difference in clinical, radiographic and aesthetic outcomes positioning single post-extractive ultra-wide 7 mm-diameter implants or waiting 4 months to place implant, after molar extraction and the socket preservation procedure. Patients requiring one implant-supported single restoration to replace a failed tooth in the molar region of both maxilla and mandible were selected. Patients were randomised according to a parallel group design into two arms: implant installation in fresh extraction sockets augmented with corticocancellous heterologous bone and porcine derma (group A) or delayed implant installation 4 months after tooth extraction and socket preservation using the same materials (group B). Ultra-wide 7 mm-diameter implants were submerged for 4 months. Outcome measures were implant success and survival; complications; horizontal dimensional changes measured on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans at three levels, localised 1, 2 and 3 mm below the most coronal aspect of the bone crest (level A, B and C); peri-implant marginal bone level changes; implant stability quotient (ISQ); and pink esthetic score (PES). Twelve patients were randomised to group A and 12 to group B. No patients dropped out. No implant failed or complications occurred up to 6-months post-loading. Six months after loading there was more horizontal alveolar bone reduction at immediate post-extractive implants, which was statistically significant. At level A was 1.78 mm ± 1.30 in group A, 0.45 mm ± 0.42 in group B, (difference 1.33 mm ± 1.39; 95% CI: 0.38 to 1.95; P = 0.003); at level B was 0.98 mm ± 1.13 in group A, 0.14 mm ± 0.22 in group B, (difference 0.84 mm ± 1.16; 95% CI: 0.24 to 1.07; P = 0.019); at level C was 0.55 mm ± 0.74 in group A, 0.03 mm ± 0.24 in group B, (difference 0.51 mm ± 0.76, 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.87; P = 0.032). One year after implant

  4. Energy harvesting from mastication forces via a smart tooth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bani-Hani, Muath; Karami, M. Amin

    2016-04-01

    The batteries of the current pacing devices are relatively large and occupy over 60 percent of the size of pulse generators. Therefore, they cannot be placed in the subtle areas of human body. In this paper, the mastication force and the resulting tooth pressure are converted to electricity. The pressure energy can be converted to electricity by using the piezoelectric effect. The tooth crown is used as a power autonomous pulse generator. We refer to this envisioned pulse generator as the smart tooth. The smart tooth is in the form of a dental implant. A piezoelectric vibration energy harvester is designed and modeled for this purpose. The Piezoelectric based energy harvesters investigated and analyzed in this paper initially includes a single degree of freedom piezoelectric based stack energy harvester which utilizes a harvesting circuit employing the case of a purely resistive circuit. The next step is utilizing and investigating a bimorph piezoelectric beam which is integrated/embedded in the smart tooth implant. Mastication process causes the bimorph beam to buckle or return to unbuckled condition. The transitions results in vibration of the piezoelectric beam and thus generate energy. The power estimated by the two mechanisms is in the order of hundreds of microwatts. Both scenarios of the energy harvesters are analytically modeled. The exact analytical solution of the piezoelectric beam energy harvester with Euler-Bernoulli beam assumptions is presented. The electro-mechanical coupling and the geometric nonlinearities have been included in the model for the piezoelectric beam.

  5. YouTube and the single-rod contraceptive implant: a content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Jennifer; Boraas, Christy M; Duvet, Mildred; Chang, Judy C

    2017-07-01

    Since the internet has become an important source of contraceptive information with YouTube.com as the second most visited site, we analysed contraceptive implant YouTube videos for content and clinical accuracy. Using the terms 'contraceptive implant', 'Nexplanon' and 'Implanon', the top 20 results on YouTube by relevance and view count were identified. After excluding duplicates, single-rod implant videos in English were included. Videos were classified as providing a professional or patient perspective. Views, duration and comments were noted. Videos were rated for reliability, global quality scale and whether they were positive or negative about the implant. Inter-rater agreement was measured. A total of 120 videos were retrieved; 52 were eligible for review. Less than 23% were professional videos; the majority reported patient experience (46% testimonials, 27% real-time procedure videos, 4% other). Patient videos had been posted a significantly longer duration of time than professional videos (364 vs 188 days, p =0.02), were less reliable ( p ≤0.0001) and were of lower global quality ( p YouTube pertaining to contraceptive implants is accurate, is presented from the patient's perspective, and promotes the method's use. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. Electrical and photoluminescence properties of carbon implanted ZnO bulk single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, K.; Kuriyama, K.; Kushida, K.

    2009-05-01

    Carbon-ions, which are expected as an amphoteric impurity, are implanted into ZnO bulk single crystals with a fluence of 1.5 × 1015 cm-2. The carbon-ion implanted ZnO shows the n-type conductivity and the resistivity varies from 6 × 104 Ω cm (for unimplanted samples) to 3 × 10-2 Ω cm (for 800 °C-annealed ones). The Rutherford backscattering (RBS) studies show the existence of the displaced zinc atoms. In photoluminescence (PL) measurements, the broad emission at 2.34 eV observed in un-implanted and as-implanted samples is related to oxygen vacancy and zinc interstitial. After annealing, the weak PL-emission related to carbon donor is observed at 3.06 eV, indicating that the donor level lies at ∼310 meV below the conduction band. The carbon-ion implanted ZnO layer with the low resistivity achieved in the present study suggests the possibility of transparent conductive oxide.

  7. Electrical and photoluminescence properties of carbon implanted ZnO bulk single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, K. [College of Engineering and Research Center of Ion Beam Technology, Hosei University, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8584 (Japan); Kuriyama, K. [College of Engineering and Research Center of Ion Beam Technology, Hosei University, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8584 (Japan)], E-mail: kuri@ionbeam.hosei.ac.jp; Kushida, K. [Department of Arts and Sciences, Osaka Kyouiku University, Kashiwara, Osaka 582-8582 (Japan)

    2009-05-01

    Carbon-ions, which are expected as an amphoteric impurity, are implanted into ZnO bulk single crystals with a fluence of 1.5 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. The carbon-ion implanted ZnO shows the n-type conductivity and the resistivity varies from 6 x 10{sup 4} {omega} cm (for unimplanted samples) to 3 x 10{sup -2} {omega} cm (for 800 deg. C-annealed ones). The Rutherford backscattering (RBS) studies show the existence of the displaced zinc atoms. In photoluminescence (PL) measurements, the broad emission at 2.34 eV observed in un-implanted and as-implanted samples is related to oxygen vacancy and zinc interstitial. After annealing, the weak PL-emission related to carbon donor is observed at 3.06 eV, indicating that the donor level lies at {approx}310 meV below the conduction band. The carbon-ion implanted ZnO layer with the low resistivity achieved in the present study suggests the possibility of transparent conductive oxide.

  8. The use of single point incremental forming for customized implants of unicondylar knee arthroplasty: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Kailasrao Bhoyar

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The implantable devices are having enormous market. These products are basically made by traditional manufacturing process, but for the custom-made implants Incremental Sheet Forming is a paramount alternative. Single Point Incremental Forming (SPIF is a manufacturing process to form intricate, asymmetrical components. It forms the component using stretching and bending by maintaining materials crystal structure. SPIF process can be performed using conventional Computer Numerical Control (CNC milling machine. Review This review paper elaborates the various manufacturing processes carried on various biocompatible metallic and nonmetallic customised implantable devices. Conclusion Ti-6Al-4V alloy is broadly used for biomedical implants, but in this alloy, Vanadium is toxic so this alloy is not compatible for implants. The attention of researchers is towards the non toxic and suitable biocompatible materials. For this reason, a novel approach was developed in order to enhance the mechanical properties of this material. . The development of incremental forming technique can improve the formability of existing alloys and may meet the current strict requirements for performance of dies and punches.

  9. Autogenous tooth transplantation: an alternative to replace extracted tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Kamadjaja

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The gold standard treatment to replace missing tooth is dental implants, however, in certain cases, such as in young patients its placement is contraindicated. Autogenous tooth transplantation, which has been widely done in Scandinavian countries for many years, may become a good alternative to overcome this problem. Purpose: This article attempted to provide information about the indication, treatment planning, surgical technique and the successful result of autogenous tooth transplantation. Case: A fifteen year old male patient presented with large caries and periapical disease of his lower left first molar, which was partially erupted and the roots was not fully formed in radiograph. Case management: Autogenous tooth transplantation procedure was performed consisting of extraction of #36, odontectomy of #38 followed by its implantation to socket #36 and fixation of the transplanted tooth to the adjacent teeth. Post operative evaluation was done on regular basis within 18 months period. There was no complaint, the tooth was clinically stable and no evidence of periodontal problem. Serial radiographs showed healing of alveolar bone and periodontal tissue, and the complete root formation was evident by 18 months post operatively. Conclusion: Autogenous tooth transplantation is a potential alternative to replace extracted tooth. Provided that the case be properly planned and operation carefully performed, successful result of this treatment can be achieved.

  10. Incidence and characteristics of acute referred orofacial pain caused by a posterior single tooth pulpitis in an Iranian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemipour, Maryam Alsadat; Borna, Roya

    2014-02-01

    This study was designed to evaluate incidence and characteristics of acute referred orofacial pain caused by a posterior single tooth pulpitis in an Iranian population. In this cross-sectional study, 3,150 patients (1,400 males and 1,750 females) with pain in the orofacial region were evaluated via clinical and radiographic examination to determine their pain source. Patients completed a standardized clinical questionnaire consisting of a numerical rating scale for pain intensity and chose verbal descriptors from short form McGill questionnaire to describe the quality of their pain. Visual analog scale (VAS) was used to score pain intensity. In addition, patients indicated sites to which pain referred by drawing on an illustration of the head and neck. Data were analyzed using chi-square, fisher exact, and Mann-Whitney tests. Two thousand and hundred twenty patients (67/3%) reported pain in sites that diagnostically differed from the pain source. According to statistical analysis, sex (P = 0.02), intensity of pain (0.04), and quality (P = 0.001) of pain influenced its referral nature, while age of patients and kind of stimulus had no considerable effect on pain referral (P > 0.05). The results of the present study show the prevalence of referred pain in the head, face, and neck region is moderately high. Therefore, in patients with orofacial pain, it is essential to carefully examination before carrying out treatment that could be inappropriate. © 2013 The Authors Pain Practice © 2013 World Institute of Pain.

  11. Persistent photoconductivity in hydrogen ion-implanted KNbO3 bulk single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruoka, R.; Shinkawa, A.; Nishimura, T.; Tanuma, C.; Kuriyama, K.; Kushida, K.

    2017-06-01

    Persistent Photoconductivity (PPC) in hydorogen-ion implanted (001) oriented KNbO3 bulk single crystals (perovskite structure at room temperature; ferroelectric with a band gap of 3.16 eV) is studied in air at room temperature to prevent the crystallinity degradation caused by the phase transition. Hydrogen is implanted into KNbO3 bulk single crystals using the energy (the peak ion fluence) of 500 keV (5.0 × 1015 cm-2). The resistivity varies from ∼108 Ω/□ for an un-implanted KNbO3 sample to 2.3 × 105 Ω/□ for as-implanted one. suggesting the presence of donors consisting of hydrogen interstitial and oxygen vacancy. The PPC is clearly observed with ultraviolet and blue LEDs illumination rather than green and infrared, suggesting the release of electrons from the metastable conductive state below the conduction band relating to the charge states of the oxygen vacancy as observed in electron irradiated ZnO.

  12. Impact of crestal and subcrestal implant placement in peri-implant bone: A prospective comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicer-Chover, Hilario; Peñarrocha-Diago, María; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Gomar-Vercher, Sonia; Agustín-Panadero, Rubén

    2016-01-01

    Background To assess the influence of the crestal or subcrestal placement of implants upon peri-implant bone loss over 12 months of follow-up. Material and Methods Twenty-six patients with a single hopeless tooth were recruited in the Oral Surgery Unit (Valencia University, Valencia, Spain). The patients were randomized into two treatment groups: group A (implants placed at crestal level) or group B (implants placed at subcrestal level). Control visits were conducted by a trained clinician at the time of implant placement and 12 months after loading. A previously established standard protocol was used to compile general data on all patients (sex and age, implant length and diameter, and brushing frequency). Implant success rate, peri-implant bone loss and the treatment of the exposed implant surface were studied. The level of statistical significance was defined as 5% (α=0.05). Results Twenty-three patients (8 males and 15 females, mean age 49.8±11.6 years, range 28-75 years) were included in the final data analyses, while three were excluded. All the included subjects were nonsmokers with a brushing frequency of up to twice a day in 85.7% of the cases. The 23 implants comprised 10 crestal implants and 13 subcrestal implants. After implant placement, the mean bone position with respect to the implant platform in group A was 0.0 mm versus 2.16±0.88 mm in group B. After 12 months of follow-up, the mean bone positions were -0.06±1.11 mm and 0.95±1.50 mm, respectively - this representing a bone loss of 0.06±1.11 mm in the case of the crestal implants and of 1.22±1.06 mm in the case of the subcrestal implants (p=0.014). Four crestal implants and 5 subcrestal implants presented peri-implant bone levels below the platform, leaving a mean exposed treated surface of 1.13 mm and 0.57 mm, respectively. The implant osseointegration success rate at 12 months was 100% in both groups. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, bone loss was found to be greater in

  13. State of the Art of Short Dental Implants: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neldam, Camilla Albeck; Pinholt, Else Marie

    2012-01-01

    of this study was systematically to evaluate publications concerning short dental implants defined as an implant with a length of =8 mm installed in the maxilla or in the mandible with special reference to implant type, survival rate, location of implant site, and observation time. Materials and Methods......: A Medline and a hand search were conducted to identify studies concerning short dental implants of length =8 mm published between 1992 and October 2009. The articles included in this study report data on implant length =8 mm, implant surface, registered region of installment, observation time, single tooth......Background: Short implants (=8 mm) are manufactured for use in atrophic regions of the jaws. As implant length in many studies has been proven to play a major role in implant survival it is indicated to evaluate survival of short implants in the present literature. Purpose: The purpose...

  14. Single-stage osseointegrated implants for nasal prosthodontic rehabilitation: A clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Bruna M D F; Freitas-Pontes, Karina M; de Negreiros, Wagner A; Verde, Marcus A R L

    2015-08-01

    Malignant tumors in the nasal region may be treated by means of invasive surgical procedures, with large facial losses. Nasal prostheses, retained by osseointegrated facial implants, instead of plastic surgery, will, in most patients, offer good biomechanical and cosmetic results. This clinical report describes the prosthetic rehabilitation of a patient with nasal cancer who had the entire nasal vestibule removed in a single-stage surgical procedure in order to shorten the rehabilitation time. The nasal prosthesis was built on a 3-magnet bar and was made of platinum silicone with intrinsic pigmentation, thereby restoring the patient's appearance and self-esteem. The authors concluded that single-stage implants may reduce the rehabilitation time to as little as 1 month, and the correct use of materials and techniques may significantly improve the nasal prosthesis. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Radiographic Comparison of Progressive and Conventional Loading on Crestal Bone Loss and Density in Single Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Sorouri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Crestal bone loss is a biologic complication in implant dentistry. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of progressive and conventional loading on crestal bone height and bone density around single osseointegrated implants in posterior maxilla by a longitudinal radiographic assessment technique.Materials and methods: Twenty micro thread implants were placed in 10 patients (two implants per patient. One of the two implants of each patient was assigned to progressive and the other to conventional loading groups. Eight weeks after surgery, conventional implants were restored with a metal ceramic crown and progressive group underwent a progressive loading protocol. The progressive loading group takes different temporary acrylic crowns at 2, 4 and 6 months. After eight months, acrylic crowns were replaced with metal ceramic crown. Computer radiography of both progressive and conventional implants was taken at 2, 4, 6, and 12 months. Image analysis was performed to measure height of crestal bone loss and bone density.Results: The mean values of crestal bone loss at month 12 were 0.11 (0.19 mm for progressively and 0.36 (0.36 mm for conventionally loaded implants, with a statistically significant difference (P 0.05.Conclusion: Progressive group showed less crestal bone loss in single osseointegrated implant than conventional group. Bone density around progressively loaded implants showed increase in crestal, middle and apica

  16. A 5-year prospective study on single immediate implants in the aesthetic zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosyn, Jan; Eghbali, Aryan; Hermans, Alexander; Vervaeke, Stijn; De Bruyn, Hugo; Cleymaet, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    There is a paucity of long-term data on soft tissue aesthetics of single immediate implants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the 5-year clinical and aesthetic outcome of this treatment concept. Twenty-two periodontally healthy patients (12 men, 10 women; mean age 50) with low risk for aesthetic complications (thick gingival biotype, intact buccal bone wall, both neighbouring teeth present) were consecutively treated with a single immediate implant in the aesthetic zone (15-25). Flapless surgery was performed and the gap between the implant and buccal bone wall was systematically filled with bovine bone particles. Implants were immediately non-functionally loaded with a screw-retained provisional crown. Cases demonstrating major alveolar process changes and/or advanced mid-facial recession (>1 mm) at 3 months were additionally treated with a connective tissue graft (CTG). Permanent crowns were installed at 6 months. The clinical and aesthetic results at 5 years were compared to those obtained at 1 year. Seventeen patients attended the 5-year re-assessment, of whom five had been treated with a CTG for early aesthetic complications. There was one early implant failure and one complication after 1 year (porcelain chipping). Mean marginal bone loss was 0.12 mm at 1 year and 0.19 mm at 5 years (p = 0.595) with the moment of implant installation as baseline. Papilla height increased between 1 and 5 years (p ≤ 0.007), whereas mid-facial contour (p = 0.005) and alveolar process deficiency (p = 0.008) deteriorated. Mean mid-facial recession was on average 0.28 mm (SD 0.48) at 1 year and 0.53 mm (SD 0.53) at 5 years (p = 0.072) with the preoperative status as baseline. Three implants demonstrated advanced mid-facial recession (>1 mm) at 5 years. All three were in a central incisor position and none had been treated with a CTG. Thus, 8/17 implants showed aesthetic complications (five early and three late aesthetic complications). Implants

  17. Cumulative Success Rate of Short and Ultrashort Implants Supporting Single Crowns in the Posterior Maxilla: A 3-Year Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Lombardo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine cumulative success rate (CSR of short and ultrashort implants in the posterior maxilla restored with single crowns. Patients and Methods. We performed a retrospective study in 65 patients with 139 implants. 46 were ultrashort and 93 short. Implants were placed with a staged approach and restored with single crowns. Success rate, clinical and radiographic outcomes, and crown-to-implant ratio (CIR were assessed after three years. Statistical analysis was performed by descriptive and inferential statistics. A log-binomial regression model where the main outcome was implant success was achieved. Coefficients and 95% confidence intervals were reported. Analyses were performed with Stata 13.2 for Windows. Results. 61.54% of patients were female and mean overall age was 51.9±11.08 years old. Overall CSR was 97.1% (95% CI: 92.4–98.9: 97.9 and 95.1% for short and ultrashort, respectively (P value: 0.33. Four implants failed. Covariates were not associated with CSR (P value > 0.05. Regression model showed coefficients correlated with implant success for ultrashort implants (0.87 and most of covariates but none were statistically significant (P values > 0.05. Conclusions. Our results suggest that short and ultrashort implants may be successfully placed and restored with single crowns in the resorbed maxillary molar region.

  18. Cumulative Success Rate of Short and Ultrashort Implants Supporting Single Crowns in the Posterior Maxilla: A 3-Year Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Giorgio; Pighi, Jacopo; Marincola, Mauro; Corrocher, Giovanni; Simancas-Pallares, Miguel; Nocini, Pier Francesco

    2017-01-01

    To determine cumulative success rate (CSR) of short and ultrashort implants in the posterior maxilla restored with single crowns. We performed a retrospective study in 65 patients with 139 implants. 46 were ultrashort and 93 short. Implants were placed with a staged approach and restored with single crowns. Success rate, clinical and radiographic outcomes, and crown-to-implant ratio (CIR) were assessed after three years. Statistical analysis was performed by descriptive and inferential statistics. A log-binomial regression model where the main outcome was implant success was achieved. Coefficients and 95% confidence intervals were reported. Analyses were performed with Stata 13.2 for Windows. 61.54% of patients were female and mean overall age was 51.9 ± 11.08 years old. Overall CSR was 97.1% (95% CI: 92.4-98.9): 97.9 and 95.1% for short and ultrashort, respectively ( P value: 0.33). Four implants failed. Covariates were not associated with CSR ( P value > 0.05). Regression model showed coefficients correlated with implant success for ultrashort implants (0.87) and most of covariates but none were statistically significant ( P values > 0.05). Our results suggest that short and ultrashort implants may be successfully placed and restored with single crowns in the resorbed maxillary molar region.

  19. A comparison of buried oxide characteristics of single and multiple implant SIMOX and bond and etch back wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annamalai, N.K.; Bockman, J.F.; McGruer, N.E.; Chapski, J.

    1990-01-01

    The current through the buried oxides of single and multiple implant SIMOX and bond and etch back silicon-on-insulator (BESOI) wafers were measured as a function of radiation dose. From these measurements, conductivity and static capacitances were derived. High frequency capacitances were also measured. Leakage current through the buried oxide of multiple implant SIMOX is considerably less than that of single implant SIMOX (more than an order of magnitude). High frequency and static capacitances, as a function of total dose, were used to study the buried oxide---top silicon interface and the buried oxide---bottom silicon interface. Multiple implant had fewer interface traps than single implant at pre-rad and after irradiation

  20. Immediate Nonfunctional Loading of Two Single-Maxillary Postextractive Implants: 6-Year Postloading Results of Two Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Ariano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare crestal bone loss of single-maxillary immediate postextractive implants and immediate nonfunctional loading (INFL during 72 months of follow-up. Material and Methods. Two single titanium implants (Certain Prevail, Biomet 3I, USA were placed in two patients using INFL technique. Implant stability and crestal bone level were measured on periapical radiographs at 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery. Results. All osseointegrated implants were clinically successful after 6 years of functional loading. Conclusion. Within the limit of the present case report, the paper supports the concept that INFL of single dental implant can be a successful treatment procedure.

  1. Options for the Esthetic Zone Using the Immediate Restoration Procedure: Observational Data of 15 Years and 5000 Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrungaro, Paul S

    2017-05-01

    Dental implants have become a suitable treatment option for patients experiencing tooth loss and a popular choice among clinicians for immediate tooth replacement. Because of modifications in implant designs and development in immediate restoration and loading protocols, dental implant treatment can be reduced to a single procedure instead of multiple processes, hence providing the patient with a streamlined treatment that is typically much less invasive with immediate-tooth replacement. The purpose of this paper is to review the immediate restoration of dental implant(s) procedure and validate its position in treatment protocols by presenting success rates documented for more than 15 years and with 5000 implants. Also, recommendations for the management of different alveolar contours and defects will be presented, which have been encountered by the author when performing the immediate restoration procedure throughout this 15-year period.

  2. Immediate Implant Placement and Loading of Single Implants in the Esthetic Zone: Clinical Outcome and Esthetic Evaluation in a Japanese Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Kenji; Vandeweghe, Stefan; Vervack, Valentin; Sumi, Takashi; De Bruyn, Hugo; Jimbo, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the clinical outcomes of immediately loaded maxillary anterior single implants placed in fresh extraction sockets. A patient cohort that was treated 1.5 years earlier was recalled, and 18 patients (6 men, 12 women) with 21 implants were included. Clinical photographs and periapical radiographs were taken at follow-up and baseline to determine the bone loss and change in esthetics. No marginal bone loss was detected at follow-up (mean bone level ± standard deviation = 0.32 ± 0.82 mm). Immediate implant placement and loading resulted in predictable clinical and esthetic outcomes, with soft and hard tissue levels remaining stable over time.

  3. The experience of artificial urinary sphincter implantation by a single surgeon in 15 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Chi Shen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Artificial urinary sphincter (AUS is the gold standard treatment for urinary incontinence owing to sphincter incompetence. We reviewed our experience in AUS implantation. From 1995 to 2009, 19 patients underwent 25 AUS implantations performed by a single surgeon. The cause of incontinence was sphincter incompetence, which was secondary to prostate surgery, neurogenic bladder, radiation, and post-traumatic urethral lesion. Twenty-three prostheses were placed in the bulbar urethra for male patients: 11 AUS cuffs were placed through the perineal approach and 12 through the penoscrotal approach. Two procedures were applied over the bladder neck for the female patients. Through a retrospective review of charts, continence and complications were analyzed. The mean follow-up time was 50.0 ± 42.9 months (range: 2–146 months. There were 16 successful surgeries (64%, and these patients were free from the need for a pad. In eight surgeries (32%, the devices were removed due to infection, while one implantation (4% was unsuccessful due to perforation into the bulbar urethra. There was a statistically significant difference (p = 0.024 in failure rates between patients who received radiotherapy (100% and other patients (22.7%. There was no statistically significant difference in dry and revision rates (p > 0.05 between the perineal and penoscrotal approach. Accordingly, over half of the patients with total incontinence benefitted from AUS implantation. In consideration of the high failure rate for patients receiving radiotherapy, caution should be exercised in the use of implantation. Secondary implantation has a satisfactory success rate in selected patients. The same success rate was noted for both perineal and penoscrotal approaches.

  4. An Automatic Segmentation and Classification Framework Based on PCNN Model for Single Tooth in MicroCT Images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liansheng Wang

    Full Text Available Accurate segmentation and classification of different anatomical structures of teeth from medical images plays an essential role in many clinical applications. Usually, the anatomical structures of teeth are manually labelled by experienced clinical doctors, which is time consuming. However, automatic segmentation and classification is a challenging task because the anatomical structures and surroundings of the tooth in medical images are rather complex. Therefore, in this paper, we propose an effective framework which is designed to segment the tooth with a Selective Binary and Gaussian Filtering Regularized Level Set (GFRLS method improved by fully utilizing three dimensional (3D information, and classify the tooth by employing unsupervised learning Pulse Coupled Neural Networks (PCNN model. In order to evaluate the proposed method, the experiments are conducted on the different datasets of mandibular molars and the experimental results show that our method can achieve better accuracy and robustness compared to other four state of the art clustering methods.

  5. Dimensions of the healthy gingiva and peri-implant mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parpaiola, Andrea; Cecchinato, Denis; Toia, Marco; Bressan, Eriberto; Speroni, Stefano; Lindhe, Jan

    2015-06-01

    To determine the dimensions of the soft tissue cuff present at various aspects of teeth and to compare these dimensions to those of the mucosa surrounding single implants. Fifty volunteers were recruited that were ≥25 years of age and exhibited no signs of (i) untreated caries; (ii) loss of periodontal tissue support in the incisor, canine, and premolar regions; (iii) systemic or local disease. Furthermore, among the 50 patients recruited (iV), 27 had one single implant in the maxilla with teeth present mesial and/or distal to the implant. Probing pocket depth (PPD) and transmucosal sounding depth (TS) were assessed by five experienced, carefully calibrated examiners and with the use of a periodontal probe at the proximal (mesial, distal) and flat (facial, buccal and palatal/lingual) surfaces of all teeth/implants. The width of the keratinized mucosa (KM) was also determined. It was demonstrated that (i) PPD and TS were greater at proximal than at flat surfaces at both tooth and implant sites. In addition, both PPD and TS were deeper at implant than at tooth sites. The TS values documented that the cuff of healthy soft tissue that surrounded a tooth varied between 2 mm at flat surfaces and 4 mm at proximal surfaces, while at implant sites, the mucosa at proximal as well as flat surfaces was 1-1.5 mm greater. The probing pocket depth (PPD) and the transmucosal sounding depth (TS) values were greater at proximal than at flat, that is, facial/palatal (lingual) surfaces at tooth sites and frequently also at implant sites. Furthermore, the PPD and the TS dimensions were greater at implant than at adjacent tooth sites. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Immediate and delayed loading of fixed dental prostheses supported by single or two splinted implants: A histomorphometric study in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaretti, G; Lang, N P; Viganò, P; Bengazi, F; Apaza Alccayhuaman, K A; Botticelli, D

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate presumptive differences in osseointegration at implants supporting crowns that are physiologically loaded either immediately or 3 months after installation. All premolars and first molars were extracted bilaterally in six dogs. After 3 months of healing, three implants were installed on the premolar region and two in the molar region in one side of the mandible. Likewise, after another 3 months, five implants were installed in the contralateral side, and impressions were taken bilaterally. Within 48 hours, two single crowns were screwed bilaterally onto two implants in the premolar region, and two splinted crowns reproducing the shape of the first molar were screwed bilaterally onto the implants in the molar region. The mesial implants were used as no-loaded controls. Sacrifices were performed after 3 months, and histological analyses were performed. At the premolar sites, mineralised bone-to-implant contact (MBIC%) was 78.0 ± 4.0% and 70.9 ± 7.9% at the delayed and immediately loaded sites, respectively. This difference was statistically significant. At the control implants, MBIC% was 61.4 ± 14.7% and 63.1 ± 13.1% at the delayed and the immediately loaded sites, respectively. At the molar sites, MBIC% was 79.2 ± 10.9% and 61.1 ± 10.3% at the delayed and immediately loaded sites, respectively. Applying a delayed loading to fixed dental prostheses supported by single or two splinted implants yielded higher proportions of bone-to-implant contact (osseointegration) compared to immediately loaded implants. Moreover, both types of loading protocols yielded a higher rate of osseointegration compared to unloaded implant sites after 3 months following implant installation. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Immediate occlusal versus non-occlusal loading of single zirconia implants. A multicentre pragmatic randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannizzaro, Gioacchino; Torchio, Cinzia; Felice, Pietro; Leone, Michele; Esposito, Marco

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate whether immediate non-occlusal loading of single zirconia implants could reduce early failures when compared to immediate occlusal loading. Forty partially edentulous patients who received one single zirconia implant (Z-Systems) at least 10 mm long and 3.25 mm wide inserted with a torque of at least 35 Ncm were randomised to immediate occlusal or non-occlusal loading groups. All patients received provisional acrylic crowns the same day of implant placement. Provisional crowns were replaced after 4 to 5 months by definitive full ceramic crowns. Outcome measures were implant success, any complications and peri-implant marginal bone levels. One year after loading, no patients had dropped out. Five implants (12.5%) failed early: three occlusally loaded and two non-occlusally loaded. Three complications occurred, all after delivery of the definitive crowns: one crown fractured (occlusal loading), one had to be remade after debridement because of hyperplastic tissues (occlusal loading), and one crown decemented (nonocclusal loading). These differences were not statistically significant. Both groups gradually lost periimplant bone in a highly statistically significant way. One year after loading, patients subjected to non-occlusal loading lost an average of 0.7 mm of peri-implant bone versus 0.9 mm in the occlusal group. This difference in bone loss between groups was not statistically significant. There was an association between immediate post-extractive implants and implant failures (P=0.01). Four of the 10 immediate post-extractive implants (40%) failed versus one out of 30 delayed implants (3%). The results of this study do not provide a conclusive answer to whether immediate non-occlusal loading may decrease implant failures. Immediately loaded zirconia implants placed in post-extractive sites had high failure rates.

  8. Ankylos implant system: concept and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nentwig, Georg H

    2004-01-01

    The Ankylos system was developed in 1985 and has been in clinical use since 1987. Some of its significant design features include (1) a progressive thread structure of the endosseous implant body for targeted load distribution to the apically positioned spongy bone; and (2) the gap-free subgingival tapered connection to the abutments. The purpose of this report is to demonstrate that the Ankylos Implant System meets both the patients' and the dentists' standards of success and is suitable for use as single tooth replacements, bridge abutments, and retention elements for all regions and prosthetic indications. The data from 5439 implants were evaluated between October 1991 and October 2002. The implants were considered successful if the following criteria were met: (1) clinical stability and function; (2) no inflammation of the peri-implant hard and soft tissue; (3) no progressive loss of the peri-implant bone; (4) no progressive loss of the peri-implant mucosa; and (5) satisfaction of the patient. All implants placed during this period were included in the evaluation as a prospective study. The average loading period was 56.8 months. Postoperative follow-ups were made once a year by a standardized protocol. The results were classified by prosthetic application in Table 1. A total of 943 implants were placed as single tooth restoration and were followed for the duration of the study. The success rate for this type of restoration was 98.7%. For free-end implant restorations, there were 1679 implants placed with a 97.9% success rate. When the edentulous area involved a large gap, a total of 805 implants were placed with a 97.3% success rate. For cases involving reduced dentition, 606 implants were used with a 95.8% success rate. Another significant finding was that the success rates classified by maxilla and mandible showed no differences.

  9. Strategies for restoration of single implants and use of cross-pin retained restorations by Australian prosthodontists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambrook, R J; Judge, R B; Abuzaar, M A

    2012-12-01

    Implant supported restorations (ISRs) for the single implant may be cement retained or screw retained. Limited scientific evidence exists to support the superiority of a retention type for either implant or prosthetic success. The aim of this study was to assess preferences of Australian prosthodontists when restoring single implants. In particular, clinical practices for cross-pin retained implant supported restorations for a single implant were investigated. A written questionnaire comprised of seven questions, some of which had multiple parts and of both open- and closed-format, was sent to 124 Australian prosthodontists. The questionnaire asked recipients to identify: (1) their preference for retention choice when restoring a single implant; (2) the frequency of use; and (3) clinical practice when restoring a cross-pin retained restoration. Seventy-seven per cent of respondents indicated that direct to fixture (DTF) retention was their first preference. DTF retention was also the most frequently employed restoration for single implants. Respondents indicated that cross-pinned ISRs are employed to maintain retrievability or when DTF is not possible. The majority of respondents indicated they always or sometimes use a gasket with cross-pin retained restorations, though gasket type varied. Thirty-eight respondents (31%) indicated that they would never use a cross-pinned retained restoration for a single ISR. Australian prosthodontists prefer, and more frequently restore single implants, using DTF retention. Queensland prosthodontists prefer cement retained ISRs. In comparison, cross-pinned restorations tend to be the least favoured and least used retention type. In addition, variation in opinion exists regarding the need for a gasket and type of gasket to be placed. © 2012 Australian Dental Association.

  10. Complications and Mortality of Single Versus Dual Chamber Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators

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    Ataallah Bagherzadeh

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs are increasingly being used as a treatment modality for life threatening tachyarrhythmia. The purpose of this study was to compare the frequency of complications and mortality between single-chamber and dual-chamber ICD implantation in Shahid Rajaie cardiovascular center. Methods and results: Between January 2000 and December 2004, 234 patients received ICD by a percutaneous transvenous approach and were followed for 33 ± 23 months. The cumulative incidence of complications was 9.4% over the follow-up period. There was no significant difference in overall complication rate between single chamber (VR and dual chamber (DR ICD groups in the follow-up period (P= 0.11. The risk of complications did not have any statistically significant difference in secondary versus primary prevention groups (P=0.06. The complications were not associated with the severity of left ventricular systolic dysfunction (P=0.16.The frequency of lead-related complications was higher in dual chamber ICDs in comparison with single chamber ICDs (P=0.02. There was no significant difference in mortality between different sex groups (P=0.37, different indications for ICD implantation (P=0.43 or between VR and DR ICD groups (P= 0.55. Predictors of mortality were NYHA class III or more (P65 years (P=0.011 and LVEF<30% (P<0.001. The mortality in patients with CAD and DCM were significantly higher than those with other structural heart diseases (P=0.001. Conclusions: Close monitoring of patients during the first 2 month after ICD implantation is recommended because the majority of complications occur early after the procedure.

  11. Straightforward Case of Dental Implant in General Dentistry

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    Aji P. Tjikman

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dental implant has become a fast developing and dynamic field in dental practice. It is acknowledged as a predictable treatment modality with high clinical success rates. Conventional fixed prostheses are no longer considered to be the first choice of treatment for replacing a missing tooth. Despite the increasing number of patients requesting dental implant treatments, there are only some clinicians who are offering implant therapy in their daily practice. The International team for Implantology described a straightforward case as a simple case such as implant placements in adquate soft and hard tissue conditions and single-tooth restorations in a non-aesthetic zone. A review of the current literature discussed the implementation of implant dentistry in universities worldwide into their curriculum for both undergraduate and postgraduate programs in general dentistry. The European consensus in implant dentistry education concluded that it is desirable to include the surgical technique for implant placement for straightforward cases into the dental curriculum. The levels and limitations to which the various aspects of implant dentistry and related skills are taught to be determined by the academic community. This review aimed at promoting awareness amongst dental practitioners and institutions in Indonesia of the shifting treatment paradigm in the maangement of a missing tooth. Hence clinicians will be able to include implant dentistry in the treatment planning of their patients and also undertake a significant part in the execution of such treatments.

  12. Outcomes with single-coil versus dual-coil implantable cardioverter defibrillators: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderland, Nicholas; Kaura, Amit; Murgatroyd, Francis; Dhillon, Para; Scott, Paul A

    2018-03-01

    Dual-coil implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) leads have traditionally been used over single-coil leads due to concerns regarding high defibrillation thresholds (DFT) and consequent poor shock efficacy. However, accumulating evidence suggests that this position may be unfounded and that dual-coil leads may also be associated with higher complication rates during lead extraction. This meta-analysis collates data comparing dual- and single-coil ICD leads. Electronic databases were systematically searched for randomized controlled trials (RCT) and non-randomized studies comparing single-coil and dual-coil leads. The mean differences in DFT and summary estimates of the odds-ratio (OR) for first-shock efficacy and the hazard-ratio (HR) for all-cause mortality were calculated using random effects models. Eighteen studies including a total of 138,124 patients were identified. Dual-coil leads were associated with a lower DFT compared to single coil leads (mean difference -0.83J; 95% confidence interval [CI] -1.39--0.27; P = 0.004). There was no difference in the first-shock success rate with dual-coil compared to single-coil leads (OR 0.74; 95%CI 0.45-1.21; P=0.22). There was a significantly lower risk of all-cause mortality associated with single-coil leads (HR 0.91; 95%CI 0.86-0.95; P dual-coil leads. The mortality benefit with single-coil leads most likely represents patient selection bias. Given the increased risk and complexity of extracting dual-coil leads, centres should strongly consider single-coil ICD leads as the lead of choice for routine new left-sided ICD implants. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Annealing effect of H+ -implanted single crystal silicon on strain and crystal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duo Xinzhong; Liu Weili; Zhang Miao; Gao Jianxia; Fu Xiaorong; Lin Chenglu

    2000-01-01

    The work focuses on the rocking curves of H + -implanted single silicon crystal detected by Four-Crystal X-ray diffractometer. The samples were annealed under different temperatures. Lattice defect in H + -implanted silicon crystals was detected by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry. It appeared that H-related complex did not crush until annealing temperature reached about 400 degree C. At that temperature H 2 was formed, deflated in silicon lattice and strained the lattice. But defects did not come into being in large quantity. The lattice was undamaged. When annealing temperature reached 500 degree C, strain induced by H 2 deflation crashed the silicon lattice. A large number of defects were formed. At the same time bubbles in the crystal and blister/flaking on the surface could be observed

  14. Home monitoring report from a single lead Lumax DX implantable cardioverter defibrillator: New observations in a new system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuval Konstantino

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A 56-year-old man underwent a single lead Lumax 640 DX implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death. A DX system consists of a single lead, which provides atrial as well as ventricular electrograms, and enhances atrial arrhythmia detection. Three months after the implantation, high-frequency episodes were detected on the far field and the atrial channels, but not on the bipolar right ventricular channel; these were classified as atrial tachycardia. In the present report, we discussed the unusual pattern of the artifacts that was related to an electromagnetic interference detected by the novel DX system.

  15. Clinical evaluation of a novel dental implant system as single implants under immediate loading conditions - 4-month post-loading results from a multicentre randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Marco; Trullenque-Eriksson, Anna; Blasone, Rodolfo; Malaguti, Giuliano; Gaffuri, Cristiano; Caneva, Marco; Minciarelli, Armando; Luongo, Giuseppe

    To evaluate the safety and clinical effectiveness of a novel dental implant system (GENESIS Implant System, Keystone Dental, Massachusetts, USA) using another dental implant system by the same manufacturer as a control (PRIMA Implant System, Keystone Dental). A total of 53 patients requiring at least two single crowns had their sites randomised according to a split-mouth design to receive both implant systems at six centres. If implants could be placed with a torque superior to 40 Ncm they were to be loaded immediately with provisional crowns, otherwise after 3 months of submerged healing. Provisional crowns were replaced by definitive crowns 4 months after initial loading, when the follow-up period for the initial part of this study was completed. Outcome measures were crown/implant failures, complications, pink esthetic score (PES), peri-implant marginal bone level changes, plaque score, marginal bleeding, patients and preference of the clinician. In total 53 PRIMA and 53 GENESIS implants were placed. Three patients dropped out but all of the remaining patients were followed up to 4-months post-loading. No PRIMA implant failed whereas four GENESIS implants failed. Only two complications were reported for PRIMA implants. There were no statistically significant differences for crown/implant failures (difference in proportions = 0.080; P (McNemar test) = 0.125) and complications (difference in proportions = -0.04; P (McNemar test) = 0.500) between the implant systems. There were no differences at 4-months post-loading for plaque (difference = -0.54, 95% CI: -3.01 to 1.93; P (Paired t-test) = 0.660), marginal bleeding (difference = -3.8, 95% CI: -7.63 to 0.019; P (Paired t-test) = 0.051), PES (difference = 0.47, 95% CI: -0.56 to 1.50; P (Paired t-test) = 0.365) and marginal bone level changes (difference in mm = -0.04, 95% CI: -0.33 to 0.26; P (Paired t-test) = 0.795). The majority of the patients (46) had no

  16. Evidence-based knowledge on the aesthetics and maintenance of peri-implant soft tissues: Osteology Foundation Consensus Report Part 3-Aesthetics of peri-implant soft tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ronald E; Heitz-Mayfield, Lisa; Schwarz, Frank

    2018-03-01

    Working Group 2 at the 2nd Consensus Meeting of the Osteology Foundation had a focus on the influence of vertical implant placement on papilla height at single implants adjacent to teeth and on the inter-implant mucosa fill at two adjacent implants in the anterior maxilla. Two systematic reviews were prepared in advance of the consensus meeting. Due to the heterogeneity among the studies with regard to study design, study population, method of assessment, meta-analyses were not possible. Consensus statements, clinical recommendations, and implications for future research were based on structured group discussions until consensus was reached among the entire expert group. The systematic review about single-tooth implants included a total of 12 studies demonstrating that the vertical distance from the crestal bone level to the base of the interproximal contact point varied considerably from 2 mm up to 11 mm, and a partial or complete papilla fill was reached in 56.5% to 100% of the cases. For the systematic review regarding two adjacent implants, only four studies reported on horizontal inter-implant distances which ranged between 2.0 and 4.0 mm. More than half of the papilla presence was indicated in 21% to 88.5% of the cases. It was concluded that for single-tooth implants, the papilla height between an implant and a tooth is predominantly dependent on the clinical attachment level of the tooth. In cases with two adjacent implants, it was concluded that it is not possible to define the optimal horizontal distance between two adjacent implants restored with fixed dental prosthess. © 2018 The Authors. Clinical Oral Implants Research Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Immediate non-occlusal loading of immediate post-extractive versus delayed placement of single implants in preserved sockets of the anterior maxilla: 1-year post-loading outcome of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felice, Pietro; Pistilli, Roberto; Barausse, Carlo; Trullenque-Eriksson, Anna; Esposito, Marco

    2015-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of immediate post-extractive single implants with delayed implants placed in preserved sockets after 4 months of healing. Implants that achieved an insertion torque of at least 35 Ncm were immediately non-occlusally loaded. Just after tooth extraction, and in the presence of less than 4 mm of vertical loss of the buccal bone in relation to the palatal wall, 50 patients requiring a single immediate post-extractive implant in the maxilla from second to second premolar were randomly allocated for either immediate implant placement (immediate group; 25 patients) or for socket preservation using an algae-derived (phycogenic) bone substitute, covered by a resorbable collagen barrier (delayed group; 25 patients), according to a parallel group design in one centre. Bone-to-implant gaps were filled with an algae-derived bone substitute. Four months after socket preservation, delayed implants were placed. Implants inserted with an insertion torque of at least 35 Ncm were immediately loaded with non-occluding provisional single crowns, then replaced, after 4 months, by definitive crowns. Patients were followed up to 1 year after loading. Outcome measures were implant failures, complications, aesthetics assessed using the pink esthetic score (PES), peri-implant marginal bone level changes and patient satisfaction, recorded by blinded assessors. Nine (36%) implants were not immediately loaded in the immediate group versus 19 (76%) implants in the delayed placement group, because an insertion torque superior to 35 Ncm could not be obtained, the difference being statistically significant (difference = - 0.40, 95% CI: -0.652 to -0.148, P = 0.010). Two patients dropped out 4 months after loading in the delayed group versus none in the immediate group. Two implants failed in the immediate group (8%) versus none in the delayed group, with the difference showing no statistical significance (considering 25 and 23 patients, the difference in proportions was

  18. Contemporary rates and outcomes of single- vs. dual-coil implantable cardioverter defibrillator lead implantation: data from the Israeli ICD Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshem, Eran; Suleiman, Mahmoud; Laish-Farkash, Avishag; Konstantino, Yuval; Glikson, Michael; Barsheshet, Alon; Goldenberg, Ilan; Michowitz, Yoav

    2017-09-01

    Dual-coil leads were traditionally considered standard of care due to lower defibrillation thresholds (DFT). Higher complication rates during extraction with parallel progression in implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) technology raised questions on dual coil necessity. Prior substudies found no significant outcome difference between dual and single coils, although using higher rates of DFT testing then currently practiced. We evaluated the temporal trends in implantation rates of single- vs. dual-coil leads and determined the associated adverse clinical outcomes, using a contemporary nation-wide ICD registry. Between July 2010 and March 2015, 6343 consecutive ICD (n = 3998) or CRT-D (n = 2345) implantation patients were prospectively enrolled in the Israeli ICD Registry. A follow-up of at least 1 year of 2285 patients was available for outcome analysis. The primary endpoint was all-cause mortality. Single-coil leads were implanted in 32% of our cohort, 36% among ICD recipients, and 26% among CRT-D recipients. Secondary prevention indication was associated with an increased rate of dual-coil implantation. A significant decline in dual-coil leads with reciprocal incline of single coils was observed, despite low rates of DFT testing (11.6%) during implantation, which also declined from 31 to 2%. In the multivariate Cox model analysis, dual- vs. single-coil lead implantation was not associated with an increased risk of mortality [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.23; P= 0.33], heart failure hospitalization (HR = 1.34; P=0.13), appropriate (HR = 1.25; P= 0.33), or inappropriate ICD therapy (HR = 2.07; P= 0.12). Real-life rates of single-coil lead implantation are rising while adding no additional risk. These results of single-coil safety are reassuring and obtained, despite low and contemporary rates of DFT testing. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Osseoperception: active tactile sensibility of osseointegrated dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enkling, Norbert; Utz, Karl Heinz; Bayer, Stefan; Stern, Regina Mericske

    2010-01-01

    The phenomenon of developing a certain tactile sensibility through osseointegrated dental implants is called osseoperception. Active tactile sensibility can be tested by having the subject bite on test bodies. The aim of the study was to describe the active tactile sensibility of single-tooth implants based on the 50% value and the slope of the sensibility curve at the 50% value. Sixty-two subjects with single-tooth implants with natural opposing teeth were included in the study. In a computer-assisted and randomized way, copper foils of varying thickness (0 to 200 Μm) were placed inter?occlusally between the single-tooth implant and the natural opposing tooth, and the active tactile perception was studied according to the psychophysical method of constant stimuli and statistically evaluated by logistic regression. Tactile perception of the implants at the 50% value estimated by logistic regression was 20.2 ± 10.9 Μm on average, and the slope was 29 ± 15. Regarding implant surface structure, significant differences were observed. The sandblasted and acid-etched surface was significantly more sensitive than the titanium plasma-sprayed surface, and the machined surface was similar to the titanium plasma-sprayed surface. Active tactile sensibility of implants with natural antagonistic teeth is very similar to that of teeth, but the slope of the tactile sensibility curve is flatter. Significant differences in tactile sensibility as a function of different implant surfaces may indicate that receptors near the implant form the basis of osseoperception.

  20. Digital subtraction radiography evaluation of longitudinal bone density changes around immediate loading implants: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, L S; da Cunha, H A; Leles, C R; Mendonça, E F

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess longitudinal quantitative changes in bone density around different implant loading protocols and implant surfaces measured by digital subtraction radiography (DSR). 12 patients received bilateral homologous standard and TiUnite® (Nobel Biocare, Kloten, Switzerland) single-tooth implants under 2 implant-loading protocols: immediate loading (8 patients, 16 implants, 12 maxillary) and conventional loading (4 patients, 8 implants, 4 maxillary). Standardized periapical radiographs were taken immediately after implant placement (baseline image) and at the 3-month, 6-month and 12-month follow ups. Radiographic images were digitized and submitted to digital subtraction using the DSR system® (Electro Medical System, Nyon, Switzerland), resulting in three subtracted images. Quantitative analysis of bone density was performed using Image Tool® software (University of Texas Health Science Centre, San Antonio, TX) to assess pixel value changes in five areas around the implants (crestal, subcrestal, medial third, apical-lateral and apical). Repeated-measures analysis of variance showed that grey levels were significantly influenced by follow-up time and implant-loading protocol. A linear increase in grey levels was found for immediate loading (IML) implants and a significant decrease in grey levels was observed in the 12-month follow up for conventional loading implants. No effect of implant surface treatment was observed. In conclusion, IML protocol induced mineral bone gain around single-tooth implants after the first year under function for cases with favourable bone conditions.

  1. Influence of Restorative Materials on Color of Implant-Supported Single Crowns in Esthetic Zone: A Spectrophotometric Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei-Jie; Hosseini, Mandana; Zhou, Wen-Juan; Xiao, Ting

    2017-01-01

    Restorations of 98 implant-supported single crowns in anterior maxillary area were divided into 5 groups: zirconia abutment, titanium abutment, and gold/gold hue abutment with zirconia coping, respectively, and titanium abutment with metal coping as well as gold/gold hue abutment with metal coping. A reflectance spectrophotometer was used to evaluate the color difference between the implant crowns and contralateral/neighboring teeth, as well as the color difference between the peri-implant soft tissue and the natural marginal mucosa. The mucosal discoloration score was used for subjective evaluation of the esthetic outcome of soft tissue around implant-supported single crowns in the anterior zone, and the crown color match score was used for subjective evaluation of the esthetic outcome of implant-supported restoration. ANOVA analysis was used to compare the differences among groups and Spearman correlation was used to test the relationships. A gold/gold hue abutment with zirconia coping was the best choice for an esthetic crown and the all-ceramic combination was the best for peri-implant soft tissue. Significant correlation was found between the spectrophotometric color difference of peri-implant soft tissue and mucosal discoloration score, while no significant correlation was found between the total spectrophotometric color difference of implant crown and crown color match score. PMID:29349075

  2. Influence of Restorative Materials on Color of Implant-Supported Single Crowns in Esthetic Zone: A Spectrophotometric Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Peng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Restorations of 98 implant-supported single crowns in anterior maxillary area were divided into 5 groups: zirconia abutment, titanium abutment, and gold/gold hue abutment with zirconia coping, respectively, and titanium abutment with metal coping as well as gold/gold hue abutment with metal coping. A reflectance spectrophotometer was used to evaluate the color difference between the implant crowns and contralateral/neighboring teeth, as well as the color difference between the peri-implant soft tissue and the natural marginal mucosa. The mucosal discoloration score was used for subjective evaluation of the esthetic outcome of soft tissue around implant-supported single crowns in the anterior zone, and the crown color match score was used for subjective evaluation of the esthetic outcome of implant-supported restoration. ANOVA analysis was used to compare the differences among groups and Spearman correlation was used to test the relationships. A gold/gold hue abutment with zirconia coping was the best choice for an esthetic crown and the all-ceramic combination was the best for peri-implant soft tissue. Significant correlation was found between the spectrophotometric color difference of peri-implant soft tissue and mucosal discoloration score, while no significant correlation was found between the total spectrophotometric color difference of implant crown and crown color match score.

  3. Evaluation of bone remodeling around single dental implants of different lengths: a mechanobiological numerical simulation and validation using clinical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotto-Maior, Bruno Salles; Mercuri, Emílio Graciliano Ferreira; Senna, Plinio Mendes; Assis, Neuza Maria Souza Picorelli; Francischone, Carlos Eduardo; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha

    2016-01-01

    Algorithmic models have been proposed to explain adaptive behavior of bone to loading; however, these models have not been applied to explain the biomechanics of short dental implants. Purpose of present study was to simulate bone remodeling around single implants of different lengths using mechanoregulatory tissue differentiation model derived from the Stanford theory, using finite elements analysis (FEA) and to validate the theoretical prediction with the clinical findings of crestal bone loss. Loading cycles were applied on 7-, 10-, or 13-mm-long dental implants to simulate daily mastication and bone remodeling was assessed by changes in the strain energy density of bone after a 3, 6, and 12 months of function. Moreover, clinical findings of marginal bone loss in 45 patients rehabilitated with same implant designs used in the simulation (n = 15) were computed to validate the theoretical results. FEA analysis showed that although the bone density values reduced over time in the cortical bone for all groups, bone remodeling was independent of implant length. Clinical data showed a similar pattern of bone resorption compared with the data generated from mathematical analyses, independent of implant length. The results of this study showed that the mechanoregulatory tissue model could be employed in monitoring the morphological changes in bone that is subjected to biomechanical loads. In addition, the implant length did not influence the bone remodeling around single dental implants during the first year of loading.

  4. Fracture Strength and Failure Mode of Maxillary Implant-Supported Provisional Single Crowns : A Comparison of Composite Resin Crowns Fabricated Directly Over PEEK Abutments and Solid Titanium Abutments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santing, H.J.; Meijer, Henny J.A.; Raghoebar, G.M.; Ozcan, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) temporary abutments have been recently introduced for making implant-supported provisional single crowns. Little information is available in the dental literature on the durability of provisional implant-supported restorations. Purpose: The objectives of this

  5. Clinical performance and material properties of single-implant overdenture attachment systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsabeeha, Nabeel H M; Swain, Michael V; Payne, Alan G T

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanical properties of different attachment systems used for mandibular single-implant overdentures and to compare their wear/deformation features with clinical performance in patients after 1 year. Three attachment systems were evaluated: large 5.9-mm titanium nitride-coated ball attachments with plastic matrices, standard 2.25-mm uncoated titanium alloy ball attachments with Dalla Bona-type gold alloy matrices, and Locator attachments of titanium nitride-coated patrices and nylon matrices. The hardness and elastic modulus of the systems were determined using the nanoindentation technique. Twelve attachments from each system were used in 36 edentulous patients to support mandibular single-implant overdentures. After 1 year, 5 samples from each system were retrieved and evaluated for wear changes under a scanning electron microscope. The titanium nitride-coated patrices, regardless of system, appeared unchanged and did not require any maintenance. Extensive wear was evident in the uncoated titanium alloy patrices and Dalla Bona-type gold alloy matrices, resulting in high maintenance (15 activations). Minimal wear was observed in the plastic matrices with minimal maintenance (2 replacements). The Locator nylon matrices showed extensive deformation and deterioration with a substantial need for maintenance (16 replacements). The performance of the patrices was related to hardness, while that of the matrices was related to the creep response. Large ball attachment systems of titanium nitride-coated patrices and plastic matrices reflect favorable wear behavior and clinical performance. These attachments are recommended for patients receiving mandibular single-implant overdentures.

  6. Hearing performance in single-sided deaf cochlear implant users after upgrade to a single-unit speech processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Griet; Hofkens, Anouk; Punte, Andrea Kleine; De Bodt, Marc; Van de Heyning, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Single-sided deaf (SSD) patients report multiple benefits after cochlear implantation (CI), such as tinnitus suppression, speech perception, and sound localization. The first single-unit speech processor, the RONDO, was launched recently. Both the RONDO and the well-known behind-the-ear (BTE) speech processor work on the same audio processor platform. However, in contrast to the BTE, the microphone placement on the RONDO is different. The aim of this study was to evaluate the hearing performances using the BTE speech processor versus using the single-unit speech processor. Subjective and objective outcomes in SSD CI patients with a BTE speech processor and a single-unit speech processor, with particular focus on spatial hearing, were compared. Ten adults with unilateral incapacitating tinnitus resulting from ipsilateral sensorineural deafness were enrolled in the study. The mean age at enrollment in the study was 56 (standard deviation, 13) years. The subjects were cochlear implanted at a mean age of 48 (standard deviation, 14) years and had on average 8 years' experience with their CI (range, 4-11 yr). At the first test interval (T0), testing was conducted using the subject's BTE speech processor, with which they were already familiar. Aided free-field audiometry, speech reception in noise, and sound localization testing were performed. Self-administered questionnaires on subjective evaluation consisted of HISQUI-NL, SSQ5, SHQ, and a Visual Analogue Scale to assess tinnitus loudness and disturbance. All 10 subjects were upgraded to the single-unit processor and retested after 28 days (T28) with the same fitting map. At T28, an additional single-unit questionnaire was administered to determine qualitative experiences and the effect of the position of the microphone on the new speech processor. Equal hearing outcomes were found between the single-unit speech processor: median PTA(single-unit) (0.5, 1, 2 kHz) = 40 (range, 33-48) dB HL; median Speech Reception

  7. Environment-adaptive speech enhancement for bilateral cochlear implants using a single processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzahasanloo, Taher S; Kehtarnavaz, Nasser; Gopalakrishna, Vanishree; Loizou, Philipos C

    2013-05-01

    A computationally efficient speech enhancement pipeline in noisy environments based on a single-processor implementation is developed for utilization in bilateral cochlear implant systems. A two-channel joint objective function is defined and a closed form solution is obtained based on the weighted-Euclidean distortion measure. The computational efficiency and no need for synchronization aspects of this pipeline make it a suitable solution for real-time deployment. A speech quality measure is used to show its effectiveness in six different noisy environments as compared to a similar one-channel enhancement pipeline when using two separate processors or when using independent sequential processing.

  8. Should Single-Coil Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Leads Be Used in all Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almehmadi, Fahad; Manlucu, Jaimie

    2018-03-01

    The historical preference for dual-coil implantable cardioverter defibrillator leads stems from high defibrillation thresholds associated with old device platforms. The high safety margins generated by contemporary devices have rendered the modest difference in defibrillation efficacy between single- and dual-coil leads clinically insignificant. Cohort data demonstrating worse lead extraction outcomes and higher all-cause mortality have brought the incremental utility of an superior vena cava coil into question. This article summarizes the current literature and re-evaluates the utility of dual-coil leads in the context of modern device technology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Complete digital workflow for the production of implant-supported single-unit monolithic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joda, Tim; Brägger, Urs

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this case series was to introduce a complete digital workflow for the production of monolithic implant crowns. Six patients were treated with implant-supported crowns made of resin nano ceramic (RNC). Starting with an intraoral optical scan (IOS), and following a CAD/CAM process, the monolithic crowns were bonded either to a novel prefabricated titanium abutment base (group A) or to a CAD/CAM-generated individualized titanium abutment (group B) in premolar or molar sites on a soft tissue level dental implant. Economic analyses included clinical and laboratory steps. An esthetic evaluation was performed to compare the two abutment-crown combinations. None of the digitally constructed RNC crowns required any clinical adaptation. Overall mean work time calculations revealed obvious differences for group A (65.3 min) compared with group B (86.5 min). Esthetic analysis demonstrated a more favorable outcome for the prefabricated bonding bases. Prefabricated or individualized abutments on monolithic RNC crowns using CAD/CAM technology in a model-free workflow seem to provide a feasible and streamlined treatment approach for single-edentulous space rehabilitation in the posterior region. However, RNC as full-contour material has to be considered experimental, and further large-scale clinical investigations with long-term follow-up observation are necessary. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Soft Tissue Stability around Single Implants Inserted to Replace Maxillary Lateral Incisors: A 3D Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. G. Mangano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the soft tissue stability around single implants inserted to replace maxillary lateral incisors, using an innovative 3D method. Methods. We have used reverse-engineering software for the superimposition of 3D surface models of the dentogingival structures, obtained from intraoral scans of the same patients taken at the delivery of the final crown (S1 and 2 years later (S2. The assessment of soft tissues changes was performed via calculation of the Euclidean surface distances between the 3D models, after the superimposition of S2 on S1; colour maps were used for quantification of changes. Results. Twenty patients (8 males, 12 females were selected, 10 with a failing/nonrestorable lateral incisor (test group: immediate placement in postextraction socket and 10 with a missing lateral incisor (control group: conventional placement in healed ridge. Each patient received one immediately loaded implant (Anyridge®, Megagen, Gyeongbuk, South Korea. The superimposition of the 3D surface models taken at different times (S2 over S1 revealed a mean (±SD reduction of 0.057 mm (±0.025 and 0.037 mm (±0.020 for test and control patients, respectively. This difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.069. Conclusions. The superimposition of the 3D surface models revealed an excellent peri-implant soft tissue stability in both groups of patients, with minimal changes registered along time.

  11. Immediate placement of tapered effect (TE) implants: 5-year results of a prospective, multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas G; Roccuzzo, Mario; Ucer, Cemal; Beagle, Jay R

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the success and survival of immediately placed tapered implants to support fixed restorations in the maxilla and mandible. The study was a prospective, multicenter, non-interventional study of patients requiring tooth extraction who requested an implant-supported restoration in the maxilla or mandible. Patients received at least one tapered implant (either immediately after tooth extraction or at a later time point). Abutments were placed 42 to 56 days after surgery, and prostheses were placed after a further 14 days. Treatment and implant success were the primary effectiveness criteria, and secondary parameters included radiographic bone loss, patient satisfaction, and gingival health. A total of 436 patients were enrolled, of whom 376 were included in the safety analysis. Single implants were placed in 77% of patients, two implants in 16%, and three or more implants in the remainder. The cumulative implant survival rates for immediately placed implants were 98.3% after 1 year and 97.7% from 2 to 5 years. Patient satisfaction was good or excellent in most patients and the majority of implants showed no or immediately placed tapered implants was comparable to that found in other studies. Immediate implant placement with tapered implants can allow rapid rehabilitation with no adverse impact on implant survival.

  12. The influence of prosthesis design on the outcomes of tooth-implants immediately placed and loaded by means of one-piece titanium restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toti, Paolo; Marconcini, Simone; Giammarinaro, Enrica; Pedretti, Giorgio; Barone, Antonio; Covani, Ugo

    2017-11-28

    Our purpose was to evaluate the occurrence of complications, and the degree of bone loss in a cohort of patients treated with fixed prostheses supported by immediately loaded dental implants. The primary aim was to compare partial versus full-arch Fixed Dental Prostheses. We then tested the effect of sinus lifting. In the present retrospective cohort study, the patients had their implants restored with Fixed Dental Prostheses supported by dental implants positioned in the posterior maxilla and mandible. When necessary, the maxillary sinuses were grafted with particulate autogenous bone. Patients were then ranked according to the following predictors: length of prosthesis, crown-to-implant ratio, number of crowns to number of implants ratio, and presence of sinus lifting. Outcomes were evaluated for up to 2 years' survey regarding the peri-implant marginal bone loss and implant/prosthesis survival rates. Fifty-eight subjects (209 implants) were rehabilitated with 25 fixed full-arch prostheses and 33 partial fixed dental implant bridges (16 supported by implants placed in grafted sinus). The mean marginal bone loss for implants supporting partial Fixed Dental Prostheses amounted to 0.81mm, whereas that for implants within the group of full-arch Fixed Dental Prostheses was of 1.21mm; the comparison of the levels in the two groups showed a significant difference (P=0.0055). A statistically-significant difference (P=0.0006) was found between the bone loss around maxillary implants (1.53mm) and the bone loss around mandibular implants (1.10mm). Two implants and four prostheses failed; two-year survival rates of partial and of full-arch Fixed Dental Prostheses, respectively, resulted as 94.1% and 96%. Bone loss in full-arch prostheses appeared to be higher than in that of partial prosthesis. Implant-supported prostheses in the maxillae exhibited a bone loss higher than that registered in mandibles.

  13. The Sound Quality of Cochlear Implants: Studies With Single-sided Deaf Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, Michael F; Natale, Sarah Cook; Butts, Austin M; Zeitler, Daniel M; Carlson, Matthew L

    2017-09-01

    The goal of the present study was to assess the sound quality of a cochlear implant for single-sided deaf (SSD) patients fit with a cochlear implant (CI). One of the fundamental, unanswered questions in CI research is "what does an implant sound like?" Conventional CI patients must use the memory of a clean signal, often decades old, to judge the sound quality of their CIs. In contrast, SSD-CI patients can rate the similarity of a clean signal presented to the CI ear and candidate, CI-like signals presented to the ear with normal hearing. For Experiment 1 four types of stimuli were created for presentation to the normal hearing ear: noise vocoded signals, sine vocoded signals, frequency shifted, sine vocoded signals and band-pass filtered, natural speech signals. Listeners rated the similarity of these signals to unmodified signals sent to the CI on a scale of 0 to 10 with 10 being a complete match to the CI signal. For Experiment 2 multitrack signal mixing was used to create natural speech signals that varied along multiple dimensions. In Experiment 1 for eight adult SSD-CI listeners, the best median similarity rating to the sound of the CI for noise vocoded signals was 1.9; for sine vocoded signals 2.9; for frequency upshifted signals, 1.9; and for band pass filtered signals, 5.5. In Experiment 2 for three young listeners, combinations of band pass filtering and spectral smearing lead to ratings of 10. The sound quality of noise and sine vocoders does not generally correspond to the sound quality of cochlear implants fit to SSD patients. Our preliminary conclusion is that natural speech signals that have been muffled to one degree or another by band pass filtering and/or spectral smearing provide a close, but incomplete, match to CI sound quality for some patients.

  14. Combined inflatable penile prosthesis-artificial urinary sphincter implantation: no increased risk of adverse events compared to single or staged device implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Robert L; Cabrini, Mercelo R; Harris, Elaine D; Mostwin, Jacek L; Bivalacqua, Trinity J; Burnett, Arthur L

    2013-12-01

    Little data exist on the outcome of combined inflatable penile prosthesis and artificial urinary sphincter insertion for erectile dysfunction and stress urinary incontinence. We assessed patient outcomes for combined vs single device implantation at a single institution. We retrospectively reviewed the records of all patients who underwent inflatable penile prosthesis and artificial urinary sphincter insertion at our hospital from January 2000 to December 2011. A total of 55 combined procedures were performed compared to the single insertion of 336 inflatable penile prostheses and 279 artificial urinary sphincters. The surgical approach consisted of penoscrotal incisions for inflatable penile prostheses and transperineal incisions for artificial urinary sphincter cuff placement with a secondary lower abdominal incision for reservoir placement. Men treated with combined implantation had greater mean age and were at greater risk for prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment, and at lesser risk for Peyronie disease than men who received an inflatable penile prosthesis alone (each pprosthesis alone and the AUS alone (mean 218.1 vs 145.9 and 114.7 minutes, respectively, p0.05). Combined inflatable penile prosthesis-artificial urinary sphincter implantation and staged prosthesis implantation are feasible without an increased risk of adverse outcomes compared to implantation of a single prosthesis. Patients with concomitant erectile dysfunction and stress urinary incontinence should be counseled about the possible advantages of this surgical option, which include a single anesthesia event and faster resumption of sexual activity and urinary control. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mechanical performance of cement- and screw-retained all-ceramic single crowns on dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermeier, Matthias; Ristow, Oliver; Erdelt, Kurt; Beuer, Florian

    2018-03-01

    This in-vitro study was performed to compare the contact wear, fracture strength and failure mode of implant-supported all-ceramic single crowns manufactured with various fabrication and fixation concepts. Fifty dental implants (Conelog Ø 4,3mm/L11mm, Camlog Biotechnologies AG) were embedded and treated with all-ceramic molar single-crowns. Three groups received hand-layered zirconia crowns (IPS e.max Ceram/ IPS e.max ZirCAD, Ivoclar Vivadent AG): CZL (cement-retained zirconia-based layered) group crowns were cemented conventionally, SZL (screw-retained zirconia-based layered) group crowns were screw-retained, MZL (modified zirconia-based layered) group crowns showed a different coping design with screw retention. The specimens of SST (screw-retained sintering-technique) and SFL (screw-retained full-contour lithium-disilicate) group were CAD/CAM (Computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing) fabricated in the sintering technique (IPS e.max ZirCAD/IPS e.max CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent AG) and full-contour of lithium disilicate (IPS e.max CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent AG) respectively and screw-retained. All specimens underwent artificial aging, load until failure and a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. The received data were statistically compared (one-way ANOVA; Student-Newman-Keuls test; Mann-Whitney U-test) at a significance level of 5%. Mouth-motion fatigue testing caused two abutment fractures (SST group and SZL group) and two chipping events (CZL group). Specimens of MZL group showed statistically significant less contact wear compared to the other groups (pCAD/CAM fabricated specimens towards manually veneered components. The mode of retention did not influence the fracture resistance but the failure patterns of the specimens. CAD/CAM milled lithium-disilicate crowns seemed to be a preserving factor for dental implants. The mode of retention and veneering influences the mechanical performance of implant-supported single crowns.

  16. Displacement of screw-retained single crowns into implants with conical internal connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Burak; Seidt, Jeremy D; McGlumphy, Edwin A; Clelland, Nancy L

    2013-01-01

    Internal conical implant-abutment connections without platforms may lead to axial displacement of crowns during screw tightening. This displacement may affect proximal contacts, incisal edge position, or occlusion. This study aimed to measure the displacement of screw-retained single crowns into an implant in three dimensions during screw tightening by hand or via torque driver. A stereolithic acrylic resin cast was created using computed tomography data from a patient missing the maxillary right central incisor. A 4.0- × 11-mm implant was placed in the edentulous site. Five porcelain-fused-to-metal single crowns were made using "cast-to" abutments. Crowns were tried on the stereolithic model, representing the patient, and hand tightened. The spatial relationship of crowns to the model after hand tightening was determined using three-dimensional digital image correlation (3D DIC), an optical measurement technique. The crowns were then tightened using a torque driver to 20 Ncm and the relative crown positions were again recorded. Testing was repeated three times for each crown, and displacement of the crowns was compared between the hand-tightened and torqued states. Commercial image correlation software was used to analyze the data. Mean vertical and horizontal crown displacement values were calculated after torqueing. The interproximal contacts were evaluated before and after torquing using an 8-μm aluminum foil shim. There were vertical and horizontal differences in crown positions between hand tightening and torqueing. Although these were small in magnitude, detectable displacements occurred in both apical and facial directions. After hand tightening, the 8-μm shim could be dragged without tearing. However, after torque tightening, the interproximal contacts were too tight and the 8-μm shim could not be dragged without tearing. Differences between hand tightening and torque tightening should be taken into consideration during laboratory and clinical

  17. Immediate placement of single implant simultaneously with immediate loading in a fresh socket associated to periapical infection: A clinical case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustín-Panadero, Rubén; Serra-Pastor, Blanca; Chust-López, Cesar; Fons-Font, Antonio; Ferreiroa, Alberto

    2015-02-01

    Early restoration of the masticatory function, phonatory and aesthetics is some of the current goals of the therapy based on endosseous implants. Facing the classic protocols of implant insertion, which recommend a period of several months between extraction and implant placement, alternatives have been developed that demonstrate that immediate implant placement after tooth extraction permits adequate osseointegration, even in those cases where there is a periapical disease. The immediate restoration of implants after placement is a possibility where aesthetic requirements are high. This article presents a case with immediate implant placement and immediate loading of a first upper premolar with prior periapical pathology due to a vertical fracture. The immediate prosthetic was performed using the extracted crown, which is adapted to be attached to a titanium temporary abutment using a resin cement. After a 4 month healing period work began on the final prosthetic crown. The screw crown was made of zirconium oxide with a covering feldspathic ceramic. At the 12-month follow-up, there were no mechanical or biological complications. The patient gave high satisfaction marks for the overall treatment, giving visual analogue scale score of nine. Immediate post-extraction implants have arisen as an alternative to traditional implants on completely healed bone. Their main aim is to reduce treatment time and number of surgical procedures, along with other objectives such as reduced bone re-absorption and improved aesthetics. Key words:Post-extraction implants, immediate loading prosthetic, implant-retained prosthesis, periapical disease, vertical fracture.

  18. Speech Intelligibility in Noise With a Single-Unit Cochlear Implant Audio Processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, Wilhelm; Caversaccio, Marco; Kompis, Martin

    2015-08-01

    The Rondo is a single-unit cochlear implant (CI) audio processor comprising the identical components as its behind-the-ear predecessor, the Opus 2. An interchange of the Opus 2 with the Rondo leads to a shift of the microphone position toward the back of the head. This study aimed to investigate the influence of the Rondo wearing position on speech intelligibility in noise. Speech intelligibility in noise was measured in 4 spatial configurations with 12 experienced CI users using the German adaptive Oldenburg sentence test. A physical model and a numerical model were used to enable a comparison of the observations. No statistically significant differences of the speech intelligibility were found in the situations in which the signal came from the front and the noise came from the frontal, ipsilateral, or contralateral side. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was significantly better with the Opus 2 in the case with the noise presented from the back (4.4 dB, p processors placed further behind the ear than closer to the ear. The study indicates that CI users with the receiver/stimulator implanted in positions further behind the ear are expected to have higher difficulties in noisy situations when wearing the single-unit audio processor.

  19. Transcatheter aortic-valve implantation with one single minimal contrast media injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigo, Mattia; Maisano, Francesco; Haueis, Sabine; Binder, Ronald K; Taramasso, Maurizio; Nietlispach, Fabian

    2015-06-01

    Performing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) with the use of minimal contrast in patients at high-risk for acute kidney injury (AKI). Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is a major cause of AKI following TAVI and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The amount of contrast media used increases the risk for CIN. Computed tomography was omitted during the screening process. For the procedure transfemoral access was default. The self-expanding CoreValve prosthesis was chosen in all patients to minimize the risk of annular rupture in case of oversizing. Valve sizing was based on echocardiography, aortography, calcification on fluoroscopy, as well as weight and height of the patient. A single contrast injection was performed to confirm correct position of the pigtail catheter at the level of the annulus. The pigtail then served as the marker for the device landing zone. Intraprocedural assessment of the implantation result relied on echocardiography and hemodynamics. Five patients with severe aortic stenosis and at high risk for developing CIN were included. Device success was achieved in all patients and no major complications occurred. The median dose of injected contrast media was 8 ml (4-9). All but one patient had improved renal function after the intervention compared to baseline. Our study shows feasibility of performing TAVI with a single minimal contrast media injection, using a self-expandable valve. This technique has the potential to reduce the incidence of CIN. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Consecutive Case Series of Healed Single-Molar Sites Immediately Restored with Wide-Diameter Implants: A 1-Year Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Antoun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. To evaluate outcomes of wide-diameter (6 mm implants immediately provisionalized with cement-retained single crowns in posterior molar sites. Materials and Methods. Forty-eight consecutive patients received a total of 53 moderately rough-surface, 6 mm diameter implants in healed sites. All implants were immediately provisionalized with a cement-retained provisional crown. Final prosthesis with cement-retained porcelain fused to metal crowns was delivered 3–6 months later. Patients were followed up for 1 year. Outcome measures were implant failures and success rate, complications, marginal bone levels, bone level changes, papilla index, bleeding on probing, and inflammation. Results. One patient was lost to follow-up. At one year, the implant survival and success rate were 98.1%. The mean marginal bone loss after 1 year was −0.17±1.84 mm. Ideal papilla score was recorded at 83.8% of the sites. More than 95.6% of the sites showed no bleeding or inflammation. No procedure-related or device-related adverse events were reported. Conclusion. Wide-diameter (6 mm implants can safely and successfully replace single posterior molars. Longer follow-up studies are necessary to evaluate the long-term success of these implants.

  1. Consecutive Case Series of Healed Single-Molar Sites Immediately Restored with Wide-Diameter Implants: A 1-Year Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherfane, Pierre; Sojod, Bouchra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. To evaluate outcomes of wide-diameter (6 mm) implants immediately provisionalized with cement-retained single crowns in posterior molar sites. Materials and Methods. Forty-eight consecutive patients received a total of 53 moderately rough-surface, 6 mm diameter implants in healed sites. All implants were immediately provisionalized with a cement-retained provisional crown. Final prosthesis with cement-retained porcelain fused to metal crowns was delivered 3–6 months later. Patients were followed up for 1 year. Outcome measures were implant failures and success rate, complications, marginal bone levels, bone level changes, papilla index, bleeding on probing, and inflammation. Results. One patient was lost to follow-up. At one year, the implant survival and success rate were 98.1%. The mean marginal bone loss after 1 year was −0.17 ± 1.84 mm. Ideal papilla score was recorded at 83.8% of the sites. More than 95.6% of the sites showed no bleeding or inflammation. No procedure-related or device-related adverse events were reported. Conclusion. Wide-diameter (6 mm) implants can safely and successfully replace single posterior molars. Longer follow-up studies are necessary to evaluate the long-term success of these implants. PMID:27195008

  2. An Implantable Wireless Neural Interface System for Simultaneous Recording and Stimulation of Peripheral Nerve with a Single Cuff Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahnsei Shon

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, implantable devices have become widely used in neural prostheses because they eliminate endemic drawbacks of conventional percutaneous neural interface systems. However, there are still several issues to be considered: low-efficiency wireless power transmission; wireless data communication over restricted operating distance with high power consumption; and limited functionality, working either as a neural signal recorder or as a stimulator. To overcome these issues, we suggest a novel implantable wireless neural interface system for simultaneous neural signal recording and stimulation using a single cuff electrode. By using widely available commercial off-the-shelf (COTS components, an easily reconfigurable implantable wireless neural interface system was implemented into one compact module. The implantable device includes a wireless power consortium (WPC-compliant power transmission circuit, a medical implant communication service (MICS-band-based radio link and a cuff-electrode path controller for simultaneous neural signal recording and stimulation. During in vivo experiments with rabbit models, the implantable device successfully recorded and stimulated the tibial and peroneal nerves while communicating with the external device. The proposed system can be modified for various implantable medical devices, especially such as closed-loop control based implantable neural prostheses requiring neural signal recording and stimulation at the same time.