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Sample records for single pass collider

  1. Single Pass Collider Memo: Gradient Perturbations of the SLC arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weng, W.T.; Sands, M.; /SLAC

    2016-12-16

    As the beam passes through the arcs, the gradient it encounters at each magnet differs from the design value. This deviation may be in part random and in part systematic. In this note we make estimates of the effects to be expected from both kinds of errors.

  2. Non-linear optics for the final focus of the single-pass-collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, K.L.; Spencer, J.E.

    1981-02-01

    The purpose of the final focus system (FFS) is to demagnify the beam envelope in the Collider arc lattice to a size suitable for beam collisions at the interaction region. The final spot size is determined by the beam emittance, the beta function β* at the IR, the momentum spread in the beam, and the quality of the FFS optics. In particular, if the focusing system is not chromatically corrected, the momentum dispersion in the beam can lead to a substantial degradation in the quality of the final focus. The objective is to design a FFS for 50 GeV/c within approx. 100 meters having an IR spot size sigma/sub xy/ of approximately 2 μm for a beam emittance of epsilon = 3 x 10 -10 m-rad and a momentum spread of delta = +-0.5%. This requires a β/sub x,y/ equal to or less than 1 cm. This report considers the problems encountered in the design of a final focus system that will reliably provide the desired beam size for collisions

  3. EMISAR single pass topographic SAR interferometer modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Nørvang; Skou, Niels; Woelders, Kim

    1996-01-01

    The Danish Center for Remote Sensing (DCRS) has augmented its dual-frequency polarimetric synthetic aperture radar system (EMISAR) with single pass across-track interferometric (XTI) modes. This paper describes the system configuration, specifications and the operating modes. Analysis of data acq...

  4. Single Pass Albumin Dialysis in Hepatorenal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Ebadur

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS is the most appalling complication of acute or chronic liver disease with 90% mortality rate. Single pass albumin dialysis (SPAD can be considered as a noble liver support technique in HRS. Here, we present a case of a young healthy patient who developed hyperacute fulminant liver failure that progressed to HRS. The patient was offered SPAD as a bridge to liver transplantation, however, it resulted in an excellent recovery.

  5. Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Weiren

    2014-01-01

    The idea of colliding two particle beams to fully exploit the energy of accelerated particles was first proposed by Rolf Wideröe, who in 1943 applied for a patent on the collider concept and was awarded the patent in 1953. The first three colliders — AdA in Italy, CBX in the US, and VEP-1 in the then Soviet Union — came to operation about 50 years ago in the mid-1960s. A number of other colliders followed. Over the past decades, colliders defined the energy frontier in particle physics. Different types of colliers — proton–proton, proton–antiproton, electron–positron, electron–proton, electron-ion and ion-ion colliders — have played complementary roles in fully mapping out the constituents and forces in the Standard Model (SM). We are now at a point where all predicted SM constituents of matter and forces have been found, and all the latest ones were found at colliders. Colliders also play a critical role in advancing beam physics, accelerator research and technology development. It is timel...

  6. NOVOSIBIRSK/STANFORD: colliding linac beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Plans to use colliding beams from linear accelerators are being considered at Novosibirsk and Stanford. The VLEPP scheme proposed for Novosibirsk and the Stanford single pass collider scheme are described. (W.D.L.).

  7. Axioms for behavioural congruence of single-pass instruction sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.; Middelburg, C.A.

    2017-01-01

    In program algebra, an algebraic theory of single-pass instruction sequences, three congruences on instruction sequences are paid attention to: instruction sequence congruence, structural congruence, and behavioural congruence. Sound and complete axiom systems for the first two congruences were

  8. Single-Pass Clustering Algorithm Based on Storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, LI; Longlong, DAI; Zhiying, JIANG; Shunzi, LI

    2017-02-01

    The dramatically increasing volume of data makes the computational complexity of traditional clustering algorithm rise rapidly accordingly, which leads to the longer time. So as to improve the efficiency of the stream data clustering, a distributed real-time clustering algorithm (S-Single-Pass) based on the classic Single-Pass [1] algorithm and Storm [2] computation framework was designed in this paper. By employing this kind of method in the Topic Detection and Tracking (TDT) [3], the real-time performance of topic detection arises effectively. The proposed method splits the clustering process into two parts: one part is to form clusters for the multi-thread parallel clustering, the other part is to merge the generated clusters in the previous process and update the global clusters. Through the experimental results, the conclusion can be drawn that the proposed method have the nearly same clustering accuracy as the traditional Single-Pass algorithm and the clustering accuracy remains steady, computing rate increases linearly when increasing the number of cluster machines and nodes (processing threads).

  9. Milestone experiments for single pass UV/X-ray FELs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Zvi, I.

    1994-01-01

    In the past decade, significant advances have been made in the theory and technology of high brightness electron beams and single pass FELS. These developments facilitate the construction of practical UV and X-ray FELs and has prompted proposals to the DOE for the construction of such facilities. There are several important experiments to be performed before committing to the construction of dedicated user facilities. Two experiments are under construction in the IR, the UCLA Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission experiment and the BNL laser seeded Harmonic Generation experiment. A multi-institution collaboration is being organized about a 210 MeV electron linac available at BNL and the 10 meter tong NISUS wiggler. This experiment will be done in the UV and will test various experimental aspects of electron beam dynamics, FEL exponential regime with gain guiding, start up from noise, seeding and harmonic generation. These experiments will advance the state of FEL research and lead towards future dedicated users' facilities

  10. Milestone experiments for single pass UV/X-ray FELs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    1995-04-01

    In the past decade, significant advances have been made in the theory and technology of high brightness electron beams and single pass FELs. These developments facilitate the construction of practical UV and X-ray FELs and has prompted proposals to the DOE for the construction of such facilities. There are several important experiments to be performed before committing to the construction of dedicated user facilities. Two experiments are under construction in the IR, the UCLA self-amplified spontaneous emission experiment and the BNL laser seeded harmonic generation experiment. A multi-institution collaboration is being organized about a 210 MeV electron linac available at BNL and the 10 m long NISUS wiggler. This experiment will be done in the UV and will test various experimental aspects of electron beam dynamics, FEL exponential regime with gain guiding, start-up from noise, seeding and harmonic generation. These experiments will advance the state of FEL research and lead towards future dedicated users' facilities.

  11. Single-pass multi-view volume rendering

    OpenAIRE

    Hübner, T; Pajarola, R

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new direct volume rendering (DVR) algorithm for multi-view auto-stereoscopic displays. Common multi-view methods perform multi-pass rendering (one pass for each view) and subsequent image compositing and masking for generating multiple views. The rendering time increases therefore linearly with the number of views, but sufficient frame-rates are achieved by sub-resolution rendering, at the expense of degraded image quality. To overcome these disadvantages for DVR...

  12. The Single Pass RF Driver: Final beam compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The Single Pass RF Driver (SPRFD) compacts the beam from the linac without storage rings by manipulations that take advantage of the multiplicity of isotopes (16), the preserved µbunch structure, and increased total linac current. Magnetic switches on a first set of delay lines rearrange the internal structure of the various isotopic beams. A second set of delay lines sets the relative timing of the 16 isotopic beam sections so they will telescope at the pellet, in one of multiple fusion chambers, e.g. 10. Shortening each isotopic beam section uses preservation of the µbunch structure up to the final ∼2 km drift before final focus. Just before the final drift, differential acceleration of the µbunches in each isotopic beam section (128 total) launches an axial collapse, referred to as the “Slick”. The µbunches interpenetrate as their centers of mass move toward each other and individual µbunches lengthen due to their momentum spread. In longitudinal phase space they slide over one another as they lengthen in time and slim down in instantaneous energy spread. The permissible amount of µbunch lengthening is set by the design pulse shape at the pellet, which varies for different groups of isotopes. In narrow bands of ranges according to the role for each isotope group in the pellet, the ranges extend from 1 to 10 g/cm 2 to drive the cylinder barrel and thin hemispherical end caps, to heat the ∼0.5 g/cm 2 ρR fast ignition zone, and to improve the quasi-sphericity of the compression of the fast ignition zones at the pellet's ends. Because the µbunch–µbunch momentum differences are correlated, time-ramped beamline transport elements close after the differential accelerator are used to correct the associated shifts of focal point. Beam neutralization is needed after the differential acceleration until adjacent bunches begin to overlap. Concurrent collapse of each isotope and telescoping of the 16 isotopes cause the current in each beamline to rise

  13. Single top quark production and properties at hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Skovpen, Kirill

    2016-01-01

    The results of cross section measurements for electroweak production of top quarks in t channel, s channel, and in association with W-boson are presented from LHC and Tevatron experiments. These measurements are used to place constraints on the CKM matrix element $V_{tb}$. Top quark polarization is studied in the measurement of the top quark spin asymmetry in single top events. Anomalous structure of top quark coupling is probed.

  14. Lucretia A Matlab-Based Toolbox for the Modeling and Simulation of Single-Pass Electron Beam Transport Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Tenenbaum, P G

    2005-01-01

    We report on Lucretia, a new simulation tool for the study of single-pass electron beam transport systems. Lucretia supports a combination of analytic and tracking techniques to model the tuning and operation of bunch compressors, linear accelerators, and beam delivery systems of linear colliders and linac-driven Free Electron Laser (FEL) facilities. Extensive use of Matlab scripting, graphics, and numerical capabilities maximize the flexibility of the system, and emphasis has been placed on representing and preserving the fixed relationships between elements (common girders, power supplies, etc.) which must be respected in the design of tuning algorithms. An overview of the code organization, some simple examples, and plans for future development are discussed.

  15. Model for Estimation of Thermal History Produced by a Single Pass Underwater Wet Weld

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dill, Jay

    1997-01-01

    Thermal history calculations for single pass underwater wet weldments were made by solving the appropriate beat transfer equations using the three-dimensional Crank-Nicholson finite difference method...

  16. Single and double pass solar air heaters with wire mesh as packing bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldabbagh, L.B.Y.; Egelioglu, F. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Eastern Mediterranean University, Magosa, Mersin 10 (Turkey); Ilkan, M. [School of Computing and Tecnology, Eastern Mediterranean University, Magosa, Mersin 10 (Turkey)

    2010-09-15

    The thermal performances of single and double pass solar air heaters with steel wire mesh layers are used instead of a flat absorber plate are investigated experimentally. The effects of mass flow rate of air on the outlet temperature and thermal efficiency were studied. The results indicate that the efficiency increases with increasing the mass flow rate for the range of the flow rate used in this work between 0.012 and 0.038 kg/s. For the same flow rate, the efficiency of the double pass is found to be higher than the single pass by 34-45%. Moreover, the maximum efficiencies obtained for the single and the double pass air collectors are 45.93 and 83.65% respectively for the mass flow rate of 0.038 kg/s. Comparison of the results of a packed bed collector with those of a conventional collector shows a substantial enhancement in the thermal efficiency. (author)

  17. Highly efficient single-pass sum frequency generation by cascaded nonlinear crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Kragh; Andersen, Peter E.; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin

    2015-01-01

    The cascading of nonlinear crystals has been established as a simple method to greatly increase the conversion efficiency of single-pass second-harmonic generation compared to a single-crystal scheme. Here, we show for the first time that the technique can be extended to sum frequency generation......, despite differences in the phase relations of the involved fields. An unprecedented 5.5 W of continuous-wave diffraction-limited green light is generated from the single-pass sum frequency mixing of two diode lasers in two periodically poled nonlinear crystals (conversion efficiency 50%). The technique...

  18. Mechanical and microstructural characterization of single and double pass Aluminum AA6061 friction stir weld joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, N H; Shah, L H; Ishak, M

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the effect of single pass (SP), double sided pass (DSP) and normal double pass (NDP) method on friction stir welding of aluminum AA6061. Two pieces of AA6061 alloy with thickness of 6 mm were friction stir welded by using conventional milling machine. The rotational speeds that were used in this study were 800 rpm, 1000 rpm and 1200 rpm, respectively. The welding speed is fixed to 100 mm/min. Microstructure observation of welded area was studied by using optical microscope. Tensile test and Vickers hardness test were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of this specimen. Mechanical property analysis results indicate that at low rotational speeds, defects such as surface lack of fill and tunneling in the welded area can be observed. Vickers hardness of specimens however did not vary much when rotational speed is varied. Welded specimens using single pass method shows higher tensile strength and hardness value compared to both double pass methods up to 180.61 MPa. Moreover, DSP showed better tensile test and hardness test compared to NDP method. The optimum parameters were found to be single pass method with 1200 rpm of rotational speed. Therefore economically sound to only perform SP method to obtain maximum tensile strength for AA6061 FSW with thickness of 6 mm. (paper)

  19. Double Pass 595?nm pulsed dye laser at a 6 minute interval for the treatment of port-wine stains is not more effective than single pass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, M. A. D.; van Drooge, A. M.; Wolkerstorfer, A.; van Gemert, M. J. C.; van der Veen, J. P. W.; Bos, J. D.; Beek, J. F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Pulsed dye laser (PDL) is the first choice for treatment of port wine stains (PWS). However, outcome is highly variable and only a few patients achieve complete clearance. The objective of the study was to compare efficacy and safety of single pass PDL with double pass PDL at a 6 minute

  20. Fuel-element failures in Hanford single-pass reactors 1944--1971

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gydesen, S.P.

    1993-07-01

    The primary objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. To estimate the doses, the staff of the Source Terms Task use operating information from historical documents to approximate the radioactive emissions. One source of radioactive emissions to the Columbia River came from leaks in the aluminum cladding of the uranium metal fuel elements in single-pass reactors. The purpose of this letter report is to provide photocopies of the documents that recorded these failures. The data from these documents will be used by the Source Terms Task to determine the contribution of single-pass reactor fuel-element failures to the radioactivity of the reactor effluent from 1944 through 1971. Each referenced fuel-element failure occurring in the Hanford single-pass reactors is addressed. The first recorded failure was in 1948, the last in 1970. No records of fuel-element failures were found in documents prior to 1948. Data on the approximately 2000 failures which occurred during the 28 years (1944--1971) of Hanford single-pass reactor operations are provided in this report.

  1. Fuel-element failures in Hanford single-pass reactors 1944--1971

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gydesen, S.P.

    1993-07-01

    The primary objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. To estimate the doses, the staff of the Source Terms Task use operating information from historical documents to approximate the radioactive emissions. One source of radioactive emissions to the Columbia River came from leaks in the aluminum cladding of the uranium metal fuel elements in single-pass reactors. The purpose of this letter report is to provide photocopies of the documents that recorded these failures. The data from these documents will be used by the Source Terms Task to determine the contribution of single-pass reactor fuel-element failures to the radioactivity of the reactor effluent from 1944 through 1971. Each referenced fuel-element failure occurring in the Hanford single-pass reactors is addressed. The first recorded failure was in 1948, the last in 1970. No records of fuel-element failures were found in documents prior to 1948. Data on the approximately 2000 failures which occurred during the 28 years (1944--1971) of Hanford single-pass reactor operations are provided in this report

  2. Effect of Single and Double Pass Arc Welding on HAZ of High Carbon Steel Weldments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Abdul Hasan Atiyah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of heat affected zone width for multi high carbon steel joint in case of single and double pass arc welded have been studied. These measurements are carried out in accompanying of hardness and microstructural observations. Knowing that, high carbon steel has a poor weld ability and most of welding processes are carried out for repairing components. It is found that a preheating was a very important parameter in identifying the width of heat-affected zone. Preheating the joint at 450°C was found to gives less width heat affected zone (i.e.5.93mm in the case of single pass welding practices. While, in the case of double pass welding, the heat affected zone becomes wider because the excessive heating during welding cycle. The double pass welding has coarsening the structure of first pass. Microscopic observations indicated that the structure of HAZ of high carbon steel was mainly lath martensite (ML under the condition of lower weld heat input. 

  3. Measuring the WWγ vertex in single W production at ep colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur, U.; Zeppenfeld, D.

    1989-01-01

    A detailed analysis of single W production in ep collisions via ep→eW ± X is presented by using helicity amplitudes for general WWγ couplings. Analytic expressions are given for the γq→W ± q' helicity amplitudes which describe ep→eWX in the Weizsaecker-Williams approximation and provide a semiquantitative understanding of the results obtained with the full matrix elements. Possibilities to test the gauge theory structure of the WWγ vertex at HERA (√s=314 GeV) and at an ep collider in the LEP tunnel (√s≅1.4 TeV) are explored. It is found that at HERA the WWγ vertex can be measured with 30-50% accuracy after a few years of running. (orig.)

  4. Single-Bunch Instability Driven by the Electron Cloud Effect in the Positron Damping Ring of the International Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivi, Mauro; Raubenheimer, Tor O.; Ghalam, Ali; Harkay, Katherine; Ohmi, Kazuhito; Wanzenberg, Rainer; Wolski, Andrzej; Zimmermann, Frank

    2005-01-01

    Collective instabilities caused by the formation of an electron cloud (EC) are a potential limitation to the performances of the damping rings for a future linear collider. In this paper, we present recent simulation results for the electron cloud build-up in damping rings of different circumferences and discuss the single-bunch instabilities driven by the electron cloud

  5. Observation of Single Isolated Electrons of High Transverse Momentum in Events with Missing Transverse Energy at the CERN pp Collider

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banner, M.; Kofoed-Hansen, O.

    1983-01-01

    We report the results of a search for single isolated electrons of high transverse momentum at the CERN collider. Above 15 GeV/c, four events are found having large missing transverse energy along a direction opposite in azimuth to that of the high-pT electron. Both the configuration of the events...

  6. A 3D Reconstruction Strategy of Vehicle Outline Based on Single-Pass Single-Polarization CSAR Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leping Chen; Daoxiang An; Xiaotao Huang; Zhimin Zhou

    2017-11-01

    In the last few years, interest in circular synthetic aperture radar (CSAR) acquisitions has arisen as a consequence of the potential achievement of 3D reconstructions over 360° azimuth angle variation. In real-world scenarios, full 3D reconstructions of arbitrary targets need multi-pass data, which makes the processing complex, money-consuming, and time expending. In this paper, we propose a processing strategy for the 3D reconstruction of vehicle, which can avoid using multi-pass data by introducing a priori information of vehicle's shape. Besides, the proposed strategy just needs the single-pass single-polarization CSAR data to perform vehicle's 3D reconstruction, which makes the processing much more economic and efficient. First, an analysis of the distribution of attributed scattering centers from vehicle facet model is presented. And the analysis results show that a smooth and continuous basic outline of vehicle could be extracted from the peak curve of a noncoherent processing image. Second, the 3D location of vehicle roofline is inferred from layover with empirical insets of the basic outline. At last, the basic line and roofline of the vehicle are used to estimate the vehicle's 3D information and constitute the vehicle's 3D outline. The simulated and measured data processing results prove the correctness and effectiveness of our proposed strategy.

  7. Stanford's linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southworth, B.

    1985-01-01

    The peak of the construction phase of the Stanford Linear Collider, SLC, to achieve 50 GeV electron-positron collisions has now been passed. The work remains on schedule to attempt colliding beams, initially at comparatively low luminosity, early in 1987. (orig./HSI).

  8. A Novel Single Pass Authenticated Encryption Stream Cipher for Software Defined Radios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khajuria, Samant

    2012-01-01

    high throughput and low overhead for SDRs. The thesis is divided into two research topics. One topic is the design of a 1-pass authenticated encryption scheme that can accomplish both message secrecy and authenticity in a single cryptographic primitive. The other topic is the implementation......With the rapid growth of new wireless communication standards, a solution that is able to provide a seamless shift between existing wireless protocols and high flexibility as well as capacity is crucial. Software Defined Radio (SDR) technology offers this flexibility. It gives the possibility...

  9. High-aspect-ratio grooves fabricated in silicon by a single pass of femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Yuncan; Shi Haitao; Si Jinhai; Ren Hai; Chen Tao; Chen Feng; Hou Xun

    2012-01-01

    High-aspect-ratio grooves have been fabricated in silicon by a single pass of femtosecond laser pulses in water and ambient air. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy were employed to image for the morphology of the photoinduced grooves and analyze the chemical composition in the surrounding of the grooves. It was observed that the sidewall of the grooves fabricated in water was much smoother than that in ambient air, and there were homogeneous nano-scale protrusions on the sidewall of the grooves fabricated in water. Meanwhile, oxygen species, which was incorporated into the grooves fabricated in air, was not observed in those in water.

  10. Generic, network schema agnostic sparse tensor factorization for single-pass clustering of heterogeneous information networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jibing Wu

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous information networks (e.g. bibliographic networks and social media networks that consist of multiple interconnected objects are ubiquitous. Clustering analysis is an effective method to understand the semantic information and interpretable structure of the heterogeneous information networks, and it has attracted the attention of many researchers in recent years. However, most studies assume that heterogeneous information networks usually follow some simple schemas, such as bi-typed networks or star network schema, and they can only cluster one type of object in the network each time. In this paper, a novel clustering framework is proposed based on sparse tensor factorization for heterogeneous information networks, which can cluster multiple types of objects simultaneously in a single pass without any network schema information. The types of objects and the relations between them in the heterogeneous information networks are modeled as a sparse tensor. The clustering issue is modeled as an optimization problem, which is similar to the well-known Tucker decomposition. Then, an Alternating Least Squares (ALS algorithm and a feasible initialization method are proposed to solve the optimization problem. Based on the tensor factorization, we simultaneously partition different types of objects into different clusters. The experimental results on both synthetic and real-world datasets have demonstrated that our proposed clustering framework, STFClus, can model heterogeneous information networks efficiently and can outperform state-of-the-art clustering algorithms as a generally applicable single-pass clustering method for heterogeneous network which is network schema agnostic.

  11. Safety and efficacy of high fluence CO2 laser skin resurfacing with a single pass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosh, M M; Larrabee, W F; Smoller, B

    1999-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) laser skin resurfacing has nearly replaced more traditional methods of superficial skin rejuvenation. Post-treatment erythema is the most common side effect of this method of skin resurfacing. Sublethal thermal damage to the dermis has been proposed as an etiology for post laser erythema. Recent developments in laser resurfacing technology have aimed at minimizing thermal damage to the dermis. To determine depth of skin ablation, extent of thermal injury, and ideal laser parameters for the FeatherTouch laser system. To assess the safety and efficacy of laser resurfacing at high energy fluences with a single pass. Laser resurfacing was performed in the preauricular skin of five patients undergoing rhytidectomy. A total of 60 sites were tested with fluences of 7 to 17 Joules/cm2. Histologic evaluation of excised skin showed maximal thermal injury to be restricted to 60 microns in the papillary dermis. The reticular dermis showed no evidence of injury. Based on these findings, laser resurfacing at 17 J/cm2 (70 watts) was performed on 30 patients (in the periorbital area, a maximum of 9 J/cm2 or 36 watts was used). Follow up ranged between 12 and 18 months. Based on histologic comparison of average and high fluence laser resurfacing, high fluence laser resurfacing did not cause added thermal damage to the reticular dermis. In the clinical group, no major complications such as scarring, scleral show, infection or ectropion were encountered. Transient hyperpigmentation was noted in three patients. Overall patient satisfaction was good to excellent. Post-treatment erythema lasted an average of 4 weeks. We conclude that CO2 laser resurfacing of the face (excluding the periorbital region) can be performed safely and effectively, with the FeatherTouch laser, at 17 J/cm2 with one pass. In our group of patients, laser resurfacing with a single pass at 17 J/cm2 caused less post-operative erythema than two or more passes at 9 J/cm2.

  12. Double Pass 595 nm Pulsed Dye Laser Does Not Enhance the Efficacy of Port Wine Stains Compared with Single Pass: A Randomized Comparison with Histological Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenxin; Zhu, Jiafang; Wang, Lizhen; Qiu, Yajing; Chen, Yijie; Yang, Xi; Chang, Lei; Ma, Gang; Lin, Xiaoxi

    2018-03-27

    To compare the efficacy and safety of double-pass pulsed dye laser (DWL) and single-pass PDL (SWL) in treating virgin port wine stain (PWS). The increase in the extent of vascular damage attributed to the use of double-pass techniques for PWS remains inconclusive. A prospective, side-by-side comparison with a histological study for virgin PWS is still lacking. Twenty-one patients (11 flat PWS, 10 hypertrophic PWS) with untreated PWS underwent 3 treatments at 2-month intervals. Each PWS was divided into three treatment sites: SWL, DWL, and untreated control. Chromametric and visual evaluation of the efficacy and evaluation of side effects were conducted 3 months after final treatment. Biopsies were taken at the treated sites immediately posttreatment. Chromametric and visual evaluation suggested that DWL sites showed no significant improvement compared with SWL (p > 0.05) in treating PWS. The mean depth of photothermal damage to the vessels was limited to a maximum of 0.36-0.41 mm in both SWL and DWL sides. Permanent side effects were not observed in any patients. Double-pass PDL does not enhance PWS clearance. To improve the clearance of PWS lesions, either the depth of laser penetration should be increased or greater photothermal damage to vessels should be generated.

  13. Low energy dark current collimation system in single-pass linacs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettoni, S.; Craievich, P.; Pedrozzi, M.; Schaer, M.; Stingelin, L.

    2018-02-01

    The dark current emitted from a surface of a radio frequency cavity may be a severe issue for the activation and the protection of the components of linear accelerators, if this current is lost in an uncontrolled manner. For a single-pass linac based on a photo-injector, we studied the possibility of using a collimator installed at low energy (below 10 MeV) to dump the maximum fraction of the dark current before it is transported along the linac. We developed and experimentally verified an emission and tracking model that we used to study and optimize the dark current mitigation at SwissFEL test facility. We optimized a collimator, which is expected to reduce by two orders of magnitude the transport of the dark current to the first compressor. We have also verified the effects of wakefield excited by the beam itself passing through the collimator at such a low energy, comparing the results of beam-based measurements with an analytical model.

  14. Non-destructive single-pass low-noise detection of ions in a beamline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Stefan; Murböck, Tobias; Andelkovic, Zoran; Birkl, Gerhard; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Stahl, Stefan; Vogel, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    We have conceived, built, and operated a device for the non-destructive single-pass detection of charged particles in a beamline. The detector is based on the non-resonant pick-up and subsequent low-noise amplification of the image charges induced in a cylindrical electrode surrounding the particles' beam path. The first stage of the amplification electronics is designed to be operated from room temperature down to liquid helium temperature. The device represents a non-destructive charge counter as well as a sensitive timing circuit. We present the concept and design details of the device. We have characterized its performance and show measurements with low-energy highly charged ions (such as Ar13+) passing through one of the electrodes of a cylindrical Penning trap. This work demonstrates a novel approach of non-destructive, low noise detection of charged particles which is, depending on the bunch structure, suitable, e.g., for ion traps, low-energy beamlines or accelerator transfer sections.

  15. Experimental and simulation studies on a single pass, double duct solar air heater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forson, F.K. [Kwame Nkrumah Univ. of Science and Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Kumasi (Ghana); Rajakaruna, H. [De Montfort Univ., School of Engineering and Technology, Leicester (United Kingdom)

    2003-05-01

    A mathematical model of a single pass, double duct solar air heater (SPDDSAH) is described. The model provides a design tool capable of predicting: incident solar radiation, heat transfer coefficients, mean air flow rates, mean air temperature and relative humidity at the exit. Results from the simulation are presented and compared with experimental ones obtained on a full scale air heater and a small scale laboratory one. Reasonable agreement between the predicted and measured values is demonstrated. Predicted results from a parametric study are also presented. It is shown that significant improvement in the SPDDSAH performance can be obtained with an appropriate choice of the collector parameters and the top to bottom channel depth ratio of the two ducts. The air mass flow rate is shown to be the dominant factor in determining the overall efficiency of the heater. (Author)

  16. High-Accuracy Elevation Data at Large Scales from Airborne Single-Pass SAR Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Jean-Pierre Schumann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital elevation models (DEMs are essential data sets for disaster risk management and humanitarian relief services as well as many environmental process models. At present, on the hand, globally available DEMs only meet the basic requirements and for many services and modeling studies are not of high enough spatial resolution and lack accuracy in the vertical. On the other hand, LiDAR-DEMs are of very high spatial resolution and great vertical accuracy but acquisition operations can be very costly for spatial scales larger than a couple of hundred square km and also have severe limitations in wetland areas and under cloudy and rainy conditions. The ideal situation would thus be to have a DEM technology that allows larger spatial coverage than LiDAR but without compromising resolution and vertical accuracy and still performing under some adverse weather conditions and at a reasonable cost. In this paper, we present a novel single pass In-SAR technology for airborne vehicles that is cost-effective and can generate DEMs with a vertical error of around 0.3 m for an average spatial resolution of 3 m. To demonstrate this capability, we compare a sample single-pass In-SAR Ka-band DEM of the California Central Valley from the NASA/JPL airborne GLISTIN-A to a high-resolution LiDAR DEM. We also perform a simple sensitivity analysis to floodplain inundation. Based on the findings of our analysis, we argue that this type of technology can and should be used to replace large regions of globally available lower resolution DEMs, particularly in coastal, delta and floodplain areas where a high number of assets, habitats and lives are at risk from natural disasters. We conclude with a discussion on requirements, advantages and caveats in terms of instrument and data processing.

  17. Evaluation of a single-pass continuous whole-body 16-MDCT protocol for patients with polytrauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duy; Platon, Alexandra; Shanmuganathan, Kathirkamanathan; Mirvis, Stuart E; Becker, Christoph D; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare a conventional multiregional MDCT protocol with two continuous single-pass whole-body MDCT protocols in imaging of patients with polytrauma. Ninety patients with polytrauma underwent whole-body 16-MDCT with a conventional (n=30) or one of two single-pass (n=60) protocols. The conventional protocol included unenhanced scans of the head and cervical spine and contrast-enhanced helical scans (140 mL, 4 mL/s, 300 mg I/mL) of the thorax and abdomen. The single-pass protocols consisted of unenhanced scans of the head followed by one-sweep acquisition from the circle of Willis through the pubic symphysis with a biphasic (150 mL, 6 and 4 mL/s, 300 mg I/mL) or monophasic (110 mL, 4 mL/s, 400 mg I/mL) injection. Acquisition times and interval delays between head, chest, and abdominal scans were recorded. Contrast enhancement was measured in the aortic arch, liver, spleen, and kidney. Diagnostic image quality in the same areas was assessed on a 4-point scale. Median acquisition times for the single-pass protocols were significantly shorter (-42.5%) than the acquisition time for the conventional protocol. No significant differences were found in mean enhancement values in the aorta, liver, spleen, and kidney for the three protocols. The image quality with both single-pass protocols was better than that with the conventional protocol in assessment of the mediastinum and cervical spine (p<0.05). There was no significant difference between the single-pass protocols. Use of single-pass continuous whole-body MDCT protocols can significantly decrease examination time for patients with polytrauma and improve image quality compared with a conventional serial scan protocol. Monophasic injection with highly concentrated contrast medium can reduce injection flow rate and should therefore be preferred to a biphasic injection technique.

  18. Polarized single top quark production at leptonic colliders from broken R parity interactions incorporating CP violation

    CERN Document Server

    Chemtob, M

    2000-01-01

    The contribution from the R parity violating interaction lambda /sub ijk/'L/sub i/Q/sub j/D/sub k//sup c/ in the associated production of a top quark (antiquark) with a charm antiquark (quark) is examined for high energy leptonic colliders. We concentrate on the reaction l /sup -/+l/sup +/ to (tc)+(ct) to (bl nu c)+(bl nu c) associated with the semileptonic top quark decay. A set of characteristic dynamical distributions for the signal events is evaluated and the results contrasted against those from the standard model W-boson pair production background. The sensitivity to parameters (R parity violating coupling constants and down-squark mass) is studied at the energies of the CERN LEP-II collider and the future linear colliders. Next, we turn to a study of a CP-odd observable, associated with the top quark spin, which leads to an asymmetry in the energy distribution of the emitted charged leptons for the pair of CP- conjugate final states bl nu c and bl nu c. A nonvanishing asymmetry arises from a CP-odd pha...

  19. Single-frequency blue light generation by single-pass sum-frequency generation in a coupled ring cavity tapered laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2013-01-01

    A generic approach for generation of tunable single frequency light is presented. 340 mW of near diffraction limited, single-frequency, and tunable blue light around 459 nm is generated by sum-frequency generation (SFG) between two tunable tapered diode lasers. One diode laser is operated in a ring...... cavity and another tapered diode laser is single-passed through a nonlinear crystal which is contained in the coupled ring cavity. Using this method, the single-pass conversion efficiency is more than 25%. In contrast to SFG in an external cavity, the system is entirely self-stabilized with no electronic...

  20. Parametric analysis of plastic strain and force distribution in single pass metal spinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, Shashank, E-mail: shashankbit08@gmail.com, E-mail: mohantejesh93@gmail.com, E-mail: regalla@hyderabad.bits-pilani.ac.in, E-mail: ksuresh@hyderabad.bits-pilani.ac.in; Tejesh, Chiruvolu Mohan, E-mail: shashankbit08@gmail.com, E-mail: mohantejesh93@gmail.com, E-mail: regalla@hyderabad.bits-pilani.ac.in, E-mail: ksuresh@hyderabad.bits-pilani.ac.in; Regalla, Srinivasa Prakash, E-mail: shashankbit08@gmail.com, E-mail: mohantejesh93@gmail.com, E-mail: regalla@hyderabad.bits-pilani.ac.in, E-mail: ksuresh@hyderabad.bits-pilani.ac.in; Suresh, Kurra, E-mail: shashankbit08@gmail.com, E-mail: mohantejesh93@gmail.com, E-mail: regalla@hyderabad.bits-pilani.ac.in, E-mail: ksuresh@hyderabad.bits-pilani.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, BITS-Pilani, Hyderabad Campus, Shamirpet, Hyderabad, 500078, Andhra Pradesh (India)

    2013-12-16

    Metal spinning also known as spin forming is one of the sheet metal working processes by which an axis-symmetric part can be formed from a flat sheet metal blank. Parts are produced by pressing a blunt edged tool or roller on to the blank which in turn is mounted on a rotating mandrel. This paper discusses about the setting up a 3-D finite element simulation of single pass metal spinning in LS-Dyna. Four parameters were considered namely blank thickness, roller nose radius, feed ratio and mandrel speed and the variation in forces and plastic strain were analysed using the full-factorial design of experiments (DOE) method of simulation experiments. For some of these DOE runs, physical experiments on extra deep drawing (EDD) sheet metal were carried out using En31 tool on a lathe machine. Simulation results are able to predict the zone of unsafe thinning in the sheet and high forming forces that are hint to the necessity for less-expensive and semi-automated machine tools to help the household and small scale spinning workers widely prevalent in India.

  1. Capacitive deionization of arsenic-contaminated groundwater in a single-pass mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chen-Shiuan; Liou, Sofia Ya Hsuan; Hou, Chia-Hung

    2017-10-01

    A single-pass-mode capacitive deionization (CDI) reactor was used to remove arsenic from groundwater in the presence of multiple ions. The CDI reactor involved an applied voltage of 1.2 V and six cell pairs of activated carbon electrodes, each of which was 20 × 30 cm 2 . The results indicate that this method achieved an effluent arsenic concentration of 0.03 mg L -1 , which is lower than the arsenic concentration standard for drinking water and irrigation sources in Taiwan, during the charging stage. Additionally, the ability of the CDI to remove other coexisting ions was studied. The presence of other ions has a significant influence on the removal of arsenic from groundwater. From the analysis of the electrosorption selectivity, the preference for anion removal could be ordered as follows: NO 3 -  > SO 4 2-  > F -  > Cl - >As. The electrosorption selectivity for cations could be ordered as follows: Ca 2+  > Mg 2+  > Na +  ∼ K + . Moreover, monovalent cations can be replaced by divalent cations at the electrode surface in the later period of the electrosorption stage. Consequently, activated carbon-based capacitive deionization is demonstrated to be a high-potential technology for remediation of arsenic-contaminated groundwater. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Error Analysis for High Resolution Topography with Bi-Static Single-Pass SAR Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muellerschoen, Ronald J.; Chen, Curtis W.; Hensley, Scott; Rodriguez, Ernesto

    2006-01-01

    We present a flow down error analysis from the radar system to topographic height errors for bi-static single pass SAR interferometry for a satellite tandem pair. Because of orbital dynamics the baseline length and baseline orientation evolve spatially and temporally, the height accuracy of the system is modeled as a function of the spacecraft position and ground location. Vector sensitivity equations of height and the planar error components due to metrology, media effects, and radar system errors are derived and evaluated globally for a baseline mission. Included in the model are terrain effects that contribute to layover and shadow and slope effects on height errors. The analysis also accounts for nonoverlapping spectra and the non-overlapping bandwidth due to differences between the two platforms' viewing geometries. The model is applied to a 514 km altitude 97.4 degree inclination tandem satellite mission with a 300 m baseline separation and X-band SAR. Results from our model indicate that global DTED level 3 can be achieved.

  3. Uranium Release from Acidic Weathered Hanford Sediments: Single-Pass Flow-Through and Column Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guohui [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Um, Wooyong [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, South Korea; Wang, Zheming [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Reinoso-Maset, Estela [Sierra; Washton, Nancy M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Mueller, Karl T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Perdrial, Nicolas [Department; Department; O’Day, Peggy A. [Sierra; Chorover, Jon [Department

    2017-09-21

    The reaction of acidic radioactive waste with sediments can induce mineral transformation reactions that, in turn, control contaminant fate. Here, sediment weathering by synthetic uranium-containing acid solutions was investigated using bench-scale experiments to simulate waste disposal conditions at Hanford’s cribs, USA. During acid weathering, the presence of phosphate exerted a strong influence over uranium mineralogy and a rapidly precipitated, crystalline uranium phosphate phase (meta-ankoleite [K(UO2)(PO4)·3H2O]) was identified using spectroscopic and diffraction-based techniques. In phosphate-free system, uranium oxyhydroxide minerals such as K-compreignacite [K2(UO2)6O4(OH)6·7H2O] were formed. Single-pass flow-through (SPFT) and column leaching experiments using synthetic Hanford pore water showed that uranium precipitated as meta-ankoleite during acid weathering was strongly retained in the sediments, with an average release rate of 2.67E-12 mol g-1 s-1. In the absence of phosphate, uranium release was controlled by dissolution of uranium oxyhydroxide (compreignacite-type) mineral with a release rate of 1.05-2.42E-10 mol g-1 s-1. The uranium mineralogy and release rates determined for both systems in this study support the development of accurate U-release models for prediction of contaminant transport. These results suggest that phosphate minerals may be a good candidate for uranium remediation approaches at contaminated sites.

  4. Evaluation of regional pulmonary blood flow in mitral valvular heart disease using single-pass radionuclide angiocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang-Soon Koh; Byung Tae Kim; Myung Chul Lee; Bo Yeon Cho

    1982-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension in mitral valvular cardiac disease has been evaluated in 122 patients by a modified upper lung/lower count ratio using single-pass radionuclide angiocardiography. The mean upper lung/lower lung radio correlates well with pulmonary artery mean (r=0.483) and wedge pressure (r=0.804). After correction surgery of the cardiac valve, the ratio decreases and returns to normal range in patients judged clinically to have good surgical benifit. This modified method using single-pass technique provides additional simple, reproducible and nontraumatic results of regional pulmonary blood flow and appears to be correlated with the degree of pulmonary hypertension in mitral heart disease

  5. FY2016 ILAW Glass Corrosion Testing with the Single-Pass Flow-Through Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neeway, James J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Asmussen, Robert M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Parruzot, Benjamin PG [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cordova, Elsa [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Williams, Benjamin D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Leavy, Ian I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stephenson, John R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McElroy, Erin M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-04-21

    The inventory of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) produced at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will be disposed of at the near-surface, on-site Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). When groundwater comes into contact with the waste form, the glass will corrode and radionuclides will be released into the near-field environment. Because the release of the radionuclides is dependent on the dissolution rate of the glass, it is important that the performance assessment (PA) model accounts for the dissolution rate of the glass as a function of various chemical conditions. To accomplish this, an IDF PA model based on Transition State Theory (TST) can be employed. The model is able to account for changes in temperature, exposed surface area, and pH of the contacting solution as well as the effect of silicon concentrations in solution, specifically the activity of orthosilicic acid (H4SiO4), whose concentration is directly linked to the glass dissolution rate. In addition, the IDF PA model accounts for the alkali-ion exchange process as sodium is leached from the glass and into solution. The effect of temperature, pH, H4SiO4 activity, and the rate of ion-exchange can be parameterized and implemented directly into the PA rate law model. The rate law parameters are derived from laboratory tests with the single-pass flow-through (SPFT) method. To date, rate law parameters have been determined for seven ILAW glass compositions, thus additional rate law parameters on a wider range of compositions will supplement the existing body of data for PA maintenance activities. The data provided in this report can be used by ILAW glass scientists to further the understanding of ILAW glass behavior, by IDF PA modelers to use the rate law parameters in PA modeling efforts, and by Department of Energy (DOE) contractors and decision makers as they assess the IDF PA program.

  6. Narrow conductive structures with high aspect ratios through single-pass inkjet printing and evaporation-induced dewetting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbel, R.; Teunissen, P.; Michels, J.; Groen, W.A.

    2015-01-01

    Inkjet printed silver lines contract to widths below 20-μm during drying on an organic planarization coating. Aspect ratios previously unprecedented with single pass inkjet printing on isotropic homogeneous substrates are obtained. This effect is caused by the subsequent evaporation of solvents from

  7. Single DV-DXCCII Based Voltage Controlled First Order All-pass Filter with Inverting and Non-inverting responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Chaturvedi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new voltage controlled first order all-pass filter is presented. The proposed circuit employs a single differential voltage dual-X second generation current conveyor (DV-DXCCII and a grounded capacitor only. The proposed all-pass filter provides both inverting and non inverting voltage-mode outputs from the same configuration simultaneously without any matching condition. Non-ideal analysis along with sensitivity analysis is also investigated. The proposed circuit has low active and passive sensitivities. As an application the proposed all-pass filter is connected in cascade to get higher order filter. The theoretical results are validated thorough PSPICE simulations using TSMC 0.18µm CMOS process parameters.

  8. Thermo-Mechanical Analysis of a Single-Pass Weld Overlay and Girth Welding in Lined Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeid, Obeid; Alfano, Giulio; Bahai, Hamid

    2017-08-01

    The paper presents a nonlinear heat-transfer and mechanical finite-element (FE) analyses of a two-pass welding process of two segments of lined pipe made of a SUS304 stainless steel liner and a C-Mn steel pipe. The two passes consist of the single-pass overlay welding (inner lap weld) of the liner with the C-Mn steel pipe for each segment and the single-pass girth welding (outer butt weld) of the two segments. A distributed power density of the moving welding torch and a nonlinear heat-transfer coefficient accounting for both radiation and convection have been used in the analysis and implemented in user subroutines for the FE code ABAQUS. The modeling procedure has been validated against previously published experimental results for stainless steel and carbon steel welding separately. The model has been then used to determine the isotherms induced by the weld overlay and the girth welding and to clarify their influence on the transient temperature field and residual stress in the lined pipe. Furthermore, the influence of the cooling time between weld overlay and girth welding and of the welding speed have been examined thermally and mechanically as they are key factors that can affect the quality of lined pipe welding.

  9. SSC 50 MM collider dipole cryostat single tube support post conceptual design and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicol, T.H.

    1992-01-01

    Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipole magnet cold masses are connected to the cryostat vacuum vessel at five places equally spaced along their length. Five supports limit sag of the cold assembly due to its own weight to a level consistent with the final magnet alignment specifications. The design essentially consists of two composite tubes nested within each other as a means of maximizing the thermal path length. In addition it provides an ideal way to utilize materials best suited for the temperature range over which they must operate. Filament wound S-glass is used between 300K and 80K. Filament wound graphite fiber is used between 80K and 20K and between 20K and 4.5K. S-glass is a better thermal performer above approximately 40K. Graphite composites are ideally suited for operation below 40K. The designs for the 50 mm reentrant supports are well documented in the literature. The current design of the reentrant support has two major drawbacks. First, it requires very tight dimensional control on all components; composite tubes and metal attachment parts. Second, it is expensive, with cost being driven by both the tolerance constraints and by a complex assembly procedure. It seems clear that production magnets will require a support structure which is considerably less expensive than that which is currently used. It seems clear that a design alternate for reentrant support posts will be required for production dipoles primarily due to their cost. It seems less clear that injection molded composite materials are the ideal choice. This report describes the conceptual design for a support post whose function is identical to that of the current reentrant design, which requires very few modifications to surrounding cryostat components, is thermally equivalent to the current 50 mm support post, and is nearly equivalent structurally

  10. Single-Pass Percutaneous Liver Biopsy for Diffuse Liver Disease Using an Automated Device: Experience in 154 Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera-Sanfeliz, Gerant; Kinney, Thomas B.; Rose, Steven C.; Agha, Ayad K.M.; Valji, Karim; Miller, Franklin J.; Roberts, Anne C.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To describe our experience with ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous liver biopsies using the INRAD 18G Express core needle biopsy system.Methods: One hundred and fifty-four consecutive percutaneous core liver biopsy procedures were performed in 153 men in a single institution over 37 months. The medical charts, pathology reports, and radiology files were retrospectively reviewed. The number of needle passes, type of guidance, change in hematocrit level, and adequacy of specimens for histologic analysis were evaluated.Results: All biopsies were performed for histologic staging of chronic liver diseases. The majority of patients had hepatitis C (134/153, 90.2%). All patients were discharged to home after 4 hr of postprocedural observation. In 145 of 154 (94%) biopsies, a single needle pass was sufficient for diagnosis. US guidance was utilized in all but one of the procedures (153/154, 99.4%). The mean hematocrit decrease was 1.2% (44.1-42.9%). Pain requiring narcotic analgesia, the most frequent complication, occurred in 28 of 154 procedures (18.2%). No major complications occurred. The specimens were diagnostic in 152 of 154 procedures (98.7%).Conclusions: Single-pass percutaneous US-guided liver biopsy with the INRAD 18G Express core needle biopsy system is safe and provides definitive pathologic diagnosis of chronic liver disease. It can be performed on an outpatient basis. Routine post-biopsy monitoring of hematocrit level in stable, asymptomatic patients is probably not warranted

  11. Thermal and structural performance of a single tube support post for the Superconducting Super Collider dipole magnet cryostat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boroski, W.N.; Nicol, T.H.; Ruschman, M.K.; Schoo, C.J.

    1993-07-01

    The reentrant support post currently incorporated in the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipole cryostat has been shown to meet the structural and thermal requirements of the cryostat, both in prototype magnet assemblies and through component testing. However, the reentrant post design has two major drawbacks: tight dimensional control on all components, and cost driven by these tolerance constraints and a complex assembly procedure. A single tube support post has been developed as an alternative to the reentrant post design. Several prototype assemblies have been fabricated and subjected to structural testing. Compressive, tensile, and bending forces were applied to each assembly with deflection measured at several locations. A prototype support post has also been thermally evaluated in a heat leak measurement facility. Heat load to 4.2 K was measured with the intermediate post intercept operating at various temperatures while thermometers positioned along the conductive path of the post mapped thermal gradients. Results from these measurements indicate the single tube support post meets the design criteria for the SSC dipole magnet cryostat support system

  12. Studies on water turbine runner which fish can pass through: In case of single stage axial runner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Yukimari; Maeda, Takao; Nagoshi, Osamu; Ieda, Kazuma; Shinma, Hisako; Hagimoto, Michiko

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between water turbine runner design and operation and the safe passage of fish through the turbine is studied. The kinds of fish used in the tests are a dace, a sweet fish and a small salmon. A single stage axial runner is used. The velocity and pressure distributions were measured inside the turbine casing and along the casing wall. Many pictures showing fish passing through the rotating runner were taken and analyzed. The swimming speed of the fish was examined from video recordings. Fish pass through the runner more rapidly when they can determine and choose the easier path. Injury and mortality of fish are affected by the runner speed and the location of impact of the runner on the fish body

  13. Muon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, David

    1995-01-01

    The increasing interest in the possibility of positive-negative muon colliders was reflected in the second workshop on the Physics Potential and Development of Muon Colliders, held in Sausalito, California, from 16-19 November, with some 60 attendees. It began with an overview of the particle physics goals, detector constraints, the muon collider and mu cooling, and source issues. The major issue confronting muon development is the possible luminosity achievable. Two collider energies were considered: 200 + 200 GeV and 2 + 2 TeV. The major particle physics goals are the detection of the higgs boson(s) for the lower energy collider, together with WW scattering and supersymmetric particle discovery. At the first such workshop, held in Napa, California, in 1992, it was estimated that a luminosity of some 10 30 and 3 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1 for the low and high energy collider might be achieved (papers from this meeting were published in the October issue of NIM). This was considered a somewhat conservative estimate at the time. At the Sausalito workshop the goal was to see if a luminosity of 10 32 to 10 34 for the two colliders might be achievable and usable by a detector. There were five working groups - physics, 200 + 200 GeV collider, 2 + 2 TeV collider, detector design and backgrounds, and muon cooling and production methods. Considerable progress was made in all these areas at the workshop.

  14. Muon Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert B. Palmer; A. Sessler; A. Skrinsky; A. Tollestrup; A.J. Baltz; P. Chen; W-H. Cheng; Y. Cho; E. Courant; Richard C. Fernow; Juan C. Gallardo; A. Garren; M. Green; S. Kahn; H. Kirk; Y. Y. Lee; F. Mills; N. Mokhov; G. Morgan; David Neuffer; R. Noble; J. Norem; M. Popovic; L. Schachinger; G. Silvestrov; D. Summers; I. Stumer; M. Syphers; Yagmur Torun; D. Trbojevic; W. Turner; A. Van Ginneken; T. Vsevolozhskaya; R. Weggel; E. Willen; David Winn; J. Wurtele

    1994-01-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity(mu)(sup+)(mu)(sup -) colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Problems of detector background are also discussed

  15. Magnesium isotope evidence for single stage formation of CB chondrules by colliding planetesimals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Mia Bjørg Stolberg; Schiller, Martin; Krot, Alexander N.

    2013-01-01

    Chondrules are igneous spherical objects preserved in chondritic meteorites and believed to have formed during transient heating events in the solar protoplanetary disk. Chondrules present in the metal-rich CB chondrites show unusual chemical and petrologic features not observed in other chondrite...... groups, implying a markedly distinct formation mechanism. Here, we report high-precision Mg-isotope data for 10 skeletal olivine chondrules from the Hammadah al Hamra 237 (HH237) chondrite to probe the formation history of CB chondrules. The Al/Mg ratios of individual chondrules are positively correlated...... to their stable Mg-isotope composition (μMg), indicating that the correlated variability was imparted by a volatility-controlled process (evaporation/condensation). The mass-independent Mg composition (μMg*) of chondrules is consistent with single stage formation from an initially homogeneous magnesium reservoir...

  16. An analysis on single and central diffractive heavy flavour production at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, M.V.T. [Universidade Federal do Pampa, Bage, RS (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas

    2008-09-15

    In this contribution results from a phenomenological analysis for the diffractive hadroproduction of heavy flavors at high energies are reported. Diffractive production of charm, bottom and top are calculated using the Regge factorization, taking into account recent experimental determination of the diffractive parton density functions in Pomeron by the H1 Collaboration at DESY-HERA. In addition, multiple-Pomeron corrections are considered through the rapidity gap survival probability factor. We give numerical predictions for single diffractive as well as double Pomeron exchange (DPE) cross sections, which agree with the available data for diffractive production of charm and beauty. We make estimates which could be compared to future measurements at the LHC. (author)

  17. Comparison of PASS Assessment Scores in Single-Gender and Heterogeneous Middle Schools in South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canada, Patricia Oxendine

    2012-01-01

    In response to the mandates of No Child Left Behind, (NCLB), educators across the country struggle to close the gaps between males and females. Some of the physiological differences existing between the male and female brain suggest support for single-gender instruction, which is on the rise within this country as well as other parts of the world.…

  18. Single-Pass Catalytic Conversion of Syngas into Olefins via Methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsbye, Unni

    2016-06-20

    All together now: Combination in a single reactor of the catalysts for converting syngas into methanol and methanol into olefins was recently reported by Cheng et al. This approach considerably simplifies the catalytic conversion of natural gas. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Single Pass Laser Welding with Multiple Spots to Join Four Sheets in a Butt-joint Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, Morten; Hansen, Klaus Schütt; Langbak, Andreas; Johansen, Sebastian Blegebrønd; Krempin, Simon Borup; Hornum, Mattias Døssing

    Laser keyhole welding is widely used in industry due to its large welding depth and low heat input. For some industrial cases it is necessary to widen the beam to cover the joint configuration, which instead results in a lower intensity and surface conduction welds. The introduction of the high-power single mode fiber laser makes it possible to deal with this problem, because the beam can be shaped into a pre-defined pattern of multiple spots shaped to the actual joint configuration. The intensity of each spot is sufficient to make a keyhole. A case with four sheets in a butt-joint configuration is used to demonstrate the principle of how to design a spot pattern which ensures weld quality in case of a single pass laser weld.

  20. Testing the single-pass VOC removal efficiency of an active green wall using methyl ethyl ketone (MEK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torpy, Fraser; Clements, Nicholas; Pollinger, Max; Dengel, Andy; Mulvihill, Isaac; He, Chuan; Irga, Peter

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, research into the efficacy of indoor air biofiltration mechanisms, notably living green walls, has become more prevalent. Whilst green walls are often utilised within the built environment for their biophilic effects, there is little evidence demonstrating the efficacy of active green wall biofiltration for the removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at concentrations found within an interior environment. The current work describes a novel approach to quantifying the VOC removal effectiveness by an active living green wall, which uses a mechanical system to force air through the substrate and plant foliage. After developing a single-pass efficiency protocol to understand the immediate effects of the system, the active green wall was installed into a 30-m 3 chamber representative of a single room and presented with the contaminant 2-butanone (methyl ethyl ketone; MEK), a VOC commonly found in interior environments through its use in textile and plastic manufacture. Chamber inlet levels of MEK remained steady at 33.91 ± 0.541 ppbv. Utilising a forced-air system to draw the contaminated air through a green wall based on a soil-less growing medium containing activated carbon, the combined effects of substrate media and botanical component within the biofiltration system showed statistically significant VOC reduction, averaging 57% single-pass removal efficiency over multiple test procedures. These results indicate a high level of VOC removal efficiency for the active green wall biofilter tested and provide evidence that active biofiltration may aid in reducing exposure to VOCs in the indoor environment.

  1. Ion Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, W

    2014-01-01

    High-energy ion colliders are large research tools in nuclear physics to study the Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP). The range of collision energy and high luminosity are important design and operational considerations. The experiments also expect flexibility with frequent changes in the collision energy, detector fields, and ion species. Ion species range from protons, including polarized protons in RHIC, to heavy nuclei like gold, lead and uranium. Asymmetric collision combinations (e.g. protons against heavy ions) are also essential. For the creation, acceleration, and storage of bright intense ion beams, limits are set by space charge, charge change, and intrabeam scattering effects, as well as beam losses due to a variety of other phenomena. Currently, there are two operating ion colliders, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

  2. Ion colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, W.

    2010-01-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions (77Asb1, 81Bou1). The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  3. Ion colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, W.

    2011-12-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions [77Asb1, 81Bou1]. The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  4. Absorption characteristics of the total alkaloids from Mahonia bealei in an in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu-He; He, Xin; Yang, Xiao-Lin; Dong, Cui-Lan; Zhang, Chun-Feng; Song, Zi-Jing; Lu, Ming-Xing; Yang, Zhong-Lin; Li, Ping

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the absorption characteristics of the total alkaloids from Mahoniae Caulis (TAMC) through the administration of monterpene absorption enhancers or protein inhibitors. The absorption behavior was investigated in an in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion (SPIP) assay in rats. The intestinal absorption of TAMC was much more than that of a single compound or a mixture of compounds (jatrorrhizine, palmatine, and berberine). Promotion of absorption by the bicyclic monoterpenoids (borneol or camphor) was higher than by the monocyclic monoterpenes (menthol or menthone), and promotion by compounds with a hydroxyl group (borneol or menthol) was higher than those with a carbonyl group (camphor or menthone). The apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) of TAMC was increased to 1.8-fold by verapamil, while it was reduced to one half by thiamine. The absorption rate constant (Ka) and Papp of TAMC were unchanged by probenecid and pantoprazole. The intestinal absorption characteristics of TAMC might be passive transport, and the intestinum tenue was the best absorptive site. In addition, TAMC might be likely a substrate of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and organic cation transporters (OCT), rather than multidrug resistance protein (MRP) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). Compared with a single compound and a mixture of compounds, TAMC was able to be absorbed in the blood circulation effectively. Copyright © 2014 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Compact, single-frequency, doubly resonant optical parametric oscillator pumped in an achromatic phase-adapted double-pass geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, B; Berrou, A; Guilbaud, S; Raybaut, M; Godard, A; Lefebvre, M

    2011-03-01

    We report on a nested-cavity, doubly resonant optical parametric oscillator (NesCOPO) architecture for widely tunable, mid-IR, single-frequency generation. By use of an achromatic phase-adapted double-pass pumping scheme, this new, low-threshold, semimonolithic architecture only requires two free-standing cavity mirrors and a nonlinear crystal with a mirror coating deposited on its input facet while the other facet is antireflection coated. It is thus as simple and compact as any basic linear optical parametric oscillator cavity, is easily tunable, and displays low sensitivity to mechanical vibrations. Using a high-repetition-rate (4.8 kHz) microlaser as the pump source of the NesCOPO, we demonstrate a compact source that provides pulsed, stable single-frequency output over a wide spectral range (3.8-4.3 μm) with a high peak power (up to 50 W), which are properties well suited for practical gas sensing applications.

  6. Asymmetric collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bharadwaj, V.; Colestock, P.; Goderre, G.; Johnson, D.; Martin, P.; Holt, J.; Kaplan, D.

    1993-01-01

    The study of CP violation in beauty decay is one of the key challenges facing high energy physics. Much work has not yielded a definitive answer how this study might best be performed. However, one clear conclusion is that new accelerator facilities are needed. Proposals include experiments at asymmetric electron-positron colliders and in fixed-target and collider modes at LHC and SSC. Fixed-target and collider experiments at existing accelerators, while they might succeed in a first observation of the effect, will not be adequate to study it thoroughly. Giomataris has emphasized the potential of a new approach to the study of beauty CP violation: the asymmetric proton collider. Such a collider might be realized by the construction of a small storage ring intersecting an existing or soon-to-exist large synchrotron, or by arranging collisions between a large synchrotron and its injector. An experiment at such a collider can combine the advantages of fixed-target-like spectrometer geometry, facilitating triggering, particle identification and the instrumentation of a large acceptance, while the increased √s can provide a factor > 100 increase in beauty-production cross section compared to Tevatron or HERA fixed-target. Beams crossing at a non-zero angle can provide a small interaction region, permitting a first-level decay-vertex trigger to be implemented. To achieve large √s with a large Lorentz boost and high luminosity, the most favorable venue is the high-energy booster (HEB) at the SSC Laboratory, though the CERN SPS and Fermilab Tevatron are also worth considering

  7. Collider Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This is summary of the activities of the working group on collider physics in the IXth Workshop on High Energy Physics Phenomenology (WHEPP-9) held at the Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar, India in January 2006. Some of the work subsequently done on these problems by the subgroups formed during the workshop is ...

  8. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Lyndon

    2012-01-01

    The construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been a massive endeavour spanning almost 30 years from conception to commissioning. Building the machine with the highest possible energy (7 TeV) in the existing large electron–positron (LEP) collider tunnel of 27 km circumference and with a tunnel diameter of only 3.8 m has required considerable innovation. The first was the development of a two-in-one magnet, where the two rings are integrated into a single magnetic structure. This compact two-in-one structure was essential for the LHC owing to the limited space available in the existing LEP collider tunnel and the cost. The second was a bold move to the use of superfluid helium cooling on a massive scale, which was imposed by the need to achieve a high (8.3 T) magnetic field using an affordable Nb-Ti superconductor.

  9. Standard practice for measurement of the glass dissolution rate using the single-pass flow-through test method

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice describes a single-pass flow-through (SPFT) test method that can be used to measure the dissolution rate of a homogeneous silicate glass, including nuclear waste glasses, in various test solutions at temperatures less than 100°C. Tests may be conducted under conditions in which the effects from dissolved species on the dissolution rate are minimized to measure the forward dissolution rate at specific values of temperature and pH, or to measure the dependence of the dissolution rate on the concentrations of various solute species. 1.2 Tests are conducted by pumping solutions in either a continuous or pulsed flow mode through a reaction cell that contains the test specimen. Tests must be conducted at several solution flow rates to evaluate the effect of the flow rate on the glass dissolution rate. 1.3 This practice excludes static test methods in which flow is simulated by manually removing solution from the reaction cell and replacing it with fresh solution. 1.4 Tests may be conducted wit...

  10. [Intestinal absorption of different combinations of active compounds from Gegenqinlian decoction by rat single pass intestinal perfusion in situ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Rui; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Yi-Zhu; Xu, Ran-Chi; Wang, Xin-Hong

    2012-12-01

    The aim is to study the intestinal absorption of different combinations of active compounds out of Gegenqinlian decoction. Rat single pass intestinal perfusion model with jugular vein cannulated was used. Samples were obtained continuously from the outlet perfusate and the mesenteric vein. The levels of puerarin, daidzin, liquilitin, baicalin, wogonoside, jatrorrhizine, berberine and palmatine were determined by LC-MS/MS and their permeability coefficients were calculated. The results showed that Glycyrrhiza could promote the absorption of the active ingredients in Pueraria which is the monarch herb; meanwhile, Pueraria also played a role in promoting the absorption of liquilitin. Based on the Gegenqinlian decoction and the different combinations experiments, the results concerning the absorption of baicalin and wogonoside were as follows. For baicalin, Pueraria and Glycyrrhiza could promote its absorption and the effect of Pueraria was more obvious. For wogonoside, Pueraria could also promote its absorption, while Glycyrrhiza played a opposite role. Pueraria and Glycyrrhiza both played a part in promoting the absorption of jateorhizine, berberine and palmatine, the effective compounds in Coptis.

  11. Sea ice local surface topography from single-pass satellite InSAR measurements: a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Dierking

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative parameters characterizing the sea ice surface topography are needed in geophysical investigations such as studies on atmosphere–ice interactions or sea ice mechanics. Recently, the use of space-borne single-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR for retrieving the ice surface topography has attracted notice among geophysicists. In this paper the potential of InSAR measurements is examined for several satellite configurations and radar frequencies, considering statistics of heights and widths of ice ridges as well as possible magnitudes of ice drift. It is shown that, theoretically, surface height variations can be retrieved with relative errors  ≤  0.5 m. In practice, however, the sea ice drift and open water leads may contribute significantly to the measured interferometric phase. Another essential factor is the dependence of the achievable interferometric baseline on the satellite orbit configurations. Possibilities to assess the influence of different factors on the measurement accuracy are demonstrated: signal-to-noise ratio, presence of a snow layer, and the penetration depth into the ice. Practical examples of sea surface height retrievals from bistatic SAR images collected during the TanDEM-X Science Phase are presented.

  12. {open_quotes}Optical guiding{close_quotes} limits on extraction efficiencies of single-pass, tapered wiggler amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fawley, W.M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Single-pass, tapered wiggler amplifiers have an attractive feature of being able, in theory at least, of extracting a large portion of the electron beam energy into light. In circumstances where an optical FEL`s wiggler length is significantly longer than the Rayleigh length Z{sub R} corresponding to the electron beam radius, diffraction losses must be controlled via the phenomenon of {open_quotes}optical guiding{close_quotes}. Since the strength of the guiding depends upon the effective refractive index {eta}{sub r} exceeding one, and since ({eta}{sub r}-1) is inversely proportional to the optical electric field, there is a natural {open_quotes}limiting{close_quotes} mechanism to the on-axis field strength and thus the rate at which energy may be extracted from the electron beam. In particular, the extraction efficiency for a prebunched beam asymptotically grows linearly with z rather than quadratically. We present analytical and numerical simulation results concerning this behavior and discuss its applicability to various FEL designs including oscillator/amplifier-radiator configurations.

  13. Evaluation of the single-pass flow-through test to support a low-activity waste specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrail, B.P.; Peeler, D.K.

    1995-09-01

    A series of single-pass flow-through (SPFT) tests was performed on five reference low-activity waste glasses and a reference glass from the National Institute of Standards and Technology to support a product specification for low-activity waste (LAW) forms. The results showed that the SPFT test provides a means to quantitatively distinguish among LAW glass forms in terms of their forward reaction rate at a given temperature and solution pH. Two of the test glasses were also subjected to SPFT testing at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Forward reaction rate constants calculated from the ANL test data were 100 to over 1,000 times larger than the values obtained from the SPFT tests conducted at PNL. An analysis of the ANL results showed that they were inconsistent with independent measurements done on glasses of similar composition, the known pH-dependence of the forward rate, and with the results from low surface-area-to-volume, short duration product consistency tests. Because the data set obtained from the SPFT tests done at PNL was consistent with each of these same factors, a detailed examination of the test procedures used at both laboratories was performed to determine the cause(s) of the discrepancy. The omission of background subtraction in the data analysis procedure and the short-duration (on the order of hours) of the ANL tests are factors that may have significantly affected the calculated rates

  14. Colliding muons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Is a muon-muon collider really practical? That is the question being asked by Bob Palmer. Well known in particle physics, Palmer, with Nick Samios and Ralph Shutt, recently won the American Physical Society's Panofsky Prize for their 1964 discovery of the omega minus. As well as contributing to other major experiments, both at CERN and in the US, he has contributed ideas to stochastic cooling and novel acceleration schemes

  15. Balancing Radiation and Contrast Media Dose in Single-Pass Abdominal Multidetector CT: Prospective Evaluation of Image Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camera, Luigi; Romano, Federica; Liccardo, Immacolata; Liuzzi, Raffaele; Imbriaco, Massimo; Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Pizzuti, Laura Micol; Segreto, Sabrina; Maurea, Simone; Brunetti, Arturo

    2015-11-01

    As both contrast and radiation dose affect the quality of CT images, a constant image quality in abdominal contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography (CE-MDCT) could be obtained balancing radiation and contrast media dose according to the age of the patients. Seventy-two (38 Men; 34 women; aged 20-83 years) patients underwent a single-pass abdominal CE-MDCT. Patients were divided into three different age groups: A (20-44 years); B (45-65 years); and C (>65 years). For each group, a different noise index (NI) and contrast media dose (370 mgI/mL) was selected as follows: A (NI, 15; 2.5 mL/kg), B (NI, 12.5; 2 mL/kg), and C (NI, 10; 1.5 mL/kg). Radiation exposure was reported as dose-length product (DLP) in mGy × cm. For quantitative analysis, signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios were calculated for both the liver (L) and the abdominal aorta (A). Statistical analysis was performed with a one-way analysis of variance. Standard imaging criteria were used for qualitative analysis. Although peak hepatic enhancement was 152 ± 16, 128 ± 12, and 101 ± 14 Hounsfield units (P contrast media dose (mL) administered were 476 ± 147 and 155 ± 27 for group A, 926 ± 291 and 130 ± 16 for group B, and 1981 ± 451 and 106 ± 15 for group C, respectively (P contrast media dose administered to patients of different age. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Single-pass Airborne InSAR for Wide-swath, High-Resolution Cryospheric Surface Topography Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, D.; Hensley, S.; Wu, X.; Muellerschoen, R.

    2014-12-01

    In May 2009 a mm-wave single-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) for the first time demonstrated ice surface topography swath-mapping in Greenland. This was achieved with the airborne Glacier and Ice Surface Topography Interferometer (GLISTIN-A). Ka-band (35.6GHz) was chosen for high-precision topographic mapping from a compact sensor with minimal surface penetration. In recent years, the system was comprehensively upgraded for improved performance, stability and calibration. In April 2013, after completing the upgrades, GLISTIN-A flew a brief campaign to Alaska. The primary purpose was to demonstrate the InSAR's ability to generate high-precision, high resolution maps of ice surface topography with swaths in excess of 10km. Comparison of GLISTIN-A's elevations over glacial ice with lidar verified the precision requirements and established elevation accuracies to within 2 m without tie points. Feature tracking of crevasses on Columbia Glacier using data acquired with a 3-day separation exhibit an impressive velocity mapping capability. Furthermore, GLISTIN-A flew over the Beaufort sea to determine if we could not only map sea ice, but also measure freeboard. Initial analysis has established we can measure sea-ice freeboard using height differences from the top of the sea-ice and the sea surface in open leads. In the future, a campaign with lidar is desired for a quantitative validation. Another proof-of-concept collection mapped snow-basins for hydrology. Snow depth measurements using summer and winter collections in the Sierras were compared with lidar measurements. Unsurprisingly when present, trees complicate the interpretation, but additional filtering and processing is in work. For each application, knowledge of the interferometric penetration is important for scientific interpretation. We present analytical predictions and experimental data to upper bound the elevation bias of the InSAR measurements over snow and snow-covered ice.

  17. Single Pass Albumin Dialysis-A Dose-Finding Study to Define Optimal Albumin Concentration and Dialysate Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmuck, Rosa Bianca; Nawrot, Gesa-Henrike; Fikatas, Panagiotis; Reutzel-Selke, Anja; Pratschke, Johann; Sauer, Igor Maximilian

    2017-02-01

    Several artificial liver support concepts have been evaluated both in vitro and clinically. Single pass albumin dialysis (SPAD) has shown to be one of the most simple approaches for removing albumin-bound toxins and water-soluble substances. Being faced with acute liver failure (ALF) in everyday practice encouraged our attempt to define the optimal conditions for SPAD more precisely in a standardized experimental setup. Albumin concentration was adjusted to either 1%, 2%, 3%, or 4%, while the flow rate of the dialysate was kept constant at a speed of 700 mL/h. The flow rate of the dialysate was altered between 350, 500, 700, and 1000 mL/h, whereas the albumin concentration was continuously kept at 3%. This study revealed that the detoxification of albumin-bound substances could be improved by increasing the concentration of albumin in the dialysate with an optimum at 3%. A further increase of the albumin concentration to 4% did not lead to a significant increase in detoxification. Furthermore, we observed a gradual increase of the detoxification efficiency for albumin-bound substances, from 350 mL/h to 700 mL/h (for bilirubin) or 1000 mL/h (for bile acids) of dialysate flow. Water-soluble toxins (ammonia, creatinine, urea, uric acid) were removed almost completely, regardless of albumin concentration or flow rate. In conclusion, this study confirmed that SPAD is effective in eliminating albumin-bound as well as water-soluble toxins using a simulation of ALF. Furthermore, this project was successful in evaluating the most effective combination of albumin concentration (3%) and dialysate flow (700 mL/h-1000 mL/h) in SPAD for the first time. © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Atrial electrogram quality in single-pass defibrillator leads with floating atrial bipole in patients with permanent atrial fibrillation and cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sticherling, Christian; Müller, Dirk; Schaer, Beat A; Krüger, Silke; Kolb, Christof

    2018-03-27

    Many patients receiving cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) suffer from permanent atrial fibrillation (AF). Knowledge of the atrial rhythm is important to direct pharmacological or interventional treatment as well as maintaining AV-synchronous biventricular pacing if sinus rhythm can be restored. A single pass single-coil defibrillator lead with a floating atrial bipole has been shown to obtain reliable information about the atrial rhythm but has never been employed in a CRT-system. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of implanting a single coil right ventricular ICD lead with a floating atrial bipole and the signal quality of atrial electrograms (AEGM) in CRT-defibrillator recipients with permanent AF. Seventeen patients (16 males, mean age 73 ± 6 years, mean EF 25 ± 5%) with permanent AF and an indication for CRT-defibrillator placement were implanted with a designated CRT-D system comprising a single pass defibrillator lead with a atrial floating bipole. They were followed-up for 103 ± 22 days using remote monitoring for AEGM transmission. All patients had at last one AEGM suitable for atrial rhythm diagnosis and of 100 AEGM 99% were suitable for visual atrial rhythm assessment. Four patients were discharged in sinus rhythm and one reverted to AF during follow-up. Atrial electrograms retrieved from a single-pass defibrillator lead with a floating atrial bipole can be reliably used for atrial rhythm diagnosis in CRT recipients with permanent AF. Hence, a single pass ventricular defibrillator lead with a floating bipole can be considered in this population. Copyright © 2018 Indian Heart Rhythm Society. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Single vector-like top partner production in the left-right twin Higgs model at TeV energy eγ colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Zhanying; Yang Guang; Yang Bingfang

    2013-01-01

    The left-right twin Higgs model contains a new vector-like heavy top quark, which mixes with the SM-like top quark. In this work, we studied the single vector-like top partner production via process e - γ → νeT-barb at the International Linear Collider. We calculated the production cross section at tree level and displayed the relevant differential distributions. The result shows that there will be 125 events produced each year with √s=2 TeV and the integrated luminosity Script Lint ≈ 500 fb -1 , and the b-quark tagging and the relevant missing energy cut will be helpful to detect this new effect. (authors)

  20. Colliding nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balian, Roger; Remaud, Bernard; Suraud, E.; Durand, Dominique; Tamain, Bernard; Gobbi, A.; Cugnon, J.; Drapier, Olivier; Govaerts, Jan; Prieels, Rene

    1995-09-01

    This 14. international school Joliot-Curie of nuclear physic deals with nuclei in collision at high energy. Nine lectures are included in the proceedings of this summer school: 1 - From statistical mechanics outside equilibrium to transport equations (Balian, R.); 2 - Modeling of heavy ions reactions (Remaud, B.); 3 - Kinetic equations in heavy ions physics (Suraud, E.); 4 - Colliding nuclei near the Fermi energy (Durand, D.; Tamain, B.); 5 - From the Fermi to the relativistic energy domain: which observable? For which physics? (Gobbi, A.); 6 - Collisions at relativistic and ultra relativistic energies, Theoretical aspects (Cugnon, J.); 7 - Quark-gluon plasma: experimental signatures (Drapier, O.); 8 - Electroweak interaction: a window on physics beyond the standard model (Govaerts, J.); 9 - Symmetry tests in β nuclear process: polarization techniques (Prieels, R.)

  1. HIGH ENERGY MUON COLLIDERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KING, B.J.

    2001-01-01

    A plausible ''straw-man'' scenario and collider ring parameter sets are presented for future energy frontier muon colliders in symbiotic facilities with e + e - and hadron colliders: 1.6-10 TeV ''mu-linear colliders'' (mu-LC) where the muons are accelerated in the linacs of a TeV-scale linear e + e - collider, and a 100 TeV Very Large Muon Collider (VLMC) that shares a facility with a 200 TeV Very Large Hadron collider (VLHC) and a 140 TeV muon-proton collider

  2. Impact of one-to-one tutoring on fundamentals of laparoscopic surgery (FLS) passing rate in a single center experience outside the United States: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheza, Federico; Raimondi, Paolo; Solaini, Leonardo; Coccolini, Federico; Baiocchi, Gian Luca; Portolani, Nazario; Tiberio, Guido Alberto Massimo

    2018-04-11

    Outside the US, FLS certification is not required and its teaching methods are not well standardized. Even if the FLS was designed as "stand alone" training system, most of Academic Institution offer support to residents during training. We present the first systematic application of FLS in Italy. Our aim was to evaluate the role of mentoring/coaching on FLS training in terms of the passing rate and global performance in the search for resource optimization. Sixty residents in general surgery, obstetrics & gynecology, and urology were selected to be enrolled in a randomized controlled trial, practicing FLS with the goal of passing a simulated final exam. The control group practiced exclusively with video material from SAGES, whereas the interventional group was supported by a mentor. Forty-six subjects met the requirements and completed the trial. For the other 14 subjects no results are available for comparison. One subject for each group failed the exam, resulting in a passing rate of 95.7%, with no obvious differences between groups. Subgroup analysis did not reveal any difference between the groups for FLS tasks. We confirm that methods other than video instruction and deliberate FLS practice are not essential to pass the final exam. Based on these results, we suggest the introduction of the FLS system even where a trained tutor is not available. This trial is the first single institution application of the FLS in Italy and one of the few experiences outside the US. Trial Number: NCT02486575 ( https://www.clinicaltrials.gov ).

  3. The Stanford Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emma, P.

    1995-01-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) is the first and only high-energy e + e - linear collider in the world. Its most remarkable features are high intensity, submicron sized, polarized (e - ) beams at a single interaction point. The main challenges posed by these unique characteristics include machine-wide emittance preservation, consistent high intensity operation, polarized electron production and transport, and the achievement of a high degree of beam stability on all time scales. In addition to serving as an important machine for the study of Z 0 boson production and decay using polarized beams, the SLC is also an indispensable source of hands-on experience for future linear colliders. Each new year of operation has been highlighted with a marked improvement in performance. The most significant improvements for the 1994-95 run include new low impedance vacuum chambers for the damping rings, an upgrade to the optics and diagnostics of the final focus systems, and a higher degree of polarization from the electron source. As a result, the average luminosity has nearly doubled over the previous year with peaks approaching 10 30 cm -2 s -1 and an 80% electron polarization at the interaction point. These developments as well as the remaining identifiable performance limitations will be discussed

  4. Muon collider design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, R.B.; Sessler, A.; Skrinsky, A.N.; Tollestrup, A.; Baltz, A.; Caspi, S.; Chen, P.; Cheng, W.-H.; Cho, Y.; Cline, D.B.; Courant, E.; Fernow, R.; Gallardo, J.C.; Garren, A.; Gordon, H.; Green, M.A.; Gupta, R.; Hershcovitch, A.; Johnstone, C.; Kahn, S.; Kirk, H.; Kycia, T.; Lee, Y.; Lissauer, D.; Luccio, A.; McInturff, A.; Mills, F.; Mokhov, N.V.; Morgan, G.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.-Y.; Noble, R.; Norem, J.; Norum, B.; Oide, K.; Parsa, Z.; Polychronakos, V.; Popovic, M.; Rehak, P.; Roser, T.; Rossmanith, R.; Scanlan, R.; Schachinger, L.; Silvestrov, G.; Stumer, I.; Summers, D.; Syphers, M.; Takahashi, H.; Torun, Y.; Trbojevic, D.; Turner, W.; Van Ginneken, A.; Vsevolozhskaya, T.; Weggel, R.; Willen, E.; Willis, W.; Winn, D.; Wurtele, J.; Zhao, Y. [Brookhaven Nat. Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, CA 94309 (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)]|[BINP, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)]|[Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)]|[Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439-4815 (United States)]|[Center for Advanced Accelerators, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90024-1547 (United States)]|[CEBAF, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)]|[University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22901 (United States)]|[KEK, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki-Ken 305 (Japan)]|[DESY, Hamburg (Germany)]|[University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS 38677 (United States)]|[SUNY, Stony Brook, NY 11974 (United States)]|[Francis Bitter National Magnet Laboratory, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)]|[Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)]|[Fairfield University, Fairfield, CT 06430-5195 (United States)]|[UC Berkele

    1996-11-01

    The construction principles of {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}-colliders are discussed. After a presentation of the properties of some collider ring candidate designs, the methods for {mu}{sup {+-}} production are described. Then the principles of beam cooling for such colliders are considered. Finally the components of a collider storage rings are described, whereby also polarization is considered. (HSI).

  5. Absorption Properties of Luteolin and Apigenin in Genkwa Flos Using In Situ Single-Pass Intestinal Perfusion System in the Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xin; Song, Zi-Jing; Jiang, Cui-Ping; Zhang, Chun-Feng

    2017-01-01

    The flower bud of Daphne genkwa (Genkwa Flos) is a commonly used herbal medicine in Asian countries. Luteolin and apigenin are two recognized active flavonoids in Genkwa Flos. The aim of this study was to investigate the intestinal absorption mechanisms of Genkwa Flos flavonoids using in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion rat model. Using HPLC, we determined its major effective flavonoids luteolin, apigenin, as well as, hydroxygenkwanin and genkwanin in biological samples. The intestinal absorption mechanisms of the total flavonoids in Genkwa Flos (TFG) were investigated using in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion rat model. Comparing the TFG absorption rate in different intestinal segments, data showed that the small intestine absorption was significantly higher than that of the colon ([Formula: see text]). Compared with duodenum and ileum, the jejunum was the best small intestinal site for TFG absorption. The high TFG concentration (61.48[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]g/ml) yielded the highest permeability ([Formula: see text]). Subsequently, three membrane protein inhibitors (verapamil, pantoprazole and probenecid) were used to explore the TFG absorption pathways. Data showed probenecid, a multidrug resistance protein (or MRP) inhibitor, effectively enhanced the TFG absorption ([Formula: see text]). Furthermore, by comparing commonly used natural absorption enhancers on TFG, it was observed that camphor was the most effective. In Situ single-pass intestinal perfusion experiment shows that TFG absorption is much higher in the small intestine than in the colon, and the TFG is absorbed mainly via an active transport pathway with MRP-mediated efflux mechanism. Camphor obviously enhanced the TFG absorption, and this could be an effective TFG formulation preparation method to increase clinical effectiveness after Genkwa Flos administration. Our study elucidated the TFG absorption mechanisms, and provided new information for its formulation preparation.

  6. Setting Passing Scores on Passage-Based Tests: A Comparison of Traditional and Single-Passage Bookmark Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaggs, Gary; Hein, Serge F.; Awuor, Risper

    2007-01-01

    In this study, a variation of the bookmark standard setting procedure for passage-based tests is proposed in which separate ordered item booklets are created for the items associated with each passage. This variation is compared to the traditional bookmark procedure for a fifth-grade reading test. The results showed that the single-passage…

  7. Top production at hadron colliders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    New results on top quark production are presented from four hadron collider experiments: CDF and D0 at the Tevatron, and ATLAS and CMS at the LHC. Cross-sections for single top and top pair production are discussed, as well as results on the top–antitop production asymmetry and searches for new physics including ...

  8. A Unified Algorithm for Channel Imbalance and Antenna Phase Center Position Calibration of a Single-Pass Multi-Baseline TomoSAR System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuncheng Bu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The multi-baseline synthetic aperture radar (SAR tomography (TomoSAR system is employed in such applications as disaster remote sensing, urban 3-D reconstruction, and forest carbon storage estimation. This is because of its 3-D imaging capability in a single-pass platform. However, a high 3-D resolution of TomoSAR is based on the premise that the channel imbalance and antenna phase center (APC position are precisely known. If this is not the case, the 3-D resolution performance will be seriously degraded. In this paper, a unified algorithm for channel imbalance and APC position calibration of a single-pass multi-baseline TomoSAR system is proposed. Based on the maximum likelihood method, as well as the least squares and the damped Newton method, we can calibrate the channel imbalance and APC position. The algorithm is suitable for near-field conditions, and no phase unwrapping operation is required. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm has been verified by simulation and experimental results.

  9. Investigating drug absorption from the colon: Single-pass vs. Doluisio approaches to in-situ rat large-intestinal perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozoya-Agullo, Isabel; Zur, Moran; Fine-Shamir, Noa; Markovic, Milica; Cohen, Yael; Porat, Daniel; González-Álvarez, Isabel; González-Álvarez, Marta; Merino-Sanjuán, Matilde; Bermejo, Marival; Dahan, Arik

    2017-07-15

    Traditionally, the colon is considered a secondary intestinal segment in the drug absorption process. However, in many cases the role of colonic drug permeability cannot be overlooked. The purpose of this research was to compare colon permeability data obtained using two different rat perfusion methods the single-pass intestinal perfusion (SPIP) approach and the closed-loop (Doluisio) perfusion model. A list of 14 structurally diverse model drugs was constructed, and their rat colon permeability was studied using the two methods. The two sets of results were compared to each other, and were evaluated vs. in-vitro, ex-vivo, and in-vivo literature values. The SPIP and the Doluisio results exhibited good correlation between them (R 2 =0.81). The best correlation of both sets was obtained with transport studies across Caco-2 monolayers (R 2 ∼0.9), as well as the sigmoidal fit vs. human fraction of dose absorbed (F abs ) data. On the other hand, Ussing chambers data, as well as lipophilicity (Log P) data, resulted in weak correlation to the in-situ results. In conclusion, the single-pass intestinal perfusion (SPIP) and the Doluisio (closed-loop) perfusion models were found to be equally convenient and useful for obtaining validated colon permeability values, although more human colonic F abs data are needed for a better understanding of colonic drug permeability and absorption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Regional brain blood flow in mouse: quantitative measurement using a single-pass radio-tracer method and a mathematical algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, K; Radhakrishnan, K; Serhal, A; Allen, F; Lamanna, J C; Puchowicz, M A

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a reliable experimental method for measuring local regional cerebral blood flows in anesthetized mice. This method is an extension of the well-established single-pass dual-label indicator method for simultaneously measuring blood flow and glucose influx in rat brains. C57BL6J mice (n = 10) were anesthetized and regional blood flows (ml/min/g) were measured using the radio-tracer method. To test the sensitivity of this method we used a mathematical algorithm to predict the blood flows and compared the two sets of results.Measured regional blood flows between 0.7 and 1.7 ml/min/g were similar to those we have previously reported in the rat. The predicted blood flows using an assumed linearly increasing arterial tracer concentration-versus-time profile (that is, a ramp) were similar to the values measured in the physiological experiments (R(2) 0.99; slope 0.91). Thus,measurements of local regional cerebral blood flow in anesthetized mice using a single-pass radio-tracer method appear to be reliable.

  11. Very high energy colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1986-03-01

    The luminosity and energy requirements are considered for both proton colliders and electron-positron colliders. Some of the basic design equations for high energy linear electron colliders are summarized, as well as design constraints. A few examples are given of parameters for very high energy machines. 4 refs., 6 figs

  12. SETI and muon collider

    OpenAIRE

    Silagadze, Z. K.

    2008-01-01

    Intense neutrino beams that accompany muon colliders can be used for interstellar communications. The presence of multi-TeV extraterrestrial muon collider at several light-years distance can be detected after one year run of IceCube type neutrino telescopes, if the neutrino beam is directed towards the Earth. This opens a new avenue in SETI: search for extraterrestrial muon colliders.

  13. Characterization of the solid, airborne materials created when UF6 reacts with moist air flowing in single-pass mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickrell, P.W.

    1985-10-01

    A series of experiments has been performed in which UF 6 was released into flowing air in order to characterize the solid particulate material produced under non-static conditions. In two of the experiments, the aerosol was allowed to stagnate in a static chamber after release and examined further but in the other experiments characterization was done only on material collected a few seconds after release. Transmission electron microscopy and mass measurement by cascaded impactor were used to characterize the aerosol particles which were usually single spheroids with little agglomeration in evidence. The goal of the work is to determine the chemistry and physics of the UF 6 -atmospheric moisture reaction under a variety of conditions so that information about resulting species and product morphologies is available for containment and removal (knockdown) studies as well as for dispersion plume modeling and toxicology studies. This report completes the milestone for reporting the information obtained from releases of UF 6 into flowing rather than static air. 26 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Passing excellence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoupikova, Daria

    2007-02-01

    This paper describes the research and development of a virtual reality visualization project "Passing excellence" about the world famous architectural ensemble "Kizhi". The Kizhi Pogost is located on an island in Lake Onega in northern Karelia in Russia. It is an authentic museum of an ancient wood building tradition which presents a unique artistic achievement. This ensemble preserves a concentration of masterpieces of the Russian heritage and is included in the List of Most Endangered Sites of the World Monuments Watch protected by World Heritage List of UNESCO. The project strives to create a unique virtual observation of the dynamics of the architectural changes of the museum area beginning from the 15th Century up to the 21st Century. The visualization is being created to restore the original architecture of Kizhi island based on the detailed photographs, architectural and geometric measurements, textural data, video surveys and resources from the Kizhi State Open-Air Museum archives. The project is being developed using Electro, an application development environment for the tiled display high-resolution graphics visualization system and can be shown on the virtual reality systems such as the GeoWall TM and the C-Wall.

  15. The Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Lyndon

    2011-11-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the most complex instrument ever built for particle physics research. It will, for the first time, provide access to the TeV-energy scale. Numerous technological innovations are necessary to achieve this goal. For example, two counterrotating proton beams are guided and focused by superconducting magnets whose novel two-in-one structure saves cost and allowed the machine to be installed in an existing tunnel. The very high (>8-T) field in the dipoles can be achieved only by cooling them below the transition temperature of liquid helium to the superfluid state. More than 80 tons of superfluid helium are needed to cool the whole machine. So far, the LHC has behaved reliably and predictably. Single-bunch currents 30% above the design value have been achieved, and the luminosity has increased by five orders of magnitude. In this review, I briefly describe the design principles of the major systems and discuss some initial results.

  16. Single Pass Optical Profile Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, R; Hutchins, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Beam profiles are acquired in transfer lines to monitor extracted beams and compute their emittance. Measurements performed on the first revolutions of a ring will evaluate the matching of a chain of accelerators. Depending on the particle type and energy, these measurements are in general performed with screens, making either use of Luminescence or Optical Transition Radiation [OTR], and the generated beam images are acquired with sensors of various types. Sometimes the beam position is also measured this way. The principle, advantages and disadvantages of both families of screens will be discussed in relation with the detectors used. Test results with beam and a possible evaluation method for luminescent screens will be presented. Finally other optical methods used will be mentioned for completeness.

  17. Segmental-dependent membrane permeability along the intestine following oral drug administration: Evaluation of a triple single-pass intestinal perfusion (TSPIP) approach in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Arik; West, Brady T; Amidon, Gordon L

    2009-02-15

    In this paper we evaluate a modified approach to the traditional single-pass intestinal perfusion (SPIP) rat model in investigating segmental-dependent permeability along the intestine following oral drug administration. Whereas in the traditional model one single segment of the intestine is perfused, we have simultaneously perfused three individual segments of each rat intestine: proximal jejunum, mid-small intestine and distal ileum, enabling to obtain tripled data from each rat compared to the traditional model. Three drugs, with different permeabilities, were utilized to evaluate the model: metoprolol, propranolol and cimetidine. Data was evaluated in comparison to the traditional method. Metoprolol and propranolol showed similar P(eff) values in the modified model in all segments. Segmental-dependent permeability was obtained for cimetidine, with lower P(eff) in the distal parts. Similar P(eff) values for all drugs were obtained in the traditional method, illustrating that the modified model is as accurate as the traditional, throughout a wide range of permeability characteristics, whether the permeability is constant or segment-dependent along the intestine. Three-fold higher statistical power to detect segmental-dependency was obtained in the modified approach, as each subject serves as his own control. In conclusion, the Triple SPIP model can reduce the number of animals utilized in segmental-dependent permeability research without compromising the quality of the data obtained.

  18. Muon Collider Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Pisin

    2003-01-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity μ + μ - colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Detector background, polarization, and nonstandard operating conditions are discussed

  19. Absorption characteristic of paeoniflorin-6'-O-benzene sulfonate (CP-25) in in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-Dan; Wang, Chun; Zhou, Peng; Yu, Jun; Asenso, James; Ma, Yong; Wei, Wei

    2016-09-01

    1. Paeoniflorin-6'-O-benzene sulfonate (CP-25) was synthesized to improve the poor oral absorption of paeoniflorin (Pae). 2. This study was performed to investigate the absorptive behavior and mechanism of CP-25 in in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion in rats, using Pae as a control. 3. The results showed that intestinal absorption of CP-25 was neither segmental nor sex dependent. However, the main segment of intestine that absorbed Pae was the duodenum. Furthermore, passive transport was confirmed to be the main absorption pattern of CP-25. More importantly, the absorption of CP-25 was much higher than Pae in the small intestine. 4. Among the ABC transporter inhibitors, the absorption rate of Pae increased in the presence of P-gp inhibitors verapamil and GF120918, which indicated that Pae was a substrate of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), however, such was not observed in the presence of breast cancer resistance protein and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2. Finally, the ABC transporter inhibitors did not have any significant impact on CP-25 as demonstrated in the parallel studies. 5. CP-25 could improve the poor absorption of Pae, which may be attributed to both the lipid solubility enhancement and its resistance to P-gp-mediated efflux.

  20. High-resolution digital elevation models from single-pass TanDEM-X interferometry over mountainous regions: A case study of Inylchek Glacier, Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelmeijer, Julia; Motagh, Mahdi; Bookhagen, Bodo

    2017-08-01

    This study demonstrates the potential of using single-pass TanDEM-X (TDX) radar imagery to analyse inter- and intra-annual glacier changes in mountainous terrain. Based on SAR images acquired in February 2012, March 2013 and November 2013 over the Inylchek Glacier, Kyrgyzstan, we discuss in detail the processing steps required to generate three reliable digital elevation models (DEMs) with a spatial resolution of 10 m that can be used for glacial mass balance studies. We describe the interferometric processing steps and the influence of a priori elevation information that is required to model long-wavelength topographic effects. We also focus on DEM alignment to allow optimal DEM comparisons and on the effects of radar signal penetration on ice and snow surface elevations. We finally compare glacier elevation changes between the three TDX DEMs and the C-band shuttle radar topography mission (SRTM) DEM from February 2000. We introduce a new approach for glacier elevation change calculations that depends on the elevation and slope of the terrain. We highlight the superior quality of the TDX DEMs compared to the SRTM DEM, describe remaining DEM uncertainties and discuss the limitations that arise due to the side-looking nature of the radar sensor.

  1. Low-mobility-pass filter between atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and electrospray ionization sources and a single quadrupole mass spectrometer: computational models and measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menlyadiev, Marlen R; Tadjimukhamedov, Fatkhulla Kh; Tarassov, Alexander; Wollnik, Hermann; Eiceman, Gary A

    2014-01-15

    Mixtures of ions produced in sources at atmospheric pressure, including chemical ionization (APCI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) can be simplified at or near ambient pressure using ion mobility based filters. A low-mobility-pass filter (LMPF) based on a simple mechanical design and simple electronic control was designed, modeled and tested with vapors of 2-hexadecanone in an APCI source and with spray of peptide solutions in an ESI source. The LMPF geometry was planar and small (4 mm wide × 13 mm long) and electric control was through a symmetric waveform in low kHz with amplitude between 0 and 10 V. Computational models established idealized performance for transmission efficiency of ions of several reduced mobility coefficients over the range of amplitudes and were matched by computed values from ion abundances in mass spectra. The filter exhibited a broad response function, equivalent to a Bode Plot in electronic filters, suggesting that ion filtering could be done in blocks ~50 m/z units wide. The benefit of this concept is that discrimination against ions of high mobility is controlled by only a single parameter: waveform amplitude at fixed frequency. The effective removal of high mobility ions, those of low mass-to-charge, can be beneficial for applications with ion-trap-based mass spectrometers to remove excessive levels of solvent or matrix ions. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Tevatron Collider physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichten, E.J.

    1990-02-01

    The physics of hadron colliders is briefly reviewed. Issues for further study are presented. Particular attention is given to the physics opportunities for a high luminosity (≥ 100 pb -1 /experiment/run) Upgrade of the Tevatron Collider. 25 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  3. The SLAC linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1985-01-01

    A report is given on the goals and progress of the SLAC Linear Collider. The author discusses the status of the machine and the detectors and give an overview of the physics which can be done at this new facility. He also gives some ideas on how (and why) large linear colliders of the future should be built

  4. RF properties of periodic accelerating structures for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.W.

    1989-07-01

    With the advent of the SLAC electron-positron linear collider (SLC) in the 100 GeV center-of-mass energy range, research and development work on even higher energy machines of this type has started in several laboratories in the United States, Europe, the Soviet Union and Japan. These linear colliders appear to provide the only promising approach to studying e + e - physics at center-of-mass energies approaching 1 TeV. This thesis concerns itself with the study of radio frequency properties of periodic accelerating structures for linear colliders and their interaction with bunched beams. The topics that have been investigated are: experimental measurements of the energy loss of single bunches to longitudinal modes in two types of structures, using an equivalent signal on a coaxial wire to simulate the beam; a method of canceling the energy spread created within a single bunch by longitudinal wakefields, through appropriate shaping of the longitudinal charge distribution of the bunch; derivation of the complete transient beam-loading equation for a train of bunches passing through a constant-gradient accelerator section, with application to the calculation and minimization of multi-bunch energy spread; detailed study of field emission and radio frequency breakdown in disk-loaded structures at S-, C- and X-band frequencies under extremely high-gradient conditions, with special attention to thermal effects, radiation, sparking, emission of gases, surface damage through explosive emission and its possible control through RF-gas processing. 53 refs., 49 figs., 9 tabs

  5. Closed-Loop Doluisio (Colon, Small Intestine) and Single-Pass Intestinal Perfusion (Colon, Jejunum) in Rat-Biophysical Model and Predictions Based on Caco-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozoya-Agullo, Isabel; Gonzalez-Alvarez, Isabel; Zur, Moran; Fine-Shamir, Noa; Cohen, Yael; Markovic, Milica; Garrigues, Teresa M; Dahan, Arik; Gonzalez-Alvarez, Marta; Merino-Sanjuán, Matilde; Bermejo, Marival; Avdeef, Alex

    2017-12-29

    The effective rat intestinal permeability (P eff ) was deconvolved using a biophysical model based on parameterized paracellular, aqueous boundary layer, transcellular permeabilities, and the villus-fold surface area expansion factor. Four types of rat intestinal perfusion data were considered: single-pass intestinal perfusion (SPIP) in the jejunum (n = 40), and colon (n = 15), closed-loop (Doluisio type) in the small intestine (n = 78), and colon (n = 74). Moreover, in vitro Caco-2 permeability values were used to predict rat in vivo values in the rat data studied. Comparable number of molecules permeate via paracellular water channels as by the lipoidal transcellular route in the SPIP method, although in the closed-loop method, the paracellular route appears dominant in the colon. The aqueous boundary layer thickness in the small intestine is comparable to that found in unstirred in vitro monolayer assays; it is thinner in the colon. The mucosal surface area in anaesthetized rats is 0.96-1.4 times the smooth cylinder calculated value in the colon, and it is 3.1-3.6 times in the small intestine. The paracellular permeability of the intestine appeared to be greater in rat than human, with the colon showing more leakiness (higher P para ) than the small intestine. Based on log intrinsic permeability values, the correlations between the in vitro and in vivo models ranged from r 2 0.82 to 0.92. The SPIP-Doluisio method comparison indicated identical log permeability selectivity trend with negligible bias.

  6. Multi-pass spectroscopic ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stehle, Jean-Louis; Samartzis, Peter C.; Stamataki, Katerina; Piel, Jean-Philippe; Katsoprinakis, George E.; Papadakis, Vassilis; Schimowski, Xavier; Rakitzis, T. Peter; Loppinet, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry is an established technique, particularly useful for thickness measurements of thin films. It measures polarization rotation after a single reflection of a beam of light on the measured substrate at a given incidence angle. In this paper, we report the development of multi-pass spectroscopic ellipsometry where the light beam reflects multiple times on the sample. We have investigated both theoretically and experimentally the effect of sample reflectivity, number of reflections (passes), angles of incidence and detector dynamic range on ellipsometric observables tanΨ and cosΔ. The multiple pass approach provides increased sensitivity to small changes in Ψ and Δ, opening the way for single measurement determination of optical thickness T, refractive index n and absorption coefficient k of thin films, a significant improvement over the existing techniques. Based on our results, we discuss the strengths, the weaknesses and possible applications of this technique. - Highlights: • We present multi-pass spectroscopic ellipsometry (MPSE), a multi-pass approach to ellipsometry. • Different detectors, samples, angles of incidence and number of passes were tested. • N passes improve polarization ratio sensitivity to the power of N. • N reflections improve phase shift sensitivity by a factor of N. • MPSE can significantly improve thickness measurements in thin films

  7. Muon collider progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noble, Robert J. FNAL

    1998-08-01

    Recent progress in the study of muon colliders is presented. An international collaboration consisting of over 100 individuals is involved in calculations and experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of this new type of lepton collider. Theoretical efforts are now concentrated on low-energy colliders in the 100 to 500 GeV center-of-mass energy range. Credible machine designs are emerging for much of a hypothetical complex from proton source to the final collider. Ionization cooling has been the most difficult part of the concept, and more powerful simulation tools are now in place to develop workable schemes. A collaboration proposal for a muon cooling experiment has been presented to the Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee, and a proposal for a targetry and pion collection channel experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory is in preparation. Initial proton bunching and space-charge compensation experiments at existing hadron facilities have occurred to demonstrate proton driver feasibility.

  8. FERMILAB: Collider detectors -2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Last month's edition (April, page 12) included a status report on data collection and preliminary physics results from the 'newcomer' DO detector at Fermilab's Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. This time the spotlight falls in the Veteran' CDF detector, in action since 1985 and meanwhile significantly upgraded. Meanwhile the Tevatron collider continues to improve, with record collision rates

  9. Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2015-01-01

    In response to a request from the 2013 Update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is preparing the foundation for a next-generation large-scale accelerator infrastructure in the heart of Europe. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh), to be accommodated in a new ∼100 km tunnel near Geneva. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCC-ee), which could be installed in the same tunnel as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detector, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on Nb3Sn superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton collider. The internat...

  10. Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    In response to a request from the 2013 Update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is preparing the foundation for a next-generation large-scale accelerator infrastructure in the heart of Europe. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh), to be accommodated in a new ∼100 km tunnel near Geneva. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCC-ee), which could be installed in the same tunnel as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on Nb3Sn superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton collider. The interna...

  11. Towards a Muon Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichten, E.

    2011-01-01

    A multi TeV Muon Collider is required for the full coverage of Terascale physics. The physics potential for a Muon Collider at ∼3 TeV and integrated luminosity of 1 ab -1 is outstanding. Particularly strong cases can be made if the new physics is SUSY or new strong dynamics. Furthermore, a staged Muon Collider can provide a Neutrino Factory to fully disentangle neutrino physics. If a narrow s-channel resonance state exists in the multi-TeV region, the physics program at a Muon Collider could begin with less than 10 31 cm -2 s -1 luminosity. Detailed studies of the physics case for a 1.5-4 TeV Muon Collider are just beginning. The goals of such studies are to: (1) identify benchmark physics processes; (2) study the physics dependence on beam parameters; (3) estimate detector backgrounds; and (4) compare the physics potential of a Muon Collider with those of the ILC, CLIC and upgrades to the LHC.

  12. Towards Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN presently provides proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass (c.m.) energy of 13 TeV. The LHC design was started more than 30 years ago, and its physics programme will extend through the second half of the 2030’s. The global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is now preparing for a post-LHC project. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh) in a new ∼100 km tunnel. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCC-ee) as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on $Nb_3Sn$ superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton c...

  13. Photon-photon colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1995-04-01

    Since the seminal work by Ginsburg, et at., the subject of giving the Next Linear Collider photon-photon capability, as well as electron-positron capability, has drawn much attention. A 1990 article by V.I. Teinov describes the situation at that time. In March 1994, the first workshop on this subject was held. This report briefly reviews the physics that can be achieved through the photon-photon channel and then focuses on the means of achieving such a collider. Also reviewed is the spectrum of backscattered Compton photons -- the best way of obtaining photons. We emphasize the spectrum actually obtained in a collider with both polarized electrons and photons (peaked at high energy and very different from a Compton spectrum). Luminosity is estimated for the presently considered colliders, and interaction and conversion-point geometries are described. Also specified are laser requirements (such as wavelength, peak power, and average power) and the lasers that might be employed. These include conventional and free-electron lasers. Finally, we describe the R&D necessary to make either of these approaches viable and explore the use of the SLC as a test bed for a photon-photon collider of very high energy.

  14. The development of colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1993-02-01

    Don Kerst, Gersh Budker, and Bruno Touschek were the individuals, and the motivating force, which brought about the development of colliders, while the laboratories at which it happened were Stanford, MURA, the Cambridge Electron Accelerator, Orsay, Frascati, CERN, and Novosibirsk. These laboratories supported, during many years, this rather speculative activity. Of course, many hundreds of physicists contributed to the development of colliders but the men who started it, set it in the right direction, and forcefully made it happen, were Don, Gersh, and Bruno. Don was instrumental in the development of proton-proton colliders, while Bruno and Gersh spearheaded the development of electron-positron colliders. In this brief review of the history, I will sketch the development of the concepts, the experiments, and the technological developments which made possible the development of colliders. It may look as if the emphasis is on theoretical concepts, but that is really not the case, for in this field -- the physics of beams -- the theory and experiment go hand in hand; theoretical understanding and advances are almost always motivated by the need to explain experimental results or the desire to construct better experimental devices

  15. COLLIDE Pro Helvetia Award

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    The COLLIDE Pro Helvetia Award is run in partnership with Pro Helvetia, giving the opportunity to Swiss artists to do research at CERN for three months.   From left to right: Laura Perrenoud, Marc Dubois and Simon de Diesbach. The photo shows their VR Project, +2199. Fragment.In are the winning artists of COLLIDE Pro Helvetia. They came to CERN for two months in 2015, and will now continue their last month in the laboratory. Fragment.In is a Swiss based interaction design studio. They create innovative projects, interactive installations, video and game design. Read more about COLLIDE here.

  16. Superconducting super collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limon, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider is to be a 20 TeV per beam proton-proton accelerator and collider. Physically the SCC will be 52 miles in circumference and slightly oval in shape. The use of superconducting magnets instead of conventional cuts the circumference from 180 miles to the 52 miles. The operating cost of the SCC per year is estimated to be about $200-250 million. A detailed cost estimate of the project is roughly $3 billion in 1986 dollars. For the big collider ring, the technical cost are dominated by the magnet system. That is why one must focus on the cost and design of the magnets. Presently, the process of site selection is underway. The major R and D efforts concern superconducting dipoles. The magnets use niobium-titanium as a conductor stabilized in a copper matrix. 10 figures

  17. Collide@CERN Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Kieffer, Robert; Blas Temino, Diego; Bertolucci, Sergio; Mr. Decelière, Rudy; Mr. Hänni, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    CERN, the Republic and Canton of Geneva, and the City of Geneva are delighted to invite you to “Collide@CERN Geneva Music”. Come to the public lecture about collisions between music and particle physics by the third winners of Collide@CERN Geneva, Vincent Hänni & Rudy Decelière, and their scientific inspiration partners, Diego Blas and Robert Kieffer. The event marks the beginning of their residency at CERN, and will be held at the CERN Globe of Science and Innovation on 16 October 2014 at 19.00. Doors will open at 18.30.

  18. The Colliding Beams Sequencer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.E.; Johnson, R.P.

    1989-01-01

    The Colliding Beam Sequencer (CBS) is a computer program used to operate the pbar-p Collider by synchronizing the applications programs and simulating the activities of the accelerator operators during filling and storage. The Sequencer acts as a meta-program, running otherwise stand alone applications programs, to do the set-up, beam transfers, acceleration, low beta turn on, and diagnostics for the transfers and storage. The Sequencer and its operational performance will be described along with its special features which include a periodic scheduler and command logger. 14 refs., 3 figs

  19. Hadron collider luminosity limitations

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Lyndon R

    1992-01-01

    The three colliders operated to date have taught us a great deal about the behaviour of both bunched and debunched beams in storage rings. The main luminosity limitations are now well enough understood that most of them can be stronglu attenuated or eliminated by approriate design precautions. Experience with the beam-beam interaction in both the SPS and the Tevatron allow us to predict the performance of the new generation of colliders with some degree of confidence. One of the main challenges that the accelerator physicist faces is the problem of the dynamic aperture limitations due to the lower field quality expected, imposed by economic and other constraints.

  20. The Muon Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the scientific motivation for a new type of accelerator, the muon collider. This accelerator would permit an energy-frontier scientific program and yet would fit on the site of an existing laboratory. Such a device is quite challenging, and requires a substantial R and D program. After describing the ingredients of the facility, the ongoing R and D activities of the Muon Accelerator Program are discussed. A possible U.S. scenario that could lead to a muon collider at Fermilab is briefly mentioned.

  1. Why Large Hadron Collider?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    or ¯pp collider is a synchrotron machine, where the particle and antiparticle beams are accelerated inside the same vacuum pipe (figure 1) using the same set of bending mag- nets and accelerating cavities (not shown). Thanks to their equal mass and opposite charge, the two beams go round in identical orbits on top of ...

  2. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    't Hooft, Gerardus; Llewellyn Smith, Christopher Hubert; Brüning, Oliver Sim; Collier, Paul; Stapnes, Steinar; Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Stachel, Johanna; Lederman, Leon Max

    2007-01-01

    Several articles about the LHC: The Making of the standard model; high-energy colliders and the rise of the standard model; How the LHC came to be; Building a behemoth; Detector challenges at the LHC; Beyond the standard model with the LHC; The quest for the quark-gluon plasma; The God particle et al. (42 pages

  3. Hadron collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pondrom, L.

    1991-10-03

    An introduction to the techniques of analysis of hadron collider events is presented in the context of the quark-parton model. Production and decay of W and Z intermediate vector bosons are used as examples. The structure of the Electroweak theory is outlined. Three simple FORTRAN programs are introduced, to illustrate Monte Carlo calculation techniques. 25 refs.

  4. Diffraction at collider energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankfurt, L.L.

    1992-01-01

    Lessons with ''soft'' hadron physics to explain (a) feasibility to observe and to investigate color transparency, color opacity effects at colliders; (b) significant probability and specific features of hard diffractive processes; (c) feasibility to investigate components of parton wave functions of hadrons with minimal number of constituents. This new physics would be more important with increase of collision energy

  5. Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "In the spring 2008, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) machine at CERN (the European Particle Physics laboratory) will be switched on for the first time. The huge machine is housed in a circular tunnel, 27 km long, excavated deep under the French-Swiss border near Geneva." (1,5 page)

  6. Superconducting Super Collider project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perl, M.L.

    1986-04-01

    The scientific need for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is outlined, along with the history of the development of the SSC concept. A brief technical description is given of each of the main points of the SSC conceptual design. The construction cost and construction schedule are discussed, followed by issues associated with the realization of the SSC. 8 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  7. High luminosity particle colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1997-03-01

    The authors consider the high energy physics advantages, disadvantages and luminosity requirements of hadron (pp, p anti p), lepton (e + e - , μ + μ - ) and photon-photon colliders. Technical problems in obtaining increased energy in each type of machine are presented. The machines relative size are also discussed

  8. LINEAR COLLIDERS: 1992 workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Settles, Ron; Coignet, Guy

    1992-01-01

    As work on designs for future electron-positron linear colliders pushes ahead at major Laboratories throughout the world in a major international collaboration framework, the LC92 workshop held in Garmisch Partenkirchen this summer, attended by 200 machine and particle physicists, provided a timely focus

  9. Tevatron's complex collider cousins

    CERN Multimedia

    Fischer, W

    2004-01-01

    Letter referring to Schwarzschild's story "Disappointing performance and tight budgets confront Fermilab with tough decisions" and contesting that the Tevatron is not the most complex accelerator operating. They use the examples of CERN's SPS collider, HERA at DESY and the RHIC at Brookhaven (1/4 page)

  10. Hadron collider physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pondrom, L.

    1991-01-01

    An introduction to the techniques of analysis of hadron collider events is presented in the context of the quark-parton model. Production and decay of W and Z intermediate vector bosons are used as examples. The structure of the Electroweak theory is outlined. Three simple FORTRAN programs are introduced, to illustrate Monte Carlo calculation techniques. 25 refs

  11. B factory with hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockyer, N.S.

    1990-01-01

    The opportunities to study B physics in a hadron collider are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the technological developments necessary for these experiments. The R and D program of the Bottom Collider Detector group is reviewed. (author)

  12. Superconducting muon collider concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willen, E.

    1996-01-01

    High energy colliding beam machines for elementary particle research have grown so costly that funding for them has become problematical. The physics they would explore, however, remains compelling, so that new methods must be found to reach high energy if this physics is to be studied. One such new approach is the muon collider. This machine could reach multi-TeV collision energies with good luminosity at an affordable cost. The scenario for producing μ + μ - collisions is shown schematically in a figure. A high intensity proton synchrotron delivers protons in sharply defined bunches onto a stationary target with an energy of 30 GeV. Many pions are produced that decay into muons; both are collected in a solenoid magnet system with useful energies in the range 0.1--1.0 GeV. The muons are then cooled, i.e. their transverse momentum as well as the spread in their longitudinal momentum is reduced. In this way, a bunch of protons is turned into a bunch of positive or negative muons suitable for acceleration and collision. The energy of the muons at this stage is only 0.02 GeV. Acceleration is accomplished in a series of recirculating linac accelerators, similar to the approach used in CEBAF. Upon reaching 2,000 GeV (2 TeV) of energy, the muons are transferred into a ring where positive and negative muons, transferred in successive bunches, collide and the collisions studied in a suitable detector. About 25% of the muons originally collected survive into the collider ring, and here they live for an average of ∼ 1,000 revolutions. At this point, the surviving muons are dumped and new bunches are injected. This paper describes in abbreviated form the main features and parameters of the presently envisioned muon collider, most of it taken from the latter two reports

  13. The Photon Collider at Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badelek, B.; Blöchinger, C.; Blümlein, J.; Boos, E.; Brinkmann, R.; Burkhardt, H.; Bussey, P.; Carimalo, C.; Chyla, J.; Çiftçi, A. K.; Decking, W.; de Roeck, A.; Fadin, V.; Ferrario, M.; Finch, A.; Fraas, H.; Franke, F.; Galynskii, M.; Gamp, A.; Ginzburg, I.; Godbole, R.; Gorbunov, D. S.; Gounaris, G.; Hagiwara, K.; Han, L.; Heuer, R.-D.; Heusch, C.; Illana, J.; Ilyin, V.; Jankowski, P.; Jiang, Y.; Jikia, G.; Jönsson, L.; Kalachnikow, M.; Kapusta, F.; Klanner, R.; Klassen, M.; Kobayashi, K.; Kon, T.; Kotkin, G.; Krämer, M.; Krawczyk, M.; Kuang, Y. P.; Kuraev, E.; Kwiecinski, J.; Leenen, M.; Levchuk, M.; Ma, W. F.; Martyn, H.; Mayer, T.; Melles, M.; Miller, D. J.; Mtingwa, S.; Mühlleitner, M.; Muryn, B.; Nickles, P. V.; Orava, R.; Pancheri, G.; Penin, A.; Potylitsyn, A.; Poulose, P.; Quast, T.; Raimondi, P.; Redlin, H.; Richard, F.; Rindani, S. D.; Rizzo, T.; Saldin, E.; Sandner, W.; Schönnagel, H.; Schneidmiller, E.; Schreiber, H. J.; Schreiber, S.; Schüler, K. P.; Serbo, V.; Seryi, A.; Shanidze, R.; da Silva, W.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Spira, M.; Stasto, A. M.; Sultansoy, S.; Takahashi, T.; Telnov, V.; Tkabladze, A.; Trines, D.; Undrus, A.; Wagner, A.; Walker, N.; Watanabe, I.; Wengler, T.; Will, I.; Wipf, S.; Yavaş, Ö.; Yokoya, K.; Yurkov, M.; Zarnecki, A. F.; Zerwas, P.; Zomer, F.

    High energy photon colliders (γγ,γe) are based on e-e- linear colliders where high energy photons are produced using Compton scattering of laser light on high energy electrons just before the interaction point. This paper is a part of the Technical Design Report of the linear collider TESLA.1 Physics program, possible parameters and some technical aspects of the photon collider at TESLA are discussed.

  14. Final focus system tuning studies towards Compact Linear Collider feasibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Marin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the latest results regarding the tuning study of the baseline design of the final focus system of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC-FFS. CLIC aims to provide collisions to the experiments at a luminosity above 10^{34}  cm^{-2} s^{-1}. In order to deliver such luminosity in a single pass machine, the vertical beam size at the interaction point (IP is reduced to about 1 nm, which imposes unprecedented tuning difficulties to the system. In previous studies, 90% of the machines reached 90% of the nominal luminosity at the expense of 18 000 luminosity measurements, when considering beam position monitor errors and transverse misalignments of magnets for a single beam case. In the present study, additional static imperfections such as roll misalignments and strength errors are included. Moreover both e^{-} and e^{+} beamlines are properly simulated. A new tuning procedure based on linear and nonlinear knobs is implemented to effectively cure the most relevant beam size aberrations at the IP. The obtained results for single and double beam studies under solely static imperfections are presented.

  15. Final focus system tuning studies towards Compact Linear Collider feasibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, E.; Latina, A.; Tomás, R.; Schulte, D.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we present the latest results regarding the tuning study of the baseline design of the final focus system of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC-FFS). CLIC aims to provide collisions to the experiments at a luminosity above 1034 c m-2 s-1 . In order to deliver such luminosity in a single pass machine, the vertical beam size at the interaction point (IP) is reduced to about 1 nm, which imposes unprecedented tuning difficulties to the system. In previous studies, 90% of the machines reached 90% of the nominal luminosity at the expense of 18 000 luminosity measurements, when considering beam position monitor errors and transverse misalignments of magnets for a single beam case. In the present study, additional static imperfections as, roll misalignments, strength v2.epss are included. Moreover both e- and e+ beamlines are properly simulated. A new tuning procedure based on linear and nonlinear knobs is implemented to effectively cure the most relevant beam size aberrations at the IP. The obtained results for single and double beam studies under solely static imperfections are presented.

  16. Single-Phase LLCL-Filter-based Grid-Tied Inverter with Low-Pass Filter Based Capacitor Current Feedback Active damper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yuan; Wu, Weimin; Li, Yun

    2016-01-01

    . In this paper, a low pass filter is proposed to be inserted in the capacitor current feedback loop op LLCL-filter based grid-tied inverter together with a digital proportional and differential compensator. The detailed theoretical analysis is given. For verification, simulations on a 2kW/220V/10kHz LLCL......The capacitor-current-feedback active damping method is attractive for high-order-filter-based high power grid-tied inverter when the grid impedance varies within a wide range. In order to improve the system control bandwidth and attenuate the high order grid background harmonics by using the quasi...

  17. The SLAC linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phinney, N.

    1992-01-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider has begun a new era of operation with the SLD detector. During 1991 there was a first engineering run for the SLD in parallel with machine improvements to increase luminosity and reliability. For the 1992 run, a polarized electron source was added and more than 10,000 Zs with an average of 23% polarization have been logged by the SLD. This paper discusses the performance of the SLC in 1991 and 1992 and the technical advances that have produced higher luminosity. Emphasis will be placed on issues relevant to future linear colliders such as producing and maintaining high current, low emittance beams and focusing the beams to the micron scale for collisions. (Author) tab., 2 figs., 18 refs

  18. Large Hadron Collider manual

    CERN Document Server

    Lavender, Gemma

    2018-01-01

    What is the universe made of? How did it start? This Manual tells the story of how physicists are seeking answers to these questions using the world’s largest particle smasher – the Large Hadron Collider – at the CERN laboratory on the Franco-Swiss border. Beginning with the first tentative steps taken to build the machine, the digestible text, supported by color photographs of the hardware involved, along with annotated schematic diagrams of the physics experiments, covers the particle accelerator’s greatest discoveries – from both the perspective of the writer and the scientists who work there. The Large Hadron Collider Manual is a full, comprehensive guide to the most famous, record-breaking physics experiment in the world, which continues to capture the public imagination as it provides new insight into the fundamental laws of nature.

  19. Polarized proton colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    High energy polarized beam collisions will open up the unique physics opportunities of studying spin effects in hard processes. This will allow the study of the spin structure of the proton and also the verification of the many well documented expectations of spin effects in perturbative QCD and parity violation in W and Z production. Proposals for polarized proton acceleration for several high energy colliders have been developed. A partial Siberian Snake in the AGS has recently been successfully tested and full Siberian Snakes, spin rotators, and polarimeters for RHIC are being developed to make the acceleration of polarized beams to 250 GeV possible. This allows for the unique possibility of colliding two 250 GeV polarized proton beams at luminosities of up to 2 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1

  20. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Juettner Fernandes, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    What really happened during the Big Bang? Why did matter form? Why do particles have mass? To answer these questions, scientists and engineers have worked together to build the largest and most powerful particle accelerator in the world: the Large Hadron Collider. Includes glossary, websites, and bibliography for further reading. Perfect for STEM connections. Aligns to the Common Core State Standards for Language Arts. Teachers' Notes available online.

  1. QCD for Collider Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Skands, Peter

    2011-01-01

    These lectures are directed at a level suitable for graduate students in experimental and theoretical High Energy Physics. They are intended to give an introduction to the theory and phenomenology of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) as it is used in collider physics applications. The aim is to bring the reader to a level where informed decisions can be made concerning different approaches and their uncertainties. The material is divided into four main areas: 1) fundamentals, 2) perturbative QCD, ...

  2. Muon Collider Progress: Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-09-10

    A muon collider would be a powerful tool for exploring the energy-frontier with leptons, and would complement the studies now under way at the LHC. Such a device would offer several important benefits. Muons, like electrons, are point particles so the full center-of-mass energy is available for particle production. Moreover, on account of their higher mass, muons give rise to very little synchrotron radiation and produce very little beamstrahlung. The first feature permits the use of a circular collider that can make efficient use of the expensive rf system and whose footprint is compatible with an existing laboratory site. The second feature leads to a relatively narrow energy spread at the collision point. Designing an accelerator complex for a muon collider is a challenging task. Firstly, the muons are produced as a tertiary beam, so a high-power proton beam and a target that can withstand it are needed to provide the required luminosity of ~1 × 10{sup 34} cm{sup –2}s{sup –1}. Secondly, the beam is initially produced with a large 6D phase space, which necessitates a scheme for reducing the muon beam emittance (“cooling”). Finally, the muon has a short lifetime so all beam manipulations must be done very rapidly. The Muon Accelerator Program, led by Fermilab and including a number of U.S. national laboratories and universities, has undertaken design and R&D activities aimed toward the eventual construction of a muon collider. Design features of such a facility and the supporting R&D program are described.

  3. Future Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, Eberhard

    1998-01-01

    Plans for future hadron colliders are presented, and accelerator physics and engineering aspects common to these machines are discussed. The Tevatron is presented first, starting with a summary of the achievements in Run IB which finished in 1995, followed by performance predictions for Run II which will start in 1999, and the TeV33 project, aiming for a peak luminosity $L ~ 1 (nbs)^-1$. The next machine is the Large Hadron Collider LHC at CERN, planned to come into operation in 2005. The last set of machines are Very Large Hadron Colliders which might be constructed after the LHC. Three variants are presented: Two machines with a beam energy of 50 TeV, and dipole fields of 1.8 and 12.6 T in the arcs, and a machine with 100 TeV and 12 T. The discussion of accelerator physics aspects includes the beam-beam effect, bunch spacing and parasitic collisions, and the crossing angle. The discussion of the engineering aspects covers synchrotron radiation and stored energy in the beams, the power in the debris of the p...

  4. Hadron Collider Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incandela, J.R.

    2000-01-01

    Experiments are being prepared at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider that promise to deliver extraordinary insights into the nature of spontaneous symmetry breaking, and the role of supersymmetry in the universe. This article reviews the goals, challenges, and designs of these experiments. The first hadron collider, the ISR at CERN, has to overcome two initial obstacles. The first was low luminosity, which steadily improved over time. The second was the broad angular spread of interesting events. In this regard Maurice Jacob noted (1): The answer is ... sophisticated detectors covering at least the whole central region (45 degree le θ le 135 degree) and full azimuth. This statement, while obvious today, reflects the major revelation of the ISR period that hadrons have partonic substructure. The result was an unexpectedly strong hadronic yield at large transverse momentum (p T ). Partly because of this, the ISR missed the discovery of the J/ψ and later missed the Υ. The ISR era was therefore somewhat less auspicious than it might have been. It did however make important contributions in areas such as jet production and charm excitation and it paved the way for the SPS collider, also at CERN

  5. Droplets passing through a soap film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jun; Wang, Wei; Ji, Chen; Pan, Min

    2017-06-01

    Here, we report an experimental study of droplets colliding with a soap film. The behavior of the droplet is found to be dependent on the impact velocity. The threshold for a droplet to pass through the soap film is influenced by the droplet diameter. The contact time decreases with increasing impact velocity. Emphasis is placed on whether the outer shell remains intact. When the dimensionless contact time approaches 1, collapse of the shell begins. However, the shell does not collapse with further increasing impact velocity.

  6. TPG bus passes

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Staff Association will stop selling TPG bus passes. All active and retired members of the CERN personnel will be able to purchase Unireso bus passes from the CERN Hostel - Building 39 (Meyrin site) from 1st February 2013. For more information: https://cds.cern.ch/journal/CERNBulletin/2013/04/Announcements/1505279?ln=en

  7. Hadron-hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Month, M.; Weng, W.T.

    1983-01-01

    The objective is to investigate whether existing technology might be extrapolated to provide the conceptual framework for a major hadron-hadron collider facility for high energy physics experimentation for the remainder of this century. One contribution to this large effort is to formalize the methods and mathematical tools necessary. In this report, the main purpose is to introduce the student to basic design procedures. From these follow the fundamental characteristics of the facility: its performance capability, its size, and the nature and operating requirements on the accelerator components, and with this knowledge, we can determine the technology and resources needed to build the new facility

  8. Hadron collider physics at UCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the research work in high energy physics by the group at the University of California, Riverside. Work has been divided between hadron collider physics and e + -e - collider physics, and theoretical work. The hadron effort has been heavily involved in the startup activities of the D-Zero detector, commissioning and ongoing redesign. The lepton collider work has included work on TPC/2γ at PEP and the OPAL detector at LEP, as well as efforts on hadron machines

  9. Status of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.

    1990-01-01

    Accelerator Physics issues, such as the dynamical aperture, the beam lifetime and the current--intensity limitation are carefully studied for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The single layer superconducting magnets, of 8 cm coil inner diameter, satisfying the beam stability requirements have also been successfully tested. The proposal has generated wide spread interest in the particle and nuclear physics. 1 ref., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Top Quark Production at Hadron Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phaf, Lukas Kaj [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2004-03-01

    This thesis describes both theoretical and experimental research into top quark production. The theoretical part contains a calculation of the single-top quark production cross section at hadron colliders, at Next to Leading Order (NLO) accuracy. The experimental part describes a measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in proton-antiproton collisions, at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV.

  11. Proton-antiproton collider physics

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido

    1989-01-01

    This volume reviews the physics studied at the CERN proton-antiproton collider during its first phase of operation, from the first physics run in 1981 to the last one at the end of 1985. The volume consists of a series of review articles written by physicists who are actively involved with the collider research program. The first article describes the proton-antiproton collider facility itself, including the antiproton source and its principle of operation based on stochastic cooling. The subsequent six articles deal with the various physics subjects studied at the collider. Each article descr

  12. TOP AND HIGGS PHYSICS AT THE HADRON COLLIDERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabeen, Shabnam

    2013-10-20

    This review summarizes the recent results for top quark and Higgs boson measurements from experiments at Tevatron, a proton–antiproton collider at a center-of-mass energy of √ s =1 . 96 TeV, and the Large Hadron Collider, a proton–proton collider at a center- of-mass energy of √ s = 7 TeV. These results include the discovery of a Higgs-like boson and measurement of its various properties, and measurements in the top quark sector, e.g. top quark mass, spin, charge asymmetry and production of single top quark.

  13. Majorana Higgses at colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemevšek, Miha; Nesti, Fabrizio; Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    2017-04-01

    Collider signals of heavy Majorana neutrino mass origin are studied in the minimal Left-Right symmetric model, where their mass is generated spontaneously together with the breaking of lepton number. The right-handed triplet Higgs boson Δ, responsible for such breaking, can be copiously produced at the LHC through the Higgs portal in the gluon fusion and less so in gauge mediated channels. At Δ masses below the opening of the V V decay channel, the two observable modes are pair-production of heavy neutrinos via the triplet gluon fusion gg → Δ → NN and pair production of triplets from the Higgs h → ΔΔ → 4 N decay. The latter features tri- and quad same-sign lepton final states that break lepton number by four units and have no significant background. In both cases up to four displaced vertices may be present and their displacement may serve as a discriminating variable. The backgrounds at the LHC, including the jet fake rate, are estimated and the resulting sensitivity to the Left-Right breaking scale extends well beyond 10 TeV. In addition, sub-dominant radiative modes are surveyed: the γγ, Zγ and lepton flavour violating ones. Finally, prospects for Δ signals at future e + e - colliders are presented.

  14. Passing and Catching in Rugby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namudu, Mike M.

    This booklet contains the fundamentals for rugby at the primary school level. It deals primarily with passing and catching the ball. It contains instructions on (1) holding the ball for passing, (2) passing the ball to the left--standing, (3) passing the ball to the left--running, (4) making a switch pass, (5) the scrum half's normal pass, (6) the…

  15. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book Snowmass 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronan, M.T.

    2001-01-01

    The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e + e - linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e + e - linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e + e - linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e + e - experiments can provide. This last point merits further emphasis. If a new accelerator could be designed and built in a few years, it would make

  16. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book Snowmass 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronan (Editor), M.T.

    2001-06-01

    The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e{sup +}e{sup -} experiments can provide. This last point merits further emphasis. If a new accelerator could be designed and

  17. The photon collider at TESLA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Badelek, B.; Bloechinger, C.; Blümlein, J.; Boos, E.; Brinkman, R.; Burkhardt, H.; Bussey, P.; Carimalo, C.; Chýla, Jiří; Ciftci, A.K.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 30 (2004), s. 5097-5186 ISSN 0217-751X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010920 Keywords : photon collider * linear collider * gamma-gamma * photon-photon * photon electron * Compton scattering Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.054, year: 2004

  18. Test of QCD at colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Shimizu, Shima; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS and CMS collaborations measure QCD processes in a wide kinematic range using proton--proton colliding data at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A variety of recent results is presented. The results provide validation of the current understanding of QCD, such as the proton structure and interactions and radiations of partons.

  19. Vanilla Technicolor at Linear Colliders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    T. Frandsen, Mads; Jarvinen, Matti; Sannino, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the reach of Linear Colliders (LC)s for models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking. We show that LCs can efficiently test the compositeness scale, identified with the mass of the new spin-one resonances, till the maximum energy in the center-of-mass of the colliding leptons...

  20. Challenges in future linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Chattopadhyay, S

    2002-01-01

    For decades, electron-positron colliders have been complementing proton-proton colliders. But the circular LEP, the largest e/sup -/e /sup +/ collider, represented an energy limit beyond which energy losses to synchrotron radiation necessitate moving to e/sup -/e/sup + / linear colliders (LCs), thereby raising new challenges for accelerator builders. Japanese-American, German, and European collaborations have presented options for the "Future Linear Collider " (FLC). Key accelerator issues for any FLC option are the achievement of high enough energy and luminosity. Damping rings, taking advantage of the phenomenon of synchrotron radiation, have been developed as the means for decreasing beam size, which is crucial for ensuring a sufficiently high rate of particle-particle collisions. Related challenges are alignment and stability in an environment where even minute ground motion can disrupt performance, and the ability to monitor beam size. The technical challenges exist within a wider context of socioeconomi...

  1. CERN balances linear collider studies

    CERN Multimedia

    ILC Newsline

    2011-01-01

    The forces behind the two most mature proposals for a next-generation collider, the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study, have been steadily coming together, with scientists from both communities sharing ideas and information across the technology divide. In a support of cooperation between the two, CERN in Switzerland, where most CLIC research takes place, recently converted the project-specific position of CLIC Study Leader to the concept-based Linear Collider Study Leader.   The scientist who now holds this position, Steinar Stapnes, is charged with making the linear collider a viable option for CERN’s future, one that could include either CLIC or the ILC. The transition to more involve the ILC must be gradual, he said, and the redefinition of his post is a good start. Though not very much involved with superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) technology, where ILC researchers have made significant advances, CERN participates in many aspect...

  2. Implementation of a split-bolus single-pass CT protocol at a UK major trauma centre to reduce excess radiation dose in trauma pan-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, V.; Sastry, A.; Woo, T.D.; Jones, H.R.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To quantify the dose reduction and ensure that the use of a split-bolus protocol provided sufficient vascular enhancement. Materials and methods: Between 1 January 2014 and 31 May 2014, both split bolus and traditional two-phase scans were performed on a single CT scanner (SOMATOM Definition AS+, Siemens Healthcare) using a two-pump injector (Medrad Stellant). Both protocols used Siemens' proprietary tube current and tube voltage modulation techniques (CARE dose and CARE kV). The protocols were compared retrospectively to assess the dose–length product (DLP), aortic radiodensity at the level of the coeliac axis and radiodensity of the portal vein. Results: There were 151 trauma CT examinations during this period. Seventy-eight used the split-bolus protocol. Seventy-one had traditional two-phase imaging. One patient was excluded as they were under the age of 18 years. The radiodensity measurements for the portal vein were significantly higher (p<0.001) in the split-bolus protocol. The mean aortic enhancement in both protocols exceeded 250 HU, although the traditional two-phase protocol gave greater arterial enhancement (p<0.001) than the split-bolus protocol. The split-bolus protocol had a significantly lower (p<0.001) DLP with 43.5% reduction in the mean DLP compared to the traditional protocol. Conclusion: Split-bolus CT imaging offers significant dose reduction for this relatively young population while retaining both arterial and venous enhancement. -- Highlights: •We implemented a split bolus pan-CT protocol for trauma CT. •We compared the radiation dose and vascular enhancement of the split bolus protocol to a traditional two phase protocol. •The split bolus protocol had a 43.5% reduction in mean DLP

  3. An experimental evaluation of multi-pass solar air heaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satcunanathan, S.; Persad, P.

    1980-12-01

    Three collectors of identical dimensions but operating in the single-pass, two-pass and three-pass modes were tested simultaneously under ambient conditions. It was found that the two-pass air heater was consistently better than the single-pass air heater over the day for the range of mass flow rates considered. It was also found that at a mass flow rate of 0.0095 kg s/sup -1/ m/sup -2/, the thermal performances of the two-pass and three-pass collectors were identical, but at higher flow rates the two-pass collector was superior to the three-pass collector, the superiority decreasing with increasing mass flow rate.

  4. Conceptual design of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider: RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    The complete Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility will be a complex set of accelerators and beam transfer equipment connecting them. A significant portion of the total facility either exists or is under construction. Two existing Tandem Van de Graaff accelerators will serve for the initial ion acceleration. Ions with a charge of -1 would be accelerated from ground to +15 MV potential, pass through a stripping foil, and accelerate back to ground potential, where they would pass through a second stripping foil. From there the ions will traverse a long transfer line to the AGS tunnel and be injected into the Booster accelerator. The Booster accelerates the ion bunch, and then the ions pass through one more stripper and then enter the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), where they are accelerated to the top AGS energy and transferred to the collider. Bending and focusing of ion beams is to be achieved by superconducting magnets. The physics goals behind the RHIC are enumerated, particularly as regards the study of quark matter and the characteristics of high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. The design of the collider and all its components is described, including the injector, the lattice, magnet system, cryogenic and vacuum systems, beam transfer, injection, and dump, rf system, and beam instrumentation and control system. Also given are cost estimates, construction schedules, and a management plan

  5. Conceptual design of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider: RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samios, Nicholas P.

    1986-05-01

    The complete Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility will be a complex set of accelerators and beam transfer equipment connecting them. A significant portion of the total facility either exists or is under construction. Two existing Tandem Van de Graaff accelerators will serve for the initial ion acceleration. Ions with a charge of -1 would be accelerated from ground to +15 MV potential, pass through a stripping foil, and accelerate back to ground potential, where they would pass through a second stripping foil. From there the ions will traverse a long transfer line to the AGS tunnel and be injected into the Booster accelerator. The Booster accelerates the ion bunch, and then the ions pass through one more stripper and then enter the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), where they are accelerated to the top AGS energy and transferred to the collider. Bending and focusing of ion beams is to be achieved by superconducting magnets. The physics goals behind the RHIC are enumerated, particularly as regards the study of quark matter and the characteristics of high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. The design of the collider and all its components is described, including the injector, the lattice, magnet system, cryogenic and vacuum systems, beam transfer, injection, and dump, rf system, and beam instrumentation and control system. Also given are cost estimates, construction schedules, and a management plan. (LEW)

  6. Topics in Collider Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petriello, Frank J

    2003-08-27

    It is an exciting time for high energy physics. Several experiments are currently exploring uncharted terrain; the next generation of colliders will begin operation in the coming decade. These experiments will together help us understand some of the most puzzling issues in particle physics: the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking and the generation of flavor physics. It is clear that the primary goal of theoretical particle physics in the near future is to support and guide this experimental program. These tasks can be accomplished in two ways: by developing experimental signatures for new models which address outstanding problems, and by improving Standard Model predictions for precision observables. We present here several results which advance both of these goals. We begin with a study of non-commutative field theories. It has been suggested that TeV-scale non-commutativity could explain the origin of CP violation in the SM. We identify several distinct signatures of non-commutativity in high energy processes. We also demonstrate the one-loop quantum consistency of a simple spontaneously broken non-commutative U(1) theory; this result is an important preface to any attempt to embed the SM within a non-commutative framework. We then investigate the phenomenology of extra-dimensional theories, which have been suggested recently as solutions to the hierarchy problem of particle physics. We first examine the implications of allowing SM fields to propagate in the full five-dimensional spacetime of the Randall-Sundrum model, which solves the hierarchy problem via an exponential ''warping'' of the Planck scale induced by a five-dimensional anti de-Sitter geometry. In an alternative extra-dimensional theory, in which all SM fields are permitted to propagate in flat extra dimensions, we show that properties of the Higgs boson are significantly modified. Finally, we discuss the next-to-next-to leading order QCD corrections to the dilepton

  7. The standard model and colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinchliffe, I.

    1987-03-01

    Some topics in the standard model of strong and electroweak interactions are discussed, as well as how these topics are relevant for the high energy colliders which will become operational in the next few years. The radiative corrections in the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam model are discussed, stressing how these corrections may be measured at LEP and the SLC. CP violation is discussed briefly, followed by a discussion of the Higgs boson and the searches which are relevant to hadron colliders are then discussed. Some of the problems which the standard model does not solve are discussed, and the energy ranges accessible to the new colliders are indicated

  8. Vanilla technicolor at linear colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Mads T.; Järvinen, Matti; Sannino, Francesco

    2011-08-01

    We analyze the reach of linear colliders for models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking. We show that linear colliders can efficiently test the compositeness scale, identified with the mass of the new spin-one resonances, until the maximum energy in the center of mass of the colliding leptons. In particular we analyze the Drell-Yan processes involving spin-one intermediate heavy bosons decaying either leptonically or into two standard model gauge bosons. We also analyze the light Higgs production in association with a standard model gauge boson stemming also from an intermediate spin-one heavy vector.

  9. Physics at Future Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Baur, U.; Parsons, J.; Albrow, M.; Denisov, D.; Han, T.; Kotwal, A.; Olness, F.; Qian, J.; Belyaev, S.; Bosman, M.; Brooijmans, G.; Gaines, I.; Godfrey, S.; Hansen, J.B.; Hauser, J.; Heintz, U.; Hinchliffe, I.; Kao, C.; Landsberg, G.; Maltoni, F.; Oleari, C.; Pagliarone, C.; Paige, F.; Plehn, T.; Rainwater, D.; Reina, L.; Rizzo, T.; Su, S.; Tait, T.; Wackeroth, D.; Vataga, E.; Zeppenfeld, D.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the physics opportunities and detector challenges at future hadron colliders. As guidelines for energies and luminosities we use the proposed luminosity and/or energy upgrade of the LHC (SLHC), and the Fermilab design of a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC). We illustrate the physics capabilities of future hadron colliders for a variety of new physics scenarios (supersymmetry, strong electroweak symmetry breaking, new gauge bosons, compositeness and extra dimensions). We also investigate the prospects of doing precision Higgs physics studies at such a machine, and list selected Standard Model physics rates.

  10. Hadron collider physics at UCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the research work in high energy physics by the group at the University of California, Riverside. Work has been divided between hadron collider physics and e{sup +}-e{sup {minus}} collider physics, and theoretical work. The hadron effort has been heavily involved in the startup activities of the D-Zero detector, commissioning and ongoing redesign. The lepton collider work has included work on TPC/2{gamma} at PEP and the OPAL detector at LEP, as well as efforts on hadron machines.

  11. When Black Holes Collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John

    2010-01-01

    Among the fascinating phenomena predicted by General Relativity, Einstein's theory of gravity, black holes and gravitational waves, are particularly important in astronomy. Though once viewed as a mathematical oddity, black holes are now recognized as the central engines of many of astronomy's most energetic cataclysms. Gravitational waves, though weakly interacting with ordinary matter, may be observed with new gravitational wave telescopes, opening a new window to the universe. These observations promise a direct view of the strong gravitational dynamics involving dense, often dark objects, such as black holes. The most powerful of these events may be merger of two colliding black holes. Though dark, these mergers may briefly release more energy that all the stars in the visible universe, in gravitational waves. General relativity makes precise predictions for the gravitational-wave signatures of these events, predictions which we can now calculate with the aid of supercomputer simulations. These results provide a foundation for interpreting expect observations in the emerging field of gravitational wave astronomy.

  12. Generalized Approximate Message Passing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxvig, Christian Schou; Arildsen, Thomas; Larsen, Torben

    2017-01-01

    This tech report details a collection of results related to the Generalised Approximate Message Passing (GAMP) algorithm. It is a summary of the results that the authors have found critical in understanding the GAMP algorithm. In particular, emphasis is on the details that are crucial in implemen...

  13. Collider Physics an Experimental Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elvezio Pagliarone, Carmine

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews shortly a small part of the contents of a set of lectures, presented at the XIV International School of Particles and Fields in Morelia, state of Michoacan, Mexico, during November 2010. The main goal of those lectures was to introduce students to some of the basic ideas and tools required for experimental and phenomenological analysis of collider data. In particular, after an introduction to the scientific motivations, that drives the construction of powerful accelerator complexes, and the need of reaching high center of mass energies and luminosities, some basic concept about collider particle detectors will be discussed. A status about the present running colliders and collider experiments as well as future plans and research and development is also given.

  14. Bottomonium production in hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner Mariotto, C. [Universidade de Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologia]. E-mail: mariotto@if.ufrgs.br; Gay Ducati, M.B. [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Grupo de Fenomenologia de Particulas em Altas Energias; Ingelman, G. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). High Energy Physics

    2004-07-01

    Production of bottomonium in hadronic collisions is studied in the framework of the soft colour approach. We report some results for production of {upsilon} in the Tevatron and predictions for the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC). (author)

  15. US panel backs linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    A draft report from a working group examining the future of American particle physics has stated that the US should give top priority to a high energy e-p collider, wherever it is built (2 paragraphs).

  16. Large Hadron Collider nears completion

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Installation of the final component of the Large Hadron Collider particle accelerator is under way along the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva, Switzerland. When completed this summer, the LHC will be the world's largest and most complex scientific instrument.

  17. Feedback systems for linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Hendrickson, L; Himel, Thomas M; Minty, Michiko G; Phinney, N; Raimondi, Pantaleo; Raubenheimer, T O; Shoaee, H; Tenenbaum, P G

    1999-01-01

    Feedback systems are essential for stable operation of a linear collider, providing a cost-effective method for relaxing tight tolerances. In the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), feedback controls beam parameters such as trajectory, energy, and intensity throughout the accelerator. A novel dithering optimization system which adjusts final focus parameters to maximize luminosity contributed to achieving record performance in the 1997-98 run. Performance limitations of the steering feedback have been investigated, and improvements have been made. For the Next Linear Collider (NLC), extensive feedback systems are planned as an intregal part of the design. Feedback requiremetns for JLC (the Japanese Linear Collider) are essentially identical to NLC; some of the TESLA requirements are similar but there are significant differences. For NLC, algorithms which incorporate improvements upon the SLC implementation are being prototyped. Specialized systems for the damping rings, rf and interaction point will operate at hi...

  18. Stable massive particles at colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbairn, M.; /Stockholm U.; Kraan, A.C.; /Pennsylvania U.; Milstead, D.A.; /Stockholm U.; Sjostrand, T.; /Lund U.; Skands, P.; /Fermilab; Sloan, T.; /Lancaster U.

    2006-11-01

    We review the theoretical motivations and experimental status of searches for stable massive particles (SMPs) which could be sufficiently long-lived as to be directly detected at collider experiments. The discovery of such particles would address a number of important questions in modern physics including the origin and composition of dark matter in the universe and the unification of the fundamental forces. This review describes the techniques used in SMP-searches at collider experiments and the limits so far obtained on the production of SMPs which possess various colour, electric and magnetic charge quantum numbers. We also describe theoretical scenarios which predict SMPs, the phenomenology needed to model their production at colliders and interactions with matter. In addition, the interplay between collider searches and open questions in cosmology such as dark matter composition are addressed.

  19. The rise of colliding beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1992-06-01

    It is a particular pleasure for me to have this opportunity to review for you the rise of colliding beams as the standard technology for high-energy-physics accelerators. My own career in science has been intimately tied up in the transition from the old fixed-target technique to colliding-beam work. I have led a kind of double life both as a machine builder and as an experimenter, taking part in building and using the first of the colliding-beam machines, the Princeton-Stanford Electron-Electron Collider, and building the most recent advance in the technology, the Stanford Linear Collider. The beginning was in 1958, and in the 34 years since there has been a succession of both electron and proton colliders that have increased the available center-of-mass energy for hard collisions by more than a factor of 1000. For the historians here, I regret to say that very little of this story can be found in the conventional literature. Standard operating procedure for the accelerator physics community has been publication in conference proceedings, which can be obtained with some difficulty, but even more of the critical papers are in internal laboratory reports that were circulated informally and that may not even have been preserved. In this presentation I shall review what happened based on my personal experiences and what literature is available. I can speak from considerable experience on the electron colliders, for that is the topic in which I was most intimately involved. On proton colliders my perspective is more than of an observer than of a participant, but I have dug into the literature and have been close to many of the participants

  20. Stabilisation and precision pointing quadrupole magnets in the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC)

    CERN Document Server

    Janssens, Stef; Linde, Frank; van den Brand, Jo; Bertolini, Alessandro; Artoos, Kurt

    This thesis describes the research done to provide stabilisation and precision positioning for the main beam quadrupole magnets of the Compact Linear Collider CLIC. The introduction describes why new particle accelerators are needed to further the knowledge of our universe and why they are linear. A proposed future accelerator is the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) which consists of a novel two beam accelerator concept. Due to its linearity and subsequent single pass at the interaction point, this new accelerator requires a very small beam size at the interaction point, in order to increase collision effectiveness. One of the technological challenges, to obtain these small beam sizes at the interaction point, is to keep the quadrupole magnets aligned and stable to 1.5 nm integrated r.m.s. in vertical and 5 nm integrated root mean square (r.m.s.) in lateral direction. Additionally there is a proposal to create an intentional offset (max. 50 nm every 20 ms with a precision of +/- 1 nm), for several quadrupole ma...

  1. Muon muon collider: Feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-18

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice--the authors believe--to allow them to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring which has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design.

  2. When Moons Collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufu, Raluca; Aharonson, Oded

    2017-10-01

    Impacts between two orbiting satellites is a natural consequence of Moon formation. Mergers between moonlets are especially important for the newly proposed multiple-impact hypothesis as these moonlets formed from different debris disks merge together to form the final Moon. However, this process is relevant also for the canonical giant impact, as previous work shows that multiple moonlets are formed from the same debris disk.The dynamics of impacts between two orbiting bodies is substantially different from previously heavily studied planetary-sized impacts. Firstly, the impact velocities are smaller and limited to, thus heating is limited. Secondly, both fragments have similar mass therefore, they would contribute similarly and substantially to the final satellite. Thirdly, this process can be more erosive than planetary impacts as the velocity of ejected material required to reach the mutual Hill sphere is smaller than the escape velocity, altering the merger efficiency. Previous simulations show that moonlets inherit different isotopic signatures from their primordial debris disk, depending on the parameters of the collision with the planet. We therefore, evaluate the degree of mixing in moonlet-moonlet collisions in the presence of a planetary gravitational field, using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). Preliminary results show that the initial thermal state of the colliding moonlets has only a minor influence on the amount of mixing, compared to the effects of velocity and impact angle over their likely ranges. For equal mass bodies in accretionary collisions, impact angular momentum enhances mixing. In the hit-and-run regime, only small amounts of material are transferred between the bodies therefore mixing is limited. Overall, these impacts can impart enough energy to melt ~15-30% of the mantle extending the magma ocean phase of the final Moon.

  3. Experimental prospects of hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Hiroyuki

    1984-01-01

    The main subject of this report is to take a general view on the experiment with several tens of TeV hadron colliders. Intensive studies have been carried out about the physics and the detectors for such hadron machines. The experimental prospect of hadron colliders based on the studies and the view of the author are presented. To obtain a fundamental knowledge on the experiment with hadron colliders, the general properties of hadron scattering should be investigated. First, the total cross sections and charged particle multiplicity are estimated, and hard scattering process is reviewed. The cross sections for some interesting hard scattering process are summarized. The most serious problem for the experiment with hadron colliders is to pick out useful signals from enormous QCD back-ground processes, and a possibility of finding heavy Higgs bosons is discussed in detail as an example. On the basis of these studies, the requirement which general purpose detectors should satisfy is considered. Also the important machine parameters from experimental viewpoint are discussed. High energy hadron colliders have a potentiality to reveal new physics in TeV region, but the preparation for unexpected physics is necessary. (Kako, I.)

  4. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Calorimetry at a Future Electron-Positron Collider (3/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    Calorimetry will play a central role in determining the physics reach at a future e+e- collider. The requirements for calorimetry place the emphasis on achieving an excellent jet energy resolution. The currently favoured option for calorimetry at a future e+e- collider is the concept of high granularity particle flow calorimetry. Here granularity and a high pattern recognition capability is more important than the single particle calorimetric response. In this lecture I will describe the recent progress in understanding the reach of high granularity particle flow calorimetry and the related R&D efforts which concentrate on test beam demonstrations of the technological options for highly granular calorimeters. I will also discuss alternatives to particle flow, for example the technique of dual readout calorimetry.

  5. Wear resistance studies of an austempered ductile iron with the aid of a single pass grooving pendulum; Estudo do comportamento em desgate de um ferro fundido nodular austemperado atraves da tecnica da tecnica de esclerometria pendular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velez, J.M.; Tschiptschin, A.P. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica

    1995-12-31

    The abrasive wear resistance of an austempered ductile iron was studied with the aid of a single pass grooving pendulum. Specimens were austenitized at 860 deg C and austempered at 370 deg C for 30, 60, 90, 180 and 240 min. Austenite transformation kinetics was measured by quantitative metallography. Specimens for pendulum tests were gridded as squared based prisms (50 mm x 10 mm x 10 mm) and one of the faces submitted to metallographic polishing before the test. A hard metal cutting tool was used as abrasive. The absorbed energy as well as the loss of matter were measured. Scanning Electron Microscopy was used to analyze the surface topography of the scratched specimen. It was observed a maximum in the absorbed specific energy for the specimen treated for 60 min. with a microstructure of bainite ferrite plus plus 42% volume fraction of retained austenite. All other structures (ferrite plus carbides, ferrite plus lower contents of austenite and martensite plus austenite) gave lower values of absorbed specific energy. Observation of scratches and chips formed on the surface of the specimen can explain the above mentioned behaviour 12 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Siting the superconducting super collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.; Rooney, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering established the Super Collider Site Evaluation Committee to evaluate the suitability of proposed sites for the Superconducting Super Collider. Thirty-six proposals were examined by the committee. Using the set of criteria announced by DOE in its Invitation for Site Proposals, the committee identified eight sites that merited inclusion on a ''best qualified list.'' The list represents the best collective judgment of 21 individuals, carefully chosen for their expertise and impartiality, after a detailed assessment of the proposals using 19 technical subcriteria and DOE's life cycle cost estimates. The sites, in alphabetical order, are: Arizona/Maricopa; Colorado; Illinois; Michigan/Stockbridge; New York/Rochester; North Carolina; Tennessee; and Texas/Dallas-Fort Worth. The evaluation of these sites and the Superconducting Super Collider are discussed in this book

  7. Muon Collider Task Force Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ankenbrandt, C.; Alexahin, Y.; Balbekov, V.; Barzi, E.; Bhat, C.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Bross, A.; Burov, A.; Drozhdin, A.; Finley, D.; Geer, S.

    2007-01-01

    Muon Colliders offer a possible long term path to lepton-lepton collisions at center-of-mass energies √s (ge) 1 TeV. In October 2006 the Muon Collider Task Force (MCTF) proposed a program of advanced accelerator R and D aimed at developing the Muon Collider concept. The proposed R and D program was motivated by progress on Muon Collider design in general, and in particular, by new ideas that have emerged on muon cooling channel design. The scope of the proposed MCTF R and D program includes muon collider design studies, helical cooling channel design and simulation, high temperature superconducting solenoid studies, an experimental program using beams to test cooling channel RF cavities and a 6D cooling demonstration channel. The first year of MCTF activities are summarized in this report together with a brief description of the anticipated FY08 R and D activities. In its first year the MCTF has made progress on (1) Muon Collider ring studies, (2) 6D cooling channel design and simulation studies with an emphasis on the HCC scheme, (3) beam preparations for the first HPRF cavity beam test, (4) preparations for an HCC four-coil test, (5) further development of the MANX experiment ideas and studies of the muon beam possibilities at Fermilab, (6) studies of how to integrate RF into an HCC in preparation for a component development program, and (7) HTS conductor and magnet studies to prepare for an evaluation of the prospects for of an HTS high-field solenoid build for a muon cooling channel

  8. TRT Barrel milestones passed

    CERN Multimedia

    Ogren, H

    2004-01-01

    The barrel TRT detector passed three significant milestones this spring. The Barrel Support Structure (BSS) was completed and moved to the SR-1 building on February 24th. On March 12th the first module passed the quality assurance testing in Building 154 and was transported to the assembly site in the SR-1 building for barrel assembly. Then on April 21st the final production module that had been scanned at Hampton University was shipped to CERN. TRT Barrel Module Production The production of the full complement of barrel modules (96 plus 9 total spares) is now complete. This has been a five-year effort by Duke University, Hampton University, and Indiana University. Actual construction of the modules in the United States was completed in the first part of 2004. The production crews at each of the sites in the United States have now completed their missions. They are shown in the following pictures. Duke University: Production crew with the final completed module. Indiana University: Module producti...

  9. Passing the baton

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    It was not only in South Korea that batons were being passed last week. While the cream of the world’s athletes were competing in the World Athletics Championships, the cream of the world’s accelerator scientists were on their way to San Sebastian in Spain for the International Particle Accelerator Conference.  One of them was carrying a rather special baton for a handover of a different kind.   When Fermilab’s Vladimir Shiltsev handed the high-energy frontier baton to CERN’s Mike Lamont on Tuesday, it marked the end of an era: a time to look back on the phenomenal contribution the Tevatron has made to particle physics over its 25-year operational lifetime, and the great contribution Fermilab has made over that period to global collaboration in particle physics. There’s always a lot of emotion involved in passing the baton. In athletics, it’s the triumph of wining or the heartbreak of losing. But for this special baton, the...

  10. Mighty Murines: Neutrino Physics at very high Energy Muon Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, B.J.

    2000-01-01

    An overview is given of the potential for neutrino physics studies through parasitic use of the intense high energy neutrino beams that would be produced at future many-TeV muon colliders. Neutrino experiments clearly cannot compete with the collider physics. Except at the very highest energy muon colliders, the main thrust of the neutrino physics program would be to improve on the measurements from preceding neutrino experiments at lower energy muon colliders, particularly in the fields of B physics, quark mixing and CP violation. Muon colliders at the 10 TeV energy scale might already produce of order 10 8 B hadrons per year in a favorable and unique enough experimental environment to have some analytical capabilities beyond any of the currently operating or proposed B factories. The most important of the quark mixing measurements at these energies might well be the improved measurements of the important CKM matrix elements |V ub | and |V cb | and, possibly, the first measurements of |V td | in the process of flavor changing neutral current interactions involving a top quark loop. Muon colliders at the highest center-of-mass energies that have been conjectured, 100--1,000 TeV, would produce neutrino beams for neutrino-nucleon interaction experiments with maximum center-of-mass energies from 300--1,000 GeV. Such energies are close to, or beyond, the discovery reach of all colliders before the turn-on of the LHC. In particular, they are comparable to the 314 GeV center-of-mass energy for electron-proton scattering at the currently operating HERA collider and so HERA provides a convenient benchmark for the physics potential. It is shown that these ultimate terrestrial neutrino experiments, should they eventually come to pass, would have several orders of magnitude more luminosity than HERA. This would potentially open up the possibility for high statistics studies of any exotic particles, such as leptoquarks, that might have been previously discovered at these

  11. Vacuum design for a superconducting mini-collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, W.A.; Monteiro, S.

    1991-01-01

    The phi factory (Superconducting Mini-Collider or SMC) proposed for construction at UCLA is a single storage ring with circulating currents of 2 A each of electrons and positrons. The small circumference exacerbates the difficulties of handling the gas load due to photodesorption from the chamber walls. The authors analyze the vacuum system for the phi factory to specify design choices

  12. Signals of universal extra dimension at the international linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In the minimal universal extra dimension model, single production of = 2 gauge bosons provides a unique discriminating feature from supersymmetry. We discuss how the proposed international linear collider can act as a = 2 factory, much in the same vein as LEP.

  13. Muon Muon Collider: Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10 35 cm -2 s -1 . The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice - we believe - to allow us to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring wich has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design. Muons because of their large mass compared to an electron, do not produce significant synchrotron radiation. As a result there is negligible beamstrahlung and high energy collisions are not limited by this phenomena. In addition, muons can be accelerated in circular devices which will be considerably smaller than two full-energy linacs as required in an e + - e - collider. A hadron collider would require a CM energy 5 to 10 times higher than 4 TeV to have an equivalent energy reach. Since the accelerator size is limited by the strength of bending magnets, the hadron collider for the same physics reach would have to be much larger than the muon collider. In addition, muon collisions should be cleaner than hadron collisions. There are many detailed particle reactions which are

  14. Muon Muon Collider: Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, J.C.; Palmer, R.B.; /Brookhaven; Tollestrup, A.V.; /Fermilab; Sessler, A.M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Skrinsky, A.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Ankenbrandt, C.; Geer, S.; Griffin, J.; Johnstone, C.; Lebrun, P.; McInturff, A.; Mills, Frederick E.; Mokhov, N.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.Y.; Noble, R.; Novitski, I.; Popovic, M.; Qian, C.; Van Ginneken, A. /Fermilab /Brookhaven /Wisconsin U., Madison /Tel Aviv U. /Indiana U. /UCLA /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC /Argonne /Sobolev IM, Novosibirsk /UC, Davis /Munich, Tech. U. /Virginia U. /KEK, Tsukuba /DESY /Novosibirsk, IYF /Jefferson Lab /Mississippi U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /MIT /Columbia U. /Fairfield U. /UC, Berkeley

    2012-04-05

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice - we believe - to allow us to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring wich has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design. Muons because of their large mass compared to an electron, do not produce significant synchrotron radiation. As a result there is negligible beamstrahlung and high energy collisions are not limited by this phenomena. In addition, muons can be accelerated in circular devices which will be considerably smaller than two full-energy linacs as required in an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider. A hadron collider would require a CM energy 5 to 10 times higher than 4 TeV to have an equivalent energy reach. Since the accelerator size is limited by the strength of bending magnets, the hadron collider for the same physics reach would have to be much larger than the muon collider. In addition, muon collisions should be cleaner than hadron collisions. There are many detailed particle

  15. Message Passing Framework for Globally Interconnected Clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafeez, M; Riaz, N; Asghar, S; Malik, U A; Rehman, A

    2011-01-01

    In prevailing technology trends it is apparent that the network requirements and technologies will advance in future. Therefore the need of High Performance Computing (HPC) based implementation for interconnecting clusters is comprehensible for scalability of clusters. Grid computing provides global infrastructure of interconnecting clusters consisting of dispersed computing resources over Internet. On the other hand the leading model for HPC programming is Message Passing Interface (MPI). As compared to Grid computing, MPI is better suited for solving most of the complex computational problems. MPI itself is restricted to a single cluster. It does not support message passing over the internet to use the computing resources of different clusters in an optimal way. We propose a model that provides message passing capabilities between parallel applications over the internet. The proposed model is based on Architecture for Java Universal Message Passing (A-JUMP) framework and Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) named as High Performance Computing Bus. The HPC Bus is built using ActiveMQ. HPC Bus is responsible for communication and message passing in an asynchronous manner. Asynchronous mode of communication offers an assurance for message delivery as well as a fault tolerance mechanism for message passing. The idea presented in this paper effectively utilizes wide-area intercluster networks. It also provides scheduling, dynamic resource discovery and allocation, and sub-clustering of resources for different jobs. Performance analysis and comparison study of the proposed framework with P2P-MPI are also presented in this paper.

  16. Message Passing Framework for Globally Interconnected Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafeez, M.; Asghar, S.; Malik, U. A.; Rehman, A.; Riaz, N.

    2011-12-01

    In prevailing technology trends it is apparent that the network requirements and technologies will advance in future. Therefore the need of High Performance Computing (HPC) based implementation for interconnecting clusters is comprehensible for scalability of clusters. Grid computing provides global infrastructure of interconnecting clusters consisting of dispersed computing resources over Internet. On the other hand the leading model for HPC programming is Message Passing Interface (MPI). As compared to Grid computing, MPI is better suited for solving most of the complex computational problems. MPI itself is restricted to a single cluster. It does not support message passing over the internet to use the computing resources of different clusters in an optimal way. We propose a model that provides message passing capabilities between parallel applications over the internet. The proposed model is based on Architecture for Java Universal Message Passing (A-JUMP) framework and Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) named as High Performance Computing Bus. The HPC Bus is built using ActiveMQ. HPC Bus is responsible for communication and message passing in an asynchronous manner. Asynchronous mode of communication offers an assurance for message delivery as well as a fault tolerance mechanism for message passing. The idea presented in this paper effectively utilizes wide-area intercluster networks. It also provides scheduling, dynamic resource discovery and allocation, and sub-clustering of resources for different jobs. Performance analysis and comparison study of the proposed framework with P2P-MPI are also presented in this paper.

  17. Multiple-pass trajectories for an aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehder, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of multiple-pass trajectories for aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles (AOTV) as a means of reducing the severe aeroheating environment and the extreme sensitivity to off-nominal trajectory and atmospheric conditions. One-, two-, and three-pass trajectories were calculated for AOTV's with ballistic coefficients ranging from 5 to 150 psf. Compared to the single-pass case, the maximum heat rate was reduced by 30 percent for two passes and 45 percent for three passes, while the maximum acceleration was reduced by 40 percent and 55 percent, respectively. The sensitivity of the trajectories to variations in atmospheric and orbital parameters was not significantly reduced.

  18. Working group report: Collider Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    journal of. October 2006 physics pp. 617–637. Working group report: Collider Physics. Coordinators: SUNANDA BANERJEE1, ROHINI M GODBOLE2 and ... and discussed, together with follow-up work, are summarized in this report. The .... Further studies are in progress, including a scan of the parameter space to see if.

  19. Top production at hadron colliders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Introduction. Top quark studies are an important aspect of physics program at the Tevatron and the ..... Sin- gle top quark production at hadron colliders was first established in 2007 by the Tevatron experiments. Basically, there are three production processes: the s-channel, the t-channel ... So confronting the measurement.

  20. Linear collider systems and costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loew, G.A.

    1993-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine some of the systems and sub-systems involved in so-called ''conventional'' e + e - linear colliders and to study how their design affects the overall cost of these machines. There are presently a total of at least six 500 GeV c. of m. linear collider projects under study in the world. Aside from TESLA (superconducting linac at 1.3 GHz) and CLIC (two-beam accelerator with main linac at 30GHz), the other four proposed e + e - linear colliders can be considered ''conventional'' in that their main linacs use the proven technique of driving room temperature accelerator sections with pulsed klystrons and modulators. The centrally distinguishing feature between these projects is their main linac rf frequency: 3 GHz for the DESY machine, 11.424 GHz for the SLAC and JLC machines, and 14 GHz for the VLEPP machine. The other systems, namely the electron and positron sources, preaccelerators, compressors, damping rings and final foci, are fairly similar from project to project. Probably more than 80% of the cost of these linear colliders will be incurred in the two main linacs facing each other and it is therefore in their design and construction that major savings or extra costs may be found

  1. Fast Timing for Collider Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Advancements in fast timing particle detectors have opened up new possibilities to design collider detectors that fully reconstruct and separate event vertices and individual particles in the time domain. The applications of these techniques are considered for the physics at HL-LHC.

  2. Unraveling supersymmetry at future colliders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Finally, we examine how we can proceed to establish whether or not any new physics discovered in the future is supersymmetry, and describe how we might zero in on the framework of SUSY breaking. In this connection, we review sparticle mass measurements at future colliders, and point out that some capabilities of ...

  3. Collider physics: A theorist's view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, S.D.

    1986-06-01

    Recent experimental results from the CERN anti p p Collider are reviewed from a theorist's perspective. The conclusion is that the standard model is impressively verified and nothing else seems to be present. Some other relevant phenomenological and theoretical issues are also reviewed

  4. Working group report: Collider Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This is summary of the activities of the working group on collider physics in the IXth Workshop on High Energy Physics Phenomenology (WHEPP-9) held at the Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar, India in January 2006. Some of the work subsequently done on these problems by the subgroups formed during the workshop is ...

  5. CERN's Large Hadron Collider project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearnley, Tom A.

    1997-03-01

    The paper gives a brief overview of CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project. After an outline of the physics motivation, we describe the LHC machine, interaction rates, experimental challenges, and some important physics channels to be studied. Finally we discuss the four experiments planned at the LHC: ATLAS, CMS, ALICE and LHC-B.

  6. CERN's Large Hadron Collider project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearnley, Tom A.

    1997-01-01

    The paper gives a brief overview of CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project. After an outline of the physics motivation, we describe the LHC machine, interaction rates, experimental challenges, and some important physics channels to be studied. Finally we discuss the four experiments planned at the LHC: ATLAS, CMS, ALICE and LHC-B

  7. The collider of the future?

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Why are two studies for one linear collider being conducted in parallel? This is far from a duplication of effort or a waste of resources, since the two studies reflect a complementary strategy aimed at providing the best technology for future physics. On Friday 12 June CERN hosted the first joint meeting between CLIC, ILC and the CERN management.

  8. Collider Scaling and Cost Estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    This paper deals with collider cost and scaling. The main points of the discussion are the following ones: 1) scaling laws and cost estimation: accelerating gradient requirements, total stored RF energy considerations, peak power consideration, average power consumption; 2) cost optimization; 3) Bremsstrahlung considerations; 4) Focusing optics: conventional, laser focusing or super disruption. 13 refs

  9. Detectors and Physics at a Future Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2090240

    An electron-positron linear collider is an option for future large particle accelerator projects. Such a collider would focus on precision tests of the Higgs boson properties. This thesis describes three studies related to the optimisation of highly granular calorimeters and one study on the sensitivity of Higgs couplings at CLIC. Photon reconstruction algorithms were developed for highly granular calorimeters of a future linear collider detector. A sophisticated pattern recognition algorithm was implemented, which uses the topological properties of electromagnetic showers to identify photon candidates and separate them from nearby particles. It performs clustering of the energy deposits in the detector, followed by topological characterisation of the clusters, with the results being considered by a multivariate likelihood analysis. This algorithm leads to a significant improvement in the reconstruction of both single photons and multiple photons in high energy jets compared to previous reconstruction softwar...

  10. Tau physics at p bar p colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konigsberg, J.

    1993-01-01

    Tau detection techniques in hadron colliders are discussed together with the measurements and searches performed so far. We also underline the importance tau physics has in present and future collider experiments

  11. World lays groundwork for future linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Feder, Toni

    2010-01-01

    "New physics from the Large Hadron Collider can best be explored with a large lepton collider; realizing one will require mobilizing accelerator and particle physicists, funding agencies, and politicians" (3 pages)

  12. Symmetrization of the beam-beam interaction in an asymmetric collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, Y.H.

    1990-07-01

    This paper studies the idea of symmetrizing both the lattice and the beams of an asymmetric collider, and discusses why this regime should be within the parametric reach of the design in order to credibly ensure its performance. Also examined is the effectiveness of a simple compensation method using the emittance as a free parameter and that it does not work in all cases. At present, when there are no existing asymmetric colliders, it seems prudent to design an asymmetric collider so as to be similar to a symmetric one (without relying on a particular theory of the asymmetric beam-beam interaction that has not passed tests of fidelity). Nevertheless, one must allow for the maximum possible flexibility and freedom in adjusting those parameters that affect luminosity. Such a parameter flexibility will be essential in tuning the collider to the highest luminosity

  13. LINEAR COLLIDER PHYSICS RESOURCE BOOK FOR SNOWMASS 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABE, T.; DAWSON, S.; HEINEMEYER, S.; MARCIANO, W.; PAIGE, F.; TURCOT, A.S.; ET

    2001-01-01

    The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e + e - linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e + e - linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e + e - linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e + e - experiments can provide

  14. Transverse mode coupling instability of colliding beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. White

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In high brightness circular colliders, coherent and incoherent beam dynamics are dominated by beam-beam interactions. It is generally assumed that the incoherent tune spread introduced by the beam-beam interactions is sufficiently large to cure any instabilities originating from impedance. However, as the two counterrotating beams interact they can give rise to coherent dipole modes and therefore modify the coherent beam dynamics and stability conditions. In this case, coherent beam-beam effects and impedance cannot be treated independently and their interplay should be taken into account in any realistic attempt to study the beam stability of colliding beams. Due to the complexity of these physics processes, numerical simulations become an important tool for the analysis of this system. Two approaches are proposed in this paper: a fully self-consistent multiparticle tracking including particle-in-cell Poisson solver for the beam-beam interactions and a linearized model taking into account finite bunch length effects. To ensure the validity of the results a detailed benchmarking of these models was performed. It will be shown that under certain conditions coherent beam-beam dipole modes can couple with higher order headtail modes and lead to strong instabilities with characteristics similar to the classical transverse mode coupling instability originating from impedance alone. Possible cures for this instability are explored both for single bunch and multibunch interactions. Simulation results and experimental evidences of the existence of this instability at the LHC will be presented for the specific case of offset collisions.

  15. The Large Hadron Collider, a personal recollection

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, L

    2014-01-01

    The construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been a massive endeavor spanning almost 30 years from conception to commissioning. Building the machine with the highest possible energy (7 TeV) in the existing LEP tunnel of 27 km circumference and with a tunnel diameter of only 3.8m has required considerable innovation. The first was the development of an idea first proposed by Bob Palmer at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1978, where the two rings are integrated into a single magnetic structure. This compact 2-in-1 structure was essential for the LHC due to both the limited space available in the existing Large Electron-Positron collider tunnel and the cost. The second innovation was the bold move to use superfluid helium cooling on a massive scale, which was imposed by the need to achieve a high (8.3 T) magnetic field using an affordable Nb-Ti superconductor. In this article, no attempt is made to give a comprehensive review of the machine design. This can be found in the LHC Design Report {[}1], w...

  16. Frequency scaling of linear super-colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondelli, A.; Chernin, D.; Drobot, A.; Reiser, M.; Granatstein, V.

    1986-06-01

    The development of electron-positron linear colliders in the TeV energy range will be facilitated by the development of high-power rf sources at frequencies above 2856 MHz. Present S-band technology, represented by the SLC, would require a length in excess of 50 km per linac to accelerate particles to energies above 1 TeV. By raising the rf driving frequency, the rf breakdown limit is increased, thereby allowing the length of the accelerators to be reduced. Currently available rf power sources set the realizable gradient limit in an rf linac at frequencies above S-band. This paper presents a model for the frequency scaling of linear colliders, with luminosity scaled in proportion to the square of the center-of-mass energy. Since wakefield effects are the dominant deleterious effect, a separate single-bunch simulation model is described which calculates the evolution of the beam bunch with specified wakefields, including the effects of using programmed phase positioning and Landau damping. The results presented here have been obtained for a SLAC structure, scaled in proportion to wavelength

  17. Scaling Laws for $e^+ e^-$ Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, J P; Raubenheimer, T O; Wilson, Ian H

    1999-01-01

    Design studies of a future TeV e+e- Linear Collider (TLC) are presently being made by five major laboratories within the framework of a world-wide collaboration. A figure of merit is defined which enables an objective comparison of these different designs. This figure of merit is shown to depend only on a small number of parameters. General scaling laws for the main beam parameters and linac parameters are derived and prove to be very effective when used as guidelines to optimize the linear collider design. By adopting appropriate parameters for beam stability, the figure of merit becomes nearly independent of accelerating gradient and RF frequency of the accelerating structures. In spite of the strong dependence of the wake-fields with frequency, the single bunch emittance preservation during acceleration along the linac is also shown to be independent of the RF frequency when using equivalent trajectory correction schemes. In this situation, beam acceleration using high frequency structures becomes very adv...

  18. Collision Technologies for Circular Colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levichev, Eugene

    2015-02-01

    For several decades already, particle colliders have been essential tools for particle physics. From the very beginning, such accelerators have been among the most complicated scientific instruments ever built, including a number of innovative technological developments. Examples are ultrahigh vacuum systems, magnets with a very high magnetic field, and equipment for sub-ns synchronization and sub-mm precision alignment of equipment inside multi-km underground tunnels. Some key technologies are related to the focusing of the beam down to a scale of sub-μm at the collision point to obtain high luminosity. This review provides an overview of collision concepts and technologies for circular particle colliders, starting from the first ideas. In particular, it discusses such novel schemes and related technologies as crab waist collision and round beam collision.

  19. Polarized proton collider at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanaka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Lehrach, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S.Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W.W. E-mail: mackay@bnl.govhttp://www.rhichome.bnl.gov/People/waldowaldo@bnl.gov; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A.N

    2003-03-01

    In addition to heavy ion collisions (RHIC Design Manual, Brookhaven National Laboratory), RHIC will also collide intense beams of polarized protons (I. Alekseev, et al., Design Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1998, reaching transverse energies where the protons scatter as beams of polarized quarks and gluons. The study of high energy polarized protons beams has been a long term part of the program at BNL with the development of polarized beams in the Booster and AGS rings for fixed target experiments. We have extended this capability to the RHIC machine. In this paper we describe the design and methods for achieving collisions of both longitudinal and transverse polarized protons in RHIC at energies up to {radical}s=500 GeV.

  20. Top production at hadron colliders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    collisions at. √ s = 1.96 TeV and proton–proton collisions at. √ s = 7 TeV. The top quark is the heaviest known elementary particle with a mass of about 173 GeV and a short ... 2010 the LHC started its operation, producing pp collisions at 7 TeV CM system energy, ... essentially all physics objects at a collider experiment.

  1. A collider observable QCD axion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimopoulos, Savas; Hook, Anson; Huang, Junwu; Marques-Tavares, Gustavo [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stanford University,Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2016-11-09

    We present a model where the QCD axion is at the TeV scale and visible at a collider via its decays. Conformal dynamics and strong CP considerations account for the axion coupling strongly enough to the standard model to be produced as well as the coincidence between the weak scale and the axion mass. The model predicts additional pseudoscalar color octets whose properties are completely determined by the axion properties rendering the theory testable.

  2. FUTURE CIRCULAR COLLIDER LOGISTICS STUDY

    CERN Document Server

    Beißert, Ulrike; Kuhlmann, Gerd; Nettsträter, Andreas; Prasse, Christian; Wohlfahrt, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN in Geneva is the largest and most powerful collider in the world. CERN and its research and experimental infrastructure is not only a focus for the science community but is also very much in the public eye. With the Future Circular Collider (FCC) Study, CERN has begun to examine the feasibility of a new underground accelerator ring with a length of approximately 100 kilometres. Logistics is of great importance for the construction, assembly and operation of the FCC. During the planning, construction and assembly of the LHC, logistics proved to be one of the key factors. As the FCC is even larger than the LHC, logistics will also become more and more significant. This report therefore shows new concepts, methods and analytics for logistics, supply chain and transport concepts as part of the FCC study. This report deals with three different logistics aspects for the planning and construction phase of FCC: 1. A discussion of d...

  3. Symmetric achromatic low-beta collider interaction region design concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Morozov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new symmetry-based concept for an achromatic low-beta collider interaction region design. A specially designed symmetric chromaticity compensation block (CCB induces an angle spread in the passing beam such that it cancels the chromatic kick of the final focusing quadrupoles. Two such CCBs placed symmetrically around an interaction point allow simultaneous compensation of the 1st-order chromaticities and chromatic beam smear at the IP without inducing significant 2nd-order aberrations to the particle trajectory. We first develop an analytic description of this approach and explicitly formulate 2nd-order aberration compensation conditions at the interaction point. The concept is next applied to develop an interaction region design for the ion collider ring of an electron-ion collider. We numerically evaluate performance of the design in terms of momentum acceptance and dynamic aperture. The advantages of the new concept are illustrated by comparing it to the conventional distributed-sextupole chromaticity compensation scheme.

  4. Colliding with a crunching bubble

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freivogel, Ben; Freivogel, Ben; Horowitz, Gary T.; Shenker, Stephen

    2007-03-26

    In the context of eternal inflation we discuss the fate of Lambda = 0 bubbles when they collide with Lambda< 0 crunching bubbles. When the Lambda = 0 bubble is supersymmetric, it is not completely destroyed by collisions. If the domain wall separating the bubbles has higher tension than the BPS bound, it is expelled from the Lambda = 0 bubble and does not alter its long time behavior. If the domain wall saturates the BPS bound, then it stays inside the Lambda = 0 bubble and removes a finite fraction of future infinity. In this case, the crunch singularity is hidden behind the horizon of a stable hyperbolic black hole.

  5. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, Daniel M. [IIT, Chicago

    2015-05-29

    Muon colliders and neutrino factories are attractive options for future facilities aimed at achieving the highest lepton-antilepton collision energies and precision measurements of Higgs boson and neutrino mixing matrix parameters. The facility performance and cost depend on how well a beam of muons can be cooled. Recent progress in muon cooling design studies and prototype tests nourishes the hope that such facilities could be built starting in the coming decade. The status of the key technologies and their various demonstration experiments is summarized. Prospects "post-P5" are also discussed.

  6. Instrumentation for Colliding Beam Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    INSTR17, the International Conference on Instrumentation for Colliding Beam Physics, will be held in the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk, Russia, on 27 February – 4 March, 2017. The conference covers novel methods of particle detection used in various experiments at particle accelerators as well as in astrophysics. It is organized in close relationship with the Vienna Conference on Instrumentation (last held in 2016) and the Pisa Meeting on Advanced Detectors (last held in 2015). The deadline for registration and abstract submission is 15 January. For more details visit the conference website instr17.inp.nsk.su. Will be published in: JINST

  7. The proton-antiproton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, L.

    1988-01-01

    The subject of this lecture is the CERN Proton-Antiproton (panti p) Collider, in which John Adams was intimately involved at the design, development, and construction stages. Its history is traced from the original proposal in 1966, to the first panti p collisions in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) in 1981, and to the present time with drastically improved performance. This project led to the discovery of the intermediate vector boson in 1983 and produced one of the most exciting and productive physics periods in CERN's history. (orig.)

  8. High-Energy Emission from Colliding Winds in Massive Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Michael; Gull, Theodore; Pollock, Andy; Moffat, Anthony; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Pittard, Julian; Russell, Christopher

    Strong shocks produced by colliding winds in massive binaries was originally understood as a mechanism by which massive stellar systems could generate observable X-ray emission. The first X-ray observations of massive stars showed that most massive stars (binary or not) were X-ray sources, and also indicated that massive binaries were only slightly brighter in X-rays than their single cousins. Over the past three and a half decades, observations at X-ray and higher energy have confirmed the presence of variable, hard emission associated with colliding wind shocks in a number of important system. In this talk I'll review the status of our understanding of the production of X-rays from wind-wind shocks, and review some key observational X-ray spectral and temporal properties for some important colliding wind systems. I'll also discuss how the study of the X-ray emission generated along the colliding wind bow shock provides important information about the mass-loss process in massive binaries.

  9. The 20th Hadron Collider Physics Symposium in Evian

    CERN Document Server

    Ludwik Dobrzynski and Emmanuel Tsesmelis

    The 20th Hadron Collider Physics Symposium took place in Evian from 16 to 20 November 2009. The Hadron Collider Physics Symposium series has been a major forum for presentations of physics at the Tevatron over the past two decades. The merger of the former Topical Conference on Hadron Collider Physics with the LHC Symposium in 2005 brought together the Tevatron and LHC communities in a single forum. The 20th Hadron Collider Physics Symposium took place in Evian, on the shores of Lake Geneva, from 16-20 November 2009, some 17 years after the historic ECFA-CERN Evian meeting in March 1992 when Expressions of Interest for LHC detectors were presented for the first time. The 2009 event was organized jointly by CERN and the French high-energy physics community (CNRS-IN2P3 and CEA-IRFU). More than 170 people registered for this symposium. This year’s symposium was held at an important time for both the Tevatron and the LHC. It stimulated the completion of analyses for a significant Tevatron data sam...

  10. Laser electron collider within a micro-channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Liangliang

    2017-10-01

    We propose a laser-electron collider based on a laser-driven micro-channel-plate target. In this unique geometry, electrons accelerated within the channel can collide head-on with the laser reflected from a foil attached onto the rear target surface. The simple scheme allows for efficient generation of gamma-photons and most importantly, the observing of radiation-reaction effect for the first time. It resolves the aligning and time synchronization challenges for laser-electron colliding scenarios involving two light/electron beams. We predict that a single 5PW laser is sufficient to make radiation-reaction effect measurable. A principle-of-proof experiment was conducted at a currently available 200TW laser system. The superior acceleration of electrons with the novel micro-channel structure was confirmed, showing enhanced electron cut-off energies and slope temperatures compared to ordinary flat interfaces. The results set forth the basis for radiation-reaction measurement from laser-electron colliding in upcoming multi-petawatt laser systems.

  11. WebPASS Explorer (HR Personnel Management)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — WebPass Explorer (WebPASS Framework): USAID is partnering with DoS in the implementation of their WebPass Post Personnel (PS) Module. WebPassPS does not replace...

  12. International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    IWLC2010 International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010ECFA-CLIC-ILC joint meeting: Monday 18 October - Friday 22 October 2010Venue: CERN and CICG (International Conference Centre Geneva, Switzerland) This year, the International Workshop on Linear Colliders organized by the European Committee for Future Accelerators (ECFA) will study the physics, detectors and accelerator complex of a linear collider covering both CLIC and ILC options.Contact Workshop Secretariat  IWLC2010 is hosted by CERN

  13. Energy doubler for a linear collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lee

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of using short plasma sections several meters in length to double the energy of a linear collider just before the collision point is proposed and modeled. In this scenario the beams from each side of a linear collider are split into pairs of microbunches with the first driving a plasma wake that accelerates the second. The luminosity of the doubled collider is maintained by employing plasma lenses to reduce the spot size before collision.

  14. Pass-transistor asynchronous sequential circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Sterling R.; Maki, Gary K.

    1989-01-01

    Design methods for asynchronous sequential pass-transistor circuits, which result in circuits that are hazard- and critical-race-free and which have added degrees of freedom for the input signals, are discussed. The design procedures are straightforward and easy to implement. Two single-transition-time state assignment methods are presented, and hardware bounds for each are established. A surprising result is that the hardware realizations for each next state variable and output variable is identical for a given flow table. Thus, a state machine with N states and M outputs can be constructed using a single layout replicated N + M times.

  15. Emittance calculations for the Stanford Linear Collider injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, J.C.; Clendenin, J.E.; Helm, R.H.; Lee, M.J.; Miller, R.H.; Blocker, C.A.

    1983-03-01

    A series of measurements have been performed to determine the emittance of the high intensity, single bunch beam that is to be injected into the Stanford Linear Collider. On-line computer programs were used to control the Linac for the purpose of data acquisition and to fit the data to a model in order to deduce the beam emittance. This paper will describe the method of emittance calculation and present some of the measurement results

  16. Study of Absorption Characteristics of the Total Saponins from Radix Ilicis Pubescentis in an In Situ Single-Pass Intestinal Perfusion (SPIP Rat Model by Using Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guojun Kuang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to the extensively reported therapeutic activities, far less attention has been paid to the intestinal absorption of the total saponins from Radix Ilicis Pubescentis (in Chinese Mao-Dong-Qing, MDQ. This study aimed to investigate the intestinal absorption characteristics of ilexgenin A (C1, ilexsaponin A1 (C2, ilexsaponin B1 (C3, ilexsaponin B2 (C4, ilexsaponin B3 (DC1, and ilexoside O (DC2 when administrated with the total saponins from MDQ (MDQ-TS. An UPLC method for simultaneous determination of C1, C2, C3, C4, DC1, and DC2 in intestinal outflow perfusate was developed and validated. The absorption characteristics of MDQ-TS were investigated by evaluating the effects of intestinal segments, drug concentration, P-glycoprotein (P-gp inhibitor (verapomil, endocytosis inhibitor (amantadine and ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA, tight junction modulator on the intestinal transportation of MDQ-TS by using a single-pass intestinal perfusion (SPIP rat model, and the influence of co-existing components on the intestinal transport of the six saponins was discussed. The results showed that effective apparent permeability (Papp of C1, C2, C3, C4, and DC2 administrated in MDQ-TS form had no segment-dependent changes at low and middle dosage levels. C1, C2, C3, D4, DC1, and DC2 administrated in MDQ-TS form all exhibited excellent transmembrane permeability with Papp > 0.12 × 10−2 cm·min−1. Meanwhile, Papp and effective absorption rate constant (Ka values for the most saponins showed concentration dependence and saturation characteristics. After combining with P-gp inhibitor of verapamil, Papp of C2, C3, and DC1 in MDQ-TS group was significantly increased up to about 2.3-fold, 1.4-fold, and 3.4-fold, respectively in comparison to that of non-verapamil added group. Verapamil was found to improve the absorption of C2, C3, and DC1, indicating the involvement of an active transport mechanism in the absorption process. Compared with the

  17. FUTURE LEPTON COLLIDERS AND LASER ACCELERATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PARSA, Z.

    2000-01-01

    Future high energy colliders along with their physics potential, and relationship to new laser technology are discussed. Experimental approaches and requirements for New Physics exploration are also described

  18. Very large hadron collider (VLHC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    A VLHC informal study group started to come together at Fermilab in the fall of 1995 and at the 1996 Snowmass Study the parameters of this machine took form. The VLHC as now conceived would be a 100 TeV hadron collider. It would use the Fermilab Main Injector (now nearing completion) to inject protons at 150 GeV into a new 3 TeV Booster and then into a superconducting pp collider ring producing 100 TeV c.m. interactions. A luminosity of {approximately}10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is planned. Our plans were presented to the Subpanel on the Planning for the Future of US High- Energy Physics (the successor to the Drell committee) and in February 1998 their report stated ``The Subpanel recommends an expanded program of R&D on cost reduction strategies, enabling technologies, and accelerator physics issues for a VLHC. These efforts should be coordinated across laboratory and university groups with the aim of identifying design concepts for an economically and technically viable facility`` The coordination has been started with the inclusion of physicists from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and Cornell University. Clearly, this collaboration must expanded internationally as well as nationally. The phrase ``economically and technically viable facility`` presents the real challenge.

  19. High Energy Hadron Colliders - Report of the Snowmass 2013 Frontier Capabilities Hadron Collider Study Group

    CERN Document Server

    Barletta, William; Battaglia, Marco; Klute, Markus; Mangano, Michelangelo; Prestemon, Soren; Rossi, Lucio; Skands, Peter

    2013-01-01

    High energy hadron colliders have been the tools for discovery at the highest mass scales of the energy frontier from the SppS, to the Tevatron and now the LHC. This report reviews future hadron collider projects from the high luminosity LHC upgrade to a 100 TeV hadron collider in a large tunnel, the underlying technology challenges and R&D directions and presents a series of recommendations for the future development of hadron collider research and technology.

  20. A Multifunction Filter for Realizing Gain Variable Low-Pass and Band-Pass Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil ALPASLAN

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The second generation current conveyors (CCIIs as active circuit devices are widely used for designing current-mode (CM filters. In this paper, a single input multi output filter employing only plus-type CCIIs (CCII+s and grounded capacitors, and for providing variable gain low-pass and band-pass responses, is suggested. The proposed filter is free from critical passive component matching conditions. Therefore, it is suitable for integrated circuit (IC technology. Further, developed filter configuration can be easily realized with commercially available active devices such as AD844s. The circuit performance is demonstrated by means of SPICE simulation and experimental test results.

  1. Computing and data handling requirements for SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] and LHC [Large Hadron Collider] experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lankford, A.J.

    1990-05-01

    A number of issues for computing and data handling in the online in environment at future high-luminosity, high-energy colliders, such as the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC), are outlined. Requirements for trigger processing, data acquisition, and online processing are discussed. Some aspects of possible solutions are sketched. 6 refs., 3 figs

  2. A high luminosity superconducting mini collider for Phi meson production and particle beam physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrini, C.; Robin, D.; Cline, D.; Kolonko, J.; Anderson, C.; Barletta, W.; Chargin, A.; Cornacchia, M.; Dalbacka, G.; Halbach, K.; Lueng, E.; Kimball, F.; Madura, D.; Patterson, L.

    1991-01-01

    A 510MeV electron-positron collider has been proposed at UCLA to study particle beam physics and Phi-Meson physics, at luminosities larger than 10 32 cm -2 s -1 . The collider consists of a single compact superconducting storage ring (SMC), with bending field of 4 T and a current larger than 1 A. The authors discuss the main characteristics of this system and its major technical components: superconducting dipoles, RF, vacuum, injection

  3. Development of semiconductor tracking: The future linear collider case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoy-Navarro, Aurore

    2011-04-01

    An active R&D on silicon tracking for the linear collider, SiLC, is pursued since several years to develop the new generation of large area silicon trackers for the future linear collider(s). The R&D objectives on new sensors, new front end processing of the signal, and the related mechanical and integration challenges for building such large detectors within the proposed detector concepts are described. Synergies and differences with the LHC construction and upgrades are explained. The differences between the linear collider projects, namely the international linear collider, ILC, and the compact linear collider, CLIC, are discussed as well. Two final objectives are presented for the construction of this important sub-detector for the future linear collider experiments: a relatively short term design based on micro-strips combined or not with a gaseous central tracker and a longer term design based on an all-pixel tracker.The R&D objectives on sensors include single sided micro-strips as baseline for the shorter term with the strips from large wafers (at least 6 in), 200 μm thick, 50 μm pitch and the edgeless and alignment friendly options. This work is conducted by SiLC in collaboration with three technical research centers in Italy, Finland, and Spain and HPK. SiLC is studied as well, using advanced Si sensor technologies for higher granularity trackers especially short strips and pixels all based on 3D technology. New Deep Sub-Micron CMOS mix mode (analog and digital) FE and readout electronics are developed to fully process the detector signals currently adapted to the ILC cycle. It is a high-level processing and a fully programmable ASIC; highly fault tolerant. In its latest version, handling 128 channels will equip these next coming years larger size silicon tracking prototypes at test beams. Connection of the FEE chip on the silicon detector especially in the strip case is a major issue. Very preliminary results with inline pitch adapter based on wiring

  4. Vertex Tracking at a Future Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglia, Marco

    2011-01-01

    The anticipated physics program at an high energy e+e- linear collider places special emphasis on the accuracy in extrapolating charged particle tracks to their production vertex to tag heavy quarks and leptons. This paper reviews physics motivations and performance requirements, sensor R&D directions and current results of the studies for a vertex tracker at a future linear collider.

  5. Higgs and SUSY searches at future colliders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... searches at future colliders, particularly comparing and contrasting the capabilities of LHC and next linear collider (NLC), including the aspects of Higgs searches in supersymmetric theories. I will also discuss how the search and study of sparticles other than the Higgs can be used to give information about the parameters ...

  6. Detector issues for a photon collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It has been proposed to collide a high power laser beam with the linear collider electron beams to create high ... At small angles the space in the γγ detector is taken by the laser pipes and the masking system. However ... of the interplay of the crossing angle and the detector solenoid the charge centre gets shifted where the ...

  7. Last magnet in place for colossal collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Cho, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    "Workers have installed the last magnet for the world's mew highest-energy particle smasher, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The installation marks an important milestone; however, researchers still may not get the collider completed in time to start it up in November as planned." (1 page)

  8. Working group report: Collider and B physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is generally hoped that the Higgs boson, supersymmetric particles, existence of extra dimensions ..... may be discovered at the upcoming colliders. Bulk of the activities of the working group on collider and B physics revolved around these topics. Different aspects of. Higgs search were discussed by A Djouadi, R M ...

  9. ACCELERATION FOR A HIGH ENERGY MUON COLLIDER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BERG,J.S

    2000-04-07

    The authors describe a method for designing the acceleration systems for a muon collider, with particular application and examples for a high energy muon collider. This paper primarily concentrates on design considerations coming from longitudinal motion, but some transverse issues are briefly discussed.

  10. Multibillion-dolalr collider plans unveiled

    CERN Multimedia

    Cartlidge, Edwin

    2007-01-01

    "Particle physicists released an outline design for the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) at a meeting in Beijing this morning. The design details the components needed to build the 31 km-long facility and comes with and initial estimate of the collider's cost: a cool $6.5bn for the core project. (1 page)

  11. Photon collider beam simulation with CAIN

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The CAIN simulation program was used to study the outgoing beam profile for the photon collider at ILC. The main aim of the analysis was to verify the feasibility of the photon linear collider running with 20 mrad electron beam crossing angle. The main problem is the distorted electron beam, which has to be removed from ...

  12. Anomalous VVH interactions at a linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We examine, in a model independent way, the sensitivity of a linear collider to the couplings of a light Higgs boson to a pair of gauge bosons, including the possibility of CP violation. We construct several observables that probe the various possible anomalous couplings. For an intermediate mass Higgs, a collider operating ...

  13. Physicist pins hopes on particle collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Physicist pins hopes on particle collider By Deseret Morning News Published: Monday, Dec. 31, 27 12:4 a.m. MST FONT Scott Thomas, a 187 State University graduate, is working at the frontiers of science. The theoretical physicist is crafting ways to extract fundamental secrets that seem certain to be uncovered by the Large Hadron Collider.

  14. Reggeon calculus at collider energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajares, C.; Varias, A.; Yepes, P.

    1983-01-01

    The phenomenology of the perturbative reggeon calculus at collider energies is studied. It is found that the graphs which were neglected at ISR energies are still negligeable at √s=540 GeV. The perturbative series for the total cross section still converges reasonably fast. The values of the different parameters which describe rightly the data up to ISR energies give rise to a total cross section of around 60 mb at √s=540 GeV. For these values, the corresponding low mass and high mass eikonal series converges much more slowly. The non perturbative reggeon calculus gives rise to a total cross section less than 60 mb. (orig.)

  15. Dark matter wants Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, S.; Asano, M.; Fujii, K.; Takubo, Y.; Honda, T.; Saito, T.; Yamamoto, H.; Humdi, R.S.; Ito, H.; Kanemura, S; Nabeshima, T.; Okada, N.; Suehara, T.

    2011-01-01

    One of the main purposes of physics at the International Linear Collider (ILC) is to study the property of dark matter such as its mass, spin, quantum numbers, and interactions with particles of the standard model. We discuss how the property can or cannot be investigated at the ILC using two typical cases of dark matter scenario: 1) most of new particles predicted in physics beyond the standard model are heavy and only dark matter is accessible at the ILC, and 2) not only dark matter but also other new particles are accessible at the ILC. We find that, as can be easily imagined, dark matter can be detected without any difficulties in the latter case. In the former case, it is still possible to detect dark matter when the mass of dark matter is less than a half mass of the Higgs boson.

  16. Collide@CERN: sharing inspiration

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Late last year, Julius von Bismarck was appointed to be CERN's first "artist in residence" after winning the Collide@CERN Digital Arts award. He’ll be spending two months at CERN starting this March but, to get a flavour of what’s in store, he visited the Organization last week for a crash course in its inspiring activities.   Julius von Bismarck, taking a closer look... When we arrive to interview German artist Julius von Bismarck, he’s being given a presentation about antiprotons’ ability to kill cancer cells. The whiteboard in the room contains graphs and equations that might easily send a non-scientist running, yet as Julius puts it, “if I weren’t interested, I’d be asleep”. Given his numerous questions, he must have been fascinated. “This ‘introduction’ week has been exhilarating,” says Julius. “I’ve been able to interact ...

  17. Collide@CERN - public lecture

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    CERN, the Republic and Canton of Geneva and the City of Geneva are delighted to invite you to a public lecture by Gilles Jobin, first winner of the Collide@CERN Geneva Dance and Performance Artist-in-residence Prize, and his CERN inspiration partner, Joao Pequenao. They will present their work in dance and science at the Globe of Science and Innovation on Wednesday, 23 May 2012 at 7 p.m. (doors open at 6.30 p.m.).   
                                                  Programme 19:00 Opening address by - Professor Rolf-Dieter Heuer, CERN Director-General, - Ariane Koek...

  18. The International Linear Collider Progress Report 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Yamamoto, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-07-15

    The International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA) set up the Global Design Effort (GDE) for the design of the International Linear Collider (ILC) in 2005. Drawing on the resources of over 300 national laboratories, universities and institutes worldwide, the GDE produced a Reference Design Report in 2007, followed by a more detailed Technical Design Report (TDR) in 2013. Following this report, the GDE was disbanded. A compact core team, the Linear Collider Collaboration (LCC), replaced it. This is still under the auspices of ICFA and is directly overseen by the Linear Collider Board, which reports to ICFA. The LCC is charged with continuing the design effort on a much-reduced scale until the Project is approved for construction. An additional mandate of the LCC was to bring together all linear collider work, including the CERN-based Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) under one structure in order to exploit synergies between the two studies.

  19. FNAL Booster intensity, extraction, and synchronization control for collider operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducar, R.J.; Lackey, J.R.; Tawzer, S.R.

    1987-03-01

    Booster operation for collider physics is considerably different than for fixed target operation. Various scenarios for collider physics, machine studies, and P-Bar targeting may require that the intensity vary from 5E10 PPP to 3E12 PPP at a 15 Hertz machine cycle rate. In addition to the normal Booster single turn extraction mode, collider operations require that the Booster inject into the Main Ring a small number of beam bunches for coalescing into a single high intensity bunch. These bunches must be synchronized such that the center bunch arrives in the RF bucket which corresponds to the zero phase of the coalescing cavity. The system implemented has the ability to deliver a precise fraction of the available 84 Booster beam bunches to Main Ring or to the P-Bar Debuncher via the newly installed AP-4 beam line for tune-up and studies. It is required that all of the various intensity and extraction scenarios be accommodated with minimal operator intervention

  20. Fnal booster intensity, extraction, and synchronization control for collider operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducar, R.J.; Lackey, J.R.; Tawzer, S.R.

    1987-01-01

    Booster operation for collider physics is considerably different than for fixed target operation. Various scenarios for collider physics, machine studies, and P-Bar targeting may require that the intensity vary from 5E10 PPP to 3E12 PPP at a 15 Hertz machine cycle rate. In addition to the normal Booster single turn extraction mode, collider operations require that the Booster inject into the Main Ring a small number of beam bunches for coalescing into a single high intensity bunch. These bunches must be synchronized such that the center bunch arrives in the RF bucket which corresponds to the zero phase of the coalescing cavity. The system implemented has the ability to deliver a precise fraction of the availability 84 Booster beam bunches to Main Ring or to the P-Bar Debuncher via the newly installed AP-4 beam line for tune-up and studies. It is required that all of the various intensity and extraction scenarios be accommodated with minimal operator intervention

  1. LINEAR COLLIDER PHYSICS RESOURCE BOOK FOR SNOWMASS 2001.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ABE,T.; DAWSON,S.; HEINEMEYER,S.; MARCIANO,W.; PAIGE,F.; TURCOT,A.S.; ET AL

    2001-05-03

    The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} experiments can provide.

  2. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book for Snowmass 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peskin, Michael E

    2001-06-05

    The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e{sup +}e{sup -} experiments can provide.

  3. Dealing with abort kicker prefire in the Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozhdin, A.I.; Baishev, I.S.; Mokhov, N.V.; Parker, B.; Richardson, R.D.; Zhou, J.

    1993-05-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider uses a single-turn extraction abort system to divert the circulating beam to a massive graphite absorber at normal termination of the operating cycle or in case of any of a number of predefined fault modes. The Collider rings must be designed to be tolerant to abort extraction kicker prefires and misfires because of the large circulating beam energy. We have studied the consequences of beam loss in the accelerator due to such prefires and misfires in terms of material heating and radiation generation using full scale machine simulations and Monte-Carlo energy deposition calculations. Some results from these calculations as well as possible protective measures for minimizing the damaging effects of kicker prefire and misfire are discussed in this paper

  4. Non-colliding Brownian Motions and the Extended Tacnode Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Kurt

    2013-04-01

    We consider non-colliding Brownian motions with two starting points and two endpoints. The points are chosen so that the two groups of Brownian motions just touch each other, a situation that is referred to as a tacnode. The extended kernel for the determinantal point process at the tacnode point is computed using new methods and given in a different form from that obtained for a single time in previous work by Delvaux, Kuijlaars and Zhang. The form of the extended kernel is also different from that obtained for the extended tacnode kernel in another model by Adler, Ferrari and van Moerbeke. We also obtain the correlation kernel for a finite number of non-colliding Brownian motions starting at two points and ending at arbitrary points.

  5. Optimizing integrated luminosity of future hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedikt, Michael; Schulte, Daniel; Zimmermann, Frank

    2015-10-01

    The integrated luminosity, a key figure of merit for any particle-physics collider, is closely linked to the peak luminosity and to the beam lifetime. The instantaneous peak luminosity of a collider is constrained by a number of boundary conditions, such as the available beam current, the maximum beam-beam tune shift with acceptable beam stability and reasonable luminosity lifetime (i.e., the empirical "beam-beam limit"), or the event pileup in the physics detectors. The beam lifetime at high-luminosity hadron colliders is largely determined by particle burn off in the collisions. In future highest-energy circular colliders synchrotron radiation provides a natural damping mechanism, which can be exploited for maximizing the integrated luminosity. In this article, we derive analytical expressions describing the optimized integrated luminosity, the corresponding optimum store length, and the time evolution of relevant beam parameters, without or with radiation damping, while respecting a fixed maximum value for the total beam-beam tune shift or for the event pileup in the detector. Our results are illustrated by examples for the proton-proton luminosity of the existing Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at its design parameters, of the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), and of the Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh).

  6. Optimizing integrated luminosity of future hadron colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Benedikt

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The integrated luminosity, a key figure of merit for any particle-physics collider, is closely linked to the peak luminosity and to the beam lifetime. The instantaneous peak luminosity of a collider is constrained by a number of boundary conditions, such as the available beam current, the maximum beam-beam tune shift with acceptable beam stability and reasonable luminosity lifetime (i.e., the empirical “beam-beam limit”, or the event pileup in the physics detectors. The beam lifetime at high-luminosity hadron colliders is largely determined by particle burn off in the collisions. In future highest-energy circular colliders synchrotron radiation provides a natural damping mechanism, which can be exploited for maximizing the integrated luminosity. In this article, we derive analytical expressions describing the optimized integrated luminosity, the corresponding optimum store length, and the time evolution of relevant beam parameters, without or with radiation damping, while respecting a fixed maximum value for the total beam-beam tune shift or for the event pileup in the detector. Our results are illustrated by examples for the proton-proton luminosity of the existing Large Hadron Collider (LHC at its design parameters, of the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC, and of the Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh.

  7. HUBBLE PHOTOGRAPHS WARPED GALAXY AS CAMERA PASSES MILESTONE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has captured an image of an unusual edge-on galaxy, revealing remarkable details of its warped dusty disk and showing how colliding galaxies spawn the formation of new generations of stars. The dust and spiral arms of normal spiral galaxies, like our own Milky Way, appear flat when viewed edge-on. This month's Hubble Heritage image of ESO 510-G13 shows a galaxy that, by contrast, has an unusual twisted disk structure, first seen in ground-based photographs obtained at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) in Chile. ESO 510-G13 lies in the southern constellation Hydra, roughly 150 million light-years from Earth. Details of the structure of ESO 510-G13 are visible because the interstellar dust clouds that trace its disk are silhouetted from behind by light from the galaxy's bright, smooth central bulge. The strong warping of the disk indicates that ESO 510-G13 has recently undergone a collision with a nearby galaxy and is in the process of swallowing it. Gravitational forces distort the structures of the galaxies as their stars, gas, and dust merge together in a process that takes millions of years. Eventually the disturbances will die out, and ESO 510-G13 will become a normal-appearing single galaxy. In the outer regions of ESO 510-G13, especially on the right-hand side of the image, we see that the twisted disk contains not only dark dust, but also bright clouds of blue stars. This shows that hot, young stars are being formed in the disk. Astronomers believe that the formation of new stars may be triggered by collisions between galaxies, as their interstellar clouds smash together and are compressed. The Heritage Team used Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) to observe ESO 510-G13 in April 2001. Pictures obtained through blue, green, and red filters were combined to make this color-composite image, which emphasizes the contrast between the dusty spiral arms, the bright bulge, and the blue star-forming regions. During the

  8. Weak boson emission in hadron collider processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur, U.

    2007-01-01

    The O(α) virtual weak radiative corrections to many hadron collider processes are known to become large and negative at high energies, due to the appearance of Sudakov-like logarithms. At the same order in perturbation theory, weak boson emission diagrams contribute. Since the W and Z bosons are massive, the O(α) virtual weak radiative corrections and the contributions from weak boson emission are separately finite. Thus, unlike in QED or QCD calculations, there is no technical reason for including gauge boson emission diagrams in calculations of electroweak radiative corrections. In most calculations of the O(α) electroweak radiative corrections, weak boson emission diagrams are therefore not taken into account. Another reason for not including these diagrams is that they lead to final states which differ from that of the original process. However, in experiment, one usually considers partially inclusive final states. Weak boson emission diagrams thus should be included in calculations of electroweak radiative corrections. In this paper, I examine the role of weak boson emission in those processes at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN LHC for which the one-loop electroweak radiative corrections are known to become large at high energies (inclusive jet, isolated photon, Z+1 jet, Drell-Yan, di-boson, tt, and single top production). In general, I find that the cross section for weak boson emission is substantial at high energies and that weak boson emission and the O(α) virtual weak radiative corrections partially cancel

  9. The principles and construction of linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, J.

    1986-09-01

    The problems posed to the designers and builders of high-energy linear colliders are discussed. Scaling laws of linear colliders are considered. The problem of attainment of small interaction areas is addressed. The physics of damping rings, which are designed to condense beam bunches in phase space, is discussed. The effect of wake fields on a particle bunch in a linac, particularly the conventional disk-loaded microwave linac structures, are discussed, as well as ways of dealing with those effects. Finally, the SLAC Linear Collider is described. 18 refs., 17 figs

  10. Self colliding beams ('migma') and controlled fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Maglic, Bogdan C; Mazarakis, M; Miller, R A; Nering, J; Powell, C; Treglio, J

    1975-01-01

    While much of the early work on colliding beams was done in the US, the lead on the development of this technique is now held by Europe. The most spectacular being the only colliding of nuclei in the intersecting storage rings at CERN. The idea of using colliding beams for fusion is nearly as old as is the interest in fusion as a source of power, but the problems of low reaction rate and high Coulomb scattering initially seemed insurmountable. The authors describe recent work done at the Fusion Energy Corporation which attempts to overcome these problems. (9 refs).

  11. Polarized electron sources for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clendenin, J.E.; Ecklund, S.D.; Miller, R.H.; Schultz, D.C.; Sheppard, J.C.

    1992-07-01

    Linear colliders require high peak current beams with low duty factors. Several methods to produce polarized e - beams for accelerators have been developed. The SLC, the first linear collider, utilizes a photocathode gun with a GaAs cathode. Although photocathode sources are probably the only practical alternative for the next generation of linear colliders, several problems remain to be solved, including high voltage breakdown which poisons the cathode, charge limitations that are associated with the condition of the semiconductor cathode, and a relatively low polarization of ≤5O%. Methods to solve or at least greatly reduce the impact of each of these problems are at hand

  12. Compensatable muon collider calorimeter with manageable backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Rajendran

    2015-02-17

    A method and system for reducing background noise in a particle collider, comprises identifying an interaction point among a plurality of particles within a particle collider associated with a detector element, defining a trigger start time for each of the pixels as the time taken for light to travel from the interaction point to the pixel and a trigger stop time as a selected time after the trigger start time, and collecting only detections that occur between the start trigger time and the stop trigger time in order to thereafter compensate the result from the particle collider to reduce unwanted background detection.

  13. High luminosity electron-hadron collider eRHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ptitsyn, V.; Aschenauer, E.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Blaskiewicz, M..; Calaga, R.; Chang, X.; Fedotov, A.; Gassner, D.; Hammons, L.; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.; He, P.; Hao, Y.; Jackson, W.; Jain, A.; Johnson, E.C.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luo, Y.; Mahler, G.; McIntyre, G.; Meng, W.; Minty, M.; Parker, B.; Pikin, A.; Rao, T.; Roser, T.; Skaritka, J.; Sheehy, B.; Skaritka, J.; Tepikian, S.; Than, Y.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Webb, S.; Wu, Q.; Xu, W.; Pozdeyev, E.; Tsentalovich, E.

    2011-03-28

    We present the design of a future high-energy high-luminosity electron-hadron collider at RHIC called eRHIC. We plan on adding 20 (potentially 30) GeV energy recovery linacs to accelerate and to collide polarized and unpolarized electrons with hadrons in RHIC. The center-of-mass energy of eRHIC will range from 30 to 200 GeV. The luminosity exceeding 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} can be achieved in eRHIC using the low-beta interaction region with a 10 mrad crab crossing. We report on the progress of important eRHIC R&D such as the high-current polarized electron source, the coherent electron cooling, ERL test facility and the compact magnets for recirculation passes. A natural staging scenario of step-by-step increases of the electron beam energy by building-up of eRHIC's SRF linacs is presented.

  14. String Resonances at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Anchordoqui, Luis A; Dai, De-Chang; Feng, Wan-Zhe; Goldberg, Haim; Huang, Xing; Lust, Dieter; Stojkovic, Dejan; Taylor, Tomasz R

    2014-01-01

    [Abridged] We consider extensions of the standard model based on open strings ending on D-branes. Assuming that the fundamental string mass scale M_s is in the TeV range and that the theory is weakly coupled, we discuss possible signals of string physics at the upcoming HL-LHC run (3000 fb^{-1}) with \\sqrt{s} = 14 TeV, and at potential future pp colliders, HE-LHC and VLHC, operating at \\sqrt{s} = 33 and 100 TeV, respectively. In such D-brane constructions, the dominant contributions to full-fledged string amplitudes for all the common QCD parton subprocesses leading to dijets and \\gamma + jet are completely independent of the details of compactification, and can be evaluated in a parameter-free manner. We make use of these amplitudes evaluated near the first (n=1) and second (n=2) resonant poles to determine the discovery potential for Regge excitations of the quark, the gluon, and the color singlet living on the QCD stack. We show that for string scales as large as 7.1 TeV (6.1 TeV), lowest massive Regge exc...

  15. Effects of multi-pass arc welding on mechanical properties of carbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... from the weld line. The tensile strength of 347 N/mm2 under multi-pass weld was higher than single pass weld with value of 314 N/mm2. Therefore, the temperature distrib-ution and apparent pre-heating during multi-pass welding increased the toughness and tensile strength of the weldments, but reduced the hardness.

  16. Facts about real antimatter collide with fiction

    CERN Multimedia

    Siegfried, Tom

    2004-01-01

    When science collides with fiction, sometimes a best seller emerges from the debris. Take Dan Brown's Angels & Demons, for instance, a murder mystery based on science at CERN, the European nuclear research laboratory outside Geneva

  17. Decoupling schemes for the SSC Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Y.; Bourianoff, G.; Cole, B.; Meinke, R.; Peterson, J.; Pilat, F.; Stampke, S.; Syphers, M.; Talman, R.

    1993-05-01

    A decoupling system is designed for the SSC Collider. This system can accommodate three decoupling schemes by using 44 skew quadrupoles in the different configurations. Several decoupling schemes are studied and compared in this paper

  18. Decoupling schemes for the SCC Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Y.; Bourianoff, G.; Cole, B.; Meinke, R.; Peterson, J.; Pilat, F.; Stampke, S.; Syphers, M.; Talman, R.

    1993-01-01

    A decoupling system is designed for the SSC Collider. This system can accommodate three decoupling schemes by using 44 skew quadrupoles in the different configurations. Several decoupling schemes are studied and compared in this paper

  19. Topcolor and the First Muon Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, C.T. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)][Chicago Univ., IL (United States)

    1998-04-01

    We describe a class of models of electroweak symmetry breaking that involve strong dynamics and top quark condensation. A new scheme based upon a seesaw mechanism appears particularly promising. Various implications for the first-stage muon collider are discussed.

  20. Physics prospects at a linear -collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The talk described the prospects of studying standard model parameters as well as scenarios beyond the standard model, like the minimal supersymmetric standard model, theories with extra dimensions and theories with extra neutral gauge bosons, at a future linear + - collider.

  1. Super High Energy Colliding Beam Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelaziz, M.E.

    2009-01-01

    This lecture presents a review of cyclic accelerators and their energy limitations. A description is given of the phase stability principle and evolution of the synchrotron, an accelerator without energy limitation. Then the concept of colliding beams emerged to yield doubling of the beam energy as in the Tevatron 2 trillion electron volts (TeV) proton collider at Fermilab and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which is now planned as a 14-TeV machine in the 27 kilometer tunnel of the Large Electron Positron (LEP) collider at CERN. Then presentation is given of the Superconducting Supercollider (SSC), a giant accelerator complex with energy 40-TeV in a tunnel 87 kilometers in circumference under the country surrounding Waxahachie in Texas, U.S.A. These superhigh energy accelerators are intended to smash protons against protons at energy sufficient to reveal the nature of matter and to consolidate the prevailing general theory of elementary particle.

  2. The collider calamity, publ. by Scientific American

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "For decades, the big guns of American science have been the U.S. Department of Energy's particle collider, which investigate the nature of matter by accelerating subatomic particles and smashing them together." (1 page)

  3. Optimizing integrated luminosity of future hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Schulte, Daniel; Zimmermann, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The integrated luminosity, a key figure of merit for any particle-physics collider, is closely linked to the peak luminosity and to the beam lifetime. The instantaneous peak luminosity of a collider is constrained by a number of boundary conditions, such as the available beam current, the maximum beam-beam tune shift with acceptable beam stability and reasonable luminosity lifetime (i.e., the empirical “beam-beam limit”), or the event pileup in the physics detectors. The beam lifetime at high-luminosity hadron colliders is largely determined by particle burn off in the collisions. In future highest-energy circular colliders synchrotron radiation provides a natural damping mechanism, which can be exploited for maximizing the integrated luminosity. In this article, we derive analytical expressions describing the optimized integrated luminosity, the corresponding optimum store length, and the time evolution of relevant beam parameters, without or with radiation damping, while respecting a fixed maximum value...

  4. New Stanford collider starts at Z

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    On 11 April the new SLC Stanford Linear Collider created its first Z particle, inaugurating high energy physics research at this novel machine based on the two-mile linac at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre, SLAC. (orig./HSI).

  5. Photon Linear Collider Gamma-Gamma Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronberg, J.

    2012-01-01

    High energy photon - photon collisions can be achieved by adding high average power short-pulse lasers to the Linear Collider, enabling an expanded physics program for the facility. The technology required to realize a photon linear collider continues to mature. Compton back-scattering technology is being developed around the world for low energy light source applications and high average power lasers are being developed for Inertial Confinement Fusion.

  6. Dedicating Fermilab's Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    It was a bold move to have a fullscale dedication ceremony for the new proton-antiproton Collider at the Fermilab Tevatron on 13 October, two days before the first collisions were seen. However the particles dutifully behaved as required, and over the following weekend the Collider delivered its goods at a total energy of 1600 GeV, significantly boosting the world record for laboratory collisions

  7. Nuclear collisions at the Future Circular Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armesto, N., E-mail: nestor.armesto@usc.es [Departamento de Física de Partículas and IGFAE, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia-Spain (Spain); Dainese, A. [INFN – Sezione di Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); D' Enterria, D. [Physics Department, CERN, CH-1211 Genéve 23 (Switzerland); Masciocchi, S. [EMMI and GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Roland, C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States); Salgado, C.A. [Departamento de Física de Partículas and IGFAE, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia-Spain (Spain); Leeuwen, M. van [Nikhef, National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Institute for Subatomic Physics of Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wiedemann, U.A. [Physics Department, CERN, CH-1211 Genéve 23 (Switzerland)

    2016-12-15

    The Future Circular Collider is a new proposed collider at CERN with centre-of-mass energies around 100 TeV in the pp mode. Ongoing studies aim at assessing its physics potential and technical feasibility. Here we focus on updates in physics opportunities accessible in pA and AA collisions not covered in previous Quark Matter contributions, including Quark-Gluon Plasma and gluon saturation studies, novel hard probes of QCD matter, and photon-induced collisions.

  8. Nuclear collisions at the Future Circular Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Armesto, N.; d'Enterria, D.; Masciocchi, S.; Roland, C.; Salgado, C.A.; van Leeuwen, M.; Wiedemann, U.A.

    2016-01-01

    The Future Circular Collider is a new proposed collider at CERN with centre-of-mass energies around 100 TeV in the pp mode. Ongoing studies aim at assessing its physics potential and technical feasibility. Here we focus on updates in physics opportunities accessible in pA and AA collisions not covered in previous Quark Matter contributions, including Quark-Gluon Plasma and gluon saturation studies, novel hard probes of QCD matter, and photon-induced collisions.

  9. Considerations on Energy Frontier Colliders after LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir [Fermilab

    2016-11-15

    Since 1960’s, particle colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics, 29 total have been built and operated, 7 are in operation now. At present the near term US, European and international strategies of the particle physics community are centered on full exploitation of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). The future of the world-wide HEP community critically depends on the feasibility of possible post-LHC colliders. The concept of the feasibility is complex and includes at least three factors: feasibility of energy, feasibility of luminosity and feasibility of cost. Here we overview all current options for post-LHC colliders from such perspective (ILC, CLIC, Muon Collider, plasma colliders, CEPC, FCC, HE-LHC) and discuss major challenges and accelerator R&D required to demonstrate feasibility of an energy frontier accelerator facility following the LHC. We conclude by taking a look into ultimate energy reach accelerators based on plasmas and crystals, and discussion on the perspectives for the far future of the accelerator-based particle physics. This paper largely follows previous study [1] and the presenta ion given at the ICHEP’2016 conference in Chicago [2].

  10. Physics at high luminosity muon colliders and a facility overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, Z.

    2001-01-01

    Physics potentials at future colliders including high luminosity μ + μ - colliders are discussed. Luminosity requirement, estimates for Muon collider energies of interest (0.1 TeV to 100 TeV) are calculated. Schematics and an overview of Muon Collider facility concept are also included

  11. 'Geant Simulation of Muon Cooling Rings,' 'Ionization Cooling Ring for Muons,' 'Geant Simulation of Six-Dimensional Cooling of Muon Beams in Ring Coolers,' 'Recent Progress in Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Research Within the Muon Collaboration,' 'Towards the Higgs Factory/Muon Collider,' 'Status of R and D on Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders,' 'Feasibility Study-II of a Muon-Based Neutrino Source,' 'A Muon Collider as a Higgs Factory,' 'Higgs Factory Muon Collider,' 'A Muon Collider as a Higgs Factory,' 'A Feasibility Study of a Neutrino Source Based on a Muon Storage Ring,' 'Status of Muon Collider Research and Development and Future Plans,'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. G. Hanson and A. Klier; R. Palmer,; Amit Klier and Gail G. Hanson,; Mohammad M. Alsharo, et al,; G. Hanson,; G. Hanson,; S. Ozaki, R. Palmer, M.S. Zisman, and J. Gallardo, eds.,; D.B. Cline and G.G. Hanson,; D.B. Cline and G.G. Hanson,; D.B. Cline and G.G. Hanson,; N. Holtkamp and D. Finley, eds.; C.M. Ankenbrandt

    2006-01-01

    FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT FOR DOE AWARD DE-FG02-03ER41267 NEUTRINO FACTORY AND MUON COLLIDER FELLOW By providing an intense, well controlled, well characterized, narrow beam of muon neutrinos and electron antineutrinos from the decay of muons in a storage ring, a neutrino factory can advance neutrino physics beyond the current round of approved and proposed experiments using conventional neutrino beams produced from a beam of decaying pions and kaons. There is no other comparable single clean source of electron neutrinos (from the decay of UNKNOWN, UNREADABLE IN ORIGINAL FILE) or antineutrinos. A muon storage ring producing 1019 to 1021 muon decays per year should be feasible. These intense neutrino beams can be used to study neutrino oscillations and possible CP violation. An entry-level muon storage ring that could provide 1019 decays per year would allow a determination of the sign of and a first measurement of sin22(UNKNOWN)±13 for favorable values of this parameter. An improved muon storage ring system that could provide 1020 muon decays per year would allow measurement of sin22(UNKNOWN)±13 to (UNKNOWN). A high performance muon storage ring capable of providing more than 1020 muon decays per year would allow the exciting possibility of a measurement of CP violation in the leptonic sector. An intense cold muon beam at the front end of a neutrino factory could enable a rich variety of precision muon physics, such as a more precise measurement of the muon anomalous magnetic moment (g - 2) and searches for (UNKNOWN, UNREADABLE IN ORIGINAL FILE) N conversion. In addition, colliding beams of (UNKNOWN) and (UNKNOWN) in a muon collider can provide an effective 'Higgs factory' or multi-TeV center-of-mass energy collisions. A muon collider will be the best way to study the Higgs bosons associated with supersymmetric theories and may be necessary to discover them. Two neutrino factory feasibility studies have been carried out in the U.S. International design efforts are

  12. Tracking studies of the Compact Linear Collider collimation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agapov, I.; Burkhardt, H.; Schulte, D.; Latina, A.; Blair, G.A.; Malton, S.; Resta-Lopez, J.

    2009-01-01

    A collimation system performance study includes several types of computations performed by different codes. Optics calculations are performed with codes such as MADX, tracking studies including additional effects such as wakefields, halo and tail generation, and dynamical machine alignment are done with codes such as PLACET, and energy deposition can be studied with BDSIM. More detailed studies of hadron production in the beam halo interaction with collimators are better performed with GEANT4 and FLUKA. A procedure has been developed that allows one to perform a single tracking study using several codes simultaneously. In this paper we study the performance of the Compact Linear Collider collimation system using such a procedure

  13. Status of the quadrupoles for RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, P.A.; Cottingham, J.G.; Garber, M.; Ghosh, A.; Goodzeit, C.; Greene, A.; Herrera, J.; Kahn, S.; Kelly, E.; Morgan, G.

    1989-01-01

    The proposed Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) will require 408 regular arc quadrupoles. Two full size prototypes have been constructed and tested. The construction uses the single layer, collarless concept which has been successful in the RHIC dipoles. Both the magnets attained short sample current, which is 60% higher than the operating current. This corresponds to a gradient of 113 T/m with clear bore of 80 mm. The preliminary field measurements are in agreement with the calculations, with the exception of an unexpectedly large show sextupole. 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Freezing of water droplets colliding with kaolinite particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Erik Anders; Delval, Christophe Eric Ludovic; Freiherr von Und zu Hessberg, P J H

    2009-01-01

    Contact freezing of single supercooled water droplets colliding with kaolinite dust particles has been investigated. The experiments were performed with droplets levitated in an electrodynamic balance at temperatures from 240 to 268 K. Under dry conditions freezing 5 was observed to occur below 249...... K, while a freezing threshold of 267 K was observed at high relative humidity. The effect of relative humidity is attributed to an influence on the contact freezing process for the kaolinite-water droplet system, and it is not related to the lifetime of the droplets in the electrodynamic balance...... studies to describe freezing rates are appropriate for kaolinite aerosol particles. Mechanisms for contact freezing are briefly discussed....

  15. Status of the Future Circular Collider Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedikt, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Following the 2013 update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the international Future Circular Collider (FCC) Study has been launched by CERN as host institute, to design an energy frontier hadron collider (FCC-hh) in a new 80-100 km tunnel with a centre-of-mass energy of about 100 TeV, an order of magnitude beyond the LHC's, as a long-term goal. The FCC study also includes the design of a 90-350 GeV high-luminosity lepton collider (FCC-ee) installed in the same tunnel, serving as Higgs, top and Z factory, as a potential intermediate step, as well as an electron-proton collider option (FCC-he). The physics cases for such machines will be assessed and concepts for experiments will be developed in time for the next update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics by the end of 2018. The presentation will summarize the status of machine designs and parameters and discuss the essential technical components to be developed in the frame of the FCC study. Key elements are superconducting accelerator-dipole magnets with a field of 16 T for the hadron collider and high-power, high-efficiency RF systems for the lepton collider. In addition the unprecedented beam power presents special challenges for the hadron collider for all aspects of beam handling and machine protection. First conclusions of geological investigations and implementation studies will be presented. The status of the FCC collaboration and the further planning for the study will be outlined.

  16. The lay-out of the photon collider at the international linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Logo of the Indian Academy of Sciences. Indian Academy of Sciences. Home · About IASc · History · Memorandum ... Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 69; Issue 6. The lay-out of the photon collider at the international linear collider. V I Telnov. Machine Detector Interface Volume 69 Issue 6 December ...

  17. PROSPECTS FOR COLLIDERS AND COLLIDER PHYSICS TO THE 1 PEV ENERGY SCALE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KING, B.J.

    2000-01-01

    A review is given of the prospects for future colliders and collider physics at the energy frontier. A proof-of-plausibility scenario is presented for maximizing the authors progress in elementary particle physics by extending the energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders as quickly and economically as might be technically and financially feasible. The scenario comprises 5 colliders beyond the LHC--one each of e + e - and hadron colliders and three μ + μ - colliders--and is able to hold to the historical rate of progress in the log-energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders, reaching the 1 PeV constituent mass scale by the early 2040's. The technical and fiscal requirements for the feasibility of the scenario are assessed and relevant long-term R and D projects are identified. Considerations of both cost and logistics seem to strongly favor housing most or all of the colliders in the scenario in a new world high energy physics laboratory

  18. PROSPECTS FOR COLLIDERS AND COLLIDER PHYSICS TO THE 1 PEV ENERGY SCALE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KING,B.J.

    2000-05-05

    A review is given of the prospects for future colliders and collider physics at the energy frontier. A proof-of-plausibility scenario is presented for maximizing the authors progress in elementary particle physics by extending the energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders as quickly and economically as might be technically and financially feasible. The scenario comprises 5 colliders beyond the LHC--one each of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and hadron colliders and three {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} colliders--and is able to hold to the historical rate of progress in the log-energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders, reaching the 1 PeV constituent mass scale by the early 2040's. The technical and fiscal requirements for the feasibility of the scenario are assessed and relevant long-term R and D projects are identified. Considerations of both cost and logistics seem to strongly favor housing most or all of the colliders in the scenario in a new world high energy physics laboratory.

  19. Crossing and Passing: Discursive Borders in Off Shoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanae Elmoudden

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available As a term in popular discourse, globalisation marks a celebrated openness of global spaces. Critics of globalisation argue that a global economy creates borders that are more discursive than territorial. A current challenge to globalisation scholars is reaching an understanding of how the many configurations of context, space, time and place created by globalisation result in new ways of organizing space and identity. Based on rich ethnographic data from an off shore call centre in Morocco and informed by interdisciplinary research on space, this paper bridges the links between territorial and discursive borders in the global social network of off shoring. Metaphorical spaces come about when dynamic configurations of contexts at territorial borders relate or are made to relate. Call centre agents use metaphorical spaces to fix the meaning of space. In this article, I identify two different metaphorical spaces: crossing and passing that help agents organize and negotiate their spaces and subsequently their identities and power relations. I suggest that agents negotiate place through space. This crossing takes place as they imbricate the Moroccan context of “L’hrig” within the continuum of the call centre. I also suggest that agents negotiate space through place. This passing occurs via the imbrication of metaphorical space of polyvalence. Crossing and passing inscribe not only a literal meaning of “movement” and “disembodiment”, but also the nuanced meaning of “movement and staying” and “disembodiment and re-embodiment” in a place where conjunctions of space, time, place and context collide. The creation of metaphorical spaces of crossing and passing suggests modification of our understanding of diaspora: attaining the diasporic space can no longer depend on physical borders alone; it must also rely on discursive borders.

  20. Progress on $e^{+}e^{-}$ linear colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit; Siemann, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Physics issues. The physics program will be reviewed for e+e- linear colliders in the TeV energy range. At these prospective facilities central issues of particle physics can be addressed, the problem of mass, unification and structure of space-time. In this context the two lectures will focus on analyses of the Higgs mechanism, supersymmetry and extra space dimensions. Moreover, high-precision studies of the top-quark and the gauge boson sector will be discussed. Combined with LHC results, a comprehensive picture can be developed of physics at the electroweak scale and beyond. Designs and technologies (R. Siemann - 29, 30, 31 May) The physics and technologies of high energy linear colliders will be reviewed. Fundamental concepts of linear colliders will be introduced. They will be discussed in: the context of the Stanford Linear Collider where many ideas changed and new ones were developed in response to operational experience. the requirements for future linear colliders. The different approaches for reac...

  1. Connecticut church passes genetics resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culliton, B J

    1984-11-09

    The Connecticut Conference of the United Church of Christ, which represents the largest Protestant denomination in the state, has passed a resolution affirming an ethical duty to do research on human gene therapy and is planning to form local church groups to study the scientific and ethical issues involved. The resolution is intended to counter an earlier one proposed by Jeremy Rifkin to ban all efforts at engineering specific traits into the human germline. The Rifkin proposal had been endorsed by a large number of religious leaders, including the head of the U.S. United Church of Christ, but was subsequently characterized by many of the church leaders as overly restrictive.

  2. Comparison of cryogenic low-pass filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalmann, M.; Pernau, H.-F.; Strunk, C.; Scheer, E.; Pietsch, T.

    2017-11-01

    Low-temperature electronic transport measurements with high energy resolution require both effective low-pass filtering of high-frequency input noise and an optimized thermalization of the electronic system of the experiment. In recent years, elaborate filter designs have been developed for cryogenic low-level measurements, driven by the growing interest in fundamental quantum-physical phenomena at energy scales corresponding to temperatures in the few millikelvin regime. However, a single filter concept is often insufficient to thermalize the electronic system to the cryogenic bath and eliminate spurious high frequency noise. Moreover, the available concepts often provide inadequate filtering to operate at temperatures below 10 mK, which are routinely available now in dilution cryogenic systems. Herein we provide a comprehensive analysis of commonly used filter types, introduce a novel compact filter type based on ferrite compounds optimized for the frequency range above 20 GHz, and develop an improved filtering scheme providing adaptable broad-band low-pass characteristic for cryogenic low-level and quantum measurement applications at temperatures down to few millikelvin.

  3. PASSING STANDARDIZED ASSESSMENTS WITH FADING PROMPTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Marie GREENE

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 mandates that all students perform at a level of proficient on state assessments. This includes students with learning and intellectual disabilities who are inherently performing below grade level. Given that schools are held accountable for meeting these goals and some states are not allowing students to graduate if they do not pass the assessments, this is a large concern for students, parents, teachers, and administration Method: Forty-five students with a disability in writing or an intellectual disability participated in this quasi-experimental, single-group, pretest-posttest design that evaluated the effectiveness of the Fading Prompts through Graphic Organizers method for students with learning and intellectual disabilities in written expression as measured according to the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment. Results: Data analyses were conducted through the use of four dichotomies for percent differences, which compared teacher administered pretests and posttests, pretests and the state administered PSSA, teacher administered posttests and the PSSA, and the participants’ PSSA and the average state PSSA score. All forty-five students performed at a below basic level during baseline and a proficient level on the posttest. The learned skills generalized to the PSSA with forty-three students earning a passing score of proficient, while two students advanced to basic. Conclusion: Based on the outcomes of this study, it is highly recommended that this program be utilized at least for students with learning and intellectual disabilities until further research can be done.

  4. The Tevatron Hadron Collider: A short history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tollestrup, A.V.

    1994-11-01

    The subject of this presentation was intended to cover the history of hadron colliders. However this broad topic is probably better left to historians. I will cover a much smaller portion of this subject and specialize my subject to the history of the Tevatron. As we will see, the Tevatron project is tightly entwined with the progress in collider technology. It occupies a unique place among accelerators in that it was the first to make use of superconducting magnets and indeed the basic design now forms a template for all machines using this technology. It was spawned in an incredibly productive era when new ideas were being generated almost monthly and it has matured into our highest energy collider complete with two large detectors that provide the major facility in the US for probing high Pt physics for the coming decade

  5. Calorimetry at a Future Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2090195; Marshall, John

    This thesis describes the optimisation of the calorimeter design for collider experiments at the future Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC). The detector design of these experiments is built around high-granularity Particle Flow Calorimetry that, in contrast to traditional calorimetry, uses the energy measurements for charged particles from the tracking detectors. This can only be realised if calorimetric energy deposits from charged particles can be separated from those of neutral particles. This is made possible with fine granularity calorimeters and sophisticated pattern recognition software, which is provided by the PandoraPFA algorithm. This thesis presents results on Particle Flow calorimetry performance for a number of detector configurations. To obtain these results a new calibration procedure was developed and applied to the detector simulation and reconstruction to ensure optimal performance was achieved for each detector configuration considered. This thesis a...

  6. SUPERCONDUCTING SOLENOIDS FOR THE MUON COLLIDER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREEN,M.A.; EYSSA,Y.; KENNY,S.; MILLER,J.R.; PRESTEMON,S.; WEGGEL,R.J.

    2000-06-12

    The muon collider is a new idea for lepton colliders. The ultimate energy of an electron ring is limited by synchrotron radiation. Muons, which have a rest mass that is 200 times that of an electron can be stored at much higher energies before synchrotron radiation limits ring performance. The problem with muons is their short life time (2.1 {micro}s at rest). In order to operate a muon storage ring large numbers of muon must be collected, cooled and accelerated before they decay to an electron and two neutrinos. As the authors see it now, high field superconducting solenoids are an integral part of a muon collider muon production and cooling systems. This report describes the design parameters for superconducting and hybrid solenoids that are used for pion production and collection, RF phase rotations of the pions as they decay into muons and the muon cooling (reduction of the muon emittance) before acceleration.

  7. Multiplicities and minijets at Tevatron Collider energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarcevic, I.

    1989-01-01

    We show that in the parton branching model, the probability distribution does not obey KNO scaling. As energy increases, gluon contribution to multiplicities increases, resulting in the widening of the probability distribution, in agreement with experimental data. We predict that the widening of the distribution will stop at Tevatron Collider energies due to the dominant role of gluons at these energies. We also find that the gluon contribution to the 'minijet' cross section increases with energy and becomes dominant at the Tevatron Collider. We calculate QCD minijet cross sections for a variety of structure functions, QCD scales and p T min . We compare our theoretical results with the experimental data and find that some of the structure functions and choices of scale are preferred by the experimental data. We give theoretical predictions for the minijet cross section at the Tevatron Collider, indicating the possibility of distinguishing between different sets of structure functions and choices of scale. (orig.)

  8. Collider and detector protection at beam accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakhno, I.L.; Mokhov, N.V.; Drozhdin, A.I.

    2003-01-01

    Dealing with beam loss due to abort kicker prefire is considered for hadron colliders. The prefires occurred at Tevatron (Fermilab) during Run I and Run II are analyzed and a protection system implemented is described. The effect of accidental beam loss in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN on machine and detector components is studied via realistic Monte Carlo calculations. The simulations show that beam loss at an unsynchronized beam abort would result in severe heating of conventional and superconducting magnets and possible damage to the collider detector elements. A proposed set of collimators would reduce energy deposition effects to acceptable levels. Special attention is paid to reducing peak temperature rise within the septum magnet and minimizing quench region length downstream of the LHC beam abort straight section

  9. Collider and Detector Protection at Beam Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakhno, I.L.; Mokhov, N.V.; Drozhdin, A.I.

    2003-01-01

    Dealing with beam loss due to abort kicker prefire is considered for hadron colliders. The prefires occurred at Tevatron (Fermilab) during Run I and Run II are analyzed and a protection system implemented is described. The effect of accidental beam loss in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN on machine and detector components is studied via realistic Monte Carlo calculations. The simulations show that beam loss at an unsynchronized beam abort would result in severe heating of conventional and superconducting magnets and possible damage to the collider detector elements. A proposed set of collimators would reduce energy deposition effects to acceptable levels. Special attention is paid to reducing peak temperature rise within the septum magnet and minimizing quench region length downstream of the LHC beam abort straight section

  10. Superconducting Solenoids for the Muon Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Eyssa, Y.; Kenny, S.; Miller, J.R.; Prestemon, S.; Weggel, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    The muon collider is a new idea for lepton colliders. The ultimate energy of an electron ring is limited by synchrotron radiation. Muons, which have a rest mass that is 200 times that of an electron can be stored at much higher energies before synchrotron radiation limits ring performance. The problem with muons is their short life time (2.1 micros at rest). In order to operate a muon storage ring large numbers of muon must be collected, cooled and accelerated before they decay to an electron and two neutrinos. As the authors see it now, high field superconducting solenoids are an integral part of a muon collider muon production and cooling systems. This report describes the design parameters for superconducting and hybrid solenoids that are used for pion production and collection, RF phase rotations of the pions as they decay into muons and the muon cooling (reduction of the muon emittance) before acceleration

  11. Final Cooling for a Muon Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta Castillo, John Gabriel [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States)

    2017-05-01

    To explore the new energy frontier, a new generation of particle accelerators is needed. Muon colliders are a promising alternative, if muon cooling can be made to work. Muons are 200 times heavier than electrons, so they produce less synchrotron radiation, and they behave like point particles. However, they have a short lifetime of 2.2 $\\mathrm{\\mu s}$ and the beam is more difficult to cool than an electron beam. The Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) was created to develop concepts and technologies required by a muon collider. An important effort has been made in the program to design and optimize a muon beam cooling system. The goal is to achieve the small beam emittance required by a muon collider. This work explores a final ionization cooling system using magnetic quadrupole lattices with a low enough $\\beta^{\\star} $ region to cool the beam to the required limit with available low Z absorbers.

  12. Electron lenses for super-colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Shiltsev, Vladimir D

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of the operating principles and technology of electron lenses in supercolliders.  Electron lenses are a novel instrument for high energy particle accelerators, particularly for the energy-frontier superconducting hadron colliders, including the Tevatron, RHIC, LHC and future very large hadron colliders.  After reviewing the issues surrounding beam dynamics in supercolliders, the book offers an introduction to the electron lens method and its application.  Further chapters describe the technology behind the electron lenses which have recently been proposed, built and employed for compensation of beam-beam effects and for collimation of high-energy high-intensity beams, for compensation of space-charge effects and several other applications in accelerators. The book will be an invaluable resource for those involved in the design, construction and operation of the next generation of hadron colliders.

  13. Final focus systems for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helm, R.; Irwing, J.

    1992-01-01

    Final focus systems for linear colliders present many exacting challenges in beam optics, component design, and beam quality. Efforts to resolve these problems as they relate to a new generation of linear colliders are under way at several laboratories around the world. We outline criteria for final focus systems and discuss the current state of understanding and resolution of the outstanding problems. We discuss tolerances on alignment, field quality and stability for optical elements, and the implications for beam parameters such as emittance, energy spread , bunch length, and stability in position and energy. Beam-based correction procedures, which in principle can alleviate many of the tolerances, are described. Preliminary results from the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) under construction at SLAC are given. Finally, we mention conclusions from operating experience at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). (Author) 16 refs., 4 tabs., 6 figs

  14. Final focus systems for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helm, R.; Irwin, J.

    1992-08-01

    Final focus systems for linear colliders present many exacting challenges in beam optics, component design, and beam quality. Efforts to resolve these problems as they relate to a new generation of linear colliders are under way at several laboratories around the world. We will outline criteria for final focus systems and discuss the current state of understanding and resolution of the outstanding problems. We will discuss tolerances on alignment, field quality and stability for optical elements, and the implications for beam parameters such as emittance, energy spread, bunch length, and stability in position and energy. Beam-based correction procedures, which in principle can alleviate many of the tolerances, will be described. Preliminary results from the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) under construction at SLAC will be given. Finally, we mention conclusions from operating experience at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC)

  15. International linear collider reference design report 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aarons, G.

    2007-01-01

    The International Linear Collider will give physicists a new cosmic doorway to explore energy regimes beyond the reach of today's accelerators. A proposed electron-positron collider, the ILC will complement the Large Hadron Collider, a proton-proton collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, together unlocking some of the deepest mysteries in the universe. With LHC discoveries pointing the way, the ILC -- a true precision machine -- will provide the missing pieces of the puzzle. Consisting of two linear accelerators that face each other, the ILC will hurl some 10 billion electrons and their anti-particles, positrons, toward each other at nearly the speed of light. Superconducting accelerator cavities operating at temperatures near absolute zero give the particles more and more energy until they smash in a blazing crossfire at the centre of the machine. Stretching approximately 35 kilometres in length, the beams collide 14,000 times every second at extremely high energies -- 500 billion-electron-volts (GeV). Each spectacular collision creates an array of new particles that could answer some of the most fundamental questions of all time. The current baseline design allows for an upgrade to a 50-kilometre, 1 trillion-electron-volt (TeV) machine during the second stage of the project. This reference design provides the first detailed technical snapshot of the proposed future electron-positron collider, defining in detail the technical parameters and components that make up each section of the 31-kilometer long accelerator. The report will guide the development of the worldwide R and D program, motivate international industrial studies and serve as the basis for the final engineering design needed to make an official project proposal later this decade

  16. International linear collider reference design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aarons, G.

    2007-06-22

    The International Linear Collider will give physicists a new cosmic doorway to explore energy regimes beyond the reach of today's accelerators. A proposed electron-positron collider, the ILC will complement the Large Hadron Collider, a proton-proton collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, together unlocking some of the deepest mysteries in the universe. With LHC discoveries pointing the way, the ILC -- a true precision machine -- will provide the missing pieces of the puzzle. Consisting of two linear accelerators that face each other, the ILC will hurl some 10 billion electrons and their anti-particles, positrons, toward each other at nearly the speed of light. Superconducting accelerator cavities operating at temperatures near absolute zero give the particles more and more energy until they smash in a blazing crossfire at the centre of the machine. Stretching approximately 35 kilometres in length, the beams collide 14,000 times every second at extremely high energies -- 500 billion-electron-volts (GeV). Each spectacular collision creates an array of new particles that could answer some of the most fundamental questions of all time. The current baseline design allows for an upgrade to a 50-kilometre, 1 trillion-electron-volt (TeV) machine during the second stage of the project. This reference design provides the first detailed technical snapshot of the proposed future electron-positron collider, defining in detail the technical parameters and components that make up each section of the 31-kilometer long accelerator. The report will guide the development of the worldwide R&D program, motivate international industrial studies and serve as the basis for the final engineering design needed to make an official project proposal later this decade.

  17. The Next Linear Collider: NLC2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Burke et al.

    2002-01-14

    Recent studies in elementary particle physics have made the need for an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider able to reach energies of 500 GeV and above with high luminosity more compelling than ever [1]. Observations and measurements completed in the last five years at the SLC (SLAC), LEP (CERN), and the Tevatron (FNAL) can be explained only by the existence of at least one particle or interaction that has not yet been directly observed in experiment. The Higgs boson of the Standard Model could be that particle. The data point strongly to a mass for the Higgs boson that is just beyond the reach of existing colliders. This brings great urgency and excitement to the potential for discovery at the upgraded Tevatron early in this decade, and almost assures that later experiments at the LHC will find new physics. But the next generation of experiments to be mounted by the world-wide particle physics community must not only find this new physics, they must find out what it is. These experiments must also define the next important threshold in energy. The need is to understand physics at the TeV energy scale as well as the physics at the 100-GeV energy scale is now understood. This will require both the LHC and a companion linear electron-positron collider. A first Zeroth-Order Design Report (ZDR) [2] for a second-generation electron-positron linear collider, the Next Linear Collider (NLC), was published five years ago. The NLC design is based on a high-frequency room-temperature rf accelerator. Its goal is exploration of elementary particle physics at the TeV center-of-mass energy, while learning how to design and build colliders at still higher energies. Many advances in accelerator technologies and improvements in the design of the NLC have been made since 1996. This Report is a brief update of the ZDR.

  18. Electron density and plasma dynamics of a colliding plasma experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiechula, J., E-mail: wiechula@physik.uni-frankfurt.de; Schönlein, A.; Iberler, M.; Hock, C.; Manegold, T.; Bohlender, B.; Jacoby, J. [Plasma Physics Group, Institute of Applied Physics, Goethe University, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    We present experimental results of two head-on colliding plasma sheaths accelerated by pulsed-power-driven coaxial plasma accelerators. The measurements have been performed in a small vacuum chamber with a neutral-gas prefill of ArH{sub 2} at gas pressures between 17 Pa and 400 Pa and load voltages between 4 kV and 9 kV. As the plasma sheaths collide, the electron density is significantly increased. The electron density reaches maximum values of ≈8 ⋅ 10{sup 15} cm{sup −3} for a single accelerated plasma and a maximum value of ≈2.6 ⋅ 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} for the plasma collision. Overall a raise of the plasma density by a factor of 1.3 to 3.8 has been achieved. A scaling behavior has been derived from the values of the electron density which shows a disproportionately high increase of the electron density of the collisional case for higher applied voltages in comparison to a single accelerated plasma. Sequences of the plasma collision have been taken, using a fast framing camera to study the plasma dynamics. These sequences indicate a maximum collision velocity of 34 km/s.

  19. Collider physics for the late 1980's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinchliffe, I.

    1987-01-01

    Topics in the Standard Model of strong and electroweak interactions and how these topics are relevant for the high energy colliders are discussed. Radiative corrections in the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam model are discussed, stressing how these corrections may be measured at LEP and the SLC. CP violation is discussed, followed by a discussion of the Higgs boson and the searches which can be carried out for it. Some features of quantum chromodynamics are discussed which are relevant to hadron colliders. Some of the problems which the Standard Model does not solve are discussed. 115 refs., 53 figs

  20. Final focus designs for crab waist colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084369; Levichev, Evgeny; Piminov, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    The crab waist collision scheme promises significant luminosity gain. The successful upgrade of the DA$\\Phi$NE collider proved the principle of crab waist collision and increased luminosity 3 times. Therefore, several new projects try to implement the scheme. The paper reviews interaction region designs with the crab waist collision scheme for already existent collider DA$\\Phi$NE and SuperKEKB, presently undergoing commissioning, for the projects of SuperB in Italy, CTau in Novosibirsk and FCC-ee at CERN.

  1. Final focus designs for crab waist colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bogomyagkov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The crab waist collision scheme promises significant luminosity gain. The successful upgrade of the DAΦNE collider proved the principle of crab waist collision and increased luminosity 3 times. Therefore, several new projects try to implement the scheme. The paper reviews interaction region designs with the crab waist collision scheme for already existent collider DAΦNE and SuperKEKB, presently undergoing commissioning, for the projects of SuperB in Italy, CTau in Novosibirsk and FCC-ee at CERN.

  2. Sixth international workshop on linear colliders. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urakawa, Junji

    1995-08-01

    The sixth international workshop on linear colliders (LC95) was held by KEK at Tsukuba Center for Institute. In the workshop 8 parallel working group were organized: WG1 (beam sources and injection linacs), WG2 (damping rings and bunch compressors), WG3 (a: RF sources and structures, b: superconducting cavities, c: two beam accelerators), WG4 (beam dynamics in main linacs), WG5 (final focus and integration regions), WG6 (beam instrumentation), WG7 (overall parameters and construction techniques), WG8 (gamma-gamma collider and miscellaneous). This issue compiles materials which were used in the workshop. (J.P.N.)

  3. Sixth international workshop on linear colliders. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urakawa, Junji [ed.

    1995-08-01

    The sixth international workshop on linear colliders (LC95) was held by KEK at Tsukuba Center for Institute. In the workshop 8 parallel working group were organized: WG1 (beam sources and injection linacs), WG2 (damping rings and bunch compressors), WG3 (a: RF sources and structures, b: superconducting cavities, c: two beam accelerators), WG4 (beam dynamics in main linacs), WG5 (final focus and integration regions), WG6 (beam instrumentation), WG7 (overall parameters and construction techniques), WG8 (gamma-gamma collider and miscellaneous). This issue compiles materials which were used in the workshop. (J.P.N.).

  4. Optimizing integrated luminosity of future hadron colliders

    OpenAIRE

    Benedikt, Michael; Schulte, Daniel; Zimmermann, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The integrated luminosity, a key figure of merit for any particle-physics collider, is closely linked to the peak luminosity and to the beam lifetime. The instantaneous peak luminosity of a collider is constrained by a number of boundary conditions, such as the available beam current, the maximum beam-beam tune shift with acceptable beam stability and reasonable luminosity lifetime (i.e., the empirical “beam-beam limit”), or the event pileup in the physics detectors. The beam lifetime at high...

  5. Top quark studies at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinervo, P.K. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-01-01

    The techniques used to study top quarks at hadron colliders are presented. The analyses that discovered the top quark are described, with emphasis on the techniques used to tag b quark jets in candidate events. The most recent measurements of top quark properties by the CDF and DO Collaborations are reviewed, including the top quark cross section, mass, branching fractions, and production properties. Future top quark studies at hadron colliders are discussed, and predictions for event yields and uncertainties in the measurements of top quark properties are presented.

  6. Passing Current through Touching Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schull, G.; Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads

    2009-01-01

    The charge flow from a single C-60 molecule to another one has been probed. The conformation and electronic states of both molecules on the contacting electrodes have been characterized using a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope. While the contact conductance of a single molecule between two...

  7. Stability diagram of colliding beams

    CERN Document Server

    Buffat, X; Mounet, N; Pieloni, T

    2014-01-01

    The effect of the beam-beam interactions on the stability of impedance mode is discussed. The detuning is evaluated by the means of single particle tracking in arbitrarily complex collision configurations, including lattice non-linearities, and used to numerically evaluate the dispersion integral. This approach also allows the effect of non-Gaussian distributions to be considered. Distributions modified by the action of external noise are discussed.

  8. Measurement of the Strong Coupling Constant from Inclusive Jet Production at the Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesropian, Christina [Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2000-06-01

    We present a measurement of the strong coupling constant from a single observable, the inclusive jet cross section. We use 86 pb-1 of data collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1800 GeV. The data was analyzed and experimental systematic uncertainties estimated.

  9. Buffels (Wes), Elsies, Sir Lowry's pass, Steenbras and Buffels (Oos)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Heinecken, TJE

    1982-06-01

    Full Text Available This report is a synthesis of all available information on five of the smaller rivers discharging in to False bay combined as a single volume. The rivers dealt with are the Buffels (Wes), Elsies, Sir Lowry' Pass, Steenbras and Buffels (Oos). False...

  10. WebPASS ICASS (HR Personnel Management)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — WebPASS Joint Administrative Support Platforms Post Administrative Software Suite - U.S. Department of State Executive Officers application suite. Web.PASS is the...

  11. Energy Extraction in the CERN Large Hadron Collider a Project Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Dahlerup-Petersen, K; Kazmine, B; Medvedko, A S; Sytchev, V V; Vasilev, L B

    2001-01-01

    In case of a resistive transition (quench), fast and reliable extraction of the magnetic energy, stored in the superconducting coils of the electromagnets of a particle collider, represents an important part of its magnet protection system. In general, the quench detectors, the quench heaters and the cold by-pass diodes across each magnet, together with the energy extraction facilities provide the required protection of the quenching superconductors against damage due to local energy dissipation. In CERN's LHC machine the energy stored in each of its eight superconducting dipole chains exceeds 1300 MJ. Following an opening of the extraction switches this energy will be absorbed in large extraction resistors located in the underground collider tunnel or adjacent galleries, during the exponential current decay. Also the sixteen, 13 kA quadrupole chains (QF, QD) and more than one hundred and fifty, 600 A circuits of the corrector magnets will be equipped with extraction systems. The extraction switch-gear is bas...

  12. Design of SSC collider structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsees, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    The authors would like to set the record straight. To date, underground construction contracts on the SSC main ring have been bid at a savings of $77 million dollars or 33 percent below the baseline cost estimate. The SSC is the largest single underground project ever built anywhere in the world. When completed it will have approximately 70 miles of tunnels, 60 shafts, two huge underground experiment halls -- each the size of a football stadium -- and numerous other structures, each of which would be considered a major facility on any other project

  13. Beam induced hydrodynamic tunneling in the future circular collider components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Tahir

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A future circular collider (FCC has been proposed as a post-Large Hadron Collider accelerator, to explore particle physics in unprecedented energy ranges. The FCC is a circular collider in a tunnel with a circumference of 80–100 km. The FCC study puts an emphasis on proton-proton high-energy and electron-positron high-intensity frontier machines. A proton-electron interaction scenario is also examined. According to the nominal FCC parameters, each of the 50 TeV proton beams will carry an amount of 8.5 GJ energy that is equivalent to the kinetic energy of an Airbus A380 (560 t at a typical speed of 850  km/h. Safety of operation with such extremely energetic beams is an important issue, as off-nominal beam loss can cause serious damage to the accelerator and detector components with a severe impact on the accelerator environment. In order to estimate the consequences of an accident with the full beam accidently deflected into equipment, we have carried out numerical simulations of interaction of a FCC beam with a solid copper target using an energy-deposition code (fluka and a 2D hydrodynamic code (big2 iteratively. These simulations show that, although the penetration length of a single FCC proton and its shower in solid copper is about 1.5 m, the full FCC beam will penetrate up to about 350 m into the target because of the “hydrodynamic tunneling.” These simulations also show that a significant part of the target is converted into high-energy-density matter. We also discuss this interesting aspect of this study.

  14. Theoretical implications of recent collider results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peccei, R.D.

    1984-10-01

    After discussing the comparison of the properties of the W and Z bosons found at the CERN collider with what is expected in the standard model, I critically overview various theoretical speculations concerning some recently reported exotic events, like radiative Z decays, monojets, hot photons, and jet activity. No overwhelmingly favored theoretical explanation appears to spring forth for all the existing exotica. (orig.)

  15. Anomalous VVH interactions at a linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the SM Higgs boson it will be therefore, necessary to establish its properties such as hypercharge, CP parity etc. At an e+e− collider the dominant Higgs production processes are e+e− → f ¯fH, which proceed via the VVH coupling with V = W, Z and f any light fermion. Demanding Lorentz invariance, the VVH couplings can.

  16. Black Holes and the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Arunava

    2011-01-01

    The European Center for Nuclear Research or CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has caught our attention partly due to the film "Angels and Demons." In the movie, an antimatter bomb attack on the Vatican is foiled by the protagonist. Perhaps just as controversial is the formation of mini black holes (BHs). Recently, the American Physical Society…

  17. Physics Case for the International Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Keisuke; /KEK, Tsukuba; Grojean, Christophe; /DESY /ICREA, Barcelona; Peskin, Michael E.; Barklow, Tim; /SLAC; Gao, Yuanning; /Tsinghua U., Beijing, CHEP; Kanemura, Shinya; /Toyama U.; Kim, Hyungdo; /Seoul Natl U.; List, Jenny; /DESY; Nojiri, Mihoko; /KEK, Tsukuba; Perelstein, Maxim; /Cornell U., LEPP; Poeschl, Roman; /LAL, Orsay; Reuter, Juergen; /DESY; Simon, Frank; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Tanabe, Tomohiko; /Tokyo U., ICEPP; Yu, Jaehoon; /Texas U., Arlington; Wells, James D.; /Michigan U., MCTP; Murayama, Hitoshi; /UC, Berkeley /LBNL /Tokyo U., IPMU; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; /Tohoku U.

    2015-06-23

    We summarize the physics case for the International Linear Collider (ILC). We review the key motivations for the ILC presented in the literature, updating the projected measurement uncertainties for the ILC experiments in accord with the expected schedule of operation of the accelerator and the results of the most recent simulation studies.

  18. Particle collider magnet self-destructs

    CERN Multimedia

    Higgins, Alexander G

    2007-01-01

    "A 43-foot-long magnet for the world's largest particle collider broke "with a loud band and a cloud of dust" during a high-pressure test, and officils said Tuesday they are working to find a replacement part." (1 page)

  19. Higgs physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    addition to this, the dark matter in the Universe, seems to also not consist of any of the known particles in the SM. Interestingly, almost all the extensions of the SM .... mental constraints on the Higgs mass from the collider experiments, taken from the web pages of the LEPEWWG and the Gfitter group. Both the panels show χ2 ...

  20. From the LHC to Future Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Roeck, A.; Ellis, J.; /CERN; Grojean, C.; Heinemeyer, S.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Jakobs, K.; /Freiburg U.; Weiglein, G.; /Durham U., IPPP; Azuelos, G.; /TRIUMF; Dawson, S.; /Brookhaven; Gripaios, B.; /CERN; Han, T.; /Wisconsin U., Madison; Hewett, J.; /SLAC; Lancaster, M.; /University Coll. London; Mariotti, C.; /INFN, Turin; Moortgat, F.; /Zurich, ETH; Moortgat-Pick, G.; /Durham U., IPPP; Polesello, G.; /INFN, Pavia; Riemann, S.; /DESY; Assamagan, K.; /Brookhaven; Bechtle, P.; /DESY; Carena, M.; /Fermilab; Chachamis, G.; /PSI, Villigen /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /INFN, Florence /Bonn U. /CERN /Bonn U. /Freiburg U. /Oxford U. /Louvain U., CP3 /Bangalore, Indian Inst. Sci. /INFN, Milan Bicocca /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Frascati /Fermilab /Warsaw U. /Florida U. /Orsay, LAL /LPSC, Grenoble /Warsaw U. /Yale U. /Stockholm U., Math. Dept. /Durham U., IPPP /DESY /Rome U. /University Coll. London /UC, San Diego /Heidelberg U. /Florida State U. /SLAC /Durham U., IPPP /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins /McGill U. /Durham U., IPPP; /more authors..

    2010-06-11

    Discoveries at the LHC will soon set the physics agenda for future colliders. This report of a CERN Theory Institute includes the summaries of Working Groups that reviewed the physics goals and prospects of LHC running with 10 to 300 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, of the proposed sLHC luminosity upgrade, of the ILC, of CLIC, of the LHeC and of a muon collider. The four Working Groups considered possible scenarios for the first 10 fb{sup -1} of data at the LHC in which (i) a state with properties that are compatible with a Higgs boson is discovered, (ii) no such state is discovered either because the Higgs properties are such that it is difficult to detect or because no Higgs boson exists, (iii) a missing-energy signal beyond the Standard Model is discovered as in some supersymmetric models, and (iv) some other exotic signature of new physics is discovered. In the contexts of these scenarios, theWorking Groups reviewed the capabilities of the future colliders to study in more detail whatever new physics may be discovered by the LHC. Their reports provide the particle physics community with some tools for reviewing the scientific priorities for future colliders after the LHC produces its first harvest of new physics from multi-TeV collisions.

  1. The Story of Large Electron Positron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 11. The Story of Large Electron Positron Collider - Experiments done at LEP. S N Ganguli. General Article Volume 7 Issue 11 November 2002 pp 18-34. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  2. Linear Collider partners woo newly opened India

    CERN Multimedia

    Bagla, Pallava

    2006-01-01

    "With the wheels of Air Force One barely off the tarmac following U.S. President George W. Bush's visit, which ended India's 3 decades as a nuclear pariah state, a delegation of U.S. and European physicists arrived here last week to discuss India's involvement in the International Linear Collider."

  3. The Fermilab proton-antiproton collider upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marriner, J.P.

    1996-10-01

    The plans for increases in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider luminosity in the near future (Run II) and the more distant future (TeV33) are described. While there are many important issues, the fundamental requirement is to produce more antiprotons and to use them more efficiently

  4. and collider physics: Working group report

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    physics pp. 335–345 and collider physics: Working group report. DEBAJYOTI CHOUDHURY. ¾ and RAHUL SINHA. Ѕї. Working Group members: S Arunagiri. ½. , Gautam .... cross-section for gluino pair production for our choice of С . As the production occurs primarily .... The final state В Г* has multiple partial waves [7] ...

  5. The Story of Large Electron Positron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Story of Large Electron Positron Collider. 2. Experiments done at LEP. S N Ganguli is at the Tata. Institute of Fundamental. Research, Mumbai. He is ...... team of engineers and technicians of CERN. The preci- sion measurements at LEP left no one in doubt that the understanding of physics through the standard model is.

  6. Beam dynamics issues for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1987-09-01

    In this paper we discuss various beam dynamics issues for linear colliders. The emphasis is to explore beam dynamics effects which lead to an effective dilution of the emittance of the beam and thus to a loss of luminosity. These considerations lead to various tolerances which are evaluated for a particular parameter set

  7. Status of the Future Circular Collider Study

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Following the 2013 update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the international Future Circular Collider (FCC) Study has been launched by CERN as host institute. Its main purpose and long-term goal is to design an energyfrontier hadron collider (FCC-hh) with a centre-of-mass energy of about 100 TeV in a new 80–100 km tunnel. The FCC study also includes the design of a 90–350 GeV highluminosity lepton collider (FCC-ee) installed in the same tunnel, serving as Higgs, top and Z factory, as a potential intermediate step, as well as an electron-proton collider option (FCC-he). The physics cases for such machines are being assessed and concepts for experiments will be developed by the end of 2018, in time for the next update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics. This overview summarizes the status of machine designs and parameters, and it discusses the essential technical components being developed in the frame of the FCC study. Key elements are superconducting accelerator-dipole magnets wit...

  8. Working group report: Collider and flavour physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Working group report: Collider and flavour physics. Coordinators: DEBAJYOTI CHOUDHURY1, ASESH K DATTA2 and ANIRBAN KUNDU3,∗. 1Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, New Delhi 110 007, India. 2Regional Centre for Accelerator-based Particle Physics, Harish-Chandra Research.

  9. Higgs physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this talk I shall begin by summarizing the importance of the Higgs physics studies at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). I shall then give a short description of the pre-LHC constraints on the Higgs mass and the theoretical predictions for the LHC along with a discussion of the current experimental results, ending with ...

  10. Working group report: Collider and flavour physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The activities of the working group took place under two broad subgroups: Collider Physics subgroup and Flavour Physics subgroup. Reports on some of the projects undertaken are included. Also, some of the leading discussions organized by the working group are summarized.

  11. Meeting the demands of future colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanar, George

    1990-01-01

    Physicists are very aware of the challenge of developing and building detectors and instrumentation for the next generation of proton colliders - the US Superconducting Supercollider (SSC) and CERN's LHC. The accompanying articles highlight special problems in electronics and in computing, but the effort underway extends over a wider front

  12. Dreams collide with reality for international experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    "Three weeks ago, an international team released a design and cost estimate for the International Linear Collider (ILC). American physicists want to build the ILC at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Batavia, Illinois, and researchers had hoped to break ground in 2012 and fire up the ILC's beams of electrons and positrons in 2019." (1 page)

  13. Measuring supersymmetry at the large hadron collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The large hadron collider (LHC) should have the ability to detect supersymmetric particles if low-energy supersymmetry solves the hierarchy problem. Studies of the LHC detection reach, and the ability to measure properties of supersymmetric particles are currently underway. We highlight some of these, such as the reach ...

  14. Working group report: Collider and B physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    60, No. 2. — journal of. February 2003 physics pp. 383–394. Working group report: Collider and B physics. Coordinators: AMITAVA DATTA and K SRIDHAR. Working Group Members: K Abe, K Agashe, ..... different from +1) will be a smoking gun signal for this model. Pramana – J. Phys., Vol. 60, No. 2, February 2003. 393 ...

  15. International linear collider simulations using BDSIM

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BDSIM is a Geant4 [1] extension toolkit for the simulation of particle transport in accelerator beamlines. It is a code that combines accelerator-style particle tracking with traditional Geant-style tracking based on Runga–Kutta techniques. A more detailed description of the code can be found in [2]. In an e+e− linear collider ...

  16. Physics with $e^{+}e^{-}$ linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Behnke, T; Zerwas, Peter M

    2002-01-01

    The physics programme is summarized for future e/sup +/e/sup -/ linear colliders. These machines will allow us to perform precision studies of the top quark and the electroweak gauge bosons in a complementary way to the proton collider LHC. The Higgs boson can be discovered at the LHC within the entire range of canonical mass values. Lepton colliders are ideal instruments to investigate the properties of the Higgs boson and to establish essential elements of the Higgs mechanism as the fundamental mechanism for breaking the electroweak symmetries. In the area beyond the Standard Model, new particles and their interactions can be discovered and explored comprehensively. Supersymmetric particles can be searched for at the LHC with masses up to 2-3 TeV. Their properties can be determined at lepton colliders with very high precision so that the mechanism of supersymmetry breaking can be investigated experimentally and the underlying unified theory can be reconstructed. Stable extrapolations are possible up to scal...

  17. Linear collider accelerator physics issues regarding alignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeman, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    The next generation of linear colliders will require more stringent alignment tolerances than those for the SLC with regard to the accelerating structures, quadrupoles, and beam position monitors. New techniques must be developed to achieve these tolerances. A combination of mechanical-electrical and beam-based methods will likely be needed

  18. Fundamentally new physics at the Tevatron Collider?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan Hongmo; Nellen, L.; Tsou Sheungtsun

    1989-02-01

    A new dispersion relation analysis of present pp-bar scattering data suggests the existence by Tevatron Collider energies of a threshold, of such nature, as is unlikely to be explainable in terms of known physics or any of its standard projections. (author)

  19. The analysis of colliding-shock experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, D.K.; Hares, J.; Rankin, A.; Rose, S.J.

    1985-03-01

    X-ray radiographic and photoabsorption measurements are described of material which has been highly compressed and strongly heated by laser-driven colliding shocks. Theoretical work which attempts to interpret the data is also presented. The experimental data appears to favour one particular formulation of the continuum lowering. (author)

  20. Emotions run high in race for collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Cartlidge, E

    2001-01-01

    The head of KEK expressed his dismay that SLAC has entered into a collaboration with 3 other US labs and proposes to build the next linear collider at Fermilab, Ilinois. KEK wants the next accelerator to be built somewhere in the Asian Pacific region (1 page).

  1. From the LHC to Future Colliders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Roeck, A.; Ellis, J.; Grojean, C.

    2010-01-01

    upgrade, of the ILC, of CLIC, of the LHeC and of a muon collider. The four Working Groups considered possible scenarios for the first 10/fb of data at the LHC in which (i) a state with properties that are compatible with a Higgs boson is discovered, (ii) no such state is discovered either because...

  2. Linear collider RF: Introduction and summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.

    1995-01-01

    The relation of acceleration gradient with RF frequency is examined, and approximate general RF power requirements are derived. Considerations of efficiency and cost are discussed. RF Sources, presented at the conference, are reviewed. Overall efficiencies of the linear collider proposals are compared. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  3. Higgs physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and on inclusion of the direct limits from the collider searches, one gets MH < 185 GeV, at 95% CL. The closeness of this bound with the theoretical analysis presented in figure 2 in fact raises the hairy prospect that we might find only a light Higgs and nothing else at the LHC. It should be mentioned here however, that some ...

  4. New physics with the Compact Linear Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Ellis, Jonathan Richard

    2001-01-01

    Investigating the 'strong' interactions between particles would be best investigated using a lepton-antilepton collider of energy 2 TeV or more. Plans for an accelerator of this type, called CLIC, have been underway at CERN for many years in collaboration with other accelerator laboratories (5 pages).

  5. Progress report on the SLAC Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, J.

    1986-06-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider project (SLC) is reported as being near completion. The performance specifications are tabulated both for the initial form and for eventual goals. Various parts of the SLC are described and the status of their construction is reported, including the front end electron gun and booster, the linac, damping ring, positron source, SLC arcs, and conventional facilities. 5 refs., 12 figs

  6. Microwave Feeding System Devices Of Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanovich, B Yu; Kaminsky, V I; Lalayan, M V; Sobenin, N P; Zavadtsev, D A

    2004-01-01

    The simulations, manufacturing and experimental results for two devices of linear collider RF power distribution system are presented. One of these devices is magic tee with movable choke plungers in E- and H-arms for the tuning the coupling-factor and RF phase of highpower accelerating cavities. The QEXT

  7. Collider Tests of (Composite) Diphoton Resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molinaro, Emiliano; Sannino, Francesco; Vignaroli, Natascia

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the Large Hadron Collider sensitivity to new pseudoscalar resonances decaying into diphoton with masses up to scales of few TeVs. We focus on minimal scenarios where the production mechanisms involve either photon or top-mediated gluon fusion, partially motivated by the tantalizing...

  8. Signals of doubly-charged Higgsinos at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demir, Durmus A.; Frank, Mariana; Turan, Ismail; Huitu, Katri; Rai, Santosh Kumar

    2008-01-01

    Several supersymmetric models with extended gauge structures, motivated by either grand unification or by neutrino mass generation, predict light doubly-charged Higgsinos. In this work we study productions and decays of doubly-charged Higgsinos present in left-right supersymmetric models, and show that they invariably lead to novel collider signals not found in the minimal supersymmetric model or in any of its extensions motivated by the μ problem or even in extra dimensional theories. We investigate their distinctive signatures at the Large Hadron Collider in both pair- and single-production modes, and show that they are powerful tools in determining the underlying model via the measurements at the Large Hadron Collider experiments.

  9. "Towards a Future Linear Collider" and "The Linear Collider Studies at CERN"

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    During the week 18-22 October, more than 400 physicists will meet at CERN and in the CICG (International Conference Centre Geneva) to review the global progress towards a future linear collider. The 2010 International Workshop on Linear Colliders will study the physics, detectors and accelerator complex of a linear collider covering both the CLIC and ILC options. Among the topics presented and discussed will be the progress towards the CLIC Conceptual Design Report in 2011, the ILC Technical Design Report in 2012, physics and detector studies linked to these reports, and an increasing numbers of common working group activities. The seminar will give an overview of these topics and also CERN’s linear collider studies, focusing on current activities and initial plans for the period 2011-16. n.b: The Council Chamber is also reserved for this colloquium with a live transmission from the Main Auditorium.

  10. SLAC linear collider and a few ideas on future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loew, G.A.

    1984-04-01

    This paper comes in two parts. The first part is a progress report on the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) with emphasis on those systems which are of special interest to linear accelerator designers; it sets the stage for a number of contributed papers on specific topics which are also presented at this conference. The second part presents some ideas which are of interest to the design of future linear colliders of higher energies

  11. The lay-out of the photon collider at the international linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The photon collider (γγ, γe) is being considered as an 'option' in the international linear collider (ILC) project [1–3], while e+e− collisions are 'baseline'. In reality, this means that at the beginning of its operation, the ILC will run in the e+e− mode, and then one of the interaction regions (IPs) and the detector will be upgraded ...

  12. Druid, displaying root module used for linear collider detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruan, M

    2012-01-01

    Based on the ROOT TEve/TGeo classes and the standard linear collider data structure, a dedicated linear collider event display has been developed. It supports the latest detector models for both International Linear Collider and Compact Linear Collider as well as the CALICE test beam prototypes. It can be used to visualise event information at the generation, simulation and reconstruction levels. Many options are provided in an intuitive interface. It has been heavily employed in a variety of analyses.

  13. Triplets pass their pressure test

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    All the LHC inner triplets have now been repaired and are in position. The first ones have passed their pressure tests with flying colours. The repaired inner triplet at LHC Point 1, right side (1R). Ranko Ostojic (on the right), who headed the team responsible for repairing the triplets, shows the magnet to Robert Zimmer, President of the University of Chicago and of Fermi Research Alliance, who visited CERN on 20th August.Three cheers for the triplets! All the LHC inner triplets have now been repaired and are in position in the tunnel. Thanks to the mobilisation of a multidisciplinary team from CERN and Fermilab, assisted by the KEK Laboratory and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), a solution has been found, tested, validated and applied. At the end of March this year, one of the inner triplets at Point 5 failed to withstand a pressure test. A fault was identified in the supports of two out of the three quadruple magne...

  14. Radiative corrections for the LHC and linear collider era

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laenen, E.; Wackeroth, D.

    2009-01-01

    We emphasize the importance of including radiative corrections when extracting physics from colliders such as the Tevatron Run II at Fermilab, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, and a future linear collider (LC). We review both well-tested methods and recent advances for calculating these

  15. Brilliant positron sources for CLIC and other collider projects

    CERN Document Server

    Rinolfi, Louis; Dadoun, Olivier; Kamitani, Takuya; Strakhovenko, Vladimir; Variola, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    The CLIC (Compact Linear Collider), as future linear collider, requires an intense positron source. A brief history is given up to the present baseline configuration which assumes unpolarized beams. A conventional scheme, with a single tungsten target as source of e-e+ pairs, has been studied several years ago. But, in order to reduce the beam energy deposition on the e+ target converter, a double-target system has been studied and proposed as baseline for CLIC. With this ‘‘hybrid target’’, the positron production scheme is based on the channeling process. A 5 GeV electron beam impinges on a thin crystal tungsten target aligned along its axis, enhancing the photon production by channeling radiation. A large number of photons are sent to a thick amorphous tungsten target, generating large number of e-e+ pairs, while the charged particles are bent away, reducing the deposited energy and the PEDD (Peak Energy Deposition Density). The targets parameters are optimized for the positron production. Polarize...

  16. Scaling laws for e sup + /e sup - linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, J P; Raubenheimer, T O; Wilson, Ian H

    1999-01-01

    Design studies of a future TeV e sup + e sup - Linear Collider (TLC) are presently being made by five major laboratories within the framework of a world-wide collaboration. A figure of merit is defined which enables an objective comparison of these different designs. This figure of merit is shown to depend only on a small number of parameters. General scaling laws for the main beam parameters and linac parameters are derived and prove to be very effective when used as guidelines to optimize the linear collider design. By adopting appropriate parameters for beam stability, the figure of merit becomes nearly independent of accelerating gradient and RF frequency of the accelerating structures. In spite of the strong dependence of the wake fields with frequency, the single-bunch emittance blow-up during acceleration along the linac is also shown to be independent of the RF frequency when using equivalent trajectory correction schemes. In this situation, beam acceleration using high-frequency structures becomes ve...

  17. Scaling Laws for Normal Conducting $e^{\\pm}$ Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, J P; Raubenheimer, T O; Wilson, Ian H

    1998-01-01

    Design studies of a future TeV e± Linear Collider (TLC) are presently being made by five major laboratories within the framework of a world-wide collaboration. A figure of merit is defined which enabl es an objective comparison of these different designs. This figure of merit is shown to depend only on a small number of parameters. General scaling laws for the main beam parameters and linac paramet ers are derived and prove to be very effective when used as guidelines to optimize the linear collider design. By adopting appropriate parameters for beam stability, the figure of merit becomes nearly independent of accelerating gradient and RF frequency of the accelerating structures. In spite of the strong dependence of the wake-fields with frequency, the single bunch emittance preservation durin g acceleration along the linac is also shown to be independent of the RF frequency when using equivalent trajectory correction schemes. In this situation, beam acceleration using high frequency struct ures becomes very ...

  18. The thermal performance of the two-pass, two-glass-cover solar air heater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persad, P.; Sateunanathan, S.

    1983-08-01

    Analytic models are developed for the performance prediction of a two-glass-cover solar air heater operated in both the single-pass and two-pass modes. It is shown that the two-pass mode of operation is superior to the single-pass mode of operation over the range of collector inlet temperatures considered. This is seen to be mainly due to the fact that, in the two-pass mode of operation, the outer glass cover is cooled by the working fluid, thereby reducing the top losses. It is also shown that the performance in the two-pass mode of operation is independent of length, over the range of collector lengths considered, and that a critical plate spacing, dependent on the temperature level of operation of the collector, is indicated. Predicted values of performance are in good agreement with experimental results.

  19. Geometrical influences on multi-pass laser forming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwardson, S P; Abed, E; Bartkowiak, K; Dearden, G; Watkins, K G

    2006-01-01

    Laser forming (LF) offers the industrial promise of controlled shaping of metallic and non-metallic components for prototyping, the correction of design shape or distortion and precision adjustment applications. The potential process advantages include precise incremental adjustment, flexibility of application and no mechanical 'spring-back' effect. To date there has been a considerable amount of work carried out on two-dimensional LF, using multi-pass straight line scan strategies to produce a reasonably controlled bend angle in a number of materials, including aerospace alloys. A key area, however, where there is a limited understanding, is the variation in bend angle per pass during multi-pass LF along a single irradiation track; in particular, the decrease in bend angle per pass after many irradiations for a given set of process parameters. Understanding this is essential if the process is to be fully controlled in a manufacturing environment. The research presented in this paper highlights the current theories as to why this occurs and proposes a further reason based on the geometrical effects of the component deformation, which in turn influences the process parameters per pass. This theory is confirmed through empirical analysis of the 2D LF process

  20. Single pass kernel k-means clustering method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Srinivasa Ramanujan Institute of Technology, Anantapur 515701, India; Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Rajeev Gandhi Memorial College of Engineering and Technology, Nandyal 518501, India; Department of Computer Science and ...

  1. Single pass kernel k-means clustering method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In unsupervised classification, kernel -means clustering method has been shown to perform better than conventional -means clustering method in ... 518501, India; Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Anantapur College of Engineering, Anantapur 515002, India ...

  2. Single pass kernel k-means clustering method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    easily implemented and is suitable for large data sets, like those in data mining appli- cations. Experimental results show that, with a small loss of quality, the proposed method can significantly reduce the time taken than the conventional kernel k-means cluster- ing method. The proposed method is also compared with other ...

  3. Single pass kernel k-means clustering method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This approach has reduced both time complexity and memory requirements. However, the clustering result of this method will be very much deviated form that obtained using the conventional kernel k-means method. This is because of the fact that pseudo cluster centers in the input space may not represent the exact cluster ...

  4. Luminosity Spectrum Reconstruction at Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Poss, Stéphane

    2014-04-11

    A good knowledge of the luminosity spectrum is mandatory for many measurements at future e+e- colliders. As the beam-parameters determining the luminosity spectrum cannot be measured precisely, the luminosity spectrum has to be measured through a gauge process with the detector. The measured distributions, used to reconstruct the spectrum, depend on Initial State Radiation, cross-section, and Final State Radiation. To extract the basic luminosity spectrum, a parametric model of the luminosity spectrum is created, in this case the spectrum at the 3 TeV Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). The model is used within a reweighting technique to extract the luminosity spectrum from measured Bhabha event observables, taking all relevant effects into account. The centre-of-mass energy spectrum is reconstructed within 5% over the full validity range of the model. The reconstructed spectrum does not result in a significant bias or systematic uncertainty in the exemplary physics benchmark process of smuon pair production.

  5. Imaging hadron calorimetry for future Lepton Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repond, José, E-mail: repond@hep.anl.gov

    2013-12-21

    To fully exploit the physics potential of a future Lepton Collider requires detectors with unprecedented jet energy and dijet-mass resolution. To meet these challenges, detectors optimized for the application of Particle Flow Algorithms (PFAs) are being designed and developed. The application of PFAs, in turn, requires calorimeters with very fine segmentation of the readout, so-called imaging calorimeters. This talk reviews progress in imaging hadron calorimetry as it is being developed for implementation in a detector at a future Lepton Collider. Recent results from the large prototypes built by the CALICE Collaboration, such as the Scintillator Analog Hadron Calorimeter (AHCAL) and the Digital Hadron Calorimeters (DHCAL and SDHCAL) are being presented. In addition, various R and D efforts beyond the present prototypes are being discussed.

  6. Collider detector at Fermilab - CDF. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theriot, D.

    1985-06-01

    CDF, the Collider Detector at Fermilab, is a collaboration of almost 180 physicists from ten US universities (University of Chicago, Brandeis University, Harvard University, University of Illinois, University of Pennsylvania, Purdue University, Rockefeller University, Rutgers University, Texas A and M University, and University of Wisconsin), three US DOE supported national laboratories (Fermilab, Argonne National Laboratory, and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), Italy (Frascati National Laboratory and University of Pisa), and Japan (KEK National Laboratory and University of Tsukuba). The primary physics goal for CDF is to study the general features of proton-antiproton collisions at 2 TeV center-of-mass energy. On general grounds, we expect that parton subenergies in the range 50 to 500 GeV will provide the most interesting physics at this energy. Work at the present CERN Collider has already demonstrated the richness of the 100 GeV scale in parton subenergies. 7 refs., 14 figs

  7. Progress on muon+muon- colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.

    1997-05-01

    Advantages and disadvantages of muon colliders are discussed. Recent results of calculations of the radiation hazard from muon decay neutrinos are presented. This is a significant problem for machines with center of mass energy of 4 TeV, but of no consequence for lower energies. Plans are outlined for future theoretical and experimental studies. Besides continued work on the parameters of a 4 TeV collider, studies are now starting on a machine near 100 GeV that could be a factory for the s-channel production of Higgs particles. Proposals are also presented for a demonstration of ionization cooling and of the required targeting, pion capture, and phase rotation rf

  8. Magnetic field measurements of model SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] dipoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassenzahl, W.V.; Gilbert, W.S.; Green, M.I.; Barale, P.J.

    1986-10-01

    To qualify for use in the Superconducting Super Collider, the 8000 or so 16 m long dipole magnets must pass a series of tests. One of these will be a set of warm measurements of field quality, which must be precise to about 0.001% of the 100 G field produced by 10 A, the maximum current the coils are allowed to carry for an extended period at room temperature. Field measurements of better than this accuracy have already been carried out on 1 m long model dipoles. These measurements have included determinations of the dipole fields and the higher harmonics in the central or two dimensional region and in the total magnet. In addition, axial scans of the dipole and higher harmonic magnetic fields have been made to determine the local variations, which might reflect fabrication and assembly tolerances. This paper describes the equipment developed for these measurements, the results of a representative set of measurements of the central and integral fields and axial scans, and a comparison between warm and cold measurements. Reproducibility, accuracy and precision will be described for some of the measurements. The significance of the warm measurements as a part of the certification process for the SSC dipoles will be discussed

  9. arXiv Proton Colliders at the Energy Frontier

    CERN Document Server

    Benedikt, Michael

    Since the CERN ISR, hadron colliders have defined the energy frontier. Noteworthy are the conversion of the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) into a proton-antiproton collider, the Tevatron collider, as well as the abandoned SSC in the United States. Hadron colliders are likely to determine the pace of particle-physics progress also during the next hundred years. Discoveries at past hadron colliders were essential for establishing the so-called Standard Model of particle physics. The world's present flagship collider, the LHC, including its high-luminosity upgrade HL-LHC, is set to operate through the second half of the 2030's. Further increases of the energy reach during the 21st century require another, still more powerful hadron collider. Three options for a next hadron collider are presently under investigation. The Future Circular Collider (FCC) study, hosted by CERN, is designing a 100 TeV collider, to be installed inside a new 100 km tunnel in the Lake Geneva basin. A similar 100 km collider, called SppC,...

  10. Hadroproduction of heavy flavors at collider energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, D.M.

    1979-11-01

    The possibility of detecting the top quark in hadron interactions at collider energies is investigated. The production of bound and naked t-quarks for m/sub t/ = 15 - 100 GeV, and the experimental signatures from their leptonic and semileptonic decay modes are studied. The background to any leptonic signature is expected to be severe, suggesting the requirement of simultaneous detection of hadrons

  11. The RHIC [Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider] lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Claus, J.; Courant, E.D.; Dell, G.F.; Hahn, H.; Parzen, G.; Ruggiero, A.G.

    1988-01-01

    An antisymmetric lattice for the proposed Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory is presented. It has been designed to have an energy range from 7 GeV/amu up to 100 GeV/amu; a good tunability of Β* and betatron tune; capability of operating unequal species, for example, proton on gold. Suppression of structure resonances is achieved by proper choice of the phase advances across the insertions and the arc cells. 9 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  12. Large Hadron Collider The Discovery Machine

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The mammoth machine, after a nine-year construction period, is scheduled (touch wood) to begin producing its beams of particles later this year. The commissioning process is planned to proceed from one beam to two beams to colliding beams; from lower energies to the terascale; from weaker test intensities to stronger ones suitable for producing data at useful rates but more difficult to control.

  13. German lab wins linear collider contest

    CERN Multimedia

    Cartlidge, Edwin

    2004-01-01

    Particle physicists have chosen to base the proposed International Linear Collider on superconducting technology developed by an international collaboration centred on the DESY lab in Germany. The superconducting approach was chosen by an internatinal panel ahead of a rival technology developed at Stanford in the US and the KEK lab in Japan. The eagerly-awaited decision was announced at the International Conference on High Energy Physics in Beijing today (½ page)

  14. Collimation systems in the next linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merminga, N.; Irwin, J.; Helm, R.; Ruth, R.D.

    1991-02-01

    Experience indicates that beam collimation will be an essential element of the next generation e + E - linear colliders. A proposal for using nonlinear lenses to drive beam tails to large amplitudes was presented in a previous paper. Here we study the optimization of such systems including effects of wakefields and optical aberrations. Protection and design of the scrapers in these systems are discussed. 9 refs., 7 figs

  15. Longitudinal damping in the Tevatron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerns, Q.A.; Jackson, G.; Kerns, C.R.; Miller, H.; Reid, J.; Siemann, R.; Wildman, D.

    1989-03-01

    This paper describes the damper design for 6 proton on 6 pbar bunches in the Tevatron collider. Signal pickup, transient phase detection, derivative networks, and phase correction via the high-level rf are covered. Each rf station is controlled by a slow feedback loop. In addition, global feedback loops control each set of four cavities, one set for protons and one set for antiprotons. Operational experience with these systems is discussed. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  16. Muon Colliders: the Ultimate Neutrino Beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Bruce J.

    1999-01-01

    It is shown that muon decays in straight sections of muon collider rings will naturally produce highly collimated neutrino beams that can be several orders of magnitude stronger than the beams at existing accelerators. We discuss possible experimental setups and give a very brief overview of the physics potential from such beamlines. Formulae are given for the neutrino event rates at both short and long baseline neutrino experiments in these beams

  17. Longitudinal damping in the Tevatron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerns, Q.A.; Jackson, G.; Kerns, C.R.; Miller, H.; Reid, J.; Siemann, R.; Wildman, D.

    1989-03-01

    This paper describes the damper design for 6 proton on 6 pbar bunches in the Tevatron collider. Signal pickup, transient phase detection, derivative networks, and phase correction via the high-level rf are covered. Each rf station is controlled by a slow feedback loop. In addition, global feedback loops control each set of four cavities, one set for protons and one set for antiprotons. Operational experience with these systems is discussed. 7 refs., 9 figs

  18. Luminosity Tuning at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Wittmer, W

    2006-01-01

    By measuring and adjusting the beta-functions at the interaction point (IP the luminosity is being optimized. In LEP (Large Electron Positron Collider) this was done with the two closest doublet magnets. This approach is not applicable for the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) and RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) due to the asymmetric lattice. In addition in the LHC both beams share a common beam pipe through the inner triplet magnets (in these region changes of the magnetic field act on both beams). To control and adjust the beta-functions without perturbation of other optics functions, quadrupole groups situated on both sides further away from the IP have to be used where the two beams are already separated. The quadrupoles are excited in specific linear combinations, forming the so-called "tuning knobs" for the IP beta-functions. For a specific correction one of these knobs is scaled by a common multiplier. The different methods which were used to compute such knobs are discussed: (1) matching in MAD, (2)i...

  19. The Next Linear Collider Design: NLC 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Alberta

    2001-08-21

    Recent studies in elementary particle physics have made the need for an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider able to reach energies of 500 GeV and above with high luminosity more compelling than ever. Observations and measurements completed in the last five years at the SLC (SLAC), LEP (CERN), and the Tevatron (FNAL) can be explained only by the existence of at least one particle or interaction that has not yet been directly observed in experiment. The Higgs boson of the Standard Model could be that particle. The data point strongly to a mass for the Higgs boson that is just beyond the reach of existing colliders. This brings great urgency and excitement to the potential for discovery at the upgraded Tevatron early in this decade, and almost assures that later experiments at the LHC will find new physics. But the next generation of experiments to be mounted by the world-wide particle physics community must not only find this new physics, they must find out what it is. These experiments must also define the next important threshold in energy. The need is to understand physics at the TeV energy scale as well as the physics at the 100-GeV energy scale is now understood. This will require both the LHC and a companion linear electron-positron collider.

  20. Seventh International Accelerator School for Linear Colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    Organizers of the Seventh International Accelerator School for Linear Colliders

    2012-01-01

    We are pleased to announce the Seventh International Accelerator School for Linear Colliders. This school is a continuation of the series of schools which began six years ago.  The first school was held in 2006 in Sokendai, Japan, the second in 2007 in Erice, Italy, the third in 2008 in Oakbrook Hills, USA, the fourth in 2009 in Huairou, China, the fifth in 2010 in Villars-sur-Ollon, Switzerland, and the sixth in 2011 in Pacific Grove, USA.   The school is organized by the International Linear Collider (ILC) Global Design Effort (GDE), the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) and the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA) Beam Dynamics Panel. The school this year will take place at the Radisson Blu Hotel, Indore, India from November 27 to December 8, 2012. It is hosted by the Raja Ramanna Center for Advanced Technology (RRCAT) and sponsored by a number of funding agencies and institutions around the world including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. National Science...

  1. Muon Collider Machine-Detector Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhov, Nikolai V.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    In order to realize the high physics potential of a Muon Collider (MC) a high luminosity of {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}-collisions at the Interaction Point (IP) in the TeV range must be achieved ({approx}10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}). To reach this goal, a number of demanding requirements on the collider optics and the IR hardware - arising from the short muon lifetime and from relatively large values of the transverse emittance and momentum spread in muon beams that can realistically be obtained with ionization cooling should be satisfied. These requirements are aggravated by limitations on the quadrupole gradients as well as by the necessity to protect superconducting magnets and collider detectors from muon decay products. The overall detector performance in this domain is strongly dependent on the background particle rates in various sub-detectors. The deleterious effects of the background and radiation environment produced by the beam in the ring are very important issues in the Interaction Region (IR), detector and Machine-Detector Interface (MDI) designs. This report is based on studies presented very recently.

  2. Linear collider IR and final focus introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, J.; Burke, D.

    1991-09-01

    The Linear Collider subgroup of the Accelerator Physics working group concerned itself with all aspects of the Next Linear Collider (NLC) design from the end of the accelerating structure to and through the interaction region. Within this region are: (1) a collimation section, (2) muon protection (of the detector from the collimator), (3) final focus system, (4) interaction point physics, and (5) detector masking from synchrotron radiation and beam-beam pair production. These areas of study are indicated schematically in Fig. 1. The parameters for the Next Linear Collider are still in motion, but attention has settled on a handful of parameter sets. Energies under consideration vary from 0.5 to 1.5 TeV in the center of mass, and luminosities vary from 10 33 to 10 34 cm -2 s -1 . To be concrete we chose as a guide for our studies the parameter sets labeled F and G, Table 1 from Palmer. These cover large and small crossing angle cases and 0.4 m to 1.8 m of free length at the interaction point

  3. Progress on the CLIC Linear Collider Study

    CERN Document Server

    Guignard, Gilbert

    2001-01-01

    The CLIC study aims at a multi-TeV, high luminosity e+e- linear collider design. Beam acceleration uses high frequency (30 GHz), normal conducting structures operating at high accelerating gradients, in order to reduce the length and, in consequence, the cost of the linac. The cost-effective RF power production scheme, based on the so-called Two-beam Acceleration method, enables electrons and positrons to be collided at energies ranging from ~ 0.1 TeV up to a maximum of 5 TeV, in stages. A road map has been drawn up to indicate the research and development necessary to demonstrate the technical feasibility of a 3 TeV centre-of-mass collider with a luminosity of 1035 cm-2s-1. Considerable progress has been made in meeting the challenges associated with the CLIC technology and the present paper briefly reviews some of them. In particular, the status is given of the studies on the CLIC high-gradient structures, the dynamic time-dependent effects, the stabilisation of the vibration and the beam delivery system. T...

  4. Jet Reconstruction and Spectroscopy at Hadron Colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellettini, Giorgio

    2011-11-01

    Dear colleagues and friends, Major new particle discoveries were made in the past by exploring the mass spectrum of lepton pairs. These searches still have great potential. However, new particle searches are now being extended to masses larger than the W, Z mass. More and more decay channels open up and the branching ratios into lepton pairs are reduced. Also, physics may dictate that states with heavy bosons and quarks become dominant. Examples are the decay of top quarks, and the expected final states of the standard model Higgs boson. Supersymmetry in any of its wide spectrum of models predicts intrigued final states where jets are major observables. To reconstruct masses and to study the dynamics of these states one must exploit the energy-momentum four-vectors of jets. Past experiments at the CERN SPS collider, at HERA, at LEP and now at the Tevatron collider and at LHC, have studied how best to reconstruct hadron jets. However, originally the role of jets in searching for new physics was primarily to sense new parton contact interactions by means of increased large pt tails in inclusive jet spectra, or studying jet events with large missing Et, or measuring branching ratios into jets of different flavour. These studies did not require as accurate a measure of jet four-momenta as needed in new particle searches in multi-jets final states. Figure 1 Figure 1. W, Z associated production in CDF events with large Et, miss and 2 jets. Consider for example (figure 1) the mass spectrum of dijets in events with large missing Et recently measured by CDF [1]. Trigger and analysis cuts were chosen so as to favour production of heavy boson pairs, with decay of one Z boson into neutrinos tagging the event and another W or Z boson decaying into jets. Associated production of boson pairs is observed, but the dijet mass resolution does not allow the separation of W from Z. A broad agreement of the overall observed rate with expectation is found, but a comparative study of the

  5. Tracking studies of the Compact Linear Collider collimation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Agapov

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A collimation system performance study includes several types of computations performed by different codes. Optics calculations are performed with codes such as MADX, tracking studies including additional effects such as wakefields, halo and tail generation, and dynamical machine alignment are done with codes such as PLACET, and energy deposition can be studied with BDSIM. More detailed studies of hadron production in the beam halo interaction with collimators are better performed with Geant4 and FLUKA. A procedure has been developed that allows one to perform a single tracking study using several codes simultaneously. In this paper we study the performance of the Compact Linear Collider collimation system using such a procedure.

  6. The Fermilab Collider D/Phi/ low Β system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McInturff, A.D.; Carson, J.; Collins, T.; Koepke, K.; Malamud, E.; Mantsch, P.; Niemann, R.; Riddiford, A.

    1988-06-01

    A new low Β system has been designed to serve the detector facility under construction at the D/Phi/ location of the Fermilab Superconducting Collider. The low Β system consists of 18 special cold iron quadrupoles powered as 11 independent circuits that can adjust the Β value at the intersection point down to 25 cm. Low beta is achieved with a set of 1.4 T/cm, two shell, high current quadrupoles. Smaller 0.7 T/cm, single shell trim quadrupoles are used to match the low beta insertion to the rest of the accelerator lattice. Gaps have been left in the lattice for electrostatic separators to separate the proton and antiproton beams everywhere except at the desired collision points. 6 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  7. The Fermilab Collider D/Phi/ low BETA system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McInturff, A.D.; Carson, J.; Collins, T.; Koepke, K.; Malamud, E.; Mantsch, P.; Niemann, R.; Riddiford, A.

    1988-06-01

    A new low BETA system has been designed to serve the detector facility under construction at the D/Phi/ location of the Fermilab Superconducting Collider. The low BETA system consists of 18 special cold iron quadrupoles powered as 11 independent circuits that can adjust the BETA value at the intersection point down to 25 cm. Low beta is achieved with a set of 1.4 T/cm, two shell, high current quadrupoles. Smaller 0.7 T/cm, single shell trim quadrupoles are used to match the low beta insertion to the rest of the accelerator lattice. Gaps have been left in the lattice for electrostatic separators to separate the proton and antiproton beams everywhere except at the desired collision points. 6 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Physics at a future collider beyond the LHC and a TeV class linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    After the LHC will have probed the physics at the TeV frontier, new generations of colliders capable of reaching into the multi-TeV energy domain will need to be considered. Concepts for both high energy e+e- linear colliders and muon storage rings have been proposed as well as hadron colliders. Highly challenging R&D programs are presently pursued to demonstrate their principles. The definition of a physics programme in the multi-TeV range still requires essential data that is likely to become available only after the first years of LHC operation and, possibly, also the results from a TeV-class linear collider. At present we have to envisage several possible scenarios for the fundamental questions to be addressed by collider experiments in the next decade, to guide the choices in the accelerator designs and parameters. After a brief review of the main accelerator projects and the present status of their R&D, I shall discuss the main signatures of the physics of possible relevance in relation to the e...

  9. Anon-Pass: Practical Anonymous Subscriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael Z.; Dunn, Alan M.; Katz, Jonathan; Waters, Brent; Witchel, Emmett

    2014-01-01

    We present the design, security proof, and implementation of an anonymous subscription service. Users register for the service by providing some form of identity, which might or might not be linked to a real-world identity such as a credit card, a web login, or a public key. A user logs on to the system by presenting a credential derived from information received at registration. Each credential allows only a single login in any authentication window, or epoch. Logins are anonymous in the sense that the service cannot distinguish which user is logging in any better than random guessing. This implies unlinkability of a user across different logins. We find that a central tension in an anonymous subscription service is the service provider’s desire for a long epoch (to reduce server-side computation) versus users’ desire for a short epoch (so they can repeatedly “re-anonymize” their sessions). We balance this tension by having short epochs, but adding an efficient operation for clients who do not need unlinkability to cheaply re-authenticate themselves for the next time period. We measure performance of a research prototype of our protocol that allows an independent service to offer anonymous access to existing services. We implement a music service, an Android-based subway-pass application, and a web proxy, and show that adding anonymity adds minimal client latency and only requires 33 KB of server memory per active user. PMID:24504081

  10. ColliderBit. A GAMBIT module for the calculation of high-energy collider observables and likelihoods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balazs, Csaba [Monash University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Tera-scale (Australia); Buckley, Andy [University of Glasgow, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Dal, Lars A.; Krislock, Abram; Raklev, Are [University of Oslo, Department of Physics, Oslo (Norway); Farmer, Ben [AlbaNova University Centre, Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Jackson, Paul; Murnane, Daniel; White, Martin [Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Tera-scale (Australia); University of Adelaide, Department of Physics, Adelaide, SA (Australia); Kvellestad, Anders [NORDITA, Stockholm (Sweden); Putze, Antje [Universite de Savoie, LAPTh, Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Rogan, Christopher [Harvard University, Department of Physics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Saavedra, Aldo [Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Tera-scale (Australia); The University of Sydney, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies, Centre for Translational Data Science, School of Physics, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Scott, Pat [Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Department of Physics, London (United Kingdom); Weniger, Christoph [University of Amsterdam, GRAPPA, Institute of Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Collaboration: The GAMBIT Scanner Workgroup

    2017-11-15

    We describe ColliderBit, a new code for the calculation of high energy collider observables in theories of physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM). ColliderBit features a generic interface to BSM models, a unique parallelised Monte Carlo event generation scheme suitable for large-scale supercomputer applications, and a number of LHC analyses, covering a reasonable range of the BSM signatures currently sought by ATLAS and CMS. ColliderBit also calculates likelihoods for Higgs sector observables, and LEP searches for BSM particles. These features are provided by a combination of new code unique toColliderBit, and interfaces to existing state-of-the-art public codes. ColliderBit is both an important part of the GAMBIT framework for BSM inference, and a standalone tool for efficiently applying collider constraints to theories of new physics. (orig.)

  11. Hydraulic characteristics of flood waves passing compound channels

    OpenAIRE

    冨永, 晃宏; 長尾, 正志; 三尾, 憲史; 劉, 建

    1994-01-01

    Hydraulic characteristics of unsteady flows were investigated experimentally when flood waves were passing through compound open channels. Some noticeable features of unsteady flow structure in compound channels were revealed which were significantly different from those in single rectangular channels. The unsteadiness of velocity appears very large in main channels and the peak of velocity appears very earlier than in rectangular channels. Lateral shear stress increases in a rising stage at ...

  12. Low-Noise Band-Pass Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinberg, L.

    1982-01-01

    Circuit uses standard components to overcome common limitation of JFET amplifiers. Low-noise band-pass amplifier employs JFET and operational amplifier. High gain and band-pass characteristics are achieved with suitable choice of resistances and capacitances. Circuit should find use as low-noise amplifier, for example as first stage instrumentation systems.

  13. Beam dynamics of the interaction region solenoid in a linear collider due to a crossing angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tenenbaum

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Future linear colliders may require a nonzero crossing angle between the two beams at the interaction point (IP. This requirement in turn implies that the beams will pass through the strong interaction region solenoid with an angle, and thus that the component of the solenoidal field perpendicular to the beam trajectory is nonzero. The interaction of the beam and the solenoidal field in the presence of a crossing angle will cause optical effects not observed for beams passing through the solenoid on axis; these effects include dispersion, deflection of the beam, and synchrotron radiation effects. For a purely solenoidal field, the optical effects which are relevant to luminosity exactly cancel at the IP when the influence of the solenoid’s fringe field is taken into account. Beam size growth due to synchrotron radiation in the solenoid is proportional to the fifth power of the product of the solenoidal field, the length of the solenoid, and the crossing angle. Examples based on proposed linear collider detector solenoid configurations are presented.

  14. Science Requirements and Conceptual Design for a Polarized Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jlab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abeyratne, S; Ahmed, S; Barber, D; Bisognano, J; Bogacz, A; Castilla, A; Chevtsov, P; Corneliussen, S; Deconinck, W; Degtiarenko, P; Delayen, J; Derbenev, Ya; DeSilva, S; Douglas, D; Dudnikov, V; Ent, R; Erdelyi, B; Evtushenko, P; Fujii, Yu; Filatov, Yury; Gaskell, D; Geng, R; Guzey, V; Horn, T; Hutton, A; Hyde, C; Johnson, R; Kim, Y; Klein, F; Kondratenko, A; Kondratenko, M; Krafft, G; Li, R; Lin, F; Manikonda, S; Marhauser, F; McKeown, R; Morozov, V; Dadel-Turonski, P; Nissen, E; Ostroumov, P; Pivi, M; Pilat, F; Poelker, M; Prokudin, A; Rimmer, R; Satogata, T; Sayed, H; Spata, M; Sullivan, M; Tennant, C; Terzic, B; Tiefenback, M; Wang, M; Wang, S; Weiss, C; Yunn, B

    2012-08-01

    beginning, the design studies at Jefferson Lab have focused on achieving high collider performance, particularly ultrahigh luminosities up to 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} per detector with large acceptance, while maintaining high polarization for both the electron and light-ion beams. These are the two key performance requirements of a future electron-ion collider facility as articulated by the NSAC Long Range Plan. In MEIC, a new ion complex is designed specifically to deliver ion beams that match the high bunch repetition and highly polarized electron beam from CEBAF. During the last two years, both development of the science case and optimization of the machine design point toward a medium-energy electron-ion collider as the topmost goal for Jefferson Lab. The MEIC, with relatively compact collider rings, can deliver a luminosity above 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} at a center-of-mass energy up to 65 GeV. It offers an electron energy up to 11 GeV, a proton energy up to 100 GeV, and corresponding energies per nucleon for heavy ions with the same magnetic rigidity. This design choice balances the scope of the science program, collider capabilities, accelerator technology innovation, and total project cost. An energy upgrade could be implemented in the future by adding two large collider rings housed in another large tunnel to push the center-of-mass energy up to or exceeding 140 GeV. After careful consideration of an alternative electron energy recovery linac on ion storage ring approach, a ring-ring collider scenario at high bunch repetition frequency was found to offer fully competitive performance while eliminating the uncertainties of challenging R&D on ampere-class polarized electron sources and many-pass energy-recovery linacs (ERLs). The essential new elements of an MEIC facility at Jefferson Lab are an electron storage ring and an entirely new, modern ion acceleration and storage complex. For the high-current electron collider ring, the upgraded 12 GeV CEBAF SRF

  15. Wake of a beam passing through a diffraction radiation target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dao Xiang

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Diffraction radiation (DR is one of the most promising candidates for electron beam diagnostics for International Linear Collider and x-ray free electron lasers due to its nonintercepting characteristic. One of the potential problems that may restrict its applications in real-time monitoring beam parameters is the wakefield generated by the presence of the DR target. In this paper, a comparative study of the wakefield and the backward DR (BDR field is performed to clarify the relationship between them. The wakefield is studied with a particle-in-cell code MAGIC and the DR field is calculated based on virtual photon diffraction model. It is found that they have the same frequency spectrum and angular distribution, which indicates that the difference only exists in the subjective terminology. The longitudinal and transverse wake for a beam passing through a DR target is calculated for a general case when the beam’s velocity is smaller than that of light. The resulted emittance growth and energy spread growth due to the short range wakefield is estimated and found to be permissible. In real measurement where BDR propagates in the direction perpendicular to the trajectory, it may add a transverse kick to the beam as a requirement of momentum conservation. The kick is found to be large enough to degrade the performance of accelerator driven facilities and needs to be corrected.

  16. Physics with e+e- linear colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accomando, E.; Andreazza, A.; Anlauf, H.; Ballestrero, A.; Barklow, T.; Bartels, J.; Bartl, A.; Battaglia, M.; Beenakker, W.; Bélanger, G.; Bernreuther, W.; Biebel, J.; Binnewies, J.; Blümlein, J.; Boos, E.; Borzumati, F.; Boudjema, F.; Brandenburg, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Cacciari, M.; Casalbuoni, R.; Corsetti, A.; De Curtis, S.; Cuypers, F.; Daskalakis, G.; Deandrea, A.; Denner, A.; Diehl, M.; Dittmaier, S.; Djouadi, A.; Dominici, D.; Dreiner, H.; Eberl, H.; Ellwanger, U.; Engel, R.; Flöttmann, K.; Franz, H.; Gajdosik, T.; Gatto, R.; Genten, H.; Godbole, R.; Gounaris, G.; Greco, M.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Guetta, D.; Haidt, D.; Harlander, R.; He, H. J.; Hollik, W.; Huitu, K.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ilyin, V.; Janot, P.; Jegerlehner, F.; Jez&dot,; abek, M.; Jim, B.; Kalinowski, J.; Kilian, W.; Kim, B. R.; Kleinwort, T.; Kniehl, B. A.; Krämer, M.; Kramer, G.; Kraml, S.; Krause, A.; Krawczyk, M.; Kryukov, A.; Kühn, J. H.; Kyriakis, A.; Leike, A.; Lotter, H.; Maalampi, J.; Majerotto, W.; Markou, C.; Martinez, M.; Martyn, U.; Mele, B.; Miller, D. J.; Miquel, R.; Nippe, A.; Nowak, H.; Ohl, T.; Osland, P.; Overmann, P.; Pancheri, G.; Pankov, A. A.; Papadopoulos, C. G.; Paver, N.; Pietila, A.; Peter, M.; Pizzio, M.; Plehn, T.; Pohl, M.; Polonsky, N.; Porod, W.; Pukhov, A.; Raidal, M.; Riemann, S.; Riemann, T.; Riesselmann, K.; Riu, I.; De Roeck, A.; Rosiek, J.; Rückl, R.; Schreiber, H. J.; Schulte, D.; Settles, R.; Shanidze, R.; Shichanin, S.; Simopoulou, E.; Sjöstrand, T.; Smith, J.; Sopczak, A.; Spiesberger, H.; Teubner, T.; Troncon, C.; Vander Velde, C.; Vogt, A.; Vuopionper, R.; Wagner, A.; Ward, J.; Weber, M.; Wiik, B. H.; Wilson, G. W.; Zerwas, P. M.

    1998-06-01

    The physics potential of e+e- linear colliders is summarized in this report. These machines are planned to operate in the first phase at a center-of-mass energy of 500 GeV, before being scaled up to about 1 TeV. In the second phase of the operation, a final energy of about 2 TeV is expected. The machines will allow us to perform precision tests of the heavy particles in the Standard Model, the top quark and the electroweak bosons. They are ideal facilities for exploring the properties of Higgs particles, in particular in the intermediate mass range. New vector bosons and novel matter particles in extended gauge theories can be searched for and studied thoroughly. The machines provide unique opportunities for the discovery of particles in supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, the spectrum of Higgs particles, the supersymmetric partners of the electroweak gauge and Higgs bosons, and of the matter particles. High precision analyses of their properties and interactions will allow for extrapolations to energy scales close to the Planck scale where gravity becomes significant. In alternative scenarios, i.e. compositeness models, novel matter particles and interactions can be discovered and investigated in the energy range above the existing colliders up to the TeV scale. Whatever scenario is realized in Nature, the discovery potential of e+e- linear colliders and the high precision with which the properties of particles and their interactions can be analyzed, define an exciting physics program complementary to hadron machines.

  17. Radial scaling in inclusive jet production at hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Frank E.

    2018-03-01

    Inclusive jet production in p-p and p ¯ -p collisions shows many of the same kinematic systematics as observed in single-particle inclusive production at much lower energies. In an earlier study (1974) a phenomenology, called radial scaling, was developed for the single-particle inclusive cross sections that attempted to capture the essential underlying physics of pointlike parton scattering and the fragmentation of partons into hadrons suppressed by the kinematic boundary. The phenomenology was successful in emphasizing the underlying systematics of the inclusive particle productions. Here we demonstrate that inclusive jet production at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in high-energy p-p collisions and at the Tevatron in p ¯ -p inelastic scattering shows similar behavior. The ATLAS inclusive jet production plotted as a function of this scaling variable is studied for √s of 2.76, 7 and 13 TeV and is compared to p ¯ -p inclusive jet production at 1.96 TeV measured at the CDF and D0 at the Tevatron and p-Pb inclusive jet production at the LHC ATLAS at √sNN=5.02 TeV . Inclusive single-particle production at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory fixed target and Intersecting Storage Rings energies are compared to inclusive J /ψ production at the LHC measured in ATLAS, CMS and LHCb. Striking common features of the data are discussed.

  18. TRISTAN, electron-positron colliding beam project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    In this report e + e - colliding beam program which is now referred to as TRISTAN Project will be described. A brief chronology and outline of TRISTAN Project is given in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 of this article gives a discussion of physics objectives at TRISTAN. Chapter 3 treats the overall description of the accelerators. Chapter 4 describes design of each of the accelerator systems. In Chapter 5, detector facilities are discussed in some detail. A description of accelerator tunnels, experimental areas, and utilities are given in Chapter 6. In the Appendix, the publications on the TRISTAN Project are listed. (author)

  19. Relativistic klystron research for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.

    1988-09-01

    Relativistic klystrons are being developed as a power source for high gradient accelerator applications which include large linear electron-positron colliders, compact accelerators, and FEL sources. We have attained 200 MW peak power at 11.4 GHz from a relativistic klystron, and 140 MV/m longitudinal gradient in a short 11.4 GHz accelerator section. We report here on the design of our relativistic klystrons, the results of our experiments so far, and some of our plans for the near future. 5 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  20. The Large Hadron Collider and Grid computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, Neil

    2012-02-28

    We present a brief history of the beginnings, development and achievements of the worldwide Large Hadron Collider Computing Grid (wLCG). The wLCG is a huge international endeavour, which is itself embedded within, and directly influences, a much broader computing and information technology landscape. It is often impossible to identify true cause and effect, and they may appear very different from the different perspectives (e.g. information technology industry or academic researcher). This account is no different. It represents a personal view of the developments over the last two decades and is therefore inevitably biased towards those things in which the author has been personally involved.

  1. Broader Impacts of the International Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardeen, M.; Fermilab; Ruchti, R.; NSF, Wash., D.C.; Notre Dame U.

    2005-01-01

    Large-scale scientific endeavors such as the International Linear Collider Project can have a lasting impact on education and outreach to our society. The ILC will provide a discovery platform for frontier physical science and it will also provide a discovery platform for broader impacts and social science. The importance of Broader Impacts of Science in general and the ILC in particular are described. Additionally, a synopsis of education and outreach activities carried out as an integral part of the Snowmass ILC Workshop is provided

  2. Electroweak physics at the Tevatron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aihara, H.

    1993-08-01

    Preliminary results on electroweak physics from the 1992--1993 run with the CDF and D0 detectors at the Tevatron collider are presented. New measurements of the ratio of the W and Z production cross sections times the branching fractions for subsequent decay into leptons are shown. The W width, Γ(W), and a limit on the top-quark mass independent of decay mode are extracted. The status of a measurement of the charge asymmetry of electrons from W decay is given. Also shown are a study of diboson (Wγ, Zγ and WZ) production and a search for a new neutral gauge boson (Z')

  3. Advanced silicon sensors for future collider experiments

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00437143; Moll, Michael; Mannelli, Marcello

    In this thesis, we address two key technological challenges: the radiation tolerance assessment and timing performance studies of thin planar diodes to be used as sensing technology in the recently approved CMS forward sampling calorimeter for the HL-LHC operation, the High Granularity Calorimeter (HGCAL); and, complementary, we carried out a detailed study of a novel kind of position sensitive microstrip sensors for ionising particles which implements the well established charge-division method to determine the particle impinging position along the microstrip electrode direction; this technology could become an interesting low-material budget solution for the new generation of tracking detectors to be operated in the future lepton collider experiments.

  4. Calorimetry at the International Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repond, Jose [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)]. E-mail: respond@hep.anl.gov

    2007-03-01

    The physics potential of the International Linear Collider depends critically on the jet energy resolution of its detector. Detector concepts are being developed which optimize the jet energy resolution, with the aim of achieving {sigma}{sub jet}=30%/E{sub jet}. Under the assumption that Particle Flow Algorithms (PFAs), which combine tracking and calorimeter information to reconstruct the energy of hadronic jets, can provide this unprecedented jet energy resolution, calorimeters with very fine granularity are being developed. After a brief introduction outlining the principles of PFAs, the current status of various calorimeter prototype construction projects and their plans for the next few years will be reviewed.

  5. [New technology for linear colliders.] Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntyre, P.M.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the contract is to devise and analyze new technologies appropriate for future linear colliders. The focus of our research during 1986 has been the coaxial pulse line (CPL) accelerating structure. It is similar to a wake field structure, except that it replaces the annular ring beam driver by an annular TEM wave. The driver wave can be launched using a capacitor discharge arrangement similar to induction linacs. The structure has the combined advantages of high gradient (∼200 MeV/m) and high efficiency (perhaps ∼50%). A high-power lasertron based on a ribbon electron beam is proposed

  6. LHC - Large Hadon Collider Exhibition LEPFest 2000

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will accelerate two proton beams to an energy corresponding to about 7,000 times their mass (7000 GeV). The collision of the two beams reproduces the conditions in the Universe when it was about 10 -1 2 sec old. Many innovative techniques - such as cooling with superfluid helium, the extensive use of high temperature superconducting cables, the two-in-one design for super-conducting dipole magnets, and new ultra-high vacuum technologies - had to be developed to make its construc-tion possible.

  7. Reducing risk where tectonic plates collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, Joan S.; Ludwig, Kristin A.

    2017-06-19

    Most of the world’s earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides, and volcanic eruptions are caused by the continuous motions of the many tectonic plates that make up the Earth’s outer shell. The most powerful of these natural hazards occur in subduction zones, where two plates collide and one is thrust beneath another. The U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) “Reducing Risk Where Tectonic Plates Collide—A USGS Plan to Advance Subduction Zone Science” is a blueprint for building the crucial scientific foundation needed to inform the policies and practices that can make our Nation more resilient to subduction zone-related hazards.

  8. SSC collider dipole magnet end mechanical design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delchamps, S.W.; Bossert, R.C.; Carson, J.; Ewald, K.; Fulton, H.; Kerby, J.; Koska, W.; Strait, J.; Wake, S.M. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA)); Leung, K.K. (Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (USA))

    1991-05-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design of the ends of Superconducting Super Collider dipole magnets to be constructed and tested at Fermilab. Coil end clamps, end yoke configuration, and end plate design are discussed. Loading of the end plate by axial Lorentz forces is discussed. Relevant data from 40 mm and 50 mm aperture model dipole magnets built and tested at Fermilab are presented. In particular, the apparent influence of end clamp design on the quench behavior of model SSC dipoles is described. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  9. A high brilliance source for muon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastaldi, Ugo

    2001-01-01

    A scheme of muon production for debugging and test of a muon collider is outlined. μ + and μ - microbunches are generated simultaneously, at high energy, with high brilliance and pointing to the same direction, by annihilation of e + and e - stored in two rings located in the same tunnel and running at the same energy E. e + and e - bunches cross each other repeatedly along the muon beam line, that they traverse respectively at angles ±α, chosen so that the total muon energy in the lab is E-m μ

  10. SUSY Without Prejudice at Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzo, T.

    2008-01-01

    We explore the physics of the general CP-conserving MSSM with Minimal Flavor Violation, the pMSSM. The 19 soft SUSY breaking parameters are chosen so to satisfy all existing experimental and theoretical constraints assuming that the WIMP is the lightest neutralino. We scan this parameter space twice using both flat and log priors and compare the results which yield similar conclusions. Constraints from both LEP and the Tevatron play an important role in obtaining our final model samples. Implications for future TeV-scale e + e - linear colliders (LC) are discussed

  11. Beam Dynamics Challenges for Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    Zimmermann, Frank

    2004-01-01

    The luminosity of hadron colliders rises with the beam intensity, until some limit is encountered, mostly due to head-on and long-range beam-beam interaction, due to electron cloud, or due to conventional impedance sources. Also beam losses caused by various mechanisms may affect the performance. The limitations can be alleviated, if not overcome, by a proper choice of beam parameters and by dedicated compensation schemes. Examples include alternating crossing at several interaction points, electromagnetic wires, super-bunches, electron lenses, clearing electrodes, and nonlinear collimation. I discuss such mitigating measures and related research efforts, with special emphasis on the LHC and its upgrade.

  12. Future high energy colliders. Formal report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, Z.

    1996-01-01

    This Report includes copies of transparencies and notes from the presentations made at the Symposium on Future High Energy Colliders, October 21-25, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara California, that was made available by the authors. Editing, reduction and changes to the authors contributions were made only to fulfill the printing and publication requirements. We would like to take this opportunity and thank the speakers for their informative presentations and for providing copies of their transparencies and notes for inclusion in this Report

  13. Beam loss mechanisms in relativistic heavy-ion colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, Roderik; Gilardoni, S; Wallén, E

    2009-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the largest particle accelerator ever built, is presently under commissioning at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). It will collide beams of protons, and later Pb82+ ions, at ultrarelativistic energies. Because of its unprecedented energy, the operation of the LHC with heavy ions will present beam physics challenges not encountered in previous colliders. Beam loss processes that are harmless in the presently largest operational heavy-ion collider, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory, risk to cause quenches of superconducting magnets in the LHC. Interactions between colliding beams of ultrarelativistic heavy ions, or between beam ions and collimators, give rise to nuclear fragmentation. The resulting isotopes could have a charge-to-mass ratio different from the main beam and therefore follow dispersive orbits until they are lost. Depending on the machine conditions and the ion species, these losses could occur in loca...

  14. The case for future hadron colliders from B → K (*) μ + μ - decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allanach, B. C.; Gripaios, Ben; You, Tevong

    2018-03-01

    Recent measurements in B → K (*) μ + μ - decays are somewhat discrepant with Standard Model predictions. They may be harbingers of new physics at an energy scale potentially accessible to direct discovery. We estimate the sensitivity of future hadron colliders to the possible new particles that may be responsible for the anomalies at tree-level: leptoquarks or Z's. We consider luminosity upgrades for a 14 TeV LHC, a 33 TeV LHC, and a 100 TeV pp collider such as the FCC-hh. In the most conservative and pessimistic models, for narrow particles with perturbative couplings, Z' masses up to 20 TeV and leptoquark masses up to 41 TeV may in principle explain the anomalies. Coverage of Z' models is excellent: a 33 TeV 1 ab-1 LHC is expected to cover most of the parameter space up to 8 TeV in mass, whereas the 100 TeV FCC-hh with 10 ab-1 will cover all of it. A smaller portion of the leptoquark parameter space is covered by future colliders: for example, in a μ + μ - jj di-leptoquark search, a 100 TeV 10 ab-1 collider has a projected sensitivity up to leptoquark masses of 12 TeV (extendable to 21 TeV with a strong coupling for single leptoquark production).

  15. Radiation Field in the Vicinity of the Collider Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, A. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-10-26

    The Collider Center and the adjoining cryogenic support building are unique among the buildings close to the collider tunnel because these are locations where the occupancy by non-radiation workers is high. This note describes calculations of the dose equivalent from local beam loss at both the nearest point of these buildings to the collider ring and on the berm in the vicinity of these buildings.

  16. Anomalous Higgs couplings at an eγ collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhury, Debajyoti; Mamta

    2006-01-01

    We examine the sensitivity of eγ colliders (based on e + e - linear colliders of c.m. energy 500 GeV) to the anomalous couplings of the Higgs to W-boson via the process e - γ→νWH. This has the advantage over e + e - collider in being able to dissociate WWH vertex from ZZH. We are able to construct several dynamical variables which may be used to constrain the various couplings in the WWH vertex

  17. Beyond the Large Hadron Collider: a first look at cryogenics for CERN future circular colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, Ph

    2015-01-01

    Following the first experimental discoveries at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the recent update of the European strategy in particle physics, CERN has undertaken an international study of possible future circular colliders beyond the LHC. The study, conducted with the collaborative participation of interested institutes world-wide, considers several options for very high energy hadron-hadron, electron-positron and hadron-electron colliders to be installed in a quasi-circular underground tunnel in the Geneva basin, with a circumference of 80 km to 100 km. All these machines would make intensive use of advanced superconducting devices, i.e. high-field bending and focusing magnets and/or accelerating RF cavities, thus requiring large helium cryogenic systems operating at 4.5 K or below. Based on preliminary sets of parameters and layouts for the particle colliders under study, we discuss the main challenges of their cryogenic systems and present first estimates of the cryogenic refrigeration capacities req...

  18. Topical perfluorodecalin resolves immediate whitening reactions and allows rapid effective multiple pass treatment of tattoos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Kavitha K; Brauer, Jeremy A; Anolik, Robert; Bernstein, Leonard; Brightman, Lori; Hale, Elizabeth; Karen, Julie; Weiss, Elliot; Geronemus, Roy G

    2013-02-01

    Laser tattoo removal using multiple passes per session, with each pass delivered after spontaneous resolution of whitening, improves tattoo fading in a 60-minute treatment time. Our objective was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of topical perfluorodecalin (PFD) in facilitating rapid effective multiple-pass tattoo removal. In a randomized, controlled study using Q-switched ruby or Nd:YAG laser, 22 previously treated tattoos were treated with 3 passes using PFD to resolve whitening after each pass ("R0 method"). In previously untreated symmetric tattoos, seven were treated over half of the tattoo with the R20 method, and the opposite half with 4 passes using PFD (R0 method); two were treated over half with a single pass and the opposite half with 4 passes using PFD (R0 method); and six treated over half with a single pass followed by PFD and the opposite half with a single pass alone. Blinded dermatologists rated tattoo fading at 1-3 months. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of whitening was performed in two tattoos. Topical PFD clinically resolved immediate whitening reactions within a mean 5 seconds (range 3-10 seconds). Tattoos treated with the R0 method demonstrated excellent fading in an average total treatment time of 5 minutes. Tattoo areas treated with the R0 method demonstrated equal fading compared to the R20 method, and improved fading compared to a single pass method. OCT imaging of whitening demonstrated epidermal and dermal hyper-reflective "bubbles" that dissipated until absent at 9-10 minutes after PFD application, and at 20 minutes without intervention. Multiple-pass tattoo removal using PFD to deliver rapid sequential passes (R0 method) appears equally effective as the R20 method, in a total treatment time averaging 5 minutes, and more effective than single pass treatment. OCT-visualized whitening-associated "bubbles," upon treatment with PFD, resolve twice as rapidly as spontaneous resolution. Copyright © 2012 Wiley

  19. 2005 Final Report: New Technologies for Future Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter McIntyre; Al McInturff

    2005-12-31

    This document presents an annual report on our long-term R&D grant for development of new technology for future colliders. The organizing theme of our development is to develop a compact high-field collider dipole, utilizing wind-and-react Nb3Sn coil fabrication, stress man-agement, conductor optimization, bladder preload, and flux plate suppression of magnetization multipoles. The development trail for this new technology began over four years ago with the successful testing of TAMU12, a NbTi model in which we put to a first test many of the construction details of the high-field design. We have built TAMU2, a mirror-geometry dipole containing a single coil module of the 3-module set required for the 14 Tesla design. This first Nb3Sn model was built using ITER conductor which carries much less current than high-performance conductor but enables us to prove in practice our reaction bake and impregnation strategies with ‘free’ su-perconductor. TAMU2 has been shipped to LBNL for testing. Work is beginning on the construction of TAMU3, which will contain two coil modules of the 14 Tesla design. TAMU3 has a design field of 13.5 Tesla and will enable us to fully evaluate the issues of stress management that will be important to the full design. With the completion of TAMU2 and the construction of TAMU3 the Texas A&M group ‘comes of age’ in the family of superconducting magnet R&D laboratories. We have completed the phase of developing core technologies and fixtures and entered the phase of building and testing a succession of model dipoles that each build incrementally upon a proven core design.

  20. Muon colliders, frictional cooling and universal extra dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwald, Daniel E.

    2011-01-01

    A muon collider combines the advantages of proton-proton and electron-positron colliders, sidestepping many of their disadvantages, and has the potential to make discoveries and precision measurements at high energies. However, muons bring their own technical challenges, largely relating to their instability. We present a summary of the motivations and R and D efforts for a muon collider. We detail a scheme for preparing high-luminosity muon beams on timescales shorter than the muon lifetime, and an experiment to demonstrate aspects of this scheme at the Max Planck Institute for Physics. We also investigate the potentials to discover physics beyond the standard model at a muon collider. (orig.)

  1. Klystron switching power supplies for the Internation Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraioli, Andrea; /Cassino U. /INFN, Pisa

    2009-12-01

    The International Linear Collider is a majestic High Energy Physics particle accelerator that will give physicists a new cosmic doorway to explore energy regimes beyond the reach of today's accelerators. ILC will complement the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a proton-proton collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, by producing electron-positron collisions at center of mass energy of about 500 GeV. In particular, the subject of this dissertation is the R&D for a solid state Marx Modulator and relative switching power supply for the International Linear Collider Main LINAC Radio Frequency stations.

  2. Muon colliders, frictional cooling and universal extra dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwald, Daniel E.

    2011-07-20

    A muon collider combines the advantages of proton-proton and electron-positron colliders, sidestepping many of their disadvantages, and has the potential to make discoveries and precision measurements at high energies. However, muons bring their own technical challenges, largely relating to their instability. We present a summary of the motivations and R and D efforts for a muon collider. We detail a scheme for preparing high-luminosity muon beams on timescales shorter than the muon lifetime, and an experiment to demonstrate aspects of this scheme at the Max Planck Institute for Physics. We also investigate the potentials to discover physics beyond the standard model at a muon collider. (orig.)

  3. eγ and γγ colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Isamu

    1994-01-01

    The results that can be expected by eγ and γγ colliders in future are summarized. eγ and γγ colliders have many fine possibilities, and are the economical selection for utilizing future e + e - colliders more effectively. eγ and γγ colliders were proposed by former USSR researchers at the beginning of 1980s, but recently, the prospect of realizing future e + e - collision type linear accelerator projects has become high, they have become to be considered seriously as the option of remodeling them. The high energy photon beam of eγ and γγ colliders is obtained by causing Compton reverse scattering, irradiating laser beam to the electron beam of e + e - accelerators. The production of γ-beam is explained. As for the physics noteworthy in eγ colliders, abnormal gauge coupling, the formation of Higgs particles, excited leptons, lepto-quark, supersymmetric particles and top quark are explained. As the physics noteworthy in γγ colliders, the formation of Higgs particles which is most interesting in γγ colliders, abnormal gauge coupling, top quark, Yukawa coupling, Higgs pair formation and other particles are enumerated. The linear e + e - accelerators of TeV range including JLC have the performance to be remodeled to eγ and γγ colliders, and the prospect of realizing them has become high. Their possibility of realization is discussed. (K.I.)

  4. Linear collider RF structure design using ARGUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok Ko

    1991-01-01

    In a linear collider, both the driving system (klystrons) and the accelerating system (linac) consists of RF structures that are inherently three-dimensional. These structures which are responsible for power input/output, have to satisfy many requirements in order that instabilities, beam or RF related, are to be avoided. At the same time, system efficiencies have to be maintained at optimal to minimize cost. Theoretical analysis on these geometrically complex structures are difficult and until recently, numerical solutions have been limited. At SLAC, there has been a continuing and close collaboration among accelerator physicists, engineers and numericists to integrate supercomputing into the design procedure which involves 3-D RF structures. The outcome is very encouraging. Using the 3-D/electromagnetic code ARGUS (developed by SAIC) on the Cray computers at NERSC in conjunction with supporting theories, a wide variety of critical components have been simulated and evaluated. Aside from structures related to the linear collider, the list also includes the RF cavity for the proposed Boson Factory and the anode circuit for the Cross-Field Amplifier, once considered as an alternative to the klystron as a possible power source. This presentation will focus on two specific structures: (1) the klystron output cavity; and (2) the linac input coupler. As the results demonstrate, supercomputing is fast becoming a viable technology that could conceivably replace actual cold-testing in the near future

  5. Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyaya, Biswarup; Raychaudhari, Amitava

    2009-01-01

    In an epoch when particle physics is awaiting a major step forward, the Large Hydron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Geneva will soon be operational. It will collide a beam of high energy protons with another similar beam circulation in the same 27 km tunnel but in the opposite direction, resulting in the production of many elementary particles some never created in the laboratory before. It is widely expected that the LHC will discover the Higgs boson, the particle which supposedly lends masses to all other fundamental particles. In addition, the question as to whether there is some new law of physics at such high energy is likely to be answered through this experiment. The present volume contains a collection of articles written by international experts, both theoreticians and experimentalists, from India and abroad, which aims to acquaint a non-specialist with some basic issues related to the LHC. At the same time, it is expected to be a useful, rudimentary companion of introductory exposition and technical expert...

  6. Ntuples for NLO Events at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Bern, Z.; Febres Cordero, F.; Höche, S.; Ita, H.; Kosower, D.A.; Maitre, D.

    2014-01-01

    We present an event-file format for the dissemination of next-to-leading-order (NLO) predictions for QCD processes at hadron colliders. The files contain all information required to compute generic jet-based infrared-safe observables at fixed order (without showering or hadronization), and to recompute observables with different factorization and renormalization scales. The files also make it possible to evaluate cross sections and distributions with different parton distribution functions. This in turn makes it possible to estimate uncertainties in NLO predictions of a wide variety of observables without recomputing the short-distance matrix elements. The event files allow a user to choose among a wide range of commonly-used jet algorithms and jet-size parameters. We provide event files for a $W$ or $Z$ boson accompanied by up to four jets, and for pure-jet events with up to four jets. The files are for the Large Hadron Collider with a center of mass energy of 7 or 8 TeV. A C++ library along with a Python in...

  7. Large hadron collider workshop. Proceedings. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarlskog, G.; Rein, D.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the LHC workshop at Aachen was to discuss the 'discovery potential' of a high-luminosity hadron collider (the Large Hadron Collider) and to define the requirements of the detectors. Of central interest was whether a Higgs particle with mass below 1 TeV could be seen using detectors potentially available within a few years from now. Other topics included supersymmetry, heavy quarks, excited gauge bosons, and exotica in proton-proton collisions, as well as physics to be observed in electron-proton and heavy-ion collisions. A large part of the workshop was devoted to the discussion of instrumental and detector concepts, including simulation, signal processing, data acquisition, tracking, calorimetry, lepton identification and radiation hardness. The workshop began with parallel sessions of working groups on physics and instrumentation and continued, in the second half, with plenary talks giving overviews of the LHC project and the SSC, RHIC, and HERA programmes, summaries of the working groups, presentations from industry, and conclusions. Vol.1 of these proceedings contains the papers presented at the plenary sessions, Vol.2 the individual contributions to the physics sessions, and Vol.3 those to the instrumentation sessions. (orig.)

  8. Large hadron collider workshop. Proceedings. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarlskog, G.; Rein, D.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the LHC workshop at Aachen was to discuss the 'discovery potential' of a high-luminosity hadron collider (the Large Hadron Collider) and to define the requirements of the detectors. Of central interest was whether a Higgs particle with mass below 1 TeV could be seen using detectors potentially available within a few years from now. Other topics included supersymmetry, heavy quarks, excited gauge bosons, and exotica in proton-proton collisions, as well as physics to be observed in electron-proton and heavy-ion collisions. A large part of the workshop was devoted to the discussion of instrumental and detector concepts, including simulation, signal processing, data acquisition, tracking, calorimetry, lepton identification and radiation hardness. The workshop began with parallel sessions of working groups on physics and instrumentaiton and continued, in the second half, with plenary talks giving overviews of the LHC project and the SSC, RHIC, and HERA programmes, summaries of the working groups, presentations from industry, and conclusions. Vol. 1 of these proceedings contains the papers presented at the plenary sessions, Vol. 2 the individual contributions to the physics sessions, and Vol. 3 those to the instrumentation sessions. (orig.)

  9. Large hadron collider workshop. Proceedings. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarlskog, G.; Rein, D.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the LCH workshop at Aachen was to discuss the 'discovery potential' of a high-luminosity hadron collider (the Large Hadron Collider) and to define the requirements of the detectors. Of central interest was whether a Higgs particle with mass below 1 TeV could be seen using detectors potentially available within a few years from now. Other topics included supersymmetry, heavy quarks, excited gauge bosons, and exotica in proton-proton collisions, as well as physics to be observed in electron-proton and heavy-ion collisions. A large part of the workshop was devoted to the discussion of instrumental and detector concepts, including simulation, signal processing, data acquisition, tracking, calorimetry, lepton identification and radiation hardness. The workshop began with parallel sessions of working groups on physics and instrumentation and continued, in the second half, with plenary talks giving overviews of the LHC project and the SSC, RHIC, and HERA programmes, summaries of the working groups, presentations from industry, and conclusions. Vol. 1 of these proceedings contains the papers presented at the plenary sessions, Vol. 2 the individual contributions to the physics sessions, and Vol. 3 those to the instrumentation sessions. (orig.)

  10. Alignment Challenges for a Future Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Durand, H; Stern, G

    2013-01-01

    The preservation of ultra-low emittances in the main linac and Beam Delivery System area is one of the main challenges for linear colliders. This requires alignment tolerances never achieved before at that scale, down to the micrometre level. As a matter of fact, in the LHC, the goal for the smoothing of the components was to obtain a 1σ deviation with respect to a smooth curve of 0.15 mm over a 150 m long sliding window, while for the CLIC project for example, it corresponds to 10 μm over a sliding window of 200 m in the Beam Delivery System area. Two complementary strategies are being studied to fulfil these requirements: the development and validation of long range alignment systems over a few hundreds of metres and short range alignment systems over a few metres. The studies undertaken, with associated tests setups and the latest results will be detailed, as well as their application for the alignment of both CLIC and ILC colliders.

  11. 5.7  W cw single-frequency laser at 671  nm by single-pass second harmonic generation of a 17.2  W injection-locked 1342  nm Nd : YVO4 ring laser using periodically poled MgO : LiNbO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Peter; Ruebel, Felix; Bartschke, Juergen; L'huillier, Johannes A

    2015-11-20

    We demonstrate a continuous wave single-frequency laser at 671.1 nm based on a high-power 888 nm pumped Nd:YVO4 ring laser at 1342.2 nm. Unidirectional operation of the fundamental ring laser is achieved with the injection-locking technique. A Nd:YVO4 microchip laser serves as the injecting seed source, providing a tunable single-frequency power of up to 40 mW. The ring laser emits a single-frequency power of 17.2 W with a Gaussian beam profile and a beam propagation factor of M2beam profile and a beam propagation factor of M2lasers. This work opens possibilities in cold atoms experiments with lithium, allowing the use of larger ensembles in magneto-optical traps or higher diffraction orders in atomic beam interferometers.

  12. How to pass higher English colour

    CERN Document Server

    Bridges, Ann

    2009-01-01

    How to Pass is the Number 1 revision series for Scottish qualifications across the three examination levels of Standard Grade, Intermediate and Higher! Second editions of the books present all of the material in full colour for the first time.

  13. House Passes AHCA; HHS Acts On Regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Timothy Stoltzfus

    2017-06-01

    As the GOP worked to pass ACA repeal legislation, HHS finalized a market stabilization rule, and the debate over cost-sharing reduction payments continued. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  14. Static thermo-optic instability in double-pass fiber amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    A coupled-mode formalism, earlier used to describe transverse mode instabilities in single-pass optical fiber amplifiers, is extended to the case of double-pass amplifiers. Contrary to the single-pass case, it is shown that the thermo-optic nonlinearity can couple light at the same frequency...... between the LP01 and LP11 modes, leading to a static deformation of the output beam profile. This novel phenomenon is caused by the interaction of light propagating in either direction with thermo-optic index perturbations caused by light propagating in the opposite direction. The threshold power...... for the static deformation is found to be several times lower than what is typically found for the dynamic modal instabilities observed in single-pass amplifiers. (C) 2016 Optical Society of America...

  15. STAR FORMATION IN TURBULENT MOLECULAR CLOUDS WITH COLLIDING FLOW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Dobashi, Kazuhito; Shimoikura, Tomomi

    2015-01-01

    Using self-gravitational hydrodynamical numerical simulations, we investigated the evolution of high-density turbulent molecular clouds swept by a colliding flow. The interaction of shock waves due to turbulence produces networks of thin filamentary clouds with a sub-parsec width. The colliding flow accumulates the filamentary clouds into a sheet cloud and promotes active star formation for initially high-density clouds. Clouds with a colliding flow exhibit a finer filamentary network than clouds without a colliding flow. The probability distribution functions (PDFs) for the density and column density can be fitted by lognormal functions for clouds without colliding flow. When the initial turbulence is weak, the column density PDF has a power-law wing at high column densities. The colliding flow considerably deforms the PDF, such that the PDF exhibits a double peak. The stellar mass distributions reproduced here are consistent with the classical initial mass function with a power-law index of –1.35 when the initial clouds have a high density. The distribution of stellar velocities agrees with the gas velocity distribution, which can be fitted by Gaussian functions for clouds without colliding flow. For clouds with colliding flow, the velocity dispersion of gas tends to be larger than the stellar velocity dispersion. The signatures of colliding flows and turbulence appear in channel maps reconstructed from the simulation data. Clouds without colliding flow exhibit a cloud-scale velocity shear due to the turbulence. In contrast, clouds with colliding flow show a prominent anti-correlated distribution of thin filaments between the different velocity channels, suggesting collisions between the filamentary clouds

  16. Dynamics of colliding aluminium plasmas produced by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambino, N., E-mail: gambino@lec.mavt.ethz.ch [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S.Sofia, 62, I95123 Catania (Italy); IET-Institute of Energy Technology, LEC-Laboratory for Energy Conversion, ETH Zurich, Sonneggstrasse 3, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Hayden, P. [School of Physical Sciences and National Centre for Plasma Science and Technology, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Mascali, D. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S.Sofia, 62, I95123 Catania (Italy); Costello, J.; Fallon, C.; Hough, P.; Yeates, P. [School of Physical Sciences and National Centre for Plasma Science and Technology, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Anzalone, A.; Musumeci, F.; Tudisco, S. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S.Sofia, 62, I95123 Catania (Italy)

    2013-05-01

    The collision of two aluminium plasmas was investigated by combining both time and space resolved spectroscopy and Langmuir probe measurements. Plasma plumes were produced by a Continuum™ Surelite Nd:YAG Laser System with pulse duration of FWHM of 6 ns and wavelength of 1064 nm, at a laser irradiance of 10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2} on slab Al targets. By analyzing the emission spectra, the temporally and spatially resolved electron density and electron temperature at the stagnation layer were extracted, with a time resolution of 10 ns. Data analysis confirms that the electron density of the stagnation layer evolves over a longer timescale than in the single plume case. On the other hand, the temperature trends show that the electron temperature decreases much more rapidly at the stagnation layer than in the case for the single expanding plasma. In addition, a Langmuir probe was used to investigate the properties of the collisional front evolution. The overall experimental results show that colliding laser produced plasmas could be useful in the design of experiments devoted to fusion reaction rate measurements in a low energy domain by including the effect of the electron screening (ES).

  17. High Energy Colliders and Hidden Sectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, Asaf Jeff

    This thesis explores two dominant frontiers of theoretical physics, high energy colliders and hidden sectors. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is just starting to reach its maximum operational capabilities. However, already with the current data, large classes of models are being put under significant pressure. It is crucial to understand whether the (thus far) null results are a consequence of a lack of solution to the hierarchy problem around the weak scale or requires expanding the search strategy employed at the LHC. It is the duty of the current generation of physicists to design new searches to ensure that no stone is left unturned. To this end, we study the sensitivity of the LHC to the couplings in the Standard Model top sector. We find it can significantly improve the measurements on ZtRtR coupling by a novel search strategy, making use of an implied unitarity violation in such models. Analogously, we show that other couplings in the top sector can also be measured with the same technique. Furthermore, we critically analyze a set of anomalies in the LHC data and how they may appear from consistent UV completions. We also propose a technique to measure lifetimes of new colored particles with non-trivial spin. While the high energy frontier will continue to take data, it is likely the only collider of its kind for the next couple decades. On the other hand, low-energy experiments have a promising future with many new proposed experiments to probe the existence of particles well below the weak scale but with small couplings to the Standard Model. In this work we survey the different possibilities, focusingon the constraints as well as possible new hidden sector dynamics. In particular, we show that vector portals which couple to an anomalous current, e.g., baryon number, are significantly constrained from flavor changing meson decays and rare Z decays. Furthermore, we present a new mechanism for dark matter freezeout which depletes the dark sector through an

  18. Ultimate parameters of the photon collider at the international linear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    At linear colliders, the + - luminosity is limited by beam-collision effects, which determine the required emittances of beams in damping rings (DRs). In collisions at the photon collider, these effects are absent, and so smaller emittances are desirable. In the present damping ring designs, nominal DR parameters ...

  19. Monolithic CMOS pixel detector for international linear collider ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Toggle navigation. Logo of the Indian Academy of Sciences. Indian Academy of Sciences. Home · About ... Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 69; Issue 6. Monolithic CMOS pixel detector for international linear ... Keywords. Vertex detector; international linear collider; linear collider; high energy physics.

  20. Working group report: High energy and collider physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    journal of. December 2004 physics pp. 1331–1353. Working group report: High energy and collider physics. Coordinators: NABA K MONDAL1 and SAURABH D ... The projects undertaken in the working group I on high energy and collider physics ..... A recent summary of the progress in the area can be found in [20,21] and.

  1. Polarized electronic sources for future e+/e- linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, H.; Alley, R.K.; Clendenin, J.E.

    1997-05-01

    Polarized electron beams will play a crucial role in maximizing the physics potential for future e + /e - linear colliders. We will review the SLC polarized electron source (PES), present a design for a conventional PES for the Next Linear Collider (NLC), and discuss the physics issues of a polarized RF gun

  2. German lab unveils plan to build physicists' next collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Abott, A

    2001-01-01

    An international team of physicists are to propose the construction of a major collider. 'TESLA' - the 'Tera electron volt Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator' will be a linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting resonators. It will be based at DESY and cost around three billion US dollars (2 pages).

  3. Linear Collider Flavour Identification status report: Sensors for the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Linear Collider Flavour Identification (LCFI) collaboration is continuing the work to develop column-parallel CCDs (CPCCD) and CMOS readout chips to be used in the vertex detector at the international linear collider (ILC). The CPCCD achieves several orders of magnitude faster readout than conventional CCDs ...

  4. Higgs physics at future colliders: Recent theoretical developments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I review the physics of the Higgs sector in the standard model and its minimal supersymmetric extension, the MSSM. I will discuss the prospects for discovering the Higgs particles at the ungraded Tevatron, at the large hadron collider, and at a future high-energy e + e − linear collider with centre-of-mass energy in the ...

  5. Detectors for Neutrino Physics at the First Muon Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.A.; McFarland, K.S.

    1998-04-01

    We consider possible detector designs for short-baseline neutrino experiments using neutrino beams produced at the First Muon Collider complex. The high fluxes available at the muon collider make possible high statistics deep-inelastic scattering neutrino experiments with a low-mass target. A design of a low-energy neutrino oscillation experiment on the ''tabletop'' scale is also discussed

  6. Higgs boson and Z physics at the First Muon Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demarteau, M.; Han, T.

    1998-01-01

    The potential for the Higgs boson and Z-pole physics at the first muon collider is summarized, based on the discussions at the open-quotes Workshop on the Physics at the First Muon Collider and at the Front End of a Muon Colliderclose quotes. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  7. Tolerable systematic errors in Really Large Hadron Collider dipoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peggs, S.; Dell, F.

    1996-01-01

    Maximum allowable systematic harmonics for arc dipoles in a Really Large Hadron Collider are derived. The possibility of half cell lengths much greater than 100 meters is justified. A convenient analytical model evaluating horizontal tune shifts is developed, and tested against a sample high field collider

  8. Electron-positron colliders: looking at future physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    With research and development work underway throughout the world towards high energy electron-positron linear colliders, interest turns to the new physics these machines would open up. The first International Workshop on Physics and Experiments with Linear Colliders was held recently in Selkirk's in Finnish Lapland - some 300 kilometres north of the Arctic Circle

  9. A Large Hadron Electron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Abelleira Fernandez, J L; Adzic, P; Akay, A N; Aksakal, H; Albacete, J L; Allanach, B; Alekhin, S; Allport, P; Andreev, V; Appleby, R B; Arikan, E; Armesto, N; Azuelos, G; Bai, M; Barber, D; Bartels, J; Behnke, O; Behr, J; Belyaev, A S; Ben-Zvi, I; Bernard, N; Bertolucci, S; Bettoni, S; Biswal, S; Blumlein, J; Bottcher, H; Bogacz, A; Bracco, C; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Braun, H; Brodsky, S; Bruning, O; Bulyak, E; Buniatyan, A; Burkhardt, H; Cakir, I T; Cakir, O; Calaga, R; Caldwell, A; Cetinkaya, V; Chekelian, V; Ciapala, E; Ciftci, R; Ciftci, A K; Cole, B A; Collins, J C; Dadoun, O; Dainton, J; Roeck, A.De; d'Enterria, D; DiNezza, P; Dudarev, A; Eide, A; Enberg, R; Eroglu, E; Eskola, K J; Favart, L; Fitterer, M; Forte, S; Gaddi, A; Gambino, P; Garcia Morales, H; Gehrmann, T; Gladkikh, P; Glasman, C; Glazov, A; Godbole, R; Goddard, B; Greenshaw, T; Guffanti, A; Guzey, V; Gwenlan, C; Han, T; Hao, Y; Haug, F; Herr, W; Herve, A; Holzer, B J; Ishitsuka, M; Jacquet, M; Jeanneret, B; Jensen, E; Jimenez, J M; Jowett, J M; Jung, H; Karadeniz, H; Kayran, D; Kilic, A; Kimura, K; Klees, R; Klein, M; Klein, U; Kluge, T; Kocak, F; Korostelev, M; Kosmicki, A; Kostka, P; Kowalski, H; Kraemer, M; Kramer, G; Kuchler, D; Kuze, M; Lappi, T; Laycock, P; Levichev, E; Levonian, S; Litvinenko, V N; Lombardi, A; Maeda, J; Marquet, C; Mellado, B; Mess, K H; Milanese, A; Milhano, J G; Moch, S; Morozov, I I; Muttoni, Y; Myers, S; Nandi, S; Nergiz, Z; Newman, P R; Omori, T; Osborne, J; Paoloni, E; Papaphilippou, Y; Pascaud, C; Paukkunen, H; Perez, E; Pieloni, T; Pilicer, E; Pire, B; Placakyte, R; Polini, A; Ptitsyn, V; Pupkov, Y; Radescu, V; Raychaudhuri, S; Rinolfi, L; Rizvi, E; Rohini, R; Rojo, J; Russenschuck, S; Sahin, M; Salgado, C A; Sampei, K; Sassot, R; Sauvan, E; Schaefer, M; Schneekloth, U; Schorner-Sadenius, T; Schulte, D; Senol, A; Seryi, A; Sievers, P; Skrinsky, A N; Smith, W; South, D; Spiesberger, H; Stasto, A M; Strikman, M; Sullivan, M; Sultansoy, S; Sun, Y P; Surrow, B; Szymanowski, L; Taels, P; Tapan, I; Tasci, T; Tassi, E; Kate, H.Ten; Terron, J; Thiesen, H; Thompson, L; Thompson, P; Tokushuku, K; Tomas Garcia, R; Tommasini, D; Trbojevic, D; Tsoupas, N; Tuckmantel, J; Turkoz, S; Trinh, T N; Tywoniuk, K; Unel, G; Ullrich, T; Urakawa, J; VanMechelen, P; Variola, A; Veness, R; Vivoli, A; Vobly, P; Wagner, J; Wallny, R; Wallon, S; Watt, G; Weiss, C; Wiedemann, U A; Wienands, U; Willeke, F; Xiao, B W; Yakimenko, V; Zarnecki, A F; Zhang, Z; Zimmermann, F; Zlebcik, R; Zomer, F; CERN. Geneva. LHeC Department

    2012-01-01

    This document provides a brief overview of the recently published report on the design of the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), which comprises its physics programme, accelerator physics, technology and main detector concepts. The LHeC exploits and develops challenging, though principally existing, accelerator and detector technologies. This summary is complemented by brief illustrations of some of the highlights of the physics programme, which relies on a vastly extended kinematic range, luminosity and unprecedented precision in deep inelastic scattering. Illustrations are provided regarding high precision QCD, new physics (Higgs, SUSY) and electron-ion physics. The LHeC is designed to run synchronously with the LHC in the twenties and to achieve an integrated luminosity of O(100) fb$^{-1}$. It will become the cleanest high resolution microscope of mankind and will substantially extend as well as complement the investigation of the physics of the TeV energy scale, which has been enabled by the LHC.

  10. Meeting of the Large Hadron Collider Committee

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Provisional Agenda for the 111th meeting of the Large Hadron Collider Committee to be held on Wednesday and Thursday, 26-27 September 2012. Open Session: Wednesday, 26 September at 9 a.m. in the Main Auditorium (Bldg. 500-1-001)  09.00 - 09.20    LHC Machine Status Report  09.30 - 10.00    ATLAS Status Report  10.10 - 10.40    CMS Status Report  10.50 - 11.10    COFFEE BREAK 11.10 - 11.40    LHCb Status Report 11.50 - 12.20   ALICE Status Report 12.30 - 12.50   TOTEM Status Report 13.00 - 13.20   LHCf Status Report

  11. Big Science and the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Giudice, Gian Francesco

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the particle accelerator operating at CERN, is probably the most complex and ambitious scientific project ever accomplished by humanity. The sheer size of the enterprise, in terms of financial and human resources, naturally raises the question whether society should support such costly basic-research programs. I address this question here by first reviewing the process that led to the emergence of Big Science and the role of large projects in the development of science and technology. I then compare the methodologies of Small and Big Science, emphasizing their mutual linkage. Finally, after examining the cost of Big Science projects, I highlight several general aspects of their beneficial implications for society.

  12. Light Higgs production at the Compton Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jikia, G.; Soeldner-Rembold, S.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied the production of a light Higgs boson with a mass of 120 GeV in photon-photon collisions at a Compton collider. The event generator for the backgrounds to a Higgs signal due to b-barb and c-barc heavy quark pair production in polarized γγ collisions is based on a complete next-to-leading order (NLO) perturbative QCD calculation. For J z = 0 the large double-logarithmic corrections up to four loops are also included. It is shown that the two-photon width of the Higgs boson can be measured with high statistical accuracy of about 2% for integrated γγ luminosity in the hard part of the spectrum of 40 fb -1 . As a result the total Higgs boson width can be calculated in a model independent way to an accuracy of about 14%

  13. Light Higgs production at a photon collider

    CERN Document Server

    Söldner-Rembold, S

    2001-01-01

    We present a preliminary study of the production of a light Higgs boson with a mass between 120 and 160 GeV in photon-photon collisions at a Compton collider. The event generator for the backgrounds to a Higgs signal due to b-barb and c-barc heavy quark pair production in polarized gamma gamma collisions is based on a complete next-to-leading order (NLO) perturbative QCD calculation. For J sub z =0 the large double-logarithmic corrections up to four loops are also included. It is shown that the two-photon width of the Higgs boson can be measured with high statistical accuracy of about 2-10% for integrated gamma gamma luminosity in the hard part of the spectrum of 43 fb sup - sup 1. From this result the total Higgs boson width can be derived in a model independent way.

  14. Signatures of massive sgoldstinos at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perazzi, Elena; Ridolfi, Giovanni; Zwirner, Fabio

    2000-01-01

    In supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model with a very light gravitino, the effective theory at the weak scale should contain not only the goldstino G-tilde, but also its supersymmetric partners, the sgoldstinos. In the simplest case, the goldstino is a gauge-singlet and its superpartners are two neutral spin-0 particles, S and P. We study possible signals of massive sgoldstinos at hadron colliders, focusing on those that are most relevant for the Tevatron. We show that inclusive production of sgoldstinos, followed by their decay into two photons, can lead to observable signals or to stringent combined bounds on the gravitino and sgoldstino masses. Sgoldstino decays into two gluon jets may provide a useful complementary signature

  15. Micro vertex detector design for collider geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, M.; Crennell, D.; Fisher, C.M.; Hughes, P.; Kurtz, N.

    1984-05-01

    Previously the analysis of fixed target jet events using a scintillating optical fibre target to provide a projection of the topology on the plane transverse to the event axis has been considered. It was argued that this transverse plane projection is optimal for the detection of charm or beauty particle decay vertices. The idea is generalised to a jet analysis in a collider geometry particularly when associated with a high Psub(perpendicular to) or missing Esub(T) trigger. This report proposes a simple arrangement of fibres to give high precision track elements in the transverse plane projection coupled with a fast read-out capability. The principle physics aim of the design is to provide a tag for selecting top quark jets by detecting a beauty flavoured particle in the jet. (U.K.)

  16. Helicity antenna showers for hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Nadine; Skands, Peter [Monash University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Clayton, VIC (Australia); Lifson, Andrew [Monash University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Clayton, VIC (Australia); ETH Zuerich, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-10-15

    We present a complete set of helicity-dependent 2 → 3 antenna functions for QCD initial- and final-state radiation. The functions are implemented in the Vincia shower Monte Carlo framework and are used to generate showers for hadron-collider processes in which helicities are explicitly sampled (and conserved) at each step of the evolution. Although not capturing the full effects of spin correlations, the explicit helicity sampling does permit a significantly faster evaluation of fixed-order matrix-element corrections. A further speed increase is achieved via the implementation of a new fast library of analytical MHV amplitudes, while matrix elements from Madgraph are used for non-MHV configurations. A few examples of applications to QCD 2 → 2 processes are given, comparing the newly released Vincia 2.200 to Pythia 8.226. (orig.)

  17. Sfermion precision measurements at a linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, A.; Ananthanarayan, B.; Bartl, A.; Blair, G.; Bloechinger, C.; Boos, E.; Brandenburg, A.; Datta, A.; Djouadi, A.; Fraas, H.; Guasch, J.; Hesselbach, S.; Hidaka, K.; Hollik, W.; Kernreiter, T.; Maniatis, M.; Manteuffel, A. von; Martyn, H.-U.; Miller, D.J.; Moortgat-Pick, G.; Muehlleitner, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Nowak, H.; Porod, W.; Sola, J.; Sopczak, A.; Stahl, A.; Weber, M.M.; Zerwas, P.M.

    2003-01-01

    At prospective e ± e - linear colliders, the large cross-sections and clean signals of scalar fermion production--in particular for the scalar leptons - allow very precise measurements of their masses and couplings and the determination of their quantum numbers. Various methods are proposed for extracting these parameters from the data at the sfermion thresholds and in the continuum. At the same time, NLO radiative corrections and non-zero width effects have been calculated in order to match the experimental accuracy. The substantial mixing expected in the third generation opens up additional opportunities. Techniques are presented for determining potential CP-violating phases and for extracting tan β from the stau sector, in particular at high values. The consequences of possible large mass differences in the stop and sbottom system are explored in dedicated analyses

  18. Helicity antenna showers for hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Nadine; Lifson, Andrew; Skands, Peter

    2017-10-01

    We present a complete set of helicity-dependent 2→ 3 antenna functions for QCD initial- and final-state radiation. The functions are implemented in the Vincia shower Monte Carlo framework and are used to generate showers for hadron-collider processes in which helicities are explicitly sampled (and conserved) at each step of the evolution. Although not capturing the full effects of spin correlations, the explicit helicity sampling does permit a significantly faster evaluation of fixed-order matrix-element corrections. A further speed increase is achieved via the implementation of a new fast library of analytical MHV amplitudes, while matrix elements from Madgraph are used for non-MHV configurations. A few examples of applications to QCD 2→ 2 processes are given, comparing the newly released Vincia 2.200 to Pythia 8.226.

  19. Final focus plasma lenses in linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Chen, Pisin.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the optics of a high energy beam which is focused by its own wake-fields in an overdense plasma. We calculate the effects of lens aberration on the focusing strength of the lens and on the dilution of the beam's phase space density. From this we derive the minimum spot size achievable using a cylindrically symmetric bi-Gaussian beam and, after inclusion of the beam-beam disruption effect, the luminosity enhancement that can be gained in principle. We estimate the luminosity enhancement in the case of SLC design parameters and discuss limitations and possible improvements in plasma lens performance. Motivated by the need to reduce the background event rate due to beam-ion collisions, we discuss the optics of the underdense plasma lens and introduce the concept of bootstrap disruption. Possible use of the underdense plasma lens in a TLC-type collider is examined. 14 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  20. Colliding bodies optimization extensions and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kaveh, A

    2015-01-01

    This book presents and applies a novel efficient meta-heuristic optimization algorithm called Colliding Bodies Optimization (CBO) for various optimization problems. The first part of the book introduces the concepts and methods involved, while the second is devoted to the applications. Though optimal design of structures is the main topic, two chapters on optimal analysis and applications in constructional management are also included.  This algorithm is based on one-dimensional collisions between bodies, with each agent solution being considered as an object or body with mass. After a collision of two moving bodies with specified masses and velocities, these bodies again separate, with new velocities. This collision causes the agents to move toward better positions in the search space.  The main algorithm (CBO) is internally parameter independent, setting it apart from previously developed meta-heuristics. This algorithm is enhanced (ECBO) for more efficient applications in the optimal design of structures...

  1. The Structure of Jets at Hadron Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larkoski, Andrew James [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Particle physics seeks to understand the interactions and properties of the fundamental particles. To gain understanding, there is an interplay between theory and experiment. Models are proposed to explain how particles behave and interact. These models make precise predictions that can be tested. Experiments are built and executed to measure the properties of these particles, providing necessary tests for the theories that attempt to explain the realm of fundamental particles. However, there is also another level of interaction between theory and experiment; the development of new experiments demands the study of how particles will behave with respect to the measured observables toward the goal of understanding the details and idiosyncrasies of the measurements very well. Only once these are well-modeled and understood can one be con dent that the data that are measured is trustworthy. The modeling and interpretation of the physics of a proton collider, such as the LHC, is the main topic of this thesis.

  2. Femtosecond laser technologies for linear collider designs

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, K

    2001-01-01

    A highly stabilized high-energy femtosecond laser system was developed for Compton X-ray experiments. The laser system is based on the chirped pulse amplification, and each component is actively or passively stabilized. A master oscillator with less than 100 fs timing jitter, two independent oscillators with 300 fs relative timing lag, a new measurement technique of timing fluctuation of low-repetition amplified pulse, and a special designed regenerative amplifier with high quality beam were developed. New technical options for linear collider are proposed based on these expertises. The options are temporally square pulse for low emittance electron generation, a timing stabilized seeder for CO sub 2 amplifier, and multi-pulse high-energy lasers for gamma-gamma collision and for multi-bunch electron generation.

  3. A feedback microprocessor for hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrup, D.A.; Chapman, L.; Franck, A.; Groves, T.; Lublinsky, B.

    1992-12-01

    A feedback microprocessor has been built for the TEVATRON. It has been constructed to be applicable to hadron colliders in general. Its inputs are realtime accelerator measurements, data describing the state of the TEVATRON, and ramp tables. The microprocessor software includes a finite state machine. Each state corresponds to a specific TEVATRON operation and has a state-specific TEVATRON model. Transitions between states are initiated by the global TEVATRON clock. Each state includes a cyclic routine which is called periodically and where all calculations are performed. The output corrections are inserted onto a fast TEVATRON-wide link from which the power supplies will read the realtime corrections. We also store all of the input data and output corrections in a set of buffers which can easily be retrieved for diagnostic analysis. In this paper we will describe this device and its use to control the TEVATRON tunes as well as other possible applications

  4. Heavy Majorana neutrinos at ep colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingelman, G.; Rathsman, J.

    1993-03-01

    Heavy Majorana neutrinos (N), predicted in various extensions of the standard model, are examined with respect to the present limits on their masses and mixings with ordinary leptons resulting in explicit examples of allowed values of interest for present and planned accelerator energies. The decay N → Zν is added to the previously available formalism and all dominating branching ratios are calculated. The production of Majorana neutrinos through charged current interactions in the ep colliders HERA and LEP+LHC is investigated using Monte Carlo event simulation. Signals in terms of isolated leptons and jets are found and shown to be effective in suppressing the dominating standard model backgrounds. The discovery limits of such Majorana neutrinos are, for a mixing of 1%, about 160 GeV at HERA and 700 GeV at LEP+LHC. (orig.)

  5. Transportation studies: 40-MM collider dipole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daly, E.

    1992-01-01

    Several fully functional 40-mm Collider Dipole Magnets (CDM) were instrumented with accelerometers to monitor shock and vibration loads during transport. The magnets were measured with optical tooling telescopes before and after transport. Changes in mechanical alignment due to shipping and handling were determined. The mechanical stability of the cryogen lines were checked using the same method. Field quality and dipole angle were measured warm before and after transport to determine changes in these parameters. Power spectra were calculated for accelerometers located on the cold mass, vacuum vessel, and trailer bed. Where available, plots of field quality and dipole roll both before and after were created. Shipping loads measured were largest in the vertical direction, where most of the structural deformation of the magnet was evident. It was not clear that magnetic performance was affected by the shipping and handling environment

  6. Collide@CERN is looking for mentors

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    The Collide@CERN Artist-in-Residence Programme is currently seeking CERN scientists interested in engaging in thought-provoking and creative collaborations with visiting artists.     In early 2012, a Digital artist will take up a 2-month residency and a Dance and Performance artist a 3-month residency.  Each artist will be allocated a specially selected science inspiration partner to work with. Both the artists and their mentors will give a public lecture in the Globe of Science and Innovation at the beginning and end of the residencies.  One scientist will be selected for each artist. Mentors and artists will be required to share knowledge by:   ·      Meeting once a week throughout the residency ·      Conducting online communications (such as a blog). If you are interested in becoming a mentor, please send the following information by e-m...

  7. ALPs effective field theory and collider signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brivio, I. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica Teorica y Instituto de Fisica Teorica, IFT-UAM/CSIC, Madrid (Spain); University of Copenhagen, Niels Bohr International Academy, Copenhagen (Denmark); Gavela, M.B.; Merlo, L.; Rey, R. del [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica Teorica y Instituto de Fisica Teorica, IFT-UAM/CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Mimasu, K. [University of Sussex, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom); Universite Catholique de Louvain, Centre for Cosmology, Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3), Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); No, J.M. [University of Sussex, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom); King' s College London, Department of Physics, London (United Kingdom); Sanz, V. [University of Sussex, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2017-08-15

    We study the leading effective interactions between the Standard Model fields and a generic singlet CP-odd (pseudo-) Goldstone boson. Two possible frameworks for electroweak symmetry breaking are considered: linear and non-linear. For the latter case, the basis of leading effective operators is determined and compared with that for the linear expansion. Associated phenomenological signals at colliders are explored for both scenarios, deriving new bounds and analyzing future prospects, including LHC and High Luminosity LHC sensitivities. Mono-Z, mono-W, W-photon plus missing energy and on-shell top final states are most promising signals expected in both frameworks. In addition, non-standard Higgs decays and mono-Higgs signatures are especially prominent and expected to be dominant in non-linear realisations. (orig.)

  8. The large hadron collider beauty experiment calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martens, A.; LHCb Collaboration; Martens, A.

    2010-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider beauty experiment (LHCb), one of the four largest experiments at the LHC at CERN, is dedicated to precision studies of CP violation and other rare effects, in particular in the b and c quark sectors. It aims at precisely measuring the Standard Model parameters and searching for effects inconsistent with this picture. The LHCb calorimeter system comprises a scintillating pad detector, a pre-shower (PS), electromagnetic (ECAL) and hadronic calorimeters, all of these employing the principle of transporting the light from scintillating layers with wavelength shifting fibers to photomultipliers. The fast response of the calorimeters ensures their key role in the LHCb trigger, which has to cope with the LHC collision rate of 40MHz. After discussing the design and expected performance of the LHCb calorimeter system, one addresses the time and energy calibration issues. The results obtained with the calorimeter system from the first LHC data will be shown.

  9. Very large lepton collider in the Very Large Hadron Collider tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaji Sen

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The Very Large Hadron Collider design is converging on a program where a 233 km circumference tunnel would first be occupied by a low field dipole system producing 40 TeV in the center of mass, followed by a higher field magnet system producing nearly 200 TeV in the center of mass. We consider the possibility of first using the tunnel for a large e^{+}e^{-} collider. We assume that the total radiated synchrotron power will be limited to 100 MW. We describe the design strategy, the luminosity and energy reach, the factors that limit the machine performance, the scaling laws that apply to its design, and the technology that would be required for its implementation.

  10. The future of the Large Hadron Collider and CERN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Rolf-Dieter

    2012-02-28

    This paper presents the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its current scientific programme and outlines options for high-energy colliders at the energy frontier for the years to come. The immediate plans include the exploitation of the LHC at its design luminosity and energy, as well as upgrades to the LHC and its injectors. This may be followed by a linear electron-positron collider, based on the technology being developed by the Compact Linear Collider and the International Linear Collider collaborations, or by a high-energy electron-proton machine. This contribution describes the past, present and future directions, all of which have a unique value to add to experimental particle physics, and concludes by outlining key messages for the way forward.

  11. Workshop on physics at the first muon collider and front-end of a muon collider: A brief summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geer, S.

    1998-01-01

    In November 1997 a workshop was held at Fermilab to explore the physics potential of the first muon collider, and the physics potential of the accelerator complex at the 'front-end' of the collider. An extensive physics program emerged from the workshop. This paper attempts to summarize this physics program and identify the main conclusions from the workshop

  12. Signals of doubly-charged Higgsinos at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demir, D.A. [Izmir Inst. of Technology IZTECH, Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Physics]|[Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Frank, M.; Turan, I. [Concordia Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. of Physics; Huitu, K.; Rai, S.K. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics]|[Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Helsinki Inst. of Physics

    2008-05-15

    Several supersymmetric models with extended gauge structures, motivated by either grand unification or by neutrino mass generation, predict light doubly-charged Higgsinos. In this work we study productions and decays of doubly-charged Higgsinos present in left-right supersymmetric models, and show that they invariably lead to novel collider signals not found in the minimal supersymmetric model (MSSM) or in any of its extensions motivated by the {mu} problem or even in extra dimensional theories. We investigate their distinctive signatures at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in both pair- and single-production modes, and show that they are powerful tools in determining the underlying model via the measurements at the LHC experiments. (orig.)

  13. Two-Pass Channel with Angled Ribs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. W. Park

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiments have been conducted to study the local heat (mass transfer distributions in a two-pass test model of internal turbine blade cooling passages, with 60 ribs on the leading and trailing walls. For radial outward flow in the first pass, rotation did not significantly increase the local nor the overall heat (mass transfer between consecutive ribs on the trailing wall. Rotation-induced Coriolis force lowered the relative overall heat (mass transfer on the leading wall less in the rib-roughened channel than in a smooth channel. When the rotation number was high, there were twin peaks in the local heat (mass transfer distribution between ribs on the leading wall. For radial inward flow in the second pass, the sharp turn reduced the difference between the heat (mass transfer.on the leading wall and that on the trailing wall.

  14. Setting pass scores for clinical skills assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Liu, Keh-Min

    2008-12-01

    In a clinical skills assessment, the decision to pass or fail an examinee should be based on the test content or on the examinees' performance. The process of deciding a pass score is known as setting a standard of the examination. This requires a properly selected panel of expert judges and a suitable standard setting method, which best fits the purpose of the examination. Six standard setting methods that are often used in clinical skills assessment are described to provide an overview of the standard setting process.

  15. Setting Pass Scores for Clinical Skills Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Liu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In a clinical skills assessment, the decision to pass or fail an examinee should be based on the test content or on the examinees' performance. The process of deciding a pass score is known as setting a standard of the examination. This requires a properly selected panel of expert judges and a suitable standard setting method, which best fits the purpose of the examination. Six standard setting methods that are often used in clinical skills assessment are described to provide an overview of the standard setting process.

  16. Can Lionel Messi's brain slow down time passing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Sajad; Smith, Leslie Samuel

    2016-01-01

    It seems that seeing others in slow-motion by heroes does not belong only to movies. When Lionel Messi plays football, you can hardly see anything from him that other players cannot do. Then why he is not stoppable really? It seems the answer may be that opponents do not have enough time to do what they want; because in Messi's neural system, time passes slower. In differential equations that model a single neuron, this speed can be generated by multiplying an equal term in all equations. Or maybe interactions between neurons and the structure of neural networks play this role.

  17. Modeling drivers' passing duration and distance in a virtual environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haneen Farah

    2013-07-01

    The main contribution of this paper is in the empirical models developed for passing duration and distance which highlights the factors that affect drivers' passing behavior and can be used to enhance the passing models in simulation programs.

  18. Pulse propagation in a two-pass optical amplifier with arbitrary laser beams overlap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AH Farahbod

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available An analytical model for two-pass optical amplifier with arbitrary beams overlap has been developed which generalized the classical theory of Frantz-Nodvik for single pass amplifier. The effect of counterpropagating beams on gain and output energy fluence included in the model. Moreover, the appropriate limiting relations for two special cases of weak input signal and saturation state of the amplifier gain have been derived. The results indicate that for complete beams overlap, the gain and output energy have the least values. The model predictions are consistent with experimental observations and exact analytical model for two-pass amplifier when beam propagation paths are coincided.

  19. Determining the Optimal Number of Core Needle Biopsy Passes for Molecular Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Nam S; Ge, Benjamin H; Pan, Lorraine Y; Ozawa, Michael G; Kong, Christina S; Louie, John D; Shah, Rajesh P

    2018-03-01

    The number of core biopsy passes required for adequate next-generation sequencing is impacted by needle cut, needle gauge, and the type of tissue involved. This study evaluates diagnostic adequacy of core needle lung biopsies based on number of passes and provides guidelines for other tissues based on simulated biopsies in ex vivo porcine organ tissues. The rate of diagnostic adequacy for pathology and molecular testing from lung biopsy procedures was measured for eight operators pre-implementation (September 2012-October 2013) and post-implementation (December 2013-April 2014) of a standard protocol using 20-gauge side-cut needles for ten core biopsy passes at a single academic hospital. Biopsy pass volume was then estimated in ex vivo porcine muscle, liver, and kidney using side-cut devices at 16, 18, and 20 gauge and end-cut devices at 16 and 18 gauge to estimate minimum number of passes required for adequate molecular testing. Molecular diagnostic adequacy increased from 69% (pre-implementation period) to 92% (post-implementation period) (p molecular characterization, while 18- and 20-gauge devices require 2-5 passes depending on needle cut and tissue type. Use of 20-gauge side-cut core biopsy needles requires a significant number of passes to ensure diagnostic adequacy for molecular testing across all tissue types. To ensure diagnostic adequacy for molecular testing, 16- and 18-gauge needles require markedly fewer passes.

  20. Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory coupled-cavity linac mechanical design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starling, W.J.; Cain, T.

    1992-01-01

    A collaboration between the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for the engineering and mechanical design of the SSCL Coupled-Cavity Linac (CCL) has yielded an innovative example of the well known side coupled-cavity type of linear accelerator. The SSCL CCL accelerates an H - beam from 70 MeV to 600 MeV with an rf cavity structure consisting of eight tanks in each of nine modules for a total length of about 112 meters. Magnetically-coupled bridge couplers transfer power from tank to tank within a module. A single rf power input is located at the center bridge coupler of each module. The bridge couplers permit placement along the beam line of combined function focusing/steering electromagnets and diagnostic pods for beam instrumentation. Each tank and bridge coupler is rf frequency stabilized, nominally to 1,283 MHz, by water pumped through integral water passages. Air isolation grooves surround the water passages at each braze joint so that water-to-vacuum interfaces are avoided. Each tank is supported by adjustable spherical bearing rod end struts to permit alignment and accommodate thermal expansion and contraction of the rf structure. Tank struts, electromagnet/diagnostic pod support frames, vacuum manifolds and utilities are all mounted to a girder-and-leg support stand running the full length of the CCL. (Author) tab., fig