WorldWideScience

Sample records for single species electronic

  1. Single Electron Tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, Steven T.

    2005-01-01

    Financial support for this project has led to advances in the science of single-electron phenomena. Our group reported the first observation of the so-called ''Coulomb Staircase'', which was produced by tunneling into ultra-small metal particles. This work showed well-defined tunneling voltage steps of width e/C and height e/RC, demonstrating tunneling quantized on the single-electron level. This work was published in a now well-cited Physical Review Letter. Single-electron physics is now a major sub-field of condensed-matter physics, and fundamental work in the area continues to be conducted by tunneling in ultra-small metal particles. In addition, there are now single-electron transistors that add a controlling gate to modulate the charge on ultra-small photolithographically defined capacitive elements. Single-electron transistors are now at the heart of at least one experimental quantum-computer element, and single-electron transistor pumps may soon be used to define fundamental quantities such as the farad (capacitance) and the ampere (current). Novel computer technology based on single-electron quantum dots is also being developed. In related work, our group played the leading role in the explanation of experimental results observed during the initial phases of tunneling experiments with the high-temperature superconductors. When so-called ''multiple-gap'' tunneling was reported, the phenomenon was correctly identified by our group as single-electron tunneling in small grains in the material. The main focus throughout this project has been to explore single electron phenomena both in traditional tunneling formats of the type metal/insulator/particles/insulator/metal and using scanning tunneling microscopy to probe few-particle systems. This has been done under varying conditions of temperature, applied magnetic field, and with different materials systems. These have included metals, semi-metals, and superconductors. Amongst a number of results, we have

  2. E. S. R. studies of electron irradiated K/sub 3/Ir(CN)/sub 6/ in KCl single crystals. Mono and di-chlorinated species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vugman, N.V.; Pinhal, N.M. (Rio de Janeiro Univ. (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica)

    1983-08-20

    E.S.R. studies of KCl single crystals doped with small amounts of K/sub 3/Ir(CN)/sub 6/ and submitted to a prolonged 2 MeV electron irradiation at room temperature reveal the presence of the species (Ir(CN)/sub 5/Cl)/sup 4 -/ and (Ir(CN)/sub 4/Cl/sub 2/)/sup 4 -/. Ligand spin densities and ligand field parameters are calculated from the experimental hyperfine and superhyperfine interactions and compared with previous data on the species (Ir(CN)/sub 5/)/sup 4 -/.

  3. Single electron-ics with carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Götz, G.T.J.

    2010-01-01

    We experimentally investigate Quantum Dots, formed in Carbon Nanotubes. The first part of this thesis deals with charge sensing on such quantum dots. The charge sensor is a metallic Single-electron-transistor, sensitive to the charge of a single electron on the quantum dot. We use this technique for

  4. Synergistic effect of single-electron-trapped oxygen vacancies and carbon species on the visible light photocatalytic activity of carbon-modified TiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaodong, E-mail: donguser@henu.edu.cn; Xue, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Xiaogang; Xing, Xing; Li, Qiuye; Yang, Jianjun

    2015-03-01

    Carbon-modified TiO{sub 2} (CT) nanoparticles were prepared via a two-step method of heat treatment without the resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) polymer. As-prepared CT nanoparticles were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV–Vis/DRS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption isotherms, thermal analysis (TA), electron spin resonance (ESR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The visible light photocatalytic activities were evaluated on the basis of the degradation of methyl orange (MO). The synergistic effect of single-electron-trapped oxygen vacancies (SETOVs) and the carbon species on the visible light photocatalytic activities of the CT nanoparticles were discussed. It was found that the crystalline phase, the morphology, and particle size of the CT nanoparticles depended on the second heat-treatment temperature instead of the first heat-treatment temperature. The visible light photocatalytic activities were attributed to the synergistic effect of SETOVs and the carbon species, and also depended on the specific surface area of the photocatalysts. - Highlights: • Carbon-modified TiO{sub 2} particles have been prepared without RF polymer. • The visible light photocatalytic activities of the particles have been evaluated. • The band gap energy structure of the carbon-modified TiO{sub 2} has been proposed. • Synergistic effect of SETOVs and carbon species has been discussed. • The activities also depend on the specific surface area of the catalysts.

  5. High field electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy under ultrahigh vacuum conditions—A multipurpose machine to study paramagnetic species on well defined single crystal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocker, J.; Cornu, D.; Kieseritzky, E.; Seiler, A.; Bondarchuk, O.; Hänsel-Ziegler, W.; Risse, T.; Freund, H.-J.

    2014-08-01

    A new ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer operating at 94 GHz to investigate paramagnetic centers on single crystal surfaces is described. It is particularly designed to study paramagnetic centers on well-defined model catalysts using epitaxial thin oxide films grown on metal single crystals. The EPR setup is based on a commercial Bruker E600 spectrometer, which is adapted to ultrahigh vacuum conditions using a home made Fabry Perot resonator. The key idea of the resonator is to use the planar metal single crystal required to grow the single crystalline oxide films as one of the mirrors of the resonator. EPR spectroscopy is solely sensitive to paramagnetic species, which are typically minority species in such a system. Hence, additional experimental characterization tools are required to allow for a comprehensive investigation of the surface. The apparatus includes a preparation chamber hosting equipment, which is required to prepare supported model catalysts. In addition, surface characterization tools such as low energy electron diffraction (LEED)/Auger spectroscopy, temperature programmed desorption (TPD), and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) are available to characterize the surfaces. A second chamber used to perform EPR spectroscopy at 94 GHz has a room temperature scanning tunneling microscope attached to it, which allows for real space structural characterization. The heart of the UHV adaptation of the EPR experiment is the sealing of the Fabry-Perot resonator against atmosphere. To this end it is possible to use a thin sapphire window glued to the backside of the coupling orifice of the Fabry Perot resonator. With the help of a variety of stabilization measures reducing vibrations as well as thermal drift it is possible to accumulate data for a time span, which is for low temperature measurements only limited by the amount of liquid helium. Test measurements show that the system can detect paramagnetic

  6. Single-electron thermal noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiguchi, Katsuhiko; Ono, Yukinori; Fujiwara, Akira

    2014-07-11

    We report the observation of thermal noise in the motion of single electrons in an ultimately small dynamic random access memory (DRAM). The nanometer-scale transistors that compose the DRAM resolve the thermal noise in single-electron motion. A complete set of fundamental tests conducted on this single-electron thermal noise shows that the noise perfectly follows all the aspects predicted by statistical mechanics, which include the occupation probability, the law of equipartition, a detailed balance, and the law of kT/C. In addition, the counting statistics on the directional motion (i.e., the current) of the single-electron thermal noise indicate that the individual electron motion follows the Poisson process, as it does in shot noise.

  7. Single Molecule Electronics and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2012-01-01

    The manufacture of integrated circuits with single-molecule building blocks is a goal of molecular electronics. While research in the past has been limited to bulk experiments on self-assembled monolayers, advances in technology have now enabled us to fabricate single-molecule junctions. This has led to significant progress in understanding electron transport in molecular systems at the single-molecule level and the concomitant emergence of new device concepts. Here, we review recent developments in this field. We summarize the methods currently used to form metal-molecule-metal structures and some single-molecule techniques essential for characterizing molecular junctions such as inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy. We then highlight several important achievements, including demonstration of single-molecule diodes, transistors, and switches that make use of electrical, photo, and mechanical stimulation to control the electron transport. We also discuss intriguing issues to be addressed further in the future such as heat and thermoelectric transport in an individual molecule. PMID:22969345

  8. Single-dopant resonance in a single-electron transistor

    OpenAIRE

    Golovach, V. N.; Jehl, X.; Houzet, M.; Pierre, M.; Roche, B.; Sanquer, M.; Glazman, L. I.

    2011-01-01

    Single dopants in semiconductor nanostructures have been studied in great details recently as they are good candidates for quantum bits, provided they are coupled to a detector. Here we report coupling of a single As donor atom to a single-electron transistor (SET) in a silicon nanowire field-effect transistor. Both capacitive and tunnel coupling are achieved, the latter resulting in a dramatic increase of the conductance through the SET, by up to one order of magnitude. The experimental resu...

  9. Characteristics of trapped electrons and electron traps in single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budzinski, E.E.; Potter, W.R.; Potienko, G.; Box, H.C.

    1979-01-01

    Two additional carbohydrates are reported whose crystal structures trap electrons intermolecularly in single crystals x irradiated at low temperature, namely sucrose and rhamnose. Five carbohydrate and polyhydroxy compounds are now known which exhibit this phenomenon. The following characteristics of the phenomenon were investigated: (1) the hyperfine couplings of the electron with protons of the polarized hydroxy groups forming the trap; (2) the distances between these protons and the trapped electron; (3) the spin density of the electron at the protons and (4) the relative stabilities of the electron trapped in various crystal structures

  10. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Electron Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, Michael; Zang, Ling; Liu, Ruchuan; Adams, David M.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this research are threefold: (1) to develop methods for the study electron transfer processes at the single molecule level, (2) to develop a series of modifiable and structurally well defined molecular and nanoparticle systems suitable for detailed single molecule/particle and bulk spectroscopic investigation, (3) to relate experiment to theory in order to elucidate the dependence of electron transfer processes on molecular and electronic structure, coupling and reorganization energies. We have begun the systematic development of single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) of electron transfer and summaries of recent studies are shown. There is a tremendous need for experiments designed to probe the discrete electronic and molecular dynamic fluctuations of single molecules near electrodes and at nanoparticle surfaces. Single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) has emerged as a powerful method to measure properties of individual molecules which would normally be obscured in ensemble-averaged measurement. Fluctuations in the fluorescence time trajectories contain detailed molecular level statistical and dynamical information of the system. The full distribution of a molecular property is revealed in the stochastic fluctuations, giving information about the range of possible behaviors that lead to the ensemble average. In the case of electron transfer, this level of understanding is particularly important to the field of molecular and nanoscale electronics: from a device-design standpoint, understanding and controlling this picture of the overall range of possible behaviors will likely prove to be as important as designing ia the ideal behavior of any given molecule.

  11. Proximity effect of electron beam lithography on single-electron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The electrical characteristics of the single-electron transistor were observed to be consistent with the expected behavior of electron transport through gated quantum dots, up to 150 K. The dependence of the electrical characteristics on the dot size reveals that the d oscillation follows from the Coulomb blockade by poly-Si ...

  12. Electron impact single ionization of copper

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electron impact single ionization cross sections of copper have been calculated in the binary encounter approximation using accurate expression for as given by Vriens and Hartree–Fock momentum distribution for the target electron. The BEA calculation based on the usual procedure does not show satisfactory ...

  13. The single electron chemistry of coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, J.W.; Flowers, R.A. II.

    1991-04-22

    The simplest explanation for these shifts in the infrared spectra is there exists in coal single electron donors which are capable of transferring an electron to TCNQ in the ground state. All of the TCNQ placed in the coal appears to be converted to the radical anion as displayed in the IR spectrum for all of the coals except for the 100% loading.

  14. Spin-Dependent Quasiparticle Transport in Aluminum Single Electron Transistors

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson, A. J.; Andresen, S. E.; Brenner, R.; Clark, R. G.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the effect of Zeeman-splitting on quasiparticle transport in normal-superconducting-normal (NSN) aluminum single electron transistors (SETs). In the above-gap transport the interplay of Coulomb blockade and Zeeman-splitting leads to spin-dependence of the sequential tunneling. This creates regimes where either one or both spin species can tunnel onto or off the island. At lower biases, spin-dependence of the single quasiparticle state is studied and operation of the device as a...

  15. Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, H. Peter [Bowling Green State Univ., Bowling Green, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Center for Photochemical Sciences

    2017-11-28

    This project is focused on the use of single-molecule high spatial and temporal resolved techniques to study molecular dynamics in condensed phase and at interfaces, especially, the complex reaction dynamics associated with electron and energy transfer rate processes. The complexity and inhomogeneity of the interfacial ET dynamics often present a major challenge for a molecular level comprehension of the intrinsically complex systems, which calls for both higher spatial and temporal resolutions at ultimate single-molecule and single-particle sensitivities. Combined single-molecule spectroscopy and electrochemical atomic force microscopy approaches are unique for heterogeneous and complex interfacial electron transfer systems because the static and dynamic inhomogeneities can be identified and characterized by studying one molecule at a specific nanoscale surface site at a time. The goal of our project is to integrate and apply these spectroscopic imaging and topographic scanning techniques to measure the energy flow and electron flow between molecules and substrate surfaces as a function of surface site geometry and molecular structure. We have been primarily focusing on studying interfacial electron transfer under ambient condition and electrolyte solution involving both single crystal and colloidal TiO2 and related substrates. The resulting molecular level understanding of the fundamental interfacial electron transfer processes will be important for developing efficient light harvesting systems and broadly applicable to problems in fundamental chemistry and physics. We have made significant advancement on deciphering the underlying mechanism of the complex and inhomogeneous interfacial electron transfer dynamics in dyesensitized TiO2 nanoparticle systems that strongly involves with and regulated by molecule-surface interactions. We have studied interfacial electron transfer on TiO2 nanoparticle surfaces by using ultrafast single

  16. Single-species microarrays and comparative transcriptomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric J J Chain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prefabricated expression microarrays are currently available for only a few species but methods have been proposed to extend their application to comparisons between divergent genomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we demonstrate that the hybridization intensity of genomic DNA is a poor basis on which to select unbiased probes on Affymetrix expression arrays for studies of comparative transcriptomics, and that doing so produces spurious results. We used the Affymetrix Xenopus laevis microarray to evaluate expression divergence between X. laevis, X. borealis, and their F1 hybrids. When data are analyzed with probes that interrogate only sequences with confirmed identity in both species, we recover results that differ substantially analyses that use genomic DNA hybridizations to select probes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings have implications for the experimental design of comparative expression studies that use single-species microarrays, and for our understanding of divergent expression in hybrid clawed frogs. These findings also highlight important limitations of single-species microarrays for studies of comparative transcriptomics of polyploid species.

  17. Single-dopant resonance in a single-electron transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovach, V. N.; Jehl, X.; Houzet, M.; Pierre, M.; Roche, B.; Sanquer, M.; Glazman, L. I.

    2011-02-01

    Single dopants in semiconductor nanostructures have been studied in great detail recently as they are good candidates for quantum bits, provided they are coupled to a detector. Here we report the coupling of a single As donor atom to a single-electron transistor (SET) in a silicon nanowire field-effect transistor. Both capacitive and tunnel coupling are achieved, the latter resulting in a dramatic increase of the conductance through the SET, by up to one order of magnitude. The experimental results are well explained by the rate-equation theory developed in parallel with the experiment.

  18. Single- and double-island ferromagnetic single-electron transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnas, J.; Weymann, I.; Wisniewska, J.; Kowalik, M.; Kunert, H.W.

    2006-01-01

    Electronic transport in a ferromagnetic single-electron transistor has been considered theoretically in the sequential tunneling regime. The device consists of two external leads and one or two islands as the central part, connected to the leads by tunneling barriers. External gates are additionally attached to the islands. Generally, the two external electrodes and the islands can be ferromagnetic with arbitrary orientation of the corresponding magnetic moments. We have carried out detailed theoretical analysis of the current-voltage characteristics and spin-valve magnetoresistance in the limit of fast spin relaxation on the islands. Asymmetry in tunneling probabilities of spin-majority and spin-minority electrons leads to interesting features in the transport characteristics, like for instance magnetoresistance oscillations with the bias and gate voltages, negative differential resistance, and others

  19. Neural Circuitry Based on Single Electron Transistors and Single Electron Memories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aïmen BOUBAKER

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose and explain a neural circuitry based on single electron transistors ‘SET’ which can be used in classification and recognition. We implement, after that, a Winner-Take-All ‘WTA’ neural network with lateral inhibition architecture. The original idea of this work is reflected, first, in the proposed new single electron memory ‘SEM’ design by hybridising two promising Single Electron Memory ‘SEM’ and the MTJ/Ring memory and second, in modeling and simulation results of neural memory based on SET. We prove the charge storage in quantum dot in two types of memories.

  20. Electron-irradiation of oxide single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caulfield, K.J.; Cooper, R.; Guy, L. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Full text: Point defects created in single crystals of CaO, MgO and {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (sapphire) by electron-irradiation give rise to luminescence from colour centres. The luminescence may be used to monitor the formation of point defects by elastic collision processes. Such processes have great technological importance, in thermoluminescent dosimetry, the development of colour centre lasers, and particularly with the use of sapphire as a first-wall insulator in nuclear fusion reactors. Point defect formation is the initial process which can ultimately lead to dielectric breakdown. By controlling the energy of incident electrons irradiating single crystals, thresholds may be determined for atomic displacement. The time-dependent spectroscopy and decay kinetics of luminescence may also be studied. Displacement thresholds, luminescence spectroscopy and decay kinetics have been studied for CaO, MgO and {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Sapphire irradiated with 0.50 MeV electrons, exhibits a broad luminescence emission band around 300 nm at room temperature, which at temperatures below 60 K broadens into two distinct bands around 300 nm and 400 nm. Analysis of the logarithmic decay kinetics of the 300 nm band reveals distinctive features observed in similar oxides by other workers, namely a rapid decrease in intensity punctuated by discrete plateau regions. A model comprising bimolecular electron-hole recombination, in conjunction with unimolecular electron-detrapping, is able to account for these features. 4 refs.

  1. Single electron transistor in pure silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Binhui

    As promising candidates for spin qubits, semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have attracted tremendous research efforts. Currently most advanced progress is from GaAs QDs. Compared to GaAs, lateral QDs in 28silicon are expected to have a spin coherence time orders of magnitude longer, because 28Si has zero nuclear spin, and there is no hyperfine interaction between electron spins and nuclear spins. We have developed enhancement mode metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) single electron transistors (SETs) using pure silicon wafers with a bi-layer gated configuration. In an MOS-SET, the top gate is used to induce a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG), just as in an MOS field effect transistor. The side gates deplete the 2DEG into a QD and two point contact channels; one connects the QD to the source reservoir, and the other connects the QD to the drain reservoir. We have systematically investigated the MOS-SETs at 4.2 K, and separately in a dilution refrigerator with a base temperature of 10 mK. The data show that there is an intrinsic QD in each point contact channel due to the local potential fluctuations in these SETs. However, after scaling down the SETs, we have found that the intrinsic QDs can be removed and the electrostatically defined dots dominate the device behavior, but these devices currently only work in the many-electron regime. In order to realize single electron confinement, it is necessary to continue scaling down the device and improving the interface quality. To explore the spin dynamics in silicon, we have investigated a single intrinsic QD by applying a magnetic field perpendicular to the sample surface. The magnetic field dependence of the ground-state and excited-state energy levels of the QD mostly can be explained by the Zeeman effect, with no obvious orbital effect up to 9 T. The two-electron singlet-triplet (ST) transition is first time directly observed in a silicon QD by excitation spectroscopy. In this ST transition, electron-electron Coulomb

  2. Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Wilson [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2018-02-03

    Interfacial electron transfer (ET) plays an important role in many chemical and biological processes. Specifically, interfacial ET in TiO2-based systems is important to solar energy technology, catalysis, and environmental remediation technology. However, the microscopic mechanism of interfacial ET is not well understood with regard to atomic surface structure, molecular structure, bonding, orientation, and motion. In this project, we used two complementary methodologies; single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, and scanning-tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM and STS) to address this scientific need. The goal of this project was to integrate these techniques and measure the molecular dependence of ET between adsorbed molecules and TiO2 semiconductor surfaces and the ET induced reactions such as the splitting of water. The scanning probe techniques, STM and STS, are capable of providing the highest spatial resolution but not easily time-resolved data. Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is capable of good time resolution but requires further development to match the spatial resolution of the STM. The integrated approach involving Peter Lu at Bowling Green State University (BGSU) and Wilson Ho at the University of California, Irvine (UC Irvine) produced methods for time and spatially resolved chemical imaging of interfacial electron transfer dynamics and photocatalytic reactions. An integral aspect of the joint research was a significant exchange of graduate students to work at the two institutions. This project bridged complementary approaches to investigate a set of common problems by working with the same molecules on a variety of solid surfaces, but using appropriate techniques to probe under ambient (BGSU) and ultrahigh vacuum (UCI) conditions. The molecular level understanding of the fundamental interfacial electron transfer processes obtained in this joint project will be important for developing efficient light harvesting

  3. Millimeter scale electron conduction through exoelectrogenic mixed species biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Lesnik, Keaton Larson; Fan, Yanzhen; Liu, Hong

    2016-08-01

    The functioning of many natural and engineered environments is dependent on long distance electron transfer mediated through electrical currents. These currents have been observed in exoelectrogenic biofilms and it has been proposed that microbial biofilms can mediate electron transfer via electrical currents on the centimeter scale. However, direct evidence to confirm this hypothesis has not been demonstrated and the longest known electrical transfer distance for single species exoelectrogenic biofilms is limited to 100 μm. In the present study, biofilms were developed on electrodes with electrically non-conductive gaps from 50 μm to 1 mm and the in situ conductance of biofilms was evaluated over time. Results demonstrated that the exoelectrogenic mixed species biofilms in the present study possess the ability to transfer electrons through electrical currents over a distance of up to 1 mm, 10 times further than previously observed. Results indicate the possibility of interspecies interactions playing an important role in the spatial development of exoelectrogenic biofilms, suggesting that these biological networks might remain conductive even at longer distance. These findings have significant implications in regards to future optimization of microbial electrochemical systems. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Opto-electronics on Single Nanowire Quantum Dots

    OpenAIRE

    Van Kouwen, M.P.

    2010-01-01

    An important goal for nanoscale opto-electronics is the transfer of single electron spin states into single photon polarization states (and vice versa), thereby interfacing quantum transport and quantum optics. Such an interface enables new experiments in the field of quantum information processing. Single and entangled photon-pair generation can be used for quantum cryptography. Furthermore, photons can be used in the readout of a quantum computer based on electron spins. Semiconducting nano...

  5. Proximity effect of electron beam lithography on single-electron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    were incident on a resist-coated photomask substrate (chrome on quartz plate). The scattering of these electrons causes undesirable resist development energy to accumulate around the patterned areas. This accumulated energy from the scat- tered electron only slightly affects isolated patterns, but significantly more ...

  6. Opto-electronics on Single Nanowire Quantum Dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Kouwen, M.P.

    2010-01-01

    An important goal for nanoscale opto-electronics is the transfer of single electron spin states into single photon polarization states (and vice versa), thereby interfacing quantum transport and quantum optics. Such an interface enables new experiments in the field of quantum information processing.

  7. Coherent control of single electrons: a review of current progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäuerle, Christopher; Christian Glattli, D; Meunier, Tristan; Portier, Fabien; Roche, Patrice; Roulleau, Preden; Takada, Shintaro; Waintal, Xavier

    2018-01-22

    In this report we review the present state of the art of the control of propagating quantum states at the single-electron level and its potential application to quantum information processing. We give an overview of the different approaches that have been developed over the last few years in order to gain full control over a propagating single-electron in a solid-state system. After a brief introduction of the basic concepts, we present experiments on flying qubit circuits for ensemble of electrons measured in the low frequency (DC) limit. We then present the basic ingredients necessary to realise such experiments at the single-electron level. This includes a review of the various single-electron sources that have been developed over the last years and which are compatible with integrated single-electron circuits. This is followed by a review of recent key experiments on electron quantum optics with single electrons. Finally we will present recent developments in the new physics that has emerged using ultrashort voltage pulses. We conclude our review with an outlook and future challenges in the field.

  8. Coherent control of single electrons: a review of current progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäuerle, Christopher; Glattli, D. Christian; Meunier, Tristan; Portier, Fabien; Roche, Patrice; Roulleau, Preden; Takada, Shintaro; Waintal, Xavier

    2018-05-01

    In this report we review the present state of the art of the control of propagating quantum states at the single-electron level and its potential application to quantum information processing. We give an overview of the different approaches that have been developed over the last few years in order to gain full control over a propagating single-electron in a solid-state system. After a brief introduction of the basic concepts, we present experiments on flying qubit circuits for ensemble of electrons measured in the low frequency (DC) limit. We then present the basic ingredients necessary to realise such experiments at the single-electron level. This includes a review of the various single-electron sources that have been developed over the last years and which are compatible with integrated single-electron circuits. This is followed by a review of recent key experiments on electron quantum optics with single electrons. Finally we will present recent developments in the new physics that has emerged using ultrashort voltage pulses. We conclude our review with an outlook and future challenges in the field.

  9. Single-pulse electrons from a linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoku, Shigetoshi; Sunayashiki, Tadashi; Takeoka, Seiji; Kato, Kazushi

    1976-01-01

    The electronic circuits of a 35 MeV linear accelerator at Hiroshima University were modified to produce single-pulse electrons. Single-pulse electrons were obtained by synchronizing one of eight pulses from an electron gun modulator, 120 pps, to one of the micro-waves from a klystron, 15 pps. After single-pulse electrons were discharged, a signal was relayed to a stop-gate circuit from a binary scaler which was connected to the gun modulator. Although reproducibility of single-pulse electrons and stability of electron output per pulse were not completely satisfactory, it was possible to use for radiobiological studies. Biological effects of single-pulse electrons (energy: 25 MeV, dose rate: 10 10 rad/min) on cultured mammalian cells and on mice were nearly equal to those of multi-pulse electrons (25 MeV, 10 7 rad/min) and Co-60 γ-rays (dose rate: 100 rad/min). (auth.)

  10. Single-electrode monitors for relativistic intense electron beam parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stratienko, V.A.; Khorenko, V.K.

    1977-01-01

    A single-electrode monitor operating in atmosphere on delta-electrons for precision measurement of high-intensity electron beams is developed. As an emitter is used a 0.2 mm aluminium foil with a hole which is a replica of the sample subjected to radiation. The electric charge from the emitter is recorded by a current integrator. The single-electrode monitor enabled to form a 225 MeV electron beam with a flux density of 5x10 15 electrons/ (cm 2 and confine the latter for 140 hours with an accuracy of +- 0.2 mm. Controlling the beam shifting by means of the single-electrode monitor described, it is possible to measure the real dimensions and density distributions of high-intensity electron beams

  11. Asymmetric tunable tunneling magnetoresistance in single-electron transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Pirmann, M; Schön, G

    2000-01-01

    We show that the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) of a ferromagnetic single-electron transistor in the sequential tunneling regime shows asymmetric Coulomb blockade oscillations as a function of gate voltage if the individual junction-TMRs differ. The relative amplitude of these oscillations grows significantly if the bias voltage is increased, becoming as large as 30% when the bias voltage is comparable to the charging energy of the single-electron transistor. This might be useful for potential applications requiring a tunable TMR.

  12. Global Asymptotic Stability for Discrete Single Species Population Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bilgin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present some basic discrete models in populations dynamics of single species with several age classes. Starting with the basic Beverton-Holt model that describes the change of single species we discuss its basic properties such as a convergence of all solutions to the equilibrium, oscillation of solutions about the equilibrium solutions, Allee’s effect, and Jillson’s effect. We consider the effect of the constant and periodic immigration and emigration on the global properties of Beverton-Holt model. We also consider the effect of the periodic environment on the global properties of Beverton-Holt model.

  13. Molecular electronics: the single molecule switch and transistor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sotthewes, Kai; Geskin, Victor; Heimbuch, Rene; Kumar, Avijit; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2014-01-01

    In order to design and realize single-molecule devices it is essential to have a good understanding of the properties of an individual molecule. For electronic applications, the most important property of a molecule is its conductance. Here we show how a single octanethiol molecule can be connected

  14. Automated data collection in single particle electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yong Zi; Cheng, Anchi; Potter, Clinton S.; Carragher, Bridget

    2016-01-01

    Automated data collection is an integral part of modern workflows in single particle electron microscopy (EM) research. This review surveys the software packages available for automated single particle EM data collection. The degree of automation at each stage of data collection is evaluated, and the capabilities of the software packages are described. Finally, future trends in automation are discussed. PMID:26671944

  15. Single species victory in a two-site, two-species model of population dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Jack; Sander, Len; Kessler, David

    2008-03-01

    We study the behavior of two species, differentiated only by their dispersal rates in an environment providing heterogeneous growth rates. Previous deterministic studies have shown that the slower-dispersal species always drives the faster species to extinction, while stochastic studies show that the opposite case can occur given small enough population and spatial heterogeneity. Other models of similar systems demonstrate the existence of an optimum dispersal rate, suggesting that distinguishing the species as faster or slower is insufficient. We here study the interface of these models for a small spatial system and determine the conditions of stability for a single species outcome.

  16. Reconfigurable Boolean logic using magnetic single-electron transistors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Fernando Gonzalez-Zalba

    Full Text Available We propose a novel hybrid single-electron device for reprogrammable low-power logic operations, the magnetic single-electron transistor (MSET. The device consists of an aluminium single-electron transistor with a GaMnAs magnetic back-gate. Changing between different logic gate functions is realized by reorienting the magnetic moments of the magnetic layer, which induces a voltage shift on the Coulomb blockade oscillations of the MSET. We show that we can arbitrarily reprogram the function of the device from an n-type SET for in-plane magnetization of the GaMnAs layer to p-type SET for out-of-plane magnetization orientation. Moreover, we demonstrate a set of reprogrammable Boolean gates and its logical complement at the single device level. Finally, we propose two sets of reconfigurable binary gates using combinations of two MSETs in a pull-down network.

  17. Reconfigurable Boolean Logic Using Magnetic Single-Electron Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Zalba, M. Fernando; Ciccarelli, Chiara; Zarbo, Liviu P.; Irvine, Andrew C.; Campion, Richard C.; Gallagher, Bryan L.; Jungwirth, Tomas; Ferguson, Andrew J.; Wunderlich, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel hybrid single-electron device for reprogrammable low-power logic operations, the magnetic single-electron transistor (MSET). The device consists of an aluminium single-electron transistor with a GaMnAs magnetic back-gate. Changing between different logic gate functions is realized by reorienting the magnetic moments of the magnetic layer, which induces a voltage shift on the Coulomb blockade oscillations of the MSET. We show that we can arbitrarily reprogram the function of the device from an n-type SET for in-plane magnetization of the GaMnAs layer to p-type SET for out-of-plane magnetization orientation. Moreover, we demonstrate a set of reprogrammable Boolean gates and its logical complement at the single device level. Finally, we propose two sets of reconfigurable binary gates using combinations of two MSETs in a pull-down network. PMID:25923789

  18. Real-time single-shot electron bunch length measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Wilke, I; Gillespie, W A; Berden, G; Knippels, G M H; Meer, A F G

    2002-01-01

    Linear accelerators employed as drivers for X-ray free electron lasers (FELs) require relativistic electron bunch with sub-picosecond bunch length. Precise bunch length measurements are important for the tuning and operation of the FELs. Previously, we have demonstrated that electro-optic detection is a powerful technique for sub-picosecond electron bunch length measurements. In those experiments, the measured bunch length was the average of all electron bunches within a macropulse. Here, for the first time, we present the measurement of the length of individual electron bunches using a development of our previous technique. In this experiment, the longitudinal electron bunch shape is encoded electro-optically on to the frequency spectrum of a chirped laser pulse. Subsequently, the laser pulse is dispersed by a grating and the spectrum is imaged with a CCD camera. Single bunch measurements are achieved by using a nanosecond gated camera, and synchronizing the gate with both the electron bunch and the laser pu...

  19. Review of Electronics Based on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yu; Cong, Sen; Cao, Xuan; Wu, Fanqi; Liu, Qingzhou; Amer, Moh R; Zhou, Chongwu

    2017-08-14

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are extremely promising materials for building next-generation electronics due to their unique physical and electronic properties. In this article, we will review the research efforts and achievements of SWNTs in three electronic fields, namely analog radio-frequency electronics, digital electronics, and macroelectronics. In each SWNT-based electronic field, we will present the major challenges, the evolutions of the methods to overcome these challenges, and the state-of-the-art of the achievements. At last, we will discuss future directions which could lead to the broad applications of SWNTs. We hope this review could inspire more research on SWNT-based electronics, and accelerate the applications of SWNTs.

  20. Are Ascaris lumbricoides and Ascaris suum a single species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leles, Daniela; Gardner, Scott L; Reinhard, Karl; Iñiguez, Alena; Araujo, Adauto

    2012-02-20

    Since the original description and naming of Ascaris lumbricoides from humans by Linnaeus in 1758 and later of Ascaris suum from pigs by Goeze 1782, these species have been considered to be valid. Four hypotheses relative to the conspecificity or lack thereof (and thus origin of these species) are possible: 1) Ascaris lumbricoides (usually infecting humans) and Ascaris suum (recorded mostly from pigs) are both valid species, with the two species originating via a speciation event from a common ancestor sometime before the domestication of pigs by humans, or 2) Ascaris lumbricoides in humans is derived directly from the species A. suum found in pigs with A. suum then existing as a persistent ancestor after formation of A. lumbricoides, or 3) Ascaris suum is derived directly from A. lumbricoides with the persistent ancestor being A. lumbricoides and A. suum being the newly derived species, and finally, 4) Ascaris lumbricoides and A. suum are the same species, this hypothesis being supported by studies showing both low morphological and low genetic divergence at several genes. We present and discuss paleoparasitological and genetic evidence that complement new data to evaluate the origin and evolution of Ascaris spp. in humans and pigs, and the uniqueness of the species in both hosts. Finally, we conclude that Ascaris lumbricoides and A. suum are a single species and that the name A. lumbricoides Linnaeus 1758 has taxonomic priority; therefore A. suum Goeze 1782 should be considered a synonym of A. lumbricoides.

  1. epidemiology of single and multiple species of helminth infections ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-03-01

    Mar 1, 2000 ... East African Medical Journal Vol. 77 No. 3 March 2000. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF SINGLE AND MULTIPLE SPECIES OF HELMINTH INFECTIONS AMONG SCHOOL CHILDREN IN BUSIA DISTRICT, KENYA. S. Brooker, MA, Wellcome Trust Centre for the Epidemiology of Infectious Disease, University of Oxford, ...

  2. A method of dopant electron energy spectrum parameterization for calculation of single-electron nanodevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorokhov, V. V.

    2017-05-01

    Solitary dopants in semiconductors and dielectrics that possess stable electron structures and interesting physical properties may be used as building blocks of quantum computers and sensor systems that operate based on new physical principles. This study proposes a phenomenological method of parameterization for a single-particle energy spectrum of dopant valence electrons in crystalline semiconductors and dielectrics that takes electron-electron interactions into account. It is proposed to take electron-electron interactions in the framework of the outer electron shell model into account. The proposed method is applied to construct the procedure for the determination of the effective dopant outer shell capacity and the method for calculation of the tunneling current in a single-electron device with one or several active dopants-charge centers.

  3. Decoherence Assisted Single Electron Trapping at Room Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhalawany, Ahmed; Leuenberger, Michael

    2012-02-01

    In this work, we theoretically investigate electron transport in heterostructure semiconductor nanowire (NW). We develop a new mechanism to trap an electron in a quantum dot (QD) by means of decoherence. There are six QDs in the NW. Bias voltage (Vb) is applied across the NW and gate voltage (Vg) is applied to the auxiliary QD to control single charge tunneling. The single electron dynamics along the NW is calculated by means of the generalized master equation based on the tight binding model taking into account electron LO phonon interaction (ELOPI) and thermal broadening inside the QDs. It is shown that the decoherence, which is in the pico-second (ps) regime, speeds up the trapping of the electron in the central QD with probability of 70% in less than 2 ps. Our results can be used for the implementation of high temperature single photon source (SPS) or single electron transistor (SET). We acknowledge support from NSF (Grant No. ECCS-0725514), DARPA/MTO (Grant No. HR0011-08-1-0059), NSF (Grant No. ECCS-0901784), AFOSR (Grant No. FA9550-09-1-0450), and NSF (Grant No. ECCS-1128597).

  4. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of a single nuclear spin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, F; Fernández-Rossier, J

    2011-08-12

    Detection of a single nuclear spin constitutes an outstanding problem in different fields of physics such as quantum computing or magnetic imaging. Here we show that the energy levels of a single nuclear spin can be measured by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). We consider two different systems, a magnetic adatom probed with scanning tunneling microscopy and a single Bi dopant in a silicon nanotransistor. We find that the hyperfine coupling opens new transport channels which can be resolved at experimentally accessible temperatures. Our simulations evince that IETS yields information about the occupations of the nuclear spin states, paving the way towards transport-detected single nuclear spin resonance.

  5. Electronic state selectivity in dication-molecule single electron transfer reactions: NO(2+) + NO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, Michael A; Lockyear, Jessica F; Schröder, Detlef; Roithová, Jana; Price, Stephen D

    2011-11-07

    The single-electron transfer reaction between NO(2+) and NO, which initially forms a pair of NO(+) ions, has been studied using a position-sensitive coincidence technique. The reactivity in this class of collision system, which involves the interaction of a dication with its neutral precursor, provides a sensitive test of recent ideas concerning electronic state selectivity in dicationic single-electron transfer reactions. In stark contrast to the recently observed single-electron transfer reactivity in the analogous CO(2)(2+)/CO(2) and O(2)(2+)/O(2) collision systems, electron transfer between NO(2+) and NO generates two product NO(+) ions which behave in an identical manner, whether the ions are formed from NO(2+) or NO. This observed behaviour is in excellent accord with the recently proposed rationalization of the state selectivity in dication-molecule SET reactions using simple propensity rules involving one-electron transitions. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  6. Transport of secondary electrons and reactive species in ion tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdutovich, Eugene; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2015-08-01

    The transport of reactive species brought about by ions traversing tissue-like medium is analysed analytically. Secondary electrons ejected by ions are capable of ionizing other molecules; the transport of these generations of electrons is studied using the random walk approximation until these electrons remain ballistic. Then, the distribution of solvated electrons produced as a result of interaction of low-energy electrons with water molecules is obtained. The radial distribution of energy loss by ions and secondary electrons to the medium yields the initial radial dose distribution, which can be used as initial conditions for the predicted shock waves. The formation, diffusion, and chemical evolution of hydroxyl radicals in liquid water are studied as well. COST Action Nano-IBCT: Nano-scale Processes Behind Ion-Beam Cancer Therapy.

  7. Communication: The electronic structure of matter probed with a single femtosecond hard x-ray pulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szlachetko

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Physical, biological, and chemical transformations are initiated by changes in the electronic configuration of the species involved. These electronic changes occur on the timescales of attoseconds (10−18 s to femtoseconds (10−15 s and drive all subsequent electronic reorganization as the system moves to a new equilibrium or quasi-equilibrium state. The ability to detect the dynamics of these electronic changes is crucial for understanding the potential energy surfaces upon which chemical and biological reactions take place. Here, we report on the determination of the electronic structure of matter using a single self-seeded femtosecond x-ray pulse from the Linac Coherent Light Source hard x-ray free electron laser. By measuring the high energy resolution off-resonant spectrum (HEROS, we were able to obtain information about the electronic density of states with a single femtosecond x-ray pulse. We show that the unoccupied electronic states of the scattering atom may be determined on a shot-to-shot basis and that the measured spectral shape is independent of the large intensity fluctuations of the incoming x-ray beam. Moreover, we demonstrate the chemical sensitivity and single-shot capability and limitations of HEROS, which enables the technique to track the electronic structural dynamics in matter on femtosecond time scales, making it an ideal probe technique for time-resolved X-ray experiments.

  8. From single-species advice to mixed-species management: taking the next step

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Morten; Reeves, S.A.; Patterson, K.R.

    2004-01-01

    that accounts for mixed-fishery effects, but in the short term there is a need for approaches to resolve the conflicting management advice for different species within the same fishery, and to generate catch or effort advice that accounts for the mixed-species nature of the fishery. This paper documents...... a recent approach used to address these problems. The approach takes the single-species advice for each species in the fishery as a starting point, then attempts to resolve it into consistent catch or effort advice using fleet-disaggregated catch forecasts in combination with explicitly stated management...

  9. Quantum-Sequencing: Fast electronic single DNA molecule sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casamada Ribot, Josep; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-03-01

    A major goal of third-generation sequencing technologies is to develop a fast, reliable, enzyme-free, high-throughput and cost-effective, single-molecule sequencing method. Here, we present the first demonstration of unique ``electronic fingerprint'' of all nucleotides (A, G, T, C), with single-molecule DNA sequencing, using Quantum-tunneling Sequencing (Q-Seq) at room temperature. We show that the electronic state of the nucleobases shift depending on the pH, with most distinct states identified at acidic pH. We also demonstrate identification of single nucleotide modifications (methylation here). Using these unique electronic fingerprints (or tunneling data), we report a partial sequence of beta lactamase (bla) gene, which encodes resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics, with over 95% success rate. These results highlight the potential of Q-Seq as a robust technique for next-generation sequencing.

  10. On the scalar electron mass limit from single photon experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grivaz, J.F.

    1987-03-01

    We discuss how the 90% C.L. lower limit on the mass of the scalar electron, as extracted from the single photon experiments, is affected by the way the background from radiative neutrino pair production is handled. We argue that some of the results presented at the Berkeley conference are overoptimistic, and that the mass lower limit is 65 GeV rather than the advertized value of 84 GeV, for the case of degenerate scalar electrons with massless photinos

  11. Nanoscale and single-molecule interfacial electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Glargaard; Wackerbarth, Hainer; Nielsen, Jens Ulrik

    2003-01-01

    Electrochemical science and technology in the 21st century have reached high levels of sophistication. A fundamental quantum mechanical theoretical frame for interfacial electrochemical electron transfer (ET) was introduced by Revaz Dogonadze. This frame has remained for four decades as a basis...... scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and single-electron tunneling (SET, or Coulomb blockade) in electrochemical. systems directly in aqueous electrolyte solution and at room temperature. We illustrate the new theoretical formalism and its perspectives by recent cases of electrochemical SET, negative...

  12. Single and double ionization of gallium by electron impact

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    case of electron impact single ionization of In·. In order to obtain satisfactory agree- ment with experimental data, the contribution of the electrons of 4d shells to the ionization cross sections was added at only one half of its calculated value. Use of only half of the d-shell contributions was first proposed by Rogers et al [8] and ...

  13. A single molecular marker to distinguish between species of Dioscorea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techen, Natascha; Parveen, Iffat; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2017-03-01

    Yams are species of the genus Dioscorea (family Dioscoreaceae), which consists of approximately 630 species. The majority of the world production of yams occurs in Africa with 58.8 million t annually, but they are also produced in the Americas and Asia. The saponins in yams have been reported to possess various properties to improve health. The tuber and aerial parts of various species often share morphological similarities, which can cause problems in the proper identification of sample material. For example, the rootstocks and aerial parts of Dioscorea villosa L. share similarities with Dioscorea polystachia Turcz. Dioscorea bulbifera L. may be mistaken for Dioscorea alata L. owing to similar morphologies. Various molecular analyses have been published to help with the identification of species and varieties within the genus Dioscorea. The multi-loci or single-locus analysis has resulted in varying success, some with only a limited discrimination rate. In the present study, a single nuclear genomic region, biparentally inherited, was analyzed for its usefulness as a molecular marker for species identification and discrimination between D. bulbifera, D. villosa, D. nipponica, D. alata, D. caucasica, and D. deltoidea samples. The results of this study show that the LFY genomic region can be useful as a molecular marker to distinguish between samples.

  14. Single electron-spin memory with a semiconductor quantum dot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Robert J; Dewhurst, Samuel J; Stevenson, R Mark; Atkinson, Paola; Bennett, Anthony J; Ward, Martin B; Cooper, Ken; Ritchie, David A; Shields, Andrew J

    2007-01-01

    We show storage of the circular polarization of an optical field, transferring it to the spin-state of an individual electron confined in a single semiconductor quantum dot. The state is subsequently read out through the electronically-triggered emission of a single photon. The emitted photon shares the same polarization as the initial pulse but has a different energy, making the transfer of quantum information between different physical systems possible. With an applied magnetic field of 2 T, spin memory is preserved for at least 1000 times more than the exciton's radiative lifetime

  15. Single ionization of helium by 730-eV electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, M. A.; Lohmann, B.; Bray, I.; Fursa, D. V.; Stelbovics, A. T.

    2007-01-01

    We present fully differential measurements of 730-eV electron-impact single ionization of the ground state of helium with 205- or 100-eV outgoing electrons. Internormalized data are obtained for coplanar geometries with the fast electron detected at θ A =6 degree sign , 9 degree sign , and 12 degree sign . The data are compared, where possible, with the corresponding data of Catoire et al. [J. Phys. B 39, 2827 (2006)] and the convergent close-coupling theory. An improved agreement is found between the present measurements and the theory

  16. Electron-vibron coupling effects on electron transport via a single-molecule magnet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCaskey, A.; Yamamoto, Y.; Warnock, M.; Burzuri, E.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.; Park, K.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate how the electron-vibron coupling influences electron transport via an anisotropic magnetic molecule, such as a single-molecule magnet (SMM) Fe4, by using a model Hamiltonian with parameter values obtained from density-functional theory (DFT). The magnetic anisotropy parameters,

  17. Transistors-From Point Contact to Single Electron

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 12. Transistors – From Point Contact to Single Electron. D N Bose. General Article Volume 2 Issue 12 December 1997 pp 39-54. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/002/12/0039-0054 ...

  18. Metal-nanoparticle single-electron transistors fabricated using electromigration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolotin, K I; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Pasupathy, A N

    2004-01-01

    We have fabricated single-electron transistors from individual metal nanoparticles using a geometry that provides improved coupling between the particle and the gate electrode. This is accomplished by incorporating a nanoparticle into a gap created between two electrodes using electromigration, all...

  19. Simulation of single-electron tunnelling circuits using SPICE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Haar, R.

    2004-01-01

    Single-electron tunnelling (SET) devices have very promising properties, like their extremely low power consumption, their extremely high switching speeds and their extremely small physical dimensions. Since the field of SET devices is far from being fully exploited, and their device properties seem

  20. Enhancement mode single electron transistor in pure silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Binhui; Yang, C. H.; Jones, G. M.; Yang, M. J.

    2007-03-01

    Solid state implementations of lateral qubits offer the advantage of being scalable and can be easily integrated by existing main stream IC technologies. In addition, the two Zeeman states of an electron spin in a quantum dot (QD) provide a promising candidate for a qubit. Spins in lateral QDs in the GaAs/AlGaAs single electron transistors (SETs) have been intensively investigated. In contrast, Si provides a number of advantages, including long spin coherence time, large g-factor, and small spin-orbit coupling effect. We have demonstrated Si SET in the few electron regime.* In this talk, we will report the isolation of a single electron in a Si QD using a fabrication technique that incorporates the standard Al/SiO2/Si system with an enhancement mode SET structure. Our SET is built in highly resistive Si substrates with bilayer gates. The high purity Si minimizes the potential disorder from impurities. The top gate induces 2D electrons, and several side gates help define the tunneling barriers, fine tune the shape of the QD, and control the number of electrons in it. We will discuss the operating principle, computer simulation, and low temperature transport data. *APPLIED PHYSICS LETTERS 89, 073106 (2006)

  1. Trapped electrons in irradiated single crystals of polyhydroxy compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Box, H.C.; Budzinski, E.E.; Freund, H.G.; Potter, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    The intermolecular trapping of electrons has been observed in single crystals of dulcitol and L(+) arabinose x-irradiated at 4.2 0 K. Attribution of a major component of the ESR absorption to trapped electrons is based upon the character of the hyperfine pattern, which arises from multiple anisotropic hyperfine interactions with exchangeable protons, and on the g value of the absorption, which is always less than the free spin value. The removal of the trapped electron absorption upon irradiation with visible light has also been demonstrated. In these experiments all of the electrons are trapped in identical sites. This circumstance provides some important advantages in the study of the factors affecting the stabilization of charge in an environment of polarizable molecules

  2. Vibrationally coupled electron transport through single-molecule junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haertle, Rainer

    2012-04-26

    Single-molecule junctions are among the smallest electric circuits. They consist of a molecule that is bound to a left and a right electrode. With such a molecular nanocontact, the flow of electrical currents through a single molecule can be studied and controlled. Experiments on single-molecule junctions show that a single molecule carries electrical currents that can even be in the microampere regime. Thereby, a number of transport phenomena have been observed, such as, for example, diode- or transistor-like behavior, negative differential resistance and conductance switching. An objective of this field, which is commonly referred to as molecular electronics, is to relate these transport phenomena to the properties of the molecule in the contact. To this end, theoretical model calculations are employed, which facilitate an understanding of the underlying transport processes and mechanisms. Thereby, one has to take into account that molecules are flexible structures, which respond to a change of their charge state by a profound reorganization of their geometrical structure or may even dissociate. It is thus important to understand the interrelation between the vibrational degrees of freedom of a singlemolecule junction and the electrical current flowing through the contact. In this thesis, we investigate vibrational effects in electron transport through singlemolecule junctions. For these studies, we calculate and analyze transport characteristics of both generic and first-principles based model systems of a molecular contact. To this end, we employ a master equation and a nonequilibrium Green's function approach. Both methods are suitable to describe this nonequilibrium transport problem and treat the interactions of the tunneling electrons on the molecular bridge non-perturbatively. This is particularly important with respect to the vibrational degrees of freedom, which may strongly interact with the tunneling electrons. We show in detail that the resulting

  3. Energy and temperature fluctuations in the single electron box

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, Tineke L van den; Brange, Fredrik; Samuelsson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In mesoscopic and nanoscale systems at low temperatures, charge carriers are typically not in thermal equilibrium with the surrounding lattice. The resulting, non-equilibrium dynamics of electrons has only begun to be explored. Experimentally the time-dependence of the electron temperature (deviating from the lattice temperature) has been investigated in small metallic islands. Motivated by these experiments, we investigate theoretically the electronic energy and temperature fluctuations in a metallic island in the Coulomb blockade regime, tunnel coupled to an electronic reservoir, i.e. a single electron box. We show that electronic quantum tunnelling between the island and the reservoir, in the absence of any net charge or energy transport, induces fluctuations of the island electron temperature. The full distribution of the energy transfer as well as the island temperature is derived within the framework of full counting statistics. In particular, the low-frequency temperature fluctuations are analysed, fully accounting for charging effects and non-zero reservoir temperature. The experimental requirements for measuring the predicted temperature fluctuations are discussed. (paper)

  4. Intrinsic magnetic refrigeration of a single electron transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarelli, C.; Campion, R. P.; Gallagher, B. L.; Ferguson, A. J.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we show that aluminium doped with low concentrations of magnetic impurities can be used to fabricate quantum devices with intrinsic cooling capabilities. We fabricate single electron transistors made of aluminium doped with 2% Mn by using a standard multi angle evaporation technique and show that the quantity of metal used to fabricate the devices generates enough cooling power to achieve a drop of 160 mK in the electron temperature at the base temperature of our cryostat (300 mK). The cooling mechanism is based on the magneto-caloric effect from the diluted Mn moments.

  5. Intrinsic magnetic refrigeration of a single electron transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciccarelli, C.; Ferguson, A. J.; Campion, R. P.; Gallagher, B. L.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we show that aluminium doped with low concentrations of magnetic impurities can be used to fabricate quantum devices with intrinsic cooling capabilities. We fabricate single electron transistors made of aluminium doped with 2% Mn by using a standard multi angle evaporation technique and show that the quantity of metal used to fabricate the devices generates enough cooling power to achieve a drop of 160 mK in the electron temperature at the base temperature of our cryostat (300 mK). The cooling mechanism is based on the magneto-caloric effect from the diluted Mn moments

  6. Electron-assisted magnetization tunneling in single spin systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balashov, Timofey; Karlewski, Christian; Märkl, Tobias; Schön, Gerd; Wulfhekel, Wulf

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic excitations of single atoms on surfaces have been widely studied experimentally in the past decade. Lately, systems with unprecedented magnetic stability started to emerge. Here, we present a general theoretical investigation of the stability of rare-earth magnetic atoms exposed to crystal or ligand fields of various symmetry and to exchange scattering with an electron bath. By analyzing the properties of the atomic wave function, we show that certain combinations of symmetry and total angular momentum are inherently stable against first or even higher-order interactions with electrons. Further, we investigate the effect of an external magnetic field on the magnetic stability.

  7. Effects of overheating in a single-electron transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korotkov, A. N.; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm; Vasenko, S. A.

    1994-01-01

    Heating of a single-electron transistor (SET) caused by the current flowing through it is considered. The current and the temperature increase should be calculated self-consistently taking into account various paths of the heat drain. Even if there is no heat drain from the central electrode...... of the SET due to transfer of phonons, the temperature of this electrode remains finite because electron tunneling decreases the temperature difference between the central and outer electrodes. Overheating effects can cause hysteresis in the I-V curve of the SET in the vicinity of the Coulomb blockade...

  8. Point defects in electron-irradiated oxide single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caulfield, K.J.; Cooper, R. [Univ. of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia). Dept. of Chemistry; Boas, J.F. [Australian Radiation Lab., Yallambie, Victoria (Australia)

    1995-04-01

    Point defects have been produced in CaO, MgO, and {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} single crystals by electron irradiation, and thresholds for atomic displacement have been measured using time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy. Oxygen displacement energies of approximately 50 eV have been determined; however, a temperature-dependent threshold observed for an emission band in MgO may arise from a magnesium displacement. A 300-nm emission in {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} may be due to an F-center transition. Studies of radiative recombination kinetics are consistent with an electron-detrapping model.

  9. Electronic properties of single-walled chiral carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mensah, S.Y.; Allotey, F.K.A.; Mensah, N.G.; Nkrumah, G.

    2001-09-01

    The electronic properties of single-walled chiral carbon nanotube has been studied using the model based on infinitely long carbon atoms wrapped along a base helix of single-walled carbon nanotubes(SWNTs). The problem is solved semiclassically, and current density J, resistivity ρ, thermopower α z , and electrical power factor P calculated. It is noted that the current density j displays negative differential conductivity, whiles the resistivity ρ increases with increasing electrical field. ρ also slowly increases at low temperatures and then gradually increases with increasing temperature. The thermopower α z shows interesting behaviour. Very intriguing is the electrical power factor which shows relatively large values. (author)

  10. Scaling Beyond Moore: Single Electron Transistor and Single Atom Transistor Integration on CMOS

    OpenAIRE

    Deshpande , Veeresh

    2012-01-01

    Continuous scaling of MOSFET dimensions has led us to the era of nanoelectronics. Multigate FET (MuGFET) architecture with 'nanowire channel'is being considered as one feasible enabler of MOSFET scaling to end-of-roadmap. Alongside classical CMOS or Moore's law scaling, many novel device proposals exploiting nanoscale phenomena have been made. Single Electron Transistor (SET), with its unique 'Coulomb Blockade' phenomena, and Single Atom Transistor (SAT), as an ultimately scaled transistor, a...

  11. Electron-vibron coupling effects on electron transport via a single-molecule magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaskey, Alexander; Yamamoto, Yoh; Warnock, Michael; Burzurí, Enrique; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Park, Kyungwha

    2015-03-01

    We investigate how the electron-vibron coupling influences electron transport via an anisotropic magnetic molecule, such as a single-molecule magnet (SMM) Fe4, by using a model Hamiltonian with parameter values obtained from density-functional theory (DFT). The magnetic anisotropy parameters, vibrational energies, and electron-vibron coupling strengths of the Fe4 are computed using DFT. A giant spin model is applied to the Fe4 with only two charge states, specifically a neutral state with a total spin S =5 and a singly charged state with S =9 /2 , which is consistent with our DFT result and experiments on Fe4 single-molecule transistors. In sequential electron tunneling, we find that the magnetic anisotropy gives rise to new features in the conductance peaks arising from vibrational excitations. In particular, the peak height shows a strong, unusual dependence on the direction as well as magnitude of applied B field. The magnetic anisotropy also introduces vibrational satellite peaks whose position and height are modified with the direction and magnitude of applied B field. Furthermore, when multiple vibrational modes with considerable electron-vibron coupling have energies close to one another, a low-bias current is suppressed, independently of gate voltage and applied B field, although that is not the case for a single mode with a similar electron-vibron coupling. In the former case, the conductance peaks reveal a stronger B -field dependence than in the latter case. The new features appear because the magnetic anisotropy barrier is of the same order of magnitude as the energies of vibrational modes with significant electron-vibron coupling. Our findings clearly show the interesting interplay between magnetic anisotropy and electron-vibron coupling in electron transport via the Fe4. Similar behavior can be observed in transport via other anisotropic magnetic molecules.

  12. Photoinduced electron transfer in singly labeled thiouredopyrenetrisulfonate azurin derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borovok, N; Kotlyar, A B; Pecht, I

    1999-01-01

    efficiency. TUPS derivatives of azurin, singly labeled at specific lysine residues, were prepared and purified to homogeneity by ion exchange HPLC. Transient absorption spectroscopy was used to directly monitor the rates of the electron transfer reaction from the photoexcited triplet state of TUPS to Cu......A novel method for the initiation of intramolecular electron transfer reactions in azurin is reported. The method is based on laser photoexcitation of covalently attached thiouredopyrenetrisulfonate (TUPS), the reaction that generates the low potential triplet state of the dye with high quantum......(II) and the back reaction from Cu(I) to the oxidized dye. For all singly labeled derivatives, the rate constants of copper ion reduction were one or two orders of magnitude larger than for its reoxidation, consistent with the larger thermodynamic driving force for the former process. Using 3-D coordinates...

  13. Symmetry breaking by quantum coherence in single electron attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnakumar, E.; Prabhudesai, Vaibhav S.; Mason, Nigel J.

    2018-02-01

    Quantum coherence-induced effects in atomic and molecular systems are the basis of several proposals for laser-based control of chemical reactions. So far, these rely on coherent photon beams inducing coherent reaction pathways that may interfere with one another, to achieve the desired outcome. This concept has been successfully exploited for removing the inversion symmetry in the dissociation of homonuclear diatomic molecules, but it remains to be seen if such quantum coherent effects can also be generated by the interaction of incoherent electrons with such molecules. Here we show that resonant electron attachment to H2 and the subsequent dissociation into H (n = 2) + H- is asymmetric about the inter-nuclear axis, whereas the asymmetry in D2 is far less pronounced. We explain this observation as due to attachment of a single electron resulting in a coherent superposition of two resonances of opposite parity. In addition to exemplifying a new quantum coherent process, our observation of coherent quantum dynamics involves the active participation of all three electrons and two nuclei, which could provide new tools for studying electron correlations as a means to control chemical processes, and demonstrates the role of coherent effects in electron-induced chemistry.

  14. Reconfigurable Boolean logic using magnetic single-electron transistors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gonzalez-Zalba, M.F.; Ciccarelli, C.; Zarbo, Liviu; Irvine, A.C.; Campion, R.C.; Gallagher, B. L.; Jungwirth, Tomáš; Ferguson, A.J.; Wunderlich, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 4 (2015), e0125142 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026; GA ČR GB14-37427G EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 268066 - 0MSPIN Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : single-electron transitor * reconfigurable logic * ferromagnetic semiconductor Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.057, year: 2015

  15. Gain Dependence of the Noise in the Single Electron Transistor

    OpenAIRE

    Starmark, B.; Henning, Torsten; Korotkov, A. N.; Claeson, T.; Delsing, P.

    1998-01-01

    An extensive investigation of low frequency noise in single electron transistors as a function of gain is presented. Comparing the output noise with gain for a large number of bias points, it is found that the noise is dominated by external charge noise. For low gains we find an additional noise contribution which is compared to a model including resistance fluctuations. We conclude that this excess noise is not only due to resistance fluctuations. For one sample, we find a record low minimum...

  16. Synchronizing a single-electron shuttle to an external drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeckel, Michael J.; Southworth, Darren R.; Weig, Eva M.; Marquardt, Florian

    2014-04-01

    The nanomechanical single-electron shuttle is a resonant system in which a suspended metallic island oscillates between and impacts at two electrodes. This setup holds promise for one-by-one electron transport and the establishment of an absolute current standard. While the charge transported per oscillation by the nanoscale island will be quantized in the Coulomb blockade regime, the frequency of such a shuttle depends sensitively on many parameters, leading to drift and noise. Instead of considering the nonlinearities introduced by the impact events as a nuisance, here we propose to exploit the resulting nonlinear dynamics to realize a highly precise oscillation frequency via synchronization of the shuttle self-oscillations to an external signal. We link the established phenomenological description of synchronization based on the Adler equation to the microscopic nonlinear dynamics of the electron shuttle by calculating the effective Adler constant analytically in terms of the microscopic parameters.

  17. Synchronizing a single-electron shuttle to an external drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeckel, Michael J; Southworth, Darren R; Weig, Eva M; Marquardt, Florian

    2014-01-01

    The nanomechanical single-electron shuttle is a resonant system in which a suspended metallic island oscillates between and impacts at two electrodes. This setup holds promise for one-by-one electron transport and the establishment of an absolute current standard. While the charge transported per oscillation by the nanoscale island will be quantized in the Coulomb blockade regime, the frequency of such a shuttle depends sensitively on many parameters, leading to drift and noise. Instead of considering the nonlinearities introduced by the impact events as a nuisance, here we propose to exploit the resulting nonlinear dynamics to realize a highly precise oscillation frequency via synchronization of the shuttle self-oscillations to an external signal. We link the established phenomenological description of synchronization based on the Adler equation to the microscopic nonlinear dynamics of the electron shuttle by calculating the effective Adler constant analytically in terms of the microscopic parameters

  18. Broadening of electron beams through a single glass macrocapillary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bereczky, R.J.; Toekesi, K.; Dassanayake, B.S.; Tanis, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The interaction of charged particles with insulating capillaries has motivated the development of nanotechnology. The interaction of slow (few keV) highly charged ions (HCI) with several kinds of insulating capillaries has been studied recently, experimentally and theoretically. These studies have shown that a considerable fraction of the ions are transmitted through the nanocapillary without close collisions with the inner wall. Moreover, the transmission of slow negative ions through insulating nanocapillary foils shows that these ions can also be guided through nanocapillaries. Studies also include faster electrons transmitting through Al 2 O 3 nanocapillaries, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) nanocapillaries, and a single glass macrocapillary. Results for electrons (200 to 350 eV) through highly ordered insulating Al 2 O 3 nanocapillaries with a large aspect ratio of 100 show evidence of guiding. Even faster electrons (500 and 1000 eV) show guiding through PET capillaries with considerable energy loss increasing with tilt angle due to inelastic scattering with the inner surface of the capillary. For the single glass macrocapillary, the transmitted electrons are found to lose energy for the same reason. Guiding is also achieved with the single glass macrocapillary for slow highly-charged ions, but no energy loss is seen. Single glass capillaries have been applied with the intention of producing submicrometer sized beams that can be used for surface modification or to selectively damage the structure of biological cells. We investigated the broadening of electron beams when traveling through an insulating single cylindrically-shaped glass capillary of macroscopic dimensions. Glass capillary samples (diameters d = 0.18 and 0.23 mm and lengths l = 14.4 and 16.8 mm) made of Borosilicate glass were subjected to bombardment by ∼500 eV electrons. Defocusing effects have also been observed in most of the electron transmission

  19. Single-Molecule Electronics: Chemical and Analytical Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Richard J; Higgins, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    It is now possible to measure the electrical properties of single molecules using a variety of techniques including scanning probe microcopies and mechanically controlled break junctions. Such measurements can be made across a wide range of environments including ambient conditions, organic liquids, ionic liquids, aqueous solutions, electrolytes, and ultra high vacuum. This has given new insights into charge transport across molecule electrical junctions, and these experimental methods have been complemented with increasingly sophisticated theory. This article reviews progress in single-molecule electronics from a chemical perspective and discusses topics such as the molecule-surface coupling in electrical junctions, chemical control, and supramolecular interactions in junctions and gating charge transport. The article concludes with an outlook regarding chemical analysis based on single-molecule conductance.

  20. Intramolecular electron transfer in single-site-mutated azurins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Skov, L K; Pascher, T

    1993-01-01

    . Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 86, 6968-6972]. The RSSR- radical produced in the above reaction was reoxidized in a slower intramolecular electron-transfer process (30-70 s-1 at 298 K) concomitant with a further reduction of the Cu(II) ion. The temperature dependence of the latter rates was determined...... and used to derive information on the possible effects of the mutations. The substitution of residue Phe114, situated on the opposite side of Cu relative to the disulfide, by Ala resulted in a rate increase by a factor of almost 2. By assuming that this effect is only due to an increase in driving force......Single-site mutants of the blue, single-copper protein, azurin, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa were reduced by CO2- radicals in pulse radiolysis experiments. The single disulfide group was reduced directly by CO2- with rates similar to those of the native protein [Farver, O., & Pecht, I. (1989) Proc...

  1. Spin-dependent quasiparticle transport in aluminum single-electron transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, A J; Andresen, S E; Brenner, R; Clark, R G

    2006-08-25

    We investigate the effect of Zeeman splitting on quasiparticle transport in normal-superconducting-normal (NSN) aluminum single-electron transistors (SETs). In the above-gap transport, the interplay of Coulomb blockade and Zeeman splitting leads to spin-dependence of the sequential tunneling. This creates regimes where either one or both spin species can tunnel onto or off the island. At lower biases, spin-dependence of the single quasiparticle state is studied, and operation of the device as a bipolar spin filter is suggested.

  2. Imaging and electron energy-loss spectroscopy using single nanosecond electron pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picher, Matthieu; Bücker, Kerstin; LaGrange, Thomas; Banhart, Florian

    2018-03-13

    We implement a parametric study with single electron pulses having a 7 ns duration to find the optimal conditions for imaging, diffraction, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in the single-shot approach. Photoelectron pulses are generated by illuminating a flat tantalum cathode with 213 nm nanosecond laser pulses in a 200 kV transmission electron microscope (TEM) with thermionic gun and Wehnelt electrode. For the first time, an EEL spectrometer is used to measure the energy distribution of single nanosecond electron pulses which is crucial for understanding the ideal imaging conditions of the single-shot approach. By varying the laser power, the Wehnelt bias, and the condenser lens settings, the optimum TEM operation conditions for the single-shot approach are revealed. Due to space charge and the Boersch effect, the energy width of the pulses under maximized emission conditions is far too high for imaging or spectroscopy. However, by using the Wehnelt electrode as an energy filter, the energy width of the pulses can be reduced to 2 eV, though at the expense of intensity. The first EEL spectra taken with nanosecond electron pulses are shown in this study. With 7 ns pulses, an image resolution of 25 nm is attained. It is shown how the spherical and chromatic aberrations of the objective lens as well as shot noise limit the resolution. We summarize by giving perspectives for improving the single-shot time-resolved approach by using aberration correction. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Single-species versus dual-species probiotic supplementation as an emerging therapeutic strategy for obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, G; Jamaluddin, R; Mohtarrudin, N; Ahmad, Z; Khazaai, H; Parvaneh, M

    2017-10-01

    Recent studies have reported beneficial effects of specific probiotics on obesity. However, the difference in the anti-obesity effects of probiotics as single species and dual species is still uncertain. Therefore, we aimed to compare the efficacy of single and dual species of bacteria on markers of obesity in high-fat diet-induced obese rats. A total of 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one of five groups of varying diets as follows: standard diet, high fat diet (HFD), HFD supplemented with Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota, HFD supplemented with Bifidobacterium longum and HFD supplemented with a mixture of these two bacterial species. After 15 weeks of supplementation, the animals were examined for changes in body weight, body fat, total count of bacteria in fecal, blood serum lipid profile, leptin, adiponectin and inflammatory biomarkers. Histological analysis of the liver and adipose tissue was performed and the hepatic mRNA expression levels of genes related to lipid metabolism were measured. It was found that probiotic supplementation of either B. longum or a mixture of B. longum and LcS bacteria significantly reduced weight and triglycerides in the HFD groups. Supplementation of B. longum bacteria showed better results in terms of modulating leptin level, fat mass, adipocyte size and lipoprotein lipase expression, as well as increasing adiponectin and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-γ expression compared to dual species of bacteria. No significant differences were observed in the total count of fecal bacteria, glucose and inflammatory biomarker levels between supplemented groups. B. longum supplementation in obesity was more beneficial in metabolic profile changes than the mixture species. Copyright © 2017 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B

  4. Spin-gating of a conventional aluminum single electron transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarbo, Liviu P.; Ciccarelli, Chiara; Irvine, Andy; Wunderlich, Jörg; Champion, Richard; Gallagher, Brian; Jungwirth, Tomáš; Ferguson, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    We report the realization of a single electron transistor in which electron transport from an aluminum source electrode to an aluminum drain electrode via an aluminum island is controlled by spins in a capacitively coupled magnetic gate electrode. The origin of the effect is in the change of the chemical potential on the gate, formed by the ferromagnetic semiconductor GaMnAs, with changing the direction of the magnetization. In agreement with experimental observations, microscopically calculated anisotropies of the chemical potential with respect to the magnetization orientation are of the order of 10μV which is comparable to the electrical gate voltages required to control the on and off state of the single electron transistor. Our phenomenon belongs to the family of anisotropic magnetoresistance effects which can be observed in ohmic, tunneling or other device geometries. In our case, the entire phenomenon is coded in the dependence of the chemical potential on the spin orientation which allowed us to remove the spin functionality from all current contacts and channels and place it in the capacitively coupled gate electrode. Our spintronic device therefore operates without spin current.

  5. Probing Spin Accumulation induced Magnetocapacitance in a Single Electron Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Teik-Hui; Chen, Chii-Dong

    2015-09-08

    The interplay between spin and charge in solids is currently among the most discussed topics in condensed matter physics. Such interplay gives rise to magneto-electric coupling, which in the case of solids was named magneto-electric effect, as predicted by Curie on the basis of symmetry considerations. This effect enables the manipulation of magnetization using electrical field or, conversely, the manipulation of electrical polarization by magnetic field. The latter is known as the magnetocapacitance effect. Here, we show that non-equilibrium spin accumulation can induce tunnel magnetocapacitance through the formation of a tiny charge dipole. This dipole can effectively give rise to an additional serial capacitance, which represents an extra charging energy that the tunneling electrons would encounter. In the sequential tunneling regime, this extra energy can be understood as the energy required for a single spin to flip. A ferromagnetic single-electron-transistor with tunable magnetic configuration is utilized to demonstrate the proposed mechanism. It is found that the extra threshold energy is experienced only by electrons entering the islands, bringing about asymmetry in the measured Coulomb diamond. This asymmetry is an unambiguous evidence of spin accumulation induced tunnel magnetocapacitance, and the measured magnetocapacitance value is as high as 40%.

  6. Defects induced in cerium dioxide single crystals by electron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Jean-Marc; Miro, Sandrine; Touati, Nadia; Binet, Laurent; Wallez, Gilles; Lelong, Gérald; Guillaumet, Maxime; Weber, William J.

    2018-01-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy, X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, and UV-visible optical absorption spectroscopy were used to study the damage production in cerium dioxide (CeO2) single crystals by electron irradiation for three energies (1.0, 1.4, and 2.5 MeV). The Raman-active T2g peak was left unchanged after 2.5-MeV electron irradiation at a high fluence. This shows that no structural modifications occurred for the cubic fluorite structure. UV-visible optical absorption spectra exhibited a characteristic sub band-gap tail for 1.4-MeV and 2.5-MeV energies, but not for 1.0 MeV. Narrow EPR lines were recorded near liquid-helium temperature after 2.5-MeV electron irradiation; whereas no such signal was found for the virgin un-irradiated crystal or after 1.0-MeV irradiation for the same fluence. The angular variation of these lines in the {111} plane revealed a weak g-factor anisotropy assigned to Ce3+ ions (with the 4f1 configuration) in a high-symmetry local environment. It is concluded that Ce3+ ions may be produced by a reduction resulting from the displacement damage process. However, no evidence of F+ or F0 center or hole center formation due to irradiation was found from the present EPR and optical absorption spectra.

  7. Photoinduced electron transfer in singly labeled thiouredopyrenetrisulfonate azurin derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borovok, N; Kotlyar, A B; Pecht, I

    1999-01-01

    A novel method for the initiation of intramolecular electron transfer reactions in azurin is reported. The method is based on laser photoexcitation of covalently attached thiouredopyrenetrisulfonate (TUPS), the reaction that generates the low potential triplet state of the dye with high quantum......(II) and the back reaction from Cu(I) to the oxidized dye. For all singly labeled derivatives, the rate constants of copper ion reduction were one or two orders of magnitude larger than for its reoxidation, consistent with the larger thermodynamic driving force for the former process. Using 3-D coordinates...... of the crystal structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin and molecular structure calculation of the TUPS modified proteins, electron transfer pathways were calculated. Analysis of the results revealed a good correlation between separation distance from donor to Cu ligating atom (His-N or Cys-S) and the observed...

  8. A search for single electron production in electron positron annihilation at E = 29 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, T.R.

    1989-09-01

    This thesis presents experimental results from the ASP detector which took data on e + e - interactions in the PEP storage ring at SLAC. Its design was particularly suitable for searching for production of supersymmetric particles. The motivations for and phenomenology of Supersymmetry are discussed. In particular, the production of a single supersymmetric electron (''selectron'', e) in combination with a supersymmetric photon (''photino'', γ) would result in events in which a single electron and no other particles are observed in the detector at an e + e - collider such as PEP, provided the masses of these particles are not too large. Such events would also result from the production of a single supersymmetric W-boson (''wino'', W) in combination with a supersymmetric neutrino (''sneutrino'', ν). These processes make it possible to search for electrons and winos with masses greater than the beam energy. Observation of these unusual events would distinctly indicate the production of new particles. The ASP detector was designed to be hermetic and to provide efficient event reconstruction for low multiplicity events. The detector is described and its performance is evaluated; it is found to be well-suited to this study. The data sample collected with the detector was thoroughly analyzed for evidence of single-electron events. The various possible background processes are considered and Monte Carlo calculations of the distributions from single selectron and single wino production are presented. Using this information an efficient off-line event selection process was developed, and it is described in detail. 82 refs., 41 figs., 4 tabs

  9. Single-shot 35 fs temporal resolution electron shadowgraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scoby, C. M.; Li, R. K.; Threlkeld, E.; To, H.; Musumeci, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2013-01-14

    We obtain single-shot time-resolved shadowgraph images of the electromagnetic fields resulting from the interaction of a high intensity ultrashort laser pulse with a metal surface. Using a high brightness relativistic electron beam and a high streaking speed radiofrequency deflector, we report <35 fs temporal resolution enabling a direct visualization of the retarded-time dominated field evolution which follows the laser-induced charge emission. A model including the finite signal propagation speed well reproduces the data and yields measurements of fundamental parameters in short pulse laser-matter interaction such as the amount of emitted charge and the emission time scale.

  10. Low-frequency noise in single electron tunneling transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavkhelidze, A.N.; Mygind, Jesper

    1998-01-01

    The noise in current biased aluminium single electron tunneling (SET) transistors has been investigated in the frequency range of 5 mHz shielding including resistive coaxial lines, that prevents spurious electromagnetic radiation and especially high energy......, we find the same input charge noise, typically QN = 5 × 10–4 e/Hz1/2 at 10 Hz, with and without the HF shielding. At lower frequencies, the noise is due to charge trapping, and the voltage noise pattern superimposed on the V(Vg) curve (voltage across transistor versus gate voltage) strongly depends...

  11. A pseudo-single-crystalline germanium film for flexible electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higashi, H.; Yamada, S.; Kanashima, T.; Hamaya, K., E-mail: hamaya@ee.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Kasahara, K.; Park, J.-H.; Miyao, M. [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Kudo, K.; Okamoto, H.; Moto, K.; Tsunoda, I. [Kumamoto National College of Technology, 2659-2 Suya, Koshi, Kumamoto 861-1102 (Japan)

    2015-01-26

    We demonstrate large-area (∼600 μm), (111)-oriented, and high-crystallinity, i.e., pseudo-single-crystalline, germanium (Ge) films at 275 °C, where the temperature is lower than the softening temperature of a flexible substrate. A modulated gold-induced layer exchange crystallization method with an atomic-layer deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} barrier and amorphous-Ge/Au multilayers is established. From the Raman measurements, we can judge that the crystallinity of the obtained Ge films is higher than those grown by aluminum-induced-crystallization methods. Even on a flexible substrate, the pseudo-single-crystalline Ge films for the circuit with thin-film transistor arrays can be achieved, leading to high-performance flexible electronics based on an inorganic-semiconductor channel.

  12. Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy of macromolecular complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiniotis, Georgios; Southworth, Daniel R

    2016-02-01

    Recent technological breakthroughs in image acquisition have enabled single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to achieve near-atomic resolution structural information for biological complexes. The improvements in image quality coupled with powerful computational methods for sorting distinct particle populations now also allow the determination of compositional and conformational ensembles, thereby providing key insights into macromolecular function. However, the inherent instability and dynamic nature of biological assemblies remain a tremendous challenge that often requires tailored approaches for successful implementation of the methodology. Here, we briefly describe the fundamentals of single-particle cryo-EM with an emphasis on covering the breadth of techniques and approaches, including low- and high-resolution methods, aiming to illustrate specific steps that are crucial for obtaining structural information by this method. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Comments on ''single-barrier penetration of electrons''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, F.; Froeman, P.O.

    1980-01-01

    It is pointed out that the problem treated in a recent paper by Shaw, Measure, Wald and Lu, concerning single-barrier penetration of electrons, has already been solved in a simpler and more general way. In fact, simple, explicit formulae for the solution of the single-barrier transmission problem by means of phase-integral approximations of arbitrary order exist since several years. By numerical evaluation of these formulae on a small desk calculator, one can easily obtain results which, in the two lowest orders of approximation, agree with those given by Shaw, Measure, Wald and Lu, and in higher orders are more accurate, if the energy of the particle is not too low. This assertion is also illustrated numerically. (author)

  14. Failure of single electron descriptions of molecular orbital collision processes. [Electron promotion mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elston, S.B.

    1978-01-01

    Inner-shell excitation occurring in low and moderate (keV range) energy collisions between light atomic and ionic systems is frequently describable in terms of molecular promotion mechanisms, which were extensively explored both theoretically and experimentally. The bulk of such studies have concentrated on processes understandable through the use of single- and independent-electron models. Nonetheless, it is possible to find cases of inner-shell excitation in relatively simple collision systems which involve nearly simultaneous multiple-electron transitions and transitions induced by inherently two-electron interactions. Evidence for these many- and nonindependent-electron phenomena in inner-shell excitation processes and the importance of considering such effects in the interpretation of collisionally induced excitation spectra is discussed. 13 references.

  15. Electron-electron interaction effects on the optical excitations of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumdar, Sumit

    2005-03-01

    We report correlated-electron calculations of optically excited states in ten semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with a wide range of diameters.ootnotetextHongbo Zhao and Sumit Mazumdar, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 157402 (2004) First, we show that optical excitation in SWCNTs occurs to excitons whose binding energies decrease with the increasing nanotube diameter, and are smaller than the binding energy of an isolated strand of poly-(paraphenylenevinylene), (PPV). Second, electron-electron interactions split the degeneracies characteristic of cylindrical geometries, and in all cases there occur forbidden excitons below the optical exciton. We ascribe the experimentally observed low quantum efficiency of the photoluminescence of SWCNTs to the presence of these forbidden states. Third, while within one-electron theory the transverse photo-excitations occur exactly halfway between the two lowest longitudinally polarized absorptions, they are shifted to considerably above the central region for nonzero electron-electron interactions. Finally, the ratio of the threshold energy of the second longitudinally polarized optical absorption to that of the lowest such transition in the widest SWCNTs is less than 2 within correlated-electron theory, in agreement with experiments.

  16. arXiv Single-electron and single-photon sensitivity with a silicon Skipper CCD

    CERN Document Server

    Tiffenberg, Javier; Drlica-Wagner, Alex; Essig, Rouven; Guardincerri, Yann; Holland, Steve; Volansky, Tomer; Yu, Tien-Tien

    2017-09-26

    We have developed ultralow-noise electronics in combination with repetitive, nondestructive readout of a thick, fully depleted charge-coupled device (CCD) to achieve an unprecedented noise level of 0.068  e- rms/pixel. This is the first time that discrete subelectron readout noise has been achieved reproducible over millions of pixels on a stable, large-area detector. This enables the contemporaneous, discrete, and quantized measurement of charge in pixels, irrespective of whether they contain zero electrons or thousands of electrons. Thus, the resulting CCD detector is an ultra-sensitive calorimeter. It is also capable of counting single photons in the optical and near-infrared regime. Implementing this innovative non-destructive readout system has a negligible impact on CCD design and fabrication, and there are nearly immediate scientific applications. As a particle detector, this CCD will have unprecedented sensitivity to low-mass dark matter particles and coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering, while ...

  17. Probing quantum coherence in single-atom electron spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willke, Philip; Paul, William; Natterer, Fabian D.; Yang, Kai; Bae, Yujeong; Choi, Taeyoung; Fernández-Rossier, Joaquin; Heinrich, Andreas J.; Lutz, Christoper P.

    2018-01-01

    Spin resonance of individual spin centers allows applications ranging from quantum information technology to atomic-scale magnetometry. To protect the quantum properties of a spin, control over its local environment, including energy relaxation and decoherence processes, is crucial. However, in most existing architectures, the environment remains fixed by the crystal structure and electrical contacts. Recently, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), in combination with electron spin resonance (ESR), allowed the study of single adatoms and inter-atomic coupling with an unprecedented combination of spatial and energy resolution. We elucidate and control the interplay of an Fe single spin with its atomic-scale environment by precisely tuning the phase coherence time T2 using the STM tip as a variable electrode. We find that the decoherence rate is the sum of two main contributions. The first scales linearly with tunnel current and shows that, on average, every tunneling electron causes one dephasing event. The second, effective even without current, arises from thermally activated spin-flip processes of tip spins. Understanding these interactions allows us to maximize T2 and improve the energy resolution. It also allows us to maximize the amplitude of the ESR signal, which supports measurements even at elevated temperatures as high as 4 K. Thus, ESR-STM allows control of quantum coherence in individual, electrically accessible spins. PMID:29464211

  18. Probing quantum coherence in single-atom electron spin resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willke, Philip; Paul, William; Natterer, Fabian D; Yang, Kai; Bae, Yujeong; Choi, Taeyoung; Fernández-Rossier, Joaquin; Heinrich, Andreas J; Lutz, Christoper P

    2018-02-01

    Spin resonance of individual spin centers allows applications ranging from quantum information technology to atomic-scale magnetometry. To protect the quantum properties of a spin, control over its local environment, including energy relaxation and decoherence processes, is crucial. However, in most existing architectures, the environment remains fixed by the crystal structure and electrical contacts. Recently, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), in combination with electron spin resonance (ESR), allowed the study of single adatoms and inter-atomic coupling with an unprecedented combination of spatial and energy resolution. We elucidate and control the interplay of an Fe single spin with its atomic-scale environment by precisely tuning the phase coherence time T 2 using the STM tip as a variable electrode. We find that the decoherence rate is the sum of two main contributions. The first scales linearly with tunnel current and shows that, on average, every tunneling electron causes one dephasing event. The second, effective even without current, arises from thermally activated spin-flip processes of tip spins. Understanding these interactions allows us to maximize T 2 and improve the energy resolution. It also allows us to maximize the amplitude of the ESR signal, which supports measurements even at elevated temperatures as high as 4 K. Thus, ESR-STM allows control of quantum coherence in individual, electrically accessible spins.

  19. Towards parallel fabrication of single electron transistors using carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Muhammad R; Joung, Daeha; Khondaker, Saiful I

    2015-06-07

    Single electron transistors (SETs) are considered to be promising building blocks for post CMOS era electronic devices, however, a major bottleneck for practical realization of SET based devices is a lack of a parallel fabrication approach. Here, we have demonstrated a technique for the scalable fabrication of SETs using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The approach is based on the integration of solution processed individual SWNTs via dielectrophoresis (DEP) at the selected position of the circuit with a 100 nm channel length, where the metal-SWNT Schottky contact works as a tunnel barrier. Measurements carried out at a low temperature (4.2 K) show that the majority of the devices with a contact resistance (RT) > 100 kΩ display SET behavior. For the devices with 100 kΩ 1 MΩ) multiple QD behavior was observed. From the transport study of 50 SWNT devices, a total of 38 devices show SET behavior giving a yield of 76%. The results presented here are a significant step forward for the practical realization of SET based devices.

  20. Single-electron transistors fabricated with sidewall spacer patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byung-Gook; Kim, Dae Hwan; Kim, Kyung Rok; Song, Ki-Whan; Lee, Jong Duk

    2003-09-01

    We have implemented a sidewall spacer patterning method for novel dual-gate single-electron transistor (DGSET) and metal-oxide-semiconductor-based SET (MOSET) based on the uniform SOI wire, using conventional lithography and processing technology. A 30 nm wide silicon quantum wire is defined by a sidewall spacer patterning method, and depletion gates for two tunnel junctions of the DGSET are formed by the doped polycrystalline silicon sidewall. The fabricated DGSET and MOSET show clear single-electron tunneling phenomena at liquid nitrogen temperature and insensitivity of the Coulomb oscillation period to gate bias conditions. On the basis of the phase control capability of the sidewall depletion gates, we have proposed a complementary self-biasing method, which enables the SET/CMOS hybrid multi-valued logic (MVL) to operate perfectly well at high temperature, where the peak-to-valley current ratio of Coulomb oscillation severely decreases. The suggested scheme is evaluated by SPICE simulation with an analytical DGSET model, and it is confirmed that even DGSETs with a large Si island can be utilized efficiently in the multi-valued logic.

  1. Electron Spin Resonance Experiments on a Single Electron in Silicon Implanted with Phosphorous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhman, Dwight R.; Nguyen, K.; Tracy, L. A.; Carr, S.; Borchardt, J.; Bishop, N.; Ten Eyck, G.; Pluym, T.; Wendt, J.; Lilly, M. P.; Carroll, M. S.

    2015-03-01

    In this talk we will discuss the results of our ongoing experiments involving electron spin resonance (ESR) on a single electron in a natural silicon sample. The sample consists of an SET, defined by lithographic polysilicon gates, coupled to nearby phosphorous donors. The SET is used to detect charge transitions and readout the spin of the electron being investigated with ESR. The measurements were done with the sample at dilution refrigerator temperatures in the presence of a 1.3 T magnetic field. We will present data demonstrating Rabi oscillations of a single electron in this system as well as measurements of the coherence time, T2. We will also discuss our results using these and various other pulsing schemes in the context of a donor-SET system. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Single Electron Transfer Living Radical Polymerization via a New Initiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiongxiong; Hu, Ying; Zhang, Xu; Ai, Lingling; Cheng, Chuanjie

    2014-08-01

    Research and development of novel initiating system such as single electron transfer living radical polymerization (SET-LRP) is of high importance in polymer chemistry. A new SET-LRP initiator was synthesized and applied to prepare end-functionalized poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) in this study. α-Trichloromethyl benzyl alcohol was firstly synthesized, followed by preparation of PMMA under SET-LRP conditions. Conversion of MMA was 81.9%, and the molecular weight of PMMA was about 2.5 kDa at 60 °C for 1 h. Consistency of the number-average molecular weight of PMMA from NMR, GPC and theoretical calculation indicated that the polymerization featured controllable property. Broad molecular weight distribution (MWD) may be ascribed to branched polymers formed by initiation and chain transfer.

  3. Single Electron Transfer Living Radical Polymerization via a New Initiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Xiongxiong; Hu, Ying; Zhang, Xu; Ai, Lingling; Cheng, Chuanjie

    2014-01-01

    Research and development of novel initiating system such as single electron transfer living radical polymerization (SET-LRP) is of high importance in polymer chemistry. A new SET-LRP initiator was synthesized and applied to prepare end-functionalized poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) in this study. α-Trichloromethyl benzyl alcohol was firstly synthesized, followed by preparation of PMMA under SET-LRP conditions. Conversion of MMA was 81.9%, and the molecular weight of PMMA was about 2.5 kDa at 60 °C for 1 h. Consistency of the number-average molecular weight of PMMA from NMR, GPC and theoretical calculation indicated that the polymerization featured controllable property. Broad molecular weight distribution (MWD) may be ascribed to branched polymers formed by initiation and chain transfer

  4. Poly-silicon quantum-dot single-electron transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kwon-Chil; Lee, Joung-Eob; Lee, Jung-Han; Lee, Jong-Ho; Shin, Hyung-Cheol; Park, Byung-Gook

    2012-01-01

    For operation of a single-electron transistors (SETs) at room temperature, we proposed a fabrication method for a SET with a self-aligned quantum dot by using polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si). The self-aligned quantum dot is formed by the selective etching of a silicon nanowire on a planarized surface and the subsequent deposition and etch-back of poly-silicon or chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). The two tunneling barriers of the SET are fabricated by thermal oxidation. Also, to decrease the leakage current and control the gate capacitance, we deposit a hard oxide mask layer. The control gate is formed by using an electron beam and photolithography on chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Owing to the small capacitance of the narrow control gate due to the tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) hard mask, we observe clear Coulomb oscillation peaks and differential trans-conductance curves at room temperature. The clear oscillation period of the fabricated SET is 2.0 V.

  5. Measuring charge density of electron beam single nanosecond pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonchar, A.I.; Nesterenko, V.S.; Fazkullin, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    A description is presented of a probe design and electrometric repeater circuit and technique for measuring the charge (current) density of electron beam single pulses by integrating current at a reference capacitor with a subsequent registering of voltage across the capacitor. The probe consists of a band-type signal electrodes and two oval cross-section sleeves: external and internal with larger and smaller rectangular openings, respectively. The external sleeve has antidynatron grid located over the hole. The design employs integer nickel sleever - the cores of electron tube cathodes. The signal electrode is made of nickel band 0.15 mm thick. The probe elements are insulated from each other along the whole length with a layer of teflon band (30 μm), with rectangular openings cut in compliance with the sleeve openings. The measurement range is from 0.4x10 - 9 to 1x10 - 7 C/cm 2 . The rated accuracy of measurements is no worse than +-5% for the beam energy of 0.2 to 3 KeV. The ultimate parameters the charge density - 6 C/cm 2 and direct current density 3 mA/cm 2 - are specified by the breakdown voltage (200 V) of the input capacitor and probe insulation

  6. Radio-frequency reflectometry on an undoped AlGaAs/GaAs single electron transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacLeod, S. J.; See, A. M.; Keane, Z. K.

    2014-01-01

    Radio frequency reflectometry is demonstrated in a sub-micron undoped AlGaAs/GaAs device. Undoped single electron transistors (SETs) are attractive candidates to study single electron phenomena, due to their charge stability and robust electronic properties after thermal cycling. However, these d......Radio frequency reflectometry is demonstrated in a sub-micron undoped AlGaAs/GaAs device. Undoped single electron transistors (SETs) are attractive candidates to study single electron phenomena, due to their charge stability and robust electronic properties after thermal cycling. However...

  7. Effectiveness of electronic stability control on single-vehicle accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyckegaard, Allan; Hels, Tove; Bernhoft, Inger Marie

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at evaluating the effectiveness of electronic stability control (ESC) on single-vehicle injury accidents while controlling for a number of confounders influencing the accident risk. Using police-registered injury accidents from 2004 to 2011 in Denmark with cars manufactured in the period 1998 to 2011 and the principle of induced exposure, 2 measures of the effectiveness of ESC were calculated: The crude odds ratio and the adjusted odds ratio, the latter by means of logistic regression. The logistic regression controlled for a number of confounding factors, of which the following were significant. For the driver: Age, gender, driving experience, valid driving license, and seat belt use. For the vehicle: Year of registration, weight, and ESC. For the accident surroundings: Visibility, light, and location. Finally, for the road: Speed limit, surface, and section characteristics. The present study calculated the crude odds ratio for ESC-equipped cars of getting in a single-vehicle injury accident as 0.40 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.34-0.47) and the adjusted odds ratio as 0.69 (95% CI, 0.54-0.88). No difference was found in the effectiveness of ESC across the injury severity categories (slight, severe, and fatal). In line with previous results, this study concludes that ESC reduces the risk for single-vehicle injury accidents by 31% when controlling for various confounding factors related to the driver, the car, and the accident surroundings. Furthermore, it is concluded that it is important to control for human factors (at a minimum age and gender) in analyses where evaluations of this type are performed.

  8. Induction of prophage lambda by chlorinated organics: Detection of some single-species/single-site carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMarini, D.M.; Brooks, H.G. (Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Twenty-eight chlorinated organic compounds were evaluated for their ability to induce DNA damage using the Microscreen prophage-induction assay in Escherichia coli. Comparison of the performance characteristics of the prophage-induction and Salmonella assays to rodent carcinogenicity assays showed that the prophage-induction assay had a somewhat higher specificity than did the Salmonella assay (70% vs. 50%); sensitivity, concordance, and positive and negative predictivity were similar for the two microbial assays. The Microscreen prophage-induction assay failed to detect eight carcinogens, perhaps due to toxicity or other unknown factors; five of these eight carcinogens were detected by the Salmonella assay. However, the prophage-induction assay did detect six carcinogens that were not detected by the Salmonella assay, and five of these were single-species, single-site carcinogens, mostly mouse liver carcinogens. Some of these carcinogens, such as the chloroethanes, produce free radicals, which may be the basis for their carcinogenicity and ability to induce prophage. The prophage-induction (or other SOS) assay may be useful in identifying some genotoxic chlorinated carcinogens that induce DNA damage that do not revert the standard Salmonella tester strains.

  9. Single electron transistor with P-type sidewall spacer gates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Han; Li, Dong Hua; Lee, Joung-Eob; Kang, Kwon-Chil; Kim, Kyungwan; Park, Byung-Gook

    2011-07-01

    A single-electron transistor (SET) is one of the promising solutions to overcome the scaling limit of the Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET). Up to now, various kinds of SETs are being proposed and SETs with a dual gate (DG) structure using an electrical potential barrier have been demonstrated for room temperature operation. To operate DG-SETs, however, extra bias of side gates is necessary. It causes new problems that the electrode for side gates and the extra bias for electrical barrier increase the complexity in circuit design and operation power consumption, respectively. For the reason, a new mechanism using work function (WF) difference is applied to operate a SET at room temperature by three electrodes. Its structure consists of an undoped active region, a control gate, n-doped source/drain electrodes, and metal/silicide or p-type silicon side gates, and a SET with metal/silicide gates or p-type silicon gates forms tunnel barriers induced by work function between an undoped channel and grounded side gates. Via simulation, the effectiveness of the new mechanism is confirmed through various silicide materials that have different WF values. Furthermore, by considering the realistic conditions of the fabrication process, SET with p-type sidewall spacer gates was designed, and its brief fabrication process was introduced. The characteristics of its electrical barrier and the controllability of its control gate were also confirmed via simulation. Finally, a single-hole transistor with n-type sidewall spacer gates was designed.

  10. Transmission electron microscopy of Tuberculina species (Helicobasidiales) reveals an unique mode of conidiogenesis within Basidiomycota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghayeva, Dilzara N; Lutz, Matthias; Piątek, Marcin

    2016-08-01

    Tuberculina species represent the asexual life stage of the plant-parasitic sexual genus Helicobasidium. Tuberculina species are distributed all over the world, living in antagonistic symbiosis with over 150 rust species from at least 15 genera. Within the Basidiomycota, besides the spermogonia of rust fungi, only Tuberculina species develop distinct fructifications in the haplophase. However, the knowledge of conidiogenesis in Tuberculina is meagre. Therefore, conidial development in Tuberculina maxima, Tuberculina persicina, and Tuberculina sbrozzii was studied using transmission electron microscopy, and compared to each other as well as to spermatia formation in rust fungi. Significant ultrastructural characteristics such as the movement of nuclei in the process of conidium formation, and formation of the initial and late stages of conidiogenesis are documented. The mode of conidiogenesis of Tuberculina species is unique within the Basidiomycota in that (1) it is realized by haploid fructifications, (2) it is holoblastic, without annellidic proliferation, (3) the nucleus of the conidiogenous cell moves towards the forming conidium, divides, and no daughter nucleus remains inside the conidiogenous cell, and (4) the conidiogenous cell retains only cytoplasmic residues after the development of a single conidium, and a successive conidium is not produced. Copyright © 2016 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Colloquium : Electronic transport in single-crystal organic transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gershenson, M.E.; Podzorov, V.; Morpurgo, A.F.

    2006-01-01

    Small-molecule organic semiconductors, together with polymers, form the basis for the emerging field of organic electronics. Despite the rapid technological progress in this area, our understanding of fundamental electronic properties of these materials remains limited. Recently developed organic

  12. Challenges for single molecule electronic devices with nanographene and organic molecules. Do single molecules offer potential as elements of electronic devices in the next generation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoki, Toshiaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2018-03-01

    Interest in utilizing organic molecules to fabricate electronic materials has existed ever since organic (molecular) semiconductors were first discovered in the 1950s. Since then, scientists have devoted serious effort to the creation of various molecule-based electronic systems, such as molecular metals and molecular superconductors. Single-molecule electronics and the associated basic science have emerged over the past two decades and provided hope for the development of highly integrated molecule-based electronic devices in the future (after the Si-based technology era has ended). Here, nanographenes (nano-sized graphene) with atomically precise structures are among the most promising molecules that can be utilized for electronic/spintronic devices. To manipulate single small molecules for an electronic device, a single molecular junction has been developed. It is a powerful tool that allows even small molecules to be utilized. External electric, magnetic, chemical, and mechanical perturbations can change the physical and chemical properties of molecules in a way that is different from bulk materials. Therefore, the various functionalities of molecules, along with changes induced by external perturbations, allows us to create electronic devices that we cannot create using current top-down Si-based technology. Future challenges that involve the incorporation of condensed matter physics, quantum chemistry calculations, organic synthetic chemistry, and electronic device engineering are expected to open a new era in single-molecule device electronic technology.

  13. A structurally based analytic model of growth and biomass dynamics in single species stands of conifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin J. Tausch

    2015-01-01

    A theoretically based analytic model of plant growth in single species conifer communities based on the species fully occupying a site and fully using the site resources is introduced. Model derivations result in a single equation simultaneously describes changes over both, different site conditions (or resources available), and over time for each variable for each...

  14. A Theoretical Study of a Novel Single-Electron Refrigerator Fabricated from Semiconductor Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Ikeda, Hiroya; Salleh, Faiz

    2011-01-01

    We propose a novel single-electron refrigerator (SER) that can be fabricated from semiconductor materials such as a silicon-on-insulator wafer. The SER consists of a single-electron box and a single-electron pump (SEP). An equivalent circuit of the SEP refrigerator was derived. Its stability diagram (Coulomb diamond) was theoretically calculated and found to have a distorted honeycomb structure. In addition, a Monte Carlo simulation based on the orthodox theory for the Coulomb blockade phenom...

  15. A Theoretical Study of a Novel Single-Electron Refrigerator Fabricated from Semiconductor Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Hiroya; Salleh, Faiz

    2011-06-01

    We propose a novel single-electron refrigerator (SER) that can be fabricated from semiconductor materials such as a silicon-on-insulator wafer. The SER consists of a single-electron box and a single-electron pump (SEP). An equivalent circuit of the SEP refrigerator was derived. Its stability diagram (Coulomb diamond) was theoretically calculated and found to have a distorted honeycomb structure. In addition, a Monte Carlo simulation based on the orthodox theory for the Coulomb blockade phenomenon predicts successful single-electron extraction and injection.

  16. Species distribution modelling for plant communities: Stacked single species or multivariate modelling approaches?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emilie B. Henderson; Janet L. Ohmann; Matthew J. Gregory; Heather M. Roberts; Harold S.J. Zald

    2014-01-01

    Landscape management and conservation planning require maps of vegetation composition and structure over large regions. Species distribution models (SDMs) are often used for individual species, but projects mapping multiple species are rarer. We compare maps of plant community composition assembled by stacking results from many SDMs with multivariate maps constructed...

  17. Single-photon emission correlated to double-electron capture by bare ions: background processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkafrawy, T.; Warczak, A.; Simon, A.; Tanis, J. A.

    2013-09-01

    Radiative single- and double-electron capture are one-step processes where a single target electron or two target electrons, respectively, are captured to a bound state of a highly charged projectile with the simultaneous emission of a single photon. In ion-atom collisions, several background processes are likely to contribute to these processes and may interfere with the measured x-rays due to radiative single and double capture. In this study, possible contributions from radiative electron capture to the continuum, secondary electron bremsstrahlung, the two-step process of independent double radiative electron capture, as well as radiative- combined with nonradiative-electron capture are taken into account based on our analysis of the data for 2.21 MeV u-1 F9+ ions colliding with a thin carbon foil.

  18. Ultrafast Non-Thermal Electron Dynamics in Single Layer Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novoselov K.S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We study the ultrafast dynamics of non-thermal electron relaxation in graphene upon impulsive excitation. The 10-fs resolution two color pump-probe allows us to unveil the non-equilibrium electron gas decay at early times.

  19. Single-stage unity power factor based electronic ballast

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper deals with the design, modeling, analysis and implementation of unity power factor (UPF) based electronic ballast for a fluorescent lamp (FL). The proposed electronic ballast uses a boost AC–DC converter as a power factor corrector (PFC) to improve the power quality at the input ac mains. In this singlestage ...

  20. A single-electron tunneling reset-set flip-flop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alencar, Bianca M. S. M. de; Guimarães, Janaina G. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Brasilia, Campus Universitário Darcy Ribeiro, Asa Norte, P.O. Box 4386, Brasilia-DF, 70919-970 (Brazil)

    2014-05-15

    In this paper, a new Reset-Set flip-flop fully implemented with single-electron devices is proposed. Its topology derived from NAND gates and was validated at room temperature by simulation. Furthermore, a comparison between the proposed single-electron device and MOS devices in terms of power consumption and occupied area is presented.

  1. Single- and multi-photon ionization studies of organosulfur species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Yu -San [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-02-12

    Accurate ionization energies (IE`s) for molecular species are used for prediction of chemical reactivity and are of fundamental importance to chemists. The IE of a gaseous molecule can be determined routinely in a photoionization or a photoelectron experiment. IE determinations made in conventional photoionization and photoelectron studies have uncertainties in the range of 3--100 meV (25--250 cm-1). In the past decade, the most exciting development in the field of photoionization and photoelectron spectroscopy has been the availability of high resolution, tunable ultraviolet (UV) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser sources. The laser pulsed field ionization photoelectron (PFI-PE) scheme is currently the state-of-the-art photoelectron spectroscopic technique and is capable of providing photoelectron energy resolution close to the optical resolution. The author has focused attention on the photoionization processes of some sulfur-containing species. The studies of the photoionization and photodissociation on sulfur-containing compounds [such as CS2, CH3SH, CH3SSCH3, CH3CH2SCH2CH3, HSCH2CH2SH and C4H4S (thiophene) and sulfur-containing radicals, such as HS, CS, CH3S, CH3CH2S and CH3SS], have been the major subjects in the group because sulfur is an important species contributing to air pollution in the atmosphere. The modeling of the combustion and oxidation of sulfur compounds represents important steps for the control of both the production and the elimination of sulfur-containing pollutants. Chapter 1 is a general introduction of the thesis. Chapters 2 and 6 contain five papers published in, or accepted for publication in, academic periodicals. In Chapter 7, the progress of the construction in the laboratory of a new vacuum ultraviolet laser system equipped with a reflectron mass

  2. Single electron based binary multipliers with overflow detection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    electron based device. Multipliers with overflow detection based on serial and parallel prefix computation algorithm are elaborately discussed analytically and designed. The overflow detection circuits works in parallel with a simplified multiplier to ...

  3. Microencapsulation of single-cell protein from various microalgae species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purnama Sukardi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of the research was to evaluate nutritional values of microencapsulated diet made from single cell protein of microalgae. Complete randomized design was applied using three different types of microalgae for inclusion trials i.e. (A Nannochloropsis sp., (B Chlorella sp., and (C Spirulina sp. with five replications respectively. Microencapsulated diet was produced by a modification method based on thermal cross-linking with stable temperature. Phytoplankton was cultured in sea water for which fertilized by a modification of Walne and Guillard fertilizer. The results showed that the highest value of nutrition content was Spirulina sp. and the average composition of protein, crude lipid, carbohydrate, ash, nitrogen free extract, and water content was 34.80%, 0.30%, 18.53%, 20.09%, 26.29%, and 13.32%, respectively. Organoleptically, microcapsule showed that the color of capsule was dark green and smell fresh phytoplankton. Keywords: microcapsule, single-cell protein, thermal cross-linking, microalgae, phytoplankton  ABSTRAK Tujuan penelitian adalah mengevaluasi kandungan nutrisi pakan mikrokapsul protein sel tunggal (single cell protein yang berasal dari berbagai jenis mikroalga (fitoplankton. Rancangan percobaan yang digunakan adalah rancangan acak lengkap, dengan perlakuan inklusi mikrokapsul dari jenis fitoplankton (A Nannochloropsis sp., (B Chlorella sp., dan (C Spirulina sp., masing-masing diulang lima kali. Pembuatan mikrokapsul dilakukan dengan menggunakan modifikasi metode dasar thermal cross-linking, serta menerapkan teknik pengeringan suhu konstan. Proses pembuatan mikrokapsul protein diawali dengan kultur fitoplankton jenis Nannochloropsis sp., Chlorella sp., dan Spirulina sp. Kultur dilakukan di dalam laboratorium menggunakan media air laut dan modifikasi pupuk Walne dan Guillard. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa kandungan nutrisi tertinggi terdapat pada jenis mikrokapsul protein sel tunggal yang berasal dari

  4. Theoretical study of one-electron bonds in a series of high-spin lithium-beryllium-hydrogen clusters: ?Valence shell single-electron repulsion? rule and electron localization function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaquin, Patrick; Chevreau, Hilaire

    A series of high-spin clusters containing Li, H, and Be in which the valence shell molecular orbitals (MOs) are occupied by a single electron has been characterized using ab initio and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. A first type (5Li2, n+1LiHn+ (n = 2-5), 8Li2H6+) possesses only one electron pair in the lowest MO, with bond energies of ?3 kcal/mol. In a second type, all the MOs are singly occupied, which results in highly excited species that nevertheless constitute a marked minimum on their potential energy surface (PES). Thus, it is possible to design a larger panel of structures (8LiBe, 7Li2, 8Li2-, 4LiH+, 6BeH2+, n+3LiHn+ (n = 3, 4), n+2LiHn2+ (n = 4-6), 8Li2H2+, 9Li2H42+, 22Li3Be3 and 22Li6H63+), single-electron equivalent to doublet ?classical? molecules ranging from CO to C6H6. The geometrical structure is studied in relation to the valence shell single-electron repulsion (VSEPR) theory and the electron localization function (ELF) is analyzed, revealing a striking similarity with the corresponding structure having paired electrons.

  5. Electronic spin transport and spin precession in single graphene layers at room temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tombros, Nikolaos; Jozsa, Csaba; Popinciuc, Mihaita; Jonkman, Harry T.; van Wees, Bart J.

    2007-01-01

    Electronic transport in single or a few layers of graphene is the subject of intense interest at present. The specific band structure of graphene, with its unique valley structure and Dirac neutrality point separating hole states from electron states, has led to the observation of new electronic

  6. Nonlinear and Nonsymmetric Single-Molecule Electronic Properties Towards Molecular Information Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Takashi; Ogawa, Takuji

    2017-09-05

    This review highlights molecular design for nonlinear and nonsymmetric single-molecule electronic properties such as rectification, negative differential resistance, and switching, which are important components of future single-molecule information processing devices. Perspectives on integrated "molecular circuits" are also provided. Nonlinear and nonsymmetric single-molecule electronics can be designed by utilizing (1) asymmetric molecular cores, (2) asymmetric anchoring groups, (3) an asymmetric junction environment, and (4) asymmetric electrode materials. This review mainly focuses on the design of molecular cores.

  7. Spin-controlled nanomechanics induced by single-electron tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radić, D; Nordenfelt, A; Kadigrobov, A M; Shekhter, R I; Jonson, M; Gorelik, L Y

    2011-12-02

    We consider dc-electronic transport through a nanowire suspended between normal- and spin-polarized metal leads in the presence of an external magnetic field. We show that magnetomotive coupling between the electrical current through the nanowire and vibrations of the wire may result in self-excitation of mechanical vibrations. The self-excitation mechanism is based on correlations between the occupancy of the quantized electronic energy levels inside the nanowire and the velocity of the nanowire. We derive conditions for the occurrence of the instability and find stable regimes of mechanical oscillations. © 2011 American Physical Society

  8. Electronic components embedded in a single graphene nanoribbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobse, P. H.; Kimouche, A.; Gebraad, T.; Ervasti, M. M.; Thijssen, J.M.; Liljeroth, P; Swart, I.

    2017-01-01

    The use of graphene in electronic devices requires a band gap, which can be achieved by creating nanostructures such as graphene nanoribbons. A wide variety of atomically precise graphene nanoribbons can be prepared through on-surface synthesis, bringing the concept of graphene nanoribbon

  9. Electronic components embedded in a single graphene nanoribbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobse, P H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412769506; Kimouche, A; Gebraad, T; Ervasti, M.; Thijssen, J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073430331; Liljeroth, P|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314007423; Swart, I|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837652

    2017-01-01

    The use of graphene in electronic devices requires a band gap, which can be achieved by creating nanostructures such as graphene nanoribbons. A wide variety of atomically precise graphene nanoribbons can be prepared through on-surface synthesis, bringing the concept of graphene nanoribbon

  10. Single-electron states near a current-carrying core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masale, M.

    2004-01-01

    The energy spectrum of an electron confined near a current-carrying core is obtained as a function of the azimuthal applied magnetic field within the effective-mass approximation. The double degeneracy of the non-zero electron's axial wave number (k z ) states is lifted by the current-induced magnetic field while that of the non-zero azimuthal quantum number (m) states is preserved. A further analysis is the evaluations of the oscillator strengths for optical transitions involving the lowest-order pair of the electron's energy subbands within the dipole approximation. The radiation field is taken as that of elliptically polarized light incident along the core axis. In this polarization and within the dipole approximation, the allowed transitions are only those governed by the following specific selection rules. The azimuthal quantum numbers of the initial and final states must differ by unity while the electron's axial wave number is conserved. The azimuthal magnetic field is also found to lift the multiple degeneracies of the k z ≠0 interaction integrals as well as those of the oscillator strengths for optical transitions

  11. Physics colloquium: Single-electron counting in quantum metrology and in statistical mechanics

    CERN Multimedia

    Geneva University

    2011-01-01

    GENEVA UNIVERSITY Ecole de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 Genève 4 Tél.: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92olé   Lundi 17 octobre 2011 17h00 - Ecole de Physique, Auditoire Stueckelberg PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM « Single-electron counting in quantum metrology and in statistical mechanics » Prof. Jukka Pekola Low Temperature Laboratory, Aalto University Helsinki, Finland   First I discuss the basics of single-electron tunneling and its potential applications in metrology. My main focus is in developing an accurate source of single-electron current for the realization of the unit ampere. I discuss the principle and the present status of the so-called single- electron turnstile. Investigation of errors in transporting electrons one by one has revealed a wealth of observations on fundamental phenomena in mesoscopic superconductivity, including individual Andreev...

  12. Photoionisation detection of single {sup 87}Rb-atoms using channel electron multipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henkel, Florian Alexander

    2011-09-02

    Fast and efficient detection of single atoms is a universal requirement concerning modern experiments in atom physics, quantum optics, and precision spectroscopy. In particular for future quantum information and quantum communication technologies, the efficient readout of qubit states encoded in single atoms or ions is an elementary prerequisite. The rapid development in the field of quantum optics and atom optics in the recent years has enabled to prepare individual atoms as quantum memories or arrays of single atoms as qubit registers. With such systems, the implementation of quantum computation or quantum communication protocols seems feasible. This thesis describes a novel detection scheme which enables fast and efficient state analysis of single neutral atoms. The detection scheme is based on photoionisation and consists of two parts: the hyperfine-state selective photoionisation of single atoms and the registration of the generated photoion-electron pairs via two channel electron multipliers (CEMs). In this work, both parts were investigated in two separate experiments. For the first step, a photoionisation probability of p{sub ion}=0.991 within an ionisation time of t{sub ion}=386 ns is achieved for a single {sup 87}Rb-atom in an optical dipole trap. For the second part, a compact detection system for the ionisation fragments was developed consisting of two opposing CEM detectors. Measurements show that single neutral atoms can be detected via their ionisation fragments with a detection efficiency of {eta}{sub atom}=0.991 within a detection time of t{sub det}=415.5 ns. In a future combined setup, this will allow the state-selective readout of optically trapped, single neutral {sup 87}Rb-atoms via photoionisation detection with an estimated detection efficiency {eta}=0.982 and a detection time of t{sub tot} = 802 ns. Although initially developed for single {sup 87}Rb-atoms, the concept of photoionisation detection is in principle generally applicable to any

  13. Single and double ionization of gallium by electron impact

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    theoretical methods. They stated that the available published data were slightly contra- dictory and according to Kozlov [6], a large number of 3d 94s24p terms are .... brief outline of the method of calculation is given below. ..... ing qualitative features of contribution of 3d shell to single and double ionization cross sections.

  14. Atomic-Scale Control of Electron Transport through Single Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Y. F.; Kroger, J.; Berndt, R.

    2010-01-01

    Tin-phthalocyanine molecules adsorbed on Ag(111) were contacted with the tip of a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope. Orders-of-magnitude variations of the single-molecule junction conductance were achieved by controllably dehydrogenating the molecule and by modifying the atomic structure...

  15. Single and double ionization of gallium by electron impact

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is concluded that the ionization of 3d shell contributes partly to single ionization and partly to double ionization. The results so obtained show reasonably good agreement with the experimental data. Author Affiliations. L K Jha1. Department of Physics, L N T College, Muzaffarpur 842 002, India. Dates. Manuscript received ...

  16. Electronic Transport Properties of Single Crystal THALLIUM-2201 Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yandrofski, Robert Michael

    1992-11-01

    Four-probe resistance measurements on single crystals of the calcium-free thallium-based superconducting rm Tl_2Ba_2CuO_{6+delta } phase (Tl-2201) were performed in magnetic fields up to 12 Telsa. Single crystals of sizes approaching 5mm x 1mm x.2mm were grown by a self-flux technique and were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction and X-ray Dispersive Analysis. Field measurements were taken both at dc and at low frequencies using a lock-in technique. Techniques were developed to oxygen-anneal the as-grown single crystals to generate single crystal samples of the same Tl-2201 phase with varying transition temperature T_{rm c}. Resistivity measurements indicate a gradual cross-over from linear temperature-dependent resistivity at high T_ {rm c} (i.e., low oxygen doping), to a predominantly quadratic temperature dependent resistivity at low T_{rm c} (i.e., high oxygen doping). These results are correlated with theories describing the gradual change in the nature of charge carrier scattering as the system is over-doped with holes. Four-probe resistivity measurements indicate that severe anisotropies in the resistivity profiles exist at all oxygen concentrations, with the out-of-plane resistivity measuring two to three orders of magnitude higher than the in-plane resistivity. Magnetic field results indicate the presence of an irreversibility transition, with a signature for a Kosterlitz-Thouless (or "melting") transition in the vortex lattice at low fields occuring in samples with the lower T_{rm c}. Such data suggest a quasi-two-dimensional behavior in this system. Measurements of the fluctuation conductivity also suggest a quasi-two -dimensional fluctuation regime. Experimental results are discussed within the framework of Fermi liquid theory.

  17. Coulomb blockade in a Si channel gated by an Al single-electron transistor

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, L.; Brown, K. R.; Kane, B. E.

    2007-01-01

    We incorporate an Al-AlO_x-Al single-electron transistor as the gate of a narrow (~100 nm) metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET). Near the MOSFET channel conductance threshold, we observe oscillations in the conductance associated with Coulomb blockade in the channel, revealing the formation of a Si single-electron transistor. Abrupt steps present in sweeps of the Al transistor conductance versus gate voltage are correlated with single-electron charging events in the Si t...

  18. Single Electron Detection in Quadruple-GEM Detector with Pad Readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Va' vra, Jaroslav

    2001-03-07

    Using a system of four GEMs operating in tandem and coupled to pad readout, we have demonstrated the detection of single electrons in ethane at 1 bar. The paper presents measurements of single electron pulse height distributions, total gas gain measurement and calculation, pad-to-pad cross-talk, quenching capability, high rate capability, charging effects, etc. We describe the overall operational experience, including addition of a gaseous photocathode, TMAE, and compare it to the SLD CRID single-electron detector [1], which has been operational during the past decade.

  19. Intramolecular electron transfer in single-site-mutated azurins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Skov, L K; Pascher, T

    1993-01-01

    and used to derive information on the possible effects of the mutations. The substitution of residue Phe114, situated on the opposite side of Cu relative to the disulfide, by Ala resulted in a rate increase by a factor of almost 2. By assuming that this effect is only due to an increase in driving force...... is apparently only marginally involved in electron transfer in wild-type azurin. Pathway calculations also suggest that a longer, through-backbone path is more efficient than the shorter one involving Trp48. The former pathway yields an exponential decay factor, beta, of 6.6 nm-1. Another mutation, raising...

  20. Hydrogen positions in single nanocrystals revealed by electron diffraction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palatinus, Lukáš; Brázda, Petr; Boullay, P.; Pérez, O.; Klementová, Mariana; Petit, S.; Eigner, Václav; Zaarour, M.; Mintova, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 355, č. 6321 (2017), s. 166-169 ISSN 0036-8075 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-10035S; GA MŠk LO1603 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24510 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : hydrogen atoms * crystal structure * electron diffraction tomography * nanocrystalline materials Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 37.205, year: 2016

  1. Integrated Transmission Electron and Single-Molecule Fluorescence Microscopy Correlates Reactivity with Ultrastructure in a Single Catalyst Particle

    OpenAIRE

    Hendriks, Frank C.; Mohammadian, Sajjad; Ristanovic, Zoran; Kalirai, Samanbir; Meirer, Florian; Vogt, Eelco T. C.; Bruijnincx, Pieter C. A.; Gerritsen, Hans; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2018-01-01

    Establishing structure–activity relationships in complex, hierarchically structured nanomaterials, such as fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts, requires characterization with complementary, correlated analysis techniques. An integrated setup has been developed to perform transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and single-molecule fluorescence (SMF) microscopy on such nanostructured samples. Correlated structure–reactivity information was obtained for 100 nm thin, microtomed sections of a ...

  2. Electron transfer dynamics of bistable single-molecule junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danilov, A.V; Kubatkin, S.; Kafanov, S. G.

    2006-01-01

    We present transport measurements of single-molecule junctions bridged by a molecule with three benzene rings connected by two double bonds and with thiol end-groups that allow chemical binding to gold electrodes. The I-V curves show switching behavior between two distinct states. By statistical ...... analysis of the switching events, we show that a 300 meV mode mediates the transition between the two states. We propose that breaking and reformation of a S-H bond in the contact zone between molecule and electrode explains the observed bistability....

  3. Current Single Event Effects Results for Candidate Spacecraft Electronics for NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBryan, Martha V.; Seidleck, Christina M.; Carts, Martin A.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Marshall, Cheryl J.; Reed, Robert A.; Sanders, Anthony B.; Hawkins, Donald K.; Cox, Stephen R.; Kniffin, Scott D.

    2004-01-01

    We present data on the vulnerability of a variety of candidate spacecraft electronics to proton and heavy ion induced single event effects. Devices tested include digital, analog, linear bipolar, and hybrid devices, among others.

  4. Cross section formulae on single W and Z boson productions in electron-positron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katuya, Mituaki

    1987-01-01

    The formulae are given for the transverse momentum distributions and total cross sections for the single W boson and Z boson productions in electron-positron collisions by using the equivalent photon approximation. (author)

  5. Single-electron thermal devices coupled to a mesoscopic gate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Rafael; Thierschmann, Holger; Molenkamp, Laurens W.

    2017-11-01

    We theoretically investigate the propagation of heat currents in a three-terminal quantum dot engine. Electron–electron interactions introduce state-dependent processes which can be resolved by energy-dependent tunneling rates. We identify the relevant transitions which define the operation of the system as a thermal transistor or a thermal diode. In the former case, thermal-induced charge fluctuations in the gate dot modify the thermal currents in the conductor with suppressed heat injection, resulting in huge amplification factors and the possible gating with arbitrarily low energy cost. In the latter case, enhanced correlations of the state-selective tunneling transitions redistribute heat flows giving high rectification coefficients and the unexpected cooling of one conductor terminal by heating the other one. We propose quantum dot arrays as a possible way to achieve the extreme tunneling asymmetries required for the different operations.

  6. Limiting factors in single particle cryo electron tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Kudryashev

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Modern methods of cryo electron microscopy and tomography allow visualization of protein nanomachines in their native state at the nanometer scale. Image processing methods including sub-volume averaging applied to repeating macromolecular elements within tomograms allow exploring their structures within the native context of the cell, avoiding the need for protein isolation and purification. Today, many different data acquisition protocols and software solutions are available to researchers to determine average structures of macromolecular complexes and potentially to classify structural intermediates. Here, we list the density maps reported in the literature, and analyze each structure for the chosen instrumental settings, sample conditions, main processing steps, and obtained resolution. We present conclusions that identify factors currently limiting the resolution gained by this approach.

  7. Investigations of single-electron avalanches in a proportional drift tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, W.S.; Armitage, J.C.; Chevreau, P.; Heinrich, J.G.; Lu, C.; McDonald, I.; McDonald, K.T.; Miller, B.; Secrest, D.; Weckel, J.

    1990-01-01

    Detailed information on single-electron drift and avalanche behavior has a basic interest in an investigation of gas-chamber performance. Its timing, avalanche distribution, attachment by the working gas mixtures, etc., provide various criteria for choosing the best suitable gas mixture under a specific experimental circumstance. Investigations of single-electron avalanches in a proportional drift tube have been carried out with a pulsed N 2 laser. The study consists of two aspects: timing properties, and fluctuations in the gas avalanche

  8. 77 FR 44592 - Atlantic Highly Migratory Species; Electronic Dealer Reporting System Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-30

    ... Dealer Reporting System Workshop AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and... through one centralized electronic reporting system. This electronic reporting system will allow dealers... Atlantic area to introduce the new reporting system to Highly Migratory Species (HMS) dealers. In this...

  9. Effectiveness of electronic stability control on single-vehicle accidents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyckegaard, Allan; Hels, Tove; Bernhoft, Inger Marie

    2015-01-01

    the following were significant. For the driver: Age, gender, driving experience, valid driving license, and seat belt use. For the vehicle: Year of registration, weight, and ESC. For the accident surroundings: Visibility, light, and location. Finally, for the road: Speed limit, surface, and section...... manufactured in the period 1998 to 2011 and the principle of induced exposure, 2 measures of the effectiveness of ESC were calculated: The crude odds ratio and the adjusted odds ratio, the latter by means of logistic regression. The logistic regression controlled for a number of confounding factors, of which...... characteristics. Results: The present study calculated the crude odds ratio for ESC-equipped cars of getting in a single-vehicle injury accident as 0.40 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.34-0.47) and the adjusted odds ratio as 0.69 (95% CI, 0.54-0.88). No difference was found in the effectiveness of ESC across...

  10. Potential DNA barcodes for Melilotus species based on five single loci and their combinations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Wu

    Full Text Available Melilotus, an annual or biennial herb, belongs to the tribe Trifolieae (Leguminosae and consists of 19 species. As an important green manure crop, diverse Melilotus species have different values as feed and medicine. To identify different Melilotus species, we examined the efficiency of five candidate regions as barcodes, including the internal transcribed spacer (ITS and two chloroplast loci, rbcL and matK, and two non-coding loci, trnH-psbA and trnL-F. In total, 198 individuals from 98 accessions representing 18 Melilotus species were sequenced for these five potential barcodes. Based on inter-specific divergence, we analysed sequences and confirmed that each candidate barcode was able to identify some of the 18 species. The resolution of a single barcode and its combinations ranged from 33.33% to 88.89%. Analysis of pairwise distances showed that matK+rbcL+trnL-F+trnH-psbA+ITS (MRTPI had the greatest value and rbcL the least. Barcode gap values and similarity value analyses confirmed these trends. The results indicated that an ITS region, successfully identifying 13 of 18 species, was the most appropriate single barcode and that the combination of all five potential barcodes identified 16 of the 18 species. We conclude that MRTPI is the most effective tool for Melilotus species identification. Taking full advantage of the barcode system, a clear taxonomic relationship can be applied to identify Melilotus species and enhance their practical production.

  11. Scintillation of lead tungstate crystal studied with single-electron beam from KUFEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizwan, Mohamad, E-mail: rizwan@nucl.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Uozumi, Yusuke; Matsuo, Kazuki [Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Ohgaki, Hideaki; Kii, Toshiteru; Zen, Heishun [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Tsamalaidze, Zviadi; Evtoukhovitch, Petr; Valentin, Samoilov [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, JINR, Joliot-Curie Str.6, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-29

    Lead tungstate (PWO) crystal has a very fast response, high atomic density and high radiation hardness. Therefore, they are suitable to be used for high-energy nuclear data measurements under high-background circumstances. Although a good electron-ion separation with a pulse shape analysis technique is essential, scintillation pulse shapes have not been observed with electron beams of a wide energy range. A single-electron beam technique has been developed at Kyoto University Free Electron Laser (KUFEL), and electron beams of 4-38 MeV are available. During the experiments, single electron beams bombarded a PWO crystal. By using oscilloscope we observed scintillation pulses of a PWO crystal coupled with a photomultiplier tube. Measured spectra were compared with the simulation code of EGS5 to analyze scattering effects. As the result, the pulse amplitudes show good linearity and the pulse shapes are almost constant in the observed energy range.

  12. The Bifurcation and Control of a Single-Species Fish Population Logistic Model with the Invasion of Alien Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to study systematically the bifurcation and control of a single-species fish population logistic model with the invasion of alien species based on the theory of singular system and bifurcation. It regards Spartina anglica as an invasive species, which invades the fisheries and aquaculture. Firstly, the stabilities of equilibria in this model are discussed. Moreover, the sufficient conditions for existence of the trans-critical bifurcation and the singularity induced bifurcation are obtained. Secondly, the state feedback controller is designed to eliminate the unexpected singularity induced bifurcation by combining harvested effort with the purification capacity. It obviously inhibits the switch of population and makes the system stable. Finally, the numerical simulation is proposed to show the practical significance of the bifurcation and control from the biological point of view.

  13. The single electron chemistry of coals. [Quarterly] report, January 1, 1991--March 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, J.W.; Flowers, R.A. II

    1991-04-22

    The simplest explanation for these shifts in the infrared spectra is there exists in coal single electron donors which are capable of transferring an electron to TCNQ in the ground state. All of the TCNQ placed in the coal appears to be converted to the radical anion as displayed in the IR spectrum for all of the coals except for the 100% loading.

  14. Evidence for Single Metal Two Electron Oxidative Addition and Reductive Elimination at Uranium

    OpenAIRE

    Gardner, Benedict M; Kefalidis, Christos E; Lu, Erli; Patel, Dipti; Mcinnes, Eric; Tuna, Floriana; Wooles, Ashley; Maron, Laurent; Liddle, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Reversible single-metal two-electron oxidative addition and reductive elimination are common fundamental reactions for transition metals that underpin major catalytic transformations. However, these reactions have never been observed together in the f-block because these metals exhibit irreversible one- or multi-electron oxidation or reduction reactions. Here, we report that azobenzene oxidises sterically and electronically unsaturated uranium(III) complexes to afford a uranium(V)-imido compl...

  15. Momentum spectra for single and double electron ionization of He in relativistic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, C.J.; Olson, R.E.

    1997-08-01

    The complete momentum spectra for single and double ionization of He by 1GeV/u (β=0.88) U 92+ have been investigated using a classical trajectory Monte Carlo method corrected for the relativistic projectile. The 1/r 12 electron-electron interaction has been included in the post-collision region for double ionization to incorporate the effects of both the nuclear-electron and electron-electron ionizing interactions, and to access the effects of electron correlation in the electron spectra. Experimental measurements were able to determine the longitudinal momentum spectra for single ionization; these observations are in accordance with the theoretical predictions for the three-body momentum balance between projectile, recoil ion, and ionized electron. In particular, the Lorentz contraction of the Coulomb interaction of the projectile manifests itself in the decrease of the post-collision interaction of the projectile with the electron and recoil ion, causing them to recoil back-to-back as in the case for a short electromagnetic pulse. This feature is clearly displayed in both the theoretical and experimental longitudinal momentum spectra, and by comparing to calculations that are performed at the same collision speed but do not include the relativistic potentials. Moreover, collision plane spectra of the three particles demonstrate that the momenta of the recoil ion and ionized electron are preferentially equal, and opposite, to each other. The electron spectra for double ionization show that the inclusion of the electron-electron interaction in the post-collision regime partitions the combined ionization momentum of the electrons so that the electrons are preferentially emitted in opposite azimuthal angles to one another. This is in contrast to calculations made assuming independent electrons. (orig.)

  16. Electron transfer and redox metalloenzyme catalysis at the single-molecule level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Glargaard; Zhang, Jingdong; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2004-01-01

    Voltammetry based on single-crystal, atomically-planar metal electrodes is novel in bioelectrochemistry. Together with in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) directly in aqueous buffer, single-crystal voltammetry has disclosed new detail in molecular adsorption and interfacial electron trans...

  17. Single-electron transfer living radical copolymerization of SWCNT-g-PMMA via graft from approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jaisankar, S. N.; Haridharan, N.; Murali, A.; Ponyrko, Sergii; Špírková, Milena; Mandal, A. B.; Matějka, Libor

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 13 (2014), s. 2959-2966 ISSN 0032-3861 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/12/1459 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : single electron transfer * single-walled carbon nanotubes * controlled radical polymerization Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.562, year: 2014

  18. Conformational analysis of single perfluoroalkyl chains by single-molecule real-time transmission electron microscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harano, Koji; Takenaga, Shinya; Okada, Satoshi; Niimi, Yoshiko; Yoshikai, Naohiko; Isobe, Hiroyuki; Suenaga, Kazu; Kataura, Hiromichi; Koshino, Masanori; Nakamura, Eiichi

    2014-01-08

    Whereas a statistical average of molecular ensembles has been the conventional source of information on molecular structures, atomic resolution movies of single organic molecules obtained by single-molecule real-time transmission electron microscopy have recently emerged as a new tool to study the time evolution of the structures of individual molecules. The present work describes a proof-of-principle study of the determination of the conformation of each C-C bond in single perfluoroalkyl fullerene molecules encapsulated in a single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) as well as those attached to the outer surface of a carbon nanohorn (CNH). Analysis of 82 individual molecules in CNTs under a 120 kV electron beam indicated that 6% of the CF2-CF2 bonds and about 20% of the CH2-CH2 bonds in the corresponding hydrocarbon analogue are in the gauche conformation. This comparison qualitatively matches the known conformational data based on time- and molecular-average as determined for ensembles. The transmission electron microscopy images also showed that the molecules entered the CNTs predominantly in one orientation. The molecules attached on a CNH surface moved more freely and exhibited more diverse conformation than those in a CNT, suggesting the potential applicability of this method for the determination of the dynamic shape of flexible molecules and of detailed conformations. We observed little sign of any decomposition of the specimen molecules, at least up to 10(7) e·nm(-2) (electrons/nm(2)) at 120 kV acceleration voltage. Decomposition of CNHs under irradiation with a 300 kV electron beam was suppressed by cooling to 77 K, suggesting that the decomposition is a chemical process. Several lines of evidence suggest that the graphitic substrate and the attached molecules are very cold.

  19. Electronic Coupling Dependence of Ultrafast Interfacial Electron Transfer on Nanocrystalline Thin Films and Single Crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian, Tianquan

    2014-04-22

    The long-term goal of the proposed research is to understand electron transfer dynamics in nanoparticle/liquid interface. This knowledge is essential to many semiconductor nanoparticle based devices, including photocatalytic waste degradation and dye sensitized solar cells.

  20. Effects of breathing and oblong mode phonons on transport properties in a single-electron transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiguchi, Norihiko; Wybourne, Martin N

    2010-02-17

    We investigate theoretically the transport characteristics of a single-electron transistor affected by the dynamic deformation of the device configuration due to phonons. By considering changes in capacitances and tunnel resistances caused by the breathing and oblong vibrations of the island that forms part of the transistor, we formulate the electron-phonon interaction peculiar to the device and derive its transport properties by means of the master equation. For a single electron transistor with a gold nanoparticle island of radius 1 nm, we demonstrate the contribution to the transport properties that originates from tunneling channels associated with THz phonon emission and absorption.

  1. Electronic spectrum of a deterministic single-donor device in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuechsle, Martin; Miwa, Jill A.; Mahapatra, Suddhasatta; Simmons, Michelle Y.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.

    2013-01-01

    We report the fabrication of a single-electron transistor (SET) based on an individual phosphorus dopant that is deterministically positioned between the dopant-based electrodes of a transport device in silicon. Electronic characterization at mK-temperatures reveals a charging energy that is very similar to the value expected for isolated P donors in a bulk Si environment. Furthermore, we find indications for bulk-like one-electron excited states in the co-tunneling spectrum of the device, in sharp contrast to previous reports on transport through single dopants

  2. Single-reviewer electronic phenotyping validation in operational settings: Comparison of strategies and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukhareva, Polina; Staes, Catherine; Noonan, Kevin W; Mueller, Heather L; Warner, Phillip; Shields, David E; Weeks, Howard; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2017-02-01

    Develop evidence-based recommendations for single-reviewer validation of electronic phenotyping results in operational settings. We conducted a randomized controlled study to evaluate whether electronic phenotyping results should be used to support manual chart review during single-reviewer electronic phenotyping validation (N=3104). We evaluated the accuracy, duration and cost of manual chart review with and without the availability of electronic phenotyping results, including relevant patient-specific details. The cost of identification of an erroneous electronic phenotyping result was calculated based on the personnel time required for the initial chart review and subsequent adjudication of discrepancies between manual chart review results and electronic phenotype determinations. Providing electronic phenotyping results (vs not providing those results) was associated with improved overall accuracy of manual chart review (98.90% vs 92.46%, preview duration per test case (62.43 vs 76.78s, preview and electronic phenotyping results was higher when the phenotyping results were provided (Cohen's kappa 0.98 vs 0.88, previewer chart review of electronic phenotyping can be conducted more accurately, quickly, and at lower cost when supported by electronic phenotyping results. However, human reviewers tend to agree with electronic phenotyping results even when those results are wrong. Thus, the value of providing electronic phenotyping results depends on the accuracy of the underlying electronic phenotyping algorithm. We recommend using a mix of phenotyping validation strategies, with the balance of strategies based on the anticipated electronic phenotyping error rate, the tolerance for missed electronic phenotyping errors, as well as the expertise, cost, and availability of personnel involved in chart review and discrepancy adjudication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Single-electron switching effect in graphene parallel-coupled double quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, M.; Masubuchi, S.; Machida, T.

    2011-12-01

    We have fabricated parallel-coupled quantum dots on single-layer graphene. The tunnel coupling between the quantum dots can be tuned by a graphene in-plane gate. Owing to the tunnel coupling, the Coulomb blockade oscillation peaks exhibit periodic shifts as the number of electron in the non-conducting side-coupled QD is changed. The result suggests the observation of the single electron switching effect, which is a prerequisite for a single photon detection scheme using parallel-coupled quantum dots.

  4. GAGG:ce single crystalline films: New perspective scintillators for electron detection in SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Jan; Lalinský, Ondřej; Hanuš, Martin; Onderišinová, Zuzana; Kelar, Jakub; Kučera, Miroslav

    2016-04-01

    Single crystal scintillators are frequently used for electron detection in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We report gadolinium aluminum gallium garnet (GAGG:Ce) single crystalline films as a new perspective scintillators for the SEM. For the first time, the epitaxial garnet films were used in a practical application: the GAGG:Ce scintillator was incorporated into a SEM scintillation electron detector and it showed improved image quality. In order to prove the GAGG:Ce quality accurately, the scintillation properties were examined using electron beam excitation and compared with frequently used scintillators in the SEM. The results demonstrate excellent emission efficiency of the GAGG:Ce single crystalline films together with their very fast scintillation decay useful for demanding SEM applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Quantum fluctuations and coherence in high-precision single-electron capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashcheyevs, Vyacheslavs; Timoshenko, Janis

    2012-11-21

    The phase of a single quantum state is undefined unless the history of its creation provides a reference point. Thus, quantum interference may seem hardly relevant for the design of deterministic single-electron sources which strive to isolate individual charge carriers quickly and completely. We provide a counterexample by analyzing the nonadiabatic separation of a localized quantum state from a Fermi sea due to a closing tunnel barrier. We identify the relevant energy scales and suggest ways to separate the contributions of quantum nonadiabatic excitation and back tunneling to the rare noncapture events. In the optimal regime of balanced decay and nonadiabaticity, our simple electron trap turns into a single-lead Landau-Zener back tunneling interferometer, revealing the dynamical phase accumulated between the particle capture and leakage. The predicted "quantum beats in back tunneling" may turn the error of a single-electron source into a valuable signal revealing essentially nonadiabatic energy scales of a dynamic quantum dot.

  6. Low Po2 conditions induce reactive oxygen species formation during contractions in single skeletal muscle fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Zuo, Li; Shiah, Amy; Roberts, William J.; Chien, Michael T.; Wagner, Peter D.; Hogan, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Contractions in whole skeletal muscle during hypoxia are known to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS); however, identification of real-time ROS formation within isolated single skeletal muscle fibers has been challenging. Consequently, there is no convincing evidence showing increased ROS production in intact contracting fibers under low Po2 conditions. Therefore, we hypothesized that intracellular ROS generation in single contracting skeletal myofibers increases during low Po2 compared wi...

  7. The electronic fine structure of 4-nitrophenyl functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Amit K; Coleman, Karl S; Dhanak, Vinod R

    2009-01-01

    Controlling the electronic structure of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is of great importance to various CNT based applications. Herein the electronic fine structure of single-walled carbon nanotube films modified with 4-nitrophenyl groups, produced following reaction with 4-nitrobenzenediazonium tetrafluoroborate, was investigated for the first time. Various techniques such as x-ray and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy, and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure studies were used to explore the electronic structure, and the results were compared with the measured electrical resistances. A reduction in number of the π electronic states in the valence band consistent with the increased resistance of the functionalized nanotube films was observed.

  8. Dissolution chemistry and biocompatibility of single-crystalline silicon nanomembranes and associated materials for transient electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Suk-Won; Park, Gayoung; Edwards, Chris; Corbin, Elise A; Kang, Seung-Kyun; Cheng, Huanyu; Song, Jun-Kyul; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Yu, Sooyoun; Ng, Joanne; Lee, Jung Eun; Kim, Jiyoung; Yee, Cassian; Bhaduri, Basanta; Su, Yewang; Omennetto, Fiorenzo G; Huang, Yonggang; Bashir, Rashid; Goddard, Lynford; Popescu, Gabriel; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Rogers, John A

    2014-06-24

    Single-crystalline silicon nanomembranes (Si NMs) represent a critically important class of material for high-performance forms of electronics that are capable of complete, controlled dissolution when immersed in water and/or biofluids, sometimes referred to as a type of "transient" electronics. The results reported here include the kinetics of hydrolysis of Si NMs in biofluids and various aqueous solutions through a range of relevant pH values, ionic concentrations and temperatures, and dependence on dopant types and concentrations. In vitro and in vivo investigations of Si NMs and other transient electronic materials demonstrate biocompatibility and bioresorption, thereby suggesting potential for envisioned applications in active, biodegradable electronic implants.

  9. Observation of negative differential resistance and single-electron tunneling in electromigrated break junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Yutaka; Ueda, Rieko; Kubota, Tohru; Kamikado, Toshiya; Yokoyama, Shiyoshi; Nagase, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    We observed a negative differential resistance (NDR) along with single-electron tunneling (SET) in the electron transport of electromigrated break junctions with metal-free tetraphenylporphyrin (H 2 BSTBPP) at a temperature of 11 K. The NDR strongly depended on the applied gate voltages, and appeared only in the electron tunneling region of the Coulomb diamond. We could explain the mechanism of this new type of electron transport by a model assuming a molecular Coulomb island and local density of states of the source and the drain electrodes

  10. Energy loss of the electron system in individual single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santavicca, Daniel F; Chudow, Joel D; Prober, Daniel E; Purewal, Meninder S; Kim, Philip

    2010-11-10

    We characterize the energy loss of the nonequilibrium electron system in individual metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes at low temperature. Using Johnson noise thermometry, we demonstrate that, for a nanotube with Ohmic contacts, the dc resistance at finite bias current directly reflects the average electron temperature. This enables a straightforward determination of the thermal conductance associated with cooling of the nanotube electron system. In analyzing the temperature- and length-dependence of the thermal conductance, we consider contributions from acoustic phonon emission, optical phonon emission, and hot electron outdiffusion.

  11. Single-cell analysis of uncultured magnetotactic bacteria via fluorescence-coupled electron microscopy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    LI, J.; Zhang, H.; Liu, P.; Menguy, N.; Pan, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are phylogenetically diverse and can biomineralize magnetic nanocrystals of magnetite or greigite in intracellular structures termed magnetosomes. Their remains within sediments or sedimentary rocks, i.e. magnetofossils, have been used to retrieve paleomagnetic and paleoenvironmental information of deposition time, as well as to trace the origin and evolution of life on Earth and even perhaps Mars. A precise identification of magnetofossils heavily depends on our knowledge of phylogenetic diversity and magnetosomal biomineralization within natural MTB. In this paper, we will present a novel method which can rapidly characterize both the phylogenetic and biomineralogical properties of uncultured MTB at the single-cell level by coupling fluorescence and electron microscopy. Using this method, we have successfully identified several uncultured MTB strains from natural environments in China. These MTB are phylogenetically affiliated with the Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Nitrospirae phylum, and form octahedral, cuboctahedral, prismatic, tooth-like and bullet-shaped magnetite magnetosomes. A corresponding analysis of magnetosome morphology and bacterial phylogenetics on each MTB strain has shown a species/strain-specific magnetosome biomineralization. The new method is not only promising for better understanding the correlation between magnetosome mineral habits and MTB phylogenies, but also crucial for unambiguously identifying magnetofossils.

  12. Electron spin resonance of X-irradiated single crystal of calcium tartrate tetrahydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korkmaz, M.

    1977-01-01

    The electron spin resonance spectra of an irradiated single crystal of calcium tartrate tetrahydrate grown from silica gel have been investigated. Only one species of free radical was observed at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. The free radical was found to be the result of the splitting of a C-H bond adjacent to both the hydroxyl and carboxyl groups. For some orientations of the crystal in the external magnetic field two unresolved doublets, due to two noequivalent protons, was observed. The g factor was found to be almost isotropic, with a value of 2.0032 +- 0.0005. Couplings with two H nuclei are believed to be the result of the proton of the hydroxyl group attached directly to the unsaturated asymmetric carbon atom and of the proton attached directly to the other asymmetric carbon atom of the molecule. The principal elements of the nuclear coupling of these protons are 5.8, 7.9, 3.7 and 6.8, 7.0, 17.3 G respectively. The radical was found to be very stable, the ESR pattern being undiminished for more than half a year after the irradiation. (author)

  13. Scanning electron microscopy of male terminalia and its application to species recognition and phylogenetic reconstruction in the Drosophila saltans group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Tiago Alves Jorge; Noll, Fernando Barbosa; Bicudo, Hermione Elly Melara de Campos; Madi-Ravazzi, Lilian

    2014-01-01

    The Drosophila saltans group consists of five subgroups and 21 species, most of which have been identified only by morphological aspects of the male terminalia revealed by drawings using a camera lucida and a bright-field microscope. However, several species in the group, mainly those included in the saltans subgroup, are difficult to differentiate using only these characteristics. In this study, we used scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to analyze 19 structures of the male terminalia in 10 species from the five saltans subgroups. Among these structures, nine could be identified only through SEM analysis. We aimed to find other characteristics useful for morphological recognition of these species and to use these characteristics for phylogenetic reconstruction. These morphological differences enabled us to effectively distinguish among sibling species. These findings confirmed the monophyly of this group as previously determined in evolutionary studies based on other markers. The single most parsimonious tree (CI = 87 and RI = 90) indicated that the cordata subgroup is the most basal lineage and the saltans subgroup is the most apical lineage, as shown in earlier studies based on morphological data. However, our findings differed somewhat from these studies with respect to the phylogenetic relationships of species in the saltans group indicating that this group is still a puzzle that remains to be deciphered.

  14. Electronic state selectivity in dication-molecule single electron transfer reactions: NO+ + NO

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Parkes, M. A.; Lockyear, J. F.; Schröder, Detlef; Roithová, J.; Price, S. D.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 41 (2011), s. 18386-18392 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/1223 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : coincidence experiments * dications * electron transfer * energy partitioning * state selectivity Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.573, year: 2011

  15. Exploring Electronic Structure and Order in Polymers via Single-Particle Microresonator Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, Erik H; Rea, Morgan T; Heylman, Kevin D; Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, David; Saikin, Semion K; Thompson, Blaise J; Kohler, Daniel D; Knapper, Kassandra A; Wei, Wei; Pan, Feng; Gopalan, Padma; Wright, John C; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Goldsmith, Randall H

    2018-02-08

    PSS, a transparent electrically conductive polymer, finds widespread use in electronic devices. While empirical efforts have increased conductivity, a detailed understanding of the coupled electronic and morphological landscapes in PEDOT:PSS has lagged due to substantial structural heterogeneity on multiple length-scales. We use an optical microresonator-based absorption spectrometer to perform single-particle measurements, providing a bottom-up examination of electronic structure and morphology ranging from single PEDOT:PSS polymers to nascent films. Using single-particle spectroscopy with complementary theoretical calculations and ultrafast spectroscopy, we demonstrate that PEDOT:PSS displays bulk-like optical response even in single polymers. We find highly ordered PEDOT assemblies with long-range ordering mediated by the insulating PSS matrix and reveal a preferential surface orientation of PEDOT nanocrystallites absent in bulk films with implications for interfacial electronic communication. Our single-particle perspective provides a unique window into the microscopic structure and electronic properties of PEDOT:PSS.

  16. An Investigative Alternative to Single-Species Dissection in the Introductory Biology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Joel L.

    2010-01-01

    Dissections of single species (e.g., fetal pig) are a common student learning activity in introductory biology courses. Such dissections demonstrate location of anatomical parts and provide dissection practice but provide less opportunity for student critical thinking, numeracy and demonstration of the scientific method. A comparative anatomy lab…

  17. Cover crops in mixtures do not use water differently than single-species plantings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some recent statements have been made about the benefits of growing cover crops in mixtures as compared with single-species plantings of cover crops. One of those stated benefits is greatly reduced water use by cover crops grown in mixtures. The objectives of this study were to characterize soil wat...

  18. Quantum electron-acoustic double layers in two electron species quantum plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, Om Prakash

    2009-01-01

    The existence and the characteristic properties of electron-acoustic double layers are investigated in three component unmagnetized dense quantum plasmas consisting of stationary background ions and two electron populations: one "cold" and the other "hot." Using the one-dimensional quantum hydrodynamic model and the reductive perturbation technique, a generalized form of nonlinear quantum Korteweg-de Vries equation governing the dynamics of weak electron acoustic double layers is derived. A stationary solution of this equation is obtained to discuss the existence criteria of different types of double layers and their characteristic properties. It is shown that two types of compressive double layers: one in the lower δ-parameter region and the other at the higher δ-parameter region, along with rarefactive double layers in the intermediate region, may exist, where δ =nec0/neh0 is the ratio of unperturbed cold to hot electron densities. The width, the amplitude, and the velocity of these double layers are significantly affected by the δ-parameter. The relevance of the present investigation is also discussed.

  19. Single atom image observation by means of scanning transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komoda, Tsutomu; Todokoro, Hideo; Nomura, Setsuo

    1977-01-01

    In a scanning transmission electron microscope, electrons emitted from the ion source are finely focused to a spot on a specimen, and scanned with the deflection coil. The electrons transmitted through the specimen are detected by the scintillate, and converted to image signals with the photomultiplier, and the image is obtained on the cathode ray tube. The Hitachi scanning transmission electron microscope employs a field emission type electron gun, thus it can focus the electron beam to 0.3 nm diameter. In the microscope, elastically scattered electrons are captured by a doughnut shaped detector, while the electrons transmitted through the specimen without colliding with atoms and the non-elastically scattered electrons which has lost a part of their energy due to the ionization or excitation of atoms are detected by the energy analyzer installed at the bottom of the microscope. Though single atom image observation requires the fixation of the atoms to be marked on a support, the problem is how to discriminate the aimed atoms from the atoms of the support. The most sensitive method is the dark-field method which uses the difference of elastically scattered electron intensity as the signal. Thorium and iodine atom images have been successfully observed as the trials to prove the feasibility of observation of heavy atoms with the scanning transmission electron microscope. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  20. Conservation of avian diversity in the Sierra Nevada: moving beyond a single-species management focus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M White

    greater benefit to ecosystem functioning then a single-species management focus.

  1. Conservation of avian diversity in the Sierra Nevada: moving beyond a single-species management focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Angela M; Zipkin, Elise F; Manley, Patricia N; Schlesinger, Matthew D

    2013-01-01

    ecosystem functioning then a single-species management focus.

  2. Electrical Initialization of Electron and Nuclear Spins in a Single Quantum Dot at Zero Magnetic Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadiz, Fabian; Djeffal, Abdelhak; Lagarde, Delphine; Balocchi, Andrea; Tao, Bingshan; Xu, Bo; Liang, Shiheng; Stoffel, Mathieu; Devaux, Xavier; Jaffres, Henri; George, Jean-Marie; Hehn, Michel; Mangin, Stephane; Carrere, Helene; Marie, Xavier; Amand, Thierry; Han, Xiufeng; Wang, Zhanguo; Urbaszek, Bernhard; Lu, Yuan; Renucci, Pierre

    2018-04-11

    The emission of circularly polarized light from a single quantum dot relies on the injection of carriers with well-defined spin polarization. Here we demonstrate single dot electroluminescence (EL) with a circular polarization degree up to 35% at zero applied magnetic field. The injection of spin-polarized electrons is achieved by combining ultrathin CoFeB electrodes on top of a spin-LED device with p-type InGaAs quantum dots in the active region. We measure an Overhauser shift of several microelectronvolts at zero magnetic field for the positively charged exciton (trion X + ) EL emission, which changes sign as we reverse the injected electron spin orientation. This is a signature of dynamic polarization of the nuclear spins in the quantum dot induced by the hyperfine interaction with the electrically injected electron spin. This study paves the way for electrical control of nuclear spin polarization in a single quantum dot without any external magnetic field.

  3. Single-electron pulse-height spectra in thin-gap parallel-plate chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Fonte, Paulo J R; Peskov, Vladimir; Policarpo, Armando

    1999-01-01

    Single-electron pulse-height spectra were measured in 0.6 and 1.2 mm parallel-plate chambers developed for the TOF system of the ALICE /LHC-HI experiment. Mixtures of Ar with ethane, isobutane, and SF/sub 6/ were studied. The observed spectrum shows a clear peak for all gases, suggesting efficient single-electron detection in thin parallel-plate structures. The pulse-height spectrum can be described by the weighted sum of an exponential and a Polya distribution, the Polya contribution becoming more important at higher gains. Additionally, it was found that the maximum gain, above 10/sup 6/, is limited by the appearance of streamers and depends weakly on the gas composition. The suitability of each mixture for single-electron detection is also quantitatively assessed. (8 refs).

  4. Digital processing with single electrons for arbitrary waveform generation of current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Yuma; Nakamura, Shuji; Onomitsu, Koji; Kaneko, Nobu-Hisa

    2018-03-01

    We demonstrate arbitrary waveform generation of current using a GaAs-based single-electron pump. In our experiment, a digital processing algorithm known as delta–sigma modulation is incorporated into single-electron pumping to generate a density-modulated single-electron stream, by which we demonstrate the generation of arbitrary waveforms of current including sinusoidal, square, and triangular waves with a peak-to-peak amplitude of approximately 10 pA and an output bandwidth ranging from dc to close to 1 MHz. The developed current generator can be used as the precise and calculable current reference required for measurements of current noise in low-temperature experiments.

  5. DNA-Based Single-Molecule Electronics: From Concept to Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Beyond being the repository of genetic information, DNA is playing an increasingly important role as a building block for molecular electronics. Its inherent structural and molecular recognition properties render it a leading candidate for molecular electronics applications. The structural stability, diversity and programmability of DNA provide overwhelming freedom for the design and fabrication of molecular-scale devices. In the past two decades DNA has therefore attracted inordinate amounts of attention in molecular electronics. This review gives a brief survey of recent experimental progress in DNA-based single-molecule electronics with special focus on single-molecule conductance and I–V characteristics of individual DNA molecules. Existing challenges and exciting future opportunities are also discussed. PMID:29342091

  6. Strong-coupling behaviour of two t - J chains with interchain single-electron hopping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guangming; Feng Shiping; Yu Lu.

    1994-01-01

    Using the fermion-spin transformation to implement spin-charge separation of constrained electrons, a model of two t - J chains with interchain single-electron hopping is studied by abelian bosonization. After spin-charge decoupling the charge dynamics can be trivially solved, while the spin dynamics is determined by a strong-coupling fixed point where the correlation functions can be calculated explicitly. This is a generalization of the Luther-Emery line for two-coupled t - J chains. The interchain single-electron hopping changes the asymptotic behaviour of the interchain spin-spin correlation functions and the electron Green function, but their exponents are independent of the coupling strength. (author). 25 refs

  7. EPR and DNP Properties of Certain Novel Single Electron Contrast Agents Intended for Oximetric Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ardenkjær-Larsen, J. H.; Laursen, I; Leunbach, I.

    1998-01-01

    Parameters of relevance to oximetry with Overhauser magnetic resonance imaging (OMRI) have been measured for three single electron contrast agents of the triphenylmethyl type. The single electron contrast agents are stable and water soluble. Magnetic resonance properties of the agents have been...... examined with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 9.5 mT in water, isotonic saline, plasma, and blood at 23 and 37°C. The relaxivities of the agents are about 0.2–0.4 mM−1s−1and the DNP enhancements extrapolate close...... than 1 μT in water at room temperature. The longitudinal electron spin relaxation rate is calculated from the DNP enhancement curves. The oxygen broadening in water is about 50 μT/mM O2at 37°C. These agents have good properties for oximetry with OMRI....

  8. In-vitro activity of taurolidine on single species and a multispecies population associated with periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollinger, Lilly; Schnyder, Simone; Nietzsche, Sandor; Sculean, Anton; Eick, Sigrun

    2015-04-01

    The antimicrobial activity of taurolidine was compared with minocycline against microbial species associated with periodontitis (four single strains and a 12-species mixture). Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs), killing as well as activities on established and forming single-species biofilms and a 12-species biofilm were determined. The MICs of taurolidine against single species were always 0.31 mg/ml, the MBCs were 0.64 mg/ml. The used mixed microbiota was less sensitive to taurolidine, MIC and the MBC was 2.5 mg/ml. The strains and the mixture were completely killed by 2.5 mg/ml taurolidine, whereas 256 μg/ml minocycline reduced the bacterial counts of the mixture by 5 log10 colony forming units (cfu). Coating the surface with 10 mg/ml taurolidine or 256 μg/ml minocycline prevented completely biofilm formation of Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 but not of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Y4 and the mixture. On 4.5 d old biofilms, taurolidine acted concentration dependent with a reduction by 5 log10 cfu (P. gingivalis ATCC 33277) and 7 log10 cfu (A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4) when applying 10 mg/ml. Minocycline decreased the cfu counts by 1-2 log10 cfu independent of the used concentration. The reduction of the cfu counts in the 4.5 d old multi-species biofilms was about 3 log10 cfu after application of any minocycline concentration and after using 10 mg/ml taurolidine. Taurolidine is active against species associated with periodontitis, even within biofilms. Nevertheless a complete elimination of complex biofilms by taurolidine seems to be impossible and underlines the importance of a mechanical removal of biofilms prior to application of taurolidine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Current status of free radicals and electronically excited metastable species as high energy propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, G.

    1973-01-01

    A survey is presented of free radicals and electronically excited metastable species as high energy propellants for rocket engines. Nascent or atomic forms of diatomic gases are considered free radicals as well as the highly reactive diatomic triatomic molecules that posess unpaired electrons. Manufacturing and storage problems are described, and a review of current experimental work related to the manufacture of atomic hydrogen propellants is presented.

  10. Readout of a single electron spin in a double quantum dot using a quantum point contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jianping; Ouyang Shihua; You, J Q; Lam, C.-H.

    2008-01-01

    We study the dynamics of a single electron spin in a double quantum dot (DQD) and its readout via a quantum point contact (QPC). We model the system microscopically and derive rate equations for the reduced electron density matrix of the DQD. Two cases with one and two electrons in the DQD are studied. In the one-electron case, with different Zeeman splittings in the two dots, the electron spin states are distinctly characterized by a constant and an oscillatory current through the QPC. In the two-electron case, the readout of the spin state of the electron in one of the dots called the qubit dot is essentially similar after considering hyperfine interactions between the electrons and the nuclear spins of the host materials and a uniform magnetic field applied to the DQD. Moreover, to ensure that an electron is properly injected into the qubit dot, we propose to determine the success of the electron injection from the variations of the QPC current after applying an oscillating magnetic field to the qubit dot

  11. Different quantization mechanisms in single-electron pumps driven by surface acoustic waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utko, P.; Gloos, K.; Hansen, Jørn Bindslev

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the acoustoelectric current in single-electron pumps driven by surface acoustic waves. We have found that in certain parameter ranges two different sets of quantized steps dominate the acoustoelectric current versus gate-voltage characteristics. In some cases, both types of quanti......We have studied the acoustoelectric current in single-electron pumps driven by surface acoustic waves. We have found that in certain parameter ranges two different sets of quantized steps dominate the acoustoelectric current versus gate-voltage characteristics. In some cases, both types...

  12. Differential cross sections for single-electron capture in He{sup 2+}-D collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, D.; Dagnac, R. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 31 - Toulouse (France)]|[Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France)

    1995-06-14

    A translational energy spectroscopy technique was used to study single-electron capture into the He{sup +} (n = 2) and He{sup +} (n 3) states in He{sup 2+}-D collisions. Differential cross sections were determined at 4, 6 and 8 keV in the angular range 5`-1{sup o}30` (laboratory frame). As expected, single-electron capture into the n = 2 state was found to be the dominant process; total cross sections for capture into the He{sup +} (n = 3) state were compared to other experimental and theoretical results. (author).

  13. Electron transfer behaviour of biological macromolecules towards the single-molecule level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Grubb, Mikala; Hansen, Allan Glargaard

    2003-01-01

    is combined with state-of-the-art physical electrochemistry with emphasis on single-crystal, atomically planar electrode surfaces, in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and other surface techniques. These approaches have brought bioelectrochemistry important steps forward towards the nanoscale...... and single-molecule levels.We discuss here these advances with reference to two specific redox metalloproteins, the blue single-copper protein Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin and the single-haem protein Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cytochrome c, and a short oligonucleotide. Both proteins can be immobilized...... electron transfer (ET) function retained. In situ STM can also address the microscopic mechanisms for electron tunnelling through the biomolecules and offers novel notions such as coherent multi-ET between the substrate and tip via the molecular redox levels. This differs in important respects from...

  14. Impact of Anthropogenic Noise on Aquatic Animals: From Single Species to Community-Level Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabet, Saeed Shafiei; Neo, Yik Yaw; Slabbekoorn, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise underwater is on the rise and may affect aquatic animals of marine and freshwater ecosystems. Many recent studies concern some sort of impact assessment of a single species. Few studies addressed the noise impact on species interactions underwater, whereas there are some studies that address community-level impact but only on land in air. Key processes such as predator-prey or competitor interactions may be affected by the masking of auditory cues, noise-related disturbance, or attentional interference. Noise-associated changes in these interactions can cause shifts in species abundance and modify communities, leading to fundamental ecosystem changes. To gain further insight into the mechanism and generality of earlier findings, we investigated the impact on both a predator and a prey species in captivity, zebrafish (Danio rerio) preying on waterfleas (Daphnia magna).

  15. Capillary Electrophoresis Single-Strand Conformational Polymorphisms as a Method to Differentiate Algal Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Jernigan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformational polymorphism (CE-SSCP was explored as a fast and inexpensive method to differentiate both prokaryotic (blue-green and eukaryotic (green and brown algae. A selection of two blue-green algae (Nostoc muscorum and Anabaena inaequalis, five green algae (Chlorella vulgaris, Oedogonium foveolatum, Mougeotia sp., Scenedesmus quadricauda, and Ulothrix fimbriata, and one brown algae (Ectocarpus sp. were examined and CE-SSCP electropherogram “fingerprints” were compared to each other for two variable regions of either the 16S or 18S rDNA gene. The electropherogram patterns were remarkably stable and consistent for each particular species. The patterns were unique to each species, although some common features were observed between the different types of algae. CE-SSCP could be a useful method for monitoring changes in an algae species over time as potential shifts in species occurred.

  16. Nanoampere charge pump by single-electron ratchet using silicon nanowire metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Akira; Nishiguchi, Katsuhiko; Ono, Yukinori

    2008-01-01

    Nanoampere single-electron pumping is presented at 20K using a single-electron ratchet comprising silicon nanowire metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors. The ratchet features an asymmetric potential with a pocket that captures single electrons from the source and ejects them to the drain. Directional single-electron transfer is achieved by applying one ac signal with the frequency up to 2.3GHz. We find anomalous shapes of current steps which can be ascribed to nonadiabatic electron capture.

  17. Impedance of the single-electron transistor at radio-frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciccarelli, C; Ferguson, A J

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally characterize the impedance of a single-electron transistor (SET) at an excitation frequency comparable to the electron tunnel rate. In contrast to usual radio-frequency-SET operations, the excitation signal is applied to the gate of the device. At zero source-drain bias, the SET displays both resistive (Sisyphus resistance) and reactive (tunnelling capacitance) components to its impedance. We study the bias dependence of the complex impedance, investigating its response as the electron tunnel rate becomes large with respect to the driving frequency. The experimental data are compared with values calculated from a master equation model.

  18. Impedance of the single-electron transistor at radio-frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarelli, C.; Ferguson, A. J.

    2011-09-01

    We experimentally characterize the impedance of a single-electron transistor (SET) at an excitation frequency comparable to the electron tunnel rate. In contrast to usual radio-frequency-SET operations, the excitation signal is applied to the gate of the device. At zero source-drain bias, the SET displays both resistive (Sisyphus resistance) and reactive (tunnelling capacitance) components to its impedance. We study the bias dependence of the complex impedance, investigating its response as the electron tunnel rate becomes large with respect to the driving frequency. The experimental data are compared with values calculated from a master equation model.

  19. Impedance of the single-electron transistor at radio-frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciccarelli, C; Ferguson, A J, E-mail: cc538@cam.ac.uk, E-mail: ajf1006@cam.ac.uk [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-15

    We experimentally characterize the impedance of a single-electron transistor (SET) at an excitation frequency comparable to the electron tunnel rate. In contrast to usual radio-frequency-SET operations, the excitation signal is applied to the gate of the device. At zero source-drain bias, the SET displays both resistive (Sisyphus resistance) and reactive (tunnelling capacitance) components to its impedance. We study the bias dependence of the complex impedance, investigating its response as the electron tunnel rate becomes large with respect to the driving frequency. The experimental data are compared with values calculated from a master equation model.

  20. The free-electron laser - Maxwell's equations driven by single-particle currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colson, W. B.; Ride, S. K.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that if single particle currents are coupled to Maxwell's equations, the resulting set of self-consistent nonlinear equations describes the evolution of the electron beam and the amplitude and phase of the free-electron-laser field. The formulation is based on the slowly varying amplitude and phase approximation, and the distinction between microscopic and macroscopic scales, which distinguishes the microscopic bunching from the macroscopic pulse propagation. The capabilities of this new theoretical approach become apparent when its predictions for the ultrashort pulse free-electron laser are compared to experimental data; the optical pulse evolution, determined simply and accurately, agrees well with observations.

  1. Electron reconstruction and calibration with single Z and W production in CMS at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Rovelli, Chiara

    2006-01-01

    The CMS experiment at the LHC is building an electromagnetic calorimeter with high performance. Preserving high reconstruction efficiency and best four momentum measurements for electrons is a necessity for optimal discovery prospects in the ZZ(*) and WW(*) Higgs boson decay channels. This is challenging in view of the material budget in front of ECAL and of the presence of a strong magnetic field. A new reconstruction strategy for electrons in CMS is described. The usage of electrons from single Z and W production for the ECAL calibration strategy is also discussed.

  2. Submolecular Electronic Mapping of Single Cysteine Molecules by in Situ Scanning Tunneling Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin; Nazmutdinov, R. R.

    2009-01-01

    based on a slab model for the metal surface. The ordered monolayer offers a platform for submolecular scale electronic mapping that is an issue of fundamental interest but remains a challenge in STM imaging science and surface chemistry. Single Cys molecules were mapped as three electronic subunits...... bulk. The correlation between physical location and electronic contrast of the adsorbed molecules was also revealed by the computational data. The present study shows that cysteine packing in the adlayer on Au(110) from the liquid environment is in contrast to that from the ultrahigh-vacuum environment...

  3. Electron requirements for carbon incorporation along a diel light cycle in three marine diatom species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelle, Jérôme; Claquin, Pascal

    2018-02-23

    Diatoms account for about 40% of primary production in highly productive ecosystems. The development of a new generation of fluorometers has made it possible to improve estimation of the electron transport rate from photosystem II, which, when coupled with the carbon incorporation rate enables estimation of the electrons required for carbon fixation. The aim of this study was to investigate the daily dynamics of these electron requirements as a function of the diel light cycle in three relevant diatom species and to apprehend if the method of estimating the electron transport rate can lead to different pictures of the dynamics. The results confirmed the species-dependent capacity for photoacclimation under increasing light levels. Despite daily variations in the photosynthetic parameters, the results of this study underline the low daily variability of the electron requirements estimated using functional absorption of the photosystem II compared to an estimation based on a specific absorption cross section of chlorophyll a. The stability of the electron requirements throughout the day would suggest it is potentially possible to estimate high-frequency primary production by using autonomous variable fluorescence measurements from ships-of-opportunity or moorings, without taking potential daily variation in this parameter into consideration, but this result has to be confirmed on natural phytoplankton assemblages. The results obtained in this study confirm the low electron requirements of diatoms to perform photosynthesis, and suggest a potential additional source of energy for carbon fixation, as recently described in the literature for this class.

  4. Photosynthesis and photosynthetic electron flow in the alpine evergreen species Quercus guyavifolia in winter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Huang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Alpine evergreen broadleaf tree species must regularly cope with low night temperatures in winter. However, the effects of low night temperatures on photosynthesis in alpine evergreen broadleaf tree species are unclear. We measured the diurnal photosynthetic parameters before and after cold snap for leaves of Quercus guyavifolia growing in its native habitat at 3290 m. On 11 and 12 December 2013 (before cold snap, stomatal and mesophyll conductances (gs and gm, CO2 assimilation rate (An, and total electron flow through PSII (JPSII at daytime were maintained at high levels. The major action of alternative electron flow was to provide extra ATP for primary metabolisms. On 20 December 2013 (after cold snap, the diurnal values of gs, gm, An and JPSII at daytime largely decreased, mainly due to the large decrease in night air temperature. Meanwhile, the ratio of photorespiration and alternative electron flow to JPSII largely increased on 20 December. Furthermore, the high levels of alternative electron flow were accompanied with low rates of extra ATP production. A quantitative limitation analysis reveals that the gm limitation increased on 20 December with decreased night air temperature. Therefore, the night air temperature was an important determinant of stomatal/mesophyll conductance and photosynthesis. When photosynthesis is inhibited following freezing night temperatures, photorespiration and alternative electron flow are important electron sinks, which support the role of photorespiration and alternative electron flow in photoportection for alpine plants under low temperatures.

  5. Molecular identification of broomrape species from a single seed by High Resolution Melting analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Rolland

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Broomrapes are holoparasitic plants spreading through seeds. Each plant produces hundreds of thousands of seeds which remain viable in the soils for decades. To limit their spread, drastic measures are being taken and the contamination of a commercial seed lot by a single broomrape seed can lead to its rejection. Considering that broomrapes species identification from a single seed is extremely difficult even for trained botanists and that among all the described species, only a few are really noxious for the crops, numerous seed lots are rejected because of the contamination by seeds of non-noxious broomrape species. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a High Resolution Melting assay identifying the eight most noxious and common broomrape species (P. aegyptiaca, O. cernua, O. crenata, O. cumana, O. foetida, O. hederae, O. minor, and P. ramosa from a single seed. Based on trnL and rbcL plastidial genes amplification, the designed assay successfully identifies O. cumana, O. cernua, O. crenata, O. minor, O. hederae, and O. foetida; P. ramosa and P. aegyptiaca can be differentiated from other species but not from each other. Tested on 50 seed lots, obtained results perfectly matched identifications performed by sequencing. Through the analysis of common seed lots by different analysts, the reproducibility of the assay was evaluated at 90 %. Despite an original sample preparation process it was not possible to extract enough DNA from some seeds (10% of the samples. The described assay fulfils its objectives and allows an accurate identification of the targeted broomrape species. It can be used to identify contaminants in commercial seed lots or for any other purpose. The assay might be extended to vegetative material.

  6. Molecular Identification of Broomrape Species from a Single Seed by High Resolution Melting Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, Mathieu; Dupuy, Aurélie; Pelleray, Aude; Delavault, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Broomrapes are holoparasitic plants spreading through seeds. Each plant produces hundreds of thousands of seeds which remain viable in the soils for decades. To limit their spread, drastic measures are being taken and the contamination of a commercial seed lot by a single broomrape seed can lead to its rejection. Considering that broomrapes species identification from a single seed is extremely difficult even for trained botanists and that among all the described species, only a few are really noxious for the crops, numerous seed lots are rejected because of the contamination by seeds of non-noxious broomrape species. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a High Resolution Melting assay identifying the eight most noxious and common broomrape species ( Phelipanche aegyptiaca , Orobanche cernua , O. crenata, O. cumana , O. foetida , O. hederae , O. minor , and P. ramosa ) from a single seed. Based on trn L and rbc L plastidial genes amplification, the designed assay successfully identifies O. cumana , O. cernua , O. crenata , O. minor , O. hederae , and O. foetida ; P. ramosa , and P. aegyptiaca can be differentiated from other species but not from each other. Tested on 50 seed lots, obtained results perfectly matched identifications performed by sequencing. Through the analysis of common seed lots by different analysts, the reproducibility of the assay was evaluated at 90%. Despite an original sample preparation process it was not possible to extract enough DNA from some seeds (10% of the samples). The described assay fulfills its objectives and allows an accurate identification of the targeted broomrape species. It can be used to identify contaminants in commercial seed lots or for any other purpose. The assay might be extended to vegetative material.

  7. Femtosecond single electron bunch generation by rotating longitudinal bunch phase space in magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J.; Kondoh, T.; Kan, K.; Kozawa, T.; Yoshida, Y.; Tagawa, S.

    2006-01-01

    A femtosecond (fs) electron bunching was observed in a photoinjector with a magnetic compressor by rotating the bunch in longitudinal phase space. The bunch length was obtained by measuring Cherenkov radiation of the electron beam with a femtosecond streak camera technique. A single electron bunch with rms bunch length of 98 fs was observed for a 32 MeV electron beam at a charge of 0.17 nC. The relative energy spread and the normalized transverse emittance of the electron beam were 0.2% and 3.8 mm-mrad, respectively. The effect of space charge on the bunch compression was investigated experimentally for charges from 0.17 to 1.25 nC. The dependences of the relative energy spread and the normalized beam transverse emittance on the bunch charge were measured

  8. Infrared single shot diagnostics for the longitudinal profile of the electron bunches at FLASH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delsim-Hashemi, Hossein

    2008-09-01

    The longitudinal profile of electron bunches plays an important role in the design of single-pass free electron lasers and future linear e + e - colliders. For the free electron laser FLASH in Hamburg, a longitudinal compression scheme is used which results in an asymmetric longitudinal bunch profile with a 'spike'. This 'spike', which has a very high peak current, is used in a high-gain SASE-FEL process to produce high intensity (about 70 μJ) femtosecond photon pulses in the XUV wavelength range. The required high peak current of the electron bunch is realized by confining a large number of electrons in a width, measured in time units, of few tens of femtosecond, making the diagnostics of such bunches a challenge. Furthermore, the operation of facilities such as FLASH shows that single-shot diagnostics is indispensable. It is intuitive to use a time domain method to measure the electron bunch length. However, when the structures present in the bunch profile fall in the femtoseconds range, this is beyond the resolution of time-resolved methods developed so far. In this thesis, a wavelength-domain technique is described that can fulfill both requirements of single shot and high resolution reaching to the femtoseconds range. The amount of charge that is confined in a typical length of several femtoseconds (FWHM of the spike) can be determined by a novel single-shot spectrometer that resolves the coherent radiation (e.g. coherent transition radiation) in the far-infrared and mid-infrared range. Furthermore the extension of this single-shot spectroscopy to shorter wavelengths reaching the near-infrared, makes it possible to investigate the presence of structures in the bunch profile that might correlate or anti-correlate to the SASE intensity. (orig.)

  9. Infrared single shot diagnostics for the longitudinal profile of the electron bunches at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delsim-Hashemi, Hossein

    2008-09-15

    The longitudinal profile of electron bunches plays an important role in the design of single-pass free electron lasers and future linear e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders. For the free electron laser FLASH in Hamburg, a longitudinal compression scheme is used which results in an asymmetric longitudinal bunch profile with a 'spike'. This 'spike', which has a very high peak current, is used in a high-gain SASE-FEL process to produce high intensity (about 70 {mu}J) femtosecond photon pulses in the XUV wavelength range. The required high peak current of the electron bunch is realized by confining a large number of electrons in a width, measured in time units, of few tens of femtosecond, making the diagnostics of such bunches a challenge. Furthermore, the operation of facilities such as FLASH shows that single-shot diagnostics is indispensable. It is intuitive to use a time domain method to measure the electron bunch length. However, when the structures present in the bunch profile fall in the femtoseconds range, this is beyond the resolution of time-resolved methods developed so far. In this thesis, a wavelength-domain technique is described that can fulfill both requirements of single shot and high resolution reaching to the femtoseconds range. The amount of charge that is confined in a typical length of several femtoseconds (FWHM of the spike) can be determined by a novel single-shot spectrometer that resolves the coherent radiation (e.g. coherent transition radiation) in the far-infrared and mid-infrared range. Furthermore the extension of this single-shot spectroscopy to shorter wavelengths reaching the near-infrared, makes it possible to investigate the presence of structures in the bunch profile that might correlate or anti-correlate to the SASE intensity. (orig.)

  10. Three-Input Single-Output Voltage-Mode Multifunction Filter with Electronic Controllability Based on Single Commercially Available IC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supachai Klungtong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a second-order voltage-mode filter with three inputs and single-output voltage using single commercially available IC, one resistor, and two capacitors. The used commercially available IC, called LT1228, is manufactured by Linear Technology Corporation. The proposed filter is based on parallel RLC circuit. The filter provides five output filter responses, namely, band-pass (BP, band-reject (BR, low-pass (LP, high-pass (HP, and all-pass (AP functions. The selection of each filter response can be done without the requirement of active and passive component matching condition. Furthermore, the natural frequency and quality factor are electronically controlled. Besides, the nonideal case is also investigated. The output voltage node exhibits low impedance. The experimental results can validate the theoretical analyses.

  11. Particularities of the recombination electron emission of single crystals of tungsten and niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashtakova, V.A.; Shishkin, B.B.

    1984-01-01

    The volt-ampere characteristics (vac) of vacuum diodes with metal single cr ystal electrodes are measured. Studied were: crystallographic plane (100) of a tungsten single crystal and (110) face of a niobium single crystal. Anomalies o n the initial portions of the vac of diodes with niobium ((110) face) electrodes are discovered. Anomalies appear at cathode temperatures t exceeding characteri stic thermoionic temperatures thetasub(the). The ''steps'' on the vac at t >thetasub(the) for tungsten are considered as voltage jumps. The ''steps'' on th e vac for niobium are considered as diode current jumps due to fluctuation processes resulting in the formation of small amount of slow electrons

  12. An ultrafast NbN hot-electron single-photon detector for electronic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipatov, A; Okunev, O; Smirnov, K; Chulkova, G; Korneev, A; Kouminov, P; Gol'tsman, G; Zhang, J; Slysz, W; Verevkin, A; Sobolewski, R

    2002-01-01

    We present the latest generation of our superconducting single-photon detector (SPD), which can work from ultraviolet to mid-infrared optical radiation wavelengths. The detector combines a high speed of operation and low jitter with high quantum efficiency (QE) and very low dark count level. The technology enhancement allows us to produce ultrathin (3.5 nm thick) structures that demonstrate QE hundreds of times better, at 1.55 μm, than previous 10 nm thick SPDs. The best, 10x10 μm 2 , SPDs demonstrate QE up to 5% at 1.55 μm and up to 11% at 0.86 μm. The intrinsic detector QE, normalized to the film absorption coefficient, reaches 100% at bias currents above 0.9 I c for photons with wavelengths shorter than 1.3 μm

  13. Probing the local environment of a single OPE3 molecule using inelastic tunneling electron spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frisenda, R.; Perrin, M.L.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.

    2015-01-01

    We study single-molecule oligo(phenylene ethynylene)dithiol junctions by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). The molecule is contacted with gold nano-electrodes formed with the mechanically controllable break junction technique. We record the IETS spectrum of the molecule from

  14. Single-active-electron potentials for molecules in intense laser fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu-Samha, Mahmoud; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2010-01-01

    Single-active-electron potentials are computed for selected molecules, and molecular wave functions with the correct asymptotic behavior are produced. Asymptotic expansion coefficients are extracted from the wave functions and used to compute alignment-dependent ionization yields from molecular t...

  15. Single-electron capture in keV Ar15+...18++He collisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoop, S.; Fischer, D.; Xue, Y.; Zapukhlyak, M.; Osborne, C. J.; Ergler, Th; Ferger, T.; Braun, J.; Brenner, G.; Bruhns, H.; Dimopoulou, C.; Epp, S. W.; Martinez, A. J. Gonzalez; Sikler, G.; Orts, R. Soria; Tawara, H.; Kirchner, T.; Lopez-Urrutia, J. R. Crespo; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.; Hoekstra, R.; Gonzales Martinez, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Single-electron capture in 14 keV q(-1) Ar15+...18++He collisions is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Partial cross sections and projectile scattering angle dependencies have been deduced from the target ion recoil momenta measured by the COLTRIMS technique. The comparison with

  16. Single particle electron microscopy in combination with mass spectrometry to investigate novel complexes of membrane proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arteni, Ana A.; Nowaczyk, Marc; Lax, Julia; Rögner, Matthias; Boekema, Egbert J.; Kouril, R.; Rogner, M.

    2005-01-01

    Large data sets of molecular projections of the membrane proteins Photosystem I and Photosystem II from cyanobacteria were analyzed by single particle electron microscopy (EM). Analysis resulted in the averaging of 2D projections from the purified complexes but also in the simultaneous detection and

  17. Current response of ac-driven nanoelectromechanical systems in single-electron tunneling regime

    OpenAIRE

    Labadze, G.; Blanter, Ya. M.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate electric current in a single-electron tunnelling device weakly coupled to an ac-driven underdamped harmonic nanomechanical oscillator. In the linear regime, the current can respond to the external frequency in a resonant as well as in an anti-resonant fashion. The main resonance is accompanied by an additional resonance at a half of the external frequency.

  18. QCD corrections to single top quark production in electron-photon interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kühn, J H; Uwer, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Single top quark production in electron-photon interactions provides a clean environment for the measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element V sub t sub b. Aiming at an experimental precision at the percent level the knowledge of radiative corrections is important. In this paper we present results for the radiative corrections in quantum chromodynamics. (orig.)

  19. Control of single-electron charging of metallic nanoparticles onto amorphous silicon surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Martin; Gmucová, Katarína; Nádazdy, Vojtech; Capek, Ignác; Satka, Alexander; Kopáni, Martin; Cirák, Július; Majková, Eva

    2008-11-01

    Sequential single-electron charging of iron oxide nanoparticles encapsulated in oleic acid/oleyl amine envelope and deposited by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique onto Pt electrode covered with undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon film is reported. Single-electron charging (so-called quantized double-layer charging) of nanoparticles is detected by cyclic voltammetry as current peaks and the charging effect can be switched on/off by the electric field in the surface region induced by the excess of negative/positive charged defect states in the amorphous silicon layer. The particular charge states in amorphous silicon are created by the simultaneous application of a suitable bias voltage and illumination before the measurement. The influence of charged states on the electric field in the surface region is evaluated by the finite element method. The single-electron charging is analyzed by the standard quantized double layer model as well as two weak-link junctions model. Both approaches are in accordance with experiment and confirm single-electron charging by tunnelling process at room temperature. This experiment illustrates the possibility of the creation of a voltage-controlled capacitor for nanotechnology.

  20. Closure of the single fluid magnetohydrodynamic equations in presence of electron cyclotron current drive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.; Pratt, J.

    2014-01-01

    In the presence of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD), the Ohm's law of single fluid magnetohydrodynamics is modified as E + v × B = η(J – J EC). This paper presents a new closure relation for the EC driven current density appearing in this modified Ohm's law. The new relation

  1. Observation and applications of single-electron charge signals in the XENON100 experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aprile, E.; et al., [Unknown; Alfonsi, M.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.

    2014-01-01

    The XENON100 dark matter experiment uses liquid xenon in a time projection chamber (TPC) to measure xenon nuclear recoils resulting from the scattering of dark matter weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). In this paper, we report the observation of single-electron charge signals which are

  2. Electron Transport through Single and Multiple Quantum Dots : The Formation of a One-Dimensional Bandstructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wees, B.J. van; Kouwenhoven, L.P.; Enden, A. van der; Harmans, C.J.P.M.

    1991-01-01

    We describe transport experiments performed on ballistic submicron devices which are defined in the two dimensional electron gas of GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures by means of metallic gates. Conductance measurements on single quantum dots reveal the formation of magnetically induced zero-dimensional

  3. Probing Electron-Induced Bond Cleavage at the Single-Molecule Level Using DNA Origami Templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Adrian Clemens; Bald, Ilko; Rotaru, Alexandru

    2012-01-01

    specifically designed oligonucleotide targets that are attached to DNA origami templates. In this way, we use a highly selective approach to compare the efficiency of the electron-induced dissociation of a single disulfide bond with the more complex cleavage of the DNA backbone within a TT dinucleotide...

  4. Spin Measurements of an Electron Bound to a Single Phosphorous Donor in Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhman, D. R.; Nguyen, K.; Tracy, L. A.; Carr, S. M.; Borchardt, J.; Bishop, N. C.; Ten Eyck, G. A.; Pluym, T.; Wendt, J.; Carroll, M. S.; Lilly, M. P.

    2014-03-01

    The spin of an electron bound to a single donor implanted in silicon is potentially useful for quantum information processing. We report on our efforts to measure and manipulate the spin of an electron bound to a single P donor in silicon. A low number of P donors are implanted using a self-aligned process into a silicon substrate in close proximity to a single-electron-transistor (SET) defined by lithographically patterned polysilicon gates. The SET is used to sense the occupancy of the electron on the donor and for spin read-out. An adjacent transmission line allows the application of microwave pulses to rotate the spin of the electron. We will present data from various experiments designed to exploit these capabilities. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. Electron transfer behaviour of biological macromolecules towards the single-molecule level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Grubb, Mikala; Hansen, Allan Glargaard

    2003-01-01

    electron transfer (ET) function retained. In situ STM can also address the microscopic mechanisms for electron tunnelling through the biomolecules and offers novel notions such as coherent multi-ET between the substrate and tip via the molecular redox levels. This differs in important respects from...... is combined with state-of-the-art physical electrochemistry with emphasis on single-crystal, atomically planar electrode surfaces, in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and other surface techniques. These approaches have brought bioelectrochemistry important steps forward towards the nanoscale...... electrochemical ET at a single metal/electrolyte interface. Similar data for a short oligonucleotide immobilized on Au(111) show that oligonucleotides can be characterized with comparable detail, with novel perspectives for addressing DNA electronic conduction mechanisms and for biological screening towards...

  6. The analysis of single-electron orbits in a free electron laser based upon a rectangular hybrid wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kordbacheh, A.; Ghahremaninezhad, Roghayeh; Maraghechi, B.

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional analysis of a novel free-electron laser (FEL) based upon a rectangular hybrid wiggler (RHW) is presented. This RHW is designed in a configuration composed of rectangular rings with alternating ferrite and dielectric spacers immersed in a solenoidal magnetic field. An analytic model of RHW is introduced by solution of Laplace's equation for the magnetostatic fields under the appropriate boundary conditions. The single-electron orbits in combined RHW and axial guide magnetic fields are studied when only the first and the third spatial harmonic components of the RHW field are taken into account and the higher order terms are ignored. The results indicate that the third spatial harmonic leads to group III orbits with a strong negative mass regime particularly in large solenoidal magnetic fields. RHW is found to be a promising candidate with favorable characteristics to be used in microwave FEL.

  7. The analysis of single-electron orbits in a free electron laser based upon a rectangular hybrid wiggler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordbacheh, A.; Ghahremaninezhad, Roghayeh; Maraghechi, B.

    2012-09-01

    A three-dimensional analysis of a novel free-electron laser (FEL) based upon a rectangular hybrid wiggler (RHW) is presented. This RHW is designed in a configuration composed of rectangular rings with alternating ferrite and dielectric spacers immersed in a solenoidal magnetic field. An analytic model of RHW is introduced by solution of Laplace's equation for the magnetostatic fields under the appropriate boundary conditions. The single-electron orbits in combined RHW and axial guide magnetic fields are studied when only the first and the third spatial harmonic components of the RHW field are taken into account and the higher order terms are ignored. The results indicate that the third spatial harmonic leads to group III orbits with a strong negative mass regime particularly in large solenoidal magnetic fields. RHW is found to be a promising candidate with favorable characteristics to be used in microwave FEL.

  8. Ancient host specificity within a single species of brood parasitic bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spottiswoode, Claire N; Stryjewski, Katherine Faust; Quader, Suhel; Colebrook-Robjent, John F R; Sorenson, Michael D

    2011-10-25

    Parasites that exploit multiple hosts often experience diversifying selection for host-specific adaptations. This can result in multiple strains of host specialists coexisting within a single parasitic species. A long-standing conundrum is how such sympatric host races can be maintained within a single parasitic species in the face of interbreeding among conspecifics specializing on different hosts. Striking examples are seen in certain avian brood parasites such as cuckoos, many of which show host-specific differentiation in traits such as host egg mimicry. Exploiting a Zambian egg collection amassed over several decades and supplemented by recent fieldwork, we show that the brood parasitic Greater Honeyguide Indicator indicator exhibits host-specific differentiation in both egg size and egg shape. Genetic analysis of honeyguide eggs and chicks show that two highly divergent mitochondrial DNA lineages are associated with ground- and tree-nesting hosts, respectively, indicating perfect fidelity to two mutually exclusive sets of host species for millions of years. Despite their age and apparent adaptive diversification, however, these ancient lineages are not cryptic species; a complete lack of differentiation in nuclear genes shows that mating between individuals reared by different hosts is sufficiently frequent to prevent speciation. These results indicate that host specificity is maternally inherited, that host-specific adaptation among conspecifics can be maintained without reproductive isolation, and that host specificity can be remarkably ancient in evolutionary terms.

  9. Multiple Phytophthora species associated with a single riparian ecosystem in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Jan H; Slippers, Bernard; Wingfield, Michael J; Gryzenhout, Marieka

    2015-01-01

    The diversity of Phytophthora spp. in rivers and riparian ecosystems has received considerable international attention, although little such research has been conducted in South Africa. This study determined the diversity of Phytophthora spp. within a single river in Gauteng province of South Africa. Samples were collected over 1 y including biweekly river baiting with Rhododendron indicum leaves. Phytophthora isolates were identified with phylogenetic analyses of sequences for the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal DNA and the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase c subunit I (coxI) gene. Eight Phytophthora spp. were identified, including a new taxon, P. taxon Sisulu-river, and two hybrid species from Cooke's ITS clade 6. Of these, species from Clade 6 were the most abundant, including P. chlamydospora and P. lacustris. Species residing in Clade 2 also were encountered, including P. multivora, P. plurivora and P. citrophthora. The detection of eight species in this investigation of Phytophthora diversity in a single riparian river ecosystem in northern South Africa adds to the known diversity of this genus in South Africa and globally. © 2015 by The Mycological Society of America.

  10. Single-molecule electronics: Cooling individual vibrational modes by the tunneling current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykkebo, Jacob; Romano, Giuseppe; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro; Solomon, Gemma C

    2016-03-21

    Electronic devices composed of single molecules constitute the ultimate limit in the continued downscaling of electronic components. A key challenge for single-molecule electronics is to control the temperature of these junctions. Controlling heating and cooling effects in individual vibrational modes can, in principle, be utilized to increase stability of single-molecule junctions under bias, to pump energy into particular vibrational modes to perform current-induced reactions, or to increase the resolution in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy by controlling the life-times of phonons in a molecule by suppressing absorption and external dissipation processes. Under bias the current and the molecule exchange energy, which typically results in heating of the molecule. However, the opposite process is also possible, where energy is extracted from the molecule by the tunneling current. Designing a molecular "heat sink" where a particular vibrational mode funnels heat out of the molecule and into the leads would be very desirable. It is even possible to imagine how the vibrational energy of the other vibrational modes could be funneled into the "cooling mode," given the right molecular design. Previous efforts to understand heating and cooling mechanisms in single molecule junctions have primarily been concerned with small models, where it is unclear which molecular systems they correspond to. In this paper, our focus is on suppressing heating and obtaining current-induced cooling in certain vibrational modes. Strategies for cooling vibrational modes in single-molecule junctions are presented, together with atomistic calculations based on those strategies. Cooling and reduced heating are observed for two different cooling schemes in calculations of atomistic single-molecule junctions.

  11. Examining the relationship between total species richness and single island palaeo- and neo-endemics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallimanis, A. S.; Panitsa, M.; Bergmeier, E.; Dimopoulos, P.

    2011-03-01

    Recently, Emerson and Kolm (2005) hypothesized that diversity begets speciation (DBS hypothesis). The relationship between total species richness and single island endemic diversity (as a proportion of the total species richness of the island) has been used as evidence for the DBS hypothesis. This relationship has been documented in oceanic archipelagos, but many criticisms have been raised on whether this relationship truly supports the DBS hypothesis. In this study we tested if this hypothesis holds in the Aegean archipelago (a continental archipelago with continuous human presence over millennia). Endemism in the Aegean includes mainly neo-endemic species but also relictual populations of formerly more widespread species (i.e. palaeo-endemics). Contrary to the DBS hypothesis, we found that total species richness was not significantly correlated to single island endemics (neither neo-endemics nor palaeo-endemics) as a proportion of the island flora. Furthermore, we found that neo-endemic diversity (either as species richness or as a proportion of the islands flora) is mainly correlated to island maximum elevation, while area and isolation were less important. So if this ratio is indeed an index of speciation, then an alternative explanation might be that elevation (interpreted as a proxy for habitat heterogeneity) is the driver of speciation in our case. Palaeo-endemics, on the other hand, were present in only six of the largest islands in the Aegean and their diversity was strongly correlated only with island area, perhaps implying that larger islands support larger population sizes that buffer stochastic extinctions risks.

  12. Directed self-assembly of nanoparticle array: A single electron device platform to make novel systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Jason Kee Yang

    The biggest attraction of building nanometer structures is the emergence of novel properties and phenomena at these length scales. In the discipline of electronics particularly, nanoscale bridges the gap between the microscopic quantum world to the macroscopic classical world. The bridge can be tailored to effectively affect the material properties. One of the well-known phenomena that is altered at the nanoscale is the electron transport through a metal, i.e. the Ohm's law. As the size of the metal particle reduces to nanometer, Ohm's law breaks down due to trapping of a single electron charge, i.e. local charging, that prohibits the subsequent steam of electrons to pass through. This phenomenon is referred to as the Coulomb blockade, where the current is blocked below a threshold bias, VT. However, to observe a robust VT, the system has to be cooled to cryogenic temperatures. Here, fabrication and construction of a nano-system using directed self-assembled network of 1D necklace of 10 nm Au particles are described, which exhibits a robust single electron effect with a record high VT of 7.5 V at room temperature and a subsequent current, I rise as ( V/VT -- 1)ζ, where ζ is a critical constant, usually around 2. These physical parameters can be precisely tuned by tailoring the dimension and topology of the ensemble. The finding is important as nanoparticle based Single Electron Devices (SEDs) have become of great interest due to their orders of magnitude high sensitivity to gating. For over six decades of research on SEDs, it is clear that V T > 2 V at room temperature is required to make a robust device to eliminate the omnipresent "quantum noise" in these systems. Our system has not only shown a room temperature VT of well above 2 V but also its easy integrability with microelectronics circuits. Detailed scientific studies have been performed on the formation and structure of necklace array to understand the assembly process. Subsequent modification of the

  13. Current Analysis and Modeling of Fullerene Single-Electron Transistor at Room Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadem Hosseini, Vahideh; Ahmadi, Mohammad Taghi; Afrang, Saeid; Ismail, Razali

    2017-07-01

    Single-electron transistors (SETs) are interesting electronic devices that have become key elements in modern nanoelectronic systems. SETs operate quickly because they use individual electrons, with the number transferred playing a key role in their switching behavior. However, rapid transmission of electrons can cause their accumulation at the island, affecting the I- V characteristic. Selection of fullerene as a nanoscale zero-dimensional material with high stability, and controllable size in the fabrication process, can overcome this charge accumulation issue and improve the reliability of SETs. Herein, the current in a fullerene SET is modeled and compared with experimental data for a silicon SET. Furthermore, a weaker Coulomb staircase and improved reliability are reported. Moreover, the applied gate voltage and fullerene diameter are found to be directly associated with the I- V curve, enabling the desired current to be achieved by controlling the fullerene diameter.

  14. Exploring the optimal performances of irreversible single resonance energy selective electron refrigerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Junle; Chen, Lingen; Ding, Zemin; Sun, Fengrui

    2016-05-01

    Applying finite-time thermodynamics (FTT) and electronic transport theory, the optimal performances of irreversible single resonance energy selective electron (ESE) refrigerator are analyzed. The effects of heat leakage between two electron reservoirs on optimal performances are discussed. The influences of system operating parameters on cooling load, coefficient of performance (COP), figure of merit and ecological function are demonstrated using numerical examples. Comparative performance analyses among different objective functions show that performance characteristics at maximum ecological function and maximum figure of merit are of great practical significance. Combining the two optimization objectives of maximum ecological function and maximum figure of merit together, more specific optimal ranges of cooling load and COP are obtained. The results can provide some advices to the design of practical electronic machine systems.

  15. Peculiar behavior of magnetoresistance in HgSe single crystal with low electron concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonchakov, A. T.; Bobin, S. B.; Deryushkin, V. V.; Okulov, V. I.; Govorkova, T. E.; Neverov, V. N.

    2018-02-01

    Magnetoresistive properties of the single crystal of HgSe with a low electron concentration were studied in a wide range of temperatures and magnetic fields. Some fundamental parameters of the spectrum and scattering of electrons were experimentally determined. Two important features of magnetic transport were found—strong transverse magnetoresistance (MR) and negative longitudinal MR, which can indicate the existence of the topological phase of the Weyl semimetal (WSM) in HgSe. Taking this hypothesis into account, we suggest a modified band diagram of mercury selenide at low electron energies. The obtained results are essential for the deeper understanding of both physics of gapless semiconductors and WSMs—promising materials for various applications in electronics, spintronics, computer, and laser technologies.

  16. Single-molecule electron tunnelling through multiple redox levels with environmental relaxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2004-01-01

    represent the substrate and tip in electrochemical in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy. An equivalent three-electrode configuration represents a molecular single-electron transistor in which the enclosing electrodes constitute source and drain, and the reference electrode the gate. Current-bias voltage...... relations at fixed electrochemical overpotential or gate voltage, and current-overpotential or current-gate voltage relations at fixed bias voltage are equivalent in the two systems. Due to the activation-less nature of the processes, electron flow between the electrodes through the molecular redox levels...... level(s) subsequent to electron transfer. Several physical mechanisms can be distinguished and distinctive current-overpotential/gate voltage or current-bias voltage relations obtained. These reflect electronic level separation, environmental nuclear reorganisation, and coherent or incoherent multi...

  17. Retrocausation acting in the single-electron double-slit interference experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokkyo, Noboru

    The single electron double-slit interference experiment is given a time-symmetric interpretation and visualization in terms of the intermediate amplitude of transition between the particle source and the detection point. It is seen that the retarded (causal) amplitude of the electron wave expanding from the source shows an advanced (retrocausal) bifurcation and merging in passing through the double-slit and converges towards the detection point as if guided by the advanced (retrocausal) wave from the detected electron. An experiment is proposed to confirm the causation-retrocausation symmetry of the electron behavior by observing the insensitivity of the interference pattern to non-magnetic obstacles placed in the shadows of the retarded and advanced waves appearing on the rear and front sides of the double-slit.

  18. Diverse and tunable electronic structures of single-layer metal phosphorus trichalcogenides for photocatalytic water splitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jian; Li, Xi-Bo; Wang, Da; Liu, Li-Min; Lau, Woon-Ming; Peng, Ping

    2014-01-01

    The family of bulk metal phosphorus trichalcogenides (APX 3 , A = M II , M 0.5 I M 0.5 III ; X = S, Se; M I , M II , and M III represent Group-I, Group-II, and Group-III metals, respectively) has attracted great attentions because such materials not only own magnetic and ferroelectric properties, but also exhibit excellent properties in hydrogen storage and lithium battery because of the layered structures. Many layered materials have been exfoliated into two-dimensional (2D) materials, and they show distinct electronic properties compared with their bulks. Here we present a systematical study of single-layer metal phosphorus trichalcogenides by density functional theory calculations. The results show that the single layer metal phosphorus trichalcogenides have very low formation energies, which indicates that the exfoliation of single layer APX 3 should not be difficult. The family of single layer metal phosphorus trichalcogenides exhibits a large range of band gaps from 1.77 to 3.94 eV, and the electronic structures are greatly affected by the metal or the chalcogenide atoms. The calculated band edges of metal phosphorus trichalcogenides further reveal that single-layer ZnPSe 3 , CdPSe 3 , Ag 0.5 Sc 0.5 PSe 3 , and Ag 0.5 In 0.5 PX 3 (X = S and Se) have both suitable band gaps for visible-light driving and sufficient over-potentials for water splitting. More fascinatingly, single-layer Ag 0.5 Sc 0.5 PSe 3 is a direct band gap semiconductor, and the calculated optical absorption further convinces that such materials own outstanding properties for light absorption. Such results demonstrate that the single layer metal phosphorus trichalcogenides own high stability, versatile electronic properties, and high optical absorption, thus such materials have great chances to be high efficient photocatalysts for water-splitting

  19. Variation among Desulfovibrio species in electron transfer systems used for syntrophic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Birte; Kuehl, Jennifer; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Price, Morgan N; Arkin, Adam P; Stahl, David A

    2013-03-01

    Mineralization of organic matter in anoxic environments relies on the cooperative activities of hydrogen producers and consumers linked by interspecies electron transfer in syntrophic consortia that may include sulfate-reducing species (e.g., Desulfovibrio). Physiological differences and various gene repertoires implicated in syntrophic metabolism among Desulfovibrio species suggest considerable variation in the biochemical basis of syntrophy. In this study, comparative transcriptional and mutant analyses of Desulfovibrio alaskensis strain G20 and Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain Hildenborough growing syntrophically with Methanococcus maripaludis on lactate were used to develop new and revised models for their alternative electron transfer and energy conservation systems. Lactate oxidation by strain G20 generates a reduced thiol-disulfide redox pair(s) and ferredoxin that are energetically coupled to H(+)/CO(2) reduction by periplasmic formate dehydrogenase and hydrogenase via a flavin-based reverse electron bifurcation process (electron confurcation) and a menaquinone (MQ) redox loop-mediated reverse electron flow involving the membrane-bound Qmo and Qrc complexes. In contrast, strain Hildenborough uses a larger number of cytoplasmic and periplasmic proteins linked in three intertwining pathways to couple H(+) reduction to lactate oxidation. The faster growth of strain G20 in coculture is associated with a kinetic advantage conferred by the Qmo-MQ-Qrc loop as an electron transfer system that permits higher lactate oxidation rates under elevated hydrogen levels (thereby enhancing methanogenic growth) and use of formate as the main electron-exchange mediator (>70% electron flux), as opposed to the primarily hydrogen-based exchange by strain Hildenborough. This study further demonstrates the absence of a conserved gene core in Desulfovibrio that would determine the ability for a syntrophic lifestyle.

  20. Strong suppression of shot noise in a feedback-controlled single-electron transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Timo; Strasberg, Philipp; Bayer, Johannes C.; Rugeramigabo, Eddy P.; Brandes, Tobias; Haug, Rolf J.

    2017-03-01

    Feedback control of quantum mechanical systems is rapidly attracting attention not only due to fundamental questions about quantum measurements, but also because of its novel applications in many fields in physics. Quantum control has been studied intensively in quantum optics but progress has recently been made in the control of solid-state qubits as well. In quantum transport only a few active and passive feedback experiments have been realized on the level of single electrons, although theoretical proposals exist. Here we demonstrate the suppression of shot noise in a single-electron transistor using an exclusively electronic closed-loop feedback to monitor and adjust the counting statistics. With increasing feedback response we observe a stronger suppression and faster freezing of charge current fluctuations. Our technique is analogous to the generation of squeezed light with in-loop photodetection as used in quantum optics. Sub-Poisson single-electron sources will pave the way for high-precision measurements in quantum transport similar to optical or optomechanical equivalents.

  1. Contemporary root canal irrigants are able to disrupt and eradicate single- and dual-species biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, Graeme; O'Donnell, Darren; Ready, Derren; Ng, Yuan-Ling; Pratten, Jonathan; Gulabivala, Kishor

    2009-09-01

    Clinical/microbiological studies have consistently revealed the persistence of some bacteria after conventional root canal debridement. Although this was originally attributed to the complexity of the root canal anatomy and the difficulty of delivering antibacterial agents effectively, it has emerged that the biofilm encasement of bacterial cells may confer a further mechanism of resistance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relative disruption and bactericidal effects of root canal irrigants on single- and dual-species biofilms of root canal isolates. Biofilms of Streptococcus sanguinis, Enterococcus faecalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis were grown on nitrocellulose membranes for 72 hours and immersed in NaOCl, EDTA, chlorhexidine, and iodine for 1, 5, or 10 minutes. The number of viable and nonviable bacteria disrupted from the biofilm and those remaining adherent were determined by using a viability stain in conjunction with fluorescence microscopy. Gram-negative obligate anaerobe species were more susceptible to cell removal than gram-positive facultative anaerobes. The majority of cells were disrupted after the first minute of exposure; however, the extent varied according to the agent and species. The most effective agent at disrupting biofilms was NaOCl. Iodine was generally effective at bacterial killing but not disruption. Biofilm disruption and cell viability were influenced by the species, their coassociation in dual-species biofilms, the test agent, and the duration of exposure. The effectiveness of NaOCl as an endodontic irrigant was reinforced.

  2. Charge transfer dynamics from adsorbates to surfaces with single active electron and configuration interaction based approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan, E-mail: r.ramakrishnan@unibas.ch [Institute of Physical Chemistry, National Center for Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials (MARVEL), Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 80, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Nest, Mathias [Theoretische Chemie, Technische Universität München, Lichtenbergstr. 4, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2015-01-13

    Highlights: • We model electron dynamics across cyano alkanethiolates attached to gold cluster. • We present electron transfer time scales from TD-DFT and TD-CI based simulations. • Both DFT and CI methods qualitatively predict the trend in time scales. • TD-CI predicts the experimental relative time scale very accurately. - Abstract: We employ wavepacket simulations based on many-body time-dependent configuration interaction (TD-CI), and single active electron theories, to predict the ultrafast molecule/metal electron transfer time scales, in cyano alkanethiolates bonded to model gold clusters. The initial states represent two excited states where a valence electron is promoted to one of the two virtual π{sup ∗} molecular orbitals localized on the cyanide fragment. The ratio of the two time scales indicate the efficiency of one charge transfer channel over the other. In both our one-and many-electron simulations, this ratio agree qualitatively with each other as well as with the previously reported experimental time scales (Blobner et al., 2012), measured for a macroscopic metal surface. We study the effect of cluster size and the description of electron correlation on the charge transfer process.

  3. Break junction under electrochemical gating: testbed for single-molecule electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cancan; Rudnev, Alexander V; Hong, Wenjing; Wandlowski, Thomas

    2015-02-21

    Molecular electronics aims to construct functional molecular devices at the single-molecule scale. One of the major challenges is to construct a single-molecule junction and to further manipulate the charge transport through the molecular junction. Break junction techniques, including STM break junctions and mechanically controllable break junctions are considered as testbed to investigate and control the charge transport on a single-molecule scale. Moreover, additional electrochemical gating provides a unique opportunity to manipulate the energy alignment and molecular redox processes for a single-molecule junction. In this review, we start from the technical aspects of the break junction technique, then discuss the molecular structure-conductance correlation derived from break junction studies, and, finally, emphasize electrochemical gating as a promising method for the functional molecular devices.

  4. Modeling and the analysis of control logic for a digital PWM controller based on a nano electronic single electron transistor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathnakannan Kailasam

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the modelling and the analysis of control logic for a Nano-Device- based PWM controller. A comprehensive simple SPICE schematic model for Single Electron transistor has been proposed. The operation of basic Single Electron Transistor logic gates and SET flip flops were successfully designed and their performances analyzed. The proposed design for realizing the logic gates and flip-flops is used in constructing the PWM controller utilized for switching the buck converter circuit. The output of the converter circuit is compared with reference voltage, and when the error voltage and the reference are matched the latch is reset so as to generate the PWM signal. Due to the simplicity and accuracy of the compact model, the simulation time and speed are much faster, which makes it potentially applicable in large-scale circuit simulation. This study confirms that the SET-based PWM controller is small in size, consumes ultra low power and operates at high speeds without compromising any performance. In addition these devices are capable of measuring charges of extremely high sensitivity.

  5. ESR Experiments on a Single Donor Electron in Isotopically Enriched Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Lisa; Luhman, Dwight; Carr, Stephen; Borchardt, John; Bishop, Nathaniel; Ten Eyck, Gregory; Pluym, Tammy; Wendt, Joel; Witzel, Wayne; Blume-Kohout, Robin; Nielsen, Erik; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    In this talk we will discuss electron spin resonance experiments in single donor silicon qubit devices fabricated at Sandia National Labs. A self-aligned device structure consisting of a polysilicon gate SET located adjacent to the donor is used for donor electron spin readout. Using a cryogenic HEMT amplifier next to the silicon device, we demonstrate spin readout at 100 kHz bandwidth and Rabi oscillations with 0.96 visibility. Electron spin resonance measurements on these devices show a linewidth of 30 kHz and coherence times T2* = 10 us and T2 = 0.3 ms. We also discuss estimates of the fidelity of our donor electron spin qubit measurements using gate set tomography. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000. ESR Experiments on a Single Donor Electron in Isotopically Enriched Silicon.

  6. The HMA-LMA dichotomy revisited: an electron microscopical survey of 56 sponge species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloeckner, Volker; Wehrl, Markus; Moitinho-Silva, Lucas; Gernert, Christine; Schupp, Peter; Pawlik, Joseph R; Lindquist, Niels L; Erpenbeck, Dirk; Wörheide, Gert; Hentschel, Ute

    2014-08-01

    The dichotomy between high microbial abundance (HMA) and low microbial abundance (LMA) sponges has been long recognized. In the present study, 56 sponge species from three geographic regions (greater Caribbean, Mediterranean, Red Sea) were investigated by transmission electron microscopy for the presence of microorganisms in the mesohyl matrix. Additionally, bacterial enumeration by DAPI-counting was performed on a subset of samples. Of the 56 species investigated, 28 were identified as belonging to the HMA and 28 to the LMA category. The sponge orders Agelasida and Verongida consisted exclusively of HMA species, and the Poecilosclerida were composed only of LMA sponges. Other taxa contained both types of microbial associations (e.g., marine Haplosclerida, Homoscleromorpha, Dictyoceratida), and a clear phylogenetic pattern could not be identified. For a few sponge species, an intermediate microbial load was determined, and the microscopy data did not suffice to reliably determine HMA or LMA status. To experimentally determine the HMA or LMA status of a sponge species, we therefore recommend a combination of transmission electron microscopy and 16S rRNA gene sequence data. This study significantly expands previous reports on microbial abundances in sponge tissues and contributes to a better understanding of the HMA-LMA dichotomy in sponge-microbe symbioses. © 2014 Marine Biological Laboratory.

  7. Pyroelectric electron emissions and domain inversion of LiNbO3 single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Wook; Bourim, E.M.; Jeong, Soo-Hwan; Yoo, In K.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the electron emissions from a congruent LiNbO 3 single crystal with variation in temperature. When there was a small gap between the crystal and detector (<2 mm), we observed abrupt drops in the emission current and polarization domain inversion of the crystal. The current burst was distributed in tree-like patterns that suggested plasma generation. A sufficient gap and a crystal with a high coercive field appear to be factors that allow reproducible electron emissions from pyroelectric materials

  8. Design of a Negative Differential Resistance Circuit Element Using Single-Electron Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, D. C.; Heij, C. P.; Hadley, P.; Mooij, J. E.

    1998-03-01

    Electronic circuit elements displaying negative differential resistance (NDR), such as tunnel diodes, have a wide variety of device applications, including oscillators, amplifiers, logic, and memory. We present a two-terminal device using two single-electron transistors (SET's) that demonstrates an NDR profile tuneable with gate voltages. If the capacitive coupling between the SET's is sufficiently larger than the junction capacitances, the device exhibits multiply-peaked NDR, allowing its use as a multi-valued digital element. We will also report recent experimental progress in measurements of such a device, fabricated using standard Al tunnel junctions, but with an additional overlap capacitor to allow the required inter-SET coupling.

  9. Non-Markovian theory for the waiting time distributions of single electron transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welack, Sven; Yan, YiJing

    2009-09-21

    We derive a non-Markovian theory for waiting time distributions of consecutive single electron transfer events. The presented microscopic Pauli rate equation formalism couples the open electrodes to the many-body system, allowing to take finite bias and temperature into consideration. Numerical results reveal transient oscillations of distinct system frequencies due to memory in the waiting time distributions. Memory effects can be approximated by an expansion in non-Markovian corrections. This method is employed to calculate memory landscapes displaying preservation of memory over multiple consecutive electron transfers.

  10. Single electron attachment and stripping cross sections for relativistic heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, H.J.

    1979-06-01

    The results of a Bevalac experiment to measure the single electron attachment and stripping cross sections for relativistic (0.5 1 , and fully stripped, N 0 , ion beams emerging from the targets. Separate counters measured the number of ions in each charge state. The ratios N 1 /N 0 for different target thicknesses were fit to a simple growth curve to yield electron attachment and stripping cross sections. The data are compared to relativistic extrapolations of available theories. Clear evidence for two separate attachment processes, radiative and non-radiative, is found. Data are compared to a recently improved formulation for the stripping cross sections

  11. Single electron attachment and stripping cross sections for relativistic heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, H.J.

    1979-01-01

    The results of a Bevalac experiment to measure the single electron attachment and stripping cross sections for relativistic (0.5 1 , and fully stripped, N 0 , ion beams emerging from the targets. Separate counters measured the number of ions in each charge state. The ratios N 1 /N 0 for different target thicknesses were fit to a simple growth curve to yield electron attachment and stripping cross sections. The data are compared to relativistic extrapolations of available theories. Clear evidence of two separate attachment processes, radiative and non-radiative, is found. Data are compared to a recently improved formulation for the stripping cross sections

  12. Microwave-induced co-tunneling in single electron tunneling transistors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejrnaes, M.; Savolainen, M.; Manscher, M.

    2002-01-01

    on rubber bellows. Cross-talk was minimized by using individual coaxial lines between the sample and the room temperature electronics: The co-tunneling experiments were performed at zero DC bias current by measuring the voltage response to a very small amplitude 2 Hz current modulation with the gate voltage......The influence of microwaves on the co-tunneling in single electron tunneling transistors has been investigated as function of frequency and power in the temperature range from 150 to 500 mK. All 20 low frequency connections and the RF line were filtered, and the whole cryostat was suspended...

  13. Single particle and molecular assembly analysis of polyribosomes by single- and double-tilt cryo electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myasnikov, Alexander G. [IGBMC (Institute of Genetics and of Molecular and Cellular Biology), Department of Integrative Structural Biology, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UMR 7104/ Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale INSERM U964/ Université de Strasbourg, 1 rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France); Afonina, Zhanna A. [Institute of Protein Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, 142290 Pushchino, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Klaholz, Bruno P., E-mail: klaholz@igbmc.fr [IGBMC (Institute of Genetics and of Molecular and Cellular Biology), Department of Integrative Structural Biology, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UMR 7104/ Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale INSERM U964/ Université de Strasbourg, 1 rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France)

    2013-03-15

    Cryo electron tomography (cryo-ET) can provide cellular and molecular structural information on various biological samples. However, the detailed interpretation of tomograms reconstructed from single-tilt data tends to suffer from low signal-to-noise ratio and artefacts caused by some systematically missing angular views. While these can be overcome by sub-tomogram averaging, they remain limiting for the analysis of unique structures. Double-tilt ET can improve the tomogram quality by acquiring a second tilt series after an in-plane rotation, but its usage is not widespread yet because it is considered technically demanding and it is rarely used under cryo conditions. Here we show that double-tilt cryo-ET improves the quality of 3D reconstructions so significantly that even single particle analysis can be envisaged despite of the intrinsically low image contrast obtained from frozen-hydrated specimens. This is illustrated by the analysis of eukaryotic polyribosomes in which individual ribosomes were reconstructed using single-tilt, partial and full double-tilt geometries. The improved tomograms favour the faster convergence of iterative sub-tomogram averaging and allow a better 3D classification using multivariate statistical analysis. Our study of single particles and molecular assemblies within polysomes illustrates that the dual-axis approach is particularly useful for cryo applications of ET, both for unique objects and for structures that can be classified and averaged. - Highlights: ► Double-tilt cryo-ET improves 3D reconstructions thus making single particle analysis possible. ► Dual-axis cryo-ET data favour a faster convergence of iterative sub-tomogram averaging. ► Individual ribosomes were reconstructed from single-tilt, partial/ full double-tilt geometries. ► Double-tilt cryo-ET facilitates analysis of larger molecular assemblies such as in cell sections. ► Dual-axis cryo-ET is applicable to unique objects and to structures that can be

  14. Single-strand-conformation polymorphism of ribosomal DNA for rapid species differentiation in genus Phytophthora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ping; Hong, Chuanxue; Richardson, Patricia A; Gallegly, Mannon E

    2003-08-01

    Single-strand-conformation polymorphism (SSCP) of ribosomal DNA of 29 species (282 isolates) of Phytophthora was characterized in this study. Phytophthora boehmeriae, Phytophthora botryosa, Phytophthora cactorum, Phytophthora cambivora, Phytophthora capsici, Phytophthora cinnamomi, Phytophthora colocasiae, Phytophthora fragariae, Phytophthora heveae, Phytophthora hibernalis, Phytophthora ilicis, Phytophthora infestans, Phytophthora katsurae, Phytophthora lateralis, Phytophthora meadii, Phytophthora medicaginis, Phytophthora megakarya, Phytophthora nicotianae, Phytophthora palmivora, Phytophthora phaseoli, Phytophthora pseudotsugae, Phytophthora sojae, Phytophthora syringae, and Phytophthora tropicalis each showed a unique SSCP pattern. Phytophthora citricola, Phytophthora citrophthora, Phytophthora cryptogea, Phytophthora drechsleri, and Phytophthora megasperma each had more than one distinct pattern. A single-stranded DNA ladder also was developed, which facilitates comparison of SSCP patterns within and between gels. With a single DNA fingerprint, 277 isolates of Phytophthora recovered from irrigation water and plant tissues in Virginia were all correctly identified into eight species at substantially reduced time, labor, and cost. The SSCP analysis presented in this work will aid in studies on taxonomy, genetics, and ecology of the genus Phytophthora.

  15. Preparation of Disease-Related Protein Assemblies for Single Particle Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron Varano, A; Harafuji, Naoe; Dearnaley, William; Guay-Woodford, Lisa; Kelly, Deborah F

    2017-01-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) is a rapidly growing area of structural biology that permits us to decode biological assemblies at the nanoscale. To examine biological materials for single particle EM analysis, purified assemblies must be obtained using biochemical separation techniques. Here, we describe effective methodologies for isolating histidine (his)-tagged protein assemblies from the nucleus of disease-relevant cell lines. We further demonstrate how isolated assemblies are visualized using single particle EM techniques and provide representative results for each step in the process.

  16. Computer-automated tuning of semiconductor double quantum dots into the single-electron regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baart, T. A.; Vandersypen, L. M. K. [QuTech, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5046, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands); Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5046, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands); Eendebak, P. T. [QuTech, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5046, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands); Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research (TNO), P.O. Box 155, 2600 AD Delft (Netherlands); Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W. [Solid State Physics Laboratory, ETH Zürich, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2016-05-23

    We report the computer-automated tuning of gate-defined semiconductor double quantum dots in GaAs heterostructures. We benchmark the algorithm by creating three double quantum dots inside a linear array of four quantum dots. The algorithm sets the correct gate voltages for all the gates to tune the double quantum dots into the single-electron regime. The algorithm only requires (1) prior knowledge of the gate design and (2) the pinch-off value of the single gate T that is shared by all the quantum dots. This work significantly alleviates the user effort required to tune multiple quantum dot devices.

  17. The Electronic and Optical Properties of Au Doped Single-Layer Phosphorene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ziqing; Chen, Changpeng; Liu, Jiayi; Han, Lu

    2018-01-01

    The electronic properties and optical properties of single and double Au-doped phosphorene have been comparatively investigated using the first-principles plane-wave pseudopotential method based on density functional theory. The decrease from direct band gap 0.78 eV to indirect band gap 0.22 and 0.11 eV are observed in the single and double Au-doped phosphorene, respectively. The red shifts of absorbing edge occur in both doped systems, which consequently enhance the absorbing of infrared light in phosphorene. Band gap engineering can, therefore, be used to directly tune the optical absorption of phosphorene system by substitutional Au doping.

  18. Development of CRID [Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detector] single electron wire detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aston, D.; Bean, A.; Bienz, T.

    1989-02-01

    We describe the R and D effort to define the design parameters, method of construction and experimental results from the single electron wire detectors. These detectors will be used for particle identification using the Cerenkov Ring Imaging techniques in the SLD experiment at SLAC. We present measurements of pulse heights for several gases as a function of gas gain, charge division performance on a single electron signal using both 7 μm and 33 μm diameter carbon wires, photon feedback in TMAE laden gas, average pulse shape, and its comparison with the predicted shape and cross-talk. In addition, we present results of wire aging tests, and other tests associated with construction of this unusual type of wire chamber. 12 refs., 9 figs

  19. Macroscopic quantum coherence in a single molecular magnet and Kondo effect of electron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Bo; Wang, Qiang; Xie, Haiqing; Liang, J.-Q.

    2011-01-01

    We report a Kondo-effect study of electron transport through a quantum dot with embedded biaxial single-molecule magnet based on slave boson mean-field theory and non-equilibrium Green-function technique. It is found the macroscopic quantum coherence of molecule-magnet results in the Kondo peak split of differential conductance due to interaction between electron and molecular magnet. It is also demonstrated that both the peak height and position can be controlled by the sweeping magnetic field and polarization of ferromagnetic electrodes. The characteristic peak split may be used to identify the macroscopic quantum coherence and develop molecule devices. -- Highlights: → Splits of Kondo peak are induced by the single molecular magnet. → Kondo effect can be controlled by magnetic field and its sweeping speed in our model. → The suppression and broadening of Kondo peaks is also observed with increase of temperature. → The peaks height and position is sensitive to polarization of the electrode.

  20. Single-Molecule Imaging with X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers: Dream or Reality?

    KAUST Repository

    Fratalocchi, Andrea

    2011-03-09

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL) are revolutionary photon sources, whose ultrashort, brilliant pulses are expected to allow single-molecule diffraction experiments providing structural information on the atomic length scale of nonperiodic objects. This ultimate goal, however, is currently hampered by several challenging questions basically concerning sample damage, Coulomb explosion, and the role of nonlinearity. By employing an original ab initio approach, we address these issues showing that XFEL-based single-molecule imaging will be only possible with a few-hundred long attosecond pulses, due to significant radiation damage and the formation of preferred multisoliton clusters which reshape the overall electronic density of the molecular system at the femtosecond scale.

  1. Single-Molecule Imaging with X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers: Dream or Reality?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fratalocchi, A.; Ruocco, G.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL) are revolutionary photon sources, whose ultrashort, brilliant pulses are expected to allow single-molecule diffraction experiments providing structural information on the atomic length scale of nonperiodic objects. This ultimate goal, however, is currently hampered by several challenging questions basically concerning sample damage, Coulomb explosion, and the role of nonlinearity. By employing an original ab initio approach, we address these issues showing that XFEL-based single-molecule imaging will be only possible with a few-hundred long attosecond pulses, due to significant radiation damage and the formation of preferred multisoliton clusters which reshape the overall electronic density of the molecular system at the femtosecond scale.

  2. Complementary Self-Biased Logics Based on Single-Electron Transistor (SET)/CMOS Hybrid Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ki-Whan; Lee, Yong Kyu; Sim, Jae Sung; Kim, Kyung Rok; Lee, Jong Duk; Park, Byung-Gook; You, Young Sub; Park, Joo-On; Jin, You Seung; Kim, Young-Wug

    2005-04-01

    We propose a complementary self-biasing method which enables the single-electron transistor (SET)/complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) hybrid multi-valued logics (MVLs) to operate well at high temperatures, where the peak-to-valley current ratio (PVCR) of the Coulomb oscillation markedly decreases. The new architecture is implemented with a few transistors by utilizing the phase control capability of the sidewall depletion gates in dual-gate single-electron transistors (DGSETs). The suggested scheme is evaluated by a SPICE simulation with an analytical DGSET model. Furthermore, we have developed a new process technology for the SET/CMOS hybrid systems. We have confirmed that both of the fabricated devices, namely, SET and CMOS transistors, exhibit the ideal characteristics for the complementary self-biasing scheme: the SET shows clear Coulomb oscillations with a 100 mV period and the CMOS transistors show a high voltage gain.

  3. Coupled Cluster Studies of Ionization Potentials and Electron Affinities of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Bo; Govind, Niranjan; Apra, Edoardo; Klemm, Michael; Hammond, Jeff R.; Kowalski, Karol

    2017-02-03

    In this paper we apply equation-of-motion coupled cluster (EOMCC) methods in studies of vertical ionization potentials (IP) and electron affinities (EA) for sin- gled walled carbon nanotubes. EOMCC formulations for ionization potentials and electron affinities employing excitation manifolds spanned by single and double ex- citations (IP/EA-EOMCCSD) are used to study IPs and EAs of nanotubes as a function of nanotube length. Several armchair nanotubes corresponding to C20nH20 models with n = 2 - 6 have been used in benchmark calculations. In agreement with previous studies, we demonstrate that the electronegativity of C20nH20 systems remains, to a large extent, independent of nanotube length. We also compare IP/EA- EOMCCSD results with those obtained with the coupled cluster models with single and double excitations corrected by perturbative triples, CCSD(T), and density func- tional theory (DFT) using global and range-separated hybrid exchange-correlation functionals.

  4. The effects of two counterpropagating surface acoustic wave beams on single electron acoustic charge transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Jianhong; Guo Huazhong; Song Li; Zhang Wei; Gao Jie; Lu Chuan

    2010-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the effects of two counterpropagating surface acoustic waves on the acoustoelectric current of single electron transport devices. A significant improvement in the accuracy of current quantization is achieved as a result of an additional surface acoustic wave beam. The experiments reveal the sinusoidally periodical modulation in the acoustoelectric current characteristic as a function of the relative phase of the two surface acoustic wave beams. Besides, by using standing surface acoustic waves, the acoustoelectric current is detected which we consider as the so-called anomalous acoustoelectric current produced by acoustic wave mechanical deformations. This kind current is contributed to one component of the acoustoelectric current in surface acoustic wave device, which could enable us to establish a more adequate description of acoustoelectric effects on single-electron acoustic charge transport.

  5. Single-Cell Resolution of Uncultured Magnetotactic Bacteria via Fluorescence-Coupled Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhua; Zhang, Heng; Menguy, Nicolas; Benzerara, Karim; Wang, Fuxian; Lin, Xiaoting; Chen, Zhibao; Pan, Yongxin

    2017-06-15

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) form intracellular chain-assembled nanocrystals of magnetite or greigite termed magnetosomes. The characterization of magnetosome crystals requires electron microscopy due to their nanoscopic sizes. However, electron microscopy does not provide phylogenetic information for MTB. We have developed a strategy for the simultaneous and rapid phylogenetic and biomineralogical characterization of uncultured MTB at the single-cell level. It consists of four steps: (i) enrichment of MTB cells from an environmental sample, (ii) 16S rRNA gene sequencing of MTB, and (iii) fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses coordinated with (iv) transmission or scanning electron microscopy of the probe-hybridized cells. The application of this strategy identified a magnetotactic Gammaproteobacteria strain, SHHR-1, from brackish sediments collected from the Shihe River estuary in Qinhuangdao City, China. SHHR-1 magnetosomes are elongated prismatic magnetites which can be idealized as hexagonal prisms. Taxonomic groups of uncultured MTB were also identified in freshwater sediments from Lake Miyun in northern Beijing via this novel coordinated fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy method based on four group-specific rRNA-targeted probes. Our analyses revealed that major magnetotactic taxonomic groups can be accurately determined only with coordinated scanning electron microscopy observations on fluorescently labeled single cells due to limited group coverage and specificity for existing group-specific MTB fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes. Our reported strategy is simple and efficient, offers great promise toward investigating the diversity and biomineralization of MTB, and may also be applied to other functional groups of microorganisms. IMPORTANCE Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are phylogenetically diverse and biomineralize morphologically diverse magnetic nanocrystals of magnetite or greigite in intracellular structures termed

  6. A critical comparison of electron scattering cross sections measured by single collision and swarm techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckman, S.J. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Research School of Physical Sciences; Brunger, M.J. [Flinders Univ. of South Australia, Bedford Park, SA (Australia). School of Physical Sciences

    1996-07-01

    Electron scattering cross sections (elastic, rotational and vibrational excitation) for a number of atomic and (relatively) single molecular systems are examined. Particular reference is made to the level of agreement which is obtained from the application of the completely different measurement philosophies embodied in `beam` and `swarm` techniques. The range of energies considered is generally restricted to the region below 5 eV. 142 refs., 1 tab., 12 figs.

  7. A clustering approach to multireference alignment of single-particle projections in electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Sorzano, C.O.S.; Bilbao-Castro, J.R.; Shkolnisky, Y.; Alcorlo, M.; Melero, R.; Caffarena-Fernández, G.; Li, M.; Xu, G.; Marabini, R.; Carazo, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Two-dimensional analysis of projections of single particles acquired by an electron microscope is a useful tool to help identifying the different kinds of projections present in a dataset and their different projection directions. Such analysis is also useful to distinguish between different kinds of particles or different particle conformations. In this paper we introduce a new algorithm for performing two-dimensional multireference alignment and classification that is based on a Hierarchica...

  8. A simple and controlled single electron transistor based on doping modulation in silicon nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Hofheinz, M.; Jehl, X.; Sanquer, M.; Molas, G.; Vinet, M.; Deleonibus, S.

    2006-01-01

    A simple and highly reproducible single electron transistor (SET) has been fabricated using gated silicon nanowires. The structure is a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor made on silicon-on-insulator thin films. The channel of the transistor is the Coulomb island at low temperature. Two silicon nitride spacers deposited on each side of the gate create a modulation of doping along the nanowire that creates tunnel barriers. Such barriers are fixed and controlled, like in metallic...

  9. Direct fabrication of diffraction grating onto organic single crystals by electron beam lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, Yoshihiro; Aoki, Kazuki; Inada, Yuhi; Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu

    2018-03-01

    We have directly fabricated a diffraction grating onto platelike single crystals made of an organic semiconducting oligomer by electron beam lithography followed by reactive-ion etching. The decrease in the grating period resulted in photoexcited spectrally narrowed emission peaks related to the first-order diffraction from the crystal edge without outstanding quenching of the crystal. This work is expected to lead to the realization of organic semiconductor lasers.

  10. A critical comparison of electron scattering cross sections measured by single collision and swarm techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckman, S.J.; Brunger, M.J.

    1996-07-01

    Electron scattering cross sections (elastic, rotational and vibrational excitation) for a number of atomic and (relatively) single molecular systems are examined. Particular reference is made to the level of agreement which is obtained from the application of the completely different measurement philosophies embodied in 'beam' and 'swarm' techniques. The range of energies considered is generally restricted to the region below 5 eV. 142 refs., 1 tab., 12 figs

  11. Coulomb Blockade Anisotropic Magnetoresistance Effect in a (Ga,Mn)As Single-Electron Transistor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wunderlich, J.; Jungwirth, Tomáš; Kaestner, B.; Irvine, A.C.; Shick, Alexander; Stone, N.; Wang, K. Y.; Rana, U.; Giddings, A.D.; Foxon, C. T.; Campion, R. P.; Williams, D.A.; Gallagher, B. L.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 97, č. 7 (2006), 077201/1-077201/4 ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/0575; GA MŠk LC510 Grant - others:EPSRC(GB) GR/S81407/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : anisotropic magnetoresistance * Coulomb blockade * single electron transistor Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 7.072, year: 2006

  12. Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy of Rift Valley fever virus

    OpenAIRE

    Sherman, Michael B.; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Holbrook, Michael R.; Watowich, Stanley J.

    2009-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; Bunyaviridae; Phlebovirus) is an emerging human veterinary pathogen causing acute hepatitis in ruminants and has the potential to Single-particle cryo-EM reconstruction of RVFV MP-12 hemorrhagic fever in humans. We report a three-dimensional reconstruction of RVFV vaccine strain MP-12 (RVFV MP-12) by cryo-electron microcopy using icosahedral symmetry of individual virions. Although the genomic core of RVFV MP-12 is apparently poorly ordered, the glycoproteins on...

  13. Addressing challenges in single species assessments via a simple state-space assessment model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders

    Single-species and age-structured fish stock assessments still remains the main tool for managing fish stocks. A simple state-space assessment model is presented as an alternative to (semi) deterministic procedures and the full parametric statistical catch at age models. It offers a solution...... to some of the key challenges of these models. Compared to the deterministic procedures it solves a list of problems originating from falsely assuming that age classified catches are known without errors and allows quantification of uncertainties of estimated quantities of interest. Compared to full...

  14. Precise measurement of a subpicosecond electron single bunch by the femtosecond streak camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uesaka, M.; Ueda, T.; Kozawa, T.; Kobayashi, T.

    1998-01-01

    Precise measurement of a subpicosecond electron single bunch by the femtosecond streak camera is presented. The subpicosecond electron single bunch of energy 35 MeV was generated by the achromatic magnetic pulse compressor at the S-band linear accelerator of nuclear engineering research laboratory (NERL), University of Tokyo. The electric charge per bunch and beam size are 0.5 nC and the horizontal and vertical beam sizes are 3.3 and 5.5 mm (full width at half maximum; FWHM), respectively. Pulse shape of the electron single bunch is measured via Cherenkov radiation emitted in air by the femtosecond streak camera. Optical parameters of the optical measurement system were optimized based on much experiment and numerical analysis in order to achieve a subpicosecond time resolution. By using the optimized optical measurement system, the subpicosecond pulse shape, its variation for the differents rf phases in the accelerating tube, the jitter of the total system and the correlation between measured streak images and calculated longitudinal phase space distributions were precisely evaluated. This measurement system is going to be utilized in several subpicosecond analyses for radiation physics and chemistry. (orig.)

  15. Influence of Bottom Quark Jet Quenching on Single ElectronTomography of Au+Au

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djordjevic, Magdalena; Gyulassy, Miklos; Vogt, Ramona; Wicks, Simon

    2005-07-12

    High transverse momentum single (non-photonic) electrons are shown to be sensitive to the stopping power of both bottom, b, and charm, c, quarks in AA collisions. We apply the DGLV theory of radiative energy loss to predict c and b quark jet quenching and compare the FONLL and PYTHIA heavy flavor fragmentation and decay schemes. We show that single electrons in the p{sub T} = 5-10 GeV range are dominated by the decay of b quarks rather than the more strongly quenched c quarks in Au+Au collisions at {radical}s = 200 AGeV. The smaller b quark energy loss, even for extreme opacities with gluon rapidity densities up to 3500, is predicted to limit the nuclear modification factor, R{sub AA}, of single electrons to the range R{sub AA} {approx} 0.5-0.6, in contrast to previous predictions of R{sub AA} {le} 0.2-0.3 based on taking only c quark jet fragmentation into account.

  16. Radio frequency single electron transistors: readout for a solid state quantum computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buehler, T.M.; Reilly, D.J.; Starrett, R.P.; Brenner, R.; Hamilton, A.R.; Clark, R.G.; Court, N.A.; Dzurak, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Quantum computers promise unprecedented computational power if they can be scaled to a large number of qubits. Essential to the operation of such a machine is readout: the determination of the final quantum state of the system. In the case of the silicon based solid state architecture proposed by Kane, readout is achieved by determining the direction of a single electron spin via the detection of a spin dependent tunneling event. This requires a highly sensitive electrometer that can detect the motion of a single electron in a timescale less than the spin relaxation time. The Radio Frequency Single Electron Transistor (RF-SET) is a device that possesses both the charge sensitivity (oq ∼ 10 -6 / √Hz), approaching the quantum limit) and fast response required to perform readout in such a system. Here we describe the fabrication and operation of transmission mode RF-SETs and discuss the application of these novel electrometers in the readout of a solid state quantum computer

  17. Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy for Studying the Generation and Scavenging of Reactive Oxygen Species by Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jun-Jie; Zhao, Baozhong; Xia, Qingsu; Fu, Peter P.

    2013-09-01

    One fundamental mechanism widely described for nanotoxicity involves oxidative damage due to generation of free radicals and other reactive oxygen species. Indeed, the ability of nanoscale materials to facilitate the transfer of electrons, and thereby promote oxidative damage or in some instances provide antioxidant protection, may be a fundamental property of these materials. Any assessment of a nanoscale material's safety must therefore consider the potential for toxicity arising from oxidative damage. Therefore, rapid and predictive methods are needed to assess oxidative damage elicited by nanoscale materials. The use of electron spin resonance (ESR) to study free radical related bioactivity of nanomaterials has several advantages for free radical determination and identification. Specifically it can directly assess antioxidant quenching or prooxidant generation of relevant free radicals and reactive oxygen species. In this chapter, we have reported some nonclassical behaviors of the electron spin relaxation properties of unpaired electrons in different fullerenes and the investigation of anti/prooxidant activity by various types of nanomaterials using ESR. In addition, we have reviewed the mechanisms of free radical formation photosensitized by different nanomaterials. This chapter also included the use of spin labels, spin traps and ESR oximetry to systematically examine the enzymatic mimetic activities of nanomaterials.

  18. Single-photon emission associated with double electron capture in F9 ++C collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkafrawy, T.; Simon, A.; Tanis, J. A.; Warczak, A.

    2016-10-01

    Radiative double electron capture (RDEC), the one-step process occurring in ion-atom collisions, has been investigated for bare fluorine ions colliding with carbon. RDEC is completed when two target electrons are captured to a bound state of a projectile simultaneously with the emission of a single photon. This work is a follow-up to our earlier measurement of RDEC for bare oxygen projectiles, thus providing a recipient system free of electron-related Coulomb fields in both cases and allowing for the comparison between the two collision systems as well as with available theoretical studies. The most significant mechanisms of x-ray emission that may contribute to the RDEC energy region as background processes are also addressed.

  19. Signature of f -electron conductance in α -Ce single-atom contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Sebastian; Berg, Oliver; Sürgers, Christoph; Löhneysen, Hilbert v.

    2017-08-01

    Cerium is a fascinating element exhibiting, with its different phases, long-range magnetic order and superconductivity in bulk form. The coupling of the 4 f electron to s d conduction electrons and to the lattice is responsible for unique structural and electronic properties like the isostructural first-order solid-solid transition from the cubic γ phase to the cubic α phase, which is accompanied by a huge volume collapse of 14%. We report experiments aiming at disentangling the 4 f contribution to the electric conductance of the different phases. On single-atom Ce contacts we observe a strongly enhanced conductance G . By controlling the content of α -Ce employing different rates of cooling, we find a strong correlation between the fraction of α -Ce and the magnitude of G at the last conductance plateau before the contact breaks. We attribute the enhanced conductance of α -Ce to the additional contribution of the 4 f level.

  20. Single-photon emission associated with double electron capture in F9+ + C collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Elkafrawy, Tamer; Tanis, John A; Warczak, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Radiative double electron capture (RDEC), the one-step process occurring in ion-atom collisions, has been investigated for bare fluorine ions colliding with carbon. RDEC is completed when two target electrons are captured to a bound state of a projectile simultaneously with the emission of a single photon. This work is a follow-up to our earlier measurement of RDEC for bare oxygen projectiles, thus providing a recipient system free of electron-related Coulomb fields in both cases and allowing for the comparison between the two collision systems as well as with available theoretical studies. The most significant mechanisms of x-ray emission that may contribute to the RDEC energy region as background processes are also addressed.

  1. Evidence for single metal two electron oxidative addition and reductive elimination at uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Benedict M; Kefalidis, Christos E; Lu, Erli; Patel, Dipti; McInnes, Eric J L; Tuna, Floriana; Wooles, Ashley J; Maron, Laurent; Liddle, Stephen T

    2017-12-01

    Reversible single-metal two-electron oxidative addition and reductive elimination are common fundamental reactions for transition metals that underpin major catalytic transformations. However, these reactions have never been observed together in the f-block because these metals exhibit irreversible one- or multi-electron oxidation or reduction reactions. Here we report that azobenzene oxidises sterically and electronically unsaturated uranium(III) complexes to afford a uranium(V)-imido complex in a reaction that satisfies all criteria of a single-metal two-electron oxidative addition. Thermolysis of this complex promotes extrusion of azobenzene, where H-/D-isotopic labelling finds no isotopomer cross-over and the non-reactivity of a nitrene-trap suggests that nitrenes are not generated and thus a reductive elimination has occurred. Though not optimally balanced in this case, this work presents evidence that classical d-block redox chemistry can be performed reversibly by f-block metals, and that uranium can thus mimic elementary transition metal reactivity, which may lead to the discovery of new f-block catalysis.

  2. Properties of a GaAs Single Electron Path Switching Node Device Using a Single Quantum Dot for Hexagonal BDD Quantum Circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Tatsuya; Abe, Yuji; Kasai, Seiya; Hasegawa, Hideki; Hashizume, Tamotsu

    2006-01-01

    A new single electron (SE) binary-decision diagram (BDD) node device having a single quantum dot connected to three nanowire branches through tunnel barriers was fabricated using etched AlGaAs/GaAs nanowires and nanometer-sized Schottky wrap gates (WPGs), and their operation was characterized experimentally, for the hexagonal BDD quantum circuit. Fabricated devices showed clear and steep single electron pass switching by applying only an input voltage signal, which was completely different from switching properties in the previous SE BDD node devices composed of two single electron switches. As the possible switching mechanism, the correlation between the probabilities of tunnelling thorough a single quantum dot in exit branches was discussed

  3. Single Nanostructure Electrochemical Devices for Studying Electronic Properties and Structural Changes in Lithiated Si Nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    McDowell, Matthew T.

    2011-07-19

    Nanostructured Si is a promising anode material for the next generation of Li-ion batteries, but few studies have focused on the electrical properties of the Li-Si alloy phase, which are important for determining power capabilities and ensuring sufficient electrical conduction in the electrode structure. Here, we demonstrate an electrochemical device framework suitable for testing the electrical properties of single Si nanowires (NWs) at different lithiation states and correlating these properties with structural changes via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We fi nd that single Si NWs usually exhibit Ohmic I - V response in the lithiated state, with conductivities two to three orders of magnitude higher than in the delithiated state. After a number of sequential lithiation/delithiation cycles, the single NWs show similar conductivity after each lithiation step but show large variations in conductivity in the delithiated state. Finally, devices with groups of NWs in physical contact were fabricated, and structural changes in the NWs were observed after lithiation to investigate how the electrical resistance of NW junctions and the NWs themselves affect the lithiation behavior. The results suggest that electrical resistance of NW junctions can limit lithiation. Overall, this study shows the importance of investigating the electronic properties of individual components of a battery electrode (single nanostructures in this case) along with studying the nature of interactions within a collection of these component structures. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Single-particle electron microscopy in the study of membrane protein structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Zorzi, Rita; Mi, Wei; Liao, Maofu; Walz, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Single-particle electron microscopy (EM) provides the great advantage that protein structure can be studied without the need to grow crystals. However, due to technical limitations, this approach played only a minor role in the study of membrane protein structure. This situation has recently changed dramatically with the introduction of direct electron detection device cameras, which allow images of unprecedented quality to be recorded, also making software algorithms, such as three-dimensional classification and structure refinement, much more powerful. The enhanced potential of single-particle EM was impressively demonstrated by delivering the first long-sought atomic model of a member of the biomedically important transient receptor potential channel family. Structures of several more membrane proteins followed in short order. This review recounts the history of single-particle EM in the study of membrane proteins, describes the technical advances that now allow this approach to generate atomic models of membrane proteins and provides a brief overview of some of the membrane protein structures that have been studied by single-particle EM to date. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Near infra-red spectroscopy quantitative modelling of bivalve protein, lipid and glycogen composition using single-species versus multi-species calibration and validation sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Jill K.; Maher, William A.; Purss, Matthew B. J.

    2018-03-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) quantitative modelling was used to measure the protein, lipid and glycogen composition of five marine bivalve species (Saccostrea glomerata, Ostrea angasi, Crassostrea gigas, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Anadara trapezia) from multiple locations and seasons. Predictive models were produced for each component using individual species and aggregated sample populations for the three oyster species (S. glomerata, O. angasi and C. gigas) and for all five bivalve species. Whole animal tissues were freeze dried, ground to > 20 μm and scanned by NIRS. Protein, lipid and glycogen composition were determined by traditional chemical analyses and calibration models developed to allow rapid NIRS-measurement of these components in the five bivalve species. Calibration modelling was performed using wavelet selection, genetic algorithms and partial least squares analysis. Model quality was assessed using RPIQ and RMESP. For protein composition, single species model results had RPIQ values between 2.4 and 3.5 and RMSEP between 8.6 and 18%, the three oyster model had an RPIQ of 2.6 and an RMSEP of 10.8% and the five bivalve species had an RPIQ of 3.6 and RMSEP of 8.7% respectively. For lipid composition, single species models achieved RPIQ values between 2.9 and 5.3 with RMSEP between 9.1 and 11.2%, the oyster model had an RPIQ of 3.6 and RMSEP of 6.8 and the five bivalve model had an RPIQ of 5.2 and RMSEP of 6.8% respectively. For glycogen composition, the single species models had RPIQs between 3.8 and 18.9 with RMSEP between 3.5 and 9.2%, the oyster model had an RPIQ of 5.5 and RMSEP of 7.1% and the five bivalve model had an RPIQ of 4 and RMSEP of 7.6% respectively. Comparison between individual species models and aggregated models for three oyster species and five bivalve species for each component indicate that aggregating data from like species produces high quality models with robust and reliable quantitative application. The benefit of

  6. Single-Bunch Instability Driven by the Electron Cloud Effect in the Positron Damping Ring of the International Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivi, Mauro; Raubenheimer, Tor O.; Ghalam, Ali; Harkay, Katherine; Ohmi, Kazuhito; Wanzenberg, Rainer; Wolski, Andrzej; Zimmermann, Frank

    2005-01-01

    Collective instabilities caused by the formation of an electron cloud (EC) are a potential limitation to the performances of the damping rings for a future linear collider. In this paper, we present recent simulation results for the electron cloud build-up in damping rings of different circumferences and discuss the single-bunch instabilities driven by the electron cloud

  7. Direct single to two/three phase power electronic conversion for AC traction applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrucky, B.; Pavlanin, R.; Pokorny, M. [Zilina Univ. (Slovakia). Faculty of Electrical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    This paper discussed single to 3-phase power electronic converters. Conversion rates were evaluated using a middle frequency transformer with matrix converters. The use of a matrix converter subsystem with a 2-phase orthogonal induction motor was compared with conventional drives as a means of reducing the number of converter power switching elements. The converter was a high voltage modular multilevel converter where the transformer was fed directly by the single phase converter system operating on an AC line voltage. The converter offered sinusoidal input and output harmonics, eliminated the need for a DC link circuit, and decreased the number of switching elements for converters in AC-AC drives. A power active filter was used to improve the harmonic content of the input and output currents. Simulations of the 2-phase matrix converter orthogonal driving concept indicated that the converter can be used to provide solutions for single phase electric traction applications. 21 refs., 15 figs.

  8. Analytical approach to phonons and electron-phonon interactions in single-walled zigzag carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandemir, B S; Keskin, M [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Ankara University, 06100 Tandogan, Ankara (Turkey)

    2008-08-13

    In this paper, exact analytical expressions for the entire phonon spectra in single-walled carbon nanotubes with zigzag geometry are presented by using a new approach, originally developed by Kandemir and Altanhan. This approach is based on the concept of construction of a classical lattice Hamiltonian of single-walled carbon nanotubes, wherein the nearest and next nearest neighbor and bond bending interactions are all included, then its quantization and finally diagonalization of the resulting second quantized Hamiltonian. Furthermore, within this context, explicit analytical expressions for the relevant electron-phonon interaction coefficients are also investigated for single-walled carbon nanotubes having this geometry, by the phonon modulation of the hopping interaction.

  9. Analytical approach to phonons and electron-phonon interactions in single-walled zigzag carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandemir, B S; Keskin, M

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, exact analytical expressions for the entire phonon spectra in single-walled carbon nanotubes with zigzag geometry are presented by using a new approach, originally developed by Kandemir and Altanhan. This approach is based on the concept of construction of a classical lattice Hamiltonian of single-walled carbon nanotubes, wherein the nearest and next nearest neighbor and bond bending interactions are all included, then its quantization and finally diagonalization of the resulting second quantized Hamiltonian. Furthermore, within this context, explicit analytical expressions for the relevant electron-phonon interaction coefficients are also investigated for single-walled carbon nanotubes having this geometry, by the phonon modulation of the hopping interaction

  10. Photon counting imaging and centroiding with an electron-bombarded CCD using single molecule localisation software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Barber, Matthew J.; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Photon event centroiding in photon counting imaging and single-molecule localisation in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy share many traits. Although photon event centroiding has traditionally been performed with simple single-iteration algorithms, we recently reported that iterative fitting algorithms originally developed for single-molecule localisation fluorescence microscopy work very well when applied to centroiding photon events imaged with an MCP-intensified CMOS camera. Here, we have applied these algorithms for centroiding of photon events from an electron-bombarded CCD (EBCCD). We find that centroiding algorithms based on iterative fitting of the photon events yield excellent results and allow fitting of overlapping photon events, a feature not reported before and an important aspect to facilitate an increased count rate and shorter acquisition times.

  11. Electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes derived from nuclear magnetic resonance

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, E

    2011-05-24

    We report on the electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). A detailed analysis of the 13C and 133Cs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra reveals an increased metallization of the pristine SWNTs under Cs intercalation. The \\'metallization\\' of CsxC materials where x=0–0.144 is evidenced from the increased local electronic density of states (DOS) n(EF) at the Fermi level of the SWNTs as determined from spin–lattice relaxation measurements. In particular, there are two distinct electronic phases called α and β and the transition between these occurs around x=0.05. The electronic DOS at the Fermi level increases monotonically at low intercalation levels x<0.05 (α-phase), whereas it reaches a plateau in the range 0.05≤x≤0.143 at high intercalation levels (β-phase). The new β-phase is accompanied by a hybridization of Cs(6s) orbitals with C(sp2) orbitals of the SWNTs. In both phases, two types of metallic nanotubes are found with a low and a high local n(EF), corresponding to different local electronic band structures of the SWNTs.

  12. Single-side electron multipacting at the photocathode in rf guns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang-Hui Han

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple electron impacting (multipacting can take place in rf fields when the rf components are composed of materials with a secondary electron yield greater than one. In rf gun cavities, multipacting may change the properties of the vacuum components or even damage them. First systematic measurements of the multipacting occurring in a photocathode rf gun were made at the Fermilab/NICADD Photoinjector Laboratory in 2000. The multipacting properties were found to depend on the cathode material and the solenoid field configuration. In this study, we measure the multipacting properties in more detail and model the secondary electron generation for numerical simulation. Measurements and simulations for the photoinjectors at Fermilab and DESY are compared. The multipacting takes place at the photocathode in rf guns and is categorized as single-side multipacting. In a low rf field, the electrons emitted from the cathode area do not leave the gun cavity within one rf cycle and have an opportunity to travel back and hit the cathode. The solenoid field distribution in the vicinity of the cathode changes the probability of electron bombardment of the cathode and makes a major contribution to the multipacting behavior.

  13. Electronic properties of prismatic modifications of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomilin, O. B.; Muryumin, E. E.; Rodionova, E. V.; Ryskina, N. P.

    2018-01-01

    The article shows the possibility of target modifying the prismatic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by regular chemisorption of fluorine atoms in the graphene surface. It is shown that the electronic properties of prismatic SWCNT modifications are determined by the interaction of π- and ρ(in-plane)-electron conjugation in the carbon-conjugated subsystems (tracks) formed in the faces. The contributions of π- and ρ(in-plane)-electron conjugation depend on the structural characteristics of the tracks. It was found that the minimum of degree deviation of the track from the plane of the prism face and the maximum of the track width ensure the maximum contribution of the π-electron conjugation, and the band gap of the prismatic modifications of the SWCNT tends to the band gap of the hydrocarbon analog of the carbon track. It is established that the maximum of degree deviation of the track from the plane of the prism face and the maximum of track width ensure the maximum contribution of the ρ(in-plane) electron interface, and the band gap of the prismatic modifications of the SWCNT tends to the band gap of the unmodified carbon nanotube. The calculation of the model systems has been carried out using an ab initio Hartree-Fock method in the 3-21G basis.

  14. Large work function difference driven electron transfer from electrides to single-walled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Menamparambath, Mini Mol

    2014-06-23

    A difference in work function plays a key role in charge transfer between two materials. Inorganic electrides provide a unique opportunity for electron transfer since interstitial anionic electrons result in a very low work function of 2.4-2.6 eV. Here we investigated charge transfer between two different types of electrides, [Ca2N]+·e- and [Ca 24Al28O64]4+·4e-, and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with a work function of 4.73-5.05 eV. [Ca2N]+·e- with open 2-dimensional electron layers was more effective in donating electrons to SWNTs than closed cage structured [Ca24Al28O64] 4+·4e- due to the higher electron concentration (1.3 × 1022 cm-3) and mobility (∼200 cm 2 V-1 s-1 at RT). A non-covalent conjugation enhanced near-infrared fluorescence of SWNTs as high as 52%. The field emission current density of electride-SWNT-silver paste dramatically increased by a factor of 46000 (14.8 mA cm-2) at 2 V μm-1 (3.5 wt% [Ca2N]+·e-) with a turn-on voltage of 0.85 V μm-1. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  15. Are single odorous components of a predator sufficient to elicit defensive behaviors in prey species?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimund eApfelbach

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available When exposed to the odor of a sympatric predator, prey animals typically display escape or defensive responses. These phenomena have been well-documented, especially in rodents, when exposed to the odor of a cat, ferret or fox. As a result of these experiments new discussions center on the following questions: 1 is a single volatile compound such as a major or a minor mixture constituent in urine or feces, emitted by the predator sufficient to cause defensive reactions in a potential prey species or 2 is a whole array of odors required to elicit a response and 3 will the relative size or escapability of the prey as compared to the predator influence responsiveness. Most predator-prey studies on this topic have been performed in the laboratory or under semi-natural conditions. Field studies could help to find answers to these questions. Australian mammals are completely naïve towards the introduced placental carnivores. That offers ideal opportunities to analyze in the field the responses of potential prey species to unknown predator odors. During the last decades researchers have accumulated an enormous amount of data exploring the effects of eutherian predator odors on native marsupial mammals. In this review, we will give a survey about the development of olfactory research, chemical signals and their influence on the behavior and - in some cases - physiology of prey species. In addition, we report on the effects of predator odor experiments performed under natural conditions in Australia. When studying all these literature we learned that data gained under controlled laboratory conditions elucidate the role of individual odors on brain structures and ultimately on a comparatively narrow range behaviors. In contrast to single odors odor arrays mimic much more the situation prey animals are confronted to in nature. Therefore, a broad range of methodology — from chemistry to ecology including anatomy, physiology and behavior — is needed to

  16. Femtosecond few- to single-electron point-projection microscopy for nanoscale dynamic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, A. R.; Barlow Myers, C. W.; Bryan, W. A.

    2016-01-01

    Femtosecond electron microscopy produces real-space images of matter in a series of ultrafast snapshots. Pulses of electrons self-disperse under space-charge broadening, so without compression, the ideal operation mode is a single electron per pulse. Here, we demonstrate femtosecond single-electron point projection microscopy (fs-ePPM) in a laser-pump fs-e-probe configuration. The electrons have an energy of only 150 eV and take tens of picoseconds to propagate to the object under study. Nonetheless, we achieve a temporal resolution with a standard deviation of 114 fs (equivalent to a full-width at half-maximum of 269 ± 40 fs) combined with a spatial resolution of 100 nm, applied to a localized region of charge at the apex of a nanoscale metal tip induced by 30 fs 800 nm laser pulses at 50 kHz. These observations demonstrate real-space imaging of reversible processes, such as tracking charge distributions, is feasible whilst maintaining femtosecond resolution. Our findings could find application as a characterization method, which, depending on geometry, could resolve tens of femtoseconds and tens of nanometres. Dynamically imaging electric and magnetic fields and charge distributions on sub-micron length scales opens new avenues of ultrafast dynamics. Furthermore, through the use of active compression, such pulses are an ideal seed for few-femtosecond to attosecond imaging applications which will access sub-optical cycle processes in nanoplasmonics. PMID:27158637

  17. Femtosecond few- to single-electron point-projection microscopy for nanoscale dynamic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Bainbridge

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond electron microscopy produces real-space images of matter in a series of ultrafast snapshots. Pulses of electrons self-disperse under space-charge broadening, so without compression, the ideal operation mode is a single electron per pulse. Here, we demonstrate femtosecond single-electron point projection microscopy (fs-ePPM in a laser-pump fs-e-probe configuration. The electrons have an energy of only 150 eV and take tens of picoseconds to propagate to the object under study. Nonetheless, we achieve a temporal resolution with a standard deviation of 114 fs (equivalent to a full-width at half-maximum of 269 ± 40 fs combined with a spatial resolution of 100 nm, applied to a localized region of charge at the apex of a nanoscale metal tip induced by 30 fs 800 nm laser pulses at 50 kHz. These observations demonstrate real-space imaging of reversible processes, such as tracking charge distributions, is feasible whilst maintaining femtosecond resolution. Our findings could find application as a characterization method, which, depending on geometry, could resolve tens of femtoseconds and tens of nanometres. Dynamically imaging electric and magnetic fields and charge distributions on sub-micron length scales opens new avenues of ultrafast dynamics. Furthermore, through the use of active compression, such pulses are an ideal seed for few-femtosecond to attosecond imaging applications which will access sub-optical cycle processes in nanoplasmonics.

  18. Mining the transcriptomes of four commercially important shellfish species for single nucleotide polymorphisms within biomineralization genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendrami, David L J; Shah, Abhijeet; Telesca, Luca; Hoffman, Joseph I

    2016-06-01

    Transcriptional profiling not only provides insights into patterns of gene expression, but also generates sequences that can be mined for molecular markers, which in turn can be used for population genetic studies. As part of a large-scale effort to better understand how commercially important European shellfish species may respond to ocean acidification, we therefore mined the transcriptomes of four species (the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, the blue mussel Mytilus edulis, the great scallop Pecten maximus and the blunt gaper Mya truncata) for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Illumina data for C. gigas, M. edulis and P. maximus and 454 data for M. truncata were interrogated using GATK and SWAP454 respectively to identify between 8267 and 47,159 high quality SNPs per species (total=121,053 SNPs residing within 34,716 different contigs). We then annotated the transcripts containing SNPs to reveal homology to diverse genes. Finally, as oceanic pH affects the ability of organisms to incorporate calcium carbonate, we honed in on genes implicated in the biomineralization process to identify a total of 1899 SNPs in 157 genes. These provide good candidates for biomarkers with which to study patterns of selection in natural or experimental populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A nonlocal and periodic reaction-diffusion-advection model of a single phytoplankton species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Rui; Zhao, Xiao-Qiang

    2016-02-01

    In this article, we are concerned with a nonlocal reaction-diffusion-advection model which describes the evolution of a single phytoplankton species in a eutrophic vertical water column where the species relies solely on light for its metabolism. The new feature of our modeling equation lies in that the incident light intensity and the death rate are assumed to be time periodic with a common period. We first establish a threshold type result on the global dynamics of this model in terms of the basic reproduction number R0. Then we derive various characterizations of R0 with respect to the vertical turbulent diffusion rate, the sinking or buoyant rate and the water column depth, respectively, which in turn give rather precise conditions to determine whether the phytoplankton persist or become extinct. Our theoretical results not only extend the existing ones for the time-independent case, but also reveal new interesting effects of the modeling parameters and the time-periodic heterogeneous environment on persistence and extinction of the phytoplankton species, and thereby suggest important implications for phytoplankton growth control.

  20. Research Update: Molecular electronics: The single-molecule switch and transistor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Sotthewes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to design and realize single-molecule devices it is essential to have a good understanding of the properties of an individual molecule. For electronic applications, the most important property of a molecule is its conductance. Here we show how a single octanethiol molecule can be connected to macroscopic leads and how the transport properties of the molecule can be measured. Based on this knowledge we have realized two single-molecule devices: a molecular switch and a molecular transistor. The switch can be opened and closed at will by carefully adjusting the separation between the electrical contacts and the voltage drop across the contacts. This single-molecular switch operates in a broad temperature range from cryogenic temperatures all the way up to room temperature. Via mechanical gating, i.e., compressing or stretching of the octanethiol molecule, by varying the contact's interspace, we are able to systematically adjust the conductance of the electrode-octanethiol-electrode junction. This two-terminal single-molecule transistor is very robust, but the amplification factor is rather limited.

  1. Single-dose electron beam irradiation in treatment and prevention of keloids and hypertrophic scars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, T.C.M.; Salzman, F.A.; Seckel, B.R.; Wright, K.A.

    1990-01-01

    Low megavolt electron beam irradiation was used on 354 sites in 199 patients at Lahey Clinic either for palliation of symptomatic hypertrophic scars or as post operative irradiation in an attempt to prevent formation or recurrence of hypertrophic scars. Electron energies used ranged from 1.5 to 3.5 MeV. The median age of the 59 male patients was 22 years and of the 140 female patients 35 years. All patients had at least one follow-up visit, and the median follow-up was 35 months. Of the 294 sites treated for the first time, 272 (93 per cent) were irradiated with a single fraction with a skin dose ranging from 2 to 20 Gy. Of the 85 sites in 63 patients without excision of symptomatic hypertrophic scars, single-dose electron beam irradiation was of clinically significant value in only 41 sites (48 per cent). No patients have been treated without surgical excision since 1973. Because of a history of formation of hypertrophic scars elsewhere in the body, 13 patients with 19 incisions were treated prophylactically after operation for other diseases. All sites were irradiated with single doses ranging from 8 to 20 Gy, and hypertrophic scars did not subsequently develop in any patient. Altogether, 119 patients with 174 sites were irradiated after surgical excision of hypertrophic scars to prevent recurrence; 168 sites (97 per cent) received singe-fraction irradiation, and 161 received a dose of 8 Gy greater, up to 15 Gy. No statistically significant differences were observed in complete success rates, ranging from 82 to 90 per cent with doses of 9 Gy or greater. An interval of up to 72h between excision and single-fraction irradiation satisfactorily prevented recurrence, and clinically significant chronic telangiectasia was recorded in only one patient. Postoperative low megavolt electron beam irradiation with a single dose of 9 Gy or greater is highly effective in the prevention of formation recurrence of hypertrophic scars or keloids. (author). 31 refs.; 2 figs.; 4 tabs

  2. Polyquant CT: direct electron and mass density reconstruction from a single polyenergetic source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Jonathan H.; Perelli, Alessandro; Nailon, William H.; Davies, Mike E.

    2017-11-01

    Quantifying material mass and electron density from computed tomography (CT) reconstructions can be highly valuable in certain medical practices, such as radiation therapy planning. However, uniquely parameterising the x-ray attenuation in terms of mass or electron density is an ill-posed problem when a single polyenergetic source is used with a spectrally indiscriminate detector. Existing approaches to single source polyenergetic modelling often impose consistency with a physical model, such as water-bone or photoelectric-Compton decompositions, which will either require detailed prior segmentation or restrictive energy dependencies, and may require further calibration to the quantity of interest. In this work, we introduce a data centric approach to fitting the attenuation with piecewise-linear functions directly to mass or electron density, and present a segmentation-free statistical reconstruction algorithm for exploiting it, with the same order of complexity as other iterative methods. We show how this allows both higher accuracy in attenuation modelling, and demonstrate its superior quantitative imaging, with numerical chest and metal implant data, and validate it with real cone-beam CT measurements.

  3. Polyquant CT: direct electron and mass density reconstruction from a single polyenergetic source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Jonathan H; Perelli, Alessandro; Nailon, William H; Davies, Mike E

    2017-11-02

    Quantifying material mass and electron density from computed tomography (CT) reconstructions can be highly valuable in certain medical practices, such as radiation therapy planning. However, uniquely parameterising the x-ray attenuation in terms of mass or electron density is an ill-posed problem when a single polyenergetic source is used with a spectrally indiscriminate detector. Existing approaches to single source polyenergetic modelling often impose consistency with a physical model, such as water-bone or photoelectric-Compton decompositions, which will either require detailed prior segmentation or restrictive energy dependencies, and may require further calibration to the quantity of interest. In this work, we introduce a data centric approach to fitting the attenuation with piecewise-linear functions directly to mass or electron density, and present a segmentation-free statistical reconstruction algorithm for exploiting it, with the same order of complexity as other iterative methods. We show how this allows both higher accuracy in attenuation modelling, and demonstrate its superior quantitative imaging, with numerical chest and metal implant data, and validate it with real cone-beam CT measurements.

  4. Electronic origin of high-temperature superconductivity in single-layer FeSe superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Defa; Zhang, Wenhao; Mou, Daixiang; He, Junfeng; Ou, Yun-Bo; Wang, Qing-Yan; Li, Zhi; Wang, Lili; Zhao, Lin; He, Shaolong; Peng, Yingying; Liu, Xu; Chen, Chaoyu; Yu, Li; Liu, Guodong; Dong, Xiaoli; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Chuangtian; Xu, Zuyan; Hu, Jiangping; Chen, Xi; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qikun; Zhou, X J

    2012-07-03

    The recent discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in iron-based compounds has attracted much attention. How to further increase the superconducting transition temperature (T(c)) and how to understand the superconductivity mechanism are two prominent issues facing the current study of iron-based superconductors. The latest report of high-T(c) superconductivity in a single-layer FeSe is therefore both surprising and significant. Here we present investigations of the electronic structure and superconducting gap of the single-layer FeSe superconductor. Its Fermi surface is distinct from other iron-based superconductors, consisting only of electron-like pockets near the zone corner without indication of any Fermi surface around the zone centre. Nearly isotropic superconducting gap is observed in this strictly two-dimensional system. The temperature dependence of the superconducting gap gives a transition temperature T(c)~ 55 K. These results have established a clear case that such a simple electronic structure is compatible with high-T(c) superconductivity in iron-based superconductors.

  5. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of single-electron multiple-trapping transport in disordered media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, Mohammad; Abdi, Yaser

    2017-12-01

    The conventional single-particle Monte Carlo simulation of charge transport in disordered media is based on the truncated density of localized states (DOLS) which benefits from very short time execution. Although this model successfully clarifies the properties of electron transport in moderately disordered media, it overestimates the electron diffusion coefficient for strongly disordered media. The origin of this deviation is discussed in terms of zero-temperature approximation in the truncated DOLS and the ignorance of spatial occupation of localized states. Here, based on the multiple-trapping regime we introduce a modified single-particle kinetic Monte Carlo model that can be used to investigate the electron transport in any disordered media independent from the value of disorder parameter. In the proposed model, instead of using a truncated DOLS we imply the raw DOLS. In addition, we have introduced an occupation index for localized states to consider the effect of spatial occupation of trap sites. The proposed model is justified in a simple cubic lattice of trap sites for broad interval of disorder parameters, Fermi levels, and temperatures.

  6. Low cost, high performance processing of single particle cryo-electron microscopy data in the cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianfrocco, Michael A; Leschziner, Andres E

    2015-05-08

    The advent of a new generation of electron microscopes and direct electron detectors has realized the potential of single particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) as a technique to generate high-resolution structures. Calculating these structures requires high performance computing clusters, a resource that may be limiting to many likely cryo-EM users. To address this limitation and facilitate the spread of cryo-EM, we developed a publicly available 'off-the-shelf' computing environment on Amazon's elastic cloud computing infrastructure. This environment provides users with single particle cryo-EM software packages and the ability to create computing clusters with 16-480+ CPUs. We tested our computing environment using a publicly available 80S yeast ribosome dataset and estimate that laboratories could determine high-resolution cryo-EM structures for $50 to $1500 per structure within a timeframe comparable to local clusters. Our analysis shows that Amazon's cloud computing environment may offer a viable computing environment for cryo-EM.

  7. AC signal characterization for optimization of a CMOS single-electron pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Roy; Perron, Justin K.; Stewart, M. D., Jr.; Zimmerman, Neil M.

    2018-02-01

    Pumping single electrons at a set rate is being widely pursued as an electrical current standard. Semiconductor charge pumps have been pursued in a variety of modes, including single gate ratchet, a variety of 2-gate ratchet pumps, and 2-gate turnstiles. Whether pumping with one or two AC signals, lower error rates can result from better knowledge of the properties of the AC signal at the device. In this work, we operated a CMOS single-electron pump with a 2-gate ratchet style measurement and used the results to characterize and optimize our two AC signals. Fitting this data at various frequencies revealed both a difference in signal path length and attenuation between our two AC lines. Using this data, we corrected for the difference in signal path length and attenuation by applying an offset in both the phase and the amplitude at the signal generator. Operating the device as a turnstile while using the optimized parameters determined from the 2-gate ratchet measurement led to much flatter, more robust charge pumping plateaus. This method was useful in tuning our device up for optimal charge pumping, and may prove useful to the semiconductor quantum dot community to determine signal attenuation and path differences at the device.

  8. Results on the Coherent Interaction of High Energy Electrons and Photons in Oriented Single Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Apyan, A.; Badelek, B.; Ballestrero, S.; Biino, C.; Birol, I.; Cenci, P.; Connell, S.H.; Eichblatt, S.; Fonseca, T.; Freund, A.; Gorini, B.; Groess, R.; Ispirian, K.; Ketel, T.J.; Kononets, Yu.V.; Lopez, A.; Mangiarotti, A.; van Rens, B.; Sellschop, J.P.F.; Shieh, M.; Sona, P.; Strakhovenko, V.; Uggerhoj, E.; Uggerhj, Ulrik Ingerslev; Unel, G.; Velasco, M.; Vilakazi, Z.Z.; Wessely, O.; Kononets, Yu.V.

    2005-01-01

    The CERN-NA-59 experiment examined a wide range of electromagnetic processes for multi-GeV electrons and photons interacting with oriented single crystals. The various types of crystals and their orientations were used for producing photon beams and for converting and measuring their polarisation. The radiation emitted by 178 GeV unpolarised electrons incident on a 1.5 cm thick Si crystal oriented in the Coherent Bremsstrahlung (CB) and the String-of-Strings (SOS) modes was used to obtain multi-GeV linearly polarised photon beams. A new crystal polarimetry technique was established for measuring the linear polarisation of the photon beam. The polarimeter is based on the dependence of the Coherent Pair Production (CPP) cross section in oriented single crystals on the direction of the photon polarisation with respect to the crystal plane. Both a 1 mm thick single crystal of Germanium and a 4 mm thick multi-tile set of synthetic Diamond crystals were used as analyzers of the linear polarisation. A birefringence ...

  9. Area efficient digital logic NOT gate using single electron box (SEB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahrepour Davoud

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuing scaling down of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS has led researchers to build new devices with nano dimensions, whose behavior will be interpreted based on quantum mechanics. Single-electron devices (SEDs are promising candidates for future VLSI applications, due to their ultra small dimensions and lower power consumption. In most SED based digital logic designs, a single gate is introduced and its performance discussed. While in the SED based circuits the fan out of designed gate circuit should be considered and measured. In the other words, cascaded SED based designs must work properly so that the next stage(s should be driven by the previous stage. In this paper, previously NOT gate based on single electron box (SEB which is an important structure in SED technology, is reviewed in order to obtain correct operation in series connections. The correct operation of the NOT gate is investigated in a buffer circuit which uses two connected NOT gate in series. Then, for achieving better performance the designed buffer circuit is improved by the use of scaling process.

  10. Effects of phylogenetic reconstruction method on the robustness of species delimitation using single-locus data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Cuong Q; Humphreys, Aelys M; Fontaneto, Diego; Barraclough, Timothy G; Paradis, Emmanuel

    2014-10-01

    Coalescent-based species delimitation methods combine population genetic and phylogenetic theory to provide an objective means for delineating evolutionarily significant units of diversity. The generalised mixed Yule coalescent (GMYC) and the Poisson tree process (PTP) are methods that use ultrametric (GMYC or PTP) or non-ultrametric (PTP) gene trees as input, intended for use mostly with single-locus data such as DNA barcodes. Here, we assess how robust the GMYC and PTP are to different phylogenetic reconstruction and branch smoothing methods. We reconstruct over 400 ultrametric trees using up to 30 different combinations of phylogenetic and smoothing methods and perform over 2000 separate species delimitation analyses across 16 empirical data sets. We then assess how variable diversity estimates are, in terms of richness and identity, with respect to species delimitation, phylogenetic and smoothing methods. The PTP method generally generates diversity estimates that are more robust to different phylogenetic methods. The GMYC is more sensitive, but provides consistent estimates for BEAST trees. The lower consistency of GMYC estimates is likely a result of differences among gene trees introduced by the smoothing step. Unresolved nodes (real anomalies or methodological artefacts) affect both GMYC and PTP estimates, but have a greater effect on GMYC estimates. Branch smoothing is a difficult step and perhaps an underappreciated source of bias that may be widespread among studies of diversity and diversification. Nevertheless, careful choice of phylogenetic method does produce equivalent PTP and GMYC diversity estimates. We recommend simultaneous use of the PTP model with any model-based gene tree (e.g. RAxML) and GMYC approaches with BEAST trees for obtaining species hypotheses.

  11. Tuning Electronic Structure of Single Layer MoS2through Defect and Interface Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Huang, Shengxi; Ji, Xiang; Adepalli, Kiran; Yin, Kedi; Ling, Xi; Wang, Xinwei; Xue, Jianmin; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Kong, Jing; Yildiz, Bilge

    2018-03-27

    Transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have emerged in recent years as a special group of two-dimensional materials and have attracted tremendous attention. Among these TMD materials, molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ) has shown promising applications in electronics, photonics, energy, and electrochemistry. In particular, the defects in MoS 2 play an essential role in altering the electronic, magnetic, optical, and catalytic properties of MoS 2 , presenting a useful way to engineer the performance of MoS 2 . The mechanisms by which lattice defects affect the MoS 2 properties are unsettled. In this work, we reveal systematically how lattice defects and substrate interface affect MoS 2 electronic structure. We fabricated single-layer MoS 2 by chemical vapor deposition and then transferred onto Au, single-layer graphene, hexagonal boron nitride, and CeO 2 as substrates and created defects in MoS 2 by ion irradiation. We assessed how these defects and substrates affect the electronic structure of MoS 2 by performing X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopies, and scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy measurements. Molecular dynamics and first-principles based simulations allowed us to conclude the predominant lattice defects upon ion irradiation and associate those with the experimentally obtained electronic structure. We found that the substrates can tune the electronic energy levels in MoS 2 due to charge transfer at the interface. Furthermore, the reduction state of CeO 2 as an oxide substrate affects the interface charge transfer with MoS 2 . The irradiated MoS 2 had a faster hydrogen evolution kinetics compared to the as-prepared MoS 2 , demonstrating the concept of defect controlled reactivity in this phase. Our findings provide effective probes for energy band and defects in MoS 2 and show the importance of defect engineering in tuning the functionalities of MoS 2 and other TMDs in electronics, optoelectronics, and

  12. Low Po2 conditions induce reactive oxygen species formation during contractions in single skeletal muscle fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiah, Amy; Roberts, William J.; Chien, Michael T.; Wagner, Peter D.; Hogan, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Contractions in whole skeletal muscle during hypoxia are known to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS); however, identification of real-time ROS formation within isolated single skeletal muscle fibers has been challenging. Consequently, there is no convincing evidence showing increased ROS production in intact contracting fibers under low Po2 conditions. Therefore, we hypothesized that intracellular ROS generation in single contracting skeletal myofibers increases during low Po2 compared with a value approximating normal resting Po2. Dihydrofluorescein was loaded into single frog (Xenopus) fibers, and fluorescence was used to monitor ROS using confocal microscopy. Myofibers were exposed to two maximal tetanic contractile periods (1 contraction/3 s for 2 min, separated by a 60-min rest period), each consisting of one of the following treatments: high Po2 (30 Torr), low Po2 (3–5 Torr), high Po2 with ebselen (antioxidant), or low Po2 with ebselen. Ebselen (10 μM) was administered before the designated contractile period. ROS formation during low Po2 treatment was greater than during high Po2 treatment, and ebselen decreased ROS generation in both low- and high-Po2 conditions (P Po2. Force was reduced >30% for each condition except low Po2 with ebselen, which only decreased ∼15%. We concluded that single myofibers under low Po2 conditions develop accelerated and more oxidative stress than at Po2 = 30 Torr (normal human resting Po2). Ebselen decreases ROS formation in both low and high Po2, but only mitigates skeletal muscle fatigue during reduced Po2 conditions. PMID:23576612

  13. Electronic readout of a single nuclear spin using a molecular spin transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, R.; Klyastskaya, S.; Ruben, M.; Wernsdorfer, W.; Balestro, F.

    2012-02-01

    Quantum control of individual spins in condensed matter devices is an emerging field with a wide range of applications ranging from nanospintronics to quantum computing [1,2]. The electron, with its spin and orbital degrees of freedom, is conventionally used as carrier of the quantum information in the devices proposed so far. However, electrons exhibit a strong coupling to the environment leading to reduced relaxation and coherence times. Indeed quantum coherence and stable entanglement of electron spins are extremely difficult to achieve. We propose a new approach using the nuclear spin of an individual metal atom embedded in a single-molecule magnet (SMM). In order to perform the readout of the nuclear spin, the quantum tunneling of the magnetization (QTM) of the magnetic moment of the SMM in a transitor-like set-up is electronically detected. Long spin lifetimes of an individual nuclear spin were observed and the relaxation characteristics were studied. The manipulation of the nuclear spin state of individual atoms embedded in magnetic molecules opens a completely new world, where quantum logic may be integrated.[4pt] [1] L. Bogani, W. Wernsdorfer, Nature Mat. 7, 179 (2008).[0pt] [2] M. Urdampilleta, S. Klyatskaya, J.P. Cleuziou, M. Ruben, W. Wernsdorfer, Nature Mat. 10, 502 (2011).

  14. A study of planar anchor groups for graphene-based single-molecule electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Steven; Visontai, David; Lambert, Colin J; Bryce, Martin R; Frampton, Harry; Chappell, David

    2014-02-07

    To identify families of stable planar anchor groups for use in single molecule electronics, we report detailed results for the binding energies of two families of anthracene and pyrene derivatives adsorbed onto graphene. We find that all the selected derivatives functionalized with either electron donating or electron accepting substituents bind more strongly to graphene than the parent non-functionalized anthracene or pyrene. The binding energy is sensitive to the detailed atomic alignment of substituent groups over the graphene substrate leading to larger than expected binding energies for -OH and -CN derivatives. Furthermore, the ordering of the binding energies within the anthracene and pyrene series does not simply follow the electron affinities of the substituents. Energy barriers to rotation or displacement on the graphene surface are much lower than binding energies for adsorption and therefore at room temperature, although the molecules are bound to the graphene, they are almost free to move along the graphene surface. Binding energies can be increased by incorporating electrically inert side chains and are sensitive to the conformation of such chains.

  15. Electronic structure of surface-supported bis(phthalocyaninato) terbium(III) single molecular magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Lucia; Fabris, Stefano; Conte, Adriano Mosca; Brink, Susan; Ruben, Mario; Baroni, Stefano; Kern, Klaus

    2008-10-01

    The electronic structure of isolated bis(phthalocyaninato) terbium(III) molecules, a novel single-molecular-magnet (SMM), supported on the Cu(111) surface has been characterized by density functional theory and scanning tunneling spectroscopy. These studies reveal that the interaction with the metal surface preserves both the molecular structure and the large spin magnetic moment of the metal center. The 4f electron states are not perturbed by the adsorption while a strong molecular/metal interaction can induce the suppression of the minor spin contribution delocalized over the molecular ligands. The calculations show that the inherent spin magnetic moment of the molecule is only weakly affected by the interaction with the surface and suggest that the SMM character might be preserved.

  16. Single-Molecule Electronics with Cross- Conjugated Molecules: Quantum Interference, IETS and Non-Equilibrium "Temperatures"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jacob Lykkebo

    Abstract The idea of using single-molecules as components in electronic devices is fas- cinating. For this idea to come into fruition, a number of technical and theo- retical challenges must be overcome. In this PhD thesis, the electron-phonon interaction is studied for a special class of molecules......, which is characterised by destructive quantum interference. The molecules are cross-conjugated, which means that the two parts of the molecules are conjugated to a third part, but not to each other. This gives rise to an anti-resonance in the trans- mission. In the low bias and low temperature regime......-conjugated molecules. We nd that the vibrational modes that would be expected to dominate, following the propensity, rules are very weak. Instead, other modes are found to be the dominant ones. We study this phenomenon for a number of cross-conjugated molecules, and link these ndings to the anti...

  17. Structural and electronic properties of a single C chain doped zigzag BN nanoribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Ping; Wang, Qianwen; Cao, Gengyu; Tang, Fuling; Huang, Min

    2014-01-01

    The effects of single C-chain on the stability, structural and electronic properties of zigzag BN nanoribbons (ZBNNRs) were investigated by first-principles calculations. C-chain was expected to dope at B-edge for all the ribbon widths N z considered. The band gaps of C-chain doped N z -ZBNNR are narrower than that of perfect ZBNNR due to new localized states induced by C-chain. The band gaps of N z -ZBNNR-C(n) are direct except for the case of C-chain position n=2. Band gaps of BN nanoribbons are tunable by C-chain and its position n, which may endow the potential applications of BNNR in electronics.

  18. Elucidation of the chemical environment for zinc species in an electron-rich zinc-incorporated zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jing-Feng; Wang, Kai-Xue; Wang, Jian-Qiang; Li, Lu; Jiang, Yan-Mei; Guo, Xing-Xing; Chen, Jie-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    An electron-rich zinc-modified zeolite has been prepared by the incorporation of zinc vapor into the channels of a dehydrated HY (protonated zeolite Y). The chemical environment of the zinc species in the electron-rich zeolite has been elucidated on the basis of X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The formation of univalent zinc (Zn + ) within the electron-rich zeolite was observed upon the irradiation of X-ray from either a synchrotron radiation source or a conventional X-ray diffractometer. The X-ray irradiation initiated the electron transfer from the electron-rich framework of zeolite Y to the nearby Zn 2+ cations, generating Zn + species. The variation of the coordination environment of the zinc species upon interaction with water molecules has also been investigated. - Graphical abstract: The chemical environment of the zinc species in an electorn-rich zeolite has been elucidated on the basis of X-ray absorption spectroscopy. - Highlights: • An electron-rich zinc-incorporated zeolite has been prepared by chemical vapor reaction. • Univalent zinc is detected after the electron-rich zeolite is irradiated with X-ray. • The chemical environment of the zinc species is elucidated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. • The coordination environment of the zinc species changes upon interaction with water molecules

  19. The effect of temperature on the secondary electron emission yield from single crystal and polycrystalline diamond surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, A.; Prawer, S.; Rubanov, S.; Ahkvlediani, R.; Michaelson, Sh.; Hoffman, A.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of temperature in the 293-473 K range, on the secondary electron emission (SEE) yield of single crystal and polycrystalline diamond film surfaces is reported. For the polycrystalline films the SEE yield was found to decay as function of electron irradiation dose while for the single crystal an increase occurs first, followed by a decrease. For both surfaces, the SEE yield increases significantly upon heating and obtained a nearly constant value with electron dose at 473 K. These effects are explained as due to the temperature dependence of the electron beam induced hydrogen desorption and surface band bending.

  20. Electronic spin transport and spin precession in single graphene layers at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombros, Nikolaos; Jozsa, Csaba; Popinciuc, Mihaita; Jonkman, Harry T; van Wees, Bart J

    2007-08-02

    Electronic transport in single or a few layers of graphene is the subject of intense interest at present. The specific band structure of graphene, with its unique valley structure and Dirac neutrality point separating hole states from electron states, has led to the observation of new electronic transport phenomena such as anomalously quantized Hall effects, absence of weak localization and the existence of a minimum conductivity. In addition to dissipative transport, supercurrent transport has also been observed. Graphene might also be a promising material for spintronics and related applications, such as the realization of spin qubits, owing to the low intrinsic spin orbit interaction, as well as the low hyperfine interaction of the electron spins with the carbon nuclei. Here we report the observation of spin transport, as well as Larmor spin precession, over micrometre-scale distances in single graphene layers. The 'non-local' spin valve geometry was used in these experiments, employing four-terminal contact geometries with ferromagnetic cobalt electrodes making contact with the graphene sheet through a thin oxide layer. We observe clear bipolar (changing from positive to negative sign) spin signals that reflect the magnetization direction of all four electrodes, indicating that spin coherence extends underneath all of the contacts. No significant changes in the spin signals occur between 4.2 K, 77 K and room temperature. We extract a spin relaxation length between 1.5 and 2 mum at room temperature, only weakly dependent on charge density. The spin polarization of the ferromagnetic contacts is calculated from the measurements to be around ten per cent.

  1. Injection of a single electron from static to moving quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Benoit; Hermelin, Sylvain; Mortemousque, Pierre-André; Takada, Shintaro; Yamamoto, Michihisa; Tarucha, Seigo; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D; Bäuerle, Christopher; Meunier, Tristan

    2016-05-27

    We study the injection mechanism of a single electron from a static quantum dot into a moving quantum dot. The moving quantum dots are created with surface acoustic waves (SAWs) in a long depleted channel. We demonstrate that the injection process is characterized by an activation law with a threshold that depends on the SAW amplitude and on the dot-channel potential gradient. By sufficiently increasing the SAW modulation amplitude, we can reach a regime where the transfer has unity probability and is potentially adiabatic. This study points to the relevant regime to use moving dots in quantum information protocols.

  2. A graphene quantum dot with a single electron transistor as an integrated charge sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin-Jun; Cao, Gang; Tu, Tao; Li, Hai-Ou; Zhou, Cheng; Hao, Xiao-Jie; Su, Zhan; Guo, Guang-Can; Jiang, Hong-Wen; Guo, Guo-Ping

    2010-12-01

    A quantum dot (QD) with an integrated charge sensor is becoming a common architecture for a spin or charge based solid state qubit. To implement such a structure in graphene, we have fabricated a twin-dot structure in which the larger dot serves as a single electron transistor (SET) to read out the charge state of the nearby gate controlled small QD. A high SET sensitivity of 10-3e/√Hz allowed us to probe Coulomb charging as well as excited state spectra of the QD, even in the regime where the current through the QD is too small to be measured by conventional transport means.

  3. FLASH free-electron laser single-shot temporal diagnostic: terahertz-field-driven streaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Rosen; Liu, Jia; Brenner, Günter; Brachmanski, Maciej; Düsterer, Stefan

    2018-01-01

    The commissioning of a terahertz-field-driven streak camera installed at the free-electron laser (FEL) FLASH at DESY in Hamburg, being able to deliver photon pulse duration as well as arrival time information with ∼10 fs resolution for each single XUV FEL pulse, is reported. Pulse durations between 300 fs and terahertz-streaking setup was operated simultaneously to an alternative method to determine the FEL pulse duration based on spectral analysis. FLASH pulse duration derived from simple spectral analysis is in good agreement with that from terahertz-streaking measurement.

  4. Fabrication of double-dot single-electron transistor in silicon nanowire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Mingyu; Kaizawa, Takuya; Arita, Masashi [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo, 060-0814 (Japan); Fujiwara, Akira; Ono, Yukinori [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, 3-1 Morinosato Wakamiya, Atsugi, 243-0198 (Japan); Inokawa, Hiroshi [Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka Univ., 3-5-1, Johoku, Hamamatsu, 432-8011 (Japan); Choi, Jung-Bum [Physics and Research Institute of NanoScience and Technology, Chungbuk National Univ., Cheongju, Chungbuk 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Takahashi, Yasuo, E-mail: y-taka@nano.ist.hokudai.ac.j [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo, 060-0814 (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    We propose a simple method for fabricating Si single-electron transistors (SET) with coupled dots by means of a pattern-dependent-oxidation (PADOX) method. The PADOX method is known to convert a small one-dimensional Si wire formed on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate into a SET automatically. We fabricated a double-dot Si SET when we oxidized specially designed Si nanowires formed on SOI substrates. We analyzed the measured electrical characteristics by fitting the measurement and simulation results and confirmed the double-dot formation and the position of the two dots in the Si wire.

  5. Application of electron energy loss spectroscopy for single wall carbon nanotubes (review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittal, N.; Jain, S.; Mittal, J.

    2015-01-01

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is among the few techniques that are available for the characterization of modified single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) having nanometer dimensions (~1-3 nm). CNTs can be modified either by surface functionalization or coating, between bundles of nanotubes by doping, intercalation and fully or partially filling the central core. EELS is an exclusive technique for the identification, composition analysis, and crystallization studies of the chemicals and materials used for the modification of SWCNTs. The present paper serves as a compendium of research work on the application of EELS for the characterization of modified SWCNTs. (authors)

  6. Directional Sensitivity in Light-Mass Dark Matter Searches with Single-Electron-Resolution Ionization Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadribasic, Fedja; Mirabolfathi, Nader; Nordlund, Kai; Sand, Andrea E.; Holmström, Eero; Djurabekova, Flyura

    2018-03-01

    We propose a method using solid state detectors with directional sensitivity to dark matter interactions to detect low-mass weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) originating from galactic sources. In spite of a large body of literature for high-mass WIMP detectors with directional sensitivity, no available technique exists to cover WIMPs in the mass range <1 GeV /c2 . We argue that single-electron-resolution semiconductor detectors allow for directional sensitivity once properly calibrated. We examine the commonly used semiconductor material response to these low-mass WIMP interactions.

  7. Ordinary and extraordinary Coulomb blockade magnetoresistance in (Ga,Mn)As single electron transistor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wunderlich, J.; Jungwirth, Tomáš; Novák, Vít; Irvine, A.C.; Kaestner, B.; Shick, Alexander; Foxon, C. T.; Campion, R. P.; Williams, D.A.; Gallagher, B. L.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 144, - (2007), s. 536-541 ISSN 0038-1098 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/0575; GA ČR GA202/04/1519; GA MŠk LC510; GA ČR GEFON/06/E001; GA ČR GEFON/06/E002 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 015728 - NANOSPIN Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521; CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : ferromagnetic semiconductors * magnetoresistance * single-electron transistor Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.535, year: 2007

  8. Grafted organic monolayer for single electron transport and for quantum dots solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillard, Louis Marie

    Functionalization of oxide-free silicon and silicon oxide surfaces is important for a number of applications. In this work, organic monolayers are grafted (GOM) on oxide-free silicon surfaces using thermal and ultraviolet-activated hydrosilylation of hydrogen-terminated silicon surfaces, primarily using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for characterization. The resulting amine-terminated GOM have been used for depositing nanoparticles, selecting the end group for two very specific applications: single electron devices and nano-quantum-dot (NQD) enhanced Si photovoltaic cells. To perform single-electron transport measurements, colloidal gold nanoparticles have been deposited on amine-functionalized silicon surfaces and tunneling measurements performed with a scanning tunneling microscope in an ultra-high vacuum chamber. Using a double-barrier tunneling junction (with the GOM as the first barrier and the vacuum between the scanning tip and the gold nanoparticle as the second one), single-electron transport was observed at 30K through a Coulomb staircase phenomenon. The critical parameters were identified to improve reproducibility. Finally, recently developed advanced modeling, based on traditional "orthodox" theory, was optimized to account for the observations (e.g. I-V dependence on band bending). This work provides a basis for the development of single-electron transistors that are compatible with current silicon based technology. To enhance standard silicon-based solar cells, GOM is also needed to graft strongly absorbing II-VI NQDs and optimize their energy transfer to the silicon substrate. Recent photoluminescence spectroscopy has demonstrated that energy transfer occurs through both radiative and non-radiative mechanisms between NQDs and the substrate. With grafting technology, the aim was to optimize absorption, as probed by photoluminescence, in two ways. First, silicon nanopillars were fabricated to increase the

  9. Single-electron capture in He[sup 2+]-D[sub 2] collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, D.; Dagnac, R. (Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France))

    1994-02-14

    Doubly differential cross sections of single-electron capture were measured for He[sup 2+] impinging on a molecular deuterium target. The investigated collision energies are 4, 6 and 8 keV and the scattering angles range from 10' to 2[sup o]30' (laboratory frame). The exothermic capture leading to He[sup +] (1s) + D[sub 2][sup +*] was found to be the most important process at low energies and angles, whereas the endothermic channels leading to dissociative capture become the main processes at high scattering angles, i.e. at small impact parameters. (author).

  10. Electronic sensitivity of a single-walled carbon nanotube to internal electrolyte composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, D; Pang, P; Lindsay, S M; Liu, H; He, J

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are well known as materials for nanoelectronics and show great potential to be used as the sensing elements in chemical and biological sensors. Recently, CNTs have been shown to be effective nanofluidic channels and the transport of substances through small diameter CNTs is intrinsically fast, selective, and operates at the single molecule level. It has been shown that the transport characteristics of semiconducting single-walled CNT (SWCNT) field effect transistors (FETs) are sensitive to internal water wetting. We report here that the characteristics of semiconducting SWCNT FETs are also sensitive to the concentration, pH and ion type of the ionic solution when the electrolyte is inside the CNT. Such sensitivity is not observed at the outside surface of a semiconducting SWCNT. This opens a new avenue for building new types of CNT sensor devices in which the SWCNT concurrently functions as a nanochannel and an electronic detector. (paper)

  11. The role of molecule–electrode contact in single-molecule electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hihath, Joshua; Tao, Nongjian

    2014-01-01

    Creating complex electronic systems from individual molecular components is one of the most formidable challenges in nanotechnology today. To achieve this goal it is necessary not only to design the functionality of the molecular system to create devices, but also to control the interface between bulk contacts and molecular systems. In this brief perspective we discuss the role of molecule–electrode contact in single-molecule systems. This contact is responsible for making the system mechanically stable enough to perform measurements, and can also have profound impacts on both the contact resistance and the energy level alignment in the system. We will discuss a variety of different linker groups that have been explored, note the advantages and disadvantages of various contact chemistries, and discuss new methodologies used for understanding the impact that the molecule–electrode contact has on the energetics of single-molecule devices. (paper)

  12. Electronic sensitivity of single-walled carbon nanotube to internal electrolyte composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, D; Pang, P; Liu, H; He, J; Lindsay, SM

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are well-known as materials for nanoelectronics and show great potential to be used as the sensing element in chemical and biological sensors. Recently, CNTs have been shown to be effective nanofluidic channels and the transport of substances through small diameter CNTs is intrinsically fast, selective, and operates at the single molecule level. It has been shown that the transport characteristics of semiconducting single-walled CNT (SWCNT) field effect transistor (FET) are sensitive to internal water wetting. We report here that the characteristics of semiconducting SWCNT FETs are also sensitive to the concentration, pH and ion type of ionic solution when the electrolytes are inside the CNT. Such sensitivity is not observed at the outside surface of a semiconducting SWCNT. This opens a new avenue for building new types of CNT sensor devices in which the SWCNT concurrently functions as a nanochannel and an electronic detector. PMID:22293518

  13. Probing the local environment of a single OPE3 molecule using inelastic tunneling electron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisenda, Riccardo; Perrin, Mickael L; van der Zant, Herre S J

    2015-01-01

    We study single-molecule oligo(phenylene ethynylene)dithiol junctions by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). The molecule is contacted with gold nano-electrodes formed with the mechanically controllable break junction technique. We record the IETS spectrum of the molecule from direct current measurements, both as a function of time and electrode separation. We find that for fixed electrode separation the molecule switches between various configurations, which are characterized by different IETS spectra. Similar variations in the IETS signal are observed during atomic rearrangements upon stretching of the molecular junction. Using quantum chemistry calculations, we identity some of the vibrational modes which constitute a chemical fingerprint of the molecule. In addition, changes can be attributed to rearrangements of the local molecular environment, in particular at the molecule-electrode interface. This study shows the importance of taking into account the interaction with the electrodes when describing inelastic contributions to transport through single-molecule junctions.

  14. High quality single crystal Ge nano-membranes for opto-electronic integrated circuitry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V. A.; Gammon, P. M.; Rhead, S. D.; Halpin, J. E.; Trushkevych, O.; Wilson, N. R.; Myronov, M.; Edwards, R. S.; Patchett, D. H.; Allred, P. S.; Prest, M. J.; Whall, T. E.; Parker, E. H. C.; Leadley, D. R.; Chávez-Ángel, E.; Shchepetov, A.; Prunnila, M.; Kachkanov, V.; Dolbnya, I. P.; Reparaz, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    A thin, flat, and single crystal germanium membrane would be an ideal platform on which to mount sensors or integrate photonic and electronic devices, using standard silicon processing technology. We present a fabrication technique compatible with integrated-circuit wafer scale processing to produce membranes of thickness between 60 nm and 800 nm, with large areas of up to 3.5 mm 2 . We show how the optical properties change with thickness, including appearance of Fabry-Pérot type interference in thin membranes. The membranes have low Q-factors, which allow the platforms to counteract distortion during agitation and movement. Finally, we report on the physical characteristics showing sub-nm roughness and a homogenous strain profile throughout the freestanding layer, making the single crystal Ge membrane an excellent platform for further epitaxial growth or deposition of materials

  15. High quality single crystal Ge nano-membranes for opto-electronic integrated circuitry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, V. A., E-mail: vishal.shah@warwick.ac.uk; Gammon, P. M. [Department of Engineering, The University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, The University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Rhead, S. D.; Halpin, J. E.; Trushkevych, O.; Wilson, N. R.; Myronov, M.; Edwards, R. S.; Patchett, D. H.; Allred, P. S.; Prest, M. J.; Whall, T. E.; Parker, E. H. C.; Leadley, D. R. [Department of Physics, The University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Chávez-Ángel, E. [ICN2-Institut Catala de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Department of Physics, UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Shchepetov, A.; Prunnila, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT, Espoo (Finland); Kachkanov, V.; Dolbnya, I. P. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Reparaz, J. S. [ICN2-Institut Catala de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); and others

    2014-04-14

    A thin, flat, and single crystal germanium membrane would be an ideal platform on which to mount sensors or integrate photonic and electronic devices, using standard silicon processing technology. We present a fabrication technique compatible with integrated-circuit wafer scale processing to produce membranes of thickness between 60 nm and 800 nm, with large areas of up to 3.5 mm{sup 2}. We show how the optical properties change with thickness, including appearance of Fabry-Pérot type interference in thin membranes. The membranes have low Q-factors, which allow the platforms to counteract distortion during agitation and movement. Finally, we report on the physical characteristics showing sub-nm roughness and a homogenous strain profile throughout the freestanding layer, making the single crystal Ge membrane an excellent platform for further epitaxial growth or deposition of materials.

  16. Probing the local environment of a single OPE3 molecule using inelastic tunneling electron spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Frisenda

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We study single-molecule oligo(phenylene ethynylenedithiol junctions by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS. The molecule is contacted with gold nano-electrodes formed with the mechanically controllable break junction technique. We record the IETS spectrum of the molecule from direct current measurements, both as a function of time and electrode separation. We find that for fixed electrode separation the molecule switches between various configurations, which are characterized by different IETS spectra. Similar variations in the IETS signal are observed during atomic rearrangements upon stretching of the molecular junction. Using quantum chemistry calculations, we identity some of the vibrational modes which constitute a chemical fingerprint of the molecule. In addition, changes can be attributed to rearrangements of the local molecular environment, in particular at the molecule–electrode interface. This study shows the importance of taking into account the interaction with the electrodes when describing inelastic contributions to transport through single-molecule junctions.

  17. Feedback for suppression of single-bunch transverse instability in electron-positron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smaluk, V; Sukhanov, D; Oreshonok, V; Cherepanov, V; Kiselev, V

    2012-01-01

    Transverse head-tail instability is a severe limitation of a single-bunch beam current in circular accelerators. Applicability and efficiency of feedbacks for suppression of the instability is analyzed. Both chromatic and nonlinear effects have been taken into account to understand the processes of excitation and damping of the instability. Analytical estimations are compared with the results of experiments and numerical simulations. A feedback system has been developed, installed and commissioned at the VEPP-4M electron-positron collider. An original scheme of the kicker powering has been developed to provide the necessary performance with minimal expenses. Real-time digital data processing performed by a code running in an FPGA module provides high efficiency and flexibility of the system. During the system commissioning, a more than threefold increase of intensity of the VEPP-4M single-bunch beam has been achieved.

  18. Series solution for continuous population models for single and interacting species by the homotopy analysis method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdy A. El-Tawil

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The homotopy analysis method (HAM is used to find approximate analytical solutions of continuous population models for single and interacting species. The homotopy analysis method contains the auxiliary parameter $hbar,$ which provides us with a simple way to adjust and control the convergence region of series solution. the solutions are compared with the numerical results obtained using NDSolve, an ordinary differential equation solver found in the Mathematica package and a good agreement is found. Also the solutions are compared with the available analytic results obtained by other methods and more accurate and convergent series solution found. The convergence region is also computed which shows the validity of the HAM solution. This method is reliable and manageable.

  19. Genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism data reveal cryptic species within cryptic freshwater snail species-The case of theAncylus fluviatilisspecies complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Martina; Weigand, Hannah; Weigand, Alexander M; Leese, Florian

    2018-01-01

    DNA barcoding utilizes short standardized DNA sequences to identify species and is increasingly used in biodiversity assessments. The technique has unveiled an unforeseeably high number of morphologically cryptic species. However, if speciation has occurred relatively recently and rapidly, the use of single gene markers, and especially the exclusive use of mitochondrial markers, will presumably fail in delimitating species. Therefore, the true number of biological species might be even higher. One mechanism that can result in rapid speciation is hybridization of different species in combination with polyploidization, that is, allopolyploid speciation. In this study, we analyzed the population genetic structure of the polyploid freshwater snail Ancylus fluviatilis , for which allopolyploidization was postulated as a speciation mechanism. DNA barcoding has already revealed four cryptic species within A. fluviatilis (i.e., A. fluviatilis s. str., Ancylus sp. A-C), but early allozyme data even hint at the presence of additional cryptic lineages in Central Europe. We combined COI sequencing with high-resolution genome-wide SNP data (ddRAD data) to analyze the genetic structure of A. fluviatilis populations in a Central German low mountain range (Sauerland). The ddRAD data results indicate the presence of three cryptic species within A. fluviatilis s. str. occurring in sympatry and even syntopy, whereas mitochondrial sequence data only support the existence of one species, with shared haplotypes between species. Our study hence points to the limitations of DNA barcoding when dealing with organismal groups where speciation is assumed to have occurred rapidly, for example, through the process of allopolyploidization. We therefore emphasize that single marker DNA barcoding can underestimate the true species diversity and argue in strong favor of using genome-wide data for species delimitation in such groups.

  20. Radiation damage in single-particle cryo-electron microscopy: effects of dose and dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karuppasamy, Manikandan; Karimi Nejadasl, Fatemeh; Vulovic, Milos; Koster, Abraham J.; Ravelli, Raimond B. G.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of dose and dose-rate were investigated for single-particle cryo-electron microscopy using stroboscopic data collection. A dose-rate effect was observed favoring lower flux densities. Radiation damage is an important resolution limiting factor both in macromolecular X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy. Systematic studies in macromolecular X-ray crystallography greatly benefited from the use of dose, expressed as energy deposited per mass unit, which is derived from parameters including incident flux, beam energy, beam size, sample composition and sample size. In here, the use of dose is reintroduced for electron microscopy, accounting for the electron energy, incident flux and measured sample thickness and composition. Knowledge of the amount of energy deposited allowed us to compare doses with experimental limits in macromolecular X-ray crystallography, to obtain an upper estimate of radical concentrations that build up in the vitreous sample, and to translate heat-transfer simulations carried out for macromolecular X-ray crystallography to cryo-electron microscopy. Stroboscopic exposure series of 50–250 images were collected for different incident flux densities and integration times from Lumbricus terrestris extracellular hemoglobin. The images within each series were computationally aligned and analyzed with similarity metrics such as Fourier ring correlation, Fourier ring phase residual and figure of merit. Prior to gas bubble formation, the images become linearly brighter with dose, at a rate of approximately 0.1% per 10 MGy. The gradual decomposition of a vitrified hemoglobin sample could be visualized at a series of doses up to 5500 MGy, by which dose the sample was sublimed. Comparison of equal-dose series collected with different incident flux densities showed a dose-rate effect favoring lower flux densities. Heat simulations predict that sample heating will only become an issue for very large dose rates (50 e − Å −2 s

  1. Single particle electron microscopy reconstruction of the exosome complex using the random conical tilt method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xueqi; Wang, Hong-Wei

    2011-03-28

    Single particle electron microscopy (EM) reconstruction has recently become a popular tool to get the three-dimensional (3D) structure of large macromolecular complexes. Compared to X-ray crystallography, it has some unique advantages. First, single particle EM reconstruction does not need to crystallize the protein sample, which is the bottleneck in X-ray crystallography, especially for large macromolecular complexes. Secondly, it does not need large amounts of protein samples. Compared with milligrams of proteins necessary for crystallization, single particle EM reconstruction only needs several micro-liters of protein solution at nano-molar concentrations, using the negative staining EM method. However, despite a few macromolecular assemblies with high symmetry, single particle EM is limited at relatively low resolution (lower than 1 nm resolution) for many specimens especially those without symmetry. This technique is also limited by the size of the molecules under study, i.e. 100 kDa for negatively stained specimens and 300 kDa for frozen-hydrated specimens in general. For a new sample of unknown structure, we generally use a heavy metal solution to embed the molecules by negative staining. The specimen is then examined in a transmission electron microscope to take two-dimensional (2D) micrographs of the molecules. Ideally, the protein molecules have a homogeneous 3D structure but exhibit different orientations in the micrographs. These micrographs are digitized and processed in computers as "single particles". Using two-dimensional alignment and classification techniques, homogenous molecules in the same views are clustered into classes. Their averages enhance the signal of the molecule's 2D shapes. After we assign the particles with the proper relative orientation (Euler angles), we will be able to reconstruct the 2D particle images into a 3D virtual volume. In single particle 3D reconstruction, an essential step is to correctly assign the proper orientation

  2. Evaluation of the Electronic Structure of Single-Molecule Junctions Based on Current-Voltage and Thermopower Measurements: Application to C60 Single-Molecule Junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komoto, Yuki; Isshiki, Yuji; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2017-02-16

    The electronic structure of molecular junctions has a significant impact on their transport properties. Despite the decisive role of the electronic structure, a complete characterization of the electronic structure remains a challenge. This is because there is no straightforward way of measuring electron spectroscopy for an individual molecule trapped in a nanoscale gap between two metal electrodes. Herein, a comprehensive approach to obtain a detailed description of the electronic structure in single-molecule junctions based on the analysis of current-voltage (I-V) and thermoelectric characteristics is described. It is shown that the electronic structure of the prototypical C 60 single-molecule junction can be resolved by analyzing complementary results of the I-V and thermoelectric measurement. This combined approach confirmed that the C 60 single-molecule junction was highly conductive with molecular electronic conductances of 0.033 and 0.003 G 0 and a molecular Seebeck coefficient of -12 μV K -1 . In addition, we revealed that charge transport was mediated by a LUMO whose energy level was located 0.5≈0.6 eV above the Fermi level of the Au electrode. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Production of radical species by electron beam deposition in an ArF* lasing medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, G. M.; Wolford, M. F.; Petrova, Tz. B.; Giuliani, J. L.; Obenschain, S. P.

    2017-10-01

    The electron-beam-pumped ArF laser is a laser technology capable of providing very high lasing energies at the shortest wavelength (λ = 193 nm) among the rare gas halide lasers and therefore has the potential to be a superior driver for inertial fusion. The electron kinetics are rigorously treated by numerically solving the steady-state, spatially averaged electron Boltzmann equation in Ar-F2 gas. The e-beam energy deposition and collisional reaction rates with electrons are calculated from the electron energy distribution function for a wide range of e-beam deposition powers (Pbeam = 10 kW/cm3-3 MW/cm3) and fluorine concentrations ( xF2 = 0.01 - 10%). The rates are reduced to a set of coefficients that are fitted with analytical formulas as a function of two universal parameters: Pbeam/p and xF2 , where p is the gas pressure. It is found that in the regime of high e-beam power deposition, the fluorine molecules are rapidly destroyed through dissociative attachment and neutral dissociation. The loss of F2 over the duration of the beam is proportional to the e-beam energy deposition per unit volume, ɛbeam, and follows ΔnF2(c m-3)≅4 ×1017ɛbeam(J/cm 3) , in agreement with experimental data. The fluorine molecule conversion to other fluorine species, including atomic fluorine, is shown to have a very small effect on the index of refraction even at percent level concentrations.

  4. Single crystal growth and electronic structure of TlPbI{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khyzhun, O.Y., E-mail: khyzhun@ipms.kiev.ua [Frantsevych Institute for Problems of Materials Science, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 3 Krzhyzhanivsky Street, 03142 Kyiv (Ukraine); Fochuk, P.M. [Yuriy Fedkovich Chernivtsi National University, 2 Kotsyubynskogo Street, 58012 Chernivtsi (Ukraine); Kityk, I.V. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czestochowa University of Technology, Armii Krajowej 17, PL-42-217 Czestochowa (Poland); Piasecki, M. [Institute of Physics, J.Dlugosz University Częstochowa, Armii Krajowej 13/15, Częstochowa (Poland); Levkovets, S.I. [Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Eastern European National University, 13 Voli Avenue, 43025 Lutsk (Ukraine); Fedorchuk, A.O. [Department of Inorganic and Organic Chemistry, Lviv National University of Veterinary Medicine and Biotechnologies, 50 Pekarska Street, 79010 Lviv (Ukraine); Parasyuk, O.V. [Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Eastern European National University, 13 Voli Avenue, 43025 Lutsk (Ukraine)

    2016-04-01

    High-quality inclusion-free TlPbI{sub 3} single crystals have been grown using Bridgman–Stockbarger method. The electronic structure of TlPbI{sub 3} is studied by using the possibilities of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). For the TlPbI{sub 3} crystal, XPS core-level and valence-band spectra for both pristine and Ar{sup +} ion-bombarded surfaces are recorded. The present XPS data indicate that the TlPbI{sub 3} single crystal surface is somewhat sensitive with respect to Ar{sup +} ion-bombardment. In particular, the XPS measurements reveal that thallium and lead atoms are in the formal valence +1 and +2, respectively, on the pristine TlPbI{sub 3} single crystal surface. Further, the 3.0 keV Ar{sup +} ion-bombardment of the surface induces partial transformation of lead ions to lower valence state, namely Pb{sup 0}; however, no partial loss of iodine atoms belonging to TlI{sub 8} polyhedra occurs due to the Ar{sup +} ion-bombardment of the TlPbI{sub 3} surface because after such a treatment thallium remains exclusively in the formal valence +1. The present XPS results indicate that low hygroscopicity is characteristic of the TlPbI{sub 3} single crystal surface. Photoinduced birefringence profiles in TlPbI{sub 3} are explored. - Highlights: • High-quality TlPbI{sub 3} single crystals have been grown by Bridgman–Stockbarger method. • Electronic structure of TlPbI{sub 3} is studied by the XPS method. • XPS data reveal low hygroscopicity of TlPbI{sub 3} surface. • TlPbI{sub 3} single crystal surface is sensitive with respect to Ar{sup +} ion-bombardment. • Photoinduced birefringence profiles in TlPbI{sub 3} are explored.

  5. Single-electron capture collisions of ground and metastable Ne2+ ions with molecular gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, A.; Abu-Haija, O.; Harris, J.; Elkafrawy, T.; Kayani, A.; Kamber, E. Y.

    2013-09-01

    Using the translational energy-gain spectroscopy technique, we have measured the energy-gain spectra and absolute total cross sections for single-electron capture in collisions of Ne2+ with N2, CO2 and H2O at laboratory impact energies between 50 and 400 eV and 0° scattering angles. In all the collision systems studied here, reaction channels have been observed which indicate the presence of the long-lived metastable states of (2s2 2p4 1D and 1S) in the Ne2+ incident beam. These measurements also indicate that capture from the metastable states into excited states of the projectile product ions is the most important inelastic process. Contributions from capture accompanied by the excitation and ionization of the target product are also detected. In addition, the energy dependence of the total single-electron capture cross sections is studied and found to slowly increase with increasing impact energy. The present data are compared with the theoretical calculations of the classical over the barrier, extended classical over the barrier and Landau-Zener models.

  6. How to probe transverse magnetic anisotropy of a single-molecule magnet by electronic transport?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiorny, M.; Burzuri, E.; Gaudenzi, R.; Park, K.; Leijnse, M.; Wegewijs, M.; Paaske, J.; Cornia, A.; van der Zant, H.

    We propose an approach for in-situ determination of the transverse magnetic anisotropy (TMA) of an individual molecule by electronic transport measurements, see Phys. Rev. B 91, 035442 (2015). We study a Fe4 single-molecule magnet (SMM) captured in a gateable junction, a unique tool for addressing the spin in different redox states of a molecule. We show that, due to mixing of the spin eigenstates of the SMM, the TMA significantly manifests itself in transport. We predict and experimentally observe the pronounced intensity modulation of the Coulomb peak amplitude with the magnetic field in the linear-response transport regime, from which the TMA parameter E can be estimated. Importantly, the method proposed here does not rely on the small induced tunnelling effects and, hence, works well at temperatures and electron tunnel broadenings by far exceeding the tunnel splittings and even E itself. We deduce that the TMA for a single Fe4 molecule captured in a junction is substantially larger than the bulk value. Work supported by the Polish Ministry of Science and Education as `Iuventus Plus' project (IP2014 030973) in years 2015-2016.

  7. High-Precision Displacement Sensing of Monolithic Piezoelectric Disk Resonators Using a Single-Electron Transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Santos, J. T.; Sillanpää, M. A.

    2018-02-01

    A single-electron transistor (SET) can be used as an extremely sensitive charge detector. Mechanical displacements can be converted into charge, and hence, SETs can become sensitive detectors of mechanical oscillations. For studying small-energy oscillations, an important approach to realize the mechanical resonators is to use piezoelectric materials. Besides coupling to traditional electric circuitry, the strain-generated piezoelectric charge allows for measuring ultrasmall oscillations via SET detection. Here, we explore the usage of SETs to detect the shear-mode oscillations of a 6-mm-diameter quartz disk resonator with a resonance frequency around 9 MHz. We measure the mechanical oscillations using either a conventional DC SET, or use the SET as a homodyne or heterodyne mixer, or finally, as a radio-frequency single-electron transistor (RF-SET). The RF-SET readout is shown to be the most sensitive method, allowing us to measure mechanical displacement amplitudes below 10^{-13} m. We conclude that a detection based on a SET offers a potential to reach the sensitivity at the quantum limit of the mechanical vibrations.

  8. High resolution transmission electron microscopic study of nanoporous carbon consisting of curved single graphite sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgeois, L.N.; Bursill, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    A high resolution transmission electron microscopic study of a nanoporous carbon rich in curved graphite monolayers is presented. Observations of very thin regions. including the effect of tilting the specimen with respect to the electron beam, are reported. The initiation of single sheet material on an oriented graphite substrate is also observed. When combined with image simulations and independent measurements of the density (1.37g cm -3 ) and sp 3 /sp 2 +sp 2 bonding fraction (0.16), these observations suggest that this material is a two phase mixture containing a relatively low density aggregation of essentially capped single shells like squat nanotubes and polyhedra, plus a relatively dense 'amorphous' carbon structure which may be described using a random-Schwarzite model. Some negatively-curved sheets were also identified in the low density phase. Finally, some discussion is offered regarding the growth mechanisms responsible for this nanoporous carbon and its relationship with the structures of amorphous carbons across a broad range of densities, porosities and sp 3 /sp 2 +sp 3 bonding fractions

  9. High resolution transmission electron microscopic study of nanoporous carbon consisting of curved single graphite sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourgeois, L.N.; Bursill, L.A.

    1997-12-31

    A high resolution transmission electron microscopic study of a nanoporous carbon rich in curved graphite monolayers is presented. Observations of very thin regions. including the effect of tilting the specimen with respect to the electron beam, are reported. The initiation of single sheet material on an oriented graphite substrate is also observed. When combined with image simulations and independent measurements of the density (1.37g cm {sup -3}) and sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2}+sp{sup 2} bonding fraction (0.16), these observations suggest that this material is a two phase mixture containing a relatively low density aggregation of essentially capped single shells like squat nanotubes and polyhedra, plus a relatively dense `amorphous` carbon structure which may be described using a random-Schwarzite model. Some negatively-curved sheets were also identified in the low density phase. Finally, some discussion is offered regarding the growth mechanisms responsible for this nanoporous carbon and its relationship with the structures of amorphous carbons across a broad range of densities, porosities and sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2}+sp{sup 3} bonding fractions. 29 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Multi-species call-broadcast improved detection of endangered Yuma clapper rail compared to single-species call-broadcast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Christopher P.; Conway, Courtney J.; Piest, Linden; Burger, William P.

    2013-01-01

    Broadcasting calls of marsh birds during point-count surveys increases their detection probability and decreases variation in the number of birds detected across replicate surveys. However, multi-species monitoring using call-broadcast may reduce these benefits if birds are reluctant to call once they hear broadcasted calls of other species. We compared a protocol that uses call-broadcast for only one species (Yuma clapper rail [Rallus longirostris yumanensis]) to a protocol that uses call-broadcast for multiple species. We detected more of each of the following species using the multi-species protocol: 25 % more pied-billed grebes, 160 % more American bitterns, 52 % more least bitterns, 388 % more California black rails, 12 % more Yuma clapper rails, 156 % more Virginia rails, 214 % more soras, and 19 % more common gallinules. Moreover, the coefficient of variation was smaller when using the multi-species protocol: 10 % smaller for pied-billed grebes, 38 % smaller for American bitterns, 19 % smaller for least bitterns, 55 % smaller for California black rails, 5 % smaller for Yuma clapper rails, 38 % smaller for Virginia rails, 44 % smaller for soras, and 8 % smaller for common gallinules. Our results suggest that multi-species monitoring approaches may be more effective and more efficient than single-species approaches even when using call-broadcast.

  11. Total and single differential cross sections for the electron impact ionization of the ground state of helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, T.S.C.; Choudhury, K.B.; Singh, M.B.; Deb, N.C.; Mukherjee, S.C.; Mazumdar, P.S.

    1997-01-01

    Total cross sections (TCS) and single differential cross sections (SDCS) have been computed for the single ionization of the ground state of helium by electron impact in a distorted wave formalism which takes into account the effects of the initial and final channel distortions. The present TCS and SDCS results are in fair agreement with the measured values and other theoretical predictions for the incident electron energy E i > 150 eV. (orig.)

  12. First observation of two-electron one-photon transitions in single-photon K-shell double ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoszowska, J; Dousse, J-Cl; Szlachetko, J; Kayser, Y; Cao, W; Jagodziński, P; Kavčič, M; Nowak, S H

    2011-07-29

    Experimental evidence for the correlated two-electron one-photon transitions (1s(-2)→2s(-1)2p(-1)) following single-photon K-shell double ionization is reported. The double K-shell vacancy states in solid Mg, Al, and Si were produced by means of monochromatized synchrotron radiation, and the two-electron one-photon radiative transitions were observed by using a wavelength dispersive spectrometer. The two-electron one-photon transition energies and the branching ratios of the radiative one-electron to two-electron transitions were determined and compared to available perturbation theory predictions and configuration interaction calculations.

  13. Field electron emission characteristics and physical mechanism of individual single-layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhiming; She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi; Tang, Zikang; Li, Zhibing; Lu, Jianming; Xu, Ningsheng

    2010-11-23

    Due to its difficulty, experimental measurement of field emission from a single-layer graphene has not been reported, although field emission from a two-dimensional (2D) regime has been an attractive topic. The open surface and sharp edge of graphene are beneficial for field electron emission. A 2D geometrical effect, such as massless Dirac fermion, can lead to new mechanisms in field emission. Here, we report our findings from in situ field electron emission characterization on an individual singe-layer graphene and the understanding of the related mechanism. The measurement of field emission from the edges was done using a microanode probe equipped in a scanning electron microscope. We show that repeatable stable field emission current can be obtained after a careful conditioning process. This enables us to examine experimentally the typical features of the field emission from a 2D regime. We plot current versus applied field data, respectively, in ln(I/E(3/2)) ∼ 1/E and ln(I/E(3)) ∼ 1/E(2) coordinates, which have recently been proposed for field emission from graphene in high- and low-field regimes. It is observed that the plots all exhibit an upward bending feature, revealing that the field emission processes undergo from a low- to high-field transition. We discuss with theoretical analysis the physical mechanism responsible for the new phenomena.

  14. Probing quantum Hall states with single-electron transistors at high magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Martin; Yankowitz, Matthew; Forsythe, Carlos; Zhu, Xiaoyang; Dean, Cory

    The sequence of fractional quantum Hall states in graphene is not yet fully understood, largely due to disorder-induced limitations of conventional transport studies. Measurements of magnetotransport in other 2D crystals are further complicated by the difficulties in making ohmic contact to the materials. On the other hand, bulk electronic compressibility can provide clear signatures of the integer and fractional quantum Hall effects, does not require ohmic contact, and can be localized to regions of low disorder. The single-electron transistor (SET) is a suitable tool for such experiments due to its small size and high charge sensitivity, which allow electric fields penetrating the 2D electron system to be detected locally and with high fidelity. Here we report studies of exfoliated 2D van der Waals materials fully encapsulated in flakes of hexagonal boron nitride. SETs are fabricated lithographically on top of the encapsulation, yielding a structure which lends itself to experiments at high electric and magnetic fields. We demonstrate the method on monolayer graphene, where we observe fractional quantum Hall states at all filling factors ν = n / 3 up to n = 17 and extract their associated energy gaps for magnetic fields up to 31 tesla.

  15. Serial single molecule electron diffraction imaging: diffraction background of superfluid helium droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; He, Yunteng; Lei, Lei; Alghamdi, Maha; Oswalt, Andrew; Kong, Wei

    2017-08-01

    In an effort to solve the crystallization problem in crystallography, we have been engaged in developing a method termed "serial single molecule electron diffraction imaging" (SS-EDI). The unique features of SS-EDI are superfluid helium droplet cooling and field-induced orientation: together the two features constitute a molecular goniometer. Unfortunately, the helium atoms surrounding the sample molecule also contribute to a diffraction background. In this report, we analyze the properties of a superfluid helium droplet beam and its doping statistics, and demonstrate the feasibility of overcoming the background issue by using the velocity slip phenomenon of a pulsed droplet beam. Electron diffraction profiles and pair correlation functions of ferrocene-monomer-doped droplets and iodine-nanocluster-doped droplets are presented. The timing of the pulsed electron gun and the effective doping efficiency under different dopant pressures can both be controlled for size selection. This work clears any doubt of the effectiveness of superfluid helium droplets in SS-EDI, thereby advancing the effort in demonstrating the "proof-of-concept" one step further.

  16. Synthetical Analysis for Morphology, biological Species, and stable Isotopes (SAMSI) of single-cell planktonic foraminifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujiie, Y.; Kimoto, K.; Ishimura, T.

    2017-12-01

    Planktonic foraminifers are widely used in the studies of paleontology and paleoceanography, because the morphology of their calcareous shells is enough highly variable to identify the morphospecies and the chemical composition of the shells reflect ambient seawater condition. Although the morphospecies were believed to represent environments associating with latitudinal temperature range of the world ocean, molecular phylogeographic studies have unveiled the presence of multiple biological species in a single morphospecies and their species-specific distributions. This implicates the actual complexity of planktonic foraminiferal ecology. Conversely, these biological species have a high potential for providing novel ecological and environmental information to us. In order to reassess the morphological and geochemical characters of biological species, the DNA extraction method with the guanidium isothiocyanate buffer was developed to preserve the calcareous shells. The present study carefully tested the physical and chemical damages of the DNA extraction process to the shells, by our novel approaches with geochemical analysis of the shells after non-destructive analysis for morphometrics on a same specimen. First, we checked the changes of the shell densities between pre- and post-DNA extraction by using the micro-focus X-ray CT (MXCT) scanning. Based on the simultaneous measurement of a sample and the standard material, we confirmed no significant changes to the shell densities through the DNA extraction process. As a next step, we compared stable oxygen and carbon isotopes among individuals of three sample sets: (1) no chemical and incubation as control, (2) incubation in the DNA extraction buffer at 65-70°C for 40 minutes as standard way, and (3) incubation in the DNA extraction buffer at 65-70°C for 120 minutes, by using the microscale isotopic analytical system (MICAL3c). Consequently, there were no significant differences among the three sample sets. These

  17. Electronic properties of graphene with single vacancy and Stone-Wales defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaminpayma, Esmaeil [Physics Group, Qazvin Branch, Islamic Azad University, Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Razavi, Mohsen Emami, E-mail: razavi246@gmail.com [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 14665-678, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nayebi, Payman [Department of Physics, College of Technical and Engineering, Saveh Branch, Islamic Azad University, Saveh (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-08-31

    Highlights: • The electronic properties of graphene device with single vacancy (SV) and Stone-Wales (SW) defect have been studied. • The first principles calculations have been performed based on self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding. • The density of state, current voltage curves of pure graphene and graphene with SV and SW defects have been investigated. • Transmission spectrum of pristine graphene device and graphene with SV and SW defects has been examined. - Abstract: The first principles calculations have been performed based on self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding in order to examine the electronic properties of graphene with single vacancy (SV) and Stone-Wales (SW) defects. We have optimized structures of pristine graphene and graphene with SV and SW defects. The bond lengths, current-voltage curve and transmission probability have been calculated. We found that the bond length for relaxed graphene is 1.43 Å while for graphene with SV and SW defects the bond lengths are 1.41 Å and 1.33 Å, respectively. For the SV defect, the arrangement of atoms with three nearest neighbors indicates sp{sub 2} bonding. While for SW defect, the arrangement of atoms suggests nearly sp bonding. From the current-voltage curve for graphene with defects we have determined that the behavior of the I–V curves is nonlinear. It is also found that the SV and SW defects cause to decrease the current compared to the pristine graphene case. Furthermore, the single vacancy defect reduces the current more than the Stone-Wales defect. Moreover, we observed that by increasing the voltage from zero to 1 V new peaks near Fermi level in the transmission probability curves have been created.

  18. Design of a hybrid double-sideband/single-sideband (schlieren) objective aperture suitable for electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buijsse, Bart; Laarhoven, Frank M.H.M. van [FEI Company, PO Box 80066, 5600 KA Eindhoven (Netherlands); Schmid, Andreas K.; Cambie, Rossana; Cabrini, Stefano; Jin, Jian [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Glaeser, Robert M., E-mail: rmglaeser@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    A novel design is described for an aperture that blocks a half-plane of the electron diffraction pattern out to a desired scattering angle, and then - except for a narrow support beam - transmits all of the scattered electrons beyond that angle. Our proposed tulip-shaped design is thus a hybrid between the single-sideband (ssb) aperture, which blocks a full half-plane of the diffraction pattern, and the conventional (i.e. fully open) double-sideband (dsb) aperture. The benefits of this hybrid design include the fact that such an aperture allows one to obtain high-contrast images of weak-phase objects with the objective lens set to Scherzer defocus. We further demonstrate that such apertures can be fabricated from thin-foil materials by milling with a focused ion beam (FIB), and that such apertures are fully compatible with the requirements of imaging out to a resolution of at least 0.34 nm. As is known from earlier work with single-sideband apertures, however, the edge of such an aperture can introduce unwanted, electrostatic phase shifts due to charging. The principal requirement for using such an aperture in a routine data-collection mode is thus to discover appropriate materials, protocols for fabrication and processing and conditions of use such that the hybrid aperture remains free of charging over long periods of time. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New objective-aperture design is proposed for imaging weak-phase objects. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Design produces single-sideband contrast at low spatial frequencies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Design also retains Scherzer-defocus phase contrast at higher resolution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proof-of-concept results are presented for microfabricated apertures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Charging of such apertures during use remains an experimental challenge.

  19. Electronic properties of graphene with single vacancy and Stone-Wales defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaminpayma, Esmaeil; Razavi, Mohsen Emami; Nayebi, Payman

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The electronic properties of graphene device with single vacancy (SV) and Stone-Wales (SW) defect have been studied. • The first principles calculations have been performed based on self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding. • The density of state, current voltage curves of pure graphene and graphene with SV and SW defects have been investigated. • Transmission spectrum of pristine graphene device and graphene with SV and SW defects has been examined. - Abstract: The first principles calculations have been performed based on self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding in order to examine the electronic properties of graphene with single vacancy (SV) and Stone-Wales (SW) defects. We have optimized structures of pristine graphene and graphene with SV and SW defects. The bond lengths, current-voltage curve and transmission probability have been calculated. We found that the bond length for relaxed graphene is 1.43 Å while for graphene with SV and SW defects the bond lengths are 1.41 Å and 1.33 Å, respectively. For the SV defect, the arrangement of atoms with three nearest neighbors indicates sp 2 bonding. While for SW defect, the arrangement of atoms suggests nearly sp bonding. From the current-voltage curve for graphene with defects we have determined that the behavior of the I–V curves is nonlinear. It is also found that the SV and SW defects cause to decrease the current compared to the pristine graphene case. Furthermore, the single vacancy defect reduces the current more than the Stone-Wales defect. Moreover, we observed that by increasing the voltage from zero to 1 V new peaks near Fermi level in the transmission probability curves have been created.

  20. Theoretical analysis of the combined effects of sulfur vacancies and analyte adsorption on the electronic properties of single-layer MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdim, Brahim; Pachter, Ruth; Mou, Shin

    2016-05-01

    We report a first-principles theoretical investigation on the electronic structure and electron transport of defective single-layer (SL) MoS2, as well as of corresponding structures adsorbed with benzyl viologen (BV), which was shown to provide improved performance of a field effect transistor. O2 adsorption was included to gain an understanding of the response upon air-exposure. Following analysis of the structure and stability of sulfur single vacancy and line defects in SL MoS2, we investigated the local transport at the adsorbed sites via a transport model that mimics a scanning tunneling spectroscopy experiment. Distinct current-voltage characteristics were indicated for adsorbed oxygen species at a sulfur vacancy. The electronic structures of defective MoS2 indicated the emergence of impurity states in the bandgap due to sulfur defects and oxygen adsorption. Electron transport calculations for the MoS2 surface with an extended defect in a device setting demonstrated that physisorption of BV enhances the output current, while facile chemisorption by O2 upon air-exposure causes degradation of electron transport.

  1. Observation of Single Isolated Electrons of High Transverse Momentum in Events with Missing Transverse Energy at the CERN pp Collider

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banner, M.; Kofoed-Hansen, O.

    1983-01-01

    We report the results of a search for single isolated electrons of high transverse momentum at the CERN collider. Above 15 GeV/c, four events are found having large missing transverse energy along a direction opposite in azimuth to that of the high-pT electron. Both the configuration of the events...

  2. Generation and characterization of ultra-short electron beams for single spike infrared FEL radiation at SPARC_LAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, F.; Anania, M. P.; Artioli, M.; Bacci, A.; Bellaveglia, M.; Bisesto, F. G.; Biagioni, A.; Carpanese, M.; Cardelli, F.; Castorina, G.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Ciocci, F.; Croia, M.; Curcio, A.; Dattoli, G.; Gallo, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Palma, E.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Giannessi, L.; Giribono, A.; Marocchino, A.; Massimo, F.; Mostacci, A.; Petralia, A.; Petrarca, M.; Petrillo, V.; Piersanti, L.; Pioli, S.; Pompili, R.; Romeo, S.; Rossi, A. R.; Scifo, J.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2017-09-01

    The technique for producing and measuring few tens of femtosecond electron beams, and the consequent generation of few tens femtoseconds single spike FEL radiation pulses at SPARC_LAB is presented. The undulator has been used in the double role of radiation source and diagnostic tool for the characterization of the electron beam. The connection between the electron bunch length and the radiation bandwidth is analyzed.

  3. A deep convolutional neural network approach to single-particle recognition in cryo-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanan; Ouyang, Qi; Mao, Youdong

    2017-07-21

    Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has become a mainstream tool for the structural determination of biological macromolecular complexes. However, high-resolution cryo-EM reconstruction often requires hundreds of thousands of single-particle images. Particle extraction from experimental micrographs thus can be laborious and presents a major practical bottleneck in cryo-EM structural determination. Existing computational methods for particle picking often use low-resolution templates for particle matching, making them susceptible to reference-dependent bias. It is critical to develop a highly efficient template-free method for the automatic recognition of particle images from cryo-EM micrographs. We developed a deep learning-based algorithmic framework, DeepEM, for single-particle recognition from noisy cryo-EM micrographs, enabling automated particle picking, selection and verification in an integrated fashion. The kernel of DeepEM is built upon a convolutional neural network (CNN) composed of eight layers, which can be recursively trained to be highly "knowledgeable". Our approach exhibits an improved performance and accuracy when tested on the standard KLH dataset. Application of DeepEM to several challenging experimental cryo-EM datasets demonstrated its ability to avoid the selection of un-wanted particles and non-particles even when true particles contain fewer features. The DeepEM methodology, derived from a deep CNN, allows automated particle extraction from raw cryo-EM micrographs in the absence of a template. It demonstrates an improved performance, objectivity and accuracy. Application of this novel method is expected to free the labor involved in single-particle verification, significantly improving the efficiency of cryo-EM data processing.

  4. Brief communication: Is variation in the cranial capacity of the Dmanisi sample too high to be from a single species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hee

    2005-07-01

    This study uses data resampling to test the null hypothesis that the degree of variation in the cranial capacity of the Dmanisi hominid sample is within the range variation of a single species. The statistical significance of the variation in the Dmanisi sample is examined using simulated distributions based on comparative samples of modern humans, chimpanzees, and gorillas. Results show that it is unlikely to find the maximum difference observed in the Dmanisi sample in distributions of female-female pairs from comparative single-species samples. Given that two sexes are represented, the difference in the Dmanisi sample is not enough to reject the null hypothesis of a single species. Results of this study suggest no compelling reason to invoke multiple taxa to explain variation in the cranial capacity of the Dmanisi hominids. (c) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  5. Structure and Electronic Properties of In Situ Synthesized Single-Layer MoS2 on a Gold Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Signe Grønborg; Füchtbauer, Henrik Gøbel; Tuxen, Anders Kyrme

    2014-01-01

    with scanning tunneling microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization of two-dimensional single-layer islands of MoS2 synthesized directly on a gold single crystal substrate. Thanks to a periodic modulation of the atom stacking induced by the lattice mismatch, we observe a structural buckling...... structure appears modified at the band gap edges. This electronic effect is further modulated by the moiré periodicity and leads to small substrate-induced electronic perturbations near the conduction band minimum in the band gap of MoS2. The results may be highly relevant in the context of nanopatterned......When transition metal sulfides such as MoS2 are present in the single-layer form, the electronic properties change in fundamental ways, enabling them to be used, e.g., in two-dimensional semiconductor electronics, optoelectronics, and light harvesting. The change is related to a subtle modification...

  6. Dose rate effect on micronuclei induction in human blood lymphocytes exposed to single pulse and multiple pulses of electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Santhosh; Bhat, N N; Joseph, Praveen; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Sreedevi, B; Narayana, Y

    2011-05-01

    The effects of single pulses and multiple pulses of 7 MV electrons on micronuclei (MN) induction in cytokinesis-blocked human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) were investigated over a wide range of dose rates per pulse (instantaneous dose rate). PBLs were exposed to graded doses of 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 Gy of single electron pulses of varying pulse widths at different dose rates per pulse, ranging from 1 × 10(6) Gy s(-1) to 3.2 × 10(8) Gy s(-1). Different dose rates per pulse were achieved by changing the dose per electron pulse by adjusting the beam current and pulse width. MN yields per unit absorbed dose after irradiation with single electron pulses were compared with those of multiple pulses of electrons. A significant decrease in the MN yield with increasing dose rates per pulse was observed, when dose was delivered by a single electron pulse. However, no reduction in the MN yield was observed when dose was delivered by multiple pulses of electrons. The decrease in the yield at high dose rates per pulse suggests possible radical recombination, which leads to decreased biological damage. Cellular response to the presence of very large numbers of chromosomal breaks may also alter the damage.

  7. Can we predict performance and spatial structure of two-species mixtures using only single species information from monocultures?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yu, F.-H.; Herben, Tomáš; Wildová, Radka; Hershock, C.; Goldberg, D. E.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 234, Sp. iss. (2012), s. 31-37 ISSN 0304-3800 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/09/1471 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : model * mixture * species Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.069, year: 2012

  8. Reconciling single-species TACs in the North Sea demersal fisheries using the Fcube mixed-fisheries advice framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Clara; Reeves, Stuart A.; Vermard, Youen

    2011-01-01

    be exhausted before the TAC of another, leading to catches of valuable fish that cannot be landed legally. This important issue is, however, usually not quantified and not accounted for in traditional management advice. A simple approach using traditional catch and effort information was developed, estimating...... in the North Sea and shaped into the advice framework. The substantial overquota catches of North Sea cod likely under the current fisheries regimes are quantified, and it is estimated that the single-species management targets for North Sea cod cannot be achieved unless substantial reductions in TACs of all......Single-species management is a cause of discarding in mixed fisheries, because individual management objectives may not be consistent with each other and the species are caught simultaneously in relatively unselective fishing operations. As such, the total allowable catch (TAC) of one species may...

  9. Single-Electron Transfer Living Radical Polymerization Platform to Practice, Develop, and Invent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lligadas, Gerard; Grama, Silvia; Percec, Virgil

    2017-10-09

    The most fundamental aspects of single-electron transfer (SET) principles are presented. They are discussed according to different definitions used by expert practitioners and are applied to SET living radical polymerization (SET-LRP) according to the definition of the division of organic chemistry of IUPAC that relies on principles elaborated by Taube, Eberson, Chanon, and Kochi. Additional definitions are also discussed to help clarify for the nonexpert contradictory literature reports. Subsequently, the principles and evolution of SET-LRP together with the methodologies currently available to practice it are discussed. It is expected that this Perspective will be able to help experts and nonexperts practice, develop, and invent new concepts and methodologies for SET-LRP to advance its status and the status of other living radical polymerization methods to the level of the most precise living polymerization methods.

  10. Hemicellulose-based multifunctional macroinitiator for single-electron-transfer mediated living radical polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voepel, Jens; Edlund, Ulrica; Albertsson, Ann-Christine; Percec, Virgil

    2011-01-10

    A multifunctional macroinitiator for single-electron-transfer mediated living radical polymerization (SET-LRP) was designed from acetylated galactoglucomannan (AcGGM) by α-bromoisobutyric acid functionalization of the anomeric hydroxyl groups on the heteropolysaccharide backbone. This macroinitiator, with a degree of substitution of 0.15, was used in the SET-LRP of methyl acrylate, catalyzed by Cu(0)/Me(6)-TREN in DMSO, DMF, or DMSO/H(2)O in various concentrations. Kinetic analyses confirm high conversions of up to 99.98% and a living behavior of the SET-LRP process providing high molecular weight hemicelluloses/methyl acrylate hybrid copolymers with a brush-like architecture.

  11. Effect of crystal orientation on conductivity and electron mobility in single-crystal alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Fritz G.; Delorenzi, Horst G.; Janora, Kevin H.

    1992-01-01

    The electrical conductivity of high-purity, single-crystal alumina is determined parallel to and perpendicular to the c-axis. The mean conductivity of four samples of each orientation is a factor 3.3 higher parallel to the c-axis than perpendicular to it. The conductivity as a function of temperature is attributed to extrinsic electron conduction at temperatures from 400 to 900 C, and intrinsic semiconduction at temperatures from 900 to 1300 C. In the high-temperature regime, the slope on all eight specimens is 4.7 +/- 0.1 eV. Hence, the thermal bandgap at O K is 9.4 +/- 0.2 eV.

  12. Optically driven Rabi oscillations and adiabatic passage of single electron spins in diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golter, D Andrew; Wang, Hailin

    2014-03-21

    Rabi oscillations and adiabatic passage of single electron spins in a diamond nitrogen vacancy center are demonstrated with two Raman-resonant optical pulses that are detuned from the respective dipole optical transitions. We show that the optical spin control is nuclear-spin selective and can be robust against rapid decoherence, including radiative decay and spectral diffusion, of the underlying optical transitions. A direct comparison between the Rabi oscillation and the adiabatic passage, along with a detailed theoretical analysis, provides significant physical insights into the connections and differences between these coherent spin processes and also elucidates the role of spectral diffusion in these processes. The optically driven coherent spin processes enable the use of nitrogen vacancy excited states to mediate coherent spin-phonon coupling, opening the door to combining optical control of both spin and mechanical degrees of freedom.

  13. Electronic fine structure and recombination dynamics in single InAs quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seguin, R.

    2008-01-01

    In the work at hand single InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) are examined via cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. A thorough analysis of the spectra leads to an unambiguous assignment of the lines to the decay of specific excitonic complexes. A special aspect of the Coulomb interaction, the exchange interaction, gives rise to a fine structure in the initial and final states of an excitonic decay. This leads to a fine structure in the emission spectra that again is unique for every excitonic complex. The exchange interaction is discussed in great detail in this work.QDs of different sizes are investigated and the influence on the electronic properties is monitored. Additionally, the structure is modified ex situ by a thermal annealing process. The changes of the spectra under different annealing temperatures are traced. Finally, recombination dynamics of different excitonic complexes are examined by performing time-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. (orig.)

  14. Microwave measurements of energy lost to longitudinal modes by single electron bunches traversing periodic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.W.; Loew, G.A.; Weaver, J.N.; Wilson, P.B.

    1981-10-01

    In the design of future linear colliders, it will be important to minimize the loss of beam energy due to the excitation of higher-order modes in the accelerator structure by single bunches of electrons or positrons. This loss is not only detrimental in itself but also gives rise to energy spectrum widening and transverse emittance growth. Microwave measurements made on disk-loaded and alternating-spoke structures to determine the loss to the longitudinal modes are described. In these measurements the Gaussian bunch is simulated by a current pulse of the same shape transmitted through the structure on an axial center conductor. Results to date are presented for the total longitudinal loss parameter per period K in volts per picocoulomb

  15. Electronic fine structure and recombination dynamics in single InAs quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seguin, R.

    2008-01-28

    In the work at hand single InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) are examined via cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. A thorough analysis of the spectra leads to an unambiguous assignment of the lines to the decay of specific excitonic complexes. A special aspect of the Coulomb interaction, the exchange interaction, gives rise to a fine structure in the initial and final states of an excitonic decay. This leads to a fine structure in the emission spectra that again is unique for every excitonic complex. The exchange interaction is discussed in great detail in this work.QDs of different sizes are investigated and the influence on the electronic properties is monitored. Additionally, the structure is modified ex situ by a thermal annealing process. The changes of the spectra under different annealing temperatures are traced. Finally, recombination dynamics of different excitonic complexes are examined by performing time-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. (orig.)

  16. Measurement of quantum noise in a single-electron transistor near the quantum limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, W. W.; Ji, Z.; Pan, Feng; Stettenheim, Joel; Blencowe, M. P.; Rimberg, A. J.

    2009-09-01

    Quantum measurement has challenged physicists for almost a century. Classically, there is no lower bound on the noise a measurement may add. Quantum mechanically, however, measuring a system necessarily perturbs it. When applied to electrical amplifiers, this means that improved sensitivity requires increased backaction that itself contributes noise. The result is a strict quantum limit on added amplifier noise. To approach this limit, a quantum-limited amplifier must possess an ideal balance between sensitivity and backaction; furthermore, its noise must dominate that of subsequent classical amplifiers. Here, we report the first complete and quantitative measurement of the quantum noise of a superconducting single-electron transistor (S-SET) near a double Cooper-pair resonance predicted to have the right combination of sensitivity and backaction. A simultaneous measurement of our S-SET's charge sensitivity indicates that it operates within a factor of 3.6 of the quantum limit, a fourfold improvement over the nearest comparable results.

  17. A clustering approach to multireference alignment of single-particle projections in electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorzano, C O S; Bilbao-Castro, J R; Shkolnisky, Y; Alcorlo, M; Melero, R; Caffarena-Fernández, G; Li, M; Xu, G; Marabini, R; Carazo, J M

    2010-08-01

    Two-dimensional analysis of projections of single-particles acquired by an electron microscope is a useful tool to help identifying the different kinds of projections present in a dataset and their different projection directions. Such analysis is also useful to distinguish between different kinds of particles or different particle conformations. In this paper we introduce a new algorithm for performing two-dimensional multireference alignment and classification that is based on a Hierarchical clustering approach using correntropy (instead of the more traditional correlation) and a modified criterion for the definition of the clusters specially suited for cases in which the Signal-to-Noise Ratio of the differences between classes is low. We show that our algorithm offers an improved sensitivity over current methods in use for distinguishing between different projection orientations and different particle conformations. This algorithm is publicly available through the software package Xmipp. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Random telegraph signals by alkanethiol-protected Au nanoparticles in chemically assembled single-electron transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kano, Shinya; Azuma, Yasuo; Tanaka, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Masanori; Teranishi, Toshiharu; Smith, Luke W.; Smith, Charles G.; Majima, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    We have studied random telegraph signals (RTSs) in a chemically assembled single-electron transistor (SET) at temperatures as low as 300 mK. The RTSs in the chemically assembled SET were investigated by measuring the source–drain current, using a histogram of the RTS dwell time, and calculating the power spectrum density of the drain current–time characteristics. It was found that the dwell time of the RTS was dependent on the drain voltage of the SET, but was independent of the gate voltage. Considering the spatial structure of the chemically assembled SET, the origin of the RTS is attributed to the trapped charges on an alkanethiol-protected Au nanoparticle positioned near the SET. These results are important as they will help to realize stable chemically assembled SETs in practical applications

  19. Single electron detachment of carbon group and oxygen group elements incident on helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yongyi; Li Guangwu; Gao Yinghui; Yang Enbo; Gao Mei; Lu Fuquan; Zhang Xuemei

    2006-01-01

    The absolute single electron detachment (SED) cross sections of carbon group elements C - , Si - , Ge - in the energy range of 0.05-0.29 a.u. (5 keV-30 keV) and oxygen group elements O - and S - 0.08-0.27 a.u. (5 keV-30 keV), incident on helium are measured with growth rate method. In our energy region, the SED cross sections of C - , Si - , S - and Ge - increase with the projectiles velocity, at the same time, O - cross sections reach a conspicuous maximum at 0.18 a.u. Some abnormal behavior occurs in measurement of SED cross sections for the oxygen group collision with helium. Our results have been compared with a previous work

  20. Influence of Polymer Electronics on Selective Dispersion of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Darryl; Bodnaryk, William J; Rice, Nicole A; Saem, Sokunthearath; Moran-Mirabal, Jose M; Adronov, Alex

    2016-10-04

    The separation and isolation of semiconducting and metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on a large scale remains a barrier to many commercial applications. Selective extraction of semiconducting SWNTs by wrapping and dispersion with conjugated polymers has been demonstrated to be effective, but the structural parameters of conjugated polymers that dictate selectivity are poorly understood. Here, we report nanotube dispersions with a poly(fluorene-co-pyridine) copolymer and its cationic methylated derivative, and show that electron-deficient conjugated π-systems bias the dispersion selectivity toward metallic SWNTs. Differentiation of semiconducting and metallic SWNT populations was carried out by a combination of UV/Vis-NIR absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and electrical conductivity measurements. These results provide new insight into the rational design of conjugated polymers for the selective dispersion of metallic SWNTs. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. A measure of localization properties of one-dimensional single electron lattice systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Longyan; Li, Wenjia; Zhao, Shengmei; Cheng, Weiwen

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel quantity to measure the degree of localization properties of various types of one-dimension single electron states. The quantity includes information about the spatial variation of probability density of quantum states. Numerical results show that it can distinguish localized states from delocalized ones, so it can be used as a fruitful index to monitor the localization–delocalization transition. Comparing with existing measures, such as geometric average density of states, inverse participation ratio, and quantum information entropies, our proposed quantity has some advantages over them. - Highlights: • A novel quantity is proposed to measure the degree of localization. • It includes information about the spatial variation of probability density. • It is a fruitful index to monitor the localization–delocalization transition.

  2. Simple and controlled single electron transistor based on doping modulation in silicon nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofheinz, M.; Jehl, X.; Sanquer, M.; Molas, G.; Vinet, M.; Deleonibus, S.

    2006-10-01

    A simple and highly reproducible single electron transistor (SET) has been fabricated using gated silicon nanowires. The structure is a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor made on silicon-on-insulator thin films. The channel of the transistor is the Coulomb island at low temperature. Two silicon nitride spacers deposited on each side of the gate create a modulation of doping along the nanowire that creates tunnel barriers. Such barriers are fixed and controlled, like in metallic SETs. The period of the Coulomb oscillations is set by the gate capacitance of the transistor and therefore controlled by lithography. The source and drain capacitances have also been characterized. This design could be used to build more complex SET devices.

  3. Electronic properties of dislocations introduced mechanically at room temperature on a single crystal silicon surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Masatoshi; Kamiya, Shoji; Izumi, Hayato; Tokuda, Yutaka

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the effects of temperature and environment on the electronic properties of dislocations in n-type single crystal silicon near the surface. Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) analyses were carried out with Schottky electrodes and p + -n junctions. The trap level, originally found at E C -0.50 eV (as commonly reported), shifted to a shallower level at E C -0.23 eV after a heat treatment at 350 K in an inert environment. The same heat treatment in lab air, however, did not cause any shift. The trap level shifted by the heat treatment in an inert environment was found to revert back to the original level when the specimens were exposed to lab air again. Therefore, the intrinsic trap level is expected to occur at E C -0.23 eV and shift sensitively with gas adsorption in air.

  4. Growth and electronic structure of single-layered transition metal dichalcogenides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dendzik, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene has opened a novel research direction focused on the properties of 2D materials. Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) were quickly identified as important materials due to the great variety of electronic properties that they manifest – properties that are markedly...... different from graphene’s. For example, semiconducting TMDCs undergo an indirectdirect band gap transition when thinned to a single layer (SL); this results in greatly enhanced photoluminescence, making those materials attractive for applications in optoelectronics. Furthermore, metallic TMDCs can host...... TMDCs is directly studied with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. Experimental results are compared with density-functional theory calculations (DFT), both for a free-standing layer and for a layer adsorbed on a metallic substrate...

  5. A practical theoretical formalism for atomic multielectron processes: direct multiple ionization by a single auger decay or by impact of a single electron or photon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pengfei; Zeng, Jiaolong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2018-04-01

    Multiple electron processes occur widely in atoms, molecules, clusters, and condensed matters when they are interacting with energetic particles or intense laser fields. Direct multielectron processes (DMEP) are the most complicated among the general multiple electron processes and are the most difficult to describe theoretically. In this work, a unified and accurate theoretical formalism is proposed on the DMEP of atoms including the multiple auger decay and multiple ionization by an impact of a single electron or a single photon based on the atomic collision theory described by a correlated many-body Green's function. Such a practical treatment is made possible by taking consideration of the different coherence features of the atoms (matter waves) in the initial and final states. We first explain how the coherence characteristics of the ejected continuum electrons is largely destructed, by taking the electron impact direct double ionization process as an example. The direct double ionization process is completely different from the single ionization where the complete interference can be maintained. The detailed expressions are obtained for the energy correlations among the continuum electrons and energy resolved differential and integral cross sections according to the separation of knock-out (KO) and shake-off (SO) mechanisms for the electron impact direct double ionization, direct double and triple auger decay, and double and triple photoionization (TPI) processes. Extension to higher order DMEP than triple ionization is straight forward by adding contributions of the following KO and SO processes. The approach is applied to investigate the electron impact double ionization processes of C+, N+, and O+, the direct double and triple auger decay of the K-shell excited states of C+ 1s2{s}22{p}2{}2D and {}2P, and the double and TPI of lithium. Comparisons with the experimental and other theoretical investigations wherever available in the literature show that our

  6. Identification of two-step chemical mechanisms using small temperature oscillations and a single tagged species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Closa, F; Gosse, C; Jullien, L; Lemarchand, A

    2015-05-07

    In order to identify two-step chemical mechanisms, we propose a method based on a small temperature modulation and on the analysis of the concentration oscillations of a single tagged species involved in the first step. The thermokinetic parameters of the first reaction step are first determined. Then, we build test functions that are constant only if the chemical system actually possesses some assumed two-step mechanism. Next, if the test functions plotted using experimental data are actually even, the mechanism is attributed and the obtained constant values provide the rate constants and enthalpy of reaction of the second step. The advantage of the protocol is to use the first step as a probe reaction to reveal the dynamics of the second step, which can hence be relieved of any tagging. The protocol is anticipated to apply to many mechanisms of biological relevance. As far as ligand binding is considered, our approach can address receptor conformational changes or dimerization as well as competition with or modulation by a second partner. The method can also be used to screen libraries of untagged compounds, relying on a tracer whose concentration can be spectroscopically monitored.

  7. Single and dual drug selection for transgenes following bombardment of Caenorhabditis species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, Jennifer I; Lehner, Ben

    2014-08-01

    The use of drugs and drug resistance genes is a powerful method to select for the presence of a transgene. Unlike methods that require the complementation of a genetic mutation, this system can be used on any genetic background. Drug selection does not require extensive manipulation or costly equipment, yet it is very rapid and can achieve extremely high efficiency, selecting a small number of transgenic worms from among millions of non-transgenic worms. Introducing integrated transgenes into Caenorhabditis elegans by microparticle bombardment represents just such a challenge. Here we describe in detail the protocol we have developed for dual-drug selection in liquid with puromycin and G418 which works well in a variety of Caenorhabditis species. We also show that single drug selection with only puromycin or only G418 is effective in C. elegans. The growing number of drug selection markers that have been adapted to C. elegans are an important addition to the genetic toolkit at our disposal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A deep-sea agglutinated foraminifer tube constructed with planktonic foraminifer shells of a single species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Paul N.; Expedition 363 Shipboard Scientific Party, IODP

    2018-01-01

    Agglutinated foraminifera are marine protists that show apparently complex behaviour in constructing their shells, involving selecting suitable sedimentary grains from their environment, manipulating them in three dimensions, and cementing them precisely into position. Here we illustrate a striking and previously undescribed example of complex organisation in fragments of a tube-like foraminifer (questionably assigned to Rhabdammina) from 1466 m water depth on the northwest Australian margin. The tube is constructed from well-cemented siliciclastic grains which form a matrix into which hundreds of planktonic foraminifer shells are regularly spaced in apparently helical bands. These shells are of a single species, Turborotalita clarkei, which has been selected to the exclusion of all other bioclasts. The majority of shells are set horizontally in the matrix with the umbilical side upward. This mode of construction, as is the case with other agglutinated tests, seems to require either an extraordinarily selective trial-and-error process at the site of cementation or an active sensory and decision-making system within the cell.

  9. Comparative Analysis of Single-Species and Polybacterial Wound Biofilms Using a Quantitative, In Vivo, Rabbit Ear Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    biofilm behavior of mixed-species cultures with dental and periodontal pathogens. PLoS One 5(10): 131–135. 47. Ma H, Bryers JD (2010) Non-invasive method...Comparative Analysis of Single-Species and Polybacterial Wound Biofilms Using a Quantitative, In Vivo, Rabbit Ear Model Akhil K. Seth1*, Matthew R...Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America, 2 Microbiology Branch, US Army Dental and Trauma Research Detachment, Institute of Surgical

  10. High-Purity Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: A Key Enabling Material in Emerging Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Jacques; Ding, Jianfu; Li, Zhao; Finnie, Paul; Lopinski, Gregory; Malenfant, Patrick R L

    2017-10-17

    Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWCNTs) are emerging as a promising material for high-performance, high-density devices as well as low-cost, large-area macroelectronics produced via additive manufacturing methods such as roll-to-roll printing. Proof-of-concept demonstrations have indicated the potential of sc-SWCNTs for digital electronics, radiofrequency circuits, radiation hard memory, improved sensors, and flexible, stretchable, conformable electronics. Advances toward commercial applications bring numerous opportunities in SWCNT materials development and characterization as well as fabrication processes and printing technologies. Commercialization in electronics will require large quantities of sc-SWCNTs, and the challenge for materials science is the development of scalable synthesis, purification, and enrichment methods. While a few synthesis routes have shown promising results in making near-monochiral SWCNTs, gram quantities are available only for small-diameter sc-SWCNTs, which underperform in transistors. Most synthesis routes yield mixtures of SWCNTs, typically 30% metallic and 70% semiconducting, necessitating the extraction of sc-SWCNTs from their metallic counterparts in high purity using scalable postsynthetic methods. Numerous routes to obtain high-purity sc-SWCNTs from raw soot have been developed, including density-gradient ultracentrifugation, chromatography, aqueous two-phase extraction, and selective DNA or polymer wrapping. By these methods (termed sorting or enrichment), >99% sc-SWCNT content can be achieved. Currently, all of these approaches have drawbacks and limitations with respect to electronics applications, such as excessive dilution, expensive consumables, and high ionic impurity content. Excess amount of dispersant is a common challenge that hinders direct inclusion of sc-SWCNTs into electronic devices. At present, conjugated polymer extraction may represent the most practical route to sc-SWCNTs. By the use of

  11. Inelastic tunneling of electrons through a quantum dot with an embedded single molecular magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Bo; Liang, J.-Q.

    2010-06-01

    We report a theoretical analysis of electron transport through a quantum dot with an embedded biaxial single-molecule magnet (SMM) based on mapping of the many-body interaction-system onto a one-body problem by means of the non-equilibrium Green function technique. It is found that the conducting current exhibits a stepwise behavior and the nonlinear differential conductance displays additional peaks with variation of the sweeping speed and the magnitude of magnetic field. This observation can be interpreted by the interaction of electron-spin with the SMM and the quantum tunneling of magnetization. The inelastic conductance and the corresponding tunneling processes are investigated with normal as well as ferromagnetic electrodes. In the case of ferromagnetic configuration, the coupling to the SMM leads to an asymmetric tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR), which can be enhanced or suppressed greatly in certain regions. Moreover, a sudden TMR-switch with the variation of magnetic field is observed, which is seen to be caused by the inelastic tunneling.

  12. Inelastic tunneling of electrons through a quantum dot with an embedded single molecular magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang Bo [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006 (China); Liang, J.-Q., E-mail: jqliang@sxu.edu.c [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006 (China)

    2010-06-28

    We report a theoretical analysis of electron transport through a quantum dot with an embedded biaxial single-molecule magnet (SMM) based on mapping of the many-body interaction-system onto a one-body problem by means of the non-equilibrium Green function technique. It is found that the conducting current exhibits a stepwise behavior and the nonlinear differential conductance displays additional peaks with variation of the sweeping speed and the magnitude of magnetic field. This observation can be interpreted by the interaction of electron-spin with the SMM and the quantum tunneling of magnetization. The inelastic conductance and the corresponding tunneling processes are investigated with normal as well as ferromagnetic electrodes. In the case of ferromagnetic configuration, the coupling to the SMM leads to an asymmetric tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR), which can be enhanced or suppressed greatly in certain regions. Moreover, a sudden TMR-switch with the variation of magnetic field is observed, which is seen to be caused by the inelastic tunneling.

  13. Single- and Multiple-Electron Removal Processes in Proton-Water Vapor Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Mitsuko; Kirchner, Tom; Horbatsch, Marko; Jürgen Lüdde, Hans

    2012-06-01

    Charge-state correlated cross sections for single- and multiple-electron removal processes due to capture and ionization in proton-H2O collisions are calculated by using the non-perturbative basis generator method adapted for ion-molecule collisions [1]. Orbital-specific cross sections for vacancy production are evaluated using this method to predict the yields of charged fragments (H2O^+, OH^+, H^+, O^+) according to branching ratios known to be valid at high impact energies. At intermediate and low energies, we obtain fragmentation results on the basis of predicted multi-electron removal cross sections, and explain most of the available experimental data [2]. The cross sections for charge transfer and for ionization are also compared with recent multi-center classical-trajectory Monte Carlo calculations [3] for impact energies from 20keV to several MeV. [4pt] [1] H.J. L"udde et al, Phys. Rev. A 80, 060702(R) (2009)[0pt] [2] M. Murakami et al, to be submitted to Phys. Rev. A (2012)[0pt] [3] C. Illescas et al, Phys. Rev. A 83, 052704 (2011)

  14. Direct exchange between silicon nanocrystals and tunnel oxide traps under illumination on single electron photodetector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatbouri, S., E-mail: Samir.chatbouri@yahoo.com; Troudi, M.; Sghaier, N.; Kalboussi, A. [Avenue de I’environnement, Université de Monastir, Laboratoire de Micro électronique et Instrumentation (LR13ES12), Faculté des Sciences de Monastir (Tunisia); Aimez, V. [Université de Sherbrooke, Laboratoire Nanotechnologies et Nanosystémes (UMI-LN2 3463), Université de Sherbrooke—CNRS—INSA de Lyon-ECL-UJF-CPE Lyon, Institut Interdisciplinaire d’Innovation Technologique (Canada); Drouin, D. [Avenue de I’environnement, Université de Monastir, Laboratoire de Micro électronique et Instrumentation (LR13ES12), Faculté des Sciences de Monastir (Tunisia); Souifi, A. [Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon—site INSA de Lyon, UMR CNRS 5270 (France)

    2016-09-15

    In this paper we present the trapping of photogenerated charge carriers for 300 s resulted by their direct exchange under illumination between a few silicon nanocrystals (ncs-Si) embedded in an oxide tunnel layer (SiO{sub x} = 1.5) and the tunnel oxide traps levels for a single electron photodetector (photo-SET or nanopixel). At first place, the presence of a photocurrent limited in the inversion zone under illumination in the I–V curves confirms the creation of a pair electron/hole (e–h) at high energy. This photogenerated charge carriers can be trapped in the oxide. Using the capacitance-voltage under illumination (the photo-CV measurements) we show a hysteresis chargement limited in the inversion area, indicating that the photo-generated charge carriers are stored at traps levels at the interface and within ncs-Si. The direct exchange of the photogenerated charge carriers between the interface traps levels and the ncs-Si contributed on the photomemory effect for 300 s for our nanopixel at room temperature.

  15. Engineering of electronic properties of single layer graphene by swift heavy ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Kumar, Ashish; Tripathi, Ambuj; Tyagi, Chetna; Avasthi, D. K.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, swift heavy ion irradiation induced effects on the electrical properties of single layer graphene are reported. The modulation in minimum conductivity point in graphene with in-situ electrical measurement during ion irradiation was studied. It is found that the resistance of graphene layer decreases at lower fluences up to 3 × 1011 ions/cm2, which is accompanied by the five-fold increase in electron and hole mobilities. The ion irradiation induced increase in electron and hole mobilities at lower fluence up to 1 × 1011 ions/cm2 is verified by separate Hall measurements on another irradiated graphene sample at the selected fluence. In contrast to the adverse effects of irradiation on the electrical properties of materials, we have found improvement in electrical mobility after irradiation. The increment in mobility is explained by considering the defect annealing in graphene after irradiation at a lower fluence regime. The modification in carrier density after irradiation is also observed. Based on findings of the present work, we suggest ion beam irradiation as a useful tool for tuning of the electrical properties of graphene.

  16. Density-Functional Theory description of transport in the single-electron transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadzki, Krissia; Oliveira, Luiz N.

    The Kondo effect governs the low-temperature transport properties of the single electron transistor (SET), a quantum dot bridging two electron gases. In the weak coupling limit, for odd dot occupation, the gate-potential profile of the conductance approaches a step, known as the Kondo plateau. The plateau and other SET properties being well understood on the basis of the Anderson model, more realistic (i. e., DFT) descriptions of the device are now desired. This poses a challenge, since the SET is strongly correlated. DFT computations that reproduce the conductance plateau have been reported, e. g., by, which rely on the exact functional provided by the Bethe-Ansatz solution for the Anderson model. Here, sticking to DFT tradition, we employ a functional derived from a homogeneous system: the parametrization of the Lieb-Wu solution for the Hubbard model due to. Our computations reproduce the plateau and yield other results in accurate agreement with the exact diagonalization of the Anderson Hamiltonian. The prospects for extensions to realistic descriptions of two-dimensional nanostructured devices will be discussed. Luiz N. Oliveira thanks CNPq (312658/2013-3) and Krissia Zawadzki thanks CNPq (140703/2014-4) for financial support.

  17. Effect of tubular chiralities of single-walled ZnO nanotubes on electronic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qin; Liu, Zhenghui; Zhou, Liping; Yu, Yiqing; Wu, Xuemei

    2017-04-01

    The electronic transport properties of single-walled ZnO nanotubes with different chiralities are investigated by nonequilibrium Green's function combined with density functional theory. In this paper we consider three representative ZnO nanotubes, namely (3, 3) armchair, (5, 0) zigzag, and (4, 2) chiral, with a similar diameter of about 5.4 Å. Short nanotubes exhibit good conductance behavior. As the tube length increases, the conductance decreases at low bias and the nanotubes indicate semiconducting behavior. The current-voltage characteristics of the nanotubes longer than 3 nm depend weakly on the length of the tubes. The armchair and chiral ZnO nanotubes with the same length and diameter have almost overlapped current-voltage curves. The electron transport behaviors are analyzed in terms of the transmission spectra, density of states and charge population of these nanotubes. The results indicate that the resonant peaks above the Fermi level are responsible for electric currents. However, the zigzag ZnO nanotubes exhibit asymmetric current-voltage curves attributed to the built-in polarization field and give larger current than the armchair and chiral nanotubes at the same bias. The features explored here strongly suggest that the ZnO nanotubes are stable, flexible structures, which are valuable in Nano-Electromechanical System.

  18. Local Electronic Structure of a Single-Layer Porphyrin-Containing Covalent Organic Framework

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Chen

    2017-12-20

    We have characterized the local electronic structure of a porphyrin-containing single-layer covalent organic framework (COF) exhibiting a square lattice. The COF monolayer was obtained by the deposition of 2,5-dimethoxybenzene-1,4-dicarboxaldehyde (DMA) and 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-aminophenyl) porphyrin (TAPP) onto a Au(111) surface in ultrahigh vacuum followed by annealing to facilitate Schiff-base condensations between monomers. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) experiments conducted on isolated TAPP precursor molecules and the covalently linked COF networks yield similar transport (HOMO-LUMO) gaps of 1.85 ± 0.05 eV and 1.98 ± 0.04 eV, respectively. The COF orbital energy alignment, however, undergoes a significant downward shift compared to isolated TAPP molecules due to the electron-withdrawing nature of the imine bond formed during COF synthesis. Direct imaging of the COF local density of states (LDOS) via dI/dV mapping reveals that the COF HOMO and LUMO states are localized mainly on the porphyrin cores and that the HOMO displays reduced symmetry. DFT calculations reproduce the imine-induced negative shift in orbital energies and reveal that the origin of the reduced COF wave function symmetry is a saddle-like structure adopted by the porphyrin macrocycle due to its interactions with the Au(111) substrate.

  19. Electronic and optical properties of vacancy defects in single-layer transition metal dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. A.; Erementchouk, Mikhail; Hendrickson, Joshua; Leuenberger, Michael N.

    2017-06-01

    A detailed first-principles study has been performed to evaluate the electronic and optical properties of single-layer (SL) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) (M X 2 ; M = transition metal such as Mo, W, and X = S, Se, Te), in the presence of vacancy defects (VDs). Defects usually play an important role in tailoring electronic, optical, and magnetic properties of semiconductors. We consider three types of VDs in SL TMDCs: (i) X vacancy, (ii) X2 vacancy, and (iii) M vacancy. We show that VDs lead to localized defect states (LDS) in the band structure, which in turn gives rise to sharp transitions in in-plane and out-of-plane optical susceptibilities, χ∥ and χ⊥. The effects of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) are also considered. We find that SOC splitting in LDS is directly related to the atomic number of the transition metal atoms. Apart from electronic and optical properties we also find magnetic signatures (local magnetic moment of ˜μB ) in MoSe2 in the presence of the Mo vacancy, which breaks the time-reversal symmetry and therefore lifts the Kramers degeneracy. We show that a simple qualitative tight-binding model (TBM), involving only the hopping between atoms surrounding the vacancy with an on-site SOC term, is sufficient to capture the essential features of LDS. In addition, the existence of the LDS can be understood from the solution of the two-dimensional Dirac Hamiltonian by employing infinite mass boundary conditions. In order to provide a clear description of the optical absorption spectra, we use group theory to derive the optical selection rules between LDS for both χ∥ and χ⊥.

  20. In Silico Modeling of Indigo and Tyrian Purple Single-Electron Nano-Transistors Using Density Functional Theory Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shityakov, Sergey; Roewer, Norbert; Förster, Carola; Broscheit, Jens-Albert

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and implement an in silico model of indigoid-based single-electron transistor (SET) nanodevices, which consist of indigoid molecules from natural dye weakly coupled to gold electrodes that function in a Coulomb blockade regime. The electronic properties of the indigoid molecules were investigated using the optimized density-functional theory (DFT) with a continuum model. Higher electron transport characteristics were determined for Tyrian purple, consistent with experimentally derived data. Overall, these results can be used to correctly predict and emphasize the electron transport functions of organic SETs, demonstrating their potential for sustainable nanoelectronics comprising the biodegradable and biocompatible materials.

  1. Single Particle Cryo-electron Microscopy and 3-D Reconstruction of Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fei; Jiang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    With fast progresses in instrumentation, image processing algorithms, and computational resources, single particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) 3-D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses has now reached near-atomic resolutions (3–4 Å). With comparable resolutions and more predictable outcomes, cryo-EM is now considered a preferred method over X-ray crystallography for determination of atomic structure of icosahedral viruses. At near-atomic resolutions, all-atom models or backbone models can be reliably built that allow residue level understanding of viral assembly and conformational changes among different stages of viral life cycle. With the developments of asymmetric reconstruction, it is now possible to visualize the complete structure of a complex virus with not only its icosahedral shell but also its multiple non-icosahedral structural features. In this chapter, we will describe single particle cryo-EM experimental and computational procedures for both near-atomic resolution reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and asymmetric reconstruction of viruses with both icosahedral and non-icosahedral structure components. Procedures for rigorous validation of the reconstructions and resolution evaluations using truly independent de novo initial models and refinements are also introduced. PMID:24357374

  2. Direct Nanoscale Sensing of the Internal Electric Field in Operating Semiconductor Devices Using Single Electron Spins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Takayuki; Naruki, Wataru; Tahara, Kosuke; Makino, Toshiharu; Kato, Hiromitsu; Ogura, Masahiko; Takeuchi, Daisuke; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Hatano, Mutsuko

    2017-02-28

    The electric field inside semiconductor devices is a key physical parameter that determines the properties of the devices. However, techniques based on scanning probe microscopy are limited to sensing at the surface only. Here, we demonstrate the direct sensing of the internal electric field in diamond power devices using single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers. The NV center embedded inside the device acts as a nanoscale electric field sensor. We fabricated vertical diamond p-i-n diodes containing the single NV centers. By performing optically detected magnetic resonance measurements under reverse-biased conditions with an applied voltage of up to 150 V, we found a large splitting in the magnetic resonance frequencies. This indicated that the NV center senses the transverse electric field in the space-charge region formed in the i-layer. The experimentally obtained electric field values are in good agreement with those calculated by a device simulator. Furthermore, we demonstrate the sensing of the electric field in different directions by utilizing NV centers with different N-V axes. This direct and quantitative sensing method using an electron spin in a wide-band-gap material provides a way to monitor the electric field in operating semiconductor devices.

  3. Multi-photon creation and single-photon annihilation of electron-positron pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Huayu

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis we study multi-photon e + e - pair production in a trident process, and singlephoton e + e - pair annihilation in a triple interaction. The pair production is considered in the collision of a relativistic electron with a strong laser beam, and calculated within the theory of laser-dressed quantum electrodynamics. A regularization method is developed systematically for the resonance problem arising in the multi-photon process. Total production rates, positron spectra, and relative contributions of different reaction channels are obtained in various interaction regimes. Our calculation shows good agreement with existing experimental data from SLAC, and adds further insights into the experimental findings. Besides, we study the process in a manifestly nonperturbative domain, whose accessibility to future all-optical experiments based on laser acceleration is shown. In the single-photon e + e - pair annihilation, the recoil momentum is absorbed by a spectator particle. Various kinematic configurations of the three incoming particles are examined. Under certain conditions, the emitted photon exhibits distinct angular and polarization distributions which could facilitate the detection of the process. Considering an equilibrium relativistic e + e - plasma, it is found that the single-photon process becomes the dominant annihilation channel for plasma temperatures above 3 MeV. Multi-particle correlation effects are therefore essential for the e + e - dynamics at very high density. (orig.)

  4. Multi-photon creation and single-photon annihilation of electron-positron pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Huayu

    2011-04-27

    In this thesis we study multi-photon e{sup +}e{sup -} pair production in a trident process, and singlephoton e{sup +}e{sup -} pair annihilation in a triple interaction. The pair production is considered in the collision of a relativistic electron with a strong laser beam, and calculated within the theory of laser-dressed quantum electrodynamics. A regularization method is developed systematically for the resonance problem arising in the multi-photon process. Total production rates, positron spectra, and relative contributions of different reaction channels are obtained in various interaction regimes. Our calculation shows good agreement with existing experimental data from SLAC, and adds further insights into the experimental findings. Besides, we study the process in a manifestly nonperturbative domain, whose accessibility to future all-optical experiments based on laser acceleration is shown. In the single-photon e{sup +}e{sup -} pair annihilation, the recoil momentum is absorbed by a spectator particle. Various kinematic configurations of the three incoming particles are examined. Under certain conditions, the emitted photon exhibits distinct angular and polarization distributions which could facilitate the detection of the process. Considering an equilibrium relativistic e{sup +}e{sup -} plasma, it is found that the single-photon process becomes the dominant annihilation channel for plasma temperatures above 3 MeV. Multi-particle correlation effects are therefore essential for the e{sup +}e{sup -} dynamics at very high density. (orig.)

  5. Analysis and optimization with ecological objective function of irreversible single resonance energy selective electron heat engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Junle; Chen, Lingen; Ding, Zemin; Sun, Fengrui

    2016-01-01

    Ecological performance of a single resonance ESE heat engine with heat leakage is conducted by applying finite time thermodynamics. By introducing Nielsen function and numerical calculations, expressions about power output, efficiency, entropy generation rate and ecological objective function are derived; relationships between ecological objective function and power output, between ecological objective function and efficiency as well as between power output and efficiency are demonstrated; influences of system parameters of heat leakage, boundary energy and resonance width on the optimal performances are investigated in detail; a specific range of boundary energy is given as a compromise to make ESE heat engine system work at optimal operation regions. Comparing performance characteristics with different optimization objective functions, the significance of selecting ecological objective function as the design objective is clarified specifically: when changing the design objective from maximum power output into maximum ecological objective function, the improvement of efficiency is 4.56%, while the power output drop is only 2.68%; when changing the design objective from maximum efficiency to maximum ecological objective function, the improvement of power output is 229.13%, and the efficiency drop is only 13.53%. - Highlights: • An irreversible single resonance energy selective electron heat engine is studied. • Heat leakage between two reservoirs is considered. • Power output, efficiency and ecological objective function are derived. • Optimal performance comparison for three objective functions is carried out.

  6. Electrical properties and mechanical stability of anchoring groups for single-molecule electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Frisenda

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We report on an experimental investigation of transport through single molecules, trapped between two gold nano-electrodes fabricated with the mechanically controlled break junction (MCBJ technique. The four molecules studied share the same core structure, namely oligo(phenylene ethynylene (OPE3, while having different aurophilic anchoring groups: thiol (SAc, methyl sulfide (SMe, pyridyl (Py and amine (NH2. The focus of this paper is on the combined characterization of the electrical and mechanical properties determined by the anchoring groups. From conductance histograms we find that thiol anchored molecules provide the highest conductance; a single-level model fit to current–voltage characteristics suggests that SAc groups exhibit a higher electronic coupling to the electrodes, together with better level alignment than the other three groups. An analysis of the mechanical stability, recording the lifetime in a self-breaking method, shows that Py and SAc yield the most stable junctions while SMe form short-lived junctions. Density functional theory combined with non-equlibrium Green’s function calculations help in elucidating the experimental findings.

  7. Realization of a Cascaded Quantum System: Heralded Absorption of a Single Photon Qubit by a Single-Electron Charged Quantum Dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delteil, Aymeric; Sun, Zhe; Fält, Stefan; Imamoğlu, Atac

    2017-04-28

    Photonic losses pose a major limitation for the implementation of a quantum state transfer between nodes of a quantum network. A measurement that heralds a successful transfer without revealing any information about the qubit may alleviate this limitation. Here, we demonstrate the heralded absorption of a single photonic qubit, generated by a single neutral quantum dot, by a single-electron charged quantum dot that is located 5 m away. The transfer of quantum information to the spin degree of freedom takes place upon the emission of a photon; for a properly chosen or prepared quantum dot, the detection of this photon yields no information about the qubit. We show that this process can be combined with local operations optically performed on the destination node by measuring classical correlations between the absorbed photon color and the final state of the electron spin. Our work suggests alternative avenues for the realization of quantum information protocols based on cascaded quantum systems.

  8. Integrated Transmission Electron and Single-Molecule Fluorescence Microscopy Correlates Reactivity with Ultrastructure in a Single Catalyst Particle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Frank C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412642697; Mohammadian, Sajjad|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/374721327; Ristanovic, Zoran|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/328233005; Kalirai, Samanbir; Meirer, Florian; Vogt, Eelco T. C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073717398; Bruijnincx, Pieter C. A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/33799529X; Gerritsen, Hans|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071548777; Weckhuysen, Bert M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    2018-01-01

    Establishing structure–activity relationships in complex, hierarchically structured nanomaterials, such as fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts, requires characterization with complementary, correlated analysis techniques. An integrated setup has been developed to perform transmission electron

  9. Electron impact experimental study of single and double ionisation of atoms and small molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naja, A.

    2008-11-01

    (e,2e) and (e,3e) experiments constitute a privileged tool for studying the dynamics of electron impact single and double ionization of small systems, and more generally for contributing to the understanding of the N-body interaction problem. In this work, we have performed such experiments in an unexplored kinematical regime where the momentum transferred to the residual ion is large, so that the ion plays a major role in the interaction process. The experimental results are compared to those of the most sophisticated theoretical models. We have measured the triply differential cross sections (TDCS) for single ionization of He and H 2 . Their comparison allowed showing the presence for the H 2 molecule of Young type quantal interference effects. We then discuss TDCS measurements for Ne and N 2 ionized either on an outer or an inner orbital. The results show the importance of the post collisional interactions and the role played by the nucleus. Finally, we study the competition between different ionization processes of argon: (e,2e) single ionization of the inner 2p shell on the one hand, and a direct (3p -2 ) (e,3e) double ionization or an indirect one via the Auger process implying the 2p shell, on the other hand. Under the chosen kinematics, these processes may compete or interfere with each other. The emphasis is put on their respective contribution, particularly for the Auger effect. Several structures observed in the angular distribution of the (e,3e) cross section are attributed to different ionization mechanisms. (author)

  10. Discontinuous genetic variation among mesophilic Naegleria isolates: further evidence that N. gruberi is not a single species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, B S; Christy, P; Hayes, S J; Dobson, P J

    1992-01-01

    Naegleria isolates which are currently placed in the type species N. gruberi display great genetic, physiological and morphological heterogeneity. There are two possible interpretations of the nature of this species--that N. gruberi is a species complex or that it is a single continuously variable species. To distinguish between these alternatives, allelic states were determined for 33 loci in 74 new isolates selected to represent wide geographic sources and diverse temperature limits for growth. The results were compared with data for culture collection strains of N. gruberi and other species in the genus. The isolates formed a discontinuous series of clusters, separated by genetic distances similar to those separating the better-characterised taxa N. fowleri, N. lovaniensis, N. jadini, N. australiensis australiensis and N. australiensis italica. Culture collection strains assigned to N. gruberi fell into six distinct clusters, while other clusters were not represented by reference strains. The data are most consistent with the interpretation that N. gruberi is a group of several distinct species, each equivalent to the recently described species in the genus. Naegleria andersoni andersoni and N. andersoni jamiesoni also formed two distinct clusters, equivalent to species. Characteristics temperature limits for growth show that the mesophilic species are ecological as well as genetic entities.

  11. Real-Time, Single-Shot Temporal Measurements of Short Electron Bunches, Terahertz CSR and FEL Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Berden, G; Van der Meer, A F G

    2005-01-01

    Electro-optic detection of the Coulomb field of electron bunches is a promising technique for single-shot measurements of the bunch length and shape in the sub-picosecond time domain. This technique has been applied to the measurement of 50 MeV electron bunches in the FELIX free electron laser, showing the longitudinal profile of single bunches of around 650 fs FWHM [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 114802 (2004)]. The method is non-destructive and real-time, and therefore ideal for online monitoring of the longitudinal shape of single electron bunches. At FELIX we have used it for real-time optimization of sub-picosecond electron bunches. Electro-optic detection has also been used to measure the electric field profiles of far-infrared (or terahertz) optical pulses generated by the relativistic electrons. We have characterised the far-infrared output of the free electron laser, and more recently, we have measured the temporal profile of terahertz optical pulses generated at one of the bending magnets.

  12. High-energy electron emission from metallic nano-tips driven by intense single-cycle terahertz pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sha; Jones, R. R.

    2016-01-01

    Electrons ejected from atoms and subsequently driven to high energies in strong laser fields enable techniques from attosecond pulse generation to imaging with rescattered electrons. Analogous processes govern strong-field electron emission from nanostructures, where long wavelength radiation and large local field enhancements hold the promise for producing electrons with substantially higher energies, allowing for higher resolution time-resolved imaging. Here we report on the use of single-cycle terahertz pulses to drive electron emission from unbiased nano-tips. Energies exceeding 5 keV are observed, substantially greater than previously attained at higher drive frequencies. Despite large differences in the magnitude of the respective local fields, we find that the maximum electron energies are only weakly dependent on the tip radius, for 10 nmsingle-cycle nature of the field, the high-energy electron emission is predicted to be confined to a single burst, potentially enabling a variety of applications. PMID:27830701

  13. MIR and FIR Analysis of Inorganic Species in a Single Data Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Shilov, Sergey

    2017-06-01

    The extension of the mid IR towards the far IR spectral range below 400 \\wn is of great interest for molecular vibrational analysis for inorganic and organometallic chemistry, for geological, pharmaceutical, and physical applications, polymorph screening and crystallinity analysis as well as for matrix isolation spectroscopy. In these cases, the additional far infrared region offers insight to low energy vibrations which are observable only there. This includes inorganic species, lattice vibrations or intermolecular vibrations in the ordered solid state. The spectral range of a FTIR spectrometer is defined by the major optical components such as the source, beamsplitter, and detector. The globar source covers a broad spectral range from 8000 to 20 \\wn. However a bottle neck exists with respect to the beamsplitter and detector. To extend the spectral range further into the far IR and THz spectral ranges, one or more additional far IR beam splitters and detectors have been previously required. Two new optic components have been incorporated in a spectrometer to achieve coverage of both the mid and far infrared in a single scan: a wide range MIR-FIR beam splitter and the wide range DLaTGS detector that utilizes a diamond window. The use of a standard SiC IR source with these components yields a spectral range of 6000 down to 50 \\wn in one step for all types of transmittance, reflectance and ATR measurements. Utilizing the external water cooled mercury arc high power lamp the spectral range can be ultimately extended down to 10 \\wn. Examples of application will include emission in MIR-THz range, identification of pigments, additives in polymers, and polymorphism studies.

  14. Two Positive Periodic Solutions for a Neutral Delay Model of Single-Species Population Growth with Harvesting

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Hui

    2012-01-01

    By coincidence degree theory for k-set-contractive mapping, this paper establishes a new criterion for the existence of at least two positive periodic solutions for a neutral delay model of single-species population growth with harvesting. An example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the result.

  15. Two Positive Periodic Solutions for a Neutral Delay Model of Single-Species Population Growth with Harvesting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Fang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available By coincidence degree theory for k-set-contractive mapping, this paper establishes a new criterion for the existence of at least two positive periodic solutions for a neutral delay model of single-species population growth with harvesting. An example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the result.

  16. Phylogenetic group- and species-specific oligonucleotide probes for single-cell detection of lactic acid bacteria in oral biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quevedo, Beatrice; Giertsen, Elin; Zijnge, Vincent; Luethi-Schaller, Helga; Guggenheim, Bernhard; Thurnheer, Thomas; Gmuer, Rudolf

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to design and evaluate fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes for the single-cell detection and enumeration of lactic acid bacteria, in particular organisms belonging to the major phylogenetic groups and species of oral lactobacilli and to

  17. Comparative Transcriptomic Analyses of Three Species of Placobdella (Rhynchobdellida: Glossiphoniidae) Confirms a Single Origin of Blood Feeding in Leeches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddall, Mark E; Brugler, Mercer R; Kvist, Sebastian

    2016-02-01

    One of the recalcitrant questions regarding the evolutionary history of clitellate annelids involves the feeding preference of the common ancestor of extant rhynchobdellid (proboscis bearing) and arhynchobdellid (jaw bearing) leeches. Whereas early evidence, based on morphological data, pointed towards independent acquisitions of blood feeding in the 2 orders, molecular-based phylogenetic data suggest that the ancestor of modern leeches was a sanguivore. Here, we use a comparative transcriptomic approach in order to increase our understanding of the diversity of anticoagulation factors for 3 species of the genus Placobdella, for which comparative data have been lacking, and inspect these in light of archetypal anticoagulant data for both arhynchobdellid and other rhynchobdellid species. Notwithstanding the varying levels of host specificity displayed by the 3 different species of Placobdella, transcriptomic profiles with respect to anticoagulation factors were largely similar -this despite the fact that Placobdella kwetlumye only retains a single pair of salivary glands, as opposed to the 2 pairs more common in the genus. Results show that 9 different anticoagulant proteins and an additional 5 putative antihemostasis proteins are expressed in salivary secretions of the 3 species. In particular, an ortholog of the archetypal, single-copy, anticoagulant hirudin (not previously available as comparative data for rhynchobdellids) is present in at least 2 of 3 species examined, corroborating the notion of a single origin of blood feeding in the ancestral leech.

  18. Single nucleotide polymorphism barcoding of cytochrome c oxidase I sequences for discriminating 17 species of Columbidae by decision tree algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Hong; Wu, Kuo-Chuan; Dahms, Hans-Uwe; Chuang, Li-Yeh; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2017-07-01

    DNA barcodes are widely used in taxonomy, systematics, species identification, food safety, and forensic science. Most of the conventional DNA barcode sequences contain the whole information of a given barcoding gene. Most of the sequence information does not vary and is uninformative for a given group of taxa within a monophylum. We suggest here a method that reduces the amount of noninformative nucleotides in a given barcoding sequence of a major taxon, like the prokaryotes, or eukaryotic animals, plants, or fungi. The actual differences in genetic sequences, called single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping, provide a tool for developing a rapid, reliable, and high-throughput assay for the discrimination between known species. Here, we investigated SNPs as robust markers of genetic variation for identifying different pigeon species based on available cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) data. We propose here a decision tree-based SNP barcoding (DTSB) algorithm where SNP patterns are selected from the DNA barcoding sequence of several evolutionarily related species in order to identify a single species with pigeons as an example. This approach can make use of any established barcoding system. We here firstly used as an example the mitochondrial gene COI information of 17 pigeon species (Columbidae, Aves) using DTSB after sequence trimming and alignment. SNPs were chosen which followed the rule of decision tree and species-specific SNP barcodes. The shortest barcode of about 11 bp was then generated for discriminating 17 pigeon species using the DTSB method. This method provides a sequence alignment and tree decision approach to parsimoniously assign a unique and shortest SNP barcode for any known species of a chosen monophyletic taxon where a barcoding sequence is available.

  19. Determination of the optimized single-layer ionospheric height for electron content measurements over China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Yuan, Yunbin; Zhang, Baocheng; Wang, Ningbo; Li, Zishen; Liu, Xifeng; Zhang, Xiao

    2018-02-01

    The ionosphere effective height (IEH) is a very important parameter in total electron content (TEC) measurements under the widely used single-layer model assumption. To overcome the requirement of a large amount of simultaneous vertical and slant ionospheric observations or dense "coinciding" pierce points data, a new approach comparing the converted vertical TEC (VTEC) value using mapping function based on a given IEH with the "ground truth" VTEC value provided by the combined International GNSS Service Global Ionospheric Maps is proposed for the determination of the optimal IEH. The optimal IEH in the Chinese region is determined using three different methods based on GNSS data. Based on the ionosonde data from three different locations in China, the altitude variation of the peak electron density (hmF2) is found to have clear diurnal, seasonal and latitudinal dependences, and the diurnal variation of hmF2 varies from approximately 210 to 520 km in Hainan. The determination of the optimal IEH employing the inverse method suggested by Birch et al. (Radio Sci 37, 2002. doi: 10.1029/2000rs002601) did not yield a consistent altitude in the Chinese region. Tests of the method minimizing the mapping function errors suggested by Nava et al. (Adv Space Res 39:1292-1297, 2007) indicate that the optimal IEH ranges from 400 to 600 km, and the height of 450 km is the most frequent IEH at both high and low solar activities. It is also confirmed that the IEH of 450-550 km is preferred for the Chinese region instead of the commonly adopted 350-450 km using the determination method of the optimal IEH proposed in this paper.

  20. Conjunctival lymphoma: Results and treatment with a single anterior electron field. A lens sparing approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunbar, S.F.; Linggood, R.M.; Doppke, K.P.; Duby, A.; Wang, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    Lymphoma of the conjunctiva is rare. It presents in older patients as a mass lesion and usually remains localized. Surgery is limited to biopsy, and radiation therapy is the definitive treatment of choice. The entire conjunctiva is treated. Relatively high doses (approximately 30 Gy) are required for local control, which may lead to cataract formation. Twelve patients with conjunctival lymphoma were treated at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 1979 and 1988. Ten of 12 patients presented with a unilateral lesion; 2 of 12 with bilateral lesions. Two of 12 patients were found to have systemic disease at the time of presentation. One patient developed conjunctival lymphoma 5 years after the diagnosis of generalized disease. Using electron beam, all patients were treated with a single anterior circular field to total doses ranging from 24 Gy to 30 Gy delivered in 8 to 16 fractions over 9 to 20 days. In all cases, the lens was shielded by a specially designed plastic contact lens bearing a 12 mm diameter lead shield. The lens dose was determined at varying depths beneath the shield for 6 MeV and 9 MeV electron beams and ranged from a minimum of 5% to an absolute maximum of 18% of the total dose delivered to the tumor. Local control was maintained in all patients with follow-up to 9 1/2 years. One patient relapsed distantly 3 years after treatment. One of 12 patients died of systemic disease 4 years after treatment of the ocular lesion. Two patients developed cataracts 4 and 5 years after treatment; one had bilateral cataract, although only one eye had been treated. Both patients were over 75 years old. In both cases, the cataracts were felt to be senile cataracts which are ophthalmologically and radiographically distinguishable from radiation induced lesions

  1. Molecular analysis of the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium olfersii (Decapoda, Palaemonidae) supports the existence of a single species throughout its distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Natália; Mantelatto, Fernando Luis

    2013-01-01

    Macrobrachium olfersii is an amphidromous freshwater prawn, widespread along the eastern coasts of the Americas. This species shows great morphological modifications during ontogenesis, and several studies have verified the existence of a wide intraspecific variation. Because of this condition, the species is often misidentified, and several synonyms have been documented. To elucidate these aspects, individuals of M. olfersii from different populations along its range of distribution were investigated. The taxonomic limit was established, and the degree of genetic variability of this species was described. We extracted DNA from 53 specimens of M. olfersii, M. americanum, M. digueti and M. faustinum, which resulted in 84 new sequences (22 of 16S mtDNA, 45 of Cythocrome Oxidase I (COI) mtDNA, and 17 of Histone (H3) nDNA). Sequences of three genes (single and concatenated) from these species were used in the Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian Inference phylogenetic analyses and COI sequences from M. olfersii were used in population analysis. The genetic variation was evaluated through the alignment of 554 bp from the 16S, 638 bp from the COI, and 338 bp from the H3. The rates of genetic divergence among populations were lower at the intraspecific level. This was confirmed by the haplotype net, which showed a continuous gene flow among populations. Although a wide distribution and high morphological intraspecific variation often suggest the existence of more than one species, genetic similarity of Caribbean and Brazilian populations of M. olfersii supported them as a single species.

  2. Molecular analysis of the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium olfersii (Decapoda, Palaemonidae supports the existence of a single species throughout its distribution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Rossi

    Full Text Available Macrobrachium olfersii is an amphidromous freshwater prawn, widespread along the eastern coasts of the Americas. This species shows great morphological modifications during ontogenesis, and several studies have verified the existence of a wide intraspecific variation. Because of this condition, the species is often misidentified, and several synonyms have been documented. To elucidate these aspects, individuals of M. olfersii from different populations along its range of distribution were investigated. The taxonomic limit was established, and the degree of genetic variability of this species was described. We extracted DNA from 53 specimens of M. olfersii, M. americanum, M. digueti and M. faustinum, which resulted in 84 new sequences (22 of 16S mtDNA, 45 of Cythocrome Oxidase I (COI mtDNA, and 17 of Histone (H3 nDNA. Sequences of three genes (single and concatenated from these species were used in the Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian Inference phylogenetic analyses and COI sequences from M. olfersii were used in population analysis. The genetic variation was evaluated through the alignment of 554 bp from the 16S, 638 bp from the COI, and 338 bp from the H3. The rates of genetic divergence among populations were lower at the intraspecific level. This was confirmed by the haplotype net, which showed a continuous gene flow among populations. Although a wide distribution and high morphological intraspecific variation often suggest the existence of more than one species, genetic similarity of Caribbean and Brazilian populations of M. olfersii supported them as a single species.

  3. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Measurements of Reactive Oxygen Species by Cyclic Hydroxylamine Spin Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikalov, Sergey I; Polienko, Yuliya F; Kirilyuk, Igor

    2017-11-17

    Oxidative stress contributes to numerous pathophysiological conditions such as development of cancer, neurodegenerative, and cardiovascular diseases. A variety of measurements of oxidative stress markers in biological systems have been developed; however, many of these methods are not specific, can produce artifacts, and do not directly detect the free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause oxidative stress. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is a unique tool that allows direct measurements of free radical species. Cyclic hydroxylamines are useful and convenient molecular probes that readily react with ROS to produce stable nitroxide radicals, which can be quantitatively measured by EPR. In this work, we critically review recent applications of various cyclic hydroxylamine spin probes in biology to study oxidative stress, their advantages, and the shortcomings. Recent Advances: In the past decade, a number of new cyclic hydroxylamine spin probes have been developed and their successful application for ROS measurement using EPR has been published. These new state-of-the-art methods provide improved selectivity and sensitivity for in vitro and in vivo studies. Although cyclic hydroxylamine spin probes EPR application has been previously described, there has been lack of translation of these new methods into biomedical research, limiting their widespread use. This work summarizes "best practice" in applications of cyclic hydroxylamine spin probes to assist with EPR studies of oxidative stress. Additional studies to advance hydroxylamine spin probes from the "basic science" to biomedical applications are needed and could lead to better understanding of pathological conditions associated with oxidative stress. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  4. Optimization of decay kinetics of YAG:Ce single crystal scintillators for S(T)EM electron detectors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schauer, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 269, č. 21 (2011), s. 2572-2577 ISSN 0168-583X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/10/1410 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : scintillation detector * electron microscope * cathodoluminescence * YAG:Ce single crystal scintillator * decay time * afterglow * kinetic model * SEM * STEM Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.211, year: 2011

  5. Mechanical energy losses in plastically deformed and electron plus neutron irradiated high purity single crystalline molybdenum at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelada, Griselda I. [Laboratorio de Materiales, Escuela de Ingenieria Electrica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingenieria y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Avda. Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Lambri, Osvaldo Agustin [Laboratorio de Materiales, Escuela de Ingenieria Electrica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingenieria y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Avda. Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica Rosario - CONICET, Member of the CONICET& #x27; s Research Staff, Avda. Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Bozzano, Patricia B. [Laboratorio de Microscopia Electronica, Unidad de Actividad Materiales, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Avda. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 San Martin (Argentina); Garcia, Jose Angel [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada II, Facultad de Ciencias y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao, Pais Vasco (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    Mechanical spectroscopy (MS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies have been performed in plastically deformed and electron plus neutron irradiated high purity single crystalline molybdenum, oriented for single slip, in order to study the dislocation dynamics in the temperature range within one third of the melting temperature. A damping peak related to the interaction of dislocation lines with both prismatic loops and tangles of dislocations was found. The peak temperature ranges between 900 and 1050 K, for an oscillating frequency of about 1 Hz. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. A radio-frequency single-electron transistor based on an InAs/InP heterostructure nanowire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Henrik A.; Duty, Tim; Abay, Simon

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate radio frequency single-electron transistors fabricated from epitaxially grown InAs/InP heterostructure nanowires. Two sets of double-barrier wires with different barrier thicknesses were grown. The wires were suspended 15 nm above a metal gate electrode. Electrical measurements...... on a high-resistance nanowire showed regularly spaced Coulomb oscillations at a gate voltage from −0.5 to at least 1.8 V. The charge sensitivity was measured to 32 µerms Hz−1/2 at 1.5 K. A low-resistance single-electron transistor showed regularly spaced oscillations only in a small gate-voltage region just...

  7. Single-Particle Cryo-EM and 3D Reconstruction of Hybrid Nanoparticles with Electron-Dense Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guimei; Yan, Rui; Zhang, Chuan; Mao, Chengde; Jiang, Wen

    2015-10-01

    Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), accompanied with 3D reconstruction, is a broadly applicable tool for the structural characterization of macromolecules and nanoparticles. Recently, the cryo-EM field has pushed the limits of this technique to higher resolutions and samples of smaller molecular mass, however, some samples still present hurdles to this technique. Hybrid particles with electron-dense components, which have been studied using single-particle cryo-EM yet with limited success in 3D reconstruction due to the interference caused by electron-dense elements, constitute one group of such challenging samples. To process such hybrid particles, a masking method is developed in this work to adaptively remove pixels arising from electron-dense portions in individual projection images while maintaining maximal biomass signals for subsequent 2D alignment, 3D reconstruction, and iterative refinements. As demonstrated by the success in 3D reconstruction of an octahedron DNA/gold hybrid particle, which has been previously published without a 3D reconstruction, the devised strategy that combines adaptive masking and standard single-particle 3D reconstruction approach has overcome the hurdle of electron-dense elements interference, and is generally applicable to cryo-EM structural characterization of most, if not all, hybrid nanomaterials with electron-dense components. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Electronic transport in single-helical protein molecules: Effects of multiple charge conduction pathways and helical symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, Sourav, E-mail: sourav.kunduphy@gmail.com; Karmakar, S.N.

    2016-07-15

    We propose a tight-binding model to investigate electronic transport properties of single helical protein molecules incorporating both the helical symmetry and the possibility of multiple charge transfer pathways. Our study reveals that due to existence of both the multiple charge transfer pathways and helical symmetry, the transport properties are quite rigid under influence of environmental fluctuations which indicates that these biomolecules can serve as better alternatives in nanoelectronic devices than its other biological counterparts e.g., single-stranded DNA.

  9. The Structures of Self-Assembled Monolayer Films of Organosulfur Compounds Adsorbed on Gold Single Crystals: Electron Diffraction Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    AD-M193 125 THE STRUCTURES OF SELF-RSSENSLED MOMOLAYER FILMS OF 1/1 ORGANOSULFUR COMPOUND..(U) HRlYARD UNJY CAMBRIDGE MASS DEPT OF CHEMISTRY L STRONG...VV L- ___ THE STRUCTURES OF SELF-ASSEMBLED MONOLAYER FILMS OF ORGANOSULFUR COMPOUNDS ADSORBED ON GOLD SINGLE CRYSTALS: ELECTRON DIFFRACTION STUDIES...true sulfide phase. V V ’A. LA8700876 REVISED The Structures of Self-Assembled Monolayer Films of Organosulfur Compounds Adsorbed on Gold Single

  10. An investigation of electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of Mn+2 ion in silver nitrate single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korkmaz, M.

    1974-01-01

    X-band EPR spectra of Mn +2 ion in AgNO 3 single crystals have been investigated as a function of temperature. Because of the small size of the fine structure constant 'a' and the large size of the hyperfine constant 'A' in this crystal, all electronic transitions are superimposed. For this reason, spectra consist of a group of six hyperfine components. The spectra appeared to be isotropic, although the symmetry of the host lattice is orthoromibc. This shows that the local symmetry of the paramagnetic ions is of cubic type. EPR signal disappears completely at -40 0 C. As the temperature is increased from this value the signal intensity increases steadily and reaches a maximum value at +40 0 C. If the temperature is raised further the signal tends to decrease. In other words in this crystal Mn +2 ion shows antiferromagnetic property below +40 0 C and paramagnetic property above +40 0 C. We also found that, in the antiferromagnetic region, the line width increases as the temperature is decreased. In the paramagnetic region the line width increases as the temperature is increased. Other spectral parameters A and g do not change with the temperature. Spectra obtained at room temperature and at different temperatures are also discussed. (Korkmaz, M.)

  11. A silicon-based single-electron interferometer coupled to a fermionic sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Anasua; Shevchenko, Sergey N.; Barraud, Sylvain; Otxoa, Rubén M.; Nori, Franco; Morton, John J. L.; Gonzalez-Zalba, M. Fernando

    2018-01-01

    We study Landau-Zener-Stückelberg-Majorana (LZSM) interferometry under the influence of projective readout using a charge qubit tunnel-coupled to a fermionic sea. This allows us to characterize the coherent charge-qubit dynamics in the strong-driving regime. The device is realized within a silicon complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) transistor. We first read out the charge state of the system in a continuous nondemolition manner by measuring the dispersive response of a high-frequency electrical resonator coupled to the quantum system via the gate. By performing multiple fast passages around the qubit avoided crossing, we observe a multipassage LZSM interferometry pattern. At larger driving amplitudes, a projective measurement to an even-parity charge state is realized, showing a strong enhancement of the dispersive readout signal. At even larger driving amplitudes, two projective measurements are realized within the coherent evolution resulting in the disappearance of the interference pattern. Our results demonstrate a way to increase the state readout signal of coherent quantum systems and replicate single-electron analogs of optical interferometry within a CMOS transistor.

  12. Electronic Transport in Single-Stranded DNA Molecule Related to Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, R. G.; Silva, R. N. O.; Madeira, M. P.; Frazão, N. F.; Sousa, J. O.; Macedo-Filho, A.

    2018-04-01

    We report a numerical analysis of the electronic transport in single chain DNA molecule consisting of 182 nucleotides. The DNA chains studied were extracted from a segment of the human chromosome 4p16.3, which were modified by expansion of CAG (cytosine-adenine-guanine) triplet repeats to mimics Huntington's disease. The mutated DNA chains were connected between two platinum electrodes to analyze the relationship between charge propagation in the molecule and Huntington's disease. The computations were performed within a tight-binding model, together with a transfer matrix technique, to investigate the current-voltage (I-V) of 23 types of DNA sequence and compare them with the distributions of the related CAG repeat numbers with the disease. All DNA sequences studied have a characteristic behavior of a semiconductor. In addition, the results showed a direct correlation between the current-voltage curves and the distributions of the CAG repeat numbers, suggesting possible applications in the development of DNA-based biosensors for molecular diagnostics.

  13. Deblurring of class-averaged images in single-particle electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Wooram; Chirikjian, Gregory S; Madden, Dean R; Rockmore, Daniel N

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for the deblurring of class-averaged images in single-particle electron microscopy (EM). Since EM images of biological samples are very noisy, the images which are nominally identical projection images are often grouped, aligned and averaged in order to cancel or reduce the background noise. However, the noise in the individual EM images generates errors in the alignment process, which creates an inherent limit on the accuracy of the resulting class averages. This inaccurate class average due to the alignment errors can be viewed as the result of a convolution of an underlying clear image with a blurring function. In this work, we develop a deconvolution method that gives an estimate for the underlying clear image from a blurred class-averaged image using precomputed statistics of misalignment. Since this convolution is over the group of rigid-body motions of the plane, SE(2), we use the Fourier transform for SE(2) in order to convert the convolution into a matrix multiplication in the corresponding Fourier space. For practical implementation we use a Hermite-function-based image modeling technique, because Hermite expansions enable lossless Cartesian-polar coordinate conversion using the Laguerre–Fourier expansions, and Hermite expansion and Laguerre–Fourier expansion retain their structures under the Fourier transform. Based on these mathematical properties, we can obtain the deconvolution of the blurred class average using simple matrix multiplication. Tests of the proposed deconvolution method using synthetic and experimental EM images confirm the performance of our method

  14. Single-site Green function of the Dirac equation for full-potential electron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kordt, Pascal

    2012-05-30

    I present an elaborated analytical examination of the Green function of an electron scattered at a single-site potential, for both the Schroedinger and the Dirac equation, followed by an efficient numerical solution, in both cases for potentials of arbitrary shape without an atomic sphere approximation. A numerically stable way to calculate the corresponding regular and irregular wave functions and the Green function is via the angular Lippmann-Schwinger integral equations. These are solved based on an expansion in Chebyshev polynomials and their recursion relations, allowing to rewrite the Lippmann-Schwinger equations into a system of algebraic linear equations. Gonzales et al. developed this method for the Schroedinger equation, where it gives a much higher accuracy compared to previous perturbation methods, with only modest increase in computational effort. In order to apply it to the Dirac equation, I developed relativistic Lippmann-Schwinger equations, based on a decomposition of the potential matrix into spin spherical harmonics, exploiting certain properties of this matrix. The resulting method was embedded into a Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker code for density functional calculations. As an example, the method is applied by calculating phase shifts and the Mott scattering of a tungsten impurity. (orig.)

  15. Correlation between modulation structure and electronic inhomogeneity on Pb-doped Bi-2212 single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, A.; Kashiwaya, S.; Eisaki, H.; Yamaguchi, H.; Oka, K.; Kashiwaya, H.; Tsuchiura, H.; Tanaka, Y.

    2005-01-01

    The correlation between nanometer-size electronic states and surface structure is investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/S) on Pb-doped Bi 2-x Pb x Sr 2 CaCu2O 8+y (Pb-Bi-2212) single crystals. The advantage of the Pb-Bi-2212 samples is that the modulation structure can be totally or locally suppressed depending on the Pb contents and annealing conditions. The superconducting gap (Δ) distribution on modulated Pb-Bi-2212 samples showed the lack of correlation with modulation structure except a slight reduction of superconducting island size for the b-axis direction. On the other hand, the optimal doped Pb-Bi-2212 (x = 0.6) samples obtained by reduced-annealing showed totally non-modulated structure in topography, however, the spatial distribution of Δ still showed inhomogeneity of which features were quite similar to those of modulated samples. These results suggest that the modulation structure is not the dominant origin of inhomogeneity although it modifies the streaky Δ structure sub-dominantly. From the gap structure variation around the border of narrow gap and broad gap regions, a trend of the coexistence of two separated phases i.e., superconducting phase and pseudogap like phase, is detected

  16. Electronic Transport in Single-Stranded DNA Molecule Related to Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, R. G.; Silva, R. N. O.; Madeira, M. P.; Frazão, N. F.; Sousa, J. O.; Macedo-Filho, A.

    2018-02-01

    We report a numerical analysis of the electronic transport in single chain DNA molecule consisting of 182 nucleotides. The DNA chains studied were extracted from a segment of the human chromosome 4p16.3, which were modified by expansion of CAG (cytosine-adenine-guanine) triplet repeats to mimics Huntington's disease. The mutated DNA chains were connected between two platinum electrodes to analyze the relationship between charge propagation in the molecule and Huntington's disease. The computations were performed within a tight-binding model, together with a transfer matrix technique, to investigate the current-voltage (I-V) of 23 types of DNA sequence and compare them with the distributions of the related CAG repeat numbers with the disease. All DNA sequences studied have a characteristic behavior of a semiconductor. In addition, the results showed a direct correlation between the current-voltage curves and the distributions of the CAG repeat numbers, suggesting possible applications in the development of DNA-based biosensors for molecular diagnostics.

  17. Experimental demonstration of a single-spike hard-X-ray free-electron laser starting from noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinelli, A.; MacArthur, J.; Emma, P.; Guetg, M.; Field, C.

    2017-01-01

    In this letter, we report the experimental demonstration of single-spike hard-X-ray free-electron laser pulses starting from noise with multi-eV bandwidth. Here, this is accomplished by shaping a low-charge electron beam with a slotted emittance spoiler and by adjusting the transport optics to optimize the beam-shaping accuracy. Based on elementary free-electron laser scaling laws, we estimate the pulse duration to be less than 1 fs full-width at half-maximum.

  18. Detection of single electrons by means of a Micromegas-covered Medi Pix2 pixel CMOS readout circuit

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, Michael; Colas, Paul; Colijn, Auke Pieter; Fornaini, Alessandro; Giomataris, Ioanis; Heijne, Erik H M; Kluit, Peter; Llopart-Cudie, Xavier; Schmitz, Jurriaan; Timmermans, J; Visschers, Jan L; Van der Graaf, Harry

    2005-01-01

    A small drift chamber was read out by means of a MediPix2 readout chip as a direct anode. A Micromegas foil was placed 50 mu m above the chip, and electron multiplication occurred in the gap. With a He /isobutane 80/20 mixture, gas multiplication factors up to tens of thousands were achieved, resulting in an efficiency for detecting single electrons of better than 90 %. We recorded many frames containing 2D images with tracks from cosmic muons. Along these tracks, electron clusters were observed, as well as delta -rays.

  19. Interaction between single gold atom and the graphene edge: A study via aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hongtao

    2012-01-01

    Interaction between single noble metal atoms and graphene edges has been investigated via aberration-corrected and monochromated transmission electron microscopy. A collective motion of the Au atom and the nearby carbon atoms is observed in transition between energy-favorable configurations. Most trapping and detrapping processes are assisted by the dangling carbon atoms, which are more susceptible to knock-on displacements by electron irradiation. Thermal energy is lower than the activation barriers in transition among different energy-favorable configurations, which suggests electron-beam irradiation can be an efficient way of engineering the graphene edge with metal atoms. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  20. Characteristic study of plasma waves by varying the applied RF frequency and electron temperature in single frequency capacitive discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Sarveshwar; Turner, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    In low-pressure capacitive discharges, stochastic heating is the dominant electron heating mechanism which occurs due to the momentum transfer from the oscillating electron sheath edge to electrons. The existence of waves in electron density close to the sheath edge was firstly reported in literature but a comprehensive analysis of their nature has not been discussed. The evidence of wave emission with a frequency near to electron plasma frequency adjacent the sheath territory in case of collisionless plasma in single frequency capacitive discharges was detailed investigated by S Sharma et al. Here the wave properties have been studied by varying the current density amplitude J0 for a constant Radio-Frequency (RF), 27.12 MHz. The electron temperature was also constant (2.5 eV). The field reversal and ion reflection phenomena were reported. In current research work, these waves are studied by varying the frequency of applied RF and keeping other parameters constant. The wave amplitude changes with the frequency of applied RF and the presence of strong field reversal region also observed. The wave properties are also studied by varying the electron temperature Te for applied frequency 27.12 MHz by keeping all other controlling parameters constant. At low values of electron temperature i.e. ∼ 2 eV the strong field reversal emerges. The wave amplitude is also varies by changing electron temperature. (author)

  1. Single-molecule interfacial electron transfer dynamics of porphyrin on TiO2 nanoparticles: dissecting the interfacial electric field and electron accepting state density dependent dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Vishal Govind; Dhital, Bharat; Lu, H Peter

    2015-12-07

    Single-molecule photon-stamping spectroscopy correlated with electrochemical techniques was used to dissect complex interfacial electron transfer (ET) dynamics by probing an m-ZnTCPP molecule anchored to a TiO2 NP surface while electrochemically controlling the energetically-accessible surface states of TiO2 NPs. Application of negative potential increases the electron density in TiO2 NPs, resulting in hindered forward ET and enhanced backward ET due to the changes in the interfacial electric field and the occupancy of acceptor states.

  2. Structural and electronic properties of alkali-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemes, Norbert Marcel

    In this thesis, we study the properties of alkali doped single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). SWNT are crystallized into ropes, which display the one-dimensional electronic properties of the constituent nanotubes. Using x-ray diffraction, we show that the alkali atoms invade the channels in the triangular rope lattice and determine the structure of the doped ropes. We show that the diffraction profile of the doped SWNT is best described by a model where the alkali ions surround each tube in an ordered fashion by dilating the channels. Alkali doped SWNT exhibit colors similar to alkali doped graphite (GIC). We study their electronic structure with IR reflectivity; the alkali dopants donate their valence electron to the SWNT host, so the free carrier concentration increases, shifting the Drude-edge into the visible spectral range. This is accompanied by a large shift of the Fermi-level, so the characteristic transitions between the 1D van Hove singularities of the undoped SWNT diminish. The presence of the alkali ions around the SWNT breaks the translational symmetry and increases coupling between parallel tubes within ropes. We find that the momentum relaxation time shortens as the ropes become more three dimensional. We also find that alkali disorder contributes to the scattering. In p-type, HNO3 doped SWNT, the charge transfer is smaller; only the first subband of the semiconducting tubes gets depleted, shown by the disappearance of the first van Hove transition. This indicates a Fermi-level shift of ˜0.3 eV. The reflectivity has structure at low energy, which moves the Drude-peak to a sharp, intense peak at 0.1 eV in the optical conductivity, reminiscent of quasi-1D TTF-TCNQ. The DC conductivity also increases ˜80-fold during doping. The low temperature divergence of undoped SWNT disappears in alkali doped SWNT. However, we find that oxygen can modulate the low-T divergence. After outgassing, the divergence becomes ˜10 times stronger. We interpret the low

  3. Differentiation of four Aspergillus species and one Zygosaccharomyces with two electronic tongues based on different measurement techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderström, C; Rudnitskaya, A; Legin, A; Krantz-Rülcker, C

    2005-09-29

    Two electronic tongues based on different measurement techniques were applied to the discrimination of four molds and one yeast. Chosen microorganisms were different species of Aspergillus and yeast specie Zygosaccharomyces bailii, which are known as food contaminants. The electronic tongue developed in Linköping University was based on voltammetry. Four working electrodes made of noble metals were used in a standard three-electrode configuration in this case. The St. Petersburg electronic tongue consisted of 27 potentiometric chemical sensors with enhanced cross-sensitivity. Sensors with chalcogenide glass and plasticized PVC membranes were used. Two sets of samples were measured using both electronic tongues. Firstly, broths were measured in which either one of the molds or the yeast grew until late logarithmic phase or border of the stationary phase. Broths inoculated by either one of molds or the yeast was measured at five different times during microorganism growth. Data were evaluated using principal component analysis (PCA), partial least square regression (PLS) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). It was found that both measurement techniques could differentiate between fungi species. Merged data from both electronic tongues improved differentiation of the samples in selected cases.

  4. The effect of driving force on intramolecular electron transfer in proteins. Studies on single-site mutated azurins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Skov, L K; van de Kamp, M

    1992-01-01

    An intramolecular electron-transfer process has previously been shown to take place between the Cys3--Cys26 radical-ion (RSSR-) produced pulse radiolytically and the Cu(II) ion in the blue single-copper protein, azurin [Farver, O. & Pecht, I. (1989) Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 86, 6868-6972]. To fu...

  5. Single-Event Transient Testing of the Crane Aerospace and Electronics SMHF2812D Dual DC-DC Converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Megan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this testing was to characterize the Crane Aerospace & Electronics (Crane) Interpoint SMHF2812D for single-event transient (SET) susceptibility. These data shall be used for flight lot evaluation, as well as qualification by similarity of the SMHF family of converters, all of which use the same active components.

  6. Characterization of voids in shock-loaded Al single crystal by combining X-ray tomography and electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, Chuanshi; Fæster, Søren; Hansen, Niels

    2017-01-01

    A combination of X-ray tomography and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was applied to investigate both the shape of voids and the plastic deformation around voids in an Al single crystal shock-loaded in the direction. The combination of these two techniques allows the addition of crystallo...

  7. Electronic Transport in Single Molecule Junctions: Control of the Molecule-Electrode Coupling Through Intramolecular Tunneling Barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danilov, Andrey; Kubatkin, Sergey; Kafanov, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    We report on single molecule electron transport measurements of two oligophenylenevinylene (OPV3) derivatives placed in a nanogap between gold (Au) or lead (Pb) electrodes in a field effect transistor device. Both derivatives contain thiol end groups that allow chemical binding to the electrodes...... to sequential tunneling and Coulomb blockade behavior....

  8. The toxicity of aromatic nitrocompounds to bovine leukemia virus-transformed fibroblasts: the role of single-electron reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cènas, N; Nemeikaitè, A; Dickancaitè, E; Anusevicius, Z; Nivinskas, H; Bironaitè, D

    1995-08-31

    Bovine leukemia virus-transformed lamb embryo fibroblasts (line FLK) possess activity of DT-diaphorase of ca. 260 U/mg protein and similar levels of other NADP(H)-oxidizing enzymes: NADH:oxidase, 359 U/mg; NADPH:oxidase, 43 U/mg; NADH:cytochrome-c reductase, 141 U/mg; NADPH:cytochrome-c reductase, 43 U/mg. In general, the toxicity of aromatic nitrocompounds towards FLK cells increases on increase of single-electron reduction potentials (E1(1)) of nitrocompounds or the log of their reduction rate constants by single-electron-transferring enzymes, microsomal NADPH:cytochrome P-450 reductase (EC 1.6.2.4) and mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone reductase (EC 1.6.99.3). No correlation between the toxicity and reduction rate of nitrocompounds by rat liver DT-diaphorase (EC 1.6.99.2) was observed. The toxicity is not significantly affected by dicumarol, an inhibitor of DT-diaphorase. Nitrocompounds examined were poor substrates for DT-diaphorase, being 10(4) times less active than menadione. Their poor reactivity is most probably determined by their preferential binding to a NADPH binding site, but not to menadione binding site of diaphorase. These data indicate that at comparable activities of DT-diaphorase and single-electron-transferring NAD(P)H dehydrogenases in the cell, the toxicity of nitrocompounds will be determined mainly by their single-electron reduction reactions.

  9. Anomalous passage of ultrarelativistic electrons in thick single crystals in axial channeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khokonov, M.K.; Telegin, V.I.

    1983-01-01

    The dynamics of ultrarelativistic axially channeled electrons in thick crystals is studied. It is revealed that a certain fraction of initial electrons have anomalously large dechanneling depths. It is shown also that the dechanneling depth in heavy and light crystals are comparable. In some cases, the number of channeled electrons can strongly increase at the expense of quasi-channeled electrons. The problem of quasichanneling is also considered. (author)

  10. Anomalous passage of ultrarelativistic electrons in thick single crystals in axial channeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khokonov, M.K. (Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR). Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki); Telegin, V.I. (Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol' zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Atomnoj Ehnergii)

    1983-07-01

    The dynamics of ultrarelativistic axially channeled electrons in thick crystals is studied. It is revealed that a certain fraction of initial electrons have anomalously large dechanneling depths. It is shown also that the dechanneling depth in heavy and light crystals are comparable. In some cases, the number of channeled electrons can strongly increase at the expense of quasi-channeled electrons. The problem of quasi-channeling is also considered.

  11. Electrical Control, Read-out and Initialization of Single Electron Spins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shafiei, M.

    2013-01-01

    An electron, in addition to its electric charge, possesses a small magnetic moment, called spin. The spin of an electron can point parallel (spin-up) or antiparallel (spin-down) to the magnetic field. These two states are analogous to zero and one of the logical bit in current digital electronic

  12. A laser desorption-electron impact ionization ion trap mass spectrometer for real-time analysis of single atmospheric particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, E. A.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Hanna, S. J.; Robb, D. B.; Hepburn, J. H.; Blades, M. W.; Bertram, A. K.

    2009-04-01

    A novel aerosol ion trap mass spectrometer combining pulsed IR laser desorption with electron impact (EI) ionization for single particle studies is described. The strengths of this instrument include a two-step desorption and ionization process to minimize matrix effects; electron impact ionization, a universal and well-characterized ionization technique; vaporization and ionization inside the ion trap to improve sensitivity; and an ion trap mass spectrometer for MSn experiments. The instrument has been used for mass spectral identification of laboratory generated pure aerosols in the 600 nm-1.1 [mu]m geometric diameter range of a variety of aromatic and aliphatic compounds, as well as for tandem mass spectrometry studies (up to MS3) of single caffeine particles. We investigate the effect of various operational parameters on the mass spectrum and fragmentation patterns. The single particle detection limit of the instrument was found to be a 325 nm geometric diameter particle (8.7 × 107 molecules or 22 fg) for 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid. Lower single particle detection limits are predicted to be attainable by modifying the EI pulse. The use of laser desorption-electron impact (LD-EI) in an ion trap is a promising technique for determining the size and chemical composition of single aerosol particles in real time.

  13. Solar light-induced production of reactive oxygen species by single walled carbon nanotubes in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photosensitizing processes of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) which include photo-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) convert light energy into oxidizing chemical energy that mediates transformations of nanomaterials. The oxidative stress associated with ROS may p...

  14. Single-electron-occupation metal-oxide-semiconductor quantum dots formed from efficient poly-silicon gate layout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, Malcolm S.; rochette, sophie; Rudolph, Martin; Roy, A. -M.; Curry, Matthew Jon; Ten Eyck, Gregory A.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Wendt, Joel R.; Pluym, Tammy; Carr, Stephen M; Ward, Daniel Robert; Lilly, Michael; pioro-ladriere, michel

    2017-07-01

    We introduce a silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor quantum dot structure that achieves dot-reservoir tunnel coupling control without a dedicated barrier gate. The elementary structure consists of two accumulation gates separated spatially by a gap, one gate accumulating a reservoir and the other a quantum dot. Control of the tunnel rate between the dot and the reservoir across the gap is demonstrated in the single electron regime by varying the reservoir accumulation gate voltage while compensating with the dot accumulation gate voltage. The method is then applied to a quantum dot connected in series to source and drain reservoirs, enabling transport down to the single electron regime. Finally, tuning of the valley splitting with the dot accumulation gate voltage is observed. This split accumulation gate structure creates silicon quantum dots of similar characteristics to other realizations but with less electrodes, in a single gate stack subtractive fabrication process that is fully compatible with silicon foundry manufacturing.

  15. 77 FR 47303 - Atlantic Highly Migratory Species; Electronic Dealer Reporting Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ... consistency in reporting requirements for different dealer permits. In addition, NMFS is integrating the HMS... reporting system. The new electronic reporting system will be integrated within existing SAFIS and Trip..., NMFS is integrating the HMS electronic reporting requirements into existing electronic reporting...

  16. Cryo-scanning electron microscopic study on freezing behavior of xylem ray parenchyma cells in hardwood species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa; Kuroda

    2000-12-01

    Differential thermal analysis (DTA) has indicated that xylem ray parenchyma cells (XRPCs) of hardwood species adapt to freezing of apoplastic water either by deep supercooling or by extracellular freezing, depending upon the species. DTA studies indicated that moderately cold hardy hardwood species exhibiting deep supercooling in the XRPCs were limited in latitudinal distribution within the -40 degrees C isotherm, while very hardy hardwood species exhibiting extracellular freezing could distribute in colder areas beyond the -40 degrees C isotherm. Predictions based on the results of DTA, however, indicate that XRPCs exhibiting extracellular freezing may appear not only in very hardy woody species native to cold areas beyond the -40 degrees C isotherm but also in less hardy hardwood species native to tropical and subtropical zones as well as in a small number of moderately hardy hardwood species native to warm temperate zones. Cryo-scanning electron microscopic (cryo-SEM) studies on the freezing behavior of XRPCs have revealed some errors in DTA. These errors are originated mainly due to the overlap between exotherms produced by freezing of water in apoplastic spaces (high temperature exotherms, HTEs) and exotherms produced by freezing of intracellular water of XRPCs by breakdown of deep supercooling (low temperature exotherms, LTEs), as well as to the shortage of LTEs produced by intracellular freezing of XRPCs. In addition, DTA results are significantly affected by cooling rates employed. Further, cryo-SEM observations, which revealed the true freezing behavior of XRPCs, changed the previous knowledge of freezing behavior of XRPCs that had been obtained by freeze-substitution and transmission electron microscopic studies. Cryo-SEM results, in association with results obtained from DTA that were reconfirmed or changed by observation using a cryo-SEM, revealed a clear tendency of the freezing behavior of XRPCs in hardwood species to change with changes in the

  17. Electrons, Photons, and Force: Quantitative Single-Molecule Measurements from Physics to Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Single-molecule measurement techniques have illuminated unprecedented details of chemical behavior, including observations of the motion of a single molecule on a surface, and even the vibration of a single bond within a molecule. Such measurements are critical to our understanding of entities ranging from single atoms to the most complex protein assemblies. We provide an overview of the strikingly diverse classes of measurements that can be used to quantify single-molecule properties, including those of single macromolecules and single molecular assemblies, and discuss the quantitative insights they provide. Examples are drawn from across the single-molecule literature, ranging from ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy studies of adsorbate diffusion on surfaces to fluorescence studies of protein conformational changes in solution. PMID:21338175

  18. p-wave triggered superconductivity in single-layer graphene on an electron-doped oxide superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bernardo, A; Millo, O; Barbone, M; Alpern, H; Kalcheim, Y; Sassi, U; Ott, A K; De Fazio, D; Yoon, D; Amado, M; Ferrari, A C; Linder, J; Robinson, J W A

    2017-01-19

    Electron pairing in the vast majority of superconductors follows the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity, which describes the condensation of electrons into pairs with antiparallel spins in a singlet state with an s-wave symmetry. Unconventional superconductivity was predicted in single-layer graphene (SLG), with the electrons pairing with a p-wave or chiral d-wave symmetry, depending on the position of the Fermi energy with respect to the Dirac point. By placing SLG on an electron-doped (non-chiral) d-wave superconductor and performing local scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy, here we show evidence for a p-wave triggered superconducting density of states in SLG. The realization of unconventional superconductivity in SLG offers an exciting new route for the development of p-wave superconductivity using two-dimensional materials with transition temperatures above 4.2 K.

  19. Comparative toxicity of a brominated flame retardant (tetrabromobisphenol A) on microalgae with single and multi-species bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debenest, Timothée; Petit, Anne-Nöelle; Gagné, François; Kohli, Mohan; Nguyen, Nien; Blaise, Christian

    2011-09-01

    The potential threat of emerging chemicals to the aquatic flora is a major issue. The purpose of the study was to develop a multispecies microalgae test in order to determine the impact of species interactions on the cytoxicity of an emergent toxic contaminant: the tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA). Single and multi-species tests were thus performed to study the effects of this flame retardant on two microalgae (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Nitzschia palea) commonly observed in freshwater. A synthetic medium was designed to allow the growth of both species. The algae were exposed to 1.8, 4.8, 9.2, 12.9 and 16.5 μM of TBBPA for 72 h. After staining with fluorescein diacetate (FDA), viable cells of each alga species were analyzed by flow cytometry based on chlorophyll autofluorescence and intracellular esterase activity. Density and abundance of viable cells were assessed to follow the population growth and the cell viability. In TBBPA treated samples, the growth of the two microalgae was significantly inhibited at the three highest concentrations (9.2, 12.9 and 16.5 μM) in the two tests. At the end of the experiment (t=72 h), the cell viability was also significantly smaller at these concentrations. The decreases of growth rate and viable cell abundance in TBBPA treated populations of N. palea were significantly higher in multi-species test in comparison with the single-species test. No significant differences were noticed between the two tests for P. subcapitata populations exposed to TBBPA. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Leaf anatomy and histochemistry of three species of Ficus sect. Americanae supported by light and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Nathalia Diniz; Coelho, Victor Peçanha M; Ventrella, Marília Contin; Agra, Maria de Fátima

    2014-02-01

    In this work the leaf anatomy of three species of Ficus section Americanae (Miq.) Miq. from Brazil, whose leaves and latex are used in folk medicine is reported. The work was carried out using light and scanning electron microscopy in order to characterize these species and to evaluate their taxonomic significance, and also contribute to the quality control of their ethnodrugs. The three species (Ficus cyclophylla, Ficus elliotiana, and Ficus caatingae) showed hypostomatic leaves, anomocytic stomata, straight epidermal cell outlines, and a dorsiventral mesophyll. Some micro-morphological characters such as density and distribution of epicuticular waxes, glandular trichomes, the length and width of stomata, as well as the palisade of mesophyll and petiole outlines proved to be the most useful and distinctive characters for the separation of species. These may contribute as additional support for the taxonomy of the section and for the quality control of their ethnodrugs.

  1. Study of the external female genitalia of 14 Rhodnius species (Hemiptera, Reduviidae, Triatominae) using scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Among the vectors of Chagas disease (Hemiptera: Reduviidae:Triatominae), there are eighteen Rhodnius species described and some are difficult to identify. The aim of this article is to contribute to the specific identification of fourteen Rhodnius spp. through morphological characters of the external female genitalia. Methods Female abdomens were cut transversely. The specimens were then prepared for examination by using scanning electron microscopy. Results The careful examination of the dorsal, posterior and ventral sides revealed characteristics that allowed the identification of each of the fourteen species. Conclusion The use of external female genitalia as characteristics are proposed as a tool for specifically identifying Rhodnius species, and an identification key for these species is presented. PMID:24405517

  2. Operation of a quantum dot in the finite-state machine mode: Single-electron dynamic memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klymenko, M. V. [Department of Chemistry, University of Liège, B4000 Liège (Belgium); Klein, M. [The Fritz Haber Center for Molecular Dynamics and the Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Levine, R. D. [The Fritz Haber Center for Molecular Dynamics and the Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging and Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, David Geffen School of Medicine and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Remacle, F., E-mail: fremacle@ulg.ac.be [Department of Chemistry, University of Liège, B4000 Liège (Belgium); The Fritz Haber Center for Molecular Dynamics and the Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2016-07-14

    A single electron dynamic memory is designed based on the non-equilibrium dynamics of charge states in electrostatically defined metallic quantum dots. Using the orthodox theory for computing the transfer rates and a master equation, we model the dynamical response of devices consisting of a charge sensor coupled to either a single and or a double quantum dot subjected to a pulsed gate voltage. We show that transition rates between charge states in metallic quantum dots are characterized by an asymmetry that can be controlled by the gate voltage. This effect is more pronounced when the switching between charge states corresponds to a Markovian process involving electron transport through a chain of several quantum dots. By simulating the dynamics of electron transport we demonstrate that the quantum box operates as a finite-state machine that can be addressed by choosing suitable shapes and switching rates of the gate pulses. We further show that writing times in the ns range and retention memory times six orders of magnitude longer, in the ms range, can be achieved on the double quantum dot system using experimentally feasible parameters, thereby demonstrating that the device can operate as a dynamic single electron memory.

  3. Operation of a quantum dot in the finite-state machine mode: Single-electron dynamic memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klymenko, M. V.; Klein, M.; Levine, R. D.; Remacle, F.

    2016-01-01

    A single electron dynamic memory is designed based on the non-equilibrium dynamics of charge states in electrostatically defined metallic quantum dots. Using the orthodox theory for computing the transfer rates and a master equation, we model the dynamical response of devices consisting of a charge sensor coupled to either a single and or a double quantum dot subjected to a pulsed gate voltage. We show that transition rates between charge states in metallic quantum dots are characterized by an asymmetry that can be controlled by the gate voltage. This effect is more pronounced when the switching between charge states corresponds to a Markovian process involving electron transport through a chain of several quantum dots. By simulating the dynamics of electron transport we demonstrate that the quantum box operates as a finite-state machine that can be addressed by choosing suitable shapes and switching rates of the gate pulses. We further show that writing times in the ns range and retention memory times six orders of magnitude longer, in the ms range, can be achieved on the double quantum dot system using experimentally feasible parameters, thereby demonstrating that the device can operate as a dynamic single electron memory.

  4. Holography and coherent diffraction with low-energy electrons: A route towards structural biology at the single molecule level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Escher, Conrad; Fink, Hans-Werner, E-mail: hwfink@physik.uzh.ch

    2015-12-15

    The current state of the art in structural biology is led by NMR, X-ray crystallography and TEM investigations. These powerful tools however all rely on averaging over a large ensemble of molecules. Here, we present an alternative concept aiming at structural analysis at the single molecule level. We show that by combining electron holography and coherent diffraction imaging estimations concerning the phase of the scattered wave become needless as the phase information is extracted from the data directly and unambiguously. Performed with low-energy electrons the resolution of this lens-less microscope is just limited by the De Broglie wavelength of the electron wave and the numerical aperture, given by detector geometry. In imaging freestanding graphene, a resolution of 2 Å has been achieved revealing the 660.000 unit cells of the graphene sheet from a single data set. Once applied to individual biomolecules the method shall ultimately allow for non-destructive imaging and imports the potential to distinguish between different conformations of proteins with atomic resolution. - Highlights: • Structural biology of single proteins. • Radiation damage-free imaging of individual biomolecules. • Holography. • Low-energy electrons. • Coherent diffraction and phase retrieval.

  5. Design of custom oligonucleotide microarrays for single species or interspecies hybrids using Array Oligo Selector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudy, Amy A

    2011-01-01

    New technologies for DNA sequencing have made it feasible to determine the genome sequence of any organism of interest. This sequence is the resource required to create tools for downstream studies, including DNA microarrays. A number of vendors can produce DNA microarrays containing customer-specified sequences, allowing investigators to design and order arrays customized for any species of interest. Freely available, user-friendly computer programs are available for designing microarray probes. These design programs can be used to create probes that distinguish between two related genomes, allowing investigation of gene expression or gene representation in intra- or interspecies hybrids or in samples containing DNA from multiple species.

  6. Novel tailor-made externally triggerable single-molecular switches for molecular electronics

    OpenAIRE

    Harzmann, Gero

    2015-01-01

    Molecular electronics marks a highly interdisciplinary scientific field, in which physicists, chemists, and biologist jointly investigate electronic phenomena on a molecular level. Herein, the foremost task of the chemist is the design and synthesis of novel, tailor-made model compounds bearing externally addressable or controllable functions, which are predominantly of electronic nature. This present PhD thesis mainly focusses on the synthetic aspects towards innovative metalorga...

  7. Stretchable form of single crystal silicon for high performance electronics on rubber substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    University of Illinois

    2009-04-21

    The present invention provides stretchable, and optionally printable, semiconductors and electronic circuits capable of providing good performance when stretched, compressed, flexed or otherwise deformed. Stretchable semiconductors and electronic circuits of the present invention preferred for some applications are flexible, in addition to being stretchable, and thus are capable of significant elongation, flexing, bending or other deformation along one or more axes. Further, stretchable semiconductors and electronic circuits of the present invention may be adapted to a wide range of device configurations to provide fully flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  8. Electronic properties of single-molecule junction: Effect of the molecular distortion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, W.; Zhao, M.; Jiang, Q.

    2009-01-01

    For a model system consisting of a benzenedithio (BDT) molecule sandwiched between two Au plates, the electronic properties as a function of different BDT geometry are investigated using density functional theory. The distorted BDT structures are got through stretching the electrode distance. The corresponding electronic properties, including the spatial distribution of the frontier orbits, the gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital levels and density of states at the Fermi energy are determined. It reveals that the molecular distortion essentially determines electronic structures. The result should be beneficial to understand the stress-dependent or structure-dependent transport mechanism of electrons of the BDT junction.

  9. The Hydrated Electron at the Surface of Neat Liquid Water Appears To Be Indistinguishable from the Bulk Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coons, Marc P; You, Zhi-Qiang; Herbert, John M

    2016-08-31

    Experiments have suggested that the aqueous electron, e(-)(aq), may play a significant role in the radiation chemistry of DNA. A recent measurement of the energy (below vacuum level) of the putative "interfacial" hydrated electron at the water/vacuum interface, performed using liquid microjet photoelectron spectroscopy, has been interpreted to suggest that aqueous electrons at the water/biomolecule interface may possess the appropriate energetics to induce DNA strand breaks, whereas e(-)(aq) in bulk water lies too far below the vacuum level to induce such reactions. Other such experiments, however, find no evidence of a long-lived feature at low binding energy. We employ a variety of computational strategies to demonstrate that the energetics of the hydrated electron at the surface of neat liquid water are not significantly different from those of e(-)(aq) in bulk water and as such are incompatible with dissociative electron attachment reactions in DNA. We furthermore suggest that no stable interfacial species may exist at all, consistent with the interpretation of certain surface-sensitive spectroscopy measurements, and that even if a short-lived, metastable species does exist at the vacuum/water interface, it would be extremely difficult to distinguish, experimentally, from e(-)(aq) in bulk water, using either optical absorption or photoelectron spectroscopy.

  10. Fluctuation in Interface and Electronic Structure of Single-Molecule Junctions Investigated by Current versus Bias Voltage Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isshiki, Yuji; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2018-03-14

    Structural and electronic detail at the metal-molecule interface has a significant impact on the charge transport across the molecular junctions, but its precise understanding and control still remain elusive. On the single-molecule scale, the metal-molecule interface structures and relevant charge transport properties are subject to fluctuation, which contain the fundamental science of single-molecule transport and implication for manipulability of the transport properties in electronic devices. Here, we present a comprehensive approach to investigate the fluctuation in the metal-molecule interface in single-molecule junctions, based on current-voltage ( I- V) measurements in combination with first-principles simulation. Contrary to conventional molecular conductance studies, this I- V approach provides a correlated statistical description of both the degree of electronic coupling across the metal-molecule interface and the molecular orbital energy level. This statistical approach was employed to study fluctuation in single-molecule junctions of 1,4-butanediamine (DAB), pyrazine (PY), 4,4'-bipyridine (BPY), and fullerene (C 60 ). We demonstrate that molecular-dependent fluctuation of σ-, π-, and π-plane-type interfaces can be captured by analyzing the molecular orbital (MO) energy level under mechanical perturbation. While the MO level of DAB with the σ-type interface shows weak distance dependence and fluctuation, the MO level of PY, BPY, and C 60 features unique distance dependence and molecular-dependent fluctuation against the mechanical perturbation. The MO level of PY and BPY with the σ+π-type interface increases with the increase in the stretch distance. In contrast, the MO level of C 60 with the π-plane-type interface decreases with the increase in the stretching perturbation. This study provides an approach to resolve the structural and electronic fluctuation in the single-molecule junctions and insight into the molecular-dependent fluctuation in

  11. A single dominant Ganoderma species is responsible for root rot of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ganoderma root rot is the most serious disease affecting commercially planted Acacia mangium in plantations in Indonesia. Numerous Ganoderma spp. have been recorded from diseased trees of this species and to a lesser extent Eucalyptus, causing confusion regarding the primary cause of the disease. In this study, a ...

  12. Beyond the single species climate envelope: A multifaceted approach to mapping climate change vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher S. Balzotti; Stanley G. Kitchen; Clinton McCarthy

    2016-01-01

    Federal land management agencies and conservation organizations have begun incorporating climate change vulnerability assessments (CCVAs) as an important component in the management and conservation of landscapes. It is often a challenge to translate that knowledge into management plans and actions, even when research infers species risk. Predictive maps can...

  13. High resolution transmission electron microscopy studies of {sigma} phase in Ni-based single crystal superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Fei [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Zhang Jianxin, E-mail: jianxin@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Liu Pan [Institute of Microstructure and Property of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Feng Qiang [National Center for Materials Service Safety, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Han Xiaodong; Mao Shengcheng [Institute of Microstructure and Property of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China)

    2012-09-25

    Graphical abstract: (a) TEM micrograph of {sigma} phase; (b) HRTEM image of {sigma}/{gamma} interface corresponding to the area of the white frame in (a); (c) an enlarged image of area from the white frame in (b). The combination of {sigma}/{gamma} interface appears very well, and a two-atomic-layer step is shown on the {sigma}/{gamma} interface. In addition, {sigma} phase has the orientation relationship of [0 0 1]{sub {gamma}}//[1 1 2{sup Macron }]{sub {sigma}}, (2{sup Macron} 2 0){sub {gamma}}//(1{sup Macron} 1 0){sub {sigma}}, (2{sup Macron }2{sup Macron} 0){sub {gamma}}//(1 1 1){sub {sigma}}; [0 1 1]{sub {gamma}}//[1 1 0]{sub {sigma}}, (1 1{sup Macron} 1){sub {gamma}}//(0 0 1{sup Macron }){sub {sigma}} with the {gamma} phase. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elemental characteristic of {sigma} phase is studied by HAADF techniques and EDS analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interfacial characteristics of {sigma}/{gamma} interface are revealed by HRTEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An atomic structural {sigma}/{gamma} interface with a two-atomic-layer step has been proposed. - Abstract: By means of high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and high-angle annular dark-field image technique (HAADF), morphological of plate-shaped {sigma} phase and interfacial characteristics between plate-shaped {sigma} phase and {gamma} phase in Ni-based single crystal superalloys have been studied. On the basis of HRTEM observations, an atomic structural interface between {sigma} phase and {gamma} phase with a step has been proposed. {sigma} Phase has the relationship of [0 0 1]{sub {gamma}}//[1 1 2{sup Macron }]{sub {sigma}}, (2{sup Macron} 2 0){sub {gamma}}//(1{sup Macron} 1 0){sub {sigma},} (2{sup Macron }2{sup Macron} 0){sub {gamma}}//(1 1 1){sub {sigma}}; [0 1 1]{sub {gamma}}//[1 1 0]{sub {sigma}}, (1 1{sup Macron} 1){sub {gamma}}//(0 0 1{sup Macron }){sub {sigma}} with the {gamma} phase. The compositional characteristics of the {sigma} phase which

  14. The effects of changing the electrodes temperature on the tunnel magnetoresistance in the ferromagnetic single electron transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, N.; Pourali, N.; Kavaz, E.

    2018-01-01

    Ferromagnetic single electron transistor with electrodes having different temperatures is investigated and the effects of changing electrodes temperature on TMR of system are studied. A modified orthodox theory is used to study the system and to calculate the electron tunneling transition rate. The results show that the temperature of electrodes can be an effective tool to control and tune the tunnel magnetoresistance of FM-SET. Also, the effects of parameters such as resistance ratio of junctions, magnetic polarization and spin relaxation time on the behaviour of the system are studied.

  15. Electronic Transport in Single Molecule Junctions: Control of the Molecule-Electrode Coupling Through Intramolecular Tunneling Barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danilov, Andrey; Kubatkin, Sergey; Kafanov, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    We report on single molecule electron transport measurements of two oligophenylenevinylene (OPV3) derivatives placed in a nanogap between gold (Au) or lead (Pb) electrodes in a field effect transistor device. Both derivatives contain thiol end groups that allow chemical binding to the electrodes....... One derivative has additional methylene groups separating the thiols from the delocalized -electron system. The insertion of methylene groups changes the open state conductance by 3-4 orders of magnitude and changes the transport mechanism from a coherent regime with finite zero-bias conductance...

  16. Channeling and Radiation of Electrons in Silicon Single Crystals and Si1−xGex Crystalline Undulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backe, H.; Krambrich, D.; Lauth, W.

    2013-01-01

    The phenomenon of channeling and the basic features of channeling radiation emission are introduced in a pedestrian way. Both, radiation spectra as well as dechanneling length measurements at electron beam energies between 195 and 855 MeV feature quantum state phenomena for the (110) planar...... potential of the silicon single crystals. Radiation from a crystalline undulator, produced at the Aarhus University (UAAR), has been investigated at the Mainz Microtron electron accelerator facility MAMI. The 4-period epitaxially grown strained layer Si1−xGex undulator had a period length λu = 9.9 μm...

  17. Surface structure determinations of crystalline ionic thin films grown on transition metal single crystal surfaces by low energy electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Joel Glenn [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-05-01

    The surface structures of NaCl(100), LiF(100) and alpha-MgCl2(0001) adsorbed on various metal single crystals have been determined by low energy electron diffraction (LEED). Thin films of these salts were grown on metal substrates by exposing the heated metal surface to a molecular flux of salt emitted from a Knudsen cell. This method of investigating thin films of insulators (ionic salts) on a conducting substrate (metal) circumvents surface charging problems that plagued bulk studies, thereby allowing the use of electron-based techniques to characterize the surface.

  18. Relativistic electron beams driven by single-cycle laser pulses at kHz repetition rate (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Jérôme; Guénot, Diego; Gustas, Dominykas; Vernier, Aline; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Böhle, Frederik; López-Martens, Rodrigo; Lifschitz, Agustin

    2017-05-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators are usually driven by 100-TW class laser systems with rather low repetition rates. However, recent years have seen the emergence of laser-plasma accelerators operating with kHz lasers and energies lower than 10 mJ. The high repetition-rate is particularly interesting for applications requiring high stability and high signal-to-noise ratio but lower energy electrons. For example, our group recently demonstrated that kHz laser-driven electron beams could be used to capture ultrafast structural dynamics in Silicon nano-membranes via electron diffraction with picosecond resolution. In these first experiments, electrons were injected in the density gradients located at the plasma exit, resulting in rather low energies in the 100 keV range. The electrons being nonrelativistic, the bunch duration quickly becomes picosecond long. Relativistic energies are required to mitigate space charge effects and maintain femtosecond bunches. In this paper, we will show very recent results where electrons are accelerated in laser-driven wakefields to relativistic energies, reaching up to 5 MeV at kHz repetition rate. The electron energy was increased by nearly two orders of magnitude by using single-cycle laser pulses of 3.5 fs, with only 2.5 mJ of energy. Using such short pulses of light allowed us to resonantly excite high amplitude and nonlinear plasma waves at high plasma density, ne=1.5-2×1020 cm-3, in a regime close to the blow-out regime. Electrons had a peaked distribution around 5 MeV, with a relative energy spread of 30 %. Charges in the 100's fC/shot and up to pC/shot where measured depending on plasma density. The electron beam was fairly collimated, 20 mrad divergence at Full Width Half Maximum. The results show remarkable stability of the beam parameters in terms of beam pointing and electron distribution. 3D PIC simulations reproduce the results very well and indicate that electrons are injected by the ionization of Nitrogen atoms, N5+ to N6

  19. Single-tree water use and water-use efficiencies of selected indigenous and introduced species in the Southern Cape region of South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mapeto, P

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available indigenous tree species can provide an additional low water-use form of forestry. Single-tree water use and water-use efficiencies of three indigenous species (Ilex mitis, Ocotea bullata and Podocarpus latifolius) and one introduced species (Pinus radiata...

  20. Detection of reactive oxygen species in isolated, perfused lungs by electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schudt Christian

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sources and measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS in intact organs are largely unresolved. This may be related to methodological problems associated with the techniques currently employed for ROS detection. Electron spin resonance (ESR with spin trapping is a specific method for ROS detection, and may address some these technical problems. Methods We have established a protocol for the measurement of intravascular ROS release from isolated buffer-perfused and ventilated rabbit and mouse lungs, combining lung perfusion with the spin probe l-hydroxy-3-carboxy-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine (CPH and ESR spectroscopy. We then employed this technique to characterize hypoxia-dependent ROS release, with specific attention paid to NADPH oxidase-dependent superoxide formation as a possible vasoconstrictor pathway. Results While perfusing lungs with CPH over a range of inspired oxygen concentrations (1–21 %, the rate of CP• formation exhibited an oxygen-dependence, with a minimum at 2.5 % O2. Addition of superoxide dismutase (SOD to the buffer fluid illustrated that a minor proportion of this intravascular ROS leak was attributable to superoxide. Stimulation of the lungs by injection of phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA into the pulmonary artery caused a rapid increase in CP• formation, concomitant with pulmonary vasoconstriction. Both the PMA-induced CPH oxidation and the vasoconstrictor response were largely suppressed by SOD. When the PMA challenge was performed at different oxygen concentrations, maximum superoxide liberation and pulmonary vasoconstriction occurred at 5 % O2. Using a NADPH oxidase inhibitor and NADPH-oxidase deficient mice, we illustrated that the PMA-induced superoxide release was attributable to the stimulation of NADPH oxidases. Conclusion The perfusion of isolated lungs with CPH is suitable for detection of intravascular ROS release by ESR spectroscopy. We employed this technique to

  1. Single Bunch Electron Cloud Effects in the NLC Beam Delivery System(LCC-0126)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, D

    2003-12-08

    A positron beam passing through a linear collider beam delivery beam line is finely focused to desired specifications during collimation and especially in Final Focusing (FFS). Undesired additional focusing is generated by beam-electron cloud interactions, which typically leads to beam size increases at high cloud densities. This paper examines the severity of the electron cloud effects and assesses the critical cloud density.

  2. Electrical and Physical Property Characterization of Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Ink for Flexible Printed Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    multilayer electronic devices, chipping away at one of the preeminent problems in current day computer architecture. 2.3.3 Dense CNT Arrays. A primary...means,” by integrating structural materials with functional electronic mediums [26]. By incorporating extrusion techniques for laying Figure 2.8: Ink

  3. Pre-embedding staining of single muscle fibers for light and electron microscopy studies of subcellular organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ralston, E; Ploug, Thorkil

    1996-01-01

    ) immunocytochemistry. Here we show that pre-embedding staining of single teased fibers, or of single enzymatically dissociated fibers, has several advantages over the use of sections for observing discrete patterns that extend over long distances in the cells. We report on an optimization study carried out......Skeletal muscle fibers are large, multinucleated cells which pose a challenge to the morphologist. In the course of studies of the distribution of the glucose transporter GLUT4, in muscle, we have compared different preparative procedures, for both light (LM) and electron microscopy (EM...

  4. 77 FR 72993 - Atlantic Highly Migratory Species; Electronic Dealer Reporting Requirements; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-07

    ...). This document corrects the final electronic dealer reporting rule by revising the first sentence of Sec... (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Final rule; correction. SUMMARY: This action is a technical amendment to a rule not yet in effect. It contains a correction to the final regulations regarding electronic dealer...

  5. 77 FR 38772 - Atlantic Highly Migratory Species; Electronic Dealer Reporting System Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... Dealer Reporting System Workshop AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and... through one centralized electronic reporting system. This electronic reporting system will allow dealers... reporting system to HMS dealers. In this notice, we announce the date and location for additional training...

  6. 77 FR 60108 - Atlantic Highly Migratory Species; Electronic Dealer Reporting System Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-02

    ... Dealer Reporting System Workshop AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and... electronic reporting system starting on January 1, 2013. This electronic reporting system will allow dealers... dates and locations of several training workshops to introduce the new reporting system to HMS dealers...

  7. Development and regulation of single- and multi-species Candida albicans biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Matthew B.; Gulati, Megha; Johnson, Alexander D.; Nobile, Clarissa J.

    2017-01-01

    Candida albicans is among the most prevalent fungal species of the human microbiota and asymptomatically colonizes healthy individuals. However, it is also an opportunistic pathogen that can cause severe, and often fatal, bloodstream infections. The medical impact of C. albicans typically depends on its ability to form biofilms, which are closely packed communities of cells that attach to surfaces, such as tissues and implanted medical devices. In this Review, we provide an overview of the processes involved in the formation of C. albicans biofilms and discuss the core transcriptional network that regulates biofilm development. We also consider some of the advantages that biofilms provide to C. albicans in comparison with planktonic growth and explore polymicrobial biofilms that are formed by C. albicans and certain bacterial species. PMID:29062072

  8. Mapping Regional Distribution of a Single Tree Species: Whitebark Pine in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles C. Schwartz

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Moderate resolution satellite imagery traditionally has been thought to be inadequate for mapping vegetation at the species level. This has made comprehensive mapping of regional distributions of sensitive species, such as whitebark pine, either impractical or extremely time consuming. We sought to determine whether using a combination of moderate resolution satellite imagery (Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus, extensive stand data collected by land management agencies for other purposes, and modern statistical classification techniques (boosted classification trees could result in successful mapping of whitebark pine. Overall classification accuracies exceeded 90%, with similar individual class accuracies. Accuracies on a localized basis varied based on elevation. Accuracies also varied among administrative units, although we were not able to determine whether these differences related to inherent spatial variations or differences in the quality of available reference data.

  9. Posterior spiracles of fourth instar larvae of four species of phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae under scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pessoa Felipe Arley Costa

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, posterior spiracles of laboratory-reared fourth instar larvae of Lutzomyia longipalpis, L. migonei, L. lenti, and L. whitmani (Diptera: Psychodidae of the State of Ceará, Brazil, were examined under scanning electron microscopy. The number of papillae of spiracles examined varied according to the species examined, but no intraspecific differences were found. The importance of this structure to sand fly larva identification and phylogeny is commented.

  10. A radio frequency single-electron transistor based on an InAs/InP heterostructure nanowire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Henrik A; Duty, Tim; Abay, Simon; Wilson, Chris; Wagner, Jakob B; Thelander, Claes; Delsing, Per; Samuelson, Lars

    2008-03-01

    We demonstrate radio frequency single-electron transistors fabricated from epitaxially grown InAs/InP heterostructure nanowires. Two sets of double-barrier wires with different barrier thicknesses were grown. The wires were suspended 15 nm above a metal gate electrode. Electrical measurements on a high-resistance nanowire showed regularly spaced Coulomb oscillations at a gate voltage from -0.5 to at least 1.8 V. The charge sensitivity was measured to 32 microe rms Hz(-1/2) at 1.5 K. A low-resistance single-electron transistor showed regularly spaced oscillations only in a small gate-voltage region just before carrier depletion. This device had a charge sensitivity of 2.5 microe rms Hz(-1/2). At low frequencies this device showed a typical 1/f noise behavior, with a level extrapolated to 300 microe rms Hz(-1/2) at 10 Hz.

  11. Single-shot mega-electronvolt ultrafast electron diffraction for structure dynamic studies of warm dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, M. Z., E-mail: mmo09@slac.stanford.edu; Shen, X.; Chen, Z.; Li, R. K.; Dunning, M.; Zheng, Q.; Weathersby, S. P.; Reid, A. H.; Coffee, R.; Makasyuk, I.; Edstrom, S.; McCormick, D.; Jobe, K.; Hast, C.; Glenzer, S. H.; Wang, X. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Sokolowski-Tinten, K. [Faculty of Physics and Centre for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Lotharstrasse 1, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    We have developed a single-shot mega-electronvolt ultrafast-electron-diffraction system to measure the structural dynamics of warm dense matter. The electron probe in this system is featured by a kinetic energy of 3.2 MeV and a total charge of 20 fC, with the FWHM pulse duration and spot size at sample of 350 fs and 120 μm respectively. We demonstrate its unique capability by visualizing the atomic structural changes of warm dense gold formed from a laser-excited 35-nm freestanding single-crystal gold foil. The temporal evolution of the Bragg peak intensity and of the liquid signal during solid-liquid phase transition are quantitatively determined. This experimental capability opens up an exciting opportunity to unravel the atomic dynamics of structural phase transitions in warm dense matter regime.

  12. Three-dimensional atomic models from a single projection using Z-contrast imaging: verification by electron tomography and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, A; Jones, L; Lobato, I; Altantzis, T; Goris, B; Nellist, P D; Bals, S; Van Aert, S

    2017-06-29

    In order to fully exploit structure-property relations of nanomaterials, three-dimensional (3D) characterization at the atomic scale is often required. In recent years, the resolution of electron tomography has reached the atomic scale. However, such tomography typically requires several projection images demanding substantial electron dose. A newly developed alternative circumvents this by counting the number of atoms across a single projection. These atom counts can be used to create an initial atomic model with which an energy minimization can be applied to obtain a relaxed 3D reconstruction of the nanoparticle. Here, we compare, at the atomic scale, this single projection reconstruction approach with tomography and find an excellent agreement. This new approach allows for the characterization of beam-sensitive materials or where the acquisition of a tilt series is impossible. As an example, the utility is illustrated by the 3D atomic scale characterization of a nanodumbbell on an in situ heating holder of limited tilt range.

  13. Spin-dependent electron-phonon coupling in the valence band of single-layer WS2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinsche, Nicki Frank; Ngankeu, Arlette S.; Guilloy, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    The absence of inversion symmetry leads to a strong spin-orbit splitting of the upper valence band of semiconducting single-layer transition-metal dichalchogenides such as MoS2 or WS2. This permits a direct comparison of the electron-phonon coupling strength in states that only differ by their spin....... Here, the electron-phonon coupling in the valence band maximum of single-layer WS2 is studied by first-principles calculations and angle-resolved photoemission. The coupling strength is found to be drastically different for the two spin-split branches, with calculated values of λK=0.0021 and 0.......40 for the upper and lower spin-split valence band of the freestanding layer, respectively. This difference is somewhat reduced when including scattering processes involving the Au(111) substrate present in the experiment but it remains significant, in good agreement with the experimental results....

  14. Multifloquet to Single Electronic Channel Transition in the Transport Properties of a Resistive 1D Driven Disordered Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foieri, Federico; Arrachea, Liliana; Sánchez, María José

    2007-12-01

    We investigate the dc response of a 1D disordered ring coupled to a reservoir and driven by a magnetic flux with a linear dependence on time. We identify two regimes: (i) A localized or large length L regime, characterized by a dc conductance, gdc, whose probability distribution P(gdc) is identical to the one exhibited by a 1D wire of the same length L and disorder strength placed in a two terminal Landauer setup and (ii) a multifloquet regime for small L and weak coupling to the reservoir, which exhibits large currents and conductances that can be gdc>1, in spite of the fact that the ring contains spinless electrons and a single electronic transmission channel. The crossover length between the multifloquet to the single-channel transport regime Lc is controlled by the coupling to the reservoir.

  15. Fabrication of metallic single electron transistors featuring plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition of tunnel barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbasian, Golnaz

    The continuing increase of the device density in integrated circuits (ICs) gives rise to the high level of power that is dissipated per unit area and consequently a high temperature in the circuits. Since temperature affects the performance and reliability of the circuits, minimization of the energy consumption in logic devices is now the center of attention. According to the International Technology Roadmaps for Semiconductors (ITRS), single electron transistors (SETs) hold the promise of achieving the lowest power of any known logic device, as low as 1x10-18 J per switching event. Moreover, SETs are the most sensitive electrometers to date, and are capable of detecting a fraction of an electron charge. Despite their low power consumption and high sensitivity for charge detection, room temperature operation of these devices is quite challenging mainly due to lithographical constraints in fabricating structures with the required dimensions of less than 10 nm. Silicon based SETs have been reported to operate at room temperature. However, they all suffer from significant variation in batch-to-batch performance, low fabrication yield, and temperature-dependent tunnel barrier height. In this project, we explored the fabrication of SETs featuring metal-insulator-metal (MIM) tunnel junctions. While Si-based SETs suffer from undesirable effect of dopants that result in irregularities in the device behavior, in metal-based SETs the device components (tunnel barrier, island, and the leads) are well-defined. Therefore, metal SETs are potentially more predictable in behavior, making them easier to incorporate into circuits, and easier to check against theoretical models. Here, the proposed fabrication method takes advantage of unique properties of chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) and plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD). Chemical mechanical polishing provides a path for tuning the dimensions of the tunnel junctions, surpassing the limits imposed by electron beam

  16. Environmental genomics reveals a single species ecosystem deep within the Earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chivian, Dylan; Brodie, Eoin L.; Alm, Eric J.; Culley, David E.; Dehal, Paramvir S.; DeSantis, Todd Z.; Gihring, Thomas M.; Lapidus, Alla; Lin, Li-Hung; Lowry, Stephen R.; Moser, Duane P.; Richardson, Paul; Southam, Gordon; Wanger, Greg; Pratt, Lisa M.; Andersen, Gary L.; Hazen, Terry C.; Brockman, Fred J.; Arkin, Adam P.; Onstott, Tullis C.

    2008-09-17

    DNA from low biodiversity fracture water collected at 2.8 km depth in a South African gold mine was sequenced and assembled into a single, complete genome. This bacterium, Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator, comprises>99.9percent of the microorganisms inhabiting the fluid phase of this particular fracture. Its genome indicates a motile, sporulating, sulfate reducing, chemoautotrophic thermophile that can fix its own nitrogen and carbon using machinery shared with archaea. Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator is capable of an independent lifestyle well suited to long-term isolation from the photosphere deep within Earth?s crust, and offers the first example of a natural ecosystem that appears to have its biological component entirely encoded within a single genome.

  17. Long-Lived Charge Separation at Heterojunctions between Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Perylene Diimide Electron Acceptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyun Suk [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Arias, Dylan H [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Blackburn, Jeffrey L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sisto, Thomas J. [Columbia University; Peurifoy, Samuel [Columbia University; Zhang, Boyuan [Columbia University; Nuckolls, Colin [Columbia University

    2018-04-13

    Nonfullerene electron acceptors have facilitated a recent surge in the efficiencies of organic solar cells, although fundamental studies of the nature of exciton dissociation at interfaces with nonfullerene electron acceptors are still relatively sparse. Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs), unique one-dimensional electron donors with molecule-like absorption and highly mobile charges, provide a model system for studying interfacial exciton dissociation. Here, we investigate excited-state photodynamics at the heterojunction between (6,5) s-SWCNTs and two perylene diimide (PDI)-based electron acceptors. Each of the PDI-based acceptors, hPDI2-pyr-hPDI2 and Trip-hPDI2, is deposited onto (6,5) s-SWCNT films to form a heterojunction bilayer. Transient absorption measurements demonstrate that photoinduced hole/electron transfer occurs at the photoexcited bilayer interfaces, producing long-lived separated charges with lifetimes exceeding 1.0 us. Both exciton dissociation and charge recombination occur more slowly for the hPDI2-pyr-hPDI2 bilayer than for the Trip-hPDI2 bilayer. To explain such differences, we discuss the potential roles of the thermodynamic charge transfer driving force available at each interface and the different molecular structure and intermolecular interactions of PDI-based acceptors. Detailed photophysical analysis of these model systems can develop the fundamental understanding of exciton dissociation between organic electron donors and nonfullerene acceptors, which has not been systematically studied.

  18. Single-molecule electron tunnelling through multiple redox levels with environmental relaxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2004-01-01

    We present an analytical theory for electron flow through a molecule with several redox levels, enclosed between a pair of metallic electrodes. The levels can be electronic or electronic-vibrational levels. Vibrational energy spacing characterises the latter sets. The levels are further coupled...... can be only achieved when the latter are located between the Fermi levels of the substrate and tip or source and drain electrodes. The redox levels can be brought into this "energy window", either by the overpotential or bias and gate voltages, or by vibrational relaxation of (a) given (set of) redox...

  19. Single-molecule X-ray free-electron laser imaging : Interconnecting sample orientation with explosion data

    OpenAIRE

    Östlin, Christofer

    2014-01-01

    X-ray crystallography has been around for 100 years and remains the preferred technique for solving molecular structures today. However, its reliance on the production of sufficiently large crystals is limiting, considering that crystallization cannot be achieved for a vast range of biomolecules. A promising way of circumventing this problem is the method of serial femtosecond imaging of single-molecules or nanocrystals utilizing an X-ray free-electron laser. In such an approach, X-ray pulses...

  20. Primary processes of the electron-protic species coupling in pure aqueous phases: - femtosecond laser spectroscopy study; - quantum approach of the electron-water interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pommeret, Stanislas

    1991-01-01

    This thesis work deals with the coupling mechanisms between an electron, water molecules or protic species (hydronium ion, hydroxyl radical). Two complementary studies have been carry out in pure aqueous phases. The first one is concerned with the structural aspect of the hydrated electron which is studied via a semi-quantum approach Splitting Operator Method. The results indicates the importance of the second hydration shell in the localisation of an electron at 77 and 300 Kelvin. The second part of this work relates to the dynamic of the primary processes in light or heavy water at room temperature: the ion-molecule reaction, radical pair formation, geminate recombination of the hydrated electron with the hydronium ion and the hydroxyl radical. The dynamic of these reactions is studied by time resolved absorption spectroscopy from the near infrared to the near ultraviolet with a few tens femto-seconds temporal precision. The analysis of the primary processes takes into account the protic properties of water molecules. (author) [fr