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Sample records for single rna species

  1. Selection of the In Vitro Culture Media Influences mRNA Expression of Hedgehog Genes, Il-6, and Important Genes regarding Reactive Oxygen Species in Single Murine Preimplantation Embryos

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    N. Pfeifer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this paper was to determine the influence of different in vitro culture media on mRNA expression of Hedgehog genes, il-6, and important genes regarding reactive oxygen species in single mouse embryos. Methods. Reverse transcription of single embryos either cultured in vitro from day 0.5 until 3.5 (COOK’s Cleavage medium or Vitrolife’s G-1 PLUS medium or in vivo until day 3.5 post coitum. PCR was carried out for β-actin followed by nested-PCR for shh, ihh, il-6, nox, gpx4, gpx1, and prdx2. Results. The number of murine blastocysts cultured in COOK medium which expressed il-6, gpx4, gpx1, and prdx2 mRNA differed significantly compared to the in vivo group. Except for nox, the mRNA profile of the Vitrolife media group embryos varied significantly from the in vivo ones regarding the number of blastocysts expressing the mRNA of shh, ihh, il-6, gpx4, gpx1 and prdx2. Conclusions. The present study shows that different in vitro culture media lead to different mRNA expression profiles during early development. Even the newly developed in vitro culture media are not able to mimic the female reproductive tract. The question of long-term consequences for children due to assisted reproduction techniques needs to be addressed in larger studies.

  2. Dicer-2 processes diverse viral RNA species.

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    Leah R Sabin

    Full Text Available RNA silencing pathways play critical roles in gene regulation, virus infection, and transposon control. RNA interference (RNAi is mediated by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs, which are liberated from double-stranded (dsRNA precursors by Dicer and guide the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC to targets. Although principles governing small RNA sorting into RISC have been uncovered, the spectrum of RNA species that can be targeted by Dicer proteins, particularly the viral RNAs present during an infection, are poorly understood. Dicer-2 potently restricts viral infection in insects by generating virus-derived siRNAs from viral RNA. To better characterize the substrates of Dicer-2, we examined the virus-derived siRNAs produced during the Drosophila antiviral RNAi response to four different viruses using high-throughput sequencing. We found that each virus was uniquely targeted by the RNAi pathway; dicing substrates included dsRNA replication intermediates and intramolecular RNA stem loops. For instance, a putative intergenic RNA hairpin encoded by Rift Valley Fever virus generates abundant small RNAs in both Drosophila and mosquito cells, while repetitive sequences within the genomic termini of Vaccinia virus, which give rise to abundant small RNAs in Drosophila, were found to be transcribed in both insect and mammalian cells. Moreover, we provide evidence that the RNA species targeted by Dicer-2 can be modulated by the presence of a viral suppressor of RNAi. This study uncovered several novel, heavily targeted features within viral genomes, offering insight into viral replication, viral immune evasion strategies, and the mechanism of antiviral RNAi.

  3. Single-Cell DNA barcoding using sequences from the small subunit rRNA and internal transcribed spacer region identifies new species of Trichonympha and Trichomitopsis from the hindgut of the termite Zootermopsis angusticollis.

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    Vera Tai

    Full Text Available To aid in their digestion of wood, lower termites are known to harbour a diverse community of prokaryotes as well as parabasalid and oxymonad protist symbionts. One of the best-studied lower termite gut communities is that of Zootermopsis angusticollis which has been known for almost 100 years to possess 3 species of Trichonympha (T. campanula, T. collaris, and T. sphaerica, 1 species of Trichomitopsis (T. termopsidis, as well as smaller flagellates. We have re-assessed this community by sequencing the small subunit (SSU rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS region from a large number of single Trichonympha and Trichomitopsis cells for which morphology was also documented. Based on phylogenetic clustering and sequence divergence, we identify 3 new species: Trichonympha postcylindrica, Trichomitopsis minor, and Trichomitopsis parvus spp. nov. Once identified by sequencing, the morphology of the isolated cells for all 3 new species was re-examined and found to be distinct from the previously described species: Trichonympha postcylindrica can be morphologically distinguished from the other Trichonympha species by an extension on its posterior end, whereas Trichomitopsis minor and T. parvus are smaller than T. termopsidis but similar in size to each other and cannot be distinguished based on morphology using light microscopy. Given that Z. angusticollis has one of the best characterized hindgut communities, the near doubling of the number of the largest and most easily identifiable symbiont species suggests that the diversity of hindgut symbionts is substantially underestimated in other termites as well. Accurate descriptions of the diversity of these microbial communities are essential for understanding hindgut ecology and disentangling the interactions among the symbionts, and molecular barcoding should be a priority for these systems.

  4. Single-Cell DNA barcoding using sequences from the small subunit rRNA and internal transcribed spacer region identifies new species of Trichonympha and Trichomitopsis from the hindgut of the termite Zootermopsis angusticollis.

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    Tai, Vera; James, Erick R; Perlman, Steve J; Keeling, Patrick J

    2013-01-01

    To aid in their digestion of wood, lower termites are known to harbour a diverse community of prokaryotes as well as parabasalid and oxymonad protist symbionts. One of the best-studied lower termite gut communities is that of Zootermopsis angusticollis which has been known for almost 100 years to possess 3 species of Trichonympha (T. campanula, T. collaris, and T. sphaerica), 1 species of Trichomitopsis (T. termopsidis), as well as smaller flagellates. We have re-assessed this community by sequencing the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region from a large number of single Trichonympha and Trichomitopsis cells for which morphology was also documented. Based on phylogenetic clustering and sequence divergence, we identify 3 new species: Trichonympha postcylindrica, Trichomitopsis minor, and Trichomitopsis parvus spp. nov. Once identified by sequencing, the morphology of the isolated cells for all 3 new species was re-examined and found to be distinct from the previously described species: Trichonympha postcylindrica can be morphologically distinguished from the other Trichonympha species by an extension on its posterior end, whereas Trichomitopsis minor and T. parvus are smaller than T. termopsidis but similar in size to each other and cannot be distinguished based on morphology using light microscopy. Given that Z. angusticollis has one of the best characterized hindgut communities, the near doubling of the number of the largest and most easily identifiable symbiont species suggests that the diversity of hindgut symbionts is substantially underestimated in other termites as well. Accurate descriptions of the diversity of these microbial communities are essential for understanding hindgut ecology and disentangling the interactions among the symbionts, and molecular barcoding should be a priority for these systems.

  5. Species-independent MicroRNA Gene Discovery

    KAUST Repository

    Kamanu, Timothy K.

    2012-12-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) are a class of small endogenous non-coding RNA that are mainly negative transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulators in both plants and animals. Recent studies have shown that miRNA are involved in different types of cancer and other incurable diseases such as autism and Alzheimer’s. Functional miRNAs are excised from hairpin-like sequences that are known as miRNA genes. There are about 21,000 known miRNA genes, most of which have been determined using experimental methods. miRNA genes are classified into different groups (miRNA families). This study reports about 19,000 unknown miRNA genes in nine species whereby approximately 15,300 predictions were computationally validated to contain at least one experimentally verified functional miRNA product. The predictions are based on a novel computational strategy which relies on miRNA family groupings and exploits the physics and geometry of miRNA genes to unveil the hidden palindromic signals and symmetries in miRNA gene sequences. Unlike conventional computational miRNA gene discovery methods, the algorithm developed here is species-independent: it allows prediction at higher accuracy and resolution from arbitrary RNA/DNA sequences in any species and thus enables examination of repeat-prone genomic regions which are thought to be non-informative or ’junk’ sequences. The information non-redundancy of uni-directional RNA sequences compared to information redundancy of bi-directional DNA is demonstrated, a fact that is overlooked by most pattern discovery algorithms. A novel method for computing upstream and downstream miRNA gene boundaries based on mathematical/statistical functions is suggested, as well as cutoffs for annotation of miRNA genes in different miRNA families. Another tool is proposed to allow hypotheses generation and visualization of data matrices, intra- and inter-species chromosomal distribution of miRNA genes or miRNA families. Our results indicate that: miRNA and miRNA

  6. A single-stranded RNA copy of the Giardia lamblia virus double-stranded RNA genome is present in the infected Giardia lamblia.

    OpenAIRE

    Furfine, E S; White, T C; Wang, A L; Wang, C C

    1989-01-01

    An isolate of Giardia lamblia infected with the double-stranded RNA virus (GLV) has two major species of RNA that are not present in an uninfected isolate. One of these species is the previously characterized double-stranded RNA genome of GLV (1). The second species of RNA appears to be a full length copy of one strand of the double-stranded RNA genome. This full length single-stranded RNA is not present in viral particles isolated from the growth medium. The cellular concentration of the sin...

  7. An RNA toolbox for single-molecule force spectroscopy studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vilfan, I.D.; Kamping, W.; Van den Hout, M.; Candelli, A.; Hage, S.; Dekker, N.H.

    2007-01-01

    Precise, controllable single-molecule force spectroscopy studies of RNA and RNA-dependent processes have recently shed new light on the dynamics and pathways of RNA folding and RNAenzyme interactions. A crucial component of this research is the design and assembly of an appropriate RNA construct.

  8. Efficient extraction of RNA from various Camellia species rich in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Camellia species, an important economic plants widely distributed in Asia, are recalcitrant to RNA extraction. Here, we developed a method for high quality RNA isolation. Based on the RNA isolated from flower buds, deep transcriptome sequencing of Camellia oleifera, Camellia chekiangoleosa and Camellia brevistyla ...

  9. Isolation of Microarray-Grade Total RNA, MicroRNA, and DNA from a Single PAXgene Blood RNA Tube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruhøffer, Mogens; Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Voss, Thorsten

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a procedure for isolation of microRNA and genomic DNA in addition to total RNA from whole blood stabilized in PAXgene Blood RNA tubes. The procedure is based on automatic extraction on a BioRobot MDx and includes isolation of DNA from a fraction of the stabilized blood......RNA was tested using spotted locked nucleic acid-based microarrays. We conclude that the yield and quality of total RNA, microRNA, and DNA from a single PAXgene blood RNA tube is sufficient for downstream microarray analysis....

  10. Axoplasmic RNA species synthesized in the isolated squid giant axon.

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    Rapallino, M V; Cupello, A; Giuditta, A

    1988-07-01

    Isolated squid stellate nerves and giant fiber lobes were incubated for 8 hr in Millipore filtered sea water containing [3H]uridine. The electrophoretic patterns of radioactive RNA purified from the axoplasm of the giant axon and from the giant fiber lobe (cell bodies of the giant axon) demonstrated the presence of RNA species with mobilities corresponding to tRNA and rRNA. The presence of labeled rRNAs was confirmed by the behavior of the large rRNA component (31S) which, in the squid, readily dissociates into its two constituent moyeties (17S and 20S). Comparable results were obtained with the axonal sheath and the stellate nerve. In all the electrophoretic patterns, additional species of radioactive RNA migrated between the 4S and the 20S markers, i.e. with mobilities corresponding to presumptive mRNAs. Chromatographic analysis of the purified RNAs on oligo(dT)cellulose indicated the presence of labeled poly(A)+ RNA in all tissue samples. Radioactive poly(A)+ RNA represented approximately 1% of the total labeled RNA in the axoplasm, axonal sheath and stellate nerve, but more than 2% in the giant fiber lobe. The labeled poly(A)+ RNAs of the giant fibre lobe showed a prevalence of larger species in comparison to the axonal sheath and stellate nerve. In conclusion, the axoplasmic RNAs synthesized by the isolated squid giant axon appear to include all the major classes of axoplasmic RNAs, that is rRNA, tRNA and mRNA.

  11. Simultaneous detection of mRNA and protein in single cells using immunofluorescence-combined single-molecule RNA FISH.

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    Kochan, Jakub; Wawro, Mateusz; Kasza, Aneta

    2015-10-01

    Although the concept of combining immunofluorescence (IF) with single-molecule RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (smRNA FISH) seems obvious, the specific materials used during IF and smRNA FISH make it difficult to perform these procedures simultaneously on the same specimen. Even though there are reports where IF and smRNA FISH were combined with success, these were insufficient in terms of signal intensities, staining patterns, and GFP-compatibility, and a detailed exploration of the various factors that influence IF and smRNA FISH outcome has not been published yet. Here, we report a detailed study of conditions and reagents used in classic IF and smRNA FISH that allowed us to establish an easy, robust, and GFP-compatible procedure. Our protocol enables simultaneous detection of mRNA and protein quantity as well as the subcellular distribution of these molecules in single cells by combining an RNase-free modification of the IF technique and the more recent smRNA FISH method. Using this procedure, we have shown the direct interaction of RNase MCPIP1 with IL-6 mRNA. We also demonstrate the use of our protocol in heterogeneous cell population analysis, revealing cell-to-cell differences in mRNA and protein content.

  12. Characterisation of several heterogeneous species of defective RNAs derived from RNA 3 of cucumber mosaic virus.

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    López, C; Aramburu, J; Galipienso, L; Nuez, F

    2007-01-01

    Preparations of double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) extracted from Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi plants infected with a subgroup IB isolate of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) were found to contain a heterogeneous population of defective RNAs (D-RNAs) derived from RNA 3. Characterised D-RNAs ranged in size from 1.5 to 1.9 kb and were derived either by a single in-frame deletion within the 3a or 3b genes or by means of double in-frame deletions within both genes. Also, northern blot hybridisation showed two other types of RNA derived from RNA 3: (a) RNA species of ca. 0.7 kb containing the 3'-terminus but lacking the 5'-terminus, which could be 3'-coterminal subgenomic of D-RNAs derived from the 3b gene and (b) RNA species of unknown origin of ca. 0.8 kb containing the 5'-terminus but lacking the 3'-terminus.

  13. Complexities due to single-stranded RNA during antibody detection of genomic rna:dna hybrids.

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    Zhang, Zheng Z; Pannunzio, Nicholas R; Hsieh, Chih-Lin; Yu, Kefei; Lieber, Michael R

    2015-04-08

    Long genomic R-loops in eukaryotes were first described at the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus switch regions using bisulfite sequencing and functional studies. A mouse monoclonal antibody called S9.6 has been used for immunoprecipitation (IP) to identify R-loops, based on the assumption that it is specific for RNA:DNA over other nucleic acid duplexes. However, recent work has demonstrated that a variable domain of S9.6 binds AU-rich RNA:RNA duplexes with a KD that is only 5.6-fold weaker than for RNA:DNA duplexes. Most IP protocols do not pre-clear the genomic nucleic acid with RNase A to remove free RNA. Fold back of ssRNA can readily generate RNA:RNA duplexes that may bind the S9.6 antibody, and adventitious binding of RNA may also create short RNA:DNA regions. Here we investigate whether RNase A is needed to obtain reliable IP with S9.6. As our test locus, we chose the most well-documented site for kilobase-long mammalian genomic R-loops, the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus (IgH) class switch regions. The R-loops at this locus can be induced by using cytokines to stimulate transcription from germline transcript promoters. We tested IP using S9.6 with and without various RNase treatments. The RNase treatments included RNase H to destroy the RNA in an RNA:DNA duplex and RNase A to destroy single-stranded (ss) RNA to prevent it from binding S9.6 directly (as duplex RNA) and to prevent the ssRNA from annealing to the genome, resulting in adventitious RNA:DNA hybrids. We find that optimal detection of RNA:DNA duplexes requires removal of ssRNA using RNase A. Without RNase A treatment, known regions of R-loop formation containing RNA:DNA duplexes can not be reliably detected. With RNase A treatment, a signal can be detected over background, but only within a limited 2 or 3-fold range, even with a stable kilobase-long genomic R-loop. Any use of the S9.6 antibody must be preceded by RNase A treatment to remove free ssRNA that may compete for the S9.6 binding by

  14. Single-cell sequencing of the small-RNA transcriptome.

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    Faridani, Omid R; Abdullayev, Ilgar; Hagemann-Jensen, Michael; Schell, John P; Lanner, Fredrik; Sandberg, Rickard

    2016-12-01

    Little is known about the heterogeneity of small-RNA expression as small-RNA profiling has so far required large numbers of cells. Here we present a single-cell method for small-RNA sequencing and apply it to naive and primed human embryonic stem cells and cancer cells. Analysis of microRNAs and fragments of tRNAs and small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) reveals the potential of microRNAs as markers for different cell types and states.

  15. Single-molecule correlated chemical probing of RNA.

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    Homan, Philip J; Favorov, Oleg V; Lavender, Christopher A; Kursun, Olcay; Ge, Xiyuan; Busan, Steven; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Weeks, Kevin M

    2014-09-23

    Complex higher-order RNA structures play critical roles in all facets of gene expression; however, the through-space interaction networks that define tertiary structures and govern sampling of multiple conformations are poorly understood. Here we describe single-molecule RNA structure analysis in which multiple sites of chemical modification are identified in single RNA strands by massively parallel sequencing and then analyzed for correlated and clustered interactions. The strategy thus identifies RNA interaction groups by mutational profiling (RING-MaP) and makes possible two expansive applications. First, we identify through-space interactions, create 3D models for RNAs spanning 80-265 nucleotides, and characterize broad classes of intramolecular interactions that stabilize RNA. Second, we distinguish distinct conformations in solution ensembles and reveal previously undetected hidden states and large-scale structural reconfigurations that occur in unfolded RNAs relative to native states. RING-MaP single-molecule nucleic acid structure interrogation enables concise and facile analysis of the global architectures and multiple conformations that govern function in RNA.

  16. Simultaneous Multiplexed Measurement of RNA and Proteins in Single Cells

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    Spyros Darmanis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant advances have been made in methods to analyze genomes and transcriptomes of single cells, but to fully define cell states, proteins must also be accessed as central actors defining a cell’s phenotype. Methods currently used to analyze endogenous protein expression in single cells are limited in specificity, throughput, or multiplex capability. Here, we present an approach to simultaneously and specifically interrogate large sets of protein and RNA targets in lysates from individual cells, enabling investigations of cell functions and responses. We applied our method to investigate the effects of BMP4, an experimental therapeutic agent, on early-passage glioblastoma cell cultures. We uncovered significant heterogeneity in responses to treatment at levels of RNA and protein, with a subset of cells reacting in a distinct manner to BMP4. Moreover, we found overall poor correlation between protein and RNA at the level of single cells, with proteins more accurately defining responses to treatment.

  17. Single-species microarrays and comparative transcriptomics.

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    Frédéric J J Chain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prefabricated expression microarrays are currently available for only a few species but methods have been proposed to extend their application to comparisons between divergent genomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we demonstrate that the hybridization intensity of genomic DNA is a poor basis on which to select unbiased probes on Affymetrix expression arrays for studies of comparative transcriptomics, and that doing so produces spurious results. We used the Affymetrix Xenopus laevis microarray to evaluate expression divergence between X. laevis, X. borealis, and their F1 hybrids. When data are analyzed with probes that interrogate only sequences with confirmed identity in both species, we recover results that differ substantially analyses that use genomic DNA hybridizations to select probes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings have implications for the experimental design of comparative expression studies that use single-species microarrays, and for our understanding of divergent expression in hybrid clawed frogs. These findings also highlight important limitations of single-species microarrays for studies of comparative transcriptomics of polyploid species.

  18. Single particle labeling of RNA virus in live cells.

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    Liu, Xiaohui; Ouyang, Ting; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Ren, Linzhu

    2017-06-02

    Real-time and visual tracking of viral infection is crucial for elucidating the infectious and pathogenesis mechanisms. To track the virus successfully, an efficient labeling method is necessary. In this review, we first discuss the practical labeling techniques for virus tracking in live cells. We then describe the current knowledge of interactions between RNA viruses (especially influenza viruses, immunodeficiency viruses, and Flaviviruses) and host cellular structures, obtained using single particle labeling techniques combined with real-time fluorescence microscopy. Single particle labeling provides an easy system for understanding the RNA virus life cycle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Single-molecule observations of RNA-RNA kissing interactions in a DNA nanostructure.

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    Takeuchi, Yosuke; Endo, Masayuki; Suzuki, Yuki; Hidaka, Kumi; Durand, Guillaume; Dausse, Eric; Toulmé, Jean-Jacques; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    RNA molecules uniquely form a complex through specific hairpin loops, called a kissing complex. The kissing complex is widely investigated and used for the construction of RNA nanostructures. Molecular switches have also been created by combining a kissing loop and a ligand-binding aptamer to control the interactions of RNA molecules. In this study, we incorporated two kinds of RNA molecules into a DNA origami structure and used atomic force microscopy to observe their ligand-responsive interactions at the single-molecule level. We used a designed RNA aptamer called GTPswitch, which has a guanosine triphosphate (GTP) responsive domain and can bind to the target RNA hairpin named Aptakiss in the presence of GTP. We observed shape changes of the DNA/RNA strands in the DNA origami, which are induced by the GTPswitch, into two different shapes in the absence and presence of GTP, respectively. We also found that the switching function in the nanospace could be improved by using a cover strand over the kissing loop of the GTPswitch or by deleting one base from this kissing loop. These newly designed ligand-responsive aptamers can be used for the controlled assembly of the various DNA and RNA nanostructures.

  20. Identification of innate lymphoid cells in single-cell RNA-Seq data.

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    Suffiotti, Madeleine; Carmona, Santiago J; Jandus, Camilla; Gfeller, David

    2017-07-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) consist of natural killer (NK) cells and non-cytotoxic ILCs that are broadly classified into ILC1, ILC2, and ILC3 subtypes. These cells recently emerged as important early effectors of innate immunity for their roles in tissue homeostasis and inflammation. Over the last few years, ILCs have been extensively studied in mouse and human at the functional and molecular level, including gene expression profiling. However, sorting ILCs with flow cytometry for gene expression analysis is a delicate and time-consuming process. Here we propose and validate a novel framework for studying ILCs at the transcriptomic level using single-cell RNA-Seq data. Our approach combines unsupervised clustering and a new cell type classifier trained on mouse ILC gene expression data. We show that this approach can accurately identify different ILCs, especially ILC2 cells, in human lymphocyte single-cell RNA-Seq data. Our new model relies only on genes conserved across vertebrates, thereby making it in principle applicable in any vertebrate species. Considering the rapid increase in throughput of single-cell RNA-Seq technology, our work provides a computational framework for studying ILC2 cells in single-cell transcriptomic data and may help exploring their conservation in distant vertebrate species.

  1. Understanding the kinetic mechanism of RNA single base pair formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaojun; Yu, Tao; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2016-01-05

    RNA functions are intrinsically tied to folding kinetics. The most elementary step in RNA folding is the closing and opening of a base pair. Understanding this elementary rate process is the basis for RNA folding kinetics studies. Previous studies mostly focused on the unfolding of base pairs. Here, based on a hybrid approach, we investigate the folding process at level of single base pairing/stacking. The study, which integrates molecular dynamics simulation, kinetic Monte Carlo simulation, and master equation methods, uncovers two alternative dominant pathways: Starting from the unfolded state, the nucleotide backbone first folds to the native conformation, followed by subsequent adjustment of the base conformation. During the base conformational rearrangement, the backbone either retains the native conformation or switches to nonnative conformations in order to lower the kinetic barrier for base rearrangement. The method enables quantification of kinetic partitioning among the different pathways. Moreover, the simulation reveals several intriguing ion binding/dissociation signatures for the conformational changes. Our approach may be useful for developing a base pair opening/closing rate model.

  2. Single-species versus dual-species probiotic supplementation as an emerging therapeutic strategy for obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, G; Jamaluddin, R; Mohtarrudin, N; Ahmad, Z; Khazaai, H; Parvaneh, M

    2017-10-01

    Recent studies have reported beneficial effects of specific probiotics on obesity. However, the difference in the anti-obesity effects of probiotics as single species and dual species is still uncertain. Therefore, we aimed to compare the efficacy of single and dual species of bacteria on markers of obesity in high-fat diet-induced obese rats. A total of 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one of five groups of varying diets as follows: standard diet, high fat diet (HFD), HFD supplemented with Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota, HFD supplemented with Bifidobacterium longum and HFD supplemented with a mixture of these two bacterial species. After 15 weeks of supplementation, the animals were examined for changes in body weight, body fat, total count of bacteria in fecal, blood serum lipid profile, leptin, adiponectin and inflammatory biomarkers. Histological analysis of the liver and adipose tissue was performed and the hepatic mRNA expression levels of genes related to lipid metabolism were measured. It was found that probiotic supplementation of either B. longum or a mixture of B. longum and LcS bacteria significantly reduced weight and triglycerides in the HFD groups. Supplementation of B. longum bacteria showed better results in terms of modulating leptin level, fat mass, adipocyte size and lipoprotein lipase expression, as well as increasing adiponectin and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-γ expression compared to dual species of bacteria. No significant differences were observed in the total count of fecal bacteria, glucose and inflammatory biomarker levels between supplemented groups. B. longum supplementation in obesity was more beneficial in metabolic profile changes than the mixture species. Copyright © 2017 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B

  3. Understanding the similarity in thermophoresis between single- and double-stranded DNA or RNA

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    Reichl, Maren; Herzog, Mario; Greiss, Ferdinand; Wolff, Manuel; Braun, Dieter

    2015-06-01

    Thermophoresis is the movement of molecules in a temperature gradient. For aqueous solutions its microscopic basis is debated. Understanding thermophoresis for this case is, however, important since it proved very useful to detect the binding affinity of biomolecules and since thermophoresis could have played an important role in early molecular evolution. Here we discuss why the thermophoresis of single- and double-stranded oligonucleotides - DNA and RNA - is surprisingly similar. This finding is understood by comparing the spherical capacitor model for single-stranded species with the case of a rod-shaped model for double-stranded oligonucleotides. The approach describes thermophoresis of DNA and RNA with fitted effective charges consistent with electrophoresis measurements and explains the similarity between single- and double-stranded species. We could not confirm the sign change for the thermophoresis of single- versus double-stranded DNA in crowded solutions containing polyethylene glycol [Y. T. Maeda, T. Tlusty, and A. Libchaber, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 109, 17972 (2012), 10.1073/pnas.1215764109], but find a salt-independent offset while the Debye length dependence still satisfies the capacitor model. Overall, the analysis documents the continuous progress in the microscopic understanding of thermophoresis.

  4. Comparative chromosome mapping of U2 snRNA and 5S rRNA genes in Gymnotus species (Gymnotiformes, Gymnotidae): evolutionary dynamics and sex chromosome linkage in G . pantanal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsunomia, Ricardo; Scacchetti, Priscilla C; Pansonato-Alves, José C; Oliveira, Claudio; Foresti, Fausto

    2014-01-01

    A comparative mapping of U2 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) and 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes was performed in 6 Gymnotus species. All species analyzed presented the U2 snDNA organized in conspicuous blocks and not co-located with rRNA genes. In addition, 5 species showed the U2 snDNA located in a single pair of chromosomes, which seems to be a conserved trait in this genus. Conversely, G. pantanal was the only species displaying several terminal signals in different chromosome pairs, including the X1 sex chromosome but not the Y chromosome. This is the first report of U2 snRNA genes in sex chromosomes of fishes. The absence of sites in the Y chromosome of G. pantanal indicates a possible loss of terminal segments of the chromosomes involved in the Y formation. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Characterization of conserved circular RNA in polyploid Gossypium species and their ancestors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ting; Wang, Luyao; Li, Sai; Xu, Min; Guan, Xueying; Zhou, Baoliang

    2017-11-01

    Circular RNA (circRNA) is a regulatory class of long, noncoding RNA found in both plant and animal kingdoms. The profile and characterization of circRNA in cotton species remains to be explored. Here, using 24 rRNA-depleted RNA-seq libraries of putative diploid progenitors of Gossypium spp., Gossypium arboreum and Gossypium raimondii, their interspecies hybrid (F 1 ) and allotetraploid Gossypium hirsutum, 1041, 1478, 1311, and 499 circRNAs were identified in each cotton species, respectively. A prevalence of 23 exon-circRNAs contain noncanonical GT/AG signals, and only ~ 10% of exon-circRNA is associated with reverse complementary intronic sequences. This result implies that plants employ a method of circRNA splicing distinct from that of animals. In addition, 432 circRNAs are stably expressed in multiple cotton species. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. A single-stranded architecture for cotranscriptional folding of RNA nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geary, Cody; Rothemund, Paul; Andersen, Ebbe Sloth

    2014-01-01

    . We introduce an architecture for designing artificial RNA structures that fold from a single strand, in which arrays of antiparallel RNA helices are precisely organized by RNA tertiary motifs and a new type of crossover pattern. We constructed RNA tiles that assemble into hexagonal lattices......Artificial DNA and RNA structures have been used as scaffolds for a variety of nanoscale devices. In comparison to DNA structures, RNA structures have been limited in size, but they also have advantages: RNA can fold during transcription and thus can be genetically encoded and expressed in cells...

  7. Single-step method of RNA isolation by acid guanidinium thiocyanate-phenol-chloroform extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomczynski, P; Sacchi, N

    1987-04-01

    A new method of total RNA isolation by a single extraction with an acid guanidinium thiocyanate-phenol-chloroform mixture is described. The method provides a pure preparation of undegraded RNA in high yield and can be completed within 4 h. It is particularly useful for processing large numbers of samples and for isolation of RNA from minute quantities of cells or tissue samples.

  8. Gene length and detection bias in single cell RNA sequencing protocols [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda Phipson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Single cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq has rapidly gained popularity for profiling transcriptomes of hundreds to thousands of single cells. This technology has led to the discovery of novel cell types and revealed insights into the development of complex tissues. However, many technical challenges need to be overcome during data generation. Due to minute amounts of starting material, samples undergo extensive amplification, increasing technical variability. A solution for mitigating amplification biases is to include unique molecular identifiers (UMIs, which tag individual molecules. Transcript abundances are then estimated from the number of unique UMIs aligning to a specific gene, with PCR duplicates resulting in copies of the UMI not included in expression estimates. Methods: Here we investigate the effect of gene length bias in scRNA-Seq across a variety of datasets that differ in terms of capture technology, library preparation, cell types and species. Results: We find that scRNA-seq datasets that have been sequenced using a full-length transcript protocol exhibit gene length bias akin to bulk RNA-seq data. Specifically, shorter genes tend to have lower counts and a higher rate of dropout. In contrast, protocols that include UMIs do not exhibit gene length bias, with a mostly uniform rate of dropout across genes of varying length. Across four different scRNA-Seq datasets profiling mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs, we found the subset of genes that are only detected in the UMI datasets tended to be shorter, while the subset of genes detected only in the full-length datasets tended to be longer. Conclusions: We find that the choice of scRNA-seq protocol influences the detection rate of genes, and that full-length datasets exhibit gene-length bias. In addition, despite clear differences between UMI and full-length transcript data, we illustrate that full-length and UMI data can be combined to reveal the underlying biology

  9. Experimental Confirmation of a Whole Set of tRNA Molecules in Two Archaeal Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoh-ichi Watanabe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the genomic sequences for most archaeal species, only one tRNA gene (isodecoder is predicted for each triplet codon. This observation promotes analysis of a whole set of tRNA molecules and actual splicing patterns of interrupted tRNA in one organism. The entire genomic sequences of two Creanarchaeota, Aeropyrum pernix and Sulfolobus tokodaii, were determined approximately 15 years ago. In these genome datasets, 47 and 46 tRNA genes were detected, respectively. Among them, 14 and 24 genes, respectively, were predicted to be interrupted tRNA genes. To confirm the actual transcription of these predicted tRNA genes and identify the actual splicing patterns of the predicted interrupted tRNA molecules, RNA samples were prepared from each archaeal species and used to synthesize cDNA molecules with tRNA sequence-specific primers. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of cDNA clones representing unspliced and spliced forms of interrupted tRNA molecules indicated that some introns were located at positions other than one base 3' from anticodon region and that bulge-helix-bulge structures were detected around the actual splicing sites in each interrupted tRNA molecule. Whole-set analyses of tRNA molecules revealed that the archaeal tRNA splicing mechanism may be essential for efficient splicing of all tRNAs produced from interrupted tRNA genes in these archaea.

  10. Enhancement of single guide RNA transcription for efficient CRISPR/Cas-based genomic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ui-Tei, Kumiko; Maruyama, Shohei; Nakano, Yuko

    2017-06-01

    Genomic engineering using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) protein is a promising approach for targeting the genomic DNA of virtually any organism in a sequence-specific manner. Recent remarkable advances in CRISPR/Cas technology have made it a feasible system for use in therapeutic applications and biotechnology. In the CRISPR/Cas system, a guide RNA (gRNA), interacting with the Cas protein, recognizes a genomic region with sequence complementarity, and the double-stranded DNA at the target site is cleaved by the Cas protein. A widely used gRNA is an RNA polymerase III (pol III)-driven single gRNA (sgRNA), which is produced by artificial fusion of CRISPR RNA (crRNA) and trans-activation crRNA (tracrRNA). However, we identified a TTTT stretch, known as a termination signal of RNA pol III, in the scaffold region of the sgRNA. Here, we revealed that sgRNA carrying a TTTT stretch reduces the efficiency of sgRNA transcription due to premature transcriptional termination, and decreases the efficiency of genome editing. Unexpectedly, it was also shown that the premature terminated sgRNA may have an adverse effect of inducing RNA interference. Such disadvantageous effects were avoided by substituting one base in the TTTT stretch.

  11. Topological and thermodynamic factors that influence the evolution of small networks of catalytic RNA species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Jessica A M; Nghe, Philippe; Lehman, Niles

    2017-07-01

    An RNA-directed recombination reaction can result in a network of interacting RNA species. It is now becoming increasingly apparent that such networks could have been an important feature of the RNA world during the nascent evolution of life on the Earth. However, the means by which such small RNA networks assimilate other available genotypes in the environment to grow and evolve into the more complex networks that are thought to have existed in the prebiotic milieu are not known. Here, we used the ability of fragments of the Azoarcus group I intron ribozyme to covalently self-assemble via genotype-selfish and genotype-cooperative interactions into full-length ribozymes to investigate the dynamics of small (three- and four-membered) networks. We focused on the influence of a three-membered core network on the incorporation of additional nodes, and on the degree and direction of connectivity as single new nodes are added to this core. We confirmed experimentally the predictions that additional links to a core should enhance overall network growth rates, but that the directionality of the link (a "giver" or a "receiver") impacts the growth of the core itself. Additionally, we used a simple mathematical model based on the first-order effects of lower-level interactions to predict the growth of more complex networks, and find that such a model can, to a first approximation, predict the ordinal rankings of nodes once a steady-state distribution has been reached. © 2017 Yeates et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  12. Characterization of viral RNA splicing using whole-transcriptome datasets from host species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chengran; Liu, Shanlin; Song, Wenhui; Luo, Shiqi; Meng, Guanliang; Yang, Chentao; Yang, Hua; Ma, Jinmin; Wang, Liang; Gao, Shan; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Zhao, Yun; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Xin

    2018-02-19

    RNA alternative splicing (AS) is an important post-transcriptional mechanism enabling single genes to produce multiple proteins. It has been well demonstrated that viruses deploy host AS machinery for viral protein productions. However, knowledge on viral AS is limited to a few disease-causing viruses in model species. Here we report a novel approach to characterizing viral AS using whole transcriptome dataset from host species. Two insect transcriptomes (Acheta domesticus and Planococcus citri) generated in the 1,000 Insect Transcriptome Evolution (1KITE) project were used as a proof of concept using the new pipeline. Two closely related densoviruses (Acheta domesticus densovirus, AdDNV, and Planococcus citri densovirus, PcDNV, Ambidensovirus, Densovirinae, Parvoviridae) were detected and analyzed for AS patterns. The results suggested that although the two viruses shared major AS features, dramatic AS divergences were observed. Detailed analysis of the splicing junctions showed clusters of AS events occurred in two regions of the virus genome, demonstrating that transcriptome analysis could gain valuable insights into viral splicing. When applied to large-scale transcriptomics projects with diverse taxonomic sampling, our new method is expected to rapidly expand our knowledge on RNA splicing mechanisms for a wide range of viruses.

  13. Analysis of the RNA species isolated from defective particles of vesicular stomatitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, R; Banerjee, A K

    1976-10-01

    Serial high multiplicity passage of a cloned stock of vesicular stomatitis virus was found to generate defective interfering particles containing three size classes of RNA, with sedimentaiton coefficients of 31 S, 23 S and 19 S. The 31 S and 23 S RNA species were found to be complementary to both the 12 to 18 S and 31 S size classes of VSV mRNAs. The 19 S class of RNA was found to be partially base-paired. All three RNA species were found to contain ppAp at their 5' termini.

  14. Efficient RNA extraction protocol for the wood mangrove species Laguncularia racemosa suited for next-generation RNA sequencing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilwerth, M. W.; Rossetto, P.

    2016-01-01

    Mangrove flora and habitat have immeasurable importance in marine and coastal ecology as well as in the economy. Despite their importance, they are constantly threatened by oil spill accidents and environmental contamination; therefore, it is crucial to understand the changes in gene expression to better predict toxicity in these plants. Among the species of Atlantic coast mangrove (Americas and Africa), Laguncularia racemosa, or white mangrove, is a conspicuous species. The wide distribution of L. racemosa in areas where marine oil exploration is rapidly increasing make it a candidate mangrove species model to uncover the impact of oil spills at the molecular level with the use of massive transcriptome sequencing. However, for this purpose, the RNA extraction protocol should ensure low levels of contaminants and structure integrity. In this study, eight RNA extraction methods were tested and analysed using downstream applications. The InviTrap Spin Plant RNA Mini Kit performed best with regard to purity and integrity. Moreover, the obtained RNA was submitted to cDNA synthesis and RT-PCR, successfully generating amplification products of the expected size. These Results show the applicability of the RNA obtained here for downstream methodologies, such as the construction of cDNA libraries for the Illumina Hi-seq platform. (author)

  15. Characterization and identification of microRNA core promoters in four model species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefeng Zhou

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are short, noncoding RNAs that play important roles in post-transcriptional gene regulation. Although many functions of microRNAs in plants and animals have been revealed in recent years, the transcriptional mechanism of microRNA genes is not well-understood. To elucidate the transcriptional regulation of microRNA genes, we study and characterize, in a genome scale, the promoters of intergenic microRNA genes in Caenorhabditis elegans, Homo sapiens, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Oryza sativa. We show that most known microRNA genes in these four species have the same type of promoters as protein-coding genes have. To further characterize the promoters of microRNA genes, we developed a novel promoter prediction method, called common query voting (CoVote, which is more effective than available promoter prediction methods. Using this new method, we identify putative core promoters of most known microRNA genes in the four model species. Moreover, we characterize the promoters of microRNA genes in these four species. We discover many significant, characteristic sequence motifs in these core promoters, several of which match or resemble the known cis-acting elements for transcription initiation. Among these motifs, some are conserved across different species while some are specific to microRNA genes of individual species.

  16. Global Asymptotic Stability for Discrete Single Species Population Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bilgin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present some basic discrete models in populations dynamics of single species with several age classes. Starting with the basic Beverton-Holt model that describes the change of single species we discuss its basic properties such as a convergence of all solutions to the equilibrium, oscillation of solutions about the equilibrium solutions, Allee’s effect, and Jillson’s effect. We consider the effect of the constant and periodic immigration and emigration on the global properties of Beverton-Holt model. We also consider the effect of the periodic environment on the global properties of Beverton-Holt model.

  17. [Nucleotide sequences of 5S rRNA genes of polyploid species of wheat and Aegilops species].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakhitov, V A; Gimalov, F R; Shumiatskiĭ, G P

    1989-01-01

    Primary structures of 5S rRNA genes and of non-transcribed spacers between them were determined in families of 5S DNA repeats 420 and 500 b.p. long in 8 wheat and Aegilops species. The high conservatism of sequences coding for 5S rRNA, 3'- and 5'-ends of non-transcribed spacers was shown not to depend on the evolutional position, ploidy level and genomic composition of species. The activity of transcription of 5S rRNA cloned genes was determined in vitro. The functional heterogeneity was revealed in each family of repeats due to the existence of exchanges of separate nucleotides within the internal transcription control region. A greater deficiency of CpG dinucleotide was revealed in 5S rRNA genes than in non-transcribed spacers.

  18. Phenotype classification of single cells using SRS microscopy, RNA sequencing, and microfluidics (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streets, Aaron M.; Cao, Chen; Zhang, Xiannian; Huang, Yanyi

    2016-03-01

    Phenotype classification of single cells reveals biological variation that is masked in ensemble measurement. This heterogeneity is found in gene and protein expression as well as in cell morphology. Many techniques are available to probe phenotypic heterogeneity at the single cell level, for example quantitative imaging and single-cell RNA sequencing, but it is difficult to perform multiple assays on the same single cell. In order to directly track correlation between morphology and gene expression at the single cell level, we developed a microfluidic platform for quantitative coherent Raman imaging and immediate RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) of single cells. With this device we actively sort and trap cells for analysis with stimulated Raman scattering microscopy (SRS). The cells are then processed in parallel pipelines for lysis, and preparation of cDNA for high-throughput transcriptome sequencing. SRS microscopy offers three-dimensional imaging with chemical specificity for quantitative analysis of protein and lipid distribution in single cells. Meanwhile, the microfluidic platform facilitates single-cell manipulation, minimizes contamination, and furthermore, provides improved RNA-Seq detection sensitivity and measurement precision, which is necessary for differentiating biological variability from technical noise. By combining coherent Raman microscopy with RNA sequencing, we can better understand the relationship between cellular morphology and gene expression at the single-cell level.

  19. Multiplex gene editing by CRISPR-Cpf1 using a single crRNA array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zetsche, Bernd; Heidenreich, Matthias; Mohanraju, Prarthana; Fedorova, Iana; Kneppers, Jeroen; Degennaro, Ellen M.; Winblad, Nerges; Choudhury, Sourav R.; Abudayyeh, Omar O.; Wu, Wen Y.; Oost, van der John

    2017-01-01

    Targeting of multiple genomic loci with Cas9 is limited by the need for multiple or large expression constructs. Here we show that the ability of Cpf1 to process its own CRISPR RNA (crRNA) can be used to simplify multiplexed genome editing. Using a single customized CRISPR array, we edit up to

  20. Single species victory in a two-site, two-species model of population dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Jack; Sander, Len; Kessler, David

    2008-03-01

    We study the behavior of two species, differentiated only by their dispersal rates in an environment providing heterogeneous growth rates. Previous deterministic studies have shown that the slower-dispersal species always drives the faster species to extinction, while stochastic studies show that the opposite case can occur given small enough population and spatial heterogeneity. Other models of similar systems demonstrate the existence of an optimum dispersal rate, suggesting that distinguishing the species as faster or slower is insufficient. We here study the interface of these models for a small spatial system and determine the conditions of stability for a single species outcome.

  1. Are Ascaris lumbricoides and Ascaris suum a single species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leles, Daniela; Gardner, Scott L; Reinhard, Karl; Iñiguez, Alena; Araujo, Adauto

    2012-02-20

    Since the original description and naming of Ascaris lumbricoides from humans by Linnaeus in 1758 and later of Ascaris suum from pigs by Goeze 1782, these species have been considered to be valid. Four hypotheses relative to the conspecificity or lack thereof (and thus origin of these species) are possible: 1) Ascaris lumbricoides (usually infecting humans) and Ascaris suum (recorded mostly from pigs) are both valid species, with the two species originating via a speciation event from a common ancestor sometime before the domestication of pigs by humans, or 2) Ascaris lumbricoides in humans is derived directly from the species A. suum found in pigs with A. suum then existing as a persistent ancestor after formation of A. lumbricoides, or 3) Ascaris suum is derived directly from A. lumbricoides with the persistent ancestor being A. lumbricoides and A. suum being the newly derived species, and finally, 4) Ascaris lumbricoides and A. suum are the same species, this hypothesis being supported by studies showing both low morphological and low genetic divergence at several genes. We present and discuss paleoparasitological and genetic evidence that complement new data to evaluate the origin and evolution of Ascaris spp. in humans and pigs, and the uniqueness of the species in both hosts. Finally, we conclude that Ascaris lumbricoides and A. suum are a single species and that the name A. lumbricoides Linnaeus 1758 has taxonomic priority; therefore A. suum Goeze 1782 should be considered a synonym of A. lumbricoides.

  2. epidemiology of single and multiple species of helminth infections ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-03-01

    Mar 1, 2000 ... East African Medical Journal Vol. 77 No. 3 March 2000. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF SINGLE AND MULTIPLE SPECIES OF HELMINTH INFECTIONS AMONG SCHOOL CHILDREN IN BUSIA DISTRICT, KENYA. S. Brooker, MA, Wellcome Trust Centre for the Epidemiology of Infectious Disease, University of Oxford, ...

  3. Multiplex real-time PCR targeting the RNase P RNA gene for detection and identification of Candida species in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innings, Asa; Ullberg, Måns; Johansson, Anders; Rubin, Carl Johan; Noreus, Niklas; Isaksson, Magnus; Herrmann, Björn

    2007-03-01

    We have developed a single-tube multiplex real-time PCR method for the detection of the eight most common Candida species causing septicemia: Candida albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. famata, C. glabrata, C. guilliermondii, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis, and C. tropicalis. The method developed targets the RNase P RNA gene RPR1. Sequences of this gene were determined for seven of the Candida species and showed surprisingly large sequence variation. C. glabrata was found to have a gene that was five times longer gene than those of the other species, and the nucleotide sequence similarity between C. krusei and C. albicans was as low as 55%. The multiplex PCR contained three probes that enabled the specific detection of C. albicans, C. glabrata, and C. krusei and a fourth probe that allowed the general detection of the remaining species. The method was able to detect 1 to 10 genome copies when the detection limit was tested repeatedly for the four species C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei, and C. guilliermondii. No significant difference in the detection limit was seen when the multiplex format was compared with single-species PCR, i.e., two primers and one probe. The method detected eight clinically relevant Candida species and did not react with other tested non-Candida species or human DNA. The assay was applied to 20 blood samples from nine patients and showed a sensitivity similar to that of culture.

  4. Bidirectional Promoter Engineering for Single Cell MicroRNA Sensors in Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna L Sladitschek

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs have emerged as important markers and regulators of cell identity. Precise measurements of cellular miRNA levels rely traditionally on RNA extraction and thus do not allow to follow miRNA expression dynamics at the level of single cells. Non-invasive miRNA sensors present an ideal solution but they critically depend on the performance of suitable ubiquitous promoters that reliably drive expression both in pluripotent and differentiated cell types. Here we describe the engineering of bidirectional promoters that drive the expression of precise ratiometric fluorescent miRNA sensors in single mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs and their differentiated derivatives. These promoters are based on combinations of the widely used CAG, EF1α and PGK promoters as well as the CMV and PGK enhancers. miR-142-3p, which is known to be bimodally expressed in mESCs, served as a model miRNA to gauge the precision of the sensors. The performance of the resulting miRNA sensors was assessed by flow cytometry in single stable transgenic mESCs undergoing self-renewal or differentiation. EF1α promoters arranged back-to-back failed to drive the robustly correlated expression of two transgenes. Back-to-back PGK promoters were shut down during mESC differentiation. However, we found that a back-to-back arrangement of CAG promoters with four CMV enhancers provided both robust expression in mESCs undergoing differentiation and the best signal-to-noise for measurement of miRNA activity in single cells among all the sensors we tested. Such a bidirectional promoter is therefore particularly well suited to study the dynamics of miRNA expression during cell fate transitions at the single cell level.

  5. How to design a single-cell RNA-sequencing experiment: pitfalls, challenges and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Molin, Alessandra; Di Camillo, Barbara

    2018-01-31

    The sequencing of the transcriptome of single cells, or single-cell RNA-sequencing, has now become the dominant technology for the identification of novel cell types in heterogeneous cell populations or for the study of stochastic gene expression. In recent years, various experimental methods and computational tools for analysing single-cell RNA-sequencing data have been proposed. However, most of them are tailored to different experimental designs or biological questions, and in many cases, their performance has not been benchmarked yet, thus increasing the difficulty for a researcher to choose the optimal single-cell transcriptome sequencing (scRNA-seq) experiment and analysis workflow. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of the current available experimental and computational methods developed to handle single-cell RNA-sequencing data and, based on their peculiarities, we suggest possible analysis frameworks depending on specific experimental designs. Together, we propose an evaluation of challenges and open questions and future perspectives in the field. In particular, we go through the different steps of scRNA-seq experimental protocols such as cell isolation, messenger RNA capture, reverse transcription, amplification and use of quantitative standards such as spike-ins and Unique Molecular Identifiers (UMIs). We then analyse the current methodological challenges related to preprocessing, alignment, quantification, normalization, batch effect correction and methods to control for confounding effects. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. visnormsc: A Graphical User Interface to Normalize Single-cell RNA Sequencing Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lijun; Zhou, Nan

    2017-12-26

    Single-cell RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) allows the analysis of gene expression with high resolution. The intrinsic defects of this promising technology imports technical noise into the single-cell RNA-seq data, increasing the difficulty of accurate downstream inference. Normalization is a crucial step in single-cell RNA-seq data pre-processing. SCnorm is an accurate and efficient method that can be used for this purpose. An R implementation of this method is currently available. On one hand, the R package possesses many excellent features from R. On the other hand, R programming ability is required, which prevents the biologists who lack the skills from learning to use it quickly. To make this method more user-friendly, we developed a graphical user interface, visnormsc, for normalization of single-cell RNA-seq data. It is implemented in Python and is freely available at https://github.com/solo7773/visnormsc . Although visnormsc is based on the existing method, it contributes to this field by offering a user-friendly alternative. The out-of-the-box and cross-platform features make visnormsc easy to learn and to use. It is expected to serve biologists by simplifying single-cell RNA-seq normalization.

  7. From single-species advice to mixed-species management: taking the next step

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Morten; Reeves, S.A.; Patterson, K.R.

    2004-01-01

    that accounts for mixed-fishery effects, but in the short term there is a need for approaches to resolve the conflicting management advice for different species within the same fishery, and to generate catch or effort advice that accounts for the mixed-species nature of the fishery. This paper documents...... a recent approach used to address these problems. The approach takes the single-species advice for each species in the fishery as a starting point, then attempts to resolve it into consistent catch or effort advice using fleet-disaggregated catch forecasts in combination with explicitly stated management...

  8. Mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene for forensic identification of crocodile species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naga Jogayya, K; Meganathan, P R; Dubey, Bhawna; Haque, I

    2013-05-01

    All crocodilians are under various threats due to over exploitation and these species have been listed in Appendix I or II of CITES. Lack of molecular techniques for the forensic identification of confiscated samples makes it difficult to enforce the law. Therefore, we herein present a molecular method developed on the basis on 16S rRNA gene of mitochondrial DNA for identification of crocodile species. We have developed a set of 16S rRNA primers for PCR based identification of crocodilian species. These novel primers amplify partial 16S rRNA sequences of six crocodile species which can be later combined to obtain a larger region (1290 bp) of 16S rRNA gene. This 16S rRNA gene could be used as an effective tool for forensic authentication of crocodiles. The described primers hold great promise in forensic identification of crocodile species, which can aid in the effective enforcement of law and conservation of these species. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  9. A single molecular marker to distinguish between species of Dioscorea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techen, Natascha; Parveen, Iffat; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2017-03-01

    Yams are species of the genus Dioscorea (family Dioscoreaceae), which consists of approximately 630 species. The majority of the world production of yams occurs in Africa with 58.8 million t annually, but they are also produced in the Americas and Asia. The saponins in yams have been reported to possess various properties to improve health. The tuber and aerial parts of various species often share morphological similarities, which can cause problems in the proper identification of sample material. For example, the rootstocks and aerial parts of Dioscorea villosa L. share similarities with Dioscorea polystachia Turcz. Dioscorea bulbifera L. may be mistaken for Dioscorea alata L. owing to similar morphologies. Various molecular analyses have been published to help with the identification of species and varieties within the genus Dioscorea. The multi-loci or single-locus analysis has resulted in varying success, some with only a limited discrimination rate. In the present study, a single nuclear genomic region, biparentally inherited, was analyzed for its usefulness as a molecular marker for species identification and discrimination between D. bulbifera, D. villosa, D. nipponica, D. alata, D. caucasica, and D. deltoidea samples. The results of this study show that the LFY genomic region can be useful as a molecular marker to distinguish between samples.

  10. Accounting for technical noise in differential expression analysis of single-cell RNA sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Cheng; Hu, Yu; Kelly, Derek; Kim, Junhyong; Li, Mingyao; Zhang, Nancy R

    2017-11-02

    Recent technological breakthroughs have made it possible to measure RNA expression at the single-cell level, thus paving the way for exploring expression heterogeneity among individual cells. Current single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) protocols are complex and introduce technical biases that vary across cells, which can bias downstream analysis without proper adjustment. To account for cell-to-cell technical differences, we propose a statistical framework, TASC (Toolkit for Analysis of Single Cell RNA-seq), an empirical Bayes approach to reliably model the cell-specific dropout rates and amplification bias by use of external RNA spike-ins. TASC incorporates the technical parameters, which reflect cell-to-cell batch effects, into a hierarchical mixture model to estimate the biological variance of a gene and detect differentially expressed genes. More importantly, TASC is able to adjust for covariates to further eliminate confounding that may originate from cell size and cell cycle differences. In simulation and real scRNA-seq data, TASC achieves accurate Type I error control and displays competitive sensitivity and improved robustness to batch effects in differential expression analysis, compared to existing methods. TASC is programmed to be computationally efficient, taking advantage of multi-threaded parallelization. We believe that TASC will provide a robust platform for researchers to leverage the power of scRNA-seq. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Genetic variability and evolutionary implications of RNA silencing suppressor genes in RNA1 of sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus isolates infecting sweetpotato and related wild species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur K Tugume

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The bipartite single-stranded RNA genome of Sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (SPCSV, genus Crinivirus; Closteroviridae encodes a Class 1 RNase III (RNase3, a putative hydrophobic protein (p7 and a 22-kDa protein (p22 from genes located in RNA1. RNase3 and p22 suppress RNA silencing, the basal antiviral defence mechanism in plants. RNase3 is sufficient to render sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas virus-susceptible and predisposes it to development of severe diseases following infection with unrelated virus. The incidence, strains and gene content of SPCSV infecting wild plant species have not been studied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Thirty SPCSV isolates were characterized from 10 wild Ipomoea species, Hewittia sublobata or Lepistemon owariensis (family Convolvulaceae in Uganda and compared with 34 local SPCSV isolates infecting sweetpotatoes. All isolates belonged to the East African (EA strain of SPCSV and contained RNase3 and p7, but p22 was not detected in six isolates. The three genes showed only limited genetic variability and the proteins were under purifying selection. SPCSV isolates lacking p22 synergized with Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV, genus potyvirus; Potyviridae and caused severe symptoms in co-infected sweetpotato plants. One SPCSV isolate enhanced accumulation of SPFMV, but no severe symptoms developed. A new whitefly-transmitted virus (KML33b encoding an RNase3 homolog (<56% identity to SPCSV RNase3 able to suppresses sense-mediated RNA silencing was detected in I. sinensis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: SPCSV isolates infecting wild species and sweetpotato in Uganda were genetically undifferentiated, suggesting inter-species transmission of SPCSV. Most isolates in Uganda contained p22, unlike SPCSV isolates characterized from other countries and continents. Enhanced accumulation of SPFMV and increased disease severity were found to be uncoupled phenotypic outcomes of RNase3-mediated viral synergism in

  12. Finding Order in Randomness: Single-Molecule Studies Reveal Stochastic RNA Processing | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Producing a functional eukaryotic messenger RNA (mRNA) requires the coordinated activity of several large protein complexes to initiate transcription, elongate nascent transcripts, splice together exons, and cleave and polyadenylate the 3’ end. Kinetic competition between these various processes has been proposed to regulate mRNA maturation, but this model could lead to multiple, randomly determined, or stochastic, pathways or outcomes. Regulatory checkpoints have been suggested as a means of ensuring quality control. However, current methods have been unable to tease apart the contributions of these processes at a single gene or on a time scale that could provide mechanistic insight. To begin to investigate the kinetic relationship between transcription and splicing, Daniel Larson, Ph.D., of CCR’s Laboratory of Receptor Biology and Gene Expression, and his colleagues employed a single-molecule RNA imaging approach to monitor production and processing of a human β-globin reporter gene in living cells.

  13. Single-Molecule Analysis of Pre-mRNA Splicing with Colocalization Single-Molecule Spectroscopy (CoSMoS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Joerg E; Serebrov, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Recent development of single-molecule techniques to study pre-mRNA splicing has provided insights into the dynamic nature of the spliceosome. Colocalization single-molecule spectroscopy (CoSMoS) allows following spliceosome assembly in real time at single-molecule resolution in the full complexity of cellular extracts. A detailed protocol of CoSMoS has been published previously (Anderson and Hoskins, Methods Mol Biol 1126:217-241, 2014). Here, we provide an update on the technical advances since the first CoSMoS studies including slide surface treatment, data processing, and representation. We describe various labeling strategies to generate RNA reporters with multiple dyes (or other moieties) at specific locations.

  14. Chum-RNA allows preparation of a high-quality cDNA library from a single-cell quantity of mRNA without PCR amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tougan, Takahiro; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2008-09-01

    Linear RNA amplification using T7 RNA polymerase is useful in genome-wide analysis of gene expression using DNA microarrays, but exponential amplification using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is still required for cDNA library preparation from single-cell quantities of RNA. We have designed a small RNA molecule called chum-RNA that has enabled us to prepare a single-cell cDNA library after four rounds of T7-based linear amplification, without using PCR amplification. Chum-RNA drove cDNA synthesis from only 0.49 femtograms of mRNA (730 mRNA molecules) as a substrate, a quantity that corresponds to a minor population of mRNA molecules in a single mammalian cell. Analysis of the independent cDNA clone of this library (6.6 x 10(5) cfu) suggests that 30-fold RNA amplification occurred in each round of the amplification process. The size distribution and representation of mRNAs in the resulting one-cell cDNA library retained its similarity to that of the million-cell cDNA library. The use of chum-RNA might also facilitate reactions involving other DNA/RNA modifying enzymes whose Michaelis constant (K(m)) values are around 1 mM, allowing them to be activated in the presence of only small quantities of substrate.

  15. Gene expression profiling of non-polyadenylated RNA-seq across species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Ou Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptomes are dynamic and unique, with each cell type/tissue, developmental stage and species expressing a different repertoire of RNA transcripts. Most mRNAs and well-characterized long noncoding RNAs are shaped with a 5′ cap and 3′ poly(A tail, thus conventional transcriptome analyses typically start with the enrichment of poly(A+ RNAs by oligo(dT selection, followed by deep sequencing approaches. However, accumulated lines of evidence suggest that many RNA transcripts are processed by alternative mechanisms without 3′ poly(A tails and, therefore, fail to be enriched by oligo(dT purification and are absent following deep sequencing analyses. We have described an enrichment strategy to purify non-polyadenylated (poly(A−/ribo− RNAs from human total RNAs by removal of both poly(A+ RNA transcripts and ribosomal RNAs, which led to the identification of many novel RNA transcripts with non-canonical 3′ ends in human. Here, we describe the application of non-polyadenylated RNA-sequencing in rhesus monkey and mouse cell lines/tissue, and further profile the transcription of non-polyadenylated RNAs across species, providing new resources for non-polyadenylated RNA identification and comparison across species.

  16. The role of mobile small RNA species during root growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Kaori; Lichtenberger, Raffael; Helariutta, Ykä

    2012-04-01

    In animals and plants, small RNAs have been identified as important regulatory factors controlling cell fate. A bidirectional cell-to-cell communication involving the mobile transcription factor SHR and microRNA165/166 species specifies the radial position of two types of xylem vessels in Arabidopsis roots. The microRNAs provide short-range non-cell-autonomous developmental signals that are transported through the plasmodesmata (PD) via the symplastic pathway. 21-24 nucleotide-long small RNA species have been shown to move from the shoot to the root. In this review, we highlight the presence of small RNA species as an emerging class of important mobile signals associated with the growth and development of the root. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Sensitive multiplex RNA quantification using capillary electrophoresis-based single-strand conformation polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Gi Won; Hwang, Hee Sung; Nam, Hong Gil; Oh, Mi-Hwa; Jung, Gyoo Yeol

    2010-05-01

    Quantification of RNA provides information crucial for various biological studies, including analysis of mRNA expression and that of microRNAs. Reverse transcription (RT) coupled with real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is known to be the most accurate method for quantifying nucleic acids, and thus represents the state-of-the-art for RNA quantification. However, the use of real-time PCR for RNA quantification is limited to a single target per analytical run because of reductions in quantification power and limitations of fluorescence dyes associated with multiplex applications. Here, we report a novel multiplex RNA quantification method that uses capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism (CE-SSCP) coupled with modified RT and asymmetric PCR. The reverse transcripts of seven in vitro transcribed RNAs were modified with common sequence tags and amplified by asymmetric PCR using primers specific to the common tags. The resulting amplicons were separated and quantified by CE-SSCP. A series of experiments using different amounts of RNA demonstrated that the assay had a limit of detection of 2 amol and a dynamic range of approximately 10(5). These results clearly indicate the potential of this method to provide robust and precise multiplex RNA quantification.

  18. Enthalpy-Driven RNA Folding: Single-Molecule Thermodynamics of Tetraloop–Receptor Tertiary Interaction†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Julie L.; Kraemer, Benedikt; Koberling, Felix; Edmann, Rainer; Nesbitt, David J.

    2010-01-01

    RNA folding thermodynamics are crucial for structure prediction, which requires characterization of both enthalpic and entropic contributions of tertiary motifs to conformational stability. We explore the temperature dependence of RNA folding due to the ubiquitous GAAA tetraloop–receptor docking interaction, exploiting immobilized and freely diffusing single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) methods. The equilibrium constant for intramolecular docking is obtained as a function of temperature (T = 21–47 °C), from which a van’t Hoff analysis yields the enthalpy (ΔH°) and entropy (ΔS°) of docking. Tetraloop–receptor docking is significantly exothermic and entropically unfavorable in 1 mM MgCl2 and 100 mM NaCl, with excellent agreement between immobilized (ΔH° = −17.4 ± 1.6 kcal/mol, and ΔS° = −56.2 ± 5.4 cal mol−1 K−1) and freely diffusing (ΔH° = −17.2 ± 1.6 kcal/mol, and ΔS° = −55.9 ± 5.2 cal mol−1 K−1) species. Kinetic heterogeneity in the tetraloop–receptor construct is unaffected over the temperature range investigated, indicating a large energy barrier for interconversion between the actively docking and nondocking subpopulations. Formation of the tetraloop–receptor interaction can account for ~60% of the ΔH° and ΔS° of P4–P6 domain folding in the Tetrahymena ribozyme, suggesting that it may act as a thermodynamic clamp for the domain. Comparison of the isolated tetraloop–receptor and other tertiary folding thermodynamics supports a theme that enthalpy- versus entropy-driven folding is determined by the number of hydrogen bonding and base stacking interactions. PMID:19186984

  19. Dissecting miRNA gene repression on single cell level with an advanced fluorescent reporter system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemus-Diaz, Nicolas; Böker, Kai O.; Rodriguez-Polo, Ignacio; Mitter, Michael; Preis, Jasmin; Arlt, Maximilian; Gruber, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Despite major advances on miRNA profiling and target predictions, functional readouts for endogenous miRNAs are limited and frequently lead to contradicting conclusions. Numerous approaches including functional high-throughput and miRISC complex evaluations suggest that the functional miRNAome differs from the predictions based on quantitative sRNA profiling. To resolve the apparent contradiction of expression versus function, we generated and applied a fluorescence reporter gene assay enabling single cell analysis. This approach integrates and adapts a mathematical model for miRNA-driven gene repression. This model predicts three distinct miRNA-groups with unique repression activities (low, mid and high) governed not just by expression levels but also by miRNA/target-binding capability. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of the system by applying controlled concentrations of synthetic siRNAs and in parallel, altering target-binding capability on corresponding reporter-constructs. Furthermore, we compared miRNA-profiles with the modeled predictions of 29 individual candidates. We demonstrate that expression levels only partially reflect the miRNA function, fitting to the model-projected groups of different activities. Furthermore, we demonstrate that subcellular localization of miRNAs impacts functionality. Our results imply that miRNA profiling alone cannot define their repression activity. The gene regulatory function is a dynamic and complex process beyond a minimalistic conception of “highly expressed equals high repression”. PMID:28338079

  20. Cotranscriptional Chromatin Remodeling by Small RNA Species: An HTLV-1 Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishat Aliya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell type specificity of human T cell leukemia virus 1 has been proposed as a possible reason for differential viral outcome in primary target cells versus secondary. Through chromatin remodeling, the HTLV-1 transactivator protein Tax interacts with cellular factors at the chromosomally integrated viral promoter to activate downstream genes and control viral transcription. RNA interference is the host innate defense mechanism mediated by short RNA species (siRNA or miRNA that regulate gene expression. There exists a close collaborative functioning of cellular transcription factors with miRNA in order to regulate the expression of a number of eukaryotic genes including those involved in suppression of cell growth, induction of apoptosis, as well as repressing viral replication and propagation. In addition, it has been suggested that retroviral latency is influenced by chromatin alterations brought about by miRNA. Since Tax requires the assembly of transcriptional cofactors to carry out viral gene expression, there might be a close association between miRNA influencing chromatin alterations and Tax-mediated LTR activation. Herein we explore the possible interplay between HTLV-1 infection and miRNA pathways resulting in chromatin reorganization as one of the mechanisms determining HTLV-1 cell specificity and viral fate in different cell types.

  1. Zika virus protection by a single low-dose nucleoside-modified mRNA vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardi, Norbert; Hogan, Michael J; Pelc, Rebecca S; Muramatsu, Hiromi; Andersen, Hanne; DeMaso, Christina R; Dowd, Kimberly A; Sutherland, Laura L; Scearce, Richard M; Parks, Robert; Wagner, Wendeline; Granados, Alex; Greenhouse, Jack; Walker, Michelle; Willis, Elinor; Yu, Jae-Sung; McGee, Charles E; Sempowski, Gregory D; Mui, Barbara L; Tam, Ying K; Huang, Yan-Jang; Vanlandingham, Dana; Holmes, Veronica M; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Sahu, Sujata; Lifton, Michelle; Higgs, Stephen; Hensley, Scott E; Madden, Thomas D; Hope, Michael J; Karikó, Katalin; Santra, Sampa; Graham, Barney S; Lewis, Mark G; Pierson, Theodore C; Haynes, Barton F; Weissman, Drew

    2017-03-09

    Zika virus (ZIKV) has recently emerged as a pandemic associated with severe neuropathology in newborns and adults. There are no ZIKV-specific treatments or preventatives. Therefore, the development of a safe and effective vaccine is a high priority. Messenger RNA (mRNA) has emerged as a versatile and highly effective platform to deliver vaccine antigens and therapeutic proteins. Here we demonstrate that a single low-dose intradermal immunization with lipid-nanoparticle-encapsulated nucleoside-modified mRNA (mRNA-LNP) encoding the pre-membrane and envelope glycoproteins of a strain from the ZIKV outbreak in 2013 elicited potent and durable neutralizing antibody responses in mice and non-human primates. Immunization with 30 μg of nucleoside-modified ZIKV mRNA-LNP protected mice against ZIKV challenges at 2 weeks or 5 months after vaccination, and a single dose of 50 μg was sufficient to protect non-human primates against a challenge at 5 weeks after vaccination. These data demonstrate that nucleoside-modified mRNA-LNP elicits rapid and durable protective immunity and therefore represents a new and promising vaccine candidate for the global fight against ZIKV.

  2. Characterization of the small RNA component of leaves and fruits from four different cucurbit species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadeeswaran Guru

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of non-coding small RNAs involved in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression critical for plant growth and development, stress responses and other diverse biological processes in plants. The Cucurbitaceae or cucurbit family represents some of economically important species, particularly those with edible and medicinal fruits. Genomic tools for the molecular analysis of members of this family are just emerging. Partial draft genome sequence became available recently for cucumber and watermelon facilitating investigation of the small RNA component of the transcriptomes in cucurbits. Results We generated four small RNA libraries from bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria, Cucurbita moschata, Cucurbita pepo, and, watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus in order to identify conserved and novel lineage specific miRNAs in these cucurbits. Deep sequencing of small RNA libraries from these species resulted in 1,597,263, 532,948, 601,388, and 493,384 unique sRNA reads from bottle gourd, moschata, pepo and watermelon, respectively. Sequence analysis of these four libraries resulted in identification of 21 miRNA families that are highly conserved and 8 miRNA families that are moderately conserved in diverse dicots. We also identified 4 putative novel miRNAs in these plant species. Furthermore, the tasiRNAs were identified and their biogenesis was determined in these cucurbits. Small RNA blot analysis or q-PCR analyses of leaf and fruit tissues of these cucurbits showed differential expression of several conserved miRNAs. Interestingly, the abundance of several miRNAs in leaves and fruits of closely related C. moschata and C. pepo was also distinctly different. Target genes for the most conserved miRNAs are also predicted. Conclusion High-throughput sequencing of small RNA libraries from four cucurbit species has provided a glimpse of small RNA component in their transcriptomes. The analysis also

  3. Global analysis of asymmetric RNA enrichment in oocytes reveals low conservation between closely related Xenopus species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claußen, Maike; Lingner, Thomas; Pommerenke, Claudia; Opitz, Lennart; Salinas, Gabriela; Pieler, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    RNAs that localize to the vegetal cortex during Xenopus laevis oogenesis have been reported to function in germ layer patterning, axis determination, and development of the primordial germ cells. Here we report on the genome-wide, comparative analysis of differentially localizing RNAs in Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis oocytes, revealing a surprisingly weak degree of conservation in respect to the identity of animally as well as vegetally enriched transcripts in these closely related species. Heterologous RNA injections and protein binding studies indicate that the different RNA localization patterns in these two species are due to gain/loss of cis-acting localization signals rather than to differences in the RNA-localizing machinery. PMID:26337391

  4. Single nucleotide polymorphism discovery in bovine liver using RNA-seq technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pareek, Chandra Shekhar; Błaszczyk, Paweł; Dziuba, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Background RNA-seq is a useful next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology that has been widely used to understand mammalian transcriptome architecture and function. In this study, a breed-specific RNA-seq experiment was utilized to detect putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in liver...... constructed for the Polish Red, Polish HF, and Hereford breeds, respectively. Using a combination of stringent parameters of a minimum depth of ≥10 mapping reads that support the polymorphic nucleotide base and 100% SNP ratio, 4,368, 3,780 and 3,800 SNP records were detected in the Polish Red, Polish HF......, and Hereford breeds, respectively. The SNP detections using RNA-seq data were successfully validated by kompetitive allele-specific PCR (KASPTM) SNP genotyping assay. The comprehensive QTL/CG analysis of 110 QTL/CG with RNA-seq data identified 20 monomorphic SNP hit loci (CARTPT, GAD1, GDF5, GHRH, GHRL, GRB10...

  5. SC3: consensus clustering of single-cell RNA-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, Vladimir Yu; Kirschner, Kristina; Schaub, Michael T; Andrews, Tallulah; Yiu, Andrew; Chandra, Tamir; Natarajan, Kedar N; Reik, Wolf; Barahona, Mauricio; Green, Anthony R; Hemberg, Martin

    2017-05-01

    Single-cell RNA-seq enables the quantitative characterization of cell types based on global transcriptome profiles. We present single-cell consensus clustering (SC3), a user-friendly tool for unsupervised clustering, which achieves high accuracy and robustness by combining multiple clustering solutions through a consensus approach (http://bioconductor.org/packages/SC3). We demonstrate that SC3 is capable of identifying subclones from the transcriptomes of neoplastic cells collected from patients.

  6. Real-time tRNA transit on single translating ribosomes at codon resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Sotaro; Aitken, Colin Echeverría; Korlach, Jonas; Flusberg, Benjamin A.; Turner, Stephen W.; Puglisi, Joseph D.

    2015-01-01

    Translation by the ribosome occurs by a complex mechanism involving the coordinated interaction of multiple nucleic acid and protein ligands. Here we have used zero-mode waveguides (ZMWs) and sophisticated detection instrumentation to allow real-time observation of translation at physiologically-relevant (μM) ligand concentrations. Translation at each codon is monitored by stable binding of tRNAs – labeled with distinct fluorophores – to translating ribosomes, allowing direct detection of the identity of tRNA molecules bound to the ribosome, and therefore, the underlying mRNA sequence. We observe the transit of tRNAs on single translating ribosomes and have determined the number of tRNA molecules simultaneously bound to the ribosome, at each codon of an mRNA. Our results show that ribosomes are only briefly occupied by two tRNAs and that release of deacylated tRNA from the E site is uncoupled from binding of A-site tRNA and occurs rapidly after translocation. The methods outlined here have broad application to the study of mRNA sequences, and the mechanism and regulation of translation. PMID:20393556

  7. Detection of hepatitis A virus by hybridization with single-stranded RNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi, J.; Estes, M.K.; Metcalf, T.G.

    1987-01-01

    An improved method of dot-blot hybridization to detect hepatitis A virus (HAV) was developed with single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) probes. Radioactive and nonradioactive ssRNA probes were generated by in vitro transcription of HAV templates inserted into the plasmid pGEM-1. 32 P-labeled ssRNA probes were at least eightfold more sensitive than the 32 P-labeled double-stranded cDNA counterparts, whereas biotin-labeled ssRNA probes showed a sensitivity comparable with that of the 32 P-labeled double-stranded cDNA counterparts. Hybridization of HAV with the ssRNA probes at high stringency revealed specific reactions with a high signal-to-noise ratio. The differential hybridization reactions seen with probes of positive and negative sense (compared with HAV genomic RNA) were used to detect HAV in clinical and field samples. A positive/negative ratio was introduced as an indicator that permitted an semiquantitative expression of a positive HAV reaction. Good agreement of this indicator was observed with normal stool samples and with HAV-seeded samples. By using this system, HAV was detected in estuarine and freshwater samples collected from a sewage-polluted bayou in Houston and a saltwater tributary of Galveston Bay

  8. A natural M RNA reassortant arising from two distinct tospovirus species

    Science.gov (United States)

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a tospovirus isolate from south Florida tomatoes was determined. Phylogenetic reconstructions of each genomic RNA segment showed that this isolate was produced by reassortment of segments from two distinct tospovirus species. The S and L segments are most closel...

  9. High-Throughput Mapping of Single-Neuron Projections by Sequencing of Barcoded RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebschull, Justus M; Garcia da Silva, Pedro; Reid, Ashlan P; Peikon, Ian D; Albeanu, Dinu F; Zador, Anthony M

    2016-09-07

    Neurons transmit information to distant brain regions via long-range axonal projections. In the mouse, area-to-area connections have only been systematically mapped using bulk labeling techniques, which obscure the diverse projections of intermingled single neurons. Here we describe MAPseq (Multiplexed Analysis of Projections by Sequencing), a technique that can map the projections of thousands or even millions of single neurons by labeling large sets of neurons with random RNA sequences ("barcodes"). Axons are filled with barcode mRNA, each putative projection area is dissected, and the barcode mRNA is extracted and sequenced. Applying MAPseq to the locus coeruleus (LC), we find that individual LC neurons have preferred cortical targets. By recasting neuroanatomy, which is traditionally viewed as a problem of microscopy, as a problem of sequencing, MAPseq harnesses advances in sequencing technology to permit high-throughput interrogation of brain circuits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Detection of colony-stimulating factor messenger RNA in single T cells by in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williamson, D J; Owens, T; Pearse, M

    1989-01-01

    In situ hybridization has been used to study the accumulation of colony-stimulating factor (CSF) mRNA in single cells of a T lymphocyte clone (E9.D4) following antibody-mediated (F23.1) activation via the Ti-T3 complex in filler-independent bulk cultures. The specificity of hybridization for cell...

  11. Analysis of Single-cell Gene Transcription by RNA Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronander, Elena; Bengtsson, Dominique C; Joergensen, Louise

    2012-01-01

    fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis of var gene transcription by the parasite in individual nuclei of P. falciparum IE(1). Here, we present a detailed protocol for carrying out the RNA-FISH methodology for analysis of var gene transcription in single-nuclei of P. falciparum infected human...

  12. Designing siRNA that distinguish between genes that differ by a single nucleotide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianne S Schwarz

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs, the guides that direct RNA interference (RNAi, provide a powerful tool to reduce the expression of a single gene in human cells. Ideally, dominant, gain-of-function human diseases could be treated using siRNAs that specifically silence the mutant disease allele, while leaving expression of the wild-type allele unperturbed. Previous reports suggest that siRNAs can be designed with single nucleotide specificity, but no rational basis for the design of siRNAs with single nucleotide discrimination has been proposed. We systematically identified siRNAs that discriminate between the wild-type and mutant alleles of two disease genes: the human Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1 gene, which contributes to the progression of hereditary amyotrophic lateral sclerosis through the gain of a toxic property, and the huntingtin (HTT gene, which causes Huntington disease when its CAG-repeat region expands beyond approximately 35 repeats. Using cell-free RNAi reactions in Drosophila embryo lysate and reporter assays and microarray analysis of off-target effects in cultured human cells, we identified positions within an siRNA that are most sensitive to mismatches. We also show that purine:purine mismatches imbue an siRNA with greater discriminatory power than other types of base mismatches. siRNAs in which either a G:U wobble or a mismatch is located in the "seed" sequence, the specialized siRNA guide region responsible for target binding, displayed lower levels of selectivity than those in which the mismatch was located 3' to the seed; this region of an siRNA is critical for target cleavage but not siRNA binding. Our data suggest that siRNAs can be designed to discriminate between the wild-type and mutant alleles of many genes that differ by just a single nucleotide.

  13. Highly efficient siRNA delivery system into human and murine cells using single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladeira, M. S.; Andrade, V. A.; Gomes, E. R. M.; Aguiar, C. J.; Moraes, E. R.; Soares, J. S.; Silva, E. E.; Lacerda, R. G.; Ladeira, L. O.; Jorio, A.; Lima, P.; Leite, M. Fatima; Resende, R. R.; Guatimosim, S.

    2010-09-01

    Development of RNA interference (RNAi) technology utilizing short interfering RNA sequences (siRNA) has focused on creating methods for delivering siRNAs to cells and for enhancing siRNA stability in vitro and in vivo. Here, we describe a novel approach for siRNA cellular delivery using siRNA coiling into carboxyl-functionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The CNT-siRNA delivery system successfully demonstrates nonspecific toxicity and transfection efficiency greater than 95%. This approach offers the potential for siRNA delivery into different types of cells, including hard-to-transfect cells, such as neuronal cells and cardiomyocytes. We also tested the CNT-siRNA system in a non-metastatic human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (SKHep1). In all types of cells used in this work the CNT-siRNA delivery system showed high efficiency and apparent no side effects for various in vitro applications.

  14. Highly efficient siRNA delivery system into human and murine cells using single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladeira, M S; Andrade, V A; Gomes, E R M; Aguiar, C J; Moraes, E R; Fatima Leite, M; Guatimosim, S [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, 31270-901 (Brazil); Soares, J S; Silva, E E; Lacerda, R G; Ladeira, L O; Jorio, A; Resende, R R [Department of Physics, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, 31270-901 (Brazil); Lima, P, E-mail: rrresende@hotmail.com, E-mail: guatimosim@icb.ufmg.br [Department of Biosystems Engineering, Federal University of Sao Joao Del Rei, Sao Joao Del Rei, MG, 36307-352 (Brazil)

    2010-09-24

    Development of RNA interference (RNAi) technology utilizing short interfering RNA sequences (siRNA) has focused on creating methods for delivering siRNAs to cells and for enhancing siRNA stability in vitro and in vivo. Here, we describe a novel approach for siRNA cellular delivery using siRNA coiling into carboxyl-functionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The CNT-siRNA delivery system successfully demonstrates nonspecific toxicity and transfection efficiency greater than 95%. This approach offers the potential for siRNA delivery into different types of cells, including hard-to-transfect cells, such as neuronal cells and cardiomyocytes. We also tested the CNT-siRNA system in a non-metastatic human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (SKHep1). In all types of cells used in this work the CNT-siRNA delivery system showed high efficiency and apparent no side effects for various in vitro applications.

  15. Isotachophoresis for fractionation and recovery of cytoplasmic RNA and nucleus from single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriyama, Kentaro; Shintaku, Hirofumi; Santiago, Juan G

    2015-07-01

    There is a substantial need for simultaneous analyses of RNA and DNA from individual single cells. Such analysis provides unique evidence of cell-to-cell differences and the correlation between gene expression and genomic mutation in highly heterogeneous cell populations. We present a novel microfluidic system that leverages isotachophoresis to fractionate and isolate cytoplasmic RNA and genomic DNA (gDNA) from single cells. The system uniquely enables independent, sequence-specific analyses of these critical markers. Our system uses a microfluidic chip with a simple geometry and four end-channel electrodes, and completes the entire process in RNA output reservoirs, each containing high quality and purity aliquots with no measurable cross-contamination of cytoplasmic RNA versus gDNA. We demonstrate our system with simultaneous, sequence-specific quantitation using off-chip RT-qPCR and qPCR for simultaneous cytoplasmic RNA and gDNA analyses, respectively. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Single-cell RNA-sequencing: The future of genome biology is now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picelli, Simone

    2017-05-04

    Genome-wide single-cell analysis represents the ultimate frontier of genomics research. In particular, single-cell RNA-sequencing (scRNA-seq) studies have been boosted in the last few years by an explosion of new technologies enabling the study of the transcriptomic landscape of thousands of single cells in complex multicellular organisms. More sensitive and automated methods are being continuously developed and promise to deliver better data quality and higher throughput with less hands-on time. The outstanding amount of knowledge that is going to be gained from present and future studies will have a profound impact in many aspects of our society, from the introduction of truly tailored cancer treatments, to a better understanding of antibiotic resistance and host-pathogen interactions; from the discovery of the mechanisms regulating stem cell differentiation to the characterization of the early event of human embryogenesis.

  17. Molecular-crowding effects on single-molecule RNA folding/unfolding thermodynamics and kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, Nicholas F.; Holmstrom, Erik D.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of “molecular crowding” on elementary biochemical processes due to high solute concentrations are poorly understood and yet clearly essential to the folding of nucleic acids and proteins into correct, native structures. The present work presents, to our knowledge, first results on the single-molecule kinetics of solute molecular crowding, specifically focusing on GAAA tetraloop–receptor folding to isolate a single RNA tertiary interaction using time-correlated single-photon counting and confocal single-molecule FRET microscopy. The impact of crowding by high–molecular-weight polyethylene glycol on the RNA folding thermodynamics is dramatic, with up to ΔΔG° ∼ −2.5 kcal/mol changes in free energy and thus >60-fold increase in the folding equilibrium constant (Keq) for excluded volume fractions of 15%. Most importantly, time-correlated single-molecule methods permit crowding effects on the kinetics of RNA folding/unfolding to be explored for the first time (to our knowledge), which reveal that this large jump in Keq is dominated by a 35-fold increase in tetraloop–receptor folding rate, with only a modest decrease in the corresponding unfolding rate. This is further explored with temperature-dependent single-molecule RNA folding measurements, which identify that crowding effects are dominated by entropic rather than enthalpic contributions to the overall free energy change. Finally, a simple “hard-sphere” treatment of the solute excluded volume is invoked to model the observed kinetic trends, and which predict ΔΔG° ∼ −5 kcal/mol free-energy stabilization at excluded volume fractions of 30%. PMID:24850865

  18. Simultaneous purification of DNA and RNA from microbiota in a single colonic mucosal biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Aina E F; Tannæs, Tone M; Vatn, Simen; Ricanek, Petr; Vatn, Morten Harald; Jahnsen, Jørgen

    2016-06-28

    Nucleic acid purification methods are of importance when performing microbiota studies and especially when analysing the intestinal microbiota as we here find a wide range of different microbes. Various considerations must be taken to lyse the microbial cell wall of each microbe. In the present article, we compare several tissue lysis steps and commercial purification kits, to achieve a joint RNA and DNA purification protocol for the purpose of investigating the microbiota and the microbiota-host interactions in a single colonic mucosal tissue sample. A further optimised tissue homogenisation and lysis protocol comprising mechanical bead beating, lysis buffer replacement and enzymatic treatment, in combination with the AllPrep DNA/RNA Mini Kit (Qiagen, Hilden, Germany) resulted in efficient and simultaneous purification of microbial and human RNA and DNA from a single mucosal colonic tissue sample. The present work provides a unique possibility to study RNA and DNA from the same mucosal biopsy sample, making a direct comparison between metabolically active microbes and total microbial DNA. The protocol also offers an opportunity to investigate other members of a microbiota such as viruses, fungi and micro-eukaryotes, and moreover the possibility to extract data on microbiota and host interactions from one single mucosal biopsy.

  19. Identification and Analysis of Informative Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in 16S rRNA Gene Sequences of the Bacillus cereus Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakovirta, Janetta R; Prezioso, Samantha; Hodge, David; Pillai, Segaran P; Weigel, Linda M

    2016-11-01

    Analysis of 16S rRNA genes is important for phylogenetic classification of known and novel bacterial genera and species and for detection of uncultivable bacteria. PCR amplification of 16S rRNA genes with universal primers produces a mixture of amplicons from all rRNA operons in the genome, and the sequence data generally yield a consensus sequence. Here we describe valuable data that are missing from consensus sequences, variable effects on sequence data generated from nonidentical 16S rRNA amplicons, and the appearance of data displayed by different software programs. These effects are illustrated by analysis of 16S rRNA genes from 50 strains of the Bacillus cereus group, i.e., Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus mycoides, and Bacillus thuringiensis These species have 11 to 14 rRNA operons, and sequence variability occurs among the multiple 16S rRNA genes. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) previously reported to be specific to B. anthracis was detected in some B. cereus strains. However, a different SNP, at position 1139, was identified as being specific to B. anthracis, which is a biothreat agent with high mortality rates. Compared with visual analysis of the electropherograms, basecaller software frequently missed gene sequence variations or could not identify variant bases due to overlapping basecalls. Accurate detection of 16S rRNA gene sequences that include intragenomic variations can improve discrimination among closely related species, improve the utility of 16S rRNA databases, and facilitate rapid bacterial identification by targeted DNA sequence analysis or by whole-genome sequencing performed by clinical or reference laboratories. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. High-throughput full-length single-cell mRNA-seq of rare cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin Chun Ooi

    Full Text Available Single-cell characterization techniques, such as mRNA-seq, have been applied to a diverse range of applications in cancer biology, yielding great insight into mechanisms leading to therapy resistance and tumor clonality. While single-cell techniques can yield a wealth of information, a common bottleneck is the lack of throughput, with many current processing methods being limited to the analysis of small volumes of single cell suspensions with cell densities on the order of 107 per mL. In this work, we present a high-throughput full-length mRNA-seq protocol incorporating a magnetic sifter and magnetic nanoparticle-antibody conjugates for rare cell enrichment, and Smart-seq2 chemistry for sequencing. We evaluate the efficiency and quality of this protocol with a simulated circulating tumor cell system, whereby non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines (NCI-H1650 and NCI-H1975 are spiked into whole blood, before being enriched for single-cell mRNA-seq by EpCAM-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles and the magnetic sifter. We obtain high efficiency (> 90% capture and release of these simulated rare cells via the magnetic sifter, with reproducible transcriptome data. In addition, while mRNA-seq data is typically only used for gene expression analysis of transcriptomic data, we demonstrate the use of full-length mRNA-seq chemistries like Smart-seq2 to facilitate variant analysis of expressed genes. This enables the use of mRNA-seq data for differentiating cells in a heterogeneous population by both their phenotypic and variant profile. In a simulated heterogeneous mixture of circulating tumor cells in whole blood, we utilize this high-throughput protocol to differentiate these heterogeneous cells by both their phenotype (lung cancer versus white blood cells, and mutational profile (H1650 versus H1975 cells, in a single sequencing run. This high-throughput method can help facilitate single-cell analysis of rare cell populations, such as circulating tumor

  1. A large collapsed-state RNA can exhibit simple exponential single-molecule dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Glenna J; Lee, Kang Taek; Qu, Xiaohui; Xie, Zheng; Pesic, Jelena; Sosnick, Tobin R; Pan, Tao; Scherer, Norbert F

    2008-05-09

    The process of large RNA folding is believed to proceed from many collapsed structures to a unique functional structure requiring precise organization of nucleotides. The diversity of possible structures and stabilities of large RNAs could result in non-exponential folding kinetics (e.g. stretched exponential) under conditions where the molecules have not achieved their native state. We describe a single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) study of the collapsed-state region of the free energy landscape of the catalytic domain of RNase P RNA from Bacillus stearothermophilus (C(thermo)). Ensemble measurements have shown that this 260 residue RNA folds cooperatively to its native state at >or=1 mM Mg(2+), but little is known about the conformational dynamics at lower ionic strength. Our measurements of equilibrium conformational fluctuations reveal simple exponential kinetics that reflect a small number of discrete states instead of the expected inhomogeneous dynamics. The distribution of discrete dwell times, collected from an "ensemble" of 300 single molecules at each of a series of Mg(2+) concentrations, fit well to a double exponential, which indicates that the RNA conformational changes can be described as a four-state system. This finding is somewhat unexpected under [Mg(2+)] conditions in which this RNA does not achieve its native state. Observation of discrete well-defined conformations in this large RNA that are stable on the seconds timescale at low [Mg(2+)] (<0.1 mM) suggests that even at low ionic strength, with a tremendous number of possible (weak) interactions, a few critical interactions may produce deep energy wells that allow for rapid averaging of motions within each well, and yield kinetics that are relatively simple.

  2. A Xenopus tropicalis oligonucleotide microarray works across species using RNA from Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Andrew D; Goldstone, Kim; Smith, James C; Gilchrist, Mike; Amaya, Enrique; Papalopulu, Nancy

    2005-03-01

    Microarrays have great potential for the study of developmental biology. As a model system Xenopus is well suited for making the most of this potential. However, Xenopus laevis has undergone a genome wide duplication meaning that most genes are represented by two paralogues. This causes a number of problems. Most importantly the presence of duplicated genes mean that a X. laevis microarray will have less or even half the coverage of a similar sized microarray from the closely related but diploid frog Xenopus tropicalis. However, to date, X. laevis is the most commonly used amphibian system for experimental embryology. Therefore, we have tested if a microarray based on sequences from X. tropicalis will work across species using RNA from X. laevis. We produced a pilot oligonucleotide microarray based on sequences from X. tropicalis. The microarray was used to identify genes whose expression levels changed during early X. tropicalis development. The same assay was then carried out using RNA from X. laevis. The cross species experiments gave similar results to those using X. tropicalis RNA. This was true at the whole microarray level and for individual genes, with most genes giving similar results using RNA from X. laevis and X. tropicalis. Furthermore, the overlap in genes identified between a X. laevis and a X. tropicalis set of experiments was only 12% less than the overlap between two sets of X. tropicalis experiments. Therefore researchers can work with X. laevis and still make use of the advantages offered by X. tropicalis microarrays.

  3. Identification and Characterization of Two Novel RNA Viruses from Anopheles gambiae Species Complex Mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carissimo, Guillaume; Eiglmeier, Karin; Reveillaud, Julie; Holm, Inge; Diallo, Mawlouth; Diallo, Diawo; Vantaux, Amélie; Kim, Saorin; Ménard, Didier; Siv, Sovannaroth; Belda, Eugeni; Bischoff, Emmanuel; Antoniewski, Christophe; Vernick, Kenneth D

    2016-01-01

    Mosquitoes of the Anopheles gambiae complex display strong preference for human bloodmeals and are major malaria vectors in Africa. However, their interaction with viruses or role in arbovirus transmission during epidemics has been little examined, with the exception of O'nyong-nyong virus, closely related to Chikungunya virus. Deep-sequencing has revealed different RNA viruses in natural insect viromes, but none have been previously described in the Anopheles gambiae species complex. Here, we describe two novel insect RNA viruses, a Dicistrovirus and a Cypovirus, found in laboratory colonies of An. gambiae taxa using small-RNA deep sequencing. Sequence analysis was done with Metavisitor, an open-source bioinformatic pipeline for virus discovery and de novo genome assembly. Wild-collected Anopheles from Senegal and Cambodia were positive for the Dicistrovirus and Cypovirus, displaying high sequence identity to the laboratory-derived virus. Thus, the Dicistrovirus (Anopheles C virus, AnCV) and Cypovirus (Anopheles Cypovirus, AnCPV) are components of the natural virome of at least some anopheline species. Their possible influence on mosquito immunity or transmission of other pathogens is unknown. These natural viruses could be developed as models for the study of Anopheles-RNA virus interactions in low security laboratory settings, in an analogous manner to the use of rodent malaria parasites for studies of mosquito anti-parasite immunity.

  4. Detecting heterogeneity in single-cell RNA-Seq data by non-negative matrix factorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xun; Ching, Travers; Pan, Xinghua; Weissman, Sherman M; Garmire, Lana

    2017-01-01

    Single-cell RNA-Sequencing (scRNA-Seq) is a fast-evolving technology that enables the understanding of biological processes at an unprecedentedly high resolution. However, well-suited bioinformatics tools to analyze the data generated from this new technology are still lacking. Here we investigate the performance of non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) method to analyze a wide variety of scRNA-Seq datasets, ranging from mouse hematopoietic stem cells to human glioblastoma data. In comparison to other unsupervised clustering methods including K-means and hierarchical clustering, NMF has higher accuracy in separating similar groups in various datasets. We ranked genes by their importance scores ( D -scores) in separating these groups, and discovered that NMF uniquely identifies genes expressed at intermediate levels as top-ranked genes. Finally, we show that in conjugation with the modularity detection method FEM, NMF reveals meaningful protein-protein interaction modules. In summary, we propose that NMF is a desirable method to analyze heterogeneous single-cell RNA-Seq data. The NMF based subpopulation detection package is available at: https://github.com/lanagarmire/NMFEM.

  5. Specific primer design of mitochondrial 12S rRNA for species identification in raw meats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahyadi, M.; Puruhita; Barido, F. H.; Hertanto, B. S.

    2018-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a molecular technique that widely used in agriculture area including species identification in animal-based products for halalness and food safety reasons. Amplification of DNA using PCR needs a primer pair (forward and reverse primers) to isolate specific DNA fragment in the genome. This objective of this study was to design specific primer from mitochondrial 12S rRNA region for species identification in raw beef, pork and chicken meat. Three published sequences, HQ184045, JN601075, and KT626857, were downloaded from National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) website. Furthermore, those reference sequences were used to design specific primer for bovine, pig, and chicken species using primer3 v.0.4.0. A total of 15 primer pairs were picked up from primer3 software. Of these, an universal forward primer and three reverse primers which are specific for bovine, pig, and chicken species were selected to be optimized using multiplex-PCR technique. The selected primers were namely UNIF (5’-ACC GCG GTC ATA CGA TTA AC-3’), SPR (5’-AGT GCG TCG GCT ATT GTA GG-3’), BBR (5’-GAA TTG GCA AGG GTT GGT AA-3’), and AR (5’-CGG TAT GTA CGT GCC TCA GA-3’). In addition, the PCR products were visualized using 2% agarose gels under the UV light and sequenced to be aligned with reference sequences using Clustal Omega. The result showed that those primers were specifically amplified mitochondrial 12S rRNA regions from bovine, pig, and chicken using PCR. It was indicated by the existence of 155, 357, and 611 bp of DNA bands for bovine, pig, and chicken species, respectively. Moreover, sequence analysis revealed that our sequences were identically similar with reference sequences. It can be concluded that mitochondrial 12S rRNA may be used as a genetic marker for species identification in meat products.

  6. Efficient CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Genome Editing Using a Chimeric Single-Guide RNA Molecule

    KAUST Repository

    Butt, Haroon

    2017-08-24

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been applied in diverse eukaryotic organisms for targeted mutagenesis. However, targeted gene editing is inefficient and requires the simultaneous delivery of a DNA template for homology-directed repair (HDR). Here, we used CRISPR/Cas9 to generate targeted double-strand breaks and to deliver an RNA repair template for HDR in rice (Oryza sativa). We used chimeric single-guide RNA (cgRNA) molecules carrying both sequences for target site specificity (to generate the double-strand breaks) and repair template sequences (to direct HDR), flanked by regions of homology to the target. Gene editing was more efficient in rice protoplasts using repair templates complementary to the non-target DNA strand, rather than the target strand. We applied this cgRNA repair method to generate herbicide resistance in rice, which showed that this cgRNA repair method can be used for targeted gene editing in plants. Our findings will facilitate applications in functional genomics and targeted improvement of crop traits.

  7. Bioinformatics resource manager v2.3: an integrated software environment for systems biology with microRNA and cross-species analysis tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are noncoding RNAs that direct post-transcriptional regulation of protein coding genes. Recent studies have shown miRNAs are important for controlling many biological processes, including nervous system development, and are highly conserved across species. Given their importance, computational tools are necessary for analysis, interpretation and integration of high-throughput (HTP) miRNA data in an increasing number of model species. The Bioinformatics Resource Manager (BRM) v2.3 is a software environment for data management, mining, integration and functional annotation of HTP biological data. In this study, we report recent updates to BRM for miRNA data analysis and cross-species comparisons across datasets. Results BRM v2.3 has the capability to query predicted miRNA targets from multiple databases, retrieve potential regulatory miRNAs for known genes, integrate experimentally derived miRNA and mRNA datasets, perform ortholog mapping across species, and retrieve annotation and cross-reference identifiers for an expanded number of species. Here we use BRM to show that developmental exposure of zebrafish to 30 uM nicotine from 6–48 hours post fertilization (hpf) results in behavioral hyperactivity in larval zebrafish and alteration of putative miRNA gene targets in whole embryos at developmental stages that encompass early neurogenesis. We show typical workflows for using BRM to integrate experimental zebrafish miRNA and mRNA microarray datasets with example retrievals for zebrafish, including pathway annotation and mapping to human ortholog. Functional analysis of differentially regulated (p<0.05) gene targets in BRM indicates that nicotine exposure disrupts genes involved in neurogenesis, possibly through misregulation of nicotine-sensitive miRNAs. Conclusions BRM provides the ability to mine complex data for identification of candidate miRNAs or pathways that drive phenotypic outcome and, therefore, is a useful hypothesis

  8. Bioinformatics resource manager v2.3: an integrated software environment for systems biology with microRNA and cross-species analysis tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilton Susan C

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are noncoding RNAs that direct post-transcriptional regulation of protein coding genes. Recent studies have shown miRNAs are important for controlling many biological processes, including nervous system development, and are highly conserved across species. Given their importance, computational tools are necessary for analysis, interpretation and integration of high-throughput (HTP miRNA data in an increasing number of model species. The Bioinformatics Resource Manager (BRM v2.3 is a software environment for data management, mining, integration and functional annotation of HTP biological data. In this study, we report recent updates to BRM for miRNA data analysis and cross-species comparisons across datasets. Results BRM v2.3 has the capability to query predicted miRNA targets from multiple databases, retrieve potential regulatory miRNAs for known genes, integrate experimentally derived miRNA and mRNA datasets, perform ortholog mapping across species, and retrieve annotation and cross-reference identifiers for an expanded number of species. Here we use BRM to show that developmental exposure of zebrafish to 30 uM nicotine from 6–48 hours post fertilization (hpf results in behavioral hyperactivity in larval zebrafish and alteration of putative miRNA gene targets in whole embryos at developmental stages that encompass early neurogenesis. We show typical workflows for using BRM to integrate experimental zebrafish miRNA and mRNA microarray datasets with example retrievals for zebrafish, including pathway annotation and mapping to human ortholog. Functional analysis of differentially regulated (p Conclusions BRM provides the ability to mine complex data for identification of candidate miRNAs or pathways that drive phenotypic outcome and, therefore, is a useful hypothesis generation tool for systems biology. The miRNA workflow in BRM allows for efficient processing of multiple miRNA and mRNA datasets in a single

  9. Development of a simplified RT-PCR without RNA isolation for rapid detection of RNA viruses in a single small brown planthopper (Laodelphax striatellus Fallén).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiufang; Liu, Haoqiu; Yuan, Pingping; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Chen, Qingqing; Jiang, Xuanli; Zhou, Yijun

    2017-05-03

    The small brown planthopper (SBPH) is an important pest of cereal crops and acts as a transmission vector for multiple RNA viruses. Rapid diagnosis of virus in the vector is crucial for efficient forecast and control of viral disease. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is a rapid, sensitive and reliable method for virus detection. The traditional RT-PCR contains a RNA isolation step and is widely used for virus detection in insect. However, using the traditional RT-PCR for detecting RNA virus in individual SBPHs becomes challenging because of the expensive reagents and laborious procedure associated with RNA isolation when processing a large number of samples. We established a simplified RT-PCR method without RNA isolation for RNA virus detection in a single SBPH. This method is achieved by grinding a single SBPH in sterile water and using the crude extract directly as the template for RT-PCR. The crude extract containing the virus RNA can be prepared in approximately two minutes. Rice stripe virus (RSV), rice black streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) and Himetobi P virus (HiPV) were successfully detected using this simplified method. The detection results were validated by sequencing and dot immunobinding assay, indicating that this simplified method is reliable for detecting different viruses in insects. The evaluation of the sensitivity of this method showed that both RSV and HiPV can be detected when the cDNA from the crude extract was diluted up to 10 3 fold. Compared to the traditional RT-PCR with RNA isolation, the simplified RT-PCR method greatly reduces the sample processing time, decreases the detection cost, and improves the efficiency by avoiding RNA isolation. A simplified RT-PCR method is developed for rapid detection of RNA virus in a single SBPH without the laborious RNA isolation step. It offers a convenient alternative to the traditional RT-PCR method.

  10. Role of electrostatics in the assembly pathway of a single-stranded RNA virus.

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    Garmann, Rees F; Comas-Garcia, Mauricio; Koay, Melissa S T; Cornelissen, Jeroen J L M; Knobler, Charles M; Gelbart, William M

    2014-09-01

    We have recently discovered (R. D. Cadena-Nava et al., J. Virol. 86:3318-3326, 2012, doi:10.1128/JVI.06566-11) that the in vitro packaging of RNA by the capsid protein (CP) of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus is optimal when there is a significant excess of CP, specifically that complete packaging of all of the RNA in solution requires sufficient CP to provide charge matching of the N-terminal positively charged arginine-rich motifs (ARMS) of the CPs with the negatively charged phosphate backbone of the RNA. We show here that packaging results from the initial formation of a charge-matched protocapsid consisting of RNA decorated by a disordered arrangement of CPs. This protocapsid reorganizes into the final, icosahedrally symmetric nucleocapsid by displacing the excess CPs from the RNA to the exterior surface of the emerging capsid through electrostatic attraction between the ARMs of the excess CP and the negative charge density of the capsid exterior. As a test of this scenario, we prepare CP mutants with extra and missing (relative to the wild type) cationic residues and show that a correspondingly smaller and larger excess, respectively, of CP is needed for complete packaging of RNA. Cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) has long been studied as a model system for the assembly of single-stranded RNA viruses. While much is known about the electrostatic interactions within the CCMV virion, relatively little is known about these interactions during assembly, i.e., within intermediate states preceding the final nucleocapsid structure. Theoretical models and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations suggest that viruses like CCMV assemble by the bulk adsorption of CPs onto the RNA driven by electrostatic attraction, followed by structural reorganization into the final capsid. Such a mechanism facilitates assembly by condensing the RNA for packaging while simultaneously concentrating the local density of CP for capsid nucleation. We provide experimental evidence of

  11. Evaluation of Human Adipose Tissue Stromal Heterogeneity in Metabolic Disease Using Single Cell RNA-Seq

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    individual cell types within human adipose tissue interact to regulate adipose tissue physiology . Specifically, we have developed the molecular and...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0251 TITLE: “Evaluation of Human Adipose Tissue Stromal Heterogeneity in Metabolic Disease Using Single Cell RNA...TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1 AUG 2016 - 31 Aug 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Evaluation of Human Adipose Tissue Stromal

  12. Identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 16S rRNA gene of foodborne Bacillus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-No, I C; Böhme, K; Caamaño-Antelo, S; Barros-Velázquez, J; Calo-Mata, P

    2015-04-01

    The main goal of this work was the identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 16S rRNA gene of foodborne Bacillus spp. that may be useful for typing purposes. These species include, among others, Bacillus cereus, an important pathogenic species involved in food poisoning, and Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus pumilus, which are causative agents of food spoilage described as responsible for foodborne disease outbreaks. With this purpose in mind, 52 Bacillus strains isolated from culture collections and fresh and processed food were considered. SNP type "Y" at sites 212 and 476 appeared in the majority of B. licheniformis studied strains. SNP type "R" at site 278 was detected in many strains of the B. subtilis/Bacillus amyloliquefaciens group, while polymorphism "Y" at site 173 was characteristic of the majority of strains of B. cereus/Bacillus thuringiensis group. The analysis of SNPs provided more intra-specific information than phylogenetic analysis in the cases of B. cereus and B. subtilis. Moreover, this study describes novel SNPs that should be considered when designing 16S rRNA-based primers and probes for multiplex-PCR, Real-Time PCR and microarray systems for foodborne Bacillus spp. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Single-cell full-length total RNA sequencing uncovers dynamics of recursive splicing and enhancer RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tetsutaro; Ozaki, Haruka; Sasagawa, Yohei; Umeda, Mana; Danno, Hiroki; Nikaido, Itoshi

    2018-02-12

    Total RNA sequencing has been used to reveal poly(A) and non-poly(A) RNA expression, RNA processing and enhancer activity. To date, no method for full-length total RNA sequencing of single cells has been developed despite the potential of this technology for single-cell biology. Here we describe random displacement amplification sequencing (RamDA-seq), the first full-length total RNA-sequencing method for single cells. Compared with other methods, RamDA-seq shows high sensitivity to non-poly(A) RNA and near-complete full-length transcript coverage. Using RamDA-seq with differentiation time course samples of mouse embryonic stem cells, we reveal hundreds of dynamically regulated non-poly(A) transcripts, including histone transcripts and long noncoding RNA Neat1. Moreover, RamDA-seq profiles recursive splicing in >300-kb introns. RamDA-seq also detects enhancer RNAs and their cell type-specific activity in single cells. Taken together, we demonstrate that RamDA-seq could help investigate the dynamics of gene expression, RNA-processing events and transcriptional regulation in single cells.

  14. Live-Cell Visualization of Pre-mRNA Splicing with Single-Molecule Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M. Martin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Removal of introns from pre-messenger RNAs (pre-mRNAs via splicing provides a versatile means of genetic regulation that is often disrupted in human diseases. To decipher how splicing occurs in real time, we directly examined with single-molecule sensitivity the kinetics of intron excision from pre-mRNA in the nucleus of living human cells. By using two different RNA labeling methods, MS2 and λN, we show that β-globin introns are transcribed and excised in 20–30 s. Furthermore, we show that replacing the weak polypyrimidine (Py tract in mouse immunoglobulin μ (IgM pre-mRNA by a U-rich Py decreases the intron lifetime, thus providing direct evidence that splice-site strength influences splicing kinetics. We also found that RNA polymerase II transcribes at elongation rates ranging between 3 and 6 kb min−1 and that transcription can be rate limiting for splicing. These results have important implications for a mechanistic understanding of cotranscriptional splicing regulation in the live-cell context.

  15. Identification of pathogenic Nocardia species by reverse line blot hybridization targeting the 16S rRNA and 16S-23S rRNA gene spacer regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Meng; Kong, Fanrong; Sorrell, Tania C; Cao, Yongyan; Lee, Ok Cha; Liu, Ying; Sintchenko, Vitali; Chen, Sharon C A

    2010-02-01

    Although 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis is employed most often for the definitive identification of Nocardia species, alternate molecular methods and polymorphisms in other gene targets have also enabled species determinations. We evaluated a combined Nocardia PCR-based reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay based on 16S and 16S-23S rRNA gene spacer region polymorphisms to identify 12 American Type Culture Collection and 123 clinical Nocardia isolates representing 14 species; results were compared with results from 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Thirteen 16S rRNA gene-based (two group-specific and 11 species-specific) and five 16S-23S spacer-targeted (two taxon-specific and three species-specific) probes were utilized. 16S rRNA gene-based probes correctly identified 124 of 135 isolates (sensitivity, 92%) but were unable to identify Nocardia paucivorans strains (n = 10 strains) and a Nocardia asteroides isolate with a novel 16S rRNA gene sequence. Nocardia farcinica and Nocardia cyriacigeorgica strains were identified by the sequential use of an N. farcinica-"negative" probe and a combined N. farcinica/N. cyriacigeorgica probe. The assay specificity was high (99%) except for weak cross-reactivity between the Nocardia brasiliensis probe with the Nocardia thailandica DNA product; however, cross-hybridization with closely related nontarget species may occur. The incorporation of 16S-23S rRNA gene spacer-based probes enabled the identification of all N. paucivorans strains. The overall sensitivity using both probe sets was >99%. Both N. farcinica-specific 16S-23S rRNA gene spacer-directed probes were required to identify all N. farcinica stains by using this probe set. The study demonstrates the utility of a combined PCR/RLB assay for the identification of clinically relevant Nocardia species and its potential for studying subtypes of N. farcinica. Where species assignment is ambiguous or not possible, 16S rRNA gene sequencing is recommended.

  16. Preparation of Single-Cell RNA-Seq Libraries for Next Generation Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombetta, John J; Gennert, David; Lu, Diana; Satija, Rahul; Shalek, Alex K; Regev, Aviv

    2014-07-01

    For the past several decades, due to technical limitations, the field of transcriptomics has focused on population-level measurements that can mask significant differences between individual cells. With the advent of single-cell RNA-Seq, it is now possible to profile the responses of individual cells at unprecedented depth and thereby uncover, transcriptome-wide, the heterogeneity that exists within these populations. This unit describes a method that merges several important technologies to produce, in high-throughput, single-cell RNA-Seq libraries. Complementary DNA (cDNA) is made from full-length mRNA transcripts using a reverse transcriptase that has terminal transferase activity. This, when combined with a second "template-switch" primer, allows for cDNAs to be constructed that have two universal priming sequences. Following preamplification from these common sequences, Nextera XT is used to prepare a pool of 96 uniquely indexed samples ready for Illumina sequencing. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  17. Characterization of a Novel Megabirnavirus from Sclerotinia sclerotiorum Reveals Horizontal Gene Transfer from Single-Stranded RNA Virus to Double-Stranded RNA Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minghong; Wang, Yong; Sun, Xiangzhong; Cheng, Jiasen; Fu, Yanping; Liu, Huiquan; Jiang, Daohong; Ghabrial, Said A; Xie, Jiatao

    2015-08-01

    Mycoviruses have been detected in all major groups of filamentous fungi, and their study represents an important branch of virology. Here, we characterized a novel double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) mycovirus, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum megabirnavirus 1 (SsMBV1), in an apparently hypovirulent strain (SX466) of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Two similarly sized dsRNA segments (L1- and L2-dsRNA), the genome of SsMBV1, are packaged in rigid spherical particles purified from strain SX466. The full-length cDNA sequence of L1-dsRNA/SsMBV1 comprises two large open reading frames (ORF1 and ORF2), which encode a putative coat protein and an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of the RdRp domain clearly indicates that SsMBV1 is related to Rosellinia necatrix megabirnavirus 1 (RnMBV1). L2-dsRNA/SsMBV1 comprises two nonoverlapping ORFs (ORFA and ORFB) encoding two hypothetical proteins with unknown functions. The 5'-terminal regions of L1- and L2-dsRNA/SsMBV1 share strictly conserved sequences and form stable stem-loop structures. Although L2-dsRNA/SsMBV1 is dispensable for replication, genome packaging, and pathogenicity of SsMBV1, it enhances transcript accumulation of L1-dsRNA/SsMBV1 and stability of virus-like particles (VLPs). Interestingly, a conserved papain-like protease domain similar to a multifunctional protein (p29) of Cryphonectria hypovirus 1 was detected in the ORFA-encoded protein of L2-dsRNA/SsMBV1. Phylogenetic analysis based on the protease domain suggests that horizontal gene transfer may have occurred from a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) virus (hypovirus) to a dsRNA virus, SsMBV1. Our results reveal that SsMBV1 has a slight impact on the fundamental biological characteristics of its host regardless of the presence or absence of L2-dsRNA/SsMBV1. Mycoviruses are widespread in all major fungal groups, and they possess diverse genomes of mostly ssRNA and dsRNA and, recently, circular ssDNA. Here, we have characterized a novel dsRNA virus

  18. Inertial-ordering-assisted droplet microfluidics for high-throughput single-cell RNA-sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hui-Sung; Je, Kwanghwi; Min, Jae-Woong; Park, Donghyun; Han, Kyung-Yeon; Shin, Seung-Ho; Park, Woong-Yang; Yoo, Chang Eun; Kim, Shin-Hyun

    2018-02-27

    Single-cell RNA-seq reveals the cellular heterogeneity inherent in the population of cells, which is very important in many clinical and research applications. Recent advances in droplet microfluidics have achieved the automatic isolation, lysis, and labeling of single cells in droplet compartments without complex instrumentation. However, barcoding errors occurring in the cell encapsulation process because of the multiple-beads-in-droplet and insufficient throughput because of the low concentration of beads for avoiding multiple-beads-in-a-droplet remain important challenges for precise and efficient expression profiling of single cells. In this study, we developed a new droplet-based microfluidic platform that significantly improved the throughput while reducing barcoding errors through deterministic encapsulation of inertially ordered beads. Highly concentrated beads containing oligonucleotide barcodes were spontaneously ordered in a spiral channel by an inertial effect, which were in turn encapsulated in droplets one-by-one, while cells were simultaneously encapsulated in the droplets. The deterministic encapsulation of beads resulted in a high fraction of single-bead-in-a-droplet and rare multiple-beads-in-a-droplet although the bead concentration increased to 1000 μl -1 , which diminished barcoding errors and enabled accurate high-throughput barcoding. We successfully validated our device with single-cell RNA-seq. In addition, we found that multiple-beads-in-a-droplet, generated using a normal Drop-Seq device with a high concentration of beads, underestimated transcript numbers and overestimated cell numbers. This accurate high-throughput platform can expand the capability and practicality of Drop-Seq in single-cell analysis.

  19. CRISPR library designer (CLD): software for multispecies design of single guide RNA libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heigwer, Florian; Zhan, Tianzuo; Breinig, Marco; Winter, Jan; Brügemann, Dirk; Leible, Svenja; Boutros, Michael

    2016-03-24

    Genetic screens using CRISPR/Cas9 are a powerful method for the functional analysis of genomes. Here we describe CRISPR library designer (CLD), an integrated bioinformatics application for the design of custom single guide RNA (sgRNA) libraries for all organisms with annotated genomes. CLD is suitable for the design of libraries using modified CRISPR enzymes and targeting non-coding regions. To demonstrate its utility, we perform a pooled screen for modulators of the TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) pathway using a custom library of 12,471 sgRNAs. CLD predicts a high fraction of functional sgRNAs and is publicly available at https://github.com/boutroslab/cld.

  20. Accurate quantification of microRNA via single strand displacement reaction on DNA origami motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhu

    Full Text Available DNA origami is an emerging technology that assembles hundreds of staple strands and one single-strand DNA into certain nanopattern. It has been widely used in various fields including detection of biological molecules such as DNA, RNA and proteins. MicroRNAs (miRNAs play important roles in post-transcriptional gene repression as well as many other biological processes such as cell growth and differentiation. Alterations of miRNAs' expression contribute to many human diseases. However, it is still a challenge to quantitatively detect miRNAs by origami technology. In this study, we developed a novel approach based on streptavidin and quantum dots binding complex (STV-QDs labeled single strand displacement reaction on DNA origami to quantitatively detect the concentration of miRNAs. We illustrated a linear relationship between the concentration of an exemplary miRNA as miRNA-133 and the STV-QDs hybridization efficiency; the results demonstrated that it is an accurate nano-scale miRNA quantifier motif. In addition, both symmetrical rectangular motif and asymmetrical China-map motif were tested. With significant linearity in both motifs, our experiments suggested that DNA Origami motif with arbitrary shape can be utilized in this method. Since this DNA origami-based method we developed owns the unique advantages of simple, time-and-material-saving, potentially multi-targets testing in one motif and relatively accurate for certain impurity samples as counted directly by atomic force microscopy rather than fluorescence signal detection, it may be widely used in quantification of miRNAs.

  1. Accurate Quantification of microRNA via Single Strand Displacement Reaction on DNA Origami Motif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jingyu; Li, Weidong; Li, Sheng; Zhu, Hongxin; Yang, Lun; Zhang, Aiping; He, Lin; Li, Can

    2013-01-01

    DNA origami is an emerging technology that assembles hundreds of staple strands and one single-strand DNA into certain nanopattern. It has been widely used in various fields including detection of biological molecules such as DNA, RNA and proteins. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in post-transcriptional gene repression as well as many other biological processes such as cell growth and differentiation. Alterations of miRNAs' expression contribute to many human diseases. However, it is still a challenge to quantitatively detect miRNAs by origami technology. In this study, we developed a novel approach based on streptavidin and quantum dots binding complex (STV-QDs) labeled single strand displacement reaction on DNA origami to quantitatively detect the concentration of miRNAs. We illustrated a linear relationship between the concentration of an exemplary miRNA as miRNA-133 and the STV-QDs hybridization efficiency; the results demonstrated that it is an accurate nano-scale miRNA quantifier motif. In addition, both symmetrical rectangular motif and asymmetrical China-map motif were tested. With significant linearity in both motifs, our experiments suggested that DNA Origami motif with arbitrary shape can be utilized in this method. Since this DNA origami-based method we developed owns the unique advantages of simple, time-and-material-saving, potentially multi-targets testing in one motif and relatively accurate for certain impurity samples as counted directly by atomic force microscopy rather than fluorescence signal detection, it may be widely used in quantification of miRNAs. PMID:23990889

  2. Phylogenetic relationships between Sarcocystis species from reindeer and other Sarcocystidae deduced from ssu rRNA gene sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgren, S.S.; Oliveira, Rodrigo Gouveia; Gjerde, B.

    2008-01-01

    any effect on previously inferred phylogenetic relationships within the Sarcocystidae. The complete small subunit (ssu) rRNA gene sequences of all six Sarcocystis species from reindeer were used in the phylogenetic analyses along with ssu rRNA gene sequences of 85 other members of the Coccidea. Trees...

  3. Principles of Long Noncoding RNA Evolution Derived from Direct Comparison of Transcriptomes in 17 Species

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    Hadas Hezroni

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The inability to predict long noncoding RNAs from genomic sequence has impeded the use of comparative genomics for studying their biology. Here, we develop methods that use RNA sequencing (RNA-seq data to annotate the transcriptomes of 16 vertebrates and the echinoid sea urchin, uncovering thousands of previously unannotated genes, most of which produce long intervening noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs. Although in each species, >70% of lincRNAs cannot be traced to homologs in species that diverged >50 million years ago, thousands of human lincRNAs have homologs with similar expression patterns in other species. These homologs share short, 5′-biased patches of sequence conservation nested in exonic architectures that have been extensively rewired, in part by transposable element exonization. Thus, over a thousand human lincRNAs are likely to have conserved functions in mammals, and hundreds beyond mammals, but those functions require only short patches of specific sequences and can tolerate major changes in gene architecture.

  4. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms of microRNA processing machinery genes and risk of colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Y

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Yufei Zhao, Yanming Du, Shengnan Zhao, Zhanjun GuoDepartment of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, People’s Republic of ChinaObjective: MicroRNA (miRNA-related single-nucleotide polymorphisms (miR-SNPs in miRNA processing machinery genes can affect cancer risk, treatment efficacy, and patient prognosis. We genotyped 6 miR-SNPs of miRNA processing machinery genes including XPO5 (rs11077, RAN (rs14035, Dicer (rs3742330, TNRC6B (rs9623117, GEMIN3 (rs197412, and GEMIN4 (rs2740348 in a case-control study to evaluate their impact on colorectal cancer (CRC risk.Materials and methods: miR-SNPs were genotyped using the polymerase chain reaction–ligase detection reaction. The Χ2 test was used to analyze dichotomous values, such as the presence or absence of any individual SNP in CRC patients and healthy controls.Results: Two of these SNPs were identified for their association with cancer risk in the Dicer and GEMIN3 genes. The AA allele of rs3742330 located in the Dicer gene exhibited a significantly increased risk of CRC (odds ratio, 2.11; 95% confidence interval: 1.33–3.34; P=0.001; the TT allele of rs197412 located in GEMIN3 also exhibited a significantly increased risk of CRC (odds ratio, 1.68; 95% confidence interval: 1.07–2.65; P=0.024.Conclusion: Our results suggest that the specific genetic variants in miRNA machinery genes may affect CRC susceptibility.Keywords: miR-SNP, CRC, GEMIN3, Dicer

  5. Induction of prophage lambda by chlorinated organics: Detection of some single-species/single-site carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMarini, D.M.; Brooks, H.G. (Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Twenty-eight chlorinated organic compounds were evaluated for their ability to induce DNA damage using the Microscreen prophage-induction assay in Escherichia coli. Comparison of the performance characteristics of the prophage-induction and Salmonella assays to rodent carcinogenicity assays showed that the prophage-induction assay had a somewhat higher specificity than did the Salmonella assay (70% vs. 50%); sensitivity, concordance, and positive and negative predictivity were similar for the two microbial assays. The Microscreen prophage-induction assay failed to detect eight carcinogens, perhaps due to toxicity or other unknown factors; five of these eight carcinogens were detected by the Salmonella assay. However, the prophage-induction assay did detect six carcinogens that were not detected by the Salmonella assay, and five of these were single-species, single-site carcinogens, mostly mouse liver carcinogens. Some of these carcinogens, such as the chloroethanes, produce free radicals, which may be the basis for their carcinogenicity and ability to induce prophage. The prophage-induction (or other SOS) assay may be useful in identifying some genotoxic chlorinated carcinogens that induce DNA damage that do not revert the standard Salmonella tester strains.

  6. Dinucleotide Composition in Animal RNA Viruses Is Shaped More by Virus Family than by Host Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giallonardo, Francesca; Schlub, Timothy E; Shi, Mang; Holmes, Edward C

    2017-04-15

    Viruses use the cellular machinery of their hosts for replication. It has therefore been proposed that the nucleotide and dinucleotide compositions of viruses should match those of their host species. If this is upheld, it may then be possible to use dinucleotide composition to predict the true host species of viruses sampled in metagenomic surveys. However, it is also clear that different taxonomic groups of viruses tend to have distinctive patterns of dinucleotide composition that may be independent of host species. To determine the relative strength of the effect of host versus virus family in shaping dinucleotide composition, we performed a comparative analysis of 20 RNA virus families from 15 host groupings, spanning two animal phyla and more than 900 virus species. In particular, we determined the odds ratios for the 16 possible dinucleotides and performed a discriminant analysis to evaluate the capability of virus dinucleotide composition to predict the correct virus family or host taxon from which it was isolated. Notably, while 81% of the data analyzed here were predicted to the correct virus family, only 62% of these data were predicted to their correct subphylum/class host and a mere 32% to their correct mammalian order. Similarly, dinucleotide composition has a weak predictive power for different hosts within individual virus families. We therefore conclude that dinucleotide composition is generally uniform within a virus family but less well reflects that of its host species. This has obvious implications for attempts to accurately predict host species from virus genome sequences alone. IMPORTANCE Determining the processes that shape virus genomes is central to understanding virus evolution and emergence. One question of particular importance is why nucleotide and dinucleotide frequencies differ so markedly between viruses. In particular, it is currently unclear whether host species or virus family has the biggest impact on dinucleotide frequencies and

  7. A selection of reference genes and early-warning mRNA biomarkers for environmental monitoring using Mytilus spp. as sentinel species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, C; Coquillé, V; Guyomarch, J; Auffret, M; Moraga, D

    2014-09-15

    mRNA biomarkers are promising tools for environmental health assessment and reference genes are needed to perform relevant qPCR analyses in tissue samples of sentinel species. In the present study, potential reference genes and mRNA biomarkers were tested in the gills and digestive glands of native and caged mussels (Mytilus spp.) exposed to harbor pollution. Results highlighted the difficulty to find stable reference genes in wild, non-model species and suggested the use of normalization indices instead of single genes as they exhibit a higher stability. Several target genes were found differentially expressed between mussel groups, especially in gills where cyp32, π-gst and CuZn-sod mRNA levels could be biomarker candidates. Multivariate analyses confirmed the ability of mRNA levels to highlight site-effects and suggested the use of several combined markers instead of individual ones. These findings support the use of qPCR technology and mRNA levels as early-warning biomarkers in marine monitoring programs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. High-resolution melting of 12S rRNA and cytochrome b DNA sequences for discrimination of species within distinct European animal families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Naue

    Full Text Available The cheap and easy identification of species is necessary within multiple fields of molecular biology. The use of high-resolution melting (HRM of DNA provides a fast closed-tube method for analysis of the sequence composition of the mitochondrial genes 12S rRNA and cytochrome b. We investigated the potential use of HRM for species identification within eleven different animal groups commonly found in Europe by animal-group-specific DNA amplification followed by DNA melting. Influence factors as DNA amount, additional single base alterations, and the existence of mixed samples were taken into consideration. Visual inspection combined with mathematical evaluation of the curve shapes did resolve nearly all species within an animal group. The assay can therefore not only be used for identification of animal groups and mixture analysis but also for species identification within the respective groups. The use of a universal 12S rRNA system additionally revealed a possible approach for species discrimination, mostly by exclusion. The use of the HRM assay showed to be a reliable, fast, and cheap method for species discrimination within a broad range of different animal species and can be used in a flexible "modular" manner depending on the question to be solved.

  9. Evolution of small putative group I introns in the SSU rRNA gene locus of Phialophora species

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    Harris Lorena B

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Group I introns (specifically subgroup IC1 are common in the nuclear ribosomal RNA genes of fungi. While most range in length from more than 200 to nearly 1800 nucleotides (nt in length, several small putative (or degenerate group I introns have been described that are between 56 and 81 nt. Although small, previously we demonstrated that the PaSSU intron in the rRNA small subunit gene of Phialophora americana isolate Wang 1046 is capable of in vitro splicing using a standard group I intron pathway, thus qualifying it as a functional ribozyme. Findings Here, we describe eight short putative group I introns, ranging in length from 63 to 75 nt, in the rRNA small subunit genes of Phialophora isolates, a fungal genus that ranges from saprobic to pathogenic on plants and animals. All contain putative pairing regions P1, P7, and P10, as well as a pairing region formed between the middle of the intron and part of the 3' exon. The other pairing regions common in the core of standard group I introns are absent. However, parts of the 3' exon may aid in the stabilization of these small introns. Although the eight putative group I introns were from at least three species of Phialophora, phylogenetic analysis indicated that the eight are monophyletic. They are also monophyletic with the small introns of two lichen-forming fungi, Porpidia crustulata and Arthonia lapidicola. Conclusions The small putative group I introns in Phialophora have common features that may represent group I introns at their minima. They appear to have a single origin as indicated by their monophyly in phylogenetic analyses.

  10. A Transcriptome Map of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae at Single-Nucleotide Resolution Using Deep RNA-Seq.

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    Zhipeng Su

    Full Text Available Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the pathogen of porcine contagious pleuropneumoniae, a highly contagious respiratory disease of swine. Although the genome of A. pleuropneumoniae was sequenced several years ago, limited information is available on the genome-wide transcriptional analysis to accurately annotate the gene structures and regulatory elements. High-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq has been applied to study the transcriptional landscape of bacteria, which can efficiently and accurately identify gene expression regions and unknown transcriptional units, especially small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs, UTRs and regulatory regions. The aim of this study is to comprehensively analyze the transcriptome of A. pleuropneumoniae by RNA-seq in order to improve the existing genome annotation and promote our understanding of A. pleuropneumoniae gene structures and RNA-based regulation. In this study, we utilized RNA-seq to construct a single nucleotide resolution transcriptome map of A. pleuropneumoniae. More than 3.8 million high-quality reads (average length ~90 bp from a cDNA library were generated and aligned to the reference genome. We identified 32 open reading frames encoding novel proteins that were mis-annotated in the previous genome annotations. The start sites for 35 genes based on the current genome annotation were corrected. Furthermore, 51 sRNAs in the A. pleuropneumoniae genome were discovered, of which 40 sRNAs were never reported in previous studies. The transcriptome map also enabled visualization of 5'- and 3'-UTR regions, in which contained 11 sRNAs. In addition, 351 operons covering 1230 genes throughout the whole genome were identified. The RNA-Seq based transcriptome map validated annotated genes and corrected annotations of open reading frames in the genome, and led to the identification of many functional elements (e.g. regions encoding novel proteins, non-coding sRNAs and operon structures. The transcriptional units

  11. Comprehensive Identification and Spatial Mapping of Habenular Neuronal Types Using Single-Cell RNA-Seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Shristi; Shekhar, Karthik; Regev, Aviv; Schier, Alexander F

    2018-04-02

    The identification of cell types and marker genes is critical for dissecting neural development and function, but the size and complexity of the brain has hindered the comprehensive discovery of cell types. We combined single-cell RNA-seq (scRNA-seq) with anatomical brain registration to create a comprehensive map of the zebrafish habenula, a conserved forebrain hub involved in pain processing and learning. Single-cell transcriptomes of ∼13,000 habenular cells with 4× cellular coverage identified 18 neuronal types and dozens of marker genes. Registration of marker genes onto a reference atlas created a resource for anatomical and functional studies and enabled the mapping of active neurons onto neuronal types following aversive stimuli. Strikingly, despite brain growth and functional maturation, cell types were retained between the larval and adult habenula. This study provides a gene expression atlas to dissect habenular development and function and offers a general framework for the comprehensive characterization of other brain regions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Beyond 16S rRNA Community Profiling: Intra-Species Diversity in the Gut Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellegaard, Kirsten M; Engel, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Interactions with microbes affect many aspects of animal biology, including immune system development, nutrition and health. In vertebrates, the gut microbiota is dominated by a small subset of phyla, but the species composition within these phyla is typically not conserved. Moreover, several recent studies have shown that bacterial species in the gut are composed of a multitude of strains, which frequently co-exist in their host, and may be host-specific. However, since the study of intra-species diversity is challenging, particularly in the setting of complex, host-associated microbial communities, our current understanding of the distribution, evolution and functional relevance of intra-species diversity in the gut is scarce. In order to unravel how genomic diversity translates into phenotypic diversity, community analyses going beyond 16S rRNA profiling, in combination with experimental approaches, are needed. Recently, the honeybee has emerged as a promising model for studying gut bacterial communities, particularly in terms of strain-level diversity. Unlike most other invertebrates, the honeybee gut is colonized by a remarkably consistent and specific core microbiota, which is dominated by only eight bacterial species. As for the vertebrate gut microbiota, these species are composed of highly diverse strains suggesting that similar evolutionary forces shape gut community structures in vertebrates and social insects. In this review, we outline current knowledge on the evolution and functional relevance of strain diversity within the gut microbiota, including recent insights gained from mammals and other animals such as the honeybee. We discuss methodological approaches and propose possible future avenues for studying strain diversity in complex bacterial communities.

  13. Patterns and plasticity in RNA-protein interactions enable recruitment of multiple proteins through a single site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valley, Cary T.; Porter, Douglas F.; Qiu, Chen; Campbell, Zachary T.; Hall, Traci M. Tanaka; Wickens, Marvin

    2012-01-01

    mRNA control hinges on the specificity and affinity of proteins for their RNA binding sites. Regulatory proteins must bind their own sites and reject even closely related noncognate sites. In the PUF [Pumilio and fem-3 binding factor (FBF)] family of RNA binding proteins, individual proteins discriminate differences in the length and sequence of binding sites, allowing each PUF to bind a distinct battery of mRNAs. Here, we show that despite these differences, the pattern of RNA interactions is conserved among PUF proteins: the two ends of the PUF protein make critical contacts with the two ends of the RNA sites. Despite this conserved “two-handed” pattern of recognition, the RNA sequence is flexible. Among the binding sites of yeast Puf4p, RNA sequence dictates the pattern in which RNA bases are flipped away from the binding surface of the protein. Small differences in RNA sequence allow new modes of control, recruiting Puf5p in addition to Puf4p to a single site. This embedded information adds a new layer of biological meaning to the connections between RNA targets and PUF proteins. PMID:22467831

  14. A structurally based analytic model of growth and biomass dynamics in single species stands of conifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin J. Tausch

    2015-01-01

    A theoretically based analytic model of plant growth in single species conifer communities based on the species fully occupying a site and fully using the site resources is introduced. Model derivations result in a single equation simultaneously describes changes over both, different site conditions (or resources available), and over time for each variable for each...

  15. Improved identification of Gordonia, Rhodococcus and Tsukamurella species by 5'-end 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Kong, Fanrong; Chen, Sharon; Xiao, Meng; Sorrell, Tania; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Shuo; Sintchenko, Vitali

    2011-01-01

    The identification of fastidious aerobic Actinomycetes such as Gordonia, Rhodococcus, and Tsukamurella has remained a challenge leading to clinically significant misclassifications. This study is intended to examine the feasibility of partial 5'-end 16S rRNA gene sequencing for the identification of Gordonia, Rhodococcus, and Tsukamurella, and defined potential reference sequences for species from each of these genera. The 16S rRNA gene sequence based identification algorithm for species identification was used and enhanced by aligning test sequences with reference sequences from the List of Prokaryotic Names with Standing in Nomenclature. Conventional PCR based 16S rRNA gene sequencing and the alignment of the isolate 16S rRNA gene sequence with reference sequences accurately identified 100% of clinical strains of aerobic Actinomycetes. While partial 16S rRNA gene sequences of reference type strains matched with the 16S rRNA gene sequences of 19 isolates in our data set, another 13 strains demonstrated a degree of polymorphism with a 1-4 bp difference in the regions of difference. 5'-end 606 bp 16S rRNA gene sequencing, coupled with the assignment of well defined reference sequences to clinically relevant species of bacteria, can be a useful strategy for improving the identification of clinically relevant aerobic Actinomycetes.

  16. Defining reference sequences for Nocardia species by similarity and clustering analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequence data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal Helal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The intra- and inter-species genetic diversity of bacteria and the absence of 'reference', or the most representative, sequences of individual species present a significant challenge for sequence-based identification. The aims of this study were to determine the utility, and compare the performance of several clustering and classification algorithms to identify the species of 364 sequences of 16S rRNA gene with a defined species in GenBank, and 110 sequences of 16S rRNA gene with no defined species, all within the genus Nocardia. METHODS: A total of 364 16S rRNA gene sequences of Nocardia species were studied. In addition, 110 16S rRNA gene sequences assigned only to the Nocardia genus level at the time of submission to GenBank were used for machine learning classification experiments. Different clustering algorithms were compared with a novel algorithm or the linear mapping (LM of the distance matrix. Principal Components Analysis was used for the dimensionality reduction and visualization. RESULTS: The LM algorithm achieved the highest performance and classified the set of 364 16S rRNA sequences into 80 clusters, the majority of which (83.52% corresponded with the original species. The most representative 16S rRNA sequences for individual Nocardia species have been identified as 'centroids' in respective clusters from which the distances to all other sequences were minimized; 110 16S rRNA gene sequences with identifications recorded only at the genus level were classified using machine learning methods. Simple kNN machine learning demonstrated the highest performance and classified Nocardia species sequences with an accuracy of 92.7% and a mean frequency of 0.578. CONCLUSION: The identification of centroids of 16S rRNA gene sequence clusters using novel distance matrix clustering enables the identification of the most representative sequences for each individual species of Nocardia and allows the quantitation of inter- and intra-species

  17. Gordonia species: emerging pathogens in pediatric patients that are identified by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaschke, Anne J; Bender, Jeffrey; Byington, Carrie L; Korgenski, Kent; Daly, Judy; Petti, Cathy A; Pavia, Andrew T; Ampofo, Krow

    2007-08-15

    Gordonia species are emerging pathogens that are often misidentified as Rhodococcus or Nocardia species but are reliably distinguished by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. We present a case series of 6 episodes of catheter-associated infection caused by Gordonia species in 5 patients seen at a tertiary care pediatric hospital and describe the management and outcomes of this infection in adults and children.

  18. Species distribution modelling for plant communities: Stacked single species or multivariate modelling approaches?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emilie B. Henderson; Janet L. Ohmann; Matthew J. Gregory; Heather M. Roberts; Harold S.J. Zald

    2014-01-01

    Landscape management and conservation planning require maps of vegetation composition and structure over large regions. Species distribution models (SDMs) are often used for individual species, but projects mapping multiple species are rarer. We compare maps of plant community composition assembled by stacking results from many SDMs with multivariate maps constructed...

  19. Changes in growth hormone (GH) messenger RNA (GH mRNA) expression in the rat anterior pituitary after single interferon (IFN) alpha administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanowski, W.; Braczkowski, R.; Nowakowska-Zajdel, E.; Muc-Wierzgon, M.; Zubelewicz-Szkodzinska, B.; Kosiewicz, J.; Korzonek, I.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Interferon a (IFN-a) is a cytokine with pleiotropic effects which, via different pathways, influences the secretion of certain cytokines and hormones. Growth hormone (GH) secreted from the pituitary has physiological effects on various target tissues. The question is how IFN-a administered in various types of disease influences GH secretion. This study investigated the acute effect of IFN-a on GH mRNA expression in the rat anterior pituitary. Objective: The aim of the study was to measure the cellular expression of GH mRNA by in situ hybridisation in the anterior pituitary after a single administration of IFN-a. Material and methods: Rats were administered an intraperitoneal injection of IFN-a or saline. The rat pituitaries were taken 2 and 4 hours after IFN/saline administration and kept frozen until in situ hybridisation histochemistry. A 31 - base 35S -labelled oligonucleotide probe complementary to part of the exonic mRNA sequence coding for GH mRNA was used. All control and experimental sections were hybridised in the same hybridisation reaction. Results: Acute administration of interferon a increased GH mRNA expression in the anterior pituitary in the 4-hour group in comparison with the control group, and there was no difference between the control group and the 2-hour rats. Conclusion: A single IFN-a administration was found to exert an influence on anterior pituitary GH mRNA expression. These observations may pave the way for presenting a possible new action of IFN-a. (author) GH mRNA, anterior pituitary, interferon

  20. RNA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    30 nov. 2013 ... RÉSUMÉ. Objectif : La présente étude est conduite dans les régions de Maradi et Zinder situées dans le Centre-Sud du. Niger où la pratique de la régénération naturelle assistée des ligneux dans les champs (RNA) a permis de reverdir plus de 5 millions d'hectares. Le but de ce travail est d'évaluer ...

  1. Single Cell Analysis Linking Ribosomal (r)DNA and rRNA Copy Numbers to Cell Size and Growth Rate Provides Insights into Molecular Protistan Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Rao; Gong, Jun

    2017-11-01

    Ribosomal (r)RNA and rDNA have been golden molecular markers in microbial ecology. However, it remains poorly understood how ribotype copy number (CN)-based characteristics are linked with diversity, abundance, and activity of protist populations and communities observed at organismal levels. Here, we applied a single-cell approach to quantify ribotype CNs in two ciliate species reared at different temperatures. We found that in actively growing cells, the per-cell rDNA and rRNA CNs scaled with cell volume (CV) to 0.44 and 0.58 powers, respectively. The modeled rDNA and rRNA concentrations thus appear to be much higher in smaller than in larger cells. The observed rRNA:rDNA ratio scaled with CV 0.14 . The maximum growth rate could be well predicted by a combination of per-cell ribotype CN and temperature. Our empirical data and modeling on single-cell ribotype scaling are in agreement with both the metabolic theory of ecology and the growth rate hypothesis, providing a quantitative framework for linking cellular rDNA and rRNA CNs with body size, growth (activity), and biomass stoichiometry. This study also demonstrates that the expression rate of rRNA genes is constrained by cell size, and favors biomass rather than abundance-based interpretation of quantitative ribotype data in population and community ecology of protists. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society of Protistologists.

  2. Efficient recovery of whole blood RNA - a comparison of commercial RNA extraction protocols for high-throughput applications in wildlife species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwochow Doreen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the emergence of next generation sequencing platforms, unprecedented opportunities have arisen in the study of natural vertebrate populations. In particular, insights into the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of adaptation can be revealed through study of the expression profiles of genes. However, as a pre-requisite to expression profiling, care must be taken in RNA preparation as factors like DNA contamination, RNA integrity or transcript abundance can affect downstream applications. Here, we evaluated five commonly used RNA extraction methods using whole blood sampled under varying conditions from 20 wild carnivores. Results Despite the use of minute starting volumes, all methods produced quantifiable RNA extracts (1.4 – 18.4 μg with varying integrity (RIN 4.6 - 7.7, the latter being significantly affected by the storage and extraction method used. We observed a significant overall effect of the extraction method on DNA contamination. One particular extraction method, the LeukoLOCK™ filter system, yielded high RNA integrity along with low DNA contamination and efficient depletion of hemoglobin transcripts highly abundant in whole blood. In a proof of concept sequencing experiment, we found globin RNA transcripts to occupy up to ¼ of all sequencing reads if libraries were not depleted of hemoglobin prior to sequencing. Conclusion By carefully choosing the appropriate RNA extraction method, whole blood can become a valuable source for high-throughput applications like expression arrays or transcriptome sequencing from natural populations. Additionally, candidate genes showing signs of selection could subsequently be genotyped in large population samples using whole blood as a source for RNA without harming individuals from rare or endangered species.

  3. Cellular Taxonomy of the Mouse Striatum as Revealed by Single-Cell RNA-Seq

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    Ozgun Gokce

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The striatum contributes to many cognitive processes and disorders, but its cell types are incompletely characterized. We show that microfluidic and FACS-based single-cell RNA sequencing of mouse striatum provides a well-resolved classification of striatal cell type diversity. Transcriptome analysis revealed ten differentiated, distinct cell types, including neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, ependymal, immune, and vascular cells, and enabled the discovery of numerous marker genes. Furthermore, we identified two discrete subtypes of medium spiny neurons (MSNs that have specific markers and that overexpress genes linked to cognitive disorders and addiction. We also describe continuous cellular identities, which increase heterogeneity within discrete cell types. Finally, we identified cell type-specific transcription and splicing factors that shape cellular identities by regulating splicing and expression patterns. Our findings suggest that functional diversity within a complex tissue arises from a small number of discrete cell types, which can exist in a continuous spectrum of functional states.

  4. Conserved properties of dentate gyrus neurogenesis across postnatal development revealed by single-cell RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochgerner, Hannah; Zeisel, Amit; Lönnerberg, Peter; Linnarsson, Sten

    2018-02-01

    The dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is a brain region in which neurogenesis persists into adulthood; however, the relationship between developmental and adult dentate gyrus neurogenesis has not been examined in detail. Here we used single-cell RNA sequencing to reveal the molecular dynamics and diversity of dentate gyrus cell types in perinatal, juvenile, and adult mice. We found distinct quiescent and proliferating progenitor cell types, linked by transient intermediate states to neuroblast stages and fully mature granule cells. We observed shifts in the molecular identity of quiescent and proliferating radial glia and granule cells during the postnatal period that were then maintained through adult stages. In contrast, intermediate progenitor cells, neuroblasts, and immature granule cells were nearly indistinguishable at all ages. These findings demonstrate the fundamental similarity of postnatal and adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus and pinpoint the early postnatal transformation of radial glia from embryonic progenitors to adult quiescent stem cells.

  5. Repeated Aurora-A siRNA Transfection Results in Effective Apoptosis of A549 Cells Compared to Single Transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhonghua; Sun, Wenwu; Cao, Jianping; Cui, Haiyang; Ma, Zhuang

    2016-01-01

    Suppression of Aurora kinase A (Aurora-A, AURKA) by Aurora-A siRNA has been proposed for lung tumor treatment. However, protocols using single administration have shown little benefit in some types of lung tumor. Given that transfection efficiency of Aurora-A siRNA is low due to tightly packed cells in the tumor, we hypothesized that repeated administration would result in efficient cell apoptosis. We compared single vs. repeated transfection (thrice) in A549 cells by transfecting Aurora-A siRNA (siA) on the 1st or 1st, 2nd and 3rd day after cell seeding. A random sequence was used as the negative siRNA control (siC). Cells in the single transfection group received only transfection reagent without siRNAs on the 2nd and 3rd day. Two days after the third transfection, both single and repeated siA administration decreased mRNA expression of Aurora-A and cell viability compared to no administration and siC single administration. However, the decrease in these two indices with repeated transfection was more obvious than that following single administration: cell viability decreased to 72.8 ± 3.05% (p transfection and to 64.2 ± 1.99% (p transfection, compared with normal control cells, respectively. Gene expression decreased to 17 ± 16.6% (p transfection and to 43.2 ± 13.0% (p transfection. Compared to single transfection, repeated Aurora-A siRNA transfection decreased Aurora-A, which, in turn, resulted in effective apoptosis of A549 cells.

  6. Selective binding and reverse transcription inhibition of single-strand poly(A) RNA by metal TMPyP complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhu-Xin; Gao, Feng; Chen, Xing; Tian, Xiang-Jing; Ji, Liang-Nian

    2014-10-06

    Ni-, Cu-, and Zn-TMPyP are capable of binding to single-strand poly(A) RNA with high preference and affinity and inhibiting the reverse transcription of RNA by both M-MuLV and HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. With 10 nM azidothymidine, the IC50 value of M-TMPyP could be lowered to 10(-1) μM order.

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of subgenus vigna species using nuclear ribosomal RNA ITS: evidence of hybridization among Vigna unguiculata subspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijaykumar, Archana; Saini, Ajay; Jawali, Narendra

    2010-01-01

    Molecular phylogeny among species belonging to subgenus Vigna (genus Vigna) was inferred based on internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of 18S-5.8S-26S ribosomal RNA gene unit. Analysis showed a total of 356 polymorphic sites of which approximately 80% were parsimony informative. Phylogenetic reconstruction by neighbor joining and maximum parsimony methods placed the 57 Vigna accessions (belonging to 15 species) into 5 major clades. Five species viz. Vigna heterophylla, Vigna pubigera, Vigna parkeri, Vigna laurentii, and Vigna gracilis whose position in the subgenus was previously not known were placed in the section Vigna. A single accession (Vigna unguiculata ssp. tenuis, NI 1637) harbored 2 intragenomic ITS variants, indicative of 2 different types of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) repeat units. ITS variant type-I was close to ITS from V. unguiculata ssp. pubescens, whereas type-II was close to V. unguiculata ssp. tenuis. Transcript analysis clearly demonstrates that in accession NI 1637, rDNA repeat units with only type-II ITS variants are transcriptionally active. Evidence from sequence analysis (of 5.8S, ITS1, and ITS2) and secondary structure analysis (of ITS1 and ITS2) indicates that the type-I ITS variant probably does not belong to the pseudogenic rDNA repeat units. The results from phylogenetic and transcript analysis suggest that the rDNA units with the type-I ITS may have introgressed as a result of hybridization (between ssp. tenuis and ssp. pubescens); however, it has been epigenetically silenced. The results also demonstrate differential evolution of ITS sequence among wild and cultivated forms of V. unguiculata.

  8. Isolation of RNA from tumor samples: single-step guanidinium acid-phenol method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Naomi; Leek, Russell

    2006-01-01

    The guanidinium acid-phenol method of RNA extraction is relatively fast (4 h) and is useful for the processing of large numbers of samples, without the need for ultracentrifugation. This protocol produces total RNA that includes ribosomal, transfer, and messenger RNA. This high-quality RNA is suitable for Northern blot analysis, dot-blot hybridization, poly (A) RNA selection, in vitro translation, cDNA library construction, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, ribonuclease protection assay, and primer extension experiments.

  9. Single nucleotide polymorphism discovery in bovine liver using RNA-seq technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Shekhar Pareek

    Full Text Available RNA-seq is a useful next-generation sequencing (NGS technology that has been widely used to understand mammalian transcriptome architecture and function. In this study, a breed-specific RNA-seq experiment was utilized to detect putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in liver tissue of young bulls of the Polish Red, Polish Holstein-Friesian (HF and Hereford breeds, and to understand the genomic variation in the three cattle breeds that may reflect differences in production traits.The RNA-seq experiment on bovine liver produced 107,114,4072 raw paired-end reads, with an average of approximately 60 million paired-end reads per library. Breed-wise, a total of 345.06, 290.04 and 436.03 million paired-end reads were obtained from the Polish Red, Polish HF, and Hereford breeds, respectively. Burrows-Wheeler Aligner (BWA read alignments showed that 81.35%, 82.81% and 84.21% of the mapped sequencing reads were properly paired to the Polish Red, Polish HF, and Hereford breeds, respectively. This study identified 5,641,401 SNPs and insertion and deletion (indel positions expressed in the bovine liver with an average of 313,411 SNPs and indel per young bull. Following the removal of the indel mutations, a total of 195,3804, 152,7120 and 205,3184 raw SNPs expressed in bovine liver were identified for the Polish Red, Polish HF, and Hereford breeds, respectively. Breed-wise, three highly reliable breed-specific SNP-databases (SNP-dbs with 31,562, 24,945 and 28,194 SNP records were constructed for the Polish Red, Polish HF, and Hereford breeds, respectively. Using a combination of stringent parameters of a minimum depth of ≥10 mapping reads that support the polymorphic nucleotide base and 100% SNP ratio, 4,368, 3,780 and 3,800 SNP records were detected in the Polish Red, Polish HF, and Hereford breeds, respectively. The SNP detections using RNA-seq data were successfully validated by kompetitive allele-specific PCR (KASPTM SNP genotyping assay. The

  10. Single nucleotide polymorphism discovery in bovine liver using RNA-seq technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareek, Chandra Shekhar; Błaszczyk, Paweł; Dziuba, Piotr; Czarnik, Urszula; Fraser, Leyland; Sobiech, Przemysław; Pierzchała, Mariusz; Feng, Yaping; Kadarmideen, Haja N.; Kumar, Dibyendu

    2017-01-01

    Background RNA-seq is a useful next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology that has been widely used to understand mammalian transcriptome architecture and function. In this study, a breed-specific RNA-seq experiment was utilized to detect putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in liver tissue of young bulls of the Polish Red, Polish Holstein-Friesian (HF) and Hereford breeds, and to understand the genomic variation in the three cattle breeds that may reflect differences in production traits. Results The RNA-seq experiment on bovine liver produced 107,114,4072 raw paired-end reads, with an average of approximately 60 million paired-end reads per library. Breed-wise, a total of 345.06, 290.04 and 436.03 million paired-end reads were obtained from the Polish Red, Polish HF, and Hereford breeds, respectively. Burrows-Wheeler Aligner (BWA) read alignments showed that 81.35%, 82.81% and 84.21% of the mapped sequencing reads were properly paired to the Polish Red, Polish HF, and Hereford breeds, respectively. This study identified 5,641,401 SNPs and insertion and deletion (indel) positions expressed in the bovine liver with an average of 313,411 SNPs and indel per young bull. Following the removal of the indel mutations, a total of 195,3804, 152,7120 and 205,3184 raw SNPs expressed in bovine liver were identified for the Polish Red, Polish HF, and Hereford breeds, respectively. Breed-wise, three highly reliable breed-specific SNP-databases (SNP-dbs) with 31,562, 24,945 and 28,194 SNP records were constructed for the Polish Red, Polish HF, and Hereford breeds, respectively. Using a combination of stringent parameters of a minimum depth of ≥10 mapping reads that support the polymorphic nucleotide base and 100% SNP ratio, 4,368, 3,780 and 3,800 SNP records were detected in the Polish Red, Polish HF, and Hereford breeds, respectively. The SNP detections using RNA-seq data were successfully validated by kompetitive allele-specific PCR (KASPTM) SNP genotyping assay

  11. Single- and multi-photon ionization studies of organosulfur species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Yu -San [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-02-12

    Accurate ionization energies (IE`s) for molecular species are used for prediction of chemical reactivity and are of fundamental importance to chemists. The IE of a gaseous molecule can be determined routinely in a photoionization or a photoelectron experiment. IE determinations made in conventional photoionization and photoelectron studies have uncertainties in the range of 3--100 meV (25--250 cm-1). In the past decade, the most exciting development in the field of photoionization and photoelectron spectroscopy has been the availability of high resolution, tunable ultraviolet (UV) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser sources. The laser pulsed field ionization photoelectron (PFI-PE) scheme is currently the state-of-the-art photoelectron spectroscopic technique and is capable of providing photoelectron energy resolution close to the optical resolution. The author has focused attention on the photoionization processes of some sulfur-containing species. The studies of the photoionization and photodissociation on sulfur-containing compounds [such as CS2, CH3SH, CH3SSCH3, CH3CH2SCH2CH3, HSCH2CH2SH and C4H4S (thiophene) and sulfur-containing radicals, such as HS, CS, CH3S, CH3CH2S and CH3SS], have been the major subjects in the group because sulfur is an important species contributing to air pollution in the atmosphere. The modeling of the combustion and oxidation of sulfur compounds represents important steps for the control of both the production and the elimination of sulfur-containing pollutants. Chapter 1 is a general introduction of the thesis. Chapters 2 and 6 contain five papers published in, or accepted for publication in, academic periodicals. In Chapter 7, the progress of the construction in the laboratory of a new vacuum ultraviolet laser system equipped with a reflectron mass

  12. The distribution of fitness effects caused by single-nucleotide substitutions in an RNA virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjuán, Rafael; Moya, Andrés; Elena, Santiago F.

    2004-01-01

    Little is known about the mutational fitness effects associated with single-nucleotide substitutions on RNA viral genomes. Here, we used site-directed mutagenesis to create 91 single mutant clones of vesicular stomatitis virus derived from a common ancestral cDNA and performed competition experiments to measure the relative fitness of each mutant. The distribution of nonlethal deleterious effects was highly skewed and had a long, flat tail. As expected, fitness effects depended on whether mutations were chosen at random or reproduced previously described ones. The effect of random deleterious mutations was well described by a log-normal distribution, with -19% reduction of average fitness; the effects distribution of preobserved deleterious mutations was better explained by a β model. The fit of both models was improved when combined with a uniform distribution. Up to 40% of random mutations were lethal. The proportion of beneficial mutations was unexpectedly high. Beneficial effects followed a γ distribution, with expected fitness increases of 1% for random mutations and 5% for preobserved mutations. PMID:15159545

  13. Genome-wide Single-Molecule Footprinting Reveals High RNA Polymerase II Turnover at Paused Promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Arnaud R; Imanci, Dilek; Hoerner, Leslie; Gaidatzis, Dimos; Burger, Lukas; Schübeler, Dirk

    2017-08-03

    Transcription initiation entails chromatin opening followed by pre-initiation complex formation and RNA polymerase II recruitment. Subsequent polymerase elongation requires additional signals, resulting in increased residence time downstream of the start site, a phenomenon referred to as pausing. Here, we harnessed single-molecule footprinting to quantify distinct steps of initiation in vivo throughout the Drosophila genome. This identifies the impact of promoter structure on initiation dynamics in relation to nucleosomal occupancy. Additionally, perturbation of transcriptional initiation reveals an unexpectedly high turnover of polymerases at paused promoters-an observation confirmed at the level of nascent RNAs. These observations argue that absence of elongation is largely caused by premature termination rather than by stable polymerase stalling. In support of this non-processive model, we observe that induction of the paused heat shock promoter depends on continuous initiation. Our study provides a framework to quantify protein binding at single-molecule resolution and refines concepts of transcriptional pausing. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Microencapsulation of single-cell protein from various microalgae species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purnama Sukardi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of the research was to evaluate nutritional values of microencapsulated diet made from single cell protein of microalgae. Complete randomized design was applied using three different types of microalgae for inclusion trials i.e. (A Nannochloropsis sp., (B Chlorella sp., and (C Spirulina sp. with five replications respectively. Microencapsulated diet was produced by a modification method based on thermal cross-linking with stable temperature. Phytoplankton was cultured in sea water for which fertilized by a modification of Walne and Guillard fertilizer. The results showed that the highest value of nutrition content was Spirulina sp. and the average composition of protein, crude lipid, carbohydrate, ash, nitrogen free extract, and water content was 34.80%, 0.30%, 18.53%, 20.09%, 26.29%, and 13.32%, respectively. Organoleptically, microcapsule showed that the color of capsule was dark green and smell fresh phytoplankton. Keywords: microcapsule, single-cell protein, thermal cross-linking, microalgae, phytoplankton  ABSTRAK Tujuan penelitian adalah mengevaluasi kandungan nutrisi pakan mikrokapsul protein sel tunggal (single cell protein yang berasal dari berbagai jenis mikroalga (fitoplankton. Rancangan percobaan yang digunakan adalah rancangan acak lengkap, dengan perlakuan inklusi mikrokapsul dari jenis fitoplankton (A Nannochloropsis sp., (B Chlorella sp., dan (C Spirulina sp., masing-masing diulang lima kali. Pembuatan mikrokapsul dilakukan dengan menggunakan modifikasi metode dasar thermal cross-linking, serta menerapkan teknik pengeringan suhu konstan. Proses pembuatan mikrokapsul protein diawali dengan kultur fitoplankton jenis Nannochloropsis sp., Chlorella sp., dan Spirulina sp. Kultur dilakukan di dalam laboratorium menggunakan media air laut dan modifikasi pupuk Walne dan Guillard. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa kandungan nutrisi tertinggi terdapat pada jenis mikrokapsul protein sel tunggal yang berasal dari

  15. Effects of single-base substitutions within the acanthamoeba castellanii rRNA promoter on transcription and on binding of transcription initiation factor and RNA polymerase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kownin, P.; Bateman, E.; Paule, M.R.

    1988-02-01

    Single-point mutations were introduced into the promoter region of the Acanthamoeba castellanii rRNA gene by chemical mutagen treatment of a single-stranded clone in vitro, followed by reverse transcription and cloning of the altered fragment. The promoter mutants were tested for transcription initiation factor (TIF) binding by a template commitment assay plus DNase I footprinting and for transcription by an in vitro runoff assay. Point mutations within the previously identified TIF interaction region (between -20 and -47, motifs A and B) indicated that TIF interacts most strongly with a sequence centered at -29 and less tightly with sequences upstream and downstream. Some alterations of the base sequence closer to the transcription start site (and outside the TIF-protected site) also significantly decrease specific RNA synthesis in vitro. These were within the region which is protected from DNAse I digestion by polymerase I, but these mutations did not detectably affect the binding of polymerase to the promoter.

  16. Exploring internal features of 16S rRNA gene for identification of clinically relevant species of the genus Streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Devi; Verma, Mansi; Lal, Rup

    2011-06-25

    Streptococcus is an economically important genus as a number of species belonging to this genus are human and animal pathogens. The genus has been divided into different groups based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. The variability observed among the members of these groups is low and it is difficult to distinguish them. The present study was taken up to explore 16S rRNA gene sequence to develop methods that can be used for preliminary identification and can supplement the existing methods for identification of clinically-relevant isolates of the genus Streptococcus. 16S rRNA gene sequences belonging to the isolates of S. dysgalactiae, S. equi, S. pyogenes, S. agalactiae, S. bovis, S. gallolyticus, S. mutans, S. sobrinus, S. mitis, S. pneumoniae, S. thermophilus and S. anginosus were analyzed with the purpose to define genetic variability within each species to generate a phylogenetic framework, to identify species-specific signatures and in-silico restriction enzyme analysis. The framework based analysis was used to segregate Streptococcus spp. previously identified upto genus level. This segregation was validated using species-specific signatures and in-silico restriction enzyme analysis. 43 uncharacterized Streptococcus spp. could be identified using this approach. The markers generated exploring 16S rRNA gene sequences provided useful tool that can be further used for identification of different species of the genus Streptococcus.

  17. Exploring internal features of 16S rRNA gene for identification of clinically relevant species of the genus Streptococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verma Mansi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus is an economically important genus as a number of species belonging to this genus are human and animal pathogens. The genus has been divided into different groups based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. The variability observed among the members of these groups is low and it is difficult to distinguish them. The present study was taken up to explore 16S rRNA gene sequence to develop methods that can be used for preliminary identification and can supplement the existing methods for identification of clinically-relevant isolates of the genus Streptococcus. Methods 16S rRNA gene sequences belonging to the isolates of S. dysgalactiae, S. equi, S. pyogenes, S. agalactiae, S. bovis, S. gallolyticus, S. mutans, S. sobrinus, S. mitis, S. pneumoniae, S. thermophilus and S. anginosus were analyzed with the purpose to define genetic variability within each species to generate a phylogenetic framework, to identify species-specific signatures and in-silico restriction enzyme analysis. Results The framework based analysis was used to segregate Streptococcus spp. previously identified upto genus level. This segregation was validated using species-specific signatures and in-silico restriction enzyme analysis. 43 uncharacterized Streptococcus spp. could be identified using this approach. Conclusions The markers generated exploring 16S rRNA gene sequences provided useful tool that can be further used for identification of different species of the genus Streptococcus.

  18. Exploring internal features of 16S rRNA gene for identification of clinically relevant species of the genus Streptococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Streptococcus is an economically important genus as a number of species belonging to this genus are human and animal pathogens. The genus has been divided into different groups based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. The variability observed among the members of these groups is low and it is difficult to distinguish them. The present study was taken up to explore 16S rRNA gene sequence to develop methods that can be used for preliminary identification and can supplement the existing methods for identification of clinically-relevant isolates of the genus Streptococcus. Methods 16S rRNA gene sequences belonging to the isolates of S. dysgalactiae, S. equi, S. pyogenes, S. agalactiae, S. bovis, S. gallolyticus, S. mutans, S. sobrinus, S. mitis, S. pneumoniae, S. thermophilus and S. anginosus were analyzed with the purpose to define genetic variability within each species to generate a phylogenetic framework, to identify species-specific signatures and in-silico restriction enzyme analysis. Results The framework based analysis was used to segregate Streptococcus spp. previously identified upto genus level. This segregation was validated using species-specific signatures and in-silico restriction enzyme analysis. 43 uncharacterized Streptococcus spp. could be identified using this approach. Conclusions The markers generated exploring 16S rRNA gene sequences provided useful tool that can be further used for identification of different species of the genus Streptococcus. PMID:21702978

  19. ASAP: a web-based platform for the analysis and interactive visualization of single-cell RNA-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardeux, Vincent; David, Fabrice P A; Shajkofci, Adrian; Schwalie, Petra C; Deplancke, Bart

    2017-10-01

    Single-cell RNA-sequencing (scRNA-seq) allows whole transcriptome profiling of thousands of individual cells, enabling the molecular exploration of tissues at the cellular level. Such analytical capacity is of great interest to many research groups in the world, yet these groups often lack the expertise to handle complex scRNA-seq datasets. We developed a fully integrated, web-based platform aimed at the complete analysis of scRNA-seq data post genome alignment: from the parsing, filtering and normalization of the input count data files, to the visual representation of the data, identification of cell clusters, differentially expressed genes (including cluster-specific marker genes), and functional gene set enrichment. This Automated Single-cell Analysis Pipeline (ASAP) combines a wide range of commonly used algorithms with sophisticated visualization tools. Compared with existing scRNA-seq analysis platforms, researchers (including those lacking computational expertise) are able to interact with the data in a straightforward fashion and in real time. Furthermore, given the overlap between scRNA-seq and bulk RNA-seq analysis workflows, ASAP should conceptually be broadly applicable to any RNA-seq dataset. As a validation, we demonstrate how we can use ASAP to simply reproduce the results from a single-cell study of 91 mouse cells involving five distinct cell types. The tool is freely available at asap.epfl.ch and R/Python scripts are available at github.com/DeplanckeLab/ASAP. bart.deplancke@epfl.ch. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. Elevation in heat shock protein 72 mRNA following contractions in isolated single skeletal muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stary, Creed M; Walsh, Brandon J; Knapp, Amy E; Brafman, David; Hogan, Michael C

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was 1) to develop a stable model for measuring contraction-induced elevations in mRNA in single skeletal muscle fibers and 2) to utilize this model to investigate the response of heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) mRNA following an acute bout of fatiguing contractions. Living, intact skeletal muscle fibers were microdissected from lumbrical muscle of Xenopus laevis and either electrically stimulated for 15 min of tetanic contractions (EX; n=26) or not stimulated to contract (REST; n=14). The relative mean developed tension of EX fibers decreased to 29+/-7% of initial peak tension at the stimulation end point. Following treatment, individual fibers were allowed to recover for 1 (n=9), 2 (n=8), or 4 h (n=9) prior to isolation of total cellular mRNA. HSP72, HSP60, and cardiac alpha-actin mRNA content were then assessed in individual fibers using quantitative PCR detection. Relative HSP72 mRNA content was significantly (Pelevated at the 2-h postcontraction time point relative to REST fibers when normalized to either HSP60 (18.5+/-7.5-fold) or cardiac alpha-actin (14.7+/-4.3-fold), although not at the 1- or 4-h time points. These data indicate that 1) extraction of RNA followed by relative quantification of mRNA of select genes in isolated single skeletal muscle fibers can be reliably performed, 2) HSP60 and cardiac alpha-actin are suitable endogenous normalizing genes in skeletal muscle following contractions, and 3) a significantly elevated content of HSP72 mRNA is detectable in skeletal muscle 2 h after a single bout of fatiguing contractions, despite minimal temperature changes and without influence from extracellular sources.

  1. Role of plant MicroRNA in cross-species regulatory networks of humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Li, Yanpu; Liu, Yuanning; Liu, Haiming; Wang, Hongyu; Jin, Wen; Zhang, Yanmei; Zhang, Chao; Xu, Dong

    2016-08-08

    It has been found that microRNAs (miRNAs) can function as a regulatory factor across species. For example, food-derived plant miRNAs may pass through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, enter into the plasma and serum of mammals, and interact with endogenous RNAs to regulate their expression. Although this new type of regulatory mechanism is not well understood, it provides a fresh look at the relationship between food consumption and physiology. To investigate this new type of mechanism, we conducted a systematic computational study to analyze the potential functions of these dietary miRNAs in the human body. In this paper, we predicted human and plant target genes using RNAhybrid and set some criteria to further filter them. Then we built the cross-species regulatory network according to the filtered targets, extracted central nodes by PageRank algorithm and built core modules. We summarized the functions of these modules to three major categories: ion transport, metabolic process and stress response, and especially some target genes are highly related to ion transport, polysaccharides and the lipid metabolic process. Through functional analysis, we found that human and plants have similar functions such as ion transport and stress response, so our study also indicates the existence of a close link between exogenous plant miRNA targets and digestive/urinary organs. According to our analysis results, we suggest that the ingestion of these plant miRNAs may have a functional impact on consuming organisms in a cross-kingdom way, and the dietary habit may affect the physiological condition at a genetic level. Our findings may be useful for discovering cross-species regulatory mechanism in further study.

  2. Human coding synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms at ramp regions of mRNA translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Quan; Qu, Hui-Qi

    2013-01-01

    According to the ramp model of mRNA translation, the first 50 codons favor rare codons and have slower speed of translation. This study aims to detect translational selection on coding synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (sSNP) to support the ramp theory. We investigated fourfold degenerate site (FFDS) sSNPs with A ↔ G or C ↔ T substitutions in human genome for distribution bias of synonymous codons (SC), grouped by CpG or non-CpG sites. Distribution bias of sSNPs between the 3(rd) ~50(th) codons and the 51(st) ~ remainder codons at non-CpG sites were observed. In the 3(rd) ~50(th) codons, G → A sSNPs at non-CpG sites are favored than A → G sSNPs [P = 2.89 × 10(-3)], and C → T at non-CpG sites are favored than T → C sSNPs [P = 8.50 × 10(-3)]. The favored direction of SC usage change is from more frequent SCs to less frequent SCs. The distribution bias is more obvious in synonymous substitutions CG(G → A), AC(C → T), and CT(C → T). The distribution bias of sSNPs in human genome, i.e. frequent SCs to less frequent SCs is favored in the 3(rd) ~50(th) codons, indicates translational selection on sSNPs in the ramp regions of mRNA templates.

  3. Human coding synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms at ramp regions of mRNA translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Li

    Full Text Available According to the ramp model of mRNA translation, the first 50 codons favor rare codons and have slower speed of translation. This study aims to detect translational selection on coding synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (sSNP to support the ramp theory. We investigated fourfold degenerate site (FFDS sSNPs with A ↔ G or C ↔ T substitutions in human genome for distribution bias of synonymous codons (SC, grouped by CpG or non-CpG sites. Distribution bias of sSNPs between the 3(rd ~50(th codons and the 51(st ~ remainder codons at non-CpG sites were observed. In the 3(rd ~50(th codons, G → A sSNPs at non-CpG sites are favored than A → G sSNPs [P = 2.89 × 10(-3], and C → T at non-CpG sites are favored than T → C sSNPs [P = 8.50 × 10(-3]. The favored direction of SC usage change is from more frequent SCs to less frequent SCs. The distribution bias is more obvious in synonymous substitutions CG(G → A, AC(C → T, and CT(C → T. The distribution bias of sSNPs in human genome, i.e. frequent SCs to less frequent SCs is favored in the 3(rd ~50(th codons, indicates translational selection on sSNPs in the ramp regions of mRNA templates.

  4. An effective strategy for species identification of avian meats using the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lan-Ping; Geng, Rong-Qing; Liu, Zhong-Quan

    2015-04-01

    An effective DNA-based molecular method had been used to identify avian species from meats. The method combined the use of a pair of universal primers, which amplified about 440-bp fragment of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene. A total of 99 meat samples were tested and 17 haplotypes were identified by DNA sequencing, which representing 14 avian species. One avian species was listed as the national first-grade protected animal in China and the IUCN endangered species. Two avian species were under the national second-grade state protection. The proposed method represents a straightforward and robust method for the accurate identification of avian species that could be used by law enforcement agencies as a tool for the control of illegal trade of meat from protected species.

  5. Data mining cDNAs reveals three new single stranded RNA viruses in Nasonia (Hymenopetera:Pteromalidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymenopteran viruses may provide insights into colony collapse disorder in honey bees and other insect species. Three novel small RNA viruses were discovered during the genomics effort for the beneficial parasitoid of flies in the genus Nasonia (Hymenoptera). Genomics provides a great deal of inform...

  6. Highly stable triple helix formation by homopyrimidine (l)-acyclic threoninol nucleic acids with single stranded DNA and RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Vipin; Kesavan, Venkitasamy; Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager

    2015-01-01

    Acyclic (l)-threoninol nucleic acid (aTNA) containing thymine, cytosine and adenine nucleobases were synthesized and shown to form surprisingly stable triplexes with complementary single stranded homopurine DNA or RNA targets. The triplex structures consist of two (l)-aTNA strands and one DNA...... or RNA, and these triplexes are significantly stronger than the corresponding DNA or RNA duplexes as shown in competition experiments. As a unique property the (l)-aTNAs exclusively form triplex structures with DNA and RNA and no duplex structures are observed by gel electrophoresis. The results were...... compared to the known enantiomer (d)-aTNA, which forms much weaker triplexes depending upon temperature and time. It was demonstrated that (l)-aTNA triplexes are able to stop primer extension on a DNA template, showing the potential of (l)-aTNA for antisense applications....

  7. Quantification of Chitinase mRNA Levels in Human and Mouse Tissues by Real-Time PCR: Species-Specific Expression of Acidic Mammalian Chitinase in Stomach Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Misa; Togashi, Yuto; Tsuda, Kyoko; Okawa, Kazuaki; Kamaya, Minori; Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Sugahara, Yasusato; Oyama, Fumitaka

    2013-01-01

    Chitinase hydrolyzes chitin, which is an N-acetyl-D-glucosamine polymer that is present in a wide range of organisms, including insects, parasites and fungi. Although mammals do not contain any endogenous chitin, humans and mice express two active chitinases, chitotriosidase (Chit1) and acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase). Because the level of expression of these chitinases is increased in many inflammatory conditions, including Gaucher disease and mouse models of asthma, both chitinases may play important roles in the pathophysiologies of these and other diseases. We recently established a quantitative PCR system using a single standard DNA and showed that AMCase mRNA is synthesized at extraordinarily high levels in mouse stomach tissues. In this study, we applied this methodology to the quantification of chitinase mRNAs in human tissues and found that both chitinase mRNAs were widely expressed in normal human tissues. Chit1 mRNA was highly expressed in the human lung, whereas AMCase mRNA was not overexpressed in normal human stomach tissues. The levels of these mRNAs in human tissues were significantly lower than the levels of housekeeping genes. Because the AMCase expression levels were quite different between the human and mouse stomach tissues, we developed a quantitative PCR system to compare the mRNA levels between human and mouse tissues using a human-mouse hybrid standard DNA. Our analysis showed that Chit1 mRNA is expressed at similar levels in normal human and mouse lung. In contrast, the AMCase expression level in human stomach was significantly lower than that expression level observed in mouse stomach. These mRNA differences between human and mouse stomach tissues were reflecting differences in the chitinolytic activities and levels of protein expression. Thus, the expression level of the AMCase in the stomach is species-specific. PMID:23826286

  8. Widespread Polycistronic Transcripts in Fungi Revealed by Single-Molecule mRNA Sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean P Gordon

    Full Text Available Genes in prokaryotic genomes are often arranged into clusters and co-transcribed into polycistronic RNAs. Isolated examples of polycistronic RNAs were also reported in some higher eukaryotes but their presence was generally considered rare. Here we developed a long-read sequencing strategy to identify polycistronic transcripts in several mushroom forming fungal species including Plicaturopsis crispa, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Trametes versicolor, and Gloeophyllum trabeum. We found genome-wide prevalence of polycistronic transcription in these Agaricomycetes, involving up to 8% of the transcribed genes. Unlike polycistronic mRNAs in prokaryotes, these co-transcribed genes are also independently transcribed. We show that polycistronic transcription may interfere with expression of the downstream tandem gene. Further comparative genomic analysis indicates that polycistronic transcription is conserved among a wide range of mushroom forming fungi. In summary, our study revealed, for the first time, the genome prevalence of polycistronic transcription in a phylogenetic range of higher fungi. Furthermore, we systematically show that our long-read sequencing approach and combined bioinformatics pipeline is a generic powerful tool for precise characterization of complex transcriptomes that enables identification of mRNA isoforms not recovered via short-read assembly.

  9. Cpf1 Is a Single RNA-Guided Endonuclease of a Class 2 CRISPR-Cas System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zetsche, Bernd; Gootenberg, Jonathan S.; Abudayyeh, Omar O.; Slaymaker, Ian M.; Makarova, Kira S.; Essletzbichler, Patrick; Volz, Sara E.; Joung, Julia; Oost, van der John; Regev, Aviv; Koonin, Eugene V.; Zhang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The microbial adaptive immune system CRISPR mediates defense against foreign genetic elements through two classes of RNA-guided nuclease effectors. Class 1 effectors utilize multi-protein complexes, whereas class 2 effectors rely on single-component effector proteins such as the well-characterized

  10. Deletions and recombinations with the RNA1 3' ends of different tobraviruses have created a multitude of tobacco rattle virus TCM-related RNA2 species in Alstroemeria and tulip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, R; Lesemann, D-E; Pfeilstetter, E; Winter, S; Pleij, C W A

    2011-04-01

    In vegetatively propagated Alstroemeria plants that showed pronounced stunting and necrotic leaf spots, a tobravirus infection was diagnosed in which one tobacco rattle virus (TRV, strain AL) RNA1 species was associated with seven different RNA2 species. The latter differed considerably in size and in the types of their 3' RNA1-related sequences. The 5' RNA2-specific part of all these RNA2 molecules showed almost 100% sequence identity with that of RNA2 of the TRV isolate TCM from tulip, but in some of these RNA2 molecules it was shorter than in the TCM isolate, whereas in others it was longer. One of the TRV AL RNA2 molecules, i.e. TC3'PE-a, contained the full set of three full-length RNA2-specific ORFs (ORF2a, -2b and -2c), whereas the previously analysed TCM sequence contained only ORF2a and -2b. In four of these TRV AL RNA2 molecules, i.e. those that had a relatively short RNA2-specific part, the 3' end was identical to that of the cognate TRV AL RNA1, but in the other three, which had a long RNA2-specific part, it was closely related to that of pea early browning virus (PEBV) RNA1, which was not detected in the infected plants. A comparison with previously described TRV/PEBV RNA2 recombinants suggested that the various TRV AL RNA2 molecules may represent various steps and side steps in an evolutionary process, which is apt to open the wide host range of TRV also to PEBV-derived RNA2 species.

  11. Single-Cell RNA Sequencing Identifies Extracellular Matrix Gene Expression by Pancreatic Circulating Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David T. Ting

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are shed from primary tumors into the bloodstream, mediating the hematogenous spread of cancer to distant organs. To define their composition, we compared genome-wide expression profiles of CTCs with matched primary tumors in a mouse model of pancreatic cancer, isolating individual CTCs using epitope-independent microfluidic capture, followed by single-cell RNA sequencing. CTCs clustered separately from primary tumors and tumor-derived cell lines, showing low-proliferative signatures, enrichment for the stem-cell-associated gene Aldh1a2, biphenotypic expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers, and expression of Igfbp5, a gene transcript enriched at the epithelial-stromal interface. Mouse as well as human pancreatic CTCs exhibit a very high expression of stromal-derived extracellular matrix (ECM proteins, including SPARC, whose knockdown in cancer cells suppresses cell migration and invasiveness. The aberrant expression by CTCs of stromal ECM genes points to their contribution of microenvironmental signals for the spread of cancer to distant organs.

  12. Single-cell RNA sequencing identifies extracellular matrix gene expression by pancreatic circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David T; Wittner, Ben S; Ligorio, Matteo; Vincent Jordan, Nicole; Shah, Ajay M; Miyamoto, David T; Aceto, Nicola; Bersani, Francesca; Brannigan, Brian W; Xega, Kristina; Ciciliano, Jordan C; Zhu, Huili; MacKenzie, Olivia C; Trautwein, Julie; Arora, Kshitij S; Shahid, Mohammad; Ellis, Haley L; Qu, Na; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Rivera, Miguel N; Deshpande, Vikram; Ferrone, Cristina R; Kapur, Ravi; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Shioda, Toshi; Toner, Mehmet; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A

    2014-09-25

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are shed from primary tumors into the bloodstream, mediating the hematogenous spread of cancer to distant organs. To define their composition, we compared genome-wide expression profiles of CTCs with matched primary tumors in a mouse model of pancreatic cancer, isolating individual CTCs using epitope-independent microfluidic capture, followed by single-cell RNA sequencing. CTCs clustered separately from primary tumors and tumor-derived cell lines, showing low-proliferative signatures, enrichment for the stem-cell-associated gene Aldh1a2, biphenotypic expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers, and expression of Igfbp5, a gene transcript enriched at the epithelial-stromal interface. Mouse as well as human pancreatic CTCs exhibit a very high expression of stromal-derived extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, including SPARC, whose knockdown in cancer cells suppresses cell migration and invasiveness. The aberrant expression by CTCs of stromal ECM genes points to their contribution of microenvironmental signals for the spread of cancer to distant organs. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mitochondrial Genes of Dinoflagellates Are Transcribed by a Nuclear-Encoded Single-Subunit RNA Polymerase.

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    Chang Ying Teng

    Full Text Available Dinoflagellates are a large group of algae that contribute significantly to marine productivity and are essential photosynthetic symbionts of corals. Although these algae have fully-functioning mitochondria and chloroplasts, both their organelle genomes have been highly reduced and the genes fragmented and rearranged, with many aberrant transcripts. However, nothing is known about their RNA polymerases. We cloned and sequenced the gene for the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial polymerase (RpoTm of the dinoflagellate Heterocapsa triquetra and showed that the protein presequence targeted a GFP construct into yeast mitochondria. The gene belongs to a small gene family, which includes a variety of 3'-truncated copies that may have originated by retroposition. The catalytic C-terminal domain of the protein shares nine conserved sequence blocks with other single-subunit polymerases and is predicted to have the same fold as the human enzyme. However, the N-terminal (promoter binding/transcription initiation domain is not well-conserved. In conjunction with the degenerate nature of the mitochondrial genome, this suggests a requirement for novel accessory factors to ensure the accurate production of functional mRNAs.

  14. Short ROSE-like RNA thermometers control IbpA synthesis in Pseudomonas species.

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    Stefanie S Krajewski

    Full Text Available The bacterial small heat shock protein IbpA protects client proteins from aggregation. Due to redundancy in the cellular chaperone network, deletion of the ibpA gene often leads to only a mild or no phenotypic defect. In this study, we show that a Pseudomonas putida ibpA deletion mutant has a severe growth defect under heat stress conditions and reduced survival during recovery revealing a critical role of IbpA in heat tolerance. Transcription of the ibpA gene depends on the alternative heat shock sigma factor σ(32. Production of IbpA protein only at heat shock temperatures suggested additional translational control. We conducted a comprehensive structural and functional analysis of the 5' untranslated regions of the ibpA genes from P. putida and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both contain a ROSE-type RNA thermometer that is substantially shorter and simpler than previously reported ROSE elements. Comprised of two hairpin structures only, they inhibit translation at low temperature and permit translation initiation after a temperature upshift. Both elements regulate reporter gene expression in Escherichia coli and ribosome binding in vitro in a temperature-dependent manner. Structure probing revealed local melting of the second hairpin whereas the first hairpin remained unaffected. High sequence and structure conservation of pseudomonal ibpA untranslated regions and their ability to confer thermoregulation in vivo suggest that short ROSE-like thermometers are commonly used to control IbpA synthesis in Pseudomonas species.

  15. Short ROSE-Like RNA Thermometers Control IbpA Synthesis in Pseudomonas Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewski, Stefanie S.; Nagel, Miriam; Narberhaus, Franz

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial small heat shock protein IbpA protects client proteins from aggregation. Due to redundancy in the cellular chaperone network, deletion of the ibpA gene often leads to only a mild or no phenotypic defect. In this study, we show that a Pseudomonas putida ibpA deletion mutant has a severe growth defect under heat stress conditions and reduced survival during recovery revealing a critical role of IbpA in heat tolerance. Transcription of the ibpA gene depends on the alternative heat shock sigma factor σ32. Production of IbpA protein only at heat shock temperatures suggested additional translational control. We conducted a comprehensive structural and functional analysis of the 5′ untranslated regions of the ibpA genes from P. putida and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both contain a ROSE-type RNA thermometer that is substantially shorter and simpler than previously reported ROSE elements. Comprised of two hairpin structures only, they inhibit translation at low temperature and permit translation initiation after a temperature upshift. Both elements regulate reporter gene expression in Escherichia coli and ribosome binding in vitro in a temperature-dependent manner. Structure probing revealed local melting of the second hairpin whereas the first hairpin remained unaffected. High sequence and structure conservation of pseudomonal ibpA untranslated regions and their ability to confer thermoregulation in vivo suggest that short ROSE-like thermometers are commonly used to control IbpA synthesis in Pseudomonas species. PMID:23741480

  16. Quantitative RNA-Seq analysis in non-model species: assessing transcriptome assemblies as a scaffold and the utility of evolutionary divergent genomic reference species

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    Hornett Emily A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How well does RNA-Seq data perform for quantitative whole gene expression analysis in the absence of a genome? This is one unanswered question facing the rapidly growing number of researchers studying non-model species. Using Homo sapiens data and resources, we compared the direct mapping of sequencing reads to predicted genes from the genome with mapping to de novo transcriptomes assembled from RNA-Seq data. Gene coverage and expression analysis was further investigated in the non-model context by using increasingly divergent genomic reference species to group assembled contigs by unique genes. Results Eight transcriptome sets, composed of varying amounts of Illumina and 454 data, were assembled and assessed. Hybrid 454/Illumina assemblies had the highest transcriptome and individual gene coverage. Quantitative whole gene expression levels were highly similar between using a de novo hybrid assembly and the predicted genes as a scaffold, although mapping to the de novo transcriptome assembly provided data on fewer genes. Using non-target species as reference scaffolds does result in some loss of sequence and expression data, and bias and error increase with evolutionary distance. However, within a 100 million year window these effect sizes are relatively small. Conclusions Predicted gene sets from sequenced genomes of related species can provide a powerful method for grouping RNA-Seq reads and annotating contigs. Gene expression results can be produced that are similar to results obtained using gene models derived from a high quality genome, though biased towards conserved genes. Our results demonstrate the power and limitations of conducting RNA-Seq in non-model species.

  17. Emergence of a replicating species from an in vitro RNA evolution reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breaker, R. R.; Joyce, G. F.

    1994-01-01

    The technique of self-sustained sequence replication allows isothermal amplification of DNA and RNA molecules in vitro. This method relies on the activities of a reverse transcriptase and a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase to amplify specific nucleic acid sequences. We have modified this protocol to allow selective amplification of RNAs that catalyze a particular chemical reaction. During an in vitro RNA evolution experiment employing this modified system, a unique class of "selfish" RNAs emerged and replicated to the exclusion of the intended RNAs. Members of this class of selfish molecules, termed RNA Z, amplify efficiently despite their inability to catalyze the target chemical reaction. Their amplification requires the action of both reverse transcriptase and RNA polymerase and involves the synthesis of both DNA and RNA replication intermediates. The proposed amplification mechanism for RNA Z involves the formation of a DNA hairpin that functions as a template for transcription by RNA polymerase. This arrangement links the two strands of the DNA, resulting in the production of RNA transcripts that contain an embedded RNA polymerase promoter sequence.

  18. RNAome sequencing delineates the complete RNA landscape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.W.J. Derks (Kasper); J. Pothof (Joris)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractStandard RNA expression profiling methods rely on enrichment steps for specific RNA classes, thereby not detecting all RNA species. For example, small and large RNAs from the same sample cannot be sequenced in a single sequence run. We designed RNAome sequencing, which is a

  19. RNA purification by preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Alexey; Wu, Tinghe; Puglisi, Elisabetta Viani; Puglisi, Joseph D

    2013-01-01

    Preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) is a powerful tool for purifying RNA samples. Denaturing PAGE allows separation of nucleic acids that differ by a single nucleotide in length. It is commonly used to separate and purify RNA species after in vitro transcription, to purify naturally occurring RNA variants such as tRNAs, to remove degradation products, and to purify labeled RNA species. To preserve RNA integrity following purification, RNA is usually visualized by UV shadowing or stained with ethidium bromide or SYBR green dyes. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Transcriptome profiling of microRNA by Next-Gen deep sequencing reveals known and novel miRNA species in the lipid fraction of human breast milk.

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    Erika M Munch

    Full Text Available While breast milk has unique health advantages for infants, the mechanisms by which it regulates the physiology of newborns are incompletely understood. miRNAs have been described as functioning transcellularly, and have been previously isolated in cell-free and exosomal form from bodily liquids (serum, saliva, urine and tissues, including mammary tissue. We hypothesized that breast milk in general, and milk fat globules in particular, contain significant numbers of known and limited novel miRNA species detectable with massively parallel sequencing. Extracted RNA from lactating mothers before and following short-term treatment with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH was smRNA-enriched. smRNA-Seq was performed to generate 124,110,646 36-nt reads. Of these, 31,102,927 (25% exactly matched known human miRNAs; with relaxing of stringency, 74,716,151 (60% matched known miRNAs including 308 of the 1018 (29% mature miRNAs (miRBase 16.0. These miRNAs are predicted to target 9074 genes; the 10 most abundant of these predicted to target 2691 genes with enrichment for transcriptional regulation of metabolic and immune responses. We identified 21 putative novel miRNAs, of which 12 were confirmed in a large validation set that included cohorts of lactating women consuming enriched diets. Of particular interest, we observed that expression of several novel miRNAs were altered by the perturbed maternal diet, notably following a high-fat intake (p<0.05. Our findings suggest that known and novel miRNAs are enriched in breast milk fat globules, and expression of several novel miRNA species is regulated by maternal diet. Based on robust pathway mapping, our data supports the notion that these maternally secreted miRNAs (stable in the milk fat globules play a regulatory role in the infant and account in part for the health benefits of breast milk. We further speculate that regulation of these miRNA by a high fat maternal diet enables modulation of fetal

  1. 16S rRNA partial gene sequencing for the differentiation and molecular subtyping of Listeria species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellberg, Rosalee S; Martin, Keely G; Keys, Ashley L; Haney, Christopher J; Shen, Yuelian; Smiley, R Derike

    2013-12-01

    Use of 16S rRNA partial gene sequencing within the regulatory workflow could greatly reduce the time and labor needed for confirmation and subtyping of Listeria monocytogenes. The goal of this study was to build a 16S rRNA partial gene reference library for Listeria spp. and investigate the potential for 16S rRNA molecular subtyping. A total of 86 isolates of Listeria representing L. innocua, L. seeligeri, L. welshimeri, and L. monocytogenes were obtained for use in building the custom library. Seven non-Listeria species and three additional strains of Listeria were obtained for use in exclusivity and food spiking tests. Isolates were sequenced for the partial 16S rRNA gene using the MicroSeq ID 500 Bacterial Identification Kit (Applied Biosystems). High-quality sequences were obtained for 84 of the custom library isolates and 23 unique 16S sequence types were discovered for use in molecular subtyping. All of the exclusivity strains were negative for Listeria and the three Listeria strains used in food spiking were consistently recovered and correctly identified at the species level. The spiking results also allowed for differentiation beyond the species level, as 87% of replicates for one strain and 100% of replicates for the other two strains consistently matched the same 16S type. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. NOVOMIR: De Novo Prediction of MicroRNA-Coding Regions in a Single Plant-Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teune, Jan-Hendrik; Steger, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) are small regulatory, noncoding RNA molecules that are transcribed as primary miRNAs (pri-miRNA) from eukaryotic genomes. At least in plants, their regulatory activity is mediated through base-pairing with protein-coding messenger RNAs (mRNA) followed by mRNA degradation or translation repression. We describe NOVOMIR, a program for the identification of miRNA genes in plant genomes. It uses a series of filter steps and a statistical model to discriminate a pre-miRNA from other RNAs and does rely neither on prior knowledge of a miRNA target nor on comparative genomics. The sensitivity and specificity of NOVOMIR for detection of premiRNAs from Arabidopsis thaliana is ~0.83 and ~0.99, respectively. Plant pre-miRNAs are more heterogeneous with respect to size and structure than animal pre-miRNAs. Despite these difficulties, NOVOMIR is well suited to perform searches for pre-miRNAs on a genomic scale. NOVOMIR is written in Perl and relies on two additional, free programs for prediction of RNA secondary structure (RNALFOLD, RNASHAPES). PMID:20871826

  3. Coupling shRNA screens with single-cell RNA-seq identifies a dual role for mTOR in reprogramming-induced senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarts, Marieke; Georgilis, Athena; Beniazza, Meryam; Beolchi, Patrizia; Banito, Ana; Carroll, Thomas; Kulisic, Marizela; Kaemena, Daniel F; Dharmalingam, Gopuraja; Martin, Nadine; Reik, Wolf; Zuber, Johannes; Kaji, Keisuke; Chandra, Tamir; Gil, Jesús

    2017-10-15

    Expression of the transcription factors OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and cMYC (OSKM) reprograms somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Reprogramming is a slow and inefficient process, suggesting the presence of safeguarding mechanisms that counteract cell fate conversion. One such mechanism is senescence. To identify modulators of reprogramming-induced senescence, we performed a genome-wide shRNA screen in primary human fibroblasts expressing OSKM. In the screen, we identified novel mediators of OSKM-induced senescence and validated previously implicated genes such as CDKN1A We developed an innovative approach that integrates single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) with the shRNA screen to investigate the mechanism of action of the identified candidates. Our data unveiled regulation of senescence as a novel way by which mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) influences reprogramming. On one hand, mTOR inhibition blunts the induction of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors (CDKIs), including p16 INK4a , p21 CIP1 , and p15 INK4b , preventing OSKM-induced senescence. On the other hand, inhibition of mTOR blunts the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), which itself favors reprogramming. These contrasting actions contribute to explain the complex effect that mTOR has on reprogramming. Overall, our study highlights the advantage of combining functional screens with scRNA-seq to accelerate the discovery of pathways controlling complex phenotypes. © 2017 Aarts et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  4. Polymerase-free measurement of microRNA-122 with single base specificity using single molecule arrays: Detection of drug-induced liver injury.

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    David M Rissin

    Full Text Available We have developed a single probe method for detecting microRNA from human serum using single molecule arrays, with sequence specificity down to a single base, and without the use of amplification by polymerases. An abasic peptide nucleic acid (PNA probe-containing a reactive amine instead of a nucleotide at a specific position in the sequence-for detecting a microRNA was conjugated to superparamagnetic beads. These beads were incubated with a sample containing microRNA, a biotinylated reactive nucleobase-containing an aldehyde group-that was complementary to the missing base in the probe sequence, and a reducing agent. When a target molecule with an exact match in sequence hybridized to the capture probe, the reactive nucleobase was covalently attached to the backbone of the probe by a dynamic covalent chemical reaction. Single molecules of the biotin-labeled probe were then labeled with streptavidin-β-galactosidase (SβG, the beads were resuspended in a fluorogenic enzyme substrate, loaded into an array of femtoliter wells, and sealed with oil. The array was imaged fluorescently to determine which beads were associated with single enzymes, and the average number of enzymes per bead was determined. The assay had a limit of detection of 500 fM, approximately 500 times more sensitive than a corresponding analog bead-based assay, with target specificity down to a single base mis-match. This assay was used to measure microRNA-122 (miR-122-an established biomarker of liver toxicity-extracted from the serum of patients who had acute liver injury due to acetaminophen, and control healthy patients. All patients with liver injury had higher levels of miR-122 in their serum compared to controls, and the concentrations measured correlated well with those determined using RT-qPCR. This approach allows rapid quantification of circulating microRNA with single-based specificity and a limit of quantification suitable for clinical use.

  5. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Discovery in Bovine Pituitary Gland Using RNA-Seq Technology.

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    Chandra Shekhar Pareek

    Full Text Available Examination of bovine pituitary gland transcriptome by strand-specific RNA-seq allows detection of putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within potential candidate genes (CGs or QTLs regions as well as to understand the genomics variations that contribute to economic trait. Here we report a breed-specific model to successfully perform the detection of SNPs in the pituitary gland of young growing bulls representing Polish Holstein-Friesian (HF, Polish Red, and Hereford breeds at three developmental ages viz., six months, nine months, and twelve months. A total of 18 bovine pituitary gland polyA transcriptome libraries were prepared and sequenced using the Illumina NextSeq 500 platform. Sequenced FastQ databases of all 18 young bulls were submitted to NCBI-SRA database with NCBI-SRA accession numbers SRS1296732. For the investigated young bulls, a total of 113,882,3098 raw paired-end reads with a length of 156 bases were obtained, resulting in an approximately 63 million paired-end reads per library. Breed-wise, a total of 515.38, 215.39, and 408.04 million paired-end reads were obtained for Polish HF, Polish Red, and Hereford breeds, respectively. Burrows-Wheeler Aligner (BWA read alignments showed 93.04%, 94.39%, and 83.46% of the mapped sequencing reads were properly paired to the Polish HF, Polish Red, and Hereford breeds, respectively. Constructed breed-specific SNP-db of three cattle breeds yielded at 13,775,885 SNPs. On an average 765,326 breed-specific SNPs per young bull were identified. Using two stringent filtering parameters, i.e., a minimum 10 SNP reads per base with an accuracy ≥ 90% and a minimum 10 SNP reads per base with an accuracy = 100%, SNP-db records were trimmed to construct a highly reliable SNP-db. This resulted in a reduction of 95,7% and 96,4% cut-off mark of constructed raw SNP-db. Finally, SNP discoveries using RNA-Seq data were validated by KASP™ SNP genotyping assay. The comprehensive QTLs/CGs analysis

  6. Elevation in heat shock protein 72 mRNA following contractions in isolated single skeletal muscle fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Stary, Creed M.; Walsh, Brandon J.; Knapp, Amy E.; Brafman, David; Hogan, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was 1) to develop a stable model for measuring contraction-induced elevations in mRNA in single skeletal muscle fibers and 2) to utilize this model to investigate the response of heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) mRNA following an acute bout of fatiguing contractions. Living, intact skeletal muscle fibers were microdissected from lumbrical muscle of Xenopus laevis and either electrically stimulated for 15 min of tetanic contractions (EX; n = 26) or not stimulated ...

  7. Molecular phylogenetics and systematics of the bivalve family Ostreidae based on rRNA sequence-structure models and multilocus species tree.

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    Daniele Salvi

    Full Text Available The bivalve family Ostreidae has a worldwide distribution and includes species of high economic importance. Phylogenetics and systematic of oysters based on morphology have proved difficult because of their high phenotypic plasticity. In this study we explore the phylogenetic information of the DNA sequence and secondary structure of the nuclear, fast-evolving, ITS2 rRNA and the mitochondrial 16S rRNA genes from the Ostreidae and we implemented a multi-locus framework based on four loci for oyster phylogenetics and systematics. Sequence-structure rRNA models aid sequence alignment and improved accuracy and nodal support of phylogenetic trees. In agreement with previous molecular studies, our phylogenetic results indicate that none of the currently recognized subfamilies, Crassostreinae, Ostreinae, and Lophinae, is monophyletic. Single gene trees based on Maximum likelihood (ML and Bayesian (BA methods and on sequence-structure ML were congruent with multilocus trees based on a concatenated (ML and BA and coalescent based (BA approaches and consistently supported three main clades: (i Crassostrea, (ii Saccostrea, and (iii an Ostreinae-Lophinae lineage. Therefore, the subfamily Crassostreinae (including Crassostrea, Saccostreinae subfam. nov. (including Saccostrea and tentatively Striostrea and Ostreinae (including Ostreinae and Lophinae taxa are recognized [corrected]. Based on phylogenetic and biogeographical evidence the Asian species of Crassostrea from the Pacific Ocean are assigned to Magallana gen. nov., whereas an integrative taxonomic revision is required for the genera Ostrea and Dendostrea. This study pointed out the suitability of the ITS2 marker for DNA barcoding of oyster and the relevance of using sequence-structure rRNA models and features of the ITS2 folding in molecular phylogenetics and taxonomy. The multilocus approach allowed inferring a robust phylogeny of Ostreidae providing a broad molecular perspective on their systematics.

  8. Potential DNA barcodes for Melilotus species based on five single loci and their combinations.

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    Fan Wu

    Full Text Available Melilotus, an annual or biennial herb, belongs to the tribe Trifolieae (Leguminosae and consists of 19 species. As an important green manure crop, diverse Melilotus species have different values as feed and medicine. To identify different Melilotus species, we examined the efficiency of five candidate regions as barcodes, including the internal transcribed spacer (ITS and two chloroplast loci, rbcL and matK, and two non-coding loci, trnH-psbA and trnL-F. In total, 198 individuals from 98 accessions representing 18 Melilotus species were sequenced for these five potential barcodes. Based on inter-specific divergence, we analysed sequences and confirmed that each candidate barcode was able to identify some of the 18 species. The resolution of a single barcode and its combinations ranged from 33.33% to 88.89%. Analysis of pairwise distances showed that matK+rbcL+trnL-F+trnH-psbA+ITS (MRTPI had the greatest value and rbcL the least. Barcode gap values and similarity value analyses confirmed these trends. The results indicated that an ITS region, successfully identifying 13 of 18 species, was the most appropriate single barcode and that the combination of all five potential barcodes identified 16 of the 18 species. We conclude that MRTPI is the most effective tool for Melilotus species identification. Taking full advantage of the barcode system, a clear taxonomic relationship can be applied to identify Melilotus species and enhance their practical production.

  9. The Bifurcation and Control of a Single-Species Fish Population Logistic Model with the Invasion of Alien Species

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    Yi Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to study systematically the bifurcation and control of a single-species fish population logistic model with the invasion of alien species based on the theory of singular system and bifurcation. It regards Spartina anglica as an invasive species, which invades the fisheries and aquaculture. Firstly, the stabilities of equilibria in this model are discussed. Moreover, the sufficient conditions for existence of the trans-critical bifurcation and the singularity induced bifurcation are obtained. Secondly, the state feedback controller is designed to eliminate the unexpected singularity induced bifurcation by combining harvested effort with the purification capacity. It obviously inhibits the switch of population and makes the system stable. Finally, the numerical simulation is proposed to show the practical significance of the bifurcation and control from the biological point of view.

  10. RNA interference and single particle tracking analysis of hepatitis C virus endocytosis.

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    Kelly E Coller

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV enters hepatocytes following a complex set of receptor interactions, culminating in internalization via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. However, aside from receptors, little is known about the cellular molecular requirements for infectious HCV entry. Therefore, we analyzed a siRNA library that targets 140 cellular membrane trafficking genes to identify host genes required for infectious HCV production and HCV pseudoparticle entry. This approach identified 16 host cofactors of HCV entry that function primarily in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, including components of the clathrin endocytosis machinery, actin polymerization, receptor internalization and sorting, and endosomal acidification. We next developed single particle tracking analysis of highly infectious fluorescent HCV particles to examine the co-trafficking of HCV virions with cellular cofactors of endocytosis. We observe multiple, sequential interactions of HCV virions with the actin cytoskeleton, including retraction along filopodia, actin nucleation during internalization, and migration of internalized particles along actin stress fibers. HCV co-localizes with clathrin and the ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl prior to internalization. Entering HCV particles are associated with the receptor molecules CD81 and the tight junction protein, claudin-1; however, HCV-claudin-1 interactions were not restricted to Huh-7.5 cell-cell junctions. Surprisingly, HCV internalization generally occurred outside of Huh-7.5 cell-cell junctions, which may reflect the poorly polarized nature of current HCV cell culture models. Following internalization, HCV particles transport with GFP-Rab5a positive endosomes, which is consistent with trafficking to the early endosome. This study presents technical advances for imaging HCV entry, in addition to identifying new host cofactors of HCV infection, some of which may be antiviral targets.

  11. Ammonia disinfection of hatchery waste for elimination of single-stranded RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmoth, Eva; Ottoson, Jakob; Albihn, Ann; Belák, Sándor; Vinnerås, Björn

    2011-06-01

    Hatchery waste, an animal by-product of the poultry industry, needs sanitation treatment before further use as fertilizer or as a substrate in biogas or composting plants, owing to the potential presence of opportunistic pathogens, including zoonotic viruses. Effective sanitation is also important in viral epizootic outbreaks and as a routine, ensuring high hygiene standards on farms. This study examined the use of ammonia at different concentrations and temperatures to disinfect hatchery waste. Inactivation kinetics of high-pathogenic avian influenza virus H7N1 and low-pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N3, as representatives of notifiable avian viral diseases, were determined in spiked hatchery waste. Bovine parainfluenza virus type 3, feline coronavirus, and feline calicivirus were used as models for other important avian pathogens, such as Newcastle disease virus, infectious bronchitis virus, and avian hepatitis E virus. Bacteriophage MS2 was also monitored as a stable indicator. Coronavirus was the most sensitive virus, with decimal reduction (D) values of 1.2 and 0.63 h after addition of 0.5% (wt/wt) ammonia at 14 and 25°C, respectively. Under similar conditions, high-pathogenic avian influenza H7N1 was the most resistant, with D values of 3.0 and 1.4 h. MS2 was more resistant than the viruses to all treatments and proved to be a suitable indicator of viral inactivation. The results indicate that ammonia treatment of hatchery waste is efficient in inactivating enveloped and naked single-stranded RNA viruses. Based on the D values and confidence intervals obtained, guidelines for treatment were proposed, and one was successfully validated at full scale at a hatchery, with MS2 added to hatchery waste.

  12. Sequence-specific RNA Photocleavage by Single-stranded DNA in Presence of Riboflavin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongyun; Chen, Gangyi; Yuan, Yi; Li, Na; Dong, Juan; Huang, Xin; Cui, Xin; Tang, Zhuo

    2015-10-01

    Constant efforts have been made to develop new method to realize sequence-specific RNA degradation, which could cause inhibition of the expression of targeted gene. Herein, by using an unmodified short DNA oligonucleotide for sequence recognition and endogenic small molecue, vitamin B2 (riboflavin) as photosensitizer, we report a simple strategy to realize the sequence-specific photocleavage of targeted RNA. The DNA strand is complimentary to the target sequence to form DNA/RNA duplex containing a G•U wobble in the middle. The cleavage reaction goes through oxidative elimination mechanism at the nucleoside downstream of U of the G•U wobble in duplex to obtain unnatural RNA terminal, and the whole process is under tight control by using light as switch, which means the cleavage could be carried out according to specific spatial and temporal requirements. The biocompatibility of this method makes the DNA strand in combination with riboflavin a promising molecular tool for RNA manipulation.

  13. Sequence-specific RNA Photocleavage by Single-stranded DNA in Presence of Riboflavin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongyun; Chen, Gangyi; Yuan, Yi; Li, Na; Dong, Juan; Huang, Xin; Cui, Xin; Tang, Zhuo

    2015-10-13

    Constant efforts have been made to develop new method to realize sequence-specific RNA degradation, which could cause inhibition of the expression of targeted gene. Herein, by using an unmodified short DNA oligonucleotide for sequence recognition and endogenic small molecule, vitamin B2 (riboflavin) as photosensitizer, we report a simple strategy to realize the sequence-specific photocleavage of targeted RNA. The DNA strand is complimentary to the target sequence to form DNA/RNA duplex containing a G • U wobble in the middle. The cleavage reaction goes through oxidative elimination mechanism at the nucleoside downstream of U of the G • U wobble in duplex to obtain unnatural RNA terminal, and the whole process is under tight control by using light as switch, which means the cleavage could be carried out according to specific spatial and temporal requirements. The biocompatibility of this method makes the DNA strand in combination with riboflavin a promising molecular tool for RNA manipulation.

  14. Repertoire and evolution of miRNA genes in four divergent nematode species.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, E.; Linsen, S.E.V.; Cuppen, E.; Berezikov, E.

    2009-01-01

    miRNAs are approximately 22-nt RNA molecules that play important roles in post-transcriptional regulation. We have performed small RNA sequencing in the nematodes Caenorhabditis elegans, C. briggsae, C. remanei, and Pristionchus pacificus, which have diverged up to 400 million years ago, to

  15. RNAome sequencing delineates the complete RNA landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper W.J. Derks

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Standard RNA expression profiling methods rely on enrichment steps for specific RNA classes, thereby not detecting all RNA species. For example, small and large RNAs from the same sample cannot be sequenced in a single sequence run. We designed RNAome sequencing, which is a strand-specific method to determine the expression of small and large RNAs from ribosomal RNA-depleted total RNA in a single sequence run. RNAome sequencing quantitatively preserves all RNA classes. This characteristic allows comparisons between RNA classes, thereby facilitating relationships between different RNA classes. Here, we describe in detail the experimental procedure associated with RNAome sequencing published by Derks and colleagues in RNA Biology (2015 [1]. We also provide the R code for the developed Total Rna Analysis Pipeline (TRAP, an algorithm to analyze RNAome sequencing datasets (deposited at the Gene Expression Omnibus data repository, accession number GSE48084.

  16. Utility of divergent domains of 28S ribosomal RNA in species discrimination of paramphistomes (Trematoda: Digenea: Paramphistomoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shylla, Jollin A; Ghatani, Sudeep; Tandon, Veena

    2013-12-01

    Among the digenetic trematodes, paramphistomes are known to be the causative agent of "amphistomiasis" or the stomach fluke disease of domestic and wild animals, mainly ruminants. The use of 28S (divergent domains) and 18S rRNA for phylogenetic inference is significantly warranted for these flukes since it is as yet limited to merely the exploration of the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) region. The present study intended to explore the divergent domains (D1-D3) of 28S rRNA and simultaneously equate the phylogenetic information with 18S rRNA in paramphistomes. Divergence of the 28S rRNA domains was evident amongst the divergent (D) domains, where D1 domain emerged as the most variable and D2, the most robust domain, since the latter could provide a higher resolution of the species. D2 was the only domain that comprised compensatory mutations in the helices of its structural constraints; this domain is thus well suited for species distinction and may be considered a potential DNA barcode complementary to mitochondrial DNA. 28S (D1 + D2 + D3) rRNA provided a significant resolution of the taxa corroborating with the taxonomy of these flukes and thus proved to be more robust as a phylogenetic marker for lower levels than 18S rRNA. Phylogenetic inferences of paramphitomes are still scarcely explored; additional data from other taxa belonging to this family may estimate better the biodiversity of these flukes.

  17. Variability in secondary structure of 18S ribosomal RNA as topological marker for identification of Paramecium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakoori, Farah R; Tasneem, Fareeda; Al-Ghanim, K; Mahboob, S; Al-Misned, F; Jahan, Nusrat; Shakoori, Abdul Rauf

    2014-12-01

    Besides cytological and molecular applications, Paramecium is being used in water quality assessment and for determination of saprobic levels. An unambiguous identification of these unicellular eukaryotes is not only essential, but its ecological diversity must also be explored in the local environment. 18SrRNA genes of all the strains of Paramecium species isolated from waste water were amplified, cloned and sequenced. Phylogenetic comparison of the nucleotide sequences of these strains with 23 closely related Paramecium species from GenBank Database enabled identification of Paramecium multimicronucleatum and Paramecium jenningsi. Some isolates did not show significant close association with other Paramecium species, and because of their unique position in the phylogenetic tree, they were considered new to the field. In the present report, these isolates are being designated as Paramecium caudatum pakistanicus. In this article, secondary structure of 18SrRNA has also been analyzed as an additional and perhaps more reliable topological marker for species discrimination and for determining possible phylogenetic relationship between the ciliate species. On the basis of comparison of secondary structure of 18SrRNA of various isolated Paramacium strains, and among Paramecium caudatum pakistanicus, Tetrahymena thermophila, Drosophila melanogaster, and Homo sapiens, it can be deduced that variable regions are more helpful in differentiating the species at interspecific level rather than at intraspecific level. It was concluded that V3 was the least variable region in all the organisms, V2 and V7 were the longest expansion segments of D. melanogaster and there was continuous mutational bias towards G.C base pairing in H. sapiens. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Low Po2 conditions induce reactive oxygen species formation during contractions in single skeletal muscle fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Zuo, Li; Shiah, Amy; Roberts, William J.; Chien, Michael T.; Wagner, Peter D.; Hogan, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Contractions in whole skeletal muscle during hypoxia are known to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS); however, identification of real-time ROS formation within isolated single skeletal muscle fibers has been challenging. Consequently, there is no convincing evidence showing increased ROS production in intact contracting fibers under low Po2 conditions. Therefore, we hypothesized that intracellular ROS generation in single contracting skeletal myofibers increases during low Po2 compared wi...

  19. Reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction amplification of rRNA for detection of Helicobacter species.

    OpenAIRE

    Engstrand, L; Nguyen, A M; Graham, D Y; el-Zaatari, F A

    1992-01-01

    Sequence data on Helicobacter pylori 16S rRNA were used to select two 22-base oligonucleotide primers for use in a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of H. pylori. H. pylori cells were treated with lysis buffer, boiled, and chloroform extracted. Reverse transcription of rRNA was followed by PCR amplification (RT-PCR) of the synthesized cDNA and 16S rRNA gene. The amplified PCR products were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis and Southern blotting. Using ethidium bromide-staine...

  20. Single-Cell RNA Sequencing of the Bronchial Epithelium in Smokers with Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    changes primarily involve incorporation of the 3’ sequencing adaptor via random hexamer-based reverse transcription (rather than RNA ligation...libraries using an adapted version of the CEL-Seq RNA library preparation protocol that includes plate-, well-, and transcript -specific barcodes...gene level counts for each cell as well as a new algorithm, Celda, to define and characterize transcriptionally distinct cell populations. We have

  1. Targeted Integration of RNA-Seq and Metabolite Data to Elucidate Curcuminoid Biosynthesis in Four Curcuma Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Donghan; Ono, Naoaki; Sato, Tetsuo; Sugiura, Tadao; Altaf-Ul-Amin, Md; Ohta, Daisaku; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Arita, Masanori; Tanaka, Ken; Ma, Zhiqiang; Kanaya, Shigehiko

    2015-05-01

    Curcuminoids, namely curcumin and its analogs, are secondary metabolites that act as the primary active constituents of turmeric (Curcuma longa). The contents of these curcuminoids vary among species in the genus Curcuma. For this reason, we compared two wild strains and two cultivars to understand the differences in the synthesis of curcuminoids. Because the fluxes of metabolic reactions depend on the amounts of their substrate and the activity of the catalysts, we analyzed the metabolite concentrations and gene expression of related enzymes. We developed a method based on RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis that focuses on a specific set of genes to detect expression differences between species in detail. We developed a 'selection-first' method for RNA-Seq analysis in which short reads are mapped to selected enzymes in the target biosynthetic pathways in order to reduce the effect of mapping errors. Using this method, we found that the difference in the contents of curcuminoids among the species, as measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, could be explained by the changes in the expression of genes encoding diketide-CoA synthase, and curcumin synthase at the branching point of the curcuminoid biosynthesis pathway. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Deciphering the RNA landscape by RNAome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derks, Kasper W J; Misovic, Branislav; van den Hout, Mirjam C G N; Kockx, Christel E M; Gomez, Cesar Payan; Brouwer, Rutger W W; Vrieling, Harry; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; van IJcken, Wilfred F J; Pothof, Joris

    2015-01-01

    Current RNA expression profiling methods rely on enrichment steps for specific RNA classes, thereby not detecting all RNA species in an unperturbed manner. We report strand-specific RNAome sequencing that determines expression of small and large RNAs from rRNA-depleted total RNA in a single sequence run. Since current analysis pipelines cannot reliably analyze small and large RNAs simultaneously, we developed TRAP, Total Rna Analysis Pipeline, a robust interface that is also compatible with existing RNA sequencing protocols. RNAome sequencing quantitatively preserved all RNA classes, allowing cross-class comparisons that facilitates the identification of relationships between different RNA classes. We demonstrate the strength of RNAome sequencing in mouse embryonic stem cells treated with cisplatin. MicroRNA and mRNA expression in RNAome sequencing significantly correlated between replicates and was in concordance with both existing RNA sequencing methods and gene expression arrays generated from the same samples. Moreover, RNAome sequencing also detected additional RNA classes such as enhancer RNAs, anti-sense RNAs, novel RNA species and numerous differentially expressed RNAs undetectable by other methods. At the level of complete RNA classes, RNAome sequencing also identified a specific global repression of the microRNA and microRNA isoform classes after cisplatin treatment whereas all other classes such as mRNAs were unchanged. These characteristics of RNAome sequencing will significantly improve expression analysis as well as studies on RNA biology not covered by existing methods.

  3. Single-Cell RNA-Seq Analysis of Infiltrating Neoplastic Cells at the Migrating Front of Human Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyros Darmanis

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Glioblastoma (GBM is the most common primary brain cancer in adults and is notoriously difficult to treat because of its diffuse nature. We performed single-cell RNA sequencing (RNA-seq on 3,589 cells in a cohort of four patients. We obtained cells from the tumor core as well as surrounding peripheral tissue. Our analysis revealed cellular variation in the tumor’s genome and transcriptome. We were also able to identify infiltrating neoplastic cells in regions peripheral to the core lesions. Despite the existence of significant heterogeneity among neoplastic cells, we found that infiltrating GBM cells share a consistent gene signature between patients, suggesting a common mechanism of infiltration. Additionally, in investigating the immunological response to the tumors, we found transcriptionally distinct myeloid cell populations residing in the tumor core and the surrounding peritumoral space. Our data provide a detailed dissection of GBM cell types, revealing an abundance of information about tumor formation and migration. : Darmanis et al. perform single-cell transcriptomic analyses of neoplastic and stromal cells within and proximal to primary glioblastomas. The authors describe a population of neoplastic-infiltrating glioblastoma cells as well as a putative role of tumor-infiltrating immune cells in supporting tumor growth. Keywords: single cell, RNA-seq, glioma, glioblastoma, GBM, brain, heterogeneity, infiltrating, diffuse, checkpoint

  4. An Investigative Alternative to Single-Species Dissection in the Introductory Biology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Joel L.

    2010-01-01

    Dissections of single species (e.g., fetal pig) are a common student learning activity in introductory biology courses. Such dissections demonstrate location of anatomical parts and provide dissection practice but provide less opportunity for student critical thinking, numeracy and demonstration of the scientific method. A comparative anatomy lab…

  5. Cover crops in mixtures do not use water differently than single-species plantings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some recent statements have been made about the benefits of growing cover crops in mixtures as compared with single-species plantings of cover crops. One of those stated benefits is greatly reduced water use by cover crops grown in mixtures. The objectives of this study were to characterize soil wat...

  6. Conservation of avian diversity in the Sierra Nevada: moving beyond a single-species management focus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M White

    greater benefit to ecosystem functioning then a single-species management focus.

  7. Conservation of avian diversity in the Sierra Nevada: moving beyond a single-species management focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Angela M; Zipkin, Elise F; Manley, Patricia N; Schlesinger, Matthew D

    2013-01-01

    ecosystem functioning then a single-species management focus.

  8. BP Neural Network Could Help Improve Pre-miRNA Identification in Various Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limin Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a set of short (21–24 nt noncoding RNAs that play significant regulatory roles in cells. In the past few years, research on miRNA-related problems has become a hot field of bioinformatics because of miRNAs’ essential biological function. miRNA-related bioinformatics analysis is beneficial in several aspects, including the functions of miRNAs and other genes, the regulatory network between miRNAs and their target mRNAs, and even biological evolution. Distinguishing miRNA precursors from other hairpin-like sequences is important and is an essential procedure in detecting novel microRNAs. In this study, we employed backpropagation (BP neural network together with 98-dimensional novel features for microRNA precursor identification. Results show that the precision and recall of our method are 95.53% and 96.67%, respectively. Results further demonstrate that the total prediction accuracy of our method is nearly 13.17% greater than the state-of-the-art microRNA precursor prediction software tools.

  9. Mirnovo: genome-free prediction of microRNAs from small RNA sequencing data and single-cells using decision forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitsios, Dimitrios M; Kentepozidou, Elissavet; Quintais, Leonor; Benito-Gutiérrez, Elia; van Dongen, Stijn; Davis, Matthew P; Enright, Anton J

    2017-12-01

    The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) remains an important problem, particularly given the growth of high-throughput sequencing, cell sorting and single cell biology. While a large number of miRNAs have already been annotated, there may well be large numbers of miRNAs that are expressed in very particular cell types and remain elusive. Sequencing allows us to quickly and accurately identify the expression of known miRNAs from small RNA-Seq data. The biogenesis of miRNAs leads to very specific characteristics observed in their sequences. In brief, miRNAs usually have a well-defined 5' end and a more flexible 3' end with the possibility of 3' tailing events, such as uridylation. Previous approaches to the prediction of novel miRNAs usually involve the analysis of structural features of miRNA precursor hairpin sequences obtained from genome sequence. We surmised that it may be possible to identify miRNAs by using these biogenesis features observed directly from sequenced reads, solely or in addition to structural analysis from genome data. To this end, we have developed mirnovo, a machine learning based algorithm, which is able to identify known and novel miRNAs in animals and plants directly from small RNA-Seq data, with or without a reference genome. This method performs comparably to existing tools, however is simpler to use with reduced run time. Its performance and accuracy has been tested on multiple datasets, including species with poorly assembled genomes, RNaseIII (Drosha and/or Dicer) deficient samples and single cells (at both embryonic and adult stage). © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Phenotypic characterization and complementation analysis of Bacillus subtilis 6S RNA single and double deletion mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Philipp G; Burenina, Olga Y; Weber, Michael H W; Elkina, Daria A; Nesterchuk, Mikhail V; Sergiev, Petr V; Hartmann, Roland K; Kubareva, Elena A

    2015-10-01

    6S RNA, a global regulator of transcription in bacteria, binds to housekeeping RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzymes to competitively inhibit transcription from DNA promoters. Bacillus subtilis encodes two 6S RNA homologs whose differential functions are as yet unclear. We constructed derivative strains of B. subtilis PY79 lacking 6S-1 RNA (ΔbsrA), 6S-2 RNA (ΔbsrB) or both (ΔbsrAB) to study the physiological role of the two 6S RNAs. We observed two growth phenotypes of mutant strains: (i) accelerated decrease of optical density toward extended stationary phase and (ii) faster outgrowth from stationary phase under alkaline stress conditions (pH 9.8). The first phenotype was observed for bacteria lacking bsrA, and even more pronounced for ΔbsrAB bacteria, but not for those lacking bsrB. The magnitude of the second phenotype was relatively weak for ΔbsrB, moderate for ΔbsrA and again strongest for ΔbsrAB bacteria. Whereas ΔbsrAB bacteria complemented with bsrB or bsrA (strains ΔbsrAB + B and ΔbsrAB + A) mimicked the phenotypes of the ΔbsrA and ΔbsrB strains, respectively, complementation with the gene ssrS encoding Escherichia coli 6S RNA failed to cure the "low stationary optical density" phenotype of the double mutant, despite ssrS expression, in line with previous findings. Finally, proteomics (two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis, 2D-DIGE) of B. subtilis 6S RNA deletion strains unveiled a set of proteins that were expressed at higher levels particularly during exponential growth and preferentially in mutant strains lacking 6S-2 RNA. Several of these proteins are involved in metabolism and stress responses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société française de biochimie et biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization of a novel single-stranded RNA virus, closely related to fusariviruses, infecting the plant pathogenic fungus Alternaria brassicicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jie; Shang, Hong Hong; Zhu, Chuan Xia; Zhu, Jun Zi; Zhu, Hong Jian; Hu, Yan; Gao, Bi Da

    2016-06-02

    The alternaria blackspot of rapeseed is one of the most prominent diseases of rapeseed. It is caused by three species of the genus Alternaria: Alternaria brassicicola, Alternaria brassicae, and Alternaria raphanin. Here we report a novel positive-sense RNA virus from an A. brassicicola strain 817-14. The virus has a 6639 nucleotide (nt) long genome, excluding a poly (A)-tail, and was predicted to contain three putative open reading frames (ORF1, ORF2, and ORF3). The large ORF1 encoded a 174-kDa polyprotein (composed of 1522 amino acid residues) containing a conserved RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domain and a helicase domain. The other two smaller ORFs encoded polypeptides with unknown function. Homology search and phylogenetic analysis, based on the RdRp and helicase domains, suggest that this virus is related to and grouped with Sclerotinia sclerotiorum fusarivirus 1 (SsFV1), Rosellinia necatrix fusarivirus 1 (RnFV1), Fusarium graminearum virus-DK21 (FgV1), and Penicillium roqueforti RNA mycovirus 1 (PrRV1), all of which belong to a newly proposed family Fusariviridae. For this study, we designed the virus as "Alternaria brassicicola fusarivirus 1" (AbFV1). Virus elimination revealed that AbFV1 has no conspicuous impact on the biological properties of its host. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. In-vitro activity of taurolidine on single species and a multispecies population associated with periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollinger, Lilly; Schnyder, Simone; Nietzsche, Sandor; Sculean, Anton; Eick, Sigrun

    2015-04-01

    The antimicrobial activity of taurolidine was compared with minocycline against microbial species associated with periodontitis (four single strains and a 12-species mixture). Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs), killing as well as activities on established and forming single-species biofilms and a 12-species biofilm were determined. The MICs of taurolidine against single species were always 0.31 mg/ml, the MBCs were 0.64 mg/ml. The used mixed microbiota was less sensitive to taurolidine, MIC and the MBC was 2.5 mg/ml. The strains and the mixture were completely killed by 2.5 mg/ml taurolidine, whereas 256 μg/ml minocycline reduced the bacterial counts of the mixture by 5 log10 colony forming units (cfu). Coating the surface with 10 mg/ml taurolidine or 256 μg/ml minocycline prevented completely biofilm formation of Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 but not of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Y4 and the mixture. On 4.5 d old biofilms, taurolidine acted concentration dependent with a reduction by 5 log10 cfu (P. gingivalis ATCC 33277) and 7 log10 cfu (A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4) when applying 10 mg/ml. Minocycline decreased the cfu counts by 1-2 log10 cfu independent of the used concentration. The reduction of the cfu counts in the 4.5 d old multi-species biofilms was about 3 log10 cfu after application of any minocycline concentration and after using 10 mg/ml taurolidine. Taurolidine is active against species associated with periodontitis, even within biofilms. Nevertheless a complete elimination of complex biofilms by taurolidine seems to be impossible and underlines the importance of a mechanical removal of biofilms prior to application of taurolidine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Quantifying in situ growth rate of a filamentous bacterial species in activated sludge using rRNA:rDNA ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vivi L; He, Xia; de Los Reyes, Francis L

    2016-11-01

    If the in situ growth rate of filamentous bacteria in activated sludge can be quantified, researchers can more accurately assess the effect of operating conditions on the growth of filaments and improve the mathematical modeling of filamentous bulking. We developed a method to quantify the in situ specific growth rate of Sphaerotilus natans (a model filament) in activated sludge using the species-specific 16S rRNA:rDNA ratio. Primers targeting the 16S rRNA of S. natans were designed, and real-time PCR and RT-PCR were used to quantify DNA and RNA levels of S. natans, respectively. A positive linear relationship was found between the rRNA:rDNA ratio (from 440 to 4500) and the specific growth rate of S. natans (from 0.036 to 0.172 h -1 ) using chemostat experiments. The in situ growth rates of S. natans in activated sludge samples from three water reclamation facilities were quantified, illustrating how the approach can be applied in a complex environment such as activated sludge. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Can Create Alternative Polyadenylation Signals and Affect Gene Expression through Loss of MicroRNA-Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Laurent F.; Sætrom, Pål

    2012-01-01

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) can for example occur when a protein-coding gene has several polyadenylation (polyA) signals in its last exon, resulting in messenger RNAs (mRNAs) with different 3′ untranslated region (UTR) lengths. Different 3′UTR lengths can give different microRNA (miRNA) regulation such that shortened transcripts have increased expression. The APA process is part of human cells' natural regulatory processes, but APA also seems to play an important role in many human diseases. Although altered APA in disease can have many causes, we reasoned that mutations in DNA elements that are important for the polyA process, such as the polyA signal and the downstream GU-rich region, can be one important mechanism. To test this hypothesis, we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that can create or disrupt APA signals (APA-SNPs). By using a data-integrative approach, we show that APA-SNPs can affect 3′UTR length, miRNA regulation, and mRNA expression—both between homozygote individuals and within heterozygote individuals. Furthermore, we show that a significant fraction of the alleles that cause APA are strongly and positively linked with alleles found by genome-wide studies to be associated with disease. Our results confirm that APA-SNPs can give altered gene regulation and that APA alleles that give shortened transcripts and increased gene expression can be important hereditary causes for disease. PMID:22915998

  15. Structure-spectrophotometric selectivity relationship in interactions of quercetin related flavonoids with double stranded and single stranded RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piantanida, Ivo; Mašić, Lozika; Rusak, Gordana

    2009-04-01

    Interactions of five flavonoids with dsRNA and single stranded ssRNA were studied by UV/vis titrations. The results obtained supported the intercalative binding mode as a dominant interaction of studied flavonoids with dsRNA as well as major interaction with ssRNA. Furthermore, changes of the UV/vis spectra of flavonoids induced by addition of poly G or poly C, respectively, are significantly stronger than changes induced by double stranded poly G-poly C, pointing to essential role of the free poly G or poly C sequence (not hydrogen bonded in double helix). Exclusively poly G caused significant batochromic shift of the UV/vis maxima of all studied flavonoids, whereby the intensity of batochromic shift is nicely correlated to the number of OH groups of flavonoid. Unlikely to poly G, addition of poly A and poly U induced measurable changes only in the UV/vis spectra of flavonoids characterised by no OH (galangin) or three OH groups (myricetin) on the phenyl part of the molecule. Consequently, flavonoids with one- or two-OH groups on the phenyl part of the molecule (luteolin, fisetin, kaempferol) specifically differentiate between poly A, poly U (negligible changes in the UV/Vis spectra) and poly G (strong changes in the UV/Vis spectra) as well as poly C (moderate changes in the UV/Vis spectra).

  16. Capillary electrophoresis ribosomal RNA single-stranded conformation polymorphism: a new approach for characterization of low-diversity microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nai, Yi H; Zemb, Oliver; Gutierrez-Zamora, Maria-Luisa; Manefield, Mike; Powell, Shane M; Breadmore, Michael C

    2012-10-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has been the principle system for nucleic acid analysis since the early 1990s due to its inherent advantages such as fast analysis time, high resolution and efficiency, minimal sample requirement, high detection sensitivity, and automation. In the past few decades, microbial community fingerprinting methods such as terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) have migrated to CE to utilize its advantages over conventional slab gel electrophoresis. Recently, a gel-based direct rRNA fingerprint method was demonstrated. Different from other existing microbial community characterization approaches, this novel approach is polymerase chain reaction free and capable of providing information on the relative abundance of rRNA from individual phylotypes in low-diversity samples. As a gel-based method, it has a long analysis time and relatively large reagent and sample requirements. Here, we addressed these limitations by transferring the RNA fingerprint approach to the CE platform. Analysis time significantly improved from 24 h to 60 min, and the use of a fluorescently labeled hybridization probe as the detection strategy decreased the sample requirement by ten-fold. The combination of fast analysis time, low sample requirement, and sensitive fluorescence detection makes CE-RNA-SSCP an appealing new approach for characterizing low-diversity microbial communities.

  17. Impact of Anthropogenic Noise on Aquatic Animals: From Single Species to Community-Level Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabet, Saeed Shafiei; Neo, Yik Yaw; Slabbekoorn, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise underwater is on the rise and may affect aquatic animals of marine and freshwater ecosystems. Many recent studies concern some sort of impact assessment of a single species. Few studies addressed the noise impact on species interactions underwater, whereas there are some studies that address community-level impact but only on land in air. Key processes such as predator-prey or competitor interactions may be affected by the masking of auditory cues, noise-related disturbance, or attentional interference. Noise-associated changes in these interactions can cause shifts in species abundance and modify communities, leading to fundamental ecosystem changes. To gain further insight into the mechanism and generality of earlier findings, we investigated the impact on both a predator and a prey species in captivity, zebrafish (Danio rerio) preying on waterfleas (Daphnia magna).

  18. Capillary Electrophoresis Single-Strand Conformational Polymorphisms as a Method to Differentiate Algal Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Jernigan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformational polymorphism (CE-SSCP was explored as a fast and inexpensive method to differentiate both prokaryotic (blue-green and eukaryotic (green and brown algae. A selection of two blue-green algae (Nostoc muscorum and Anabaena inaequalis, five green algae (Chlorella vulgaris, Oedogonium foveolatum, Mougeotia sp., Scenedesmus quadricauda, and Ulothrix fimbriata, and one brown algae (Ectocarpus sp. were examined and CE-SSCP electropherogram “fingerprints” were compared to each other for two variable regions of either the 16S or 18S rDNA gene. The electropherogram patterns were remarkably stable and consistent for each particular species. The patterns were unique to each species, although some common features were observed between the different types of algae. CE-SSCP could be a useful method for monitoring changes in an algae species over time as potential shifts in species occurred.

  19. Emendation of the family Chlamydiaceae: proposal of a single genus, Chlamydia, to include all currently recognized species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachse, Konrad; Bavoil, Patrik M; Kaltenboeck, Bernhard; Stephens, Richard S; Kuo, Cho-Chou; Rosselló-Móra, Ramon; Horn, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    The family Chlamydiaceae (order Chlamydiales, phylum Chlamydiae) comprises important, obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens of humans and animals. Subdivision of the family into the two genera Chlamydia and Chlamydophila has been discussed controversially during the past decade. Here, we have revisited the current classification in the light of recent genomic data and in the context of the unique biological properties of these microorganisms. We conclude that neither generally used 16S rRNA sequence identity cut-off values nor parameters based on genomic similarity consistently separate the two genera. Notably, no easily recognizable phenotype such as host preference or tissue tropism is available that would support a subdivision. In addition, the genus Chlamydophila is currently not well accepted and not used by a majority of research groups in the field. Therefore, we propose the classification of all 11 currently recognized Chlamydiaceae species in a single genus, the genus Chlamydia. Finally, we provide emended descriptions of the family Chlamydiaceae, the genus Chlamydia, as well as the species Chlamydia abortus, Chlamydia caviae and Chlamydia felis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of Electrostatics in the assembly pathway of a single-stranded RNA virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garmann, R.F.; Comas-Garcia, M.; Koay, M.S.T.; Cornelissen, Jeroen Johannes Lambertus Maria; Knobler, C.M.; Gelbart, W.M.

    2014-01-01

    We have recently discovered (R. D. Cadena-Nava et al., J. Virol. 86:3318–3326, 2012, doi:10.1128/JVI.06566-11) that the in vitro packaging of RNA by the capsid protein (CP) of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus is optimal when there is a significant excess of CP, specifically that complete packaging of

  1. How to switch the motor on: RNA polymerase initiation steps at the single-molecule level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchetti, M.; Malinowska, A.; Heller, I.; Wuite, G. J. L.

    RNA polymerase (RNAP) is the central motor of gene expression since it governs the process of transcription. In prokaryotes, this holoenzyme is formed by the RNAP core and a sigma factor. After approaching and binding the specific promoter site on the DNA, the holoenzyme-promoter complex undergoes

  2. A Bayesian taxonomic classification method for 16S rRNA gene sequences with improved species-level accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiang; Lin, Huaiying; Revanna, Kashi; Dong, Qunfeng

    2017-05-10

    Species-level classification for 16S rRNA gene sequences remains a serious challenge for microbiome researchers, because existing taxonomic classification tools for 16S rRNA gene sequences either do not provide species-level classification, or their classification results are unreliable. The unreliable results are due to the limitations in the existing methods which either lack solid probabilistic-based criteria to evaluate the confidence of their taxonomic assignments, or use nucleotide k-mer frequency as the proxy for sequence similarity measurement. We have developed a method that shows significantly improved species-level classification results over existing methods. Our method calculates true sequence similarity between query sequences and database hits using pairwise sequence alignment. Taxonomic classifications are assigned from the species to the phylum levels based on the lowest common ancestors of multiple database hits for each query sequence, and further classification reliabilities are evaluated by bootstrap confidence scores. The novelty of our method is that the contribution of each database hit to the taxonomic assignment of the query sequence is weighted by a Bayesian posterior probability based upon the degree of sequence similarity of the database hit to the query sequence. Our method does not need any training datasets specific for different taxonomic groups. Instead only a reference database is required for aligning to the query sequences, making our method easily applicable for different regions of the 16S rRNA gene or other phylogenetic marker genes. Reliable species-level classification for 16S rRNA or other phylogenetic marker genes is critical for microbiome research. Our software shows significantly higher classification accuracy than the existing tools and we provide probabilistic-based confidence scores to evaluate the reliability of our taxonomic classification assignments based on multiple database matches to query sequences. Despite

  3. Comparison of Bacteroides-Prevotella 16S rRNA genetic markers for fecal samples from different animal species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, L.R.; Voytek, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    To effectively manage surface and ground waters it is necessary to improve our ability to detect and identify sources of fecal contamination. We evaluated the use of the anaerobic bacterial group Bacteroides-Prevotella as a potential fecal indicator. Terminal restriction length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of the 16S rRNA genes from this group was used to determine differences in populations and to identify any unique populations in chickens, cows, deer, dogs, geese, horses, humans, pigs, and seagulls. The group appears to be a good potential fecal indicator in all groups tested except for avians. Cluster analysis of Bacteroides-Prevotella community T-RFLP profiles indicates that Bacteroides-Prevotella populations from samples of the same host species are much more similar to each other than to samples from different source species. We were unable to identify unique peaks that were exclusive to any source species; however, for most host species, at least one T-RFLP peak was identified to be more commonly found in that species, and a combination of peaks could be used to identify the source. T-RFLP profiles obtained from water spiked with known-source feces contained the expected diagnostic peaks from the source. These results indicate that the approach of identifying Bacteroides-Prevotella molecular markers associated with host species might be useful in identifying sources of fecal contamination in the environment.

  4. Molecular identification of broomrape species from a single seed by High Resolution Melting analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Rolland

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Broomrapes are holoparasitic plants spreading through seeds. Each plant produces hundreds of thousands of seeds which remain viable in the soils for decades. To limit their spread, drastic measures are being taken and the contamination of a commercial seed lot by a single broomrape seed can lead to its rejection. Considering that broomrapes species identification from a single seed is extremely difficult even for trained botanists and that among all the described species, only a few are really noxious for the crops, numerous seed lots are rejected because of the contamination by seeds of non-noxious broomrape species. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a High Resolution Melting assay identifying the eight most noxious and common broomrape species (P. aegyptiaca, O. cernua, O. crenata, O. cumana, O. foetida, O. hederae, O. minor, and P. ramosa from a single seed. Based on trnL and rbcL plastidial genes amplification, the designed assay successfully identifies O. cumana, O. cernua, O. crenata, O. minor, O. hederae, and O. foetida; P. ramosa and P. aegyptiaca can be differentiated from other species but not from each other. Tested on 50 seed lots, obtained results perfectly matched identifications performed by sequencing. Through the analysis of common seed lots by different analysts, the reproducibility of the assay was evaluated at 90 %. Despite an original sample preparation process it was not possible to extract enough DNA from some seeds (10% of the samples. The described assay fulfils its objectives and allows an accurate identification of the targeted broomrape species. It can be used to identify contaminants in commercial seed lots or for any other purpose. The assay might be extended to vegetative material.

  5. Molecular Identification of Broomrape Species from a Single Seed by High Resolution Melting Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, Mathieu; Dupuy, Aurélie; Pelleray, Aude; Delavault, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Broomrapes are holoparasitic plants spreading through seeds. Each plant produces hundreds of thousands of seeds which remain viable in the soils for decades. To limit their spread, drastic measures are being taken and the contamination of a commercial seed lot by a single broomrape seed can lead to its rejection. Considering that broomrapes species identification from a single seed is extremely difficult even for trained botanists and that among all the described species, only a few are really noxious for the crops, numerous seed lots are rejected because of the contamination by seeds of non-noxious broomrape species. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a High Resolution Melting assay identifying the eight most noxious and common broomrape species ( Phelipanche aegyptiaca , Orobanche cernua , O. crenata, O. cumana , O. foetida , O. hederae , O. minor , and P. ramosa ) from a single seed. Based on trn L and rbc L plastidial genes amplification, the designed assay successfully identifies O. cumana , O. cernua , O. crenata , O. minor , O. hederae , and O. foetida ; P. ramosa , and P. aegyptiaca can be differentiated from other species but not from each other. Tested on 50 seed lots, obtained results perfectly matched identifications performed by sequencing. Through the analysis of common seed lots by different analysts, the reproducibility of the assay was evaluated at 90%. Despite an original sample preparation process it was not possible to extract enough DNA from some seeds (10% of the samples). The described assay fulfills its objectives and allows an accurate identification of the targeted broomrape species. It can be used to identify contaminants in commercial seed lots or for any other purpose. The assay might be extended to vegetative material.

  6. The evaluation of an identification algorithm for Mycobacterium species using the 16S rRNA coding gene and rpoB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Kazumi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: The 16S rRNA gene identification is a rapid and prevalent method but still has some limitations. Therefore, the stepwise combination of rpoB with 16S rRNA gene analysis is an effective system for the identification of Mycobacterium species.

  7. The effects of a single bout pilates exercise on mRNA expression of bone metabolic cytokines in osteopenia women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang Sun; Kim, Ji Yeon; Kim, Hyo Jin

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a single bout pilates exercise on mRNA expression of bone metabolic cytokines in elderly osteopenia women. We selected 11 people of elderly osteopenia women and loaded a single bout pilates exercise about RPE 10-14 level. The blood samples were collected before, immediately after and 60 minute after pilates exercise, then examined calcium metabolic markers in serum and extracted peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) from whole blood and confirmed mRNA expression of bone metabolic cytokines from PBMC. To clarify the changes during exercise, we designed repeated measure ANOVA as the control group to perform blood sampling without exercise. As a result, serum P showed significant interaction effect between group and time (ppilates exercise group decreased about 9% at immediately after exercise and 13% during recovery after exercise (ppilates group significantly increased at immediately after exercise and during recovery after exercise (ppilates group (ppilates group (NS). These results suggested that a single bout pilates exercise of elderly osteopenia women cause hypophosphatemia with temporary muscle damage, and it leading high turnover bone metabolic state with to activate both of bone formation and bone resorption.

  8. Obtaining high quality RNA from single cell populations in human postmortem brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietersen, Charmaine Y; Lim, Maribel P; Woo, Tsung-Ung W

    2009-08-06

    We proposed to investigate the gray matter reduction in the superior temporal gyrus seen in schizophrenia patients, by interrogating gene expression profiles of pyramidal neurons in layer III. It is well known that the cerebral cortex is an exceptionally heterogeneous structure comprising diverse regions, layers and cell types, each of which is characterized by distinct cellular and molecular compositions and therefore differential gene expression profiles. To circumvent the confounding effects of tissue heterogeneity, we used laser-capture microdissection (LCM) in order to isolate our specific cell-type i.e pyramidal neurons. Approximately 500 pyramidal neurons stained with the Histogene staining solution were captured using the Arcturus XT LCM system. RNA was then isolated from captured cells and underwent two rounds of T7-based linear amplification using Arcturus/Molecular Devices kits. The Experion LabChip (Bio-Rad) gel and electropherogram indicated good quality a(m)RNA, with a transcript length extending past 600nt required for microarrays. The amount of mRNA obtained averaged 51 microg, with acceptable mean sample purity as indicated by the A260/280 ratio, of 2.5. Gene expression was profiled using the Human X3P GeneChip probe array from Affymetrix.

  9. Beyond Streptococcus mutans: dental caries onset linked to multiple species by 16S rRNA community analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin L Gross

    Full Text Available Dental caries in very young children may be severe, result in serious infection, and require general anesthesia for treatment. Dental caries results from a shift within the biofilm community specific to the tooth surface, and acidogenic species are responsible for caries. Streptococcus mutans, the most common acid producer in caries, is not always present and occurs as part of a complex microbial community. Understanding the degree to which multiple acidogenic species provide functional redundancy and resilience to caries-associated communities will be important for developing biologic interventions. In addition, microbial community interactions in health and caries pathogenesis are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate bacterial community profiles associated with the onset of caries in the primary dentition. In a combination cross-sectional and longitudinal design, bacterial community profiles at progressive stages of caries and over time were examined and compared to those of health. 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used for bacterial community analysis. Streptococcus mutans was the dominant species in many, but not all, subjects with caries. Elevated levels of S. salivarius, S. sobrinus, and S. parasanguinis were also associated with caries, especially in subjects with no or low levels of S. mutans, suggesting these species are alternative pathogens, and that multiple species may need to be targeted for interventions. Veillonella, which metabolizes lactate, was associated with caries and was highly correlated with total acid producing species. Among children without previous history of caries, Veillonella, but not S. mutans or other acid-producing species, predicted future caries. Bacterial community diversity was reduced in caries as compared to health, as many species appeared to occur at lower levels or be lost as caries advanced, including the Streptococcus mitis group, Neisseria, and Streptococcus sanguinis. This

  10. Beyond Streptococcus mutans: Dental Caries Onset Linked to Multiple Species by 16S rRNA Community Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Erin L.; Beall, Clifford J.; Kutsch, Stacey R.; Firestone, Noah D.; Leys, Eugene J.; Griffen, Ann L.

    2012-01-01

    Dental caries in very young children may be severe, result in serious infection, and require general anesthesia for treatment. Dental caries results from a shift within the biofilm community specific to the tooth surface, and acidogenic species are responsible for caries. Streptococcus mutans, the most common acid producer in caries, is not always present and occurs as part of a complex microbial community. Understanding the degree to which multiple acidogenic species provide functional redundancy and resilience to caries-associated communities will be important for developing biologic interventions. In addition, microbial community interactions in health and caries pathogenesis are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate bacterial community profiles associated with the onset of caries in the primary dentition. In a combination cross-sectional and longitudinal design, bacterial community profiles at progressive stages of caries and over time were examined and compared to those of health. 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used for bacterial community analysis. Streptococcus mutans was the dominant species in many, but not all, subjects with caries. Elevated levels of S. salivarius, S. sobrinus, and S. parasanguinis were also associated with caries, especially in subjects with no or low levels of S. mutans, suggesting these species are alternative pathogens, and that multiple species may need to be targeted for interventions. Veillonella, which metabolizes lactate, was associated with caries and was highly correlated with total acid producing species. Among children without previous history of caries, Veillonella, but not S. mutans or other acid-producing species, predicted future caries. Bacterial community diversity was reduced in caries as compared to health, as many species appeared to occur at lower levels or be lost as caries advanced, including the Streptococcus mitis group, Neisseria, and Streptococcus sanguinis. This may have

  11. Selective release of microRNA species from normal and malignant mammary epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Pigati

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs in body fluids are candidate diagnostics for a variety of conditions and diseases, including breast cancer. One premise for using extracellular miRNAs to diagnose disease is the notion that the abundance of the miRNAs in body fluids reflects their abundance in the abnormal cells causing the disease. As a result, the search for such diagnostics in body fluids has focused on miRNAs that are abundant in the cells of origin. Here we report that released miRNAs do not necessarily reflect the abundance of miRNA in the cell of origin. We find that release of miRNAs from cells into blood, milk and ductal fluids is selective and that the selection of released miRNAs may correlate with malignancy. In particular, the bulk of miR-451 and miR-1246 produced by malignant mammary epithelial cells was released, but the majority of these miRNAs produced by non-malignant mammary epithelial cells was retained. Our findings suggest the existence of a cellular selection mechanism for miRNA release and indicate that the extracellular and cellular miRNA profiles differ. This selective release of miRNAs is an important consideration for the identification of circulating miRNAs as biomarkers of disease.

  12. Single-Cell RNA-Seq Reveals Transcriptional Heterogeneity in Latent and Reactivated HIV-Infected Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golumbeanu, Monica; Cristinelli, Sara; Rato, Sylvie; Munoz, Miguel; Cavassini, Matthias; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Ciuffi, Angela

    2018-04-24

    Despite effective treatment, HIV can persist in latent reservoirs, which represent a major obstacle toward HIV eradication. Targeting and reactivating latent cells is challenging due to the heterogeneous nature of HIV-infected cells. Here, we used a primary model of HIV latency and single-cell RNA sequencing to characterize transcriptional heterogeneity during HIV latency and reactivation. Our analysis identified transcriptional programs leading to successful reactivation of HIV expression. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Ancient host specificity within a single species of brood parasitic bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spottiswoode, Claire N; Stryjewski, Katherine Faust; Quader, Suhel; Colebrook-Robjent, John F R; Sorenson, Michael D

    2011-10-25

    Parasites that exploit multiple hosts often experience diversifying selection for host-specific adaptations. This can result in multiple strains of host specialists coexisting within a single parasitic species. A long-standing conundrum is how such sympatric host races can be maintained within a single parasitic species in the face of interbreeding among conspecifics specializing on different hosts. Striking examples are seen in certain avian brood parasites such as cuckoos, many of which show host-specific differentiation in traits such as host egg mimicry. Exploiting a Zambian egg collection amassed over several decades and supplemented by recent fieldwork, we show that the brood parasitic Greater Honeyguide Indicator indicator exhibits host-specific differentiation in both egg size and egg shape. Genetic analysis of honeyguide eggs and chicks show that two highly divergent mitochondrial DNA lineages are associated with ground- and tree-nesting hosts, respectively, indicating perfect fidelity to two mutually exclusive sets of host species for millions of years. Despite their age and apparent adaptive diversification, however, these ancient lineages are not cryptic species; a complete lack of differentiation in nuclear genes shows that mating between individuals reared by different hosts is sufficiently frequent to prevent speciation. These results indicate that host specificity is maternally inherited, that host-specific adaptation among conspecifics can be maintained without reproductive isolation, and that host specificity can be remarkably ancient in evolutionary terms.

  14. Multiple Phytophthora species associated with a single riparian ecosystem in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Jan H; Slippers, Bernard; Wingfield, Michael J; Gryzenhout, Marieka

    2015-01-01

    The diversity of Phytophthora spp. in rivers and riparian ecosystems has received considerable international attention, although little such research has been conducted in South Africa. This study determined the diversity of Phytophthora spp. within a single river in Gauteng province of South Africa. Samples were collected over 1 y including biweekly river baiting with Rhododendron indicum leaves. Phytophthora isolates were identified with phylogenetic analyses of sequences for the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal DNA and the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase c subunit I (coxI) gene. Eight Phytophthora spp. were identified, including a new taxon, P. taxon Sisulu-river, and two hybrid species from Cooke's ITS clade 6. Of these, species from Clade 6 were the most abundant, including P. chlamydospora and P. lacustris. Species residing in Clade 2 also were encountered, including P. multivora, P. plurivora and P. citrophthora. The detection of eight species in this investigation of Phytophthora diversity in a single riparian river ecosystem in northern South Africa adds to the known diversity of this genus in South Africa and globally. © 2015 by The Mycological Society of America.

  15. Identification of Egyptian Fasciola species by PCR and restriction endonucleases digestion of the nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gozamy, Bothina R; Shoukry, Nahla M

    2009-08-01

    Fascioliasis is one of the familiar zoonotic health problems of worldwide distribution including Egypt. In this study, a simple and rapid polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphisms (PCR/RFLPs) assay, using the common restriction endonucleases Aval, EcoRI, Eael, Sac11 and Avail was applied to differentiate between both Fasciola gigantica and F. hepatica. The five restriction endonucleases were used to differentiate between the two species of Fasciola based on -1950 bp long sequence of the 18S nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA gene. Aval and EcoRI restriction endonucleases failed to differentiate between the two Fasciola species when each restriction enzyme gave the same restriction patterns in both of them. However, F. gigantica and F. hepatica were well-differentiated when their small subunit ribosomal DNA were digested with Eael and Sac 11 restriction endonucleases.

  16. Rapid Identification of Clinically Relevant Nocardia Species to Genus Level by 16S rRNA Gene PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Frederic J.; Provost, Frederique; Boiron, Patrick

    1999-01-01

    Two regions of the gene coding for 16S rRNA in Nocardia species were selected as genus-specific primer sequences for a PCR assay. The PCR protocol was tested with 60 strains of clinically relevant Nocardia isolates and type strains. It gave positive results for all strains tested. Conversely, the PCR assay was negative for all tested species belonging to the most closely related genera, including Dietzia, Gordona, Mycobacterium, Rhodococcus, Streptomyces, and Tsukamurella. Besides, unlike the latter group of isolates, all Nocardia strains exhibited one MlnI recognition site but no SacI restriction site. This assay offers a specific and rapid alternative to chemotaxonomic methods for the identification of Nocardia spp. isolated from pathogenic samples. PMID:9854071

  17. Examining the relationship between total species richness and single island palaeo- and neo-endemics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallimanis, A. S.; Panitsa, M.; Bergmeier, E.; Dimopoulos, P.

    2011-03-01

    Recently, Emerson and Kolm (2005) hypothesized that diversity begets speciation (DBS hypothesis). The relationship between total species richness and single island endemic diversity (as a proportion of the total species richness of the island) has been used as evidence for the DBS hypothesis. This relationship has been documented in oceanic archipelagos, but many criticisms have been raised on whether this relationship truly supports the DBS hypothesis. In this study we tested if this hypothesis holds in the Aegean archipelago (a continental archipelago with continuous human presence over millennia). Endemism in the Aegean includes mainly neo-endemic species but also relictual populations of formerly more widespread species (i.e. palaeo-endemics). Contrary to the DBS hypothesis, we found that total species richness was not significantly correlated to single island endemics (neither neo-endemics nor palaeo-endemics) as a proportion of the island flora. Furthermore, we found that neo-endemic diversity (either as species richness or as a proportion of the islands flora) is mainly correlated to island maximum elevation, while area and isolation were less important. So if this ratio is indeed an index of speciation, then an alternative explanation might be that elevation (interpreted as a proxy for habitat heterogeneity) is the driver of speciation in our case. Palaeo-endemics, on the other hand, were present in only six of the largest islands in the Aegean and their diversity was strongly correlated only with island area, perhaps implying that larger islands support larger population sizes that buffer stochastic extinctions risks.

  18. Directed evolution of DNA polymerase, RNA polymerase and reverse transcriptase activity in a single polypeptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Jennifer L; Loakes, David; Jaroslawski, Szymon; Too, Kathleen; Holliger, Philipp

    2006-08-18

    DNA polymerases enable key technologies in modern biology but for many applications, native polymerases are limited by their stringent substrate recognition. Here we describe short-patch compartmentalized self-replication (spCSR), a novel strategy to expand the substrate spectrum of polymerases in a targeted way. spCSR is based on the previously described CSR, but unlike CSR only a short region (a "patch") of the gene under investigation is diversified and replicated. This allows the selection of polymerases under conditions where catalytic activity and processivity are compromised to the extent that full self-replication is inefficient. We targeted two specific motifs involved in substrate recognition in the active site of DNA polymerase I from Thermus aquaticus (Taq) and selected for incorporation of both ribonucleotide- (NTP) and deoxyribonucleotide-triphosphates (dNTPs) using spCSR. This allowed the isolation of multiple variants of Taq with apparent dual substrate specificity. They were able to synthesize RNA, while still retaining essentially wild-type (wt) DNA polymerase activity as judged by PCR. One such mutant (AA40: E602V, A608V, I614M, E615G) was able to incorporate both NTPs and dNTPs with the same catalytic efficiency as the wt enzyme incorporates dNTPs. AA40 allowed the generation of mixed RNA-DNA amplification products in PCR demonstrating DNA polymerase, RNA polymerase as well as reverse transcriptase activity within the same polypeptide. Furthermore, AA40 displayed an expanded substrate spectrum towards other 2'-substituted nucleotides and was able to synthesize nucleic acid polymers in which each base bore a different 2'-substituent. Our results suggest that spCSR will be a powerful strategy for the generation of polymerases with altered substrate specificity for applications in nano- and biotechnology and in the enzymatic synthesis of antisense and RNAi probes.

  19. Toxin MqsR Cleaves Single-Stranded mRNA with Various 5 Ends

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-24

    decreases persisence about 2400- fold (Harrison et al. 2009). Another type II TA toxin, MazF, induces growth arrest that results in up to a 700- fold...Life Technologies, Waltham, MA). In brief, 25 pmol of RNA was first treated with 0.1 U of calf intestine alkaline phosphatase (CIP, 0.1 U/μL) for 1...MqsR/MqsA regulate toxin CspD. Environ. Microbiol. 12:1105–1121. Kwan, B. W., J. A. Valenta, M. J. Benedik, and T. K. Wood. 2013. Arrested protein

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of RNA: An in silico single molecule approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    McDowell, S.E.; Špačková, Naďa; Šponer, Jiří; Walter, N.G.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 2 (2006), s. 169-184 ISSN 0006-3525 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/05/0009; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/05/0388; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040581; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06030; GA MŠk(CZ) LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : hydration and cation binding * molecular dynamics * RNA Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.480, year: 2006

  1. Early transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of CD8+ T cell differentiation revealed by single-cell RNA-seq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakaradov, Boyko; Arsenio, Janilyn; Widjaja, Christella E.; He, Zhaoren; Aigner, Stefan; Metz, Patrick J.; Yu, Bingfei; Wehrens, Ellen J.; Lopez, Justine; Kim, Stephanie H.; Zuniga, Elina I.; Goldrath, Ananda W.; Chang, John T.; Yeo, Gene W.

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY During microbial infection, responding CD8+ T lymphocytes differentiate into heterogeneous subsets that together provide immediate and durable protection. To elucidate the dynamic transcriptional changes that underlie this process, we applied a single-cell RNA sequencing approach and analyzed individual CD8+ T lymphocytes sequentially throughout the course of a viral infection in vivo. Our analyses revealed a striking transcriptional divergence among cells that had undergone their first division and identified previously unknown molecular determinants controlling CD8+ T lymphocyte fate specification. These findings suggest a model of terminal effector cell differentiation initiated by an early burst of transcriptional activity and subsequently refined by epigenetic silencing of transcripts associated with memory lymphocytes, highlighting the power and necessity of single-cell approaches. PMID:28218746

  2. Kinetic proofreading at single molecular level: aminoacylation of tRNA(Ile and the role of water as an editor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantu Santra

    Full Text Available Proofreading/editing in protein synthesis is essential for accurate translation of information from the genetic code. In this article we present a theoretical investigation of efficiency of a kinetic proofreading mechanism that employs hydrolysis of the wrong substrate as the discriminatory step in enzyme catalytic reactions. We consider aminoacylation of tRNA(Ile which is a crucial step in protein synthesis and for which experimental results are now available. We present an augmented kinetic scheme and then employ methods of stochastic simulation algorithm to obtain time dependent concentrations of different substances involved in the reaction and their rates of formation. We obtain the rates of product formation and ATP hydrolysis for both correct and wrong substrates (isoleucine and valine in our case, respectively, in single molecular enzyme as well as ensemble enzyme kinetics. The present theoretical scheme correctly reproduces (i the amplitude of the discrimination factor in the overall rates between isoleucine and valine which is obtained as (1.8×10(2.(4.33×10(2 = 7.8×10(4, (ii the rates of ATP hydrolysis for both Ile and Val at different substrate concentrations in the aminoacylation of tRNA(Ile. The present study shows a non-michaelis type dependence of rate of reaction on tRNA(Ile concentration in case of valine. The overall editing in steady state is found to be independent of amino acid concentration. Interestingly, the computed ATP hydrolysis rate for valine at high substrate concentration is same as the rate of formation of Ile-tRNA(Ile whereas at intermediate substrate concentration the ATP hydrolysis rate is relatively low. We find that the presence of additional editing domain in class I editing enzyme makes the kinetic proofreading more efficient through enhanced hydrolysis of wrong product at the editing CP1 domain.

  3. Contemporary root canal irrigants are able to disrupt and eradicate single- and dual-species biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, Graeme; O'Donnell, Darren; Ready, Derren; Ng, Yuan-Ling; Pratten, Jonathan; Gulabivala, Kishor

    2009-09-01

    Clinical/microbiological studies have consistently revealed the persistence of some bacteria after conventional root canal debridement. Although this was originally attributed to the complexity of the root canal anatomy and the difficulty of delivering antibacterial agents effectively, it has emerged that the biofilm encasement of bacterial cells may confer a further mechanism of resistance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relative disruption and bactericidal effects of root canal irrigants on single- and dual-species biofilms of root canal isolates. Biofilms of Streptococcus sanguinis, Enterococcus faecalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis were grown on nitrocellulose membranes for 72 hours and immersed in NaOCl, EDTA, chlorhexidine, and iodine for 1, 5, or 10 minutes. The number of viable and nonviable bacteria disrupted from the biofilm and those remaining adherent were determined by using a viability stain in conjunction with fluorescence microscopy. Gram-negative obligate anaerobe species were more susceptible to cell removal than gram-positive facultative anaerobes. The majority of cells were disrupted after the first minute of exposure; however, the extent varied according to the agent and species. The most effective agent at disrupting biofilms was NaOCl. Iodine was generally effective at bacterial killing but not disruption. Biofilm disruption and cell viability were influenced by the species, their coassociation in dual-species biofilms, the test agent, and the duration of exposure. The effectiveness of NaOCl as an endodontic irrigant was reinforced.

  4. Purification and characterization of RNA allied extracellular tyrosinase from Aspergillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamdar, Shrirang; Joshi, Swati; Bapat, Vishwas; Jadhav, Jyoti

    2014-02-01

    Production of L-DOPA, an anti-Parkinson's drug, using biological sources is widely studied in which tyrosinase is known to play a vital role. Tyrosinase is an omnipresent type 3 copper enzyme participating in many essential biological functions. Understanding properties of tyrosinase is essential for developing useful tyrosinase-based applications. Hence, extracellular tyrosinase from Aspergillus flavus UWFP 570 was purified using ammonium sulphate precipitation and DEAE ion exchange chromatography up to 8.3-fold. Purified protein was a riboprotein in nature containing significant amount of RNA which was confirmed colorimetrically and by electrophoresis. Removal of RNA reduced the activity and altered the conformation of tyrosinase as suggested by spectroflurometric results. Optimum pH and temperature of this 140 kDa protein were 7 and 40 °C, respectively. Copper sulphate and magnesium chloride enhanced the activity whereas in contrast FeCl₃ inhibited the activity completely. Purified tyrosinase transformed L-tyrosine (5 mM) to L-DOPA within 5 h.

  5. Species specificity of human RPA in simian virus 40 DNA replication lies in T-antigen-dependent RNA primer synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M; Park, J S; Ishiai, M; Hurwitz, J; Lee, S H

    2000-12-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a three-subunit protein complex with multiple functions in DNA replication. Previous study indicated that human RPA (h-RPA) could not be replaced by Schizosaccharomyces pombe RPA (sp-RPA) in simian virus 40 (SV40) replication, suggesting that h-RPA may have a specific function in SV40 DNA replication. To understand the specificity of h-RPA in replication, we prepared heterologous RPAs containing the mixture of human and S.pombe subunits and compared these preparations for various enzymatic activities. Heterologous RPAs containing two human subunits supported SV40 DNA replication, whereas those containing only one human subunit poorly supported DNA replication, suggesting that RPA complex requires at least two human subunits to support its function in SV40 DNA replication. All heterologous RPAs effectively supported single-stranded (ss)DNA binding activity and an elongation of a primed DNA template catalyzed by DNA polymerase (pol) alpha and delta. A strong correlation between SV40 DNA replication activity and large tumor antigen (T-ag)-dependent RNA primer synthesis by pol alpha-primase complex was observed among the heterologous RPAs. Furthermore, T-ag showed a strong interaction with 70- and 34-kDa subunits from human, but poorly interacted with their S.pombe counterparts, indicating that the specificity of h-RPA is due to its role in RNA primer synthesis. In the SV40 replication reaction, the addition of increasing amounts of sp-RPA in the presence of fixed amount of h-RPA significantly reduced overall DNA synthesis, but increased the size of lagging strand, supporting a specific role for h-RPA in RNA primer synthesis. Together, these results suggest that the specificity of h-RPA in SV40 replication lies in T-ag-dependent RNA primer synthesis.

  6. Identification and comparative analysis of the chloroplast α-subunit gene of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase from seven Euglena species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheveleva, Elena V.; Giordani, Nicole V.; Hallick, Richard B.

    2002-01-01

    When the sequence of the Euglena gracilis chloroplast genome was reported in 1993 the α-subunit gene (rpoA) of RNA polymerase appeared to be missing, based on a comparison of all putative reading frames to the then known rpoA loci. Since there has been a large increase in known rpoA sequences, the question of a Euglena chloroplast rpoA gene was re-examined. A previously described unknown reading frame of 161 codons was found to be part of an rpoA gene split by a single group III intron. This rpoA gene, which is highly variable from species to species, was then isolated and characterized in five other euglenoid species, Euglena anabaena, Euglena granulata, Euglena myxocylindracea, Euglena stellata and Euglena viridis, and in the Astasia longa plastid genome. All seven Euglena rpoA genes have either one or three group III introns. The rpoA gene products in Euglena spp. appear to be the most variable in this gene family when compared to the rpoA gene in other species of bacteria, algae and plants. Additionally, Euglena rpoA proteins lack a C-terminal domain required for interaction with some regulatory proteins, a feature shared only with some chlorophyte green algae. The E.gracilis rpoA gene is the distal cistron of a multigene cluster that includes genes for carbohydrate biosynthesis, photosynthetic electron transport, an antenna complex and ribosomal proteins. This study provides new insights into the transcription system of euglenoid plastids, the organization of the plastid genome, group III intron evolution and euglenoid phylogeny. PMID:11861918

  7. Single-strand-conformation polymorphism of ribosomal DNA for rapid species differentiation in genus Phytophthora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ping; Hong, Chuanxue; Richardson, Patricia A; Gallegly, Mannon E

    2003-08-01

    Single-strand-conformation polymorphism (SSCP) of ribosomal DNA of 29 species (282 isolates) of Phytophthora was characterized in this study. Phytophthora boehmeriae, Phytophthora botryosa, Phytophthora cactorum, Phytophthora cambivora, Phytophthora capsici, Phytophthora cinnamomi, Phytophthora colocasiae, Phytophthora fragariae, Phytophthora heveae, Phytophthora hibernalis, Phytophthora ilicis, Phytophthora infestans, Phytophthora katsurae, Phytophthora lateralis, Phytophthora meadii, Phytophthora medicaginis, Phytophthora megakarya, Phytophthora nicotianae, Phytophthora palmivora, Phytophthora phaseoli, Phytophthora pseudotsugae, Phytophthora sojae, Phytophthora syringae, and Phytophthora tropicalis each showed a unique SSCP pattern. Phytophthora citricola, Phytophthora citrophthora, Phytophthora cryptogea, Phytophthora drechsleri, and Phytophthora megasperma each had more than one distinct pattern. A single-stranded DNA ladder also was developed, which facilitates comparison of SSCP patterns within and between gels. With a single DNA fingerprint, 277 isolates of Phytophthora recovered from irrigation water and plant tissues in Virginia were all correctly identified into eight species at substantially reduced time, labor, and cost. The SSCP analysis presented in this work will aid in studies on taxonomy, genetics, and ecology of the genus Phytophthora.

  8. Single-cell duplex RT-LATE-PCR reveals Oct4 and Xist RNA gradients in 8-cell embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartung Odelya

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The formation of two distinctive cell lineages in preimplantation mouse embryos is characterized by differential gene expression. The cells of the inner cell mass are pluripotent and express high levels of Oct4 mRNA, which is down-regulated in the surrounding trophectoderm. In contrast, the trophectoderm of female embryos contains Xist mRNA, which is absent from cells of the inner mass. Prior to blastocyst formation, all blastomeres of female embryos still express both of these RNAs. We, thus, postulated that simultaneous quantification of Oct4 and Xist transcripts in individual blastomeres at the 8-cell stage could be informative as to their subsequent fate. Testing this hypothesis, however, presented numerous technical challenges. We overcame these difficulties by combining PurAmp, a single-tube method for RNA preparation and quantification, with LATE-PCR, an advanced form of asymmetric PCR. Results We constructed a duplex RT-LATE-PCR assay for real-time measurement of Oct4 and Xist templates and confirmed its specificity and quantitative accuracy with different methods. We then undertook analysis of sets of blastomeres isolated from embryos at the 8-cell stage. At this stage, all cells in the embryo are still pluripotent and morphologically equivalent. Our results demonstrate, however, that both Oct4 and Xist RNA levels vary in individual blastomeres comprising the same embryo, with some cells having particularly elevated levels of either transcript. Analysis of multiple embryos also shows that Xist and Oct4 expression levels are not correlated at the 8-cell stage, although transcription of both genes is up-regulated at this time in development. In addition, comparison of data from males and females allowed us to determine that the efficiency of the Oct4/Xist assay is unaffected by sex-related differences in gene expression. Conclusion This paper describes the first example of multiplex RT-LATE-PCR and its utility, when

  9. Bioconductor workflow for single-cell RNA sequencing: Normalization, dimensionality reduction, clustering, and lineage inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perraudeau, Fanny; Risso, Davide; Street, Kelly; Purdom, Elizabeth; Dudoit, Sandrine

    2017-01-01

    Novel single-cell transcriptome sequencing assays allow researchers to measure gene expression levels at the resolution of single cells and offer the unprecendented opportunity to investigate at the molecular level fundamental biological questions, such as stem cell differentiation or the discovery and characterization of rare cell types. However, such assays raise challenging statistical and computational questions and require the development of novel methodology and software. Using stem cell differentiation in the mouse olfactory epithelium as a case study, this integrated workflow provides a step-by-step tutorial to the methodology and associated software for the following four main tasks: (1) dimensionality reduction accounting for zero inflation and over dispersion and adjusting for gene and cell-level covariates; (2) cell clustering using resampling-based sequential ensemble clustering; (3) inference of cell lineages and pseudotimes; and (4) differential expression analysis along lineages.

  10. Addressing challenges in single species assessments via a simple state-space assessment model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders

    Single-species and age-structured fish stock assessments still remains the main tool for managing fish stocks. A simple state-space assessment model is presented as an alternative to (semi) deterministic procedures and the full parametric statistical catch at age models. It offers a solution...... to some of the key challenges of these models. Compared to the deterministic procedures it solves a list of problems originating from falsely assuming that age classified catches are known without errors and allows quantification of uncertainties of estimated quantities of interest. Compared to full...

  11. Single-cell genomics reveals features of a Colwellia species that was dominant during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia eMason

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available During the Deepwater Horizon (DWH oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico a deep-sea hydrocarbon plume developed resulting in a rapid succession of bacteria. Colwellia eventually supplanted Oceanospirillales, which dominated the plume early in the spill. These successional changes may have resulted, in part, from the changing composition and abundance of hydrocarbons over time. Colwellia abundance peaked when gaseous and simple aromatic hydrocarbons increased, yet the metabolic pathway used by Colwellia in hydrocarbon disposition is unknown. Here we used single-cell genomics to gain insights into the genome properties of a Colwellia enriched during the DWH deep-sea plume. A single amplified genome (SAG of a Colwellia cell isolated from a DWH plume, closely related (avg. 98% 16S rRNA gene similarity to other plume Colwellia, was sequenced and annotated. The SAG was similar to the sequenced isolate Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H (84% avg. nucleotide identity. Both had genes for denitrification, chemotaxis and motility, adaptations to cold environments, and a suite of nutrient acquisition genes. The Colwellia SAG may be capable of gaseous and aromatic hydrocarbon degradation, which contrasts with a DWH plume Oceanospirillales SAG genome which encoded non-gaseous n-alkane and cycloalkane degradation. The disparate hydrocarbon degradation pathways are consistent with hydrocarbons that were abundant at different times in the deep-sea plume; first, non-gaseous n-alkanes and cycloalkanes that could be degraded by Oceanospirillales, followed by gaseous, and simple aromatic hydrocarbons that may have been degraded by Colwellia. These insights into the genomic properties of a Colwellia species, which were supported by existing metagenomic sequence data from the plume and DWH contaminated sediments, help further our understanding of the successional changes in the dominant microbial players in the plume over the course of the DWH spill.

  12. Evidence of birth-and-death evolution of 5S rRNA gene in Channa species (Teleostei, Perciformes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Anindya Sundar; Singh, Mamta; Singh, Rajeev Kumar; Lal, Kuldeep Kumar

    2016-12-01

    In higher eukaryotes, minor rDNA family codes for 5S rRNA that is arranged in tandem arrays and comprises of a highly conserved 120 bp long coding sequence with a variable non-transcribed spacer (NTS). Initially the 5S rDNA repeats are considered to be evolved by the process of concerted evolution. But some recent reports, including teleost fishes suggested that evolution of 5S rDNA repeat does not fit into the concerted evolution model and evolution of 5S rDNA family may be explained by a birth-and-death evolution model. In order to study the mode of evolution of 5S rDNA repeats in Perciformes fish species, nucleotide sequence and molecular organization of five species of genus Channa were analyzed in the present study. Molecular analyses revealed several variants of 5S rDNA repeats (four types of NTS) and networks created by a neighbor net algorithm for each type of sequences (I, II, III and IV) did not show a clear clustering in species specific manner. The stable secondary structure is predicted and upstream and downstream conserved regulatory elements were characterized. Sequence analyses also shown the presence of two putative pseudogenes in Channa marulius. Present study supported that 5S rDNA repeats in genus Channa were evolved under the process of birth-and-death.

  13. Transcriptomes of major renal collecting duct cell types in mouse identified by single-cell RNA-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lihe; Lee, Jae Wook; Chou, Chung-Lin; Nair, Anil V; Battistone, Maria A; Păunescu, Teodor G; Merkulova, Maria; Breton, Sylvie; Verlander, Jill W; Wall, Susan M; Brown, Dennis; Burg, Maurice B; Knepper, Mark A

    2017-11-14

    Prior RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) studies have identified complete transcriptomes for most renal epithelial cell types. The exceptions are the cell types that make up the renal collecting duct, namely intercalated cells (ICs) and principal cells (PCs), which account for only a small fraction of the kidney mass, but play critical physiological roles in the regulation of blood pressure, extracellular fluid volume, and extracellular fluid composition. To enrich these cell types, we used FACS that employed well-established lectin cell surface markers for PCs and type B ICs, as well as a newly identified cell surface marker for type A ICs, c-Kit. Single-cell RNA-seq using the IC- and PC-enriched populations as input enabled identification of complete transcriptomes of A-ICs, B-ICs, and PCs. The data were used to create a freely accessible online gene-expression database for collecting duct cells. This database allowed identification of genes that are selectively expressed in each cell type, including cell-surface receptors, transcription factors, transporters, and secreted proteins. The analysis also identified a small fraction of hybrid cells expressing aquaporin-2 and anion exchanger 1 or pendrin transcripts. In many cases, mRNAs for receptors and their ligands were identified in different cells (e.g., Notch2 chiefly in PCs vs. Jag1 chiefly in ICs), suggesting signaling cross-talk among the three cell types. The identified patterns of gene expression among the three types of collecting duct cells provide a foundation for understanding physiological regulation and pathophysiology in the renal collecting duct.

  14. Near infra-red spectroscopy quantitative modelling of bivalve protein, lipid and glycogen composition using single-species versus multi-species calibration and validation sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Jill K.; Maher, William A.; Purss, Matthew B. J.

    2018-03-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) quantitative modelling was used to measure the protein, lipid and glycogen composition of five marine bivalve species (Saccostrea glomerata, Ostrea angasi, Crassostrea gigas, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Anadara trapezia) from multiple locations and seasons. Predictive models were produced for each component using individual species and aggregated sample populations for the three oyster species (S. glomerata, O. angasi and C. gigas) and for all five bivalve species. Whole animal tissues were freeze dried, ground to > 20 μm and scanned by NIRS. Protein, lipid and glycogen composition were determined by traditional chemical analyses and calibration models developed to allow rapid NIRS-measurement of these components in the five bivalve species. Calibration modelling was performed using wavelet selection, genetic algorithms and partial least squares analysis. Model quality was assessed using RPIQ and RMESP. For protein composition, single species model results had RPIQ values between 2.4 and 3.5 and RMSEP between 8.6 and 18%, the three oyster model had an RPIQ of 2.6 and an RMSEP of 10.8% and the five bivalve species had an RPIQ of 3.6 and RMSEP of 8.7% respectively. For lipid composition, single species models achieved RPIQ values between 2.9 and 5.3 with RMSEP between 9.1 and 11.2%, the oyster model had an RPIQ of 3.6 and RMSEP of 6.8 and the five bivalve model had an RPIQ of 5.2 and RMSEP of 6.8% respectively. For glycogen composition, the single species models had RPIQs between 3.8 and 18.9 with RMSEP between 3.5 and 9.2%, the oyster model had an RPIQ of 5.5 and RMSEP of 7.1% and the five bivalve model had an RPIQ of 4 and RMSEP of 7.6% respectively. Comparison between individual species models and aggregated models for three oyster species and five bivalve species for each component indicate that aggregating data from like species produces high quality models with robust and reliable quantitative application. The benefit of

  15. Extractions of High Quality RNA from the Seeds of Jerusalem Artichoke and Other Plant Species with High Levels of Starch and Lipid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanupat Mornkham

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L. is an important tuber crop. However, Jerusalem artichoke seeds contain high levels of starch and lipid, making the extraction of high-quality RNA extremely difficult and the gene expression analysis challenging. This study was aimed to improve existing methods for extracting total RNA from Jerusalem artichoke dry seeds and to assess the applicability of the improved method in other plant species. Five RNA extraction methods were evaluated on Jerusalem artichoke seeds and two were modified. One modified method with the significant improvement was applied to assay seeds of diverse Jerusalem artichoke accessions, sunflower, rice, maize, peanut and marigold. The effectiveness of the improved method to extract total RNA from seeds was assessed using qPCR analysis of four selected genes. The improved method of Ma and Yang (2011 yielded a maximum RNA solubility and removed most interfering substances. The improved protocol generated 29 to 41 µg RNA/30 mg fresh weight. An A260/A280 ratio of 1.79 to 2.22 showed their RNA purity. Extracted RNA was effective for downstream applications such as first-stranded cDNA synthesis, cDNA cloning and qPCR. The improved method was also effective to extract total RNA from seeds of sunflower, rice, maize and peanut that are rich in polyphenols, lipids and polysaccharides.

  16. Cells Respond to Distinct Nanoparticle Properties with Multiple Strategies As Revealed by Single-Cell RNA-Seq

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Hugh D.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Chrisler, William B.; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Hu, Dehong; Szymanski, Craig J.; Xie, Yumei; Melby, Eric S.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Taylor, Ronald C.; Grate, Eva K.; Cooley, Scott K.; McDermott, Jason E.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Orr, Galya

    2016-11-22

    The impact of distinct nanoparticle (NP) properties on cellular response and ultimately human health is unclear. This gap is partially due to experimental difficulties in achieving uniform NP loads in the studied cells, creating heterogeneous populations with some cells “overloaded” while other cells are loaded with few or no NPs. Yet gene expression studies have been conducted in the population as a whole, identifying generic responses, while missing unique responses due to signal averaging across many cells, each carrying different loads. Here we applied single-cell RNA-Seq to alveolar epithelial cells carrying defined loads of aminated or carboxylated quantum dots (QDs), showing higher or lower toxicity, respectively. Interestingly, cells carrying lower loads responded with multiple strategies, mostly with upregulated processes, which were nonetheless coherent and unique to each QD type. In contrast, cells carrying higher loads responded more uniformly, with mostly downregulated processes that were shared across QD types. Strategies unique to aminated QDs showed strong upregulation of stress responses, coupled in some cases with regulation of cell cycle, protein synthesis and organelle activities. In contrast, strategies unique to carboxylated QDs showed upregulation of DNA repair and RNA activities, and decreased regulation of cell division, coupled in some cases with upregulation of stress responses and ATP related functions. Together, our studies suggest scenarios where higher NP loads lock cells into uniform responses, mostly shutdown of cellular processes, whereas lower loads allow for unique responses to each NP type that are more diversified, proactive defenses or repairs of the NP insults.

  17. Regulation of toxin and bacteriocin synthesis in Clostridium species by a new subgroup of RNA polymerase sigma-factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, Bruno; Matamouros, Susana

    2006-04-01

    Many Clostridium species are pathogenic for humans and animals, and most of the resulting diseases, such as tetanus, botulism, gas gangrene and pseudomembranous colitis, are due to the production of potent extracellular toxins. The biochemical mechanisms of action of Clostridium toxins have been extensively studied in the past ten years. However, detailed information about the regulation of toxin gene expression has only recently emerged. TcdR, BotR, TetR and UviA are now known to be related alternative RNA polymerase sigma factors that drive transcription of toxin A and toxin B genes in C. difficile, the neurotoxin genes in C. botulinum and C. tetani, and a bacteriocin gene in C. perfringens. Although the Clostridium sigma factors have some similarity to members of the ECF sigma factor group, they differ sufficiently in structure and function so that they have been assigned to a new group within the sigma(70)-family.

  18. The single-step method of RNA isolation by acid guanidinium thiocyanate-phenol-chloroform extraction: twenty-something years on.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomczynski, Piotr; Sacchi, Nicoletta

    2006-01-01

    Since its introduction, the 'single-step' method has become widely used for isolating total RNA from biological samples of different sources. The principle at the basis of the method is that RNA is separated from DNA after extraction with an acidic solution containing guanidinium thiocyanate, sodium acetate, phenol and chloroform, followed by centrifugation. Under acidic conditions, total RNA remains in the upper aqueous phase, while most of DNA and proteins remain either in the interphase or in the lower organic phase. Total RNA is then recovered by precipitation with isopropanol and can be used for several applications. The original protocol, enabling the isolation of RNA from cells and tissues in less than 4 hours, greatly advanced the analysis of gene expression in plant and animal models as well as in pathological samples, as demonstrated by the overwhelming number of citations the paper gained over 20 years.

  19. Genetic relatedness of orbiviruses by RNA-RNA blot hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodkin, D.K.

    1985-01-01

    RNA-RNA blot hybridization was developed in order to identify type-specific genes among double-stranded (ds) RNA viruses, to assess the genetic relatedness of dsRNA viruses and to classify new strains. Viral dsRNA segments were electrophoresed through 10% polyacrylamide gels, transferred to membranes, and hybridized to [5' 32 P]-pCp labeled genomic RNA from a related strain. Hybridization was performed at 52 0 C, 50% formamide, 5X SSC. Under these conditions heterologous RNA species must share ≥ 74% sequence homology in order to form stable dsRNA hybrids. Cognate genes of nine members of the Palyam serogroup of orbiviruses were identified and their sequence relatedness to the prototype. Palyam virus, was determined. Reciprocal blot hybridizations were performed using radiolabeled genomic RNA of all members of the Palyam serogroup. Unique and variant genes were identified by lack of cross-homology or by weak homology between segments. Since genes 2 and 6 exhibited the highest degree of sequence variability, response to the vertebrate immune system may be a major cause of sequence divergence among members of a single serogroup. Changuinola serogroup isolates were compared by dot-blot hybridization, while Colorado tick fever (CTF) serogroup isolates were compared by the RNA-RNA blot hybridization procedure described for reovirus and Palyam serogroup isolates. Preliminary blot hybridization data were also obtained on the relatedness of members of different Orbivirus serogroups

  20. Are single odorous components of a predator sufficient to elicit defensive behaviors in prey species?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimund eApfelbach

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available When exposed to the odor of a sympatric predator, prey animals typically display escape or defensive responses. These phenomena have been well-documented, especially in rodents, when exposed to the odor of a cat, ferret or fox. As a result of these experiments new discussions center on the following questions: 1 is a single volatile compound such as a major or a minor mixture constituent in urine or feces, emitted by the predator sufficient to cause defensive reactions in a potential prey species or 2 is a whole array of odors required to elicit a response and 3 will the relative size or escapability of the prey as compared to the predator influence responsiveness. Most predator-prey studies on this topic have been performed in the laboratory or under semi-natural conditions. Field studies could help to find answers to these questions. Australian mammals are completely naïve towards the introduced placental carnivores. That offers ideal opportunities to analyze in the field the responses of potential prey species to unknown predator odors. During the last decades researchers have accumulated an enormous amount of data exploring the effects of eutherian predator odors on native marsupial mammals. In this review, we will give a survey about the development of olfactory research, chemical signals and their influence on the behavior and - in some cases - physiology of prey species. In addition, we report on the effects of predator odor experiments performed under natural conditions in Australia. When studying all these literature we learned that data gained under controlled laboratory conditions elucidate the role of individual odors on brain structures and ultimately on a comparatively narrow range behaviors. In contrast to single odors odor arrays mimic much more the situation prey animals are confronted to in nature. Therefore, a broad range of methodology — from chemistry to ecology including anatomy, physiology and behavior — is needed to

  1. Mining the transcriptomes of four commercially important shellfish species for single nucleotide polymorphisms within biomineralization genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendrami, David L J; Shah, Abhijeet; Telesca, Luca; Hoffman, Joseph I

    2016-06-01

    Transcriptional profiling not only provides insights into patterns of gene expression, but also generates sequences that can be mined for molecular markers, which in turn can be used for population genetic studies. As part of a large-scale effort to better understand how commercially important European shellfish species may respond to ocean acidification, we therefore mined the transcriptomes of four species (the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, the blue mussel Mytilus edulis, the great scallop Pecten maximus and the blunt gaper Mya truncata) for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Illumina data for C. gigas, M. edulis and P. maximus and 454 data for M. truncata were interrogated using GATK and SWAP454 respectively to identify between 8267 and 47,159 high quality SNPs per species (total=121,053 SNPs residing within 34,716 different contigs). We then annotated the transcripts containing SNPs to reveal homology to diverse genes. Finally, as oceanic pH affects the ability of organisms to incorporate calcium carbonate, we honed in on genes implicated in the biomineralization process to identify a total of 1899 SNPs in 157 genes. These provide good candidates for biomarkers with which to study patterns of selection in natural or experimental populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A nonlocal and periodic reaction-diffusion-advection model of a single phytoplankton species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Rui; Zhao, Xiao-Qiang

    2016-02-01

    In this article, we are concerned with a nonlocal reaction-diffusion-advection model which describes the evolution of a single phytoplankton species in a eutrophic vertical water column where the species relies solely on light for its metabolism. The new feature of our modeling equation lies in that the incident light intensity and the death rate are assumed to be time periodic with a common period. We first establish a threshold type result on the global dynamics of this model in terms of the basic reproduction number R0. Then we derive various characterizations of R0 with respect to the vertical turbulent diffusion rate, the sinking or buoyant rate and the water column depth, respectively, which in turn give rather precise conditions to determine whether the phytoplankton persist or become extinct. Our theoretical results not only extend the existing ones for the time-independent case, but also reveal new interesting effects of the modeling parameters and the time-periodic heterogeneous environment on persistence and extinction of the phytoplankton species, and thereby suggest important implications for phytoplankton growth control.

  3. Genetic regulation of salt stress tolerance revealed by RNA-Seq in cotton diploid wild species, Gossypium davidsonii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Zhu, Guozhong; Du, Lei; Shang, Xiaoguang; Cheng, Chaoze; Yang, Bing; Hu, Yan; Cai, Caiping; Guo, Wangzhen

    2016-02-03

    Cotton is an economically important crop throughout the world, and is a pioneer crop in salt stress tolerance research. Investigation of the genetic regulation of salinity tolerance will provide information for salt stress-resistant breeding. Here, we employed next-generation RNA-Seq technology to elucidate the salt-tolerant mechanisms in cotton using the diploid cotton species Gossypium davidsonii which has superior stress tolerance. A total of 4744 and 5337 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were found to be involved in salt stress tolerance in roots and leaves, respectively. Gene function annotation elucidated salt overly sensitive (SOS) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling pathways. Furthermore, we found that photosynthesis pathways and metabolism play important roles in ion homeostasis and oxidation balance. Moreover, our studies revealed that alternative splicing also contributes to salt-stress responses at the posttranscriptional level, implying its functional role in response to salinity stress. This study not only provides a valuable resource for understanding the genetic control of salt stress in cotton, but also lays a substantial foundation for the genetic improvement of crop resistance to salt stress.

  4. A biologically inspired two-species exclusion model: effects of RNA polymerase motor traffic on simultaneous DNA replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumendu; Mishra, Bhavya; Patra, Shubhadeep; Schadschneider, Andreas; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2018-04-01

    We introduce a two-species exclusion model to describe the key features of the conflict between the RNA polymerase (RNAP) motor traffic, engaged in the transcription of a segment of DNA, concomitant with the progress of two DNA replication forks on the same DNA segment. One of the species of particles (P) represents RNAP motors while the other (R) represents the replication forks. Motivated by the biological phenomena that this model is intended to capture, a maximum of two R particles only are allowed to enter the lattice from two opposite ends whereas the unrestricted number of P particles constitutes a totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) in a segment in the middle of the lattice. The model captures three distinct pathways for resolving the co-directional as well as head-on collision between the P and R particles. Using Monte Carlo simulations and heuristic analytical arguments that combine exact results for the TASEP with mean-field approximations, we predict the possible outcomes of the conflict between the traffic of RNAP motors (P particles engaged in transcription) and the replication forks (R particles). In principle, the model can be adapted to experimental conditions to account for the data quantitatively.

  5. Effects of phylogenetic reconstruction method on the robustness of species delimitation using single-locus data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Cuong Q; Humphreys, Aelys M; Fontaneto, Diego; Barraclough, Timothy G; Paradis, Emmanuel

    2014-10-01

    Coalescent-based species delimitation methods combine population genetic and phylogenetic theory to provide an objective means for delineating evolutionarily significant units of diversity. The generalised mixed Yule coalescent (GMYC) and the Poisson tree process (PTP) are methods that use ultrametric (GMYC or PTP) or non-ultrametric (PTP) gene trees as input, intended for use mostly with single-locus data such as DNA barcodes. Here, we assess how robust the GMYC and PTP are to different phylogenetic reconstruction and branch smoothing methods. We reconstruct over 400 ultrametric trees using up to 30 different combinations of phylogenetic and smoothing methods and perform over 2000 separate species delimitation analyses across 16 empirical data sets. We then assess how variable diversity estimates are, in terms of richness and identity, with respect to species delimitation, phylogenetic and smoothing methods. The PTP method generally generates diversity estimates that are more robust to different phylogenetic methods. The GMYC is more sensitive, but provides consistent estimates for BEAST trees. The lower consistency of GMYC estimates is likely a result of differences among gene trees introduced by the smoothing step. Unresolved nodes (real anomalies or methodological artefacts) affect both GMYC and PTP estimates, but have a greater effect on GMYC estimates. Branch smoothing is a difficult step and perhaps an underappreciated source of bias that may be widespread among studies of diversity and diversification. Nevertheless, careful choice of phylogenetic method does produce equivalent PTP and GMYC diversity estimates. We recommend simultaneous use of the PTP model with any model-based gene tree (e.g. RAxML) and GMYC approaches with BEAST trees for obtaining species hypotheses.

  6. β-glucuronidase use as a single internal control gene may confound analysis in FMR1 mRNA toxicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraan, Claudine M; Cornish, Kim M; Bui, Quang M; Li, Xin; Slater, Howard R; Godler, David E

    2018-01-01

    Relationships between Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 (FMR1) mRNA levels in blood and intragenic FMR1 CGG triplet expansions support the pathogenic role of RNA gain of function toxicity in premutation (PM: 55-199 CGGs) related disorders. Real-time PCR (RT-PCR) studies reporting these findings normalised FMR1 mRNA level to a single internal control gene called β-glucuronidase (GUS). This study evaluated FMR1 mRNA-CGG correlations in 33 PM and 33 age- and IQ-matched control females using three normalisation strategies in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs): (i) GUS as a single internal control; (ii) the mean of GUS, Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 4A2 (EIF4A2) and succinate dehydrogenase complex flavoprotein subunit A (SDHA); and (iii) the mean of EIF4A2 and SDHA (with no contribution from GUS). GUS mRNA levels normalised to the mean of EIF4A2 and SDHA mRNA levels and EIF4A2/SDHA ratio were also evaluated. FMR1mRNA level normalised to the mean of EIF4A2 and SDHA mRNA levels, with no contribution from GUS, showed the most significant correlation with CGG size and the greatest difference between PM and control groups (p = 10-11). Only 15% of FMR1 mRNA PM results exceeded the maximum control value when normalised to GUS, compared with over 42% when normalised to the mean of EIF4A2 and SDHA mRNA levels. Neither GUS mRNA level normalised to the mean RNA levels of EIF4A2 and SDHA, nor to the EIF4A2/SDHA ratio were correlated with CGG size. However, greater variability in GUS mRNA levels were observed for both PM and control females across the full range of CGG repeat as compared to the EIF4A2/SDHA ratio. In conclusion, normalisation with multiple control genes, excluding GUS, can improve assessment of the biological significance of FMR1 mRNA-CGG size relationships.

  7. A Single Species of Clostridium Subcluster XIVa Decreased in Ulcerative Colitis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Kozue; Mizuno, Shinta; Mikami, Yohei; Sujino, Tomohisa; Saigusa, Keiichiro; Matsuoka, Katsuyoshi; Naganuma, Makoto; Sato, Tadashi; Takada, Toshihiko; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Kushiro, Akira; Nomoto, Koji; Kanai, Takanori

    2016-12-01

    Imbalance of the intestinal microbiota is associated with gastrointestinal disease and autoimmune disease and metabolic syndrome. Analysis of the intestinal microbiota has recently progressed, and the association with inflammatory bowel disease has been reported at the species level. Such findings suggest that the recovery of homeostasis in the intestinal microbiota could cure inflammatory bowel disease. We aimed to search new probiotic candidates for inflammatory bowel disease through translational research by analysis of ulcerative colitis (UC) patients' intestinal microbiota and clarify the effects of them on inflammation. Here, we focused on Fusicatenibacter saccharivorans, which belongs to Clostridium subcluster XIVa and was successfully isolated and cultured in 2013. We analyzed the association of F. saccharivorans to UC patients' activity and inflammation for the first time. Feces from UC patients and healthy controls were analyzed by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences. F. saccharivorans was administered to murine colitis model. Colitic lamina propria mononuclear cells from UC patients and mice were stimulated with F. saccharivorans. The whole fecal bacteria in active UC patients were less than that in quiescent UC patients. Furthermore, F. saccharivorans was decreased in active UC patients and increased in quiescent. The administration of F. saccharivorans improved murine colitis. F. saccharivorans induced interleukin 10 production by lamina propria mononuclear cells from not only colitis model mice but also UC patients. F. saccharivorans decreased in correlation to UC activity and suppresses intestinal inflammation. These results suggest that F. saccharivorans could lead to a novel UC treatment.

  8. Somatosensory neuron types identified by high-coverage single-cell RNA-sequencing and functional heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chang-Lin; Li, Kai-Cheng; Wu, Dan; Chen, Yan; Luo, Hao; Zhao, Jing-Rong; Wang, Sa-Shuang; Sun, Ming-Ming; Lu, Ying-Jin; Zhong, Yan-Qing; Hu, Xu-Ye; Hou, Rui; Zhou, Bei-Bei; Bao, Lan; Xiao, Hua-Sheng; Zhang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Sensory neurons are distinguished by distinct signaling networks and receptive characteristics. Thus, sensory neuron types can be defined by linking transcriptome-based neuron typing with the sensory phenotypes. Here we classify somatosensory neurons of the mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) by high-coverage single-cell RNA-sequencing (10 950 ± 1 218 genes per neuron) and neuron size-based hierarchical clustering. Moreover, single DRG neurons responding to cutaneous stimuli are recorded using an in vivo whole-cell patch clamp technique and classified by neuron-type genetic markers. Small diameter DRG neurons are classified into one type of low-threshold mechanoreceptor and five types of mechanoheat nociceptors (MHNs). Each of the MHN types is further categorized into two subtypes. Large DRG neurons are categorized into four types, including neurexophilin 1-expressing MHNs and mechanical nociceptors (MNs) expressing BAI1-associated protein 2-like 1 (Baiap2l1). Mechanoreceptors expressing trafficking protein particle complex 3-like and Baiap2l1-marked MNs are subdivided into two subtypes each. These results provide a new system for cataloging somatosensory neurons and their transcriptome databases. PMID:26691752

  9. Single-step multiplex RT-PCR for simultaneous and colourimetric detection of six RNA viruses in olive trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolini, E; Olmos, A; Martínez, M C; Gorris, M T; Cambra, M

    2001-07-01

    A single-step multiplex RT-PCR was developed for the simultaneous and colourimetric detection of six RNA viruses (Cucumber mosaic virus, Cherry leaf roll virus, strawberry latent ringspot virus, Arabis mosaic virus, Olive latent-1 virus and Olive latent-2 virus) which infect olive trees. Six compatible primer set for one-step RT-PCR amplification in a single closed-tube and 3' digoxigenin labelled probes were designed in optimal, specific and conserved regions. The method has been assessed with 195 Spanish field olive trees, suggesting that approximately 1.5% of the tested material was infected by Cucumber mosaic virus and 0.5% by Cherry leaf roll virus. This method saves time and reagent costs compared with monospecific RT-PCR which needs several reactions for the same number of tests. Using colourimetric detection, it is possible to analyse many samples, it increases sensitivity 10-fold, and whilst facilitating the interpretation of results, it avoids the use of gels and the toxic ethidium bromide. The method could be used routinely for sanitary and certification programmes.

  10. A Single RNaseIII Domain Protein from Entamoeba histolytica Has dsRNA Cleavage Activity and Can Help Mediate RNAi Gene Silencing in a Heterologous System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justine M Pompey

    Full Text Available Dicer enzymes process double-stranded RNA (dsRNA into small RNAs that target gene silencing through the RNA interference (RNAi pathway. Dicer enzymes are complex, multi-domain RNaseIII proteins, however structural minimalism of this protein has recently emerged in parasitic and fungal systems. The most minimal Dicer, Saccharomyces castellii Dicer1, has a single RNaseIII domain and two double stranded RNA binding domains. In the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica 27nt small RNAs are abundant and mediate silencing, yet no canonical Dicer enzyme has been identified. Although EhRNaseIII does not exhibit robust dsRNA cleavage in vitro, it can process dsRNA in the RNAi-negative background of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and in conjunction with S. castellii Argonaute1 can partially reconstitute the RNAi pathway. Thus, although EhRNaseIII lacks the domain architecture of canonical or minimal Dicer enzymes, it has dsRNA processing activity that contributes to gene silencing via RNAi. Our data advance the understanding of small RNA biogenesis in Entamoeba as well as broaden the spectrum of non-canonical Dicer enzymes that contribute to the RNAi pathway.

  11. A Single RNaseIII Domain Protein from Entamoeba histolytica Has dsRNA Cleavage Activity and Can Help Mediate RNAi Gene Silencing in a Heterologous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompey, Justine M; Foda, Bardees; Singh, Upinder

    2015-01-01

    Dicer enzymes process double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into small RNAs that target gene silencing through the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. Dicer enzymes are complex, multi-domain RNaseIII proteins, however structural minimalism of this protein has recently emerged in parasitic and fungal systems. The most minimal Dicer, Saccharomyces castellii Dicer1, has a single RNaseIII domain and two double stranded RNA binding domains. In the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica 27nt small RNAs are abundant and mediate silencing, yet no canonical Dicer enzyme has been identified. Although EhRNaseIII does not exhibit robust dsRNA cleavage in vitro, it can process dsRNA in the RNAi-negative background of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and in conjunction with S. castellii Argonaute1 can partially reconstitute the RNAi pathway. Thus, although EhRNaseIII lacks the domain architecture of canonical or minimal Dicer enzymes, it has dsRNA processing activity that contributes to gene silencing via RNAi. Our data advance the understanding of small RNA biogenesis in Entamoeba as well as broaden the spectrum of non-canonical Dicer enzymes that contribute to the RNAi pathway.

  12. Low Po2 conditions induce reactive oxygen species formation during contractions in single skeletal muscle fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiah, Amy; Roberts, William J.; Chien, Michael T.; Wagner, Peter D.; Hogan, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Contractions in whole skeletal muscle during hypoxia are known to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS); however, identification of real-time ROS formation within isolated single skeletal muscle fibers has been challenging. Consequently, there is no convincing evidence showing increased ROS production in intact contracting fibers under low Po2 conditions. Therefore, we hypothesized that intracellular ROS generation in single contracting skeletal myofibers increases during low Po2 compared with a value approximating normal resting Po2. Dihydrofluorescein was loaded into single frog (Xenopus) fibers, and fluorescence was used to monitor ROS using confocal microscopy. Myofibers were exposed to two maximal tetanic contractile periods (1 contraction/3 s for 2 min, separated by a 60-min rest period), each consisting of one of the following treatments: high Po2 (30 Torr), low Po2 (3–5 Torr), high Po2 with ebselen (antioxidant), or low Po2 with ebselen. Ebselen (10 μM) was administered before the designated contractile period. ROS formation during low Po2 treatment was greater than during high Po2 treatment, and ebselen decreased ROS generation in both low- and high-Po2 conditions (P Po2. Force was reduced >30% for each condition except low Po2 with ebselen, which only decreased ∼15%. We concluded that single myofibers under low Po2 conditions develop accelerated and more oxidative stress than at Po2 = 30 Torr (normal human resting Po2). Ebselen decreases ROS formation in both low and high Po2, but only mitigates skeletal muscle fatigue during reduced Po2 conditions. PMID:23576612

  13. Series solution for continuous population models for single and interacting species by the homotopy analysis method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdy A. El-Tawil

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The homotopy analysis method (HAM is used to find approximate analytical solutions of continuous population models for single and interacting species. The homotopy analysis method contains the auxiliary parameter $hbar,$ which provides us with a simple way to adjust and control the convergence region of series solution. the solutions are compared with the numerical results obtained using NDSolve, an ordinary differential equation solver found in the Mathematica package and a good agreement is found. Also the solutions are compared with the available analytic results obtained by other methods and more accurate and convergent series solution found. The convergence region is also computed which shows the validity of the HAM solution. This method is reliable and manageable.

  14. Genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism data reveal cryptic species within cryptic freshwater snail species-The case of theAncylus fluviatilisspecies complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Martina; Weigand, Hannah; Weigand, Alexander M; Leese, Florian

    2018-01-01

    DNA barcoding utilizes short standardized DNA sequences to identify species and is increasingly used in biodiversity assessments. The technique has unveiled an unforeseeably high number of morphologically cryptic species. However, if speciation has occurred relatively recently and rapidly, the use of single gene markers, and especially the exclusive use of mitochondrial markers, will presumably fail in delimitating species. Therefore, the true number of biological species might be even higher. One mechanism that can result in rapid speciation is hybridization of different species in combination with polyploidization, that is, allopolyploid speciation. In this study, we analyzed the population genetic structure of the polyploid freshwater snail Ancylus fluviatilis , for which allopolyploidization was postulated as a speciation mechanism. DNA barcoding has already revealed four cryptic species within A. fluviatilis (i.e., A. fluviatilis s. str., Ancylus sp. A-C), but early allozyme data even hint at the presence of additional cryptic lineages in Central Europe. We combined COI sequencing with high-resolution genome-wide SNP data (ddRAD data) to analyze the genetic structure of A. fluviatilis populations in a Central German low mountain range (Sauerland). The ddRAD data results indicate the presence of three cryptic species within A. fluviatilis s. str. occurring in sympatry and even syntopy, whereas mitochondrial sequence data only support the existence of one species, with shared haplotypes between species. Our study hence points to the limitations of DNA barcoding when dealing with organismal groups where speciation is assumed to have occurred rapidly, for example, through the process of allopolyploidization. We therefore emphasize that single marker DNA barcoding can underestimate the true species diversity and argue in strong favor of using genome-wide data for species delimitation in such groups.

  15. Dissecting Cell-Type Composition and Activity-Dependent Transcriptional State in Mammalian Brains by Massively Parallel Single-Nucleus RNA-Seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Peng; Fabyanic, Emily; Kwon, Deborah Y; Tang, Sheng; Zhou, Zhaolan; Wu, Hao

    2017-12-07

    Massively parallel single-cell RNA sequencing can precisely resolve cellular diversity in a high-throughput manner at low cost, but unbiased isolation of intact single cells from complex tissues such as adult mammalian brains is challenging. Here, we integrate sucrose-gradient-assisted purification of nuclei with droplet microfluidics to develop a highly scalable single-nucleus RNA-seq approach (sNucDrop-seq), which is free of enzymatic dissociation and nucleus sorting. By profiling ∼18,000 nuclei isolated from cortical tissues of adult mice, we demonstrate that sNucDrop-seq not only accurately reveals neuronal and non-neuronal subtype composition with high sensitivity but also enables in-depth analysis of transient transcriptional states driven by neuronal activity, at single-cell resolution, in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of epidermal growth factor on the labeling of the various RNA species and of nuclear proteins in primary rat astroglial cell cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avola, R.; Condorelli, D.F.; Turpeenoja, L.; Ingrao, F.; Reale, S.; Ragusa, N.; Giuffrida Stella, A.M.

    1988-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on the labeling of various RNA species and of nuclear proteins in primary rat astroglial cell cultures. After 12 hours of EGF treatment in serum-free medium or chemically defined medium, significant increase in RNA labeling, and also in acid-soluble radioactivity and RNA content, was observed. The ratio RNA/DNA was significantly higher in EGF-treated cultures compared with controls. Ribosomal RNAs (28S and 18S), polyadenylated, and nonpolyadenylated RNAs showed a higher specific radioactivity in EGF-treated cultures. Among the nuclear proteins, the labeling of basic proteins was enhanced by EGF treatment, whereas that of total nuclear acidic protein (NHPs) was less modified, except for some NHPs separated by gel electrophoresis with a molecular weight (MW) approximately 95-83 and 44 kd, which were significantly more labeled in EGF-treated cultures.

  17. Multi-species call-broadcast improved detection of endangered Yuma clapper rail compared to single-species call-broadcast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Christopher P.; Conway, Courtney J.; Piest, Linden; Burger, William P.

    2013-01-01

    Broadcasting calls of marsh birds during point-count surveys increases their detection probability and decreases variation in the number of birds detected across replicate surveys. However, multi-species monitoring using call-broadcast may reduce these benefits if birds are reluctant to call once they hear broadcasted calls of other species. We compared a protocol that uses call-broadcast for only one species (Yuma clapper rail [Rallus longirostris yumanensis]) to a protocol that uses call-broadcast for multiple species. We detected more of each of the following species using the multi-species protocol: 25 % more pied-billed grebes, 160 % more American bitterns, 52 % more least bitterns, 388 % more California black rails, 12 % more Yuma clapper rails, 156 % more Virginia rails, 214 % more soras, and 19 % more common gallinules. Moreover, the coefficient of variation was smaller when using the multi-species protocol: 10 % smaller for pied-billed grebes, 38 % smaller for American bitterns, 19 % smaller for least bitterns, 55 % smaller for California black rails, 5 % smaller for Yuma clapper rails, 38 % smaller for Virginia rails, 44 % smaller for soras, and 8 % smaller for common gallinules. Our results suggest that multi-species monitoring approaches may be more effective and more efficient than single-species approaches even when using call-broadcast.

  18. Targeted next-generation sequencing of the 16S-23S rRNA region for culture-independent bacterial identification - increased discrimination of closely related species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabat, Artur J.; van Zanten, Evert; Akkerboom, Viktoria; Wisselink, Guido J; van Slochteren, Kees; de Boer, Richard F; Hendrix, Ron; Friedrich, Alexander W.; Rossen, John W. A.; Kooistra-Smid, Anna M.D. (Mirjam)

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an easy-to-use culture-free diagnostic method based on next generation sequencing (NGS) of PCR amplification products encompassing whole 16S-23S rRNA region to improve the resolution of bacterial species identification. To determine the resolution of the new

  19. Synthetical Analysis for Morphology, biological Species, and stable Isotopes (SAMSI) of single-cell planktonic foraminifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujiie, Y.; Kimoto, K.; Ishimura, T.

    2017-12-01

    Planktonic foraminifers are widely used in the studies of paleontology and paleoceanography, because the morphology of their calcareous shells is enough highly variable to identify the morphospecies and the chemical composition of the shells reflect ambient seawater condition. Although the morphospecies were believed to represent environments associating with latitudinal temperature range of the world ocean, molecular phylogeographic studies have unveiled the presence of multiple biological species in a single morphospecies and their species-specific distributions. This implicates the actual complexity of planktonic foraminiferal ecology. Conversely, these biological species have a high potential for providing novel ecological and environmental information to us. In order to reassess the morphological and geochemical characters of biological species, the DNA extraction method with the guanidium isothiocyanate buffer was developed to preserve the calcareous shells. The present study carefully tested the physical and chemical damages of the DNA extraction process to the shells, by our novel approaches with geochemical analysis of the shells after non-destructive analysis for morphometrics on a same specimen. First, we checked the changes of the shell densities between pre- and post-DNA extraction by using the micro-focus X-ray CT (MXCT) scanning. Based on the simultaneous measurement of a sample and the standard material, we confirmed no significant changes to the shell densities through the DNA extraction process. As a next step, we compared stable oxygen and carbon isotopes among individuals of three sample sets: (1) no chemical and incubation as control, (2) incubation in the DNA extraction buffer at 65-70°C for 40 minutes as standard way, and (3) incubation in the DNA extraction buffer at 65-70°C for 120 minutes, by using the microscale isotopic analytical system (MICAL3c). Consequently, there were no significant differences among the three sample sets. These

  20. Identification and characterization of alkaline protease producing Bacillus firmus species EMBS023 by 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wishard, Rohan; wishard, Rohan; Jaiswal, Mahak; Parveda, Maheshwari; Amareshwari, P; Bhadoriya, Sneha Singh; Rathore, Pragya; Yadav, Mukesh; Nayarisseri, Anuraj; Nair, Achuthsankar S

    2014-12-01

    Probiotic microorganisms are those which exert a positive exect on the growth of the host, when administered as a dietary mixture in an adequate amount. They form the best alternative to the use of antibiotics for controlling enteric diseases in poultry farm animals, especially in the light of the gruesome problems of development of antibiotic resistance in enteric pathogens and the contamination of poultry products with antibiotics. 16S rDNA sequencing which has gained wide popularity amongst microbiologists for the molecular characterization and identification of newly discovered isolates provides accurate identification of isolates down to the level of sub-species (strain). It's most important advantage over the traditional biochemical characterization methods are that it can provide an accurate identification of strains with atypical phenotypic characters as well. The following work is an application of 16S rRNA gene sequencing approach to identify a novel, alkaline protease producing bacteria, from poultry farm waste. The sample was collected from a local poultry farm in the Guntur district, Andhra Pradesh, India. Subsequently the sample was serially diluted and the aliquots were incubated for a suitable time period following which the suspected colony was subjected to 16S rDNA sequencing. The results showed the isolate to be a novel, high alkaline protease producing bacteria, which was named Bacillus firmus isolate EMBS023, after characterization the sequence of isolate was deposited in GenBank with accession number JN990980.

  1. Single-cell RNA-seq reveals changes in cell cycle and differentiation programs upon aging of hematopoietic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Monika S.; Tirosh, Itay; Heckl, Dirk; Rao, Tata Nageswara; Dixit, Atray; Haas, Brian J.; Schneider, Rebekka K.; Wagers, Amy J.; Ebert, Benjamin L.; Regev, Aviv

    2015-01-01

    Both intrinsic cell state changes and variations in the composition of stem cell populations have been implicated as contributors to aging. We used single-cell RNA-seq to dissect variability in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and hematopoietic progenitor cell populations from young and old mice from two strains. We found that cell cycle dominates the variability within each population and that there is a lower frequency of cells in the G1 phase among old compared with young long-term HSCs, suggesting that they traverse through G1 faster. Moreover, transcriptional changes in HSCs during aging are inversely related to those upon HSC differentiation, such that old short-term (ST) HSCs resemble young long-term (LT-HSCs), suggesting that they exist in a less differentiated state. Our results indicate both compositional changes and intrinsic, population-wide changes with age and are consistent with a model where a relationship between cell cycle progression and self-renewal versus differentiation of HSCs is affected by aging and may contribute to the functional decline of old HSCs. PMID:26430063

  2. Single-Cell RNA Sequencing Reveals T Helper Cells Synthesizing Steroids De Novo to Contribute to Immune Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidesh Mahata

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available T helper 2 (Th2 cells regulate helminth infections, allergic disorders, tumor immunity, and pregnancy by secreting various cytokines. It is likely that there are undiscovered Th2 signaling molecules. Although steroids are known to be immunoregulators, de novo steroid production from immune cells has not been previously characterized. Here, we demonstrate production of the steroid pregnenolone by Th2 cells in vitro and in vivo in a helminth infection model. Single-cell RNA sequencing and quantitative PCR analysis suggest that pregnenolone synthesis in Th2 cells is related to immunosuppression. In support of this, we show that pregnenolone inhibits Th cell proliferation and B cell immunoglobulin class switching. We also show that steroidogenic Th2 cells inhibit Th cell proliferation in a Cyp11a1 enzyme-dependent manner. We propose pregnenolone as a “lymphosteroid,” a steroid produced by lymphocytes. We speculate that this de novo steroid production may be an intrinsic phenomenon of Th2-mediated immune responses to actively restore immune homeostasis.

  3. Probing the HIV-1 genomic RNA trafficking pathway and dimerization by genetic recombination and single virion analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Moore

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Once transcribed, the nascent full-length RNA of HIV-1 must travel to the appropriate host cell sites to be translated or to find a partner RNA for copackaging to form newly generated viruses. In this report, we sought to delineate the location where HIV-1 RNA initiates dimerization and the influence of the RNA transport pathway used by the virus on downstream events essential to viral replication. Using a cell-fusion-dependent recombination assay, we demonstrate that the two RNAs destined for copackaging into the same virion select each other mostly within the cytoplasm. Moreover, by manipulating the RNA export element in the viral genome, we show that the export pathway taken is important for the ability of RNA molecules derived from two viruses to interact and be copackaged. These results further illustrate that at the point of dimerization the two main cellular export pathways are partially distinct. Lastly, by providing Gag in trans, we have demonstrated that Gag is able to package RNA from either export pathway, irrespective of the transport pathway used by the gag mRNA. These findings provide unique insights into the process of RNA export in general, and more specifically, of HIV-1 genomic RNA trafficking.

  4. Isolation of endophytic bacteria from arboreal species of the Amazon and identification by sequencing of the 16S rRNA encoding gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariza M. Coêlho

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Endophytic bacteria from three arboreal species native to the Amazon (Carapa guianenses, Ceiba pentandra, and Swietenia macrophylla, were isolated and identified, through partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA encoding gene. From these, 16 isolates were obtained, although, when compared to sequences deposited in GenBank, only seven had produced identifiable fragments. Bacillus, Pantoea and two non-culturable samples were identified. Results obtained through sequence analysis revealed low genetic diversity across the isolates, even when analyzing different species and plant structures. This is the first report concerning the isolation and identification of endophytic bacteria in these plant species.

  5. Expansion of the known Klebsiella pneumoniae species gene pool by characterization of novel alien DNA islands integrated into tmRNA gene sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; van Aartsen, Jon Jurriaan; Jiang, Xiaofei; Shao, Yucheng; Tai, Cui; He, Xinyi; Tan, Zhilei; Deng, Zixin; Jia, Shiru; Rajakumar, Kumar; Ou, Hong-Yu

    2011-02-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important bacterial pathogen of man that is commonly associated with opportunistic and hospital-associated infections. Increasing levels of multiple-antibiotic resistance associated with this species pose a major emerging clinical problem. This organism also occurs naturally in other diverse environments, including the soil. Consistent with its varied lifestyle and membership of the Enterobacteriaceae family, K. pneumoniae genomes exhibit highly plastic architecture comprising a core genome backbone interspersed with numerous and varied alien genomic islands. In this study the size of the presently known K. pneumoniae pan-genome gene pool was estimated through analysis of complete sequences of three chromosomes and 31 plasmids belonging to K. pneumoniae strains. In addition, using a PCR-based strategy the genomic content of eight tRNA/tmRNA gene sites that serve as DNA insertion hotspots were investigated in 28 diverse environmental and clinical strains of K. pneumoniae. Sequencing and characterization of five newly identified horizontally-acquired tmRNA-associated islands further expanded the archived K. pneumoniae gene pool to a total of 7648 unique gene members. Large-scale investigation of the content of tRNA/tmRNA hotspots will be useful to identify and/or survey accessory sequences dispersed amongst hundreds to thousands of members of many key bacterial species. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Activation of 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase by single-stranded and double-stranded RNA aptamers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, R; Norby, P L; Martensen, P M

    1998-01-01

    A number of small RNA molecules that are high affinity ligands for the 46-kDa form of human 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase have been identified by the SELEX method. Surface plasmon resonance analysis indicates that these RNAs bind to the enzyme with dissociation constants in the nanomolar range....... Competition experiments indicate that the binding site for the small RNAs on the 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase molecule at least partially overlaps that for the synthetic double-stranded RNA, poly(I).poly(C). Several of the RNAs function as potent activators of 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase in vitro......-stranded RNA, can also be activated by RNA ligands with little secondary structure. Since 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase possesses no homology to other known RNA-binding proteins, the development of small specific ligands by SELEX should facilitate studies of RNA-protein interactions and may reveal novel...

  7. High throughput detection of miRNAs and gene-specific mRNA at the single-cell level by flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porichis, Filippos; Hart, Meghan G.; Griesbeck, Morgane; Everett, Holly L.; Hassan, Muska; Baxter, Amy E.; Lindqvist, Madelene; Miller, Sara M.; Soghoian, Damien Z.; Kavanagh, Daniel G.; Reynolds, Susan; Norris, Brett; Mordecai, Scott K.; Nguyen, Quan; Lai, Chunfai; Kaufmann, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is a method that uses fluorescent probes to detect specific nucleic acid sequences at the single cell level. Here we describe optimized protocols that exploit a highly sensitive FISH method based on branched DNA technology to detect mRNA and miRNA in human leukocytes. This technique can be multiplexed and combined with fluorescent antibody protein staining to addressa variety of questions in heterogeneous cell populations. We demonstrate antigen-specific upregulation of IFNγ and IL-2 mRNAs in HIV- and CMV-specific T cells. We show simultaneous detection of cytokine mRNA and corresponding protein in single cells. We apply this method to detect mRNAs for which flow antibodies against the corresponding proteins are poor or are not available. We use this technique to show modulation of a microRNA critical for T cell function, miR-155. We adapt this assay for simultaneous detection of mRNA and proteins by Image Stream technology. PMID:25472703

  8. Brief communication: Is variation in the cranial capacity of the Dmanisi sample too high to be from a single species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hee

    2005-07-01

    This study uses data resampling to test the null hypothesis that the degree of variation in the cranial capacity of the Dmanisi hominid sample is within the range variation of a single species. The statistical significance of the variation in the Dmanisi sample is examined using simulated distributions based on comparative samples of modern humans, chimpanzees, and gorillas. Results show that it is unlikely to find the maximum difference observed in the Dmanisi sample in distributions of female-female pairs from comparative single-species samples. Given that two sexes are represented, the difference in the Dmanisi sample is not enough to reject the null hypothesis of a single species. Results of this study suggest no compelling reason to invoke multiple taxa to explain variation in the cranial capacity of the Dmanisi hominids. (c) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  9. sRNAbench: profiling of small RNAs and its sequence variants in single or multi-species high-throughput experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Barturen, G.; Rueda, A.; Hamberg, M.; Alganza, A.; Lebron, R.; Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Shi, B.-J.; Koppers-Lalic, D.; Hackenberg, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 1, SEP 30 2014 (2014), s. 21-31 ISSN 2084-7173 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : microRNA * small RNA * isomiRs * expression profiling * multi-species experiment * webserver Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  10. Can we predict performance and spatial structure of two-species mixtures using only single species information from monocultures?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yu, F.-H.; Herben, Tomáš; Wildová, Radka; Hershock, C.; Goldberg, D. E.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 234, Sp. iss. (2012), s. 31-37 ISSN 0304-3800 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/09/1471 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : model * mixture * species Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.069, year: 2012

  11. Reconciling single-species TACs in the North Sea demersal fisheries using the Fcube mixed-fisheries advice framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Clara; Reeves, Stuart A.; Vermard, Youen

    2011-01-01

    be exhausted before the TAC of another, leading to catches of valuable fish that cannot be landed legally. This important issue is, however, usually not quantified and not accounted for in traditional management advice. A simple approach using traditional catch and effort information was developed, estimating...... in the North Sea and shaped into the advice framework. The substantial overquota catches of North Sea cod likely under the current fisheries regimes are quantified, and it is estimated that the single-species management targets for North Sea cod cannot be achieved unless substantial reductions in TACs of all......Single-species management is a cause of discarding in mixed fisheries, because individual management objectives may not be consistent with each other and the species are caught simultaneously in relatively unselective fishing operations. As such, the total allowable catch (TAC) of one species may...

  12. Identification of two-step chemical mechanisms using small temperature oscillations and a single tagged species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Closa, F; Gosse, C; Jullien, L; Lemarchand, A

    2015-05-07

    In order to identify two-step chemical mechanisms, we propose a method based on a small temperature modulation and on the analysis of the concentration oscillations of a single tagged species involved in the first step. The thermokinetic parameters of the first reaction step are first determined. Then, we build test functions that are constant only if the chemical system actually possesses some assumed two-step mechanism. Next, if the test functions plotted using experimental data are actually even, the mechanism is attributed and the obtained constant values provide the rate constants and enthalpy of reaction of the second step. The advantage of the protocol is to use the first step as a probe reaction to reveal the dynamics of the second step, which can hence be relieved of any tagging. The protocol is anticipated to apply to many mechanisms of biological relevance. As far as ligand binding is considered, our approach can address receptor conformational changes or dimerization as well as competition with or modulation by a second partner. The method can also be used to screen libraries of untagged compounds, relying on a tracer whose concentration can be spectroscopically monitored.

  13. Single and dual drug selection for transgenes following bombardment of Caenorhabditis species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, Jennifer I; Lehner, Ben

    2014-08-01

    The use of drugs and drug resistance genes is a powerful method to select for the presence of a transgene. Unlike methods that require the complementation of a genetic mutation, this system can be used on any genetic background. Drug selection does not require extensive manipulation or costly equipment, yet it is very rapid and can achieve extremely high efficiency, selecting a small number of transgenic worms from among millions of non-transgenic worms. Introducing integrated transgenes into Caenorhabditis elegans by microparticle bombardment represents just such a challenge. Here we describe in detail the protocol we have developed for dual-drug selection in liquid with puromycin and G418 which works well in a variety of Caenorhabditis species. We also show that single drug selection with only puromycin or only G418 is effective in C. elegans. The growing number of drug selection markers that have been adapted to C. elegans are an important addition to the genetic toolkit at our disposal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A deep-sea agglutinated foraminifer tube constructed with planktonic foraminifer shells of a single species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Paul N.; Expedition 363 Shipboard Scientific Party, IODP

    2018-01-01

    Agglutinated foraminifera are marine protists that show apparently complex behaviour in constructing their shells, involving selecting suitable sedimentary grains from their environment, manipulating them in three dimensions, and cementing them precisely into position. Here we illustrate a striking and previously undescribed example of complex organisation in fragments of a tube-like foraminifer (questionably assigned to Rhabdammina) from 1466 m water depth on the northwest Australian margin. The tube is constructed from well-cemented siliciclastic grains which form a matrix into which hundreds of planktonic foraminifer shells are regularly spaced in apparently helical bands. These shells are of a single species, Turborotalita clarkei, which has been selected to the exclusion of all other bioclasts. The majority of shells are set horizontally in the matrix with the umbilical side upward. This mode of construction, as is the case with other agglutinated tests, seems to require either an extraordinarily selective trial-and-error process at the site of cementation or an active sensory and decision-making system within the cell.

  15. Comparative Analysis of Single-Species and Polybacterial Wound Biofilms Using a Quantitative, In Vivo, Rabbit Ear Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    biofilm behavior of mixed-species cultures with dental and periodontal pathogens. PLoS One 5(10): 131–135. 47. Ma H, Bryers JD (2010) Non-invasive method...Comparative Analysis of Single-Species and Polybacterial Wound Biofilms Using a Quantitative, In Vivo, Rabbit Ear Model Akhil K. Seth1*, Matthew R...Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America, 2 Microbiology Branch, US Army Dental and Trauma Research Detachment, Institute of Surgical

  16. [Analysis of the ITS1/ITS2 nuclear spacers and the secondary structure of 5.8S rRNA gene in endemic species Bellevalia sarmatica (Pall. ex Georgi) Woronow and related species of the subfamily scilloideae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifonova, A A; Filyushin, M A; Kochieva, E Z; Kudryavtsev, A M

    2016-05-01

    Sequence variability of the ITS spacers and 5.8S rRNA gene was examined in 11 accessions of the subfamily Scilloideae, including seven accessions of rare and endangered species Bellevalia sarmatica from Volgograd region. The intraspecific polymorphism level of the examined ITS1–5.8S–ITS2 sequence of B. sarmatica accessions constituted 1.3%. The phylogenetic position of B. sarmatica within the genus Bellevalia was determined. It was demonstrated that B. sarmatica belonged to the section Nutantes, and the most closely related species were B. webbiana and B. dubia. Nucleotide substitutions in the 5.8S rRNA gene sequence of the analyzed Scilloideae accessions were identified and studied. The predicted secondary structure of 5.8S rRNA gene was constructed. It was demonstrated that in the examined accessions, mutations in the 5.8S rRNA gene were mainly localized in the third hairpin region and had no effect on the secondary structure of the 5.8S rRNA molecule.

  17. A high-throughput RNA extraction for sprouted single-seed malting barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) rich in polysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germinated seed from cereal crops including barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) is an important tissue to extract RNA and analyze expression levels of genes that control aspects of germination. These tissues are rich in polysaccharides and most methods for RNA extraction are not suitable to handle the exces...

  18. Single base mutation in the pro. alpha. 2(I) collagen gene that causes efficient splicing of RNA from exon 27 to exon 29 and synthesis of a shortened but in-frame pro. alpha. 2(I) chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tromp, G.; Prockop, D.J. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (USA))

    1988-07-01

    Previous observations demonstrated that a lethal variant of osteogenesis imperfecta had two altered alleles for pro{alpha}2(I) chains of type I procollagen. One mutation produced a nonfunctioning allele in that there was synthesis of mRNA but no detectable synthesis of pro{alpha}2(I) chains from the allele. The mutation in the other allele caused synthesis of shortened pro{alpha}2(I) chains that lacked most or all of the 18 amino acids encoded by exon 28. Subclones of the pro{alpha}2(I) gene were prepared from the proband's DNA and the DNA sequence was determined for a 582-base-pair (bp) region that extended from the last 30 bp of intervening sequence 26 to the first 26 bp of intervening sequence 29. Data from six independent subclones demonstrated that all had the same sequence as a previously isolated normal clone for the pro{alpha}2(I) gene except that four subclones had a single base mutation at the 3{prime} end of intervening sequence 27. The mutation was a substitution of guanine for adenine that changed the universal consensus sequence for the 3{prime} splicing site of RNA from -AG- to -GG-. S1 nuclease experiments demonstrated that about half the pro{alpha}2(I) mRNA in the proband's fibroblasts was abnormally spliced and that the major species of abnormal pro{alpha}2(I) mRNA was completely spliced from the last codon of exon 27 to the first codon of exon 29. The mutation is apparently unique among RNA splicing mutations of mammalian systems in producing a shortened polypeptide chain that is in-frame in terms of coding sequences, that is used in the subunit assembly of a protein, and that contributes to a lethal phenotype.

  19. [Identification of 23 mycobacterial species by Invader assay with targeting 16S rRNA gene and ITS-1 region--comparison with DDH method in clinical isolates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Makoto; Ichimura, Sadahiro; Ito, Nobuko; Tomii, Takayuki; Kazumi, Yuko; Takei, Katsuaki; Abe, Chiyoji; Sugawara, Isamu

    2008-07-01

    The Invader assay was developed to identify 23 mycobacterial species using probes derived from the species-specific region of the 16S rRNA gene and the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS-1) region, with minor modifications of our previous study. In the present study, we compared the identification capability between the Invader assay and DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH) method. DDH is commonly used to identify non-tuberculosis mycobacterium in Japan and 636 clinical mycobacterial strains cultured on Ogawa slants were tested. The Invader assay could identify 615 (96.7%) of the 636 strains. The results contained 14 M.lentiflavum, 3 M. parascrofulaceum and 1 M. intermedium, which were undetectable with DDH method. On the other hand, DDH method could identify 580 (91.2%) strains with duplicate assay. Of 628 strains except 8 strains identified as a few species by Invader assay, 551 (87.7%) strains were identified as the same species by two methods. Discordant results were mainly recognized for the identification of M. gordonae, M. avium, M. lentiflavum and M. intracellurare. The results of other methods targeting 16S rRNA indicated correctness of the Invader assay. These results indicate that Invader assay could identify more correctly than DDH method and could identify about 97% of clinically important mycobacterium.

  20. Comparison of primary and secondary 26S rRNA structures in two Tetrahymena species: evidence for a strong evolutionary and structural constraint in expansion segments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, J; Nielsen, Henrik; Lenaers, G

    1990-01-01

    . These are regions within the common core of secondary structure where expansions have taken place during the evolution of the rRNA of higher eukaryotes. The dispensable nature of some of the expansion segments has been taken as evidence of their non-functionality. However, our data show that a considerable......We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the 26S large subunit (LSU) rRNA genes for two Tetrahymena species, T. thermophila and T. pyriformis. The inferred rRNA sequences are presented in their most probable secondary structures based on compensatory mutations, energy, and conservation...... selective constraint has operated to preserve the secondary structure of these segments. Especially in the case of the D2 and D8 segments, the presence of a considerable number of compensatory base changes suggests that the secondary structure of these regions is of functional importance. Alternatively...

  1. Secondary Structural Models (16S rRNA of Polyhydroxyalkanoates Producing Bacillus Species Isolated from Different Rhizospheric Soil: Phylogenetics and Chemical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Mohapatra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs producing bacterial isolates are gaining more importance over the world due to the synthesis of a biodegradable polymer which is extremely desirable to substitute synthetic plastics. PHAs are produced by various microorganisms under certain stress conditions. In this study, sixteen bacterial isolates characterized previously by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing (NCBI Accession No. KF626466 to KF626481 were again stained by Nile red after three years of preservation in order to confirm their ability to accumulate PHAs. Also, phylogenetic analysis carried out in the present investigation evidenced that the bacterial species belonging to genus Bacillus are the dominant flora of the rhizospheric region, with a potentiality of biodegradable polymer (PHAs production. Again, RNA secondary structure prediction hypothesized that there is no direct correlation between RNA folding pattern stability with a rate of PHAs production among the selected isolates of genus Bacillus.

  2. Single base mismatches in the mRNA target site allow specific seed region-mediated off-target binding of siRNA targeting human coagulation factor 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravon, Morgane; Berrera, Marco; Ebeling, Martin; Certa, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    We have analyzed the off-target activity of two siRNAs (F7-1, F7-2) that knock-down human blood coagulation factor 7 mRNA. F7-1 modulates a significant number of non-target transcripts while F7-2 shows high selectivity for the target transcript under various experimental conditions. The 3'-UTRs of all F7-1 off-target genes show statistically significant enrichment of the reverse complement of the F7-1 siRNA seed region located in the guide strand. Seed region enrichment was confirmed in off-target transcripts modulated by siRNA targeting the glucocorticoid receptor. To investigate how these sites contribute to off-target recognition of F7-1, we employed CXCL5 transcript as model system because it contains five F7-1 seed sequence motifs with single base mismatches. We show by transient transfection of reporter gene constructs into HEK293 cells that three out of five sites located in the 3'-UTR region are required for F7-1 off-target activity. For further mechanistic dissection, the sequences of these sites were synthesized and inserted either individually or joined in dimeric or trimeric constructs. Only the fusion constructs were silenced by F7-1 while the individual sites had no off-target activity. Based on F7-1 as a model, a single mismatch between the siRNA seed region and mRNA target sites is tolerated for target recognition and the CXCL5 data suggest a requirement for binding to multiple target sites in off-target transcripts.

  3. Discontinuous genetic variation among mesophilic Naegleria isolates: further evidence that N. gruberi is not a single species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, B S; Christy, P; Hayes, S J; Dobson, P J

    1992-01-01

    Naegleria isolates which are currently placed in the type species N. gruberi display great genetic, physiological and morphological heterogeneity. There are two possible interpretations of the nature of this species--that N. gruberi is a species complex or that it is a single continuously variable species. To distinguish between these alternatives, allelic states were determined for 33 loci in 74 new isolates selected to represent wide geographic sources and diverse temperature limits for growth. The results were compared with data for culture collection strains of N. gruberi and other species in the genus. The isolates formed a discontinuous series of clusters, separated by genetic distances similar to those separating the better-characterised taxa N. fowleri, N. lovaniensis, N. jadini, N. australiensis australiensis and N. australiensis italica. Culture collection strains assigned to N. gruberi fell into six distinct clusters, while other clusters were not represented by reference strains. The data are most consistent with the interpretation that N. gruberi is a group of several distinct species, each equivalent to the recently described species in the genus. Naegleria andersoni andersoni and N. andersoni jamiesoni also formed two distinct clusters, equivalent to species. Characteristics temperature limits for growth show that the mesophilic species are ecological as well as genetic entities.

  4. MIR and FIR Analysis of Inorganic Species in a Single Data Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Shilov, Sergey

    2017-06-01

    The extension of the mid IR towards the far IR spectral range below 400 \\wn is of great interest for molecular vibrational analysis for inorganic and organometallic chemistry, for geological, pharmaceutical, and physical applications, polymorph screening and crystallinity analysis as well as for matrix isolation spectroscopy. In these cases, the additional far infrared region offers insight to low energy vibrations which are observable only there. This includes inorganic species, lattice vibrations or intermolecular vibrations in the ordered solid state. The spectral range of a FTIR spectrometer is defined by the major optical components such as the source, beamsplitter, and detector. The globar source covers a broad spectral range from 8000 to 20 \\wn. However a bottle neck exists with respect to the beamsplitter and detector. To extend the spectral range further into the far IR and THz spectral ranges, one or more additional far IR beam splitters and detectors have been previously required. Two new optic components have been incorporated in a spectrometer to achieve coverage of both the mid and far infrared in a single scan: a wide range MIR-FIR beam splitter and the wide range DLaTGS detector that utilizes a diamond window. The use of a standard SiC IR source with these components yields a spectral range of 6000 down to 50 \\wn in one step for all types of transmittance, reflectance and ATR measurements. Utilizing the external water cooled mercury arc high power lamp the spectral range can be ultimately extended down to 10 \\wn. Examples of application will include emission in MIR-THz range, identification of pigments, additives in polymers, and polymorphism studies.

  5. Development of Quantitative PCR Assays Targeting the 16S rRNA Genes of Enterococcus spp. and Their Application to the Identification of Enterococcus Species in Environmental Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Hodon; Henson, Michael; Elk, Michael; Toledo-Hernandez, Carlos; Griffith, John; Blackwood, Denene; Noble, Rachel; Gourmelon, Michèle; Glassmeyer, Susan

    2013-01-01

    The detection of environmental enterococci has been determined primarily by using culture-based techniques that might exclude some enterococcal species as well as those that are nonculturable. To address this, the relative abundances of enterococci were examined by challenging fecal and water samples against a currently available genus-specific assay (Entero1). To determine the diversity of enterococcal species, 16S rRNA gene-based group-specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays were developed and evaluated against eight of the most common environmental enterococcal species. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequences of 439 presumptive environmental enterococcal strains were analyzed to study further the diversity of enterococci and to confirm the specificities of group-specific assays. The group-specific qPCR assays showed relatively high amplification rates with targeted species (>98%), although some assays cross-amplified with nontargeted species (1.3 to 6.5%). The results with the group-specific assays also showed that different enterococcal species co-occurred in most fecal samples. The most abundant enterococci in water and fecal samples were Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium, although we identified more water isolates as Enterococcus casseliflavus than as any of the other species. The prevalence of the Entero1 marker was in agreement with the combined number of positive signals determined by the group-specific assays in most fecal samples, except in gull feces. On the other hand, the number of group-specific assay signals was lower in all water samples tested, suggesting that other enterococcal species are present in these samples. While the results highlight the value of genus- and group-specific assays for detecting the major enterococcal groups in environmental water samples, additional studies are needed to determine further the diversity, distributions, and relative abundances of all enterococcal species found in water. PMID:23087032

  6. Two Positive Periodic Solutions for a Neutral Delay Model of Single-Species Population Growth with Harvesting

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Hui

    2012-01-01

    By coincidence degree theory for k-set-contractive mapping, this paper establishes a new criterion for the existence of at least two positive periodic solutions for a neutral delay model of single-species population growth with harvesting. An example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the result.

  7. Two Positive Periodic Solutions for a Neutral Delay Model of Single-Species Population Growth with Harvesting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Fang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available By coincidence degree theory for k-set-contractive mapping, this paper establishes a new criterion for the existence of at least two positive periodic solutions for a neutral delay model of single-species population growth with harvesting. An example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the result.

  8. Phylogenetic group- and species-specific oligonucleotide probes for single-cell detection of lactic acid bacteria in oral biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quevedo, Beatrice; Giertsen, Elin; Zijnge, Vincent; Luethi-Schaller, Helga; Guggenheim, Bernhard; Thurnheer, Thomas; Gmuer, Rudolf

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to design and evaluate fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes for the single-cell detection and enumeration of lactic acid bacteria, in particular organisms belonging to the major phylogenetic groups and species of oral lactobacilli and to

  9. Comparative Transcriptomic Analyses of Three Species of Placobdella (Rhynchobdellida: Glossiphoniidae) Confirms a Single Origin of Blood Feeding in Leeches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddall, Mark E; Brugler, Mercer R; Kvist, Sebastian

    2016-02-01

    One of the recalcitrant questions regarding the evolutionary history of clitellate annelids involves the feeding preference of the common ancestor of extant rhynchobdellid (proboscis bearing) and arhynchobdellid (jaw bearing) leeches. Whereas early evidence, based on morphological data, pointed towards independent acquisitions of blood feeding in the 2 orders, molecular-based phylogenetic data suggest that the ancestor of modern leeches was a sanguivore. Here, we use a comparative transcriptomic approach in order to increase our understanding of the diversity of anticoagulation factors for 3 species of the genus Placobdella, for which comparative data have been lacking, and inspect these in light of archetypal anticoagulant data for both arhynchobdellid and other rhynchobdellid species. Notwithstanding the varying levels of host specificity displayed by the 3 different species of Placobdella, transcriptomic profiles with respect to anticoagulation factors were largely similar -this despite the fact that Placobdella kwetlumye only retains a single pair of salivary glands, as opposed to the 2 pairs more common in the genus. Results show that 9 different anticoagulant proteins and an additional 5 putative antihemostasis proteins are expressed in salivary secretions of the 3 species. In particular, an ortholog of the archetypal, single-copy, anticoagulant hirudin (not previously available as comparative data for rhynchobdellids) is present in at least 2 of 3 species examined, corroborating the notion of a single origin of blood feeding in the ancestral leech.

  10. Increasing cDNA yields from single-cell quantities of mRNA in standard laboratory reverse transcriptase reactions using acoustic microstreaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, Wah Chin; Petkovic-Duran, Karolina; Zhu, Yonggang; Manasseh, Richard; Horne, Malcolm K; Aumann, Tim D

    2011-07-11

    Correlating gene expression with cell behavior is ideally done at the single-cell level. However, this is not easily achieved because the small amount of labile mRNA present in a single cell (1-5% of 1-50 pg total RNA, or 0.01-2.5 pg mRNA, per cell) mostly degrades before it can be reverse transcribed into a stable cDNA copy. For example, using standard laboratory reagents and hardware, only a small number of genes can be qualitatively assessed per cell. One way to increase the efficiency of standard laboratory reverse transcriptase (RT) reactions (i.e. standard reagents in microliter volumes) comprising single-cell amounts of mRNA would be to more rapidly mix the reagents so the mRNA can be converted to cDNA before it degrades. However this is not trivial because at microliter scales liquid flow is laminar, i.e. currently available methods of mixing (i.e. shaking, vortexing and trituration) fail to produce sufficient chaotic motion to effectively mix reagents. To solve this problem, micro-scale mixing techniques have to be used. A number of microfluidic-based mixing technologies have been developed which successfully increase RT reaction yields. However, microfluidics technologies require specialized hardware that is relatively expensive and not yet widely available. A cheaper, more convenient solution is desirable. The main objective of this study is to demonstrate how application of a novel "micromixing" technique to standard laboratory RT reactions comprising single-cell quantities of mRNA significantly increases their cDNA yields. We find cDNA yields increase by approximately 10-100-fold, which enables: greater numbers of genes to be analyzed per cell; more quantitative analysis of gene expression; and better detection of low-abundance genes in single cells. The micromixing is based on acoustic microstreaming, a phenomenon where sound waves propagating around a small obstacle create a mean flow near the obstacle. We have developed an acoustic microstreaming

  11. Two new species of Ripella (Amoebozoa, Vannellida) and unusual intragenomic variability in the SSU rRNA gene of this genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, Alexander; Gladkikh, Anna

    2017-10-01

    Two new species, Ripella decalvata and R. tribonemae (Amoebozoa, Vannellida), are described and the diversity of known strains assigned to the genus analyzed. Ripella spp. are closely similar to each other in the light microscopic characters and sequences of small-subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA gene, but differences in the cell coat structure and cytochrome oxidase (COI) gene sequences are more prominent. SSU rRNA in R. platypodia CCAP1589/2, R. decalvata and R. tribonemae demonstrates an unusual pattern of intragenomic variation. Sequencing of multiple molecular clones of this gene produced numerous sequence variants in a number of specific sites. These sites were usually terminal parts of several variable helices in all studied strains. Analysis of all known Ripella strains shows that SSU rRNA sites differing between strains of different origin are mainly restricted to these areas of the gene. There are only two sites, which differ between strains, but not within genomes. This intragenomic variability of the SSU rRNA gene, seemingly characteristic of all Ripella spp., was never reported to be so extensive in Amoebozoa. The data obtained show another example of complex organization of rRNA gene cluster in protists and emphasize caution needed when interpreting the metagenomic data based on this marker. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of microRNA-21 combining layered nanostructure of oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes and nanodiamonds by hybridization chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lingzhi; Song, Chao; Zhang, Zhang; Yang, Juan; Zhou, Lili; Zhang, Xing; Xie, Guoming

    2015-08-15

    Measurement of microRNA (miRNA) levels in body fluids is a crucial tool for the early diagnosis and prognosis of cancers. In this study, we developed an electrochemical assay to detect miRNA-21 by fabricating the electrode with layer-by-layer assembly of oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes and nanodiamonds. Tetrahedron-structured probes with free-standing probe on the top served as receptors to hybridize with target miRNA directly. The probes were immobilized on the deposited gold nanoparticles through a well-established strong Au-S bond. The electrochemical signal was mainly derived from an ultrasensitive pattern by combining hybridization chain reaction with DNA-functionalized AuNPs, which provided DNAzyme to catalyze H2O2 reduction. Differential pulse voltammetry was applied to record the electrochemical signals, which was increased linearly with the target miRNA-21, and the linear detection range was 10 fM to 1.0 nM. The limit of detection reached 1.95 fM (S/N=3), and the proposed biosensor exhibited good reproducibility and stability, as well as high sensitivity. Hence, this biosensor has a promising potential in clinical application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Single nucleotide polymorphism barcoding of cytochrome c oxidase I sequences for discriminating 17 species of Columbidae by decision tree algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Hong; Wu, Kuo-Chuan; Dahms, Hans-Uwe; Chuang, Li-Yeh; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2017-07-01

    DNA barcodes are widely used in taxonomy, systematics, species identification, food safety, and forensic science. Most of the conventional DNA barcode sequences contain the whole information of a given barcoding gene. Most of the sequence information does not vary and is uninformative for a given group of taxa within a monophylum. We suggest here a method that reduces the amount of noninformative nucleotides in a given barcoding sequence of a major taxon, like the prokaryotes, or eukaryotic animals, plants, or fungi. The actual differences in genetic sequences, called single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping, provide a tool for developing a rapid, reliable, and high-throughput assay for the discrimination between known species. Here, we investigated SNPs as robust markers of genetic variation for identifying different pigeon species based on available cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) data. We propose here a decision tree-based SNP barcoding (DTSB) algorithm where SNP patterns are selected from the DNA barcoding sequence of several evolutionarily related species in order to identify a single species with pigeons as an example. This approach can make use of any established barcoding system. We here firstly used as an example the mitochondrial gene COI information of 17 pigeon species (Columbidae, Aves) using DTSB after sequence trimming and alignment. SNPs were chosen which followed the rule of decision tree and species-specific SNP barcodes. The shortest barcode of about 11 bp was then generated for discriminating 17 pigeon species using the DTSB method. This method provides a sequence alignment and tree decision approach to parsimoniously assign a unique and shortest SNP barcode for any known species of a chosen monophyletic taxon where a barcoding sequence is available.

  14. Molecular analysis of the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium olfersii (Decapoda, Palaemonidae) supports the existence of a single species throughout its distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Natália; Mantelatto, Fernando Luis

    2013-01-01

    Macrobrachium olfersii is an amphidromous freshwater prawn, widespread along the eastern coasts of the Americas. This species shows great morphological modifications during ontogenesis, and several studies have verified the existence of a wide intraspecific variation. Because of this condition, the species is often misidentified, and several synonyms have been documented. To elucidate these aspects, individuals of M. olfersii from different populations along its range of distribution were investigated. The taxonomic limit was established, and the degree of genetic variability of this species was described. We extracted DNA from 53 specimens of M. olfersii, M. americanum, M. digueti and M. faustinum, which resulted in 84 new sequences (22 of 16S mtDNA, 45 of Cythocrome Oxidase I (COI) mtDNA, and 17 of Histone (H3) nDNA). Sequences of three genes (single and concatenated) from these species were used in the Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian Inference phylogenetic analyses and COI sequences from M. olfersii were used in population analysis. The genetic variation was evaluated through the alignment of 554 bp from the 16S, 638 bp from the COI, and 338 bp from the H3. The rates of genetic divergence among populations were lower at the intraspecific level. This was confirmed by the haplotype net, which showed a continuous gene flow among populations. Although a wide distribution and high morphological intraspecific variation often suggest the existence of more than one species, genetic similarity of Caribbean and Brazilian populations of M. olfersii supported them as a single species.

  15. Molecular analysis of the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium olfersii (Decapoda, Palaemonidae supports the existence of a single species throughout its distribution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Rossi

    Full Text Available Macrobrachium olfersii is an amphidromous freshwater prawn, widespread along the eastern coasts of the Americas. This species shows great morphological modifications during ontogenesis, and several studies have verified the existence of a wide intraspecific variation. Because of this condition, the species is often misidentified, and several synonyms have been documented. To elucidate these aspects, individuals of M. olfersii from different populations along its range of distribution were investigated. The taxonomic limit was established, and the degree of genetic variability of this species was described. We extracted DNA from 53 specimens of M. olfersii, M. americanum, M. digueti and M. faustinum, which resulted in 84 new sequences (22 of 16S mtDNA, 45 of Cythocrome Oxidase I (COI mtDNA, and 17 of Histone (H3 nDNA. Sequences of three genes (single and concatenated from these species were used in the Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian Inference phylogenetic analyses and COI sequences from M. olfersii were used in population analysis. The genetic variation was evaluated through the alignment of 554 bp from the 16S, 638 bp from the COI, and 338 bp from the H3. The rates of genetic divergence among populations were lower at the intraspecific level. This was confirmed by the haplotype net, which showed a continuous gene flow among populations. Although a wide distribution and high morphological intraspecific variation often suggest the existence of more than one species, genetic similarity of Caribbean and Brazilian populations of M. olfersii supported them as a single species.

  16. RNA binding to APOBEC3G induces the disassembly of functional deaminase complexes by displacing single-stranded DNA substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polevoda, Bogdan; McDougall, William M.; Tun, Bradley N.; Cheung, Michael; Salter, Jason D.; Friedman, Alan E.; Smith, Harold C.

    2015-01-01

    APOBEC3G (A3G) DNA deaminase activity requires a holoenzyme complex whose assembly on nascent viral reverse transcripts initiates with A3G dimers binding to ssDNA followed by formation of higher-order A3G homo oligomers. Catalytic activity is inhibited when A3G binds to RNA. Our prior studies suggested that RNA inhibited A3G binding to ssDNA. In this report, near equilibrium binding and gel shift analyses showed that A3G assembly and disassembly on ssDNA was an ordered process involving A3G dimers and multimers thereof. Although, fluorescence anisotropy showed that A3G had similar nanomolar affinity for RNA and ssDNA, RNA stochastically dissociated A3G dimers and higher-order oligomers from ssDNA, suggesting a different modality for RNA binding. Mass spectrometry mapping of A3G peptides cross-linked to nucleic acid suggested ssDNA only bound to three peptides, amino acids (aa) 181–194 in the N-terminus and aa 314–320 and 345–374 in the C-terminus that were part of a continuous exposed surface. RNA bound to these peptides and uniquely associated with three additional peptides in the N- terminus, aa 15–29, 41–52 and 83–99, that formed a continuous surface area adjacent to the ssDNA binding surface. The data predict a mechanistic model of RNA inhibition of ssDNA binding to A3G in which competitive and allosteric interactions determine RNA-bound versus ssDNA-bound conformational states. PMID:26424853

  17. mRNA-Seq of single prostate cancer circulating tumor cells reveals recapitulation of gene expression and pathways found in prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon M Cann

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTC mediate metastatic spread of many solid tumors and enumeration of CTCs is currently used as a prognostic indicator of survival in metastatic prostate cancer patients. Some evidence suggests that it is possible to derive additional information about tumors from expression analysis of CTCs, but the technical difficulty of isolating and analyzing individual CTCs has limited progress in this area. To assess the ability of a new generation of MagSweeper to isolate intact CTCs for downstream analysis, we performed mRNA-Seq on single CTCs isolated from the blood of patients with metastatic prostate cancer and on single prostate cancer cell line LNCaP cells spiked into the blood of healthy donors. We found that the MagSweeper effectively isolated CTCs with a capture efficiency that matched the CellSearch platform. However, unlike CellSearch, the MagSweeper facilitates isolation of individual live CTCs without contaminating leukocytes. Importantly, mRNA-Seq analysis showed that the MagSweeper isolation process did not have a discernible impact on the transcriptional profile of single LNCaPs isolated from spiked human blood, suggesting that any perturbations caused by the MagSweeper process on the transcriptional signature of isolated cells are modest. Although the RNA from patient CTCs showed signs of significant degradation, consistent with reports of short half-lives and apoptosis amongst CTCs, transcriptional signatures of prostate tissue and of cancer were readily detectable with single CTC mRNA-Seq. These results demonstrate that the MagSweeper provides access to intact CTCs and that these CTCs can potentially supply clinically relevant information.

  18. mRNA-Seq of single prostate cancer circulating tumor cells reveals recapitulation of gene expression and pathways found in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cann, Gordon M; Gulzar, Zulfiqar G; Cooper, Samantha; Li, Robin; Luo, Shujun; Tat, Mai; Stuart, Sarah; Schroth, Gary; Srinivas, Sandhya; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Brooks, James D; Talasaz, Amirali H

    2012-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) mediate metastatic spread of many solid tumors and enumeration of CTCs is currently used as a prognostic indicator of survival in metastatic prostate cancer patients. Some evidence suggests that it is possible to derive additional information about tumors from expression analysis of CTCs, but the technical difficulty of isolating and analyzing individual CTCs has limited progress in this area. To assess the ability of a new generation of MagSweeper to isolate intact CTCs for downstream analysis, we performed mRNA-Seq on single CTCs isolated from the blood of patients with metastatic prostate cancer and on single prostate cancer cell line LNCaP cells spiked into the blood of healthy donors. We found that the MagSweeper effectively isolated CTCs with a capture efficiency that matched the CellSearch platform. However, unlike CellSearch, the MagSweeper facilitates isolation of individual live CTCs without contaminating leukocytes. Importantly, mRNA-Seq analysis showed that the MagSweeper isolation process did not have a discernible impact on the transcriptional profile of single LNCaPs isolated from spiked human blood, suggesting that any perturbations caused by the MagSweeper process on the transcriptional signature of isolated cells are modest. Although the RNA from patient CTCs showed signs of significant degradation, consistent with reports of short half-lives and apoptosis amongst CTCs, transcriptional signatures of prostate tissue and of cancer were readily detectable with single CTC mRNA-Seq. These results demonstrate that the MagSweeper provides access to intact CTCs and that these CTCs can potentially supply clinically relevant information.

  19. Inactivation of a single copy of Crebbp selectively alters pre-mRNA processing in mouse hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine E Lemieux

    Full Text Available Global expression analysis of fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells (FL HSCs revealed the presence of unspliced pre-mRNA for a number of genes in normal FL HSCs. In a subset of these genes, Crebbp+/- FL HSCs had less unprocessed pre-mRNA without a corresponding reduction in total mRNA levels. Among the genes thus identified were the key regulators of HSC function Itga4, Msi2 and Tcf4. A similar but much weaker effect was apparent in Ep300+/- FL HSCs, indicating that, in this context as in others, the two paralogs are not interchangeable. As a group, the down-regulated intronic probe sets could discriminate adult HSCs from more mature cell types, suggesting that the underlying mechanism is regulated with differentiation stage and is active in both fetal and adult hematopoiesis. Consistent with increased myelopoiesis in Crebbp hemizygous mice, targeted reduction of CREBBP abundance by shRNA in the multipotent EML cell line triggered spontaneous myeloid differentiation in the absence of the normally required inductive signals. In addition, differences in protein levels between phenotypically distinct EML subpopulations were better predicted by taking into account not only the total mRNA signal but also the amount of unspliced message present. CREBBP thus appears to selectively influence the timing and degree of pre-mRNA processing of genes essential for HSC regulation and thereby has the potential to alter subsequent cell fate decisions in HSCs.

  20. Phylogenetic analysis of two single-copy nuclear genes revealed origin and complex relationships of polyploid species of Hordeum in Triticeae (Poaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qianni; Sun, Genlou

    2017-06-01

    Two single-copy nuclear genes, the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RPB2) and thioredoxin-like gene (HTL), were used to explore the phylogeny and origin of polyploid species in Hordeum. Our results were partly in accord with previous studies, but disclosed additional complexity. Both RPB2 and HTL trees confirmed the presence of Xa genome in H. capense and H. secalinum, and that H. depressum originated from H. californicum together with other American diploids, either H. intercedens or H. pusillum. American diploids solely contributed to the origin of H. depressum. The Asian diploids, either H. bogdanii or H. brevisubulatum, contributed to the formation of American polyploids except H. depressum. RPB2 and HTL sequences showed that H. roshevitzii did not contribute to the origin of American tetraploids. Our data showed a close relationship between the hexaploids H. procerum and H. parodii and the tetraploids H. brachyantherum, H. fuegianum, H. guatemalense, H. jubatum, and H. tetraploidum. The involvement of the diploid H. pusillum and the tetraploid H. jubatum in the formation of H. arizonicum was also indicated in the HTL phylogeny. Our results suggested a possible gene introgression of W- and P-genome species into the tetraploid H. jubatum and the hexaploid H. procerum.

  1. Complete Genome Sequences of Chrysanthemum Stunt Viroid from a Single Chrysanthemum Cultivar

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Hoseong; Jo, Yeonhwa; Yoon, Ju-Yeon; Choi, Seung-Kook; Cho, Won Kyong

    2015-01-01

    The chrysanthemum stunt viroid (CSVd), a member of the genus Pospiviroid with a single circular RNA genome, infects many chrysanthemum species. Here, we report 25 complete genome sequences of CSVd in a single chrysanthemum cultivar, revealing 20 variants.

  2. Hydrogen gas production is associated with reduced interleukin-1β mRNA in peripheral blood after a single dose of acarbose in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamasawa, Atsuko; Mochizuki, Kazuki; Hariya, Natsuyo; Saito, Miyoko; Ishida, Hidenori; Doguchi, Satako; Yanagiya, Syoko; Osonoi, Takeshi

    2015-09-05

    Acarbose, an α-glucosidase inhibitor, leads to the production of hydrogen gas, which reduces oxidative stress. In this study, we examined the effects of a single dose of acarbose immediately before a test meal on postprandial hydrogen gas in breath and peripheral blood interleukin (IL)-1β mRNA expression in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients. Sixteen Japanese patients (14 men, 2 women) participated in this study. The mean±standard deviation age, hemoglobin A1c and body mass index were 52.1±15.4 years, 10.2±2.0%, and 27.7±8.0kg/m(2), respectively. The patients were admitted into our hospital for 2 days and underwent test meals at breakfast without (day 1) or with acarbose (day 2). We performed continuous glucose monitoring and measured hydrogen gas levels in breath, and peripheral blood IL-1β mRNA levels before (0min) and after the test meal (hydrogen gas: 60, 120, 180, and 300min; IL-1β: 180min). The induction of hydrogen gas production and the reduction in peripheral blood IL-1β mRNA after the test meal were not significant between days 1 (without acarbose) and 2 (with acarbose). However, the changes in total hydrogen gas production from day 1 to day 2 were closely and inversely associated with the changes in peripheral blood IL-1β mRNA levels. Our results suggest that an increase in hydrogen gas production is inversely associated with a reduction of the peripheral blood IL-1β mRNA level after a single dose of acarbose in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Single-cell profiling reveals that eRNA accumulation at enhancer-promoter loops is not required to sustain transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Samir; Zorca, Cornelia E; Traboulsi, Tatiana; Noutahi, Emmanuel; Krause, Matthew R; Mader, Sylvie; Zenklusen, Daniel

    2017-04-07

    Enhancers are intergenic DNA elements that regulate the transcription of target genes in response to signaling pathways by interacting with promoters over large genomic distances. Recent studies have revealed that enhancers are bi-directionally transcribed into enhancer RNAs (eRNAs). Using single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH), we investigated the eRNA-mediated regulation of transcription during estrogen induction in MCF-7 cells. We demonstrate that eRNAs are localized exclusively in the nucleus and are induced with similar kinetics as target mRNAs. However, eRNAs are mostly nascent at enhancers and their steady-state levels remain lower than those of their cognate mRNAs. Surprisingly, at the single-allele level, eRNAs are rarely co-expressed with their target loci, demonstrating that active gene transcription does not require the continuous transcription of eRNAs or their accumulation at enhancers. When co-expressed, sub-diffraction distance measurements between nascent mRNA and eRNA signals reveal that co-transcription of eRNAs and mRNAs rarely occurs within closed enhancer-promoter loops. Lastly, basal eRNA transcription at enhancers, but not E2-induced transcription, is maintained upon depletion of MLL1 and ERα, suggesting some degree of chromatin accessibility prior to signal-dependent activation of transcription. Together, our findings suggest that eRNA accumulation at enhancer-promoter loops is not required to sustain target gene transcription. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Soil bacterial diversity screening using single 16S rRNA gene V regions coupled with multi-million read generating sequencing technologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotirios Vasileiadis

    Full Text Available The novel multi-million read generating sequencing technologies are very promising for resolving the immense soil 16S rRNA gene bacterial diversity. Yet they have a limited maximum sequence length screening ability, restricting studies in screening DNA stretches of single 16S rRNA gene hypervariable (V regions. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of properties of four consecutive V regions (V3-6 on commonly applied analytical methodologies in bacterial ecology studies. Using an in silico approach, the performance of each V region was compared with the complete 16S rRNA gene stretch. We assessed related properties of the soil derived bacterial sequence collection of the Ribosomal Database Project (RDP database and concomitantly performed simulations based on published datasets. Results indicate that overall the most prominent V region for soil bacterial diversity studies was V3, even though it was outperformed in some of the tests. Despite its high performance during most tests, V4 was less conserved along flanking sites, thus reducing its ability for bacterial diversity coverage. V5 performed well in the non-redundant RDP database based analysis. However V5 did not resemble the full-length 16S rRNA gene sequence results as well as V3 and V4 did when the natural sequence frequency and occurrence approximation was considered in the virtual experiment. Although, the highly conserved flanking sequence regions of V6 provide the ability to amplify partial 16S rRNA gene sequences from very diverse owners, it was demonstrated that V6 was the least informative compared to the rest examined V regions. Our results indicate that environment specific database exploration and theoretical assessment of the experimental approach are strongly suggested in 16S rRNA gene based bacterial diversity studies.

  5. Repression of multiple CYP2D genes in mouse primary hepatocytes with a single siRNA construct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elraghy, Omaima; Baldwin, William S

    2015-01-01

    The Cyp2d subfamily is the second most abun-dant subfamily of hepatic drug-metabolizing CYPs. In mice, there are nine Cyp2d members that are believed to have redundant catalytic activity. We are testing and optimizing the ability of one short interfering RNA (siRNA) construct to knockdown the expression of multiple mouse Cyp2ds in primary hepatocytes. Expression of Cyp2d10, Cyp2d11, Cyp2d22, and Cyp2d26 was observed in the primary male mouse hepatocytes. Cyp2d9, which is male-specific and growth hormone-dependent, was not expressed in male primary hepatocytes, potentially because of its dependence on pulsatile growth hormone release from the anterior pituitary. Several different siRNAs at different concentrations and with different reagents were used to knockdown Cyp2d expression. siRNA constructs designed to repress only one construct often mildly repressed several Cyp2d isoforms. A construct designed to knockdown every Cyp2d isoform provided the best results, especially when incubated with transfection reagents designed specifically for primary cell culture. Interestingly, a construct designed to knockdown all Cyp2d isoforms, except Cyp2d10, caused a 2.5× increase in Cyp2d10 expression, presumably because of a compensatory response. However, while RNA expression is repressed 24 h after siRNA treatment, associated changes in Cyp2d-mediated metabolism are tenuous. Overall, this study provides data on the expression of murine Cyp2ds in primary cell lines, valuable information on designing siRNAs for silencing multiple murine CYPs, and potential pros and cons of using siRNA as a tool for repressing Cyp2d and estimating Cyp2d's role in murine xenobiotic metabolism.

  6. Isolation and characterization of Nylanderia fulva virus 1, a positive-sense, single-stranded RNA virus infecting the tawny crazy ant, Nylanderia fulva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valles, Steven M., E-mail: steven.valles@ars.usda.gov [Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology, USDA-ARS, 1600 SW 23rd Drive, Gainesville, FL 32608 (United States); Oi, David H.; Becnel, James J. [Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology, USDA-ARS, 1600 SW 23rd Drive, Gainesville, FL 32608 (United States); Wetterer, James K. [Wilkes Honors College, Florida Atlantic University, 5353 Parkside Drive, Jupiter, FL 33458 (United States); LaPolla, John S. [Department of Biological Sciences, Towson University, 8000 York Road, Towson, MD 21252 (United States); Firth, Andrew E. [Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1QP (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-15

    We report the discovery of Nylanderia fulva virus 1 (NfV-1), the first virus identified and characterized from the ant, Nylanderia fulva. The NfV-1 genome (GenBank accession KX024775) is 10,881 nucleotides in length, encoding one large open reading frame (ORF). Helicase, protease, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and jelly-roll capsid protein domains were recognized within the polyprotein. Phylogenetic analysis placed NfV-1 in an unclassified clade of viruses. Electron microscopic examination of negatively stained samples revealed particles with icosahedral symmetry with a diameter of 28.7±1.1 nm. The virus was detected by RT-PCR in larval, pupal, worker and queen developmental stages. However, the replicative strand of NfV-1 was only detected in larvae. Vertical transmission did not appear to occur, but horizontal transmission was facile. The inter-colonial field prevalence of NfV-1 was 52±35% with some local infections reaching 100%. NfV-1 was not detected in limited samples of other Nylanderia species or closely related ant species. - Highlights: • A new positive-strand RNA virus was discovered in the ant, Nylanderia fulva. • The Nylanderia fulva virus 1 genome was comprised of 10,881 nucleotides. • NfV-1 was detected in larval, pupal, queen and worker ants, but not eggs. • Replication of NfV-1 appeared to be limited to the larval stage.

  7. Solar light-induced production of reactive oxygen species by single walled carbon nanotubes in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photosensitizing processes of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) which include photo-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) convert light energy into oxidizing chemical energy that mediates transformations of nanomaterials. The oxidative stress associated with ROS may p...

  8. Cuprolinic Blue: a specific dye for single-stranded RNA in the presence of magnesium chloride. I. Fundamental aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tas, J.; MENDELSON, D.; NOORDEN, C. J. F.

    1983-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative aspects of the cationic dye Cuprolinic Blue were investigated with model films of polyacrylamide gel in which RNA, DNA and other biological polyanionic compounds had been incorporated. In the presence of 1 M MgCl2, Curpolinic Blue was found to bind specifically to

  9. Inhibition of HIV-1 by multiple siRNAs expressed from a single microRNA polycistron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Ying Poi; Haasnoot, Joost; ter Brake, Olivier; Berkhout, Ben; Konstantinova, Pavlina

    2008-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful approach to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. However, HIV-1 can escape from RNAi-mediated antiviral therapy by selection of mutations in the targeted sequence. To prevent viral escape, multiple small interfering RNAs (siRNAs)

  10. Mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase single-nucleotide polymorphisms that lead to defects in refolding but not aminoacylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banerjee, Rajat; Reynolds, Noah M; Yadavalli, Srujana S

    2011-01-01

    that mutations in nuclear-encoded components of the mitochondrial translation machinery, such as aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs), can also lead to disease. In some cases, mutations can be directly linked to losses in enzymatic activity; however, for many, their effect is unknown. To investigate how aa...

  11. Construction of a laser combiner for dual fluorescent single molecule imaging of pRNA of phi29 DNA packaging motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Shu, Dan; Browne, Mark; Guo, Peixuan

    2010-02-01

    A customized laser combiner was designed and constructed for dual channel single molecule imaging. The feasibility of a combiner-incorporated imaging system was demonstrated in studies of single molecule FRET. Distance rulers made of dual-labeled dsDNA were used to evaluate the system by determining the distance between one FRET pair. The results showed that the system is sensitive enough to distinguish between distances differing by two base pair and the distances calculated from FRET efficiencies are close to those documented in the literature. The single molecule FRET with the dual-color imaging system was also applied to reconstructed phi29 motor pRNA monomers. Finally, techniques for dual laser alignment and tuning of laser power for dual-color excitation are discussed.

  12. Comparative toxicity of a brominated flame retardant (tetrabromobisphenol A) on microalgae with single and multi-species bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debenest, Timothée; Petit, Anne-Nöelle; Gagné, François; Kohli, Mohan; Nguyen, Nien; Blaise, Christian

    2011-09-01

    The potential threat of emerging chemicals to the aquatic flora is a major issue. The purpose of the study was to develop a multispecies microalgae test in order to determine the impact of species interactions on the cytoxicity of an emergent toxic contaminant: the tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA). Single and multi-species tests were thus performed to study the effects of this flame retardant on two microalgae (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Nitzschia palea) commonly observed in freshwater. A synthetic medium was designed to allow the growth of both species. The algae were exposed to 1.8, 4.8, 9.2, 12.9 and 16.5 μM of TBBPA for 72 h. After staining with fluorescein diacetate (FDA), viable cells of each alga species were analyzed by flow cytometry based on chlorophyll autofluorescence and intracellular esterase activity. Density and abundance of viable cells were assessed to follow the population growth and the cell viability. In TBBPA treated samples, the growth of the two microalgae was significantly inhibited at the three highest concentrations (9.2, 12.9 and 16.5 μM) in the two tests. At the end of the experiment (t=72 h), the cell viability was also significantly smaller at these concentrations. The decreases of growth rate and viable cell abundance in TBBPA treated populations of N. palea were significantly higher in multi-species test in comparison with the single-species test. No significant differences were noticed between the two tests for P. subcapitata populations exposed to TBBPA. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterisation of peacock (Pavo cristatus) mitochondrial 12S rRNA sequence and its use in differentiation from closely related poultry species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, M; Das, D K; Dhara, A; Swarup, D; Yadav, M P; Gupta, P K

    2007-04-01

    1. Poaching of peacocks, the national bird of India, is illegal. People kill this beautiful pheasant bird for tail feathers and mix the meat with chicken or turkey. Differentiation of the meat of these species is essential in order to address the ambiguity about the origin of the sample. 2. The present study was carried out to investigate the use of polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) of mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene for identification of these species. 3. Peacock mitochondrial 12S rRNA partial gene was amplified using universal primers, cloned and characterised. It was found to be 446 nucleotides long. 4. Sequence analysis revealed 86.8 and 84.1% similarity with reported turkey and chicken sequences, respectively. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis showed that the peacock is much closer to the turkey than the chicken. 5. PCR-RFLP of 446 bp amplicon using commonly available restriction enzymes AluI and Sau3AI produced a differential pattern for identifying these poultry species unambiguously.

  14. Single-Molecule Imaging of PSD-95 mRNA Translation in Dendrites and Its Dysregulation in a Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifrim, Marius F; Williams, Kathryn R; Bassell, Gary J

    2015-05-06

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is caused by the loss of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), an RNA binding protein that regulates translation of numerous target mRNAs, some of which are dendritically localized. Our previous biochemical studies using synaptoneurosomes demonstrate a role for FMRP and miR-125a in regulating the translation of PSD-95 mRNA. However, the local translation of PSD-95 mRNA within dendrites and spines, as well as the roles of FMRP or miR-125a, have not been directly studied. Herein, local synthesis of a Venus-PSD-95 fusion protein was directly visualized in dendrites and spines using single-molecule imaging of a diffusion-restricted Venus-PSD-95 reporter under control of the PSD-95 3'UTR. The basal translation rates of Venus-PSD-95 mRNA was increased in cultured hippocampal neurons from Fmr1 KO mice compared with WT neurons, which correlated with a transient elevation of endogenous PSD-95 within dendrites. Following mGluR stimulation with (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine, the rate of Venus-PSD-95 mRNA translation increased rapidly in dendrites of WT hippocampal neurons, but not in those of Fmr1 KO neurons or when the binding site of miR125a, previously shown to bind PSD-95 3'UTR, was mutated. This study provides direct support for the hypothesis that local translation within dendrites and spines is dysregulated in FXS. Impairments in the regulated local synthesis of PSD-95, a critical regulator of synaptic structure and function, may affect the spatiotemporal control of PSD-95 levels and affect dendritic spine development and synaptic plasticity in FXS. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/357116-15$15.00/0.

  15. Systematic and quantitative mRNA expression analysis of TRP channel genes at the single trigeminal and dorsal root ganglion level in mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandewauw Ine

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Somatosensory nerve fibres arising from cell bodies within the trigeminal ganglia (TG in the head and from a string of dorsal root ganglia (DRG located lateral to the spinal cord convey endogenous and environmental stimuli to the central nervous system. Although several members of the transient receptor potential (TRP superfamily of cation channels have been implicated in somatosensation, the expression levels of TRP channel genes in the individual sensory ganglia have never been systematically studied. Results Here, we used quantitative real-time PCR to analyse and compare mRNA expression of all TRP channels in TG and individual DRGs from 27 anatomically defined segments of the spinal cord of the mouse. At the mRNA level, 17 of the 28 TRP channel genes, TRPA1, TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPC5, TRPM2, TRPM3, TRPM4, TRPM5, TRPM6, TRPM7, TRPM8, TRPV1, TRPV2, TRPV4, TRPML1 and TRPP2, were detectable in every tested ganglion. Notably, four TRP channels, TRPC4, TRPM4, TRPM8 and TRPV1, showed statistically significant variation in mRNA levels between DRGs from different segments, suggesting ganglion-specific regulation of TRP channel gene expression. These ganglion-to-ganglion differences in TRP channel transcript levels may contribute to the variability in sensory responses in functional studies. Conclusions We developed, compared and refined techniques to quantitatively analyse the relative mRNA expression of all TRP channel genes at the single ganglion level. This study also provides for the first time a comparative mRNA distribution profile in TG and DRG along the entire vertebral column for the mammalian TRP channel family.

  16. Design of custom oligonucleotide microarrays for single species or interspecies hybrids using Array Oligo Selector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudy, Amy A

    2011-01-01

    New technologies for DNA sequencing have made it feasible to determine the genome sequence of any organism of interest. This sequence is the resource required to create tools for downstream studies, including DNA microarrays. A number of vendors can produce DNA microarrays containing customer-specified sequences, allowing investigators to design and order arrays customized for any species of interest. Freely available, user-friendly computer programs are available for designing microarray probes. These design programs can be used to create probes that distinguish between two related genomes, allowing investigation of gene expression or gene representation in intra- or interspecies hybrids or in samples containing DNA from multiple species.

  17. Detection of Cryptosporidium species in feces or gastric contents from snakes and lizards as determined by polymerase chain reaction analysis and partial sequencing of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Barbara; Nedorost, Nora; Maderner, Anton; Weissenböck, Herbert

    2011-05-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is a well-known gastrointestinal disease of snakes and lizards. In the current study, 672 samples (feces and/or gastric contents or regurgitated food items) of various snakes and lizards were examined for the presence of cryptosporidia by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay targeting a part of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene. A consecutive sequencing reaction was used to identify the cryptosporidian species present in PCR-positive samples. Cryptosporidium varanii (saurophilum) was detected in 17 out of 106 (16%) samples from corn snakes (Pantherophis guttatus) and in 32 out of 462 (7%) samples from leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius). Cryptosporidium serpentis was found in 8 out of 462 (2%) leopard gecko samples, but in no other reptile. The Cryptosporidium sp. "lizard genotype" was present in 1 leopard gecko sample, and 1 sample from a corn snake showed a single nucleotide mismatch to this genotype. Pseudoparasitic cryptosporidian species were identified in 5 out of 174 (3%) ophidian samples, but not in lizards. Other sequences did not show complete similarity to previously published Cryptosporidium sequences. The results stress the importance for diagnostic methods to be specific for Cryptosporidium species especially in snakes and show a relatively high prevalence of C. varanii in leopard geckos and corn snakes. © 2011 The Author(s)

  18. A rapid, ratiometric, enzyme-free, and sensitive single-step miRNA detection using three-way junction based FRET probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qingying; Liu, Lin; Yang, Cai; Yuan, Jing; Feng, Hongtao; Chen, Yan; Zhao, Peng; Yu, Zhiqiang; Jin, Zongwen

    2018-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are single stranded endogenous molecules composed of only 18-24 nucleotides which are critical for gene expression regulating the translation of messenger RNAs. Conventional methods based on enzyme-assisted nucleic acid amplification techniques have many problems, such as easy contamination, high cost, susceptibility to false amplification, and tendency to have sequence mismatches. Here we report a rapid, ratiometric, enzyme-free, sensitive, and highly selective single-step miRNA detection using three-way junction assembled (or self-assembled) FRET probes. The developed strategy can be operated within the linear range from subnanomolar to hundred nanomolar concentrations of miRNAs. In comparison with the traditional approaches, our method showed high sensitivity for the miRNA detection and extreme selectivity for the efficient discrimination of single-base mismatches. The results reveal that the strategy paved a new avenue for the design of novel highly specific probes applicable in diagnostics and potentially in microscopic imaging of miRNAs in real biological environments.

  19. A simple and novel method for RNA-seq library preparation of single cell cDNA analysis by hyperactive Tn5 transposase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouilette, Scott; Kuersten, Scott; Mein, Charles; Bozek, Monika; Terry, Anna; Dias, Kerith-Rae; Bhaw-Rosun, Leena; Shintani, Yasunori; Coppen, Steven; Ikebe, Chiho; Sawhney, Vinit; Campbell, Niall; Kaneko, Masahiro; Tano, Nobuko; Ishida, Hidekazu; Suzuki, Ken; Yashiro, Kenta

    2012-10-01

    Deep sequencing of single cell-derived cDNAs offers novel insights into oncogenesis and embryogenesis. However, traditional library preparation for RNA-seq analysis requires multiple steps with consequent sample loss and stochastic variation at each step significantly affecting output. Thus, a simpler and better protocol is desirable. The recently developed hyperactive Tn5-mediated library preparation, which brings high quality libraries, is likely one of the solutions. Here, we tested the applicability of hyperactive Tn5-mediated library preparation to deep sequencing of single cell cDNA, optimized the protocol, and compared it with the conventional method based on sonication. This new technique does not require any expensive or special equipment, which secures wider availability. A library was constructed from only 100 ng of cDNA, which enables the saving of precious specimens. Only a few steps of robust enzymatic reaction resulted in saved time, enabling more specimens to be prepared at once, and with a more reproducible size distribution among the different specimens. The obtained RNA-seq results were comparable to the conventional method. Thus, this Tn5-mediated preparation is applicable for anyone who aims to carry out deep sequencing for single cell cDNAs. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Fluctuation localization imaging-based fluorescence in situ hybridization (fliFISH) for accurate detection and counting of RNA copies in single cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Yi; Hu, Dehong; Markillie, Lye Meng; Chrisler, William B.; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Ansong, Charles; Sussel, Lori; Orr, Galya

    2017-10-04

    Quantitative gene expression analysis in intact single cells can be achieved using single molecule- based fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH). This approach relies on fluorescence intensity to distinguish between true signals, emitted from an RNA copy hybridized with multiple FISH sub-probes, and background noise. Thus, the precision in smFISH is often compromised by partial or nonspecific binding of sub-probes and tissue autofluorescence, limiting its accuracy. Here we provide an accurate approach for setting quantitative thresholds between true and false signals, which relies on blinking frequencies of photoswitchable dyes. This fluctuation localization imaging-based FISH (fliFISH) uses blinking frequency patterns, emitted from a transcript bound to multiple sub-probes, which are distinct from blinking patterns emitted from partial or nonspecifically bound sub-probes and autofluorescence. Using multicolor fliFISH, we identified radial gene expression patterns in mouse pancreatic islets for insulin, the transcription factor, NKX2-2, and their ratio (Nkx2-2/Ins2). These radial patterns, showing higher values in β cells at the islet core and lower values in peripheral cells, were lost in diabetic mouse islets. In summary, fliFISH provides an accurate, quantitative approach for detecting and counting true RNA copies and rejecting false signals by their distinct blinking frequency patterns, laying the foundation for reliable single-cell transcriptomics.

  1. Sincell: an R/Bioconductor package for statistical assessment of cell-state hierarchies from single-cell RNA-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliá, Miguel; Telenti, Amalio; Rausell, Antonio

    2015-10-15

    Cell differentiation processes are achieved through a continuum of hierarchical intermediate cell states that might be captured by single-cell RNA seq. Existing computational approaches for the assessment of cell-state hierarchies from single-cell data can be formalized under a general framework composed of (i) a metric to assess cell-to-cell similarities (with or without a dimensionality reduction step) and (ii) a graph-building algorithm (optionally making use of a cell clustering step). The Sincell R package implements a methodological toolbox allowing flexible workflows under such a framework. Furthermore, Sincell contributes new algorithms to provide cell-state hierarchies with statistical support while accounting for stochastic factors in single-cell RNA seq. Graphical representations and functional association tests are provided to interpret hierarchies. The functionalities of Sincell are illustrated in a real case study, which demonstrates its ability to discriminate noisy from stable cell-state hierarchies. Sincell is an open-source R/Bioconductor package available at http://bioconductor.org/packages/sincell. A detailed manual and a vignette are provided with the package. antonio.rausell@isb-sib.ch Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  2. Analysis of MDM2 and MDM4 single nucleotide polymorphisms, mRNA splicing and protein expression in retinoblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justina McEvoy

    Full Text Available Retinoblastoma is a childhood cancer of the developing retina that begins in utero and is diagnosed in the first years of life. Biallelic RB1 gene inactivation is the initiating genetic lesion in retinoblastoma. The p53 gene is intact in human retinoblastoma but the pathway is believed to be suppressed by increased expression of MDM4 (MDMX and MDM2. Here we quantify the expression of MDM4 and MDM2 mRNA and protein in human fetal retinae, primary retinoblastomas, retinoblastoma cell lines and several independent orthotopic retinoblastoma xenografts. We found that MDM4 is the major p53 antagonist expressed in retinoblastoma and in the developing human retina. We also discovered that MDM4 protein steady state levels are much higher in retinoblastoma than in human fetal retinae. This increase would not have been predicted based on the mRNA levels. We explored several possible post-transcriptional mechanisms that may contribute to the elevated levels of MDM4 protein. A proportion of MDM4 transcripts are alternatively spliced to produce protein products that are reported to be more stable and oncogenic. We also discovered that a microRNA predicted to target MDM4 (miR191 was downregulated in retinoblastoma relative to human fetal retinae and a subset of samples had somatic mutations that eliminated the miR-191 binding site in the MDM4 mRNA. Taken together, these data suggest that post-transcriptional mechanisms may contribute to stabilization of the MDM4 protein in retinoblastoma.

  3. Analysis of MDM2 and MDM4 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms, mRNA Splicing and Protein Expression in Retinoblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, Justina; Ulyanov, Anatoly; Brennan, Rachel; Wu, Gang; Pounds, Stanley; Zhang, Jinghui; Dyer, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is a childhood cancer of the developing retina that begins in utero and is diagnosed in the first years of life. Biallelic RB1 gene inactivation is the initiating genetic lesion in retinoblastoma. The p53 gene is intact in human retinoblastoma but the pathway is believed to be suppressed by increased expression of MDM4 (MDMX) and MDM2. Here we quantify the expression of MDM4 and MDM2 mRNA and protein in human fetal retinae, primary retinoblastomas, retinoblastoma cell lines and several independent orthotopic retinoblastoma xenografts. We found that MDM4 is the major p53 antagonist expressed in retinoblastoma and in the developing human retina. We also discovered that MDM4 protein steady state levels are much higher in retinoblastoma than in human fetal retinae. This increase would not have been predicted based on the mRNA levels. We explored several possible post-transcriptional mechanisms that may contribute to the elevated levels of MDM4 protein. A proportion of MDM4 transcripts are alternatively spliced to produce protein products that are reported to be more stable and oncogenic. We also discovered that a microRNA predicted to target MDM4 (miR191) was downregulated in retinoblastoma relative to human fetal retinae and a subset of samples had somatic mutations that eliminated the miR-191 binding site in the MDM4 mRNA. Taken together, these data suggest that post-transcriptional mechanisms may contribute to stabilization of the MDM4 protein in retinoblastoma. PMID:22916154

  4. A single dominant Ganoderma species is responsible for root rot of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ganoderma root rot is the most serious disease affecting commercially planted Acacia mangium in plantations in Indonesia. Numerous Ganoderma spp. have been recorded from diseased trees of this species and to a lesser extent Eucalyptus, causing confusion regarding the primary cause of the disease. In this study, a ...

  5. Beyond the single species climate envelope: A multifaceted approach to mapping climate change vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher S. Balzotti; Stanley G. Kitchen; Clinton McCarthy

    2016-01-01

    Federal land management agencies and conservation organizations have begun incorporating climate change vulnerability assessments (CCVAs) as an important component in the management and conservation of landscapes. It is often a challenge to translate that knowledge into management plans and actions, even when research infers species risk. Predictive maps can...

  6. Consuming algal products: trophic interactions of bacteria and a diatom species determined by RNA stable isotope probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapp, Melanie; Gerdts, Gunnar; Wellinger, Marco; Wichels, Antje

    2008-09-01

    Heterotrophic marine bacteria utilise a wide range of carbon sources. Recently, techniques were developed to link bacterial identity and physiological capacity of microorganisms within natural communities. One of these methods is stable isotope probing (SIP) which allows an identification of active microorganisms using particular growth substrates. In this study, we present the first attempt to analyse bacterial communities associated with microalgae by rRNA-SIP. This approach was used to analyse bacterial populations consuming algal products of Thalassiosira rotula by applying SIP followed by reverse transcription of 16S rRNA and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Generally, our results indicate that bacteria which consume algal products can be detected by isotope arrays coupled with fingerprinting methods.

  7. Transcriptomic profiling of interacting nasal staphylococci species reveals global changes in gene and non-coding RNA expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Grith Miriam Maigaard; Sazinas, Pavelas; Kofod, Ditte

    2018-01-01

    Interspecies interactions between bacterial pathogens and the commensal microbiota can influence disease outcome. In the nasal cavities, Staphylococcus epidermidis has been shown to be a determining factor for Staphylococcus aureus colonization and biofilm formation. However, the interaction......RNA are both downregulated during interaction with S. aureus. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of pathogen physiology in the context of interactions with the commensal microbiota, and may provide targets for future therapeutics....

  8. Single-tree water use and water-use efficiencies of selected indigenous and introduced species in the Southern Cape region of South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mapeto, P

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available indigenous tree species can provide an additional low water-use form of forestry. Single-tree water use and water-use efficiencies of three indigenous species (Ilex mitis, Ocotea bullata and Podocarpus latifolius) and one introduced species (Pinus radiata...

  9. Development and regulation of single- and multi-species Candida albicans biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Matthew B.; Gulati, Megha; Johnson, Alexander D.; Nobile, Clarissa J.

    2017-01-01

    Candida albicans is among the most prevalent fungal species of the human microbiota and asymptomatically colonizes healthy individuals. However, it is also an opportunistic pathogen that can cause severe, and often fatal, bloodstream infections. The medical impact of C. albicans typically depends on its ability to form biofilms, which are closely packed communities of cells that attach to surfaces, such as tissues and implanted medical devices. In this Review, we provide an overview of the processes involved in the formation of C. albicans biofilms and discuss the core transcriptional network that regulates biofilm development. We also consider some of the advantages that biofilms provide to C. albicans in comparison with planktonic growth and explore polymicrobial biofilms that are formed by C. albicans and certain bacterial species. PMID:29062072

  10. Mapping Regional Distribution of a Single Tree Species: Whitebark Pine in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles C. Schwartz

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Moderate resolution satellite imagery traditionally has been thought to be inadequate for mapping vegetation at the species level. This has made comprehensive mapping of regional distributions of sensitive species, such as whitebark pine, either impractical or extremely time consuming. We sought to determine whether using a combination of moderate resolution satellite imagery (Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus, extensive stand data collected by land management agencies for other purposes, and modern statistical classification techniques (boosted classification trees could result in successful mapping of whitebark pine. Overall classification accuracies exceeded 90%, with similar individual class accuracies. Accuracies on a localized basis varied based on elevation. Accuracies also varied among administrative units, although we were not able to determine whether these differences related to inherent spatial variations or differences in the quality of available reference data.

  11. Illumina sequencing of bacterial 16S rDNA and 16S rRNA reveals seasonal and species-specific variation in bacterial communities in four moss species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Tang, Jing Yan; Wang, Su; Chen, Zhi Ling; Li, Xue Dong; Li, Yan Hong

    2017-09-01

    In order to better understand the factors that influence bacterial diversity and community composition in moss-associated bacteria, a study of bacterial communities in four moss species collected in three seasons was carried out via high-throughput sequencing of 16S rDNA and 16S rRNA. Moss species included Cratoneuron filicinum, Pylaisiella polyantha, Campyliadelphus polygamum, and Grimmia pilifera, with samples collected in May, July, and October 2015 from rocks at Beijing Songshan National Nature Reserve. In total, the bacterial richness and diversity were high regardless of moss species, sampling season, or data source (DNA vs. RNA). Bacterial sequences were assigned to a total of 558 OTUs and 279 genera in 16 phyla. Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria were the two most abundant phyla, and Cellvibrio, Lapillicoccus, Jatrophihabitans, Friedmanniella, Oligoflexus, and Bosea the most common genera in the samples. A clustering algorithm and principal coordinate analysis revealed that C. filicinum and C. polygamum had similar bacterial communities, as did P. polyantha and G. pilifera. Metabolically active bacteria showed the same pattern in addition to seasonal variation: bacterial communities were most similar in summer and autumn, looking at each moss species separately. In contrast, DNA profiles lacked obvious seasonal dynamics. A partial least squares discriminant analysis identified three groups of samples that correlated with differences in moss species resources. Although bacterial community composition did vary with the sampling season and data source, these were not the most important factors influencing bacterial communities. Previous reports exhibited that mosses have been widely used in biomonitoring of air pollution by enriching some substances or elements in the moss-tag technique and the abundant moss associated bacteria might also be important components involved in the related biological processes. Thus, this survey not only enhanced our understanding

  12. RNA Sequencing Reveals Age and Species Differences of Constitutive Androstane Receptor-Targeted Drug-Processing Genes in the Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sunny Lihua; Bammler, Theo K; Cui, Julia Yue

    2017-07-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR/Nr1i3) is an important xenobiotic-sensing nuclear receptor that is highly expressed in the liver and is well known to have species differences. During development, age-specific activation of CAR may lead to modified pharmacokinetics and toxicokinetics of drugs and environmental chemicals, leading to higher risks for adverse drug reactions in newborns and children. The goal of this study was to systematically investigate the age- and species-specific regulation of various drug-processing genes (DPGs) after neonatal or adult CAR activation in the livers of wild-type, CAR-null, and humanized CAR transgenic mice. At either 5 or 60 days of age, the three genotypes of mice were administered a species-appropriate CAR ligand or vehicle once daily for 4 days (i.p.). The majority of DPGs were differentially regulated by age and/or CAR activation. Thirty-six DPGs were commonly upregulated by CAR activation regardless of age or species of CAR. Although the cumulative mRNAs of uptake transporters were not readily altered by CAR, the cumulative phase I and phase II enzymes as well as efflux transporters were all increased after CAR activation in both species. In general, mouse CAR activation produced comparable or even greater fold increases of many DPGs in newborns than in adults; conversely, humanized CAR activation produced weaker induction in newborns than in adults. Western blotting and enzyme activity assays confirmed the age and species specificities of selected CAR-targeted DPGs. In conclusion, this study systematically compared the effect of age and species of CAR proteins on the regulation of DPGs in the liver and demonstrated that the regulation of xenobiotic biotransformation by CAR is profoundly modified by age and species. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  13. Environmental genomics reveals a single species ecosystem deep within the Earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chivian, Dylan; Brodie, Eoin L.; Alm, Eric J.; Culley, David E.; Dehal, Paramvir S.; DeSantis, Todd Z.; Gihring, Thomas M.; Lapidus, Alla; Lin, Li-Hung; Lowry, Stephen R.; Moser, Duane P.; Richardson, Paul; Southam, Gordon; Wanger, Greg; Pratt, Lisa M.; Andersen, Gary L.; Hazen, Terry C.; Brockman, Fred J.; Arkin, Adam P.; Onstott, Tullis C.

    2008-09-17

    DNA from low biodiversity fracture water collected at 2.8 km depth in a South African gold mine was sequenced and assembled into a single, complete genome. This bacterium, Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator, comprises>99.9percent of the microorganisms inhabiting the fluid phase of this particular fracture. Its genome indicates a motile, sporulating, sulfate reducing, chemoautotrophic thermophile that can fix its own nitrogen and carbon using machinery shared with archaea. Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator is capable of an independent lifestyle well suited to long-term isolation from the photosphere deep within Earth?s crust, and offers the first example of a natural ecosystem that appears to have its biological component entirely encoded within a single genome.

  14. Identification of squid species by melting temperature shifts on fluorescence melting curve analysis (FMCA) using single dual-labeled probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Eunjung; Song, Ha Jeong; Kwon, Na Young; Kim, Gi Won; Lee, Kwang Ho; Jo, Soyeon; Park, Sujin; Park, Jihyun; Park, Eun Kyeong; Hwang, Seung Yong

    2017-06-01

    Real time PCR is a standard method for identification of species. One of limitations of the qPCR is that there would be false-positive result due to mismatched hybridization between target sequence and probe depending on the annealing temperature in the PCR condition. As an alternative, fluorescence melting curve analysis (FMCA) could be applied for species identification. FMCA is based on a dual-labeled probe. Even with subtle difference of target sequence, there are visible melting temperature (Tm) shift. One of FMCA applications is distinguishing organisms distributed and consumed globally as popular food ingredients. Their prices are set by species or country of origin. However, counterfeiting or distributing them without any verification procedure are becoming social problems and threatening food safety. Besides distinguishing them in naked eye is very difficult and almost impossible in any processed form. Therefore, it is necessary to identify species in molecular level. In this research three species of squids which have 1-2 base pair differences each are selected as samples since they have the same issue. We designed a probe which perfectly matches with one species and the others mismatches 2 and 1 base pair respectively and labeled with fluorophore and quencher. In an experiment with a single probe, we successfully distinguished them by Tm shift depending on the difference of base pair. By combining FMCA and qPCR chip, smaller-scale assay with higher sensitivity and resolution could be possible, andc furthermore, enabling results analysis with smart phone would realize point-of-care testing (POCT).

  15. Ultrastructure, SSU rRNA gene sequences and phylogenetic relationships of Flamella Schaeffer, 1926 (Amoebozoa), with description of three new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, Alexander; Wylezich, Claudia; Schlegel, Martin; Walochnik, Julia; Michel, Rolf

    2009-02-01

    We isolated and described three new freshwater amoebozoan species that could be unambiguously assigned to the genus Flamella Schaeffer, 1926 by light microscopy. The phylogenetic position of the genus Flamella within the Amoebozoa was unknown, and gene sequence data were lacking. We sequenced the SSU rRNA gene of five Flamella spp., including a previously described F. aegyptia Michel et Smirnov, 1999. The phylogenetic trees inferred from these data showed, that Flamella is monophyletic and robustly branches within Amoebozoa. It belongs to a clade comprising Filamoeba spp., "Arachnula" sp., some protostelids and several SSU rRNA sequences of unidentified or uncultured eukaryotes. This clade consistently branched close to Archamoebae, Mycetozoa, Acramoeba dendroida and Multicilia marina; in contrast to the previous hypotheses, Flamella spp. did not show any relatedness either to Leptomyxida, or to Flabellinea. The ultrastructure of trophic amoebae and especially cysts of the species studied showed considerable similarity to Comandonia operculata Pernin et Pussard, 1979. We therefore suggest that Comandonia may be a junior synonym of Flamella, although more ultrastructural data about Comandonia operculata are necessary to test this hypothesis.

  16. Genome-wide mRNA sequencing of a single canine cerebellar cortical degeneration case leads to the identification of a disease associated SPTBN2 mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forman Oliver P

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neonatal cerebellar cortical degeneration is a neurodegenerative disease described in several canine breeds including the Beagle. Affected Beagles are unable to ambulate normally from the onset of walking and the main pathological findings include Purkinje cell loss with swollen dendritic processes. Previous reports suggest an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. The development of massively parallel sequencing techniques has presented the opportunity to investigate individual clinical cases using genome-wide sequencing approaches. We used genome-wide mRNA sequencing (mRNA-seq of cerebellum tissue from a single Beagle with neonatal cerebellar cortical degeneration as a method of candidate gene sequencing, with the aim of identifying the causal mutation. Results A four-week old Beagle dog presented with progressive signs of cerebellar ataxia and the owner elected euthanasia. Histopathology revealed findings consistent with cerebellar cortical degeneration. Genome-wide mRNA sequencing (mRNA-seq of RNA from cerebellum tissue was used as a method of candidate gene sequencing. After analysis of the canine orthologues of human spinocerebellar ataxia associated genes, we identified a homozygous 8 bp deletion in the β-III spectrin gene, SPTBN2, associated with spinocerebellar type 5 in humans. Genotype analysis of the sire, dam, ten clinically unaffected siblings, and an affected sibling from a previous litter, showed the mutation to fully segregate with the disorder. Previous studies have shown that β-III spectrin is critical for Purkinje cell development, and the absence of this protein can lead to cell damage through excitotoxicity, consistent with the observed Purkinje cell loss, degeneration of dendritic processes and associated neurological dysfunction in this Beagle. Conclusions An 8 bp deletion in the SPTBN2 gene encoding β-III spectrin is associated with neonatal cerebellar cortical degeneration in Beagle dogs

  17. The effect of selected plant extracts on the development of single-species dental biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahim, Z.H.; Shaikh, S.; Razak, A.; Ismail, W.N.H.W.

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effect of a mixture of plant extracts on the adherence and retention of bacteria in dental biofilm. Study Design: Experimental study. Place and Duration of Study:Department of Oral Biology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, from December 2009 to December 2011. Methodology: For determination of adhering ability, experimental pellicle was first treated with the Plant Extracts Mixture (PEM) before inoculating it with individual bacterial species ( S. mitis / S. sanguinis / S. mutans). For the determination of retention ability, the procedure was repeated with the experimental pellicle being inoculated first with the individual bacterial species and then treating it with the PEM. These two experiments were repeated with deionized distilled water (negative control) and Thymol (0.64%) (positive control). The bacterial populations in biofilms for the two experiments were expressed as Colony Forming Unit (CFU) / mL x 10/sup 4/ and the corresponding values were expressed as mean +- SD. Results: The effect of the Plant Extracts Mixture (PEM) for the two experiments was compared with that of Thymol and deionized distilled water. It was shown that there is a reduced adherence of bacteria to PEM-treated and Thymol (0.064%) treated experimental pellicle compared with the negative control (p < 0.001). It was also found that the retention of bacteria in both treated biofilms is also lower than that of negative control (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Plant Extracts Mixture (PEM) may influence the development of dental biofilm by affecting the adhering and retention capacities of the bacterial species in the dental biofilms. (author)

  18. Two-dimensional strandness-dependent electrophoresis: a method to characterize single-stranded DNA, double-stranded DNA, and RNA-DNA hybrids in complex samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsson, Gudmundur H; Gudmundsson, Bjarki; Thormar, Hans G; Alfredsson, Arni; Jonsson, Jon J

    2006-03-01

    We describe two-dimensional strandness-dependent electrophoresis (2D-SDE) for quantification and length distribution analysis of single-stranded (ss) DNA fragments, double-stranded (ds) DNA fragments, RNA-DNA hybrids, and nicked DNA fragments in complex samples. In the first dimension nucleic acid molecules are separated based on strandness and length in the presence of 7 M urea. After the first-dimension electrophoresis all nucleic acid fragments are heat denatured in the gel. During the second-dimension electrophoresis all nucleic acid fragments are single-stranded and migrate according to length. 2D-SDE takes about 90 min and requires only basic skills and equipment. We show that 2D-SDE has many applications in analyzing complex nucleic acid samples including (1) estimation of renaturation efficiency and kinetics, (2) monitoring cDNA synthesis, (3) detection of nicked DNA fragments, and (4) estimation of quality and in vitro damage of nucleic acid samples. Results from 2D-SDE should be useful to validate techniques such as complex polymerase chain reaction, subtractive hybridization, cDNA synthesis, cDNA normalization, and microarray analysis. 2D-SDE could also be used, e.g., to characterize biological nucleic acid samples. Information obtained with 2D-SDE cannot be readily obtained with other methods. 2D-SDE can be used for preparative isolation of ssDNA fragments, dsDNA fragments, and RNA-DNA hybrids.

  19. Intra-Species Bacterial Quorum Sensing Studied at Single Cell Level in a Double Droplet Trapping System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelm T. S. Huck

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigated the intra-species bacterial quorum sensing at the single cell level using a double droplet trapping system. Escherichia coli transformed to express the quorum sensing receptor protein, LasR, were encapsulated in microdroplets that were positioned adjacent to microdroplets containing the autoinducer, N-(3-oxododecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (OdDHL. Functional activation of the LasR protein by diffusion of the OdDHL across the droplet interface was measured by monitoring the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP from a LasR-dependent promoter. A threshold concentration of OdDHL was found to induce production of quorum-sensing associated GFP by E. coli. Additionally, we demonstrated that LasR-dependent activation of GFP expression was also initiated when the adjacent droplets contained single E. coli transformed with the OdDHL synthase gene, LasI, representing a simple quorum sensing circuit between two droplets.

  20. Real-Time Visualization of Active Species in a Single-Site Metal–Organic Framework Photocatalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Sizhuo [Department of Chemistry, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201, United States; Pattengale, Brian [Department of Chemistry, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201, United States; Lee, Sungsik [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60349, United States; Huang, Jier [Department of Chemistry, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201, United States

    2018-02-06

    In this work, we report a new single-site photocatalyst (Co-Ru-UIO- 67(bpy)) based on a metal-organic framework platform with incorporated molecular photosensitizer and catalyst. We show that this catalyst not only demonstrates exceptional activity for light-driven H2 production but also can be recycled without loss of activity. Using the combination of optical transient absorption spectroscopy and in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we not only captured the key CoI intermediate species formed after ultrafast charge transfer from the incorporated photosensitizer but also identified the rate-limiting step in the catalytic cycle, providing insight into the catalysis mechanism of these single-site metal-organic framework photocatalysts.

  1. Isolation of dimorphic chloroplasts from the single-cell C4 species Bienertia sinuspersici

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lung Shiu-Cheung

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Three terrestrial plants are known to perform C4 photosynthesis without the dual-cell system by partitioning two distinct types of chloroplasts in separate cytoplasmic compartments. We report herein a protocol for isolating the dimorphic chloroplasts from Bienertia sinuspersici. Hypo-osmotically lysed protoplasts under our defined conditions released intact compartments containing the central chloroplasts and intact vacuoles with adhering peripheral chloroplasts. Following Percoll step gradient purification both chloroplast preparations demonstrated high homogeneities as evaluated from the relative abundance of respective protein markers. This protocol will open novel research directions toward understanding the mechanism of single-cell C4 photosynthesis.

  2. Species specificity of human RPA in simian virus 40 DNA replication lies in T-antigen-dependent RNA primer synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mu; Park, Jang-Su; Ishiai, Masamichi; Hurwitz, Jerard; Lee, Suk-Hee

    2000-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a three-subunit protein complex with multiple functions in DNA replication. Previous study indicated that human RPA (h-RPA) could not be replaced by Schizosaccharomyces pombe RPA (sp-RPA) in simian virus 40 (SV40) replication, suggesting that h-RPA may have a specific function in SV40 DNA replication. To understand the specificity of h-RPA in replication, we prepared heterologous RPAs containing the mixture of human and S.pombe subunits and compared these preparations for various enzymatic activities. Heterologous RPAs containing two human subunits supported SV40 DNA replication, whereas those containing only one human subunit poorly supported DNA replication, suggesting that RPA complex requires at least two human subunits to support its function in SV40 DNA replication. All heterologous RPAs effectively supported single-stranded (ss)DNA binding activity and an elongation of a primed DNA template catalyzed by DNA polymerase (pol) α and δ. A strong correlation between SV40 DNA replication activity and large tumor antigen (T-ag)-dependent RNA primer synthesis by pol α–primase complex was observed among the heterologous RPAs. Furthermore, T-ag showed a strong interaction with 70- and 34-kDa subunits from human, but poorly interacted with their S.pombe counterparts, indicating that the specificity of h-RPA is due to its role in RNA primer synthesis. In the SV40 replication reaction, the addition of increasing amounts of sp-RPA in the presence of fixed amount of h-RPA significantly reduced overall DNA synthesis, but increased the size of lagging strand, supporting a specific role for h-RPA in RNA primer synthesis. Together, these results suggest that the specificity of h-RPA in SV40 replication lies in T-ag-dependent RNA primer synthesis. PMID:11095685

  3. Technical note: use of transfer RNA-intergenic spacer PCR combined with capillary electrophoresis to identify coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species originating from bovine milk and teat apices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supré, K; De Vliegher, S; Sampimon, O C; Zadoks, R N; Vaneechoutte, M; Baele, M; De Graef, E; Piepers, S; Haesebrouck, F

    2009-07-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are the most frequently isolated bacteria in milk samples from cows with and without mastitis. Elucidating their relevance in bovine udder health is hampered because identification at the species level, if done at all, used to be performed based on phenotypic features. To provide a rapid, cheap, and easy-to-use genotypic technique that can be used to identify CNS species from milk and teat apices from cows, the performance of transfer RNA-intergenic spacer PCR (tDNA-PCR) in combination with capillary electrophoresis was evaluated. After updating the tDNA library with CNS reference strains, 288 field isolates were identified with tDNA-PCR and gene sequencing, and the latter was used as the reference method. The field isolates were divided in 2 groups of 144. Isolates of the first group were identified with tDNA-PCR with a typeability of 81.9% and an accuracy of 94.1%. Peak patterns of these isolates were then added to the tDNA library with species identity as determined by DNA sequencing. The second group was identified with the updated tDNA library, resulting in 91.0% typeability and 99.2% accuracy. This study showed that the updated tDNA-PCR in combination with capillary electrophoresis was almost as accurate as gene sequencing but faster and cheaper (only $3 per isolate), and is a useful tool in observational studies concerning the epidemiology of bovine CNS species.

  4. Cigarette smoke exposure-associated alterations to noncoding RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Alan Maccani

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Environmental exposures vary by timing, severity, and frequency and may have a number of deleterious effects throughout the life course. The period of in utero development, for example, is one of the most crucial stages of development during which adverse environmental exposures can both alter the growth and development of the fetus as well as lead to aberrant fetal programming, increasing disease risk. During fetal development and beyond, the plethora of exposures, including nutrients, drugs, stress, and trauma, influence health, development, and survival. Recent research in environmental epigenetics has investigated the roles of environmental exposures in influencing epigenetic modes of gene regulation during pregnancy and at various stages of life. Many relatively common environmental exposures, such as cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and drug use, may have consequences for the expression and function of noncoding RNA (ncRNA, important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. A number of ncRNA have been discovered, including microRNA (miRNA, Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA, and long noncoding RNA (long ncRNA. The best-characterized species of ncRNA are miRNA, the mature forms of which are ~22 nucleotides in length and capable of post-transcriptionally regulating target mRNA utilizing mechanisms based largely on the degree of complementarity between miRNA and target mRNA. Because miRNA can still negatively regulate gene expression when imperfectly base-paired with a target mRNA, a single miRNA can have a large number of potential mRNA targets and can regulate many different biological processes critical for health and development. The following review analyzes the current literature detailing links between cigarette smoke exposure and aberrant expression and function of noncoding RNA, assesses how such alterations may have consequences throughout the life course, and proposes future directions for this intriguing field of

  5. Robust species taxonomy assignment algorithm for 16S rRNA NGS reads: application to oral carcinoma samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezar Noor Al-Hebshi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Usefulness of next-generation sequencing (NGS in assessing bacteria associated with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC has been undermined by inability to classify reads to the species level. Objective: The purpose of this study was to develop a robust algorithm for species-level classification of NGS reads from oral samples and to pilot test it for profiling bacteria within OSCC tissues. Methods: Bacterial 16S V1-V3 libraries were prepared from three OSCC DNA samples and sequenced using 454's FLX chemistry. High-quality, well-aligned, and non-chimeric reads ≥350 bp were classified using a novel, multi-stage algorithm that involves matching reads to reference sequences in revised versions of the Human Oral Microbiome Database (HOMD, HOMD extended (HOMDEXT, and Greengene Gold (GGG at alignment coverage and percentage identity ≥98%, followed by assignment to species level based on top hit reference sequences. Priority was given to hits in HOMD, then HOMDEXT and finally GGG. Unmatched reads were subject to operational taxonomic unit analysis. Results: Nearly, 92.8% of the reads were matched to updated-HOMD 13.2, 1.83% to trusted-HOMDEXT, and 1.36% to modified-GGG. Of all matched reads, 99.6% were classified to species level. A total of 228 species-level taxa were identified, representing 11 phyla; the most abundant were Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Fusobacteria, and Actinobacteria. Thirty-five species-level taxa were detected in all samples. On average, Prevotella oris, Neisseria flava, Neisseria flavescens/subflava, Fusobacterium nucleatum ss polymorphum, Aggregatibacter segnis, Streptococcus mitis, and Fusobacterium periodontium were the most abundant. Bacteroides fragilis, a species rarely isolated from the oral cavity, was detected in two samples. Conclusion: This multi-stage algorithm maximizes the fraction of reads classified to the species level while ensuring reliable classification by giving priority to the

  6. Chasing the hare - Evaluating the phylogenetic utility of a nuclear single copy gene region at and below species level within the species rich group Peperomia (Piperaceae

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    Naumann Julia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rapidly increasing number of available plant genomes opens up almost unlimited prospects for biology in general and molecular phylogenetics in particular. A recent study took advantage of this data and identified a set of nuclear genes that occur in single copy in multiple sequenced angiosperms. The present study is the first to apply genomic sequence of one of these low copy genes, agt1, as a phylogenetic marker for species-level phylogenetics. Its utility is compared to the performance of several coding and non-coding chloroplast loci that have been suggested as most applicable for this taxonomic level. As a model group, we chose Tildenia, a subgenus of Peperomia (Piperaceae, one of the largest plant genera. Relationships are particularly difficult to resolve within these species rich groups due to low levels of polymorphisms and fast or recent radiation. Therefore, Tildenia is a perfect test case for applying new phylogenetic tools. Results We show that the nuclear marker agt1, and in particular the agt1 introns, provide a significantly increased phylogenetic signal compared to chloroplast markers commonly used for low level phylogenetics. 25% of aligned characters from agt1 intron sequence are parsimony informative. In comparison, the introns and spacer of several common chloroplast markers (trnK intron, trnK-psbA spacer, ndhF-rpl32 spacer, rpl32-trnL spacer, psbA-trnH spacer provide less than 10% parsimony informative characters. The agt1 dataset provides a deeper resolution than the chloroplast markers in Tildenia. Conclusions Single (or very low copy nuclear genes are of immense value in plant phylogenetics. Compared to other nuclear genes that are members of gene families of all sizes, lab effort, such as cloning, can be kept to a minimum. They also provide regions with different phylogenetic content deriving from coding and non-coding parts of different length. Thus, they can be applied to a wide range of

  7. Development and evaluation of 16S rRNA gene targeting Enterococcus genus- and species-specific assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enterococci have been widely used as indicators of fecal pollution in recreational waters. Most studies enumerate enterococci using culture-based techniques that are time consuming and do not provide information on the identity of enterococci species within a given sample. Althou...

  8. Single-Particle Momentum Distributions of Efimov States in Mixed-Species Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    T. Yamashita, M.; F. Bellotti, F.; Frederico, T.

    2013-01-01

    to derive formulas for the scaling factor of the Efimov spectrum for any mass ratio assuming either that two or three of the two-body subsystems have a bound state at zero energy. We consider the single-particle momentum distribution analytically and numerically and analyse the tail of the momentum......We solve the three-body bound state problem in three dimensions for mass imbalanced systems of two identical bosons and a third particle in the universal limit where the interactions are assumed to be of zero-range. The system displays the Efimov effect and we use the momentum-space wave equation...... distribution to obtain the three-body contact parameter. Our finding demonstrate that the functional form of the three-body contact term depends on the mass ratio and we obtain an analytic expression for this behavior. To exemplify our results, we consider mixtures of Lithium with either two Caesium or Rubium...

  9. Transfer RNA detection by small RNA deep sequencing and disease association with myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan; Bosompem, Amma; Mohan, Sanjay; Erdogan, Begum; Ye, Fei; Vickers, Kasey C; Sheng, Quanhu; Zhao, Shilin; Li, Chung-I; Su, Pei-Fang; Jagasia, Madan; Strickland, Stephen A; Griffiths, Elizabeth A; Kim, Annette S

    2015-09-24

    Although advances in sequencing technologies have popularized the use of microRNA (miRNA) sequencing (miRNA-seq) for the quantification of miRNA expression, questions remain concerning the optimal methodologies for analysis and utilization of the data. The construction of a miRNA sequencing library selects RNA by length rather than type. However, as we have previously described, miRNAs represent only a subset of the species obtained by size selection. Consequently, the libraries obtained for miRNA sequencing also contain a variety of additional species of small RNAs. This study looks at the prevalence of these other species obtained from bone marrow aspirate specimens and explores the predictive value of these small RNAs in the determination of response to therapy in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Paired pre and post treatment bone marrow aspirate specimens were obtained from patients with MDS who were treated with either azacytidine or decitabine (24 pre-treatment specimens, 23 post-treatment specimens) with 22 additional non-MDS control specimens. Total RNA was extracted from these specimens and submitted for next generation sequencing after an additional size exclusion step to enrich for small RNAs. The species of small RNAs were enumerated, single nucleotide variants (SNVs) identified, and finally the differential expression of tRNA-derived species (tDRs) in the specimens correlated with diseasestatus and response to therapy. Using miRNA sequencing data generated from bone marrow aspirate samples of patients with known MDS (N = 47) and controls (N = 23), we demonstrated that transfer RNA (tRNA) fragments (specifically tRNA halves, tRHs) are one of the most common species of small RNA isolated from size selection. Using tRNA expression values extracted from miRNA sequencing data, we identified six tRNA fragments that are differentially expressed between MDS and normal samples. Using the elastic net method, we identified four tRNAs-derived small RNAs (t

  10. Thiol-linked alkylation of RNA to assess expression dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Veronika A; Reichholf, Brian; Neumann, Tobias; Rescheneder, Philipp; Bhat, Pooja; Burkard, Thomas R; Wlotzka, Wiebke; von Haeseler, Arndt; Zuber, Johannes; Ameres, Stefan L

    2017-12-01

    Gene expression profiling by high-throughput sequencing reveals qualitative and quantitative changes in RNA species at steady state but obscures the intracellular dynamics of RNA transcription, processing and decay. We developed thiol(SH)-linked alkylation for the metabolic sequencing of RNA (SLAM seq), an orthogonal-chemistry-based RNA sequencing technology that detects 4-thiouridine (s 4 U) incorporation in RNA species at single-nucleotide resolution. In combination with well-established metabolic RNA labeling protocols and coupled to standard, low-input, high-throughput RNA sequencing methods, SLAM seq enabled rapid access to RNA-polymerase-II-dependent gene expression dynamics in the context of total RNA. We validated the method in mouse embryonic stem cells by showing that the RNA-polymerase-II-dependent transcriptional output scaled with Oct4/Sox2/Nanog-defined enhancer activity, and we provide quantitative and mechanistic evidence for transcript-specific RNA turnover mediated by post-transcriptional gene regulatory pathways initiated by microRNAs and N 6 -methyladenosine. SLAM seq facilitates the dissection of fundamental mechanisms that control gene expression in an accessible, cost-effective and scalable manner.

  11. Nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae causes otitis media during single-species infection and during polymicrobial infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

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    Murrah, Kyle A; Pang, Bing; Richardson, Stephen; Perez, Antonia; Reimche, Jennifer; King, Lauren; Wren, John; Swords, W Edward

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae strains lacking capsular polysaccharide have been increasingly reported in carriage and disease contexts. Since most cases of otitis media involve more than one bacterial species, we aimed to determine the capacity of a nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae clinical isolate to induce disease in the context of a single-species infection and as a polymicrobial infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae. Using the chinchilla model of otitis media, we found that nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae colonizes the nasopharynx following intranasal inoculation, but does not readily ascend into the middle ear. However, when we inoculated nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae directly into the middle ear, the bacteria persisted for two weeks post-inoculation and induced symptoms consistent with chronic otitis media. During coinfection with nontypeable H. influenzae, both species persisted for one week and induced polymicrobial otitis media. We also observed that nontypeable H. influenzae conferred passive protection from killing by amoxicillin upon S. pneumoniae from within polymicrobial biofilms in vitro. Therefore, based on these results, we conclude that nonencapsulated pneumococci are a potential causative agent of chronic/recurrent otitis media, and can also cause mutualistic infection with other opportunists, which could complicate treatment outcomes. © FEMS 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. The karyotype and 5S rRNA genes from Spanish individuals of the bat species Rhinolophus hipposideros (Rhinolophidae; Chiroptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerma, Eva; Acosta, Manuel J; Barragán, Maria José L; Martínez, Sergio; Marchal, Juan Alberto; Bullejos, Mónica; Sánchez, Antonio

    2008-11-01

    The karyotype of individuals of the species Rhinolophus hipposideros from Spain present a chromosome number of 2n = 54 (NFa = 62). The described karyotype for these specimens is very similar to another previously described in individual from Bulgaria. However, the presence of one additional pair of autosomal acrocentric chromosomes in the Bulgarian karyotype and the differences in X chromosome morphology indicated that we have described a new karyotype variant in this species. In addition, we have analyzed several clones of 1.4 and 1 kb of a PstI repeated DNA sequence from the genome of R. hipposideros. The repeated sequence included a region with high identity with the 5S rDNA genes and flanking regions, with no homology with GenBank sequences. Search for polymerase III regulatory elements demonstrated the presence of type I promoter elements (A-box, Intermediate Element and C-box) in the 5S rDNA region. In addition, upstream regulatory elements, as a D-box and Sp1 binding sequences, were present in flanking regions. All data indicated that the cloned repeated sequences are the functional rDNA genes from this species. Finally, FISH demonstrated the presence of rDNA in nine chromosome pairs, which is surprising as most mammals have only one carrier chromosome pair.

  13. Species authentication of commercial beef jerky based on PCR-RFLP analysis of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shi-Yi; Liu, Yi-Ping; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2010-11-01

    In this study, we determined species-specific variations by analyzing the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene sequence variation (∼440 bp) in 17 newly obtained sequences and 90 published cattle, yak, buffalo, goat, and pig sequences, which represent 62 breeds and 17 geographic regions. Based on the defined species-specific variations, two endonucleases, Alu I and Bfa I, were selected for species authentication using raw meat/tissue samples and the PCR-RFLP method. Goat and pig were identified using the Alu I enzyme, while cattle, yak, and buffalo were identified by digestion with Bfa I. Our approach had relatively high detection sensitivity of cattle DNA in mixed cattle and yak products, with the lowest detectable threshold equaling 20% of cattle DNA in a mixed cattle/yak sample. This method was successfully used to type commercial beef jerky products, which were produced by different companies utilizing various processing technologies. Our results show that several yak jerky products might be implicated in commercial fraud by using cattle meat instead of yak meat. Copyright © 2010 Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology and the Genetics Society of China. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Molecular Characterization of the 16S rRNA Gene of Phytoplasmas Detected in Two Leafhopper Species Associated with Alfalfa Plants Infected with Witches' Broom in Oman

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    A.J. Khan

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Two leafhopper species, Austroagallia avicula and Empoasca sp., were consistently found in alfalfa fields infected with witches’ broom phytoplasma (OmanAlfWB in the Al-Batinah, Dakhliya, North and South Sharqiya, Muscat, and Al-Bureimi regions of the Sultanate of Oman. Phytoplasmas from both leafhoppers were detected by specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene and the spacer region in direct PCR using P1/P7 primer pairs. Comparative RFLP profiles of the amplified rRNA gene and the spacer region from leafhopper phytoplasmas and from 20 phytoplasma controls yielded patterns referable to phytoplasmas belonging to the peanut witches’ broom group (16SrII group. In particular, extensive RFLP analyses with the endonucleases HpaII, Tru9I, Tsp509I, and RsaI indicated that the phytoplasmas in A. avicula and Empoasca sp. were identical but showed some differences from OmanAlfWB; however, RFLP patterns obtained with TaqI showed the OmanAlfWB and the phytoplasmas from the two leafhoppers to be identical. Direct PCR products amplified from phytoplasma leafhopper DNA using the P1/P7 primer pair were cloned and sequenced yielding 1758 bp and 1755 bp products from A. avicula and Empoasca sp. respectively; the homology of these sequences with OmanAlfWB and papaya yellow crinkle phytoplasmas was more than 98%. A phylogenetic tree based on the 16S rRNA gene and spacer region sequences from 44 phytoplasmas revealed that the phytoplasmas from the leafhoppers clustered with OmanAlfWB, papaya yellow crinkle, and gerbera phyllody phytoplasmas, all belonging to 16SrII group, but were distinct from lime witches’ broom phytoplasma, the most commonly found phytoplasma in the Sultanate of Oman.

  15. Ralstonia syzygii, the Blood Disease Bacterium and some Asian R. solanacearum strains form a single genomic species despite divergent lifestyles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remenant, Benoît; de Cambiaire, Jean-Charles; Cellier, Gilles; Jacobs, Jonathan M; Mangenot, Sophie; Barbe, Valérie; Lajus, Aurélie; Vallenet, David; Medigue, Claudine; Fegan, Mark; Allen, Caitilyn; Prior, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The Ralstonia solanacearum species complex includes R. solanacearum, R. syzygii, and the Blood Disease Bacterium (BDB). All colonize plant xylem vessels and cause wilt diseases, but with significant biological differences. R. solanacearum is a soilborne bacterium that infects the roots of a broad range of plants. R. syzygii causes Sumatra disease of clove trees and is actively transmitted by cercopoid insects. BDB is also pathogenic to a single host, banana, and is transmitted by pollinating insects. Sequencing and DNA-DNA hybridization studies indicated that despite their phenotypic differences, these three plant pathogens are actually very closely related, falling into the Phylotype IV subgroup of the R. solanacearum species complex. To better understand the relationships among these bacteria, we sequenced and annotated the genomes of R. syzygii strain R24 and BDB strain R229. These genomes were compared to strain PSI07, a closely related Phylotype IV tomato isolate of R. solanacearum, and to five additional R. solanacearum genomes. Whole-genome comparisons confirmed previous phylogenetic results: the three phylotype IV strains share more and larger syntenic regions with each other than with other R. solanacearum strains. Furthermore, the genetic distances between strains, assessed by an in-silico equivalent of DNA-DNA hybridization, unambiguously showed that phylotype IV strains of BDB, R. syzygii and R. solanacearum form one genomic species. Based on these comprehensive data we propose a revision of the taxonomy of the R. solanacearum species complex. The BDB and R. syzygii genomes encoded no obvious unique metabolic capacities and contained no evidence of horizontal gene transfer from bacteria occupying similar niches. Genes specific to R. syzygii and BDB were almost all of unknown function or extrachromosomal origin. Thus, the pathogenic life-styles of these organisms are more probably due to ecological adaptation and genomic convergence during vertical

  16. Ralstonia syzygii, the Blood Disease Bacterium and some Asian R. solanacearum strains form a single genomic species despite divergent lifestyles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Remenant

    Full Text Available The Ralstonia solanacearum species complex includes R. solanacearum, R. syzygii, and the Blood Disease Bacterium (BDB. All colonize plant xylem vessels and cause wilt diseases, but with significant biological differences. R. solanacearum is a soilborne bacterium that infects the roots of a broad range of plants. R. syzygii causes Sumatra disease of clove trees and is actively transmitted by cercopoid insects. BDB is also pathogenic to a single host, banana, and is transmitted by pollinating insects. Sequencing and DNA-DNA hybridization studies indicated that despite their phenotypic differences, these three plant pathogens are actually very closely related, falling into the Phylotype IV subgroup of the R. solanacearum species complex. To better understand the relationships among these bacteria, we sequenced and annotated the genomes of R. syzygii strain R24 and BDB strain R229. These genomes were compared to strain PSI07, a closely related Phylotype IV tomato isolate of R. solanacearum, and to five additional R. solanacearum genomes. Whole-genome comparisons confirmed previous phylogenetic results: the three phylotype IV strains share more and larger syntenic regions with each other than with other R. solanacearum strains. Furthermore, the genetic distances between strains, assessed by an in-silico equivalent of DNA-DNA hybridization, unambiguously showed that phylotype IV strains of BDB, R. syzygii and R. solanacearum form one genomic species. Based on these comprehensive data we propose a revision of the taxonomy of the R. solanacearum species complex. The BDB and R. syzygii genomes encoded no obvious unique metabolic capacities and contained no evidence of horizontal gene transfer from bacteria occupying similar niches. Genes specific to R. syzygii and BDB were almost all of unknown function or extrachromosomal origin. Thus, the pathogenic life-styles of these organisms are more probably due to ecological adaptation and genomic convergence

  17. RNA Sequencing Analysis of Salivary Extracellular RNA.

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    Majem, Blanca; Li, Feng; Sun, Jie; Wong, David T W

    2017-01-01

    Salivary biomarkers for disease detection, diagnostic and prognostic assessments have become increasingly well established in recent years. In this chapter we explain the current leading technology that has been used to characterize salivary non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) from the extracellular RNA (exRNA) fraction: HiSeq from Illumina® platform for RNA sequencing. Therefore, the chapter is divided into two main sections regarding the type of the library constructed (small and long ncRNA libraries), from saliva collection, RNA extraction and quantification to cDNA library generation and corresponding QCs. Using these invaluable technical tools, one can identify thousands of ncRNA species in saliva. These methods indicate that salivary exRNA provides an efficient medium for biomarker discovery of oral and systemic diseases.

  18. Relationship between two androgenetic clam species, Corbicula leana and Corbicula fluminea, inferred from mitochondrial cytochrome b and nuclear 28S rRNA markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komaru, Akira; Yamada, Mitsuya; Houki, Shouji

    2013-05-01

    Two shell color types, yellow (type I) and brown (type II), of hermaphrodite Corbicula fluminea clams from Ritto, Shiga Prefecture, Japan, are sympatric with both male and hermaphrodite Corbicula leana. In the present study, the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) cytochrome b and nuclear 28S rRNA genes of C. fluminea were sequenced to construct a haplotype network in order to investigate the genetic relationship with C. leana. Ninety C. fluminea samples revealed only two cytb haplotypes; the majority (97.8%) were CB7, while the remainder were CB1. In C. leana, only CB1 was detected in hermaphrodites, but both CB1 and CB7 were detected in males. Nuclear 28S rRNA haplotypes of C. fluminea type I individuals were divergent from those of hermaphrodite C. leana. However, C. fluminea type I clams shared haplotypes with male C. leana individuals, whereas C. fluminea type II individuals shared haplotypes with both hermaphrodite and male C. leana samples. These results suggest that it may be difficult to define a clear genetic border between these species.

  19. Full-length single-cell RNA-seq applied to a viral human cancer: applications to HPV expression and splicing analysis in HeLa S3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liang; Zhang, Xiaolong; Zhao, Zhikun; Wang, Ling; Li, Bo; Li, Guibo; Dean, Michael; Yu, Qichao; Wang, Yanhui; Lin, Xinxin; Rao, Weijian; Mei, Zhanlong; Li, Yang; Jiang, Runze; Yang, Huan; Li, Fuqiang; Xie, Guoyun; Xu, Liqin; Wu, Kui; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Jianghao; Wang, Ting; Kristiansen, Karsten; Zhang, Xiuqing; Li, Yingrui; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Hou, Yong; Xu, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Viral infection causes multiple forms of human cancer, and HPV infection is the primary factor in cervical carcinomas. Recent single-cell RNA-seq studies highlight the tumor heterogeneity present in most cancers, but virally induced tumors have not been studied. HeLa is a well characterized HPV+ cervical cancer cell line. We developed a new high throughput platform to prepare single-cell RNA on a nanoliter scale based on a customized microwell chip. Using this method, we successfully amplified full-length transcripts of 669 single HeLa S3 cells and 40 of them were randomly selected to perform single-cell RNA sequencing. Based on these data, we obtained a comprehensive understanding of the heterogeneity of HeLa S3 cells in gene expression, alternative splicing and fusions. Furthermore, we identified a high diversity of HPV-18 expression and splicing at the single-cell level. By co-expression analysis we identified 283 E6, E7 co-regulated genes, including CDC25, PCNA, PLK4, BUB1B and IRF1 known to interact with HPV viral proteins. Our results reveal the heterogeneity of a virus-infected cell line. It not only provides a transcriptome characterization of HeLa S3 cells at the single cell level, but is a demonstration of the power of single cell RNA-seq analysis of virally infected cells and cancers.

  20. Perturbation of discrete sites on a single protein domain with RNA aptamers: targeting of different sides of the TATA-binding protein (TBP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohmura, Ken I; Shi, Hua; Hirayoshi, Kazunori

    2013-01-01

    Control of interactions among proteins is critical in the treatment of diseases, but the specificity required is not easily incorporated into small molecules. Macromolecules could be more suitable as antagonists in this situation, and RNA aptamers have become particularly promising. Here we describe a novel selection procedure for RNA aptamers against a protein that constitutes a single structural domain, the Drosophila TATA-binding protein (TBP). In addition to the conventional filter partitioning method with free TBP as target, we performed another experiment, in which the TATA-bound form of TBP was targeted. Aptamers generated by both selections were able to bind specifically to TBP, but the two groups showed characteristics which were clearly different in terms of their capability to compete with TATA-DNA, their effects on the TATA-bound form of TBP, and their effects on in vitro transcription. The method used to generate these two groups of aptamers can be used with other targets to direct aptamer specificity to discrete sites on the surface of a protein.

  1. Genome-wide dynamic transcriptional profiling in clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 using single-nucleotide resolution RNA-Seq

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    Wang Yi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clostridium beijerinckii is a prominent solvent-producing microbe that has great potential for biofuel and chemical industries. Although transcriptional analysis is essential to understand gene functions and regulation and thus elucidate proper strategies for further strain improvement, limited information is available on the genome-wide transcriptional analysis for C. beijerinckii. Results The genome-wide transcriptional dynamics of C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 over a batch fermentation process was investigated using high-throughput RNA-Seq technology. The gene expression profiles indicated that the glycolysis genes were highly expressed throughout the fermentation, with comparatively more active expression during acidogenesis phase. The expression of acid formation genes was down-regulated at the onset of solvent formation, in accordance with the metabolic pathway shift from acidogenesis to solventogenesis. The acetone formation gene (adc, as a part of the sol operon, exhibited highly-coordinated expression with the other sol genes. Out of the > 20 genes encoding alcohol dehydrogenase in C. beijerinckii, Cbei_1722 and Cbei_2181 were highly up-regulated at the onset of solventogenesis, corresponding to their key roles in primary alcohol production. Most sporulation genes in C. beijerinckii 8052 demonstrated similar temporal expression patterns to those observed in B. subtilis and C. acetobutylicum, while sporulation sigma factor genes sigE and sigG exhibited accelerated and stronger expression in C. beijerinckii 8052, which is consistent with the more rapid forespore and endspore development in this strain. Global expression patterns for specific gene functional classes were examined using self-organizing map analysis. The genes associated with specific functional classes demonstrated global expression profiles corresponding to the cell physiological variation and metabolic pathway switch. Conclusions The results from this

  2. Effects of Nitrogen Addition on Leaf Decomposition of Single-Species and Litter Mixture in Pinus tabulaeformis Forests

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    Jinsong Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The litter decomposition process is closely correlated with nutrient cycling and the maintenance of soil fertility in the forest ecosystem. In particular, the intense environmental concern about atmospheric nitrogen (N deposition requires a better understanding of its influence on the litter decomposition process. This study examines the responses of single-species litter and litter mixture decomposition processes to N addition in Chinese pine (Pinus tabulaeformis Carr. ecosystems. Chinese pine litter, Mongolian oak (Quercus mongolica Fisch. ex Ledeb. litter, and a pine–oak mixture were selected from a plantation and a natural forest of Chinese pine. Four N addition treatments, i.e., control (N0: 0 kg N ha−1·year−1, low-N (N1: 5 kg N ha−1·year−1, medium-N (N2: 10 kg N ha−1·year−1, and high-N (N3: 15 kg N ha−1·year−1, were applied starting May 2010. In the plantation, N addition significantly stimulated the decomposition of the Chinese pine litter. In the natural forest, N addition had variable effects on the decomposition of single-species litter and the litter mixture. A stimulatory effect of the high-N treatment on the Chinese pine litter decomposition could be attributed to a decrease in the substrate C:N ratio. However, an opposite effect was found for the Mongolian oak litter decomposition. The stimulating effect of N addition on the Chinese pine litter may offset the suppressive effect on the Mongolian oak litter, resulting in a neutral effect on the litter mixture. These results suggest that the different responses in decomposition of single-species litter and the litter mixture to N addition are mainly attributed to litter chemical composition. Further investigations are required to characterize the effect of long-term high-level N addition on the litter decomposition as N deposition is likely to increase rapidly in the region where this study was conducted.

  3. Predicting the functional states of human iPSC-derived neurons with single-cell RNA-seq and electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardy, C; van den Hurk, M; Kakaradov, B; Erwin, J A; Jaeger, B N; Hernandez, R V; Eames, T; Paucar, A A; Gorris, M; Marchand, C; Jappelli, R; Barron, J; Bryant, A K; Kellogg, M; Lasken, R S; Rutten, B P F; Steinbusch, H W M; Yeo, G W; Gage, F H

    2016-11-01

    Human neural progenitors derived from pluripotent stem cells develop into electrophysiologically active neurons at heterogeneous rates, which can confound disease-relevant discoveries in neurology and psychiatry. By combining patch clamping, morphological and transcriptome analysis on single-human neurons in vitro, we defined a continuum of poor to highly functional electrophysiological states of differentiated neurons. The strong correlations between action potentials, synaptic activity, dendritic complexity and gene expression highlight the importance of methods for isolating functionally comparable neurons for in vitro investigations of brain disorders. Although whole-cell electrophysiology is the gold standard for functional evaluation, it often lacks the scalability required for disease modeling studies. Here, we demonstrate a multimodal machine-learning strategy to identify new molecular features that predict the physiological states of single neurons, independently of the time spent in vitro. As further proof of concept, we selected one of the potential neurophysiological biomarkers identified in this study-GDAP1L1-to isolate highly functional live human neurons in vitro.

  4. Phylogeny of 54 representative strains of species in the family Pasteurellaceae as determined by comparison of 16S rRNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhirst, F E; Paster, B J; Olsen, I; Fraser, G J

    1992-03-01

    Virtually complete 16S rRNA sequences were determined for 54 representative strains of species in the family Pasteurellaceae. Of these strains, 15 were Pasteurella, 16 were Actinobacillus, and 23 were Haemophilus. A phylogenetic tree was constructed based on sequence similarity, using the Neighbor-Joining method. Fifty-three of the strains fell within four large clusters. The first cluster included the type strains of Haemophilus influenzae, H. aegyptius, H. aphrophilus, H. haemolyticus, H. paraphrophilus, H. segnis, and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. This cluster also contained A. actinomycetemcomitans FDC Y4, ATCC 29522, ATCC 29523, and ATCC 29524 and H. aphrophilus NCTC 7901. The second cluster included the type strains of A. seminis and Pasteurella aerogenes and H. somnus OVCG 43826. The third cluster was composed of the type strains of Pasteurella multocida, P. anatis, P. avium, P. canis, P. dagmatis, P. gallinarum, P. langaa, P. stomatis, P. volantium, H. haemoglobinophilus, H. parasuis, H. paracuniculus, H. paragallinarum, and A. capsulatus. This cluster also contained Pasteurella species A CCUG 18782, Pasteurella species B CCUG 19974, Haemophilus taxon C CAPM 5111, H. parasuis type 5 Nagasaki, P. volantium (H. parainfluenzae) NCTC 4101, and P. trehalosi NCTC 10624. The fourth cluster included the type strains of Actinobacillus lignieresii, A. equuli, A. pleuropneumoniae, A. suis, A. ureae, H. parahaemolyticus, H. parainfluenzae, H. paraphrohaemolyticus, H. ducreyi, and P. haemolytica. This cluster also contained Actinobacillus species strain CCUG 19799 (Bisgaard taxon 11), A. suis ATCC 15557, H. ducreyi ATCC 27722 and HD 35000, Haemophilus minor group strain 202, and H. parainfluenzae ATCC 29242. The type strain of P. pneumotropica branched alone to form a fifth group. The branching of the Pasteurellaceae family tree was quite complex. The four major clusters contained multiple subclusters. The clusters contained both rapidly and slowly evolving

  5. RNA-seq analyses of blood-induced changes in gene expression in the mosquito vector species, Aedes aegypti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson Ken E

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hematophagy is a common trait of insect vectors of disease. Extensive genome-wide transcriptional changes occur in mosquitoes after blood meals, and these are related to digestive and reproductive processes, among others. Studies of these changes are expected to reveal molecular targets for novel vector control and pathogen transmission-blocking strategies. The mosquito Aedes aegypti (Diptera, Culicidae, a vector of Dengue viruses, Yellow Fever Virus (YFV and Chikungunya virus (CV, is the subject of this study to look at genome-wide changes in gene expression following a blood meal. Results Transcriptional changes that follow a blood meal in Ae. aegypti females were explored using RNA-seq technology. Over 30% of more than 18,000 investigated transcripts accumulate differentially in mosquitoes at five hours after a blood meal when compared to those fed only on sugar. Forty transcripts accumulate only in blood-fed mosquitoes. The list of regulated transcripts correlates with an enhancement of digestive activity and a suppression of environmental stimuli perception and innate immunity. The alignment of more than 65 million high-quality short reads to the Ae. aegypti reference genome permitted the refinement of the current annotation of transcript boundaries, as well as the discovery of novel transcripts, exons and splicing variants. Cis-regulatory elements (CRE and cis-regulatory modules (CRM enriched significantly at the 5'end flanking sequences of blood meal-regulated genes were identified. Conclusions This study provides the first global view of the changes in transcript accumulation elicited by a blood meal in Ae. aegypti females. This information permitted the identification of classes of potentially co-regulated genes and a description of biochemical and physiological events that occur immediately after blood feeding. The data presented here serve as a basis for novel vector control and pathogen transmission

  6. V2 regions of 16S ribosomal RNA used as a molecular marker for the species identification of streptococci in peripheral blood and synovial fluid from patients with psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q; Vasey, F B; Mahfood, J P; Valeriano, J; Kanik, K S; Anderson, B E; Bridgeford, P H

    1999-10-01

    To detect the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) of 3 streptococcal species in the peripheral blood and synovial fluid of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) detection targets bacterial 16S rRNA, which is present in bacteria at high copy numbers. The 3 species-specific primers for group A streptococci (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes), group B streptococci (GBS; Streptococcus agalactiae), and Streptococcus pneumoniae were designed from the fragments of highly variable V2 regions of 16S rRNA. Total RNA was prepared from whole peripheral blood and joint fluid obtained from patients with PsA and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). All positive PCR reactions were then sequenced with a Pharmacia ALF DNA sequencing system. Our data in 19 PsA patients showed that 7 peripheral blood samples were positive for GAS (P = 0.006 versus GAS-positive RA patients [n = 0], by Fisher's exact test), and 2 were also positive for GBS. One synovial fluid sample from a PsA patient was positive for GAS. S pneumoniae was absent from all specimens. Seventeen patients with RA were PCR negative for the 3 streptococcal species. Peripheral blood from a patient with inflammatory bowel disease was positive for GAS. The presence of GAS 16S rRNA in the peripheral blood and synovial fluid of patients with PsA supports the concept that PsA is a reactive arthritis to certain streptococci.

  7. Singly protonated dehydronorcantharidin silver coordination polymer induces apoptosis of lung cancer cells via reactive oxygen species-mediated mitochondrial pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Senpeng; Zhang, Shuo; Jin, Xing; Tan, Xuejie; Lou, Jianfang; Zhang, Xiumei; Zhao, Yunxue

    2014-10-30

    Silver complexes have been shown to possess antimicrobial and anticancer properties. Ag-SP-DNC, a novel silver and singly protonated dehydronorcantharidin complex, was synthesized in our previous study. In this study, we offer evidence that Ag-SP-DNC elicits a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis in lung cancer cells. Ag-SP-DNC inhibited the growth of A549 cells by inducing G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Ag-SP-DNC induced apoptosis was associated with the levels of intracellular ROS. The further study revealed that Ag-SP-DNC disrupted the mitochondrial membrane potential, induced the caspase-3 activation and led to the translocation of apoptosis inducing factor and endonucleaseG to the nucleus. These findings have important implications for the development of silver complexes for anticancer applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Strain typing of Zygosaccharomyces yeast species using a single molecular method based on polymorphism of the intergenic spacer region (IGS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrent, Petra; Rivas, Eva-María; Peinado, José M; de Silóniz, María-Isabel

    2010-08-15

    Unlike previously reported methods that need a combination of several typing techniques, we have developed a single method for strain typing of the Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Z. mellis and Z. rouxii spoilage species. Strains belonging to other species have also been included for comparison. We have demonstrated that the IGS-PCR RFLP method has a high discriminative power. Considering the three endonucleases used in this work, we have obtained a variability of 100% for Z. mellis and Z. rouxii strains and up to 70% for Z. bailii. We have also detected two misidentified Z. mellis strains (CBS 711 and CBS 7412) which have RFLP patterns with a set of bands characteristic of Z. rouxii strains. Sequencing of 26S rDNA D1/D2 domains and the 5.8-ITS rDNA region confirmed these strains as Z. rouxii. The method also groups three certified hybrid strains of Zygosaccharomyces in a separate cluster. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Phylogenetic group- and species-specific oligonucleotide probes for single-cell detection of lactic acid bacteria in oral biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to design and evaluate fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes for the single-cell detection and enumeration of lactic acid bacteria, in particular organisms belonging to the major phylogenetic groups and species of oral lactobacilli and to Abiotrophia/Granulicatella. Results As lactobacilli are known for notorious resistance to probe penetration, probe-specific assay protocols were experimentally developed to provide maximum cell wall permeability, probe accessibility, hybridization stringency, and fluorescence intensity. The new assays were then applied in a pilot study to three biofilm samples harvested from variably demineralized bovine enamel discs that had been carried in situ for 10 days by different volunteers. Best probe penetration and fluorescent labeling of reference strains were obtained after combined lysozyme and achromopeptidase treatment followed by exposure to lipase. Hybridization stringency had to be established strictly for each probe. Thereafter all probes showed the expected specificity with reference strains and labeled the anticipated morphotypes in dental plaques. Applied to in situ grown biofilms the set of probes detected only Lactobacillus fermentum and bacteria of the Lactobacillus casei group. The most cariogenic biofilm contained two orders of magnitude higher L. fermentum cell numbers than the other biofilms. Abiotrophia/Granulicatella and streptococci from the mitis group were found in all samples at high levels, whereas Streptococcus mutans was detected in only one sample in very low numbers. Conclusions Application of these new group- and species-specific FISH probes to oral biofilm-forming lactic acid bacteria will allow a clearer understanding of the supragingival biome, its spatial architecture and of structure-function relationships implicated during plaque homeostasis and caries development. The probes should prove of value far beyond the field of oral microbiology, as many of

  10. Phylogenetic group- and species-specific oligonucleotide probes for single-cell detection of lactic acid bacteria in oral biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thurnheer Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to design and evaluate fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH probes for the single-cell detection and enumeration of lactic acid bacteria, in particular organisms belonging to the major phylogenetic groups and species of oral lactobacilli and to Abiotrophia/Granulicatella. Results As lactobacilli are known for notorious resistance to probe penetration, probe-specific assay protocols were experimentally developed to provide maximum cell wall permeability, probe accessibility, hybridization stringency, and fluorescence intensity. The new assays were then applied in a pilot study to three biofilm samples harvested from variably demineralized bovine enamel discs that had been carried in situ for 10 days by different volunteers. Best probe penetration and fluorescent labeling of reference strains were obtained after combined lysozyme and achromopeptidase treatment followed by exposure to lipase. Hybridization stringency had to be established strictly for each probe. Thereafter all probes showed the expected specificity with reference strains and labeled the anticipated morphotypes in dental plaques. Applied to in situ grown biofilms the set of probes detected only Lactobacillus fermentum and bacteria of the Lactobacillus casei group. The most cariogenic biofilm contained two orders of magnitude higher L. fermentum cell numbers than the other biofilms. Abiotrophia/Granulicatella and streptococci from the mitis group were found in all samples at high levels, whereas Streptococcus mutans was detected in only one sample in very low numbers. Conclusions Application of these new group- and species-specific FISH probes to oral biofilm-forming lactic acid bacteria will allow a clearer understanding of the supragingival biome, its spatial architecture and of structure-function relationships implicated during plaque homeostasis and caries development. The probes should prove of value far beyond the field of

  11. Mixing state of particles with secondary species by single particle aerosol mass spectrometer in an atmospheric pollution event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lingling; Chen, Jinsheng

    2016-04-01

    Single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) was used to characterize size distribution, chemical composition, and mixing state of particles in an atmospheric pollution event during 20 Oct. - 5 Nov., 2015 in Xiamen, Southeast China. A total of 533,012 particle mass spectra were obtained and clustered into six groups, comprising of industry metal (4.5%), dust particles (2.6%), carbonaceous species (70.7%), K-Rich particles (20.7%), seasalt (0.6%) and other particles (0.9%). Carbonaceous species were further divided into EC (70.6%), OC (28.5%), and mixed ECOC (0.9%). There were 61.7%, 58.3%, 4.0%, and 14.6% of particles internally mixed with sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and C2H3O, respectively, indicating that these particles had undergone significant aging processing. Sulfate was preferentially mixed with carbonaceous particles, while nitrate tended to mix with metal-containing and dust particles. Compared to clear days, the fractions of EC-, metal- and dust particles remarkably increased, while the fraction of OC-containing particles decreased in pollution days. The mixing state of particles, excepted for OC-containing particles with secondary species was much stronger in pollution days than that in clear days, which revealed the significant influence of secondary particles in atmospheric pollution. The different activity of OC-containing particles might be related to their much smaller aerodynamic diameter. These results could improve our understanding of aerosol characteristics and could be helpful to further investigate the atmospheric process of particles.

  12. Dominance effects of deleterious and beneficial mutations in a single gene of the RNA virus ϕ6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah B Joseph

    Full Text Available Most of our knowledge of dominance stems from studies of deleterious mutations. From these studies we know that most deleterious mutations are recessive, and that this recessivity arises from a hyperbolic relationship between protein function (i.e., protein concentration or activity and fitness. Here we investigate whether this knowledge can be used to make predictions about the dominance of beneficial and deleterious mutations in a single gene. We employed a model system--the bacteriophage φ6--that allowed us to generate a collection of mutations in haploid conditions so that it was not biased toward either dominant beneficial or recessive deleterious mutations. Screening for the ability to infect a bacterial host that does not permit infection by the wildtype φ6, we generated a collection of mutations in P3, a gene involved in attachment to the host and in phage particle assembly. The resulting collection contained mutations with both deleterious and beneficial effects on fitness. The deleterious mutations in our collection had additive effects on fitness and the beneficial mutations were recessive. Neither of these observations were predicted from previous studies of dominance. This pattern is not consistent with the hyperbolic (diminishing returns relationship between protein function and fitness that is characteristic of enzymatic genes, but could have resulted from a curve of increasing returns.

  13. Effects of sediment-spiked lufenuron on benthic macroinvertebrates in outdoor microcosms and single-species toxicity tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, T C M; Bas, D A; Belgers, J D M; Bibbe, L; Boerwinkel, M-C; Crum, S J H; Diepens, N J; Kraak, M H S; Vonk, J A; Roessink, I

    2016-08-01

    Sediment ecotoxicity studies were conducted with lufenuron to (i) complement the results of a water-spiked mesocosm experiment with this lipophilic benzoylurea insecticide, (ii) to explore the predictive value of laboratory single-species tests for population and community-level responses of benthic macroinvertebrates, and (iii) to calibrate the tier-1 effect assessment procedure for sediment organisms. For this purpose the concentration-response relationships for macroinvertebrates between sediment-spiked microcosms and those of 28-d sediment-spiked single-species toxicity tests with Chironomus riparius, Hyalella azteca and Lumbriculus variegatus were compared. Lufenuron persisted in the sediment of the microcosms. On average, 87.7% of the initial lufenuron concentration could still be detected in the sediment after 12 weeks. Overall, benthic insects and crustaceans showed treatment-related declines and oligochaetes treatment-related increases. The lowest population-level NOEC in the microcosms was 0.79μg lufenuron/g organic carbon in dry sediment (μg a.s./g OC) for Tanytarsini, Chironomini and Dero sp. Multivariate analysis of the responses of benthic macroinvertebrates revealed a community-level NOEC of 0.79μg a.s./g OC. The treatment-related responses observed in the microcosms are in accordance with the results of the 28-d laboratory toxicity tests. These tests showed that the insect C. riparius and the crustacean H. azteca were approximately two orders of magnitude more sensitive than the oligochaete L. variegatus. In our laboratory tests, using field-collected sediment, the lowest 28-d EC10 (0.49μg a.s./g OC) was observed for C. riparius (endpoint survival), while for the standard OECD test with this species, using artificial sediment, a NOEC of 2.35μg a.s./g OC (endpoint emergence) is reported. In this particular case, the sediment tier-1 effect assessment using the chronic EC10 (field-collected sediment) or chronic NOEC (artificial sediment) of C

  14. RNA viruses in hymenopteran pollinators: evidence of inter-Taxa virus transmission via pollen and potential impact on non-Apis hymenopteran species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajwinder Singh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Although overall pollinator populations have declined over the last couple of decades, the honey bee (Apis mellifera malady, colony collapse disorder (CCD, has caused major concern in the agricultural community. Among honey bee pathogens, RNA viruses are emerging as a serious threat and are suspected as major contributors to CCD. Recent detection of these viral species in bumble bees suggests a possible wider environmental spread of these viruses with potential broader impact. It is therefore vital to study the ecology and epidemiology of these viruses in the hymenopteran pollinator community as a whole. We studied the viral distribution in honey bees, in their pollen loads, and in other non-Apis hymenopteran pollinators collected from flowering plants in Pennsylvania, New York, and Illinois in the United States. Viruses in the samples were detected using reverse transcriptase-PCR and confirmed by sequencing. For the first time, we report the molecular detection of picorna-like RNA viruses (deformed wing virus, sacbrood virus and black queen cell virus in pollen pellets collected directly from forager bees. Pollen pellets from several uninfected forager bees were detected with virus, indicating that pollen itself may harbor viruses. The viruses in the pollen and honey stored in the hive were demonstrated to be infective, with the queen becoming infected and laying infected eggs after these virus-contaminated foods were given to virus-free colonies. These viruses were detected in eleven other non-Apis hymenopteran species, ranging from many solitary bees to bumble bees and wasps. This finding further expands the viral host range and implies a possible deeper impact on the health of our ecosystem. Phylogenetic analyses support that these viruses are disseminating freely among the pollinators via the flower pollen itself. Notably, in cases where honey bee apiaries affected by CCD harbored honey bees with Israeli Acute Paralysis virus (IAPV, nearby

  15. RNA viruses in hymenopteran pollinators: evidence of inter-Taxa virus transmission via pollen and potential impact on non-Apis hymenopteran species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajwinder; Levitt, Abby L; Rajotte, Edwin G; Holmes, Edward C; Ostiguy, Nancy; Vanengelsdorp, Dennis; Lipkin, W Ian; Depamphilis, Claude W; Toth, Amy L; Cox-Foster, Diana L

    2010-12-22

    Although overall pollinator populations have declined over the last couple of decades, the honey bee (Apis mellifera) malady, colony collapse disorder (CCD), has caused major concern in the agricultural community. Among honey bee pathogens, RNA viruses are emerging as a serious threat and are suspected as major contributors to CCD. Recent detection of these viral species in bumble bees suggests a possible wider environmental spread of these viruses with potential broader impact. It is therefore vital to study the ecology and epidemiology of these viruses in the hymenopteran pollinator community as a whole. We studied the viral distribution in honey bees, in their pollen loads, and in other non-Apis hymenopteran pollinators collected from flowering plants in Pennsylvania, New York, and Illinois in the United States. Viruses in the samples were detected using reverse transcriptase-PCR and confirmed by sequencing. For the first time, we report the molecular detection of picorna-like RNA viruses (deformed wing virus, sacbrood virus and black queen cell virus) in pollen pellets collected directly from forager bees. Pollen pellets from several uninfected forager bees were detected with virus, indicating that pollen itself may harbor viruses. The viruses in the pollen and honey stored in the hive were demonstrated to be infective, with the queen becoming infected and laying infected eggs after these virus-contaminated foods were given to virus-free colonies. These viruses were detected in eleven other non-Apis hymenopteran species, ranging from many solitary bees to bumble bees and wasps. This finding further expands the viral host range and implies a possible deeper impact on the health of our ecosystem. Phylogenetic analyses support that these viruses are disseminating freely among the pollinators via the flower pollen itself. Notably, in cases where honey bee apiaries affected by CCD harbored honey bees with Israeli Acute Paralysis virus (IAPV), nearby non

  16. CCR5 gene disruption via lentiviral vectors expressing Cas9 and single guided RNA renders cells resistant to HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiming; Ye, Chaobaihui; Liu, Jingjing; Zhang, Di; Kimata, Jason T; Zhou, Paul

    2014-01-01

    CCR5, a coreceptor for HIV-1 entry, is a major target for drug and genetic intervention against HIV-1. Genetic intervention strategies have knocked down CCR5 expression levels by shRNA or disrupted the CCR5 gene using zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) or Transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN). In the present study, we silenced CCR5 via CRISPR associated protein 9 (Cas9) and single guided RNAs (sgRNAs). We constructed lentiviral vectors expressing Cas9 and CCR5 sgRNAs. We show that a single round transduction of lentiviral vectors expressing Cas9 and CCR5 sgRNAs into HIV-1 susceptible human CD4+ cells yields high frequencies of CCR5 gene disruption. CCR5 gene-disrupted cells are not only resistant to R5-tropic HIV-1, including transmitted/founder (T/F) HIV-1 isolates, but also have selective advantage over CCR5 gene-undisrupted cells during R5-tropic HIV-1 infection. Importantly, using T7 endonuclease I assay we did not detect genome mutations at potential off-target sites that are highly homologous to these CCR5 sgRNAs in stably transduced cells even at 84 days post transduction. Thus we conclude that silencing of CCR5 via Cas9 and CCR5-specific sgRNAs could be a viable alternative strategy for engineering resistance against HIV-1.

  17. An image-based, dual fluorescence reporter assay to evaluate the efficacy of shRNA for gene silencing at the single-cell level [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2tt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ichiro Kojima

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is widely used to suppress gene expression in a specific manner. The efficacy of RNAi is mainly dependent on the sequence of small interfering RNA (siRNA in relation to the target mRNA. Although several algorithms have been developed for the design of siRNA, it is still difficult to choose a really effective siRNA from among multiple candidates. In this article, we report the development of an image-based, quantitative, ratiometric fluorescence reporter assay to evaluate the efficacy of RNAi at the single-cell level. Two fluorescence reporter constructs are used. One expresses the candidate small hairpin RNA (shRNA together with an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP; the other expresses a 19-nt target sequence inserted into a cassette expressing a red fluorescent protein (either DsRed or mCherry. Effectiveness of the candidate shRNA is evaluated as the extent to which it knocks down expression of the red fluorescent protein. Thus, the red-to-green fluorescence intensity ratio (appropriately normalized to controls is used as the read-out for quantifying the siRNA efficacy at the individual cell level. We tested this dual fluorescence assay and compared predictions to actual endogenous knockdown levels for three different genes (vimentin, lamin A/C and Arp3 and twenty different shRNAs. For each of the genes, our assay successfully predicted the target sequences for effective RNAi. To further facilitate testing of RNAi efficacy, we developed a negative selection marker (ccdB method for construction of shRNA and red fluorescent reporter plasmids that allowed us to purify these plasmids directly from transformed bacteria without the need for colony selection and DNA sequencing verification.

  18. An image-based, dual fluorescence reporter assay to evaluate the efficacy of shRNA for gene silencing at the single-cell level [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/39j

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ichiro Kojima

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is widely used to suppress gene expression in a specific manner. The efficacy of RNAi is mainly dependent on the sequence of small interfering RNA (siRNA in relation to the target mRNA. Although several algorithms have been developed for the design of siRNA, it is still difficult to choose a really effective siRNA from among multiple candidates. In this article, we report the development of an image-based, quantitative, ratiometric fluorescence reporter assay to evaluate the efficacy of RNAi at the single-cell level. Two fluorescence reporter constructs are used. One expresses the candidate small hairpin RNA (shRNA together with an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP; the other expresses a 19-nt target sequence inserted into a cassette expressing a red fluorescent protein (either DsRed or mCherry. Effectiveness of the candidate shRNA is evaluated as the extent to which it knocks down expression of the red fluorescent protein. Thus, the red-to-green fluorescence intensity ratio (appropriately normalized to controls is used as the read-out for quantifying the siRNA efficacy at the individual cell level. We tested this dual fluorescence assay and compared predictions to actual endogenous knockdown levels for three different genes (vimentin, lamin A/C and Arp3 and twenty different shRNAs. For each of the genes, our assay successfully predicted the target sequences for effective RNAi. To further facilitate testing of RNAi efficacy, we developed a negative selection marker (ccdB method for construction of shRNA and red fluorescent reporter plasmids that allowed us to purify these plasmids directly from transformed bacteria without the need for colony selection and DNA sequencing verification.

  19. Effects of sediment-spiked lufenuron on benthic macroinvertebrates in outdoor microcosms and single-species toxicity tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brock, T.C.M., E-mail: theo.brock@wur.nl [Alterra, Wageningen University and Research Centre, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands); Bas, D.A. [Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics (IBED), University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Belgers, J.D.M. [Alterra, Wageningen University and Research Centre, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands); Bibbe, L. [Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics (IBED), University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boerwinkel, M-C.; Crum, S.J.H. [Alterra, Wageningen University and Research Centre, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands); Diepens, N.J. [Department of Aquatic Ecology and Water Quality Management, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands); Kraak, M.H.S.; Vonk, J.A. [Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics (IBED), University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Roessink, I. [Alterra, Wageningen University and Research Centre, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • In outdoor microcosms constructed with lufenuron-spiked sediment we observed that this insecticide persistent in the sediment compartment. • Sediment exposure to lufenuron caused population-level declines (insects and crustaceans) and increases (mainly oligochaete worms) of benthic invertebrates. • The direct and indirect effects observed in the microcosms were supported by results of sediment-spiked single species tests with Chironomus riparius, Hyalella azteca and Lumbriculus variegatus. • The tier-1 effect assessment procedure for sediment organisms recommended by the European Food Safety Authority is protective for the treatment-related responses observed in the microcosm test. - Abstract: Sediment ecotoxicity studies were conducted with lufenuron to (i) complement the results of a water-spiked mesocosm experiment with this lipophilic benzoylurea insecticide, (ii) to explore the predictive value of laboratory single-species tests for population and community-level responses of benthic macroinvertebrates, and (iii) to calibrate the tier-1 effect assessment procedure for sediment organisms. For this purpose the concentration-response relationships for macroinvertebrates between sediment-spiked microcosms and those of 28-d sediment-spiked single-species toxicity tests with Chironomus riparius, Hyalella azteca and Lumbriculus variegatus were compared. Lufenuron persisted in the sediment of the microcosms. On average, 87.7% of the initial lufenuron concentration could still be detected in the sediment after 12 weeks. Overall, benthic insects and crustaceans showed treatment-related declines and oligochaetes treatment-related increases. The lowest population-level NOEC in the microcosms was 0.79 μg lufenuron/g organic carbon in dry sediment (μg a.s./g OC) for Tanytarsini, Chironomini and Dero sp. Multivariate analysis of the responses of benthic macroinvertebrates revealed a community-level NOEC of 0.79 μg a.s./g OC. The treatment

  20. Development and assessment of multiplex high resolution melting assay as a tool for rapid single-tube identification of five Brucella species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopaul, Krishna K; Sells, Jessica; Lee, Robin; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M; Foster, Jeffrey T; Whatmore, Adrian M

    2014-12-11

    The zoonosis brucellosis causes economically significant reproductive problems in livestock and potentially debilitating disease of humans. Although the causative agent, organisms from the genus Brucella, can be differentiated into a number of species based on phenotypic characteristics, there are also significant differences in genotype that are concordant with individual species. This paper describes the development of a five target multiplex assay to identify five terrestrial Brucella species using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subsequent high resolution melt curve analysis. This technology offers a robust and cost effective alternative to previously described hydrolysis-probe Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP)-based species defining assays. Through the use of Brucella whole genome sequencing five species defining SNPs were identified. Individual HRM assays were developed to these target these changes and, following optimisation of primer concentrations, it was possible to multiplex all five assays in a single tube. In a validation exercise using a panel of 135 Brucella strains of terrestrial and marine origin, it was possible to distinguish the five target species from the other species within this panel. The HRM multiplex offers a number of diagnostic advantages over previously described SNP-based typing approaches. Further, and uniquely for HRM, the successful multiplexing of five assays in a single tube allowing differentiation of five Brucella species in the diagnostic laboratory in a cost-effective and timely manner is described. However there are possible limitations to using this platform on DNA extractions direct from clinical material.

  1. RNA-Seq-based analysis of cold shock response in Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis, a bacterium harboring a single cold shock protein encoding gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although cold shock responses and the roles of cold shock proteins in microorganisms containing multiple cold shock protein genes have been well characterized, related studies on bacteria possessing a single cold shock protein gene have not been reported. Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis MB4, a thermophile harboring only one known cold shock protein gene (TtescpC, can survive from 50° to 80 °C, but has poor natural competence under cold shock at 50 °C. We therefore examined cold shock responses and their effect on natural competence in this bacterium. RESULTS: The transcriptomes of T. tengcongensis before and after cold shock were analyzed by RNA-seq and over 1200 differentially expressed genes were successfully identified. These genes were involved in a wide range of biological processes, including modulation of DNA replication, recombination, and repair; energy metabolism; production of cold shock protein; synthesis of branched amino acids and branched-chain fatty acids; and sporulation. RNA-seq analysis also suggested that T. tengcongensis initiates cell wall and membrane remodeling processes, flagellar assembly, and sporulation in response to low temperature. Expression profiles of TtecspC and failed attempts to produce a TtecspC knockout strain confirmed the essential role of TteCspC in the cold shock response, and also suggested a role of this protein in survival at optimum growth temperature. Repression of genes encoding ComEA and ComEC and low energy metabolism levels in cold-shocked cells are the likely basis of poor natural competence at low temperature. CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrated changes in global gene expression under cold shock and identified several candidate genes related to cold shock in T. tengcongensis. At the same time, the relationship between cold shock response and poor natural competence at low temperature was preliminarily elucidated. These findings provide a foundation for future studies on genetic

  2. RNA topology

    OpenAIRE

    Frank-Kamenetskii, Maxim D.

    2013-01-01

    A new variety on non-coding RNA has been discovered by several groups: circular RNA (circRNA). This discovery raises intriguing questions about the possibility of the existence of knotted RNA molecules and the existence of a new class of enzymes changing RNA topology, RNA topoisomerases.

  3. Raman crystallography of RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Bo; Chen, Jui-Hui; Yajima, Rieko; Chen, Yuanyuan; Chase, Elaine; Chadalavada, Durga M; Golden, Barbara L; Carey, Paul R; Bevilacqua, Philip C

    2009-10-01

    Raman crystallography is the application of Raman spectroscopy to single crystals. This technique has been applied to a variety of protein molecules where it has provided unique information about biopolymer folding, substrate binding, and catalysis. Here, we describe the application of Raman crystallography to functional RNA molecules. RNA represents unique opportunities and challenges for Raman crystallography. One issue that confounds studies of RNA is its tendency to adopt multiple non-functional folds. Raman crystallography has the advantage that it isolates a single state of the RNA within the crystal and can evaluate its fold, metal ion binding properties (ligand identity, stoichiometry, and affinity), proton binding properties (identity, stoichiometry, and affinity), and catalytic potential. In particular, base-specific stretches can be identified and then associated with the binding of metal ions and protons. Because measurements are carried out in the hanging drop at ambient, rather than cryo, conditions and because RNA crystals tend to be approximately 70% solvent, RNA dynamics and conformational changes become experimentally accessible. This review focuses on experimental setup and procedures, acquisition and interpretation of Raman data, and determination of physicochemical properties of the RNA. Raman crystallographic and solution biochemical experiments on the HDV RNA enzyme are summarized and found to be in excellent agreement. Remarkably, characterization of the crystalline state has proven to help rather than hinder functional characterization of functional RNA, most likely because the tendency of RNA to fold heterogeneously is limited in a crystalline environment. Future applications of Raman crystallography to RNA are briefly discussed.

  4. Site-specific binding of viral plus single-stranded RNA to replicase-containing open virus-like particles of yeast.

    OpenAIRE

    Esteban, R; Fujimura, T; Wickner, R B

    1988-01-01

    X double-stranded RNA is a deletion mutant of L-A double-stranded RNA and is encapsidated in viral particles by the L-A-encoded major coat protein. X double-stranded RNA has all the cis sites necessary to be transcribed, encapsidated, and replicated. We have cloned X double-stranded RNA and sequenced it. The complete X double-stranded RNA sequence deduced indicates that the first 25 bases of the X plus-strand 5' end originated from the 5' end of the L-A plus strand and that most, if not all, ...

  5. RNA-Seq Reveals Enhanced Sugar Metabolism in Streptococcus mutans Co-cultured with Candida albicans within Mixed-Species Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jinzhi; Kim, Dongyeop; Zhou, Xuedong; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Burne, Robert A.; Richards, Vincent P.; Koo, Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Early childhood caries (ECC), which can lead to rampant tooth-decay that is painful and costly to treat, is one of the most prevalent infectious diseases affecting children worldwide. Previous studies support that interactions between Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans are associated with the pathogenesis of ECC. The presence of Candida enhances S. mutans growth, fitness and accumulation within biofilms in vitro, although the molecular basis for these behaviors is undefined. Using an established co-cultivation biofilm model and RNA-Seq, we investigated how C. albicans influences the transcriptome of S. mutans. The presence of C. albicans dramatically altered gene expression in S. mutans in the dual-species biofilm, resulting in 393 genes differentially expressed, compared to mono-species biofilms of S. mutans. By Gene Ontology analysis, the majority of up-regulated genes were related to carbohydrate transport and metabolic/catabolic processes. KEGG pathway impact analysis showed elevated pyruvate and galactose metabolism, suggesting that co-cultivation with C. albicans influences carbohydrate utilization by S. mutans. Analysis of metabolites confirmed the increases in carbohydrate metabolism, with elevated amounts of formate in the culture medium of co-cultured biofilms. Moreover, co-cultivation with C. albicans altered transcription of S. mutans signal transduction (comC and ciaRH) genes associated with fitness and virulence. Interestingly, the expression of genes for mutacins (bacteriocins) and CRISPR were down-regulated. Collectively, the data provide a comprehensive insight into S. mutans transcriptomic changes induced by C. albicans, and offer novel insights into how bacterial–fungal interactions may enhance the severity of dental caries. PMID:28642749

  6. RNA-Seq Reveals Enhanced Sugar Metabolism in Streptococcus mutans Co-cultured with Candida albicans within Mixed-Species Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinzhi He

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Early childhood caries (ECC, which can lead to rampant tooth-decay that is painful and costly to treat, is one of the most prevalent infectious diseases affecting children worldwide. Previous studies support that interactions between Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans are associated with the pathogenesis of ECC. The presence of Candida enhances S. mutans growth, fitness and accumulation within biofilms in vitro, although the molecular basis for these behaviors is undefined. Using an established co-cultivation biofilm model and RNA-Seq, we investigated how C. albicans influences the transcriptome of S. mutans. The presence of C. albicans dramatically altered gene expression in S. mutans in the dual-species biofilm, resulting in 393 genes differentially expressed, compared to mono-species biofilms of S. mutans. By Gene Ontology analysis, the majority of up-regulated genes were related to carbohydrate transport and metabolic/catabolic processes. KEGG pathway impact analysis showed elevated pyruvate and galactose metabolism, suggesting that co-cultivation with C. albicans influences carbohydrate utilization by S. mutans. Analysis of metabolites confirmed the increases in carbohydrate metabolism, with elevated amounts of formate in the culture medium of co-cultured biofilms. Moreover, co-cultivation with C. albicans altered transcription of S. mutans signal transduction (comC and ciaRH genes associated with fitness and virulence. Interestingly, the expression of genes for mutacins (bacteriocins and CRISPR were down-regulated. Collectively, the data provide a comprehensive insight into S. mutans transcriptomic changes induced by C. albicans, and offer novel insights into how bacterial–fungal interactions may enhance the severity of dental caries.

  7. Metschnikowia Species Share a Pool of Diverse rRNA Genes Differing in Regions That Determine Hairpin-Loop Structures and Evolve by Reticulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Sipiczki

    Full Text Available Modern taxonomy of yeasts is mainly based on phylogenetic analysis of conserved DNA and protein sequences. By far the most frequently used sequences are those of the repeats of the chromosomal rDNA array. It is generally accepted that the rDNA repeats of a genome have identical sequences due to the phenomenon of sequence homogenisation and can thus be used for identification and barcoding of species. Here we show that the rDNA arrays of the type strains of Metschnikowia andauensis and M. fructicola are not homogenised. Both have arrays consisting of diverse repeats that differ from each other in the D1/D2 domains by up to 18 and 25 substitutions. The variable sites are concentrated in two regions that correspond to back-folding stretches of hairpin loops in the predicted secondary structure of the RNA molecules. The substitutions do not alter significantly the overall hairpin-loop structure due to wobble base pairing at sites of C-T transitions and compensatory mutations in the complementary strand of the hairpin stem. The phylogenetic and network analyses of the cloned sequences revealed that the repeats had not evolved in a vertical tree-like way but reticulation might have shaped the rDNA arrays of both strains. The neighbour-net analysis of all cloned sequences of the type strains and the database sequences of different strains further showed that these species share a continuous pool of diverse repeats that appear to evolve by reticulate evolution.

  8. Dynamics of a Birth-Pulse Single-Species Model with Restricted Toxin Input and Pulse Harvesting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Ma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a birth-pulses single-species model with restricted toxin input and pulse harvesting in a polluted environment. Pollution accumulates as a slowly decaying stock and is assumed to affect the growth of the renewable resource population. Firstly, by using the discrete dynamical system determined by the stroboscopic map, we obtain an exact 1-period solution of system whose birth function is Ricker function or Beverton-Holt function and obtain the threshold conditions for their stability. Furthermore, we show that the timing of harvesting has a strong impact on the maximum annual sustainable yield. The best timing of harvesting is immediately after the birth pulses. Finally, we investigate the effect of the amount of toxin input on the stable resource population size. We find that when the birth rate is comparatively lower, the population size is decreasing with the increase of toxin input; that when the birth rate is high, the population size may begin to rise and then drop with the increase of toxin input.

  9. Epidemiological survey in single-species flocks from Poland reveals expanded genetic and antigenic diversity of small ruminant lentiviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valas, Stephen; Kuźmak, Jacek

    2018-01-01

    Small ruminant lentivirus (SRLV) infections are widespread in Poland and circulation of subtypes A1, A12, A13, B1 and B2 was detected. The present work aimed at extending previous study based on the analysis of a larger number of animals from single-species flocks. Animals were selected for genetic analysis based on serological reactivity towards a range of recombinant antigens derived from Gag and Env viral proteins. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the existence of subtypes B2 and A12 in both goats and sheep and subtypes A1 and B1 in goats only. In addition, two novel subtypes, A16 and A17, were found in goats. Co-infections with strains belonging to different subtypes within A and B groups were detected in 1 sheep and 4 goats originating from four flocks. Although the reactivity of serum samples towards the recombinant antigens confirmed immunological relatedness between Gag epitopes of different subtypes and the cross-reactive nature of Gag antibodies, eleven serum samples failed to react with antigens representing all subtypes detected up-to-date in Poland, highlighting the limitations of the serological diagnosis. These data showed the complex nature of SRLV subtypes circulating in sheep and goats in Poland and the need for improving SRLV-related diagnostic capacity. PMID:29505612

  10. Red oak in southern New England and big-leaf mahogany in the Yucatan Peninsula: can mixed-species forests be sustainably managed for single-species production?

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Kelty; L. Camara-Cabrales; J. Grogan

    2011-01-01

    Complex mixed-species forests are the focus of conservation efforts that seek to maintain native biodiversity. However, much of this forestland is privately owned and is managed for timber income as well as for conservation. Management of these high-diversity forests is particularly difficult when only one tree species produces the majority of high-value timber. We...

  11. Zona pellucida glycoprotein 3 (pZP3) and integrin β2 (ITGB2) mRNA and protein expression in porcine oocytes after single and double exposure to brilliant cresyl blue test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempisty, B; Jackowska, M; Piotrowska, H; Antosik, P; Woźna, M; Bukowska, D; Brüssow, K P; Jaśkowski, J M

    2011-05-01

    Brilliant cresyl blues (BCB) staining test is a useful tool in assessing the competence of cumulus-oocyte-complexes (COCs) in several mammalian species. It is mostly used to select gametes after they are recovered from the ovary or before and after IVM to isolate those oocytes that reach developmental competency. However, there is evidence that double exposure to BCB test may lead to impaired fertilization or even have a toxic effect on cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression pattern of sperm-egg interaction molecules in oocytes after single and double exposure to BCB test. Follicles were dissected from porcine ovaries after slaughter and aspirated COCs were cultured in standard porcine IVM culture medium (TCM 199) for 44 h. The BCB test was applied to COCs before and after IVM. In developmentally competent oocytes, assessed by determining the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH; BCB test), real-time quantitative PCR reaction methods, western blot and confocal microscopy analysis were applied to determine the transcript levels of porcine zona pellucida glycoprotein 3 (pZP3), and integrin beta 2 (ITGB2), as well as the levels of pZP3 and ITGB2 proteins. In the control group, assessment of the expression of the investigated genes was performed before and after IVM without BCB test. We observed a significantly higher level of pZP3 mRNA in oocytes after single exposure to BCB test compared to control before and after IVM (P BCB test as compared to control before and after IVM (P BCB as compared to control both before and after IVM (P BCB test. In both cases we detected specific cytoplasmic localization of both proteins. The ITGB2 protein has zona pellucida and membrane localization in control oocytes before IVM. After IVM and after single exposure to BCB, ITGB2 was also strongly detected in the cytoplasm. In both cases, after double exposure to BCB both proteins were detected only partially in the cytoplasm. Our results

  12. ‘N-of-1-pathways’ unveils personal deregulated mechanisms from a single pair of RNA-Seq samples: towards precision medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardeux, Vincent; Achour, Ikbel; Li, Jianrong; Maienschein-Cline, Mark; Li, Haiquan; Pesce, Lorenzo; Parinandi, Gurunadh; Bahroos, Neil; Winn, Robert; Foster, Ian; Garcia, Joe G N; Lussier, Yves A

    2014-01-01

    Background The emergence of precision medicine allowed the incorporation of individual molecular data into patient care. Indeed, DNA sequencing predicts somatic mutations in individual patients. However, these genetic features overlook dynamic epigenetic and phenotypic response to therapy. Meanwhile, accurate personal transcriptome interpretation remains an unmet challenge. Further, N-of-1 (single-subject) efficacy trials are increasingly pursued, but are underpowered for molecular marker discovery. Method ‘N-of-1-pathways’ is a global framework relying on three principles: (i) the statistical universe is a single patient; (ii) significance is derived from geneset/biomodules powered by paired samples from the same patient; and (iii) similarity between genesets/biomodules assesses commonality and differences, within-study and cross-studies. Thus, patient gene-level profiles are transformed into deregulated pathways. From RNA-Seq of 55 lung adenocarcinoma patients, N-of-1-pathways predicts the deregulated pathways of each patient. Results Cross-patient N-of-1-pathways obtains comparable results with conventional genesets enrichment analysis (GSEA) and differentially expressed gene (DEG) enrichment, validated in three external evaluations. Moreover, heatmap and star plots highlight both individual and shared mechanisms ranging from molecular to organ-systems levels (eg, DNA repair, signaling, immune response). Patients were ranked based on the similarity of their deregulated mechanisms to those of an independent gold standard, generating unsupervised clusters of diametric extreme survival phenotypes (p=0.03). Conclusions The N-of-1-pathways framework provides a robust statistical and relevant biological interpretation of individual disease-free survival that is often overlooked in conventional cross-patient studies. It enables mechanism-level classifiers with smaller cohorts as well as N-of-1 studies. Software http://lussierlab.org/publications/N-of-1-pathways

  13. Multiple detection of zoonotic variegated squirrel bornavirus 1 RNA in different squirrel species suggests a possible unknown origin for the virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlottau, Kore; Hoffmann, Bernd; Homeier-Bachmann, Timo; Fast, Christine; Ulrich, Rainer G; Beer, Martin; Hoffmann, Donata

    2017-09-01

    The recently discovered variegated squirrel bornavirus 1 (VSBV-1) caused the death of three squirrel breeders in Germany. Subsequent first screening of squirrels with in vivo collected swab samples and a VSBV-1-specific RT-qPCR revealed not only variegated squirrel infections (Sciurus variegatoides), but also Prevost's squirrels (Callosciurus prevostii) as positive for VSBV-1 genome. In this study, 328 squirrels were tested using the established RT-qPCR assays. In 16 individual animals VSBV-1 RNA could be detected; 15 individuals were from small breedings and zoological gardens in Germany, with the remaining individual being from a zoological garden in Croatia. Positive animals belonged to the species C. prevostii, C. finlaysonii, and Tamiops swinhoei within the subfamily Callosciurinae and Sciurus granatensis within the subfamily Sciurinae. Repeated non-invasive oral swab sampling in one holding indicated positive animals months after a first negative result. Besides the oral swabs, VSBV-1 was also detected in fecal (pool) samples allowing the future monitoring of squirrel holdings based on RT-qPCR investigation of such samples. The detection in zoological gardens emphasizes the need for further investigations into the transmission route to humans in order to develop rational public health measures for prevention of transmission. Finally, the detection of several closely related VSBV-1 sequences in squirrels from different subfamilies raises questions as to the origin of the virus.

  14. Detection and cell sorting of Pseudonocardia species by fluorescence in situ hybridization and flow cytometry using 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengyan; Yang, Yu; He, Ya; Mathieu, Jacques; Yu, Cong; Li, Qilin; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2018-04-01

    Pseudonocardia spp. are receiving increasing attention due to their ability to biodegrade recalcitrant cyclic ether pollutants (e.g., 1,4-dioxane and tetrahydrofuran), as well as for their distinctive ecological niches (e.g., symbiosis with ants/plants and production of antibiotics). Isolating and characterizing Pseudonocardia spp. is thus important to discern their metabolic and physiological idiosyncrasies and advance their potential applications. However, slow growth, low cell yield, and dissimilar colony morphology hinder efficient isolation of Pseudonocardia using conventional plating methods. Here, we develop the first fluorescent probe (Pse631) targeting the 16S rRNA of Pseudonocardia members. In combination with flow cytometry and cell sorting, in situ hybridization with this probe enables sensitive and specific detection of Pseudonocardia cells in mixed cultures and enriched environmental samples without significant false positives, using Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Mycobacterium spp. as negative controls. Pseudonocardia dioxanivorans CB1190 cells labeled with Pse631 as a positive control were detected when their relative abundance in the total bacterial community was as low as 0.1%. Effective separation of Pseudonocardia cells from the mixed consortium was confirmed by quantitative PCR analysis of sorted cells. This study provides a culture-independent high-throughput molecular approach enabling effective separation of Pseudonocardia populations from complex microbial communities. This approach will not only facilitate subsequent molecular analyses including species identification and quantification, but also advance understanding of their catabolic capacities and functional molecular diversity.

  15. 16S-rRNA-based analysis of bacterial diversity in the gut of fungus-cultivating termites (Microtermes and Odontotermes species).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makonde, Huxley M; Boga, Hamadi I; Osiemo, Zipporah; Mwirichia, Romano; Mackenzie, Lucy M; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2013-11-01

    The interaction between termites and their gut symbionts has continued to attract the curiosity of researchers over time. The aim of this study was to characterize and compare the bacterial diversity and community structure in the guts of three termites (Odontotermes somaliensis, Odontotermes sp. and Microtermes sp.) using 16S rRNA gene sequencing of clone libraries. Clone libraries were screened by restriction fragment length polymorphism and representative clones from O. somaliensis (100 out of 330 clones), Odontotermes sp. (100 out of 359 clones) and Microtermes sp. (96 out 336 clones) were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis indicated seven bacterial phyla were represented: Bacteroidetes, Spirochaetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Synergistetes, Planctomycetes and Actinobacteria. Sequences representing the phylum Bacteroidetes (>60 %) were the most abundant group in Odontotermes while those of Spirochaetes (29 %) and Firmicutes (23 %) were the abundant groups in Microtermes. The gut bacterial community structure within the two Odontotermes species investigated here was almost identical at the phylum level, but the Microtermes sp. had a unique bacterial community structure. Bacterial diversity was higher in Odontotermes than in Microtermes. The affiliation and clustering of the sequences, often with those from other termites' guts, indicate a majority of the gut bacteria are autochthonous having mutualistic relationships with their hosts. The findings underscore the presence of termite-specific bacterial lineages, the majority of which are still uncultured.

  16. An RNA Topoisomerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; di Gate, Russell J.; Seeman, Nadrian C.

    1996-09-01

    A synthetic strand of RNA has been designed so that it can adopt two different topological states (a circle and a trefoil knot) when ligated into a cyclic molecule. The RNA knot and circle have been characterized by their behavior in gel electrophoresis and sedimentation experiments. This system allows one to assay for the existence of an RNA topoisomerase, because the two RNA molecules can be interconverted only by a strand passage event. We find that the interconversion of these two species can be catalyzed by Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase III, indicating that this enzyme can act as an RNA topoisomerase. The conversion of circles to knots is accompanied by a small amount of RNA catenane generation. These findings suggest that strand passage must be considered a potential component of the folding and modification of RNA structures.

  17. Resistance to the macrolide antibiotic tylosin is conferred by single methylations at 23S rRNA nucleotides G748 and A2058 acting in synergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingfu; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    The macrolide antibiotic tylosin has been used extensively in veterinary medicine and exerts potent antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria. Tylosin-synthesizing strains of the Gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces fradiae protect themselves from their own product by differential expression of four resistance determinants, tlrA, tlrB, tlrC, and tlrD. The tlrB and tlrD genes encode methyltransferases that add single methyl groups at 23S rRNA nucleotides G748 and A2058, respectively. Here we show that methylation by neither TlrB nor TlrD is sufficient on its own to give tylosin resistance, and resistance is conferred by the G748 and A2058 methylations acting together in synergy. This synergistic mechanism of resistance is specific for the macrolides tylosin and mycinamycin that possess sugars extending from the 5- and 14-positions of the macrolactone ring and is not observed for macrolides, such as carbomycin, spiramycin, and erythromycin, that have different constellations of sugars. The manner in which the G748 and A2058 methylations coincide with the glycosylation patterns of tylosin and mycinamycin reflects unambiguously how these macrolides fit into their binding site within the bacterial 50S ribosomal subunit. PMID:12417742

  18. Single amino acid change in the helicase domain of the putative RNA replicase of turnip crinkle virus alters symptom intensification by virulent satellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collmer, C W; Stenzler, L; Chen, X; Fay, N; Hacker, D; Howell, S H

    1992-01-01

    The virulent satellite [satellite C (sat C)] of turnip crinkle virus (TCV) is a small pathogenic RNA that intensifies symptoms in TCV-infected turnip plants (Brassica campestris). The virulence of sat C is determined by properties of the satellite itself and is influenced by the helper virus. Symptoms produced in infections with sat C differ in severity depending on the helper virus. The TCV-JI helper virus produces more severe symptoms than the TCV-B helper virus when inoculated with sat C. To find determinants in the TCV helper virus genome that affect satellite virulence, the TCV-JI genome was cloned and the sequence compared to the TCV-B genome. The genomes were found to differ by only five base changes, and only one of the base changes, at nucleotide position 1025, produced an amino acid change, an aspartic acid----glycine in the putative viral replicase. A chimeric TCV genome (TCV-B/JI) containing four of the five base changes (including the base change at position 1025) and a mutant TCV-B genome (TCV-B1025G) containing a single base substitution at position 1025 converted the TCV-B genome into a form that produces severe symptoms with sat C. The base change a position 1025 is located in the helicase of the putative viral replicase, and symptom intensification appears to result from differences in the rate of replication of the satellite supported by the two helper viruses. Images PMID:1370351

  19. Human α2-HS-glycoprotein: the A and B chains with a connecting sequence are encoded by a single mRNA transcript

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.C.; Bowman, B.H.; Yang, F.

    1987-01-01

    The α 2 -HS-glycoprotein (AHSG) is a plasma protein reported to play roles in bone mineralization and in the immune response. It is composed of two subunits, the A and B chains. Recombinant plasmids containing human cDNA AHSG have been isolated by screening an adult human liver library with a mixed oligonucleotide probe. The cDNA clones containing AHSG inserts span approximately 1.5 kilobase pairs and include the entire AHSG coding sequence, demonstrating that the A and B chains are encoded by a single mRNA transcript. The cDNA sequence predicts an 18-amino-acid signal peptide, followed by the A-chain sequence of AHSG. A heretofore unseen connecting sequence of 40 amino acids was deduced between the A- and B-chain sequences. The connecting sequence demonstrates the unique amino acid doublets and collagen triplets found in the A and B chains; it is not homologous with other reported amino acid sequences. The connecting sequence may be cleaved in a posttranslational step by limited proteolysis before mature AHSG is released into the circulation or may vary in its presence because of alternative processing. The AHSG cDNA was utilized for mapping the AHSG gene to the 3q21→qter region of human chromosome 3. The availability of the AHSG cDNA clone will facilitate the analysis of its genetic control and gene expression during development and bone formation

  20. Visualization of Enhancer-Derived Noncoding RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibayama, Youtaro; Fanucchi, Stephanie; Mhlanga, Musa M

    2017-01-01

    Enhancers are principal regulators that allow spatiotemporal tissue-specific control of gene expression. While mounting evidence suggests that enhancer-derived long noncoding RNAs (long ncRNAs), including enhancer RNAs (eRNAs), are an important component of enhancer function, their expression has not been broadly analyzed at a single cell level via imaging techniques. This protocol describes a method to image eRNA in single cells by in situ hybridization followed by tyramide signal amplification (TSA). The procedure can be multiplexed to simultaneously visualize both eRNA and protein-coding transcript at the site of transcriptional elongation, thereby permitting analysis of dynamics between the two transcript species in single cells. Our approach is not limited to eRNAs, but can be implemented on other transcripts.

  1. Speciālās izglītības skolotāja sadarbība ar 4-5 gadīga bērna ģimeni

    OpenAIRE

    Velpa, Dana

    2018-01-01

    Diplomdarba tēma: ”Speciālās izglītības skolotāja sadarbība ar 4 - 5 gadīgu bērna ģimeni”. Diplomdarba vadītāja: Rasma Vīgante Diplomdarba autore: Dana Velpa Diplomdarba mērķis: Izpētīt speciālās izglītības skolotāja un ģimenes sadarbības iespējas. Bērna ģimene ir vide, kurā bērns ar speciālām vajadzībām saņem nepārtrauktu atbalstu. Veidojot sadarbību speciālās izglītības skolotājam ar 4 - 5 gadīgu bērna ģimeni, atbalsts kļūs vispusīgs. Diplomdarba mērķis un uzdevumi ir pētīt, analizēt speciā...

  2. Deciphering the RNA landscape by RNAome sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.W.J. Derks (Kasper); B. Misovic (Branislav); M.C.G.N. van den hout (Mirjam); C. Kockx (Christel); C.P. Gomez (Cesar Payan); R.W.W. Brouwer (Rutger); H. Vrieling (Harry); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); J. Pothof (Joris)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractCurrent RNA expression profiling methods rely on enrichment steps for specific RNA classes, thereby not detecting all RNA species in an unperturbed manner. We report strand-specific RNAome sequencing that determines expression of small and large RNAs from rRNA-depleted total RNA in a

  3. Implementing ecosystem-based fisheries management: from single-species to integrated ecosystem assessment and advice for Baltic Sea fish stocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möllmann, Christian; Lindegren, Martin; Blenckner, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Theory behind ecosystem-based management (EBM) and ecosystem-based fisheries management (EBFM) is nowwell developed. However, the implementation of EBFM exemplified by fisheries management in Europe is still largely based on single-species assessments and ignores the wider ecosystem context and i...

  4. Adsorption of DNA/RNA nucleobases onto single-layer MoS2 and Li-Doped MoS2: A dispersion-corrected DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Meisam; Jahanshahi, Mohsen; Ghorbanzadeh, Morteza; Najafpour, Ghasem

    2018-03-01

    The kind of sensing platform in nano biosensor plays an important role in nucleic acid sequence detection. It has been demonstrated that graphene does not have an intrinsic band gap; therefore, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are desirable materials for electronic base detection. In the present work, a comparative study of the adsorption of the DNA/RNA nucleobases [Adenine (A), Cytosine (C) Guanine (G), Thymine (T) and Uracil (U)] onto the single-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) and Li-doped MoS2 (Li-MoS2) as a sensing surfaces was investigated by using Dispersion-corrected Density Functional Theory (D-DFT) calculations and different measure of equilibrium distances, charge transfers and binding energies for the various nucleobases were calculated. The results revealed that the interactions between the nucleobases and the MoS2 can be strongly enhanced by introducing metal atom, due to significant charge transfer from the Li atom to the MoS2 when Lithium is placed on top of the MoS2. Furthermore, the binding energies of the five nucleobases were in the range of -0.734 to -0.816 eV for MoS2 and -1.47 to -1.80 eV for the Li-MoS2. Also, nucleobases were adsorbed onto MoS2 sheets via the van der Waals (vdW) force. This high affinity and the renewable properties of the biosensing platform demonstrated that Li-MoS2 nanosheet is biocompatible and suitable for nucleic acid analysis.

  5. Sequence relationships between the genome and the intracellular RNA species 1,3,6 and 7 of mouse hepatitis virus strain A59

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Spaan, W.J.M.; Rottier, P.J.M.; Zeijst, B.A.M. van der

    1982-01-01

    We have shown by T1 oligonucleotide fingerprinting that the genome of mouse hepatitis virus strain A59 and its intracellular RNA 1 have identical fingerprints and that RNA 1 and the subgenomic RNAs 3, 6, and 7 contain common sequences. To localize the homologous region between the RNAs, we compared

  6. A single methyltransferase YefA (RlmCD) catalyses both m5U747 and m5U1939 modifications in Bacillus subtilis 23S rRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desmolaize, Benoit; Fabret, Céline; Brégeon, Damien

    2011-01-01

    Escherichia coli possesses three paralogues. These comprise the methyltransferases TrmA that targets U54 in tRNAs, RlmC that modifies U747 in 23S rRNA and RlmD that is specific for U1939 in 23S rRNA. The tRNAs and rRNAs of the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis have the same three m(5)U modifications....... However, as previously shown, the m(5)U54 modification in B. subtilis tRNAs is catalysed in a fundamentally different manner by the folate-dependent enzyme TrmFO, which is unrelated to the E. coli TrmA. Here, we show that methylation of U747 and U1939 in B. subtilis rRNA is catalysed by a single enzyme...

  7. Cell Death-Associated Ribosomal RNA Cleavage in Postmortem Tissues and Its Forensic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Yeon; Kim, Yunmi; Cha, Hyo Kyeong; Lim, Hye Young; Kim, Hyungsub; Chung, Sooyoung; Hwang, Juck-Joon; Park, Seong Hwan; Son, Gi Hoon

    2017-06-30

    Estimation of postmortem interval (PMI) is a key issue in the field of forensic pathology. With the availability of quantitative analysis of RNA levels in postmortem tissues, several studies have assessed the postmortem degradation of constitutively expressed RNA species to estimate PMI. However, conventional RNA quantification as well as biochemical and physiological changes employed thus far have limitations related to standardization or normalization. The present study focuses on an interesting feature of the subdomains of certain RNA species, in which they are site-specifically cleaved during apoptotic cell death. We found that the D8 divergent domain of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) bearing cell death-related cleavage sites was rapidly removed during postmortem RNA degradation. In contrast to the fragile domain, the 5' terminal region of 28S rRNA was remarkably stable during the postmortem period. Importantly, the differences in the degradation rates between the two domains in mammalian 28S rRNA were highly proportional to increasing PMI with a significant linear correlation observed in mice as well as human autopsy tissues. In conclusion, we demonstrate that comparison of the degradation rates between domains of a single RNA species provides quantitative information on postmortem degradation states, which can be applied for the estimation of PMI.

  8. Effect of single base changes and the absence of modified bases in 16S RNA on the reconstitution and function of Escherichia coli 30S ribosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denman, R.; Krzyzosiak, W.; Nurse, K.; Ofengand, J.

    1987-01-01

    The gene coding for E. coli 16S rRNA was placed in pUC19 under the control of the strong class III T7 promoter, phi 10, by ligation of the 1490 bp BclI/BstEII fragment of the rrnB operon with appropriate synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides. Such constructs allowed efficient in vitro synthesis of full-length transcripts (up to 900 mol RNA/mol template) free of modified bases. The synthetic RNA could be assembled into 30S subunits upon addition of E. coli 30S ribosomal proteins. The particles co-sedimented with authentic 30S particles and were electron microscopically indistinguishable from them. Upon addition of 50S subunits, codon-dependent P-site binding of tRNA and codon-dependent polypeptide synthesis were >80% of 30S reconstituted from natural 16S RNA and >50% of isolated 30S. UV-induced crosslinking of P-site bound AcVal-tRNA to residue C 1400 was preserved. Changing C 1400 to A had little effect on reconstitution, P-site binding, or polypeptide synthesis. However, the substitution of C 1499 by G markedly inhibited assembly. The effect on P-site binding and polypeptide synthesis is under study. These results show (1) none of the modified bases of 16S RNA are essential for protein synthesis, (2) substitution of A for C 1400 has little functional effect, and (3) position 1400 may be important for ribosome assembly

  9. Growth response of drought-stressed Pinus sylvestris seedlings to single- and multi-species inoculation with ectomycorrhizal fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabea Kipfer

    Full Text Available Many trees species form symbiotic associations with ectomycorrhizal (ECM fungi, which improve nutrient and water acquisition of their host. Until now it is unclear whether the species richness of ECM fungi is beneficial for tree seedling performance, be it during moist conditions or drought. We performed a pot experiment using Pinus sylvestris seedlings inoculated with four selected ECM fungi (Cenococcum geophilum, Paxillus involutus, Rhizopogon roseolus and Suillus granulatus to investigate (i whether these four ECM fungi, in monoculture or in species mixtures, affect growth of P. sylvestris seedlings, and (ii whether this effect can be attributed to species number per se or to species identity. Two different watering regimes (moist vs. dry were applied to examine the context-dependency of the results. Additionally, we assessed the activity of eight extracellular enzymes in the root tips. Shoot growth was enhanced in the presence of S. granulatus, but not by any other ECM fungal species. The positive effect of S. granulatus on shoot growth was more pronounced under moist (threefold increase than under dry conditions (twofold increase, indicating that the investigated ECM fungi did not provide additional support during drought stress. The activity of secreted extracellular enzymes was higher in S. granulatus than in any other species. In conclusion, our findings suggest that ECM fungal species composition may affect seedling performance in terms of aboveground biomass.

  10. Using single strand conformational polymorphisms (SSCP) to identify Phytophthora species in Oregon forests affected by sudden oak death

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Hansen; C. Hesse; P. Reeser; W. Sutton; L. Winton

    2006-01-01

    Phytophthora species are abundant in streams, widespread in soils and occasionally found in diseased plants in the tanoak forests of southwestern Oregon. It is time-consuming and expensive to identify hundreds of isolates to species using morphology or internal transribed spacer (ITS) sequencing. We modified a published Phytophthora...

  11. A G-C-rich palindromic structural motif and a stretch of single-stranded purines are required for optimal packaging of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV) genomic RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaballah, Soumeya Ali; Aktar, Suriya J; Ali, Jahabar; Phillip, Pretty Susan; Al Dhaheri, Noura Salem; Jabeen, Aayesha; Rizvi, Tahir A

    2010-09-03

    During retroviral RNA packaging, two copies of genomic RNA are preferentially packaged into the budding virus particles whereas the spliced viral RNAs and the cellular RNAs are excluded during this process. Specificity towards retroviral RNA packaging is dependent upon sequences at the 5' end of the viral genome, which at times extend into Gag sequences. It has earlier been suggested that the Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV) contains packaging sequences within the 5' untranslated region (UTR) and Gag. These studies have also suggested that the packaging determinants of MPMV that lie in the UTR are bipartite and are divided into two regions both upstream and downstream of the major splice donor. However, the precise boundaries of these discontinuous regions within the UTR and the role of the intervening sequences between these dipartite sequences towards MPMV packaging have not been investigated. Employing a combination of genetic and structural prediction analyses, we have shown that region "A", immediately downstream of the primer binding site, is composed of 50 nt, whereas region "B" is composed of the last 23 nt of UTR, and the intervening 55 nt between these two discontinuous regions do not contribute towards MPMV RNA packaging. In addition, we have identified a 14-nt G-C-rich palindromic sequence (with 100% autocomplementarity) within region A that has been predicted to fold into a structural motif and is essential for optimal MPMV RNA packaging. Furthermore, we have also identified a stretch of single-stranded purines (ssPurines) within the UTR and 8 nt of these ssPurines are duplicated in region B. The native ssPurines or its repeat in region B when predicted to refold as ssPurines has been shown to be essential for RNA packaging, possibly functioning as a potential nucleocapsid binding site. Findings from this study should enhance our understanding of the steps involved in MPMV replication including RNA encapsidation process. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd

  12. E. S. R. studies of electron irradiated K/sub 3/Ir(CN)/sub 6/ in KCl single crystals. Mono and di-chlorinated species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vugman, N.V.; Pinhal, N.M. (Rio de Janeiro Univ. (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica)

    1983-08-20

    E.S.R. studies of KCl single crystals doped with small amounts of K/sub 3/Ir(CN)/sub 6/ and submitted to a prolonged 2 MeV electron irradiation at room temperature reveal the presence of the species (Ir(CN)/sub 5/Cl)/sup 4 -/ and (Ir(CN)/sub 4/Cl/sub 2/)/sup 4 -/. Ligand spin densities and ligand field parameters are calculated from the experimental hyperfine and superhyperfine interactions and compared with previous data on the species (Ir(CN)/sub 5/)/sup 4 -/.

  13. Phylogentic Relationship among Limnonectes (Ranidae: Amphibia found in West Sumatra with Other Species from South East Asia based on the based on the 16S rRNA Gen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djoko T. Iskandar

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research to study the phylogenetic relationship among Limnonectes species found in West Sumatra and with other species from South East Asia based on the partial DNA sequences16S rRNA sequences. DNA sequences were aligned using ClustalX version 1.64b, and the phylogenetic relationship within samples were analyzed using PHYLIP version 3.5c program. The alignment showed that, from 805 sites, there are 250 parsimony informative polymorphism sites. The phylogenetic tree showed that all of the Limnonectes spesies were divided in two clusters, the L. blythii complex and L. kuhlii complex. L. kuhlii and L. sp1 clustered into L. kuhlii complex and L. shomponerum and L. macrodon were clustered to L. blythii complex.. This result showed that L. kuhlii and L. blythii are species complexes that are actually constituted of several species.

  14. RNA Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Barbara L.; Kundrot, Craig E.

    2003-01-01

    RNA molecules may be crystallized using variations of the methods developed for protein crystallography. As the technology has become available to syntheisize and purify RNA molecules in the quantities and with the quality that is required for crystallography, the field of RNA structure has exploded. The first consideration when crystallizing an RNA is the sequence, which may be varied in a rational way to enhance crystallizability or prevent formation of alternate structures. Once a sequence has been designed, the RNA may be synthesized chemically by solid-state synthesis, or it may be produced enzymatically using RNA polymerase and an appropriate DNA template. Purification of milligram quantities of RNA can be accomplished by HPLC or gel electrophoresis. As with proteins, crystallization of RNA is usually accomplished by vapor diffusion techniques. There are several considerations that are either unique to RNA crystallization or more important for RNA crystallization. Techniques for design, synthesis, purification, and crystallization of RNAs will be reviewed here.

  15. Evolution of RNA-Based Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Peter F

    2016-01-01

    RNA molecules have served for decades as a paradigmatic example of molecular evolution that is tractable both in in vitro experiments and in detailed computer simulation. The adaptation of RNA sequences to external selection pressures is well studied and well understood. The de novo innovation or optimization of RNA aptamers and riboswitches in SELEX experiments serves as a case in point. Likewise, fitness landscapes building upon the efficiently computable RNA secondary structures have been a key toward understanding realistic fitness landscapes. Much less is known, however, on models in which multiple RNAs interact with each other, thus actively influencing the selection pressures acting on them. From a computational perspective, RNA-RNA interactions can be dealt with by same basic methods as the folding of a single RNA molecule, although many details become more complicated. RNA-RNA interactions are frequently employed in cellular regulation networks, e.g., as miRNA bases mRNA silencing or in the modulation of bacterial mRNAs by small, often highly structured sRNAs. In this chapter, we summarize the key features of networks of replicators. We highlight the differences between quasispecies-like models describing templates copied by an external replicase and hypercycle similar to autocatalytic replicators. Two aspects are of importance: the dynamics of selection within a population, usually described by conventional dynamical systems, and the evolution of replicating species in the space of chemical types. Product inhibition plays a key role in modulating selection dynamics from survival of the fittest to extinction of unfittest. The sequence evolution of replicators is rather well understood as approximate optimization in a fitness landscape for templates that is shaped by the sequence-structure map of RNA. Some of the properties of this map, in particular shape space covering and extensive neutral networks, give rise to evolutionary patterns such as drift

  16. Complexities of bloom dynamics in the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense revealed through DNA measurements by imaging flow cytometry coupled with species-specific rRNA probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnahan, Michael L.; Farzan, Shahla; Keafer, Bruce A.; Sosik, Heidi M.; Olson, Robert J.; Anderson, Donald M.

    2014-05-01

    Measurements of the DNA content of different protist populations can shed light on a variety of processes, including cell division, sex, prey ingestion, and parasite invasion. Here, we modified an Imaging FlowCytobot (IFCB), a custom-built flow cytometer that records images of microplankton, to measure the DNA content of large dinoflagellates and other high-DNA content species. The IFCB was also configured to measure fluorescence from Cy3-labeled rRNA probes, aiding the identification of Alexandrium fundyense (syn. A. tamarense Group I), a photosynthetic dinoflagellate that causes paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP). The modified IFCB was used to analyze samples from the development, peak and termination phases of an inshore A. fundyense bloom (Salt Pond, Eastham, MA, USA), and from a rare A. fundyense ‘red tide’ that occurred in the western Gulf of Maine, offshore of Portsmouth, NH (USA). Diploid or G2 phase (‘2C’) A. fundyense cells were frequently enriched at the near-surface, suggesting an important role for aggregation at the air-sea interface during sexual events. Also, our analysis showed that large proportions of A. fundyense cells in both the Salt Pond and red tide blooms were planozygotes during bloom decline, highlighting the importance of sexual fusion to bloom termination. At Salt Pond, bloom decline also coincided with a dramatic rise in infections by the parasite genus Amoebophrya. The samples that were most heavily infected contained many large cells with higher DNA-associated fluorescence than 2C vegetative cells, but these cells' nuclei were also frequently consumed by Amoebophrya trophonts. Neither large cell size nor increased DNA-associated fluorescence could be replicated by infecting an A. fundyense culture of vegetative cells. Therefore, we attribute these characteristics of the large Salt Pond cells to planozygote maturation rather than Amoebophrya infection, though an interaction between infection and planozygote maturation may

  17. Niche overlap of congeneric invaders supports a single-species hypothesis and provides insight into future invasion risk: implications for global management of the Bactrocera dorsalis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Matthew P; Terblanche, John S

    2014-01-01

    The invasive fruit fly, Bactrocera invadens, has expanded its range rapidly over the past 10 years. Here we aimed to determine if the recent range expansion of Bactrocera invadens into southern Africa can be better understood through niche exploration tools, ecological niche models (ENMs), and through incorporating information about Bactrocera dorsalis s.s., a putative conspecific species from Asia. We test for niche overlap of environmental variables between Bactrocera invadens and Bactrocera dorsalis s.s. as well as two other putative conspecific species, Bactrocera philippinensis and B. papayae. We examine overlap and similarity in the geographical expression of each species' realised niche through reciprocal distribution models between Africa and Asia. We explore different geographical backgrounds, environmental variables and model complexity with multiple and single Bactrocera species hypotheses in an attempt to predict the recent range expansion of B. invadens into northern parts of South Africa. Bactrocera invadens has a high degree of niche overlap with B. dorsalis s.s. (and B. philippinensis and B. papayae). Ecological niche models built for Bactrocera dorsalis s.s. have high transferability to describe the range of B. invadens, and B. invadens is able to project to the core range of B. dorsalis s.s. The ENMs of both Bactrocera dorsalis and B. dorsalis combined with B. philipenesis and B. papayae have significantly higher predictive ability to capture the distribution points in South Africa than for B. invadens alone. Consistent with other studies proposing these Bactrocera species as conspecific, niche similarity and overlap between these species is high. Considering these other Bactrocera dorsalis complex species simultaneously better describes the range expansion and invasion potential of B. invadens in South Africa. We suggest that these species should be considered the same-at least functionally-and global quarantine and management strategies applied

  18. Niche overlap of congeneric invaders supports a single-species hypothesis and provides insight into future invasion risk: implications for global management of the Bactrocera dorsalis complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P Hill

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The invasive fruit fly, Bactrocera invadens, has expanded its range rapidly over the past 10 years. Here we aimed to determine if the recent range expansion of Bactrocera invadens into southern Africa can be better understood through niche exploration tools, ecological niche models (ENMs, and through incorporating information about Bactrocera dorsalis s.s., a putative conspecific species from Asia. We test for niche overlap of environmental variables between Bactrocera invadens and Bactrocera dorsalis s.s. as well as two other putative conspecific species, Bactrocera philippinensis and B. papayae. We examine overlap and similarity in the geographical expression of each species' realised niche through reciprocal distribution models between Africa and Asia. We explore different geographical backgrounds, environmental variables and model complexity with multiple and single Bactrocera species hypotheses in an attempt to predict the recent range expansion of B. invadens into northern parts of South Africa. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Bactrocera invadens has a high degree of niche overlap with B. dorsalis s.s. (and B. philippinensis and B. papayae. Ecological niche models built for Bactrocera dorsalis s.s. have high transferability to describe the range of B. invadens, and B. invadens is able to project to the core range of B. dorsalis s.s. The ENMs of both Bactrocera dorsalis and B. dorsalis combined with B. philipenesis and B. papayae have significantly higher predictive ability to capture the distribution points in South Africa than for B. invadens alone. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Consistent with other studies proposing these Bactrocera species as conspecific, niche similarity and overlap between these species is high. Considering these other Bactrocera dorsalis complex species simultaneously better describes the range expansion and invasion potential of B. invadens in South Africa. We suggest that these species should be considered the same

  19. A single bout of whole-leg, peristaltic pulse external pneumatic compression upregulates PGC-1α mRNA and endothelial nitric oxide sythase protein in human skeletal muscle tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kephart, Wesley C; Mobley, C Brooks; Fox, Carlton D; Pascoe, David D; Sefton, JoEllen M; Wilson, Trent J; Goodlett, Michael D; Kavazis, Andreas N; Roberts, Michael D; Martin, Jeffrey S

    2015-07-01

    What is the central question of this study? Does 60 min of peristaltic pulse external pneumatic compression (EPC) alter gene and protein expression patterns related to metabolism, vascular biology, redox balance and inflammation in vastus lateralis biopsy samples? What is the main finding and its importance? A single bout of EPC transiently upregulates PGC-1α mRNA, while also upregulating endothelial nitric oxide synthase protein and nitric oxide metabolite concentrations in vastus lateralis biopsy samples. We investigated whether a single 60 min bout of whole-leg, lower pressure external pneumatic compression (EPC) altered select vascular, metabolic, antioxidant and inflammation-related mRNAs. Ten participants (eight male, two female; aged 22.0 ± 0.4 years) reported to the laboratory 4 h postprandial, and vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were obtained before (PRE) and 1 and 4 h after EPC treatment. Messenger RNA expression was analysed using real-time RT-PCR, and significant mRNA findings were investigated further by Western blot analysis of respective protein concentrations. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) mRNA increased by 77% 1 h following EPC compared with PRE levels (P = 0.005), but no change in protein concentration 1 or 4 h post-EPC was observed. Increases in endothelial nitric oxide sythase (eNOS) mRNA (+44%) and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) mRNA (+57%) 1 h post-EPC as well as an increase in interleukin-10 mRNA (+132%) 4 h post-EPC compared with PRE levels were observed, but only approached significance (P = 0.076, 0.077 and 0.074, respectively). Interestingly, eNOS protein (+40%, P = 0.025) and nitrate and nitrite (NOx) concentrations (+69%, P = 0.025) increased 1-4 h post-EPC. Moreover, SOD2 protein tended to increase from PRE to 4 h post-EPC (+43%, P = 0.074), although no changes in tissue 4-hydroxnonenal levels was observed. An acute bout of EPC transiently upregulates PGC-1α mRNA, while also upregulating e

  20. Maternal characteristics during pregnancy and risk factors for positive HIV RNA at delivery: a single-cohort observational study (Brescia, Northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magoni Michele

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detectable HIV RNA in mothers at delivery is an important risk factor for HIV transmission to newborns. Our hypothesis was that, in migrant women, the risk of detectable HIV RNA at delivery is greater owing to late HIV diagnosis. Therefore, we examined pregnant women by regional provenance and measured variables that could be associated with detectable HIV RNA at delivery. Methods A observational retrospective study was conducted from January 1999 to May 2008. Univariate and multivariable regression analyses (generalized linear models were used, with detectable HIV RNA at delivery as dependent variable. Results The overall population comprised 154 women (46.8% migrants. Presentation was later in migrant women than Italians, as assessed by CD4-T-cell count at first contact (mean 417/mm3 versus 545/mm3, respectively; p = 0.003. Likewise, HIV diagnosis was made before pregnancy and HAART was already prescribed at the time of pregnancy in more Italians (91% and 75%, respectively than migrants (61% and 42.8%, respectively. A subgroup of women with available HIV RNA close to term (i.e., ≤30 days before labour was studied for risk factors of detectable HIV RNA (≥50 copies/ml at delivery. Among 93 women, 25 (26.9% had detectable HIV RNA. A trend toward an association between non-Italian nationality and detectable HIV RNA at delivery was demonstrated by univariate analysis (relative risk, RR = 1.86; p = 0.099. However, by multivariable regression analysis, the following factors appeared to be more important: lack of stable (i.e., ≥14 days antiretroviral therapy at the time of HIV RNA testing (RR = 4.3; p 3, RR = 0.94; p = 0.038. Conclusions These results reinforce the importance of extensive screening for HIV infection, earlier initiation of antiretroviral therapy and stricter monitoring of pregnant women to reduce the risk of detectable HIV RNA at delivery. Public health interventions should be particularly targeted to migrant

  1. Photoinactivation of single and mixed biofilms of Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida species using Photodythazine® [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmello, Juliana Cabrini; Alves, Fernanda; Mima, Ewerton Garcia de Oliveira; Jorge, Janaina Habib; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Pavarina, Ana Cláudia

    2017-03-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) mediated by Photodithazine ® (PDZ) formulated in hydrogel, in the inactivation of mono and duo-species biofilms of Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis. Standardized suspensions of each strain were prepared and after biofilm formation, mono-species were treated with 150 and 175mg/L of PDZ for 20min (pre-irradiation time), and exposed to LED light at a dose of 37.5J/cm 2 (660nm). The duo-species biofilms (C. albicans+C. glabrata and C. albicans+C. tropicalis) were treated with 150mg/L of PDZ and light. Additional samples were treated with PDZ or light only, and the control did not receive any treatment. Next, microbiological evaluation was performed by spreading the cells on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar and CHROMagar Candida for colony forming units (CFU/mL). Moreover, the total biomass of biofilm was verified using the crystal violet staining assay (CV). The data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc (α=0.05). The use of PDZ 150mg/L promoted a reduction of 1.0, 1.2, 1.5 log 10 in the viability of C. glabrata, C. albicans and C. tropicalis, respectively. The same concentration reduced in 1.0 log 10 the viability of each species grown as duo-species biofilms. The crystal violet assay showed that the use of 150mg/L reduced 24.4%, 39.2% and 43.7% of the total biomass of C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C. glabrata, respectively. aPDT did not reduce the total biomass to the duo-species biofilms. Thus, PDZ-mediated aPDT was more effective in the inactivation of mono-species biofilms of Candida spp. compared with duo-species biofilm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Depressive-like behavioural profiles in captive-bred single- and socially-housed rhesus and cynomolgus macaques: a species comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine MJ Camus

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: To unravel the causes of major depressive disorder (MDD, the third leading cause of disease burden around the world, ethological animal models have recently been proposed. Our previous studies highlighted a depressive-like profile among single- and socially-housed farm-bred cynomolgus macaques. Although phylogenetically close, cynomolgus and rhesus macaques, the two most commonly used macaque species in biomedical research, differ on several levels such as patterns of aggression, reconciliation, temperament or dominance styles. The question of whether one captive macaque species was more vulnerable than another in the development of a pathological profile reminiscent of MDD symptoms was explored.Methods: Behavioural data (including body postures, orientations, gaze directions, inter-individual distances and locations in the cage were collected in farming conditions. Using an unbiased validated ethological scan-sampling method, followed by multiple correspondence and hierarchical clustering analyses, 40 single- and 35 socially-housed rhesus macaques were assessed. Independently, for each housing condition, inter-species comparisons were made with previously acquired data on farm-bred cynomolgus monkeys.Results: Consistent with our previous studies, we found depressive-like characteristics (e.g. inactivity, low level of investigation and maintenance, long time spent inactive while facing the wall among single- and socially-housed rhesus macaques. Species-specificities were reported in non-depressive time budgets and in the prevalence of the pathological profiles.Conclusions: Our results suggest that rhesus may be more vulnerable to developing a despair-like state than cynomolgus macaques, both in single- and in social-housing conditions. Therefore, rhesus macaques are more suitable for use as a spontaneous model of depressive disorders.

  3. Double-Stranded RNA Is Detected by Immunofluorescence Analysis in RNA and DNA Virus Infections, Including Those by Negative-Stranded RNA Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Kyung-No; Liang, Zhiguo; Lipton, Howard L

    2015-09-01

    Early biochemical studies of viral replication suggested that most viruses produce double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), which is essential for the induction of the host immune response. However, it was reported in 2006 that dsRNA could be detected by immunofluorescence antibody staining in double-stranded DNA and positive-strand RNA virus infections but not in negative-strand RNA virus infections. Other reports in the literature seemed to support these observations. This suggested that negative-strand RNA viruses produce little, if any, dsRNA or that more efficient viral countermeasures to mask dsRNA are mounted. Because of our interest in the use of dsRNA antibodies for virus discovery, particularly in pathological specimens, we wanted to determine how universal immunostaining for dsRNA might be in animal virus infections. We have detected the in situ formation of dsRNA in cells infected with vesicular stomatitis virus, measles virus, influenza A virus, and Nyamanini virus, which represent viruses from different negative-strand RNA virus families. dsRNA was also detected in cells infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, an ambisense RNA virus, and minute virus of mice (MVM), a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) parvovirus, but not hepatitis B virus. Although dsRNA staining was primarily observed in the cytoplasm, it was also seen in the nucleus of cells infected with influenza A virus, Nyamanini virus, and MVM. Thus, it is likely that most animal virus infections produce dsRNA species that can be detected by immunofluorescence staining. The apoptosis induced in several uninfected cell lines failed to upregulate dsRNA formation. An effective antiviral host immune response depends on recognition of viral invasion and an intact innate immune system as a first line of defense. Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is a viral product essential for the induction of innate immunity, leading to the production of type I interferons (IFNs) and the activation of hundreds of IFN

  4. Ro60-associated single-stranded RNA links inflammation with fetal cardiac fibrosis via ligation of TLRs: a novel pathway to autoimmune-associated heart block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Robert M; Alvarez, David; Komissarova, Elena; Barrat, Franck J; Swartz, Jordan; Buyon, Jill P

    2010-02-15

    Activation of TLR by ssRNA after FcgammaR-mediated phagocytosis of immune complexes (IC) may be relevant in autoimmune-associated congenital heart block (CHB) where the obligate factor is a maternal anti-SSA/Ro Ab and the fetal factors, protein/RNA on an apoptotic cardiocyte and infiltrating macrophages. This study addressed the hypothesis that Ro60-associated ssRNAs link macrophage activation to fibrosis via TLR engagement. Both macrophage transfection with noncoding ssRNA that bind Ro60 and an IC generated by incubation of Ro60-ssRNA with an IgG fraction from a CHB mother or affinity purified anti-Ro60 significantly increased TNF-alpha secretion, an effect not observed using control RNAs or normal IgG. Dependence on TLR was supported by the significant inhibition of TNF-alpha release by IRS661 and chloroquine. The requirement for FcgammaRIIIa-mediated delivery was provided by inhibition with an anti-CD16a Ab. Fibrosis markers were noticeably increased in fetal cardiac fibroblasts after incubation with supernatants generated from macrophages transfected with ssRNA or incubated with the IC. Supernatants generated from macrophages with ssRNA in the presence of IRS661 or chloroquine did not cause fibrosis. In a CHB heart, but not a healthy heart, TLR7 immunostaining was localized to a region near the atrioventricular groove at a site enriched in mononuclear cells and fibrosis. These data support a novel injury model in CHB, whereby endogenous ligand, Ro60-associated ssRNA, forges a nexus between TLR ligation and fibrosis instigated by binding of anti-Ro Abs to the target protein likely accessible via apoptosis.

  5. RNA Origami

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparvath, Steffen Lynge

    introducerede vores gruppe den enkeltstrengede RNA-origami metode, der giver mulighed for cotranscriptional foldning af veldefinerede nanostrukturer, og er en central del af arbejdet præsenteret heri. Denne ph.d.-afhandling udforsker potentielle anvendelser af RNA-origami nanostrukturer, som nanomedicin eller...... biosensorer. Afhandlingen består af en introduktion til RNA-nanoteknologi feltet, en introduktion af enkeltstrenget RNA-origami design, og fire studier, der beskriver design, produktion og karakterisering af både strukturelle og funktionelle RNA-origamier. Flere RNA-origami designs er blevet undersøgt, og...... projekterne, der indgår i denne afhandling, inkluderer de nyeste fremskridt indenfor strukturel RNA-nanoteknologi og udvikling af funktionelle RNA-baserede enheder. Det første studie beskriver konstruktion og karakterisering af en enkeltstrenget 6-helix RNA-origami stuktur, som er den første demonstration af...

  6. Niche Overlap of Congeneric Invaders Supports a Single-Species Hypothesis and Provides Insight into Future Invasion Risk: Implications for Global Management of the Bactrocera dorsalis Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Matthew P.; Terblanche, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Background The invasive fruit fly, Bactrocera invadens, has expanded its range rapidly over the past 10 years. Here we aimed to determine if the recent range expansion of Bactrocera invadens into southern Africa can be better understood through niche exploration tools, ecological niche models (ENMs), and through incorporating information about Bactrocera dorsalis s.s., a putative conspecific species from Asia. We test for niche overlap of environmental variables between Bactrocera invadens and Bactrocera dorsalis s.s. as well as two other putative conspecific species, Bactrocera philippinensis and B. papayae. We examine overlap and similarity in the geographical expression of each species’ realised niche through reciprocal distribution models between Africa and Asia. We explore different geographical backgrounds, environmental variables and model complexity with multiple and single Bactrocera species hypotheses in an attempt to predict the recent range expansion of B. invadens into northern parts of South Africa. Principal Findings Bactrocera invadens has a high degree of niche overlap with B. dorsalis s.s. (and B. philippinensis and B. papayae). Ecological niche models built for Bactrocera dorsalis s.s. have high transferability to describe the range of B. invadens, and B. invadens is able to project to the core range of B. dorsalis s.s. The ENMs of both Bactrocera dorsalis and B. dorsalis combined with B. philipenesis and B. papayae have significantly higher predictive ability to capture the distribution points in South Africa than for B. invadens alone. Conclusions/Significance Consistent with other studies proposing these Bactrocera species as conspecific, niche similarity and overlap between these species is high. Considering these other Bactrocera dorsalis complex species simultaneously better describes the range expansion and invasion potential of B. invadens in South Africa. We suggest that these species should be considered the same–at least

  7. RNA Localization in Astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Rune

    2012-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) localization is a mechanism by which polarized cells can regulate protein synthesis to specific subcellular compartments in a spatial and temporal manner, and plays a pivotal role in multiple physiological processes from embryonic development to cell differentiation......, regulation of the blood brain barrier and glial scar tissue formation. Despite the involvement in various CNS functions only a limited number of studies have addressed mRNA localization in astrocytes. This PhD project was initially focused on developing and implementing methods that could be used to asses mRNA...... localization in astrocyte protrusions, and following look into the subcellular localization pattern of specific mRNA species of both primary astrocytes isolated from cortical hemispheres of newborn mice, and the mouse astrocyte cell line, C8S. The Boyden chamber cell fractionation assay was optimized, in a way...

  8. Keragaman Spesies dan Genetik Bakteri Staphylococcus pada Ikan Tuna dengan Analisis Sekuen 16s rRNA (SPECIES DIVERSITY AND GENETIC OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS BACTERIA IN TUNA FISH BY USING 16S rRNA SEQUENCE ANALYSIS)

    OpenAIRE

    Putu Mei Purnama Dewi; I Nengah Kerta Besung; I Gusti Ngurah Kade Mahardika

    2015-01-01

    Tuna industry belongs to high economic value fish of marine fisheries commodity. Bacteria found intuna might have impact on consumer health. The purpose of this research was to determine the geneticvariation of Staphylococcus in Kedonganan fish market, Kuta, Badung, Bali by sequence analysis of 16SrRNA. Staphylococcus bacteria was isolated from feces samples of 30 tuna. After identification with Gramstaining, Staphylococcus colonies were transferred to the medium chelex 10% for DNA extraction...

  9. A novel single-stranded RNA virus isolated from a phytopathogenic filamentous fungus, Rosellinia necatrix, with similarity to hypo-like viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui eZhang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Here we report a biological and molecular characterization of a novel positive-sense RNA virus isolated from a field isolate (NW10 of a filamentous phytopathogenic fungus, the white root rot fungus that is designated as Rosellinia necatrix fusarivirus 1 (RnFV1. A recently developed technology using zinc ions allowed us to transfer RnFV1 to two mycelially incompatible Rosellinia necatrix strains. A biological comparison of the virus-free and -recipient isogenic fungal strains suggested that RnFV1 infects latently and thus has no potential as a virocontrol agent. The virus has an undivided positive-sense RNA genome of 6286 nucleotides excluding a poly (A tail. The genome possesses two non-overlapping open reading frames (ORFs: a large ORF1 that encodes polypeptides with RNA replication functions and a smaller ORF2 that encodes polypeptides of unknown function. A lack of coat protein genes was suggested by the failure of virus particles from infected mycelia. No evidence was obtained by Northern analysis or classical 5'-RACE for the presence of subgenomic RNA for the downstream ORF. Sequence similarities were found in amino-acid sequence between RnFV1 putative proteins and counterparts of a previously reported mycovirus, Fusarium graminearum virus 1 (FgV1. Interestingly, several related sequences were detected by BLAST searches of independent transcriptome assembly databases one of which probably represents an entire virus genome. Phylogenetic analysis based on the conserved RNA-dependent RNA polymerase showed that RnFV1, FgV1, and these similar sequences are grouped in a cluster distinct from distantly related hypoviruses. It is proposed that a new taxonomic family termed Fusariviridae be created to include RnFV1and FgV1.

  10. Identification and characterization of intervening sequences within 23S rRNA genes from more than 200 Campylobacter isolates from seven species including atypical campylobacters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millar Beverley C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification and characterization of intervening sequences (IVSs within 23S rRNA genes from Campylobacter organisms including atypical campylobacters were carried out using two PCR primer pairs, designed to generate helix 25 and 45 regions. Results Only C. sputorum biovar sputorum LMG7975 and fecalis LMG8531, LMG8534 and LMG6728 of a total of 204 Campylobacter isolates (n = 56 C. jejuni; n = 11 C. coli; n = 33 C. fetus; n = 43 C. upsaliensis; n = 30 C. hyointestinalis; n = 4 C. sputorum biovar sputorum; n = 5 C. sputorum biovar fecalis; n = 5 C. sputorum biovar paraureolyticus; n = 10 C. concisus; n = 7 C. curvus were shown to carry IVSs in helix 25 region. C. sputorum biovar fecalis LMG8531 and LMG8534, interestingly, carried two different kinds of the 23S rRNA genes with and without the IVS, respectively. Consequently, in a total of 265 isolates of 269, including 65 C. lari isolates examined previously, the absence of IVSs was identified in the helix 25 region. In the helix 45 region, all the C. hyointestinalis, C. sputorum and C. concisus isolates were shown not to carry any IVSs. However, the 30 of 56 C. jejuni isolates (54%, 5 of 11 C. coli (45%, 25 of 33 C. fetus (76%, 30 of 43 C. upsaliensis (70% and 6 of 7 C. curvus (90% were shown to carry IVSs. In C. jejuni and C. upsaliensis isolates, two different kinds of the 23S rRNA genes were also identified to occur with and without IVSs in the helix 45 region, respectively. Conclusions Secondary structure models were also constructed with all the IVSs identified in the present study. In the purified RNA fractions from the isolates which carried the 16S or 23S rRNA genes with the IVSs, no 16S or 23S rRNA was evident, respectively.

  11. Organometallic synthesis, reactivity and catalysis in the solid state using well-defined single-site species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Sebastian D.; Weller, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    Acting as a bridge between the heterogeneous and homogeneous realms, the use of discrete, well-defined, solid-state organometallic complexes for synthesis and catalysis is a remarkably undeveloped field. Here, we present a review of this topic, focusing on describing the key transformations that can be observed at a transition-metal centre, as well as the use of well-defined organometallic complexes in the solid state as catalysts. There is a particular focus upon gas–solid reactivity/catalysis and single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformations. PMID:25666064

  12. Conservation of tRNA and rRNA 5-methylcytosine in the kingdom Plantae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Alice Louise; David, Rakesh; Searle, Iain Robert

    2015-08-14

    Post-transcriptional methylation of RNA cytosine residues to 5-methylcytosine (m(5)C) is an important modification that regulates RNA metabolism and occurs in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Yet, to date, no transcriptome-wide identification of m(5)C sites has been undertaken in plants. Plants provide a unique comparative system for investigating the origin and evolution of m(5)C as they contain three different genomes, the nucleus, mitochondria and chloroplast. Here we use bisulfite conversion of RNA combined with high-throughput IIlumina sequencing (RBS-seq) to identify single-nucleotide resolution of m(5)C sites in non-coding ribosomal RNAs and transfer RNAs of all three sub-cellular transcriptomes across six diverse species that included, the single-celled algae Nannochloropsis oculata, the macro algae Caulerpa taxifolia and multi-cellular higher plants Arabidopsis thaliana, Brassica rapa, Triticum durum and Ginkgo biloba. Using the plant model Arabidopsis thaliana, we identified a total of 39 highly methylated m(5)C sites in predicted structural positions of nuclear tRNAs and 7 m(5)C sites in rRNAs from nuclear, chloroplast and mitochondrial transcriptomes. Both the nucleotide position and percent methylation of tRNAs and rRNAs m(5)C sites were conserved across all species analysed, from single celled algae N. oculata to multicellular plants. Interestingly the mitochondrial and chloroplast encoded tRNAs were devoid of m(5)C in A. thaliana and this is generally conserved across Plantae. This suggests independent evolution of organelle methylation in animals and plants, as animal mitochondrial tRNAs have m(5)C sites. Here we characterize 5 members of the RNA 5-methylcytosine family in Arabidopsis and extend the functional characterization of TRDMT1 and NOP2A/OLI2. We demonstrate that nuclear tRNA methylation requires two evolutionarily conserved methyltransferases, TRDMT1 and TRM4B. trdmt1 trm4b double mutants are hypersensitive to the antibiotic hygromycin B

  13. Single season effects of mixed-species cover crops on tomato health (cultivar Celebrity) in multi-state field trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cover crop use can help mitigate the deleterious effects of common cropping practices (e.g., tillage) and is, therefore, an important component of soil health maintenance. While known to be beneficial in the long term, the short-term effects of cover crops, specifically mixed-species cover crops in ...

  14. The diploid origins of allopolyploid rose species studied using single nucleotide polymorphism haplotypes flanking a microsatellite repeat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, J.; Esselink, G.; Che, D.; Fougère-Danezan, M.; Arens, P.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    The taxonomy of the genus Rosa is complex, not least because of hybridisations between species.We aimed to develop a method to connect the diploid Rosa taxa to the allopolyploid taxa to which they contributed, based on the sharing of haplotypes. For this we used an SNPSTR marker, which combines a

  15. Small RNA Functions Are Required for Growth and Development of Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Vidhyavathi; Simon, Stacey A; Demirci, Feray; Nakano, Mayumi; Meyers, Blake C; Donofrio, Nicole M

    2017-07-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is conserved in eukaryotic organisms, and it has been well studied in many animal and plant species and some fungal species, yet it is not well studied in fungal plant pathogens. In the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae, we examined small RNA (sRNA) and their biogenesis in the context of growth and pathogenicity. Through genetic and genomic analyses, we demonstrate that loss of a single gene encoding Dicer, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, or Argonaute reduces sRNA levels. These three proteins are required for the biogenesis of sRNA-matching genome-wide regions (coding regions, repeats, and intergenic regions). The loss of one Argonaute reduced both sRNA and fungal virulence on barley leaves. Transcriptome analysis of multiple mutants revealed that sRNA play an important role in transcriptional regulation of repeats and intergenic regions in M. oryzae. Together, these data support that M. oryzae sRNA regulate developmental processes including, fungal growth and virulence.

  16. Phylogenomics of palearctic Formica species suggests a single origin of temporary parasitism and gives insights to the evolutionary pathway toward slave-making behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romiguier, Jonathan; Rolland, Jonathan; Morandin, Claire; Keller, Laurent

    2018-03-28

    The ants of the Formica genus are classical model species in evolutionary biology. In particular, Darwin used Formica as model species to better understand the evolution of slave-making, a parasitic behaviour where workers of another species are stolen to exploit their workforce. In his book "On the Origin of Species" (1859), Darwin first hypothesized that slave-making behaviour in Formica evolved in incremental steps from a free-living ancestor. The absence of a well-resolved phylogenetic tree of the genus prevent an assessment of whether relationships among Formica subgenera are compatible with this scenario. In this study, we resolve the relationships among the 4 palearctic Formica subgenera (Formica str. s., Coptoformica, Raptiformica and Serviformica) using a phylogenomic dataset of 945 genes for 16 species. We provide a reference tree resolving the relationships among the main Formica subgenera with high bootstrap supports. The branching order of our tree suggests that the free-living lifestyle is ancestral in the Formica genus and that parasitic colony founding could have evolved a single time, probably acting as a pre-adaptation to slave-making behaviour. This phylogenetic tree provides a solid backbone for future evolutionary studies in the Formica genus and slave-making behaviour.

  17. miRge - A Multiplexed Method of Processing Small RNA-Seq Data to Determine MicroRNA Entropy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander S Baras

    Full Text Available Small RNA RNA-seq for microRNAs (miRNAs is a rapidly developing field where opportunities still exist to create better bioinformatics tools to process these large datasets and generate new, useful analyses. We built miRge to be a fast, smart small RNA-seq solution to process samples in a highly multiplexed fashion. miRge employs a Bayesian alignment approach, whereby reads are sequentially aligned against customized mature miRNA, hairpin miRNA, noncoding RNA and mRNA sequence libraries. miRNAs are summarized at the level of raw reads in addition to reads per million (RPM. Reads for all other RNA species (tRNA, rRNA, snoRNA, mRNA are provided, which is useful for identifying potential contaminants and optimizing small RNA purification strategies. miRge was designed to optimally identify miRNA isomiRs and employs an entropy based statistical measurement to identify differential production of isomiRs. This allowed us to identify decreasing entropy in isomiRs as stem cells mature into retinal pigment epithelial cells. Conversely, we show that pancreatic tumor miRNAs have similar entropy to matched normal pancreatic tissues. In a head-to-head comparison with other miRNA analysis tools (miRExpress 2.0, sRNAbench, omiRAs, miRDeep2, Chimira, UEA small RNA Workbench, miRge was faster (4 to 32-fold and was among the top-two methods in maximally aligning miRNAs reads per sample. Moreover, miRge has no inherent limits to its multiplexing. miRge was capable of simultaneously analyzing 100 small RNA-Seq samples in 52 minutes, providing an integrated analysis of miRNA expression across all samples. As miRge was designed for analysis of single as well as multiple samples, miRge is an ideal tool for high and low-throughput users. miRge is freely available at http://atlas.pathology.jhu.edu/baras/miRge.html.

  18. Stand dynamics following gap-scale exogenous disturbance in a single cohort mixed species stand in Morgan County, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian S. Hughett; Wayne K. Clatterbuck

    2014-01-01

    Differences in composition, structure, and growth under canopy gaps created by the mortality of a single stem were analyzed using analysis of variance under two scenarios, with stem removed or with stem left as a standing snag. There were no significant differences in composition and structure of large diameter residual stems within upper canopy strata. Some...

  19. Mg2+-Dependent High Mechanical Anisotropy of Three-Way-Junction pRNA as Revealed by Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yang; Di, Weishuai; Li, Yiran; Huang, Wenmao; Wang, Xin; Qin, Meng; Wang, Wei; Cao, Yi

    2017-08-01

    Mechanical anisotropy is ubiquitous in biological tissues but is hard to reproduce in synthetic biomaterials. Developing molecular building blocks with anisotropic mechanical response is the key towards engineering anisotropic biomaterials. The three-way-junction (3WJ) pRNA, derived from ϕ29 DNA packaging motor, shows strong mechanical anisotropy upon Mg 2+ binding. In the absence of Mg 2+ , 3WJ-pRNA is mechanically weak without noticeable mechanical anisotropy. In the presence of Mg 2+ , the unfolding forces can differ by more than 4-fold along different pulling directions, ranging from about 47 pN to about 219 pN. Mechanical anisotropy of 3WJ-pRNA stems from pulling direction dependent cooperativity for the rupture of two Mg 2+ binding sites, which is a novel mechanism for the mechanical anisotropy of biomacromolecules. It is anticipated that 3WJ-pRNA can be used as a key element for the construction of biomaterials with controllable mechanical anisotropy. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Prognostic value of single measurements of beta-2-microglobulin, immunoglobulin A in HIV disease after controlling for CD4 lymphocyte counts and plasma HIV RNA levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullum, H; Lepri, A Cozzi; Katzenstein, T L

    2000-01-01

    The interrelationships between the CD4 lymphocyte count, plasma viral load [human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA], beta-2-microglobulin (beta2-M) and immunoglobulin A (IgA) and the mortality risk was explored in 234 HIV-infected individuals (median CD4 count 230 cells/mm3, range 1-1,247). Product......-moment correlation analysis was used to study the association between beta2-M, IgA and HIV RNA. A proportional hazards Cox model was used to estimate the relative hazard (RH) of death. Both beta2-M (r = 0.49, p HIV RNA. High beta2-M levels were...... associated with an increased risk of death in both univariate Cox analysis and after adjustment for HIV RNA, CD4 lymphocyte count and age [RH = 1.16 per 100 nmol/l higher beta2-M, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05-1.27]. Raised IgA levels were associated with shorter survival in individuals with a CD4 count...

  1. A single mutation in the 15S rRNA gene confers nonsense suppressor activity and interacts with mRF1 the release factor in yeast mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Gargouri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the mim3-1 mitochondrial ribosomal suppressor, acting on ochre mitochondrial mutations and one frameshift mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The 15s rRNA suppressor gene contains a G633 to C transversion. Yeast mitochondrial G633 corresponds to G517 of the E.coli 15S rRNA, which is occupied by an invariant G in all known small rRNA sequences. Interestingly, this mutation has occurred at the same position as the known MSU1 mitochondrial suppressor which changes G633 to A. The suppressor mutation lies in a highly conserved region of the rRNA, known in E.coli as the 530-loop, interacting with the S4, S5 and S12 ribosomal proteins. We also show an interesting interaction between the mitochondrial mim3-1 and the nuclear nam3-1 suppressors, both of which have the same action spectrum on mitochondrial mutations: nam3-1 abolishes the suppressor effect when present with mim3-1 in the same haploid cell. We discuss these results in the light of the nature of Nam3, identified by [1] as the yeast mitochondrial translation release factor. A hypothetical mechanism of suppression by "ribosome shifting" is also discussed in view of the nature of mutations suppressed and not suppressed.

  2. Design and Assessment of a Real Time Reverse Transcription-PCR Method to Genotype Single-Stranded RNA Male-Specific Coliphages (Family Leviviridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    A real-time, reverse transcription-PCR (RT-qPCR) assay was developed to differentiate the four genogroups of male-specific ssRNA coliphages (FRNA) (family Leviviridae). As FRNA display a trend of source-specificity (human sewage or animal waste) at the genogroup level, this assa...

  3. Assessing environmental attributes and effects of climate change on Sphagnum peatland distributions in North America using single- and multi-species models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oke, Tobi A; Hager, Heather A

    2017-01-01

    The fate of Northern peatlands under climate change is important because of their contribution to global carbon (C) storage. Peatlands are maintained via greater plant productivity (especially of Sphagnum species) than decomposition, and the processes involved are strongly mediated by climate. Although some studies predict that warming will relax constraints on decomposition, leading to decreased C sequestration, others predict increases in productivity and thus increases in C sequestration. We explored the lack of congruence between these predictions using single-species and integrated species distribution models as proxies for understanding the environmental correlates of North American Sphagnum peatland occurrence and how projected changes to the environment might influence these peatlands under climate change. Using Maximum entropy and BIOMOD modelling platforms, we generated single and integrated species distribution models for four common Sphagnum species in North America under current climate and a 2050 climate scenario projected by three general circulation models. We evaluated the environmental correlates of the models and explored the disparities in niche breadth, niche overlap, and climate suitability among current and future models. The models consistently show that Sphagnum peatland distribution is influenced by the balance between soil moisture deficit and temperature of the driest quarter-year. The models identify the east and west coasts of North America as the core climate space for Sphagnum peatland distribution. The models show that, at least in the immediate future, the area of suitable climate for Sphagnum peatland could expand. This result suggests that projected warming would be balanced effectively by the anticipated increase in precipitation, which would increase Sphagnum productivity.

  4. Multi-rate Poisson tree processes for single-locus species delimitation under maximum likelihood and Markov chain Monte Carlo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapli, P; Lutteropp, S; Zhang, J; Kobert, K; Pavlidis, P; Stamatakis, A; Flouri, T

    2017-06-01

    In recent years, molecular species delimitation has become a routine approach for quantifying and classifying biodiversity. Barcoding methods are of particular importance in large-scale surveys as they promote fast species discovery and biodiversity estimates. Among those, distance-based methods are the most common choice as they scale well with large datasets; however, they are sensitive to similarity threshold parameters and they ignore evolutionary relationships. The recently introduced "Poisson Tree Processes" (PTP) method is a phylogeny-aware approach that does not rely on such thresholds. Yet, two weaknesses of PTP impact its accuracy and practicality when applied to large datasets; it does not account for divergent intraspecific variation and is slow for a large number of sequences. We introduce the multi-rate PTP (mPTP), an improved method that alleviates the theoretical and technical shortcomings of PTP. It incorporates different levels of intraspecific genetic diversity deriving from differences in either the evolutionary history or sampling of each species. Results on empirical data suggest that mPTP is superior to PTP and popular distance-based methods as it, consistently yields more accurate delimitations with respect to the taxonomy (i.e., identifies more taxonomic species, infers species numbers closer to the taxonomy). Moreover, mPTP does not require any similarity threshold as input. The novel dynamic programming algorithm attains a speedup of at least five orders of magnitude compared to PTP, allowing it to delimit species in large (meta-) barcoding data. In addition, Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling provides a comprehensive evaluation of the inferred delimitation in just a few seconds for millions of steps, independently of tree size. mPTP is implemented in C and is available for download at http://github.com/Pas-Kapli/mptp under the GNU Affero 3 license. A web-service is available at http://mptp.h-its.org . : paschalia.kapli@h-its.org or

  5. Phylogenetic relationships among the species of the genus testudo (Testudines : Testudinidae) inferred from mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kuyl, Antoinette C.; Ph Ballasina, Donato L.; Dekker, John T.; Maas, Jolanda; Willemsen, Ronald E.; Goudsmit, Jaap

    2002-01-01

    To test phylogenetic relationships within the genus Testudo (Testudines: Testudinidae), we have sequenced a fragment of the mitochondrial (mt) 12S rRNA gene of 98 tortoise specimens belonging to the genera Testudo, Indotestudo, and Geochelone. Maximum likelihood and neighbor-joining methods identify

  6. Web-based bioinformatics workflows for end-to-end RNA-seq data computation and analysis in agricultural animal species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remarkable advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, bioinformatics algorithms, and computational technologies have significantly accelerated genomic research. However, complicated NGS data analysis still remains as a major bottleneck. RNA-seq, as one of the major area in the NGS fi...

  7. MicroRNA mimicry blocks pulmonary fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montgomery, Rusty L; Yu, Guoying; Latimer, Paul A; Stack, Christianna; Robinson, Kathryn; Dalby, Christina M; Kaminski, Naftali; van Rooij, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, great enthusiasm has evolved for microRNA (miRNA) therapeutics. Part of the excitement stems from the fact that a miRNA often regulates numerous related mRNAs. As such, modulation of a single miRNA allows for parallel regulation of multiple genes involved in a particular

  8. RNA-dependent RNA targeting by CRISPR-Cas9

    OpenAIRE

    Strutt, Steven C; Torrez, Rachel M; Kaya, Emine; Negrete, Oscar A; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2018-01-01

    Double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) binding and cleavage by Cas9 is a hallmark of type II CRISPR-Cas bacterial adaptive immunity. All known Cas9 enzymes are thought to recognize DNA exclusively as a natural substrate, providing protection against DNA phage and plasmids. Here, we show that Cas9 enzymes from both subtypes II-A and II-C can recognize and cleave single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) by an RNA-guided mechanism that is independent of a protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) sequence in the target RNA. RNA...

  9. Increasing single and multi-antibiotic resistance in Shigella species isolated from shigellosis patients in Sana'a, Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Moyed, Khaled A; Harmal, Nabil S; Al-Harasy, Abdulilah H; Al-Shamahy, Hassan A

    2006-08-01

    The epidemiology and antibiotic susceptibility of Shigella species changes over time. Updated susceptibility knowledge is necessary for appropriate empirical antibiotic treatment. Thus, this research aimed to study these changes in 2 time periods with an interval of 10 years. Two hundreds and three Shigella strains, isolated from stool samples of diarrheic patients at the Central Health Laboratory in Sana'a, Yemen in 2 time periods (1993 and 2003) with a 10-year interval, were examined for serotyping and drug resistance pattern. Resistance patterns of the strains to 12 commonly used antimicrobial agents and minimum inhibitory concentrations of the antibiotics were tested. Shigella flexneri (60%) was found to be the most common isolate of the total Shigella species, followed by Shigella dysenteriae (28.6%) and Shigella boydii (11.3%). In Shigella flexneri strains, Shigella flexneri 3 (30.5%) was the most prevalent serotype, followed by Shigella flexneri 6 (17.2%), and Shigella flexneri 1 (12.3%). All strains were found equally susceptible to cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, and gentamicin, but more than 80% of the strains of 2003 were resistant to tetracycline, co-trimoxazole, and 52% of the same strains were resistant to ampicillin. Resistance to chloramphenicol was found in 61%, cefuroxime in 56.2%, and cephradine, 52% of the strains. Overall, Shigella species showed statistically significant increase in resistance against tetracycline, cephradine, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, nalidixic acid, and aztreonam (pYemen. Almost 55.2% of the strains were resistant to 4 drugs. This is one of the first studies reporting epidemiological pattern of Shigella species in Sana'a, Yemen with regard to serotypes and antibiotic resistance patterns. Based on these antibiotic resistance pattern findings, it is suggested that the commonly in use antibiotics including ampicillin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, and chloramphenicol should not be used for empirical

  10. Epidemiology, risk factor, species distribution, antifungal resistance and outcome of Candidemia at a single French hospital: a 7-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadec, Laurent; Talarmin, Jean-Philippe; Gastinne, Thomas; Bretonnière, Cédric; Miegeville, Michel; Le Pape, Patrice; Morio, Florent

    2016-05-01

    Candidemia remains a major cause of disease worldwide and is associated with a high mortality rate. We conducted a retrospective study of candidemia at Nantes Hospital, France, between 2004 and 2010. A total of 191 episodes (n = 188 patients) were reviewed. Incidence, demographics, risk factors, antifungal management, species identification, in vitro susceptibility and 12 weeks survival were analysed. Global incidence of candidemia was 0.37‰ admissions. Higher incidences were observed in haematology (6.65‰) and intensive care units (2‰). Central venous catheter and antibiotic exposure were the most frequent risk factors (77% and 76% respectively). Candida albicans was the predominant species (51.8%) followed by C. parapsilosis (14.5%), C. glabrata (9.8%), C. tropicalis (9.8%) and C. krusei (4.1%). However, species distribution differed significantly between medical units with frequency of C. tropicalis being higher in haematology compared to other medical units. Fluconazole and caspofungin were the main antifungals given as first-line therapy. Although not significant, 12 weeks mortality rate was 30.9%, being higher for C. tropicalis (44.4%) than for C. parapsilosis (16%). Acquired azole or echinocandin resistance was noted in some isolates, underlining the need for systematic antifungal susceptibility testing in patients with candidemia. These epidemiological findings will be of interest for antifungal stewardship at our hospital. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Inactivation of Spores of Bacillus Species by Wet Heat: Studies on Single Spores Using Laser Tweezers Taman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    13/2011 22.00 Keren K. Griffiths, Jingqiao Zhang, Ann E. Cowan, Ji Yu, Peter Setlow. Germination proteins in the inner membrane of dormant Bacillus...that this technique can be used to rapidly identify single airborne particles or bacteria collected on a slide and to monitor germination dynamics of...the environment of dipicolinic acid in the core of superdormant spores is different from that in dormant spores [J. Bacteriol., 191, 5584 (2009

  12. Chronic Toxicity of Ferric Iron for North American Aquatic Organisms: Derivation of a Chronic Water Quality Criterion Using Single Species and Mesocosm Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadmus, Pete; Brinkman, Stephen F; May, Melynda K

    2018-01-22

    Iron is a common pollutant in waters near coal and hard rock mine disturbances. The current 1000 µg/L total recoverable chronic criterion for iron (Fe) for protection of aquatic life in the United States was developed using very limited data in 1976 and has not been revised since. To develop a more scientifically based criterion, several chronic laboratory toxicity experiments (> 30 days) were conducted with ferric Fe at circumneutral pH on a taxonomically diverse group of organisms including brown trout (Salmo trutta), mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni), boreal toad tadpoles (Bufo boreas), the oligochaete worm Lumbriculus variegatus, the mayfly Hexagenia limbata, and the planarian Dugesia dorotocephala. Results of these tests and those of previously published toxicity data were used to derive a Final Chronic Value (FCV) of 499 µg/L by using the US Environmental Protection Agency's recommended methods based on single species toxicity tests. In addition to single species toxicity tests, ferric Fe toxicity experiments (10 days) were performed on mesocosms containing naturally colonized communities of benthic macroinvertebrates. Fourteen genera in the mesocosms occurred at sufficient densities to estimate an iron concentration resulting in 20% reduction in abundance (EC 20 ). Three of these taxa had EC 20 s less than the FCV of 499 µg/L derived from single species tests: the mayfly Epeorus sp. (335 µg/L), the caddisfly Micrasema sp. (356 µg/L), and midge Tanytarsini (234 µg/L). When mesocosm results were included, the FCV was lowered to 251 µg/L. These findings support the suggestion that modernization of water quality criteria should include data generated from mesocosm experiments and other lines of evidence.

  13. RNA-SSPT: RNA Secondary Structure Prediction Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Freed; Mahboob, Shahid; Gulzar, Tahsin; Din, Salah U; Hanif, Tanzeela; Ahmad, Hifza; Afzal, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of RNA structure is useful for understanding evolution for both in silico and in vitro studies. Physical methods like NMR studies to predict RNA secondary structure are expensive and difficult. Computational RNA secondary structure prediction is easier. Comparative sequence analysis provides the best solution. But secondary structure prediction of a single RNA sequence is challenging. RNA-SSPT is a tool that computationally predicts secondary structure of a single RNA sequence. Most of the RNA secondary structure prediction tools do not allow pseudoknots in the structure or are unable to locate them. Nussinov dynamic programming algorithm has been implemented in RNA-SSPT. The current studies shows only energetically most favorable secondary structure is required and the algorithm modification is also available that produces base pairs to lower the total free energy of the secondary structure. For visualization of RNA secondary structure, NAVIEW in C language is used and modified in C# for tool requirement. RNA-SSPT is built in C# using Dot Net 2.0 in Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 Professional edition. The accuracy of RNA-SSPT is tested in terms of Sensitivity and Positive Predicted Value. It is a tool which serves both secondary structure prediction and secondary structure visualization purposes.

  14. Phylogeny of the cycads based on multiple single-copy nuclear genes: congruence of concatenated parsimony, likelihood and species tree inference methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Leiva, Dayana E; Meerow, Alan W; Calonje, Michael; Griffith, M Patrick; Francisco-Ortega, Javier; Nakamura, Kyoko; Stevenson, Dennis W; Lewis, Carl E; Namoff, Sandra

    2013-11-01

    Despite a recent new classification, a stable phylogeny for the cycads has been elusive, particularly regarding resolution of Bowenia, Stangeria and Dioon. In this study, five single-copy nuclear genes (SCNGs) are applied to the phylogeny of the order Cycadales. The specific aim is to evaluate several gene tree-species tree reconciliation approaches for developing an accurate phylogeny of the order, to contrast them with concatenated parsimony analysis and to resolve the erstwhile problematic phylogenetic position of these three genera. DNA sequences of five SCNGs were obtained for 20 cycad species representing all ten genera of Cycadales. These were analysed with parsimony, maximum likelihood (ML) and three Bayesian methods of gene tree-species tree reconciliation, using Cycas as the outgroup. A calibrated date estimation was developed with Bayesian methods, and biogeographic analysis was also conducted. Concatenated parsimony, ML and three species tree inference methods resolve exactly the same tree topology with high support at most nodes. Dioon and Bowenia are the first and second branches of Cycadales after Cycas, respectively, followed by an encephalartoid clade (Macrozamia-Lepidozamia-Encephalartos), which is sister to a zamioid clade, of which Ceratozamia is the first branch, and in which Stangeria is sister to Microcycas and Zamia. A single, well-supported phylogenetic hypothesis of the generic relationships of the Cycadales is presented. However, massive extinction events inferred from the fossil record that eliminated broader ancestral distributions within Zamiaceae compromise accurate optimization of ancestral biogeographical areas for that hypothesis. While major lineages of Cycadales are ancient, crown ages of all modern genera are no older than 12 million years, supporting a recent hypothesis of mostly Miocene radiations. This phylogeny can contribute to an accurate infrafamilial classification of Zamiaceae.

  15. The development and validation of a single SNaPshot multiplex for tiger species and subspecies identification--implications for forensic purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitpipit, Thitika; Tobe, Shanan S; Kitchener, Andrew C; Gill, Peter; Linacre, Adrian

    2012-03-01

    The tiger (Panthera tigris) is currently listed on Appendix I of the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora; this affords it the highest level of international protection. To aid in the investigation of alleged illegal trade in tiger body parts and derivatives, molecular approaches have been developed to identify biological material as being of tiger in origin. Some countries also require knowledge of the exact tiger subspecies present in order to prosecute anyone alleged to be trading in tiger products. In this study we aimed to develop and validate a reliable single assay to identify tiger species and subspecies simultaneously; this test is based on identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the tiger mitochondrial genome. The mitochondrial DNA sequence from four of the five extant putative tiger subspecies that currently exist in the wild were obtained and combined with DNA sequence data from 492 tiger and 349 other mammalian species available on GenBank. From the sequence data a total of 11 SNP loci were identified as suitable for further analyses. Five SNPs were species-specific for tiger and six amplify one of the tiger subspecies-specific SNPs, three of which were specific to P. t. sumatrae and the other three were specific to P. t. tigris. The multiplex assay was able to reliably identify 15 voucher tiger samples. The sensitivity of the test was 15,000 mitochondrial DNA copies (approximately 0.26 pg), indicating that it will work on trace amounts of tissue, bone or hair samples. This simple test will add to the DNA-based methods currently being used to identify the presence of tiger within mixed samples. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. High field electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy under ultrahigh vacuum conditions—A multipurpose machine to study paramagnetic species on well defined single crystal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocker, J.; Cornu, D.; Kieseritzky, E.; Seiler, A.; Bondarchuk, O.; Hänsel-Ziegler, W.; Risse, T.; Freund, H.-J.

    2014-08-01

    A new ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer operating at 94 GHz to investigate paramagnetic centers on single crystal surfaces is described. It is particularly designed to study paramagnetic centers on well-defined model catalysts using epitaxial thin oxide films grown on metal single crystals. The EPR setup is based on a commercial Bruker E600 spectrometer, which is adapted to ultrahigh vacuum conditions using a home made Fabry Perot resonator. The key idea of the resonator is to use the planar metal single crystal required to grow the single crystalline oxide films as one of the mirrors of the resonator. EPR spectroscopy is solely sensitive to paramagnetic species, which are typically minority species in such a system. Hence, additional experimental characterization tools are required to allow for a comprehensive investigation of the surface. The apparatus includes a preparation chamber hosting equipment, which is required to prepare supported model catalysts. In addition, surface characterization tools such as low energy electron diffraction (LEED)/Auger spectroscopy, temperature programmed desorption (TPD), and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) are available to characterize the surfaces. A second chamber used to perform EPR spectroscopy at 94 GHz has a room temperature scanning tunneling microscope attached to it, which allows for real space structural characterization. The heart of the UHV adaptation of the EPR experiment is the sealing of the Fabry-Perot resonator against atmosphere. To this end it is possible to use a thin sapphire window glued to the backside of the coupling orifice of the Fabry Perot resonator. With the help of a variety of stabilization measures reducing vibrations as well as thermal drift it is possible to accumulate data for a time span, which is for low temperature measurements only limited by the amount of liquid helium. Test measurements show that the system can detect paramagnetic

  17. Individual activity coefficients of single ionic species of alkaline earth halogenides, alkaline earth perchlorates, and uranyl perchlorate at 25 0C in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferse, A.

    1981-01-01

    The individual activity coefficients of the single ionic species of alkaline-earth haloides, alkaline earth perchlorates and uranylic perchlorate, resp., at 25 0 C in aqueous solution are calculated and presented up to the concentration of about m = 4 mol/kg. The individual activity coefficients of the alkaline-earth ions pass mostly as a function of the concentration through a steep minimum and decrease from Mg 2+ to Ba 2+ . The individual activity coefficients of the anions pass generally as a function of the concentration through a marked flat minimum, but they increase - the complex perchlorate ions excepted - only a little above 1. (author)

  18. Complete mitochondrial genomes and nuclear ribosomal RNA operons of two species of Diplostomum (Platyhelminthes: Trematoda): a molecular resource for taxonomy and molecular epidemiology of important fish pathogens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brabec, Jan; Kostadinova, Aneta; Scholz, Tomáš; Littlewood, D. T. J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 8, JUN 19 2015 (2015), s. 336 ISSN 1756-3305 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-14198S Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Diplostomum (Platyhelminthes: Trematoda) * fish pathogens * mitochondrial genome * ribosomal RNA * illumina next- gene ration sequencing * phylogeny Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2015

  19. A single extracellular amino acid in Free Fatty Acid Receptor 2 defines antagonist species selectivity and G protein selection bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sergeev, Eugenia; Hansen, Anders Højgaard; Bolognini, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    that are able to block the human receptor. Docking of exemplar antagonists from two chemical series to homology models of both human and mouse Free Fatty Acid Receptor 2 suggested that a single lysine - arginine variation at the extracellular face of the receptor might provide the basis for antagonist...... selectivity and mutational swap studies confirmed this hypothesis. Extending these studies to agonist function indicated that although the lysine - arginine variation between human and mouse orthologs had limited effect on G protein-mediated signal transduction, removal of positive charge from this residue...

  20. The effect of sodium hypochlorite on Enterococcus faecalis when grown on dentine as a single- and multi-species biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Benlee; Zilm, Peter S; Briggs, Nancy; Rogers, Anthony H; Cathro, Peter C

    2014-12-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is often involved in the aetiology of apical periodontitis after endodontic treatment. This project aimed to establish, on dentine in vitro, a multi-species biofilm containing E. faecalis, and to determine if the organism had an increased resistance to sodium hypochlorite compared with an axenic biofilm. Biofilms were established on dentine discs in flow cells with either E. faecalis alone (axenic) or together with Fusobacterium nucleatum and Streptococcus sanguinis. Following treatment with either 0.9% sodium hypochlorite or saline, the viability of E. faecalis was determined by serial plating and qualitative analysis was performed by scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Viable counts indicated that 0.9% NaOCl is highly effective against E. faecalis grown alone and as part of a multi-species biofilm (P = 0.0005 and P = 0.001, respectively). No significant difference in its survival in the two biofilm types was found (P = 0.8276). © 2014 Australian Society of Endodontology.

  1. Melon Transcriptome Characterization: Simple Sequence Repeats and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Discovery for High Throughput Genotyping across the Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Miguel Blanca

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Melon ( L. ranks among the highest-valued fruit crops worldwide. Some genomic tools are available for this crop, including a Sanger transcriptome. We report the generation of 689,054 high-quality expressed sequence tags (ESTs from two 454 sequencing runs, using normalized and nonnormalized complementary DNA (cDNA libraries prepared from four genotypes belonging to the two subspecies and the main commercial types. 454 ESTs were combined with the Sanger available ESTs and de novo assembled into 53,252 unigenes. Over 63% of the unigenes were functionally annotated with Gene Ontology (GO terms and 21% had known orthologs of (L. Heynh. Annotation distribution followed similar tendencies than that reported for , suggesting that the dataset represents a fairly complete melon transcriptome. Furthermore, we identified a set of 3298 unigenes with microsatellite motifs and 14,417 sequences with single nucleotide variants of which 11,655 single nucleotide polymorphism met criteria for use with high-throughput genotyping platforms, and 453 could be detected as cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS. A set of markers were validated, 90% of them being polymorphic in a number of variable accessions. This transcriptome provides an invaluable new tool for biological research, more so when it includes transcripts not described previously. It is being used for genome annotation and has provided a large collection of markers that will allow speeding up the process of breeding new melon varieties.

  2. Primer-dependent and primer-independent initiation of double stranded RNA synthesis by purified arabidopsis RNA-dependent RNA polymerases RDR2 and RDR6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devert, Anthony; Fabre, Nicolas; Floris, Maina Huguette Joséphine

    2015-01-01

    Cellular RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs) are fundamental components of RNA silencing in plants and many other eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis thaliana genetic studies have demonstrated that RDR2 and RDR6 are involved in the synthesis of double stranded RNA (dsRNA) from single stranded RNA (ssRNA)...

  3. Identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs at candidate genes involved in abiotic stress in two Prosopis species of hybrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria F. Pomponio

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: Identify and compare SNPs on candidate genes related to abiotic stress in Prosopis chilensis, Prosopis flexuosa and interspecific hybridsArea of the study: Chaco árido, Argentina. Material and Methods: Fragments from 6 candidate genes were sequenced in 60 genotypes. DNA polymorphisms were analyzed.Main Results: The analysis revealed that the hybrids had the highest rate of polymorphism, followed by P. flexuosa and P. chilensis, the values found are comparable to other forest tree species.Research highlights: This approach will help to study genetic diversity variation on natural populations for assessing the effects of environmental changes.Keywords: SNPs; abiotic stress; interspecific variation; molecular markers. 

  4. RNA-Seq transcriptome analysis of reactive oxygen species gene network in Mizuna plants grown in long-term space flight

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space environment is suspected to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induce oxidative stress in plants however little is known about the gene expression of...

  5. Comparison of primary and secondary 26S rRNA structures in two Tetrahymena species: evidence for a strong evolutionary and structural constraint in expansion segments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, J; Nielsen, Henrik; Lenaers, G

    1990-01-01

    . These are regions within the common core of secondary structure where expansions have taken place during the evolution of the rRNA of higher eukaryotes. The dispensable nature of some of the expansion segments has been taken as evidence of their non-functionality. However, our data show that a considerable...... selective constraint has operated to preserve the secondary structure of these segments. Especially in the case of the D2 and D8 segments, the presence of a considerable number of compensatory base changes suggests that the secondary structure of these regions is of functional importance. Alternatively...

  6. Using single-species toxicity tests, community-level responses, and toxicity identification evaluations to investigate effluent impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltby, L.; Clayton, S.A.; Yu, H.; McLoughlin, N.; Wood, R.M.; Yin, D.

    2000-01-01

    Whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests are increasingly used to monitor compliance of consented discharges, but few studies have related toxicity measured using WET tests to receiving water impacts. Here the authors adopt a four-stage procedure to investigate the toxicity and biological impact of a point source discharge and to identify the major toxicants. In stage 1, standard WET tests were employed to determine the toxicity of the effluent. This was then followed by an assessment of receiving water toxicity using in situ deployment of indigenous (Gammarus pulex) and standard (Daphnia magna) test species. The third stage involved the use of biological survey techniques to assess the impact of the discharge on the structure and functioning of the benthic macroinvertebrate community. In stage 4, toxicity identification evaluations (TIE) were used to identify toxic components in the effluent. Receiving-water toxicity and ecological impact detected downstream of the discharge were consistent with the results of WET tests performed on the effluent. Downstream of the discharge, there was a reduction in D. magna survival, in G. pulex survival and feeding rate, in detritus processing, and in biotic indices based on macroinvertebrate community structure. The TIE studies suggested that chlorine was the principal toxicant in the effluent.

  7. Influence of reactions heats on variation of radius, temperature, pressure and chemical species amounts within a single acoustic cavitation bubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerboua, Kaouther; Hamdaoui, Oualid

    2018-03-01

    The scientific interest toward the study of acoustic bubble is mainly explained by its practical benefit in providing a reactional media favorable to the rapid evolution of chemical mechanism. The evolution of this mechanism is related to the simultaneous and dependent variation of the volume, temperature and pressure within the bubble, retrieved by the resolution of a differential equations system, including among others the thermal balance. This last one is subject to different assumptions, some authors deem simply that the temperature varies adiabatically during the collapsing phase, without considering the reactions heat of the studied mechanism. This paper aims to evaluate the pertinence of neglecting reactions heats in the thermal balance, by analyzing their effect on the variation of radius, temperature, pressure and chemical species amounts. The results show that the introduction of reactions heats conducts to a decrease of the temperature, an increase of the pressure and a reduction of the bubble volume. As a consequence, this leads to a drop of the quantities of free radicals produced by the chemical mechanism evolving within the bubble. This paper also proved that the impact of the consideration of reactions heats is dependent of the frequency and the acoustic amplitude of the ultrasonic wave. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Identifikasi Keragaman Genetik Gen 12S Ribomsom RNA Sebagai Penanda Genetik untuk Penentuan Spesies Kuskus (IDENTIFICATION OF GENETIC DIVERSITY 12SRRNA GENES AS GENETIC MARKER FOR DETERMINING SPECIES CUSCUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rini Widayanti

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cuscus is marsupial’s animal (Phalageridae which has limited spread in eastern Indonesia (Sulawesi,Maluku, Papua, Australia and Papua New Guinea. The ex-situ and in-situ conservation of cuscus undercaptivating condition is an alternative solution to protect cuscus from extinction. This study aimed todetermine nucleotide sequence and genetic markers on 12Sr RNA gene with sequencing method of eachspecies on three islands. Whole genome DNA was extracted from 1