WorldWideScience

Sample records for single reactive species

  1. Low Po2 conditions induce reactive oxygen species formation during contractions in single skeletal muscle fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Zuo, Li; Shiah, Amy; Roberts, William J.; Chien, Michael T.; Wagner, Peter D.; Hogan, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Contractions in whole skeletal muscle during hypoxia are known to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS); however, identification of real-time ROS formation within isolated single skeletal muscle fibers has been challenging. Consequently, there is no convincing evidence showing increased ROS production in intact contracting fibers under low Po2 conditions. Therefore, we hypothesized that intracellular ROS generation in single contracting skeletal myofibers increases during low Po2 compared wi...

  2. Solar light-induced production of reactive oxygen species by single walled carbon nanotubes in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photosensitizing processes of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) which include photo-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) convert light energy into oxidizing chemical energy that mediates transformations of nanomaterials. The oxidative stress associated with ROS may p...

  3. Low Po2 conditions induce reactive oxygen species formation during contractions in single skeletal muscle fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiah, Amy; Roberts, William J.; Chien, Michael T.; Wagner, Peter D.; Hogan, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Contractions in whole skeletal muscle during hypoxia are known to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS); however, identification of real-time ROS formation within isolated single skeletal muscle fibers has been challenging. Consequently, there is no convincing evidence showing increased ROS production in intact contracting fibers under low Po2 conditions. Therefore, we hypothesized that intracellular ROS generation in single contracting skeletal myofibers increases during low Po2 compared with a value approximating normal resting Po2. Dihydrofluorescein was loaded into single frog (Xenopus) fibers, and fluorescence was used to monitor ROS using confocal microscopy. Myofibers were exposed to two maximal tetanic contractile periods (1 contraction/3 s for 2 min, separated by a 60-min rest period), each consisting of one of the following treatments: high Po2 (30 Torr), low Po2 (3–5 Torr), high Po2 with ebselen (antioxidant), or low Po2 with ebselen. Ebselen (10 μM) was administered before the designated contractile period. ROS formation during low Po2 treatment was greater than during high Po2 treatment, and ebselen decreased ROS generation in both low- and high-Po2 conditions (P Po2. Force was reduced >30% for each condition except low Po2 with ebselen, which only decreased ∼15%. We concluded that single myofibers under low Po2 conditions develop accelerated and more oxidative stress than at Po2 = 30 Torr (normal human resting Po2). Ebselen decreases ROS formation in both low and high Po2, but only mitigates skeletal muscle fatigue during reduced Po2 conditions. PMID:23576612

  4. Singly protonated dehydronorcantharidin silver coordination polymer induces apoptosis of lung cancer cells via reactive oxygen species-mediated mitochondrial pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Senpeng; Zhang, Shuo; Jin, Xing; Tan, Xuejie; Lou, Jianfang; Zhang, Xiumei; Zhao, Yunxue

    2014-10-30

    Silver complexes have been shown to possess antimicrobial and anticancer properties. Ag-SP-DNC, a novel silver and singly protonated dehydronorcantharidin complex, was synthesized in our previous study. In this study, we offer evidence that Ag-SP-DNC elicits a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis in lung cancer cells. Ag-SP-DNC inhibited the growth of A549 cells by inducing G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Ag-SP-DNC induced apoptosis was associated with the levels of intracellular ROS. The further study revealed that Ag-SP-DNC disrupted the mitochondrial membrane potential, induced the caspase-3 activation and led to the translocation of apoptosis inducing factor and endonucleaseG to the nucleus. These findings have important implications for the development of silver complexes for anticancer applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Organometallic synthesis, reactivity and catalysis in the solid state using well-defined single-site species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Sebastian D.; Weller, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    Acting as a bridge between the heterogeneous and homogeneous realms, the use of discrete, well-defined, solid-state organometallic complexes for synthesis and catalysis is a remarkably undeveloped field. Here, we present a review of this topic, focusing on describing the key transformations that can be observed at a transition-metal centre, as well as the use of well-defined organometallic complexes in the solid state as catalysts. There is a particular focus upon gas–solid reactivity/catalysis and single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformations. PMID:25666064

  6. Reactive Oxygen Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franchina, Davide G.; Dostert, Catherine; Brenner, Dirk

    2018-01-01

    oxygen species (ROS), which have long been known to trigger cell death. However, there is now evidence that ROS also act as intracellular signaling molecules both in steady-state and upon antigen recognition. The levels and localization of ROS contribute to the redox modeling of effector proteins...

  7. Genotoxicity, cytotoxicity, and reactive oxygen species induced by single-walled carbon nanotubes and C(60) fullerenes in the FE1-Mutatrade markMouse lung epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Pojana, Giulio; White, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Viability, cell cycle effects, genotoxicity, reactive oxygen species production, and mutagenicity of C(60) fullerenes (C(60)) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) were assessed in the FE1-Mutatrade markMouse lung epithelial cell line. None of these particles induced cell death within 24 hr...... at doses between 0 and 200 microg/ml or during long-term subculture exposure (576 hr) at 100 microg/ml, as determined by two different assays. However, cell proliferation was slower with SWCNT exposure and a larger fraction of the cells were in the G1 phase. Exposure to carbon black resulted...... by the comet assay. The mutant frequency in the cII gene was unaffected by 576 hr of exposure to either 100 microg/ml C(60) or SWCNT when compared with control incubations, whereas we have previously reported that carbon black and diesel exhaust particles induce mutations using an identical exposure scenario...

  8. Reactive species and pulmonary edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iles, Karen E; Song, Weifeng; Miller, David W; Dickinson, Dale A; Matalon, Sadis

    2009-10-01

    Pulmonary edema occurs when fluid flux into the lung interstitium exceeds its removal, resulting in hypoxemia and even death. Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) generally results when microvascular and alveolar permeability to plasma proteins increase, one possible etiology being oxidant injury. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) can modify or damage ion channels, such as epithelial sodium channels, which alters fluid balance. Experimental systems in which either RONS are increased or protective antioxidant mechanisms are decreased result in alterations of epithelial sodium channel activity and support the hypothesis that RONS are important in NPE. Both basic and clinical studies are needed to critically define the RONS-NPE connection and the capacity of antioxidant therapy (either alone or as a supplement to β-agonists) to improve patient outcome.

  9. Reactive oxygen species in periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parveen Dahiya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent epidemiological studies reveal that more than two-third of the world′s population suffers from one of the chronic forms of periodontal disease. The primary etiological agent of this inflammatory disease is a polymicrobial complex, predominantly Gram negative anaerobic or facultative bacteria within the sub-gingival biofilm. These bacterial species initiate the production of various cytokines such as interleukin-8 and TNF-α, further causing an increase in number and activity of polymorphonucleocytes (PMN along with these cytokines, PMNs also produce reactive oxygen species (ROS superoxide via the respiratory burst mechanism as the part of the defence response to infection. ROS just like the interleukins have deleterious effects on tissue cells when produced in excess. To counter the harmful effects of ROS, human body has its own defence mechanisms to eliminate them as soon as they are formed. The aim of this review is to focus on the role of different free radicals, ROS, and antioxidants in the pathophysiology of periodontal tissue destruction.

  10. Microbeam facility extension for single-cell irradiation experiments. Investigations about bystander effect and reactive oxygen species impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanot, M.; Khodja, H.; Daudin, L.; Hoarau, J.; Carriere, M.; Gouget, B.

    2006-01-01

    The LPS microbeam facility is based on a KN3750 Van de Graaff accelerator devoted to microbeam analysis [1]. It is equipped with two horizontal microbeam lines used in various fields such as material science, geological science, nuclear material science and biology. Since two years, a single ion hit device is being developed at the LPS. The setup is dedicated to the study of ionizing radiation effects on living cells by performing single ion irradiation at controlled doses and locations. This study will complete current researches conducted on uranium chemical toxicity on renal an d osteoblastic cells. After ingestion, most uranium is excreted from the body within a few days except small fraction that is absorbed into the blood-stream (0.2 to 5%) and then deposit and preferentially in kidneys and bones, where it can remain for many years. Uranium is a heavy metal and a primarily alpha emitter. It can lead to bone cancer as a result of the ionizing radiation associated with the radioactive decay products. The study of the response to an exposure to alpha particles will permit to distinguish radiotoxicity and chemical toxicity of uranium bone cells with a special emphasis or the bystander effect at low dose.All the beam lines at the LPS nuclear microprobe are horizontal and under vacuum. A dedicated deflecting magnet was inserted in one of the two available beam lines of the facility. The ion beam is extracted to air using a 100 nm thick silicon nitride membrane, thin enough to induce negligible effects on the ions in terms of energy loss and spatial resolution. By this way, we believe that we minimize the experimental setup impact on the living cells easing the detection of low irradiation dose impact. The atmosphere around the samples is also important to guaranty low stressed cell culture conditions. A temperature, hygrometry and CO 2 controlled atmosphere device will be implanted in the future. The irradiation microbeam is produced using a fused silica capillary

  11. Rosacea, Reactive Oxygen Species, and Azelaic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Rosacea is a common skin condition thought to be primarily an inflammatory disorder. Neutrophils, in particular, have been implicated in the inflammation associated with rosacea and mediate many of their effects through the release of reactive oxygen species. Recently, the role of reactive oxygen species in the pathophysiology of rosacea has been recognized. Many effective agents for rosacea, including topical azelaic acid and topical metronidazole, have anti-inflammatory properties. in-vitro...

  12. Rosacea, reactive oxygen species, and azelaic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David A

    2009-01-01

    Rosacea is a common skin condition thought to be primarily an inflammatory disorder. Neutrophils, in particular, have been implicated in the inflammation associated with rosacea and mediate many of their effects through the release of reactive oxygen species. Recently, the role of reactive oxygen species in the pathophysiology of rosacea has been recognized. Many effective agents for rosacea, including topical azelaic acid and topical metronidazole, have anti-inflammatory properties. in-vitro models have demonstrated the potent antioxidant effects of azelaic acid, providing a potential mechanistic explanation for its efficacy in the treatment of rosacea.

  13. Effects of reactive oxygen species on metabolism monitored by longitudinal 1H single voxel MRS follow-up in patients with mitochondrial disease or cerebral tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constans, J M; Collet, S; Hossu, G; Courtheoux, P; Guillamo, J S; Lechapt-Zalcman, E; Valable, S; Lacombe, S; Houee Levin, C; Gauduel, Y A; Dou, W; Ruan, S; Barre, L; Rioult, F; Derlon, J M; Chapon, F; Fong, V; Kauffmann, F

    2011-01-01

    Free radicals, or Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), have an effect on energy and glycolytic metabolism, mitochondrial function, lipid metabolism, necrosis and apoptosis, cell proliferation, and infiltration. These changes could be monitored longitudinally (every 4 months over 6 years) in humans with glial brain tumors (low and high grade) after therapy, using conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) and MR perfusion. Some examples of early clinical data from longitudinal follow-up monitoring in humans of energy and glycolytic metabolism, lipid metabolism, necrosis, proliferation, and infiltration measured by conventional MRI, MRS and perfusion, and positron emission tomography (PET) are shown in glial brain tumors after therapy. Despite the difficulty, the variability and unknown factors, these repeated measurements give us a better insight into the nature of the different processes, tumor progression and therapeutic response.

  14. Formation and Detoxification of Reactive Oxygen Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuciel, Radoslawa; Mazurkiewicz, Aleksandra

    2004-01-01

    A model of reactive oxygen species metabolism is proposed as a laboratory exercise for students. The superoxide ion in this model is generated during the reaction of oxidation of xanthine, catalyzed by xanthine oxidase. The effect of catalase, superoxide dismutase, and allopurinol on superoxide ion generation and removal in this system is also…

  15. Reactive oxygen species and the cardiovascular system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.J.H.J. Taverne (Yannick); A.J.J.C. Bogers (Ad); D.J.G.M. Duncker (Dirk); D. Merkus (Daphne)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractEver since the discovery of free radicals, many hypotheses on the deleterious actions of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been proposed. However, increasing evidence advocates the necessity of ROS for cellular homeostasis. ROS are generated as inherent by-products of aerobic metabolism

  16. Stabilization of reactive species by supramolecular encapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galan, Albano; Ballester, Pablo

    2016-03-21

    Molecular containers have attracted the interest of supramolecular chemists since the early beginnings of the field. Cavitands' inner cavities were quickly exploited by Cram and Warmuth to construct covalent containers able to stabilize and assist the characterization of short-lived reactive species such as cyclobutadiene or o-benzyne. Since then, more complex molecular architectures have been prepared able to store and isolate a myriad of fleeting species (i.e. organometallic compounds, cationic species, radical initiators…). In this review we cover selected examples of the stabilization of reactive species by encapsulation in molecular containers from the first reports of covalent containers described by Cram et al. to the most recent examples of containers with self-assembled structure (metal coordination cages and hydrogen bonded capsules). Finally, we briefly review examples reported by Rebek et al. in which elusive reaction intermediates could be detected in the inner cavities of self-folding resorcin[4]arene cavitands by the formation of covalent host-guest complexes. The utilization of encapsulated reactive species in catalysis or synthesis is not covered.

  17. Reactive oxygen species enhance insulin sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Loh, Kim; Deng, Haiyang; Fukushima, Atsushi; Cai, Xiaochu; Boivin, Benoit; Galic, Sandra; Bruce, Clinton; Shields, Benjamin J.; Skiba, Beata; Ooms, Lisa M.; Stepto, Nigel; Wu, Ben; Mitchell, Christina A.; Tonks, Nicholas K.; Watt, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by mitochondria may contribute to the development of insulin resistance, a primary feature of type 2 diabetes. In recent years it has become apparent that ROS generation in response to physiological stimuli such as insulin may also facilitate signaling by reversibly oxidizing and inhibiting protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Here we report that mice lacking one of the key enzymes involved in the elimination of physiological ROS, glutathione ...

  18. Species comparison of inflammatory cell reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boncavage-Hennessey, E.M.; Twerdok, L.E. [Geo-Centers, Inc., Frederick, MD (United States); Finch, R.A.; Gardner, H.S. [Army Biomedical Research and Development Lab., Frederick, MD (United States)

    1994-12-31

    In comparison to the use of rodent models, the use of fish as a potential model to predict immune dysfunction in response to environmental contaminants is a relatively new concept. The development of a fish model for immunotoxicity is possible due to the phylogenetic conservation of many immune functions. The authors have compared mononuclear cell reactivity following in vitro stimulation among five species; Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), DBA/2 mice, Sprague-Dawley rats and human ML-1 cells. Mononuclear cells were isolated from the rodent bone marrow and from the teleost anterior kidney (the cell population which most closely resembles mammalian hematopoietic tissue). ML-1 cells are a myeloblastic cell line that were differentiated in vitro to monocytes/macrophages. Cell populations were characterized by myeloperoxidase and nonspecific esterase staining characteristic. Reactive oxidant production following in vitro stimulation by phorbol ester was measured using the following methods: reduction of cytochrome c (detection of extracellular superoxide), reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium (detection of intracellular superoxide) and oxidation of phenol red in the presence of horseradish peroxidase (hydrogen peroxide production). In general, teleost cells demonstrated higher superoxide anion production and mammalian cells produced higher quantities of hydrogen peroxide.

  19. Senescence, Stress, and Reactive Oxygen Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Jajic

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS is one of the earliest responses of plant cells to various biotic and abiotic stresses. ROS are capable of inducing cellular damage by oxidation of proteins, inactivation of enzymes, alterations in the gene expression, and decomposition of biomembranes. On the other hand, they also have a signaling role and changes in production of ROS can act as signals that change the transcription of genes that favor the acclimation of plants to abiotic stresses. Among the ROS, it is believed that H2O2 causes the largest changes in the levels of gene expression in plants. A wide range of plant responses has been found to be triggered by H2O2 such as acclimation to drought, photooxidative stress, and induction of senescence. Our knowledge on signaling roles of singlet oxygen (1O2 has been limited by its short lifetime, but recent experiments with a flu mutant demonstrated that singlet oxygen does not act primarily as a toxin but rather as a signal that activates several stress-response pathways. In this review we summarize the latest progress on the signaling roles of ROS during senescence and abiotic stresses and we give a short overview of the methods that can be used for their assessment.

  20. Senescence, Stress, and Reactive Oxygen Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jajic, Ivan; Sarna, Tadeusz; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one of the earliest responses of plant cells to various biotic and abiotic stresses. ROS are capable of inducing cellular damage by oxidation of proteins, inactivation of enzymes, alterations in the gene expression, and decomposition of biomembranes. On the other hand, they also have a signaling role and changes in production of ROS can act as signals that change the transcription of genes that favor the acclimation of plants to abiotic stresses. Among the ROS, it is believed that H2O2 causes the largest changes in the levels of gene expression in plants. A wide range of plant responses has been found to be triggered by H2O2 such as acclimation to drought, photooxidative stress, and induction of senescence. Our knowledge on signaling roles of singlet oxygen (1O2) has been limited by its short lifetime, but recent experiments with a flu mutant demonstrated that singlet oxygen does not act primarily as a toxin but rather as a signal that activates several stress-response pathways. In this review we summarize the latest progress on the signaling roles of ROS during senescence and abiotic stresses and we give a short overview of the methods that can be used for their assessment. PMID:27135335

  1. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, Alexander; Kohlhaas, Michael; Maack, Christoph

    2014-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in cardiovascular diseases, and one important source for ROS are mitochondria. Emission of ROS from mitochondria is the net result of ROS production at the electron transport chain (ETC) and their elimination by antioxidative enzymes. Both of these processes are highly dependent on the mitochondrial redox state, which is dynamically altered under different physiological and pathological conditions. The concept of "redox-optimized ROS balance" integrates these aspects and implies that oxidative stress occurs when the optimal equilibrium of an intermediate redox state is disturbed towards either strong oxidation or reduction. Furthermore, mitochondria integrate ROS signals from other cellular sources, presumably through a process termed "ROS-induced ROS release" that involves mitochondrial ion channels. Here, we attempt to integrate these recent advances in our understanding of the control of mitochondrial ROS emission and develop a concept of how in heart failure, defects in ion handling can lead to mitochondrial oxidative stress. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Redox Signalling in the Cardiovascular System". Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Selection of the In Vitro Culture Media Influences mRNA Expression of Hedgehog Genes, Il-6, and Important Genes regarding Reactive Oxygen Species in Single Murine Preimplantation Embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Pfeifer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this paper was to determine the influence of different in vitro culture media on mRNA expression of Hedgehog genes, il-6, and important genes regarding reactive oxygen species in single mouse embryos. Methods. Reverse transcription of single embryos either cultured in vitro from day 0.5 until 3.5 (COOK’s Cleavage medium or Vitrolife’s G-1 PLUS medium or in vivo until day 3.5 post coitum. PCR was carried out for β-actin followed by nested-PCR for shh, ihh, il-6, nox, gpx4, gpx1, and prdx2. Results. The number of murine blastocysts cultured in COOK medium which expressed il-6, gpx4, gpx1, and prdx2 mRNA differed significantly compared to the in vivo group. Except for nox, the mRNA profile of the Vitrolife media group embryos varied significantly from the in vivo ones regarding the number of blastocysts expressing the mRNA of shh, ihh, il-6, gpx4, gpx1 and prdx2. Conclusions. The present study shows that different in vitro culture media lead to different mRNA expression profiles during early development. Even the newly developed in vitro culture media are not able to mimic the female reproductive tract. The question of long-term consequences for children due to assisted reproduction techniques needs to be addressed in larger studies.

  3. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species accelerate gastric cancer cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Masato; Matsui, Hirofumi; Tomita, Tsutomu; Sadakata, Hisato; Indo, Hiroko P; Majima, Hideyuki J; Kaneko, Tsuyoshi; Hyodo, Ichinosuke

    2014-01-01

    Tumor invasion is the most important factor to decide patient's prognosis. The relation between reactive oxygen species and tumor invasion is mainly reported that nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase in the cell membrane is a reactive oxygen species producer for formulating an invadopodia. On the other hand, mitochondrion was known as one of the most important reactive oxygen species-producer in the cell via an energy transfer system. However, the relation between mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and the tumor invasion was not well clarified. In this study, we evaluated the relation between mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and tumor invasion using a normal gastric mucosal cell-line (RGM-1) and a cancerous mutant RGM-1 cell-line (RGK-1). Manganese superoxide dismutase-expressing RGK-1 cell-lines were used for a scavenging mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. The cells have been evaluated their movement ability as follows; cellular ruffling frequencies, wound healing assay to evaluate horizontal cellular migration, and invasion assay using matrigel to analyze vertical cellular migration. All cellular movement abilities were inhibited by scavenging mitochondrial reactive oxygen species with manganese superoxide dismutase. Therefore mitochondrial reactive oxygen species was one of factors enhancing the tumor invasion in gastric cancer.

  4. DNA damage by reactive species: Mechanisms, mutation and repair

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DNA is continuously attacked by reactive species that can affect its structure and function severely. Structural modifications to DNA mainly arise from modifications in its bases that primarily occur due to their exposure to different reactive species. Apart from this, DNA strand break, inter- and intra-strand crosslinks and ...

  5. Differential reduction of reactive oxygen species by human tissue ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swati Paliwal

    2017-06-24

    Jun 24, 2017 ... Keywords. Oxidative stress; reactive oxygen species; tissue-specific mesenchymal stem cells. Abbreviations: AD, adipose; AMA, Antimycin A; AU, arbitrary units; BM, bone marrow; DP, dental pulp; MFI, mean fluorescence intensity; MSC, mesenchymal stem cell; ROS, reactive oxygen species. 1. Introduction.

  6. Mitochondrial Signaling in Plants Under Hypoxia: Use of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and Reactive Nitrogen Species (RNS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebelstrup, Kim; Møller, Ian Max

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia commonly occurs in roots in water-saturated soil and in maturing and germinating seeds. We here review the role of the mitochondria in the cellular response to hypoxia with an emphasis on the turnover of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and Reactive Nitrogen Species (RNS) and their potential...

  7. Targeting Reactive Carbonyl Species with Natural Sequestering Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Won Hwang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Reactive carbonyl species generated by the oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids and sugars are highly reactive due to their electrophilic nature, and are able to easily react with the nucleophilic sites of proteins as well as DNA causing cellular dysfunction. Levels of reactive carbonyl species and their reaction products have been reported to be elevated in various chronic diseases, including metabolic disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. In an effort to identify sequestering agents for reactive carbonyl species, various analytical techniques such as spectrophotometry, high performance liquid chromatography, western blot, and mass spectrometry have been utilized. In particular, recent advances using a novel high resolution mass spectrometry approach allows screening of complex mixtures such as natural products for their sequestering ability of reactive carbonyl species. To overcome the limited bioavailability and bioefficacy of natural products, new techniques using nanoparticles and nanocarriers may offer a new attractive strategy for increased in vivo utilization and targeted delivery of bioactives.

  8. Single-cell analysis of dihydroartemisinin-induced apoptosis through reactive oxygen species-mediated caspase-8 activation and mitochondrial pathway in ASTC-a-1 cells using fluorescence imaging techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ying-Ying; Chen, Tong-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Li, Li

    2010-07-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a front-line antimalarial herbal compound, has been shown to possess promising anticancer activity with low toxicity. We have previously reported that DHA induced caspase-3-dependent apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma cells. However, the cellular target and molecular mechanism of DHA-induced apoptosis is still poorly defined. We use confocal fluorescence microscopy imaging, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching techniques to explore the roles of DHA-elicited reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the DHA-induced Bcl-2 family proteins activation, mitochondrial dysfunction, caspase cascade, and cell death. Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and flow cytometry analysis showed that DHA induced ROS-mediated apoptosis. Confocal imaging analysis in a single living cell and Western blot assay showed that DHA triggered ROS-dependent Bax translocation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, alteration of mitochondrial morphology, cytochrome c release, caspase-9, caspase-8, and caspase-3 activation, indicating the coexistence of ROS-mediated mitochondrial and death receptor pathway. Collectively, our findings demonstrate for the first time that DHA induces cell apoptosis by triggering ROS-mediated caspase-8/Bid activation and the mitochondrial pathway, which provides some novel insights into the application of DHA as a potential anticancer drug and a new therapeutic strategy by targeting ROS signaling in lung adenocarcinoma therapy in the future.

  9. [Chemiluminescence assay for the investigation of reactive oxygen species generator].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishikawa, Naoya; Kuroda, Naotaka

    2015-01-01

    Quinones play critical roles in biological systems, but are also regarded as a class of toxins that can cause oxidative stress in living cells, and the involvement of quinone-based reactive oxygen species in oxidative stress has been reported. In biological systems, quinones are reduced to semiquinone radicals by the enzyme NADPH:quinone reductase. Next, semiquinone radicals react with dissolved oxygen to form superoxide anion, which reacts with biological molecules to cause oxidative stress. On the other hand, chemiluminescence reagents such as luminol can emit chemiluminescence after oxidation by reactive oxygen species. Therefore, chemiluminescence reagents have been used widely to investigate reactive oxygen species. We have developed a sensitive and selective assay for quantifying quinones using luminol chemiluminescence. This chemiluminescence assay is based on the generation of reactive oxygen species through the redox reaction between quinone and dithiothreitol, a reductant, followed by detection of the generated reactive oxygen by luminol. Additionally, this assay can be used to quantify the toxic herbicide, paraquat, which produces reactive oxygen species in the same manner as quinones. This review describes the development of a sensitive and selective chemiluminescence assay for investigating quinones and paraquat by utilizing their ability to generate reactive oxygen species.

  10. Using exomarkers to assess mitochondrial reactive species in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Angela; Cochemé, Helena M; Li Pun, Pamela Boon; Apostolova, Nadezda; Smith, Robin A J; Larsen, Lesley; Larsen, David S; James, Andrew M; Fearnley, Ian M; Rogatti, Sebastian; Prime, Tracy A; Finichiu, Peter G; Dare, Anna; Chouchani, Edward T; Pell, Victoria R; Methner, Carmen; Quin, Caroline; McQuaker, Stephen J; Krieg, Thomas; Hartley, Richard C; Murphy, Michael P

    2014-02-01

    The ability to measure the concentrations of small damaging and signalling molecules such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vivo is essential to understanding their biological roles. While a range of methods can be applied to in vitro systems, measuring the levels and relative changes in reactive species in vivo is challenging. One approach towards achieving this goal is the use of exomarkers. In this, exogenous probe compounds are administered to the intact organism and are then transformed by the reactive molecules in vivo to produce a diagnostic exomarker. The exomarker and the precursor probe can be analysed ex vivo to infer the identity and amounts of the reactive species present in vivo. This is akin to the measurement of biomarkers produced by the interaction of reactive species with endogenous biomolecules. Our laboratories have developed mitochondria-targeted probes that generate exomarkers that can be analysed ex vivo by mass spectrometry to assess levels of reactive species within mitochondria in vivo. We have used one of these compounds, MitoB, to infer the levels of mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide within flies and mice. Here we describe the development of MitoB and expand on this example to discuss how better probes and exomarkers can be developed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Current methods to study reactive oxygen species - pros and cons and biophysics of membrane proteins. Guest Editor: Christine Winterbourn. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Fluxes of chemically reactive species inferred from mean concentration measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galmarini, S.; Vilà-Guerau De Arellano, J.; Duyzer, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    A method is presented for the calculation of the fluxes of chemically reactive species on the basis of routine measurements of meteorological variables and chemical species. The method takes explicity into account the influence of chemical reactions on the fluxes of the species. As a demonstration

  12. A case of mistaken identity: are reactive oxygen species actually reactive sulfide species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLeon, Eric R; Gao, Yan; Huang, Evelyn; Arif, Maaz; Arora, Nitin; Divietro, Alexander; Patel, Shivali; Olson, Kenneth R

    2016-04-01

    Stepwise one-electron reduction of oxygen to water produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are chemically and biochemically similar to reactive sulfide species (RSS) derived from one-electron oxidations of hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur. Both ROS and RSS are endogenously generated and signal via protein thiols. Given the similarities between ROS and RSS, we wondered whether extant methods for measuring the former would also detect the latter. Here, we compared ROS to RSS sensitivity of five common ROS methods: redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein (roGFP), 2', 7'-dihydrodichlorofluorescein, MitoSox Red, Amplex Red, and amperometric electrodes. All methods detected RSS and were as, or more, sensitive to RSS than to ROS. roGFP, arguably the "gold standard" for ROS measurement, was more than 200-fold more sensitive to the mixed polysulfide H2Sn(n = 1-8) than to H2O2 These findings suggest that RSS may be far more prevalent in intracellular signaling than previously appreciated and that the contribution of ROS may be overestimated. This conclusion is further supported by the observation that estimated daily sulfur metabolism and ROS production are approximately equal and the fact that both RSS and antioxidant mechanisms have been present since the origin of life, nearly 4 billion years ago, long before the rise in environmental oxygen 600 million years ago. Although ROS are assumed to be the most biologically relevant oxidants, our results question this paradigm. We also anticipate our findings will direct attention toward development of novel and clinically relevant anti-(RSS)-oxidants. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Production and Consumption of Reactive Oxygen Species by Fullerenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are one of the most important intermediates in chemical, photochemical, and biological processes. To understand the environmental exposure and toxicity of fullerenes better, the production and consumption of ROS (singlet oxygen, superoxide, hydrogen ...

  14. The reactive oxygen species network pathways: an essential ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ) genome sequences, together with molecular recourses of functional genomics and proteomics have revolutionized our understanding of reactive oxygen species (ROS) signalling network mediating disease resistance in plants. So far, ROS ...

  15. Influence of reactive oxygen species on the sterilization of microbes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The influence of reactive oxygen species on living cells, including various microbes, is discussed. A sterilization experiment with bacterial endospores reveals that an argoneoxygen plasma jet very effectively kills endospores of Bacillus atrophaeus (ATCC 9372), thereby indicating that oxygen radic...

  16. Mitochondria and Reactive Oxygen Species: Physiology and Pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolisetty, Subhashini; Jaimes, Edgar A.

    2013-01-01

    The air that we breathe contains nearly 21% oxygen, most of which is utilized by mitochondria during respiration. While we cannot live without it, it was perceived as a bane to aerobic organisms due to the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen metabolites by mitochondria and other cellular compartments. However, this dogma was challenged when these species were demonstrated to modulate cellular responses through altering signaling pathways. In fact, since this discovery of a dichotomous role of reactive species in immune function and signal transduction, research in this field grew at an exponential pace and the pursuit for mechanisms involved began. Due to a significant number of review articles present on the reactive species mediated cell death, we have focused on emerging novel pathways such as autophagy, signaling and maintenance of the mitochondrial network. Despite its role in several processes, increased reactive species generation has been associated with the origin and pathogenesis of a plethora of diseases. While it is tempting to speculate that anti-oxidant therapy would protect against these disorders, growing evidence suggests that this may not be true. This further supports our belief that these reactive species play a fundamental role in maintenance of cellular and tissue homeostasis. PMID:23528859

  17. Mitochondria and Reactive Oxygen Species: Physiology and Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhashini Bolisetty

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The air that we breathe contains nearly 21% oxygen, most of which is utilized by mitochondria during respiration. While we cannot live without it, it was perceived as a bane to aerobic organisms due to the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen metabolites by mitochondria and other cellular compartments. However, this dogma was challenged when these species were demonstrated to modulate cellular responses through altering signaling pathways. In fact, since this discovery of a dichotomous role of reactive species in immune function and signal transduction, research in this field grew at an exponential pace and the pursuit for mechanisms involved began. Due to a significant number of review articles present on the reactive species mediated cell death, we have focused on emerging novel pathways such as autophagy, signaling and maintenance of the mitochondrial network. Despite its role in several processes, increased reactive species generation has been associated with the origin and pathogenesis of a plethora of diseases. While it is tempting to speculate that anti-oxidant therapy would protect against these disorders, growing evidence suggests that this may not be true. This further supports our belief that these reactive species play a fundamental role in maintenance of cellular and tissue homeostasis.

  18. Oxygen negative glow: reactive species and emissivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahli, Khaled

    1991-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the study of a specific type of oxygen plasma created by electron beams (1 keV, 20 mA/cm 2 ), negative glow of a luminescent discharge in abnormal regime. The objective is to test the qualities of this plasma as source of two 'active' species of oxygen (singlet molecular oxygen and atomic oxygen) which are useful in applications. The experiment mainly bears on the use of VUV (120 to 150 nm) absorption spectroscopy measurements of concentrations of these both species, and on the recording of plasma emissivity space profiles in the visible region (450 to 850 nm). It appears that low concentrations of singlet oxygen definitely exclude this type of discharge for iodine laser applications. On the contrary, concentrations measured for atomic oxygen show it is a good candidate for the oxidation of large surfaces by sheets of beams. The satisfying comparison of emissivity results with a published model confirm the prevailing role of fast electrons, and gives evidence of an important effect of temperature: temperature can reach 1000 K, and this is in agreement with the presented measurement [fr

  19. Reactive oxygen species is associated with cryptolepine cytotoxicity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of the present study was to determine if the cytotoxicity of CLP is as a result of metabolic activation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Involvement of metabolic activation was assessed by studying the differential toxicity of CLP to MCL-5 and cHoL, two human lymphoblastoid cell lines differing only ...

  20. Formation of reactive oxygen species in rat epithelial cells upon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    < 100 nm) that contributed 31% to the particle number. In our study, we investigated the influence of fly ash on the promotion of early inflammatory reactions like the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in rat lung epithelial cells (RLE-6TN). Furthermore, we determined the formation of nitric oxide (NO). The cells show a.

  1. Luminometric determination of antioxidant capacity towards individual reactive oxygen species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Komrsková, D.; Lojek, Antonín; Hrbáč, J.; Číž, Milan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 1 (2005), S25 [Cells VI - Biological Days /18./. 24.10.2005-26.10.2005, České Budějovice] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA524/01/1219 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : chemiluminescence * reactive oxygen species * scavenger Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  2. Differential reduction of reactive oxygen species by human ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, for the first time, we investigated the differences in the reactive oxygen species (ROS) reductionabilities of tissue-specific MSCs to mitigate cellular damage in oxidative stress. Hepatic Stellate cells (LX-2) and cardiomyocyteswere treated with Antimycin A (AMA) to induce oxidative stress and tissue specific ...

  3. Effects of proline on photosynthesis, root reactive oxygen species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of 0.2 mM proline applied to saline nutrient solution on biomass, chlorophyll content, photosynthetic parameters, reactive oxygen species and antioxidant enzymes activities of two melon cultivars (cv. Yuhuang and cv. Xuemei) were examined. Results indicate that exogenous proline increased the fresh and dry ...

  4. Formation of reactive oxygen species in rat epithelial cells upon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In our study, we investigated the influence of fly ash on the promotion of early inflammatory reactions like the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in rat lung epithelial cells (RLE-6TN). Furthermore, we determined the formation of nitric oxide (NO). The cells show a clear dose-response relationship concerning the ...

  5. Reactive oxygen species in cancer: a dance with the devil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacker, Paul T

    2015-02-09

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can initiate cancer, but oxidant generation in tumors leaves them vulnerable to further stresses. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Harris and colleagues show that augmenting oxidant stress in normal cells limits tumor initiation and progression. Hence, strategic targeting of antioxidant systems may undermine survival of new tumor cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Role of reactive species in the photocatalytic degradation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-12-06

    Dec 6, 2017 ... amaranth (AM) dye under visible and UVA light along with the role of reactive species, which has not yet been studied for N-WO3 photocatalysts. Doping of N into substitutional and interstitial sites of WO3 is confirmed by X-ray photoelec- tron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy.

  7. Reactive Oxygen Species and Nitric Oxide in Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fátima Horta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous leishmaniasis affects millions of people around the world. Several species of Leishmania infect mouse strains, and murine models closely reproduce the cutaneous lesions caused by the parasite in humans. Mouse models have enabled studies on the pathogenesis and effector mechanisms of host resistance to infection. Here, we review the role of nitric oxide (NO, reactive oxygen species (ROS, and peroxynitrite (ONOO− in the control of parasites by macrophages, which are both the host cells and the effector cells. We also discuss the role of neutrophil-derived oxygen and nitrogen reactive species during infection with Leishmania. We emphasize the role of these cells in the outcome of leishmaniasis early after infection, before the adaptive Th-cell immune response.

  8. Computational simulation of reactive species production by methane-air DBD at high pressure and high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takana, H.; Tanaka, Y.; Nishiyama, H.

    2012-01-01

    Computational simulations of a single streamer in DBD in lean methane-air mixture at pressure of 1 and 3 atm and temperature of 300 and 500 K were conducted for plasma-enhanced chemical reactions in a closed system. The effects of surrounding pressure and temperature are characterized for reactive species production by a DBD discharge. The results show that the production characteristics of reactive species are strongly influenced by the total gas number density and the higher concentration of reactive species are produced at higher pressure and lower gas temperature for a given initial reduced electric field.

  9. Role of reactive nitrogen species in male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doshi Sejal B

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Reactive nitrogen species (RNS is a subset of free oxygen radicals called reactive oxygen species (ROS. Physiological levels of ROS are necessary to maintain the reproductive functions such as cell signaling, tight junction regulation, production of hormones, capacitation, acrosomal reaction, sperm motility, and zona pellucida binding. However, an excess of RNS can adversely affect reproductive potential by causing testicular dysfunction, decreased gonadotropin secretion, and abnormal semen parameters. Because such levels of RNS have been demonstrated in males with fertility problems and routine semen analysis has not been able to accurately predict IVF outcomes, it is imperative that novel strategies be developed in order to both assess and treat oxidative stress. This article describes both physiological and pathological roles of this unique subset of ROS.

  10. Multiple species reactive chemical transport in groundwater: A verification exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narasimhan, T.N.; Apps, J.A.; Zhu, Ming.

    1991-04-01

    Two multiple-species reactive chemical transport models (FASTCHEM and DYNAMIX) were tested against each other to check for consistency of solutions. For the particular problem studied, FASTCHEM and DYNAMIX led to differences in aqueous concentrations and mineral assemblages primarily because FASTCHEM ignores redox reactions in the transport phase of the calculations. Also, the spatial concentration profiles generated by FASTCHEM tend to be sharper than those generated by DYNAMIX because FASTCHEM is particularly designed to handle advection-dominated transport systems

  11. HIF and reactive oxygen species regulate oxidative phosphorylation in cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hervouet, E.; Čížková, Alena; Demont, J.; Vojtíšková, Alena; Pecina, Petr; Franssen-van Hal, N.; Keijer, J.; Simonnet, H.; Ivánek, Robert; Kmoch, S.; Godinot, C.; Houštěk, Josef

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 8 (2008), s. 1528-1537 ISSN 0143-3334 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520; GA ČR GA303/07/0781 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : carcinoma * mitochondrial biogenesis * reactive oxygen species Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.930, year: 2008

  12. Reactive oxygen species at phospholipid bilayers: distribution, mobility and permeation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, Rodrigo M

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in biochemical processes such as redox signaling, aging, carcinogenesis and neurodegeneration. Although biomembranes are targets for reactive oxygen species attack, little is known about the role of their specific interactions. Here, molecular dynamics simulations were employed to determine the distribution, mobility and residence times of various reactive oxygen species at the membrane-water interface. Simulations showed that molecular oxygen (O2) accumulated at the membrane interior. The applicability of this result to singlet oxygen ((1)O2) was discussed. Conversely, superoxide (O2(-)) radicals and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) remained at the aqueous phase. Both hydroxyl (HO) and hydroperoxyl (HO2) radicals were able to penetrate deep into the lipid headgroups region. Due to membrane fluidity and disorder, these radicals had access to potential peroxidation sites along the lipid hydrocarbon chains, without having to overcome the permeation free energy barrier. Strikingly, HO2 radicals were an order of magnitude more concentrated in the headgroups region than in water, implying a large shift in the acid-base equilibrium between HO2 and O2(-). In comparison with O2, both HO and HO2 radicals had lower lateral mobility at the membrane. Simulations revealed that there were intermittent interruptions in the H-bond network around the HO radicals at the headgroups region. This effect is expected to be unfavorable for the H-transfer mechanism involved in HO diffusion. The implications for lipid peroxidation and for the effectiveness of membrane antioxidants were evaluated. © 2013.

  13. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generation by lunar simulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Rickman, Douglas; Schoonen, Martin A.

    2016-05-01

    The current interest in human exploration of the Moon and past experiences of Apollo astronauts has rekindled interest into the possible harmful effects of lunar dust on human health. In comparison to the Apollo-era explorations, human explorers may be weeks on the Moon, which will raise the risk of inhalation exposure. The mineralogical composition of lunar dust is well documented, but its effects on human health are not fully understood. With the aim of understanding the reactivity of dusts that may be encountered on geologically different lunar terrains, we have studied Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generation by a suite of lunar simulants of different mineralogical-chemical composition dispersed in water and Simulated Lung Fluid (SLF). To further explore the reactivity of simulants under lunar environmental conditions, we compared the reactivity of simulants both in air and inert atmosphere. As the impact of micrometeorites with consequent shock-induced stresses is a major environmental factor on the Moon, we also studied the effect of mechanical stress on samples. Mechanical stress was induced by hand crushing the samples both in air and inert atmosphere. The reactivity of samples after crushing was analyzed for a period of up to nine days. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in water and SLF was analyzed by an in situ electrochemical probe and hydroxyl radical (•OH) by Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and Adenine probe. Out of all simulants, CSM-CL-S was found to be the most reactive simulant followed by OB-1 and then JSC-1A simulant. The overall reactivity of samples in the inert atmosphere was higher than in air. Fresh crushed samples showed a higher level of reactivity than uncrushed samples. Simulant samples treated to create agglutination, including the formation of zero-valent iron, showed less reactivity than untreated simulants. ROS generation in SLF is initially slower than in deionized water (DI), but the ROS formation is sustained for as long as 7

  14. Reactive oxygen species: toxic molecules or spark of life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magder, Sheldon

    2006-02-01

    Increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and tissue evidence of oxidative injury are common in patients with inflammatory processes or tissue injury. This has led to many clinical attempts to scavenge ROS and reduce oxidative injury. However, we live in an oxygen rich environment and ROS and their chemical reactions are part of the basic chemical processes of normal metabolism. Accordingly, organisms have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to control these reactive molecules. Recently, it has become increasingly evident that ROS also play a role in the regulation of many intracellular signaling pathways that are important for normal cell growth and inflammatory responses that are essential for host defense. Thus, simply trying to scavenge ROS is likely not possible and potentially harmful. The 'normal' level of ROS will also likely vary in different tissues and even in different parts of cells. In this paper, the terminology and basic chemistry of reactive species are reviewed. Examples and mechanisms of tissue injury by ROS as well as their positive role as signaling molecules are discussed. Hopefully, a better understanding of the nature of ROS will lead to better planned therapeutic attempts to manipulate the concentrations of these important molecules. We need to regulate ROS, not eradicate them.

  15. Toxicological and pathophysiological roles of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, Ruth A.; Smith, Robert A.; Safe, Stephen; Szabo, Csaba; Tjalkens, Ronald B.; Robertson, Fredika M.

    2010-01-01

    'Oxidative and Nitrative Stress in Toxicology and Disease' was the subject of a symposium held at the EUROTOX meeting in Dresden 15th September 2009. Reactive oxygen (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) produced during tissue pathogenesis and in response to viral or chemical toxicants, induce a complex series of downstream adaptive and reparative events driven by the associated oxidative and nitrative stress. As highlighted by all the speakers, ROS and RNS can promote diverse biological responses associated with a spectrum of disorders including neurodegenerative/neuropsychiatric and cardiovascular diseases. Similar pathways are implicated during the process of liver and skin carcinogenesis. Mechanistically, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species drive sustained cell proliferation, cell death including both apoptosis and necrosis, formation of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA mutations, and in some cases stimulation of a pro-angiogenic environment. Here we illustrate the pivotal role played by oxidative and nitrative stress in cell death, inflammation and pain and its consequences for toxicology and disease pathogenesis. Examples are presented from five different perspectives ranging from in vitro model systems through to in vivo animal model systems and clinical outcomes.

  16. Reactive oxygen species and associated reactivity of peroxymonosulfate activated by soluble iron species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Richard J; Yu, Miao; Teel, Amy L

    2017-10-01

    The activation of peroxymonosulfate by iron (II), iron (III), and iron (III)-EDTA for in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) was compared using nitrobenzene as a hydroxyl radical probe, anisole as a hydroxyl radical+sulfate radical probe, and hexachloroethane as a reductant+nucleophile probe. In addition, activated peroxymonosulfate was investigated for the treatment of the model groundwater contaminants perchloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE). The relative activities of hydroxyl radical and sulfate radical in the degradation of the probe compounds and PCE and TCE were isolated using the radical scavengers tert-butanol and isopropanol. Iron (II), iron (III), and iron (III)-EDTA effectively activated peroxymonosulfate to generate hydroxyl radical and sulfate radical, but only a minimal flux of reductants or nucleophiles. Iron (III)-EDTA was a more effective activator than iron (II) and iron (III), and also provided a non-hydroxyl radical, non-sulfate radical degradation pathway. The contribution of sulfate radical relative to hydroxyl radical followed the order of anisole>TCE>PCE >nitrobenzene; i.e., sulfate radical was less dominant in the oxidation of more oxidized target compounds. Sulfate radical is often assumed to be the primary oxidant in activated peroxymonosulfate and persulfate systems, but the results of this research demonstrate that the reactivity of sulfate radical with the target compound must be considered before drawing such a conclusion. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Reactivation of dead sulfide species in lithium polysulfide flow battery for grid scale energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yang; Zhou, Guangmin; Shi, Feifei; Zhuo, Denys; Zhao, Jie; Liu, Kai; Liu, Yayuan; Zu, Chenxi; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Rufan; Huang, Xuanyi; Cui, Yi

    2017-09-06

    Lithium polysulfide batteries possess several favorable attributes including low cost and high energy density for grid energy storage. However, the precipitation of insoluble and irreversible sulfide species on the surface of carbon and lithium (called "dead" sulfide species) leads to continuous capacity degradation in high mass loading cells, which represents a great challenge. To address this problem, herein we propose a strategy to reactivate dead sulfide species by reacting them with sulfur powder with stirring and heating (70 °C) to recover the cell capacity, and further demonstrate a flow battery system based on the reactivation approach. As a result, ultrahigh mass loading (0.125 g cm -3 , 2 g sulfur in a single cell), high volumetric energy density (135 Wh L -1 ), good cycle life, and high single-cell capacity are achieved. The high volumetric energy density indicates its promising application for future grid energy storage.Lithium polysulfide batteries suffer from the precipitation of insoluble and irreversible sulfide species on the surface of carbon and lithium. Here the authors show a reactivation strategy by a reaction with cheap sulfur powder under stirring and heating to recover the cell capacity.

  18. Study of dopamine reactivity on platinum single crystal electrode surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chumillas, Sara; Figueiredo, Marta C.; Climent, Víctor; Feliu, Juan M.

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine is the biological molecule responsible, among other functions, of the heart beat and blood pressure regulation. Its loss, in the human body, can result in serious diseases such as Parkinson's, schizophrenia or depression. Structurally, this molecule belongs to the group of catecholamines, together with epinephrine (adrenaline) and norepinephrine (noradrenaline). The hydroquinone moiety of the molecule can be easily oxidized to quinone, rendering the electrochemical methods a convenient approach for the development of dopamine biosensors. The reactivity of similar aromatic molecules, such as catechol and hydroquinone, at well-ordered platinum surfaces, has recently been investigated in our group. In this paper, we extend these studies to the structurally related molecule dopamine. The study has been performed in neutral pH, since this is closer to the natural conditions for these molecules in biological media. Cyclic voltammetry and in situ infra-red spectroscopy have been combined to extract information about the behavior of this molecule on well-defined platinum surfaces. Dopamine appears to be electrochemically active and reveals interesting adsorption phenomena at low potentials (0.15–0.25 V vs RHE), sensitive to the single crystal orientation. The adsorption of dopamine on these surfaces is very strong, taking place at much lower potentials than the electron transfer from solution species. Specifically, the voltammetry of Pt(1 1 1) and Pt(1 0 0) in dopamine solutions shows an oxidation peak at potentials close to the onset of hydrogen evolution, which is related to the desorption of hydrogen and the adsorption of dopamine. On the other hand, adsorption on Pt(1 1 0) is irreversible and the surface appears totally blocked. Spectroscopic results indicate that dopamine is adsorbed flat on the surface. At potentials higher than 0.6 V vs RHE the three basal planes show a common redox process. The initial formation of the quinone moiety is followed by a

  19. Reactive oxygen species in disease: Rebuttal of a conventional concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Vitetta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species has long been proposed as leading to the random deleterious modification of macromolecules (i.e., nucleic acids, proteins with an associated progressive development of the age associated systemic diseases (e.g., diabetes, Parkinson’s disease as well as contributing to the ageing process.   Superoxide anion (hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide (peroxynitrite comprise regulated intracellular second messenger pro-oxidant systems, with specific sub-cellular locales of production and are essential for the normal function of the metabolome and cellular electro-physiology.  We have posited that the formation of superoxide anion and its metabolic product hydrogen peroxide, and nitric oxide, do not conditionally lead to random damage of macromolecular species such as nucleic acids or proteins.  Under normal physiological conditions their production is intrinsically regulated that is very much consistent with their second messenger purpose of function.   We further propose that the concept of an orally administered small molecule antioxidant as a therapy to abrogate free radical activity (to control oxidative stress is a chimera.  As such we consider that free radicals are not a major overwhelming player in the development of the chronic diseases or the ageing process.

  20. Chaetocin reactivates the lytic replication of Epstein-Barr virus from latency via reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shilun; Yin, Juan; Zhong, Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress, regarded as a negative effect of free radicals in vivo, takes place when organisms suffer from harmful stimuli. Some viruses can induce the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in infected cells, which may be closely related with their pathogenicity. In this report, chaetocin, a fungal metabolite reported to have antimicrobial and cytostatic activity, was studied for its effect on the activation of latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in B95-8 cells. We found that chaetocin remarkably up-regulated EBV lytic transcription and DNA replication at a low concentration (50 nmol L -1 ). The activation of latent EBV was accompanied by an increased cellular ROS level. N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), an ROS inhibitor, suppressed chaetocin-induced EBV activation. Chaetocin had little effect on histone H3K9 methylation, while NAC also significantly reduced H3K9 methylation. These results suggested that chaetocin reactivates latent EBV primarily via ROS pathways.

  1. Reactive halogen species above salt lakes and salt pans

    OpenAIRE

    Holla, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Salt lakes can be found on all continents and saline soils cover 2.5% of the land surface of the earth (FAO, 2012). This thesis investigates the presence of reactive halogen species (RHS) above salt lakes and saline soils to evaluate their relevance for tropospheric chemistry of the planetary boundary layer. Ground-based MAX-DOAS and LP-DOAS measurements were conducted at salt lakes and two other sites with high halogen content. Prior to this work, RHS were found at three salt ...

  2. Nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species in limb vascular function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gliemann, Lasse; Nyberg, Michael Permin; Hellsten, Ylva

    2014-01-01

    , the extent of enzymatic and non-enzymatic formation of NO and on the other hand, removal of NO, which in part is dependent on the reaction of NO with reactive oxygen species (ROS). The presence of ROS is dependent on the extent of ROS formation via mitochondria and/or enzymes such as NAD(P)H oxidase...... the bioavailability of NO but may also cause cellular damage in the cardiovascular system. Physical activity has been shown to greatly improve cardiovascular function, in part through improved bioavailability of NO, enhanced endogenous antioxidant defense and a lowering of the expression of ROS forming enzymes...

  3. Magnetic nanoparticles: reactive oxygen species generation and potential therapeutic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Trang; Hilt, J. Zach

    2017-07-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been demonstrated to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), which play a major role in various cellular pathways, via Fenton and Haber-Weiss reaction. ROS act as a double-edged sword inside the body. At normal conditions, the generation of ROS is in balance with their elimination by scavenger systems, and they can promote cell proliferation as well as differentiation. However, at an increased level, they can cause damages to protein, lead to cellular apoptosis, and contribute to many diseases including cancer. Many recent studies proposed a variety of strategies to either suppress toxicity of ROS generation or exploit the elevated ROS levels for cancer therapy.

  4. Reactive oxygen species inhibit catalytic activity of peptidylarginine deiminase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Dres; Bjørn, Mads Emil; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2017-01-01

    on calcium and reducing conditions. However, reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to induce citrullination of histones in granulocytes. Here we examine the ability of H2O2 and leukocyte-derived ROS to regulate PAD activity using citrullination of fibrinogen as read-out. H2O2 at concentrations above...... from stimulated leukocytes was unaffected by exogenously added H2O2 at concentrations up to 1000 µM. The role of ROS in regulating PAD activity may play an important part in preventing hypercitrullination of proteins....

  5. Nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species in plant biotic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheler, Claudia; Durner, Jörg; Astier, Jeremy

    2013-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important signaling molecules in plants. Recent progress has been made in defining their role during plant biotic interactions. Over the last decade, their function in disease resistance has been highlighted and focused a lot of investigations. Moreover, NO and ROS have recently emerged as important players of defense responses after herbivore attacks. Besides their role in plant adaptive response development, NO and ROS have been demonstrated to be involved in symbiotic interactions between plants and microorganisms. Here we review recent data concerning these three sides of NO and ROS functions in plant biotic interactions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Mechanisms of hypoxic signal transduction regulated by reactive nitrogen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumbayev, V V; Yasinska, I M

    2007-05-01

    Recent reports devoted to the field of oxygen sensing outline that signalling molecules such as nitric oxide/nitric oxide derived species as well as cytokines and other inflammatory mediators participate in hypoxic signal transduction. In the present review, we summarize the current knowledge about the role of nitric oxide and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) derived from it in hypoxic signal transduction and particularly in accumulation/de-accumulation of hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1alpha) protein, which is critical not only for cellular adaptation to low oxygen availability but also for generation of inflammatory and innate immune responses. After brief description of nitric oxide and other RNS as multifunctional messengers we analyse and discuss the RNS-dependent accumulation of HIF-1alpha protein under normoxia followed by discussion of the mechanisms of nitric oxide (NO)-dependent enzyme-regulated degradation of HIF-1alpha protein under low oxygen availability.

  7. Reactive species formed on proteins exposed to singlet oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    hydroperoxides, which can be reduced to the corresponding alcohols; other products arising from radical intermediates can also be generated, particularly in the presence of UV light and metal ions. With His side-chains, poorly characterised peroxides are also formed. Reaction with Met and Cys has been proposed...... to occur via zwitterionic peroxy intermediates. Peroxides are also generated on isolated proteins, and protein within intact cells, via(1)O(2)-mediated reactions. The peroxides formed on Trp, Tyr, and His peptides, as well as on proteins, have been shown to induce damage to other targets, with molecular...... oxidation of thiol residues an important reaction. This can result in the inactivation of cellular enzymes and the oxidation of other biological targets. Protein cross-linking and aggregation can also be induced by reactive species formed on photo-oxidised proteins, though the nature of the species...

  8. Nanotechnology for Electroanalytical Biosensors of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seenivasan, Rajesh; Kolodziej, Charles; Karunakaran, Chandran; Burda, Clemens

    2017-09-01

    Over the past several decades, nanotechnology has contributed to the progress of biomedicine, biomarker discovery, and the development of highly sensitive electroanalytical / electrochemical biosensors for in vitro and in vivo monitoring, and quantification of oxidative and nitrosative stress markers like reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). A major source of ROS and RNS is oxidative stress in cells, which can cause many human diseases, including cancer. Therefore, the detection of local concentrations of ROS (e. g. superoxide anion radical; O 2 •- ) and RNS (e. g. nitric oxide radical; NO • and its metabolites) released from biological systems is increasingly important and needs a sophisticated detection strategy to monitor ROS and RNS in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we discuss the nanomaterials-based ROS and RNS biosensors utilizing electrochemical techniques with emphasis on their biomedical applications. © 2017 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Cell signaling by reactive nitrogen and oxygen species in atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, R. P.; Moellering, D.; Murphy-Ullrich, J.; Jo, H.; Beckman, J. S.; Darley-Usmar, V. M.

    2000-01-01

    The production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species has been implicated in atherosclerosis principally as means of damaging low-density lipoprotein that in turn initiates the accumulation of cholesterol in macrophages. The diversity of novel oxidative modifications to lipids and proteins recently identified in atherosclerotic lesions has revealed surprising complexity in the mechanisms of oxidative damage and their potential role in atherosclerosis. Oxidative or nitrosative stress does not completely consume intracellular antioxidants leading to cell death as previously thought. Rather, oxidative and nitrosative stress have a more subtle impact on the atherogenic process by modulating intracellular signaling pathways in vascular tissues to affect inflammatory cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Furthermore, cellular responses can affect the production of nitric oxide, which in turn can strongly influence the nature of oxidative modifications occurring in atherosclerosis. The dynamic interactions between endogenous low concentrations of oxidants or reactive nitrogen species with intracellular signaling pathways may have a general role in processes affecting wound healing to apoptosis, which can provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  10. In vivo regulation of biochemical processes by reactive species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spasic, M.B.; Zunic, Z.; Vujin, S.

    1998-01-01

    For the regulation of exposure to low level radiation so called linear-no-threshold (LNT) model is usually employed. The premise of LNT is that there is no safe level of exposure. It is well established that ionizing radiation induces in an organism the appearance of free radicals and other reactive species, such as hydrated electrons and ions, due to ionization of aqueous medium. Among direct damaging effects to biomacromolecules, ionizing radiation induces free radical chain reactions which lead to the appearance of non-functional derivatized molecules and thus disturbed physiological functions. Overwhelming defense capacity for preventing formation and elimination of damaged molecules results in pathological changes and fatal outcome and represents molecular basis for LNT interpretation of ionizing radiation effects. Redox reactions in aerobes are usually connected to molecular oxygen reduction in the process of oxidative phosphorylation and during xenobiotic detoxification (mixed function microsomal oxidases, cytochrome P 450 ). This fact, together with chemical characteristics (production of reactive and free radical intermediates) and a strict cellular compartmentalization of redox reactions can explain insufficient knowledge on possible role of these reactions in signal transduction. Recognition of physiological role of a free radical nitrogen oxide (NO), as a regulator of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) activity and thus production of cGMP (a second messenger) led to the intensification of the studies focused on the elucidation of the role of redox processes in signal transduction. In this paper we will summarize evidence for a direct regulatory role of reactive oxygen species evolving upon low dose ionising radiation through their interaction with regulatory molecules such as sGC tyrosine kinases or nuclear factor -kB, and discuss a possible role of such interactions on an organism. (author)

  11. Single-species microarrays and comparative transcriptomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric J J Chain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prefabricated expression microarrays are currently available for only a few species but methods have been proposed to extend their application to comparisons between divergent genomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we demonstrate that the hybridization intensity of genomic DNA is a poor basis on which to select unbiased probes on Affymetrix expression arrays for studies of comparative transcriptomics, and that doing so produces spurious results. We used the Affymetrix Xenopus laevis microarray to evaluate expression divergence between X. laevis, X. borealis, and their F1 hybrids. When data are analyzed with probes that interrogate only sequences with confirmed identity in both species, we recover results that differ substantially analyses that use genomic DNA hybridizations to select probes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings have implications for the experimental design of comparative expression studies that use single-species microarrays, and for our understanding of divergent expression in hybrid clawed frogs. These findings also highlight important limitations of single-species microarrays for studies of comparative transcriptomics of polyploid species.

  12. Properties of reactive oxygen species by quantum Monte Carlo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, Andrea; Trout, Bernhardt L; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2014-07-07

    The electronic properties of the oxygen molecule, in its singlet and triplet states, and of many small oxygen-containing radicals and anions have important roles in different fields of chemistry, biology, and atmospheric science. Nevertheless, the electronic structure of such species is a challenge for ab initio computational approaches because of the difficulties to correctly describe the statical and dynamical correlation effects in presence of one or more unpaired electrons. Only the highest-level quantum chemical approaches can yield reliable characterizations of their molecular properties, such as binding energies, equilibrium structures, molecular vibrations, charge distribution, and polarizabilities. In this work we use the variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and the lattice regularized Monte Carlo (LRDMC) methods to investigate the equilibrium geometries and molecular properties of oxygen and oxygen reactive species. Quantum Monte Carlo methods are used in combination with the Jastrow Antisymmetrized Geminal Power (JAGP) wave function ansatz, which has been recently shown to effectively describe the statical and dynamical correlation of different molecular systems. In particular, we have studied the oxygen molecule, the superoxide anion, the nitric oxide radical and anion, the hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals and their corresponding anions, and the hydrotrioxyl radical. Overall, the methodology was able to correctly describe the geometrical and electronic properties of these systems, through compact but fully-optimised basis sets and with a computational cost which scales as N(3) - N(4), where N is the number of electrons. This work is therefore opening the way to the accurate study of the energetics and of the reactivity of large and complex oxygen species by first principles.

  13. Mechanisms of group A Streptococcus resistance to reactive oxygen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningham, Anna; Döhrmann, Simon; Nizet, Victor; Cole, Jason N.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), is an exclusively human Gram-positive bacterial pathogen ranked among the ‘top 10’ causes of infection-related deaths worldwide. GAS commonly causes benign and self-limiting epithelial infections (pharyngitis and impetigo), and less frequent severe invasive diseases (bacteremia, toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis). Annually, GAS causes 700 million infections, including 1.8 million invasive infections with a mortality rate of 25%. In order to establish an infection, GAS must counteract the oxidative stress conditions generated by the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the infection site by host immune cells such as neutrophils and monocytes. ROS are the highly reactive and toxic byproducts of oxygen metabolism, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide anion (O2•−), hydroxyl radicals (OH•) and singlet oxygen (O2*), which can damage bacterial nucleic acids, proteins and cell membranes. This review summarizes the enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms utilized by GAS to thwart ROS and survive under conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:25670736

  14. Calcific Uremic Arteriolopathy: Pathophysiology, Reactive Oxygen Species and Therapeutic Approaches

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    Kurt M. Sowers

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcific uremic arteriolopathy (CUA/calciphylaxis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease requiring renal replacement. Once thought to be rare, it is being increasingly recognized and reported on a global scale. The uremic milieu predisposes to multiple metabolic toxicities including increased levels of reactive oxygen species and inflammation. Increased oxidative stress and inflammation promote this arteriolopathy by adversely affecting endothelial function resulting in a prothrombotic milieu and significant remodeling effects on vascular smooth muscle cells. These arteriolar pathological effects include intimal hyperplasia, inflammation, endovascular fibrosis and vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis and differentiation into bone forming osteoblast-like cells resulting in medial calcification. Systemic factors promoting this vascular condition include elevated calcium, parathyroid hormone and hyperphosphatemia with consequent increases in the calcium × phosphate product. The uremic milieu contributes to a marked increased in upstream reactive oxygen species—oxidative stress and subsequent downstream increased inflammation, in part, via activation of the nuclear transcription factor NFκB and associated downstream cytokine pathways. Consitutive anti-calcification proteins such as Fetuin-A and matrix GLA proteins and their signaling pathways may be decreased, which further contributes to medial vascular calcification. The resulting clinical entity is painful, debilitating and contributes to the excess morbidity and mortality associated with chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease. These same histopathologic conditions also occur in patients without uremia and therefore, the term calcific obliterative arteriolopathy could be utilized in these conditions.

  15. Mechanisms of group A Streptococcus resistance to reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningham, Anna; Döhrmann, Simon; Nizet, Victor; Cole, Jason N

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), is an exclusively human Gram-positive bacterial pathogen ranked among the 'top 10' causes of infection-related deaths worldwide. GAS commonly causes benign and self-limiting epithelial infections (pharyngitis and impetigo), and less frequent severe invasive diseases (bacteremia, toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis). Annually, GAS causes 700 million infections, including 1.8 million invasive infections with a mortality rate of 25%. In order to establish an infection, GAS must counteract the oxidative stress conditions generated by the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the infection site by host immune cells such as neutrophils and monocytes. ROS are the highly reactive and toxic byproducts of oxygen metabolism, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide anion (O2•(-)), hydroxyl radicals (OH•) and singlet oxygen (O2*), which can damage bacterial nucleic acids, proteins and cell membranes. This review summarizes the enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms utilized by GAS to thwart ROS and survive under conditions of oxidative stress. © FEMS 2015.

  16. Bacterial persistence induced by salicylate via reactive oxygen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tiebin; El Meouche, Imane; Dunlop, Mary J.

    2017-01-01

    Persisters are phenotypic variants of regular cells that exist in a dormant state with low metabolic activity, allowing them to exhibit high tolerance to antibiotics. Despite increasing recognition of their role in chronic and recalcitrant infections, the mechanisms that induce persister formation are not fully understood. In this study, we find that salicylate can induce persister formation in Escherichia coli via generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Salicylate-induced ROS cause a decrease in the membrane potential, reduce metabolism and lead to an increase in persistence. These effects can be recovered by culturing cells in the presence of a ROS quencher or in an anaerobic environment. Our findings reveal that salicylate-induced oxidative stress can lead to persistence, suggesting that ROS, and their subsequent impact on membrane potential and metabolism, may play a broad role in persister formation. PMID:28281556

  17. Reactive Species Involved in the Regioselective Photooxidation of Heptamethine Cyanines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nani, Roger R; Kelley, James A; Ivanic, Joseph; Schnermann, Martin J

    2015-11-01

    Heptamethine cyanines are important near-IR fluorophores used in many fluorescence applications. Despite this utility, these molecules are susceptible to light-promoted reactions (photobleaching) involving photochemically generated reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we have sought to define key chemical aspects of this nearly inescapable process. Near-IR photolysis of a model heptamethine cyanine leads to the regioselective oxidative cleavage of the cyanine polyene. We report the first quantitative analysis of the major reaction pathway following either photolysis or exposure to candidate ROS. These studies clearly indicate that only singlet oxygen ( 1 O 2 ), and not other feasible ROS, recapitulates the direct photolysis pathway. Computational studies were employed to investigate the regioselectivity of the oxidative cleavage process, and the theoretical ratio is comparable to observed experimental values. These results provide a more complete picture of heptamethine cyanine photooxidation, and provide insight for design of improved compounds for future applications.

  18. [The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in arrhythmogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tytman, Karol; Kaczmarek, Krzysztof; Lipińska, Stanisława; Wranicz, Jerzy K

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are the molecular oxygen derivatives that have at least one unpaired electron. Thus, ROS easily react with a number of cell structures causing a change in their functions. ROS produced in small quantities positively affect many cellular mechanisms, but in excess are responsible for the formation of oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is considered a major cause of many diseases, including cardiovascular disease. Abolition of the adverse effects of ROS on organisms in order to maintain redox homeostasis is possible thanks to antioxidants. The research conducted mainly in recent years shows that the formation of arrhythmias may also be related to the phenomenon of oxidative stress. Oxidative damage to cell membranes in particular are causing changes in ion channel activity, which proper functioning is the basis for the formation of normal heart rhythm. Antioxidants seem to play a protective role against the formation of arrhythmias. © 2016 MEDPRESS.

  19. Reactive oxygen species production and discontinuous gas exchange in insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boardman, Leigh; Terblanche, John S.; Hetz, Stefan K.; Marais, Elrike; Chown, Steven L.

    2012-01-01

    While biochemical mechanisms are typically used by animals to reduce oxidative damage, insects are suspected to employ a higher organizational level, discontinuous gas exchange mechanism to do so. Using a combination of real-time, flow-through respirometry and live-cell fluorescence microscopy, we show that spiracular control associated with the discontinuous gas exchange cycle (DGC) in Samia cynthia pupae is related to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hyperoxia fails to increase mean ROS production, although minima are elevated above normoxic levels. Furthermore, a negative relationship between mean and mean ROS production indicates that higher ROS production is generally associated with lower . Our results, therefore, suggest a possible signalling role for ROS in DGC, rather than supporting the idea that DGC acts to reduce oxidative damage by regulating ROS production. PMID:21865257

  20. Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Modulate Mosquito Susceptibility to Plasmodium Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Giselle A.; Andersen, John F.; Oliveira, Marcus F.; Oliveira, Pedro L.; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    Background Mitochondria perform multiple roles in cell biology, acting as the site of aerobic energy-transducing pathways and as an important source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that modulate redox metabolism. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrate that a novel member of the mitochondrial transporter protein family, Anopheles gambiae mitochondrial carrier 1 (AgMC1), is required to maintain mitochondrial membrane potential in mosquito midgut cells and modulates epithelial responses to Plasmodium infection. AgMC1 silencing reduces mitochondrial membrane potential, resulting in increased proton-leak and uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation. These metabolic changes reduce midgut ROS generation and increase A. gambiae susceptibility to Plasmodium infection. Conclusion We provide direct experimental evidence indicating that ROS derived from mitochondria can modulate mosquito epithelial responses to Plasmodium infection. PMID:22815925

  1. Reactive oxygen species-activated nanomaterials as theranostic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kye S; Lee, Dongwon; Song, Chul Gyu; Kang, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated from the endogenous oxidative metabolism or from exogenous pro-oxidant exposure. Oxidative stress occurs when there is excessive production of ROS, outweighing the antioxidant defense mechanisms which may lead to disease states. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the most abundant and stable forms of ROS, implicated in inflammation, cellular dysfunction and apoptosis, which ultimately lead to tissue and organ damage. This review is an overview of the role of ROS in different diseases. We will also examine ROS-activated nanomaterials with emphasis on hydrogen peroxide, and their potential medical implications. Further development of the biocompatible, stimuli-activated agent responding to disease causing oxidative stress, may lead to a promising clinical use.

  2. Tracking the Penetration of Plasma Reactive Species in Tissue Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szili, Endre J; Hong, Sung-Ha; Oh, Jun-Seok; Gaur, Nishtha; Short, Robert D

    2017-08-23

    Electrically generated cold atmospheric plasma is being intensively researched for novel applications in biology and medicine. Significant attention is being given to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS), initially generated upon plasma-air interactions, and subsequently delivered to biological systems. Effects of plasma exposure are observed to millimeter depths within tissue. However, the exact nature of the initial plasma-tissue interactions remains unknown, including RONS speciation and delivery depth, or how plasma-derived RONS intervene in biological processes. Herein, we focus on current research using tissue and cell models to learn more about the plasma delivery of RONS into biological environments. We argue that this research is vital in underpinning the knowledge required to realize the full potential of plasma in biology and medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Reactive Oxygen Species in Vascular Formation and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijiang Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are derived from the metabolism of oxygen and are traditionally viewed as toxic byproducts that cause damage to biomolecules. It is now becoming widely acknowledged that ROS are key modulators in a variety of biological processes and pathological states. ROS mediate key signaling transduction pathways by reversible oxidation of certain signaling components and are involved in the signaling of growth factors, G-protein-coupled receptors, Notch, and Wnt and its downstream cascades including MAPK, JAK-STAT, NF-κB, and PI3K/AKT. Vascular formation and development is one of the most important events during embryogenesis and is vital for postnasal tissue repair. In this paper, we will discuss how ROS regulate different steps in vascular development, including smooth muscle cell differentiation, angiogenesis, endothelial progenitor cells recruitment, and vascular cell migration.

  4. Redox mechanism of reactive oxygen species in exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng He

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that regular exercise benefits health. However, unaccustomed and/or exhaustive exercise can generate excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS, leading to oxidative stress-related tissue damage and impaired muscle contractility. ROS are produced in both aerobic and anaerobic exercise. Although mitochondria, NADPH oxidases and xanthine oxidase have all been identified as contributors to ROS production, the exact redox mechanisms underlying exercise-induced oxidative stress remain elusive. Interestingly, moderate exposure to ROS is necessary to induce the body’s adaptive responses such as the activation of antioxidant defense mechanisms. Dietary antioxidant manipulation can also reduce ROS levels and muscle fatigue, as well as enhance exercise recovery. To elucidate the complex role of ROS in exercise, this article updates on new findings of ROS origins within skeletal muscles associated with various types of exercises such as endurance, sprint and mountain climbing, corresponding antioxidant defense systems as well as dietary manipulation against damage caused by ROS.

  5. Transport of secondary electrons and reactive species in ion tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdutovich, Eugene; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2015-08-01

    The transport of reactive species brought about by ions traversing tissue-like medium is analysed analytically. Secondary electrons ejected by ions are capable of ionizing other molecules; the transport of these generations of electrons is studied using the random walk approximation until these electrons remain ballistic. Then, the distribution of solvated electrons produced as a result of interaction of low-energy electrons with water molecules is obtained. The radial distribution of energy loss by ions and secondary electrons to the medium yields the initial radial dose distribution, which can be used as initial conditions for the predicted shock waves. The formation, diffusion, and chemical evolution of hydroxyl radicals in liquid water are studied as well. COST Action Nano-IBCT: Nano-scale Processes Behind Ion-Beam Cancer Therapy.

  6. Reactive Oxygen Species: Physiological and Physiopathological Effects on Synaptic Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckhauser, Thiago Fernando; Francis-Oliveira, José; De Pasquale, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    In the mammalian central nervous system, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation is counterbalanced by antioxidant defenses. When large amounts of ROS accumulate, antioxidant mechanisms become overwhelmed and oxidative cellular stress may occur. Therefore, ROS are typically characterized as toxic molecules, oxidizing membrane lipids, changing the conformation of proteins, damaging nucleic acids, and causing deficits in synaptic plasticity. High ROS concentrations are associated with a decline in cognitive functions, as observed in some neurodegenerative disorders and age-dependent decay of neuroplasticity. Nevertheless, controlled ROS production provides the optimal redox state for the activation of transductional pathways involved in synaptic changes. Since ROS may regulate neuronal activity and elicit negative effects at the same time, the distinction between beneficial and deleterious consequences is unclear. In this regard, this review assesses current research and describes the main sources of ROS in neurons, specifying their involvement in synaptic plasticity and distinguishing between physiological and pathological processes implicated. PMID:27625575

  7. Adaptation of Candida albicans to Reactive Sulfur Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebaro, Yasmin; Lorenz, Michael; Fa, Alice; Zheng, Rui; Gustin, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that is highly resistant to different oxidative stresses. How reactive sulfur species (RSS) such as sulfite regulate gene expression and the role of the transcription factor Zcf2 and the sulfite exporter Ssu1 in such responses are not known. Here, we show that C. albicans specifically adapts to sulfite stress and that Zcf2 is required for that response as well as induction of genes predicted to remove sulfite from cells and to increase the intracellular amount of a subset of nitrogen metabolites. Analysis of mutants in the sulfate assimilation pathway show that sulfite conversion to sulfide accounts for part of sulfite toxicity and that Zcf2-dependent expression of the SSU1 sulfite exporter is induced by both sulfite and sulfide. Mutations in the SSU1 promoter that selectively inhibit induction by the reactive nitrogen species (RNS) nitrite, a previously reported activator of SSU1 , support a model for C. albicans in which Cta4-dependent RNS induction and Zcf2-dependent RSS induction are mediated by parallel pathways, different from S. cerevisiae in which the transcription factor Fzf1 mediates responses to both RNS and RSS. Lastly, we found that endogenous sulfite production leads to an increase in resistance to exogenously added sulfite. These results demonstrate that C. albicans has a unique response to sulfite that differs from the general oxidative stress response, and that adaptation to internal and external sulfite is largely mediated by one transcription factor and one effector gene. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  8. Selective degeneration of oligodendrocytes mediated by reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griot, C; Vandevelde, M; Richard, A; Peterhans, E; Stocker, R

    1990-01-01

    The mechanism underlying demyelination in inflammatory canine distemper encephalitis is uncertain. Macrophages and their secretory products are thought to play an important effector role in this lesion. Recently, we have shown that anti-canine distemper virus antibodies, known to occur in chronic inflammatory lesions, stimulate macrophages leading to the secretion of reactive oxygen species (ROS). To investigate whether ROS could be involved in demyelination, dog glial cell cultures were exposed to xanthine/xanthine oxidase (X/XO), a system capable of generating O2-. This treatment resulted in a specific time-dependent degeneration and loss of oligodendrocytes, the myelin producing cells of the central nervous system. Initial degeneration was not associated with a decrease in viability of oligodendrocytes as judged by trypan blue and propidium iodide exclusion. Astrocytes and brain macrophages were not affected morphologically by this treatment. Further, an evaluation of the effect of several ROS scavengers, transition metal chelators and inhibitors of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase suggests that a metal dependent formation of .OH or a similar highly oxidizing species could be responsible for the observed selective damage to oligodendrocytes.

  9. Xanthine Oxidoreductase-Derived Reactive Species: Physiological and Pathological Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Giulia Battelli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR is the enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of hypoxanthine to xanthine and xanthine to uric acid and is widely distributed among species. In addition to this housekeeping function, mammalian XOR is a physiological source of superoxide ion, hydrogen peroxide, and nitric oxide, which can function as second messengers in the activation of various pathways. This review intends to address the physiological and pathological roles of XOR-derived oxidant molecules. The cytocidal action of XOR products has been claimed in relation to tissue damage, in particular damage induced by hypoxia and ischemia. Attempts to exploit this activity to eliminate unwanted cells via the construction of conjugates have also been reported. Moreover, different aspects of XOR activity related to phlogosis, endothelial activation, leukocyte activation, and vascular tone regulation, have been taken into consideration. Finally, the positive and negative outcomes concerning cancer pathology have been analyzed because XOR products may induce mutagenesis, cell proliferation, and tumor progression, but they are also associated with apoptosis and cell differentiation. In conclusion, XOR activity generates free radicals and other oxidant reactive species that may result in either harmful or beneficial outcomes.

  10. Effect of antibiotics on the generation of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyachi, Y; Yoshioka, A; Imamura, S; Niwa, Y

    1986-04-01

    The relative antioxidant efficacy, in vitro, of several antibiotics was examined by studying their effects on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) using zymosan-stimulated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) and the cell-free, xanthine-xanthine oxidase system. The species investigated are superoxide radical anion (O2-.), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and hydroxyl radical (OH.). Three tetracyclines (tetracycline HCl, oxytetracycline HCl, and minocycline HCl), erythromycin, cephalexin, penicillin G, chloramphenicol, and streptomycin were used as test drugs. At concentrations comparable to therapeutic blood levels, tetracycline HCl, oxytetracycline HCl, minocycline HCl, and erythromycin inhibited some of the ROS production by PMNL. In the xanthine-xanthine oxidase system, only minocycline HCl suppressed the H2O2 level. Cephalexin, penicillin G, chloramphenicol, and streptomycin did not affect any of the ROS examined at the concentrations tested. The capacity of some of these agents to inhibit ROS generation by PMNL may account, in part, for their efficacy in inflammatory skin diseases such as acne vulgaris. The antioxidant effect of these antibiotics does not stem from their capability to scavenge ROS, but originates rather from their effect on PMNL cell function directly with resultant anti-inflammatory effects on the inflammatory processes.

  11. Mitochondria: Much ado about nothing? How dangerous is reactive oxygen species production?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzerová, Eliška; Prokisch, Holger

    2015-06-01

    For more than 50 years, reactive oxygen species have been considered as harmful agents, which can attack proteins, lipids or nucleic acids. In order to deal with reactive oxygen species, there is a sophisticated system developed in mitochondria to prevent possible damage. Indeed, increased reactive oxygen species levels contribute to pathomechanisms in several human diseases, either by its impaired defense system or increased production of reactive oxygen species. However, in the last two decades, the importance of reactive oxygen species in many cellular signaling pathways has been unraveled. Homeostatic levels were shown to be necessary for correct differentiation during embryonic expansion of stem cells. Although the mechanism is still not fully understood, we cannot only regard reactive oxygen species as a toxic by-product of mitochondrial respiration anymore. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Energy Metabolism Disorders and Therapies. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Inverse modeling of multicomponent reactive transport through single and dual porosity media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samper, Javier; Zheng, Liange; Fernández, Ana María; Montenegro, Luis

    2008-06-01

    Compacted bentonite is foreseen as buffer material for high-level radioactive waste in deep geological repositories because it provides hydraulic isolation, chemical stability, and radionuclide sorption. A wide range of laboratory tests were performed within the framework of FEBEX ( Full-scale Engineered Barrier EXperiment) project to characterize buffer properties and develop numerical models for FEBEX bentonite. Here we present inverse single and dual-continuum multicomponent reactive transport models of a long-term permeation test performed on a 2.5 cm long sample of FEBEX bentonite. Initial saline bentonite porewater was flushed with 5.5 pore volumes of fresh granitic water. Water flux and chemical composition of effluent waters were monitored during almost 4 years. The model accounts for solute advection and diffusion and geochemical reactions such as aqueous complexation, acid-base, cation exchange, protonation/deprotonation by surface complexation and dissolution/precipitation of calcite, chalcedony and gypsum. All of these processes are assumed at local equilibrium. Similar to previous studies of bentonite porewater chemistry on batch systems which attest the relevance of protonation/deprotonation on buffering pH, our results confirm that protonation/deprotonation is a key process in maintaining a stable pH under dynamic transport conditions. Breakthrough curves of reactive species are more sensitive to initial porewater concentration than to effective diffusion coefficient. Optimum estimates of initial porewater chemistry of saturated compacted FEBEX bentonite are obtained by solving the inverse problem of multicomponent reactive transport. While the single-continuum model reproduces the trends of measured data for most chemical species, it fails to match properly the long tails of most breakthrough curves. Such limitation is overcome by resorting to a dual-continuum reactive transport model.

  13. Measurement of Reactive Oxygen Species, Reactive Nitrogen Species, and Redox-Dependent Signaling in the Cardiovascular System: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griendling, Kathy K; Touyz, Rhian M; Zweier, Jay L; Dikalov, Sergey; Chilian, William; Chen, Yeong-Renn; Harrison, David G; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2016-08-19

    Reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species are biological molecules that play important roles in cardiovascular physiology and contribute to disease initiation, progression, and severity. Because of their ephemeral nature and rapid reactivity, these species are difficult to measure directly with high accuracy and precision. In this statement, we review current methods for measuring these species and the secondary products they generate and suggest approaches for measuring redox status, oxidative stress, and the production of individual reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. We discuss the strengths and limitations of different methods and the relative specificity and suitability of these methods for measuring the concentrations of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species in cells, tissues, and biological fluids. We provide specific guidelines, through expert opinion, for choosing reliable and reproducible assays for different experimental and clinical situations. These guidelines are intended to help investigators and clinical researchers avoid experimental error and ensure high-quality measurements of these important biological species. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Molecular and biochemical mechanisms in teratogenesis involving reactive oxygen species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, Peter G.; Bhuller, Yadvinder; Chen, Connie S.; Jeng, Winnie; Kasapinovic, Sonja; Kennedy, Julia C.; Kim, Perry M.; Laposa, Rebecca R.; McCallum, Gordon P.; Nicol, Christopher J.; Parman, Toufan; Wiley, Michael J.; Wong, Andrea W.

    2005-01-01

    Developmental pathologies may result from endogenous or xenobiotic-enhanced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which oxidatively damage cellular macromolecules and/or alter signal transduction. This minireview focuses upon several model drugs (phenytoin, thalidomide, methamphetamine), environmental chemicals (benzo[a]pyrene) and gamma irradiation to examine this hypothesis in vivo and in embryo culture using mouse, rat and rabbit models. Embryonic prostaglandin H synthases (PHSs) and lipoxygenases bioactivate xenobiotics to free radical intermediates that initiate ROS formation, resulting in oxidation of proteins, lipids and DNA. Oxidative DNA damage and embryopathies are reduced in PHS knockout mice, and in mice treated with PHS inhibitors, antioxidative enzymes, antioxidants and free radical trapping agents. Thalidomide causes embryonic DNA oxidation in susceptible (rabbit) but not resistant (mouse) species. Embryopathies are increased in mutant mice deficient in the antioxidative enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), or by glutathione (GSH) depletion, or inhibition of GSH peroxidase or GSH reductase. Inducible nitric oxide synthase knockout mice are partially protected. Inhibition of Ras or NF-kB pathways reduces embryopathies, implicating ROS-mediated signal transduction. Atm and p53 knockout mice deficient in DNA damage response/repair are more susceptible to xenobiotic or radiation embryopathies, suggesting a teratological role for DNA damage, consistent with enhanced susceptibility to methamphetamine in ogg1 knockout mice with deficient repair of oxidative DNA damage. Even endogenous embryonic oxidative stress carries a risk, since untreated G6PD- or ATM-deficient mice have increased embryopathies. Thus, embryonic processes regulating the balance of ROS formation, oxidative DNA damage and repair, and ROS-mediated signal transduction may be important determinants of teratological risk

  15. Use the Protonmotive Force: Mitochondrial Uncoupling and Reactive Oxygen Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Brandon J; Trewin, Adam J; Amitrano, Andrea M; Kim, Minsoo; Wojtovich, Andrew P

    2018-04-04

    Mitochondrial respiration results in an electrochemical proton gradient, or protonmotive force (pmf), across the mitochondrial inner membrane. The pmf is a form of potential energy consisting of charge (∆ψ m ) and chemical (∆pH) components, that together drive ATP production. In a process called uncoupling, proton leak into the mitochondrial matrix independent of ATP production dissipates the pmf and energy is lost as heat. Other events can directly dissipate the pmf independent of ATP production as well, such as chemical exposure or mechanisms involving regulated mitochondrial membrane electrolyte transport. Uncoupling has defined roles in metabolic plasticity and can be linked through signal transduction to physiologic events. In the latter case, the pmf impacts mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Although capable of molecular damage, ROS also have signaling properties that depend on the timing, location, and quantity of their production. In this review, we provide a general overview of mitochondrial ROS production, mechanisms of uncoupling, and how these work in tandem to affect physiology and pathologies, including obesity, cardiovascular disease, and immunity. Overall, we highlight that isolated bioenergetic models-mitochondria and cells-only partially recapitulate the complex link between the pmf and ROS signaling that occurs in vivo. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Matairesinol inhibits angiogenesis via suppression of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Boram; Kim, Ki Hyun; Jung, Hye Jin [Chemical Genomics National Research Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Translational Research Center for Protein Function Control, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Ho Jeong, E-mail: kwonhj@yonsei.ac.kr [Chemical Genomics National Research Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Translational Research Center for Protein Function Control, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matairesinol suppresses mitochondrial ROS generation during hypoxia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matairesinol exhibits potent anti-angiogenic activity both in vitro and in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matairesinol could be a basis for the development of novel anti-angiogenic agents. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) are involved in cancer initiation and progression and function as signaling molecules in many aspects of hypoxia and growth factor-mediated signaling. Here we report that matairesinol, a natural small molecule identified from the cell-based screening of 200 natural plants, suppresses mROS generation resulting in anti-angiogenic activity. A non-toxic concentration of matairesinol inhibited the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The compound also suppressed in vitro angiogenesis of tube formation and chemoinvasion, as well as in vivo angiogenesis of the chorioallantoic membrane at non-toxic doses. Furthermore, matairesinol decreased hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} in hypoxic HeLa cells. These results demonstrate that matairesinol could function as a novel angiogenesis inhibitor by suppressing mROS signaling.

  17. REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES AT THE CROSSROADS OF INFLAMMASOME AND INFLAMMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anantha eHarijith

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammasomes form a crucial part of the innate immune system. These are multi-protein oligomer platforms that are composed of intracellular sensors which are coupled with caspase and interleukin activating systems. Nod-like receptor protein (NLRP 3, and 6 and NLRC4 and AIM2 are the prominent members of the inflammasome family. Inflammasome activation leads to pyroptosis, a process of programmed cell death distinct from apoptosis through activation of Caspase and further downstream targets such as IL-1β and IL-18 leading to activation of inflammatory cascade. Reactive oxygen species (ROS serve as important inflammasome activating signals. ROS activate inflammasome through mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2. Dysregulation of inflammasome is plays a significant role in various pathological process. Viral infections such as Dengue and Respiratory syncytial virus activate inflammasomes. Crystal compounds in silicosis and gout also activate ROS. In diabetes, inhibition of autophagy with resultant accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria leads to enhanced ROS production activating inflammasomes. Activation of inflammasomes can be dampened by antioxidants such as SIRT-1. Inflammasome and related cascade could serve as future therapeutic targets for various pathological conditions.

  18. Quantification of reactive oxygen species for photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zou; Zhang, Jinde; Lin, Lisheng; Li, Buhong

    2016-10-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an effective therapeutic modality that uses a light source to activate light-sensitive photosensitizers to treat both oncologic and nononcological indications. Photosensitizers are excited to the long-lived triplet state, and they react with biomolecules via type I or II mechanism resulted in cell death and tumor necrosis. Free radicals and radical ions are formed by electron transfer reactions (type I), which rapidly react with oxygen leading to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide ions, hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide. Singlet molecular oxygen is produced in a Type II reaction, in which the excited singlet state of the photosensitizer generated upon photon absorption by the ground-state photosensitizer molecule undergoes intersystem crossing to a long-lived triplet state. In this talk, the fundmental mechanisms and detection techniques for ROS generation in PDT will be introduced. In particular, the quantification of singlet oxygen generation for pre-clinical application will be highlighted, which plays an essential role in the establishment of robust singlet oxygen-mediated PDT dosimetry.

  19. Scavenging reactive oxygen species inhibits status epilepticus-induced neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy, Pallavi B; Liang, Li-Ping; Day, Brian J; Patel, Manisha

    2017-12-01

    Inflammation has been identified as an important mediator of seizures and epileptogenesis. Understanding the mechanisms underlying seizure-induced neuroinflammation could lead to the development of novel therapies for the epilepsies. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are recognized as mediators of seizure-induced neuronal damage and are known to increase in models of epilepsies. ROS are also known to contribute to inflammation in several disease states. We hypothesized that ROS are key modulators of neuroinflammation i.e. pro-inflammatory cytokine production and microglial activation in acquired epilepsy. The role of ROS in modulating seizure-induced neuroinflammation was investigated in the pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) resulted in a time-dependent increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine production in the hippocampus and piriform cortex. Scavenging ROS with a small-molecule catalytic antioxidant decreased SE-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production and microglial activation, suggesting that ROS contribute to SE-induced neuroinflammation. Scavenging ROS also attenuated phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6, the downstream target of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway indicating that this pathway might provide one mechanistic link between SE-induced ROS production and inflammation. Together, these results demonstrate that ROS contribute to SE-induced cytokine production and antioxidant treatment may offer a novel approach to control neuroinflammation in epilepsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. In situ reactive oxygen species production for tertiary wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guitaya, Léa; Drogui, Patrick; Blais, Jean François

    2015-05-01

    The goal of this research was to develop a new approach for tertiary water treatment, particularly disinfection and removal of refractory organic compounds, without adding any chemical. Hydrogen peroxide can indeed be produced from dissolved oxygen owing to electrochemical processes. Using various current intensities (1.0 to 4.0 A), it was possible to in situ produce relatively high concentration of H2O2 with a specific production rate of 0.05 × 10(-5) M/min/A. Likewise, by using ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy method, it was shown that other reactive oxygen species (ROS) including HO(*) radical and O3 could be simultaneously formed during electrolysis. The ROS concentration passed from 0.45 × 10(-5) M after 20 min of electrolysis to a concentration of 2.87 × 10(-5) M after 100 min of electrolysis. The disinfection and the organic matter removal were relatively high during the tertiary treatment of municipal and domestic wastewaters. More than 90 % of organic compounds (chemical oxygen demand) can be removed, whereas 99 % of faecal coliform abatement can be reached. Likewise, the process was also effective in removing turbidity (more than 90 % of turbidity was removed) so that the effluent became more and more transparent.

  1. Reactive oxygen species in phytopathogenic fungi: signaling, development, and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Jens; Tudzynski, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a major role in pathogen-plant interactions: recognition of a pathogen by the plant rapidly triggers the oxidative burst, which is necessary for further defense reactions. The specific role of ROS in pathogen defense is still unclear. Studies on the pathogen so far have focused on the importance of the oxidative stress response (OSR) systems to overcome the oxidative burst or of its avoidance by effectors. This review focuses on the role of ROS for fungal virulence and development. In the recent years, it has become obvious that (a) fungal OSR systems might not have the predicted crucial role in pathogenicity, (b) fungal pathogens, especially necrotrophs, can actively contribute to the ROS level in planta and even take advantage of the host's response, (c) fungi possess superoxide-generating NADPH oxidases similar to mammalian Nox complexes that are important for pathogenicity; however, recent data indicate that they are not directly involved in pathogen-host communication but in fungal differentiation processes that are necessary for virulence. Copyright © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  2. NSAIDs and Cardiovascular Diseases: Role of Reactive Oxygen Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Rajeshwary; Alajbegovic, Azra; Gomes, Aldrin V.

    2015-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most commonly used drugs worldwide. NSAIDs are used for a variety of conditions including pain, rheumatoid arthritis, and musculoskeletal disorders. The beneficial effects of NSAIDs in reducing or relieving pain are well established, and other benefits such as reducing inflammation and anticancer effects are also documented. The undesirable side effects of NSAIDs include ulcers, internal bleeding, kidney failure, and increased risk of heart attack and stroke. Some of these side effects may be due to the oxidative stress induced by NSAIDs in different tissues. NSAIDs have been shown to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) in different cell types including cardiac and cardiovascular related cells. Increases in ROS result in increased levels of oxidized proteins which alters key intracellular signaling pathways. One of these key pathways is apoptosis which causes cell death when significantly activated. This review discusses the relationship between NSAIDs and cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and the role of NSAID-induced ROS in CVD. PMID:26457127

  3. Reactive oxygen species as mediator of tumor radiosensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu Dayal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In normal functioning of the cell, there is a balance between generation and neutralization of reactive oxygen species (ROS by endogenous cellular defense machinery. Low levels of ROS inside the cells are required for normal functioning of the cell, which regulate signaling mechanisms involved in mitosis and apoptosis; excess of ROS production may cause oxidative stress leading to damage in vital cellular molecules, namely cytosolic lipids, proteins, and DNA. In the situation of intracellular redox imbalance, molecules of cells are altered by ROS leading to pathogenic state. It is to be noted that ROS is not only known to be involved in tumor induction and progression processes but also enhances tumor cell radiosensitivity. The level of ROS-mediated oxidative stress is linked to cellular radiosensitivity. In general, cancer cells exhibit high levels of ROS, which forms a target for selectively killing them by radiation. In this paper, we have reviewed how oxidative stress determines the radiosensitivity of tumor cells involving ROS in the mechanism of radiation induced tumor cell killing. It is suggested that radiation-induced ROS play a key role in the mechanism of tumor cell killing by altering the signaling network and triggering of apoptosis. Furthermore, it is pointed out that combined use of plant-derived antioxidants and radiation enhance overproduction of ROS in tumor cells leading to enhanced radiosensitivity, which may find practical applications in clinic.

  4. Matairesinol inhibits angiogenesis via suppression of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Matairesinol suppresses mitochondrial ROS generation during hypoxia. ► Matairesinol exhibits potent anti-angiogenic activity both in vitro and in vivo. ► Matairesinol could be a basis for the development of novel anti-angiogenic agents. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) are involved in cancer initiation and progression and function as signaling molecules in many aspects of hypoxia and growth factor-mediated signaling. Here we report that matairesinol, a natural small molecule identified from the cell-based screening of 200 natural plants, suppresses mROS generation resulting in anti-angiogenic activity. A non-toxic concentration of matairesinol inhibited the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The compound also suppressed in vitro angiogenesis of tube formation and chemoinvasion, as well as in vivo angiogenesis of the chorioallantoic membrane at non-toxic doses. Furthermore, matairesinol decreased hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in hypoxic HeLa cells. These results demonstrate that matairesinol could function as a novel angiogenesis inhibitor by suppressing mROS signaling.

  5. Nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species in the nucleus revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provost, Chantale; Choufani, Faten; Avedanian, Levon; Bkaily, Ghassan; Gobeil, Fernand; Jacques, Danielle

    2010-03-01

    Recent work from our group showed that the nuclear envelope membranes contain several G protein-coupled receptors, including prostaglandin E2 (EP3R) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) receptors. Activation of EP3R increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) RNA expression in nuclei. eNOS and inducible NOS (iNOS) are reported to also be present at the nuclear level. Furthermore, reactive oxygen species (ROS) were also localized at the nuclear level. In this review, we show that stimulation with NO donor sodium nitroprusside results in an increase of intranuclear calcium that was dependent on guanylate cyclase activation, but independent of MAPK. This increase in nuclear calcium correlated with an increase in nuclear transcription of iNOS. H2O2 and ET-1 increase both cytosolic and nuclear ROS in human endocardial endothelial cells and in human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. This increase in ROS levels by H2O2 and ET-1 was reversed by the antioxidant glutathione. In addition, our results strongly suggest that cytosolic signalization is not only transmitted to the nucleus but is also generated by the nucleus. Furthermore, we demonstrate that oxidative stress can be sensed by the nucleus. These results highly suggest that ROS formation is also generated directly by the nucleus and that free radicals may contribute to ET-1 regulation of nuclear Ca2+ homeostasis.

  6. Reactive Oxygen Species and Targeted Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generally increased in pancreatic cancer cells compared with normal cells. ROS plays a vital role in various cellular biological activities including proliferation, growth, apoptosis, and invasion. Besides, ROS participates in tumor microenvironment orchestration. The role of ROS is a doubled-edged sword in pancreatic cancer. The dual roles of ROS depend on the concentration. ROS facilitates carcinogenesis and cancer progression with mild-to-moderate elevated levels, while excessive ROS damages cancer cells dramatically and leads to cell death. Based on the recent knowledge, either promoting ROS generation to increase the concentration of ROS with extremely high levels or enhancing ROS scavenging ability to decrease ROS levels may benefit the treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, when faced with oxidative stress, the antioxidant programs of cancer cells have been activated to help cancer cells to survive in the adverse condition. Furthermore, ROS signaling and antioxidant programs play the vital roles in the progression of pancreatic cancer and in the response to cancer treatment. Eventually, it may be the novel target for various strategies and drugs to modulate ROS levels in pancreatic cancer therapy. PMID:26881012

  7. Role of Melanin in Melanocyte Dysregulation of Reactive Oxygen Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah C. Jenkins

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have recently reported a potential alternative tumor suppressor function for p16 relating to its capacity to regulate oxidative stress and observed that oxidative dysregulation in p16-depleted cells was most profound in melanocytes, compared to keratinocytes or fibroblasts. Moreover, in the absence of p16 depletion or exogenous oxidative insult, melanocytes exhibited significantly higher basal levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS than these other epidermal cell types. Given the role of oxidative stress in melanoma development, we speculated that this increased susceptibility of melanocytes to oxidative stress (and greater reliance on p16 for suppression of ROS may explain why genetic compromise of p16 is more commonly associated with predisposition to melanoma rather than other cancers. Here we show that the presence of melanin accounts for this differential oxidative stress in normal and p16-depleted melanocytes. Thus the presence of melanin in the skin appears to be a double-edged sword: it protects melanocytes as well as neighboring keratinocytes in the skin through its capacity to absorb UV radiation, but its synthesis in melanocytes results in higher levels of intracellular ROS that may increase melanoma susceptibility.

  8. Endogenous mechanisms of reactive oxygen species (ROS generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Sarniak

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The main cellular source of reactive oxygen species (ROS is mitochondrial respiratory chain and active NADPH responsible for “respiratory burst” of phagocytes. Whatsmore ROS are produced in endoplasmic reticulum, peroxisomes, with the participation of xanthine and endothelial oxidase and during autoxidation process of small molecules. Mitochondrial respiratory chain is the main cellular source of ROS. It is considered that in aerobic organisms ROS are mainly formed during normal oxygen metabolism, as byproducts of oxidative phosphorylation, during the synthesis of ATP. The intermembranous phagocyte enzyme – activated NADPH oxidase, responsible for the “respiratory burst” of phagocytes, which is another source of ROS, plays an important role in defense of organism against infections.The aim of this article is to resume actuall knowledge about structure and function of the mitochondrial electron transport chain in which ROS are the byproducts and about NADPH oxidase as well as the function of each of its components in the “respiratory burst” of phagocytes.

  9. Mechanisms of nanotoxicity: generation of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Peter P; Xia, Qingsu; Hwang, Huey-Min; Ray, Paresh C; Yu, Hongtao

    2014-03-01

    Nanotechnology is a rapidly developing field in the 21(st) century, and the commercial use of nanomaterials for novel applications is increasing exponentially. To date, the scientific basis for the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of most manufactured nanomaterials are not understood. The mechanisms underlying the toxicity of nanomaterials have recently been studied intensively. An important mechanism of nanotoxicity is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Overproduction of ROS can induce oxidative stress, resulting in cells failing to maintain normal physiological redox-regulated functions. This in turn leads to DNA damage, unregulated cell signaling, change in cell motility, cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and cancer initiation. There are critical determinants that can affect the generation of ROS. These critical determinants, discussed briefly here, include: size, shape, particle surface, surface positive charges, surface-containing groups, particle dissolution, metal ion release from nanometals and nanometal oxides, UV light activation, aggregation, mode of interaction with cells, inflammation, and pH of the medium. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Reactive oxygen species: players in the cardiovascular effects of testosterone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Fernando S.; Carvalho, Maria Helena C.; Reckelhoff, Jane F.

    2015-01-01

    Androgens are essential for the development and maintenance of male reproductive tissues and sexual function and for overall health and well being. Testosterone, the predominant and most important androgen, not only affects the male reproductive system, but also influences the activity of many other organs. In the cardiovascular system, the actions of testosterone are still controversial, its effects ranging from protective to deleterious. While early studies showed that testosterone replacement therapy exerted beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease, some recent safety studies point to a positive association between endogenous and supraphysiological levels of androgens/testosterone and cardiovascular disease risk. Among the possible mechanisms involved in the actions of testosterone on the cardiovascular system, indirect actions (changes in the lipid profile, insulin sensitivity, and hemostatic mechanisms, modulation of the sympathetic nervous system and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system), as well as direct actions (modulatory effects on proinflammatory enzymes, on the generation of reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide bioavailability, and on vasoconstrictor signaling pathways) have been reported. This mini-review focuses on evidence indicating that testosterone has prooxidative actions that may contribute to its deleterious actions in the cardiovascular system. The controversial effects of testosterone on ROS generation and oxidant status, both prooxidant and antioxidant, in the cardiovascular system and in cells and tissues of other systems are reviewed. PMID:26538238

  11. Reactive oxygen species a double-edged sword for mesothelioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalani, Simona; Galati, Rossella

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that oxidative stress can lead to chronic inflammation which, in turn, could mediate most chronic diseases including cancer. Oxidants have been implicated in the activity of crocidolite and amosite, the most powerful types of asbestos associated to the occurrence of mesothelioma. Currently rates of mesothelioma are rising and estimates indicate that the incidence of mesothelioma will peak within the next 10–15 years in the western world, while in Japan the peak is predicted not to occur until 40 years from now. Although the use of asbestos has been banned in many countries around the world, production of and the potentially hazardous exposure to asbestos is still present with locally high incidences of mesothelioma. Today a new man-made material, carbon nanotubes, has arisen as a concern; carbon nanotubes may display ‘asbestos-like’ pathogenicity with mesothelioma induction potential. Carbon nanotubes resulted in the greatest reactive oxygen species generation. How oxidative stress activates inflammatory pathways leading to the transformation of a normal cell to a tumor cell, to tumor cell survival, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, chemoresistance, and radioresistance, is the aim of this review. PMID:26078352

  12. Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species from Silicon Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen S. Leonard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Processing and synthesis of purified nanomaterials of diverse composition, size, and properties is an evolving process. Studies have demonstrated that some nanomaterials have potential toxic effects and have led to toxicity research focusing on nanotoxicology. About two million workers will be employed in the field of nanotechnology over the next 10 years. The unknown effects of nanomaterials create a need for research and development of techniques to identify possible toxicity. Through a cooperative effort between National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and IBM to address possible occupational exposures, silicon-based nanowires (SiNWs were obtained for our study. These SiNWs are anisotropic filamentary crystals of silicon, synthesized by the vapor-liquid-solid method and used in bio-sensors, gas sensors, and field effect transistors. Reactive oxygen species (ROS can be generated when organisms are exposed to a material causing cellular responses, such as lipid peroxidation, H 2 O 2 production, and DNA damage. SiNWs were assessed using three different in vitro environments (H 2 O 2 , RAW 264.7 cells, and rat alveolar macrophages for ROS generation and possible toxicity identification. We used electron spin resonance, analysis of lipid peroxidation, measurement of H 2 O 2 production, and the comet assay to assess generation of ROS from SiNW and define possible mechanisms. Our results demonstrate that SiNWs do not appear to be significant generators of free radicals.

  13. Aqueous chemistry of chlorine: chemistry, analysis, and environmental fate of reactive oxidant species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jolley, R.L.; Carpenter, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    This report reviews (1) the chemistry of chlorine relative to its reactions in fresh, estuarine, and marine waters and the formation of reactive oxidant species; (2) the current status of chemical analysis of reactive chlorine species and chlorine-produced oxidant species relative to analysis of low concentrations (microgram-per-liter range) and determination of accuracy and precision of methods; and (3) the environmental fate of chlorine and chlorine-produced oxidant species.

  14. NADPH oxidase(s): new source(s) of reactive oxygen species in the vascular system?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heerebeek, L.; Meischl, C.; Stooker, W.; Meijer, C. J. L. M.; Niessen, H. W. M.; Roos, D.

    2002-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species play an important role in a variety of (patho)physiological vascular processes. Recent publications have produced evidence of a role for putative non-phagocyte NADP oxidase(s) in the vascular production of reactive oxygen species. In the present review, we discuss the

  15. Reactive oxygen species in health and disease : Finding the right balance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wijst, Monique

    2016-01-01

    When oxygen takes up an electron, reactive oxygen species are formed. These free radicals can react with important molecules in our body (DNA, proteins), just like iron rusts (oxidation). Too many reactive oxygen species, called oxidative stress, result in cellular damage causing either cell death

  16. Are mitochondrial reactive oxygen species required for autophagy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Jianfei, E-mail: jjf73@pitt.edu [Center for Free Radical and Antioxidant Health, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh (United States); Maeda, Akihiro; Ji, Jing [Center for Free Radical and Antioxidant Health, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh (United States); Baty, Catherine J.; Watkins, Simon C. [Center for Biologic Imaging, Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, University of Pittsburgh (United States); Greenberger, Joel S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh (United States); Kagan, Valerian E., E-mail: kagan@pitt.edu [Center for Free Radical and Antioxidant Health, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh (United States)

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} Autophageal and apoptotic pathways were dissected in cytochrome c deficient cells. {yields} Staurosporine (STS)-induced autophagy was not accompanied by ROS generation. {yields} Autophagy was detectable in mitochondrial DNA deficient {rho}{sup 0} cells. {yields} Mitochondrial ROS are not required for the STS-induced autophagy in HeLa cells. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are said to participate in the autophagy signaling. Supporting evidence is obscured by interference of autophagy and apoptosis, whereby the latter heavily relies on ROS signaling. To dissect autophagy from apoptosis we knocked down expression of cytochrome c, the key component of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis, in HeLa cells using shRNA. In cytochrome c deficient HeLa1.2 cells, electron transport was compromised due to the lack of electron shuttle between mitochondrial respiratory complexes III and IV. A rapid and robust LC3-I/II conversion and mitochondria degradation were observed in HeLa1.2 cells treated with staurosporine (STS). Neither generation of superoxide nor accumulation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was detected in STS-treated HeLa1.2 cells. A membrane permeable antioxidant, PEG-SOD, plus catalase exerted no effect on STS-induced LC3-I/II conversion and mitochondria degradation. Further, STS caused autophagy in mitochondria DNA-deficient {rho}{sup o} HeLa1.2 cells in which both electron transport and ROS generation were completely disrupted. Counter to the widespread view, we conclude that mitochondrial ROS are not required for the induction of autophagy.

  17. Biochemistry and Physiology of Reactive Oxygen Species in Euglena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Takahiro; Tamaki, Shun; Maruta, Takanori; Shigeoka, Shigeru

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide are by-products of various metabolic processes in aerobic organisms including Euglena. Chloroplasts and mitochondria are the main sites of ROS generation by photosynthesis and respiration, respectively, through the active electron transport chain. An efficient antioxidant network is required to maintain intracellular ROS pools at optimal conditions for redox homeostasis. A comparison with the networks of plants and animals revealed that Euglena has acquired some aspects of ROS metabolic process. Euglena lacks catalase and a typical selenocysteine containing animal-type glutathione peroxidase for hydrogen peroxide scavenging, but contains enzymes involved in ascorbate-glutathione cycle solely in the cytosol. Ascorbate peroxidase in Euglena, which plays a central role in the ascorbate-glutathione cycle, forms a unique intra-molecular dimer structure that is related to the recognition of peroxides. We recently identified peroxiredoxin and NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase isoforms in cellular compartments including chloroplasts and mitochondria, indicating the physiological significance of the thioredoxin system in metabolism of ROS. Besides glutathione, Euglena contains the unusual thiol compound trypanothione, an unusual form of glutathione involving two molecules of glutathione joined by a spermidine linker, which has been identified in pathogenic protists such as Trypanosomatida and Schizopyrenida. Furthermore, in contrast to plants, photosynthesis by Euglena is not susceptible to hydrogen peroxide because of resistance of the Calvin cycle enzymes fructose-1,6-bisphosphatse, NADP + -glyceraldehyde-3-phosphatase, sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase, and phosphoribulokinase to hydrogen peroxide. Consequently, these characteristics of Euglena appear to exemplify a strategy for survival and adaptation to various environmental conditions during the evolutionary process of euglenoids.

  18. Reactive Oxygen Species Alter Autocrine and Paracrine Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zangar, Richard C.; Bollinger, Nikki; Weber, Thomas J.; Tan, Ruimin; Markillie, Lye Meng; Karin, Norman J.

    2011-12-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) 3A4 (CYP3A4) is the most abundant P450 protein in human liver and intestine and is highly inducible by a variety of drugs and other compounds. The P450 catalytic cycle is known to uncouple and release reactive oxygen species (ROS), but the effects of ROS from P450 and other enzymes in the endo-plasmic reticulum have been poorly studied from the perspective of effects on cell biology. In this study, we expressed low levels of CYP3A4 in HepG2 cells, a human hepatocarcinoma cell line, and examined effects on intracellular levels of ROS and on the secretion of a variety of growth factors that are important in extracellular communication. Using the redox-sensitive dye RedoxSensor red, we demonstrate that CYP3A4 expression increases levels of ROS in viable cells. A customELISA microarray platform was employed to demonstrate that expression of CYP3A4 increased secretion of amphiregulin, intracellular adhesion molecule 1, matrix metalloprotease 2, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and vascular endothelial growth factor, but suppressed secretion of CD14. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine suppressed all P450-dependent changes in protein secretion except for CD14. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that changes in protein secretion were consistently associated with corresponding changes in gene expression. Inhibition of the NF-{kappa}B pathway blocked P450 effects on PDGF secretion. CYP3A4 expression also altered protein secretion in human mammary epithelial cells and C10 mouse lung cells. Overall, these results suggest that increased ROS production in the endoplasmic reticulum alters the secretion of proteins that have key roles in paracrine and autocrine signaling.

  19. The connection of monocytes and reactive oxygen species in pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Hackel

    Full Text Available The interplay of specific leukocyte subpopulations, resident cells and proalgesic mediators results in pain in inflammation. Proalgesic mediators like reactive oxygen species (ROS and downstream products elicit pain by stimulation of transient receptor potential (TRP channels. The contribution of leukocyte subpopulations however is less clear. Local injection of neutrophilic chemokines elicits neutrophil recruitment but no hyperalgesia in rats. In meta-analyses the monocytic chemoattractant, CCL2 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1; MCP-1, was identified as an important factor in the pathophysiology of human and animal pain. In this study, intraplantar injection of CCL2 elicited thermal and mechanical pain in Wistar but not in Dark Agouti (DA rats, which lack p47(phox, a part of the NADPH oxidase complex. Inflammatory hyperalgesia after complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA as well as capsaicin-induced hyperalgesia and capsaicin-induced current flow in dorsal root ganglion neurons in DA were comparable to Wistar rats. Macrophages from DA expressed lower levels of CCR2 and thereby migrated less towards CCL2 and formed limited amounts of ROS in vitro and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE in the tissue in response to CCL2 compared to Wistar rats. Local adoptive transfer of peritoneal macrophages from Wistar but not from DA rats reconstituted CCL2-triggered hyperalgesia in leukocyte-depleted DA and Wistar rats. A pharmacological stimulator of ROS production (phytol restored CCL2-induced hyperalgesia in vivo in DA rats. In Wistar rats, CCL2-induced hyperalgesia was completely blocked by superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase or tempol. Likewise, inhibition of NADPH oxidase by apocynin reduced CCL2-elicited hyperalgesia but not CFA-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia. In summary, we provide a link between CCL2, CCR2 expression on macrophages, NADPH oxidase, ROS and the development CCL2-triggered hyperalgesia, which is different from CFA-induced hyperalgesia. The study

  20. Physiologic and pathologic levels of reactive oxygen species in neat semen of infertile men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Nisarg; Sharma, Rakesh; Makker, Kartikeya; Sabanegh, Edmund; Agarwal, Ashok

    2009-11-01

    To define physiologic levels of reactive oxygen species in infertile men and establish a cutoff value of reactive oxygen species level in neat semen with a high sensitivity and specificity to differentiate infertile men from fertile donors (controls). Reactive oxygen species levels were measured in the neat semen samples (n = 51) from fertile donors and infertile patients (n = 54). Reproductive research laboratory at a tertiary care hospital. Infertile patients from male infertility clinic. Reactive oxygen species measurement in neat semen sample using luminol-based chemiluminescence method, receiver operating characteristic curves. Seminal reactive oxygen species levels, cutoff value, sensitivity and specificity, positive and negative predictive values. The best cutoff value to distinguish between healthy fertile donors and infertile men was 0.0185 x 10(6) counted photons per minute/20 x 10(6) sperm. At this threshold, the specificity was 82% and the sensitivity was 78%. This value can be defined as basal reactive oxygen species level in infertile men. Reactive oxygen species levels in neat semen samples as measured by luminol-based chemiluminescence are a highly specific and sensitive test in the diagnosis of infertility. This test also may help clinicians treat patients with seminal oxidative stress.

  1. Involvement of oxygen reactive species in the cellular response of carcinoma cells to irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulard, A.

    2004-06-01

    After a presentation of oxygen reactive species and their sources, the author describes the enzymatic and non-enzymatic anti-oxidative defenses, the physiological roles of oxygen reactive species, the oxidative stress, the water radiolysis, the anti-oxidative enzymes and the effects of ionizing radiations. The author then reports an investigation on the contribution of oxygen reactive species in the cellular response to irradiation, and an investigation on the influence of the breathing chain on the persistence of a radio-induced oxidative stress. He also reports a research on molecular mechanisms involved in the cellular radio-sensitivity

  2. 1 Role of reactive species in the photocatalytic degradation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    70

    N-WO3 is evaluated for the degradation of amaranth (AM) dye under visible and UVA light, along with the role of reactive .... temperature of 77 K by an adsorption instrument (Belsorp 28SA, Bel). The diffuse reflectance ..... However, it was also reported that an excess of H2O2 leads to competitive reactions that can inhibit the ...

  3. DMPD: NF-kappaB activation by reactive oxygen species: fifteen years later. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16723122 NF-kappaB activation by reactive oxygen species: fifteen years later. Gloi...svg) (.html) (.csml) Show NF-kappaB activation by reactive oxygen species: fifteen years later. PubmedID 167...23122 Title NF-kappaB activation by reactive oxygen species: fifteen years later.

  4. Direct and Indirect Photoreactions of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter: Roles of Reactive Oxygen Species and Iron

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goldstone, Jared

    2002-01-01

    ...), thus acting as a sink for CDOM and photodecomposition may proceed both via direct photochemical reactions or via indirect processes, involving photochemically generated intermediates such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Superoxide (O2...

  5. Prodrugs activated by reactive oxygen species for use in the treatment of inflammatory diseases and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2018-01-01

    Prodrugs activated predominantly or exclusively in inflammatory tissue, more particularly prodrugs of methotrexate and derivatives thereof, which are selectively activated by Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in inflammatory tissues associated with cancer and inflammatory diseases, as well as method...

  6. Rapid lupus autoantigen relocalization and reactive oxygen species accumulation following ultraviolet irradiation of human keratinocytes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lawley, W.; Doherty, A; Denniss, S; Chauhan, D; Pruijn, G.J.M.; Venrooij, W.J.W. van; Lunec, J; Herbert, K

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In vitro treatment with ultraviolet B (UVB) induces relocalization of lupus autoantigens to the cell surface. We have addressed the relationship between autoantigen relocalization, accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the induction of apoptosis following UVA and

  7. Involvement of Cytochrome P450 in Reactive Oxygen Species Formation and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrycay, Eugene G; Bandiera, Stelvio M

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the involvement of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in the formation of reactive oxygen species in biological systems and discusses the possible involvement of reactive oxygen species and CYP enzymes in cancer. Reactive oxygen species are formed in biological systems as byproducts of the reduction of molecular oxygen and include the superoxide radical anion (∙O2-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydroxyl radical (∙OH), hydroperoxyl radical (HOO∙), singlet oxygen ((1)O2), and peroxyl radical (ROO∙). Two endogenous sources of reactive oxygen species are the mammalian CYP-dependent microsomal electron transport system and the mitochondrial electron transport chain. CYP enzymes catalyze the oxygenation of an organic substrate and the simultaneous reduction of molecular oxygen. If the transfer of oxygen to a substrate is not tightly controlled, uncoupling occurs and leads to the formation of reactive oxygen species. Reactive oxygen species are capable of causing oxidative damage to cellular membranes and macromolecules that can lead to the development of human diseases such as cancer. In normal cells, intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species are maintained in balance with intracellular biochemical antioxidants to prevent cellular damage. Oxidative stress occurs when this critical balance is disrupted. Topics covered in this review include the role of reactive oxygen species in intracellular cell signaling and the relationship between CYP enzymes and cancer. Outlines of CYP expression in neoplastic tissues, CYP enzyme polymorphism and cancer risk, CYP enzymes in cancer therapy and the metabolic activation of chemical procarcinogens by CYP enzymes are also provided. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Monascus purpureus induced apoptosis on gastric cancer cell by scavenging mitochondrial reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Hiromi; Ito, Hiromu; Matsui, Hirofumi

    2017-11-01

    Monascus purpureus is a red dye derived from yeast rice and has been used as color additives for food in East Asia. Monascus purpureus consists of several bioactive components. Some of these components work as a radical scavenger, thus monascus purpureus would also eliminate reactive oxygen species. Cancer cells maintain the high level of reactive oxygen species than normal cell and are death by imbalance in pro-oxidant/antioxidant homeostasis. In this study, we investigated whether monascus purpureus induced cancer specific cell death by scavenging reactive oxygen species. Compared to normal cell, monascus purpureus had cancer specific cytotoxicity. Monascus purpureus and lovastatin, its component, scavenged free radicals caused by a xanthine/xanthine oxidase system, thus Monascus purpureus is likely to scavenge reactive oxygen species by a synergistic effect between lovastatin and other components. Monascus purpureus also decreased reactive oxygen species derived from mitochondria in cancer cells, and cellular apoptosis was induced via activation of caspase-9. Induction of apoptosis by reduction of reactive oxygen species generation decreased acid ceramidase, and this mechanism could be involved with increasing ceramide accumulation in cells.

  9. Cytotoxic and Antitumor Activity of Sulforaphane: The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Sestili

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available According to recent estimates, cancer continues to remain the second leading cause of death and is becoming the leading one in old age. Failure and high systemic toxicity of conventional cancer therapies have accelerated the identification and development of innovative preventive as well as therapeutic strategies to contrast cancer-associated morbidity and mortality. In recent years, increasing body of in vitro and in vivo studies has underscored the cancer preventive and therapeutic efficacy of the isothiocyanate sulforaphane. In this review article, we highlight that sulforaphane cytotoxicity derives from complex, concurring, and multiple mechanisms, among which the generation of reactive oxygen species has been identified as playing a central role in promoting apoptosis and autophagy of target cells. We also discuss the site and the mechanism of reactive oxygen species’ formation by sulforaphane, the toxicological relevance of sulforaphane-formed reactive oxygen species, and the death pathways triggered by sulforaphane-derived reactive oxygen species.

  10. Reactivity of a Carbon-Supported Single-Site Molybdenum Dioxo Catalyst for Biodiesel Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouat, Aidan R.; Lohr, Tracy L.; Wegener, Evan C.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Delferro, Massimiliano; Stair, Peter C.; Marks, Tobin J.

    2016-08-23

    A single-site molybdenum dioxo catalyst, (Oc)2Mo(=O)2@C, was prepared via direct grafting of MoO2Cl2(dme) (dme = 1,2-dimethoxyethane) on high-surface- area activated carbon. The physicochemical and chemical properties of this catalyst were fully characterized by N2 physisorption, ICP-AES/OES, PXRD, STEM, XPS, XAS, temperature-programmed reduction with H2 (TPR-H2), and temperature-programmed NH3 desorption (TPD-NH3). The single-site nature of the Mo species is corroborated by XPS and TPR-H2 data, and it exhibits the lowest reported MoOx Tmax of reduction reported to date, suggesting a highly reactive MoVI center. (Oc)2Mo(=O)2@C catalyzes the transesterification of a variety of esters and triglycerides with ethanol, exhibiting high activity at moderate temperatures (60-90 °C) and with negligible deactivation. (Oc)2Mo(=O)2@C is resistant to water and can be recycled at least three times with no loss of activity. The transesterification reaction is determined experimentally to be first order in [ethanol] and first order in [Mo] with ΔH = 10.5(8) kcal mol-1 and ΔS = -32(2) eu. The low energy of activation is consistent with the moderate conditions needed to achieve rapid turnover. This highly active carbon-supported single-site molybdenum dioxo species is thus an efficient, robust, and lowcost catalyst with significant potential for transesterification processes.

  11. Species-level variability in extracellular production rates of reactive oxygen species by diatoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Julie Schneider

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Biological production and decay of the reactive oxygen species (ROS hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and superoxide (O2- likely have significant effects on the cycling of trace metals and carbon in marine systems. In this study, extracellular production rates of H2O2 and O2- were determined for five species of marine diatoms in the presence and absence of light. Production of both ROS was measured in parallel by suspending cells on filters and measuring the ROS downstream using chemiluminescence probes. In addition, the ability of these organisms to break down O2- and H2O2 was examined by measuring recovery of O2- and H2O2 added to the influent medium. O2- production rates ranged from undetectable to 7.3 x 10-16 mol cell-1 hr-1, while H2O2 production rates ranged from undetectable to 3.4 x 10-16 mol cell-1 hr-1. Results suggest that extracellular ROS production occurs through a variety of pathways even amongst organisms of the same genus. Thalassiosira spp. produced more O2- in light than dark, even when the organisms were killed, indicating that O2- is produced via a passive photochemical process on the cell surface. The ratio of H2O¬2 to O2- production rates was consistent with production of H2O2 solely through dismutation of O2- for T. oceanica, while T. pseudonana made much more H2O2 than O2 . T. weissflogii only produced H2O2 when stressed or killed. P. tricornutum cells did not make cell-associated ROS, but did secrete H2O2-producing substances into the growth medium. In all organisms, recovery rates for killed cultures (94-100% H2O2; 10-80% O2- were consistently higher than those for live cultures (65-95% H2O2; 10-50% O2-. While recovery rates for killed cultures in H2O2 indicate that nearly all H2O2 was degraded by active cell processes, O2- decay appeared to occur via a combination of active and passive processes. Overall, this study shows that the rates and pathways for ROS production and decay vary greatly among diatom species, even between

  12. Electrochemical sensor for the detection of multiple reactive oxygen and nitrogen species from ageing central nervous system homogenates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan-Murphy, A; Hachoumi, L; Yeoman, M S; Patel, B A

    2016-12-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) have been widely implicated in the ageing process and various approaches exist for monitoring these species in biological tissues. These approaches at present are limited to monitoring either a single pro-oxidant species or total pro-oxidant levels and therefore provide limited insight into the range of pro-oxidant species and their relative proportions in the ageing process. We have utilised a sensor that allows us to simultaneously monitor hydrogen peroxide, peroxynitrite, nitric oxide and nitrite. Using CNS homogenates from the pond snail, Lymnaea, we were able to show that levels of these ROS/RNS increased between young and old CNS homogenates and were different in various aged CNS regions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. Balancing the generation and elimination of reactive oxygen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Rusty; Redman, Regina

    2005-01-01

    Fossil records suggest that bacteria developed the ability to photosynthesize ≈3,500 million years ago (mya), initiating a very slow accumulation of atmospheric oxygen (1). Recent geochemical models suggest that atmospheric oxygen did not accumulate to levels conducive for aerobic life until 500–1,000 mya (2, 3). The oxygenation of Earth's atmosphere resulted in the emergence of aerobic organisms followed by a great diversification of biological species and the eventual evolution of humans.

  14. Generation of reactive species in atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge with liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelong, ZHANG; Jie, SHEN; Cheng, CHENG; Zimu, XU; Weidong, XIA

    2018-04-01

    Atmospheric pressure helium/water dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma is used to investigate the generation of reactive species in a gas-liquid interface and in a liquid. The emission intensity of the reactive species is measured by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) with different discharge powers at the gas-liquid interface. Spectrophotometry is used to analyze the reactive species induced by the plasma in the liquid. The concentration of OH radicals reaches 2.2 μm after 3 min of discharge treatment. In addition, the concentration of primary long-lived reactive species such as H2O2, {{{{NO}}}3}- and O3 are measured based on plasma treatment time. After 5 min of discharge treatment, the concentration of H2O2, {{{{NO}}}3}-, and O3 increased from 0 mg · L-1 to 96 mg · L-1, 19.5 mg · L-1, and 3.5 mg · L-1, respectively. The water treated by plasma still contained a considerable concentration of reactive species after 6 h of storage. The results will contribute to optimizing the DBD plasma system for biological decontamination.

  15. Principles for integrating reactive species into in vivo biological processes: Examples from exercise physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaritelis, Nikos V; Cobley, James N; Paschalis, Vassilis; Veskoukis, Aristidis S; Theodorou, Anastasios A; Kyparos, Antonios; Nikolaidis, Michalis G

    2016-04-01

    The equivocal role of reactive species and redox signaling in exercise responses and adaptations is an example clearly showing the inadequacy of current redox biology research to shed light on fundamental biological processes in vivo. Part of the answer probably relies on the extreme complexity of the in vivo redox biology and the limitations of the currently applied methodological and experimental tools. We propose six fundamental principles that should be considered in future studies to mechanistically link reactive species production to exercise responses or adaptations: 1) identify and quantify the reactive species, 2) determine the potential signaling properties of the reactive species, 3) detect the sources of reactive species, 4) locate the domain modified and verify the (ir)reversibility of post-translational modifications, 5) establish causality between redox and physiological measurements, 6) use selective and targeted antioxidants. Fulfilling these principles requires an idealized human experimental setting, which is certainly a utopia. Thus, researchers should choose to satisfy those principles, which, based on scientific evidence, are most critical for their specific research question. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. TGA2 signaling in response to reactive electrophile species is not dependent on cysteine modification of TGA2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findling, Simone; Stotz, Henrik U; Zoeller, Maria; Krischke, Markus; Zander, Mark; Gatz, Christiane; Berger, Susanne; Mueller, Martin J

    2018-01-01

    Reactive electrophile species (RES), including prostaglandins, phytoprostanes and 12-oxo phytodienoic acid (OPDA), activate detoxification responses in plants and animals. However, the pathways leading to the activation of defense reactions related to abiotic or biotic stress as a function of RES formation, accumulation or treatment are poorly understood in plants. Here, the thiol-modification of proteins, including the RES-activated basic region/leucine zipper transcription factor TGA2, was studied. TGA2 contains a single cysteine residue (Cys186) that was covalently modified by reactive cyclopentenones but not required for induction of detoxification genes in response to OPDA or prostaglandin A1. Activation of the glutathione-S-transferase 6 (GST6) promoter was responsive to cyclopentenones but not to unreactive cyclopentanones, including jasmonic acid suggesting that thiol reactivity of RES is important to activate the TGA2-dependent signaling pathway resulting in GST6 activation We show that RES modify thiols in numerous proteins in vivo, however, thiol reactivity alone appears not to be sufficient for biological activity as demonstrated by the failure of several membrane permeable thiol reactive reagents to activate the GST6 promoter.

  17. Integrated Transmission Electron and Single-Molecule Fluorescence Microscopy Correlates Reactivity with Ultrastructure in a Single Catalyst Particle

    OpenAIRE

    Hendriks, Frank C.; Mohammadian, Sajjad; Ristanovic, Zoran; Kalirai, Samanbir; Meirer, Florian; Vogt, Eelco T. C.; Bruijnincx, Pieter C. A.; Gerritsen, Hans; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2018-01-01

    Establishing structure–activity relationships in complex, hierarchically structured nanomaterials, such as fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts, requires characterization with complementary, correlated analysis techniques. An integrated setup has been developed to perform transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and single-molecule fluorescence (SMF) microscopy on such nanostructured samples. Correlated structure–reactivity information was obtained for 100 nm thin, microtomed sections of a ...

  18. Summertime distribution of PAN and other reactive nitrogen species in the northern high-latitude atmosphere of eastern Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, H. B.; Herlth, D.; O'Hara, D.; Zahnle, K.; Bradshaw, J. D.; Sandholm, S. T.; Talbot, R.; Gregory, G. L.; Sachse, G. W.; Blake, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    Aircraft measurements of key reactive nitrogen species (NO, NO2, HNO3, PAN, PPN, NO3(-), NO(y)), C1 to C6 hydrocarbons, acetone, O3, chemical tracers (C2Cl4, CO), and important meteorological parameters were performed over eastern Canada during July to August 1990 at altitudes between 0 and 6 km as part of an Arctic Boundary Layer Expedition (ABLE3B). In the free troposphere, PAN was found to be the single most abundant reactive nitrogen species constituting a major fraction of NO(y) and was significantly more abundant than NO(x) and HNO3. PAN and O3 were well correlated both in their fine and gross structures. Compared to data previously collected in the Arctic/subarctic atmosphere over Alaska (ABLE3A), the lower troposphere (0-4 km) over eastern Canada was found to contain larger reactive nitrogen and anthropogenic tracer concentrations. At higher altitudes (4-6 km) the atmospheric composition was in many ways similar to what was seen over Alaska and supports the view that a large-scale reservoir of PAN (and NO(y)) is present in the upper troposphere over the entire Arctic/subarctic region. The reactive nitrogen budget based on missions conducted from the North Bay site (missions 2-10) showed a small shortfall, whereas the budget for data collected from the Goose Bay operation (missions 11-19) showed essential balance. It is calculated that 15-20 ppt of the observed NO(x) may find its source from the available PAN reservoir. Meteorological considerations as well as relationships between reactive nitrogen and tracer species suggest that the atmosphere over eastern Canada during summer is greatly influenced by forest fires and transported industrial pollution.

  19. In vitro scavenging capacity of annatto seed extracts against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisté, Renan Campos; Mercadante, Adriana Zerlotti; Gomes, Ana; Fernandes, Eduarda; Lima, José Luís Fontes da Costa; Bragagnolo, Neura

    2011-07-15

    Bixa orellana L. (annatto), from Bixaceae family, is a native plant of tropical America, which accumulates several carotenoids (including bixin and norbixin), terpenoids, tocotrienols and flavonoids with potential antioxidant activity. In the present study, the in vitro scavenging capacity of annatto seed extracts against reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) was evaluated and compared to the bixin standard. Annatto extracts were obtained using solvents with different polarities and their phenolic compounds and bixin levels were determined by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to diode array detector. All annatto extracts were able to scavenge all the reactive species tested at the low μg/mL range, with the exception of superoxide radical. The ethanol:ethyl acetate and ethyl acetate extracts of annatto seeds, which presented the highest levels of hypolaetin and bixin, respectively, were the extracts with the highest antioxidant capacity, although bixin standard presented the lowest IC(50) values. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Analyses of reactive oxygen species and antioxidants in relation to seed longevity and germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly, Christophe; Kranner, Ilse

    2011-01-01

    Evidence is emerging that reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidants, together with plant hormones and other reactive species, such as reactive nitrogen species, are part of signalling networks pertinent to plant stress responses, cell division, and cell death. Consequently, they play pivotal roles in the regulation of seed development and maturation, germination and dormancy, seedling establishment, and seed ageing. Importantly, ROS, although essentially required at low concentrations, must be kept under stringent control by antioxidants. If the balance between pro- and antioxidative processes is lost and ROS production prevails, oxidative stress is the result, which can induce cell death and ultimately seed death. This chapter offers a variety of protocols for the determination of ROS, antioxidants, and stress markers aimed at enabling the reader to quantify these compounds. Protocols are also described to visualize ROS and localize the sites of ROS production, hoping to stimulate more research into ROS signalling and antioxidant control in key physiological and biochemical processes in seeds.

  1. IASI measurements of reactive trace species in biomass burning plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.-F. Coheur

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This work presents observations of a series of short-lived species in biomass burning plumes from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI, launched onboard the MetOp-A platform in October 2006. The strong fires that have occurred in the Mediterranean Basin – and particularly Greece – in August 2007, and those in Southern Siberia and Eastern Mongolia in the early spring of 2008 are selected to support the analyses. We show that the IASI infrared spectra in these fire plumes contain distinctive signatures of ammonia (NH3, ethene (C2H4, methanol (CH3OH and formic acid (HCOOH in the atmospheric window between 800 and 1200 cm−1, with some noticeable differences between the plumes. Peroxyacetyl nitrate (CH3COOONO2, abbreviated as PAN was also observed with good confidence in some plumes and a tentative assignment of a broadband absorption spectral feature to acetic acid (CH3COOH is made. For several of these species these are the first reported measurements made from space in nadir geometry. The IASI measurements are analyzed for plume height and concentration distributions of NH3, C2H4 and CH3OH. The Greek fires are studied in greater detail for the days associated with the largest emissions. In addition to providing information on the spatial extent of the plume, the IASI retrievals allow an estimate of the total mass emissions for NH3, C2H4 and CH3OH. Enhancement ratios are calculated for the latter relative to carbon monoxide (CO, giving insight in the chemical processes occurring during the transport, the first day after the emission.

  2. The Reactive Species Interactome: Evolutionary Emergence, Biological Significance, and Opportunities for Redox Metabolomics and Personalized Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese-Krott, Miriam M; Koning, Anne; Kuhnle, Gunter G C; Nagy, Peter; Bianco, Christopher L; Pasch, Andreas; Wink, David A; Fukuto, Jon M; Jackson, Alan A; van Goor, Harry; Olson, Kenneth R; Feelisch, Martin

    2017-10-01

    Oxidative stress is thought to account for aberrant redox homeostasis and contribute to aging and disease. However, more often than not, administration of antioxidants is ineffective, suggesting that our current understanding of the underlying regulatory processes is incomplete. Recent Advances: Similar to reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, reactive sulfur species are now emerging as important signaling molecules, targeting regulatory cysteine redox switches in proteins, affecting gene regulation, ion transport, intermediary metabolism, and mitochondrial function. To rationalize the complexity of chemical interactions of reactive species with themselves and their targets and help define their role in systemic metabolic control, we here introduce a novel integrative concept defined as the reactive species interactome (RSI). The RSI is a primeval multilevel redox regulatory system whose architecture, together with the physicochemical characteristics of its constituents, allows efficient sensing and rapid adaptation to environmental changes and various other stressors to enhance fitness and resilience at the local and whole-organism level. To better characterize the RSI-related processes that determine fluxes through specific pathways and enable integration, it is necessary to disentangle the chemical biology and activity of reactive species (including precursors and reaction products), their targets, communication systems, and effects on cellular, organ, and whole-organism bioenergetics using system-level/network analyses. Understanding the mechanisms through which the RSI operates will enable a better appreciation of the possibilities to modulate the entire biological system; moreover, unveiling molecular signatures that characterize specific environmental challenges or other forms of stress will provide new prevention/intervention opportunities for personalized medicine. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  3. Measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species with fluorescent probes: challenges and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Davies, Kelvin J.A.; Dennery, Phyllis A.; Forman, Henry Jay; Grisham, Matthew B.; Mann, Giovanni E.; Moore, Kevin; Roberts, L. Jackson; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this position paper is to present a critical analysis of the challenges and limitations of the most widely used fluorescent probes for detecting and measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Where feasible, we have made recommendations for the use of alternate probes and appropriate analytical techniques that measure the specific products formed from the reactions between fluorescent probes and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. We have proposed guidelines that will help present and future researchers with regard to the optimal use of selected fluorescent probes and interpretation of results. PMID:22027063

  4. Rapid evaluation of the durability of cortical neural implants using accelerated aging with reactive oxygen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takmakov, Pavel; Ruda, Kiersten; Phillips, K. Scott; Isayeva, Irada S.; Krauthamer, Victor; Welle, Cristin G.

    2015-04-01

    Objective. A challenge for implementing high bandwidth cortical brain-machine interface devices in patients is the limited functional lifespan of implanted recording electrodes. Development of implant technology currently requires extensive non-clinical testing to demonstrate device performance. However, testing the durability of the implants in vivo is time-consuming and expensive. Validated in vitro methodologies may reduce the need for extensive testing in animal models. Approach. Here we describe an in vitro platform for rapid evaluation of implant stability. We designed a reactive accelerated aging (RAA) protocol that employs elevated temperature and reactive oxygen species (ROS) to create a harsh aging environment. Commercially available microelectrode arrays (MEAs) were placed in a solution of hydrogen peroxide at 87 °C for a period of 7 days. We monitored changes to the implants with scanning electron microscopy and broad spectrum electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (1 Hz-1 MHz) and correlated the physical changes with impedance data to identify markers associated with implant failure. Main results. RAA produced a diverse range of effects on the structural integrity and electrochemical properties of electrodes. Temperature and ROS appeared to have different effects on structural elements, with increased temperature causing insulation loss from the electrode microwires, and ROS concentration correlating with tungsten metal dissolution. All array types experienced impedance declines, consistent with published literature showing chronic (>30 days) declines in array impedance in vivo. Impedance change was greatest at frequencies impedance at 1 kHz, our results indicate that an impedance change at 1 kHz is not a reliable predictive marker of implant degradation or failure. Significance. ROS, which are known to be present in vivo, can create structural damage and change electrical properties of MEAs. Broad-spectrum electrical impedance spectroscopy

  5. The Effect of Tacrolimus on Reactive Oxygen Species and Total Antioxidant Status in Pancreatic Beta Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namvaran, Fatemeh; Sharifi, Ali; Namvaran, Mohamad Mehdi; Maruf, Neda; Azarpira, Negar

    2015-12-01

    The mechanism responsible for the development of posttransplant diabetes mellitus associated with tacrolimus treatment remains unclear. To investigate the possible effect of tacrolimus on the development of impaired glucose tolerance in transplant recipients, this study focused on early and second phase insulin secretion, which may be affected by reactive oxygen species under tacrolimus therapy. We measured the anti-oxidant status and reactive oxygen species levels before and after tacrolimus treatment. The pro-duction of reactive oxygen species was determined by flow cytometry. Total antioxidant status was measured using total antioxidant status kits. The antioxidant status decreased while reactive oxygen species level increased significantly (P = .032) CONCLUSIONS: Tacrolimus treatment resulted in dose- and time-dependent increases in the production of reactive oxygen species by beta cells. The antioxidant status decreased in beta cells after tacrolimus treatment. Increased production of reactive oxygen species and decreased antioxidant status by tacrolimus in beta cells may lead to some adverse events.

  6. Regulation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species by salicylic acid in rice plants under salinity stress conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Bong-Gyu; Khan, Abdul Latif; Waqas, Muhammad; Kim, Hyun-Ho; Shahzad, Raheem; Imran, Muhammad

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated the regulatory role of exogenous salicylic acid (SA) in rice and its effects on toxic reactive oxygen and nitrogen species during short-term salinity stress. SA application (0.5 and 1.0 mM) during salinity-induced stress (100 mM NaCl) resulted in significantly longer shoot length and higher chlorophyll and biomass accumulation than with salinity stress alone. NaCl-induced reactive oxygen species production led to increased levels of lipid peroxidation in rice plants, which were significantly reduced following SA application. A similar finding was observed for superoxide dismutase; however, catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) were significantly reduced in rice plants treated with SA and NaCl alone and in combination. The relative mRNA expression of OsCATA and OsAPX1 was lower in rice plants during SA stress. Regarding nitrogenous species, S-nitrosothiol (SNO) was significantly reduced initially (one day after treatment [DAT]) but then increased in plants subjected to single or combined stress conditions. Genes related to SNO biosynthesis, S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR1), NO synthase-like activity (NOA), and nitrite reductase (NIR) were also assessed. The mRNA expression of GSNOR1 was increased relative to that of the control, whereas OsNOA was expressed at higher levels in plants treated with SA and NaCl alone relative to the control. The mRNA expression of OsNR was decreased in plants subjected to single or combination treatment, except at 2 DAT, compared to the control. In conclusion, the current findings suggest that SA can regulate the generation of NaCl-induced oxygen and nitrogen reactive species in rice plants. PMID:29558477

  7. Reactive oxygen species in human semen: validation and qualification of a chemiluminescence assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vessey, Wayne; Perez-Miranda, Ana; Macfarquhar, Rachel; Agarwal, Ashok; Homa, Sheryl

    2014-12-01

    To standardize and validate an assay for reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human semen. ROS levels assayed in blanks, negative and positive control samples (30% H2O2), and human semen, with the use of a luminol-based chemiluminescence assay measured in a single tube luminometer. Andrology laboratory. Semen samples from 19 men attending for routine semen analysis. None. ROS levels reported in relative light units (RLU) per second, adjusted for sperm concentration. The ROS assay equipment performed according to expectations, generating a chemiluminescence signal for positive control samples and semen samples that decayed rapidly and was captured within 10 minutes. Blanks and negative control samples gave negligible readings. There was no significant intra- or interassay variation. Interference from extraneous factors was negligible. The assay distinguished changes in ROS over a wide range of concentrations and provided consistent results between reagent batches. Working reagents remained stable for 3 months. Acceptable levels for negative and positive control samples were established to set criteria for the test passing or failing on any given day. The assay was sensitive to ambient temperature >25°C. ROS declined significantly with time after ejaculation. Mechanical agitation doubled ROS production in semen. These results validate the ROS assay and demonstrate that it is a highly reliable and accurate diagnostic test. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Transcriptomic footprints disclose specificity of reactive oxygen species signaling in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gadjev, Ilya; Vanderauwera, Sandy; Gechev, Tsanko S.; Laloi, Christophe; Minkov, Ivan N.; Shulaev, Vladimir; Apel, Klaus; Inze, Dirk; Mittler, Ron; Van Breusegem, Frank

    Transcriptomic Footprints Disclose Specificity of Reactive Oxygen Species Signaling in Arabidopsis1,[W] Ilya Gadjev2, Sandy Vanderauwera2, Tsanko S. Gechev, Christophe Laloi, Ivan N. Minkov, Vladimir Shulaev, Klaus Apel, Dirk Inzé, Ron Mittler and Frank Van Breusegem* Department of Plant Systems

  9. The role of reactive oxygen species in apoptosis of the diabetic kidney.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagener, F.A.D.T.G.; Dekker, D.; Berden, J.H.M.; Scharstuhl, A.; Vlag, J. van der

    2009-01-01

    Increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by hyperglycemia can induce apoptosis of renal cells and diabetic nephropathy. The redox balance in the renal cell seems, therefore, of the utmost importance. ROS-mediated apoptosis may be further aggravated by an inadequate cytoprotective response

  10. Detection and manipulation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in mammalian cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forkink, M.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Brock, R.E.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Koopman, W.J.H.

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are formed upon incomplete reduction of molecular oxygen (O2) as an inevitable consequence of mitochondrial metabolism. Because ROS can damage biomolecules, cells contain elaborate antioxidant defense systems to prevent oxidative stress. In addition to their damaging

  11. Involvement of reactive oxygen species in the electrochemical inhibition of barnacle (Amphibalanus amphitrite) settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodolfo E. Perez-Roa; Marc A. Anderson; Dan Rittschof; Christopher G. Hunt; Daniel R. Noguera

    2009-01-01

    The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in electrochemical biofouling inhibition was investigated using a series of abiotic tests and settlement experiments with larvae of the barnacle Amphibalanus amphitrite, a cosmopolitan fouler. Larval settlement, a measure of biofouling potential, was reduced from 43% ± 14% to 5% ± 6% upon the application of...

  12. Water-soluble fullerene materials for bioapplications: photoinduced reactive oxygen species generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The photoinduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation from several water-soluble fullerenes was examined. Macromolecular or small molecular water-soluble fullerene complexes/derivatives were prepared and their 1O2 and O2•- generation abilities were evaluated by EPR spin-trapping methods. As a r...

  13. Herbivore derived fatty acid-amides elicit reactive oxygen species burst in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    The formation of a reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst is a central response of plants to many forms of stress including pathogen attack, several abiotic stresses, damage and insect infestation. These ROS act as a direct defense as well as signaling and regulatory molecules. Perception of microbe or...

  14. The determination and analysis of site-specific rates of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quinlan, Casey L; Perevoschikova, Irina V; Goncalves, Renata L S

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) are widely implicated in physiological and pathological pathways. We propose that it is critical to understand the specific sites of mitochondrial ROS production and their mechanisms of action. Mitochondria possess at least eight distinct sites of ROS...

  15. Significant levels of extracellular reactive oxygen species produced by brown rot basidiomycetes on cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roni Cohen; Kenneth A. Jensen; Carl J. Houtman; Kenneth E. Hammel

    2002-01-01

    It is often proposed that brown rot basidiomycetes use extracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) to accomplish the initial depolymerization of cellulose in wood, but little evidence has been presented to show that the fungi produce these oxidants in physiologically relevant quantities. We used [14C]phenethyl polyacrylate as a radical trap to estimate extracellular...

  16. Effects of reactive oxygen species action on sperm function in spermatozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and lipid peroxidation have been recognized as problems for sperm survival and fertility. The precise roles and detection of superoxide (SO), hydrogen peroxide (HP), and membrane lipid peroxidation have been problematic because of the low specificity and sens...

  17. Semiconducting Polymer Nanoprobe for in vivo Imaging of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Kanyi; Shuhendler, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Semiconducting polymer nanoparticles are utilized as a free-radical inert and light-harvesting nanoplatform for in vivo molecular imaging of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS). With its RONS-sensitive fluorescence, good biodistribution and passive targeting ability to leaky inflammatory vasculature, this nanoprobe permits detection of RONS in the microenvironment of spontaneous bacterial infection following systemic administration. PMID:23943508

  18. Role of Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species in the Activation of Cellular Signals, Molecules, and Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Indo, Hiroko P.; Hawkins, Clare L; Nakanishi, Ikuo

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are a major source of intracellular energy and reactive oxygen species in cells, but are also increasingly being recognized as a controller of cell death. Here, we review evidence of signal transduction control by mitochondrial superoxide generation via the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) ...

  19. Ca 2+ and reactive oxygen species are involved in the defense ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The role of Ca2+ and reactive oxygen species in the defense responses of callus cultures of rice (Oryza sativa L., cv. Zenith) to infection with avirulent strain of rice blast fungus (Magnaporthe grisea, strain Ina168) was investigated. It was observed that rice calli, especially after mild blast infection, exude substances ...

  20. Lysosome-Targeting Amplifiers of Reactive Oxygen Species as Anticancer Prodrugs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Daum, S.; Reshetnikov, M.S.V.; Šíša, Miroslav; Dumych, T.; Lootsik, M. D.; Bilyy, R.; Bila, E.; Janko, C.; Alexiou, C.; Herrmann, M.; Sellner, L.; Mokhir, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 49 (2017), s. 15545-15549 ISSN 1433-7851 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : aminoferrocene * cancer * lysosomes * prodrugs * reactive oxygen species Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Organic chemistry Impact factor: 11.994, year: 2016

  1. Generation of reactive oxygen species in relevant cell lines as a bio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Generation of reactive oxygen species in relevant cell lines as a bio-indicator of oxidative effects caused by acid mine water. Oluwafikemi T Iji, June C Serem, Megan J Bester, E Annette Venter, Jan G Myburgh, Lyndy J McGaw ...

  2. Role of metal-induced reactive oxygen species generation in lung ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in ROFA-induced lung injury. ROFA was collected from a precipitator at ... However, cellular oxidant production and tissue injury were observed mostly with the ROFA-total and ..... transition metals are likely the causative agents of ROFA- induced acute injury (Dreher et al 1997).

  3. Induction of regulatory T cells by macrophages is dependent on production of reactive oxygen species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaij, Marina D.; Savage, Nigel D. L.; van der Kooij, Sandra W.; Koekkoek, Karin; Wang, Jun; van den Berg, J. Merlijn; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Holmdahl, Rikard; van Kooten, Cees; Gelderman, Kyra A.

    2010-01-01

    The phagocyte NAPDH-oxidase complex consists of several phagocyte oxidase (phox) proteins, generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon activation. ROS are involved in the defense against microorganisms and also in immune regulation. Defective ROS formation leads to chronic granulomatous disease

  4. Regulation of lifespan by the mitochondrial electron transport chain: reactive oxygen species-dependent and reactive oxygen species-independent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scialo, Filippo; Mallikarjun, Venkatesh; Stefanatos, Rhoda; Sanz, Alberto

    2013-12-01

    Aging is a consequence of the accumulation of cellular damage that impairs the capacity of an aging organism to adapt to stress. The Mitochondrial Free Radical Theory of Aging (MFRTA) has been one of the most influential ideas over the past 50 years. The MFRTA is supported by the accumulation of oxidative damage during aging along with comparative studies demonstrating that long-lived species or individuals produce fewer mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and have lower levels of oxidative damage. Recently, however, species that combine high oxidative damage with a longer lifespan (i.e., naked mole rats) have been described. Moreover, most of the interventions based on antioxidant supplementation do not increase longevity, as would be predicted by the MFRTA. Studies to date provide a clear understanding that mitochondrial function regulates the rate of aging, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we review the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent and ROS-independent mechanisms by which mitochondria can affect longevity. We discuss the role of different ROS (superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radical), both as oxidants as well as signaling molecules. We also describe how mitochondria can regulate longevity by ROS-independent mechanisms. We discuss alterations in mitochondrial DNA, accumulation of cellular waste as a consequence of glyco- and lipoxidative damage, and the regulation of DNA maintenance enzymes as mechanisms that can determine longevity without involving ROS. We also show how the regulation of longevity is a complex process whereby ROS-dependent and ROS-independent mechanisms interact to determine the maximum lifespan of species and individuals.

  5. Elevated cytosolic Na+ increases mitochondrial formation of reactive oxygen species in failing cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlhaas, Michael; Liu, Ting; Knopp, Andreas; Zeller, Tanja; Ong, Mei Fang; Böhm, Michael; O'Rourke, Brian; Maack, Christoph

    2010-04-13

    Oxidative stress is causally linked to the progression of heart failure, and mitochondria are critical sources of reactive oxygen species in failing myocardium. We previously observed that in heart failure, elevated cytosolic Na(+) ([Na(+)](i)) reduces mitochondrial Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](m)) by accelerating Ca(2+) efflux via the mitochondrial Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger. Because the regeneration of antioxidative enzymes requires NADPH, which is indirectly regenerated by the Krebs cycle, and Krebs cycle dehydrogenases are activated by [Ca(2+)](m), we speculated that in failing myocytes, elevated [Na(+)](i) promotes oxidative stress. We used a patch-clamp-based approach to simultaneously monitor cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) and, alternatively, mitochondrial H(2)O(2) together with NAD(P)H in guinea pig cardiac myocytes. Cells were depolarized in a voltage-clamp mode (3 Hz), and a transition of workload was induced by beta-adrenergic stimulation. During this transition, NAD(P)H initially oxidized but recovered when [Ca(2+)](m) increased. The transient oxidation of NAD(P)H was closely associated with an increase in mitochondrial H(2)O(2) formation. This reactive oxygen species formation was potentiated when mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake was blocked (by Ru360) or Ca(2+) efflux was accelerated (by elevation of [Na(+)](i)). In failing myocytes, H(2)O(2) formation was increased, which was prevented by reducing mitochondrial Ca(2+) efflux via the mitochondrial Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger. Besides matching energy supply and demand, mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake critically regulates mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production. In heart failure, elevated [Na(+)](i) promotes reactive oxygen species formation by reducing mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. This novel mechanism, by which defects in ion homeostasis induce oxidative stress, represents a potential drug target to reduce reactive oxygen species production in the failing heart.

  6. Global Asymptotic Stability for Discrete Single Species Population Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bilgin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present some basic discrete models in populations dynamics of single species with several age classes. Starting with the basic Beverton-Holt model that describes the change of single species we discuss its basic properties such as a convergence of all solutions to the equilibrium, oscillation of solutions about the equilibrium solutions, Allee’s effect, and Jillson’s effect. We consider the effect of the constant and periodic immigration and emigration on the global properties of Beverton-Holt model. We also consider the effect of the periodic environment on the global properties of Beverton-Holt model.

  7. A carnosine intervention study in overweight human volunteers: bioavailability and reactive carbonyl species sequestering effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regazzoni, Luca; de Courten, Barbora; Garzon, Davide; Altomare, Alessandra; Marinello, Cristina; Jakubova, Michaela; Vallova, Silvia; Krumpolec, Patrik; Carini, Marina; Ukropec, Jozef; Ukropcova, Barbara; Aldini, Giancarlo

    2016-06-01

    Carnosine is a natural dipeptide able to react with reactive carbonyl species, which have been recently associated with the onset and progression of several human diseases. Herein, we report an intervention study in overweight individuals. Carnosine (2 g/day) was orally administered for twelve weeks in order to evaluate its bioavailability and metabolic fate. Two carnosine adducts were detected in the urine samples of all subjects. Such adducts are generated from a reaction with acrolein, which is one of the most toxic and reactive compounds among reactive carbonyl species. However, neither carnosine nor adducts have been detected in plasma. Urinary excretion of adducts and carnosine showed a positive correlation although a high variability of individual response to carnosine supplementation was observed. Interestingly, treated subjects showed a significant decrease in the percentage of excreted adducts in reduced form, accompanied by a significant increase of the urinary excretion of both carnosine and carnosine-acrolein adducts. Altogether, data suggest that acrolein is entrapped in vivo by carnosine although the response to its supplementation is possibly influenced by individual diversities in terms of carnosine dietary intake, metabolism and basal production of reactive carbonyl species.

  8. Solid-state molecular organometallic chemistry. Single-crystal to single-crystal reactivity and catalysis with light hydrocarbon substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, F Mark; McKay, Alasdair I; Martinez-Martinez, Antonio J; Rees, Nicholas H; Krämer, Tobias; Macgregor, Stuart A; Weller, Andrew S

    2017-08-01

    Single-crystal to single-crystal solid/gas reactivity and catalysis starting from the precursor sigma-alkane complex [Rh(Cy 2 PCH 2 CH 2 PCy 2 )(η 2 η 2 -NBA)][BAr F 4 ] (NBA = norbornane; Ar F = 3,5-(CF 3 ) 2 C 6 H 3 ) is reported. By adding ethene, propene and 1-butene to this precursor in solid/gas reactions the resulting alkene complexes [Rh(Cy 2 PCH 2 CH 2 PCy 2 )(alkene) x ][BAr F 4 ] are formed. The ethene ( x = 2) complex, [Rh(Cy 2 PCH 2 CH 2 PCy 2 )(ethene) 2 ][BAr F 4 ]-Oct , has been characterized in the solid-state (single-crystal X-ray diffraction) and by solution and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Rapid, low temperature recrystallization using solution methods results in a different crystalline modification, [Rh(Cy 2 PCH 2 CH 2 PCy 2 )(ethene) 2 ][BAr F 4 ]-Hex , that has a hexagonal microporous structure ( P 6 3 22). The propene complex ( x = 1) [Rh(Cy 2 PCH 2 CH 2 PCy 2 )(propene)][BAr F 4 ] is characterized as having a π-bound alkene with a supporting γ-agostic Rh···H 3 C interaction at low temperature by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, variable temperature solution and solid-state NMR spectroscopy, as well as periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations. A fluxional process occurs in both the solid-state and solution that is proposed to proceed via a tautomeric allyl-hydride. Gas/solid catalytic isomerization of d 3 -propene, H 2 C 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 1111111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111111

  9. Uranium tris-aryloxide derivatives supported by triazacyclononane: engendering a reactive uranium(III) center with a single pocket for reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Rodriguez, Ingrid; Olsen, Kristian; Gantzel, Peter; Meyer, Karsten

    2003-04-16

    The synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of the mononuclear uranium complex [((ArO)(3)tacn)U(III)(NCCH(3))] is reported. The uranium(III) complex reacts with organic azides to yield uranium(IV) azido as well as uranium(V) imido complexes, [((ArO)(3)tacn)U(IV)(N(3))] and [((ArO)(3)tacn)U(V)(NSi(CH(3))(3))]. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction, spectroscopic, and computational studies of this analogous series of uranium tris-aryloxide complexes supported by triazacyclononane are described. The hexadentate, tris-anionic ligand coordinates to the large uranium ion in unprecedented fashion, engendering coordinatively unsaturated and highly reactive uranium centers. The macrocyclic triazacyclononane tris-aryloxide derivative occupies six coordination sites, with the three aryloxide pendant arms forming a trigonal plane at the metal center. DFT quantum mechanic methods were applied to rationalize the reactivity and to elucidate the electronic structure of the newly synthesized compounds. It is shown that the deeply colored uranium(III) and uranium(V) species are stabilized via pi-bonding interaction, involving uranium f-orbitals and the axial acetonitrile and imido ligand, respectively. In contrast, the bonding in the colorless uranium(IV) azido complex is purely ionic in nature. The magnetism of the series of complexes with an [N3O3-N(ax)] core structure and oxidation states +III, +IV, and +V is discussed in context of the electronic structures.

  10. Reactivation of Reward-Related Patterns from Single Past Episodes Supports Memory-Based Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, G Elliott; Büchel, Christian

    2016-03-09

    Rewarding experiences exert a strong influence on later decision making. While decades of neuroscience research have shown how reinforcement gradually shapes preferences, decisions are often influenced by single past experiences. Surprisingly, relatively little is known about the influence of single learning episodes. Although recent work has proposed a role for episodes in decision making, it is largely unknown whether and how episodic experiences contribute to value-based decision making and how the values of single episodes are represented in the brain. In multiple behavioral experiments and an fMRI experiment, we tested whether and how rewarding episodes could support later decision making. Participants experienced episodes of high reward or low reward in conjunction with incidental, trial-unique neutral pictures. In a surprise test phase, we found that participants could indeed remember the associated level of reward, as evidenced by accurate source memory for value and preferences to re-engage with rewarded objects. Further, in a separate experiment, we found that high-reward objects shown as primes before a gambling task increased financial risk taking. Neurally, re-exposure to objects in the test phase led to significant reactivation of reward-related patterns. Importantly, individual variability in the strength of reactivation predicted value memory performance. Our results provide a novel demonstration that affect-related neural patterns are reactivated during later experience. Reactivation of value information represents a mechanism by which memory can guide decision making. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/362868-13$15.00/0.

  11. Effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids on the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species production by raw 264.7 macrophages

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ambrožová, Gabriela; Pekarová, Michaela; Lojek, Antonín

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 3 (2010), s. 133-139 ISSN 1436-6207 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : polyunsaturated fatty acids * reactive oxygen species * reactive nitrogen species Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.343, year: 2010

  12. Single species victory in a two-site, two-species model of population dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Jack; Sander, Len; Kessler, David

    2008-03-01

    We study the behavior of two species, differentiated only by their dispersal rates in an environment providing heterogeneous growth rates. Previous deterministic studies have shown that the slower-dispersal species always drives the faster species to extinction, while stochastic studies show that the opposite case can occur given small enough population and spatial heterogeneity. Other models of similar systems demonstrate the existence of an optimum dispersal rate, suggesting that distinguishing the species as faster or slower is insufficient. We here study the interface of these models for a small spatial system and determine the conditions of stability for a single species outcome.

  13. FORMATION OF LONG-LIVED REACTIVE SPECIES OF BLOOD SERUM PROTEINS BY THE ACTION OF HEAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Ivanov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Proteins oxidized by the action of X-rays represent long-lived reactive species, which trigger the secondary generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. A change in the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 content induced by various physical impacts may be an important factor of the therapeutic effect and the adaptation of the organism to unfavorable environmental conditions. Moderate hyperthermia and a number of physiotherapeutic procedures leading to a local warming of tissues are widely used in medical practice. However, the biological mechanisms of their curative effect are poorly understood. The prolonged generation of H2O2 long-lived reactive protein species (LRPS after heating may be one of the mechanisms of activation of protective cellular mechanisms and thus to contribute to overcoming the disease. Aim: To investigate if the serum proteins bovine serum albumin (BSA and bovine gamma-globulin (BGG can form LRPS under moderate hyperthermia and show that heat induces LRPS, which in turn continuously generate ROS, in particular H2O2. Materials and methods: LRPS were studied by measuring the heat-induced chemiluminescence of protein solutions using a specially elaborated highly sensitive photon-counting chemiluminometer Biotoks-7 AM. The Results: Here we studied the possibility of formation of long-lived species of the blood serum proteins BSA and BGG in air-saturated solutions under the action of heat. It is shown that heat induces the generation of long-lived protein species, which in turn generate ROS (1O2, О2-•, OH•, H2O2. The formation of the long-lived reactive species of BSA and BGG with a half-life of about 4 h induced by moderate hyperthermia was revealed using the chemiluminescence of protein solutions. It was found that long-lived reactive species of BSA and BGG cause prolonged generation of H2O2. Conclusion: Thus, we found a new fundamental property of serum proteins: by the action of moderate heating, they are able to

  14. Are Ascaris lumbricoides and Ascaris suum a single species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leles, Daniela; Gardner, Scott L; Reinhard, Karl; Iñiguez, Alena; Araujo, Adauto

    2012-02-20

    Since the original description and naming of Ascaris lumbricoides from humans by Linnaeus in 1758 and later of Ascaris suum from pigs by Goeze 1782, these species have been considered to be valid. Four hypotheses relative to the conspecificity or lack thereof (and thus origin of these species) are possible: 1) Ascaris lumbricoides (usually infecting humans) and Ascaris suum (recorded mostly from pigs) are both valid species, with the two species originating via a speciation event from a common ancestor sometime before the domestication of pigs by humans, or 2) Ascaris lumbricoides in humans is derived directly from the species A. suum found in pigs with A. suum then existing as a persistent ancestor after formation of A. lumbricoides, or 3) Ascaris suum is derived directly from A. lumbricoides with the persistent ancestor being A. lumbricoides and A. suum being the newly derived species, and finally, 4) Ascaris lumbricoides and A. suum are the same species, this hypothesis being supported by studies showing both low morphological and low genetic divergence at several genes. We present and discuss paleoparasitological and genetic evidence that complement new data to evaluate the origin and evolution of Ascaris spp. in humans and pigs, and the uniqueness of the species in both hosts. Finally, we conclude that Ascaris lumbricoides and A. suum are a single species and that the name A. lumbricoides Linnaeus 1758 has taxonomic priority; therefore A. suum Goeze 1782 should be considered a synonym of A. lumbricoides.

  15. Experimental measurement and modelling of reactive species generation in TiO2 nanoparticle photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turolla, Andrea; Piazzoli, Andrea; Budarz, Jeffrey Farner; Wiesner, Mark R; Antonelli, Manuela

    2015-07-01

    The generation of reactive species in titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) nanoparticle photocatalysis was assessed in a laboratory scale setup, in which P25 Aeroxide TiO 2 suspensions were photoactivated by means of UV-A radiation. Photogenerated holes and hydroxyl radicals were monitored over time by observing their selective reaction with probe compounds, iodide and terephthalic acid, respectively. TiO 2 aggregate size and structure were characterized over the reaction time. Reactive species quenching was then described by a model, accounting for radiative phenomena, TiO 2 nanoparticle aggregation and kinetic reactions. The interaction between iodide and photogenerated holes was influenced by iodide adsorption on TiO 2 surface, described by a Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism, whose parameters were studied as a function of TiO 2 concentration and irradiation time. Iodide oxidation was effectively simulated by modelling the reaction volume as a completely stirred two-dimensional domain, in which irradiation phenomena were described by a two-flux model and the steady state for reactive species was assumed. The kinetic parameters for iodide adsorption and oxidation were estimated and successfully validated in a different experimental setup. The same model was adapted to describe the oxidation of terephthalic acid by hydroxyl radicals. The kinetic parameters for terephthalic acid oxidation were estimated and validated, while the issues in investigating the interaction mechanisms among the involved species have been discussed. The sensitivity of operating parameters on model response was assessed and the most relevant parameters were highlighted.

  16. Reactive species in non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas: Generation, transport, and biological effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, X., E-mail: luxinpei@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Naidis, G.V. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Laroussi, M. [Plasma Engineering & Medicine Institute, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529 (United States); Reuter, S. [Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology, Felix-Hausdorff-Strasse 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Graves, D.B. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ostrikov, K. [Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia); School of Physics, Chemistry, and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia); Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, P.O.Box 218, Lindfield, NSW 2070 (Australia); School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2016-05-04

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas have recently become a topical area of research owing to their diverse applications in health care and medicine, environmental remediation and pollution control, materials processing, electrochemistry, nanotechnology and other fields. This review focuses on the reactive electrons and ionic, atomic, molecular, and radical species that are produced in these plasmas and then transported from the point of generation to the point of interaction with the material, medium, living cells or tissues being processed. The most important mechanisms of generation and transport of the key species in the plasmas of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets and other non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas are introduced and examined from the viewpoint of their applications in plasma hygiene and medicine and other relevant fields. Sophisticated high-precision, time-resolved plasma diagnostics approaches and techniques are presented and their applications to monitor the reactive species and plasma dynamics in the plasma jets and other discharges, both in the gas phase and during the plasma interaction with liquid media, are critically reviewed. The large amount of experimental data is supported by the theoretical models of reactive species generation and transport in the plasmas, surrounding gaseous environments, and plasma interaction with liquid media. These models are presented and their limitations are discussed. Special attention is paid to biological effects of the plasma-generated reactive oxygen and nitrogen (and some other) species in basic biological processes such as cell metabolism, proliferation, survival, etc. as well as plasma applications in bacterial inactivation, wound healing, cancer treatment and some others. Challenges and opportunities for theoretical and experimental research are discussed and the authors’ vision for the emerging convergence trends across several disciplines and application domains is presented to

  17. Reactive Power Injection Strategies for Single-Phase Photovoltaic Systems Considering Grid Requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yongheng; Wang, Huai; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2014-01-01

    .g. Germany and Italy. Those advanced features can be provided by next generation PV systems, and will be enhanced in the future to ensure an even efficient and reliable utilization of PV systems. In light of this, Reactive Power Injection (RPI) strategies for single-phase PV systems are explored...... like what the conventional power plants do today in the grid regulation participation. Requirements of ancillary services like Low-Voltage Ride-Through (LVRT) associated with reactive current injection and voltage support through reactive power control, have been in effectiveness in some countries, e...... in this paper. The RPI possibilities are: a) constant average active power control, b) constant active current control, c) constant peak current control and d) thermal optimized control strategy. All those strategies comply with the currently active grid codes, but are with different objectives. The proposed...

  18. Reactive Power Injection Strategies for Single-Phase Photovoltaic Systems Considering Grid Requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yongheng; Wang, Huai; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2014-01-01

    . Those advanced features can be provided by next-generation PV systems, and will be enhanced in the future to ensure an even efficient and reliable utilization of PV systems. In the light of this, Reactive Power Injection (RPI) strategies for single-phase PV systems are explored in this paper. The RPI...... like what the conventional power plants do today in the grid regulation participation. Requirements of ancillary services like Low-Voltage Ride-Through (LVRT) associated with reactive current injection and voltage support through reactive power control, have been in effectiveness in some countries...... possibilities are: a) constant average active power control, b) constant active current control, c) constant peak current control and d) thermal optimized control strategy. All those strategies comply with the currently active grid codes, but are with different objectives. The thermal optimized control strategy...

  19. epidemiology of single and multiple species of helminth infections ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-03-01

    Mar 1, 2000 ... East African Medical Journal Vol. 77 No. 3 March 2000. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF SINGLE AND MULTIPLE SPECIES OF HELMINTH INFECTIONS AMONG SCHOOL CHILDREN IN BUSIA DISTRICT, KENYA. S. Brooker, MA, Wellcome Trust Centre for the Epidemiology of Infectious Disease, University of Oxford, ...

  20. Contribution of reactive oxygen species to the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Jay S.; Weise-Cross, Laura; Detweiler, Neil D.; Herbert, Lindsay M.; Yellowhair, Tracylyn R.; Resta, Thomas C.

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is associated with a decreased antioxidant capacity. However, neither the contribution of reactive oxygen species to pulmonary vasoconstrictor sensitivity, nor the therapeutic efficacy of antioxidant strategies in this setting are known. We hypothesized that reactive oxygen species play a central role in mediating both vasoconstrictor and arterial remodeling components of severe pulmonary arterial hypertension. We examined the effect of the chemical antioxidant, TEMPOL, on right ventricular systolic pressure, vascular remodeling, and enhanced vasoconstrictor reactivity in both chronic hypoxia and hypoxia/SU5416 rat models of pulmonary hypertension. SU5416 is a vascular endothelial growth factor receptor antagonist and the combination of chronic hypoxia/SU5416 produces a model of severe pulmonary arterial hypertension with vascular plexiform lesions/fibrosis that is not present with chronic hypoxia alone. The major findings from this study are: 1) compared to hypoxia alone, hypoxia/SU5416 exposure caused more severe pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular hypertrophy, adventitial lesion formation, and greater vasoconstrictor sensitivity through a superoxide and Rho kinase-dependent Ca2+ sensitization mechanism. 2) Chronic hypoxia increased medial muscularization and superoxide levels, however there was no effect of SU5416 to augment these responses. 3) Treatment with TEMPOL decreased right ventricular systolic pressure in both hypoxia and hypoxia/SU5416 groups. 4) This effect of TEMPOL was associated with normalization of vasoconstrictor responses, but not arterial remodeling. Rather, medial hypertrophy and adventitial fibrotic lesion formation were more pronounced following chronic TEMPOL treatment in hypoxia/SU5416 rats. Our findings support a major role for reactive oxygen species in mediating enhanced vasoconstrictor reactivity and pulmonary hypertension in both chronic hypoxia and hypoxia/SU5416 rat models, despite a

  1. Contribution of reactive oxygen species to the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikki L Jernigan

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension is associated with a decreased antioxidant capacity. However, neither the contribution of reactive oxygen species to pulmonary vasoconstrictor sensitivity, nor the therapeutic efficacy of antioxidant strategies in this setting are known. We hypothesized that reactive oxygen species play a central role in mediating both vasoconstrictor and arterial remodeling components of severe pulmonary arterial hypertension. We examined the effect of the chemical antioxidant, TEMPOL, on right ventricular systolic pressure, vascular remodeling, and enhanced vasoconstrictor reactivity in both chronic hypoxia and hypoxia/SU5416 rat models of pulmonary hypertension. SU5416 is a vascular endothelial growth factor receptor antagonist and the combination of chronic hypoxia/SU5416 produces a model of severe pulmonary arterial hypertension with vascular plexiform lesions/fibrosis that is not present with chronic hypoxia alone. The major findings from this study are: 1 compared to hypoxia alone, hypoxia/SU5416 exposure caused more severe pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular hypertrophy, adventitial lesion formation, and greater vasoconstrictor sensitivity through a superoxide and Rho kinase-dependent Ca2+ sensitization mechanism. 2 Chronic hypoxia increased medial muscularization and superoxide levels, however there was no effect of SU5416 to augment these responses. 3 Treatment with TEMPOL decreased right ventricular systolic pressure in both hypoxia and hypoxia/SU5416 groups. 4 This effect of TEMPOL was associated with normalization of vasoconstrictor responses, but not arterial remodeling. Rather, medial hypertrophy and adventitial fibrotic lesion formation were more pronounced following chronic TEMPOL treatment in hypoxia/SU5416 rats. Our findings support a major role for reactive oxygen species in mediating enhanced vasoconstrictor reactivity and pulmonary hypertension in both chronic hypoxia and hypoxia/SU5416 rat models

  2. Inorganic Reactive Sulfur-Nitrogen Species: Intricate Release Mechanisms or Cacophony in Yellow, Blue and Red?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grman, Marian; Nasim, Muhammad Jawad; Leontiev, Roman; Misak, Anton; Jakusova, Veronika; Ondrias, Karol; Jacob, Claus

    2017-02-15

    Since the heydays of Reactive Sulfur Species (RSS) research during the first decade of the Millennium, numerous sulfur species involved in cellular regulation and signalling have been discovered. Yet despite the general predominance of organic species in organisms, recent years have also seen the emergence of inorganic reactive sulfur species, ranging from inorganic polysulfides (HS x - /S x 2- ) to thionitrous acid (HSNO) and nitrosopersulfide (SSNO - ). These inorganic species engage in a complex interplay of reactions in vitro and possibly also in vivo. Employing a combination of spectrophotometry and sulfide assays, we have investigated the role of polysulfanes from garlic during the release of nitric oxide ( • NO) from S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) in the absence and presence of thiol reducing agents. Our studies reveal a distinct enhancement of GSNO decomposition by compounds such as diallyltrisulfane, which is most pronounced in the presence of cysteine and glutathione and presumably proceeds via the initial release of an inorganic mono- or polysulfides, i.e., hydrogen sulfide (H₂S) or HS x - , from the organic polysulfane. Albeit being of a preliminary nature, our spectrophotometric data also reveals a complicated underlying mechanism which appears to involve transient species such as SSNO - . Eventually, more in depth studies are required to further explore the underlying chemistry and wider biological and nutritional implications of this interplay between edible garlic compounds, reductive activation, inorganic polysulfides and their interplay with • NO storage and release.

  3. In Vivo Detection of Reactive Oxygen Species and Redox Status in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolders, Arne; Back, Patricia; De Henau, Sasha

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Due to its large families of redox-active enzymes, genetic amenability, and complete transparency, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has the potential to become an important model for the in vivo study of redox biology. Recent Advances: The recent development of several genetically encoded ratiometric reactive oxygen species (ROS) and redox sensors has revolutionized the quantification and precise localization of ROS and redox signals in living organisms. Only few exploratory studies have applied these sensors in C. elegans and undoubtedly much remains to be discovered in this model. As a follow-up to our recent findings that the C. elegans somatic gonad uses superoxide and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) signals to communicate with the germline, we here analyze the patterns of H2O2 inside the C. elegans germline. Critical Issues: Despite the advantages of genetically encoded ROS and redox sensors over classic chemical sensors, still several general as well as C. elegans-specific issues need to be addressed. The major concerns for the application of these sensors in C. elegans are (i) decreased vitality of some reporter strains, (ii) interference of autofluorescent compartments with the sensor signal, and (iii) the use of immobilization methods that do not influence the worm's redox physiology. Future Directions: We propose that several of the current issues may be solved by designing reporter strains carrying single copies of codon-optimized sensors. Preferably, these sensors should have their emission wavelengths in the red region, where autofluorescence is absent. Worm analysis could be optimized using four-dimensional ratiometric fluorescence microscopy of worms immobilized in microfluidic chips. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 577–592. PMID:27306519

  4. Role of ginsenosides in reactive oxygen species-mediated anticancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodrul, Islam M.D.; Wang, Chenying; Chen, Xiangfeng; Du, Jing; Sun, Hongxiang

    2018-01-01

    Cancer is still a global public health problem, which is the leading cause of death in most countries. Ginseng has been used for centuries all over the world as a panacea that promotes longevity. As the king of herb plants, ginseng holds great promise as a new treatment option which is used either by itself or in combination with other medicinal ingredients that is widely accepted as complementary and alternative medicine in cancer therapy. Ginsenosides, the major pharmacologically active ingredients of ginseng, have been shown to have multiple medicinal effects including prominent anticancer activity. The purpose of this review is to give our perspective about the roles of ginsenosides in reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated anticancer therapy. Additionally, to provide new sheds light for further improvement and carry out pre-clinical and clinical trials to develop it successfully into a potential anticancer agent. Panax herbs and their derivate/metabolites ginsenosides exert beneficial effects for treating various types of cancers. The mechanism of ROS-mediated anticancer activities of ginsenosides varies depending on the specific type of cancer cells involved. Ginsenosides may suppress cancer cell proliferation through anti-oxidation on tumor initiation and induce apoptosis, paraptosis or autophagy via generation of ROS on tumor progression, promotion, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis by various signaling pathways e.g., activation of AMPK, MEK, ASK-1/JNK, ESR2-NCF1-ROS, ER-dependent PI3K/Akt/Nrf2, P53-CHOP, ROS-JNK-autophagy, and/or inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. These multiple effects rather than a single may play a crucial role in emerging ginsenosides as a successful anticancer drug. PMID:29416826

  5. Release of intracellular Calcium increase production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in renal distal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Henning F.

    to G-protein stimulation of phospholipase C and release of inositol -3 phosphate. Cd (0.4 mM) treatment of A6 cells enhanced the ROS production after one minutes incubation. The production rate was constant for at least 10 to 20 min. Experiments showed that the Cd induced increase in ROS production......Release of intracellular Calcium increase production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in renal distal epithelial cells. Henning F. Bjerregaard, Roskilde University, Department of Science, Systems and Models , 4000 Roskilde, Denmark. HFB@ RUC.DK Reactive oxygen species (ROS) like, hydrogen...... peroxide (H2O2) has traditionally been regarded as toxic by-products of aerobic metabolism. However, recent findings indicate that H2O2 act as a signalling molecule. The aim of the present study was to monitor, in real time, the rates of ROS generation in order to directly determine their production...

  6. Release of intracellular Calcium increase production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in renal distal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Henning F.

    was inhibited by buffering of intracellular calcium with BAPTA, by the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine and by uncoupling of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation from respiration with CCCP. These results indicate that Cd generate a prompt initiation of ROS production from mitochondria due to an increase......Release of intracellular Calcium increase production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in renal distal epithelial cells. Henning F. Bjerregaard, Roskilde University, Department of Science, Systems and Models , 4000 Roskilde, Denmark. HFB@ RUC.DK Reactive oxygen species (ROS) like, hydrogen...... dynamics in living cells in response to hormonal signal events in the A6 cell culture. A6 cells have a divalent cation-sensing receptor (the extracellular calcium receptor) that can be stimulated with cadmium (Cd) and thereby induce a fast and transient liberation of calcium from intracellular stores, due...

  7. Surface-Selective Preferential Production of Reactive Oxygen Species on Piezoelectric Ceramics for Bacterial Killing

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Guoxin; Wang, Shuangying; Zhu, Ye; Zhou, Lei; Yu, Peng; Wang, Xiaolan; He, Tianrui; Chen, Junqi; Mao, Chuanbin; Ning, Chengyun

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be used to kill bacterial cells, and thus the selective generation of ROS from material surfaces is an emerging direction in antibacterial material discovery. We found the polarization of piezoelectric ceramic causes the two sides of the disk to become positively and negatively charged, which translate into cathode and anode surfaces in an aqueous solution. Because of the microelectrolysis of water, ROS are preferentially formed on the cathode surface. Conseq...

  8. Mitochondrial role of Apoptosis-Inducing Factor (AIF): Oxidative Phosphorylation and Reactive Oxygen Species.

    OpenAIRE

    Apostolova, Nadezda

    2008-01-01

    The apoptotic function of Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) is well documented in the literature, but its physiological role in the mitochondrion is less certain. Using a small interfering RNA (siRNA) strategy, we studied whether modulation of AIF expression in cultured cells influenced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We found that siAIF-transfected cells had reduced AIF protein levels and this was paralleled by a significant increase in ROS. We tested the genera...

  9. The phytoalexin camalexin mediates cytotoxicity towards aggressive prostate cancer cells via reactive oxygen species

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Basil A.; Neal, Corey L.; Chetram, Mahandranauth; Vo, BaoHan; Mezencev, Roman; Hinton, Cimona; Odero-Marah, Valerie A.

    2012-01-01

    Camalexin is a phytoalexin that accumulates in various cruciferous plants upon exposure to environmental stress and plant pathogens. Besides moderate antibacterial and antifungal activity, camalexin was reported to also exhibit antiproliferative and cancer chemopreventive effects in breast cancer and leukemia. We studied the cytotoxic effects of camalexin treatment on prostate cancer cell lines and whether this was mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. As models, we utilized L...

  10. Role of Insulin-Induced Reactive Oxygen Species in the Insulin Signaling Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    GOLDSTEIN, BARRY J.; MAHADEV, KALYANKAR; WU, XIANGDONG; ZHU, LI; MOTOSHIMA, HIROYUKI

    2005-01-01

    Oxidants, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), have been recognized for years to mimic insulin action on glucose transport in adipose cells. Early studies also demonstrated the complementary finding that H2O2 was elaborated during treatment of cells with insulin, suggesting that cellular H2O2 generation was integral to insulin signaling. Recently, reactive oxygen species elicited by various hormones and growth factors have been shown to affect signal transduction pathways in various cell types...

  11. Formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the presence of pinosylvin - an analogue of resveratrol

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jančinová, V.; Nosál, R.; Lojek, Antonín; Číž, Milan; Ambrožová, Gabriela; Mihalová, D.; Bauerová, K.; Harmatha, Juraj; Perečko, T.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 2 (2010), s. 79-83 ISSN 0172-780X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) MEB0810013 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA203/07/1227 Program:GA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : pinosylvin * reactive oxygen species * neutrophils Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.621, year: 2010

  12. Mechanisms underlying reductant-induced reactive oxygen species formation by anticancer copper(II) compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Kowol, Christian R.; Heffeter, Petra; Miklos, Walter; Gille, Lars; Trondl, Robert; Cappellacci, Loredana; Berger, Walter; Keppler, Bernhard K.

    2011-01-01

    Intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via thiol-mediated reduction of copper(II) to copper(I) has been assumed as the major mechanism underlying the anticancer activity of copper(II) complexes. The aim of this study was to compare the anticancer potential of copper(II) complexes of Triapine (3-amino-pyridine-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone; currently in phase II clinical trials) and its terminally dimethylated derivative with that of 2-formylpyridine thiosemicarbazone a...

  13. (3) Melatonin Protects Oocytes and Granulosa Cells from Reactive Oxygen Species during the Ovulatory Process

    OpenAIRE

    田村, 博史; Hiroshi, TAMURA; 山口大学大学院医学系研究科産科婦人科学; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine

    2009-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced within the follicle especially during the ovulatory process. ROS play a physiological role in the process of ovulation, e.g. follicle rapture. However, excessive amount of ROS causes oxidative stress and damages oocytes and luteinized granulosa cells. On the other hand, antioxidant defense systems including superoxide dismutase (SOD) or glutathione (GSH) are present in follicles. The balance between ROS and antioxidants within the follicle seems to b...

  14. Sites of reactive oxygen species generation by mitochondria oxidizing different substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quinlan, Casey L; Perevoshchikova, IrinaV; Hey-Mogensen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial radical production is important in redox signaling, aging and disease, but the relative contributions of different production sites are poorly understood. We analyzed the rates of superoxide/H2O2 production from different defined sites in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria oxidizing...... of specific sites to the production of reactive oxygen species in isolated mitochondria depend very strongly on the substrates being oxidized, and the same is likely true in cells and in vivo....

  15. Role of reactive oxygen species in male infertility: An updated review of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Hillary Wagner; Julie W. Cheng; Edmund Y. Ko

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: To review the literature and provide an updated summary on the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in male infertility. Methods: A review of PubMed, Cochrane review, and Web of Science databases for full-text English-language articles published between 1943 and 2017 was performed, focusing on the aetiology of ROS, physiological role of ROS on spermatic function, pathological role of ROS in infertility, evaluation of ROS, and role of antioxidants in oxidative stress. Results: ROS...

  16. Involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the induction of genetic instability by radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Tominaga, Hideyuki; Kodama, Seiji; Matsuda, Naoki; Suzuki, Keiji; Watanabe, Masami

    2002-01-01

    Radiation generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) that interact with cellular molecules, including DNA, lipids, and proteins. To know how ROS contribute to the induction of genetic instability, we examined the effect of the anti-ROS condition, using both ascorbic acid phosphate (APM) treatment or a low oxygen condition, on the induction of delayed reproductive cell death and delayed chromosome aberrations. The primary surviving colonies of mouse m5S-derived cl. 2011-14 cells irradiated with 6...

  17. Modulation of reactive oxygen species in skeletal muscle by myostatin is mediated through NF??B

    OpenAIRE

    Sriram, Sandhya; Subramanian, Subha; Sathiakumar, Durga; Venkatesh, Rithika; Salerno, Monica S.; McFarlane, Craig D.; Kambadur, Ravi; Sharma, Mridula

    2011-01-01

    Summary Abnormal levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammatory cytokines have been observed in the skeletal muscle during muscle wasting including sarcopenia. However, the mechanisms that signal ROS production and prolonged maintenance of ROS levels during muscle wasting are not fully understood. Here, we show that myostatin (Mstn) is a pro?oxidant and signals the generation of ROS in muscle cells. Myostatin, a transforming growth factor?? (TGF??) family member, has been shown to p...

  18. Neuroprotection of taurine against reactive oxygen species is associated with inhibiting NADPH oxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhou; Gao, Li-Yan; Lin, Yu-Hui; Chang, Lei; Wu, Hai-Yin; Luo, Chun-Xia; Zhu, Dong-Ya

    2016-04-15

    It is well established that taurine shows potent protection against glutamate-induced injury to neurons in stroke. The neuroprotection may result from multiple mechanisms. Increasing evidences suggest that NADPH oxidases (Nox), the primary source of superoxide induced by N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation, are involved in the process of oxidative stress. We found that 100μM NMDA induced oxidative stress by increasing the reactive oxygen species level, which contributed to the cell death, in vitro. Neuron cultures pretreated with 25mM taurine showed lower percentage of death cells and declined reactive oxygen species level. Moreover, taurine attenuated Nox2/Nox4 protein expression and enzyme activity and declined intracellular calcium intensity during NMDA-induced neuron injury. Additionally, taurine also showed neuroprotection against H2O2-induced injury, accompanying with Nox inhibition. So, we suppose that protection of taurine against reactive oxygen species during NMDA-induced neuron injury is associated with Nox inhibition, probably in a calcium-dependent manner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. [Effects of allelochemical dibutyl phthalate on Gymnodinium breve reactive oxygen species].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bie, Cong-Cong; Li, Feng-Min; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Zhen-Yu

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of inhibitory action of dibutyl phthalate (DBP) on red tide algae Gymnodinium breve. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, contents of *OH and H2O2, and O2*(-) production rate were investigated, and also for the effects of electron transfer inhibitors on the ROS induction of DBP. The results showed that DBP triggered the synthesis of reactive oxygen species ROS, and with the increase of concentration of DBP, *OH and H2O2 contents in cells accumulated, as for the 3 mg x L(-1) DBP treated algae cultures, OH showed a peak of 33 U x mL(-1) at 48 h, which was about 2. 4 times higher than that in the controlled, and H2O2 contents was about 250 nmol x (10(7) cells)(-1) at 72 h, which was about 5 times higher and also was the highest during the whole culture. Rotenone (an inhibitor of complex I in the mitochondria electron transport chain) decreased the DBP induced ROS production, and dicumarol (an inhibitor of the redox enzyme system in the plasma membrane) stimulated the DBP induced ROS production. Taken all together, the results demonstrated DBP induced over production of reactive oxygen species in G. breve, which is the main inhibitory mechanism, and mitochondria and plasma membrane seem to be the main target site of DBP. These conclusions were of scientific meaning on uncovering the inhibitory mechanism of allelochemical on algae.

  20. From single-species advice to mixed-species management: taking the next step

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Morten; Reeves, S.A.; Patterson, K.R.

    2004-01-01

    that accounts for mixed-fishery effects, but in the short term there is a need for approaches to resolve the conflicting management advice for different species within the same fishery, and to generate catch or effort advice that accounts for the mixed-species nature of the fishery. This paper documents...... a recent approach used to address these problems. The approach takes the single-species advice for each species in the fishery as a starting point, then attempts to resolve it into consistent catch or effort advice using fleet-disaggregated catch forecasts in combination with explicitly stated management...

  1. Biological Activities of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species: Oxidative Stress versus Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidinger, Adelheid; Kozlov, Andrey V

    2015-04-15

    In the past, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) were shown to cause oxidative damage to biomolecules, contributing to the development of a variety of diseases. However, recent evidence has suggested that intracellular RONS are an important component of intracellular signaling cascades. The aim of this review was to consolidate old and new ideas on the chemical, physiological and pathological role of RONS for a better understanding of their properties and specific activities. Critical consideration of the literature reveals that deleterious effects do not appear if only one primary species (superoxide radical, nitric oxide) is present in a biological system, even at high concentrations. The prerequisite of deleterious effects is the formation of highly reactive secondary species (hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrite), emerging exclusively upon reaction with another primary species or a transition metal. The secondary species are toxic, not well controlled, causing irreversible damage to all classes of biomolecules. In contrast, primary RONS are well controlled (superoxide dismutase, catalase), and their reactions with biomolecules are reversible, making them ideal for physiological/pathophysiological intracellular signaling. We assume that whether RONS have a signal transducing or damaging effect is primarily defined by their quality, being primary or secondary RONS, and only secondly by their quantity.

  2. A single molecular marker to distinguish between species of Dioscorea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techen, Natascha; Parveen, Iffat; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2017-03-01

    Yams are species of the genus Dioscorea (family Dioscoreaceae), which consists of approximately 630 species. The majority of the world production of yams occurs in Africa with 58.8 million t annually, but they are also produced in the Americas and Asia. The saponins in yams have been reported to possess various properties to improve health. The tuber and aerial parts of various species often share morphological similarities, which can cause problems in the proper identification of sample material. For example, the rootstocks and aerial parts of Dioscorea villosa L. share similarities with Dioscorea polystachia Turcz. Dioscorea bulbifera L. may be mistaken for Dioscorea alata L. owing to similar morphologies. Various molecular analyses have been published to help with the identification of species and varieties within the genus Dioscorea. The multi-loci or single-locus analysis has resulted in varying success, some with only a limited discrimination rate. In the present study, a single nuclear genomic region, biparentally inherited, was analyzed for its usefulness as a molecular marker for species identification and discrimination between D. bulbifera, D. villosa, D. nipponica, D. alata, D. caucasica, and D. deltoidea samples. The results of this study show that the LFY genomic region can be useful as a molecular marker to distinguish between samples.

  3. Reactive species generated during wet chemical etching of silicon in HF/HNO3 mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinert, Marco; Acker, Jörg; Krause, Matthias; Oswald, Steffen; Wetzig, Klaus

    2006-06-15

    The role of intermediate species generated during wet chemical etching of silicon in a HF-rich HF/HNO3 mixture was studied by spectroscopic and analytical methods at 1 degrees C. The intermediate N2O3 was identified by its cobalt blue color and the characteristic features in its UV-vis and Raman spectra. Furthermore, a complex N(III) species (3NO+.NO3-) denoted as [N4O6(2+)] is observed in these solutions. The time-dependent decay of the N(III) intermediates, mainly by their oxidation at the liquid-air interface, serves as a precondition for the study of the etch rate as function of the intermediate concentration measured by Raman spectroscopy. From a linear relationship between etch rate and [N4O6(2+)] concentration, NO+ is considered to be a reactive species in the rate-limiting step. This step is attributed to the oxidation of permanent existing Si-H bonds at the silicon surface by the reactive NO+ species. N2O3 serves as a reservoir for the generation of NO+ leading to a complete coverage of the silicon surface with reactive species at high intermediate concentrations. As long as this condition is valid (plateau region), the etch rate is constant and yields a smooth silicon surface upon completion of the etching. If the N2O3 concentration is insufficient to ensure a coverage of the Si surface by NO+, the etch rate decreases linearly with the N2O3 concentration and results in a roughening of the etched silicon surface (slope region).

  4. Development and Characterization of New Species Cross-Reactive Anti-Sialoadhesin Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie De Schryver

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sialoadhesin (Sn is a surface receptor expressed on a subset of macrophages in steady state conditions. During inflammation and diseases, Sn is highly upregulated on macrophages and blood monocytes. Therefore, therapies using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs to target Sn-positive (Sn+ cells are a potential strategy for targeted treatment. It has been shown that Sn internalizes after binding with a mAb, though it is not clear whether this is species-specific. In this study, new Sn-specific mAbs were developed and analyzed for cross-reactivity between species. In addition, the newly developed mAbs were compared to mAbs used in previous research for their epitope recognition and other Sn-specific characteristics. Both species-specific and cross-reactive antibodies could be identified. Furthermore, sialic acid-binding of red blood cells (RBC could be inhibited with mAbs recognizing different epitopes and all mAb showed internalization of Sn. The newly developed mAbs can be used as novel tools for Sn research and further analysis of Sn internalization in different species.

  5. Antimicrobial strategies centered around reactive oxygen species - bactericidal antibiotics, photodynamic therapy and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatansever, Fatma; de Melo, Wanessa C.M.A.; Avci, Pinar; Vecchio, Daniela; Sadasivam, Magesh; Gupta, Asheesh; Chandran, Rakkiyappan; Karimi, Mahdi; Parizotto, Nivaldo A; Yin, Rui; Tegos, George P; Hamblin, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can attack a diverse range of targets to exert antimicrobial activity, which accounts for their versatility in mediating host defense against a broad range of pathogens. Most ROS are formed by the partial reduction of molecular oxygen. Four major ROS are recognized comprising: superoxide (O2•−), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydroxyl radical (•OH), and singlet oxygen (1O2), but they display very different kinetics and levels of activity. The effects of O2•− and H2O2 are less acute than those of •OH and 1O2, since the former are much less reactive and can be detoxified by endogenous antioxidants (both enzymatic and non-enzymatic) that are induced by oxidative stress. In contrast, no enzyme can detoxify •OH or 1O2, making them extremely toxic and acutely lethal. The present review will highlight the various methods of ROS formation and their mechanism of action. Antioxidant defenses against ROS in microbial cells and the use of ROS by antimicrobial host defense systems are covered. Antimicrobial approaches primarily utilizing ROS comprise both bactericidal antibiotics, and non-pharmacological methods such as photodynamic therapy, titanium dioxide photocatalysis, cold plasma and medicinal honey. A brief final section covers, reactive nitrogen species, and related therapeutics, such as acidified nitrite and nitric oxide releasing nanoparticles. PMID:23802986

  6. Reactive oxygen species produced upon photoexcitation of sunscreens containing titanium dioxide (an EPR study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezová, Vlasta; Gabcová, Sona; Dvoranová, Dana; Stasko, Andrej

    2005-05-13

    Commercial sunscreen products containing titanium dioxide were irradiated with lambda>300 nm and the formation of oxygen- (.OH, O2.-/.OOH) and carbon-centered radicals was monitored by EPR spectroscopy and spin trapping technique using 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide, alpha-phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN), alpha-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone as spin traps, and free nitroxide radical 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine N-oxyl. The photoinduced production of singlet oxygen was shown by 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-piperidine. The generation of reactive oxygen radical species upon irradiation of sunscreens significantly depends on their composition, as the additives present (antioxidants, radical-scavengers, solvents) can transform the reactive radicals formed to less harmful products. The continuous in situ irradiation of titanium dioxide powder, recommended for cosmetic application, investigated in different solvents (water, dimethyl sulfoxide, isopropyl myristate) resulted in the generation of oxygen-centered reactive radical species (superoxide anion radical, hydroxyl and alkoxyl radicals).

  7. The Escherichia coli BtuE protein functions as a resistance determinant against reactive oxygen species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe A Arenas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This work shows that the recently described Escherichia coli BtuE peroxidase protects the bacterium against oxidative stress that is generated by tellurite and by other reactive oxygen species elicitors (ROS. Cells lacking btuE (ΔbtuE displayed higher sensitivity to K(2TeO(3 and other oxidative stress-generating agents than did the isogenic, parental, wild-type strain. They also exhibited increased levels of cytoplasmic reactive oxygen species, oxidized proteins, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and lipoperoxides. E. coli ΔbtuE that was exposed to tellurite or H(2O(2 did not show growth changes relative to wild type cells either in aerobic or anaerobic conditions. Nevertheless, the elimination of btuE from cells deficient in catalases/peroxidases (Hpx(- resulted in impaired growth and resistance to these toxicants only in aerobic conditions, suggesting that BtuE is involved in the defense against oxidative damage. Genetic complementation of E. coli ΔbtuE restored toxicant resistance to levels exhibited by the wild type strain. As expected, btuE overexpression resulted in decreased amounts of oxidative damage products as well as in lower transcriptional levels of the oxidative stress-induced genes ibpA, soxS and katG.

  8. Advanced glycation end products enhance reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation in neutrophils in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Savita; Siddarth, Manushi; Chawla, Diwesh; Banerjee, Basu D; Madhu, S V; Tripathi, Ashok K

    2012-02-01

    Increased oxidative stress (OS) in diabetes mellitus is one of the major factors leading to diabetic pathology. However, the mediators and mechanism that provoke OS in diabetes is not fully understood, and it is possible that accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) formed secondary to hyperglycemic conditions may incite circulating polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this report, we aim to investigate the effect of AGE on reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation and subsequent OS in PMN. AGE-HSA exert dose- and time-dependent enhancement of ROS and reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI) generation by PMN. Increased ROS and RNI generation were found to be mediated through the upregulation of NADPH oxidase and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), respectively, as evident from the fact that AGE-treated neutrophils failed to generate ROS and RNI in presence of diphenyleneiodonium, a flavoprotein inhibitor for both enzymes. Further increased generation of ROS and RNI ceased when the cells were incubated with anti-RAGE antibody suggesting the involvement of AGE-RAGE interaction. Also increased malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonyl formation in AGE-exposed PMN suggest induction of OS by AGE. This study provides evidence that AGEs may play a key role in the induction of oxidative stress through the augmentation of PMN-mediated ROS and RNI generation and this may be in part responsible for development of AGE-induced diabetic pathology.

  9. Reactive Electrophilic OI-Species Evidenced in High-Performance Iridium Oxohydroxide Water Oxidation Electrocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massué, Cyriac; Pfeifer, Verena; van Gastel, Maurice; Noack, Johannes; Algara-Siller, Gerardo; Cap, Sébastien; Schlögl, Robert

    2017-12-08

    Although quasi-amorphous iridium oxohydroxides have been identified repeatedly as superior electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER), an exact description of the performance-relevant species has remained a challenge. In this context, we report the characterization of hydrothermally prepared iridium(III/IV) oxohydroxides that exhibit exceptional OER performances. Holes in the O 2p states of the iridium(III/IV) oxohydroxides result in reactive O I- species, which are identified by characteristic near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) features. A prototypical titration reaction with CO as a probe molecule shows that these O I- species are highly susceptible to nucleophilic attack at room temperature. Similarly to the preactivated oxygen involved in the biological OER in photosystem II, the electrophilic O I- species evidenced in the iridium(III/IV) oxohydroxides are suggested to be precursors to species involved in the O-O bond formation during the electrocatalytic OER. The CO titration also highlights a link between the OER performance and the surface/subsurface mobility of the O I- species. Thus, the superior electrocatalytic properties of the iridium (III/IV) oxohydroxides are explained by their ability to accommodate preactivated electrophilic O I- species that can migrate within the lattice. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Reactive Electrophilic OI− Species Evidenced in High‐Performance Iridium Oxohydroxide Water Oxidation Electrocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massué, Cyriac; Pfeifer, Verena; van Gastel, Maurice; Noack, Johannes; Algara‐Siller, Gerardo; Schlögl, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Although quasi‐amorphous iridium oxohydroxides have been identified repeatedly as superior electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER), an exact description of the performance‐relevant species has remained a challenge. In this context, we report the characterization of hydrothermally prepared iridium(III/IV) oxohydroxides that exhibit exceptional OER performances. Holes in the O 2p states of the iridium(III/IV) oxohydroxides result in reactive OI− species, which are identified by characteristic near‐edge X‐ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) features. A prototypical titration reaction with CO as a probe molecule shows that these OI− species are highly susceptible to nucleophilic attack at room temperature. Similarly to the preactivated oxygen involved in the biological OER in photosystem II, the electrophilic OI− species evidenced in the iridium(III/IV) oxohydroxides are suggested to be precursors to species involved in the O−O bond formation during the electrocatalytic OER. The CO titration also highlights a link between the OER performance and the surface/subsurface mobility of the OI− species. Thus, the superior electrocatalytic properties of the iridium (III/IV) oxohydroxides are explained by their ability to accommodate preactivated electrophilic OI− species that can migrate within the lattice. PMID:28941180

  11. Crosstalk between nitrite, myoglobin and reactive oxygen species to regulate vasodilation under hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Totzeck

    Full Text Available The systemic response to decreasing oxygen levels is hypoxic vasodilation. While this mechanism has been known for more than a century, the underlying cellular events have remained incompletely understood. Nitrite signaling is critically involved in vessel relaxation under hypoxia. This can be attributed to the presence of myoglobin in the vessel wall together with other potential nitrite reductases, which generate nitric oxide, one of the most potent vasodilatory signaling molecules. Questions remain relating to the precise concentration of nitrite and the exact dose-response relations between nitrite and myoglobin under hypoxia. It is furthermore unclear whether regulatory mechanisms exist which balance this interaction. Nitrite tissue levels were similar across all species investigated. We then investigated the exact fractional myoglobin desaturation in an ex vivo approach when gassing with 1% oxygen. Within a short time frame myoglobin desaturated to 58±12%. Given that myoglobin significantly contributes to nitrite reduction under hypoxia, dose-response experiments using physiological to pharmacological nitrite concentrations were conducted. Along all concentrations, abrogation of myoglobin in mice impaired vasodilation. As reactive oxygen species may counteract the vasodilatory response, we used superoxide dismutase and its mimic tempol as well as catalase and ebselen to reduce the levels of reactive oxygen species during hypoxic vasodilation. Incubation of tempol in conjunction with catalase alone and catalase/ebselen increased the vasodilatory response to nitrite. Our study shows that modest hypoxia leads to a significant nitrite-dependent vessel relaxation. This requires the presence of vascular myoglobin for both physiological and pharmacological nitrite levels. Reactive oxygen species, in turn, modulate this vasodilation response.

  12. Annato extract and β-carotene modulate the production of reactive oxygen species/nitric oxide in neutrophils from diabetic rats

    OpenAIRE

    Rossoni-Júnior, Joamyr Victor; Araújo, Glaucy Rodrigues; Pádua, Bruno da Cruz; Chaves, Míriam Martins; Pedrosa, Maria Lúcia; Silva, Marcelo Eustáquio; Costa, Daniela Caldeira

    2011-01-01

    Annatto has been identified asecarotenoids that havetantioxidative effects. It is well known that one of the key elements in the development of diabetic complications is oxidative stress. The immune system is especially vulnerable to oxidative damage because many immune cells, such as neutrophils, produce reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species as part of the body’s defense mechanisms to destroy invading pathogens. Reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species are excessivel...

  13. Involvement of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide radicals in activation and proliferation of rat hepatic stellate cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svegliati-Baroni, G; Saccomanno, S; van Goor, H; Jansen, P; Benedetti, A; Moshage, H

    Background/Aims: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) induce HSCs activation, proliferation and collagen gene expression in vitro. Nitric oxide (NO) represents a reactive molecule that reacts with ROS, yielding peroxynitrite. We thus verified the effect of NO on ROS-induced HSCs proliferation in vitro and

  14. Microparticles from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus induce production of reactive oxygen species and degranulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winberg, Line Kjær; Jacobsen, Søren; Nielsen, Claus H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The interaction of circulating microparticles (MPs) with immune cells in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is sparsely investigated. We examined the ability of MPs from SLE patients to induce production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and degranulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes...

  15. Exposure to ultrafine particles, intracellular production of reactive oxygen species in leukocytes and altered levels of endothelial progenitor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Kim; Møller, Peter Horn; Karottki, Dorina Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    polychromatic flow cytometry. We additionally measured production of reactive oxygen species in leukocyte subsets (lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes) by flow cytometry using intracellular 2',7'-dichlorofluoroscein. The measurements encompassed both basal levels of reactive oxygen species production...... to leukocyte-mediated oxidative stress. The study utilized a cross sectional design performed in 58 study participants from a larger cohort. Levels of circulating endothelial progenitor cells, defined as either late (CD34(+)KDR(+) cells) or early (CD34(+)CD133(+)KDR(+) cells) subsets were measured using...... and capacity for reactive oxygen species production for each leukocyte subset. We found that the late endothelial progenitor subset was negatively associated with levels of ultrafine particles measured within the participant residences and with reactive oxygen species production capacity in lymphocytes...

  16. Thiazolidinone prodrugs activated by reactive oxygen species for use in the treatment of inflammatory diseases and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2018-01-01

    Prodrugs activated predominantly or exclusively in inflammatory tissue, more particularly prodrugs of methotrexate and derivatives thereof, which are selectively activated by Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in inflammatory tissues associated with cancer and inflammatory diseases, as well as method...

  17. Mild hyperthermia enhances sensitivity of gastric cancer cells to chemotherapy through reactive oxygen species-induced autophagic death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Ming-Chen; Long, Hui; Cui, Shu-Zhong; Gong, Yuan-Feng; Yan, Zhao-Fei; Wang, Shuai; Wu, Yin-Bing

    2017-06-01

    Mild hyperthermia enhances anti-cancer effects of chemotherapy, but the precise biochemical mechanisms involved are not clear. This study was carried out to investigate whether mild hyperthermia sensitizes gastric cancer cells to chemotherapy through reactive oxygen species-induced autophagic death. In total, 20 BABL/c mice of MKN-45 human gastric cancer tumor model were divided into hyperthermia + chemotherapy group, hyperthermia group, chemotherapy group, N-acetyl-L-cysteine group, and mock group. Reactive oxygen species production and expression of autophagy-related genes Beclin1, LC3B, and mammalian target of rapamycin were determined. The relationships between tumor growth regression, expression of autophagy-related genes, and reactive oxygen species production were evaluated. Tumor size and wet weight of hyperthermia + chemotherapy group was significantly decreased relative to values from hyperthermia group, chemotherapy group, N-acetyl-L-cysteine group, and mock group ( F = 6.92, p Reactive oxygen species production was significantly higher in hyperthermia + chemotherapy group than in hyperthermia, chemotherapy, and mock groups. The expression levels of Beclin1 and LC3B were significantly higher, while those of mammalian target of rapamycin were significantly lower in hyperthermia + chemotherapy group than in hyperthermia, chemotherapy, and mock groups. Tumor growth regression was consistent with changes in reactive oxygen species production and expression of autophagy-related genes. N-acetyl-L-cysteine inhibited changes in the expression of the autophagy-related genes and also suppressed reactive oxygen species production and tumor growth. Hyperthermia + chemotherapy increase expression of autophagy-related genes Beclin1 and LC3B, decrease expression of mammalian target of rapamycin, and concomitantly increase reactive oxygen species generation. These results strongly indicate that mild hyperthermia enhances sensitivity of gastric

  18. Salicylate induces reactive oxygen species and reduces UVC susceptibility in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jia-Yi; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Ma, Kai; Hou, Yong-Na; Yao, Guo-Dong; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Itoh, Kikuji; Tashiro, Shin-Ichi; Onodera, Satoshi; Ikejima, Takashi

    2018-03-13

    Present study demonstrates that growth of Staphylococcus aureus in the presence of salicylate reduces ultraviolet C (UVC)-induced cell death and increases the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, compounds that scavenge ROS (N-acetylcysteine, glutathione, catalase and superoxide dismutase) reverse the increased UVC survival induced by growth in the presence of salicylate, while ROS donors (tert-butylhydroperoxide, H2O2, and NaClO) enhance survival of salicylate challenged cultures. Collectively these findings suggest that ROS production induced by growth in the presence of salicylate protects S. aureus from UVC-induced cell death.

  19. Surface-Selective Preferential Production of Reactive Oxygen Species on Piezoelectric Ceramics for Bacterial Killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Guoxin; Wang, Shuangying; Zhu, Ye; Zhou, Lei; Yu, Peng; Wang, Xiaolan; He, Tianrui; Chen, Junqi; Mao, Chuanbin; Ning, Chengyun

    2016-09-21

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be used to kill bacterial cells, and thus the selective generation of ROS from material surfaces is an emerging direction in antibacterial material discovery. We found the polarization of piezoelectric ceramic causes the two sides of the disk to become positively and negatively charged, which translate into cathode and anode surfaces in an aqueous solution. Because of the microelectrolysis of water, ROS are preferentially formed on the cathode surface. Consequently, the bacteria are selectively killed on the cathode surface. However, the cell experiment suggested that the level of ROS is safe for normal mammalian cells.

  20. Mutagenicity of arsenic in mammalian cells: role of reactive oxygen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei, T. K.; Liu, S. X.; Waldren, C.

    1998-01-01

    Arsenite, the trivalent form of arsenic present in the environment, is a known human carcinogen that lacked mutagenic activity in bacterial and standard mammalian cell mutation assays. We show herein that when evaluated in an assay (AL cell assay), in which both intragenic and multilocus mutations are detectable, that arsenite is in fact a strong dose-dependent mutagen and that it induces mostly large deletion mutations. Cotreatment of cells with the oxygen radical scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide significantly reduces the mutagenicity of arsenite. Thus, the carcinogenicity of arsenite can be explained at least in part by it being a mutagen that depends on reactive oxygen species for its activity.

  1. Reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide mediate plasticity of neuronal calcium signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yermolaieva, Olena; Brot, Nathan; Weissbach, Herbert; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2000-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) are important participants in signal transduction that could provide the cellular basis for activity-dependent regulation of neuronal excitability. In young rat cortical brain slices and undifferentiated PC12 cells, paired application of depolarization/agonist stimulation and oxidation induces long-lasting potentiation of subsequent Ca2+ signaling that is reversed by hypoxia. This potentiation critically depends on NO production and involves cellular ROS utilization. The ability to develop the Ca2+ signal potentiation is regulated by the developmental stage of nerve tissue, decreasing markedly in adult rat cortical neurons and differentiated PC12 cells.

  2. Reactive oxygen species impact on sperm DNA and its role in male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, A D; Sharma, R; Henkel, R; Agarwal, A

    2018-04-11

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been extensively studied as a cause of male infertility. Excessive levels of ROS coupled with a deficiency in antioxidants can lead to oxidative stress (OS), which in turn can lead to nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage, telomere shortening, epigenetic alterations and Y chromosomal microdeletions. In this review, we discuss how OS induces DNA damage and the types of DNA damage that can occur. We also briefly touch on the clinical consequences of OS-induced DNA damage. © 2018 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Mitochondria in homeostasis of reactive oxygen species in cell, tissues, and organism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježek, Petr; Hlavatá, Lydie

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 12 (2005), s. 2478-2503 ISSN 1357-2725 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5011106; GA ČR(CZ) GA301/02/1215; GA ČR(CZ) GA301/05/0221; GA ČR(CZ) GA204/04/0495 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : mitochondria * reactive oxygen species * oxidative stress Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.871, year: 2005

  4. Single-molecule imaging of platinum ligand exchange reaction reveals reactivity distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfandiari, N Melody; Wang, Yong; Bass, Jonathan Y; Cornell, Trevor P; Otte, Douglas A L; Cheng, Ming H; Hemminger, John C; McIntire, Theresa M; Mandelshtam, Vladimir A; Blum, Suzanne A

    2010-11-03

    Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy provided information about the real-time distribution of chemical reactivity on silicon oxide supports at the solution-surface interface, at a level of detail which would be unavailable from a traditional ensemble technique or from a technique that imaged the static physical properties of the surface. Chemical reactions on the surface were found to be uncorrelated; that is, the chemical reaction of one metal complex did not influence the location of a future chemical reaction of another metal complex.

  5. Oleic acid increases mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and decreases endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity in cultured endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gremmels, Hendrik; Bevers, Lonneke M; Fledderus, Joost O; Braam, Branko; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; Verhaar, Marianne C; Joles, Jaap A

    2015-03-15

    Elevated plasma levels of free fatty acids (FFA) are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. This may be related to FFA-induced elevation of oxidative stress in endothelial cells. We hypothesized that, in addition to mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-mediated reactive oxygen species production contributes to oleic acid (OA)-induced oxidative stress in endothelial cells, due to eNOS uncoupling. We measured reactive oxygen species production and eNOS activity in cultured endothelial cells (bEnd.3) in the presence of OA bound to bovine serum albumin, using the CM-H2DCFDA assay and the L-arginine/citrulline conversion assay, respectively. OA induced a concentration-dependent increase in reactive oxygen species production, which was inhibited by the mitochondrial complex II inhibitor thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA). OA had little effect on eNOS activity when stimulated by a calcium-ionophore, but decreased both basal and insulin-induced eNOS activity, which was restored by TTFA. Pretreatment of bEnd.3 cells with tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) prevented OA-induced reactive oxygen species production and restored inhibition of eNOS activity by OA. Elevation of OA levels leads to both impairment in receptor-mediated stimulation of eNOS and to production of mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species and hence endothelial dysfunction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Photofunctional Co-Cr Alloy Generating Reactive Oxygen Species for Photodynamic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang-Kyun Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the fabrication of photofunctional Co-Cr alloy plate that is prepared by a simple modification process for photodynamic application. Photoinduced functionality is provided by the photosensitizer of hematoporphyrin (Hp that initially generates reactive oxygen species (ROS such as superoxide anion radical and singlet oxygen. The photosensitizer with carboxyl group was chemically bonded to the surface of the Co-Cr alloy plate by esterification reaction. Microstructure and elemental composition of the Co-Cr alloy plate were checked with scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS. Fabrication of the photofunctionality of the Co-Cr alloy plate was confirmed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, reflectance UV-Vis absorption, and emission spectroscopy. Reactive oxygen generation from the photofunctional Co-Cr alloy plate was confirmed by using the decomposition reaction of 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran (DPBF. The results suggest that the immobilized photosensitizer molecules on the surface of Co-Cr alloy plate still possess their optical and functional properties including reactive oxygen generation. To open the possibility for its application as a photodynamic material to biological system, the fabricated photofunctional Co-Cr alloy is applied to the decomposition of smooth muscle cells.

  7. Oxidation of glycosaminoglycans by free radicals and reactive oxidative species: A review of investigative methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, B J

    2015-05-01

    Glycosaminoglycans, in particular hyaluronan (HA), and proteoglycans are components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM plays a key role in the regulation of cellular behaviour and alterations to it can modulate both the development of human diseases as well as controlling normal biochemical processes such as cell signalling and pro-inflammatory responses. For these reasons, in vitro fragmentation studies of glycosaminoglycans by free radicals and oxidative species are seen to be relevant to the understanding of in vivo studies of damage to the ECM. A wide range of investigative techniques have therefore been applied to gain insights into the relative fragmentation effects of several reactive oxidative species with the ultimate goal of determining mechanisms of fragmentation at the molecular level. These methods are reviewed here.

  8. Mechanism of artemisinin phytotoxicity action: induction of reactive oxygen species and cell death in lettuce seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Dan-Dan; Ding, Lan; Cui, Hai-Yan; Jin, Hui; Yang, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Jian-She; Qin, Bo

    2015-03-01

    Artemisinin has been recognized as an allelochemical that inhibits growth of several plant species. However, its mode of action is not well clarified. In this study, the mechanism of artemisinin phytotoxicity on lettuce seedlings was investigated. Root and shoot elongation of lettuce seedlings were inhibited by artemisinin in a concentration-dependent manner. The compound effectively arrested cell division and caused loss of cell viability in root tips of lettuce. Overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was induced by artemisinin. Lipid peroxidation, proline overproduction and reduction of chlorophyll content in lettuce seedlings were found after treatments. These results suggested that artemisinin could induce ROS overproduction, which caused membrane lipids peroxidation and cell death, and impacted mitosis and physiological processes, resulting in growth inhibition of receptor plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Hydrous Ferric Oxides in Sediment Catalyze Formation of Reactive Oxygen Species during Sulfide Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A. Murphy

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This article describes the formation of reactive oxygen species as a result of the oxidation of dissolved sulfide by Fe(III-containing sediments suspended in oxygenated seawater over the pH range 7.00 and 8.25. Sediment samples were obtained from across the coastal littoral zone in South Carolina, US, at locations from the beach edge to the forested edge of a Spartina dominated estuarine salt marsh and suspended in aerated seawater. Reactive oxygen species (superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production was initiated in sediment suspensions by the addition of sodium bisulfide. The subsequent loss of HS-, formation of Fe(II (as indicated by Ferrozine, and superoxide and hydrogen peroxide were monitored over time. The concentration of superoxide rose from the baseline and then persisted at an apparent steady state concentration of approximately 500 nanomolar at pH 8.25 and 200 nanomolar at pH 7.00 respectively until >97% hydrogen sulfide was consumed. Measured superoxide was used to predict hydrogen peroxide yield based on superoxide dismutation. Dismutation alone quantitatively predicted hydrogen peroxide formation at pH 8.25 but over predicted hydrogen peroxide formation at pH 7 by a factor of approximately 102. Experiments conducted with episodic spikes of added hydrogen peroxide indicated rapid hydrogen peroxide consumption could account for its apparent low instantaneous yield, presumably the result of its reaction with Fe(II species, polysulfides or bisulfite. All sediment samples were characterized for total Fe, Cu, Mn, Ni, Co and hydrous ferric oxide by acid extraction followed by mass spectrometric or spectroscopic characterization. Sediments with the highest loadings of hydrous ferric oxide were the only sediments that produced significant dissolved Fe(II species or ROS as a result of sulfide exposure.

  10. Candida albicans Biofilms Do Not Trigger Reactive Oxygen Species and Evade Neutrophil Killing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhihong; Thompson, Angela; Sobue, Takanori; Kashleva, Helena; Xu, Hongbin; Vasilakos, John; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophils are found within Candida albicans biofilms in vivo and could play a crucial role in clearing the pathogen from biofilms forming on catheters and mucosal surfaces. Our goal was to compare the antimicrobial activity of neutrophils against developing and mature C. albicans biofilms and identify biofilm-specific properties mediating resistance to immune cells. Antibiofilm activity was measured with the 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide assay and a molecular Candida viability assay. Reactive oxygen species generation was assessed by measuring fluorescence of 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate, acetyl ester in preloaded neutrophils. We found that mature biofilms were resistant to leukocytic killing and did not trigger reactive oxygen species, even though neutrophils retained their viability and functional activation potential. Beta-glucans found in the extracellular matrix negatively affected antibiofilm activities. We conclude that these polymers act as a decoy mechanism to prevent neutrophil activation and that this represents an important innate immune evasion mechanism of C. albicans biofilms. PMID:23033146

  11. Bactericidal Antibiotics Promote Reactive Oxygen Species Formation and Inflammation in Human Sinonasal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohanski, Michael A; Tharakan, Anuj; Lane, Andrew P.; Ramanathan, Murugappan

    2015-01-01

    Background Bactericidal antibiotics have been shown to stimulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in mammalian cells through mitochondrial dysfunction. This results in oxidative tissue damage that may have negative consequences for long-term antibiotic use. Antibiotics are widely and heavily used in the treatment of acute and chronic sinusitis, however the relationship between antibiotics and ROS formation in sinonasal epithelial cells (SNECs) has not yet been demonstrated. Methods Human SNECs were collected from patients during endoscopic sinus surgery and grown in culture at the air-liquid interface. Differentiated SNECs were stimulated with the bactericidal antibiotics amoxicillin and levofloxacin and the bacteriostatic antibiotic clarithromycin for 24-hours. Reactive oxygen species were quantified via fluorescence. Cell death was quantified by LDH secretion. Expression of inflammatory markers such as TNF-α and Nrf2 mediated antioxidant genes were measured by RT-PCR. Results Cultured SNECs treated with the bactericidal antibiotics amoxicillin and levofloxacin resulted in a significant increase in production of ROS (pbactericidal antibiotics leads to formation of ROS with an associated increase in inflammatory and antioxidant gene expression and cell death. This suggests that long term or inappropriate antibiotic use in the treatment of sinusitis, may result in oxidative tissue damage to the sinonasal epithelium. Future studies will explore the clinical implications of such damage to the sinonasal epithelium. PMID:26624249

  12. Berberine-induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells is initiated by reactive oxygen species generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meeran, Syed M.; Katiyar, Suchitra; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2008-01-01

    Phytochemicals show promise as potential chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic agents against various cancers. Here we report the chemotherapeutic effects of berberine, a phytochemical, on human prostate cancer cells. The treatment of human prostate cancer cells (PC-3) with berberine induced dose-dependent apoptosis but this effect of berberine was not seen in non-neoplastic human prostate epithelial cells (PWR-1E). Berberine-induced apoptosis was associated with the disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, release of apoptogenic molecules (cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO) from mitochondria and cleavage of caspase-9,-3 and PARP proteins. This effect of berberine on prostate cancer cells was initiated by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) irrespective of their androgen responsiveness, and the generation of ROS was through the increased induction of xanthine oxidase. Treatment of cells with allopurinol, an inhibitor of xanthine oxidase, inhibited berberine-induced oxidative stress in cancer cells. Berberine-induced apoptosis was blocked in the presence of antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine, through the prevention of disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and subsequently release of cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO. In conclusion, the present study reveals that the berberine-mediated cell death of human prostate cancer cells is regulated by reactive oxygen species, and therefore suggests that berberine may be considered for further studies as a promising therapeutic candidate for prostate cancer

  13. Extensive Dark Biological Production of Reactive Oxygen Species in Brackish and Freshwater Ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tong; Hansel, Colleen M; Voelker, Bettina M; Lamborg, Carl H

    2016-03-15

    Within natural waters, photodependent processes are generally considered the predominant source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a suite of biogeochemically important molecules. However, recent discoveries of dark particle-associated ROS production in aquatic environments and extracellular ROS production by various microorganisms point to biological activity as a significant source of ROS in the absence of light. Thus, the objective of this study was to explore the occurrence of dark biological production of the ROS superoxide (O2(-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in brackish and freshwater ponds. Here we show that the ROS superoxide and hydrogen peroxide were present in dark waters at comparable concentrations as in sunlit waters. This suggests that, at least for the short-lived superoxide species, light-independent processes were an important control on ROS levels in these natural waters. Indeed, we demonstrated that dark biological production of ROS extensively occurred in brackish and freshwater environments, with greater dark ROS production rates generally observed in the aphotic relative to the photic zone. Filtering and formaldehyde inhibition confirmed the biological nature of a majority of this dark ROS production, which likely involved phytoplankton, particle-associated heterotrophic bacteria, and NADH-oxidizing enzymes. We conclude that biological ROS production is widespread, including regions devoid of light, thereby expanding the relevance of these reactive molecules to all regions of our oxygenated global habit.

  14. New enzymatic pathways for the reduction of reactive oxygen species in Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabeza, Matías S; Guerrero, Sergio A; Iglesias, Alberto A; Arias, Diego G

    2015-06-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, an intestinal parasite that is the causative agent of amoebiasis, is exposed to elevated amounts of highly toxic reactive oxygen and nitrogen species during tissue invasion. A flavodiiron protein and a rubrerythrin have been characterized in this human pathogen, although their physiological reductants have not been identified. The present work deals with biochemical studies performed to reach a better understanding of the kinetic and structural properties of rubredoxin reductase and two ferredoxins from E. histolytica. We complemented the characterization of two different metabolic pathways for O2 and H2O2 detoxification in E. histolytica. We characterized a novel amoebic protein with rubredoxin reductase activity that is able to catalyze the NAD(P)H-dependent reduction of heterologous rubredoxins, amoebic rubrerythrin and flavodiiron protein but not ferredoxins. In addition, the protein exhibited an NAD(P)H oxidase activity, which generates hydrogen peroxide from molecular oxygen. We describe how different ferredoxins were also efficient reducing substrates for both flavodiiron protein and rubrerythrin. The enzymatic systems herein characterized could contribute to the in vivo detoxification of O2 and H2O2, playing a key role for the parasite defense against reactive oxidant species. To the best of our knowledge this is the first characterization of a eukaryotic rubredoxin reductase, including a novel kinetic study on ferredoxin-dependent reduction of flavodiiron and rubrerythrin proteins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Cysteine protects rabbit spermatozoa against reactive oxygen species-induced damages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhendong; Ren, Zhanjun; Fan, Xiaoteng; Pan, Yang; Lv, Shan; Pan, Chuanying; Lei, Anmin; Zeng, Wenxian

    2017-01-01

    The process of cryopreservation results in over-production of reactive oxygen species, which is extremely detrimental to spermatozoa. The aim of this study was to investigate whether addition of cysteine to freezing extender would facilitate the cryosurvival of rabbit spermatozoa, and if so, how cysteine protects spermatozoa from cryodamages. Freshly ejaculated semen was diluted with Tris-citrate-glucose extender supplemented with different concentrations of cysteine. The motility, intact acrosomes, membrane integrity, mitochondrial potentials, 8-hydroxyguanosine level and sperm-zona pellucida binding capacity were examined. Furthermore, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, glutathione content (GSH), and level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and hydrogen peroxide of spermatozoa were analyzed. The values of motility, intact acrosomes, membrane integrity, mitochondrial potentials and sperm-zona pellucida binding capacity of the frozen-thawed spermatozoa in the treatment of cysteine were significantly higher than those of the control. Addition of cysteine to extenders improved the GPx activity and GSH content of spermatozoa, while lowered the ROS, DNA oxidative alterations and lipid peroxidation level, which makes spermatozoa avoid ROS to attack DNA, the plasma membrane and mitochondria. In conclusion, cysteine protects spermatozoa against ROS-induced damages during cryopreservation and post-thaw incubation. Addition of cysteine is recommended to facilitate the improvement of semen preservation for the rabbit breeding industry.

  16. Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species in Pathogenesis of Vascular Complications of Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok Man Son

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Macrovascular and microvascular diseases are currently the principal causes of morbidity and mortality in subjects with diabetes. Disorders of the physiological signaling functions of reactive oxygen species (superoxide and hydrogen peroxide and reactive nitrogen species (nitric oxide and peroxynitrite are important features of diabetes. In the absence of an appropriate compensation by the endogenous antioxidant defense network, increased oxidative stress leads to the activation of stress-sensitive intracellular signaling pathways and the formation of gene products that cause cellular damage and contribute to the vascular complications of diabetes. It has recently been suggested that diabetic subjects with vascular complications may have a defective cellular antioxidant response against the oxidative stress generated by hyperglycemia. This raises the concept that antioxidant therapy may be of great benefit to these subjects. Although our understanding of how hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress ultimately leads to tissue damage has advanced considerably in recent years, effective therapeutic strategies to prevent or delay the development of this damage remain limited. Thus, further investigation of therapeutic interventions to prevent or delay the progression of diabetic vascular complications is needed.

  17. Reactive oxygen species in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus alter sympathetic activity during metabolic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSIANE CAMPOS CRUZ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN contains heterogeneous populations of neurons involved in autonomic and neuroendocrine regulation. The PVN plays an important role in the sympathoexcitatory response to increasing circulating levels of angiotensin II (Ang-II, which activates AT1 receptors in the circumventricular organs (OCVs, mainly in the subfornical organ (SFO. Circulating Ang-II induces a de novo synthesis of Ang-II in SFO neurons projecting to pre-autonomic PVN neurons. Activation of AT1 receptors induces intracellular increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS, leading to increases in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA. Chronic sympathetic nerve activation promotes a series of metabolic disorders that characterizes the metabolic syndrome (MetS: dyslipidemia, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, hyperleptinemia and elevated plasma hormone levels, such as noradrenaline, glucocorticoids, leptin, insulin and Ang-II. This review will discuss the contribution of our laboratory and others regarding the sympathoexcitation caused by peripheral Ang-II-induced reactive oxygen species along the subfornical organ and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. We hypothesize that this mechanism could be involved in metabolic disorders underlying MetS.

  18. Interactions of staphyloxanthin and enterobactin with myeloperoxidase and reactive chlorine species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Melanie S; Forbes, Louisa V; Plowman-Holmes, Matthew; Murdoch, David R; Winterbourn, Christine C; Kettle, Anthony J

    2018-03-31

    When neutrophils engulf bacteria, myeloperoxidase converts hydrogen peroxide to hypochlorous acid, which is toxic to all micro-organisms. It has been suggested that some pathogens have virulence factors that target myeloperoxidase to dampen the oxidative reactions of neutrophils. These virulence factors include staphyloxanthin, the golden pigment of Staphylococcus aureus, and enterobactin - a siderophore released by gram-negative bacteria. We investigated the potential of staphyloxanthin and enterobactin to shield bacteria from hypochlorous acid and related chloramines. Clinical strains of S. aureus with high levels of staphyloxanthin and related carotenoids were in general more resistant to low doses of hypochlorous acid than non-pigmented bacteria. But some non-pigmented strains were also resistant to the oxidant. Doses of reactive chlorine species that killed bacteria also bleached their carotenoids. Hypochlorous acid, NH 2 Cl, and NHCl 2 bleached purified staphyloxanthin. When S. aureus were phagocytosed by neutrophils there was no discernible loss of staphyloxanthin. These data suggest that staphyloxanthin is capable of protecting bacteria from low doses of reactive chlorine species formed inside phagosomes. Enterobactin was not an inhibitor of myeloperoxidase. We conclude that staphyloxanthin may protect some bacterial strains against oxidative killing by neutrophils, but enterobactin will not inhibit the production of hypochlorous acid. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Modelling the helium plasma jet delivery of reactive species into a 3D cancer tumour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szili, Endre J.; Oh, Jun-Seok; Fukuhara, Hideo; Bhatia, Rishabh; Gaur, Nishtha; Nguyen, Cuong K.; Hong, Sung-Ha; Ito, Satsuki; Ogawa, Kotaro; Kawada, Chiaki; Shuin, Taro; Tsuda, Masayuki; Furihata, Mutsuo; Kurabayashi, Atsushi; Furuta, Hiroshi; Ito, Masafumi; Inoue, Keiji; Hatta, Akimitsu; Short, Robert D.

    2018-01-01

    Cold atmospheric plasmas have attracted significant worldwide attention for their potential beneficial effects in cancer therapy. In order to further improve the effectiveness of plasma in cancer therapy, it is important to understand the generation and transport of plasma reactive species into tissue fluids, tissues and cells, and moreover the rates and depths of delivery, particularly across physical barriers such as skin. In this study, helium (He) plasma jet treatment of a 3D cancer tumour, grown on the back of a live mouse, induced apoptosis within the tumour to a depth of 2.8 mm. The He plasma jet was shown to deliver reactive oxygen species through the unbroken skin barrier before penetrating through the entire depth of the tumour. The depth and rate of transport of He plasma jet generated H2O2, NO3 ‑ and NO2 ‑, as well as aqueous oxygen [O2(aq)], was then tracked in an agarose tissue model. This provided an approximation of the H2O2, NO3 ‑, NO2 ‑ and O2(aq) concentrations that might have been generated during the He plasma jet treatment of the 3D tumour. It is proposed that the He plasma jet can induce apoptosis within a tumour by the ‘deep’ delivery of H2O2, NO3 ‑ and NO2 ‑ coupled with O2(aq); the latter raising oxygen tension in hypoxic tissue.

  20. Hyperglycemia induced reactive species trigger structural changes in human serum albumin of type 1 diabetic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Zarina; Neelofar, Km; Arfat, Mir Yasir; Zaman, Asif; Tarannum, Akhlas; Parveen, Iffat; Ahmad, Shafeeque; Khan, Md Adnan; Badar, Asim; Islam, Shireen Naaz

    2018-02-01

    Chronic oxidative stress fuels pathogenesis of a large set of diseases. Oxidative stress is the cause and consequence of numerous diseases including type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), in which there is selective destruction of insulin producing pancreatic β-cells. Studies have documented that hyperglycemia produces profound stress. In vivo production of numerous reactive oxygen, nitrogen, chlorine species and lipid/sugar oxidation products in T1DM patients may be the result of persistent hyperglycemia. Post-translational modifications by reactive species may create new antigenic epitopes and play a role in the development of autoimmune response. In this paper our main focus was to establish the effect of existing hyperglycemia induced oxido-nitrosative stress in T1DM patients on the integrity of human serum albumin. Raised nitric oxide, carbonyl, RBC hemolysis, lowered ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), thiol and deformed RBC in T1DM are all highly suggestive of persistent oxido-nitrosative stress. Hyperglycemia induced generation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) was established by LCMS. Chronic oxido-nitrosative stress can modify HSA in T1DM patients, producing immunologically active albumin. Therefore, it is speculated that the aberrant HSA may play a role in the initiation/progression of T1DM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy for Studying the Generation and Scavenging of Reactive Oxygen Species by Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jun-Jie; Zhao, Baozhong; Xia, Qingsu; Fu, Peter P.

    2013-09-01

    One fundamental mechanism widely described for nanotoxicity involves oxidative damage due to generation of free radicals and other reactive oxygen species. Indeed, the ability of nanoscale materials to facilitate the transfer of electrons, and thereby promote oxidative damage or in some instances provide antioxidant protection, may be a fundamental property of these materials. Any assessment of a nanoscale material's safety must therefore consider the potential for toxicity arising from oxidative damage. Therefore, rapid and predictive methods are needed to assess oxidative damage elicited by nanoscale materials. The use of electron spin resonance (ESR) to study free radical related bioactivity of nanomaterials has several advantages for free radical determination and identification. Specifically it can directly assess antioxidant quenching or prooxidant generation of relevant free radicals and reactive oxygen species. In this chapter, we have reported some nonclassical behaviors of the electron spin relaxation properties of unpaired electrons in different fullerenes and the investigation of anti/prooxidant activity by various types of nanomaterials using ESR. In addition, we have reviewed the mechanisms of free radical formation photosensitized by different nanomaterials. This chapter also included the use of spin labels, spin traps and ESR oximetry to systematically examine the enzymatic mimetic activities of nanomaterials.

  2. The potential of extracts of Caryocar villosum pulp to scavenge reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisté, Renan Campos; Freitas, Marisa; Mercadante, Adriana Zerlotti; Fernandes, Eduarda

    2012-12-01

    Caryocar villosum (piquiá) is a native fruit from the Amazonian region, considered to be an interesting source of bioactive compounds. In this paper, five extracts of C. villosum pulp were obtained, using solvents with different polarities and their in vitro scavenging capacity against reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) was determined. Additionally, the phenolic compounds and carotenoids in each extract were identified and quantified by a high performance liquid chromatography coupled to diode array and mass spectrometer detectors (HPLC-DAD-MS/MS). The ethanol/water and water extracts, which presented the highest phenolic contents (5163 and 1745μg/g extract, respectively), with ellagic acid as the major phenolic compound, proved to have the highest ROS and RNS scavenging potential. Nevertheless, in general, ellagic acid was less effective in scavenging ROS (IC(50) from 1.7 to 108μg/ml) and RNS (IC(50) from 0.05 to 0.59μg/ml), when compared to gallic acid (IC(50) from 0.4 to 226μg/ml for ROS and IC(50) from 0.04 to 0.12μg/ml for RNS). The results obtained in the present study clearly demonstrated that the in vitro antioxidant efficiency of C. villosum extracts was closely related to their contents of phenolic compounds. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Oxygen reactivity of PutA from Helicobacter species and proline-linked oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Navasona; Becker, Donald F

    2006-02-01

    Proline is converted to glutamate in two successive steps by the proline utilization A (PutA) flavoenzyme in gram-negative bacteria. PutA contains a proline dehydrogenase domain that catalyzes the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent oxidation of proline to delta1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) and a P5C dehydrogenase domain that catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of P5C to glutamate. Here, we characterize PutA from Helicobacter hepaticus (PutA(Hh)) and Helicobacter pylori (PutA(Hp)) to provide new insights into proline metabolism in these gastrointestinal pathogens. Both PutA(Hh) and PutA(Hp) lack DNA binding activity, in contrast to PutA from Escherichia coli (PutA(Ec)), which both regulates and catalyzes proline utilization. PutA(Hh) and PutA(Hp) display catalytic activities similar to that of PutA(Ec) but have higher oxygen reactivity. PutA(Hh) and PutA(Hp) exhibit 100-fold-higher turnover numbers (approximately 30 min(-1)) than PutA(Ec) (PutA(Hh) forms a reversible FAD-sulfite adduct. The significance of increased oxygen reactivity in PutA(Hh) and PutA(Hp) was probed by oxidative stress studies in E. coli. Expression of PutA(Ec) and PutA from Bradyrhizobium japonicum, which exhibit low oxygen reactivity, does not diminish stress survival rates of E. coli cell cultures. In contrast, PutA(Hp) and PutA(Hh) expression dramatically reduces E. coli cell survival and is correlated with relatively lower proline levels and increased hydrogen peroxide formation. The discovery of reduced oxygen species formation by PutA suggests that proline catabolism may influence redox homeostasis in the ecological niches of these Helicobacter species.

  4. Concentrations and Fluxes of Reactive Oxygen Species on the Mauritanian Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, M. I.; Wuttig, K.; Croot, P. L.

    2016-02-01

    We present field work, which studies biogeochemical processes at the Mauritanian shelf edge in the tropical eastern north Atlantic. The importance of photochemically formed reactive oxygen species (ROS) to biogeochemical and biological processes in the ocean is now clear but we still have a poor understanding of the exact mechanisms and critically, the rates and fluxes of these compounds. Previous research has identified that the redox switch of the essential trace metals Copper (Cu), Manganese (Mn) and Iron (Fe) is sensitive to this mostly photochemically produced ROS, like superoxide (O2-) and its daughter product, Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2). As O2- and H2O2 can act as both an oxidant and a reductant they can exert an important influence in trace metal redox cycling and with this solubility and bioavailability. However, presently we have little information on the formation rates of O2- and H2O2 from direct photochemical production in the ocean and their relative reactivity with different metal or organic species present in seawater. In this current field work, we present for the first time data, where we used the superoxide thermal source SOTS-1, an over hours at low levels constantly producing O2- source, which we showed earlier, can be used to determine both, concentrations and fluxes of ROS in seawater. The reactivity of O2- in the experimental treatments, which included Cu, Mn, Fe but also the reaction with organic matter, was followed by a well-established chemiluminescence technique using the reagent MCLA, a Cypridina luciferin analog, after additions of SOTS-1, but was also compared to data obtained with potassium superoxide (KO2), another reliable O2- the source, as described and used in field work previously. Additionally the experiments with Mn consisted of treatments with the redox state +II and +III, as we aim to examine the current evidence for Mn(III) in the euphotic zone of the open ocean.

  5. Inverse correlation between reactive oxygen species in unwashed semen and sperm motion parameters as measured by a computer-assisted semen analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshima, Teppei; Yumura, Yasushi; Yasuda, Kengo; Sanjo, Hiroyuki; Kuroda, Shinnosuke; Yamanaka, Hiroyuki; Iwasaki, Akira

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the correlation between sperm motion parameters obtained by a computer-assisted semen analyzer and levels of reactive oxygen species in unwashed semen. In total, 847 patients, except for azoospermic patients were investigated. At the time of each patient's first consultation, semen parameters were measured using SMAS™ or CellSoft 3000™, and production of reactive oxygen species was measured using a computer-driven LKB Wallac Luminometer 1251 Analyzer. The patients were divided into two groups: reactive oxygen species - positive and negative. The semen parameters within each group were measured using one of the two computer-assisted semen analyzer systems and then compared. Correlations between reactive oxygen species levels and sperm motion parameters in semen from the reactive oxygen species - positive group were also investigated. Reactive oxygen species were detected in semen samples of 282 cases (33.3%). Sperm concentration (P reactive oxygen species - positive group than in the reactive oxygen species - negative group. Among the sperm motion parameters in the reactive oxygen species - positive group, sperm concentration (P reactive oxygen species levels. Therefore, this study demonstrated that excessive reactive oxygen species in semen damage sperm concentration, motility, and other sperm motion parameters.

  6. Crucial roles of reactive chemical species in modification of respiratory syncytial virus by nitrogen gas plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Toyokawa, Yoichi; Imanishi, Yuichiro; Murakami, Tomoyuki

    2017-05-01

    The exact mechanisms by which nanoparticles, especially those composed of soft materials, are modified by gas plasma remain unclear. Here, we used respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which has a diameter of 80-350nm, as a model system to identify important factors for gas plasma modification of nanoparticles composed of soft materials. Nitrogen gas plasma, generated by applying a short high-voltage pulse using a static induction (SI) thyristor power supply produced reactive chemical species (RCS) and caused virus inactivation. The plasma treatment altered the viral genomic RNA, while treatment with a relatively low concentration of hydrogen peroxide, which is a neutral chemical species among RCS, effectively inactivated the virus. Furthermore, a zero dimensional kinetic global model of the reaction scheme during gas plasma generation identified the production of various RCS, including neutral chemical species. Our findings suggest the nitrogen gas plasma generates RCS, including neutral species that damage the viral genomic RNA, leading to virus inactivation. Thus, RCS generated by gas plasma appears to be crucial for virus inactivation, suggesting this may constitute an important factor in terms of the efficient modification of nanoparticles composed of soft materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Dual oxidase 2 generated reactive oxygen species selectively mediate the induction of mucins by epidermal growth factor in enterocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Simona; Morano, Annalisa; Ucci, Valentina; Accetta, Roberta; Mondola, Paolo; Paternò, Roberto; Avvedimento, V Enrico; Santillo, Mariarosaria

    2015-03-01

    Dual oxidase 2 enzyme is a member of the reactive oxygen species-generating cell membrane NADPH oxidases involved in mucosal innate immunity. It is not known if the biological activity of dual oxidase 2 is mediated by direct bacterial killing by reactive oxygen species produced by the enzyme or by the same reactive oxygen species acting as second messengers that stimulate novel gene expression. To uncover the role of reactive oxygen species and dual oxidases as signaling molecules, we have dissected the pathway triggered by epidermal growth factor to induce mucins, the principal protective components of gastrointestinal mucus. We show that dual oxidase 2 is essential for selective epidermal growth factor induction of the transmembrane MUC3 and the secreted gel-forming MUC5AC mucins. Reactive oxygen species generated by dual oxidase 2 stabilize tyrosine phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor and induce MUC3 and MUC5AC through persistent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2-protein kinase C. Knocking down dual oxidase 2 by selective RNA targeting (siRNA) reduced epidermal growth factor receptor phosphorylation, and MUC3 and MUC5AC gene expression. Extracellular reactive oxygen species produced by dual oxidase 2, upon stimulation by epidermal growth factor, stabilize epidermal growth factor receptor phosphorylation and activate extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2-protein kinase C which induce MUC5AC and MUC3. Extracellular reactive oxygen species produced by dual oxidase 2 that are known to directly kill bacteria, also contribute to the maintenance of the epidermal growth factor-amplification loop, which induces mucins. These data suggest a new function of dual oxidase 2 protein in the luminal protection of the gastrointestinal tract through the induction of mucin expression by growth factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Kinetics of reactive oxygen species produced by rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss leukocytes and the effect of the antioxidant astaxanthin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Gomez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species contribute to kill of microorganisms. Their activity is usually measured by their capacity to reduce nitroblue tetrazolium into formazan. The incubation time to allow nitroblue tetrazolium reduction by reactive oxygen species usually ranges from 30 to 60 min. The aim of our study was to determine the kinetics of formazan formation, to determine the shortest incubation time possible, and to find if astaxanthin negatively affects the availability of reactive oxygen species (and defense mechanisms of fish. The blood/nitroblue tetrazolium method is based on nitroblue tetrazolium reduction into formazan by reactive oxygen species present in blood. Formazan can be spectrophotometrically measured, allowing quantification of reactive oxygen species. Reactive oxygen species were measured in blood samples from 30 trout intramuscularly injected with astaxanthin (0.3 mg/100 g of fish (experimental group and 30 non-injected trout (controls. Results indicated that in trout non-treated with astaxanthin, the plateau of formazan production was reached after 20 min of incubation. Trout intramuscularly injected with astaxanthin showed the following: on Day 1 after astaxanthin injection, the kinetics were slower but finally reached a plateau similar to astaxanthin-free trouts, and by Day 11 the plateau was significantly higher after 60 min incubation. In conclusion, the kinetics curves here reported allow reducing incubation time of the method to only 20 min in antioxidant-free trout and, on the other hand, our results also revealed that astaxanthin can be used to improve flesh colour in salmonids without affecting reactive oxygen species availability and therefore the defense mechanisms of trout.

  9. Differential accumulation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in maize lines with contrasting drought tolerance and aflatoxin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiotic stresses such as drought stress can exacerbate aflatoxin contamination of maize kernels. Previous studies showed that maize lines resistance to aflatoxin contamination tend to exhibit enhanced drought tolerance and accumulate lower levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen species...

  10. Reactive Oxygen Species on the Early Earth and Survival of Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, Melikea; Mason, Paul; Stams, Alfons J. M.; Smidt, Hauke; Freund, Friedemann; Rothschild, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    An oxygen-rich atmosphere appears to have been a prerequisite for complex, multicellular life to evolve on Earth and possibly elsewhere in the Universe. However it remains unclear how free oxygen first became available on the early Earth. A potentially important, and as yet poorly constrained pathway, is the production of oxygen through the weathering of rocks and release into the near-surface environment. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), as precursors to molecular oxygen, are a key step in this process, and may have had a decisive impact on the evolution of life, present and past. ROS are generated from minerals in igneous rocks during hydrolysis of peroxy defects, which consist of pairs of oxygen anions oxidized to the valence state -1 and during (bio) transformations of iron sulphide minerals. ROS are produced and consumed by intracellular and extracellular reactions of Fe, Mn, C, N, and S species. We propose that, despite an overall reducing or neutral oxidation state of the macroenvironment and the absence of free O2 in the atmosphere, organisms on the early Earth had to cope with ROS in their microenvironments. They were thus under evolutionary pressure to develop enzymatic and other defences against the potentially dangerous, even lethal effects of oxygen and its derived ROS. Conversely it appears that microorganisms learned to take advantage of the enormous reactive potential and energy gain provided by nascent oxygen. We investigate how oxygen might be released through weathering. We test microorganisms in contact with rock surfaces and iron sulphides. We model bacteria such as Deionococcus radiodurans and Desulfotomaculum, Moorella and Bacillus species for their ability to grow or survive in the presence of ROS. We examine how early Life might have adapted to oxygen.

  11. Single- and multi-photon ionization studies of organosulfur species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Yu -San [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-02-12

    Accurate ionization energies (IE`s) for molecular species are used for prediction of chemical reactivity and are of fundamental importance to chemists. The IE of a gaseous molecule can be determined routinely in a photoionization or a photoelectron experiment. IE determinations made in conventional photoionization and photoelectron studies have uncertainties in the range of 3--100 meV (25--250 cm-1). In the past decade, the most exciting development in the field of photoionization and photoelectron spectroscopy has been the availability of high resolution, tunable ultraviolet (UV) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser sources. The laser pulsed field ionization photoelectron (PFI-PE) scheme is currently the state-of-the-art photoelectron spectroscopic technique and is capable of providing photoelectron energy resolution close to the optical resolution. The author has focused attention on the photoionization processes of some sulfur-containing species. The studies of the photoionization and photodissociation on sulfur-containing compounds [such as CS2, CH3SH, CH3SSCH3, CH3CH2SCH2CH3, HSCH2CH2SH and C4H4S (thiophene) and sulfur-containing radicals, such as HS, CS, CH3S, CH3CH2S and CH3SS], have been the major subjects in the group because sulfur is an important species contributing to air pollution in the atmosphere. The modeling of the combustion and oxidation of sulfur compounds represents important steps for the control of both the production and the elimination of sulfur-containing pollutants. Chapter 1 is a general introduction of the thesis. Chapters 2 and 6 contain five papers published in, or accepted for publication in, academic periodicals. In Chapter 7, the progress of the construction in the laboratory of a new vacuum ultraviolet laser system equipped with a reflectron mass

  12. Single-species versus dual-species probiotic supplementation as an emerging therapeutic strategy for obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, G; Jamaluddin, R; Mohtarrudin, N; Ahmad, Z; Khazaai, H; Parvaneh, M

    2017-10-01

    Recent studies have reported beneficial effects of specific probiotics on obesity. However, the difference in the anti-obesity effects of probiotics as single species and dual species is still uncertain. Therefore, we aimed to compare the efficacy of single and dual species of bacteria on markers of obesity in high-fat diet-induced obese rats. A total of 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one of five groups of varying diets as follows: standard diet, high fat diet (HFD), HFD supplemented with Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota, HFD supplemented with Bifidobacterium longum and HFD supplemented with a mixture of these two bacterial species. After 15 weeks of supplementation, the animals were examined for changes in body weight, body fat, total count of bacteria in fecal, blood serum lipid profile, leptin, adiponectin and inflammatory biomarkers. Histological analysis of the liver and adipose tissue was performed and the hepatic mRNA expression levels of genes related to lipid metabolism were measured. It was found that probiotic supplementation of either B. longum or a mixture of B. longum and LcS bacteria significantly reduced weight and triglycerides in the HFD groups. Supplementation of B. longum bacteria showed better results in terms of modulating leptin level, fat mass, adipocyte size and lipoprotein lipase expression, as well as increasing adiponectin and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-γ expression compared to dual species of bacteria. No significant differences were observed in the total count of fecal bacteria, glucose and inflammatory biomarker levels between supplemented groups. B. longum supplementation in obesity was more beneficial in metabolic profile changes than the mixture species. Copyright © 2017 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B

  13. Reactive oxygen species modulator 1, a novel protein, combined with carcinoembryonic antigen in differentiating malignant from benign pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianmeng; Zhang, Na; Dong, Jiahui; Sun, Gengyun

    2017-05-01

    The differential diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion and benign pleural effusion remains a clinical problem. Reactive oxygen species modulator 1 is a novel protein overexpressed in various human tumors. The objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of joint detection of reactive oxygen species modulator 1 and carcinoembryonic antigen in the differential diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion and benign pleural effusion. One hundred two consecutive patients with pleural effusion (including 52 malignant pleural effusion and 50 benign pleural effusion) were registered in this study. Levels of reactive oxygen species modulator 1 and carcinoembryonic antigen were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and radioimmunoassay, respectively. Results showed that the concentrations of reactive oxygen species modulator 1 both in pleural fluid and serum of patients with malignant pleural effusion were significantly higher than those of benign pleural effusion (both p carcinoembryonic antigen were 69.23% and 88.00%, respectively, at the cutoff value of 3.05 ng/mL, while serum carcinoembryonic antigen were 80.77% and 72.00% at the cutoff value of 2.60 ng/mL. The sensitivity could be raised to 88.17% in parallel detection of plural fluid reactive oxygen species modulator 1 and carcinoembryonic antigen concentration, and the specificity could be improved to 97.84% in serial detection.

  14. Protective effect of flavonoids against reactive oxygen species production in sickle cell anemia patients treated with hydroxyurea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Railson Henneberg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effects of quercetin, rutin, hesperidin and myricetin against reactive oxygen species production with the oxidizing action of tert-butylhydroperoxide in erythrocytes from normal subjects and sickle cell anemia carriers treated with hydroxyurea. METHODS: Detection of intracellular reactive oxygen species was carried out using a liposoluble probe, 2',7'-dichlorfluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA. A 10% erythrocyte suspension was incubated with flavonoids (quercetin, rutin, hesperidin or myricetin; 30, 50, and 100 µmol/L, and then incubated withtert-butylhydroperoxide (75 µmol/L. Untreated samples were used as controls. RESULTS: Red blood cell exposure to tert-butylhydroperoxide resulted in significant increases in the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species compared to basal levels. Reactive oxygen species production was significantly inhibited when red blood cells were pre-incubated with flavonoids, both in normal individuals and in patients with sickle cell anemia. Quercetin and rutin had the highest antioxidant activity, followed by myricetin and hesperidin. CONCLUSION: Flavonoids, in particular quercetin and rutin, showed better antioxidant effects against damage caused by excess reactive oxygen species characteristic of sickle cell anemia. Results obtained with patients under treatment with hydroxyurea suggest an additional protective effect when associated with the use of flavonoids.

  15. Free radicals and related reactive species as mediators of tissue injury and disease: implications for Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehrer, James P; Klotz, Lars-Oliver

    2015-01-01

    A radical is any molecule that contains one or more unpaired electrons. Radicals are normal products of many metabolic pathways. Some exist in a controlled (caged) form as they perform essential functions. Others exist in a free form and interact with various tissue components. Such interactions can cause both acute and chronic dysfunction, but can also provide essential control of redox regulated signaling pathways. The potential roles of endogenous or xenobiotic-derived free radicals in several human pathologies have stimulated extensive research linking the toxicity of numerous xenobiotics and disease processes to a free radical mechanism. In recent years, improvements in analytical methodologies, as well as the realization that subtle effects induced by free radicals and oxidants are important in modulating cellular signaling, have greatly improved our understanding of the roles of these reactive species in toxic mechanisms and disease processes. However, because free radical-mediated changes are pervasive, and a consequence as well as a cause of injury, whether such species are a major cause of tissue injury and human disease remains unclear. This concern is supported by the fact that the bulk of antioxidant defenses are enzymatic and the findings of numerous studies showing that exogenously administered small molecule antioxidants are unable to affect the course of most toxicities and diseases purported to have a free radical mechanism. This review discusses cellular sources of various radical species and their reactions with vital cellular constituents, and provides examples of selected disease processes that may have a free radical component.

  16. Observation of skin thermal inertia distribution during reactive hyperaemia using a single-hood measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, M; Togawa, T

    2001-02-01

    An attempt was made to image the thermal inertia (defined as the square root of the product of thermal conductivity, specific heat and density) of the skin to observe the distribution of blood in the skin during post-occlusive reactive hyperaemia in normal healthy volunteers. The method was based on the ability to calculate thermal inertia by successive thermographic measurements of the skin after stepwise change in ambient radiation temperature surrounding the skin area. The stepwise change was achieved within 0.1 s through a single hood. Experimentation on the undisturbed volar forearm of normal subjects at the same site showed that the measurements thus achieved were reproducible. The thermal inertia values of forearm skin in normal subjects were scattered throughout the range 1.1 x 10(3) to 1.7 x 10(3) W s(1/2) m(-2) K(-1). Experiments on forearm skin subjected to arterial cuff occlusion indicated that thermal inertia can be detected at a low level of blood perfusion. A linear relationship was observed between thermal inertia and blood perfusion measured by laser Doppler imager before and during blood flow occlusion. During reactive hyperaemia, the thermal inertia image exhibited a non-uniform island-shaped pattern of distribution over the forearm, suggesting that, after release from occlusion, recovery of blood flow is non-uniform.

  17. [Association between CMTM5 gene rs723840 single nucleotide polymorphism and high on asprin platelet reactivity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Teng-fei; Zhang, Jing-wei; Chen, Xia-huan; Feng, Xue-ru; Bai, Zhong-sheng; Liu, Mei-lin

    2015-12-18

    To elucidate the correlation between the single nucleotide polymorphism of CKLF-like MARVEL transmembrane member 5 (CMTM5) gene rs723840 and the occurrence of high on aspirin platelet reactivity (HAPR). The present study is a case-control study. A total of 210 hospitalized patients in Peking University First Hospital were enrolled. Aspirin response was assessed by 0.5 g/L arachidonic acid (AA)-induced platelet aggregation ratio (PR), and ≥ 3/4 quartile of PR of the population was defined as HAPR. Accordingly all the enrolled 210 coronary artery diseases (CAD) patients were divided into HAPR group and No-HAPR group. The genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing analysis for rs723840 of CMTM5 gene. The genotype frequencies in rs723840 C>T of CMTM5 gene conformed well to the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in both HAPR group and No-HAPR group. Between the two groups, the genotypes frequencies in HAPR and No-HAPR groups were 48.4%, 51.6%, 0.0% and 73.7%, 22.9%, 0.034%, respectively (P=0.004). The C, T allele frequencies were significantly different in the two groups (P=0.031,OR=0.501, 95% CI: 0.264-0.947). Our study finds a significant correlation between CMTM5 gene rs723840 polymorphism and high on aspirin platelet reactivity.

  18. Microplasma array patterning of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species onto polystyrene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szili, Endre J.; Dedrick, James; Oh, Jun-Seok; Bradley, James W.; Boswell, Roderick W.; Charles, Christine; Short, Robert D.; Al-Bataineh, Sameer A.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate an approach for the patterning of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) onto polystyrene using atmospheric-pressure microplasma arrays. The spectrally integrated and time-resolved optical emission from the array is characterised with respect to the applied voltage, applied-voltage frequency and pressure; and the array is used to achieve spatially resolved modification of polystyrene at three pressures: 500 Torr, 760 Torr and 1000 Torr. As determined by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), regions over which surface modification occurs are clearly restricted to areas that are exposed to individual microplasma cavities. Analysis of the negative-ion ToF-SIMS mass spectra from the centre of the modified microspots shows that the level of oxidation is dependent on the operating pressure, and closely correlated with the spatial distribution of the optical emission. The functional groups that are generated by the microplasma array on the polystyrene surface are shown to readily participate in an oxidative reaction in phosphate buffered saline solution (pH 7.4). Patterns of oxidised and chemically reactive functionalities could potentially be applied to the future development of biomaterial surfaces, where spatial control over biomolecule or cell function is needed.

  19. Redox and Reactive Oxygen Species Regulation of Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase Biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourens, Myriam; Fontanesi, Flavia; Soto, Iliana C.; Liu, Jingjing

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the last enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is the major oxygen consumer enzyme in the cell. COX biogenesis involves several redox-regulated steps. The process is highly regulated to prevent the formation of pro-oxidant intermediates. Recent Advances: Regulation of COX assembly involves several reactive oxygen species and redox-regulated steps. These include: (i) Intricate redox-controlled machineries coordinate the expression of COX isoenzymes depending on the environmental oxygen concentration. (ii) COX is a heme A-copper metalloenzyme. COX copper metallation involves the copper chaperone Cox17 and several other recently described cysteine-rich proteins, which are oxidatively folded in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Copper transfer to COX subunits 1 and 2 requires concomitant transfer of redox power. (iii) To avoid the accumulation of reactive assembly intermediates, COX is regulated at the translational level to minimize synthesis of the heme A-containing Cox1 subunit when assembly is impaired. Critical Issues: An increasing number of regulatory pathways converge to facilitate efficient COX assembly, thus preventing oxidative stress. Future Directions: Here we will review on the redox-regulated COX biogenesis steps and will discuss their physiological relevance. Forthcoming insights into the precise regulation of mitochondrial COX biogenesis in normal and stress conditions will likely open future perspectives for understanding mitochondrial redox regulation and prevention of oxidative stress. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1940–1952. PMID:22937827

  20. Honokiol induces reactive oxygen species-mediated apoptosis in Candida albicans through mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lingmei; Liao, Kai; Hang, Chengcheng; Wang, Dayong

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effects of honokiol on induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), antioxidant defense systems, mitochondrial dysfunction, and apoptosis in Candida albicans. To measure ROS accumulation, 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate fluorescence was used. Lipid peroxidation was assessed using both fluorescence staining and a thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assay. Protein oxidation was determined using dinitrophenylhydrazine derivatization. Antioxidant enzymatic activities were measured using commercially available detection kits. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) genes expression was measured using real time RT-PCR. To assess its antifungal abilities and effectiveness on ROS accumulation, honokiol and the SOD inhibitor N,N'-diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) were used simultaneously. Mitochondrial dysfunction was assessed by measuring the mitochondrial membrane potential (mtΔψ). Honokiol-induced apoptosis was assessed using an Annexin V-FITC apoptosis detection kit. ROS, lipid peroxidation, and protein oxidation occurred in a dose-dependent manner in C. albicans after honokiol treatment. Honokiol caused an increase in antioxidant enzymatic activity. In addition, honokiol treatment induced SOD genes expression in C. albicans cells. Moreover, addition of DDC resulted in increased endogenous ROS levels and potentiated the antifungal activity of honokiol. Mitochondrial dysfunction was confirmed by measured changes to mtΔψ. The level of apoptosis increased in a dose-dependent manner after honokiol treatment. Collectively, these results indicate that honokiol acts as a pro-oxidant in C. albicans. Furthermore, the SOD inhibitor DDC can be used to potentiate the activity of honokiol against C. albicans.

  1. Adatom Fe(III on the hematite surface: Observation of a key reactive surface species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosso Kevin M

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The reactivity of a mineral surface is determined by the variety and population of different types of surface sites (e.g., step, kink, adatom, and defect sites. The concept of "adsorbed nutrient" has been built into crystal growth theories, and many other studies of mineral surface reactivity appeal to ill-defined "active sites." Despite their theoretical importance, there has been little direct experimental or analytical investigation of the structure and properties of such species. Here, we use ex-situ and in-situ scanning tunneling microcopy (STM combined with calculated images based on a resonant tunneling model to show that observed nonperiodic protrusions and depressions on the hematite (001 surface can be explained as Fe in an adsorbed or adatom state occupying sites different from those that result from simple termination of the bulk mineral. The number of such sites varies with sample preparation history, consistent with their removal from the surface in low pH solutions.

  2. Effect of ectomycorrhizal colonization and drought on reactive oxygen species metabolism of Nothofagus dombeyi roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Maricel; Huygens, Dries; Fernandez, Carlos; Gacitúa, Yessy; Olivares, Erick; Saavedra, Isabel; Alberdi, Miren; Valenzuela, Eduardo

    2009-08-01

    Infection with ectomycorrhizal fungi can increase the ability of plants to resist drought stress through morphophysiological and biochemical mechanisms. However, the metabolism of antioxidative enzyme activities in the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis remains poorly understood. This study investigated biomass production, reactive oxygen metabolism (hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde concentration) and antioxidant enzyme activity (superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase) in pure cultures of the ectomycorrhizal fungi Descolea antartica Sing. and Pisolithus tinctorius (Pers.) Coker & Couch, and non-mycorrhizal and mycorrhizal roots of Nothofagus dombeyi (Mirb.) roots under well-watered conditions and drought conditions (DC). The studied ectomycorrhizal fungi regulated their antioxidative enzyme metabolism differentially in response to drought, resulting in cellular damage in D. antartica but not in P. tinctorius. Ectomycorrhizal inoculation and water treatment had a significant effect on all parameters studied, including relative water content of the plant. As such, N. dombeyi plants in symbiosis experienced a lower oxidative stress effect than non-mycorrhizal plants under DC. Additionally, ectomycorrhizal N. dombeyi roots showed a greater antioxidant enzyme activity relative to non-mycorrhizal roots, an effect which was further expressed under DC. The association between the non-specific P. tinctorius and N. dombeyi had a more effective reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism than the specific D. antartica-N. dombeyi symbiosis. We conclude that the combination of effective ROS prevention and ROS detoxification by ectomycorrhizal plants resulted in reduced cellular damage and increased plant growth relative to non-mycorrhizal plants under drought.

  3. Reactive oxygen species and angiotensin II signaling in vascular cells: implications in cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touyz R.M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Diseases such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes are associated with vascular functional and structural changes including endothelial dysfunction, altered contractility and vascular remodeling. Cellular events underlying these processes involve changes in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC growth, apoptosis/anoikis, cell migration, inflammation, and fibrosis. Many factors influence cellular changes, of which angiotensin II (Ang II appears to be amongst the most important. The physiological and pathophysiological actions of Ang II are mediated primarily via the Ang II type 1 receptor. Growing evidence indicates that Ang II induces its pleiotropic vascular effects through NADPH-driven generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. ROS function as important intracellular and intercellular second messengers to modulate many downstream signaling molecules, such as protein tyrosine phosphatases, protein tyrosine kinases, transcription factors, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and ion channels. Induction of these signaling cascades leads to VSMC growth and migration, regulation of endothelial function, expression of pro-inflammatory mediators, and modification of extracellular matrix. In addition, ROS increase intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i, a major determinant of vascular reactivity. ROS influence signaling molecules by altering the intracellular redox state and by oxidative modification of proteins. In physiological conditions, these events play an important role in maintaining vascular function and integrity. Under pathological conditions ROS contribute to vascular dysfunction and remodeling through oxidative damage. The present review focuses on the biology of ROS in Ang II signaling in vascular cells and discusses how oxidative stress contributes to vascular damage in cardiovascular disease.

  4. Effects of Reactive Oxygen Species on Tubular Transport along the Nephron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Vicente, Agustin; Garvin, Jeffrey L

    2017-03-23

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are oxygen-containing molecules naturally occurring in both inorganic and biological chemical systems. Due to their high reactivity and potentially damaging effects to biomolecules, cells express a battery of enzymes to rapidly metabolize them to innocuous intermediaries. Initially, ROS were considered by biologists as dangerous byproducts of respiration capable of causing oxidative stress, a condition in which overproduction of ROS leads to a reduction in protective molecules and enzymes and consequent damage to lipids, proteins, and DNA. In fact, ROS are used by immune systems to kill virus and bacteria, causing inflammation and local tissue damage. Today, we know that the functions of ROS are not so limited, and that they also act as signaling molecules mediating processes as diverse as gene expression, mechanosensation, and epithelial transport. In the kidney, ROS such as nitric oxide (NO), superoxide (O₂ - ), and their derivative molecules hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) and peroxynitrite (ONO₂ - ) regulate solute and water reabsorption, which is vital to maintain electrolyte homeostasis and extracellular fluid volume. This article reviews the effects of NO, O₂ - , ONO₂ - , and H₂O₂ on water and electrolyte reabsorption in proximal tubules, thick ascending limbs, and collecting ducts, and the effects of NO and O₂ - in the macula densa on tubuloglomerular feedback.

  5. Honokiol induces reactive oxygen species-mediated apoptosis in Candida albicans through mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingmei Sun

    Full Text Available To investigate the effects of honokiol on induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS, antioxidant defense systems, mitochondrial dysfunction, and apoptosis in Candida albicans.To measure ROS accumulation, 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate fluorescence was used. Lipid peroxidation was assessed using both fluorescence staining and a thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS assay. Protein oxidation was determined using dinitrophenylhydrazine derivatization. Antioxidant enzymatic activities were measured using commercially available detection kits. Superoxide dismutase (SOD genes expression was measured using real time RT-PCR. To assess its antifungal abilities and effectiveness on ROS accumulation, honokiol and the SOD inhibitor N,N'-diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC were used simultaneously. Mitochondrial dysfunction was assessed by measuring the mitochondrial membrane potential (mtΔψ. Honokiol-induced apoptosis was assessed using an Annexin V-FITC apoptosis detection kit.ROS, lipid peroxidation, and protein oxidation occurred in a dose-dependent manner in C. albicans after honokiol treatment. Honokiol caused an increase in antioxidant enzymatic activity. In addition, honokiol treatment induced SOD genes expression in C. albicans cells. Moreover, addition of DDC resulted in increased endogenous ROS levels and potentiated the antifungal activity of honokiol. Mitochondrial dysfunction was confirmed by measured changes to mtΔψ. The level of apoptosis increased in a dose-dependent manner after honokiol treatment.Collectively, these results indicate that honokiol acts as a pro-oxidant in C. albicans. Furthermore, the SOD inhibitor DDC can be used to potentiate the activity of honokiol against C. albicans.

  6. Mechanisms Underlying Interferon-γ-Induced Priming of Microglial Reactive Oxygen Species Production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas G Spencer

    Full Text Available Microglial priming and enhanced reactivity to secondary insults cause substantial neuronal damage and are hallmarks of brain aging, traumatic brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases. It is, thus, of particular interest to identify mechanisms involved in microglial priming. Here, we demonstrate that priming of microglia with interferon-γ (IFN γ substantially enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS following stimulation of microglia with ATP. Priming of microglial ROS production was substantially reduced by inhibition of p38 MAPK activity with SB203580, by increases in intracellular glutathione levels with N-Acetyl-L-cysteine, by blockade of NADPH oxidase subunit NOX2 activity with gp91ds-tat or by inhibition of nitric oxide production with L-NAME. Together, our data indicate that priming of microglial ROS production involves reduction of intracellular glutathione levels, upregulation of NADPH oxidase subunit NOX2 and increases in nitric oxide production, and suggest that these simultaneously occurring processes result in enhanced production of neurotoxic peroxynitrite. Furthermore, IFNγ-induced priming of microglial ROS production was reduced upon blockade of Kir2.1 inward rectifier K+ channels with ML133. Inhibitory effects of ML133 on microglial priming were mediated via regulation of intracellular glutathione levels and nitric oxide production. These data suggest that microglial Kir2.1 channels may represent novel therapeutic targets to inhibit excessive ROS production by primed microglia in brain pathology.

  7. Tks5-dependent, Nox-mediated Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species is Necessary for Invadopodia Formation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Begoña; Shani, Gidon; Pass, Ian; Anderson, Diana; Quintavalle, Manuela; Courtneidge, Sara A.

    2009-01-01

    Invadopodia are actin-rich membrane protrusions of cancer cells which facilitate pericellular proteolysis and invasive behavior. We show here that reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by the NADPH oxidase (Nox) system are necessary for invadopodia formation and function. The invadopodia protein Tks5 is structurally related to p47phox, a Nox component in phagocytic cells. Knockdown of Tks5 reduces total ROS levels in cancer cells. Furthermore, Tks5 and p22phox can associate with each other, suggesting that Tks5 is part of the Nox complex. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Tks5 and Tks4, but not other Src substrates, is reduced by Nox inhibition. We propose that Tks5 facilitates the production of ROS necessary for invadopodia formation, and that in turn ROS modulates Tks5 tyrosine phosphorylation in a positive feedback loop. PMID:19755709

  8. Tks5-dependent, nox-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species is necessary for invadopodia formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Begoña; Shani, Gidon; Pass, Ian; Anderson, Diana; Quintavalle, Manuela; Courtneidge, Sara A

    2009-09-15

    Invadopodia are actin-rich membrane protrusions of cancer cells that facilitate pericellular proteolysis and invasive behavior. We show here that reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by the NADPH (reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase (Nox) system are necessary for invadopodia formation and function. Knockdown of the invadopodia protein Tks5 [tyrosine kinase substrate with five Src homology 3 (SH3) domains], which is structurally related to the Nox component p47(phox), reduces total ROS abundance in cancer cells. Furthermore, Tks5 and p22(phox) can associate with each other, suggesting that Tks5 is part of the Nox complex. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Tks5 and Tks4, but not other Src substrates, is reduced by Nox inhibition. We propose that Tks5 facilitates the production of ROS necessary for invadopodia formation, and that in turn ROS modulate Tks5 tyrosine phosphorylation in a positive feedback loop.

  9. On the in-vivo photochemical rate parameters for PDT reactive oxygen species modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Michele M.; Ghogare, Ashwini A.; Greer, Alexander; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2017-01-01

    Photosensitizer photochemical parameters are crucial data in accurate dosimetry for photodynamic therapy (PDT) based on photochemical modeling. Progress has been made in the last few decades in determining the photochemical properties of commonly used photosensitizers (PS), but mostly in solution or in-vitro. Recent developments allow for the estimation of some of these photochemical parameters in-vivo. This review will cover the currently available in-vivo photochemical properties of photosensitizers as well as the techniques for measuring those parameters. Furthermore, photochemical parameters that are independent of environmental factors or are universal for different photosensitizers will be examined. Most photosensitizers discussed in this review are of the type II (singlet oxygen) photooxidation category, although type I photosensitizers that involve other reactive oxygen species (ROS) will be discussed as well. The compilation of these parameters will be essential for ROS modeling of PDT. PMID:28166056

  10. Transportation of reactive oxygen species in a tissue phantom after plasma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Toshiyuki; Kuroeda, Gouya; Sei, Ryuhei; Yamaguchi, Masaaki; Yoshinaga, Reishi; Yamashita, Riho; Tasaki, Hikaru; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2018-01-01

    The transportation of reactive oxygen species (ROSs) in a tissue phantom after plasma irradiation was studied using a two-layered target consisting of a KI-starch gel reagent and an agarose tissue phantom. The two-layered target can visualize the two-dimensional concentration distribution of ROSs after passing through the tissue phantom. ROSs were accumulated in the tissue phantom by the plasma irradiation, and they continued to be transported in the depth direction with the standing time after the plasma irradiation. The amount of ROS after passing through the tissue phantom increased in proportion to both plasma irradiation time and standing time. In this case, the ROS distribution patterns did not depend on these times. The ROS transportation speed after plasma irradiation was 0.05 mm/min in the tissue phantom. The ROS penetration rate depended on the standing time, not on the plasma irradiation time, and it was less than 1%.

  11. Oxygen delivery, consumption, and conversion to reactive oxygen species in experimental models of diabetic retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshaq, Randa S.; Wright, William S.; Harris, Norman R.

    2014-01-01

    Retinal tissue receives its supply of oxygen from two sources – the retinal and choroidal circulations. Decreases in retinal blood flow occur in the early stages of diabetes, with the eventual development of hypoxia thought to contribute to pathological neovascularization. Oxygen consumption in the retina has been found to decrease in diabetes, possibly due to either a reduction in neuronal metabolism or to cell death. Diabetes also enhances the rate of conversion of oxygen to superoxide in the retina, with experimental evidence suggesting that mitochondrial superoxide not only drives the overall production of reactive oxygen species, but also initiates several pathways leading to retinopathy, including the increased activity of the polyol and hexosamine pathways, increased production of advanced glycation end products and expression of their receptors, and activation of protein kinase C. PMID:24936440

  12. Enhanced reactive oxygen species through direct copper sulfide nanoparticle-doxorubicin complexation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yajuan; Cupo, Michela; Guo, Liangran; Scott, Julie; Chen, Yi-Tzai; Yan, Bingfang; Lu, Wei

    2017-12-01

    CuS-based nanostructures loading the chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin (DOX) exerted excellent cancer photothermal chemotherapy under multi-external stimuli. The DOX loading was generally designed through electrostatic interaction or chemical linkers. However, the interaction between DOX molecules and CuS nanoparticles has not been investigated. In this work, we use PEGylated hollow copper sulfide nanoparticles (HCuSNPs) to directly load DOX through the DOX/Cu2+ chelation process. Distinctively, the synthesized PEG–HCuSNPs–DOX release the DOX/Cu2+ complexes into surrounding environment, which generate significant reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a controlled manner by near-infrared laser. The CuS nanoparticle-mediated photothermal ablation facilitates the ROS-induced cancer cell killing effect. Our current work reveals a DOX/Cu2+-mediated ROS-enhanced cell-killing effect in addition to conventional photothermal chemotherapy through the direct CuS nanoparticle-DOX complexation.

  13. Fluorinated methacrylamide chitosan sequesters reactive oxygen species to relieve oxidative stress while delivering oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Pritam S; Leipzig, Nic D

    2017-08-01

    Antioxidants play an important role in regulating overabundant reactive oxygen species (ROS) in wound healing to reduce oxidative stress and inflammation. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time that functionalization of methacrylamide chitosan (MAC) with aliphatic pentadecafluoro chains, to synthesize pentadecafluoro-octanoyl methacrylamide chitosan (MACF), enhances the antioxidant capacity of the MAC base hydrogel material, while being able to deliver oxygen for future enhanced wound healing applications. As such, MACF was shown to sequester more nitric oxide (p oxygen. MACF's beneficial antioxidant capacity was further confirmed in in vitro cell culture experiments using human dermal fibroblasts stressed with 2,2'-azobis(2-methylpropionamidine) dihydrochloride (AAPH). © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 2368-2374, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Effects of various physical stress factors on mitochondrial function and reactive oxygen species in rat spermatozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suhee; Agca, Cansu; Agca, Yuksel

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of various physical interventions on the function of epididymal rat spermatozoa and determine whether there are correlations among these functional parameters. Epididymal rat spermatozoa were subjected to various mechanical (pipetting, centrifugation and Percoll gradient separation) and anisotonic conditions, and sperm motility, plasma membrane integrity (PMI), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were evaluated. Repeated pipetting caused a loss in motility, PMI and MMP (P spermatozoa that were subjected to mechanical interventions showed high susceptibility to a ROS stimulant (P spermatozoa. Therefore, careful consideration and proper protocols for handling of rat spermatozoa and osmotic conditions are required to achieve reliable results and minimise damage. PMID:23140582

  15. Influence of the main reactive species formed during the detoxication process of toxins by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Murilo Casare da

    2003-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has been satisfactorily employed for venoms detoxification. In this report, the radiation was employed to verify the effects caused by the radiolysis products of water on two toxins (Crotoxin and Crotamine) purified from Crotalus durissus terrificus venom. These effects were analyzed using some substances called 'scavengers', those substances competes for specific reactive species hindering them to act on the toxins molecules. In order to study the possible structural damages caused on the toxins, UV spectra, fluorescence, mass spectrometry, enzymatic activity were employed. In addition, biochemical techniques were employed to evaluate the decrease of toxicity and the immunogenicity of toxins before and after the irradiation. Our results indicate that the irradiation promotes structural damages, even at low doses. These modifications lead to a gradual decrease in toxicity, however, the immunogenic properties of the toxins are preserved. (author)

  16. The Injury and Therapy of Reactive Oxygen Species in Intracerebral Hemorrhage Looking at Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Qu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracerebral hemorrhage is an emerging major health problem often resulting in death or disability. Reactive oxygen species (ROS have been identified as one of the major damaging factors in ischemic stroke. However, there is less discussion about ROS in hemorrhage stroke. Metabolic products of hemoglobin, excitatory amino acids, and inflammatory cells are all sources of ROS, and ROS harm the central nervous system through cell death and structural damage, especially disruption of the blood-brain barrier. We have considered the antioxidant system of the CNS itself and the drugs aiming to decrease ROS after ICH, and we find that mitochondria are key players in all of these aspects. Moreover, when the mitochondrial permeability transition pore opens, ROS-induced ROS release, which leads to extensive liberation of ROS and mitochondrial failure, occurs. Therefore, the mitochondrion may be a significant target for elucidating the problem of ROS in ICH; however, additional experimental support is required.

  17. Restraining reactive oxygen species in Listeria monocytogenes promotes the apoptosis of glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sen; Li, Yixuan; Chen, Guowei; Zhang, Jingchen; Xu, Fei; Wu, Man

    2017-07-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative anaerobic foodborne pathogen that can traverse the blood-brain barrier and cause brain infection. L. monocytogenes infection induces host cell apoptosis in several cell types. In this study, we investigated the apoptosis of human glioma cell line U251 invaded by L. monocytogenes and evaluated the function of bacterial reactive oxygen species (ROS) during infection. Bacterial ROS level was reduced by carrying out treatment with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI). After infection, the apoptosis of U251 cells was examined by flow cytometry assay and propidium iodide staining. DPI and NAC efficiently decreased ROS level in L. monocytogenes without affecting bacterial growth. Moreover, the apoptosis of glial cells was enhanced upon invasion of DPI- and NAC-pretreated L. monocytogenes. Results indicate that the apoptosis of glial cells can be induced by L. monocytogenes, and that the inhibition of bacterial ROS increases the apoptosis of host cells.

  18. Oxidative stress in cerebral small vessel disease. Role of reactive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grochowski, Cezary; Litak, Jakub; Kamieniak, Piotr; Maciejewski, Ryszard

    2018-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) is a wide term describing the condition affecting perforating arterial branches as well as arterioles, venules, and capillaries. Cerebral vascular net is one of the main targets of localised oxidative stress processes causing damage to vasculature, changes in the blood flow and blood-brain barrier and, in consequence, promoting neurodegenerative alterations in the brain tissue. Numerous studies report the fact of oxidation to proteins, sugars, lipids and nucleic acids, occurring in most neurodegenerative diseases mainly in the earliest stages and correlations with the development of cognitive and motor disturbances. The dysfunction of endothelium can be caused by oxidative stress and inflammatory mechanisms as a result of reactions and processes generating extensive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production such as high blood pressure, oxidised low density lipoproteins (oxLDL), very low density lipoproteins (vLDL), diabetes, homocysteinaemia, smoking, and infections. Several animal studies show positive aspects of ROS, especially within cerebral vasculature.

  19. Research on killing Escherichia Coli by reactive oxygen species based on strong ionization discharging plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y J; Tian, Y P; Zhang, Z T; Li, R H; Cai, L J; Gao, J Y

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species solution produced by strong ionization discharging plasma was used to kill Escherichia coli by spraying. Several effect factors such as pH value, solution temperature, spraying time and exposure time were observed in this study, and their effects on killing rate of Escherichia coli were discussed and analysed. Results show that the treating efficiency of ROS solution for Escherichia coli is higher in alkaline solution than that in acid solution. The killing rate of Escherichia coli increases while the spraying time and exposure time are longer and the temperature is lower. The effects of different factors on killing rate of Escherichia coli are as follows: spraying time > pH value > exposure time > solution temperature.

  20. [Transformation of endogenous reactive oxygen species participates into bacterial antibiotic resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; Zhong, Y L; Feng, Y J

    2018-04-06

    A growing body of diversified antibiotic resistances raises a significant challenge to anti-infection clinical therapeutics. The emergence of superbugs carrying MCR-1/2 or NDM-1 determinants underlines the importance and urgency in elucidation of molecular mechanisms shared by antibiotic resistances. It is aware that different classes of bactericidal antibiotics consistently stimulate the production of deleterious reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are accompanied with metabolic disturbance. The different destinations of ROS determine its consequence on bacterial fate. Here, we review antibiotic-induced production, progression and transformation of ROS, as well as its role in the development of antibiotic resistance. Additionally, we anticipate that mesosome-like structures-aided exclusion of hydrogen peroxide might represent a previously-unknown mechanism for antibiotic resistance. This mini-review is aiming to present an update overview on antibiotic resistance and provide clues to the development of novel antibiotics.

  1. Ionized gas (plasma) delivery of reactive oxygen species (ROS) into artificial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung-Ha; Szili, Endre J.; Jenkins, A. Toby A.; Short, Robert D.

    2014-09-01

    This study was designed to enhance our understanding of how reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated ex situ by ionized gas (plasma), can affect the regulation of signalling processes within cells. A model system, comprising of a suspension of phospholipid vesicles (cell mimics) encapsulating a ROS reporter, was developed to study the plasma delivery of ROS into cells. For the first time it was shown that plasma unequivocally delivers ROS into cells over a sustained period and without compromising cell membrane integrity. An important consideration in cell and biological assays is the presence of serum, which significantly reduced the transfer efficiency of ROS into the vesicles. These results are key to understanding how plasma treatments can be tailored for specific medical or biotechnology applications. Further, the phospholipid vesicle ROS reporter system may find use in other studies involving the application of free radicals in biology and medicine.

  2. The Role of Heme and Reactive Oxygen Species in Proliferation and Survival of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Cristina Paes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan responsible for Chagas disease, has a complex life cycle comprehending two distinct hosts and a series of morphological and functional transformations. Hemoglobin degradation inside the insect vector releases high amounts of heme, and this molecule is known to exert a number of physiological functions. Moreover, the absence of its complete biosynthetic pathway in T. cruzi indicates heme as an essential molecule for this trypanosomatid survival. Within the hosts, T. cruzi has to cope with sudden environmental changes especially in the redox status and heme is able to increase the basal production of reactive oxygen species (ROS which can be also produced as byproducts of the parasite aerobic metabolism. In this regard, ROS sensing is likely to be an important mechanism for the adaptation and interaction of these organisms with their hosts. In this paper we discuss the main features of heme and ROS susceptibility in T. cruzi biology.

  3. Inactivation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 by mitochondrial reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, Thomas R; Collins, Yvonne; Abakumova, Irina; Chouchani, Edward T; Baranowski, Bartlomiej; Fearnley, Ian M; Prime, Tracy A; Murphy, Michael P; James, Andrew M

    2012-10-12

    Reactive oxygen species are byproducts of mitochondrial respiration and thus potential regulators of mitochondrial function. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 (PDHK2) inhibits the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, thereby regulating entry of carbohydrates into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Here we show that PDHK2 activity is inhibited by low levels of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) generated by the respiratory chain. This occurs via reversible oxidation of cysteine residues 45 and 392 on PDHK2 and results in increased pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity. H(2)O(2) derives from superoxide (O(2)(.)), and we show that conditions that inhibit PDHK2 also inactivate the TCA cycle enzyme, aconitase. These findings suggest that under conditions of high mitochondrial O(2)(.) production, such as may occur under nutrient excess and low ATP demand, the increase in O(2)() and H(2)O(2) may provide feedback signals to modulate mitochondrial metabolism.

  4. Autophagy, programmed cell death and reactive oxygen species in sexual reproduction in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurusu, Takamitsu; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki

    2017-05-01

    Autophagy is one of the major cellular processes of recycling of proteins, metabolites and intracellular organelles, and plays crucial roles in the regulation of innate immunity, stress responses and programmed cell death (PCD) in many eukaryotes. It is also essential in development and sexual reproduction in many animals. In plants, although autophagy-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana show phenotypes in abiotic and biotic stress responses, their life cycle seems normal and thus little had been known until recently about the roles of autophagy in development and reproduction. Rice mutants defective in autophagy show sporophytic male sterility and immature pollens, indicating crucial roles of autophagy during pollen maturation. Enzymatic production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by respiratory burst oxidase homologues (Rbohs) play multiple roles in regulating anther development, pollen tube elongation and fertilization. Significance of autophagy and ROS in the regulation of PCD of transient cells during plant sexual reproduction is discussed in comparison with animals.

  5. Hemoglobin fructation promotes heme degradation through the generation of endogenous reactive oxygen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodarzi, M.; Moosavi-Movahedi, A. A.; Habibi-Rezaei, M.; Shourian, M.; Ghourchian, H.; Ahmad, F.; Farhadi, M.; Saboury, A. A.; Sheibani, N.

    2014-09-01

    Protein glycation is a cascade of nonenzymatic reactions between reducing sugars and amino groups of proteins. It is referred to as fructation when the reducing monosaccharide is fructose. Some potential mechanisms have been suggested for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by protein glycation reactions in the presence of glucose. In this state, glucose autoxidation, ketoamine, and oxidative advance glycation end products (AGEs) formation are considered as major sources of ROS and perhaps heme degradation during hemoglobin glycation. However, whether fructose mediated glycation produces ROS and heme degradation is unknown. Here we report that ROS (H2O2) production occurred during hemoglobin fructation in vitro using chemiluminescence methods. The enhanced heme exposure and degradation were determined using UV-Vis and fluorescence spectrophotometry. Following accumulation of ROS, heme degradation products were accumulated reaching a plateau along with the detected ROS. Thus, fructose may make a significant contribution to the production of ROS, glycation of proteins, and heme degradation during diabetes.

  6. Fundamental roles of reactive oxygen species and protective mechanisms in the female reproductive system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okada Futoshi

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Controlled oxidation, such as disulfide bond formation in sperm nuclei and during ovulation, plays a fundamental role in mammalian reproduction. Excess oxidation, however, causes oxidative stress, resulting in the dysfunction of the reproductive process. Antioxidation reactions that reduce the levels of reactive oxygen species are of prime importance in reproductive systems in maintaining the quality of gametes and support reproduction. While anti-oxidative enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase and peroxidase, play a central role in eliminating oxidative stress, reduction-oxidation (redox systems, comprised of mainly glutathione and thioredoxin, function to reduce the levels of oxidized molecules. Aldo-keto reductase, using NADPH as an electron donor, detoxifies carbonyl compounds resulting from the oxidation of lipids and proteins. Thus, many antioxidative and redox enzyme genes are expressed and aggressively protect gametes and embryos in reproductive systems.

  7. Using consensus bayesian network to model the reactive oxygen species regulatory pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangdong Hu

    Full Text Available Bayesian network is one of the most successful graph models for representing the reactive oxygen species regulatory pathway. With the increasing number of microarray measurements, it is possible to construct the bayesian network from microarray data directly. Although large numbers of bayesian network learning algorithms have been developed, when applying them to learn bayesian networks from microarray data, the accuracies are low due to that the databases they used to learn bayesian networks contain too few microarray data. In this paper, we propose a consensus bayesian network which is constructed by combining bayesian networks from relevant literatures and bayesian networks learned from microarray data. It would have a higher accuracy than the bayesian networks learned from one database. In the experiment, we validated the bayesian network combination algorithm on several classic machine learning databases and used the consensus bayesian network to model the Escherichia coli's ROS pathway.

  8. Angiotensin-II-derived reactive oxygen species on baroreflex sensitivity during hypertension: new perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thyago Moreira Queiroz

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a multifactorial disorder which has been associated with the reduction in baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic dysfunction. Several studies have revealed that increased reactive oxygen species (ROS generated by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate [NAD(PH] oxidase, following activation of type 1 receptor (AT1R by Angiotensin-(Ang II, the main peptide of the Renin–Angiotensin–Aldosterone System (RAAS, is the central mechanism involved in Angiotensin-II-derived hypertension. In the present review we will discuss the role of Angiotensin-II and oxidative stress in hypertension, the relationship between the baroreflex sensitivity (BRS and the genesis of hypertension and how the oxidative stress triggers baroreflex dysfunction in several models of hypertension. Finally, we will describe some novel therapeutic drugs for improving the baroreflex sensitivity during hypertension.

  9. Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species in the Development of Pulmonary Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J.R. Fulton

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a progressive disease of the lung vasculature that involves the loss of endothelial function together with inappropriate smooth muscle cell growth, inflammation, and fibrosis. These changes underlie a progressive remodeling of blood vessels that alters flow and increases pulmonary blood pressure. Elevated pressures in the pulmonary artery imparts a chronic stress on the right ventricle which undergoes compensatory hypertrophy but eventually fails. How PAH develops remains incompletely understood and evidence for the altered production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS, RNS respectively in the pulmonary circulation has been well documented. There are many different types of ROS and RNS, multiple sources, and collective actions and interactions. This review summarizes past and current knowledge of the sources of ROS and RNS and how they may contribute to the loss of endothelial function and changes in smooth muscle proliferation in the pulmonary circulation.

  10. Diminished macrophage apoptosis and reactive oxygen species generation after phorbol ester stimulation in Crohn's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine D Palmer

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Crohn's Disease (CD is a chronic relapsing disorder characterized by granulomatous inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. Although its pathogenesis is complex, we have recently shown that CD patients have a systemic defect in macrophage function, which results in the defective clearance of bacteria from inflammatory sites.Here we have identified a number of additional macrophage defects in CD following diacylglycerol (DAG homolog phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA activation. We provide evidence for decreased DNA fragmentation, reduced mitochondrial membrane depolarization, impaired reactive oxygen species production, diminished cytochrome c release and increased IL-6 production compared to healthy subjects after PMA exposure. The observed macrophage defects in CD were stimulus-specific, as normal responses were observed following p53 activation and endoplasmic reticulum stress.These findings add to a growing body of evidence highlighting disordered macrophage function in CD and, given their pivotal role in orchestrating inflammatory responses, defective apoptosis could potentially contribute to the pathogenesis of CD.

  11. Single-phase pressure-drop measurements over low void reactivity fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senaratne, U.P.M.; Leung, L.K.H.; Doria, F.J.; Lau, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    An experiment has been performed to obtain pressure-drop measurements over Low Reactivity Fuel (LVRF) bundles in Refrigerant-134a flow. Production LVRF bundles inserted into the test station with either an uncrept or a 5.1% crept flow channel. For comparison purposes, several production Bruce 37-element bundles were also included in the test string. Overall, the single-phase pressure drop of the LVRF bundle is slightly higher than that Bruce 37-element bundle. Pressure-drop measurements were used to derive bundle and loss coefficients for hydraulic calculations in safety analyses. Applying these loss coefficients, an assessment showed that the overall pressure drop over a string of 12 LVRF bundles (after conversion) remains less than that over a string of 13 Bruce 37-element fuel bundles (before conversion) at the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station. (author)

  12. Exendin-4 protects mitochondria from reactive oxygen species induced apoptosis in pancreatic Beta cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Li

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Mitochondrial oxidative stress is the basis for pancreatic β-cell apoptosis and a common pathway for numerous types of damage, including glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity. We cultivated mice pancreatic β-cell tumor Min6 cell lines in vitro and observed pancreatic β-cell apoptosis and changes in mitochondrial function before and after the addition of Exendin-4. Based on these observations, we discuss the protective role of Exendin-4 against mitochondrial oxidative damage and its relationship with Ca(2+-independent phospholipase A2. METHODS: We established a pancreatic β-cell oxidative stress damage model using Min6 cell lines cultured in vitro with tert-buty1 hydroperoxide and hydrogen peroxide. We then added Exendin-4 to observe changes in the rate of cell apoptosis (Annexin-V-FITC-PI staining flow cytometry and DNA ladder. We detected the activity of the caspase 3 and 8 apoptotic factors, measured the mitochondrial membrane potential losses and reactive oxygen species production levels, and detected the expression of cytochrome c and Smac/DLAMO in the cytosol and mitochondria, mitochondrial Ca2-independent phospholipase A2 and Ca(2+-independent phospholipase A2 mRNA. RESULTS: The time-concentration curve showed that different percentages of apoptosis occurred at different time-concentrations in tert-buty1 hydroperoxide- and hydrogen peroxide-induced Min6 cells. Incubation with 100 µmol/l of Exendin-4 for 48 hours reduced the Min6 cell apoptosis rate (p<0.05. The mitochondrial membrane potential loss and total reactive oxygen species levels decreased (p<0.05, and the release of cytochrome c and Smac/DLAMO from the mitochondria was reduced. The study also showed that Ca(2+-independent phospholipase A2 activity was positively related to Exendin-4 activity. CONCLUSION: Exendin-4 reduces Min6 cell oxidative damage and the cell apoptosis rate, which may be related to Ca(2-independent phospholipase A2.

  13. Protective effects of myricitrin against osteoporosis via reducing reactive oxygen species and bone-resorbing cytokines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Qiang; Gao, Bo; Wang, Long; Hu, Ya-Qian; Lu, Wei-Guang; Yang, Liu; Luo, Zhuo-Jing; Liu, Jian, E-mail: liujianhq@sina.com

    2014-11-01

    Oxidative stress is a crucial pathogenic factor in the development of osteoporosis. Myricitrin, isolated from Myrica cerifera, is a potent antioxidant. We hypothesized that myricitrin possessed protective effects against osteoporosis by partially reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and bone-resorbing cytokines in osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs). We investigated myricitrin on osteogenic differentiation under oxidative stress. Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) was used to establish an oxidative cell injury model. Our results revealed that myricitrin significantly improved some osteogenic markers in these cells. Myricitrin decreased lipid production and reduced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-2 (PPARγ2) expression in hBMSCs. Moreover, myricitrin reduced the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and IL-6 and partially suppressed ROS production. In vivo, we established a murine ovariectomized (OVX) osteoporosis model. Our results demonstrated that myricitrin supplementation reduced serum malondialdehyde (MDA) activity and increased reduced glutathione (GSH) activity. Importantly, it ameliorated the micro-architecture of trabecular bones in the 4th lumbar vertebrae (L4) and distal femur. Taken together, these results indicated that the protective effects of myricitrin against osteoporosis are linked to a reduction in ROS and bone-resorbing cytokines, suggesting that myricitrin may be useful in bone metabolism diseases, particularly osteoporosis. - Highlights: • Myricitrin protects MC3T3-E1 cells and hBMSCs from oxidative stress. • It is accompanied by a decrease in oxidative stress and bone-resorbing cytokines. • Myricitrin decreases serum reactive oxygen species to some degree. • Myricitrin partly reverses ovariectomy effects in vivo. • Myricitrin may represent a beneficial anti-osteoporosis treatment method.

  14. Effect of density gradient centrifugation on reactive oxygen species in human semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshima, Teppei; Yumura, Yasushi; Kuroda, Shinnosuke; Kawahara, Takashi; Uemura, Hiroji; Iwasaki, Akira

    2017-06-01

    Density gradient centrifugation can separate motile sperm from immotile sperm and other cells for assisted reproduction, but may also remove antioxidants from seminal plasma, resulting in oxidative stress. Therefore, we investigated reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentrations and distribution in semen before and after density gradient centrifugation. We assessed semen volume, sperm concentration, sperm motility, and ROS levels before and after density gradient centrifugation (300 x g for 20 minutes) in 143 semen samples from 118 patients. The ROS removal rate was evaluated in ROS-positive samples and ROS formation rate in ROS-negative samples. Thirty-eight of 143 untreated samples (26.6%) were ROS-positive; sperm motility was significantly lower in these samples than in ROS-negative samples (p centrifugation, only seven of the 38 ROS-positive samples (18.42%) exhibited a ROS-positive lower layer (containing motile sperm) with a ROS removal rate of 81.58%, whereas the upper layer was ROS-positive in 24 samples (63.16%). In the ROS-negative group (n = 105), ROS was detected in 19 samples after centrifugation (18.10%, ROS generation rate), of which 18 were ROS-positive only in the upper layer or interface and the other was ROS-positive in both layers. Density gradient centrifugation can separate motile sperm from immotile sperm as well as remove ROS (including newly generated ROS). This data supports the view that density gradient centrifugation can select motile spermatozoa without enhancing oxidative stress. ROS: reactive oxygen species; SOD: superoxide dismutase; GPx: glutathione peroxidase; DNA: deoxyribonucleic acid; DGC: density gradient centrifugation; IUI: intrauterine insemination; IVF: in vitro fertilization; HEPES: 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid; EDTA: ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid; HTF: HEPES-buffered human tubal fluid; IMSI: intracytoplasmic morphologically selected sperm injection; SMAS: sperm motility analyzing system; CASA

  15. Single-Cell RNA-Seq Reveals Transcriptional Heterogeneity in Latent and Reactivated HIV-Infected Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golumbeanu, Monica; Cristinelli, Sara; Rato, Sylvie; Munoz, Miguel; Cavassini, Matthias; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Ciuffi, Angela

    2018-04-24

    Despite effective treatment, HIV can persist in latent reservoirs, which represent a major obstacle toward HIV eradication. Targeting and reactivating latent cells is challenging due to the heterogeneous nature of HIV-infected cells. Here, we used a primary model of HIV latency and single-cell RNA sequencing to characterize transcriptional heterogeneity during HIV latency and reactivation. Our analysis identified transcriptional programs leading to successful reactivation of HIV expression. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A Hybrid Estimator for Active/Reactive Power Control of Single-Phase Distributed Generation Systems with Energy Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pahlevani, Majid; Eren, Suzan; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a new active/reactive power closed-loop control system for a hybrid renewable energy generation system used for single-phase residential/commercial applications. The proposed active/reactive control method includes a hybrid estimator, which is able to quickly and accurately...... estimate the active/reactive power values. The proposed control system enables the hybrid renewable energy generation system to be able to perform real-time grid interconnection services such as active voltage regulation, active power control, and fault ride-through.Simulation and experimental results...... demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed closed-loop control system....

  17. Evidence for Detrimental Cross Interactions between Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species in Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falabella, Micol; Forte, Elena; Magnifico, Maria Chiara; Santini, Paolo; Arese, Marzia; Giuffrè, Alessandro; Radić, Kristina; Chessa, Luciana; Coarelli, Giulia; Buscarinu, Maria Chiara; Mechelli, Rosella; Salvetti, Marco; Sarti, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Here we have collected evidence suggesting that chronic changes in the NO homeostasis and the rise of reactive oxygen species bioavailability can contribute to cell dysfunction in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) patients. We report that peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), derived from a female LHON patient with bilateral reduced vision and carrying the pathogenic mutation 11778/ND4, display increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), as revealed by flow cytometry, fluorometric measurements of nitrite/nitrate, and 3-nitrotyrosine immunodetection. Moreover, viability assays with the tetrazolium dye MTT showed that lymphoblasts from the same patient are more sensitive to prolonged NO exposure, leading to cell death. Taken together these findings suggest that oxidative and nitrosative stress cooperatively play an important role in driving LHON pathology when excess NO remains available over time in the cell environment.

  18. Inactivation of myeloma cancer cells by helium and argon plasma jets: The effect comparison and the key reactive species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zeyu; Cui, Qingjie; Chen, Chen; Xu, Dehui; Liu, Dingxin; Chen, H. L.; Kong, Michael G.

    2018-02-01

    In plasma cancer therapy, the inactivation of cancer cells under plasma treatment is closely related to the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) induced by plasmas. Quantitative study on the plasma-induced RONS that related to cancer cells apoptosis is critical for advancing the research of plasma cancer therapy. In this paper, the effects of several reactive species on the inactivation of LP-1 myeloma cancer cells are comparatively studied with variable working gas composition, surrounding gas composition, and discharge power. The results show that helium plasma jet has a higher cell inactivation efficiency than argon plasma jet under the same discharge power. By comparing the concentration of aqueous phase reactive species and the cell inactivation efficiency under different working gases and discharge powers, it is demonstrated that the inactivation efficiency of LP-1 myeloma cancer cells is strongly correlated with the concentration of peroxynitrite (ONOOH/ONOO-).

  19. Induction of reactive oxygen species in marine phytoplankton under crude oil exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozhan, Koray; Zahraeifard, Sara; Smith, Aaron P; Bargu, Sibel

    2015-12-01

    Exposure of phytoplankton to the water-accommodated fraction of crude oil can elicit a number of stress responses, but the mechanisms that drive these responses are unclear. South Louisiana crude oil was selected to investigate its effects on population growth, chlorophyll a (Chl a) content, antioxidative defense, and lipid peroxidation, for the marine diatom, Ditylum brightwellii, and the dinoflagellate, Heterocapsa triquetra, in laboratory-based microcosm experiments. The transcript levels of several possible stress-responsive genes in D. brightwellii were also measured. The microalgae were exposed to crude oil for up to 96 h, and Chl a content, superoxide dismutase (SOD), the glutathione pool (GSH and GSSG), and lipid peroxidation content were analyzed. The cell growth of both phytoplankton species was inhibited with increasing crude oil concentrations. Crude oil exposure did not affect Chl a content significantly in cells. SOD activities showed similar responses in both species, being enhanced at 4- and 8-mg/L crude oil exposure. Only H. triquetra demonstrated enhanced activity in GSSG pool and lipid peroxidation at 8-mg/L crude oil exposure, suggesting that phytoplankton species have distinct physiological responses and tolerance levels to crude oil exposure. This study indicated the activation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in phytoplankton under crude oil exposure; however, the progressive damage in cells is still unknown. Thus, ROS-related damage in nucleic acid, lipids, proteins, and DNA, due to crude oil exposure could be a worthwhile subject of study to better understand crude oil toxicity at the base of the food web.

  20. Mitochondrial redox signaling: Interaction of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species with other sources of oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Eberhard; Wenzel, Philip; Münzel, Thomas; Daiber, Andreas

    2014-01-10

    Oxidative stress is a well established hallmark of cardiovascular disease and there is strong evidence for a causal role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) therein. Improvement of cardiovascular complications by genetic deletion of RONS producing enzymes and overexpression of RONS degrading enzymes proved the involvement of these species in cardiovascular disease at a molecular level. Vice versa, overexpression of RONS producing enzymes as well as deletion of antioxidant enzymes was demonstrated to aggravate cardiovascular complications. With the present overview we present and discuss different pathways how mitochondrial RONS interact (crosstalk) with other sources of oxidative stress, namely NADPH oxidases, xanthine oxidase and an uncoupled nitric oxide synthase. The potential mechanisms of how this crosstalk proceeds are discussed in detail. Several examples from the literature are summarized (including hypoxia, angiotensin II mediated vascular dysfunction, cellular starvation, nitrate tolerance, aging, hyperglycemia, β-amyloid stress and others) and the underlying mechanisms are put together to a more general concept of redox-based activation of different sources of RONS via enzyme-specific "redox switches". Mitochondria play a key role in this concept providing redox triggers for oxidative damage in the cardiovascular system but also act as amplifiers to increase the burden of oxidative stress. Based on these considerations, the characterization of the role of mitochondrial RONS formation in cardiac disease as well as inflammatory processes but also the role of mitochondria as potential therapeutic targets in these pathophysiological states should be addressed in more detail in the future.

  1. Reactive oxygen species and sperm function--in sickness and in health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, R John; Jones, Keith T; Robertson, Sarah A

    2012-01-01

    The ability of spermatozoa to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been appreciated since the 1940s. It is a universal property of mature spermatozoa from all mammalian species and a major contributor to the oxidative stress responsible for defective sperm function. The mechanisms by which oxidative stress limits the functional competence of mammalian spermatozoa involve the peroxidation of lipids, the induction of oxidative DNA damage, and the formation of protein adducts. ROS production in these cells involves electron leakage from the sperm mitochondria, triggered by a multitude of factors that impede electron flow along the electron transport chain. The net result of mitochondrial ROS generation is to damage these organelles and initiate an intrinsic apoptotic cascade, as a consequence of which spermatozoa lose their motility, DNA integrity, and vitality. This pathway of programmed senescence also results in the exteriorization of phosphatidylserine, which may facilitate the silent phagocytosis of these cells in the aftermath of insemination, in turn influencing the female tract immune response to sperm antigens and future fertility. Despite the vulnerability of sperm to oxidative stress, it is also clear that normal sperm function depends on low levels of ROS generation in order to promote the signal transduction pathways associated with capacitation. Modulators of ROS generation by spermatozoa may therefore have clinical utility in regulating the fertilizing capacity of these cells and preventing the development of antisperm immunity. Achievement of these objectives will require a systematic evaluation of pro- and antioxidant strategies in vivo and in vitro.

  2. Reactive oxygen species generation and use of antioxidants during in vitro maturation of oocytes: a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    faranak aghaz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In vitro maturation (IVM is emerging as a popular technology at the forefront of fertility treatment and preservation. However, standard in vitro culture (IVC conditions usually increase reactive oxygen species (ROS, which have been implicated as one of the major causes for reduced embryonic development. It is well-known that higher than physiological levels of ROS trigger granulosa cell apoptosis and thereby reduce the transfer of nutrients and survival factors to oocytes, which leads to apoptosis. ROS are neutralized by an elaborate defense system that consists of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. The balance between ROS levels and antioxidants within IVM media are important for maintenance of oocytes that develop to the blastocyst stage. The effects of antioxidant supplementation of IVM media have been studied in various mammalian species. Therefore, this article reviews and summarizes the effects of ROS on oocyte quality and the use of antioxidant supplementations for IVM, in addition to its effects on maturation rates and further embryo development.

  3. Reactive oxygen species: role in the development of cancer and various chronic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waris Gulam

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Oxygen derived species such as superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide, singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radical are well known to be cytotoxic and have been implicated in the etiology of a wide array of human diseases, including cancer. Various carcinogens may also partly exert their effect by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS during their metabolism. Oxidative damage to cellular DNA can lead to mutations and may, therefore, play an important role in the initiation and progression of multistage carcinogenesis. The changes in DNA such as base modification, rearrangement of DNA sequence, miscoding of DNA lesion, gene duplication and the activation of oncogenes may be involved in the initiation of various cancers. Elevated levels of ROS and down regulation of ROS scavengers and antioxidant enzymes are associated with various human diseases including various cancers. ROS are also implicated in diabtes and neurodegenerative diseases. ROS influences central cellular processes such as proliferation a, apoptosis, senescence which are implicated in the development of cancer. Understanding the role of ROS as key mediators in signaling cascades may provide various opportunities for pharmacological intervention.

  4. Reactive oxygen species: role in the development of cancer and various chronic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waris, Gulam; Ahsan, Haseeb

    2006-01-01

    Oxygen derived species such as superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide, singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radical are well known to be cytotoxic and have been implicated in the etiology of a wide array of human diseases, including cancer. Various carcinogens may also partly exert their effect by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) during their metabolism. Oxidative damage to cellular DNA can lead to mutations and may, therefore, play an important role in the initiation and progression of multistage carcinogenesis. The changes in DNA such as base modification, rearrangement of DNA sequence, miscoding of DNA lesion, gene duplication and the activation of oncogenes may be involved in the initiation of various cancers. Elevated levels of ROS and down regulation of ROS scavengers and antioxidant enzymes are associated with various human diseases including various cancers. ROS are also implicated in diabtes and neurodegenerative diseases. ROS influences central cellular processes such as proliferation a, apoptosis, senescence which are implicated in the development of cancer. Understanding the role of ROS as key mediators in signaling cascades may provide various opportunities for pharmacological intervention. PMID:16689993

  5. Decolorisation of Reactive Red 120 Dye by Using Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edris Bazrafshan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dyes are one of the most hazardous chemical compound classes found in industrial effluents and need to be treated since their presence in water bodies reduces light penetration, precluding the photosynthesis of aqueous flora. In the present study, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs was used as an adsorbent for the successful removal of Reactive Red 120 (RR-120 textile dye from aqueous solutions. The effect of various operating parameters such as initial concentration of dye, contact time, adsorbent dosage and initial pH was investigated in order to find the optimum adsorption conditions. Equilibrium isotherms were used to identify the possible mechanism of the adsorption process. The optimum pH for removing of RR-120 dye from aqueous solutions was found to be 5 and for this condition maximum predicted adsorption capacity for RR-120 dye was obtained as 426.49 mg/g. Also, the equilibrium data were also fitted to the Langmuir, Freundlich and BET equilibrium isotherm models. It was found that the data fitted to BET (R2=0.9897 better than Langmuir (R2=0.9190 and Freundlich (R2=0.8819 model. Finally it was concluded that the single-walled carbon nanotubes can be used for dye removal from aqueous solutions.

  6. Reactive oxygen species and cancer paradox: To promote or to suppress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galadari, Sehamuddin; Rahman, Anees; Pallichankandy, Siraj; Thayyullathil, Faisal

    2017-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), a group of highly reactive ions and molecules, are increasingly being appreciated as powerful signaling molecules involved in the regulation of a variety of biological processes. Indeed, their role is continuously being delineated in a variety of pathophysiological conditions. For instance, cancer cells are shown to have increased ROS levels in comparison to their normal counterparts. This is partly due to an enhanced metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer cells. The escalated ROS generation in cancer cells contributes to the biochemical and molecular changes necessary for the tumor initiation, promotion and progression, as well as, tumor resistance to chemotherapy. Therefore, increased ROS in cancer cells may provide a unique opportunity to eliminate cancer cells via elevating ROS to highly toxic levels intracellularly, thereby, activating various ROS-induced cell death pathways, or inhibiting cancer cell resistance to chemotherapy. Such results can be achieved by using agents that either increase ROS generation, or inhibit antioxidant defense, or even a combination of both. In fact, a large variety of anticancer drugs, and some of those currently under clinical trials, effectively kill cancer cells and overcome drug resistance via enhancing ROS generation and/or impeding the antioxidant defense mechanism. This review focuses on our current understanding of the tumor promoting (tumorigenesis, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis, and chemoresistance) and the tumor suppressive (apoptosis, autophagy, and necroptosis) functions of ROS, and highlights the potential mechanism(s) involved. It also sheds light on a very novel and an actively growing field of ROS-dependent cell death mechanism referred to as ferroptosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species and Functional Adaptation of the Placenta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myatt, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    The placenta regulates fetal growth and development via transport of nutrients and gases, and synthesis and secretion of steroid and peptide hormones. These functions are determined by vascular development and blood flow and by growth and differentiation of the trophoblast, which contains receptors, transporters and enzymes. The placenta generates reactive oxygen species which may contribute to the oxidative stress seen even in normal pregnancy but this is increased in pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia, IUGR and pregestational diabetes where oxidative and nitrative stress have been clearly documented. Nitrative stress is the covalent modification of proteins and DNA by peroxynitrite formed by the interaction of superoxide and nitric oxide. We have demonstrated nitrative stress by localizing nitrotyrosine residues in these placentas and found increased expression of NADPH oxidase (NOX) enzyme isoforms 1 and 5 as a potential source of superoxide generation. The presence of nitrative stress was associated with diminished vascular reactivity of the fetal placental circulation, a situation that could be reproduced by treatment with peroxynitrite in vitro. We find many nitrated proteins in the placenta, including p38 MAP kinase which has a role in development of the villous vasculature. Nitration of p38 MAPK was increased in the preeclamptic placenta and associated with loss of catalytic activity. We hypothesize that nitration of proteins in the placenta including receptors, transporters, enzymes and structural proteins can alter protein and placental function and this influences fetal growth and development. Increasing nitrative stress but a decrease in oxidative stress, measured as protein carbonylation, is found in the placenta with increasing BMI. Formation of peroxynitrite may then consume superoxide, decreasing nitrative stress. As protein carbonylation is a covalent modification at Lys, Arg, Pro and Thr residues the switch from carbonylation to nitration at

  8. The role of reactive oxygen species and proinflammatory cytokines in type 1 diabetes pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, Lindsey E; Broniowska, Katarzyna A; Hansen, Polly A; Corbett, John A; Tse, Hubert M

    2013-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a T cell–mediated autoimmune disease characterized by the destruction of insulin-secreting pancreatic β cells. In humans with T1D and in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice (a murine model for human T1D), autoreactive T cells cause β-cell destruction, as transfer or deletion of these cells induces or prevents disease, respectively. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells use distinct effector mechanisms and act at different stages throughout T1D to fuel pancreatic β-cell destruction and disease pathogenesis. While these adaptive immune cells employ distinct mechanisms for β-cell destruction, one central means for enhancing their autoreactivity is by the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, such as IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-1. In addition to their production by diabetogenic T cells, proinflammatory cytokines are induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) via redox-dependent signaling pathways. Highly reactive molecules, proinflammatory cytokines are produced upon lymphocyte infiltration into pancreatic islets and induce disease pathogenicity by directly killing β cells, which characteristically possess low levels of antioxidant defense enzymes. In addition to β-cell destruction, proinflammatory cytokines are necessary for efficient adaptive immune maturation, and in the context of T1D they exacerbate autoimmunity by intensifying adaptive immune responses. The first half of this review discusses the mechanisms by which autoreactive T cells induce T1D pathogenesis and the importance of ROS for efficient adaptive immune activation, which, in the context of T1D, exacerbates autoimmunity. The second half provides a comprehensive and detailed analysis of (1) the mechanisms by which cytokines such as IL-1 and IFN-γ influence islet insulin secretion and apoptosis and (2) the key free radicals and transcription factors that control these processes. PMID:23323860

  9. Contrasting characteristics of aqueous reactive species induced by cross-field and linear-field plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Han; Chen, Chen; Liu, Dingxin; Xu, Dehui; Liu, Zhijie; Wang, Xiaohua; Kong, Michael G.

    2017-06-01

    A comparative study on aqueous reactive species in deionized water treated by two types of plasma jets is presented. Classified by the direction of the electric field in the jet device, a linear-field jet and cross-field jet have been set up. Concentrations of several aqueous reactive species are measured quantitatively by chemical fluorescent assays and electron spin resonance spectrometer. Results show that these two-type plasma jets would generate approximately the same gaseous reactive species under the same discharge power, but the linear-field plasma jet is much more efficient at delivering those species to the remote deionized water. This leads to a much more aqueous short-lived species including OH and \\text{O}2- produced in water, which are mainly correlated to the solvation of gaseous short-lived species such as ions and electrons. Regarding the long-lived species of aqueous H2O2, the concentration grows faster when treated by the linear-field plasma jet in the initial stage, but after 10 min it is similar to that treated by the cross-field counterpart due to the vapor-liquid equilibrium. The aqueous peroxynitrite is also predicted to be produced as a result of the air inclusion in the feeding gas.

  10. Implementation research: reactive mass vaccination with single-dose oral cholera vaccine, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncin, Marc; Zulu, Gideon; Voute, Caroline; Ferreras, Eva; Muleya, Clara Mbwili; Malama, Kennedy; Pezzoli, Lorenzo; Mufunda, Jacob; Robert, Hugues; Uzzeni, Florent; Luquero, Francisco J; Chizema, Elizabeth; Ciglenecki, Iza

    2018-02-01

    To describe the implementation and feasibility of an innovative mass vaccination strategy - based on single-dose oral cholera vaccine - to curb a cholera epidemic in a large urban setting. In April 2016, in the early stages of a cholera outbreak in Lusaka, Zambia, the health ministry collaborated with Médecins Sans Frontières and the World Health Organization in organizing a mass vaccination campaign, based on single-dose oral cholera vaccine. Over a period of 17 days, partners mobilized 1700 health ministry staff and community volunteers for community sensitization, social mobilization and vaccination activities in 10 townships. On each day, doses of vaccine were delivered to vaccination sites and administrative coverage was estimated. Overall, vaccination teams administered 424 100 doses of vaccine to an estimated target population of 578 043, resulting in an estimated administrative coverage of 73.4%. After the campaign, few cholera cases were reported and there was no evidence of the disease spreading within the vaccinated areas. The total cost of the campaign - 2.31 United States dollars (US$) per dose - included the relatively low cost of local delivery - US$ 0.41 per dose. We found that an early and large-scale targeted reactive campaign using a single-dose oral vaccine, organized in response to a cholera epidemic within a large city, to be feasible and appeared effective. While cholera vaccines remain in short supply, the maximization of the number of vaccines in response to a cholera epidemic, by the use of just one dose per member of an at-risk community, should be considered.

  11. Serologic cross-reactivity of human IgM and IgG antibodies to five species of Ebola virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Macneil

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Five species of Ebola virus (EBOV have been identified, with nucleotide differences of 30-45% between species. Four of these species have been shown to cause Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF in humans and a fifth species (Reston ebolavirus is capable of causing a similar disease in non-human primates. While examining potential serologic cross-reactivity between EBOV species is important for diagnostic assays as well as putative vaccines, the nature of cross-reactive antibodies following EBOV infection has not been thoroughly characterized. In order to examine cross-reactivity of human serologic responses to EBOV, we developed antigen preparations for all five EBOV species, and compared serologic responses by IgM capture and IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA in groups of convalescent diagnostic sera from outbreaks in Kikwit, Democratic Republic of Congo (n=24, Gulu, Uganda (n=20, Bundibugyo, Uganda (n=33, and the Philippines (n=18, which represent outbreaks due to four different EBOV species. For groups of samples from Kikwit, Gulu, and Bundibugyo, some limited IgM cross-reactivity was noted between heterologous sera-antigen pairs, however, IgM responses were largely stronger against autologous antigen. In some instances IgG responses were higher to autologous antigen than heterologous antigen, however, in contrast to IgM responses, we observed strong cross-reactive IgG antibody responses to heterologous antigens among all sets of samples. Finally, we examined autologous IgM and IgG antibody levels, relative to time following EHF onset, and observed early peaking and declining IgM antibody levels (by 80 days and early development and persistence of IgG antibodies among all samples, implying a consistent pattern of antibody kinetics, regardless of EBOV species. Our findings demonstrate limited cross-reactivity of IgM antibodies to EBOV, however, the stronger tendency for cross-reactive IgG antibody responses can largely circumvent

  12. Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species in Carcinogenesis: Implications of Oxidative Stress on the Progression and Development of Several Cancer Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, Joanna; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2017-01-01

    The body of evidence available from published literature during the past three decades indicates that reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species can induce, promote and modulate carcinogenesis. The purpose of this review was to present the current status of knowledge on the possible role of oxidative/nitrosative stress in the development and progression of several human cancers. Moreover, we discuss briefly the formation and decomposition of oxygen and nitrogen species within cells and their physiological and damaging influences. Given that some antitumor treatments are based on the formation of ROS, we also summarize what is currently known about supplementing the diet with antioxidants. We conducted literature searches to review the recent progress toward the potential role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and associated oxidative stress in carcinogenesis. The epidemiological and laboratory studies showed that excessive production of reactive oxygen/ nitrogen species may lead to consequent alteration in the intracellular homeostasis and cause damage to all important cellular components when the excess of oxidants is not balanced by antioxidant defence and/or DNA repair mechanisms. Chronic oxidative stress can drive carcinogenesis by altering expression of cancer-related genes causing mutation and transformation. There is now common agreement that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are involved in the development and progression of several human cancers like breast, prostate, colorectal, gynecological, cervical, eye, skin, leukemia, gastric. Antioxidant supplements at low doses can promote health, while excess supplementation can be harmful and even carcinogenic. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Mobile phone radiation induces reactive oxygen species production and DNA damage in human spermatozoa in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffry N De Iuliis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In recent times there has been some controversy over the impact of electromagnetic radiation on human health. The significance of mobile phone radiation on male reproduction is a key element of this debate since several studies have suggested a relationship between mobile phone use and semen quality. The potential mechanisms involved have not been established, however, human spermatozoa are known to be particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress by virtue of the abundant availability of substrates for free radical attack and the lack of cytoplasmic space to accommodate antioxidant enzymes. Moreover, the induction of oxidative stress in these cells not only perturbs their capacity for fertilization but also contributes to sperm DNA damage. The latter has, in turn, been linked with poor fertility, an increased incidence of miscarriage and morbidity in the offspring, including childhood cancer. In light of these associations, we have analyzed the influence of RF-EMR on the cell biology of human spermatozoa in vitro. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Purified human spermatozoa were exposed to radio-frequency electromagnetic radiation (RF-EMR tuned to 1.8 GHz and covering a range of specific absorption rates (SAR from 0.4 W/kg to 27.5 W/kg. In step with increasing SAR, motility and vitality were significantly reduced after RF-EMR exposure, while the mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species and DNA fragmentation were significantly elevated (P<0.001. Furthermore, we also observed highly significant relationships between SAR, the oxidative DNA damage bio-marker, 8-OH-dG, and DNA fragmentation after RF-EMR exposure. CONCLUSIONS: RF-EMR in both the power density and frequency range of mobile phones enhances mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation by human spermatozoa, decreasing the motility and vitality of these cells while stimulating DNA base adduct formation and, ultimately DNA fragmentation. These findings have clear implications

  14. Reactive Carbonyl Species Activate Caspase-3-Like Protease to Initiate Programmed Cell Death in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Md Sanaullah; Mano, Jun'ichi

    2016-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-triggered programmed cell death (PCD) is a typical plant response to biotic and abiotic stressors. We have recently shown that lipid peroxide-derived reactive carbonyl species (RCS), downstream products of ROS, mediate oxidative signal to initiate PCD. Here we investigated the mechanism by which RCS initiate PCD. Tobacco Bright Yellow-2 cultured cells were treated with acrolein, one of the most potent RCS. Acrolein at 0.2 mM caused PCD in 5 h (i.e. lethal), but at 0.1 mM it did not (sublethal). Specifically, these two doses caused critically different effects on the cells. Both lethal and sublethal doses of acrolein exhausted the cellular glutathione pool in 30 min, while the lethal dose only caused a significant ascorbate decrease and ROS increase in 1-2 h. Prior to such redox changes, we found that acrolein caused significant increases in the activities of caspase-1-like protease (C1LP) and caspase-3-like protease (C3LP), the proteases which trigger PCD. The lethal dose of acrolein increased the C3LP activity 2-fold more than did the sublethal dose. In contrast, C1LP activity increments caused by the two doses were not different. Acrolein and 4-hydroxy-(E)-2-nonenal, another RCS, activated both proteases in a cell-free extract from untreated cells. H 2 O 2 at 1 mM added to the cells increased C1LP and C3LP activities and caused PCD, and the RCS scavenger carnosine suppressed their activation and PCD. However, H 2 O 2 did not activate the proteases in a cell-free extract. Thus the activation of caspase-like proteases, particularly C3LP, by RCS is an initial biochemical event in oxidative signal-stimulated PCD in plants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Radiation-Driven Formation of Reactive Oxygen Species in Oxychlorine-Containing Mars Surface Analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Christos D; Zisimopoulos, Dimitrios; Kalaitzopoulou, Electra; Quinn, Richard C

    2017-04-01

    The present study demonstrates that γ-radiolyzed perchlorate-containing Mars soil salt analogues (in a CO 2 atmosphere) generate upon H 2 O wetting the reactive oxygen species (ROS) superoxide radical (O 2 •- ), hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), and hydroxyl radicals ( • OH). This study also validates that analogue radiolysis forms oxychlorine species that, in turn, can UV-photolyze to • OH upon UV photolysis. This investigation was made possible by the development of a new assay for inorganic-origin O 2 •- and H 2 O 2 determination and by the modification of a previous assay for soil • OH. Results show that radiolyzed Mg(ClO 4 ) 2 generates H 2 O 2 and • OH; and when included as part of a mixture analogous to the salt composition of samples analyzed at the Mars Phoenix site, the analogue generated O 2 •- , H 2 O 2 , and • OH, with • OH levels 150-fold higher than in the radiolyzed Mg(ClO 4 ) 2 samples. Radiolyzed Mars Phoenix site salt analogue that did not contain Mg(ClO 4 ) 2 generated only • OH also at 150-fold higher concentration than Mg(ClO 4 ) 2 alone. Additionally, UV photolysis of the perchlorate γ radiolysis product chlorite (ClO 2 - ) generated the oxychlorine products trihalide (Cl 3 - ), chlorine dioxide (ClO 2 • ), and hypochlorite (ClO - ), with the formation of • OH by UV photolysis of ClO - . While the generation of ROS may have contributed in part to 14 CO 2 production in the Viking Labeled Release (LR) experiment and O 2 (g) release in the Viking Gas Exchange (GEx) experiment, our results indicate that they are not likely to be the major contributor to the LR and GEx results. However, due to their highly reactive nature, they are expected to play a significant role in the alteration of organics on Mars. Additionally, experiments with hypochlorite show that the thermal stability of NaClO is in the range of the thermal stability observed for thermally liable oxidant responsible for the Viking LR results. Key Words: Mars

  16. Real-time in vivo mitochondrial redox assessment confirms enhanced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, Daniel L; Badal, Shawn S; Long, Jianyin; Chang, Benny H; Schumacker, Paul T; Overbeek, Paul A; Danesh, Farhad R

    2017-11-01

    While increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species have been commonly implicated in a variety of disease states, their in vivo role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy remains controversial. Using a two-photon imaging approach with a genetically encoded redox biosensor, we monitored mitochondrial redox state in the kidneys of experimental models of diabetes in real-time in vivo. Diabetic (db/db) mice that express a redox-sensitive Green Fluorescent Protein biosensor (roGFP) specifically in the mitochondrial matrix (db/dbmt-roGFP) were generated, allowing dynamic monitoring of redox changes in the kidneys. These db/dbmt-roGFP mice exhibited a marked increase in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in the kidneys. Yeast NADH-dehydrogenase, a mammalian Complex I homolog, was ectopically expressed in cultured podocytes, and this forced expression in roGFP-expressing podocytes prevented high glucose-induced increases in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. Thus, in vivo monitoring of mitochondrial roGFP in diabetic mice confirms increased production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in the kidneys. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The known and unknown sources of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in haemocytes of marine bivalve molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaghy, Ludovic; Hong, Hyun-Ki; Jauzein, Cécile; Choi, Kwang-Sik

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) are naturally produced in all cells and organisms. Modifications of standard conditions alter reactive species generation and may result in oxidative stress. Because of the degradation of marine ecosystems, massive aquaculture productions, global change and pathogenic infections, oxidative stress is highly prevalent in marine bivalve molluscs. Haemocytes of bivalve molluscs produce ROS and RNS as part of their basal metabolism as well as in response to endogenous and exogenous stimuli. However, sources and pathways of reactive species production are currently poorly deciphered in marine bivalves, potentially leading to misinterpretations. Although sources and pathways of ROS and RNS productions are highly conserved between vertebrates and invertebrates, some uncommon pathways seem to only exist in marine bivalves. To understand the biology and pathobiology of ROS and RNS in haemocytes of marine bivalves, it is necessary to characterise their sources and pathways of production. The aims of the present review are to discuss the currently known and unknown intracellular sources of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in marine bivalve molluscs, in light of terrestrial vertebrates, and to expose principal pitfalls usually encountered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Melatonin affects membrane integrity, intracellular reactive oxygen species, caspase3 activity and AKT phosphorylation in frozen thawed human sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Atefeh; Adutwum, Emmanuel; Yari, Abazar; Salehi, Ensieh; Mikaeili, Saideh; Dashtestani, Fariba; Abolhassani, Farid; Rashki, Leila; Shiasi, Setareh; Asadi, Ebrahim

    2018-04-01

    Cryopreservation is known to induce oxidative stress in spermatozoa. Although melatonin has powerful antioxidant properties, little is known about its effects on human sperm quality during cryopreservation. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of melatonin treatment on human sperm parameters essential for fertilization. We first evaluated the effects of various concentrations of melatonin (0-15 mM) on human sperm parameters such as motility, viability and levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species during cryopreservation in order to identify an optimal dose with the greatest effects for further studies. Liquefied semen samples were then divided into three aliquots: cryopreserved without melatonin (control), cryopreserved with 3 mM melatonin and fresh groups. After being thawed, samples were evaluated for motility, viability, membrane integrity, intracellular reactive oxygen species levels, caspase-3 activity and AKT phosphorylation. Treatment of spermatozoa with the various concentrations of melatonin significantly increased their motility and viability and decreased their intracellular reactive oxygen species levels compared with the control group. The optimal melatonin concentration (3 mM) significantly decreased the intracellular reactive oxygen species levels, caspase-3 activity and the percentage of both dead and apoptotic-like sperm cells and increased the vitality, progressive motility and total motility and AKT phosphorylation compared with the control group. Thus, melatonin exerts protective effects against cryodamage during human spermatozoa cryopreservation and may exert its effects via the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

  19. Eicosanoids up-regulate production of reactive oxygen species by NADPH-dependent oxidase in Spodoptera exigua phagocytic hemocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicosanoids mediate cellular immune responses in insects, including phagocytosis of invading microbes. Phagocytosis entails two major steps, the internalization of microbes and the subsequent killing of them via formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we posed the hypothesis that eicosanoi...

  20. Using fluorescence-activated flow cytometry to determine reactive oxygen species formation and membrane lipid peroxidation in viable boar spermatozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluorescence-activated flow cytometry analyses were developed for determination of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and membrane lipid peroxidation in live spermatozoa loaded with, respectively, hydroethidine (HE) or the lipophilic probe 4,4-difluoro-5-(4-phenyl-1,3-butadienyl)-4-bora-3a,4a-d...

  1. Surgery-induced reactive oxygen species enhance colon carcinoma cell binding by disrupting the liver endothelial cell lining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gül, N.; Bögels, M.; Grewal, S.; van der Meer, A.J.; Rojas, L.B.; Fluitsma, D.M.; van den Tol, M.P.; Hoeben, K.A.; van Marle, J.; de Vries, H.E.; Beelen, R.H.J.; van Egmond, M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Resection of primary colorectal cancer is associated with enhanced risk of development of liver metastases. It was previously demonstrated that surgery initiated an early inflammatory response resulting in elevated tumour cell adhesion in the liver. Because reactive oxygen species (ROS)

  2. Characterization of combined power plasma jet using AC high voltage and nanosecond pulse for reactive species composition control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, Keisuke; Konishi, Hideaki; Kato, Toshiaki; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2014-10-01

    In the application studies for both bio-medical and agricultural applications, the roles of the reactive oxide and/or nitride species generated in the plasma has been reported as a key to control the effects and ill-effects on the living organism. The correlation between total OH radical exposure from an air atmospheric pressure plasma jet and the sterilization threshold on Botrytis cinerea is presented. With the increase of the OH radical exposure to the Botrytis cinerea, the probability of sterilization is increased. In this study, to resolve the roles of reactive species including OH radicals, a combined power plasma jet using nanosecond pulses and low-frequency sinusoidal AC high voltage (a few kHz) is studied for controlling the composition of the reactive species. The nanosecond pulses are superimposed on the AC voltage which is in synchronization with the AC phase. The undergoing work to characterize the combined power discharge with electric charge and voltage cycle on the plasma jet will also be presented to discuss the discharge characteristics to control the composition of the reactive species.

  3. The effect of histamine on the oxidative burst of HL60 cells before and after exposure to reactive oxygen species.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ching, T.L.; Koelemij, J.G.; Bast, A.

    1995-01-01

    During an inflammation neutrophils are stimulated to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). These ROS induce the release of histamine from mast cells, which are also present at the inflammation site. In this study dibutyryl cAMP differentiated HL60 cells are used as a model for human neutrophils.

  4. Role of histamine receptors in the effects of histamine on the production of reactive oxygen species by whole blood phagocytes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vašíček, Ondřej; Lojek, Antonín; Jančinová, V.; Nosál, R.; Číž, Milan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 1 (2014), s. 67-72 ISSN 0024-3205 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD11010 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Histamine * Histamine receptors * Reactive oxygen species Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.702, year: 2014

  5. Pyruvate: immunonutritional effects on neutrophil intracellular amino or alpha-keto acid profiles and reactive oxygen species production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathioudakis, D.; Engel, J.; Welters, I.D.; Dehne, M.G.; Matejec, R.; Harbach, H.; Henrich, M.; Schwandner, T.; Fuchs, M.; Weismuller, K.; Scheffer, G.J.; Muhling, J.

    2011-01-01

    For the first time the immunonutritional role of pyruvate on neutrophils (PMN), free alpha-keto and amino acid profiles, important reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced [superoxide anion (O(2) (-)), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))] as well as released myeloperoxidase (MPO) acitivity has been

  6. The role of UCP 1 in production of reactive oxygen species by mitochondria isolated from brown adipose tissue

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlasková, Andrea; Clarke, K.J.; Porter, R. K.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 1797, č. 8 (2010), s. 1470-1476 ISSN 0005-2728 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Mitochondria * Reactive oxygen species * Uncoupling protein 1 Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 5.132, year: 2010

  7. Reactive Stresses in Ni49Fe18Ga27Co6 Shape-Memory-Alloy Single Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averkin, A. I.; Krymov, V. M.; Guzilova, L. I.; Timashov, R. B.; Soldatov, A. V.; Nikolaev, V. I.

    2018-03-01

    The reactive stresses induced in Ni49Fe18Ga27Co6-alloy single crystals during martensitic transformations with a limited possibility of shape-memory-strain recovery have been experimentally studied. The data on these crystals are compared with the results obtained previously for Cu-Al-Ni, Ni-Ti, and Ni‒Fe-Ga crystals. The potential of application of the Ni49Fe18Ga27Co6 single crystals in designing drives and power motors is demonstrated.

  8. Quantification of environmentally persistent free radicals and reactive oxygen species in atmospheric aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arangio, Andrea M.; Tong, Haijie; Socorro, Joanna; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-10-01

    Fine particulate matter plays a central role in the adverse health effects of air pollution. Inhalation and deposition of aerosol particles in the respiratory tract can lead to the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may cause oxidative stress. In this study, we have detected and quantified a wide range of particle-associated radicals using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Ambient particle samples were collected using a cascade impactor at a semi-urban site in central Europe, Mainz, Germany, in May-June 2015. Concentrations of environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFR), most likely semiquinone radicals, were found to be in the range of (1-7) × 1011 spins µg-1 for particles in the accumulation mode, whereas coarse particles with a diameter larger than 1 µm did not contain substantial amounts of EPFR. Using a spin trapping technique followed by deconvolution of EPR spectra, we have also characterized and quantified ROS, including OH, superoxide (O2-) and carbon- and oxygen-centered organic radicals, which were formed upon extraction of the particle samples in water. Total ROS amounts of (0.1-3) × 1011 spins µg-1 were released by submicron particle samples and the relative contributions of OH, O2-, C-centered and O-centered organic radicals were ˜ 11-31, ˜ 2-8, ˜ 41-72 and ˜ 0-25 %, respectively, depending on particle sizes. OH was the dominant species for coarse particles. Based on comparisons of the EPR spectra of ambient particulate matter with those of mixtures of organic hydroperoxides, quinones and iron ions followed by chemical analysis using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS), we suggest that the particle-associated ROS were formed by decomposition of organic hydroperoxides interacting with transition metal ions and quinones contained in atmospheric humic-like substances (HULIS).

  9. Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Mediate Lysophosphatidylcholine-Induced Endothelial Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinyuan; Fang, Pu; Li, Yafeng; Kuo, Yin-Ming; Andrews, Andrew J; Nanayakkara, Gayani; Johnson, Candice; Fu, Hangfei; Shan, Huimin; Du, Fuyong; Hoffman, Nicholas E; Yu, Daohai; Eguchi, Satoru; Madesh, Muniswamy; Koch, Walter J; Sun, Jianxin; Jiang, Xiaohua; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiaofeng

    2016-06-01

    Hyperlipidemia-induced endothelial cell (EC) activation is considered as an initial event responsible for monocyte recruitment in atherogenesis. However, it remains poorly defined what is the mechanism underlying hyperlipidemia-induced EC activation. Here, we tested a novel hypothesis that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) serve as signaling mediators for EC activation in early atherosclerosis. Metabolomics and transcriptomics analyses revealed that several lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) species, such as 16:0, 18:0, and 18:1, and their processing enzymes, including Pla2g7 and Pla2g4c, were significantly induced in the aortas of apolipoprotein E knockout mice during early atherosclerosis. Using electron spin resonance and flow cytometry, we found that LPC 16:0, 18:0, and 18:1 induced mtROS in primary human aortic ECs, independently of the activities of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase. Mechanistically, using confocal microscopy and Seahorse XF mitochondrial analyzer, we showed that LPC induced mtROS via unique calcium entry-mediated increase of proton leak and mitochondrial O2 reduction. In addition, we found that mtROS contributed to LPC-induced EC activation by regulating nuclear binding of activator protein-1 and inducing intercellular adhesion molecule-1 gene expression in vitro. Furthermore, we showed that mtROS inhibitor MitoTEMPO suppressed EC activation and aortic monocyte recruitment in apolipoprotein E knockout mice using intravital microscopy and flow cytometry methods. ATP synthesis-uncoupled, but proton leak-coupled, mtROS increase mediates LPC-induced EC activation during early atherosclerosis. These results indicate that mitochondrial antioxidants are promising therapies for vascular inflammation and cardiovascular diseases. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Surface functionalization of titanium dioxide nanoparticles: Photo-stability and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Kacie M.

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are becoming increasingly prevalent in society for applications of sunscreens, cosmetics, paints, biomedical imaging, and photovoltaics. Due to the increased surface area to volume ratio of nanoparticles compared to bulk materials, it is important to know the health and safety impacts of these materials. One mechanism of toxicity of nominally "safe" materials such as TiO 2 is through the photocatalytic generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS production and ligand degradation can affect the bioavailability of these particles in aqueous organisms. We have investigated ROS generation by functionalized TiO2 nanoparticles and its influence on aggregation and bioavailability and toxicity to zebrafish embryos/larvae. For these studies we investigated anatase TiO2 nanoparticles. For application purposes and solution stability, the TiO2 nanoparticles were functionalized with a variety of ligands such as citrate, 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, and ascorbate. We quantitatively examined the amount of ROS produced in aqueous solution using fluorescent probes and see that more ROS is produced under UV light than in the dark control. Our measurements show that TiO2 toxicity reaches a maximum for nanoparticles with smaller diameters, and is correlated with surface area dependent changes in ROS generation. In an effort to reduce toxicity through control of the surface and surface ligands, we synthesized anatase nanoparticles of different sizes, functionalized them with different ligands, and examined the resulting ROS generation and ligand stability. Using a modular ligand containing a hydrophobic inner region and a hydrophilic outer region, we synthesized water-stable nanoparticles, via two different chemical reactions, having much-reduced ROS generation and thus reduced toxicity. These results suggest new strategies for making safer nanoparticles while still retaining their desired properties. We also examine the degradation of the different ligands

  11. Reactive oxygen species accumulation and homeostasis are involved in plant immunity to an opportunistic fungal pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Parissa; Kakooee, Tahereh

    2017-09-01

    Alternaria blight is a major and destructive disease of potato worldwide. In recent years, A. tenuissima is recognized as the most prevalent species of this phytopathogenic fungus in potato fields of Asian countries, which causes high yield losses every year. Any potato cultivar with complete resistance to this disease is not recognized, so far. Therefore, screening resistance levels of potatoes and identification of plant defense mechanisms against this fungus might be important for designing novel and effective disease management strategies for controlling the disease. In this research, the role of reactive oxygen species, antioxidants, lignin and phenolics in potato basal resistance to A. tenuissima was compared in the partially resistant Ramus and susceptible Bamba cultivars. Priming O 2 - and H 2 O 2 production and enhanced activity of peroxidase (POX) and catalase (CAT) during interaction with A. tenuissima were observed in Ramus cultivar. Application of ROS generating systems and scavengers revealed critical role of O 2 - and H 2 O 2 in potato defense, which was associated with lignification and phenolics production. More OH - and lipid peroxidation in the susceptible Bamba compared to Ramus cultivar showed their negative effects on resistance. Priming the POX and CAT activity, in correlation with upregulation of the corresponding genes was observed in Ramus. The POX and CAT inhibitors increased disease progress, which was related with decreased lignification. This assay demonstrated not only POX-dependency of lignification, but also its dependence on CAT. However, POX had more importance than CAT in potato defense and in lignification. These findings highlight the function of ROS accumulation and homeostasis in potato resistance against A. tenuissima. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Measurements of Reactive Oxygen Species by Cyclic Hydroxylamine Spin Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikalov, Sergey I; Polienko, Yuliya F; Kirilyuk, Igor

    2017-11-17

    Oxidative stress contributes to numerous pathophysiological conditions such as development of cancer, neurodegenerative, and cardiovascular diseases. A variety of measurements of oxidative stress markers in biological systems have been developed; however, many of these methods are not specific, can produce artifacts, and do not directly detect the free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause oxidative stress. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is a unique tool that allows direct measurements of free radical species. Cyclic hydroxylamines are useful and convenient molecular probes that readily react with ROS to produce stable nitroxide radicals, which can be quantitatively measured by EPR. In this work, we critically review recent applications of various cyclic hydroxylamine spin probes in biology to study oxidative stress, their advantages, and the shortcomings. Recent Advances: In the past decade, a number of new cyclic hydroxylamine spin probes have been developed and their successful application for ROS measurement using EPR has been published. These new state-of-the-art methods provide improved selectivity and sensitivity for in vitro and in vivo studies. Although cyclic hydroxylamine spin probes EPR application has been previously described, there has been lack of translation of these new methods into biomedical research, limiting their widespread use. This work summarizes "best practice" in applications of cyclic hydroxylamine spin probes to assist with EPR studies of oxidative stress. Additional studies to advance hydroxylamine spin probes from the "basic science" to biomedical applications are needed and could lead to better understanding of pathological conditions associated with oxidative stress. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  13. Iron- and ferritin-dependent reactive oxygen species distribution: impact on Arabidopsis root system architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyt, Guilhem; Boudouf, Soukaina; Boucherez, Jossia; Gaymard, Frédéric; Briat, Jean-Francois

    2015-03-01

    Iron (Fe) homeostasis is integrated with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and distribution at the root tip participates in the control of root growth. Excess Fe increases ferritin abundance, enabling the storage of Fe, which contributes to protection of plants against Fe-induced oxidative stress. AtFer1 and AtFer3 are the two ferritin genes expressed in the meristematic zone, pericycle and endodermis of the Arabidopsis thaliana root, and it is in these regions that we observe Fe stained dots. This staining disappears in the triple fer1-3-4 ferritin mutant. Fe excess decreases primary root length in the same way in wild-type and in fer1-3-4 mutant. In contrast, the Fe-mediated decrease of lateral root (LR) length and density is enhanced in fer1-3-4 plants due to a defect in LR emergence. We observe that this interaction between excess Fe, ferritin, and root system architecture (RSA) is in part mediated by the H2O2/O2·- balance between the root cell proliferation and differentiation zones regulated by the UPB1 transcription factor. Meristem size is also decreased in response to Fe excess in ferritin mutant plants, implicating cell cycle arrest mediated by the ROS-activated SMR5/SMR7 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors pathway in the interaction between Fe and RSA. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Emerging Role of Reactive Oxygen Species Signaling during Lateral Root Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzano, Concepción; Pallero-Baena, Mercedes; Casimiro, Ilda; De Rybel, Bert; Orman-Ligeza, Beata; Van Isterdael, Gert; Beeckman, Tom; Draye, Xavier; Casero, Pedro; Del Pozo, Juan C

    2014-07-01

    Overall root architecture is the combined result of primary and lateral root growth and is influenced by both intrinsic genetic programs and external signals. One of the main questions for root biologists is how plants control the number of lateral root primordia and their emergence through the main root. We recently identified S-phase kinase-associated protein2 (SKP2B) as a new early marker for lateral root development. Here, we took advantage of its specific expression pattern in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) in a cell-sorting and transcriptomic approach to generate a lateral root-specific cell sorting SKP2B data set that represents the endogenous genetic developmental program. We first validated this data set by showing that many of the identified genes have a function during root growth or lateral root development. Importantly, genes encoding peroxidases were highly represented in our data set. Thus, we next focused on this class of enzymes and showed, using genetic and chemical inhibitor studies, that peroxidase activity and reactive oxygen species signaling are specifically required during lateral root emergence but, intriguingly, not for primordium specification itself. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Autophagy induction upon reactive oxygen species in Cd-stressed Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, WeiNa; Chen, WenLi

    2010-02-01

    Autophagy is a protein degradation process in which cells recycle cytoplasmic contents when subjected to environmental stress conditions or during certain stages of development. Upon the induction of autophagy, a double membrane autophagosome forms around cytoplasmic components and delivers them to the vacuole for degradation. In plants, autophagy has been shown previously to be induced during abiotic stresses including oxidative stress. Cd, as a toxicity heavy metal, resulted in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this paper, we demonstrated that ROS contributed to the induction of autophagy in Cd-stressed Arabidopsis thaliana. However, pre-incubation with ascorbic acid (AsA, antioxidant molecule) and catalase (CAT, a H2O2-specific scavenger) decreased the ROS production and the number of autolysosomal-like structures. Together our results indicated that the oxidative condition was essential for autophagy, as treatment with AsA and CAT abolished the formation of autophagosomes, and ROS may function as signal molecules to induce autophagy in abiotic stress.

  16. Photoreactivity of Metal-Organic Frameworks in Aqueous Solutions: Metal Dependence of Reactive Oxygen Species Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai; Gao, Yanxin; Liu, Jing; Wen, Yifan; Zhao, Yingcan; Zhang, Kunyang; Yu, Gang

    2016-04-05

    Promising applications of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) in various fields have raised concern over their environmental fate and safety upon inevitable discharge into aqueous environments. Currently, no information regarding the transformation processes of MOFs is available. Due to the presence of repetitive π-bond structure and semiconductive property, photochemical transformations are an important fate process that affects the performance of MOFs in practical applications. In the current study, the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in isoreticular MIL-53s was studied. Scavengers were employed to probe the production of (1)O2, O2(•-), and •OH, respectively. In general, MIL-53(Cr) and MIL-53(Fe) are dominated by type I and II photosensitization reactions, respectively, and MIL-53(Al) appears to be less photoreactive. The generation of ROS in MIL-53(Fe) may be underestimated due to dismutation. Further investigation of MIL-53(Fe) encapsulated diclofenac transformation revealed that diclofenac can be easily transformed by MIL-53(Fe) generated ROS. However, the cytotoxicity results implied that the ROS generated from MIL-53s have little effect on the viability of the human hepatocyte (HepG2) cell line. These results suggest that the photogeneration of ROS by MOFs may be metal-node dependent, and the application of MIL-53s as drug carriers needs to be carefully considered due to their high photoreactivity.

  17. Tuning of redox regulatory mechanisms, reactive oxygen species and redox homeostasis under salinity stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossain eSazzad

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity is a crucial environmental constraint which limits biomass production at many sites on a global scale. Saline growth conditions cause osmotic and ionic imbalances, oxidative stress and perturb metabolism, e.g. the photosynthetic electron flow. The plant ability to tolerate salinity is determined by multiple biochemical and physiological mechanisms protecting cell functions, in particular by regulating proper water relations and maintaining ion homeostasis. Redox homeostasis is a fundamental cell property. Its regulation includes control of reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, sensing deviation from and readjustment of the cellular redox state. All these redox related functions have been recognized as decisive factors in salinity acclimation and adaptation. This review focuses on the core response of plants to overcome the challenges of salinity stress through regulation of ROS generation and detoxification systems and to maintain redox homeostasis. Emphasis is given to the role of NADH oxidase (RBOH, alternative oxidase (AOX, the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX and the malate valve with the malate dehydrogenase isoforms under salt stress. Overwhelming evidence assigns an essential auxiliary function of ROS and redox homeostasis to salinity acclimation of plants.

  18. Screening reactive oxygen species scavenging properties of platinum nanoparticles on a microfluidic chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Wenfu; Jiang, Bo; Zhao, Yuyun; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Xingyu; Hao, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and inflammation are key risk factors for atherosclerosis and can lead to overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which plays a critical role in vascular endothelial dysfunction and subsequent progress of atherosclerosis. However, there is currently a lack of effective drugs that deal with ROS. Platinum nanoparticles (Pt-NPs) have proven to be promising antioxidant drugs in vitro and in vivo. To optimize the efficacy of Pt-NP based drugs, we synthesized and characterized the ROS scavenging properties of three kinds of small molecules that capped Pt-NPs (Pt-AMP-NPs, Pt-ATT-NPs, Pt-MI-NPs) on a blood vessel-mimicking microfluidic chip. The Pt-NPs showed superior superoxide dismutase (SOD)-like functions and can scavenge ROS and recover compromised cell-cell junctions under hyperglycemic, hyperlipidemic and proinflammatory conditions. Amongst these NPs, Pt-AMP-NPs showed the most superior antioxidant properties, suggesting its potency to serve as a novel drug to treat vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. Our microfluidic chip, providing physiological hemodynamic conditions for the experiments, is potentially a promising tool for a wide range of biological research on the vascular system. (paper)

  19. Electrical stimulation of human embryonic stem cells: cardiac differentiation and the generation of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serena, Elena; Figallo, Elisa; Tandon, Nina; Cannizzaro, Christopher; Gerecht, Sharon; Elvassore, Nicola; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-12-10

    Exogenous electric fields have been implied in cardiac differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this work, we explored the effects of electrical field stimulation on ROS generation and cardiogenesis in embryoid bodies (EBs) derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC, line H13), using a custom-built electrical stimulation bioreactor. Electrical properties of the bioreactor system were characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and analysis of electrical currents. The effects of the electrode material (stainless steel, titanium-nitride-coated titanium, titanium), length of stimulus (1 and 90 s) and age of EBs at the onset of electrical stimulation (4 and 8 days) were investigated with respect to ROS generation. The amplitude of the applied electrical field was 1 V/mm. The highest rate of ROS generation was observed for stainless steel electrodes, for signal duration of 90 s and for 4-day-old EBs. Notably, comparable ROS generation was achieved by incubation of EBs with 1 nM H(2)O(2). Cardiac differentiation in these EBs was evidenced by spontaneous contractions, expression of troponin T and its sarcomeric organization. These results imply that electrical stimulation plays a role in cardiac differentiation of hESCs, through mechanisms associated with the intracellular generation of ROS.

  20. Nicorandil prevents sirolimus-induced production of reactive oxygen species, endothelial dysfunction, and thrombus formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Aizawa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sirolimus (SRL is widely used to prevent restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention. However, its beneficial effect is hampered by complications of thrombosis. Several studies imply that reactive oxygen species (ROS play a critical role in endothelial dysfunction and thrombus formation. The present study investigated the protective effect of nicorandil (NIC, an anti-angina agent, on SRL-associated thrombosis. In human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs, SRL stimulated ROS production, which was prevented by co-treatment with NIC. The preventive effect of NIC on ROS was abolished by 5-hydroxydecanoate but not by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one. NIC also inhibited SRL-induced up-regulation of NADPH oxidase subunit p22phox mRNA. Co-treatment with NIC and SRL significantly up-regulated superoxide dismutase 2. NIC treatment significantly improved SRL-induced decrease in viability of HCAECs. The functional relevance of the preventive effects of NIC on SRL-induced ROS production and impairment of endothelial viability was investigated in a mouse model of thrombosis. Pretreatment with NIC inhibited the SRL-induced acceleration of FeCl3-initiated thrombus formation and ROS production in the testicular arteries of mice. In conclusion, NIC prevented SRL-induced thrombus formation, presumably due to the reduction of ROS and to endothelial protection. The therapeutic efficacy of NIC could represent an additional option in the prevention of SRL-related thrombosis.

  1. Restraining of reactive oxygen species promotes invasion of Listeria monocytogenes into glia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sen; Chen, Guowei; Wu, Man; Zhang, Jingchen; Wu, Shuyan

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that could cause severe infection in the central nervous system of humans and animals. However, the molecular mechanism of the pathogenesis is not fundamentally assessed. This study aimed to analyze the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in L. monocytogenes during its invasion into glia cells. The ROS level in L. monocytogenes was manipulated using NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI) and ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). Results showed that the invasiveness of L. monocytogenes was elevated when ROS was downregulated by DPI and NAC treatment. Expression profiles of proinflammatory factors in glia cells were also examined because they play important roles in the functions of glia cells in the brain immune system. The expression levels of proinflammatory factors (tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin-1β) in host glia cells were downregulated when invaded by L. monocytogenes with lower ROS level. This finding indicates that ROS may function as negative regulator during the invasion of L. monocytogenes in brain infection. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Bio-inspired redox-cycling antimicrobial film for sustained generation of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huan; Qu, Xue; Kim, Eunkyoung; Lei, Miao; Dai, Kai; Tan, Xiaoli; Xu, Miao; Li, Jinyang; Liu, Yangping; Shi, Xiaowen; Li, Peng; Payne, Gregory F; Liu, Changsheng

    2018-04-01

    Open wounds and burns are prone to infection and there remains considerable interest in developing safe and effective mechanisms to confer antimicrobial activities to wound dressings. We report a biomimetic wound dressing for the in situ and sustained generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Specifically, we fabricate a catechol-modified chitosan film that mimics features of the melanin capsule generated during an insect immune response to infection. We use an electrochemical reverse engineering approach to demonstrate that this catechol-chitosan film possesses redox-activities and can be repeatedly oxidized and reduced. In vitro tests demonstrate that this film catalyzes the transfer of electrons from physiological reductant ascorbate to O 2 for sustained ROS generation, and confers ascorbate-dependent antimicrobial activities. In vivo antimicrobial experiment with a rat subcutaneous model indicates the catechol-chitosan film at reduced state inhibits the bacterial growth and alleviates the infection of the incisions. Open wound healing tests with a mouse model indicate that the catechol-chitosan film suppresses the bacterial population at the wound site, induces less inflammation and promotes wound healing. We envision this biomimetic approach for the sustained, localized and in situ generation of ROS could provide new opportunities for wound management by protecting against pathogen infection and potentially even enlisting ROS-mediated wound healing mechanisms. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Silver nanoparticles induced reactive oxygen species via photosynthetic energy transport imbalance in an aquatic plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong Sheng; Yin, Li Yan; Ren, Na Na; Zhao, Su Ting; Li, Zhi; Zhi, Yongwei; Shao, Hui; Li, Wei; Gontero, Brigitte

    2017-03-01

    The rapid growth in silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) commercialization has increased environmental exposure, including aquatic ecosystem. It has been reported that the AgNPs have damaging effects on photosynthesis and induce oxidative stress, but the toxic mechanism of AgNPs is still a matter of debate. In the present study, on the model aquatic higher plant Spirodela polyrhiza, we found that AgNPs affect photosynthesis and significantly inhibit Photosystem II (PSII) maximum quantum yield (F v /F m ) and effective quantum yield (Φ PSII ). The changes of non-photochemical fluorescence quenching (NPQ), light-induced non-photochemical fluorescence quenching [Y(NPQ)] and non-light-induced non-photochemical fluorescence quenching [Y(NO)] showed that AgNPs inhibit the photo-protective capacity of PSII. AgNPs induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are mainly produced in the chloroplast. The activity of ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco) was also very sensitive to AgNPs. The internalized Ag, regardless of whether the exposure was Ag +  or AgNPs had the same capacity to generate ROS. Our results support the hypothesis that intra-cellular AgNP dissociate into high toxic Ag + . Rubisco inhibition leads to slowing down of CO 2 assimilation. Consequently, the solar energy consumption decreases and then the excess excitation energy promotes ROS generation in chloroplast.

  4. Reactive oxygen species and synthetic antioxidants as angiogenesis modulators: Clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radomska-Leśniewska, Dorota M; Hevelke, Agata; Skopiński, Piotr; Bałan, Barbara; Jóźwiak, Jarosław; Rokicki, Dariusz; Skopińska-Różewska, Ewa; Białoszewska, Agata

    2016-04-01

    Angiogenesis is important for normal functioning of organism and its disturbances are observed in many diseases, called angiogenesis-related states. Reactive oxygen species (ROSs) play an important role in physiology, but high level of cellular ROSs is cytotoxic and mutagenic for the cells, i.e. it can lead to oxidative stress. In this review we discuss close relationship between ROSs and angiogenesis process. Substances counteracting free radicals or their action and oxidative stress are known as antioxidants. We postulate that antioxidants, by affecting angiogenesis, may modulate therapy results in the case of angiogenesis-related disease. Herein, we present some antioxidant preparations of synthetic (N-acetylcysteine, curcumin and its analogs, Probucol, oleane tripertenoid, EGCG synthetic analogs) and nature-identical (vitamin E and C) origin. Then, we analyze their angiogenic properties and their multidirectional molecular effect on angiogenesis. Most preparations reduce neovascularization and diminish the level of proangiogenic molecules, downregulating signaling pathways related to angiogenesis. Moreover, we discuss studies concerning anticancer properties of presented synthetic antioxidants and their application in several angiogenesis-related diseases. We conclude that therapy in angiogenesis-related diseases should be planned with consideration of the angiogenic status of the patient. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  5. Reactive oxygen species contribute toward Smac mimetic/temozolomide-induced cell death in glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfrid, Mathieu; Marschall, Viola; Fulda, Simone

    2016-11-01

    Small-molecule inhibitors of Inhibitor of Apoptosis proteins such as Smac mimetics have been reported to provide a promising tool to sensitize glioblastoma (GBM) cells to cytotoxic therapies including chemotherapeutic drugs. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of action have not yet been fully unraveled. In the present study, we therefore investigated the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the regulation of Smac mimetic/temozolomide (TMZ)-induced cell death in GBM cells. Here, we show that the Smac mimetic BV6 and TMZ act in concert to stimulate the production of both cytosolic and mitochondrial ROS. This accumulation of ROS contributes toward the activation of the proapoptotic factor BAX upon BV6/TMZ cotreatment as several ROS scavengers (i.e. N-acetyl-L-cysteine, MnTBAP, or α-tocopherol) protect GBM cells against BV6/TMZ-mediated BAX activation. In addition, ROS scavengers significantly rescue GBM cells from BV6/TMZ-triggered cell death, indicating that ROS generation is required for the induction of cell death. By showing that ROS play an important role in the regulation of Smac mimetic/TMZ-induced cell death, our work sheds light on the crucial role of the oxidative system in the cooperative antitumor activity of Smac mimetic/TMZ combination therapy against GBM cells.

  6. Detection of reactive oxygen species in mainstream cigarette smoke by a fluorescent probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Xu, Shi-jie; Li, Song-zhan

    2009-07-01

    A mass of reactive oxygen species(ROS) are produced in the process of smoking. Superfluous ROS can induce the oxidative stress in organism, which will cause irreversible damage to cells. Fluorescent probe is taken as a marker of oxidative stress in biology and has been applied to ROS detection in the field of biology and chemistry for high sensitivity, high simplicity of data collection and high resolution. As one type of fluorescent probe, dihydrorhodamine 6G (dR6G) will be oxidized to the fluorescent rhodamine 6G, which could be used to detect ROS in mainstream cigarette smoke. We investigated the action mechanism of ROS on dR6G, built up the standard curve of R6G fluorescence intensity with its content, achieved the variation pattern of R6G fluorescence intensity with ROS content in mainstream cigarette smoke and detected the contents of ROS from the 4 types of cigarettes purchased in market. The result shows that the amount of ROS has close relationship with the types of tobacco and cigarette production technology. Compared with other detecting methods such as electronic spin resonance(ESR), chromatography and mass spectrometry, this detection method by the fluorescent probe has higher efficiency and sensitivity and will have wide applications in the ROS detection field.

  7. Extracellular ultrathin fibers sensitive to intracellular reactive oxygen species: Formation of intercellular membrane bridges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Se-Hui; Park, Jin-Young; Joo, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Young-Myeong; Ha, Kwon-Soo, E-mail: ksha@kangwon.ac.kr

    2011-07-15

    Membrane bridges are key cellular structures involved in intercellular communication; however, dynamics for their formation are not well understood. We demonstrated the formation and regulation of novel extracellular ultrathin fibers in NIH3T3 cells using confocal and atomic force microscopy. At adjacent regions of neighboring cells, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and glucose oxidase induced ultrathin fiber formation, which was prevented by Trolox, a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger. The height of ROS-sensitive ultrathin fibers ranged from 2 to 4 nm. PMA-induced formation of ultrathin fibers was inhibited by cytochalasin D, but not by Taxol or colchicine, indicating that ultrathin fibers mainly comprise microfilaments. PMA-induced ultrathin fibers underwent dynamic structural changes, resulting in formation of intercellular membrane bridges. Thus, these fibers are formed by a mechanism(s) involving ROS and involved in formation of intercellular membrane bridges. Furthermore, ultrastructural imaging of ultrathin fibers may contribute to understanding the diverse mechanisms of cell-to-cell communication and the intercellular transfer of biomolecules, including proteins and cell organelles.

  8. Rapid and transient stimulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species by melatonin in normal and tumor leukocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radogna, Flavia; Paternoster, Laura; De Nicola, Milena; Cerella, Claudia; Ammendola, Sergio; Bedini, Annalida; Tarzia, Giorgio; Aquilano, Katia; Ciriolo, Maria; Ghibelli, Lina

    2009-01-01

    Melatonin is a modified tryptophan with potent biological activity, exerted by stimulation of specific plasma membrane (MT1/MT2) receptors, by lower affinity intracellular enzymatic targets (quinone reductase, calmodulin), or through its strong anti-oxidant ability. Scattered studies also report a perplexing pro-oxidant activity, showing that melatonin is able to stimulate production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we show that on U937 human monocytes melatonin promotes intracellular ROS in a fast (< 1 min) and transient (up to 5-6 h) way. Melatonin equally elicits its pro-radical effect on a set of normal or tumor leukocytes; intriguingly, ROS production does not lead to oxidative stress, as shown by absence of protein carbonylation, maintenance of free thiols, preservation of viability and regular proliferation rate. ROS production is independent from MT1/MT2 receptor interaction, since a) requires micromolar (as opposed to nanomolar) doses of melatonin; b) is not contrasted by the specific MT1/MT2 antagonist luzindole; c) is not mimicked by a set of MT1/MT2 high affinity melatonin analogues. Instead, chlorpromazine, the calmodulin inhibitor shown to prevent melatonin-calmodulin interaction, also prevents melatonin pro-radical effect, suggesting that the low affinity binding to calmodulin (in the micromolar range) may promote ROS production.

  9. Chronic restraint stress inhibits hair growth via substance P mediated by reactive oxygen species in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nan; Wang, Lin-Hui; Guo, Ling-Ling; Wang, Guo-Qing; Zhou, Xi-Ping; Jiang, Yan; Shang, Jing; Murao, Koji; Chen, Jing-Wei; Fu, Wen-Qing; Zhang, Guo-Xing

    2013-01-01

    Solid evidence has demonstrated that psychoemotional stress induced alteration of hair cycle through neuropeptide substance P (SP) mediated immune response, the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in brain-skin-axis regulation system remains unknown. The present study aims to investigate possible mechanisms of ROS in regulation of SP-mast cell signal pathway in chronic restraint stress (CRS, a model of chronic psychoemotional stress) which induced abnormal of hair cycle. Our results have demonstrated that CRS actually altered hair cycle by inhibiting hair follicle growth in vivo, prolonging the telogen stage and delaying subsequent anagen and catagen stage. Up-regulation of SP protein expression in cutaneous peripheral nerve fibers and activation of mast cell were observed accompanied with increase of lipid peroxidation levels and reduction of the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in CRS mice skin. In addition, SP receptor antagonist (RP67580) reduced mast cell activations and lipid peroxidation levels as well as increased GSH-Px activity and normalized hair cycle. Furthermore, antioxidant Tempol (a free radical scavenger) also restored hair cycle, reduced SP protein expression and mast cell activation. Our study provides the first solid evidence for how ROS play a role in regulation of psychoemotional stress induced SP-Mast cell pathway which may provide a convincing rationale for antioxidant application in clinical treatment with psychological stress induced hair loss.

  10. Fish oil increases mitochondrial phospholipid unsaturation, upregulating reactive oxygen species and apoptosis in rat colonocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Mee Young; Chapkin, Robert S.; Barhoumi, Rola; Burghardt, Robert C.; Turner, Nancy D.; Henderson, Cara E.; Sanders, Lisa M.; Fan, Yang-Yi; Davidson, Laurie A.; Murphy, Mary E.; hide

    2002-01-01

    We have shown that a combination of fish oil (high in n-3 fatty acids) with the butyrate-producing fiber pectin, upregulates apoptosis in colon cells exposed to the carcinogen azoxymethane, protecting against colon tumor development. We now hypothesize that n-3 fatty acids prime the colonocytes such that butyrate can initiate apoptosis. To test this, 30 Sprague-Dawley rats were provided with diets differing in the fatty acid composition (corn oil, fish oil or a purified fatty acid ethyl ester diet). Intact colon crypts were exposed ex vivo to butyrate, and analyzed for reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), translocation of cytochrome C to the cytosol, and caspase-3 activity (early events in apoptosis). The fatty acid composition of the three major mitochondrial phospholipids was also determined, and an unsaturation index calculated. The unsaturation index in cardiolipin was correlated with ROS levels (R = 0.99; P = 0.02). When colon crypts from fish oil and FAEE-fed rats were exposed to butyrate, MMP decreased (P = 0.041); and translocation of cytochrome C to the cytosol (P = 0.037) and caspase-3 activation increased (P = 0.032). The data suggest that fish oil may prime the colonocytes for butyrate-induced apoptosis by enhancing the unsaturation of mitochondrial phospholipids, especially cardiolipin, resulting in an increase in ROS and initiating apoptotic cascade.

  11. The oxygen sensing signal cascade under the influence of reactive oxygen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acker, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    Structural and functional integrity of organ function profoundly depends on a regular oxygen and glucose supply. Any disturbance of this supply becomes life threatening and may result in severe loss of organ function. Particular reductions in oxygen availability (hypoxia) caused by respiratory or blood circulation irregularities cannot be tolerated for longer periods due to an insufficient energy supply by anaerobic glycolysis. Complex cellular oxygen sensing systems have evolved to tightly regulate oxygen homeostasis. In response to variations in oxygen partial pressure (PO2), these systems induce adaptive and protective mechanisms to avoid or at least minimize tissue damage. These various responses might be based on a range of oxygen sensing signal cascades including an isoform of the neutrophil NADPH oxidase, different electron carrier units of the mitochondrial chain such as a specialized mitochondrial, low PO2 affinity cytochrome c oxidase (aa3) and a subfamily of 2-oxoglutarate dependent dioxygenases termed HIF (hypoxia inducible factor) prolyl-hydroxylase and HIF asparaginyl hydroxylase called factor-inhibiting HIF (FIH-1). Thus, specific oxygen sensing cascades involving reactive oxygen species as second messengers may by means of their different oxygen sensitivities, cell-specific and subcellular localization help to tailor various adaptive responses according to differences in tissue oxygen availability. PMID:16321790

  12. Membrane-bound globin X protects the cell from reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Jonas; Burmester, Thorsten

    2016-01-08

    Globin X (GbX) is a member of the globin family that emerged early in the evolution of Metazoa. In vertebrates, GbX is restricted to lampreys, fish, amphibians and some reptiles, and is expressed in neurons. Unlike any other metazoan globin, GbX is N-terminally acylated and anchored in the cell membrane via myristoyl and palmitoyl groups, suggesting a unique function. Here, we compared the capacity of GbX to protect a mouse neuronal cell line from hypoxia and reactive oxygen species (ROS) with that of myoglobin. To evaluate the contribution of membrane-binding, we generated a mutated version of GbX without acyl groups. All three globins enhanced cell viability under hypoxia, with myoglobin having the most pronounced effect. GbX but not myoglobin protected the cells from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced stress. Membrane-bound GbX was significantly more efficient than its mutated, soluble form. Furthermore, myoglobin and mutated GbX increased production of ROS upon H2O2-treatment, while membrane-bound GbX did not. The results indicate that myoglobin enhances O2 supply while GbX protects the cell membrane from ROS-stress. The ancient origin of GbX suggests that ROS-protection reflects the function of the early globins before they acquired a respiratory role. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Reactive oxygen species generating systems meeting challenges of photodynamic cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zijian; Song, Jibin; Nie, Liming; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-11-21

    The reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated mechanism is the major cause underlying the efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT). The PDT procedure is based on the cascade of synergistic effects between light, a photosensitizer (PS) and oxygen, which greatly favors the spatiotemporal control of the treatment. This procedure has also evoked several unresolved challenges at different levels including (i) the limited penetration depth of light, which restricts traditional PDT to superficial tumours; (ii) oxygen reliance does not allow PDT treatment of hypoxic tumours; (iii) light can complicate the phototherapeutic outcomes because of the concurrent heat generation; (iv) specific delivery of PSs to sub-cellular organelles for exerting effective toxicity remains an issue; and (v) side effects from undesirable white-light activation and self-catalysation of traditional PSs. Recent advances in nanotechnology and nanomedicine have provided new opportunities to develop ROS-generating systems through photodynamic or non-photodynamic procedures while tackling the challenges of the current PDT approaches. In this review, we summarize the current status and discuss the possible opportunities for ROS generation for cancer therapy. We hope this review will spur pre-clinical research and clinical practice for ROS-mediated tumour treatments.

  14. Hyperglycaemia modifies energy metabolism and reactive oxygen species formation in endothelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dymkowska, Dorota; Drabarek, Beata; Podszywałow-Bartnicka, Paulina; Szczepanowska, Joanna; Zabłocki, Krzysztof

    2014-01-15

    There is significant evidence for an involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications through many metabolic and structural derangements. However, despite the advanced knowledge on the crucial role of ROS in cardiovascular damage, their intracellular source in endothelial cells exposed to high concentrations of glucose has not been precisely defined. Moreover, the molecular mechanism of action of elevated glucose on mitochondria has not been fully elucidated. The main aim of this study was to describe changes in the mitochondrial metabolism of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) treated with high glucose concentrations and to indicate the actual source of ROS in these cells. HUVECs exposed to 30 mM glucose exhibited an increased content of vascular adhesive molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and an excessive ROS production. Faster oxygen consumption and increased abundance of selected respiratory complexes coexist with slightly declined mitochondrial membrane potential and substantially elevated amount of uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2). Inhibition of NADPH oxidase (NOX) and modification of mitochondrial ROS generation with a mitochondrial uncoupler or respiratory chain inhibitors allowed concluding that the major source of ROS in HUVECs exposed to hyperglycaemic conditions is NOX. The mitochondrial respiratory chain seems not to participate in this phenomenon. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Progress in understanding the molecular oxygen paradox - function of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuksal, Nidhi; Chalker, Julia; Mailloux, Ryan J

    2017-10-26

    The molecular oxygen (O2) paradox was coined to describe its essential nature and toxicity. The latter characteristic of O2 is associated with the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can damage structures vital for cellular function. Mammals are equipped with antioxidant systems to fend off the potentially damaging effects of ROS. However, under certain circumstances antioxidant systems can become overwhelmed leading to oxidative stress and damage. Over the past few decades, it has become evident that ROS, specifically H2O2, are integral signaling molecules complicating the previous logos that oxyradicals were unfortunate by-products of oxygen metabolism that indiscriminately damage cell structures. To avoid its potential toxicity whilst taking advantage of its signaling properties, it is vital for mitochondria to control ROS production and degradation. H2O2 elimination pathways are well characterized in mitochondria. However, less is known about how H2O2 production is controlled. The present review examines the importance of mitochondrial H2O2 in controlling various cellular programs and emerging evidence for how production is regulated. Recently published studies showing how mitochondrial H2O2 can be used as a secondary messenger will be discussed in detail. This will be followed with a description of how mitochondria use S-glutathionylation to control H2O2 production.

  16. New insights into reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide signalling under low oxygen in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucciariello, Chiara; Perata, Pierdomenico

    2017-04-01

    Plants produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) when exposed to low oxygen (O 2 ). Much experimental evidence has demonstrated the existence of an oxidative burst when there is an O 2 shortage. This originates at various subcellular sites. The activation of NADPH oxidase(s), in complex with other proteins, is responsible for ROS production at the plasma membrane. Another source of low O 2 -dependent ROS is the mitochondrial electron transport chain, which misfunctions when low O 2 limits its activity. Arabidopsis mutants impaired in proteins playing a role in ROS production display an intolerant phenotype to anoxia and submergence, suggesting a role in acclimation to stress. In rice, the presence of the submergence 1A (SUB1A) gene for submergence tolerance is associated with a higher capacity to scavenge ROS. Additionally, the destabilization of group VII ethylene responsive factors, which are involved in the direct O 2 sensing mechanism, requires nitric oxide (NO). All this evidence suggests the existence of a ROS and NO - low O 2 mechanism interplay which likely includes sensing, anaerobic metabolism and acclimation to stress. In this review, we summarize the most recent findings on this topic, formulating hypotheses on the basis of the latest advances. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The role of metals in production and scavenging of reactive oxygen species in photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospíšil, Pavel

    2014-07-01

    Metal ions play a crucial role in enzymatic reactions in all photosynthetic organisms such as cyanobacteria, algae and plants. It well known that metal ions maintain the binding of substrate in the active site of the metalloenzymes and control the redox activity of the metalloenzyme in the enzymatic reaction. A large pigment-protein complex, PSII, known to serve as a water-plastoquinone oxidoreductase, contains three metal centers comprising non-heme iron, heme iron of Cyt b559 and the water-splitting manganese complex. Metal ions bound to PSII proteins maintain the electron transport from water to plastoquinone and regulate the pro-oxidant and antioxidant activity in PSII. In this review, attention is focused on the role of PSII metal centers in (i) the formation of superoxide anion and hydroxyl radicals by sequential one-electron reduction of molecular oxygen and the formation of hydrogen peroxide by incomplete two-electron oxidation of water; and (ii) the elimination of superoxide anion radical by one-electron oxidation and reduction (superoxide dismutase activity) and of hydrogen peroxide by two-electron oxidation and reduction (catalase activity). The balance between the formation and elimination of reactive oxygen species by PSII metal centers is discussed as an important aspect in the prevention of photo-oxidative damage of PSII proteins and lipids. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. The influence of reactive oxygen species on cell cycle progression in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbon, Eline Hendrike; Post, Jan Andries; Boonstra, Johannes

    2012-12-10

    Cell cycle regulation is performed by cyclins and cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs). Recently, it has become clear that reactive oxygen species (ROS) influence the presence and activity of these enzymes and thereby control cell cycle progression. In this review, we first describe the discovery of enzymes specialized in ROS production: the NADPH oxidase (NOX) complexes. This discovery led to the recognition of ROS as essential players in many cellular processes, including cell cycle progression. ROS influence cell cycle progression in a context-dependent manner via phosphorylation and ubiquitination of CDKs and cell cycle regulatory molecules. We show that ROS often regulate ubiquitination via intermediate phosphorylation and that phosphorylation is thus the major regulatory mechanism influenced by ROS. In addition, ROS have recently been shown to be able to activate growth factor receptors. We will illustrate the diverse roles of ROS as mediators in cell cycle regulation by incorporating phosphorylation, ubiquitination and receptor activation in a model of cell cycle regulation involving EGF-receptor activation. We conclude that ROS can no longer be ignored when studying cell cycle progression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. [Comparison of reactive oxygen species production in neat semen and washed spermatozoa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svobodová, M; Oborná, I; Fingerová, H; Novotný, J; Brezinová, J; Radová, L; Vyslouzilová, J; Horáková, J; Grohmannová, J

    2009-12-01

    To determine Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) production in neat semen and spermatozoa suspension using chemiluminescence and to examine correlation between both methods. Prospective laboratory study. Department of Obstetric and Gynecology, University Hospital, Olomouc. The study included fertile volunteers (FV, n = 17), men from infertile couples (NM, n = 19) and men with idiopathic infertility (NMI, n = 15). ROS levels were determined by the same method in neat and washed semen samples. The ROS production in neat semen was lower than that in spermatozoa suspension. There was no significant diference in ROS production between volunteers and males from infertile couples. There was a significant correlation between log ROS in neat semen and in spermatozoa suspension in studied groups (FV r = 0.85, p = 1.5 x 10(-5); NM r = 0.76, p neat semen is simpler, faster and better reflecting the actual level of oxidative stress than the same measurement in spermatozoa suspension. The implementation of this method can complement the algorithm of diagnostics and treatment of male infertility and be helpful in selection of patients for antioxidant or antibiotic treatment.

  20. Comparison of reactive oxygen species in neat and washed semen of infertile men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moein, Mohammad Reza; Vahidi, Serajedin; Ghasemzadeh, Jalal; Tabibnejad, Nasim

    2014-05-01

    Male are involved in near 50% of cases of infertility and reactive oxygen species (ROS) playing an important role in decreasing fertility potential. Accurate measurement of ROS seems to be important in evaluation of infertile male patients. To compare ROS measurement in neat and washed semen samples of infertile men and define the best method for evaluation of ROS in these patients. We measured the level of ROS in semen samples of thirty five non-azoospermic men with infertility. The semen samples were divided into two parts and the semen parameters and ROS levels in neat and washed samples were evaluated. We also evaluated the presence of pyospermia using peroxidase test. The differences regarding sperm count and quick motility were significant in neat and washed semen samples. The mean ROS level was significantly higher in neat samples compared with washed spermatozoa (7.50 RLU vs. 1.20 RLU respectively). Difference in ROS levels was more significant in patients with pyospermia compared to whom with no pyospermia (378.67 RLU vs. 9.48 RLU respectively). Our study confirmed that neat or unprocessed samples are better index of normal oxidative status of semen samples. Because we do not artificially add or remove factors that may play an important role in oxidative equilibrium status.

  1. Silvering and swimming effects on aerobic metabolism and reactive oxygen species in the European eel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amérand, Aline; Mortelette, Hélène; Belhomme, Marc; Moisan, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Silvering, the last metamorphosis in the eel life cycle induces morphological and physiological modifications in yellow eels (sedentary stage). It pre-adapts them to cope with the extreme conditions they will encounter during their 6000-km spawning migration. A previous study showed that silver eels are able to cope with reactive oxygen species (ROS) over-production linked to an increase in aerobic metabolism during sustained swimming, but the question remains as to whether this mechanism is associated with silvering. A sustained swimming session decreased red muscle in vitro mitochondrial oxygen consumption (MO 2 ) but increased ROS production in both eel stages. The swimming exercise used here was perhaps too intense to induce a stimulation of mitochondrial function or biogenesis even when antioxidant enzyme activities were unchanged. Pro-oxidant/antioxidant imbalance by lipid peroxidation increased in yellow but significantly decreased in silver eels. The silvering process therefore appears to allow a pre-adaptation of red muscle radical metabolism to the demands of spawning migration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Contribution of reactive oxygen species to the anticancer activity of aminoalkanol derivatives of xanthone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sypniewski, Daniel; Szkaradek, Natalia; Loch, Tomasz; Waszkielewicz, Anna M; Gunia-Krzyżak, Agnieszka; Matczyńska, Daria; Sołtysik, Dagna; Marona, Henryk; Bednarek, Ilona

    2017-11-08

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are critically involved in the action of anticancer agents. In this study, we investigated the role of ROS in the anticancer mechanism of new aminoalkanol derivatives of xanthone. Most xanthones used in the study displayed significant pro-oxidant effects similar to those of gambogic acid, one of the most active anticancer xanthones. The pro-oxidant activity of our xanthones was shown both directly (by determination of ROS induction, effects on the levels of intracellular antioxidants, and expression of antioxidant enzymes) and indirectly by demonstrating that the overexpression of manganese superoxide dismutase decreases ROS-mediated cell senescence. We also observed that mitochondrial dysfunction and cellular apoptosis enhancement correlated with xanthone-induced oxidative stress. Finally, we showed that the use of the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine partly reversed these effects of aminoalkanol xanthones. Our results demonstrated that novel aminoalkanol xanthones mediated their anticancer activity primarily through ROS elevation and enhanced oxidative stress, which led to mitochondrial cell death stimulation; this mechanism was similar to the activity of gambogic acid.

  3. p53 activation contributes to patulin-induced nephrotoxicity via modulation of reactive oxygen species generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Huan; Yin, Shutao; Song, Xinhua; Zhang, Enxiang; Fan, Lihong; Hu, Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    Patulin is a major mycotoxin found in fungal contaminated fruits and their derivative products. Previous studies showed that patulin was able to induce increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and oxidative stress was suggested to play a pivotal role in patulin-induced multiple toxic signaling. The objective of the present study was to investigate the functional role of p53 in patulin-induced oxidative stress. Our study demonstrated that higher levels of ROS generation and DNA damage were induced in wild-type p53 cell lines than that found in either knockdown or knockout p53 cell lines in response to patulin exposure, suggesting p53 activation contributed to patulin-induced ROS generation. Mechanistically, we revealed that the pro-oxidant role of p53 in response to patulin was attributed to its ability to suppress catalase activity through up-regulation of PIG3. Moreover, these in vitro findings were further validated in the p53 wild-type/knockout mouse model. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report addressing the functional role of p53 in patulin-induced oxidative stress. The findings of the present study provided novel insights into understanding mechanisms behind oxidative stress in response to patulin exposure. PMID:27071452

  4. Zinc oxide nanoparticle induced autophagic cell death and mitochondrial damage via reactive oxygen species generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Yoon, Tae-Jong; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Kim, Ji-Eun; Park, Soo Jin; Jeong, Min Sook; Ha, Shin-Woo; Lee, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Jun Sung; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2013-06-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-np) are used in an increasing number of industrial products such as paint, coating and cosmetics, and in other biological applications. There have been many suggestions of a ZnO-np toxicity paradigm but the underlying molecular mechanisms about the toxicity of ZnO-np remain unclear. This study was done to determine the potential toxicity of ZnO-np and to assess the toxicity mechanism in normal skin cells. Synthesized ZnO-np generated reactive oxygen species (ROS), as determined by electron spin resonance. After uptake into cells, ZnO-np induced ROS in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. To demonstrate ZnO-np toxicity mechanism related to ROS, we detected abnormal autophagic vacuoles accumulation and mitochondria dysfunction after ZnO-np treatment. Furthermore mitochondria membrane potential and adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) production are decreased for culture with ZnO-np. We conclude that ZnO-np leads to cell death through autophagic vacuole accumulation and mitochondria damage in normal skin cells via ROS induction. Accordingly, ZnO-np may cause toxicity and the results highlight and need for careful regulation of ZnO-np production and use. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Phenolic extract of Dialium guineense pulp enhances reactive oxygen species detoxification in aflatoxin B₁ hepatocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeleye, Abdulwasiu O; Ajiboye, Taofeek O; Iliasu, Ganiyat A; Abdussalam, Folakemi A; Balogun, Abdulazeez; Ojewuyi, Oluwayemisi B; Yakubu, Musa T

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of Dialium guineense pulp phenolic extract on aflatoxin B1 (AFB1)-induced oxidative imbalance in rat liver. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging potentials of free and bound phenolic extract of D. guineense (0.2-1.0 mg/mL) were investigated in vitro using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical, superoxide ion (O2(-)), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydroxyl radical, and ferric ion reducing system. In the in vivo study, 35 animals were randomized into seven groups of five rats each. Free and bound phenolic extract (1 mg/mL) produced 66.42% and 93.08%, 57.1% and 86.0%, 62.0% and 90.05%, and 60.11% and 72.37% scavenging effect on DPPH radical, O2(-) radical, H2O2, and hydroxyl radical, while ferric ion was significantly reduced. An AFB1-mediated decrease in the activities of ROS detoxifying enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase) was significantly attenuated (P<.05). AFB1-mediated elevation in the concentrations of oxidative stress biomarkers; malondialdehyde, conjugated dienes, lipid hydroperoxides, protein carbonyl, and percentage DNA fragmentation were significantly lowered by D. guineense phenolic extract (P<.05). Overall, the in vitro and in vivo effects suggest that D. guineense phenolic extract elicited ROS scavenging and detoxification potentials, as well as the capability of preventing lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, and DNA fragmentation.

  6. Iron species determination to investigate early diagenetic reactivity in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haese, R. R.; Wallmann, K.; Dahmke, A.; Kretzmann, U.; Müller, P. J.; Schulz, H. D.

    1997-01-01

    Iron speciation was determined in hemiplegic sediments from a high productivity area to investigate systematically the early diagenetic reactivity of Fe. A combination of various leaching agents (1 M HCI, dithionite buffered in citrate/acetic acid, HF/H 2SO 4, acetic Cr(II)) was applied to sediment and extracted more than 80% of total Fe. Subsequent Fe species determination defined specific mineral fractions that are available for Fe reduction and fractions formed as products of Fe diagenesis. To determine the Fe speciation of (sheet) silicates we explored an extraction procedure (HF/H 2SO 4) and verified the procedure by application to standard rocks. Variations of Fe speciation of (sheet) silicates reflect the possible formation of Fe-bearing silicates in near surface sediments. The same fraction indicates a change in the primary input at greater depth, which is supported by other parameters. The Fe(II)/ Fe(III) -ratio of total sediment determined by extractions was compared with Mössbauer-spectroscopy ] at room temperature and showed agreement within 10%. M6ssbauer-spectroscopy indicates the occurrence of siderite in the presence of free sulfide and pyrite, supporting the importance of microenvironments during mineral formation. The occurrence of other Fe(II) bearing minerals such as ankerite (Ca-, Fe-, Mg-carbonate) can be presumed but remains speculative.

  7. α-Syntrophin stabilizes catalase to reduce endogenous reactive oxygen species levels during myoblast differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jae Yun; Choi, Su Jin; Heo, Cheol Ho; Kim, Hwan Myung; Kim, Hye Sun

    2017-07-01

    α-Syntrophin is a component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex that interacts with various intracellular signaling proteins in muscle cells. The α-syntrophin knock-down C2 cell line (SNKD), established by infecting lentivirus particles with α-syntrophin shRNA, is characterized by a defect in terminal differentiation and increase in cell death. Since myoblast differentiation is accompanied by intensive mitochondrial biogenesis, the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) is also increased during myogenesis. Two-photon microscopy imaging showed that excessive intracellular ROS accumulated during the differentiation of SNKD cells as compared with control cells. The formation of 4-hydroxynonenal adduct, a byproduct of lipid peroxidation during oxidative stress, significantly increased in differentiated SNKD myotubes and was dramatically reduced by epigallocatechin-3-gallate, a well-known ROS scavenger. Among antioxidant enzymes, catalase was significantly decreased during differentiation of SNKD cells without changes at the mRNA level. Of interest was the finding that the degradation of catalase was rescued by MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, in the SNKD cells. This study demonstrates a novel function of α-syntrophin. This protein plays an important role in the regulation of oxidative stress from endogenously generated ROS during myoblast differentiation by modulating the protein stability of catalase. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  8. Oxidative Stress in the Developing Rat Brain due to Production of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Jiří; Vytášek, Richard; Uhlík, Jiří; Vajner, Luděk

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress after birth led us to localize reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) production in the developing rat brain. Brains were assessed a day prenatally and on postnatal days 1, 2, 4, 8, 14, 30, and 60. Oxidation of dihydroethidium detected superoxide; 6-carboxy-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate revealed hydrogen peroxide; immunohistochemical proof of nitrotyrosine and carboxyethyllysine detected peroxynitrite formation and lipid peroxidation, respectively. Blue autofluorescence detected protein oxidation. The foetuses showed moderate RONS production, which changed cyclically during further development. The periods and sites of peak production of individual RONS differed, suggesting independent generation. On day 1, neuronal/glial RONS production decreased indicating that increased oxygen concentration after birth did not cause oxidative stress. Dramatic changes in the amount and the sites of RONS production occurred on day 4. Nitrotyrosine detection reached its maximum. Day 14 represented other vast alterations in RONS generation. Superoxide production in arachnoidal membrane reached its peak. From this day on, the internal elastic laminae of blood vessels revealed the blue autofluorescence. The adult animals produced moderate levels of superoxide; all other markers reached their minimum. There was a strong correlation between detection of nitrotyrosine and carboxyethyllysine probably caused by lipid peroxidation initiated with RONS.

  9. Targeting reactive nitrogen species: a promising therapeutic strategy for cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing-miao; Chen, Han-sen; Xu, Ming-jing; Shen, Jian-gang

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic stroke accounts for nearly 80% of stroke cases. Recanalization with thrombolysis is a currently crucial therapeutic strategy for re-building blood supply, but the thrombolytic therapy often companies with cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury, which are mediated by free radicals. As an important component of free radicals, reactive nitrogen species (RNS), including nitric oxide (NO) and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)), play important roles in the process of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. Ischemia-reperfusion results in the production of nitric oxide (NO) and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) in ischemic brain, which trigger numerous molecular cascades and lead to disruption of the blood brain barrier and exacerbate brain damage. There are few therapeutic strategies available for saving ischemic brains and preventing the subsequent brain damage. Recent evidence suggests that RNS could be a therapeutic target for the treatment of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. Herein, we reviewed the recent progress regarding the roles of RNS in the process of cerebral ischemic-reperfusion injury and discussed the potentials of drug development that target NO and ONOO(-) to treat ischemic stroke. We conclude that modulation for RNS level could be an important therapeutic strategy for preventing cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  10. Antifungal Effect of Arabidopsis SGT1 Proteins via Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong-Cheol; Cheong, Mi Sun; Kim, Eun-Ji; Kim, Jin Hyo; Chi, Yong Hun; Jang, Mi-Kyeong

    2017-09-27

    The highly conserved SGT1 (suppressor of the G2 alleles of skp1) proteins from Arabidopsis are known to contribute to plant resistance to pathogens. While SGT1 proteins respond to fungal pathogens, their antifungal activity is not reported and the mechanism for this inhibition is not well understood. Therefore, recombinant Arabidopsis SGT1 proteins were cloned, expressed, and purified to evaluate their antifungal activity, resulting in their potent inhibition of pathogen growth. Dye-labeled proteins are localized to the cytosol of Candida albicans cells without the disruption of the cell membrane. Moreover, we showed that entry of the proteins into C. albicans cells resulted in the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell death via altered mitochondrial potential. Morphological changes of C. albicans cells in the presence of proteins were visualized by scanning electron microscopy. Our data suggest that AtSGT1 proteins play a critical role in plant resistance to pathogenic fungal infection and they can be classified to a new plant antifungal protein.

  11. Development of nitroxide radicals-containing polymer for scavenging reactive oxygen species from cigarette smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitomi, Toru; Kuramochi, Kazuhiro; Binh Vong, Long; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2014-06-01

    We developed a nitroxide radicals-containing polymer (NRP), which is composed of poly(4-methylstyrene) possessing nitroxide radicals as a side chain via amine linkage, to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) from cigarette smoke. In this study, the NRP was coated onto cigarette filters and its ROS-scavenging activity from streaming cigarette smoke was evaluated. The intensity of electron spin resonance signals of the NRP in the filter decreased after exposure to cigarette smoke, indicating consumption of nitroxide radicals. To evaluate the ROS-scavenging activity of the NRP-coated filter, the amount of peroxy radicals in an extract of cigarette smoke was measured using UV-visible spectrophotometry and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). The absorbance of DPPH at 517 nm decreased with exposure to cigarette smoke. When NRP-coated filters were used, the decrease in the absorbance of DPPH was prevented. In contrast, both poly[4-(cyclohexylamino)methylstyrene]- and poly(acrylic acid)-coated filters, which have no nitroxide radical, did not show any effect, indicating that the nitroxide radicals in the NRP scavenge the ROS in cigarette smoke. As a result, the extract of cigarette smoke passed through the NRP-coated filter has a lower cellular toxicity than smoke passed through poly[4-(cyclohexylamino)methylstyrene]- and poly(acrylic acid)-coated filters. Accordingly, NRP is a promising material for ROS scavenging from cigarette smoke.

  12. Fine tuning of reactive oxygen species homeostasis regulates primed immune responses in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, Victoria; Luna, Estrella; Ton, Jurriaan; Cerezo, Miguel; García-Agustín, Pilar; Flors, Victor

    2013-11-01

    Selected stimuli can prime the plant immune system for a faster and stronger defense reaction to pathogen attack. Pretreatment of Arabidopsis with the chemical agent β-aminobutyric acid (BABA) augmented H2O2 and callose production after induction with the pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) chitosan, or inoculation with the necrotrophic fungus Plectosphaerella cucumerina. However, BABA failed to prime H2O2 and callose production after challenge with the bacterial PAMP Flg22. Analysis of Arabidopsis mutants in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production (rbohD) or ROS scavenging (pad2, vtc1, and cat2) suggested a regulatory role for ROS homeostasis in priming of chitosan- and P. cucumerina-inducible callose and ROS. Moreover, rbohD and pad2 were both impaired in BABA-induced resistance against P. cucumerina. Gene expression analysis revealed direct induction of NADPH/respiratory burst oxidase protein D (RBOHD), γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase 1 (GSH1), and vitamin C defective 1 (VTC1) genes after BABA treatment. Conversely, ascorbate peroxidase 1 (APX1) transcription was repressed by BABA after challenge with chitosan or P. cucumerina, probably to provide a more oxidized environment in the cell and facilitate augmented ROS accumulation. Measuring ratios between reduced and oxidized glutathione confirmed that augmented defense expression in primed plants is associated with a more oxidized cellular status. Together, our data indicate that an altered ROS equilibrium is required for augmented defense expression in primed plants.

  13. Interaction between Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species, Heme Oxygenase, and Nitric Oxide Synthase Stimulates Phagocytosis in Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Müllebner

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMacrophages are cells of the innate immune system that populate every organ. They are required not only for defense against invading pathogens and tissue repair but also for maintenance of tissue homeostasis and iron homeostasis.AimThe aim of this study is to understand whether heme oxygenase (HO and nitric oxide synthase (NOS contribute to the regulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NOX activity and phagocytosis, two key components of macrophage function.MethodsThis study was carried out using resting J774A.1 macrophages treated with hemin or vehicle. Activity of NOS, HO, or NOX was inhibited using specific inhibitors. Reactive oxygen species (ROS formation was determined by Amplex® red assay, and phagocytosis was measured using fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled bacteria. In addition, we analyzed the fate of the intracellular heme by using electron spin resonance.ResultsWe show that both enzymes NOS and HO are essential for phagocytic activity of macrophages. NOS does not directly affect phagocytosis, but stimulates NOX activity via nitric oxide-triggered ROS production of mitochondria. Treatment of macrophages with hemin results in intracellular accumulation of ferrous heme and an inhibition of phagocytosis. In contrast to NOS, HO products, including carbon monoxide, neither clearly affect NOX activity nor clearly affect phagocytosis, but phagocytosis is accelerated by HO-mediated degradation of heme.ConclusionBoth enzymes contribute to the bactericidal activity of macrophages independently, by controlling different pathways.

  14. Brain infarction correlates more closely with acrolein than with reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Ryotaro; Park, Hyerim; Ishii, Itsuko; Yoshida, Madoka; Nishimura, Kazuhiro; Toida, Toshihiko; Tatsukawa, Hideki; Kojima, Soichi; Ikeguchi, Yoshihiko; Pegg, Anthony E; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Igarashi, Kazuei

    2011-01-28

    Although it is thought that the major factor responsible for cell damage is reactive oxygen species (ROS), our recent studies have shown that acrolein is more toxic than ROS. Thus, the relative importance of acrolein and ROS in cell damage during brain infarction was compared using photochemically induced thrombosis model mice. The levels of acrolein-conjugated albumin, and of 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE)-conjugated albumin and 8-OHdG were evaluated as indicators of damage produced by acrolein and ROS, respectively. The increase in acrolein-conjugated albumin was much greater than the increase in HNE-conjugated albumin or 8-OHdG, suggesting that acrolein is more strongly involved in cell damage than ROS during brain infarction. It was also shown that infarction led more readily to RNA damage than to DNA or phospholipid damage. As a consequence, polyamines were released from RNA, and acrolein was produced from polyamines, especially from spermine by spermine oxidase. Production of acrolein from spermine by spermine oxidase was clarified using spermine synthase-deficient Gy mice and transglutaminase 2-knockout mice, in which spermine content is negligible or spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase activity is elevated. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Acrolein activates matrix metalloproteinases by increasing reactive oxygen species in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Timothy E; Zheng, Yu-Ting; Hellmann, Jason; Conklin, Daniel J; Barski, Oleg; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2009-04-15

    Acrolein is a ubiquitous component of environmental pollutants such as automobile exhaust, cigarette, wood, and coal smoke. It is also a natural constituent of several foods and is generated endogenously during inflammation or oxidation of unsaturated lipids. Because increased inflammation and episodic exposure to acrolein-rich pollutants such as traffic emissions or cigarette smoke have been linked to acute myocardial infarction, we examined the effects of acrolein on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which destabilize atherosclerotic plaques. Our studies show that exposure to acrolein resulted in the secretion of MMP-9 from differentiated THP-1 macrophages. Acrolein-treatment of macrophages also led to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), free intracellular calcium ([Ca2+](i)), and xanthine oxidase (XO) activity. ROS production was prevented by allopurinol, but not by rotenone or apocynin and by buffering changes in [Ca2+](I) with BAPTA-AM. The increase in MMP production was abolished by pre-treatment with the antioxidants Tiron and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or with the xanthine oxidase inhibitors allopurinol or oxypurinol. Finally, MMP activity was significantly stimulated in aortic sections from apoE-null mice containing advanced atherosclerotic lesions after exposure to acrolein ex vivo. These observations suggest that acrolein exposure results in MMP secretion from macrophages via a mechanism that involves an increase in [Ca2+](I), leading to xanthine oxidase activation and an increase in ROS production. ROS-dependent activation of MMPs by acrolein could destabilize atherosclerotic lesions during brief episodes of inflammation or pollutant exposure.

  16. The role of reactive oxygen species in the degradation of lignin derived dissolved organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, Derek C.; Wozniak, Andrew S.; Cory, Rose M.; Hatcher, Patrick G.

    2017-07-01

    Evidence suggests that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important in transforming the chemical composition of the large pool of terrestrially-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) exported from land to water annually. However, due to the challenges inherent in isolating the effects of individual ROS on DOM composition, the role of ROS in the photochemical alteration of DOM remains poorly characterized. In this work, terrestrial DOM was independently exposed to singlet oxygen (1O2), and superoxide (O2-rad under controlled laboratory conditions). Using ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry to track molecular level alterations of DOM by ROS, these findings suggest exposure to 1O2 (generated using Rose Bengal and visible light) removed formulas with an O/C > 0.3, and primarily resulted in DOM comprised of formulas with higher oxygen content, while O2-rad exposure (from KO2 in DMSO) removed formulas with O/C 1.5). Comparison of DOM altered by ROS in this study to riverine and coastal DOM showed that (20-80%) overlap in formulas, providing evidence for the role of ROS in shaping the composition of DOM exported from rivers to oceans.

  17. The Role of Reactive-Oxygen-Species in Microbial Persistence and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralee Spooner

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of chronic infections caused by opportunistic pathogens are of keen interest to both researchers and health professionals globally. Typically, chronic infectious disease can be characterized by an elevation in immune response, a process that can often lead to further destruction. Reactive-Oxygen-Species (ROS have been strongly implicated in the aforementioned detrimental response by host that results in self-damage. Unlike excessive ROS production resulting in robust cellular death typically induced by acute infection or inflammation, lower levels of ROS produced by host cells are increasingly recognized to play a critical physiological role for regulating a variety of homeostatic cellular functions including growth, apoptosis, immune response, and microbial colonization. Sources of cellular ROS stimulation can include “danger-signal-molecules” such as extracellular ATP (eATP released by stressed, infected, or dying cells. Particularly, eATP-P2X7 receptor mediated ROS production has been lately found to be a key modulator for controlling chronic infection and inflammation. There is growing evidence that persistent microbes can alter host cell ROS production and modulate eATP-induced ROS for maintaining long-term carriage. Though these processes have yet to be fully understood, exploring potential positive traits of these “injurious” molecules could illuminate how opportunistic pathogens maintain persistence through physiological regulation of ROS signaling.

  18. Role of Reactive Oxygen Species and Advanced Glycation End Products in the Malfunctioning of Dental Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, M; Liu, L; Zhang, J; Liu, M

    2015-09-01

    In the last decade, dental implants have emerged as a crucial modality and serve as an individual form of therapy for dental failure. However, disparities in host responses have led to peri-implantitis and implant failure. The pathological mechanisms driving peri-implantitis remain largely unknown. In this study, we evaluated the role of oxidative stress and advanced glycation end products (AGE) in the progression of peri-implantitis and dental implants failure, compared with chronic periodontal disease. Three patient groups (peri-implantitis, chronic periodontal disease and control), each with 10 subjects (7M/3F) and average age ranging from 40-60 years were selected for analysis. Salivary oxidative stress and tissue AGE levels were analysed by probing for reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Maillard reaction-related fluorescence, respectively. We observed significant increase (> 2-fold) in oxidative stress and AGE levels in patients with peri-implantitis and chronic periodontal disease compared to controls, with chronic periodontal disease having the highest levels. In addition, we observed a strong positive correlation (r = 0.94) between oxidative stress and AGE levels in the patients. We propose that increased AGE levels and oxidative stress, although not the only pathway, are significant mediators in the pathogenesis of peri-implantitis. Altering them may potentially be used in combination with other modalities to manage peri-implantitis.

  19. The role of reactive oxygen species in the antimicrobial activity of pyochelin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan Shion Ong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The increase in prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria (ARB is currently a serious threat, thus there is a need for new antimicrobial compounds to combat infections caused by these ARB. An antimicrobial-producing bacterium, Burkholderia paludis was recently isolated and was able to produce a type of siderophore with antimicrobial properties, later identified as pyochelin. The chelating ability of pyochelin has been well-characterized but not for its antimicrobial characteristics. It was found that pyochelin had MIC values (MBC values of 3.13 µg/mL (6.26 µg/mL and 6.26 µg/mL (25.00 µg/mL against three Enterococcus strains and four Staphylococcus strains. Pyochelin was able to inhibit E. faecalis ATCC 700802 (a vancomycin-resistant strain in a time and dose dependent manner via killing kinetics assay. It was demonstrated that pyochelin enhanced the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS over time, which subsequently caused a significant increase in malondialdehyde (MDA production (a marker for lipid peroxidation and ultimately led to cell death by disrupting the integrity of the bacterial membrane (validated via BacLight assay. This study has revealed the mechanism of action of pyochelin as an antimicrobial agent for the first time and has shown that pyochelin might be able to combat infections caused by E. faecalis in the future.

  20. Targeting cancer cells with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generated by atmospheric-pressure air plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hak Jun; Kim, Kang Il; Hoan, Nguyen Ngoc; Kim, Churl Ho; Moon, Eunpyo; Choi, Kyeong Sook; Yang, Sang Sik; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2014-01-01

    The plasma jet has been proposed as a novel therapeutic method for cancer. Anticancer activity of plasma has been reported to involve mitochondrial dysfunction. However, what constituents generated by plasma is linked to this anticancer process and its mechanism of action remain unclear. Here, we report that the therapeutic effects of air plasma result from generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) including H2O2, Ox, OH-, •O2, NOx, leading to depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial ROS accumulation. Simultaneously, ROS/RNS activate c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase. As a consequence, treatment with air plasma jets induces apoptotic death in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Pretreatment of the cells with antioxidants, JNK and p38 inhibitors, or JNK and p38 siRNA abrogates the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and impairs the air plasma-induced apoptotic cell death, suggesting that the ROS/RNS generated by plasma trigger signaling pathways involving JNK and p38 and promote mitochondrial perturbation, leading to apoptosis. Therefore, administration of air plasma may be a feasible strategy to eliminate cancer cells.

  1. Hydrolase stabilization via entanglement in poly(propylene sulfide) nanoparticles: stability towards reactive oxygen species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, Brett L; Johnson, Jermaine D; Walker, Jeremy P

    2012-01-01

    In the advancement of green syntheses and sustainable reactions, enzymatic biocatalysis offers extremely high reaction rates and selectivity that goes far beyond the reach of chemical catalysts; however, these enzymes suffer from typical environmental constraints, e.g. operational temperature, pH and tolerance to oxidative environments. A common hydrolase enzyme, diisopropylfluorophosphatase (DFPase, EC 3.1.8.2), has demonstrated a pronounced efficacy for the hydrolysis of a variety of substrates for potential toxin remediation, but suffers from the aforementioned limitations. As a means to enhance DFPase’s stability in oxidative environments, enzymatic covalent immobilization within the polymeric matrix of poly(propylene sulfide) (PPS) nanoparticles was performed. By modifying the enzyme’s exposed lysine residues via thiolation, DFPase is utilized as a comonomer/crosslinker in a mild emulsion polymerization. The resultant polymeric polysulfide shell acts as a ‘sacrificial barrier’ by first oxidizing to polysulfoxides and polysulfones, rendering DFPase in an active state. DFPase–PPS nanoparticles thus retain activity upon exposure to as high as 50 parts per million (ppm) of hypochlorous acid (HOCl), while native DFPase is observed as inactive at 500 parts per billion (ppb). This trend is also confirmed by enzyme-generated (chloroperoxidase (CPO), EC 1.11.1.10) reactive oxygen species (ROS) including both HOCl (3 ppm) and ClO 2 (100 ppm). (paper)

  2. Mechanisms underlying reductant-induced reactive oxygen species formation by anticancer copper(II) compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowol, Christian R; Heffeter, Petra; Miklos, Walter; Gille, Lars; Trondl, Robert; Cappellacci, Loredana; Berger, Walter; Keppler, Bernhard K

    2012-03-01

    Intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via thiol-mediated reduction of copper(II) to copper(I) has been assumed as the major mechanism underlying the anticancer activity of copper(II) complexes. The aim of this study was to compare the anticancer potential of copper(II) complexes of Triapine (3-aminopyridine-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone; currently in phase II clinical trials) and its terminally dimethylated derivative with that of 2-formylpyridine thiosemicarbazone and that of 2,2'-bipyridyl-6-carbothioamide. Experiments on generation of oxidative stress and the influence of biologically relevant reductants (glutathione, ascorbic acid) on the anticancer activity of the copper complexes revealed that reductant-dependent redox cycling occurred mainly outside the cells, leading to generation and dismutation of superoxide radicals resulting in cytotoxic amounts of H(2)O(2). However, without extracellular reductants only weak intracellular ROS generation was observed at IC(50) levels, suggesting that cellular thiols are not involved in copper-complex-induced oxidative stress. Taken together, thiol-induced intracellular ROS generation might contribute to the anticancer activity of copper thiosemicarbazone complexes but is not the determining factor.

  3. Metabolic Reprogramming, Autophagy, and Reactive Oxygen Species Are Necessary for Primordial Germ Cell Reprogramming into Pluripotency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Sainz de la Maza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular reprogramming is accompanied by a metabolic shift from oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS toward glycolysis. Previous results from our laboratory showed that hypoxia alone is able to reprogram primordial germ cells (PGCs into pluripotency and that this action is mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1. As HIF1 exerts a myriad of actions by upregulating several hundred genes, to ascertain whether the metabolic switch toward glycolysis is solely responsible for reprogramming, PGCs were cultured in the presence of a pyruvate kinase M2 isoform (PKM2 activator, or glycolysis was promoted by manipulating PPARγ. Conversely, OXPHOS was stimulated by inhibiting PDK1 activity in normoxic or in hypoxic conditions. Inhibition or promotion of autophagy and reactive oxygen species (ROS production was performed to ascertain their role in cell reprogramming. Our results show that a metabolic shift toward glycolysis, autophagy, and mitochondrial inactivation and an early rise in ROS levels are necessary for PGC reprogramming. All of these processes are governed by HIF1/HIF2 balance and strict intermediate Oct4 levels. Histone acetylation plays a role in reprogramming and is observed under all reprogramming conditions. The pluripotent cells thus generated were unable to self-renew, probably due to insufficient Blimp1 downregulation and a lack of Klf4 and cMyc expression.

  4. Bufalin Induces Reactive Oxygen Species Dependent Bax Translocation and Apoptosis in ASTC-a-1 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Sun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bufalin has been shown to induce cancer cell death through apoptotic pathways. However, the molecular mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we used the confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM to monitor the spatio-temporal dynamics of reactive oxygen species (ROS production, Bax translocation and caspase-3 activation during bufalin-induced apoptosis in living human lung adenocarcinoma (ASTC-a-1 cells. Bufalin induced ROS production and apoptotic cell death, demonstrated by Hoechst 33258 staining as well as flow cytometry analysis. Bax redistributed from cytosol to mitochondria from 12 to 48 h after bufalin treatment in living cells expressed with green fluorescent protein Bax. Treatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC, a ROS scavenger, inhibited ROS generation and Bax translocation and led to a significant protection against bufalin-induced apoptosis. Our results also revealed that bufalin induced a prominent increase of caspase-3 activation blocked potently by NAC. Taken together, bufalin induced ROS-mediated Bax translocation, mitochondrial permeability transition and caspase-3 activation, implying that bufalin induced apoptosis via ROS-dependent mitochondrial death pathway in ASTC-a-1 cells.

  5. Detection of the Level of Reactive Oxygen Species Induced by Ionizing Radiation in Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Chung, Dong Min; Kim, Jin-Hong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    By definition, the direct effect is referred to interaction between photon and DNA molecule, whereas the indirect effect is mediated by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by radiolysis and subsequent reaction. It has been reported that ROS produced after exposure to IR can react with cellular materials such as DNA, proteins, carbohydrates and lipids. ROS is free radicals such as the superoxide anion, hydroxyl radicals and the non-radical hydrogen peroxide. Cells generate ROS during aerobic metabolism. Excessive production of ROS can lead to oxidative stress, genetic alteration and even cell death. It has been reported that ROS plays a critical role in radiation-induced cell injury. Thus, it is of great interest to determine the radiation-induced ROS level. Many kinds of methods to detect the level of ROS have been developed so far. There were random changes of fluorescence intensity in the treatment after irradiation. This result meant that this protocol was not appropriate for determination of radiation-induced ROS. On the other hand, the fluorescence intensity was increased in a dose-dependent manner when the cells were treated with the DCFH-DA solution before irradiation. Conclusions can be drawn from the experimental results of this study. In order to properly measure the ROS level in the cells exposed to ionizing radiation, the cells should be treated with the DCFH-DA solution before irradiation.

  6. Cold stress increases reactive oxygen species formation via TRPA1 activation in A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenwu; Wang, Zhonghua; Cao, Jianping; Cui, Haiyang; Ma, Zhuang

    2016-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are responsible for lung damage during inhalation of cold air. However, the mechanism of the ROS production induced by cold stress in the lung is still unclear. In this work, we measured the changes of ROS and the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c) in A549 cell. We observed that cold stress (from 20 to 5 °C) exposure of A549 cell resulted in an increase of ROS and [Ca(2+)]c, which was completely attenuated by removing Ca(2+) from medium. Further experiments showed that cold-sensing transient receptor potential subfamily member 1 (TRPA1) agonist (allyl isothiocyanate, AITC) increased the production of ROS and the level of [Ca(2+)]c in A549 cell. Moreover, HC-030031, a TRPA1 selective antagonist, significantly inhibited the enhanced ROS and [Ca(2+)]c induced by AITC or cold stimulation, respectively. Taken together, these data demonstrated that TRPA1 activation played an important role in the enhanced production of ROS induced by cold stress in A549 cell.

  7. The role of reactive oxygen species in the antimicrobial activity of pyochelin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Kuan Shion; Cheow, Yuen Lin; Lee, Sui Mae

    2017-07-01

    The increase in prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria (ARB) is currently a serious threat, thus there is a need for new antimicrobial compounds to combat infections caused by these ARB. An antimicrobial-producing bacterium, Burkholderia paludis was recently isolated and was able to produce a type of siderophore with antimicrobial properties, later identified as pyochelin. The chelating ability of pyochelin has been well-characterized but not for its antimicrobial characteristics. It was found that pyochelin had MIC values (MBC values) of 3.13 µg/mL (6.26 µg/mL) and 6.26 µg/mL (25.00 µg/mL) against three Enterococcus strains and four Staphylococcus strains. Pyochelin was able to inhibit E. faecalis ATCC 700802 (a vancomycin-resistant strain) in a time and dose dependent manner via killing kinetics assay. It was demonstrated that pyochelin enhanced the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) over time, which subsequently caused a significant increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) production (a marker for lipid peroxidation) and ultimately led to cell death by disrupting the integrity of the bacterial membrane (validated via BacLight assay). This study has revealed the mechanism of action of pyochelin as an antimicrobial agent for the first time and has shown that pyochelin might be able to combat infections caused by E. faecalis in the future.

  8. Controllable generation of reactive oxygen species by femtosecond-laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Wei; He, Hao, E-mail: haohe@tju.edu.cn; Wang, Yintao; Wang, Yisen; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Chingyue [Ultrafast Laser Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Information Technology (Ministry of Education), College of Precision Instrument and Optoelectronics Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China)

    2014-02-24

    Femtosecond lasers have been advancing Biophotonics research in the past two decades with multiphoton microscopy, microsurgery, and photodynamic therapy. Nevertheless, laser irradiation is identified to bring photodamage to cells via reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation with unclear mechanism. Meanwhile, currently in biological researches, there is no effective method to provide controllable ROS production precisely, which originally is leaked from mitochondria during respiration and plays a key role in a lot of important cellular processes and cellular signaling pathways. In this study, we show the process of how the tightly focused femtosecond-laser induces ROS generation solely in mitochondria at the very beginning and then release to cytosol if the stimulus is intense enough. At certain weak power levels, the laser pulses induce merely moderate Ca{sup 2+} release but this is necessary for the laser to generate ROS in mitochondria. Cellular original ROS are also involved with a small contribution. When the power is above a threshold, ROS are then released to cytosol, indicating photodamage overwhelming cellular repair ability. The mechanisms in those two cases are quite different. Those results clarify parts of the mechanism in laser-induced ROS generation. Hence, it is possible to further this optical scheme to provide controllable ROS generation for ROS-related biological researches including mitochondrial diseases and aging.

  9. Reactive oxygen species induction by cabazitaxel through inhibiting Sestrin-3 in castration resistant prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Takeo; Hongo, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Yasumasa; Nishimoto, Koshiro; Miyajima, Akira; Oya, Mototsugu

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production induced by taxanes in cancer cells may influence the taxane-induced cell death or the drug resistance. We investigated the correlation between the cytotoxic effect of taxanes and ROS production in human castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cell lines. Three human prostate cancer cell lines were treated with increasing concentrations of docetaxel or cabazitaxel in vitro. Cabazitaxel showed significantly higher cytotoxic efficacy than docetaxel in human CRPC cells, accompanied by elevated ROS production detected by FACS analysis. To investigate whether cabazitaxel-mediated cell death was caused by the ROS generation induced by cabazitaxel, we treated CRPC cells in the presence of antioxidant NAC. NAC reduced the cytotoxic effect induced by cabazitaxel. We found that ROS elimination by Sestrin-3 (SESN3) was significantly inhibited by cabazitaxel, but not by docetaxel. These results indicate higher sensitivity of human CRPC to cabazitaxel compared to docetaxel involves ROS production through inhibiting the expression of antioxidant enzyme SESN3. PMID:29152111

  10. Preliminary study on overproduction of reactive oxygen species by neutrophils in diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridzuan, Noridzzaida; John, Cini Mathew; Sandrasaigaran, Pratheep; Maqbool, Maryam; Liew, Lee Chuen; Lim, Jonathan; Ramasamy, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess the amount and pattern of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in diabetic patient-derived neutrophils. METHODS: Blood samples from type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients and volunteers (controls) were subjected to neutrophil isolation and the assessment of neutrophil oxidative burst using chemiluminescence assay. Neutrophils were activated by using phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and neutrophils without activation were kept as a negative control. The chemiluminescence readings were obtained by transferring cell suspension into a 1.5 mL Eppendorf tube, with PMA and luminol. Reaction mixtures were gently vortexed and placed inside luminometer for a duration of 5 min. RESULTS: Our results showed that in the resting condition, the secretion of ROS in normal non-diabetic individuals was relatively low compared to diabetic patients. However, the time scale observation revealed that the secreted ROS declined accordingly with time in non-diabetic individuals, yet such a reduction was not detected in diabetic patients where at all the time points, the secretion of ROS was maintained at similar magnitudes. This preliminary study demonstrated that ROS production was significantly higher in patients with DM compared to non-diabetic subjects in both resting and activated conditions. CONCLUSION: The respiratory burst activity of neutrophils could be affected by DM and the elevation of ROS production might be an aggravating factor in diabetic-related complications. PMID:27433296

  11. A comparative kinetic and mechanistic study between tetrahydrozoline and naphazoline toward photogenerated reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criado, Susana; García, Norman A

    2010-01-01

    Kinetic and mechanistic aspects of the vitamin B2 (riboflavin [Rf])-sensitized photo-oxidation of the imidazoline derivates (IDs) naphazoline (NPZ) and tetrahydrozoline (THZ) were investigated in aqueous solution. The process appears as important on biomedical grounds, considering that the vitamin is endogenously present in humans, and IDs are active components of ocular medicaments of topical application. Under aerobic visible light irradiation, a complex picture of competitive interactions between sensitizer, substrates and dissolved oxygen takes place: the singlet and triplet ((3)Rf*) excited states of Rf are quenched by the IDs: with IDs concentrations ca. 5.0 mM and 0.02 mM Rf, (3)Rf* is quenched by IDs, in a competitive fashion with dissolved ground state oxygen. Additionally, the reactive oxygen species: O(2)((1)Delta(g)), O(2)(*-), HO(*) and H(2)O(2), generated from (3)Rf* and Rf(*-), were detected with the employment of time-resolved methods or specific scavengers. Oxygen uptake experiments indicate that, for NPZ, only H(2)O(2) was involved in the photo-oxidation. In the case of THZ, O(2)(*-), HO(*) and H(2)O(2) were detected, whereas only HO(*) was unambiguously identified as THZ oxidative agents. Upon direct UV light irradiation NPZ and THZ generate O(2)((1)Delta(g)), with quantum yields of 0.2 (literature value, employed as a reference) and 0.08, respectively, in acetonitrile.

  12. Development of nitroxide radicals–containing polymer for scavenging reactive oxygen species from cigarette smoke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshitomi, Toru; Kuramochi, Kazuhiro; Binh Vong, Long; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    We developed a nitroxide radicals–containing polymer (NRP), which is composed of poly(4-methylstyrene) possessing nitroxide radicals as a side chain via amine linkage, to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) from cigarette smoke. In this study, the NRP was coated onto cigarette filters and its ROS-scavenging activity from streaming cigarette smoke was evaluated. The intensity of electron spin resonance signals of the NRP in the filter decreased after exposure to cigarette smoke, indicating consumption of nitroxide radicals. To evaluate the ROS-scavenging activity of the NRP-coated filter, the amount of peroxy radicals in an extract of cigarette smoke was measured using UV–visible spectrophotometry and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). The absorbance of DPPH at 517 nm decreased with exposure to cigarette smoke. When NRP-coated filters were used, the decrease in the absorbance of DPPH was prevented. In contrast, both poly[4-(cyclohexylamino)methylstyrene]- and poly(acrylic acid)-coated filters, which have no nitroxide radical, did not show any effect, indicating that the nitroxide radicals in the NRP scavenge the ROS in cigarette smoke. As a result, the extract of cigarette smoke passed through the NRP-coated filter has a lower cellular toxicity than smoke passed through poly[4-(cyclohexylamino)methylstyrene]- and poly(acrylic acid)-coated filters. Accordingly, NRP is a promising material for ROS scavenging from cigarette smoke. (papers)

  13. Diabetes-Induced Reactive Oxygen Species: Mechanism of Their Generation and Role in Renal Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhruddin, Selim; Alanazi, Wael

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes induces the onset and progression of renal injury through causing hemodynamic dysregulation along with abnormal morphological and functional nephron changes. The most important event that precedes renal injury is an increase in permeability of plasma proteins such as albumin through a damaged glomerular filtration barrier resulting in excessive urinary albumin excretion (UAE). Moreover, once enhanced UAE begins, it may advance renal injury from progression of abnormal renal hemodynamics, increased glomerular basement membrane (GBM) thickness, mesangial expansion, extracellular matrix accumulation, and glomerulosclerosis to eventual end-stage renal damage. Interestingly, all these pathological changes are predominantly driven by diabetes-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and abnormal downstream signaling molecules. In diabetic kidney, NADPH oxidase (enzymatic) and mitochondrial electron transport chain (nonenzymatic) are the prominent sources of ROS, which are believed to cause the onset of albuminuria followed by progression to renal damage through podocyte depletion. Chronic hyperglycemia and consequent ROS production can trigger abnormal signaling pathways involving diverse signaling mediators such as transcription factors, inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and vasoactive substances. Persistently, increased expression and activation of these signaling molecules contribute to the irreversible functional and structural changes in the kidney resulting in critically decreased glomerular filtration rate leading to eventual renal failure. PMID:28164134

  14. Glucocorticoids: Dose-related effects on osteoclast formation and function via reactive oxygen species and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jun; Wang, Long; Zhang, Hongyang; Jie, Qiang; Li, Xiaojie; Shi, Qiyue; Huang, Qiang; Gao, Bo; Han, Yuehu; Guo, Kai; Liu, Jian; Yang, Liu; Luo, Zhuojing

    2015-10-01

    Whether glucocorticoids directly enhance or interrupt osteoclastogenesis is still a controversial subject. In this study, we ascertained the dose-dependent positive effects of glucocorticoids on osteoclastogenesis in vivo and in vitro as well as investigated the mechanism in vitro. As the dose of glucocorticoids increased, osteoclastogenesis was stimulated at 0.1 μM, a peak was achieved at 1 μM and a corresponding decrease occurred at 10 μM. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), which play a crucial role in osteoclastogenesis, and autophagy flux activity, a cellular recycling process, were consistently up-regulated along with the dose-dependent effects of the glucocorticoids on osteoclast formation and function. N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), a ROS scavenger, abrogated the effects of the glucocorticoids on autophagy and osteoclastogenesis. Moreover, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), an autophagy inhibitor, interrupted osteoclastogenesis stimulation by the glucocorticoids. These results implied that with glucocorticoid administration, ROS and autophagy, as a downstream factor of ROS, played vital roles in osteoclast formation and function. 3-MA administration did not enhance ROS accumulation, so that autophagy had no effect on ROS induced by glucocorticoids. Our investigation demonstrated that glucocorticoids had dose-dependent positive effects on osteoclast formation and function via ROS and autophagy. These results provide support for ROS and autophagy as therapeutic targets in glucocorticoid-related bone loss diseases such as glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the induction of genetic instability by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tominaga, Hideyuki; Kodama, Seiji; Suzuki, Keiji; Watanabe, Masami; Matsuda, Naoki

    2004-01-01

    Radiation generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) that interact with cellular molecules, including DNA, lipids, and proteins. To know how ROS contribute to the induction of genetic instability, we examined the effect of the anti-ROS condition, using both ascorbic acid phosphate (APM) treatment or a low oxygen condition, on the induction of delayed reproductive cell death and delayed chromosome aberrations. The primary surviving colonies of mouse m5S-derived cl. 2011-14 cells irradiated with 6 Gy of X-rays were replated and allowed to form secondary colonies. The anti-ROS treatments were applied to either preirradiation culture or postirradiation cultures for primary or secondary colony formation. Both anti-ROS conditions relieved X-ray-induced acute cell killing to a similar extent. These anti-ROS conditions also relieved genetic instability when those conditions were applied during primary colony formation. However, no effect was observed when the conditions were applied during preirradiation culture and secondary colony formation. We also demonstrated that the amounts of ROS in X-ray-irradiated cells rapidly increase and then decrease at 6 hr postirradiation, and the levels of ROS then gradually decrease to a baseline within 2 weeks. The APM treatment kept the ROS production at a lower level than an untreated control. These results suggest that the cause of genetic instability might be fixed by ROS during a 2-week postirradiation period. (author)

  16. Reactive oxygen species scavenging ability of a new compound derived from weathered coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, J.; Ikota, N.; Shinozuka, T.; Yamaguchi, T. [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2004-09-01

    The scavenging activity of three fulvic acids (named XWCS-1, XWCS-4, and XWCS-8 according to time taken for ozonolysis) obtained by ozonolysis of humic acid extracted from Xinjiang (China) weathered coal and a fulvic acid (named XWCFA) extracted from the same coal towards reactive oxygen species such as superoxide radical (O{sub 2}.{sup -}) and hydroxyl radical (OH) was investigated with an electron spin resonance (ESR)-spin trapping method using 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) as a spin trap. O{sub 2}.{sup -} was generated with a hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase system. OH was generated by three different methods; (i) FeSO{sub 4}-hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) system, (ii) Cu(en){sub 2}-H{sub 2}O{sub 2} system, and (iii) UVB photolysis of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. At physiological pH, XWCS-1 had the greatest O{sub 2}.{sup -} scavenging activity, followed by XWCS-4, XWCS-8 and XWCFA. XWCFA had the greatest OH scavenging activity among the four fulvic acids, whereas XWCS-1 and XWCS-4 enhanced the production of .OH from a metal-catalyzed hydroxyl radical generating system, suggesting that these molecules act as prooxidants in the presence of metal ion.

  17. Regulation of radiation protective agents on cell damage induced by reactive oxygen species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Hee; Lee, Si Eun; Ju, Eun Mi; Gao, Eu Feng [Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea)

    2002-04-01

    In this study, we developed candidates of new radio-protective agents and elucidated the regulation mechanism of these candidates on cell damage induced by reactive oxygen species. The methanol extracts and ethylacetate fractions of NP-1, NP-5, NP-7, NP-11, NP-12 and NP-14 showed higher radical scavenging activity. The extracts of NP-7, NP-12 and NP-14 showed strong protective effect against oxidative damage induced by UV and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The most of samples enhanced SOD, CAT and GPX activity in V79-4 cells. The protective effect of samples on H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced apoptosis was observed with microscope and flow cytometer. Cells exposed to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} exhibit distinct morphological features of programmed cell death, such as nuclear fragmentation and increase in the percentage of cells with a sub-G1 DNA content. However, cells which was pretreated with samples significantly reduced the characteristics of apoptotic cells. Their morphological observation and DNA profiles were similar to those of the control cells. NP-14 which had excellent antioxidant activity restored G2/M arrest induced by oxidative stress. These data suggested that natural medicinal plants protected H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced apoptosis. 42 refs., 29 figs., 11 tabs. (Author)

  18. Alpha-synuclein induces lysosomal rupture and cathepsin dependent reactive oxygen species following endocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Freeman

    Full Text Available α-synuclein dysregulation is a critical aspect of Parkinson's disease pathology. Recent studies have observed that α-synuclein aggregates are cytotoxic to cells in culture and that this toxicity can be spread between cells. However, the molecular mechanisms governing this cytotoxicity and spread are poorly characterized. Recent studies of viruses and bacteria, which achieve their cytoplasmic entry by rupturing intracellular vesicles, have utilized the redistribution of galectin proteins as a tool to measure vesicle rupture by these organisms. Using this approach, we demonstrate that α-synuclein aggregates can induce the rupture of lysosomes following their endocytosis in neuronal cell lines. This rupture can be induced by the addition of α-synuclein aggregates directly into cells as well as by cell-to-cell transfer of α-synuclein. We also observe that lysosomal rupture by α-synuclein induces a cathepsin B dependent increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS in target cells. Finally, we observe that α-synuclein aggregates can induce inflammasome activation in THP-1 cells. Lysosomal rupture is known to induce mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation, both of which are well established aspects of Parkinson's disease, thus connecting these aspects of Parkinson's disease to the propagation of α-synuclein pathology in cells.

  19. Salinomycin induces autophagy in colon and breast cancer cells with concomitant generation of reactive oxygen species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berlinda Verdoodt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Salinomycin is a polyether ionophore antibiotic that has recently been shown to induce cell death in human cancer cells displaying multiple mechanisms of drug resistance. The underlying mechanisms leading to cell death after salinomycin treatment have not been well characterized. We therefore investigated the role of salinomycin in caspase dependent and independent cell death in colon cancer (SW480, SW620, RKO and breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D, MDA-MB-453. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We detected features of apoptosis in all cell lines tested, but the executor caspases 3 and 7 were only strongly activated in RKO and MDA-MB-453 cells. MCF-7 and SW620 cells instead presented features of autophagy such as cytoplasmic vacuolization and LC3 processing. Caspase proficient cell lines activated autophagy at lower salinomycin concentrations and before the onset of caspase activation. Salinomycin also led to the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS eliciting JNK activation and induction of the transcription factor JUN. Salinomycin mediated cell death could be partially inhibited by the free radical scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine, implicating ROS formation in the mechanism of salinomycin toxicity. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that, in addition to its previously reported induction of caspase dependent apoptosis, the initiation of autophagy is an important and early effect of salinomycin in tumor cells.

  20. The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS in the Biological Activities of Metallic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdal Dayem

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles (NPs possess unique physical and chemical properties that make them appropriate for various applications. The structural alteration of metallic NPs leads to different biological functions, specifically resulting in different potentials for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. The amount of ROS produced by metallic NPs correlates with particle size, shape, surface area, and chemistry. ROS possess multiple functions in cellular biology, with ROS generation a key factor in metallic NP-induced toxicity, as well as modulation of cellular signaling involved in cell death, proliferation, and differentiation. In this review, we briefly explained NP classes and their biomedical applications and describe the sources and roles of ROS in NP-related biological functions in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we also described the roles of metal NP-induced ROS generation in stem cell biology. Although the roles of ROS in metallic NP-related biological functions requires further investigation, modulation and characterization of metallic NP-induced ROS production are promising in the application of metallic NPs in the areas of regenerative medicine and medical devices.

  1. Acrolein activates matrix metalloproteinases by increasing reactive oxygen species in macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Toole, Timothy E.; Zheng Yuting; Hellmann, Jason; Conklin, Daniel J.; Barski, Oleg; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2009-01-01

    Acrolein is a ubiquitous component of environmental pollutants such as automobile exhaust, cigarette, wood, and coal smoke. It is also a natural constituent of several foods and is generated endogenously during inflammation or oxidation of unsaturated lipids. Because increased inflammation and episodic exposure to acrolein-rich pollutants such as traffic emissions or cigarette smoke have been linked to acute myocardial infarction, we examined the effects of acrolein on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which destabilize atherosclerotic plaques. Our studies show that exposure to acrolein resulted in the secretion of MMP-9 from differentiated THP-1 macrophages. Acrolein-treatment of macrophages also led to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), free intracellular calcium ([Ca 2+ ] i ), and xanthine oxidase (XO) activity. ROS production was prevented by allopurinol, but not by rotenone or apocynin and by buffering changes in [Ca 2+ ] I with BAPTA-AM. The increase in MMP production was abolished by pre-treatment with the antioxidants Tiron and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or with the xanthine oxidase inhibitors allopurinol or oxypurinol. Finally, MMP activity was significantly stimulated in aortic sections from apoE-null mice containing advanced atherosclerotic lesions after exposure to acrolein ex vivo. These observations suggest that acrolein exposure results in MMP secretion from macrophages via a mechanism that involves an increase in [Ca 2+ ] I , leading to xanthine oxidase activation and an increase in ROS production. ROS-dependent activation of MMPs by acrolein could destabilize atherosclerotic lesions during brief episodes of inflammation or pollutant exposure.

  2. Reactive oxygen species production and Brugia pahangi survivorship in Aedes polynesiensis with artificial Wolbachia infection types.

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    Elizabeth S Andrews

    Full Text Available Heterologous transinfection with the endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia has been shown previously to induce pathogen interference phenotypes in mosquito hosts. Here we examine an artificially infected strain of Aedes polynesiensis, the primary vector of Wuchereria bancrofti, which is the causative agent of Lymphatic filariasis (LF throughout much of the South Pacific. Embryonic microinjection was used to transfer the wAlbB infection from Aedes albopictus into an aposymbiotic strain of Ae. polynesiensis. The resulting strain (designated "MTB" experiences a stable artificial infection with high maternal inheritance. Reciprocal crosses of MTB with naturally infected wild-type Ae. polynesiensis demonstrate strong bidirectional incompatibility. Levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS in the MTB strain differ significantly relative to that of the wild-type, indicating an impaired ability to regulate oxidative stress. Following a challenge with Brugia pahangi, the number of filarial worms achieving the infective stage is significantly reduced in MTB as compared to the naturally infected and aposymbiotic strains. Survivorship of MTB differed significantly from that of the wild-type, with an interactive effect between survivorship and blood feeding. The results demonstrate a direct correlation between decreased ROS levels and decreased survival of adult female Aedes polynesiensis. The results are discussed in relation to the interaction of Wolbachia with ROS production and antioxidant expression, iron homeostasis and the insect immune system. We discuss the potential applied use of the MTB strain for impacting Ae. polynesiensis populations and strategies for reducing LF incidence in the South Pacific.

  3. Reactive oxygen species inactivation improves pancreatic capillary blood flow in caerulein-induced pancreatitis in rats

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    Meirelles Jr. Roberto Ferreira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Reactive oxygen species (ROS inactivation was studied to determine alterations in the pancreatic capillary blood flow (PCBF during caerulein-induced pancreatitis in rats. METHODS: A laser-Doppler flowmeter to measure PCBF and N-t-Butyl-Phenylnitrone (PBN compound to inactivate ROS were used. Forty rats were divided in groups: 1 control; 2 caerulein; 3 PBN; 4 caerulein+PBN. Serum biochemistry and histopathological analyses were performed. RESULTS: PCBF measured a mean of 109.08 ± 14.54%, 68.24 ± 10.47%, 102.18 ± 10.23% and 87.73 ± 18.72% in groups 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. PCBF in groups 2 and 4 decreased 31.75 ± 16.79% and 12.26 ± 15.24%, respectively. Serum amylase was 1323.70 ± 239.10 U/l, 2184.60 ± 700.46 U/l, 1379.80 ± 265.72 U/l and 1622.10 ± 314.60 U/l in groups 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. There was a significant difference in the PCBF and serum amylase when compared groups 2 and 4. Cytoplasmatic vacuolation was present in groups 2 and 4. Otherwise, no qualitative changes were seen. CONCLUSION: ROS inactivation improves PCBF and minimizes the serum amylase increase during caerulein-induced pancreatitis. ROS effect may be one of the leading causative events in this model of acute pancreatitis.

  4. Colloidal gold nanorings for improved photodynamic therapy through field-enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species

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    Hu, Yue; Yang, Yamin; Wang, Hongjun; Du, Henry

    2013-02-01

    Au nanostructures that exhibit strong localized surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have excellent potential for photo-medicine, among a host of other applications. Here, we report the synthesis and use of colloidal gold nanorings (GNRs) with potential for enhanced photodynamic therapy of cancer. The GNRs were fabricated via galvanic replacement reaction of sacrificial Co nanoparticles in gold salt solution with low molecular weight (Mw = 2,500) poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) as a stabilizing agent. The size and the opening of the GNRs were controlled by the size of the starting Co particles and the concentration of the gold salt. UV-Vis absorption measurements indicated the tunability of the SPR of the GNRs from 560 nm to 780 nm. MTT assay showed that GNRs were non-toxic and biocompatible when incubated with breast cancer cells as well as the healthy counterpart cells. GNRs conjugated with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) photosensitizer precursor led to elevated formation of reactive oxygen species and improved efficacy of photodynamic therapy of breast cancer cells under light irradiation compared to 5-ALA alone. These results can be attributed to significantly enhance localized electromagnetic field of the GNRs.

  5. Macrophage-derived reactive oxygen species protects against autoimmune priming with a defined polymeric adjuvant.

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    Shakya, Akhilesh Kumar; Kumar, Ashok; Holmdahl, Rikard; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the nature of adjuvants and the immune priming events in autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, is a key challenge to identify their aetiology. Adjuvants are, however, complex structures with inflammatory and immune priming properties. Synthetic polymers provide a possibility to separate these functions and allow studies of the priming mechanisms in vivo. A well-balanced polymer, poly-N-isopropyl acrylamide (PNiPAAm) mixed with collagen type II (CII) induced relatively stronger autoimmunity and arthritis compared with more hydrophilic (polyacrylamide) or hydrophobic (poly-N-isopropylacrylamide-co-poly-N-tertbutylacrylamide and poly-N-tertbutylacrylamide) polymers. Clearly, all the synthesized polymers except the more hydrophobic poly-N-tertbutylacrylamide induced arthritis, especially in Ncf1-deficient mice, which are deficient in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. We identified macrophages as the major infiltrating cells present at PNiPAAm-CII injection sites and demonstrate that ROS produced by the macrophages attenuated the immune response and the development of arthritis. Our results reveal that thermo-responsive polymers with high immune priming capacity could trigger an autoimmune response to CII and the subsequent arthritis development, in particular in the absence of NOX2 derived ROS. Importantly, ROS from macrophages protected against the autoimmune priming, demonstrating a critical regulatory role of macrophages in immune priming events. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Small molecule CP-31398 induces reactive oxygen species-dependent apoptosis in human multiple myeloma.

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    Arihara, Yohei; Takada, Kohichi; Kamihara, Yusuke; Hayasaka, Naotaka; Nakamura, Hajime; Murase, Kazuyuki; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Iyama, Satoshi; Sato, Tsutomu; Miyanishi, Koji; Kobune, Masayoshi; Kato, Junji

    2017-09-12

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are normal byproducts of a wide variety of cellular processes. ROS have dual functional roles in cancer cell pathophysiology. At low to moderate levels, ROS act as signaling transducers to activate cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and angiogenesis. In contrast, high levels of ROS induce cell death. In multiple myeloma (MM), ROS overproduction is the trigger for apoptosis induced by several anticancer compounds, including proteasome inhibitors. However, no drugs for which oxidative stress is the main mechanism of action are currently used for treatment of MM in clinical situations. In this study, we demonstrate that the p53-activating small molecule CP-31398 (CP) effectively inhibits the growth of MM cell lines and primary MM isolates from patients. CP also suppresses the growth of MM xenografts in mice. Mechanistically, CP was found to induce intrinsic apoptosis in MM cells via increasing ROS production. Interestingly, CP-induced apoptosis occurs regardless of the p53 status, suggesting that CP has additional mechanisms of action. Our findings thus indicate that CP could be an attractive candidate for treatment of MM patients harboring p53 abnormalities; this satisfies an unmet clinical need, as such individuals currently have a poor prognosis.

  7. The role of reactive oxygen species in myocardial redox signaling and regulation.

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    Moris, Demetrios; Spartalis, Michael; Tzatzaki, Eleni; Spartalis, Eleftherios; Karachaliou, Georgia-Sofia; Triantafyllis, Andreas S; Karaolanis, Georgios I; Tsilimigras, Diamantis I; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2017-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are subcellular messengers in gene regulatory and signal transduction pathways. In pathological situations, ROS accumulate due to excessive production or insufficient degradation, leading to oxidative stress (OS). OS causes oxidation of DNA, membranes, cellular lipids, and proteins, impairing their normal function and leading ultimately to cell death. OS in the heart is increased in response to ischemia/reperfusion, hypertrophy, and heart failure. The concentration of ROS is determined by their rates of production and clearance by antioxidants. Increases in OS in heart failure are primarily a result of the functional uncoupling of the respiratory chain due to inactivation of complex I. However, increased ROS in the failing myocardium may also be caused by impaired antioxidant capacity, such as decreased activity of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) or stimulation of enzymatic sources, including, cyclooxygenase, xanthine oxidase (XO), nitric oxide synthase, and nonphagocytic NAD(P)H oxidases (Noxs). Mitochondria are the main source of ROS during heart failure and aging. Increased production of ROS in the failing heart leads to mitochondrial permeability transition, which results in matrix swelling, outer membrane rupture, a release of apoptotic signaling molecules, and irreversible injury to the mitochondria. Alterations of "redox homeostasis" leads to major cellular consequences, and cellular survival requires an optimal regulation of the redox balance.

  8. Reactive oxygen species production in mitochondria of human gingival fibroblast induced by blue light irradiation.

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    Yoshida, Ayaka; Yoshino, Fumihiko; Makita, Tetsuya; Maehata, Yojiro; Higashi, Kazuyoshi; Miyamoto, Chihiro; Wada-Takahashi, Satoko; Takahashi, Shun-suke; Takahashi, Osamu; Lee, Masaichi Chang-il

    2013-12-05

    In recent years, it has become well known that the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by blue-light irradiation causes adverse effects of photo-aging, such as age-related macular degeneration of the retina. Thus, orange-tinted glasses are used to protect the retina during dental treatment involving blue-light irradiation (e.g., dental resin restorations or tooth bleaching treatments). However, there are few studies examining the effects of blue-light irradiation on oral tissue. For the first time, we report that blue-light irradiation by quartz tungsten halogen lamp (QTH) or light-emitting diode (LED) decreased cell proliferation activity of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) in a time-dependent manner (LED irradiation compared with cytotoxicity after QTH irradiation. These results suggest that blue light irradiation, especially by LED light sources used in dental aesthetic treatment, might have adverse effects on human gingival tissue. Hence, this necessitates the development of new dental aesthetic treatment methods and/or techniques to protect HGFs from blue light irradiation during dental therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. AMPK Maintains Cellular Metabolic Homeostasis through Regulation of Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species

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    Rebecca C. Rabinovitch

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are continuously produced as a by-product of mitochondrial metabolism and eliminated via antioxidant systems. Regulation of mitochondrially produced ROS is required for proper cellular function, adaptation to metabolic stress, and bypassing cellular senescence. Here, we report non-canonical regulation of the cellular energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK by mitochondrial ROS (mROS that functions to maintain cellular metabolic homeostasis. We demonstrate that mitochondrial ROS are a physiological activator of AMPK and that AMPK activation triggers a PGC-1α-dependent antioxidant response that limits mitochondrial ROS production. Cells lacking AMPK activity display increased mitochondrial ROS levels and undergo premature senescence. Finally, we show that AMPK-PGC-1α-dependent control of mitochondrial ROS regulates HIF-1α stabilization and that mitochondrial ROS promote the Warburg effect in cells lacking AMPK signaling. These data highlight a key function for AMPK in sensing and resolving mitochondrial ROS for stress resistance and maintaining cellular metabolic balance.

  10. Involvement of reactive oxygen species in cocaine-taking behaviors in rats

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    Jang, Eun Young; Ryu, Yeon-Hee; Lee, Bong Hyo; Chang, Su-Chan; Yeo, Mi Jin; Kim, Sang Hyun; Folsom, Ryan J.; Schilaty, Nathan D.; Kim, Kwang Joong; Yang, Chae Ha; Steffensen, Scott C.; Kim, Hee Young

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the development of behavioral sensitization following repeated cocaine exposure. We hypothesized that increased ROS following cocaine exposure would act as signaling molecules in the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system, which might play an important role in mediating the reinforcing effects of cocaine. The aim of this study was to evaluate cocaine enhancement of brain metabolic activity and the effects of ROS scavengers on cocaine self-administration behavior, cocaine-induced ROS production in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and cocaine enhancement of DA release in the NAc. Metabolic neural activity monitored by temperature and oxidative stress were increased in NAc following cocaine exposure. Systemic administration of the ROS scavenger N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN) or 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPOL), either pre- or post-treatment, significantly decreased cocaine self-administration without affecting food intake. Infusion of TEMPOL into the NAc inhibited cocaine self-administration. Increased oxidative stress was found mainly on neurons, but not astrocytes, microglia or oligodendrocytes, in NAc of rats self-administering cocaine. TEMPOL significantly attenuated cocaine-induced enhancement of DA release in the NAc, compared to saline controls. TEMPOL had no effect on the enhancement of DA release produced by the DA transporter inhibitor GBR12909. Taken together, these findings suggest that enhancement of ROS production in NAc neurons contributes to the reinforcing effect of cocaine. PMID:24975938

  11. Eltrombopag modulates reactive oxygen species and decreases acute myeloid leukemia cell survival.

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    Anna Kalota

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated that the small molecule thrombopoietin (TPO mimetic, eltrombopag (E, induces apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells. Here, we sought to define the mechanism of the anti-leukemic effect of eltrombopag. Our studies demonstrate that, at a concentration of 5 μM E in 2% serum, E induces apoptosis in leukemia cells by triggering PARP cleavage and activation of caspase cascades within 2-6 hours. The induction of apoptotic enzymes is critically dependent on drug concentration and the concentration of serum. This effect is not associated with an alteration in mitochondrial potential but is associated with a rapid decrease in a reactive oxygen species (ROS in particular hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. Interestingly, E also decreases mitochondrial maximal and spare respiratory capacities suggesting an induced mitochondrial dysfunction that may not be readily apparent under basal conditions but becomes manifest only under stress. Co-treatment of MOLM14 AML cells with E plus Tempol or H2O2 provides a partial rescue of cell toxicity. Ferric ammonioum citrate (FAC also antagonized the E induced toxicity, by inducing notable increase in ROS level. Overall, we propose that E dramatically decreases ROS levels leading to a disruption of AML intracellular metabolism and rapid cell death.

  12. Chronic restraint stress inhibits hair growth via substance P mediated by reactive oxygen species in mice.

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    Nan Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUNDS: Solid evidence has demonstrated that psychoemotional stress induced alteration of hair cycle through neuropeptide substance P (SP mediated immune response, the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS in brain-skin-axis regulation system remains unknown. OBJECTIVES: The present study aims to investigate possible mechanisms of ROS in regulation of SP-mast cell signal pathway in chronic restraint stress (CRS, a model of chronic psychoemotional stress which induced abnormal of hair cycle. METHODS AND RESULTS: Our results have demonstrated that CRS actually altered hair cycle by inhibiting hair follicle growth in vivo, prolonging the telogen stage and delaying subsequent anagen and catagen stage. Up-regulation of SP protein expression in cutaneous peripheral nerve fibers and activation of mast cell were observed accompanied with increase of lipid peroxidation levels and reduction of the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px in CRS mice skin. In addition, SP receptor antagonist (RP67580 reduced mast cell activations and lipid peroxidation levels as well as increased GSH-Px activity and normalized hair cycle. Furthermore, antioxidant Tempol (a free radical scavenger also restored hair cycle, reduced SP protein expression and mast cell activation. CONCLUSIONS: Our study provides the first solid evidence for how ROS play a role in regulation of psychoemotional stress induced SP-Mast cell pathway which may provide a convincing rationale for antioxidant application in clinical treatment with psychological stress induced hair loss.

  13. Roles of Reactive Oxygen Species in Anticancer Therapy with Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge

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    Yu-Chiang Hung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. We aim to provide a systematic review about the roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS in anticancer therapy with Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (Danshen. Danshen, including its lipophilic and hydrophilic constituents, is potentially beneficial for treating various cancers. The mechanisms of ROS-related anticancer effects of Danshen vary depending on the specific type of cancer cells involved. Danshen may enhance TNF-α-induced apoptosis, upregulate caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, endoplasmic reticulum stress, P21, P53, Bax/Bcl-2, DR5, and AMP-activated protein kinase, or activate the p38/JNK, mitogen-activated protein kinase, and FasL signaling pathways. Conversely, Danshen may downregulate human telomerase reverse transcriptase mRNA, telomerase, survivin, vascular endothelial growth factor/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, CD31, NF-κB, Erk1/2, matrix metalloproteinases, microtubule assembly, and receptor tyrosine kinases including epidermal growth factor receptors, HER2, and P-glycoprotein and inhibit the PI3K/Akt/mTOR or estrogen receptor signaling pathways. Therefore, Danshen may inhibit cancer cells proliferation through antioxidation on tumor initiation and induce apoptosis or autophagy through ROS generation on tumor progression, tumor promotion, and tumor metastasis. Based on the available evidence regarding its anticancer properties, this review provides new insights for further anticancer research or clinical trials with Danshen.

  14. Exploitation of reactive oxygen species by fungi: roles in host-fungus interaction and fungal development.

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    Kim, Hyo Jin

    2014-11-28

    In the past, reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been considered a harmful byproduct of aerobic metabolism. However, accumulating evidence implicates redox homeostasis, which maintains appropriate ROS levels, in cell proliferation and differentiation in plants and animals. Similarly, ROS generation and signaling are instrumental in fungal development and host-fungus interaction. In fungi, NADPH oxidase, a homolog of human gp91(phox), generates superoxide and is the main source of ROS. The mechanism of activation and signaling by NADPH oxidases in fungi appears to be largely comparable to those in plants and animals. Recent studies have shown that the fungal NADPH oxidase homologs NoxA (Nox1), NoxB (Nox2), and NoxC (Nox3) have distinct functions. In particular, these studies have consistently demonstrated the impact of NoxA on the development of fungal multicellular structures. Both NoxA and NoxB (but not NoxC) are involved in host-fungus interactions, with the function of NoxA being more critical than that of NoxB.

  15. Long-Term Alteration of Reactive Oxygen Species Led to Multidrug Resistance in MCF-7 Cells

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    Cen, Juan; Zhang, Li; Liu, Fangfang

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in multidrug resistance (MDR). This study aimed to investigate the effects of long-term ROS alteration on MDR in MCF-7 cells and to explore its underlying mechanism. Our study showed both long-term treatments of H2O2 and glutathione (GSH) led to MDR with suppressed iROS levels in MCF-7 cells. Moreover, the MDR cells induced by 0.1 μM H2O2 treatment for 20 weeks (MCF-7/ROS cells) had a higher viability and proliferative ability than the control MCF-7 cells. MCF-7/ROS cells also showed higher activity or content of intracellular antioxidants like glutathione peroxidase (GPx), GSH, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT). Importantly, MCF-7/ROS cells were characterized by overexpression of MDR-related protein 1 (MRP1) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp), as well as their regulators NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1α), and the activation of PI3K/Akt pathway in upstream. Moreover, several typical MDR mediators, including glutathione S-transferase-π (GST-π) and c-Myc and Protein Kinase Cα (PKCα), were also found to be upregulated in MCF-7/ROS cells. Collectively, our results suggest that ROS may be critical in the generation of MDR, which may provide new insights into understanding of mechanisms of MDR. PMID:28058088

  16. The epigenetic landscape related to reactive oxygen species formation in the cardiovascular system.

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    Kietzmann, Thomas; Petry, Andreas; Shvetsova, Antonina; Gerhold, Joachim M; Görlach, Agnes

    2017-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are among the leading causes of death worldwide. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can act as damaging molecules but also represent central hubs in cellular signalling networks. Increasing evidence indicates that ROS play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases, although the underlying mechanisms and consequences of pathophysiologically elevated ROS in the cardiovascular system are still not completely resolved. More recently, alterations of the epigenetic landscape, which can affect DNA methylation, post-translational histone modifications, ATP-dependent alterations to chromatin and non-coding RNA transcripts, have been considered to be of increasing importance in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. While it has long been accepted that epigenetic changes are imprinted during development or even inherited and are not changed after reaching the lineage-specific expression profile, it becomes more and more clear that epigenetic modifications are highly dynamic. Thus, they might provide an important link between the actions of ROS and cardiovascular diseases. This review will provide an overview of the role of ROS in modulating the epigenetic landscape in the context of the cardiovascular system. This article is part of a themed section on Redox Biology and Oxidative Stress in Health and Disease. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v174.12/issuetoc. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  17. Oxygen pathway modeling estimates high reactive oxygen species production above the highest permanent human habitation.

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    Isaac Cano

    Full Text Available The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS from the inner mitochondrial membrane is one of many fundamental processes governing the balance between health and disease. It is well known that ROS are necessary signaling molecules in gene expression, yet when expressed at high levels, ROS may cause oxidative stress and cell damage. Both hypoxia and hyperoxia may alter ROS production by changing mitochondrial Po2 (PmO2. Because PmO2 depends on the balance between O2 transport and utilization, we formulated an integrative mathematical model of O2 transport and utilization in skeletal muscle to predict conditions to cause abnormally high ROS generation. Simulations using data from healthy subjects during maximal exercise at sea level reveal little mitochondrial ROS production. However, altitude triggers high mitochondrial ROS production in muscle regions with high metabolic capacity but limited O2 delivery. This altitude roughly coincides with the highest location of permanent human habitation. Above 25,000 ft., more than 90% of exercising muscle is predicted to produce abnormally high levels of ROS, corresponding to the "death zone" in mountaineering.

  18. Alteration of Neutrophil Reactive Oxygen Species Production by Extracts of Devil’s Claw (Harpagophytum

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    Mbaki Muzila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Harpagophytum, Devil’s Claw, is a genus of tuberiferous xerophytic plants native to southern Africa. Some of the taxa are appreciated for their medicinal effects and have been traditionally used to relieve symptoms of inflammation. The objectives of this pilot study were to investigate the antioxidant capacity and the content of total phenols, verbascoside, isoverbascoside, and selected iridoids, as well as to investigate the capacity of various Harpagophytum taxa in suppressing respiratory burst in terms of reactive oxygen species produced by human neutrophils challenged with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA, opsonised Staphylococcus aureus, and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Harpagophytum plants were classified into different taxa according to morphology, and DNA analysis was used to confirm the classification. A putative new variety of H. procumbens showed the highest degree of antioxidative capacity. Using PMA, three Harpagophytum taxa showed anti-inflammatory effects with regard to the PBS control. A putative hybrid between H. procumbens and H. zeyheri in contrast showed proinflammatory effect on the response of neutrophils to F. nucleatum in comparison with treatment with vehicle control. Harpagophytum taxa were biochemically very variable and the response in suppressing respiratory burst differed. Further studies with larger number of subjects are needed to corroborate anti-inflammatory effects of different taxa of Harpagophytum.

  19. Oxidative Stress in the Developing Rat Brain due to Production of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species

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    Jiří Wilhelm

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress after birth led us to localize reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS production in the developing rat brain. Brains were assessed a day prenatally and on postnatal days 1, 2, 4, 8, 14, 30, and 60. Oxidation of dihydroethidium detected superoxide; 6-carboxy-2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate revealed hydrogen peroxide; immunohistochemical proof of nitrotyrosine and carboxyethyllysine detected peroxynitrite formation and lipid peroxidation, respectively. Blue autofluorescence detected protein oxidation. The foetuses showed moderate RONS production, which changed cyclically during further development. The periods and sites of peak production of individual RONS differed, suggesting independent generation. On day 1, neuronal/glial RONS production decreased indicating that increased oxygen concentration after birth did not cause oxidative stress. Dramatic changes in the amount and the sites of RONS production occurred on day 4. Nitrotyrosine detection reached its maximum. Day 14 represented other vast alterations in RONS generation. Superoxide production in arachnoidal membrane reached its peak. From this day on, the internal elastic laminae of blood vessels revealed the blue autofluorescence. The adult animals produced moderate levels of superoxide; all other markers reached their minimum. There was a strong correlation between detection of nitrotyrosine and carboxyethyllysine probably caused by lipid peroxidation initiated with RONS.

  20. Nitric Oxide and Reactive Oxygen Species in the Pathogenesis of Preeclampsia

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    Keiichi Matsubara

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia (PE is characterized by disturbed extravillous trophoblast migration toward uterine spiral arteries leading to increased uteroplacental vascular resistance and by vascular dysfunction resulting in reduced systemic vasodilatory properties. Its pathogenesis is mediated by an altered bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO and tissue damage caused by increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Furthermore, superoxide (O2− rapidly inactivates NO and forms peroxynitrite (ONOO−. It is known that ONOO− accumulates in the placental tissues and injures the placental function in PE. In addition, ROS could stimulate platelet adhesion and aggregation leading to intravascular coagulopathy. ROS-induced coagulopathy causes placental infarction and impairs the uteroplacental blood flow in PE. The disorders could lead to the reduction of oxygen and nutrients required for normal fetal development resulting in fetal growth restriction. On the other hand, several antioxidants scavenge ROS and protect tissues against oxidative damage. Placental antioxidants including catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx protect the vasculature from ROS and maintain the vascular function. However, placental ischemia in PE decreases the antioxidant activity resulting in further elevated oxidative stress, which leads to the appearance of the pathological conditions of PE including hypertension and proteinuria. Oxidative stress is defined as an imbalance between ROS and antioxidant activity. This review provides new insights about roles of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of PE.

  1. Thrombopoietin (TPO) regulates HIF-1alpha levels through generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species.

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    Yoshida, Kozue; Kirito, Keita; Yongzhen, Hu; Ozawa, Keiya; Kaushansky, Kenneth; Komatsu, Norio

    2008-07-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1 is a master transcriptional regulator mediating the cellular adaptation to hypoxia. In addition, HIF-1 is also vital for the development of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). In a previous study we found that thrombopoietin (TPO), an important and non-redundant cytokine for HSC maintenance and expansion, induces HIF-1alpha expression in HSCs by enhancing the stability of HIF-1alpha under normoxic conditions. However, the molecular mechanisms of these effects are not yet fully understood. In this study, we explored the mechanisms and found that TPO-induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) played a crucial role in stabilization of HIF-1. Both ROS scavengers and inhibitors of mitochondrial electron transport completely blocked HIF-1alpha induction by TPO in UT-7/TPO cells and in primary immature mouse bone marrow cells. We also found that TPO-induced HIF-1alpha induction was tightly coupled with glucose metabolism. Inhibition of glucose transporter or glycolytic enzyme blocked HIF-1alpha elevation of TPO. These results indicate that TPO induces HIF-1alpha expression in a manner very similar to that of hypoxia.

  2. Reactive Oxygen Species Regulate the Inflammatory Function of NKT Cells through Promyelocytic Leukemia Zinc Finger.

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    Kim, Yeung-Hyen; Kumar, Ajay; Chang, Cheong-Hee; Pyaram, Kalyani

    2017-11-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are byproducts of aerobic metabolism and contribute to both physiological and pathological conditions as second messengers. ROS are essential for activation of T cells, but how ROS influence NKT cells is unknown. In the present study, we investigated the role of ROS in NKT cell function. We found that NKT cells, but not CD4 or CD8 T cells, have dramatically high ROS in the spleen and liver of mice but not in the thymus or adipose tissues. Accordingly, ROS-high NKT cells exhibited increased susceptibility and apoptotic cell death with oxidative stress. High ROS in the peripheral NKT cells were primarily produced by NADPH oxidases and not mitochondria. We observed that sorted ROS-high NKT cells were enriched in NKT1 and NKT17 cells, whereas NKT2 cells were dominant in ROS-low cells. Furthermore, treatment of NKT cells with antioxidants led to reduced frequencies of IFN-γ- and IL-17-expressing cells, indicating that ROS play a role in regulating the inflammatory function of NKT cells. The transcription factor promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) seemed to control the ROS levels. NKT cells from adipose tissues that do not express PLZF and those from PLZF haplodeficient mice have low ROS. Conversely, ROS were highly elevated in CD4 T cells from mice ectopically expressing PLZF. Thus, our findings demonstrate that PLZF controls ROS levels, which in turn governs the inflammatory function of NKT cells. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. Controllable generation of reactive oxygen species by femtosecond-laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Wei; He, Hao; Wang, Yintao; Wang, Yisen; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Chingyue

    2014-01-01

    Femtosecond lasers have been advancing Biophotonics research in the past two decades with multiphoton microscopy, microsurgery, and photodynamic therapy. Nevertheless, laser irradiation is identified to bring photodamage to cells via reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation with unclear mechanism. Meanwhile, currently in biological researches, there is no effective method to provide controllable ROS production precisely, which originally is leaked from mitochondria during respiration and plays a key role in a lot of important cellular processes and cellular signaling pathways. In this study, we show the process of how the tightly focused femtosecond-laser induces ROS generation solely in mitochondria at the very beginning and then release to cytosol if the stimulus is intense enough. At certain weak power levels, the laser pulses induce merely moderate Ca 2+ release but this is necessary for the laser to generate ROS in mitochondria. Cellular original ROS are also involved with a small contribution. When the power is above a threshold, ROS are then released to cytosol, indicating photodamage overwhelming cellular repair ability. The mechanisms in those two cases are quite different. Those results clarify parts of the mechanism in laser-induced ROS generation. Hence, it is possible to further this optical scheme to provide controllable ROS generation for ROS-related biological researches including mitochondrial diseases and aging

  4. Controllable generation of reactive oxygen species by femtosecond-laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei; He, Hao; Wang, Yintao; Wang, Yisen; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Chingyue

    2014-02-01

    Femtosecond lasers have been advancing Biophotonics research in the past two decades with multiphoton microscopy, microsurgery, and photodynamic therapy. Nevertheless, laser irradiation is identified to bring photodamage to cells via reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation with unclear mechanism. Meanwhile, currently in biological researches, there is no effective method to provide controllable ROS production precisely, which originally is leaked from mitochondria during respiration and plays a key role in a lot of important cellular processes and cellular signaling pathways. In this study, we show the process of how the tightly focused femtosecond-laser induces ROS generation solely in mitochondria at the very beginning and then release to cytosol if the stimulus is intense enough. At certain weak power levels, the laser pulses induce merely moderate Ca2+ release but this is necessary for the laser to generate ROS in mitochondria. Cellular original ROS are also involved with a small contribution. When the power is above a threshold, ROS are then released to cytosol, indicating photodamage overwhelming cellular repair ability. The mechanisms in those two cases are quite different. Those results clarify parts of the mechanism in laser-induced ROS generation. Hence, it is possible to further this optical scheme to provide controllable ROS generation for ROS-related biological researches including mitochondrial diseases and aging.

  5. (±)-2-Chloropropionic acid elevates reactive oxygen species formation in human neutrophil granulocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aam, B.B.; Fonnum, F.

    2006-01-01

    (±)-2-Chloropropionic acid (2-CPA) is a neurotoxic compound which kills cerebellar granule cells in vivo, and makes cerebellar granule cells in vitro produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). We have studied the effect of 2-CPA on ROS formation in human neutrophil granulocytes in vitro. We found an increased formation of ROS after 2-CPA exposure using three different methods; the fluorescent probe DCFH-DA and the chemiluminescent probes lucigenin and luminol. Four different inhibitors of ROS formation were tested on the cells in combination with 2-CPA to characterize the signalling pathways. The spin-trap s-PBN, the ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 and the antioxidant Vitamin E inhibited the 2-CPA-induced ROS formation completely, while the mitochondrial transition permeability pore blocker cyclosporine A inhibited the ROS formation partly. We also found that 2-CPA induced an increased nitric oxide production in the cells by using the Griess reagent. The level of reduced glutathione, measured with the DTNB assay, was decreased after exposure to high concentrations of 2-CPA. Western blotting analysis showed that 2-CPA exposure led to an elevated phosphorylation of ERK MAP kinase. This phosphorylation was inhibited by U0126. Based on these experiments it seems like the mechanisms for 2-CPA induced toxicity involves ROS formation and is similar in neutrophil granulocytes as earlier shown in cerebellar granule cells. This also implies that 2-CPA may be immunotoxic

  6. Plasmonic photocatalyst-like fluorescent proteins for generating reactive oxygen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leem, Jung Woo; Kim, Seong-Ryul; Choi, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Young L.

    2018-03-01

    The recent advances in photocatalysis have opened a variety of new possibilities for energy and biomedical applications. In particular, plasmonic photocatalysis using hybridization of semiconductor materials and metal nanoparticles has recently facilitated the rapid progress in enhancing photocatalytic efficiency under visible or solar light. One critical underlying aspect of photocatalysis is that it generates and releases reactive oxygen species (ROS) as intermediate or final products upon light excitation or activation. Although plasmonic photocatalysis overcomes the limitation of UV irradiation, synthesized metal/semiconductor nanomaterial photocatalysts often bring up biohazardous and environmental issues. In this respect, this review article is centered in identifying natural photosensitizing organic materials that can generate similar types of ROS as those of plasmonic photocatalysis. In particular, we propose the idea of plasmonic photocatalyst-like fluorescent proteins for ROS generation under visible light irradiation. We recapitulate fluorescent proteins that have Type I and Type II photosensitization properties in a comparable manner to plasmonic photocatalysis. Plasmonic photocatalysis and protein photosensitization have not yet been compared systemically in terms of ROS photogeneration under visible light, although the phototoxicity and cytotoxicity of some fluorescent proteins are well recognized. A comprehensive understanding of plasmonic photocatalyst-like fluorescent proteins and their potential advantages will lead us to explore new environmental, biomedical, and defense applications.

  7. Alpha-particles microbeam irradiation: impact of reactive oxygen species in bystander effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanot, M.

    2008-11-01

    Ionizing radiation-induced bystander effects arise in bystander cells that receive signals from directly irradiated cells. To date, free radicals are believed to play an active role in the bystander response, but this is incompletely characterized. To mark temporal and spatial impacts of bystander effect, we employed a precise α-particle microbeam to target a small fraction of sub-confluent osteoblastic cell cultures (MC3T3-E1). We identified the cellular membrane and mitochondria like two distinct places generating reactive oxygen species. The global oxidative stress observed after irradiation was significantly attenuated after filipin treatment, evidencing the pivotal role of membrane in MC3T3-E1 cells bystander response. To determine impact of bystander effect at a cell level, cellular consequences of this membrane-dependant bystander effect were then investigated. A variable fraction of the cell population (10 to 100%) was individually targeted. In this case, mitotic death and micronuclei yield both increased in bystander cells as well as in targeted cells demonstrating a role of bystander signals between irradiated cells in an autocrine or paracrine manner. Our results indicate a complex interaction of direct irradiation and bystander signals that lead to a membrane-dependant amplification of cell responses. (author)

  8. Angiotensin II induces human astrocyte senescence through reactive oxygen species production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Hosomi, Naohisa; Hitomi, Hirofumi; Pelisch, Nicolas; Fu, Hua; Masugata, Hisashi; Murao, Koji; Ueno, Masaki; Matsumoto, Masayasu; Nishiyama, Akira

    2011-04-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced astrocyte senescence may be involved in cerebral ischemic injury and age-associated neurodegenerative disease. This study was conducted to determine the roles of reactive oxygen species production in Ang II-induced cellular senescence in cultured human astrocytes. Human astrocytes were stimulated with Ang II either with or without an angiotensin type 1 receptor blocker, CV11974, or an antioxidant, tempol. Application of Ang II to human astrocytes resulted in a concentration-dependent increase in staining for dihydroethidium. Ang II (100 nM for 30 min) increased the translocation of two cytosolic components of NADPH oxidase, p47phox and p67phox, to the cell membrane and formation of the complex of p47phox, p67phox and p22phox. Ang II concentration-dependently induced an increase in β-galactosidase staining. Pretreatment with CV11974 (100 nM) or tempol (3 mM) abolished Ang II-induced astrocyte β-galactosidase staining. Moreover, Ang II significantly upregulated p16 mRNA expression, which was inhibited by pretreatment with CV11974 or tempol. These findings indicate that superoxide production contributes to Ang II-induced astrocyte senescence.

  9. Hyperthermia Induces Apoptosis through Endoplasmic Reticulum and Reactive Oxygen Species in Human Osteosarcoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Han Hou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma (OS is a relatively rare form of cancer, but OS is the most commonly diagnosed bone cancer in children and adolescents. Chemotherapy has side effects and induces drug resistance in OS. Since an effective adjuvant therapy was insufficient for treating OS, researching novel and adequate remedies is critical. Hyperthermia can induce cell death in various cancer cells, and thus, in this study, we investigated the anticancer method of hyperthermia in human OS (U-2 OS cells. Treatment at 43 °C for 60 min induced apoptosis in human OS cell lines, but not in primary bone cells. Furthermore, hyperthermia was associated with increases of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS and caspase-3 activation in U-2 OS cells. Mitochondrial dysfunction was followed by the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria, and was accompanied by decreased anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, and increased pro-apoptotic proteins Bak and Bax. Hyperthermia triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, which was characterized by changes in cytosolic calcium levels, as well as increased calpain expression and activity. In addition, cells treated with calcium chelator (BAPTA-AM blocked hyperthermia-induced cell apoptosis in U-2 OS cells. In conclusion, hyperthermia induced cell apoptosis substantially via the ROS, ER stress, mitochondria, and caspase pathways. Thus, hyperthermia may be a novel anticancer method for treating OS.

  10. Exposure to ultrafine particles, intracellular production of reactive oxygen species in leukocytes and altered levels of endothelial progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantzen, Kim; Møller, Peter; Karottki, Dorina Gabriela; Olsen, Yulia; Bekö, Gabriel; Clausen, Geo; Hersoug, Lars-Georg; Loft, Steffen

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to particles in the fine and ultrafine size range has been linked to induction of low-grade systemic inflammation, oxidative stress and development of cardiovascular diseases. Declining levels of endothelial progenitor cells within systemic circulation have likewise been linked to progression of cardiovascular diseases. The objective was to determine if exposure to fine and ultrafine particles from indoor and outdoor sources, assessed by personal and residential indoor monitoring, is associated with altered levels of endothelial progenitor cells, and whether such effects are related to leukocyte-mediated oxidative stress. The study utilized a cross sectional design performed in 58 study participants from a larger cohort. Levels of circulating endothelial progenitor cells, defined as either late (CD34(+)KDR(+) cells) or early (CD34(+)CD133(+)KDR(+) cells) subsets were measured using polychromatic flow cytometry. We additionally measured production of reactive oxygen species in leukocyte subsets (lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes) by flow cytometry using intracellular 2',7'-dichlorofluoroscein. The measurements encompassed both basal levels of reactive oxygen species production and capacity for reactive oxygen species production for each leukocyte subset. We found that the late endothelial progenitor subset was negatively associated with levels of ultrafine particles measured within the participant residences and with reactive oxygen species production capacity in lymphocytes. Additionally, the early endothelial progenitor cell levels were positively associated with a personalised measure of ultrafine particle exposure and negatively associated with both basal and capacity for reactive oxygen species production in lymphocytes and granulocytes, respectively. Our results indicate that exposure to fine and ultrafine particles derived from indoor sources may have adverse effects on human vascular health. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier

  11. Induction of prophage lambda by chlorinated organics: Detection of some single-species/single-site carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMarini, D.M.; Brooks, H.G. (Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Twenty-eight chlorinated organic compounds were evaluated for their ability to induce DNA damage using the Microscreen prophage-induction assay in Escherichia coli. Comparison of the performance characteristics of the prophage-induction and Salmonella assays to rodent carcinogenicity assays showed that the prophage-induction assay had a somewhat higher specificity than did the Salmonella assay (70% vs. 50%); sensitivity, concordance, and positive and negative predictivity were similar for the two microbial assays. The Microscreen prophage-induction assay failed to detect eight carcinogens, perhaps due to toxicity or other unknown factors; five of these eight carcinogens were detected by the Salmonella assay. However, the prophage-induction assay did detect six carcinogens that were not detected by the Salmonella assay, and five of these were single-species, single-site carcinogens, mostly mouse liver carcinogens. Some of these carcinogens, such as the chloroethanes, produce free radicals, which may be the basis for their carcinogenicity and ability to induce prophage. The prophage-induction (or other SOS) assay may be useful in identifying some genotoxic chlorinated carcinogens that induce DNA damage that do not revert the standard Salmonella tester strains.

  12. Annato extract and β-carotene modulate the production of reactive oxygen species/nitric oxide in neutrophils from diabetic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossoni-Júnior, Joamyr Victor; Araújo, Glaucy Rodrigues; Pádua, Bruno da Cruz; Chaves, Míriam Martins; Pedrosa, Maria Lúcia; Silva, Marcelo Eustáquio; Costa, Daniela Caldeira

    2012-01-01

    Annatto has been identified as carotenoids that have antioxidative effects. It is well known that one of the key elements in the development of diabetic complications is oxidative stress. The immune system is especially vulnerable to oxidative damage because many immune cells, such as neutrophils, produce reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species as part of the body’s defense mechanisms to destroy invading pathogens. Reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species are excessively produced by active peripheral neutrophils, and may damage essential cellular components, which in turn can cause vascular complications in diabetes. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the possible protective effects of annatto on the reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide (NO) inhibition in neutrophils from alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Adult female rats were divided into six groups based on receiving either a standard diet with or without supplementation of annatto extract or beta carotene. All animals were sacrificed 30 days after treatment and the neutrophils were isolated using two gradients of different densities. The reactive oxygen species and NO were quantified by a chemiluminescence and spectrophotometric assays, respectively. Our results show that neutrophils from diabetic animals produce significantly more reactive oxygen species and NO than their respective controls and that supplementation with beta carotene and annatto is able to modulate the production of these species. Annatto extract may have therapeutic potential for modulation of the balance reactive oxygen species/NO induced by diabetes. PMID:22573917

  13. Annato extract and β-carotene modulate the production of reactive oxygen species/nitric oxide in neutrophils from diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossoni-Júnior, Joamyr Victor; Araújo, Glaucy Rodrigues; Pádua, Bruno da Cruz; Chaves, Míriam Martins; Pedrosa, Maria Lúcia; Silva, Marcelo Eustáquio; Costa, Daniela Caldeira

    2012-05-01

    Annatto has been identified as carotenoids that have antioxidative effects. It is well known that one of the key elements in the development of diabetic complications is oxidative stress. The immune system is especially vulnerable to oxidative damage because many immune cells, such as neutrophils, produce reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species as part of the body's defense mechanisms to destroy invading pathogens. Reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species are excessively produced by active peripheral neutrophils, and may damage essential cellular components, which in turn can cause vascular complications in diabetes. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the possible protective effects of annatto on the reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide (NO) inhibition in neutrophils from alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Adult female rats were divided into six groups based on receiving either a standard diet with or without supplementation of annatto extract or beta carotene. All animals were sacrificed 30 days after treatment and the neutrophils were isolated using two gradients of different densities. The reactive oxygen species and NO were quantified by a chemiluminescence and spectrophotometric assays, respectively. Our results show that neutrophils from diabetic animals produce significantly more reactive oxygen species and NO than their respective controls and that supplementation with beta carotene and annatto is able to modulate the production of these species. Annatto extract may have therapeutic potential for modulation of the balance reactive oxygen species/NO induced by diabetes.

  14. Overview of Reactive Halogen Species in the Marine Boundary Layer observed with different DOAS techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampel, Johannes; Tschritter, Jens; Pöhler, Denis; Großmann, Katja; Horbanski, Martin; Frieß, Udo; Platt, Ulrich

    2014-05-01

    Reactive halogen species (RHS) in the in the marine boundary layer have the potential to influence the ozone budget on a global scale, but their release processes are partly uncertain and measurements on global scale with the required precision are rare. Their direct dependence on halogenated compounds as precursors is uncertain as well as the precursors' fluxes. To clarify these interdependencies various campaigns during the last years with a broad range of different measured species were performed in the Mauretanian Upwelling, Cape Verde and the eastern tropical Pacific between 2009 and 2014 mostly within the SOPRAN project (BMBF Förderkennzeichen 03F0611F). They are used to obtain a picture of the global distribution of reactive halogen species (RHS) in the marine boundary layer (MBL) and their driving mechanisms. Cavity-Enhanced (CE) and MAX-DOAS measurements were performed on several ship and land campaigns. In the later case they were also accompanied by Longpath (LP)-DOAS measurements. An overview of the measurement results will be presented. Iodine monoxide measurements over the open tropical ocean show agreement for different measurements, most measurement techniques and different campaigns. Especially during SOPRAN M91 in the Peruvian upwelling region very good agreement for MAX-DOAS and CE-DOAS inferred IO mixing ratios was found. The good agreement between the retrieved NO2 and water vapor mixing ratios of the MAX-DOAS and CE-DOAS measurements further confirms the applied aerosol and trace gas retrieval. Values for BrO volume mixing ratios in the marine boundary layer apart from so-called 'BrO-events' in the upwelling regions of the eastern tropical Atlantic remain challenging. The limiting factors were often not instrumental limitations, but could rather be found in measurement errors of literature cross-sections and the way in which spectral data was analyzed. For coastal studies on Cape Verde LP-DOAS measurements as well as MAX-DOAS measurements

  15. Development, characterization and first deployment of an improved online reactive oxygen species analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Bruns, Emily A.; Zotter, Peter; Stefenelli, Giulia; Prévôt, André S. H.; Baltensperger, Urs; El-Haddad, Imad; Dommen, Josef

    2018-01-01

    Inhalation of atmospheric particles is linked to human diseases. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) present in these atmospheric aerosols may play an important role. However, the ROS content in aerosols and their formation pathways are still largely unknown. Here, we have developed an online and offline ROS analyzer using a 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin (DCFH) based assay. The ROS analyzer was calibrated with H2O2 and its sensitivity was characterized using a suite of model organic compounds. The instrument detection limit determined as 3 times the noise is 1.3 nmol L-1 for offline analysis and 2 nmol m-3 of sampled air when the instrument is operated online at a fluorescence response time of approximately 8 min, while the offline method detection limit is 18 nmol L-1. Potential interferences from gas-phase O3 and NO2 as well as matrix effects of particulate SO42- and NO3- were tested, but not observed. Fe3+ had no influence on the ROS signal, while soluble Fe2+ reduced it if present at high concentrations in the extracts. Both online and offline methods were applied to identify the ROS content of different aerosol types, i.e., ambient aerosols as well as fresh and aged aerosols from wood combustion emissions. The stability of the ROS was assessed by comparing the ROS concentration measured by the same instrumentation online in situ with offline measurements. We also analyzed the evolution of ROS in specific samples by conducting the analysis after storage times of up to 4 months. The ROS were observed to decay with increasing storage duration. From their decay behavior, ROS in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can be separated into short- and long-lived fractions. The half-life of the short-lived fraction was 1.7 ± 0.4 h, while the half-life of the long-lived fraction could not be determined with our uncertainties. All these measurements showed consistently that on average 60 ± 20 % of the ROS were very reactive and disappeared during the filter storage time. This

  16. Development, characterization and first deployment of an improved online reactive oxygen species analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zhou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhalation of atmospheric particles is linked to human diseases. Reactive oxygen species (ROS present in these atmospheric aerosols may play an important role. However, the ROS content in aerosols and their formation pathways are still largely unknown. Here, we have developed an online and offline ROS analyzer using a 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescin (DCFH based assay. The ROS analyzer was calibrated with H2O2 and its sensitivity was characterized using a suite of model organic compounds. The instrument detection limit determined as 3 times the noise is 1.3 nmol L−1 for offline analysis and 2 nmol m−3 of sampled air when the instrument is operated online at a fluorescence response time of approximately 8 min, while the offline method detection limit is 18 nmol L−1. Potential interferences from gas-phase O3 and NO2 as well as matrix effects of particulate SO42− and NO3− were tested, but not observed. Fe3+ had no influence on the ROS signal, while soluble Fe2+ reduced it if present at high concentrations in the extracts. Both online and offline methods were applied to identify the ROS content of different aerosol types, i.e., ambient aerosols as well as fresh and aged aerosols from wood combustion emissions. The stability of the ROS was assessed by comparing the ROS concentration measured by the same instrumentation online in situ with offline measurements. We also analyzed the evolution of ROS in specific samples by conducting the analysis after storage times of up to 4 months. The ROS were observed to decay with increasing storage duration. From their decay behavior, ROS in secondary organic aerosol (SOA can be separated into short- and long-lived fractions. The half-life of the short-lived fraction was 1.7 ± 0.4 h, while the half-life of the long-lived fraction could not be determined with our uncertainties. All these measurements showed consistently that on average 60 ± 20 % of the ROS were very reactive and

  17. Comparison of stainless and mild steel welding fumes in generation of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Stephen S; Chen, Bean T; Stone, Samuel G; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Kenyon, Allison J; Frazer, David; Antonini, James M

    2010-11-03

    Welding fumes consist of a wide range of complex metal oxide particles which can be deposited in all regions of the respiratory tract. The welding aerosol is not homogeneous and is generated mostly from the electrode/wire. Over 390,000 welders were reported in the U.S. in 2008 while over 1 million full-time welders were working worldwide. Many health effects are presently under investigation from exposure to welding fumes. Welding fume pulmonary effects have been associated with bronchitis, metal fume fever, cancer and functional changes in the lung. Our investigation focused on the generation of free radicals and reactive oxygen species from stainless and mild steel welding fumes generated by a gas metal arc robotic welder. An inhalation exposure chamber located at NIOSH was used to collect the welding fume particles. Our results show that hydroxyl radicals (.OH) were generated from reactions with H2O2 and after exposure to cells. Catalase reduced the generation of .OH from exposed cells indicating the involvement of H2O2. The welding fume suspension also showed the ability to cause lipid peroxidation, effect O2 consumption, induce H2O2 generation in cells, and cause DNA damage. Increase in oxidative damage observed in the cellular exposures correlated well with .OH generation in size and type of welding fumes, indicating the influence of metal type and transition state on radical production as well as associated damage. Our results demonstrate that both types of welding fumes are able to generate ROS and ROS-related damage over a range of particle sizes; however, the stainless steel fumes consistently showed a significantly higher reactivity and radical generation capacity. The chemical composition of the steel had a significant impact on the ROS generation capacity with the stainless steel containing Cr and Ni causing more damage than the mild steel. Our results suggest that welding fumes may cause acute lung injury. Since type of fume generated, particle size

  18. Comparison of stainless and mild steel welding fumes in generation of reactive oxygen species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frazer David

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Welding fumes consist of a wide range of complex metal oxide particles which can be deposited in all regions of the respiratory tract. The welding aerosol is not homogeneous and is generated mostly from the electrode/wire. Over 390,000 welders were reported in the U.S. in 2008 while over 1 million full-time welders were working worldwide. Many health effects are presently under investigation from exposure to welding fumes. Welding fume pulmonary effects have been associated with bronchitis, metal fume fever, cancer and functional changes in the lung. Our investigation focused on the generation of free radicals and reactive oxygen species from stainless and mild steel welding fumes generated by a gas metal arc robotic welder. An inhalation exposure chamber located at NIOSH was used to collect the welding fume particles. Results Our results show that hydroxyl radicals (.OH were generated from reactions with H2O2 and after exposure to cells. Catalase reduced the generation of .OH from exposed cells indicating the involvement of H2O2. The welding fume suspension also showed the ability to cause lipid peroxidation, effect O2 consumption, induce H2O2 generation in cells, and cause DNA damage. Conclusion Increase in oxidative damage observed in the cellular exposures correlated well with .OH generation in size and type of welding fumes, indicating the influence of metal type and transition state on radical production as well as associated damage. Our results demonstrate that both types of welding fumes are able to generate ROS and ROS-related damage over a range of particle sizes; however, the stainless steel fumes consistently showed a significantly higher reactivity and radical generation capacity. The chemical composition of the steel had a significant impact on the ROS generation capacity with the stainless steel containing Cr and Ni causing more damage than the mild steel. Our results suggest that welding fumes may cause acute

  19. Development and application of a sampling method for the determination of reactive halogen species in volcanic gas emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüdiger, Julian; Bobrowski, Nicole; Liotta, Marcello; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2017-04-01

    Volcanoes are a potential large source of several reactive atmospheric trace gases including sulfur and halogen containing species. Besides the importance for atmospheric chemistry, the detailed knowledge of halogen chemistry in volcanic plumes can help to get insights into subsurface processes. In this study a gas diffusion denuder sampling method, using a 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene (1,3,5-TMB) coating for the derivatization of reactive halogen species (RHS), was characterized by dilution chamber experiments. The coating proved to be suitable to collect selectively gaseous bromine species with oxidation states (OS) of +1 or 0 (such as Br2, BrCl, BrO(H) and BrONO2), while being ignorant to HBr (OS -1). The reaction of 1,3,5-TMB with reactive bromine species gives 1-bromo-2,4,6-trimethoxybenzene (1-bromo-2,4,6-TMB) - other halogens give corresponding products. Solvent elution of the derivatized analytes and subsequent analysis with gas chromatography mass spectrometry gives detection limits of 10 ng or less for Br2, Cl2, and I2. In 2015 the method was applied on volcanic gas plumes at Mt. Etna (Italy) giving reactive bromine mixing ratios from 0.8 ppbv to 7.0 ppbv. Total bromine mixing ratios of 4.7 ppbv to 27.5 ppbv were obtained by simultaneous alkaline trap sampling (by a Raschig-tube) followed by analysis with ion chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. This leads to the first results of in-situ measured reactive bromine to total bromine ratios, spanning a range between 12±1 % and 36±2 %. Our finding is in an agreement with previous model studies, which imply values < 44 % for plume ages < 1 minute, which is consistent with the assumed plume age at the sampling sites.

  20. AKTIVITAS REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES MAKROFAG AKIBAT STIMULASI GEL LIDAH BUAYA PADA INFEKSI Salmonella typhimurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Susanti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS merupakan salah satu lethal chemical yang dapatmembunuh dan mengeliminasi bakteri pada sel fagosit. Lidah Buaya (Aloevera banyak dipakai sebagai pengobatan tradisional, tetapi belum ada buktiilmiah sampai tingkat seluler apalagi subseluler dalam hal efek imunostimulanpada penyakit infeksi. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui aktivitasimunostimulan dari gel lidah buaya yang ditunjukkan oleh aktivitas ROS makrofagsecara in vivo terhadap infeksi bakteri patogen Salmonella typhimurium. Sebanyak24 ekor mencit BABL/c betina umur 8-10 minggu berat 20-30 gram dikelompokkansecara acak menjadi empat kelompok, masing-masing kelompok enam ekor.Kelompok kontrol tidak diberi gel Aloe vera, sementara kelompok P1, P2, dan P3berturut-turut diberi gel Aloe vera 0,5 ml/ekor/hari; 1,0 ml/ekor/hari, dan 1,5ml/ekor/hari. Pemberian gel Aloe vera dilakukan selama sembilan hari. Pada harike-6, mencit diinfeksi bakteri patogen Salmonella typhimurium intraperitoneal105 CFU. Selanjutnya pada hari ke-10 mencit didislokasi dan dibedah, diambilmakrofag dari peritoneum untuk dianalisis produksi ROS-nya. Hasil penelitianmenunjukkan bahwa pemberian gel Aloe vera berpengaruh signi..ikan terhadappeningkatan produksi ROS makrofag mencit BALB/c yang diinfeksi Salmonellatyphimurium. Terdapat perbedaan secara signi..ikan antara kelompok kontroldengan kelompok P1, P2, dan P3, tetapi tidak terdapat perbedaan signi..ikan antarkelompok P1, P2, dan P3. Pemberian gel Aloe vera dosis 0,5 ml/ekor/hari sudahmampu meningkatkan produksi ROS makrofag. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS is one of lethal chemicals that can kill and eliminatebacteria in phagocytic cells. Aloe vera is widely used as traditional medicine, but thereis no scienti..ic evidence to prove the effect of immunostimulatory of the Aloe vera gel oninfectious disease in the cellular or subcellular level. This research aims to determinethe immunostimulatory activity of Aloe vera gel showed by

  1. Enhanced reactive oxygen species overexpression by CuO nanoparticles in poorly differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Mei-Lang; Hsieh, Shu-Ling; Wu, Chih-Chung; Chu, Tian-Huei; Lin, Yu-Chun; Yeh, Bi-Wen; Hsieh, Shuchen

    2015-01-01

    Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) are known to exhibit toxic effects on a variety of cell types and organs. To determine the oxidative impact of CuO NPs on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, well-differentiated (HepG2) and poorly differentiated (SK-Hep-1) cells were exposed to CuO NPs. Cell viability assay showed that the median inhibition concentration (IC50) for SK-Hep-1 and HepG2 cells was 25 μg ml-1 and 85 μg ml-1, respectively. Cellular fluorescence intensity using DCFH-DA staining analysis revealed significant intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation of up to 242% in SK-Hep-1 cells, compared with 86% in HepG2 cells. HPLC analysis demonstrated that a CuO NP treatment caused cellular GSH depletion of 58% and a GSH/GSSG ratio decrease to ~0.1 in SK-Hep-1 cells. The oxidative stress caused by enhanced superoxide anion production was observed in both HepG2 (146%) and SK-Hep-1 (192%) cells. The Griess assay verified that CuO NPs induced NO production (170%) in SK-Hep-1 cells. Comet assay and western blot further demonstrated that CuO NPs induced severe DNA strand breakage (70%) in SK-Hep-1 cells and caused DNA damage via increased γ-H2AX levels. These results suggest that well-differentiated HepG2 cells possess a robust antioxidant defense system against CuO NP-induced ROS stress and exhibit more tolerance to oxidative stress. Conversely, poorly differentiated SK-Hep-1 cells exhibited a deregulated antioxidant defense system that allowed accumulation of CuO NP-induced ROS and resulted in severe cytotoxicity.Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) are known to exhibit toxic effects on a variety of cell types and organs. To determine the oxidative impact of CuO NPs on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, well-differentiated (HepG2) and poorly differentiated (SK-Hep-1) cells were exposed to CuO NPs. Cell viability assay showed that the median inhibition concentration (IC50) for SK-Hep-1 and HepG2 cells was 25 μg ml-1 and 85 μg ml-1, respectively

  2. Leaf senescence and abiotic stresses share reactive oxygen species-mediated chloroplast degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna-Chopra, Renu

    2012-07-01

    Leaf senescence is a genetically programmed decline in various cellular processes including photosynthesis and involves the hydrolysis of macromolecules such as proteins, lipids, etc. It is governed by the developmental age and is induced or enhanced by environmental stresses such as drought, heat, salinity and others. Internal factors such as reproductive structures also influence the rate of leaf senescence. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation is one of the earliest responses of plant cells under abiotic stresses and senescence. Chloroplasts are the main targets of ROS-linked damage during various environmental stresses and natural senescence as ROS detoxification systems decline with age. Plants adapt to environmental stresses through the process of acclimation, which involves less ROS production coupled with an efficient antioxidant defence. Chloroplasts are a major site of protein degradation, and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is rapidly and selectively degraded during senescence and stress. The process of protein degradation is initiated by ROS and involves the action of proteolytic enzymes such as cysteine and serine proteases. The mechanism of Rubisco degradation still remains to be elucidated. The molecular understanding of leaf senescence was achieved through the characterization of senescence-associated genes and various senescence mutants of Arabidopsis, which is a suitable model plant showing monocarpic senescence. The regulation of senescence involves many regulatory elements composed of positive and negative elements to fine-tune the initiation and progression of senescence. This review gives an overview on chloroplast protein degradation during leaf senescence and abiotic stresses and also highlights the role of ROS management in both processes.

  3. Regulation of soybean seed germination through ethylene production in response to reactive oxygen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Yushi; Koda, Yuka; Zheng, Shao-Hui; Yuasa, Takashi; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Despite their toxicity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) play important roles in plant cell signalling pathways, such as mediating responses to stress or infection and in programmed cell death, at lower levels. Although studies have indicated that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) promotes seed germination of several plants such as Arabidopsis, barley, wheat, rice and sunflower, the role of H2O2 in soybean seed germination is not well known. The aim of this study therefore was to investigate the relationships between ROS, plant hormones and soybean seed germination. Methods An examination was made of soybean seed germination, the expression of genes related to ethylene biosynthesis, endogenous ethylene contents, and the number and area of cells in the root tip, using N-acetylcysteine, an antioxidant, to counteract the effect of ROS. Key Results H2O2 promoted germination, which N-acetylcysteine suppressed, suggesting that ROS are involved in the regulation of soybean germination. H2O2 was produced in the embryonic axis after imbibition. N-Acetylcysteine suppressed the expression of genes related to ethylene biosynthesis and the production of endogenous ethylene. Interestingly, ethephon, which is converted to ethylene, and H2O2 reversed the suppression of seed germination by N-acetylcysteine. Furthermore, morphological analysis revealed that N-acetylcysteine suppressed cell elongation at the root tip, and this suppression was also reversed by ethephon or H2O2 treatments, as was the case in germination. Conclusions In soybean seeds, ROS produced in the embryonic axis after imbibition induce the production of endogenous ethylene, which promotes cell elongation in the root tip. This appears to be how ROS regulate soybean seed germination. PMID:23131300

  4. Photochemical generation of reactive species upon irradiation of rainwater: Negligible photoactivity of dissolved organic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albinet, Alexandre; Minero, Claudio; Vione, Davide

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the study of the photochemical activity of dissolved organic matter present in rainwater. Formation rates of the reactive species hydroxyl radical (OH · ), singlet oxygen ( 1 O 2 ) and dissolved organic matter triplet states ( 3 DOM * ) were determined by irradiation (UV-A) of wet-only rainwater samples collected in Turin (Italy) in the presence of specific scavengers (benzene, furfuryl alcohol and phenol, respectively). Photo-formation rates of OH · (∼ 3 . 10 -11 M s -1 ) and 1 O 2 (∼ 10 -14 M s -1 ) were lower (1 or 2 orders of magnitude) or largely lower (4 to 10 orders of magnitude) than those determined for fog and cloud samples in previous studies. 3 DOM * formation rate values were either negligible or quite low (∼ 10 -12 M s -1 ) by comparison with those evaluated for surface water samples. Deduced steady-state [OH · ] were in the same range as those reported for fog samples in the literature (8.7 . 10 -16 to 1.5 . 10 -15 M), while [ 1 O 2 ] was often several orders of magnitude lower and, therefore, could be considered as negligible. Nitrite (NO 2 - ) constituted the main source of OH · (69 ± 21 to 138 ± 36%), and the deduced contribution of DOM was low or nil. All the results obtained in this study tend to demonstrate that DOM (including HUmic LIke Substances, HULIS) present in rainwater is poorly or not photoactive. Therefore, there could be considerable difference between rainwater DOM (HULIS included) and the organic matter present in surface waters, particularly the humic substances, as far as the photochemical activity is concerned.

  5. Photochemical generation of reactive species upon irradiation of rainwater: negligible photoactivity of dissolved organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albinet, Alexandre; Minero, Claudio; Vione, Davide

    2010-07-15

    This paper focuses on the study of the photochemical activity of dissolved organic matter present in rainwater. Formation rates of the reactive species hydroxyl radical (OH(*)), singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) and dissolved organic matter triplet states ((3)DOM()) were determined by irradiation (UV-A) of wet-only rainwater samples collected in Turin (Italy) in the presence of specific scavengers (benzene, furfuryl alcohol and phenol, respectively). Photo-formation rates of OH(*) ( approximately 3.10(-)(11)Ms(-)(1)) and (1)O(2) ( approximately 10(-)(14)Ms(-)(1)) were lower (1 or 2 orders of magnitude) or largely lower (4 to 10 orders of magnitude) than those determined for fog and cloud samples in previous studies. (3)DOM() formation rate values were either negligible or quite low ( approximately 10(-)(12)Ms(-)(1)) by comparison with those evaluated for surface water samples. Deduced steady-state [OH(*)] were in the same range as those reported for fog samples in the literature (8.7.10(-)(16) to 1.5.10(-)(15)M), while [(1)O(2)] was often several orders of magnitude lower and, therefore, could be considered as negligible. Nitrite (NO(2)(-)) constituted the main source of OH(*) (69 + or - 21 to 138 + or - 36%), and the deduced contribution of DOM was low or nil. All the results obtained in this study tend to demonstrate that DOM (including HUmic LIke Substances, HULIS) present in rainwater is poorly or not photoactive. Therefore, there could be considerable difference between rainwater DOM (HULIS included) and the organic matter present in surface waters, particularly the humic substances, as far as the photochemical activity is concerned. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Rethinking Dithiothreitol-Based Particulate Matter Oxidative Potential: Measuring Dithiothreitol Consumption versus Reactive Oxygen Species Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Qianshan; Yu, Haoran; Wang, Runran; Wei, Jinlai; Verma, Vishal

    2017-06-06

    We measured the rate of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) [hydroxyl radicals ( • OH) and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 )] catalyzed by ambient particulate matter (PM) in the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. To understand the mechanism of ROS generation, we tested several redox-active substances, such as 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (PQ), 5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (5H-1,4NQ), 1,2-naphthoquinone (1,2-NQ), 1,4-naphthoquinone (1,4-NQ), copper(II), manganese(II), and iron (II and III). Both pure compounds and their mixtures show different patterns in DTT oxidation versus ROS generation. The quinones, known to oxidize DTT in the efficiency order of PQ > 5H-1,4NQ > 1,2-NQ > 1,4-NQ, show a different efficiency order (5H-1,4NQ > 1,2-NQ ≈ PQ > 1,4-NQ) in the ROS generation. Cu(II), a dominant metal in DTT oxidation, contributes almost negligibly to the ROS generation. Fe is mostly inactive in DTT oxidation, but shows synergistic effect in • OH formation in the presence of other quinones (mixture/sum > 1.5). Ten ambient PM samples collected from an urban site were analyzed, and although DTT oxidation was significantly correlated with H 2 O 2 generation (Pearson's r = 0.91), no correlation was observed between DTT oxidation and • OH formation. Our results show that measuring both DTT consumption and ROS generation in the DTT assay is important to incorporate the synergistic contribution from different aerosol components and to provide a more inclusive picture of the ROS activity of ambient PM.

  7. Redox and Reactive Oxygen Species Network in Acclimation for Salinity Tolerance in Sugar Beet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, M Sazzad; ElSayed, Abdelaleim Ismail; Moore, Marten

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Fine-tuned and coordinated regulation of transport, metabolism and redox homeostasis allows plants to acclimate to osmotic and ionic stress caused by high salinity. Sugar beet is a highly salt tolerant crop plant and is therefore an interesting model to study sodium chloride (NaCl) acclimation in crops. Sugar beet plants were subjected to a final level of 300 mM NaCl for up to 14 d in hydroponics. Plants acclimated to NaCl stress by maintaining its growth rate and adjusting its cellular redox and reactive oxygen species (ROS) network. In order to understand the unusual suppression of ROS accumulation under severe salinity, the regulation of elements of the redox and ROS network was investigated at the transcript level. First, the gene families of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxiredoxins (Prx), alternative oxidase (AOX), plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX) and NADPH oxidase (RBOH) were identified in the sugar beet genome. Salinity induced the accumulation of Cu-Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD, Fe-SOD3, all AOX isoforms, 2-Cys-PrxB, PrxQ, and PrxIIF. In contrast, Fe-SOD1, 1-Cys-Prx, PrxIIB and PrxIIE levels decreased in response to salinity. Most importantly, RBOH transcripts of all isoforms decreased. This pattern offers a straightforward explanation for the low ROS levels under salinity. Promoters of stress responsive antioxidant genes were analyzed in silico for the enrichment of cis-elements, in order to gain insights into gene regulation. The results indicate that special cis-elements in the promoters of the antioxidant genes in sugar beet participate in adjusting the redox and ROS network and are fundamental to high salinity tolerance of sugar beet PMID:28338762

  8. Phototoxicity Evaluation of Pharmaceutical Substances with a Reactive Oxygen Species Assay Using Ultraviolet A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Sun; Yi, Jung-Sun; Lim, Hye Rim; Kim, Tae Sung; Ahn, Il Young; Ko, Kyungyuk; Kim, JooHwan; Park, Hye-Kyung; Sohn, Soo Jung; Lee, Jong Kwon

    2017-01-01

    With ultraviolet and visible light exposure, some pharmaceutical substances applied systemically or topically may cause phototoxic skin irritation. The major factor in phototoxicity is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as singlet oxygen and superoxide anion that cause oxidative damage to DNA, lipids and proteins. Thus, measuring the generation of ROS can predict the phototoxic potential of a given substance indirectly. For this reason, a standard ROS assay (ROS assay) was developed and validated and provides an alternative method for phototoxicity evaluation. However, negative substances are over-predicted by the assay. Except for ultraviolet A (UVA), other UV ranges are not a major factor in causing phototoxicity and may lead to incorrect labeling of some non-phototoxic substances as being phototoxic in the ROS assay when using a solar simulator. A UVA stimulator is also widely used to evaluate phototoxicity in various test substances. Consequently, we identified the applicability of a UVA simulator to the ROS assay for photoreactivity. In this study, we tested 60 pharmaceutical substances including 50 phototoxins and 10 non-phototoxins to predict their phototoxic potential via the ROS assay with a UVA simulator. Following the ROS protocol, all test substances were dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide or sodium phosphate buffer. The final concentration of the test solutions in the reaction mixture was 20 to 200 μM. The exposure was with 2.0~2.2 mW/cm2 irradiance and optimization for a relevant dose of UVA was performed. The generation of ROS was compared before and after UVA exposure and was measured by a microplate spectrophotometer. Sensitivity and specificity values were 85.7% and 100.0% respectively, and the accuracy was 88.1%. From this analysis, the ROS assay with a UVA simulator is suitable for testing the photoreactivity and estimating the phototoxic potential of various test pharmaceutical substances. PMID:28133512

  9. The role of reactive oxygen species in tumor cells apoptosis induced by landomycin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Lehka

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Landomycin A (LA is a new antitumor antibiotic of angucycline group, possessing high antitumor activity against cancer cells of different origin, which induces early apoptosis in target cells. It was shown that under LA action the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS in human T-leukemia cells had increased 5.6 times in comparison to control already at the 1st hour after the addition of studied antibiotic to the culture medium. At the 6th hour after incubation of cells with LA the nucleosomal DNA cleavage, chromatin condensation and nucleus fragmentation were observed, indicating apoptotic cell death. Catalase (scavenger of hydrogen peroxide, mannitol (scavenger of hydroxyl radicals and superoxide dismutase (scavenger of superoxide radicals reduced the level of ROS production under LA, suggesting the generation of H2O2, OH• and O2– radicals, respectively. It was revealed that catalase and mannitol effectively inhibited LA-mediated tumor cell death, increasing 2.5 times the percentage of alive cells in comparison to LA. However, superoxide dismutase had no significant inhibitory effect on cytotoxic activity of LA, indicating the minor role of superoxide anions in the implementation of antitumor activity of this antibiotic. Combination of catalase, mannitol and superoxide dismutase with LA increased 4-fold the percentage of alive cells in comparison to the action of LA. Dynamics of ROS formation confirms that the increase of ROS is a very rapid process, but at the same time it is not a direct consequence of apoptosis triggering, mediated by mitochondria

  10. Impact of hypothalamic reactive oxygen species in the control of energy metabolism and food intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eDrougard

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypothalamus is a key area involved in the control of metabolism and food intake via the integrations of numerous signals (hormones, neurotransmitters, metabolites from various origins. These factors modify hypothalamic neurons activity and generate adequate molecular and behavioral responses to control energy balance. In this complex integrative system, a new concept has been developed in recent years, that includes reactive oxygen species (ROS as a critical player in energy balance. ROS are known to act in many signaling pathways in different peripheral organs, but also in hypothalamus where they regulate food intake and metabolism by acting on different types of neurons, including proopiomelanocortin (POMC and agouti-related protein (AgRP/neuropeptide Y (NPY neurons. Hypothalamic ROS release is under the influence of different factors such as pancreatic and gut hormones, adipokines (leptin, apelin,..., neurotransmitters and nutrients (glucose, lipids,.... The sources of ROS production are multiple including NADPH oxidase, but also the mitochondria which is considered as the main ROS producer in the brain. ROS are considered as signaling molecules, but conversely impairment of this neuronal signaling ROS pathway contributes to alterations of autonomic nervous system and neuroendocrine function, leading to metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes.In this review we focus our attention on factors that are able to modulate hypothalamic ROS release in order to control food intake and energy metabolism, and whose deregulations could participate to the development of pathological conditions. This novel insight reveals an original mechanism in the hypothalamus that controls energy balance and identify hypothalamic ROS signaling as a potential therapeutic strategy to treat metabolic disorders.

  11. Correlation between reactive oxygen species and oral conditions in elderly individuals with hypertension: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanan Nur'aeny

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The increased number of elderly people in Indonesia can be a positive phenomenon if their health is well-preserved. The elderly are influenced by physiological changes, environmental factors, and personal habits making them susceptible to chronic diseases. The oral cavity is also subject to change, one of the causes being reduced salivary flow that is manifested in dental caries and other oral health concerns. This disease is stimulated by oxidative stress in the body due to an imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS and the antioxidant defense system. Purpose: This preliminary study aimed to investigate ROS-related hypertension and the state of oral health of elderly patients. Methods: The study constitutes a combination of cross-sectional observation and consecutive sampling. Twelve subjects, selected on the basis of inclusive and exclusive criteria, consisted of two males and ten females. Physical examinations and blood sampling were performed on all subjects. R version 3.4.1 for Windows operating system was used to perform statistical tests. Results: The 12 patients shared a history of hypertension, the lowest ROS level was 0.87 IU/ml, while the highest was one of 7.20 IU/ml. The correlation between ROS and oral conditions showed only ROS and tooth loss as having a significant positive correlation. An independent t test showed there to be a mean difference between ROS with Miyazaki index 1 and 2 but it was statistically insignificant. Conclusion: There was no correlation between the ROS level in the bloodstream and general oral health, except in the relationship between the ROS level in the bloodstream and tooth loss which had a positive correlation.

  12. Photoirradiation of dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids--formation of reactive oxygen species and induction of lipid peroxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuewei; Xia, Qingsu; Yin, Jun Jie; Lin, Ge; Fu, Peter P

    2011-09-10

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PA)-containing plants are widespread in the world and are probably the most common poisonous plants affecting livestock, wildlife, and human. PAs require metabolic activation to generate pyrrolic metabolites (dehydro-PAs) that bind cellular protein and DNA, leading to hepatotoxicity and genotoxicity, including tumorigenicity. In this study we report that UVA photoirradiation of a series of dehydro-PAs, e.g., dehydromonocrotaline, dehydroriddelliine, dehydroretrorsine, dehydrosenecionine, dehydroseneciphylline, dehydrolasiocarpine, dehydroheliotrine, and dehydroretronecine (DHR) at 0-70 J/cm2 in the presence of a lipid, methyl linoleate, resulted in lipid peroxidation in a light dose-responsive manner. When irradiated in the presence of sodium azide, the level of lipid peroxidation decreased; lipid peroxidation was enhanced when methanol was replaced by deuterated methanol. These results suggest that singlet oxygen is a photo-induced product. When irradiated in the presence of superoxide dismutase, the level of lipid peroxidation decreased, indicating that lipid peroxidation is also mediated by superoxide. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spin trapping studies confirmed that both singlet oxygen and superoxide anion radical were formed during photoirradiation. These results indicate that UVA photoirradiation of dehydro-PAs generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) that mediated the initiation of lipid peroxidation. UVA irradiation of the parent PAs and other PA metabolites, including PA N-oxides, under similar experimental conditions did not produce lipid peroxidation. It is known that PAs induce skin cancer and are secondary (hepatogenous) photosensitization agents. Our results suggest that dehydro-PAs are the active metabolites responsible for skin cancer formation and PA-induced secondary photosensitization. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. TEMPO-Conjugated Gold Nanoparticles for Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging and Regulation of Stem Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingchao; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Ying; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2017-10-18

    Controlling the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) shows a great potential in regenerative medicine. Because overproduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) have an obvious inhibitory effect on the differentiation and functions of hMSCs, it is highly desirable to develop an effective strategy for ROS scavenging and stem cell differentiation controlling. In this study, gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) with an average size of 40 nm were conjugated with 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (TEMPO) to endow them with ROS-scavenging capacity while holding the beneficial effect of Au NPs. The TEMPO-conjugated Au NPs (Au-PEG-TEMPO NPs) were used for the culture of hMSCs to investigate their effect on ROS scavenging, proliferation, and osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of hMSCs. The Au-PEG-TEMPO NPs had a negligible influence on cell viability and proliferation of hMSCs and could effectively reduce the ROS level of hMSCs under H 2 O 2 -exposed conditions because of their excellent cellular uptake. Similar to the counterparts without surface TEMPO modification (Au-mPEG NPs), the Au-PEG-TEMPO NPs could promote the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs, whereas they could inhibit the adipogenic differentiation of hMSCs. The results indicated that the TEMPO-conjugated Au NPs had high scavenging capacity for overproduced ROS and maintained the promotive effect of Au NPs on osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs without the inhibitory effect of free TEMPO. This study offers a promising strategy for ROS scavenging to control stem cell differentiation in stem cell transplantation and regenerative medicine.

  14. Anionic Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles Protect Plant Photosynthesis from Abiotic Stress by Scavenging Reactive Oxygen Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Honghong; Tito, Nicholas; Giraldo, Juan P

    2017-11-28

    Plant abiotic stress leads to accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a consequent decrease in photosynthetic performance. We demonstrate that a plant nanobionics approach of localizing negatively charged, sub-11 nm, spherical cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) inside chloroplasts in vivo augments ROS scavenging and photosynthesis of Arabidopsis thaliana plants under excess light (2000 μmol m -2 s -1 , 1.5 h), heat (35 °C, 2.5 h), and dark chilling (4 °C, 5 days). Poly(acrylic acid) nanoceria (PNC) with a hydrodynamic diameter (10.3 nm)-lower than the maximum plant cell wall porosity-and negative ζ-potential (-16.9 mV) exhibit significantly higher colocalization (46%) with chloroplasts in leaf mesophyll cells than aminated nanoceria (ANC) (27%) of similar size (12.6 nm) but positive charge (9.7 mV). Nanoceria are transported into chloroplasts via nonendocytic pathways, influenced by the electrochemical gradient of the plasma membrane potential. PNC with a low Ce 3+ /Ce 4+ ratio (35.0%) reduce leaf ROS levels by 52%, including hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anion, and hydroxyl radicals. For the latter ROS, there is no known plant enzyme scavenger. Plants embedded with these PNC that were exposed to abiotic stress exhibit an increase up to 19% in quantum yield of photosystem II, 67% in carbon assimilation rates, and 61% in Rubisco carboxylation rates relative to plants without nanoparticles. In contrast, PNC with high Ce 3+ /Ce 4+ ratio (60.8%) increase overall leaf ROS levels and do not protect photosynthesis from oxidative damage during abiotic stress. This study demonstrates that anionic, spherical, sub-11 nm PNC with low Ce 3+ /Ce 4+ ratio can act as a tool to study the impact of oxidative stress on plant photosynthesis and to protect plants from abiotic stress.

  15. Antioxidants Maintain Cellular Redox Homeostasis by Elimination of Reactive Oxygen Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Long; He, Ting; Farrar, Shabnam; Ji, Linbao; Liu, Tianyi; Ma, Xi

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced by living cells as normal cellular metabolic byproduct. Under excessive stress conditions, cells will produce numerous ROS, and the living organisms eventually evolve series of response mechanisms to adapt to the ROS exposure as well as utilize it as the signaling molecules. ROS molecules would trigger oxidative stress in a feedback mechanism involving many biological processes, such as apoptosis, necrosis and autophagy. Growing evidences have suggested that ROS play a critical role as the signaling molecules throughout the entire cell death pathway. Overwhelming production of ROS can destroy organelles structure and bio-molecules, which lead to inflammatory response that is a known underpinning mechanism for the development of diabetes and cancer. Cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP) are regarded as the markers of oxidative stress, can transform toxic metabolites into ROS, such as superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical which might cause injury of cells. Accordingly, cells have evolved a balanced system to neutralize the extra ROS, namely antioxidant systems that consist of enzymatic antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidases (GPxs), thioredoxin (Trx) as well as the non-enzymatic antioxidants which collectively reduce oxidative state. Herein, we review the recent novel findings of cellular processes induced by ROS, and summarize the roles of cellular endogenous antioxidant systems as well as natural anti-oxidative compounds in several human diseases caused by ROS in order to illustrate the vital role of antioxidants in prevention against oxidative stress. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species mediate metabolic changes in barley seed embryo during germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenguo eMa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The levels of nitric oxide (NO and reactive oxygen species (ROS, ATP/ADP ratios, reduction levels of ascorbate and glutathione, expression of the genes encoding proteins involved in metabolism of NO and activities of the enzymes involved in fermentation and in metabolism of NO and ROS were studied in the embryos of germinating seeds of two barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cultivars differing in dormancy level. The level of NO production continuously increased after imbibition while the level of nitrosylated SH-groups in proteins increased. This corresponded to the decrease of free SH-groups in proteins. At early stage of germination (0-48 h postimbibition the genes encoding class 1 phytoglobin (the protein scavenging NO and S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (scavenging S-nitrosoglutathione were markedly expressed. More dormant cultivar exhibited lower ATP/ADP and ascorbate/dehydroascorbate ratios and lower lactate and alcohol dehydrogenase activities, while the production of NO and nitrosylation of proteins was higher as compared to the non-dormant cultivar. The obtained data indicate that at the onset of germination NO is actively generated causing nitrosylation of SH-groups and a switch from respiration to fermentation. After radicle protrusion the metabolism changes in a more reducing type as recorded by ratio of reduced and oxidized glutathione and ascorbate. The turnover of NO by the scavenging systems (phytoglobin, S-nitrosoglutathione reductase and interaction with ROS might contribute to the maintenance of redox and energy balance of germinating seeds and lead to alleviation of dormancy.

  17. Butyrate induces reactive oxygen species production and affects cell cycle progression in human gingival fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, M-C; Tsai, Y-L; Chen, Y-W; Chan, C-P; Huang, C-F; Lan, W-C; Lin, C-C; Lan, W-H; Jeng, J-H

    2013-02-01

    Short-chain fatty acids, such as butyric acid and propionic acid, are metabolic by-products generated by periodontal microflora such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, and contribute to the pathogenesis of periodontitis. However, the effects of butyrate on the biological activities of gingival fibroblasts (GFs) are not well elucidated. Human GFs were exposed to various concentrations of butyrate (0.5-16 mm) for 24 h. Viable cells that excluded trypan blue were counted. Cell cycle distribution of GFs was analyzed by propidium iodide-staining flow cytometry. Cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was measured by flow cytometry using 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF). Total RNA and protein lysates were isolated and subjected to RT-PCR using specific primers or to western blotting using specific antibodies, respectively. Butyrate inhibited the growth of GFs, as indicated by a decrease in the number of viable cells. This event was associated with an induction of G0/G1 and G2/M cell cycle arrest by butyrate (4-16 mm) in GFs. However, no marked apoptosis of GFs was noted in this experimental condition. Butyrate (> 2 mm) inhibited the expression of cdc2, cdc25C and cyclinB1 mRNAs and reduced the levels of Cdc2, Cdc25C and cyclinB1 proteins in GFs, as determined using RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. This toxic effect of butyrate was associated with the production of ROS. These results suggest that butyrate generated by periodontal pathogens may be involved in the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases via the induction of ROS production and the impairment of cell growth, cell cycle progression and expression of cell cycle-related genes in GFs. These events are important in the initiation and prolongation of inflammatory processes in periodontal diseases. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. A porous tissue engineering scaffold selectively degraded by cell-generated reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, John R; Gupta, Mukesh K; Page, Jonathan M; Yu, Fang; Davidson, Jeffrey M; Guelcher, Scott A; Duvall, Craig L

    2014-04-01

    Biodegradable tissue engineering scaffolds are commonly fabricated from poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or similar polyesters that degrade by hydrolysis. PLGA hydrolysis generates acidic breakdown products that trigger an accelerated, autocatalytic degradation mechanism that can create mismatched rates of biomaterial breakdown and tissue formation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key mediators of cell function in both health and disease, especially at sites of inflammation and tissue healing, and induction of inflammation and ROS are natural components of the in vivo response to biomaterial implantation. Thus, polymeric biomaterials that are selectively degraded by cell-generated ROS may have potential for creating tissue engineering scaffolds with better matched rates of tissue in-growth and cell-mediated scaffold biodegradation. To explore this approach, a series of poly(thioketal) (PTK) urethane (PTK-UR) biomaterial scaffolds were synthesized that degrade specifically by an ROS-dependent mechanism. PTK-UR scaffolds had significantly higher compressive moduli than analogous poly(ester urethane) (PEUR) scaffolds formed from hydrolytically-degradable ester-based diols (p PEUR scaffolds, the PTK-UR scaffolds were stable under aqueous conditions out to 25 weeks but were selectively degraded by ROS, indicating that their biodegradation would be exclusively cell-mediated. The in vitro oxidative degradation rates of the PTK-URs followed first-order degradation kinetics, were significantly dependent on PTK composition (p PEUR scaffolds. These combined results indicate that ROS-degradable PTK-UR tissue engineering scaffolds have significant advantages over analogous polyester-based biomaterials and provide a robust, cell-degradable substrate for guiding new tissue formation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Low glucose induces mitochondrial reactive oxygen species via fatty acid oxidation in bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajihara, Nobuhiro; Kukidome, Daisuke; Sada, Kiminori; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Furukawa, Noboru; Matsumura, Takeshi; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Araki, Eiichi

    2017-11-01

    Overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in endothelial cells (ECs) plays a pivotal role in endothelial dysfunction. Mitochondrial ROS (mtROS) is one of the key players in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications. Hypoglycemia is linked to increased ROS production and vascular events; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether and how low glucose (LG) mediates mtROS generation in ECs, and to examine the impact of LG-induced mtROS on endothelial dysfunction. Metabolomic profiling, cellular oxygen consumption rate, mtROS, endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation, and the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 or intercellular adhesion molecule-1 were evaluated in bovine aortic ECs. We found that LG increased mtROS generation in ECs; which was suppressed by overexpression of manganese superoxide dismutase. Comprehensive metabolic analysis using capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry and oxygen consumption rate assessment showed that the pathway from fatty acid to acetyl-CoA through fatty acid oxidation was upregulated in ECs under LG conditions. In addition, etomoxir, a specific inhibitor of the free fatty acid transporter, decreased LG-induced mtROS production. These results suggested that LG increased mtROS generation through activation of fatty acid oxidation. We further revealed that LG inhibited endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation, and increased the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1. These effects were suppressed either by overexpression of manganese superoxide dismutase or by treatment with etomoxir. The activation of fatty acid oxidation followed by mtROS production could be one of the causes for endothelial dysfunction during hypoglycemia. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Mitochondrial respiration deficits driven by reactive oxygen species in experimental temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, Shane; Liang, Li-Ping; Fulton, Ruth; Shimizu, Takahiko; Day, Brian; Patel, Manisha

    2015-03-01

    Metabolic alterations have been implicated in the etiology of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), but whether or not they have a functional impact on cellular energy producing pathways (glycolysis and/or oxidative phosphorylation) is unknown. The goal of this study was to determine if alterations in cellular bioenergetics occur using real-time analysis of mitochondrial oxygen consumption and glycolytic rates in an animal model of TLE. We hypothesized that increased steady-state levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) initiated by epileptogenic injury result in impaired mitochondrial respiration. We established methodology for assessment of bioenergetic parameters in isolated synaptosomes from the hippocampus of Sprague-Dawley rats at various times in the kainate (KA) model of TLE. Deficits in indices of mitochondrial respiration were observed at time points corresponding with the acute and chronic phases of epileptogenesis. We asked if mitochondrial bioenergetic dysfunction occurred as a result of increased mitochondrial ROS and if it could be attenuated in the KA model by pharmacologically scavenging ROS. Increased steady-state ROS in mice with forebrain-specific conditional deletion of manganese superoxide dismutase (Sod2(fl/fl)NEX(Cre/Cre)) in mice resulted in profound deficits in mitochondrial oxygen consumption. Pharmacological scavenging of ROS with a catalytic antioxidant restored mitochondrial respiration deficits in the KA model of TLE. Together, these results demonstrate that mitochondrial respiration deficits occur in experimental TLE and ROS mechanistically contribute to these deficits. Furthermore, this study provides novel methodology for assessing cellular metabolism during the entire time course of disease development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Reactive Oxygen Species, Mitochondria, and Endothelial Cell Death during In Vitro Simulated Dives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiong; Guerrero, François; Mazur, Aleksandra; Lambrechts, Kate; Buzzacott, Peter; Belhomme, Marac; Theron, Michaël

    2015-07-01

    Excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) is considered a consequence of hyperoxia and a major contributor to diving-derived vascular endothelial damage and decompression sickness. The aims of this work were: 1) to directly observe endothelial ROS production during simulated air dives as well as its relation with both mitochondrial activity and cell survival; and 2) to determine which ambient factor during air diving (hydrostatic pressure or oxygen and/or nitrogen partial pressure) is responsible for the observed modifications. In vitro diving simulation was performed with bovine arterial endothelial cells under real-time observation. The effects of air diving, hydrostatic, oxygen and nitrogen pressures, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) treatment on mitochondrial ROS generation, mitochondrial membrane potential and cellular survival during simulation were investigated. Vascular endothelial cells performing air diving simulation suffered excessive mitochondrial ROS, mitochondrial depolarization, and cell death. These effects were prevented by NAC: after NAC treatment, the cells presented no difference in damage from nondiving cells. Oxygen diving showed a higher effect on ROS generation but lower impacts on mitochondrial depolarization and cell death than hydrostatic or nitrogen diving. Nitrogen diving had no effect on the inductions of ROS, mito-depolarization, or cell death. This study is the first direct observation of mitochondrial ROS production, mitochondrial membrane potential and cell survival during diving. Simulated air SCUBA diving induces excessive ROS production, which leads to mitochondrial depolarization and endothelial cell death. Oxygen partial pressure plays a crucial role in the production of ROS. Deleterious effects of hyperoxia-induced ROS are potentiated by hydrostatic pressure. These findings hold new implications for the pathogenesis of diving-derived endothelial dysfunction.

  2. Manipulation of environmental oxygen modifies reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation during myogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Rachel; Pearson, Timothy; Vasilaki, Aphrodite

    2016-08-01

    Regulated changes in reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) activities are important in maintaining the normal sequence and development of myogenesis. Both excessive formation and reduction in RONS have been shown to affect muscle differentiation in a negative way. Cultured cells are typically grown in 20% O2 but this is not an appropriate physiological concentration for a number of cell types, including skeletal muscle. The aim was to examine the generation of RONS in cultured skeletal muscle cells under a physiological oxygen concentration condition (6% O2) and determine the effect on muscle myogenesis. Primary mouse satellite cells were grown in 20% or 6% O2 environments and RONS activity was measured at different stages of myogenesis by real-time fluorescent microscopy using fluorescent probes with different specificities i.e. dihydroethidium (DHE), 4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF-FM DA) and 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7' -dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (CM-DCFH-DA). Data demonstrate that satellite cell proliferation increased when cells were grown in 6% O2 compared with 20% O2. Myoblasts grown in 20% O2 showed an increase in DCF fluorescence and DHE oxidation compared with myoblasts grown at 6% O2. Myotubes grown in 20% O2 also showed an increase in DCF and DAF-FM fluorescence and DHE oxidation compared with myotubes grown in 6% O2. The catalase and MnSOD contents were also increased in myoblasts and myotubes that were maintained in 20% O2 compared with myoblasts and myotubes grown in 6% O2. These data indicate that intracellular RONS activities in myoblasts and myotubes at rest are influenced by changes in environmental oxygen concentration and that the increased ROS may influence myogenesis in a negative manner. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Reactive oxygen species are involved in BMP-induced dendritic growth in cultured rat sympathetic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Vidya; Lea, Charlotte; Sosa, Jose Carlo; Higgins, Dennis; Lein, Pamela J

    2015-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) promote dendritic growth in sympathetic neurons; however, the downstream signaling molecules that mediate the dendrite promoting activity of BMPs are not well characterized. Here we test the hypothesis that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated signaling links BMP receptor activation to dendritic growth. In cultured rat sympathetic neurons, exposure to any of the three mechanistically distinct antioxidants, diphenylene iodinium (DPI), nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NGA) or desferroxamine (DFO), blocked de novo BMP-induced dendritic growth. Addition of DPI to cultures previously induced with BMP to extend dendrites caused dendritic retraction while DFO and NGA prevented further growth of dendrites. The inhibition of the dendrite promoting activity of BMPs by antioxidants was concentration-dependent and occurred without altering axonal growth or neuronal cell survival. Antioxidant treatment did not block BMP activation of SMAD 1,5 as determined by nuclear localization of these SMADs. While BMP treatment did not cause a detectable increase in intracellular ROS in cultured sympathetic neurons as assessed using fluorescent indicator dyes, BMP treatment increased the oxygen consumption rate in cultured sympathetic neurons as determined using the Seahorse XF24 Analyzer, suggesting increased mitochondrial activity. In addition, BMPs upregulated expression of NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) and either pharmacological inhibition or siRNA knockdown of NOX2 significantly decreased BMP-7 induced dendritic growth. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that ROS are involved in the downstream signaling events that mediate BMP7-induced dendritic growth in sympathetic neurons, and suggest that ROS-mediated signaling positively modulates dendritic complexity in peripheral neurons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The measurement of reactive oxygen species in human neat semen and in suspended spermatozoa: a comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingerova, Helena; Oborna, Ivana; Novotny, Jiri; Svobodova, Magda; Brezinova, Jana; Radova, Lenka

    2009-10-27

    It is generally accepted that oxidative stress is an important factor in male infertility because it may impair the physiological function of spermatozoa at the molecular level. Nevertheless, although several approaches have been reported, the imbalance between production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activity of the antioxidant defense system in semen is difficult to investigate and remains poorly understood. This study compares measurement of ROS production in neat semen and in washed spermatozoa obtained from the same ejaculate, and suspended in phosphate buffered saline using exactly the same luminol-mediated chemiluminescence method. Ninety one samples were obtained from males of infertile couples and 34 from volunteers with proven fertility. As expected, ROS levels were markedly lower in neat semen than in washed spermatozoa suspensions where seminal plasma with its potent antioxidant capacity was removed. In the cases of both neat semen and washed spermatozoa, ROS production was lowest in samples from normozoospermic males and highest in samples containing more than half million peroxidase-positive leukocytes per milliliter. For all samples, there was a significant positive correlation between ROS production by neat semen and that by washed spermatozoa suspension. Measurement of ROS production in neat semen better reflects actual oxidative status because it detects only the overproduction of ROS which are not effectively scavenged by antioxidant capacity of seminal fluid. The results of our study show a good commutability of both measurements for identification of semen samples with high ROS production. The measurement in neat semen is even less time consuming and therefore easier to implement into laboratory routine.

  5. Reactive oxygen species promote heat shock protein 90-mediated HBV capsid assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yoon Sik; Seo, Hyun Wook; Jung, Guhung

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and has been associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). ROS are also an important factor in HCC because the accumulated ROS leads to abnormal cell proliferation and chromosome mutation. In oxidative stress, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and glutathione (GSH) function as part of the defense mechanism. Hsp90 prevents cellular component from oxidative stress, and GSH acts as antioxidants scavenging ROS in the cell. However, it is not known whether molecules regulated by oxidative stress are involved in HBV capsid assembly. Based on the previous study that Hsp90 facilitates HBV capsid assembly, which is an important step for the packing of viral particles, here, we show that ROS enrich Hsp90-driven HBV capsid formation. In cell-free system, HBV capsid assembly was facilitated by ROS with Hsp90, whereas it was decreased without Hsp90. In addition, GSH inhibited the function of Hsp90 to decrease HBV capsid assembly. Consistent with the result of cell-free system, ROS and buthionine sulfoximine (BS), an inhibitor of GSH synthesis, increased HBV capsid formation in HepG2.2.15 cells. Thus, our study uncovers the interplay between ROS and Hsp90 during HBV capsid assembly. - Highlights: • We examined H 2 O 2 and GSH modulate HBV capsid assembly. • H 2 O 2 facilitates HBV capsid assembly in the presence of Hsp90. • GSH inhibits function of Hsp90 in facilitating HBV capsid assembly. • H 2 O 2 and GSH induce conformation change of Hsp90

  6. Reactive oxygen species promote heat shock protein 90-mediated HBV capsid assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yoon Sik, E-mail: yumshak@naver.com; Seo, Hyun Wook, E-mail: suruk@naver.com; Jung, Guhung, E-mail: drjung@snu.ac.kr

    2015-02-13

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and has been associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). ROS are also an important factor in HCC because the accumulated ROS leads to abnormal cell proliferation and chromosome mutation. In oxidative stress, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and glutathione (GSH) function as part of the defense mechanism. Hsp90 prevents cellular component from oxidative stress, and GSH acts as antioxidants scavenging ROS in the cell. However, it is not known whether molecules regulated by oxidative stress are involved in HBV capsid assembly. Based on the previous study that Hsp90 facilitates HBV capsid assembly, which is an important step for the packing of viral particles, here, we show that ROS enrich Hsp90-driven HBV capsid formation. In cell-free system, HBV capsid assembly was facilitated by ROS with Hsp90, whereas it was decreased without Hsp90. In addition, GSH inhibited the function of Hsp90 to decrease HBV capsid assembly. Consistent with the result of cell-free system, ROS and buthionine sulfoximine (BS), an inhibitor of GSH synthesis, increased HBV capsid formation in HepG2.2.15 cells. Thus, our study uncovers the interplay between ROS and Hsp90 during HBV capsid assembly. - Highlights: • We examined H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH modulate HBV capsid assembly. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} facilitates HBV capsid assembly in the presence of Hsp90. • GSH inhibits function of Hsp90 in facilitating HBV capsid assembly. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH induce conformation change of Hsp90.

  7. Reactive oxygen species contribute to the presynaptic action of extracellular ATP at the frog neuromuscular junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giniatullin, AR; Grishin, SN; Sharifullina, ER; Petrov, AM; Zefirov, AL; Giniatullin, RA

    2005-01-01

    During normal cell metabolism the production of intracellular ATP is associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which appear to be important signalling molecules. Both ATP and ROS can be released extracellularly by skeletal muscle during intense activity. Using voltage clamp recording combined with imaging and biochemical assay of ROS, we tested the hypothesis that at the neuromuscular junction extracellular ATP generates ROS to inhibit transmitter release from motor nerve endings. We found that ATP produced the presynaptic inhibitory action on multiquantal end-plate currents. The inhibitory action of ATP (but not that of adenosine) was significantly reduced by several antioxidants or extracellular catalase, which breaks down H2O2. Consistent with these data, the depressant effect of ATP was dramatically potentiated by the pro-oxidant Fe2+. Exogenous H2O2 reproduced the depressant effects of ATP and showed similar sensitivity to anti- and pro-oxidants. While NO also inhibited synaptic transmission, inhibitors of the NO-producing cascade did not prevent the depressant action of ATP. The ferrous oxidation in xylenol orange assay showed the increase of ROS production by ATP and 2-MeSADP but not by adenosine. Suramin, a non-selective antagonist of P2 receptors, and pertussis toxin prevented the action of ATP on ROS production. Likewise, imaging with the ROS-sensitive dye carboxy-2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein revealed increased production of ROS in the muscle treated with ATP or ADP while UTP or adenosine had no effect. Thus, generation of ROS contributed to the ATP-mediated negative feedback mechanism controlling quantal secretion of ACh from the motor nerve endings. PMID:15774519

  8. Integration of intracellular telomerase monitoring by electrochemiluminescence technology and targeted cancer therapy by reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huairong; Li, Binxiao; Sun, Zhaomei; Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Shusheng

    2017-12-01

    Cancer therapies based on reactive oxygen species (ROS) have emerged as promising clinical treatments. Electrochemiluminescence (ECL) technology has also attracted considerable attention in the field of clinical diagnosis. However, studies about the integration of ECL diagnosis and ROS cancer therapy are very rare. Here we introduce a novel strategy that employs ECL technology and ROS to fill the above vacancy. Briefly, an ITO electrode was electrodeposited with polyluminol-Pt NPs composite films and modified with aptamer DNA to capture HL-60 cancer cells with high specificity. After that, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) filled with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) were closed by the telomerase primer DNA (T-primer DNA) and aptamer. After aptamer on MSN@PMA recognized and combined with the HL-60 cancer cells with high specificity, T-primer DNA on MSN@PMA could be moved away from the MSN@PMA surface after extension by telomerase in the HL-60 cancer cells and PMA was released to induce the production of ROS by the HL-60 cancer cells. After that, the polyluminol-Pt NPs composite films could react with hydrogen peroxide (a major ROS) and generate an ECL signal. Thus the intracellular telomerase activity of the HL-60 cancer cells could be detected in situ . Besides, ROS could induce apoptosis in the HL-60 cancer cells with high efficacy by causing oxidative damage to the lipids, protein, and DNA. Above all, the designed platform could not only detect intracellular telomerase activity instead of that of extracted telomerase, but could also kill targeted tumors by ECL technology and ROS.

  9. Glucose modulation induces reactive oxygen species and increases P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance to chemotherapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seebacher, N A; Richardson, D R; Jansson, P J

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cancer cells develop resistance to stress induced by chemotherapy. In tumours, a considerable glucose gradient exists, resulting in stress. Notably, hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a redox-sensitive transcription factor that regulates P-glycoprotein (Pgp), a crucial drug-efflux transporter involved in multidrug resistance (MDR). Here, we investigated how glucose levels regulate Pgp-mediated drug transport and resistance. Experimental Approach Human tumour cells (KB31, KBV1, A549 and DMS-53) were incubated under glucose starvation to hyperglycaemic conditions. Flow cytometry assessed reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and Pgp activity. HIF-1α, NF-κB and Pgp expression were assessed by reverse transcriptase-PCR and Western blotting. Fluorescence microscopy examined p65 distribution and a luciferase-reporter assay assessed HIF-1 promoter-binding activity. The effect of glucose-induced stress on Pgp-mediated drug resistance was examined after incubating cells with the chemotherapeutic and Pgp substrate, doxorubicin (DOX), and performing MTT assays validated by viable cell counts. Key Results Changes in glucose levels markedly enhanced cellular ROS and conferred Pgp-mediated drug resistance. Low and high glucose levels increased (i) ROS generation via NADPH oxidase 4 and mitochondrial membrane destabilization; (ii) HIF-1 activity; (iii) nuclear translocation of the NF-κB p65 subunit; and (iv) HIF-1α mRNA and protein levels. Increased HIF-1α could also be due to decreased prolyl hydroxylase protein under these conditions. The HIF-1α target, Pgp, was up-regulated at low and high glucose levels, which led to lower cellular accumulation of Pgp substrate, rhodamine123, and greater resistance to DOX. Conclusions and Implications As tumour cells become glucose-deprived or exposed to high glucose levels, this increases stress, leading to a more aggressive MDR phenotype via up-regulation of Pgp. PMID:25586174

  10. Green synthesized silver nanoparticles destroy multidrug resistant bacteria via reactive oxygen species mediated membrane damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaram Das

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The growing need of antimicrobial agent for novel therapies against multi-drug resistant bacteria has drawn researchers to green nanotechnology. Especially, eco-friendly biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs has shown its interesting impact against bacterial infection in laboratory research. In this study, a simple method was developed to form Ag NPs at room temperature, bio-reduction of silver ions from silver nitrate salt by leaf extract from Ocimum gratissimum. The Ag NPs appear to be capped with plant proteins, but are otherwise highly crystalline and pure. The Ag NPs have a zeta potential of −15 mV, a hydrodynamic diameter of 31 nm with polydispersity index of 0.65, and dry sizes of 18 ± 3 nm and 16 ± 2 nm, based on scanning and transmission electron microscopy respectively. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of the Ag NPs against a multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli was 4 μg/mL and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC was 8 μg/mL, while the MIC and MBC against a resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus were slightly higher at 8 μg/mL and 16 μg/mL respectively. Further, the Ag NPs inhibited biofilm formation by both Escherichia coli and S. aureus at concentrations similar to the MIC for each strain. Treatment of E. coli and S. aureus with Ag NPs resulted in damage to the surface of the cells and the production of reactive oxygen species. Both mechanisms likely contribute to bacterial cell death. In summary, this new method appears promising for green biosynthesis of pure Ag NPs with potent antimicrobial activity.

  11. Scoparone attenuates RANKL-induced osteoclastic differentiation through controlling reactive oxygen species production and scavenging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Jang, Hae-Dong, E-mail: haedong@hnu.kr

    2015-02-15

    Scoparone, one of the bioactive components of Artemisia capillaris Thunb, has various biological properties including immunosuppressive, hepatoprotective, anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant effects. This study aims at evaluating the anti-osteoporotic effect of scoparone and its underlying mechanism in vitro. Scoparone demonstrated potent cellular antioxidant capacity. It was also found that scoparone inhibited the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation and suppressed cathepsin K and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) expression via c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/p38-mediated c-Fos–nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) signaling pathway. During osteoclast differentiation, the production of general reactive oxygen species (ROS) and superoxide anions was dose-dependently attenuated by scoparone. In addition, scoparone diminished NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase 1 (Nox1) expression and activation via the tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6)–cSrc–phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3k) signaling pathway and prevented the disruption of mitochondrial electron transport chain system. Furthermore, scoparone augmented the expression of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and catalase (CAT). The overall results indicate that the inhibitory effect of scoparone on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation is attributed to the suppressive effect on ROS and superoxide anion production by inhibiting Nox1 expression and activation and protecting the mitochondrial electron transport chain system and the scavenging effect of ROS resulting from elevated SOD1 and CAT expression. - Highlights: • Scoparone dose-dependently inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation. • Scoparone diminished general ROS and superoxide anions in a dose-dependent manner. • Scoparone inhibited Nox1 expression and

  12. Salicylic Acid Alleviates Aluminum Toxicity in Soybean Roots through Modulation of Reactive Oxygen Species Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Liu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available As an important signal molecule, salicylic acid (SA improves plant tolerance to aluminum (Al stress. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of exogenous SA application on the dynamics of endogenous SA and reactive oxygen species in soybean (Glycine max L. exposed to Al stress. The roots of soybean seedlings were exposed to a combination of AlCl3 (30 μM and SA (10 μM/PAC (100 μM, paclobutrazol, SA biosynthesis inhibitor for 3, 6, 9, and 12 h. Al stress induced an increase in endogenous SA concentration in a time-dependent manner, also verified by the up-regulated expression of GmNPR1, an SA-responsive gene. Al stress increased the activities of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL and benzoic acid 2-hydroxylase (BA2H, and the contents of SA, O2- and malondialdehyde (MDA in the root apex. The application of exogenous SA increased PAL and BA2H, and reduced O2- and MDA contents in soybean roots under Al stress. PAC inhibited the SA induced increase in BA2H activity. In addition, the SA application resulted in a rapid increase in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 concentration under Al stress, followed by a sharp decrease. Compared with the plants exposed to Al alone, Al+SA plants possessed higher activities of superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, and ascorbate peroxidase, and lower catalase activity, indicating that SA alleviated Al-induced oxidative damage. These results suggested that PAL and BA2H were involved in Al-induced SA production and showed that SA alleviated the adverse effects of Al toxicity by modulating the cellular H2O2 level and the antioxidant enzyme activities in the soybean root apex.

  13. Vascular smooth muscle modulates endothelial control of vasoreactivity via reactive oxygen species production through myoendothelial communications.

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    Marie Billaud

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endothelial control of vascular smooth muscle plays a major role in the resulting vasoreactivity implicated in physiological or pathological circulatory processes. However, a comprehensive understanding of endothelial (EC/smooth muscle cells (SMC crosstalk is far from complete. Here, we have examined the role of gap junctions and reactive oxygen species (ROS in this crosstalk and we demonstrate an active contribution of SMC to endothelial control of vasomotor tone. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In small intrapulmonary arteries, quantitative RT-PCR, Western Blot analyses and immunofluorescent labeling evidenced connexin (Cx 37, 40 and 43 in EC and/or SMC. Functional experiments showed that the Cx-mimetic peptide targeted against Cx 37 and Cx 43 ((37,43Gap27 (1 reduced contractile and calcium responses to serotonin (5-HT simultaneously recorded in pulmonary arteries and (2 abolished the diffusion in SMC of carboxyfluorescein-AM loaded in EC. Similarly, contractile and calcium responses to 5-HT were decreased by superoxide dismutase and catalase which, catabolise superoxide anion and H(2O(2, respectively. Both Cx- and ROS-mediated effects on the responses to 5-HT were reversed by L-NAME, a NO synthase inhibitor or endothelium removal. Electronic paramagnetic resonance directly demonstrated that 5-HT-induced superoxide anion production originated from the SMC. Finally, whereas 5-HT increased NO production, it also decreased cyclic GMP content in isolated intact arteries. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data demonstrate that agonist-induced ROS production in SMC targeting EC via myoendothelial gap junctions reduces endothelial NO-dependent control of pulmonary vasoreactivity. Such SMC modulation of endothelial control may represent a signaling pathway controlling vasoreactivity under not only physiological but also pathological conditions that often implicate excessive ROS production.

  14. A high precision method for quantitative measurements of reactive oxygen species in frozen biopsies.

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    Kirsti Berg

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: An electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR technique using the spin probe cyclic hydroxylamine 1-hydroxy-3-methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine (CMH was introduced as a versatile method for high precision quantification of reactive oxygen species, including the superoxide radical in frozen biological samples such as cell suspensions, blood or biopsies. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Loss of measurement precision and accuracy due to variations in sample size and shape were minimized by assembling the sample in a well-defined volume. Measurement was carried out at low temperature (150 K using a nitrogen flow Dewar. The signal intensity was measured from the EPR 1st derivative amplitude, and related to a sample, 3-carboxy-proxyl (CP• with known spin concentration. RESULTS: The absolute spin concentration could be quantified with a precision and accuracy better than ±10 µM (k = 1. The spin concentration of samples stored at -80°C could be reproduced after 6 months of storage well within the same error estimate. CONCLUSION: The absolute spin concentration in wet biological samples such as biopsies, water solutions and cell cultures could be quantified with higher precision and accuracy than normally achievable using common techniques such as flat cells, tissue cells and various capillary tubes. In addition; biological samples could be collected and stored for future incubation with spin probe, and also further stored up to at least six months before EPR analysis, without loss of signal intensity. This opens for the possibility to store and transport incubated biological samples with known accuracy of the spin concentration over time.

  15. Longevity of animals under reactive oxygen species stress and disease susceptibility due to global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paital, Biswaranjan; Panda, Sumana Kumari; Hati, Akshaya Kumar; Mohanty, Bobllina; Mohapatra, Manoj Kumar; Kanungo, Shyama; Chainy, Gagan Bihari Nityananda

    2016-02-26

    The world is projected to experience an approximate doubling of atmospheric CO2 concentration in the next decades. Rise in atmospheric CO2 level as one of the most important reasons is expected to contribute to raise the mean global temperature 1.4 °C-5.8 °C by that time. A survey from 128 countries speculates that global warming is primarily due to increase in atmospheric CO2 level that is produced mainly by anthropogenic activities. Exposure of animals to high environmental temperatures is mostly accompanied by unwanted acceleration of certain biochemical pathways in their cells. One of such examples is augmentation in generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent increase in oxidation of lipids, proteins and nucleic acids by ROS. Increase in oxidation of biomolecules leads to a state called as oxidative stress (OS). Finally, the increase in OS condition induces abnormality in physiology of animals under elevated temperature. Exposure of animals to rise in habitat temperature is found to boost the metabolism of animals and a very strong and positive correlation exists between metabolism and levels of ROS and OS. Continuous induction of OS is negatively correlated with survivability and longevity and positively correlated with ageing in animals. Thus, it can be predicted that continuous exposure of animals to acute or gradual rise in habitat temperature due to global warming may induce OS, reduced survivability and longevity in animals in general and poikilotherms in particular. A positive correlation between metabolism and temperature in general and altered O2 consumption at elevated temperature in particular could also increase the risk of experiencing OS in homeotherms. Effects of global warming on longevity of animals through increased risk of protein misfolding and disease susceptibility due to OS as the cause or effects or both also cannot be ignored. Therefore, understanding the physiological impacts of global warming in relation to

  16. The phytoalexin camalexin mediates cytotoxicity towards aggressive prostate cancer cells via reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Basil A; Neal, Corey L; Chetram, Mahandranauth; Vo, BaoHan; Mezencev, Roman; Hinton, Cimona; Odero-Marah, Valerie A

    2013-07-01

    Camalexin is a phytoalexin that accumulates in various cruciferous plants upon exposure to environmental stress and plant pathogens. Besides moderate antibacterial and antifungal activity, camalexin was reported to also exhibit antiproliferative and cancer chemopreventive effects in breast cancer and leukemia. We studied the cytotoxic effects of camalexin treatment on prostate cancer cell lines and whether this was mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. As models, we utilized LNCaP and its aggressive subline, C4-2, as well as ARCaP cells stably transfected with empty vector (Neo) control or constitutively active Snail cDNA that represents an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) model and displays increased cell migration and tumorigenicity. We confirmed previous studies showing that C4-2 and ARCaP-Snail cells express more ROS than LNCaP and ARCaP-Neo, respectively. Camalexin increased ROS, decreased cell proliferation, and increased apoptosis more significantly in C4-2 and ARCaP-Snail cells as compared to LNCaP and ARCaP-Neo cells, respectively, while normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC) were unaffected. Increased caspase-3/7 activity and increased cleaved PARP protein shown by Western blot analysis was suggestive of increased apoptosis. The ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) antagonized the effects of camalexin, whereas the addition of exogenous hydrogen peroxide potentiated the effects of camalexin, showing that camalexin is mediating its effects through ROS. In conclusion, camalexin is more potent in aggressive prostate cancer cells that express high ROS levels, and this phytoalexin has a strong potential as a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of especially metastatic prostate cancer.

  17. Redox signaling (cross-talk) from and to mitochondria involves mitochondrial pores and reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daiber, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    This review highlights the important role of redox signaling between mitochondria and NADPH oxidases. Besides the definition and general importance of redox signaling, the cross-talk between mitochondrial and Nox-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) is discussed on the basis of 4 different examples. In the first model, angiotensin-II is discussed as a trigger for NADPH oxidase activation with subsequent ROS-dependent opening of mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channels leading to depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential followed by mitochondrial ROS formation and respiratory dysfunction. This concept was supported by observations that ethidium bromide-induced mitochondrial damage suppressed angiotensin-II-dependent increase in Nox1 and oxidative stress. In another example hypoxia was used as a stimulator of mitochondrial ROS formation and by using pharmacological and genetic inhibitors, a role of mitochondrial ROS for the induction of NADPH oxidase via PKCvarepsilon was demonstrated. The third model was based on cell death by serum withdrawal that promotes the production of ROS in human 293T cells by stimulating both the mitochondria and Nox1. By superior molecular biological methods the authors showed that mitochondria were responsible for the fast onset of ROS formation followed by a slower but long-lasting oxidative stress condition based on the activation of an NADPH oxidase (Nox1) in response to the fast mitochondrial ROS formation. Finally, a cross-talk between mitochondria and NADPH oxidases (Nox2) was shown in nitroglycerin-induced tolerance involving the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and ATP-sensitive potassium channels. The use of these redox signaling pathways as pharmacological targets is briefly discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. CD137 ligand activated microglia induces oligodendrocyte apoptosis via reactive oxygen species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeo Yee

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract CD137 (4-1BB, TNFRSF9, a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF receptor family, is a potent T cell co-stimulatory molecule. CD137 ligand (CD137L is expressed by antigen presenting cells (APC as a transmembrane protein and transmits activating signals into APC. In this study we investigated the effects of CD137L signaling in microglia, the resident APC in the central nervous system. In vitro, the murine microglia cell lines BV-2 and N9, as well as primary murine microglia responded with activation as evidenced by adherence and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, MMP-9, and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM. CD137L signaling is also important for microglia activation in vivo, since CD137L-deficient mice exhibited profoundly less microglia activation during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE which is a well-established murine model for neuroinflammation and human multiple sclerosis (MS. Also CD137 is expressed in the CNS of mice during EAE. Activated microglia has been reported to mediate the destruction of axonal myelin sheaths and cause the death of oligodendrocytes, the main pathogenic mechanisms in EAE and MS. Corresponding to the lower microglia activation there were also fewer apoptotic oligodendrocytes in the CNS of CD137L-deficient mice. In vitro co-culture confirmed that CD137L-activated microglia induces apoptosis in oligodendrocytes, and identified reactive oxygen species as the mechanism of apoptosis induction. These data demonstrate activating effects of CD137L signaling to microglia, and show for the first time that the CD137 receptor/ligand system may be a mediator of neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative disease, by activating microglia which in turn kill oligodendrocytes.

  19. Regional inverse modeling for high reactive species with PYVAR-CHIMERE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortems-Cheiney, A.; Pison, I.; Dufour, G.; Broquet, G.; Costantino, L.

    2017-12-01

    The degradation of air quality is a worldwide environmental problem: according to the World Health Organization WHO, 92% of the world's population breathe polluted air in 2016. A number of air pollutants associated with respiratory disease and shortened life expectancy play a particularly important role in global outdoor air pollution. In addition to threatening both human health and ecosystems, these gaseous air pollutants including nitrogen oxides (NOx=NO+NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), ammonia (NH3), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) could be precursors of ozone (O3) and Particulate Matter (PM). Without a strong scientific back-up to determine their different sources, the necessary regulations to improve air quality will not be efficient. To date, only chemistry-transport models (CTM) are able to describe pollutant concentrations at any location in the world and their evolution in the atmosphere. Consequently, they have become essential tools for studying air quality. However, CTM are hampered by incomplete information on gaseous precursors and one of the large shortcoming for simulating the gaseous pollutants budgets is the lack of high spatio-temporal variability for the emission estimations provided as inputs for chemistry-transport models. For all these reasons, an inverse system called PYVAR-CHIMERE has been developed, operating in synergy between a CTM and atmospheric observations, and being adjust for the highly reactive species of interest here, as NO2. We present here the first results of this Bayesian variational inverse method for the quantification of NO2 emissions both over Europe (in March 2011) and over China (in January 2015), with a spatial resolution of 0.5°x0.5° and at a weekly temporal resolution, constrained by surface measurements and OMI NO2 satellite observations.

  20. Curcumin-induced inhibition of cellular reactive oxygen species generation: novel therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanyam, M; Koteswari, A Adaikala; Kumar, R Sampath; Monickaraj, S Finny; Maheswari, J Uma; Mohan, V

    2003-12-01

    There is evidence for increased levels of circulating reactive oxygen species (ROS) in diabetics, as indirectly inferred by the findings of increased lipid peroxidation and decreased antioxidant status. Direct measurements of intracellular generation of ROS using fluorescent dyes also demonstrate an association of oxidative stress with diabetes. Although phenolic compounds attenuate oxidative stress-related tissue damage, there are concerns over toxicity of synthetic phenolic antioxidants and this has considerably stimulated interest in investigating the role of natural phenolics in medicinal applications. Curcumin (the primary active principle in turmeric, Curcuma longa Linn.) has been claimed to represent a potential antioxidant and antiinflammatory agent with phytonutrient and bioprotective properties. However there are lack of molecular studies to demonstrate its cellular action and potential molecular targets. In this study the antioxidant effect of curcumin as a function of changes in cellular ROS generation was tested. Our results clearly demonstrate that curcumin abolished both phorbol-12 myristate-13 acetate (PMA) and thapsigargin-induced ROS generation in cells from control and diabetic subjects. The pattern of these ROS inhibitory effects as a function of dose-dependency suggests that curcumin mechanistically interferes with protein kinase C (PKC) and calcium regulation. Simultaneous measurements of ROS and Ca2+ influx suggest that a rise in cytosolic Ca2+ may be a trigger for increased ROS generation. We suggest that the antioxidant and antiangeogenic actions of curcumin, as a mechanism of inhibition of Ca2+ entry and PKC activity, should be further exploited to develop suitable and novel drugs for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy and other diabetic complications.

  1. Reactive oxygen species generators affect quality parameters and apoptosis markers differently in red deer spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pastor, Felipe; Aisen, Eduardo; Fernández-Santos, María Rocío; Esteso, Milagros C; Maroto-Morales, Alejandro; García-Alvarez, Olga; Garde, J Julián

    2009-02-01

    Fe(2)(+)/ascorbate, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), and hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase (XOD) are commonly used for inducing oxidative stress on spermatozoa. A comparative study of these agents was carried out on thawed spermatozoa from red deer. First, we tested a high, medium, and low concentration of each agent: 100, 10, and 1 microM Fe(2)(+) (hydroxyl radical generator); 1 mM, 100, and 10 microM H(2)O(2); and 100, 10, and 1 mU/ml XOD (superoxide and H(2)O(2) generator), incubated at 37 degrees C for 180 min. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS; H(2)DCFDA) increased with dose and time similarly for the three systems at each concentration level. Motility and mitochondrial membrane potential (Deltapsi(m)) were considerably decreased by H(2)O(2) (1 mM and 100 microM) and XOD (100 and 10 mU/ml). Only 1 mM H(2)O(2) reduced viability. The antioxidant Trolox (10 microM) reduced intracellular ROS, but could not prevent the H(2)O(2) or XOD effects. In a second experiment, YO-PRO-1 and M540 were used as apoptotic and membrane stability markers respectively. Only H(2)O(2) increased the proportion of apoptotic and membrane-destabilized spermatozoa. Catalase added to XOD prevented Deltapsi(m) loss, confirming that H(2)O(2) was the causative agent, not superoxide. In a third experiment, caspase activation was tested using the (FAM-VAD-FMK) probe. Viable spermatozoa with activated caspases could be detected in untreated samples, and only H(2)O(2) increased their proportion after 60 min. There were important differences between ROS generators, H(2)O(2) being the most cytotoxic. Although H(2)O(2) and XOD caused Deltapsi(m) dissipation, this was not reflected in increasing apoptotic markers.

  2. Reactive oxygen species regulated mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in PC12 cells exposed to chlorpyrifos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Eun [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hanyang Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Hyeon [Hanyang Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Graduate School of Biomedical Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, In Chul [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Hyun Chul, E-mail: hckoh@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hanyang Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Graduate School of Biomedical Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-01

    Reactive oxidative species (ROS) generated by environmental toxicants including pesticides could be one of the factors underlying the neuronal cell damage in neurodegenerative diseases. In this study we found that chlorpyrifos (CPF) induced apoptosis in dopaminergic neuronal components of PC12 cells as demonstrated by the activation of caspases and nuclear condensation. Furthermore, CPF also reduced the tyrosine hydroxylase-positive immunoreactivity in substantia nigra of the rat. In addition, CPF induced inhibition of mitochondrial complex I activity. Importantly, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) treatment effectively blocked apoptosis via the caspase-9 and caspase-3 pathways while NAC attenuated the inhibition of mitochondrial complex I activity as well as the oxidative metabolism of dopamine (DA). These results demonstrated that CPF-induced apoptosis was involved in mitochondrial dysfunction through the production of ROS. In the response of cellular antioxidant systems to CPF, we found that CPF treatment increased HO-1 expression while the expression of CuZnSOD and MnSOD was reduced. In addition, we found that CPF treatment activated MAPK pathways, including ERK 1/2, the JNK, and the p38 MAP kinase in a time-dependent manner. NAC treatment abolished MAPK phosphorylation caused by CPF, indicating that ROS are upstream signals of MAPK. Interestingly, MAPK inhibitors abolished cytotoxicity and reduced ROS generation by CPF treatment. Our results demonstrate that CPF induced neuronal cell death in part through MAPK activation via ROS generation, suggesting its potential to generate oxidative stress via mitochondrial damage and its involvement in oxidative stress-related neurodegenerative disease. -- Highlights: ► Chlorpyrifos induces apoptosis. ► Chlorpyrifos inhibits mitochondrial complex I activity. ► ROS is involved in chlorpyrifos-induced apoptosis. ► Chlorpyrifos affects cellular antioxidant systems. ► Chlorpyrifos-induced apoptosis mediates activation of MAPK.

  3. Sites of reactive oxygen species generation by mitochondria oxidizing different substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey L. Quinlan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial radical production is important in redox signaling, aging and disease, but the relative contributions of different production sites are poorly understood. We analyzed the rates of superoxide/H2O2 production from different defined sites in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria oxidizing a variety of conventional substrates in the absence of added inhibitors: succinate; glycerol 3-phosphate; palmitoylcarnitine plus carnitine; or glutamate plus malate. In all cases, the sum of the estimated rates accounted fully for the measured overall rates. There were two striking results. First, the overall rates differed by an order of magnitude between substrates. Second, the relative contribution of each site was very different with different substrates. During succinate oxidation, most of the superoxide production was from the site of quinone reduction in complex I (site IQ, with small contributions from the flavin site in complex I (site IF and the quinol oxidation site in complex III (site IIIQo. However, with glutamate plus malate as substrate, site IQ made little or no contribution, and production was shared between site IF, site IIIQo and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase. With palmitoylcarnitine as substrate, the flavin site in complex II (site IIF was a major contributor (together with sites IF and IIIQo, and with glycerol 3-phosphate as substrate, five different sites all contributed, including glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Thus, the relative and absolute contributions of specific sites to the production of reactive oxygen species in isolated mitochondria depend very strongly on the substrates being oxidized, and the same is likely true in cells and in vivo.

  4. PKCα promotes generation of reactive oxygen species via DUOX2 in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiajun; Shao, Miaomiao; Liu, Min; Peng, Peike; Li, Lili; Wu, Weicheng; Wang, Lan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, 200032 Shanghai (China); Duan, Fangfang [Institute of Biomedical Science, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Mingming; Song, Shushu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, 200032 Shanghai (China); Jia, Dongwei, E-mail: jiadongwei@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, 200032 Shanghai (China); Ruan, Yuanyuan, E-mail: yuanyuanruan@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, 200032 Shanghai (China); Gu, Jianxin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, 200032 Shanghai (China); Institute of Biomedical Science, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2015-08-07

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and elevated rates of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have long been considered as a hallmark of almost all types of cancer including HCC. Protein kinase C alpha (PKCα), a serine/threonine kinase among conventional PKC family, is recognized as a major player in signal transduction and tumor progression. Overexpression of PKCα is commonly observed in human HCC and associated with its poor prognosis. However, how PKCα is involved in hepatocellular carcinogenesis remains not fully understood. In this study, we found that among the members of conventional PKC family, PKCα, but not PKCβI or βII, promoted ROS production in HCC cells. PKCα stimulated generation of ROS by up-regulating DUOX2 at post-transcriptional level. Depletion of DUOX2 abrogated PKCα-induced activation of AKT/MAPK pathways as well as cell proliferation, migration and invasion in HCC cells. Moreover, the expression of DUOX2 and PKCα was well positively correlated in both HCC cell lines and patient samples. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that PKCα plays a critical role in HCC development by inducing DUOX2 expression and ROS generation, and propose a strategy to target PKCα/DUOX2 as a potential adjuvant therapy for HCC treatment. - Highlights: • PKCα promotes the generation of ROS in hepatocellular carcinoma. • PKCα induces ROS production by up-regulating DUOX2 at post-transcriptional level. • DUOX2 is required for PKCα-induced AKT/MAPK activation and tumor progression in HCC. • The expression of PKCα is positively correlated with DUOX2 in HCC.

  5. Reactive oxygen species regulated mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in PC12 cells exposed to chlorpyrifos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Eun; Park, Jae Hyeon; Shin, In Chul; Koh, Hyun Chul

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxidative species (ROS) generated by environmental toxicants including pesticides could be one of the factors underlying the neuronal cell damage in neurodegenerative diseases. In this study we found that chlorpyrifos (CPF) induced apoptosis in dopaminergic neuronal components of PC12 cells as demonstrated by the activation of caspases and nuclear condensation. Furthermore, CPF also reduced the tyrosine hydroxylase-positive immunoreactivity in substantia nigra of the rat. In addition, CPF induced inhibition of mitochondrial complex I activity. Importantly, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) treatment effectively blocked apoptosis via the caspase-9 and caspase-3 pathways while NAC attenuated the inhibition of mitochondrial complex I activity as well as the oxidative metabolism of dopamine (DA). These results demonstrated that CPF-induced apoptosis was involved in mitochondrial dysfunction through the production of ROS. In the response of cellular antioxidant systems to CPF, we found that CPF treatment increased HO-1 expression while the expression of CuZnSOD and MnSOD was reduced. In addition, we found that CPF treatment activated MAPK pathways, including ERK 1/2, the JNK, and the p38 MAP kinase in a time-dependent manner. NAC treatment abolished MAPK phosphorylation caused by CPF, indicating that ROS are upstream signals of MAPK. Inter