WorldWideScience

Sample records for single particle size

  1. Decomposition of Atmospheric Aerosol Phase Function by Particle Size and Morphology via Single Particle Scattering Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aptowicz, K. B.; Pan, Y.; Martin, S.; Fernandez, E.; Chang, R.; Pinnick, R. G.

    2013-12-01

    We report upon an experimental approach that provides insight into how particle size and shape affect the scattering phase function of atmospheric aerosol particles. Central to our approach is the design of an apparatus that measures the forward and backward scattering hemispheres (scattering patterns) of individual atmospheric aerosol particles in the coarse mode range. The size and shape of each particle is discerned from the corresponding scattering pattern. In particular, autocorrelation analysis is used to differentiate between spherical and non-spherical particles, the calculated asphericity factor is used to characterize the morphology of non-spherical particles, and the integrated irradiance is used for particle sizing. We found the fraction of spherical particles decays exponentially with particle size, decreasing from 11% for particles on the order of 1 micrometer to less than 1% for particles over 5 micrometer. The average phase functions of subpopulations of particles, grouped by size and morphology, are determined by averaging their corresponding scattering patterns. The phase functions of spherical and non-spherical atmospheric particles are shown to diverge with increasing size. In addition, the phase function of non-spherical particles is found to vary little as a function of the asphericity factor.

  2. Understanding particle size and distance driven competition of interparticle interactions and effective single-particle anisotropy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pacáková, Barbara; Mantlíková, Alice; Nižňanský, D.; Kubíčková, Simona; Vejpravová, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 20 (2016), 1-11, č. článku 206004. ISSN 0953-8984 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01953S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : magnetic nanoparticles * single-particle anisotropy * dipolar energy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.649, year: 2016

  3. Direct uranium isotope ratio analysis of single micrometer-sized glass particles

    OpenAIRE

    Kappel, Stefanie; Boulyga, Sergei F.; Prohaska, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We present the application of nanosecond laser ablation (LA) coupled to a ‘Nu Plasma HR’ multi collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS) for the direct analysis of U isotope ratios in single, 10–20 μm-sized, U-doped glass particles. Method development included studies with respect to (1) external correction of the measured U isotope ratios in glass particles, (2) the applied laser ablation carrier gas (i.e. Ar versus He) and (3) the accurate determination of lower abu...

  4. Optical Detection and Sizing of Single Nano-Particles Using Continuous Wetting Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennequin, Yves; McLeod, Euan; Mudanyali, Onur; Migliozzi, Daniel; Ozcan, Aydogan; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    The physical interaction between nano-scale objects and liquid interfaces can create unique optical properties, enhancing the signatures of the objects with sub-wavelength features. Here we show that the evaporation on a wetting substrate of a polymer solution containing sub-micrometer or nano-scale particles creates liquid micro-lenses that arise from the local deformations of the continuous wetting film. These micro-lenses have properties similar to axicon lenses that are known to create beams with a long depth of focus. This enhanced depth of focus allows detection of single nanoparticles using a low magnification microscope objective lens, achieving a relatively wide field-of-view, while also lifting the constraints on precise focusing onto the object plane. Hence, by creating these liquid axicon lenses through spatial deformations of a continuous thin wetting film, we transfer the challenge of imaging individual nano-particles to detecting the light focused by these lenses. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate the detection and sizing of single nano-particles (100 and 200 nm), CpGV granuloviruses as well as Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria over a wide field of view of e.g., 5.10×3.75 mm2 using a ×5 objective lens with a numerical aperture of 0.15. In addition to conventional lens-based microscopy, this continuous wetting film based approach is also applicable to lensfree computational on-chip imaging, which can be used to detect single nano-particles over a large field-of-view of e.g., >20-30 mm2. These results could be especially useful for high-throughput field-analysis of nano-scale objects using compact and cost-effective microscope designs. PMID:23889001

  5. Direct uranium isotope ratio analysis of single micrometer-sized glass particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappel, Stefanie; Boulyga, Sergei F; Prohaska, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    We present the application of nanosecond laser ablation (LA) coupled to a 'Nu Plasma HR' multi collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS) for the direct analysis of U isotope ratios in single, 10-20 μm-sized, U-doped glass particles. Method development included studies with respect to (1) external correction of the measured U isotope ratios in glass particles, (2) the applied laser ablation carrier gas (i.e. Ar versus He) and (3) the accurate determination of lower abundant (236)U/(238)U isotope ratios (i.e. 10(-5)). In addition, a data processing procedure was developed for evaluation of transient signals, which is of potential use for routine application of the developed method. We demonstrate that the developed method is reliable and well suited for determining U isotope ratios of individual particles. Analyses of twenty-eight S1 glass particles, measured under optimized conditions, yielded average biases of less than 0.6% from the certified values for (234)U/(238)U and (235)U/(238)U ratios. Experimental results obtained for (236)U/(238)U isotope ratios deviated by less than -2.5% from the certified values. Expanded relative total combined standard uncertainties U(c) (k = 2) of 2.6%, 1.4% and 5.8% were calculated for (234)U/(238)U, (235)U/(238)U and (236)U/(238)U, respectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Direct uranium isotope ratio analysis of single micrometer-sized glass particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kappel, Stefanie; Boulyga, Sergei F.; Prohaska, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We present the application of nanosecond laser ablation (LA) coupled to a ‘Nu Plasma HR’ multi collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS) for the direct analysis of U isotope ratios in single, 10–20 μm-sized, U-doped glass particles. Method development included studies with respect to (1) external correction of the measured U isotope ratios in glass particles, (2) the applied laser ablation carrier gas (i.e. Ar versus He) and (3) the accurate determination of lower abundant 236 U/ 238 U isotope ratios (i.e. 10 −5 ). In addition, a data processing procedure was developed for evaluation of transient signals, which is of potential use for routine application of the developed method. We demonstrate that the developed method is reliable and well suited for determining U isotope ratios of individual particles. Analyses of twenty-eight S1 glass particles, measured under optimized conditions, yielded average biases of less than 0.6% from the certified values for 234 U/ 238 U and 235 U/ 238 U ratios. Experimental results obtained for 236 U/ 238 U isotope ratios deviated by less than −2.5% from the certified values. Expanded relative total combined standard uncertainties U c (k = 2) of 2.6%, 1.4% and 5.8% were calculated for 234 U/ 238 U, 235 U/ 238 U and 236 U/ 238 U, respectively. - Highlights: ► LA-MC-ICP-MS was fully validated for the direct analysis of individual particles. ► Traceability was established by using an IRMM glass particle reference material. ► Measured U isotope ratios were in agreement with the certified range. ► A comprehensive total combined uncertainty evaluation was performed. ► The analysis of 236 U/ 238 U isotope ratios was improved by using a deceleration filter.

  7. Toward single-mode random lasing within a submicrometre-sized spherical ZnO particle film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niyuki, Ryo; Fujiwara, Hideki; Sasaki, Keiji; Ishikawa, Yoshie; Koshizaki, Naoto; Tsuji, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    We had recently reported unique random laser action such as quasi-single-mode and low-threshold lasing from a submicrometre-sized spherical ZnO nanoparticle film with polymer particles as defects. The present study demonstrates a novel approach to realize single-mode random lasing by adjusting the sizes of the defect particles. From the dependence of random lasing properties on defect size, we find that the average number of lasing peaks can be modified by the defect size, while other lasing properties such as lasing wavelengths and thresholds remain unchanged. These results suggest that lasing wavelengths and thresholds are determined by the resonant properties of the surrounding scatterers, while the defect size stochastically determines the number of lasing peaks. Therefore, if we optimize the sizes of the defects and scatterers, we can intentionally induce single-mode lasing even in a random structure (Fujiwara et al 2013 Appl. Phys. Lett. 102 061110). (paper)

  8. Inert gases in a terra sample - Measurements in six grain-size fractions and two single particles from Lunar 20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymann, D.; Lakatos, S.; Walton, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Review of the results of inert gas measurements performed on six grain-size fractions and two single particles from four samples of Luna 20 material. Presented and discussed data include the inert gas contents, element and isotope systematics, radiation ages, and Ar-36/Ar-40 systematics.

  9. Micromanipulation and pick-up system for X-Ray diffraction characterization of micrometer-sized single particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeichi, Y; Inami, N; Saito, K; Otori, H; Sagayama, R; Kumai, R; Ono, K; Ueno, T

    2014-01-01

    We describe a micromanipulation and pick-up system for preparing a micrometer-sized single particle for X-ray diffraction characterization. Combining a microgripper based on microelectromechanical systems, piezo-motor-driven linear stages, and a gamepad, the system provides precise and intuitive handling of the object. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction measurements of Sm-Fe-N permanent magnet were performed using this system. We also describe a method to distinguish crystallographically homogeneous particles found in powder-form samples.

  10. An instrument for the simultaneous acquisition of size, shape, and spectral fluorescence data from single aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Edwin; Kaye, Paul H.; Foot, Virginia E.; Clark, James M.; Withers, Philip B.

    2004-12-01

    We describe the construction of a bio-aerosol monitor designed to capture and record intrinsic fluorescence spectra from individual aerosol particles carried in a sample airflow and to simultaneously capture data relating to the spatial distribution of elastically scattered light from each particle. The spectral fluorescence data recorded by this PFAS (Particle Fluorescence and Shape) monitor contains information relating to the particle material content and specifically to possible biological fluorophores. The spatial scattering data from PFAS yields information relating to particle size and shape. The combination of these data can provide a means of aiding the discrimination of bio-aerosols from background or interferent aerosol particles which may have similar fluorescence properties but exhibit shapes and/or sizes not normally associated with biological particles. The radiation used both to excite particle fluorescence and generate the necessary spatially scattered light flux is provided by a novel compact UV fiber laser operating at 266nm wavelength. Particles drawn from the ambient environment traverse the laser beam in single file. Intrinsic particle fluorescence in the range 300-570nm is collected via an ellipsoidal concentrator into a concave grating spectrometer, the spectral data being recorded using a 16-anode linear array photomultiplier detector. Simultaneously, the spatial radiation pattern scattered by the particle over 5°-30° scattering angle and 360° of azimuth is recorded using a custom designed 31-pixel radial hybrid photodiode array. Data from up to ~5,000 particles per second may be acquired for analysis, usually performed by artificial neural network classification.

  11. Single Atomic Iron Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction in Acidic Media: Particle Size Control and Thermal Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hanguang [Department; Hwang, Sooyeon [Center; Wang, Maoyu [School; Feng, Zhenxing [School; Karakalos, Stavros [Department; Luo, Langli [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Qiao, Zhi [Department; Xie, Xiaohong [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Wang, Chongmin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Su, Dong [Center; Shao, Yuyan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Wu, Gang [Department

    2017-09-26

    To significantly reduce the cost of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, current Pt must be replaced by platinum-metal-group (PGM)-free catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acid. We report here a new class of high-performance atomic iron dispersed carbon catalysts through controlled chemical doping of iron ions into zinc-zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF), a type of metal-organic framework (MOF). The novel synthetic chemistry enables accurate size control of Fe-doped ZIF catalyst particles with a wide range from 20 to 1000 nm without changing chemical properties, which provides a great opportunity to increase the density of active sites that is determined by the particle size. We elucidated the active site formation mechanism by correlating the chemical and structural changes with thermal activation process for the conversion from Fe-N4 complex containing hydrocarbon networks in ZIF to highly active FeNx sites embedded into carbon. A temperature of 800oC was identified as the critical point to start forming pyridinic nitrogen doping at the edge of the graphitized carbon planes. Further increasing heating temperature to 1100oC leads to increase of graphitic nitrogen, generating possible synergistic effect with FeNx sites to promote ORR activity. The best performing catalyst, which has well-defined particle size around 50 nm and abundance of atomic FeNx sites embedded into carbon structures, achieve a new performance milestone for the ORR in acid including a half-wave potential of 0.85 V vs RHE and only 20 mV loss after 10,000 cycles in O2 saturated H2SO4 electrolyte. The new class PGM-free catalyst with approaching activity to Pt holds great promise for future PEM fuel cells.

  12. Impact of and correction for instrument sensitivity drift on nanoparticle size measurements by single-particle ICP-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hadri, Hind; Petersen, Elijah J.; Winchester, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of ICP-MS instrument sensitivity drift on the accuracy of NP size measurements using single particle (sp)ICP-MS is investigated. Theoretical modeling and experimental measurements of the impact of instrument sensitivity drift are in agreement and indicate that drift can impact the measured size of spherical NPs by up to 25 %. Given this substantial bias in the measured size, a method was developed using an internal standard to correct for the impact of drift and was shown to accurately correct for a decrease in instrument sensitivity of up to 50 % for 30 nm and 60 nm gold nanoparticles. PMID:26894759

  13. Particle Size (Sieving) and Enthalpy (Acid Calorimetry) Analysis of Single-Pull K East Basin Floor and Pit Sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bredt, P.R.; Delegard, C.H.; Schmidt, A.J.; Silvers, K.L.; Thornton, B.M.; Gano, S.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents the results of particle size analyses and calorimetry testing performed on selected single-pull sludge samples collected from the Hanford K East Basin between December 1998 and June 1999. The samples were collected as isolated cores predominantly from areas that had not been previously sampled (e.g., North Loadout Pit, Dummy Elevator Pit, Tech View Pit), or from areas in which the sludge composition had been altered since the last sampling (e.g., Weasel Pit). Particle size analyses were performed by washing wet sludge samples through a series of four sieves with openings of 250, 500, 1410, and 4000 microm. The loaded sieves were weighed before and after drying to obtain wet and dry particle size distributions. Knowledge of the particle size distribution is needed to design and predict the performance of the systems that will be used to retrieve, transport, and recover sludge. Also, sieving provides an opportunity to observe the components in the sludge. For example, during sieving of the sludge sample from the North Loadout Pit, significant quantities of organic ion exchange beads were observed. The uranium metal content and the particle size of the uranium metal in the K Basin sludge will largely determine the chemical reactivity of the sludge. In turn, the designs for the sludge handling and storage systems must be compatible with the reactivity of the sludge. Therefore, acid calorimetry was performed to estimate the uranium metal content of the sludge. For this testing, sludge samples were dissolved in nitric acid within a calibrated adiabatic calorimeter. The resulting dissolution enthalpy data were then used to discriminate between metallic uranium (minus3750 J/g in nitric acid) and uranium oxide (minus394 J/g in nitric acid). Results from this testing showed that the single-pull sludge samples contained little or no uranium metal

  14. Single Atomic Iron Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction in Acidic Media: Particle Size Control and Thermal Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hanguang; Hwang, Sooyeon; Wang, Maoyu; Feng, Zhenxing; Karakalos, Stavros; Luo, Langli; Qiao, Zhi; Xie, Xiaohong; Wang, Chongmin; Su, Dong; Shao, Yuyan; Wu, Gang (BNL); (Oregon State U.); (SC); (PNNL); (Buffalo)

    2017-09-26

    It remains a grand challenge to replace platinum group metal (PGM) catalysts with earth-abundant materials for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic media, which is crucial for large-scale deployment of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Here, we report a high-performance atomic Fe catalyst derived from chemically Fe-doped zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) by directly bonding Fe ions to imidazolate ligands within 3D frameworks. Although the ZIF was identified as a promising precursor, the new synthetic chemistry enables the creation of well-dispersed atomic Fe sites embedded into porous carbon without the formation of aggregates. The size of catalyst particles is tunable through synthesizing Fe-doped ZIF nanocrystal precursors in a wide range from 20 to 1000 nm followed by one-step thermal activation. Similar to Pt nanoparticles, the unique size control without altering chemical properties afforded by this approach is able to increase the number of PGM-free active sites. The best ORR activity is measured with the catalyst at a size of 50 nm. Further size reduction to 20 nm leads to significant particle agglomeration, thus decreasing the activity. Using the homogeneous atomic Fe model catalysts, we elucidated the active site formation process through correlating measured ORR activity with the change of chemical bonds in precursors during thermal activation up to 1100 °C. The critical temperature to form active sites is 800 °C, which is associated with a new Fe species with a reduced oxidation number (from Fe3+ to Fe2+) likely bonded with pyridinic N (FeN4) embedded into the carbon planes. Further increasing the temperature leads to continuously enhanced activity, linked to the rise of graphitic N and Fe–N species. The new atomic Fe catalyst has achieved respectable ORR activity in challenging acidic media (0.5 M H2SO4), showing a half-wave potential of 0.85 V vs RHE and leaving only a 30 mV gap with Pt/C (60 μgPt/cm2). Enhanced stability

  15. Post hoc interlaboratory comparison of single particle ICP-MS size measurements of NIST gold nanoparticle reference materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoro Bustos, Antonio R; Petersen, Elijah J; Possolo, Antonio; Winchester, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    Single particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (spICP-MS) is an emerging technique that enables simultaneous measurement of nanoparticle size and number quantification of metal-containing nanoparticles at realistic environmental exposure concentrations. Such measurements are needed to understand the potential environmental and human health risks of nanoparticles. Before spICP-MS can be considered a mature methodology, additional work is needed to standardize this technique including an assessment of the reliability and variability of size distribution measurements and the transferability of the technique among laboratories. This paper presents the first post hoc interlaboratory comparison study of the spICP-MS technique. Measurement results provided by six expert laboratories for two National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) gold nanoparticle reference materials (RM 8012 and RM 8013) were employed. The general agreement in particle size between spICP-MS measurements and measurements by six reference techniques demonstrates the reliability of spICP-MS and validates its sizing capability. However, the precision of the spICP-MS measurement was better for the larger 60 nm gold nanoparticles and evaluation of spICP-MS precision indicates substantial variability among laboratories, with lower variability between operators within laboratories. Global particle number concentration and Au mass concentration recovery were quantitative for RM 8013 but significantly lower and with a greater variability for RM 8012. Statistical analysis did not suggest an optimal dwell time, because this parameter did not significantly affect either the measured mean particle size or the ability to count nanoparticles. Finally, the spICP-MS data were often best fit with several single non-Gaussian distributions or mixtures of Gaussian distributions, rather than the more frequently used normal or log-normal distributions.

  16. Particle size determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burr, K.J.

    1979-01-01

    A specification is given for an apparatus to provide a completely automatic testing cycle to determine the proportion of particles of less than a predetermined size in one of a number of fluid suspensions. Monitoring of the particle concentration during part of the process can be carried out by an x-ray source and detector. (U.K.)

  17. Spectroscopy of size dependent many-particle effects in single self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dal Savio, C.

    2006-02-20

    Single InAs quantum dots (QDs) grown with the Stranski-Krastanov method in a In{sub 0.12}Ga{sub 0.88}As quantum well embedded in GaAs and emitting in the near infrared have been optically investigated. To perform QD spectroscopy at low temperatures a very stable micro-photoluminescence ({mu}-PL) microscope set-up fully integrated in a liquid helium (LHe) cryostate has been successfully developed. The system is based on the cold finger technique and a Fourier Transform (FT) spectrometer combined with a nitrogen cooled Ge detector. Photoluminescence of the QDs was excited non resonantly with a He-Ne laser and single dot spectroscopy was carried out at temperatures below 60 K. The experimental set-up allows mapping of the optical emission by recording spectra for every point of a scan grid. This mapping mode is used to acquire optical images and to locate a particular dot for investigation. Series of measurement on a single QD were normally performed over a long time (from a few days to a week), with the need of daily adjustment in the sub-micrometer range. At low excitation power a single sharp line (E{sub x}) arising from recombination of a single exciton in the dot is observed. Varying the excitation density the spectra become more complex, with appearance of the biexciton emission line (E{sub xx}) on the lower energies side of the E{sub x} line, followed by emission from excitons occupying higher shells in the dot. Measured biexciton binding energies and power dependence are in good agreement with values reported in the literature. The temperature dependence of the optical emission was investigated. The energy shows the characteristic decrease related to the shrinking of the semiconductor band gap, while the linewidth evolution is compatible with broadening due to coupling with acoustic and optical phonons. A statistics of biexciton binding energies over a dozen of dots was acquired and the results compared with single QD spectroscopy data available in the

  18. Single Particle Optical Sizing (SPOS). II. Hydrodynamic forces and application to aggregating dispersions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelssers, E.G.M.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Fleer, G.J.

    1990-01-01

    The shear and extension forces occurring during the hydrodynamic focusing in our SPOS instrument which is described in the preceding paper ([1.]), are analyzed and compared with estimates for the binding forces between particles in salt coagulation and polymer flocculation. It is found that the

  19. Investigation of the particle size distribution of the ejected material generated during the single femtosecond laser pulse ablation of aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Han; Zhang, Nan; Zhu, Xiaonong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Single 50 fs laser pulse ablation of an aluminium target in vacuum is investigated in our experiments. • Nanoparticles with large radii of several hundred nanometers are observed. • The nanoparticles are most likely from the mechanical tensile stress relaxation. - Abstract: Single femtosecond laser pulses are employed to ablate an aluminium target in vacuum, and the particle size distribution of the ablated material deposited on a mica substrate is examined with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The recorded AFM images show that these particles have a mean radius of several tens of nanometres. It is also determined that the mean radius of these deposited nanoparticles increases when the laser fluence at the aluminium target increases from 0.44 J/cm 2 to 0.63 J/cm 2 . The mechanism of the laser-induced nanoparticle generation is thought to be photomechanical tensile stress relaxation. Raman spectroscopy measurements confirm that the nanoparticles thus produced have the same structure as the bulk aluminium

  20. Standard Practice for Continuous Sizing and Counting of Airborne Particles in Dust-Controlled Areas and Clean Rooms Using Instruments Capable of Detecting Single Sub-Micrometre and Larger Particles

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers the determination of the particle concentration, by number, and the size distribution of airborne particles in dust-controlled areas and clean rooms, for particles in the size range of approximately 0.01 to 5.0 m. Particle concentrations not exceeding 3.5 106 particles/m3 (100 000/ft 3) are covered for all particles equal to and larger than the minimum size measured. 1.2 This practice uses an airborne single particle counting device (SPC) whose operation is based on measuring the signal produced by an individual particle passing through the sensing zone. The signal must be directly or indirectly related to particle size. Note 1The SPC type is not specified here. The SPC can be a conventional optical particle counter (OPC), an aerodynamic particle sizer, a condensation nucleus counter (CNC) operating in conjunction with a diffusion battery or differential mobility analyzer, or any other device capable of counting and sizing single particles in the size range of concern and of sampling...

  1. Single particle dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemens, P.J.; Jensen, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the opening of the 3-quasiparticle continuum at 3Δ sets the energy scale for the enhancement of the effective mass near the Fermi surface of nuclei. The authors argue that the spreading width of single-particle states due to coupling with low-lying collective modes is qualitatively different from the two-body collision mechanism, and contributes little to the single-particle lifetime in the sense of the optical model. (orig.)

  2. One at a time: counting single-nanoparticle/electrode collisions for accurate particle sizing by overcoming the instability of gold nanoparticles under electrolytic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, Danfeng; Wang, Song; Zheng, Yuanqin; Deng, Zhaoxiang

    2013-01-01

    In response to an increasing demand for understanding electrochemical processes on the nanometer scale, it now becomes possible to monitor electron transfer reactions at the single-nanoparticle level, namely particle collision electrochemistry. This technique has great potential in the development of research tools towards single-particle electrocatalysis and selective and multiplexed particle sizing. However, one existing problem that may discourage these applications is the relatively weak colloidal stability of nanoparticles in an electrolytic solution. Here we report on a facile but efficient way to achieve a good stability of gold nanoparticles in an acidic media so that ‘zero-aggregation’ collisions can be achieved at a carbon ultramicroelectrode. This allows us to obtain anodic dissolution currents from individual nanoparticles in a ‘one particle at a time’ manner, based on which accurate particle sizing with a resolution of 1–2 nm can be achieved. Our work strongly suggests that to maintain a well dispersed nanoparticle solution during a particle impact electrochemical experiment is critically important for accurate particle sizing, as well as other applications that require information to be extracted from individual nanoparticles (not their aggregates). (paper)

  3. Practical limitations of single particle ICP-MS in the determination of nanoparticle size distributions and dissolution: case of rare earth oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fréchette-Viens, Laurie; Hadioui, Madjid; Wilkinson, Kevin J

    2017-01-15

    The applicability of single particle ICP-MS (SP-ICP-MS) for the analysis of nanoparticle size distributions and the determination of particle numbers was evaluated using the rare earth oxide, La 2 O 3 , as a model particle. The composition of the storage containers, as well as the ICP-MS sample introduction system were found to significantly impact SP-ICP-MS analysis. While La 2 O 3 nanoparticles (La 2 O 3 NP) did not appear to interact strongly with sample containers, adsorptive losses of La 3+ (over 24h) were substantial (>72%) for fluorinated ethylene propylene bottles as opposed to polypropylene (size distributions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Particle sizes from sectional data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlas, Zbynek; Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Jensen, Eva Bjørn Vedel

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new statistical method for obtaining information about particle size distributions from sectional data without specific assumptions about particle shape. The method utilizes recent advances in local stereology. We show how to estimate separately from sectional data the variance due t...

  5. Single particle detecting telescope system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, I.; Tomiyama, T.; Iga, Y.; Komatsubara, T.; Kanada, M.; Yamashita, Y.; Wada, T.; Furukawa, S.

    1981-01-01

    We constructed the single particle detecting telescope system for detecting a fractionally charged particle. The telescope consists of position detecting counters, wall-less multi-cell chambers, single detecting circuits and microcomputer system as data I/0 processor. Especially, a frequency of double particle is compared the case of the single particle detecting with the case of an ordinary measurement

  6. A single particle energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodmer, A.R. [Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Usmani, Q.N.; Sami, M. [Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Physics

    1993-09-01

    We consider the binding energies of {Lambda} hypernuclei (HN), in particular the single-particle (s.p.) energy data, which have been obtained for a wide range of HN with mass numbers A {le} 89 and for orbital angular momenta {ell}{sub {Lambda}} {le} 4. We briefly review some of the relevant properties of A hypernuclei. These are nuclei {sub {Lambda}}{sup A}Z with baryon number A in which a single {Lambda} hyperon (baryon number = 1) is bound to an ordinary nucleus {sup A}Z consisting of A - 1 nucleons = Z protons + N neutrons. The {Lambda} hyperon is neutral, has spin 1/2, strangeness S = {minus}1, isospin I = O and a mass M{sub {Lambda}} = 1116 MeV/c{sup 2}. Although the {Lambda} interacts with a nucleon, its interaction is only about half as strong as that between two nucleons, and thus very roughly V{sub {Lambda}N} {approx} 0.5 V{sub NN}. As a result, the two-body {Lambda}N system is unbound, and the lightest bound HN is the three-body hypertriton {sub {Lambda}}{sup 3}H in which the {Lambda} is bound to a deuteron with the {Lambda}-d separation energy being only {approx} 0.1 MeV corresponding to an exponential tail of radius {approx} 15 fm! In strong interactions the strangeness S is of course conserved, and the {Lambda} is distinct from the nucleons. In a HN strangeness changes only in the weak decays of the {Lambda} which can decay either via ``free`` pionic decay {Lambda} {yields} N + {pi} or via induced decay {Lambda} + N {yields} N + N which is only possible in the presence of nucleons. Because of the small energy release the pionic decay is strongly suppressed in all but the lightest HN and the induced decay dominates. However, the weak decay lifetime {approx} 10{sup {minus}10}s is in fact close to the lifetime of a free {Lambda}. Since this is much longer than the strong interaction time {approx} 10{sup {minus}22}s we can ignore the weak interactions when considering the binding of HN, just as for ordinary nuclei.

  7. A single particle energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodmer, A.R.; Usmani, Q.N.; Sami, M.

    1993-01-01

    We consider the binding energies of Λ hypernuclei (HN), in particular the single-particle (s.p.) energy data, which have been obtained for a wide range of HN with mass numbers A ≤ 89 and for orbital angular momenta ell Λ ≤ 4. We briefly review some of the relevant properties of A hypernuclei. These are nuclei Λ A Z with baryon number A in which a single Λ hyperon (baryon number = 1) is bound to an ordinary nucleus A Z consisting of A - 1 nucleons = Z protons + N neutrons. The Λ hyperon is neutral, has spin 1/2, strangeness S = -1, isospin I = O and a mass M Λ = 1116 MeV/c 2 . Although the Λ interacts with a nucleon, its interaction is only about half as strong as that between two nucleons, and thus very roughly V ΛN ∼ 0.5 V NN . As a result, the two-body ΛN system is unbound, and the lightest bound HN is the three-body hypertriton Λ 3 H in which the Λ is bound to a deuteron with the Λ-d separation energy being only ∼ 0.1 MeV corresponding to an exponential tail of radius ∼ 15 fm exclamation point In strong interactions the strangeness S is of course conserved, and the Λ is distinct from the nucleons. In a HN strangeness changes only in the weak decays of the Λ which can decay either via ''free'' pionic decay Λ → N + π or via induced decay Λ + N → N + N which is only possible in the presence of nucleons. Because of the small energy release the pionic decay is strongly suppressed in all but the lightest HN and the induced decay dominates. However, the weak decay lifetime ∼ 10 -10 s is in fact close to the lifetime of a free Λ. Since this is much longer than the strong interaction time ∼ 10 -22 s we can ignore the weak interactions when considering the binding of HN, just as for ordinary nuclei

  8. Single particle distributions, ch.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blokzijl, R.

    1977-01-01

    A survey of inclusive single particle distributions is given for various particles. A comparison of particle cross-sections measured in K - p experiments at different center of mass energies shows that some of these cross-sections remain almost constant over a wide range of incoming K - momenta

  9. Delivery of single accelerated particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNulty, P.J.; Pease, V.P.; Bond, V.P.; Schimmerling, W.; Vosburgh, K.G.; Crebbin, K.; Everette, W.; Howard, J.

    1978-01-01

    It is desirable for certain experiments involving accelerators to have the capability of delivering just a single beam particle to the target area. The essential features of such a one-at-a-time facility are discussed. Two such facilities are described which were implemented at high-energy heavy ion accelerators without having to make major structural changes in the existing beam lines or substantially interfering with other accelerator uses. Two accelerator facilities are described which had the capability of delivering a single beam particle to the target area. This feature is necessary in certain experiments investigating visual phenomena induced by charged particles, other single particle interactions in biology, and other experiments in which the low intensities of cosmic rays need to be simulated. Both facilities were implemented without having to make structural changes in the existing beam lines or substantially interfering with other accelerator uses. (Auth.)

  10. Fundamental study of single biomass particle combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momeni, M.

    2013-06-01

    This thesis is a comprehensive study of single biomass particle combustion. The effect of particle shape and size and operating conditions on biomass conversion characteristics were investigated experimentally and theoretically. The experimental samples were divided in two groups: particles with regular shapes (spheres and cylinders) and particles with irregular shapes (almost flake-like). A CAMSIZER analyser (Retsch Technology GMBH) was used to determine the size and shape of the particles via Dynamical Digital Image Processing. The experiments were performed in a single particle reactor under well-defined conditions, and the complete combustion processes were recorded as video sequences by a CCD camera installed in the set-up. One of the project objectives is to simulate conditions reasonably close to the conditions in a power plant boiler, i.e., reasonably high temperatures (up to 1600 deg. C) and varying oxygen concentrations in the 5 to 20% range. A one-dimensional mathematical model was used to simulate all the intraparticle conversion processes (drying, recondensation, devolatilisation, char gasification/oxidation and heat/mass/momentum transfer) within single particles of different shapes and size under various conditions. The model also predicts the flame layer domain of a single particle. The model was validated by experimental results under different conditions; good agreement between the model predictions and the experimental data was observed. Both the experimental and modelling results showed that cylindrical particles lose mass faster than spherical particles of a similar volume (mass) and that the burnout time is reduced by increasing the particle aspect ratio (surface area to volume ratio). Very similar conversion times were observed for cylindrical particles with nearly identical surface area to volume ratios. Similar conversion times were also observed for two size classes of pulverised particles (with irregular shapes) made from the same type of

  11. Fundamental Study of Single Biomass Particle Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momenikouchaksaraei, Maryam

    This thesis is a comprehensive study of single biomass particle combustion. The effect of particle shape and size and operating conditions on biomass conversion characteristics were investigated experimentally and theoretically. The experimental samples were divided in two groups: particles...... well-defined conditions, and the complete combustion processes were recorded as video sequences by a CCD camera installed in the set-up. One of the project objectives is to simulate conditions reasonably close to the conditions in a power plant boiler, i.e., reasonably high temperatures (up to 1600°C...

  12. Dual color single particle tracking via nanobodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, David; Winterflood, Christian M; Ewers, Helge

    2015-01-01

    Single particle tracking is a powerful tool to investigate the function of biological molecules by following their motion in space. However, the simultaneous tracking of two different species of molecules is still difficult to realize without compromising the length or density of trajectories, the localization accuracy or the simplicity of the assay. Here, we demonstrate a simple dual color single particle tracking assay using small, bright, high-affinity labeling via nanobodies of accessible targets with widely available instrumentation. We furthermore apply a ratiometric step-size analysis method to visualize differences in apparent membrane viscosity. (paper)

  13. EFFECTS OF EFFECTS OF PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    The parameters examined were: moisture content, particle size distribution, total isture content, particle size distribution, total hydrocarbon content, soil pH, available nitrogen, available phosphorus, total heterotrophic bacteria and fungi count. The analysis of the soil characteristics throughout the remediation period showed ...

  14. Results of an interlaboratory method performance study for the size determination and quantification of silver nanoparticles in chicken meat by single-particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (sp-ICP-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Stefan; Peters, Ruud; Loeschner, Katrin; Grombe, Ringo; Linsinger, Thomas P J

    2017-08-01

    Single-particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (sp-ICP-MS) promises fast and selective determination of nanoparticle size and number concentrations. While several studies on practical applications have been published, data on formal, especially interlaboratory validation of sp-ICP-MS, is sparse. An international interlaboratory study was organized to determine repeatability and reproducibility of the determination of the median particle size and particle number concentration of Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) in chicken meat. Ten laboratories from the European Union, the USA, and Canada determined particle size and particle number concentration of two chicken meat homogenates spiked with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-stabilized AgNPs. For the determination of the median particle diameter, repeatability standard deviations of 2 and 5% were determined, and reproducibility standard deviations were 15 and 25%, respectively. The equivalent median diameter itself was approximately 60% larger than the diameter of the particles in the spiking solution. Determination of the particle number concentration was significantly less precise, with repeatability standard deviations of 7 and 18% and reproducibility standard deviations of 70 and 90%.

  15. Particle size distribution instrument. Topical report 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okhuysen, W.; Gassaway, J.D.

    1995-04-01

    The development of an instrument to measure the concentration of particles in gas is described in this report. An in situ instrument was designed and constructed which sizes individual particles and counts the number of occurrences for several size classes. Although this instrument was designed to detect the size distribution of slag and seed particles generated at an experimental coal-fired magnetohydrodynamic power facility, it can be used as a nonintrusive diagnostic tool for other hostile industrial processes involving the formation and growth of particulates. Two of the techniques developed are extensions of the widely used crossed beam velocimeter, providing simultaneous measurement of the size distribution and velocity of articles.

  16. Modeling single-scattering properties of small cirrus particles by use of a size-shape distribution of ice spheroids and cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Li; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Cairns, Brian; Carlson, Barbara E.; Travis, Larry D.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we model single-scattering properties of small cirrus crystals using mixtures of polydisperse, randomly oriented spheroids and cylinders with varying aspect ratios and with a refractive index representative of water ice at a wavelength of 1.88 μm. The Stokes scattering matrix elements averaged over wide shape distributions of spheroids and cylinders are compared with those computed for polydisperse surface-equivalent spheres. The shape-averaged phase function for a mixture of oblate and prolate spheroids is smooth, featureless, and nearly flat at side-scattering angles and closely resembles those typically measured for cirrus. Compared with the ensemble-averaged phase function for spheroids, that for a shape distribution of cylinders shows a relatively deeper minimum at side-scattering angles. This may indicate that light scattering from realistic cirrus crystals can be better represented by a shape mixture of ice spheroids. Interestingly, the single-scattering properties of shape-averaged oblate and prolate cylinders are very similar to those of compact cylinders with a diameter-to-length ratio of unity. The differences in the optical cross sections, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry parameter between the spherical and the nonspherical particles studied appear to be relatively small. This may suggest that for a given optical thickness, the influence of particle shape on the radiative forcing caused by a cloud composed of small ice crystals can be negligible

  17. Particle size distribution of plutonium contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Ke; Wu Wangsuo; Jin Yuren; Shen Maoquan; Han Zhaoyang; Hu Zhiqian; Ma Teqi

    2012-01-01

    Wet classification and γ ray spectroscopy had been applied to study the particle size distribution of Pu in the desert soil of somewhere in Northern China. It was found that nearly 90% of Pu exits in 0.1-10 mm particles. only 10% less in particles under 0.05 mm that still poses notable hazards to biosphere if any resuspension. Providing a decontamination target of 239 Pu <4000 Bq/kg, accident condition. (authors)

  18. "Size-Independent" Single-Electron Tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianli; Sun, Shasha; Swartz, Logan; Riechers, Shawn; Hu, Peiguang; Chen, Shaowei; Zheng, Jie; Liu, Gang-Yu

    2015-12-17

    Incorporating single-electron tunneling (SET) of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) into modern electronic devices offers great promise to enable new properties; however, it is technically very challenging due to the necessity to integrate ultrasmall (<10 nm) particles into the devices. The nanosize requirements are intrinsic for NPs to exhibit quantum or SET behaviors, for example, 10 nm or smaller, at room temperature. This work represents the first observation of SET that defies the well-known size restriction. Using polycrystalline Au NPs synthesized via our newly developed solid-state glycine matrices method, a Coulomb Blockade was observed for particles as large as tens of nanometers, and the blockade voltage exhibited little dependence on the size of the NPs. These observations are counterintuitive at first glance. Further investigations reveal that each observed SET arises from the ultrasmall single crystalline grain(s) within the polycrystal NP, which is (are) sufficiently isolated from the nearest neighbor grains. This work demonstrates the concept and feasibility to overcome orthodox spatial confinement requirements to achieve quantum effects.

  19. Particle sizes in slash fire smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David V. Sandberg; Robert E. Martin

    1975-01-01

    Particulate emissions are the most objectionable atmospheric contaminant from forest burning. Little is known of the particulate sizes, and this research was done under laboratory conditions to obtain particle size information. Comments are made concerning techniques for future work in this field.

  20. MICRON-SIZED POLYMER PARTICLES FROM TANZANIAN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Micron sized polymeric particles were prepared from cashew nut shell liquid and subsequently functionalized to produce micron-sized carboxylated cation exchange resin (MCCER). By titrimetry and analytical procedures employing atomic absorption spectrometry, an assessment of the cation exchange capability of the ...

  1. Suppression of coffee ring: (Particle) size matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Lalit; Seth, Pranjal; Murugappan, Bhubesh; Basu, Saptarshi

    2018-05-01

    Coffee ring patterns in drying sessile droplets are undesirable in various practical applications. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that on hydrophobic substrates, the coffee ring can be suppressed just by increasing the particle diameter. Particles with larger size flocculate within the evaporation timescale, leading to a significant gravimetric settling (for Pe > 1) triggering a uniform deposit. Interestingly, the transition to a uniform deposit is found to be independent of the internal flow field and substrate properties. Flocculation of particles also alters the particle packing at the nanoscale resulting in order to disorder transitions. In this letter, we exhibit a physical exposition on how particle size affects morphodynamics of the droplet drying at macro-nano length scales.

  2. Single Particle Entropy in Heated Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guttormsen, M.; Chankova, R.; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Rekstad, J.; Siem, S.; Sunde, A. C.; Syed, N. U. H.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Schiller, A.; Voinov, A.

    2006-01-01

    The thermal motion of single particles represents the largest contribution to level density (or entropy) in atomic nuclei. The concept of single particle entropy is presented and shown to be an approximate extensive (additive) quantity for mid-shell nuclei. A few applications of single particle entropy are demonstrated

  3. Automatic size analysis of coated fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallisch, K.; Koss, P.

    1977-01-01

    The determination of the diameter, coating thickness, and sphericity of coated fuel particles by conventional methods is very time consuming. Therefore, statistical data can only be obtained with limited accuracy. An alternative method is described that avoids these disadvantages by utilizing a fast optical data-collecting system of high accuracy. This system allows the determination of the diameter of particles in the range between 100 and 1500 μm, with an accuracy of better than +-2 μm and with a rate of 100 particles per second. The density and thickness of coating layers can be determined by comparing the data obtained before and after coating, taking into account the relative increase of weight. A special device allows the automatic determination of the sphericity of single particles as well as the distribution in a batch. This device measures 50 to 100 different diameters of each particle per second. An on-line computer stores the measured data and calculates all parameters required, e.g., number of particles measured, particle diameter, standard deviation, diameter limiting values, average particle volume, average particle surface area, and the distribution of sphericity in absolute and percent form

  4. Vibro-spring particle size distribution analyser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Ketan Shantilal

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes the design and development of an automated pre-production particle size distribution analyser for particles in the 20 - 2000 μm size range. This work is follow up to the vibro-spring particle sizer reported by Shaeri. In its most basic form, the instrument comprises a horizontally held closed coil helical spring that is partly filled with the test powder and sinusoidally vibrated in the transverse direction. Particle size distribution data are obtained by stretching the spring to known lengths and measuring the mass of the powder discharged from the spring's coils. The size of the particles on the other hand is determined from the spring 'intercoil' distance. The instrument developed by Shaeri had limited use due to its inability to measure sample mass directly. For the device reported here, modifications are made to the original configurations to establish means of direct sample mass measurement. The feasibility of techniques for measuring the mass of powder retained within the spring are investigated in detail. Initially, the measurement of mass is executed in-situ from the vibration characteristics based on the spring's first harmonic resonant frequency. This method is often erratic and unreliable due to the particle-particle-spring wall interactions and the spring bending. An much more successful alternative is found from a more complicated arrangement in which the spring forms part of a stiff cantilever system pivoted along its main axis. Here, the sample mass is determined in the 'static mode' by monitoring the cantilever beam's deflection following the wanton termination of vibration. The system performance has been optimised through the variations of the mechanical design of the key components and the operating procedure as well as taking into account the effect of changes in the ambient temperature on the system's response. The thesis also describes the design and development of the ancillary mechanisms. These include the pneumatic

  5. Saha equation, single and two particle states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraeft, W.D.; Girardeau, M.D.; Strege, B.

    1990-01-01

    Single and two particle porperties in dense plasma are discussed in connection with their role in the mass action law for a partially ionized plasma. The two particle bound states are nearly density independent, while the continuum is essentially shifted. The single particle states are damped, and their energy has a negative shift and a parabolic behaviour for small momenta. (orig.)

  6. Permeability of different size waste particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Gavelytė

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The world and life style is changing, but the most popular disposal route for waste is landfill globally until now. We have to think about waste prevention and preparing for re-use or recycling firstly, according to the waste disposal hierarchy. Disposed waste to the landfill must be the last opportunity. In a landfill, during waste degradation processes leachate is formed that can potentially cause clogging of bottom drainage layers. To ensure stability of a landfill construction, the physical properties of its components have to be controlled. The hydrology of precipitation, evaporation, runoff and the hydraulic performance of the capping and liner materials are important controls of the moisture content. The water balance depends also on the waste characteristics and waste particle size distribution. The aim of this paper is to determine the hydraulic permeability in a landfill depending on the particle size distribution of municipal solid waste disposed. The lab experiment results were compared with the results calculated with DEGAS model. Samples were taken from a landfill operated for five years. The samples particle sizes are: >100 mm, 80 mm, 60 mm, 40 mm, 20 mm, 0.01 mm and <0.01 mm. The permeability test was conducted using the column test. The paper presents the results of experiment and DEGAS model water permeability with waste particle size.

  7. Remote Laser Diffraction Particle Size Distribution Analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas; Huestis, Gary Michael; Bolton, Steven Michael

    2001-03-01

    In support of a radioactive slurry sampling and physical characterization task, an “off-the-shelf” laser diffraction (classical light scattering) particle size analyzer was utilized for remote particle size distribution (PSD) analysis. Spent nuclear fuel was previously reprocessed at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC—formerly recognized as the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant) which is on DOE’s INEEL site. The acidic, radioactive aqueous raffinate streams from these processes were transferred to 300,000 gallon stainless steel storage vessels located in the INTEC Tank Farm area. Due to the transfer piping configuration in these vessels, complete removal of the liquid can not be achieved. Consequently, a “heel” slurry remains at the bottom of an “emptied” vessel. Particle size distribution characterization of the settled solids in this remaining heel slurry, as well as suspended solids in the tank liquid, is the goal of this remote PSD analyzer task. A Horiba Instruments Inc. Model LA-300 PSD analyzer, which has a 0.1 to 600 micron measurement range, was modified for remote application in a “hot cell” (gamma radiation) environment. This technology provides rapid and simple PSD analysis, especially down in the fine and microscopic particle size regime. Particle size analysis of these radioactive slurries down in this smaller range was not previously achievable—making this technology far superior than the traditional methods used. Successful acquisition of this data, in conjunction with other characterization analyses, provides important information that can be used in the myriad of potential radioactive waste management alternatives.

  8. High-resolution extraction of particle size via Fourier Ptychography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengfu; Zhao, Yu; Chen, Guanghua; Luo, Zhenxiong; Ye, Yan

    2017-11-01

    This paper proposes a method which can extract the particle size information with a resolution beyond λ/NA. This is achieved by applying Fourier Ptychographic (FP) ideas to the present problem. In a typical FP imaging platform, a 2D LED array is used as light sources for angle-varied illuminations, a series of low-resolution images was taken by a full sequential scan of the array of LEDs. Here, we demonstrate the particle size information is extracted by turning on each single LED on a circle. The simulated results show that the proposed method can reduce the total number of images, without loss of reliability in the results.

  9. Diffusion of Finite-Size Particles in Confined Geometries

    KAUST Repository

    Bruna, Maria

    2013-05-10

    The diffusion of finite-size hard-core interacting particles in two- or three-dimensional confined domains is considered in the limit that the confinement dimensions become comparable to the particle\\'s dimensions. The result is a nonlinear diffusion equation for the one-particle probability density function, with an overall collective diffusion that depends on both the excluded-volume and the narrow confinement. By including both these effects, the equation is able to interpolate between severe confinement (for example, single-file diffusion) and unconfined diffusion. Numerical solutions of both the effective nonlinear diffusion equation and the stochastic particle system are presented and compared. As an application, the case of diffusion under a ratchet potential is considered, and the change in transport properties due to excluded-volume and confinement effects is examined. © 2013 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  10. Influence of particle size in silo discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gella Diego

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently Janda et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 248001 (2012] reported an experimental study where it was measured the velocity and volume fraction fields of 1 mm diameter stainless steel beads in the exit of a two-dimensional silo. In that work, they proposed a new expression to predict the flow of granular media in silos which does not explicitly include the particle size as a parameter. Here, we study if effectively, there is not such influence of the particle size in the flux equations as well as investigate any possible effect in the velocity and volume fraction fields. To this end, we have performed high speed motion measurements of these magnitudes in a two-dimensional silo filled with 4 mm diameter beads of stainless steel, the same material than the previous works. A developed tracking program has been implemented to obtain at the same time both, the velocity and volume fraction. The final objective of this work has been to extend and generalize the theoretical framework of Janda et al. for all sizes of particles. We have found that the obtained functionalities are the same than in the 1 mm case, but the exponents and other fitting parameters are different.

  11. Size exclusion chromatography with superficially porous particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schure, Mark R; Moran, Robert E

    2017-01-13

    A comparison is made using size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) of synthetic polymers between fully porous particles (FPPs) and superficially porous particles (SPPs) with similar particle diameters, pore sizes and equal flow rates. Polystyrene molecular weight standards with a mobile phase of tetrahydrofuran are utilized for all measurements conducted with standard HPLC equipment. Although it is traditionally thought that larger pore volume is thermodynamically advantageous in SEC for better separations, SPPs have kinetic advantages and these will be shown to compensate for the loss in pore volume compared to FPPs. The comparison metrics include the elution range (smaller with SPPs), the plate count (larger for SPPs), the rate production of theoretical plates (larger for SPPs) and the specific resolution (larger with FPPs). Advantages to using SPPs for SEC are discussed such that similar separations can be conducted faster using SPPs. SEC using SPPs offers similar peak capacities to that using FPPs but with faster operation. This also suggests that SEC conducted in the second dimension of a two-dimensional liquid chromatograph may benefit with reduced run time and with equivalently reduced peak width making SPPs advantageous for sampling the first dimension by the second dimension separator. Additional advantages are discussed for biomolecules along with a discussion of optimization criteria for size-based separations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The measurement of single particle temperature in plasma sprays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fincke, J.R.; Swank, W.D.; Bolsaitis, P.P.; Elliott, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    A measurement technique for simultaneously obtaining the size, velocity, temperature, and relative number density of particles entrained in high temperature flow fields is described. In determining the particle temperature from a two-color pyrometery technique, assumptions about the relative spectral emissivity of the particle are required. For situations in which the particle surface undergoes chemical reactions the assumption of grey body behavior is shown to introduce large Temperature measurement uncertainties. Results from isolated, laser heated, single particle measurements and in-flight data from the plasma spraying of WC-Co are presented. 10 refs., 5 figs

  13. Thermal and particle size distribution effects on the ferromagnetic resonance in magnetic fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin, C.N.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal and particle size distribution effects on the ferromagnetic resonance of magnetic fluids were theoretically investigated, assuming negligible interparticle interactions and neglecting the viscosity of the carrier liquid. The model is based on the usual approach for the ferromagnetic resonance description of single-domain magnetic particle systems, which was amended in order to take into account the finite particle size effect, the particle size distribution and the orientation mobility of the particles within the magnetic fluid. Under these circumstances the shape of the resonance line, the resonance field and the line width are found to be strongly affected by the temperature and by the particle size distribution of magnetic fluids

  14. Particle-size distribution study: PILEDRIVER event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabb, David D [Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1970-05-15

    Reentry was made by mining into the chimney of broken rock created by a nuclear detonation in granite at a depth of 1500 feet. The chimney was 160 ft in radius and 890 ft high. An injection of radioactive melt was encountered at 300 ft from shot point. Radiochemical analyses determined that the yield of PILEDRIVER nuclear device was 61 {+-} 10 kt. Two samples of chimney rubble totalling over 5,000 lb were obtained during the postshot exploration. These samples of broken granite underwent screen analysis, a radioactivity-distribution study, and cursory leaching tests. The two samples were separated into 25 different size-fractions. An average of the particle-size data from the two samples showed that 17% of the material is between 20 mesh and I in.; 42% between 1 and 6 in.; and 34% between 6 in. and 3 ft. The distribution of radioactivity varies markedly with the particle size. The minus 100-mesh material comprizes less than 1.5% of the weight but contains almost 20% of the radioactivity. Small-scale batch-leaching tests showed that 25% of the radioactivity could be removed in a few hours by a film-percolation leach with distilled water, and 40% with dilute acid. Brief studies were made of the microfractures in the broken rock and of the radioactivity created by the PILEDRIVER explosion. (author)

  15. Particle-size distribution study: PILEDRIVER event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabb, David D.

    1970-01-01

    Reentry was made by mining into the chimney of broken rock created by a nuclear detonation in granite at a depth of 1500 feet. The chimney was 160 ft in radius and 890 ft high. An injection of radioactive melt was encountered at 300 ft from shot point. Radiochemical analyses determined that the yield of PILEDRIVER nuclear device was 61 ± 10 kt. Two samples of chimney rubble totalling over 5,000 lb were obtained during the postshot exploration. These samples of broken granite underwent screen analysis, a radioactivity-distribution study, and cursory leaching tests. The two samples were separated into 25 different size-fractions. An average of the particle-size data from the two samples showed that 17% of the material is between 20 mesh and I in.; 42% between 1 and 6 in.; and 34% between 6 in. and 3 ft. The distribution of radioactivity varies markedly with the particle size. The minus 100-mesh material comprizes less than 1.5% of the weight but contains almost 20% of the radioactivity. Small-scale batch-leaching tests showed that 25% of the radioactivity could be removed in a few hours by a film-percolation leach with distilled water, and 40% with dilute acid. Brief studies were made of the microfractures in the broken rock and of the radioactivity created by the PILEDRIVER explosion. (author)

  16. Single-particle dispersion in compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingqing; Xiao, Zuoli

    2018-04-01

    Single-particle dispersion statistics in compressible box turbulence are studied using direct numerical simulation. Focus is placed on the detailed discussion of effects of the particle Stokes number and turbulent Mach number, as well as the forcing type. When solenoidal forcing is adopted, it is found that the single-particle dispersion undergoes a transition from the ballistic regime at short times to the diffusive regime at long times, in agreement with Taylor's particle dispersion argument. The strongest dispersion of heavy particles is announced when the Stokes number is of order 1, which is similar to the scenario in incompressible turbulence. The dispersion tends to be suppressed as the Mach number increases. When hybrid solenoidal and compressive forcing at a ratio of 1/2 is employed, the flow field shows apparent anisotropic property, characterized by the appearance of large shock wave structures. Accordingly, the single-particle dispersion shows extremely different behavior from the solenoidal forcing case.

  17. Spatial Variability of CCN Sized Aerosol Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmi, A.; Väänänen, R.

    2014-12-01

    The computational limitations restrict the grid size used in GCM models, and for many cloud types they are too large when compared to the scale of the cloud formation processes. Several parameterizations for e.g. convective cloud formation exist, but information on spatial subgrid variation of the cloud condensation nuclei (CCNs) sized aerosol concentration is not known. We quantify this variation as a function of the spatial scale by using datasets from airborne aerosol measurement campaigns around the world including EUCAARI LONGREX, ATAR, INCA, INDOEX, CLAIRE, PEGASOS and several regional airborne campaigns in Finland. The typical shapes of the distributions are analyzed. When possible, we use information obtained by CCN counters. In some other cases, we use particle size distribution measured by for example SMPS to get approximated CCN concentration. Other instruments used include optical particle counters or condensational particle counters. When using the GCM models, the CCN concentration used for each the grid-box is often considered to be either flat, or as an arithmetic mean of the concentration inside the grid-box. However, the aircraft data shows that the concentration values are often lognormal distributed. This, combined with the subgrid variations in the land use and atmospheric properties, might cause that the aerosol-cloud interactions calculated by using mean values to vary significantly from the true effects both temporary and spatially. This, in turn, can cause non-linear bias into the GCMs. We calculate the CCN aerosol concentration distribution as a function of different spatial scales. The measurements allow us to study the variation of these distributions within from hundreds of meters up to hundreds of kilometers. This is used to quantify the potential error when mean values are used in GCMs.

  18. Diffusion of Finite-Size Particles in Confined Geometries

    KAUST Repository

    Bruna, Maria; Chapman, S. Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    The diffusion of finite-size hard-core interacting particles in two- or three-dimensional confined domains is considered in the limit that the confinement dimensions become comparable to the particle's dimensions. The result is a nonlinear diffusion equation for the one-particle probability density function, with an overall collective diffusion that depends on both the excluded-volume and the narrow confinement. By including both these effects, the equation is able to interpolate between severe confinement (for example, single-file diffusion) and unconfined diffusion. Numerical solutions of both the effective nonlinear diffusion equation and the stochastic particle system are presented and compared. As an application, the case of diffusion under a ratchet potential is considered, and the change in transport properties due to excluded-volume and confinement effects is examined. © 2013 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  19. Determination of particle size distributions from acoustic wave propagation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spelt, P.D.; Norato, M.A.; Sangani, A.S.; Tavlarides, L.L.

    1999-01-01

    The wave equations for the interior and exterior of the particles are ensemble averaged and combined with an analysis by Allegra and Hawley [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 51, 1545 (1972)] for the interaction of a single particle with the incident wave to determine the phase speed and attenuation of sound waves propagating through dilute slurries. The theory is shown to compare very well with the measured attenuation. The inverse problem, i.e., the problem of determining the particle size distribution given the attenuation as a function of frequency, is examined using regularization techniques that have been successful for bubbly liquids. It is shown that, unlike the bubbly liquids, the success of solving the inverse problem is limited since it depends strongly on the nature of particles and the frequency range used in inverse calculations. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  20. Particle size distribution control of Pt particles used for particle gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiji, M.; Akiba, H.; Nagao, H.; Hirasawa, I.

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study is particle size distribution (PSD) control of submicron sized Pt particles used for particle gun. In this report, simple reaction crystallization is conducted by mixing H2PtCl6 and ascorbic acid. Without the additive, obtained Pt particles have broad PSD and reproducibility of experiment is low. With seeding, Pt particles have narrow PSD and reproducibility improved. Additionally, mean particle diameter of 100-700 nm is controlled by changing seeding amount. Obtained particles are successfully characterized as Pt by XRD results. Moreover, XRD spectra indicate that obtained particles are polycrystals. These experimental results suggest that seeding consumed nucleation, as most nuclei attached on the seed surface. This mechanism virtually restricted nucleation to have narrow PSD can be obtained.

  1. Distribution of lead in single atmospheric particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Murphy

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Three independent single particle mass spectrometers measured Pb in individual aerosol particles. These data provide unprecedented sensitivity and statistical significance for the measurement of Pb in single particles. This paper explores the reasons for the frequency of Pb in fine particles now that most gasoline is unleaded. Trace amounts of Pb were found in 5 to 25% of 250 to 3000 nm diameter particles sampled by both aircraft and surface instruments in the eastern and western United States. Over 5% of particles at a mountain site in Switzerland contained Pb. Particles smaller than 100 nm with high Pb content were also observed by an instrument that was only operated in urban areas. Lead was found on all types of particles, including Pb present on biomass burning particles from remote fires. Less common particles with high Pb contents contributed a majority of the total amount of Pb. Single particles with high Pb content often also contained alkali metals, Zn, Cu, Sn, As, and Sb. The association of Pb with Zn and other metals is also found in IMPROVE network filter data from surface sites. Sources of airborne Pb in the United States are reviewed for consistency with these data. The frequent appearance of trace Pb is consistent with widespread emissions of fine Pb particles from combustion sources followed by coagulation with larger particles during long-range transport. Industrial sources that directly emit Pb-rich particles also contribute to the observations. Clean regions of the western United States show some transport of Pb from Asia but most Pb over the United States comes from North American sources. Resuspension of Pb from soil contaminated by the years of leaded gasoline was not directly apparent.

  2. Distribution of lead in single atmospheric particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, D. M.; Hudson, P. K.; Cziczo, D. J.; Gallavardin, S.; Froyd, K. D.; Johnston, M. V.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Reinard, M. S.; Thomson, D. S.; Thornberry, T.; Wexler, A. S.

    2007-06-01

    Three independent single particle mass spectrometers measured Pb in individual aerosol particles. These data provide unprecedented sensitivity and statistical significance for the measurement of Pb in single particles. This paper explores the reasons for the frequency of Pb in fine particles now that most gasoline is unleaded. Trace amounts of Pb were found in 5 to 25% of 250 to 3000 nm diameter particles sampled by both aircraft and surface instruments in the eastern and western United States. Over 5% of particles at a mountain site in Switzerland contained Pb. Particles smaller than 100 nm with high Pb content were also observed by an instrument that was only operated in urban areas. Lead was found on all types of particles, including Pb present on biomass burning particles from remote fires. Less common particles with high Pb contents contributed a majority of the total amount of Pb. Single particles with high Pb content often also contained alkali metals, Zn, Cu, Sn, As, and Sb. The association of Pb with Zn and other metals is also found in IMPROVE network filter data from surface sites. Sources of airborne Pb in the United States are reviewed for consistency with these data. The frequent appearance of trace Pb is consistent with widespread emissions of fine Pb particles from combustion sources followed by coagulation with larger particles during long-range transport. Industrial sources that directly emit Pb-rich particles also contribute to the observations. Clean regions of the western United States show some transport of Pb from Asia but most Pb over the United States comes from North American sources. Resuspension of Pb from soil contaminated by the years of leaded gasoline was not directly apparent.

  3. Single particle dynamics in circular accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1986-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the reader to the theory associated with the transverse dynamics of single particle, in circular accelerators. The discussion begins with a review of Hamiltonian dynamics and canonical transformations. The case of a single particle in a circular accelerator is considered with a discussion of non-linear terms and chromaticity. The canonical perturbation theory is presented and nonlinear resonances are considered. Finally, the concept of renormalization and residue criterion are examined. (FI)

  4. Calcination and solid state reaction of ceramic-forming components to provide single-phase superconducting materials having fine particle size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Poeppel, Roger B.; Emerson, James E.; Johnson, Stanley A.

    1992-01-01

    An improved method for the preparation of single phase, fine grained ceramic materials from precursor powder mixtures where at least one of the components of the mixture is an alkali earth carbonate. The process consists of heating the precursor powders in a partial vacuum under flowing oxygen and under conditions where the partial pressure of CO.sub.2 evolved during the calcination is kept to a very low level relative to the oxygen. The process has been found particularly suitable for the preparation of high temperature copper oxide superconducting materials such as YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x "123" and YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.4 O.sub.8 "124".

  5. Results of an interlaboratory method performance study for the size determination and quantification of silver nanoparticles in chicken meat by single-particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (sp-ICP-MS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weigel, Stefan; Peters, Ruud J.; Löschner, Katrin

    2017-01-01

    determined particle size and particle number concentration of two chicken meat homogenates spiked with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-stabilized AgNPs. For the determination of the median particle diameter, repeatability standard deviations of 2 and 5% were determined, and reproducibility standard deviations...... were 15 and 25%, respectively. The equivalent median diameter itself was approximately 60% larger than the diameter of the particles in the spiking solution. Determination of the particle number concentration was significantly less precise, with repeatability standard deviations of 7 and 18......% and reproducibility standard deviations of 70 and 90%....

  6. Physical and chemical study of single aerosol particles using optical trapping cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-30

    scope that views the trapped particle walking through the ringdown beam step by step. (b) An image that shows the traces of the particle (MWCNT... walking through the RD beam . 5 a b c Fig.3 The OT-CRDS single particle scope views oscillations of a trapped particle. (a) Image of a trapped...and walking single carbon- nanotube particles of ?50 µm in size and viewing those properties via changes of ringdown time. This single- aerosol

  7. An alternative method for determining particle-size distribution of forest road aggregate and soil with large-sized particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakjun Rhee; Randy B. Foltz; James L. Fridley; Finn Krogstad; Deborah S. Page-Dumroese

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of particle-size distribution (PSD) of soil with large-sized particles (e.g., 25.4 mm diameter) requires a large sample and numerous particle-size analyses (PSAs). A new method is needed that would reduce time, effort, and cost for PSAs of the soil and aggregate material with large-sized particles. We evaluated a nested method for sampling and PSA by...

  8. Automatic particle-size analysis of HTGR recycle fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, J.E.; Pechin, W.H.

    1977-09-01

    An automatic particle-size analyzer was designed, fabricated, tested, and put into operation measuring and counting HTGR recycle fuel particles. The particle-size analyzer can be used for particles in all stages of fabrication, from the loaded, uncarbonized weak acid resin up to fully-coated Biso or Triso particles. The device handles microspheres in the range of 300 to 1000 μm at rates up to 2000 per minute, measuring the diameter of each particle to determine the size distribution of the sample, and simultaneously determining the total number of particles. 10 figures

  9. Well installation, single-well testing, and particle-size analysis for selected sites in and near the Lost Creek Designated Ground Water Basin, north-central Colorado, 2003-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Jennifer A.; Paschke, Suzanne S.; Arnold, L. Rick

    2011-01-01

    This report describes results from a groundwater data-collection program completed in 2003-2004 by the U.S. Geological Survey in support of the South Platte Decision Support System and in cooperation with the Colorado Water Conservation Board. Two monitoring wells were installed adjacent to existing water-table monitoring wells. These wells were installed as well pairs with existing wells to characterize the hydraulic properties of the alluvial aquifer and shallow Denver Formation sandstone aquifer in and near the Lost Creek Designated Ground Water Basin. Single-well tests were performed in the 2 newly installed wells and 12 selected existing monitoring wells. Sediment particle size was analyzed for samples collected from the screened interval depths of each of the 14 wells. Hydraulic-conductivity and transmissivity values were calculated after the completion of single-well tests on each of the selected wells. Recovering water-level data from the single-well tests were analyzed using the Bouwer and Rice method because test data most closely resembled those obtained from traditional slug tests. Results from the single-well test analyses for the alluvial aquifer indicate a median hydraulic-conductivity value of 3.8 x 10-5 feet per second and geometric mean hydraulic-conductivity value of 3.4 x 10-5 feet per second. Median and geometric mean transmissivity values in the alluvial aquifer were 8.6 x 10-4 feet squared per second and 4.9 x 10-4 feet squared per second, respectively. Single-well test results for the shallow Denver Formation sandstone aquifer indicate a median hydraulic-conductivity value of 5.4 x 10-6 feet per second and geometric mean value of 4.9 x 10-6 feet per second. Median and geometric mean transmissivity values for the shallow Denver Formation sandstone aquifer were 4.0 x 10-5 feet squared per second and 5.9 x 10-5 feet squared per second, respectively. Hydraulic-conductivity values for the alluvial aquifer in and near the Lost Creek Designated

  10. Concentration and size distribution of particles in abstracted groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beek, C G E M; de Zwart, A H; Balemans, M; Kooiman, J W; van Rosmalen, C; Timmer, H; Vandersluys, J; Stuyfzand, P J

    2010-02-01

    Particle number concentrations have been counted and particle size distributions calculated in groundwater derived by abstraction wells. Both concentration and size distribution are governed by the discharge rate: the higher this rate the higher the concentration and the higher the proportion of larger particles. However, the particle concentration in groundwater derived from abstraction wells, with high groundwater flow velocities, is much lower than in groundwater from monitor wells, with minimal flow velocities. This inconsistency points to exhaustion of the particle supply in the aquifer around wells due to groundwater abstraction for many years. The particle size distribution can be described with the help of a power law or Pareto distribution. Comparing the measured particle size distribution with the Pareto distribution shows that particles with a diameter >7 microm are under-represented. As the particle size distribution is dependent on the flow velocity, so is the value of the "Pareto" slope beta. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Real-time analysis of insoluble particles in glacial ice using single-particle mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Matthew; Zawadowicz, Maria A.; Das, Sarah B.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2017-11-01

    Insoluble aerosol particles trapped in glacial ice provide insight into past climates, but analysis requires information on climatically relevant particle properties, such as size, abundance, and internal mixing. We present a new analytical method using a time-of-flight single-particle mass spectrometer (SPMS) to determine the composition and size of insoluble particles in glacial ice over an aerodynamic size range of ˜ 0.2-3.0 µm diameter. Using samples from two Greenland ice cores, we developed a procedure to nebulize insoluble particles suspended in melted ice, evaporate condensed liquid from those particles, and transport them to the SPMS for analysis. We further determined size-dependent extraction and instrument transmission efficiencies to investigate the feasibility of determining particle-class-specific mass concentrations. We find SPMS can be used to provide constraints on the aerodynamic size, composition, and relative abundance of most insoluble particulate classes in ice core samples. We describe the importance of post-aqueous processing to particles, a process which occurs due to nebulization of aerosols from an aqueous suspension of originally soluble and insoluble aerosol components. This study represents an initial attempt to use SPMS as an emerging technique for the study of insoluble particulates in ice cores.

  12. Estimating particle number size distributions from multi-instrument observations with Kalman Filtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viskari, T.

    2012-07-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have several important effects on the environment and human society. The exact impact of aerosol particles is largely determined by their particle size distributions. However, no single instrument is able to measure the whole range of the particle size distribution. Estimating a particle size distribution from multiple simultaneous measurements remains a challenge in aerosol physical research. Current methods to combine different measurements require assumptions concerning the overlapping measurement ranges and have difficulties in accounting for measurement uncertainties. In this thesis, Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) is presented as a promising method to estimate particle number size distributions from multiple simultaneous measurements. The particle number size distribution estimated by EKF includes information from prior particle number size distributions as propagated by a dynamical model and is based on the reliabilities of the applied information sources. Known physical processes and dynamically evolving error covariances constrain the estimate both over time and particle size. The method was tested with measurements from Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (DMPS), Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS) and nephelometer. The particle number concentration was chosen as the state of interest. The initial EKF implementation presented here includes simplifications, yet the results are positive and the estimate successfully incorporated information from the chosen instruments. For particle sizes smaller than 4 micrometers, the estimate fits the available measurements and smooths the particle number size distribution over both time and particle diameter. The estimate has difficulties with particles larger than 4 micrometers due to issues with both measurements and the dynamical model in that particle size range. The EKF implementation appears to reduce the impact of measurement noise on the estimate, but has a delayed reaction to sudden

  13. Single particle analysis with a 3600 light scattering photometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholdi, M.F.

    1979-06-01

    Light scattering by single spherical homogeneous particles in the diameter range 1 to 20 μm and relative refractive index 1.20 is measured. Particle size of narrowly dispersed populations is determined and a multi-modal dispersion of five components is completely analyzed. A 360 0 light scattering photometer for analysis of single particles has been designed and developed. A fluid stream containing single particles intersects a focused laser beam at the primary focal point of an ellipsoidal reflector ring. The light scattered at angles theta = 2.5 0 to 177.5 0 at phi = 0 0 and 180 0 is reflected onto a circular array of photodiodes. The ellipsoidal reflector is situated in a chamber filled with fluid matching that of the stream to minimize refracting and reflecting interfaces. The detector array consists of 60 photodiodes each subtending 3 0 in scattering angle on 6 0 centers around 360 0 . 32 measurements on individual particles can be acquired at rates of 500 particles per second. The intensity and angular distribution of light scattered by spherical particles are indicative of size and relative refractive index. Calculations, using Lorenz--Mie theory, of differential scattering patterns integrated over angle corresponding to the detector geometry determined the instrument response to particle size. From this the expected resolution and experimental procedures are determined.Ultimately, the photometer will be utilized for identification and discrimination of biological cells based on the sensitivity of light scattering to size, shape, refractive index differences, internal granularity, and other internal morphology. This study has demonstrated the utility of the photometer and indicates potential for application to light scattering studies of biological cells

  14. Single-particle Schroedinger fluid. I. Formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, K.K.; Griffin, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of a single quantal particle moving in a time-dependent external potential well is formulated specifically to emphasize and develop the fluid dynamical aspects of the matter flow. This idealized problem, the single-particle Schroedinger fluid, is shown to exhibit already a remarkably rich variety of fluid dynamical features, including compressible flow and line vortices. It provides also a sufficient framework to encompass simultaneously various simplified fluidic models for nuclei which have earlier been postulated on an ad hoc basis, and to illuminate their underlying restrictions. Explicit solutions of the single-particle Schroedinger fluid problem are studied in the adiabatic limit for their mathematical and physical implications (especially regarding the collective kinetic energy). The basic generalizations for extension of the treatment to the many-body Schroedinger fluid are set forth

  15. Single-particle Glauber matrix elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oset, E.; Strottman, D.

    1983-01-01

    The single-particle matrix elements of the Glauber profile function are tabulated for harmonic oscillator single-particle wave functions. The tables are presented in such a manner as to be applicable if the hadron--nucleon elementary scattering amplitude is specified by either a partial wave expansion or a Gaussian in momentum transfer squared. The table is complete through the 1 g/sub 9/2/ orbital and contains entries for the 3s/sub 1/2/ orbital for use if realistic wave functions are expanded in terms of harmonic oscillator functions

  16. Intercomparison of 15 Aerodynamic Particle Size Spectrometers (APS 3321): Uncertainties in Particle Sizing and Number Size Distribution.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pfeifer, S.; Müller, T.; Weinhold, K.; Zíková, Naděžda; dos Santos, S.M.; Marinoni, A.; Bischof, O.F.; Kykal, C.; Ries, L.; Meinhardt, F.; Aalto, P.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 4 (2016), s. 1545-1551 ISSN 1867-1381 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 262254 - ACTRIS Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : counting efficiency * aerodynamic particle size spectrometers * laboratory study Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.089, year: 2016

  17. Optimization of magnetic switches for single particle and cell transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abedini-Nassab, Roozbeh; Yellen, Benjamin B., E-mail: yellen@duke.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Duke University, Box 90300 Hudson Hall, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Joint Institute, University of Michigan—Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Murdoch, David M. [Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Kim, CheolGi [Department of Emerging Materials Science, Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST), Daegu 711-873 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-28

    The ability to manipulate an ensemble of single particles and cells is a key aim of lab-on-a-chip research; however, the control mechanisms must be optimized for minimal power consumption to enable future large-scale implementation. Recently, we demonstrated a matter transport platform, which uses overlaid patterns of magnetic films and metallic current lines to control magnetic particles and magnetic-nanoparticle-labeled cells; however, we have made no prior attempts to optimize the device geometry and power consumption. Here, we provide an optimization analysis of particle-switching devices based on stochastic variation in the particle's size and magnetic content. These results are immediately applicable to the design of robust, multiplexed platforms capable of transporting, sorting, and storing single cells in large arrays with low power and high efficiency.

  18. Emissions from Ethanol-Gasoline Blends: A Single Particle Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H. McMurry

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to its agricultural origin and function as a fuel oxygenate, ethanol is being promoted as an alternative biomass-based fuel for use in spark ignition engines, with mandates for its use at state and regional levels. While it has been established that the addition of ethanol to a fuel reduces the particulate mass concentration in the exhaust, little attention has been paid to changes in the physicochemical properties of the emitted particles. In this work, a dynamometer-mounted GM Quad-4 spark ignition engine run without aftertreatment at 1,500 RPM and 100% load was used with four different fuel blends, containing 0, 20, 40 and 85 percent ethanol in gasoline. This allowed the effects of the fuel composition to be isolated from other effects. Instrumentation employed included two Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometers covering different size ranges for analysis of single particle composition, an Aethalometer for black carbon, a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer for particle size distributions, a Photoelectric Aerosol Sensor for particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH species and gravimetric filter measurements for particulate mass concentrations. It was found that, under the conditions investigated here, additional ethanol content in the fuel changes the particle size distribution, especially in the accumulation mode, and decreases the black carbon and total particulate mass concentrations. The molecular weight distribution of the PAHs was found to decrease with added ethanol. However, PAHs produced from higher ethanol-content fuels are associated with NO2− (m/z—46 in the single-particle mass spectra, indicating the presence of nitro-PAHs. Compounds associated with the gasoline (e.g., sulfur-containing species are diminished due to dilution as ethanol is added to the fuel relative to those associated with the lubricating oil (e.g., calcium, zinc, phosphate in the single particle spectra. These changes have potential

  19. Projection operator treatment of single particle resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lev, A.; Beres, W.P.

    1976-01-01

    A projection operator method is used to obtain the energy and width of a single particle resonance. The resonance energy is found without scanning. An example of the first g/sub 9/2/ neutron resonance in 40 Ca is given and compared with the traditional phase shift method. The results of both approaches are quite similar. 4 figures

  20. Morphologically and size uniform monodisperse particles and their shape-directed self-assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Joshua E.; Bell, Howard Y.; Ye, Xingchen; Murray, Christopher Bruce

    2017-09-12

    Monodisperse particles having: a single pure crystalline phase of a rare earth-containing lattice, a uniform three-dimensional size, and a uniform polyhedral morphology are disclosed. Due to their uniform size and shape, the monodisperse particles self assemble into superlattices. The particles may be luminescent particles such as down-converting phosphor particles and up-converting phosphors. The monodisperse particles of the invention have a rare earth-containing lattice which in one embodiment may be an yttrium-containing lattice or in another may be a lanthanide-containing lattice. The monodisperse particles may have different optical properties based on their composition, their size, and/or their morphology (or shape). Also disclosed is a combination of at least two types of monodisperse particles, where each type is a plurality of monodisperse particles having a single pure crystalline phase of a rare earth-containing lattice, a uniform three-dimensional size, and a uniform polyhedral morphology; and where the types of monodisperse particles differ from one another by composition, by size, or by morphology. In a preferred embodiment, the types of monodisperse particles have the same composition but different morphologies. Methods of making and methods of using the monodisperse particles are disclosed.

  1. New instrument for tribocharge measurement due to single particle impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Hideo; Ghadiri, Mojtaba; Matsuyama, Tatsushi; Ding Yulong; Pitt, Kendal G.

    2007-01-01

    During particulate solid processing, particle-particle and particle-wall collisions can generate electrostatic charges. This may lead to a variety of problems ranging from fire and explosion hazards to segregation, caking, and blocking. A fundamental understanding of the particle charging in such situations is therefore essential. For this purpose we have developed a new device that can measure charge transfer due to impact between a single particle and a metal plate. The device consists of an impact test system and two sets of Faraday cage and preamplifier for charge measurement. With current amplifiers, high-resolution measurements of particle charges of approximately 1 and 10 fC have been achieved before and after the impact, respectively. The device allows charge measurements of single particles with a size as small as ∼100 μm impacting on the target at different incident angles with a velocity up to about 80 m/s. Further analyses of the charge transfer as a function of particle initial charge define an equilibrium charge, i.e., an initial charge level prior to impact for which no net charge transfer would occur as a result of impact

  2. Particle size - An important factor in environmental consequence modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Y.C.; MacFarlane, D.

    1991-01-01

    Most available environmental transport and dosimetry codes for radiological consequence analysis are designed primarily for estimating dose and health consequences to specific off-site individuals as well as the population as a whole from nuclear facilities operating under either normal or accident conditions. Models developed for these types of analyses are generally based on assumptions that the receptors are at great distances (several kilometers), and the releases are prolonged and filtered. This allows the use of simplified approaches such as averaged meteorological conditions and the use of a single (small) particle size for atmospheric transport and dosimetry analysis. Source depletion from particle settling, settle-out, and deposition is often ignored. This paper estimates the effects of large particles on the resulting dose consequences from an atmospheric release. The computer program AI-RISK has been developed to perform multiparticle-sized atmospheric transport, dose, and pathway analyses for estimating potential human health consequences from the accidental release of radioactive materials. The program was originally developed to facilitate comprehensive analyses of health consequences, ground contamination, and cleanup associated with possible energetic chemical reactions in high-level radioactive waste (HLW) tanks at a US Department of Energy site

  3. Effect of silica particle size on macrophage inflammatory responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshimasa Kusaka

    Full Text Available Amorphous silica particles, such as nanoparticles (<100 nm diameter particles, are used in a wide variety of products, including pharmaceuticals, paints, cosmetics, and food. Nevertheless, the immunotoxicity of these particles and the relationship between silica particle size and pro-inflammatory activity are not fully understood. In this study, we addressed the relationship between the size of amorphous silica (particle dose, diameter, number, and surface area and the inflammatory activity (macrophage phagocytosis, inflammasome activation, IL-1β secretion, cell death and lung inflammation. Irrespective of diameter size, silica particles were efficiently internalized by mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages via an actin cytoskeleton-dependent pathway, and induced caspase-1, but not caspase-11, activation. Of note, 30 nm-1000 nm diameter silica particles induced lysosomal destabilization, cell death, and IL-1β secretion at markedly higher levels than did 3000 nm-10000 nm silica particles. Consistent with in vitro results, intra-tracheal administration of 30 nm silica particles into mice caused more severe lung inflammation than that of 3000 nm silica particles, as assessed by measurement of pro-inflammatory cytokines and neutrophil infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of mice, and by the micro-computed tomography analysis. Taken together, these results suggest that silica particle size impacts immune responses, with submicron amorphous silica particles inducing higher inflammatory responses than silica particles over 1000 nm in size, which is ascribed not only to their ability to induce caspase-1 activation but also to their cytotoxicity.

  4. Burnout of pulverized biomass particles in large scale boiler - Single particle model approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saastamoinen, Jaakko; Aho, Martti; Moilanen, Antero [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Box 1603, 40101 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Soerensen, Lasse Holst [ReaTech/ReAddit, Frederiksborgsveij 399, Niels Bohr, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Clausen, Soennik [Risoe National Laboratory, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Berg, Mogens [ENERGI E2 A/S, A.C. Meyers Vaenge 9, DK-2450 Copenhagen SV (Denmark)

    2010-05-15

    Burning of coal and biomass particles are studied and compared by measurements in an entrained flow reactor and by modelling. The results are applied to study the burning of pulverized biomass in a large scale utility boiler originally planned for coal. A simplified single particle approach, where the particle combustion model is coupled with one-dimensional equation of motion of the particle, is applied for the calculation of the burnout in the boiler. The particle size of biomass can be much larger than that of coal to reach complete burnout due to lower density and greater reactivity. The burner location and the trajectories of the particles might be optimised to maximise the residence time and burnout. (author)

  5. Dependence of strength on particle size in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, E.P.; Kennedy, C.R.

    The strength to particle size relationship for specially fabricated graphites has been demonstrated and rationalized using fracture mechanics. In the past, similar studies have yielded empirical data using only commercially available material. Thus, experimental verification of these relationships has been difficult. However, the graphites of this study were fabricated by controlling the particle size ranges for a series of isotropic graphites. All graphites that were evaluated had a constant 1.85 g/cm 3 density. Thus, particle size was the only variable. This study also considered the particle size effect on other physical properties; coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), electrical resistivity, fracture strain, and Young's modulus

  6. Magnetic Properties of Nanometer-sized Crystalline and Amorphous Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Bødker, Franz; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    1997-01-01

    Amorphous transition metal-metalloid alloy particles can be prepared by chemical preparation techniques. We discuss the preparation of transition metal-boron and iron-carbon particles and their magnetic properties. Nanometer-sized particles of both crystalline and amorphous magnetic materials...... are superparamagnetic at finite temperatures. The temperature dependence of the superparamagnetic relaxation time and the influence of inter-particle interactions is discussed. Finally, some examples of studies of surface magnetization of alpha-Fe particles are presented....

  7. Particle-Size-Exclusion Clogging Regimes in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, G.; Rodts, S.; Aimedieu, P.; Faure, P.; Coussot, P.

    2018-04-01

    From observations of the progressive deposition of noncolloidal particles by geometrical exclusion effects inside a 3D model porous medium, we get a complete dynamic view of particle deposits over a full range of regimes from transport over a long distance to clogging and caking. We show that clogging essentially occurs in the form of an accumulation of elements in pore size clusters, which ultimately constitute regions avoided by the flow. The clusters are dispersed in the medium, and their concentration (number per volume) decreases with the distance from the entrance; caking is associated with the final stage of this effect (for a critical cluster concentration at the entrance). A simple probabilistic model, taking into account the impact of clogging on particle transport, allows us to quantitatively predict all these trends up to a large cluster concentration, based on a single parameter: the clogging probability, which is a function of the confinement ratio. This opens the route towards a unification of the different fields of particle transport, clogging, caking, and filtration.

  8. Damping of unbound single-particle modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortier, S.; Beaumel, D.; Gales, S.; Guillot, J.; Langevin-Joliot, H.; Laurent, H.; Maison, J.M.

    1995-07-01

    The (α, 3 He-n) reaction has been investigated at 120 MeV incident energy on 64 Ni, 90 Zr and 120 Sn target nuclei. Neutrons in coincidence with 3 He particles emitted at 0 deg were detected, in order to get information about the decay of single-particle states embedded in the (α, 3 He) continuum. Neutron angular correlations, multiplicity values and branching ratios to low-lying states of the final nuclei have been compared with the predictions of the statistical decay model. Direct branching ratios in 91 Zr deduced from this analysis are compared with the predictions of two nuclear structure models. (author)

  9. Production of sized particles of uranium oxides and uranium oxyfluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudsen, I.E.; Randall, C.C.

    1976-01-01

    A process is claimed for converting uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) to uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) of a relatively large particle size in a fluidized bed reactor by mixing uranium hexafluoride with a mixture of steam and hydrogen and by preliminary reacting in an ejector gaseous uranium hexafluoride with steam and hydrogen to form a mixture of uranium and oxide and uranium oxyfluoride seed particles of varying sizes, separating the larger particles from the smaller particles in a cyclone separator, recycling the smaller seed particles through the ejector to increase their size, and introducing the larger seed particles from the cyclone separator into a fluidized bed reactor where the seed particles serve as nuclei on which coarser particles of uranium dioxide are formed. 9 claims, 2 drawing figures

  10. Ultraviolet (UV) disinfection of grey water: particle size effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winward, G P; Avery, L M; Stephenson, T; Jefferson, B

    2008-02-01

    The impact of water quality on the ultraviolet (UV) disinfection of grey water was investigated with reference to urban water reuse. Direct UV disinfection of grey water did not meet the stringent California State Title 22 criteria for unrestricted urban water reuse due to the presence of particulate material ranging from or = 2000 microm in size. Grey water was manipulated by settling to produce fractions of varying particle size distributions and blending was employed post-disinfection to extract particle-associated coliforms (PACs). The efficacy of UV disinfection was found to be linked to the particle size of the grey water fractions. The larger particle size fractions with a mean particle size of 262 microm and above were observed to shield more coliforms from UV light than did the smaller particles with a mean particle size below 119 microm. Up to 70% of total coliforms in the larger particle size fractions were particle-associated following a UV dose (fluence) of 260 mJ.cm(-2) and would remain undetected by standard coliform enumeration techniques. Implications for urban water reuse are discussed and recommendations made for grey water treatment to ensure removal of particle-associated indicator bacteria and pathogens prior to UV disinfection.

  11. Artificial neural network based particle size prediction of polymeric nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youshia, John; Ali, Mohamed Ehab; Lamprecht, Alf

    2017-10-01

    Particle size of nanoparticles and the respective polydispersity are key factors influencing their biopharmaceutical behavior in a large variety of therapeutic applications. Predicting these attributes would skip many preliminary studies usually required to optimize formulations. The aim was to build a mathematical model capable of predicting the particle size of polymeric nanoparticles produced by a pharmaceutical polymer of choice. Polymer properties controlling the particle size were identified as molecular weight, hydrophobicity and surface activity, and were quantified by measuring polymer viscosity, contact angle and interfacial tension, respectively. A model was built using artificial neural network including these properties as input with particle size and polydispersity index as output. The established model successfully predicted particle size of nanoparticles covering a range of 70-400nm prepared from other polymers. The percentage bias for particle prediction was 2%, 4% and 6%, for the training, validation and testing data, respectively. Polymer surface activity was found to have the highest impact on the particle size followed by viscosity and finally hydrophobicity. Results of this study successfully highlighted polymer properties affecting particle size and confirmed the usefulness of artificial neural networks in predicting the particle size and polydispersity of polymeric nanoparticles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Statistical properties of the normalized ice particle size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delanoë, Julien; Protat, Alain; Testud, Jacques; Bouniol, Dominique; Heymsfield, A. J.; Bansemer, A.; Brown, P. R. A.; Forbes, R. M.

    2005-05-01

    Testud et al. (2001) have recently developed a formalism, known as the "normalized particle size distribution (PSD)", which consists in scaling the diameter and concentration axes in such a way that the normalized PSDs are independent of water content and mean volume-weighted diameter. In this paper we investigate the statistical properties of the normalized PSD for the particular case of ice clouds, which are known to play a crucial role in the Earth's radiation balance. To do so, an extensive database of airborne in situ microphysical measurements has been constructed. A remarkable stability in shape of the normalized PSD is obtained. The impact of using a single analytical shape to represent all PSDs in the database is estimated through an error analysis on the instrumental (radar reflectivity and attenuation) and cloud (ice water content, effective radius, terminal fall velocity of ice crystals, visible extinction) properties. This resulted in a roughly unbiased estimate of the instrumental and cloud parameters, with small standard deviations ranging from 5 to 12%. This error is found to be roughly independent of the temperature range. This stability in shape and its single analytical approximation implies that two parameters are now sufficient to describe any normalized PSD in ice clouds: the intercept parameter N*0 and the mean volume-weighted diameter Dm. Statistical relationships (parameterizations) between N*0 and Dm have then been evaluated in order to reduce again the number of unknowns. It has been shown that a parameterization of N*0 and Dm by temperature could not be envisaged to retrieve the cloud parameters. Nevertheless, Dm-T and mean maximum dimension diameter -T parameterizations have been derived and compared to the parameterization of Kristjánsson et al. (2000) currently used to characterize particle size in climate models. The new parameterization generally produces larger particle sizes at any temperature than the Kristjánsson et al. (2000

  13. Seasonal and particle size-dependent variations in gas/particle partitioning of PCDD/Fs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Se-Jin; Ale, Debaki; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Oh, Jeong-Eun; Shin, Sun Kyoung

    2008-01-01

    This study monitored particle size-dependent variations in atmospheric polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs). Two gas/particle partitioning models, the subcooled liquid vapor pressure (P L 0 ) and the octanol-air partition coefficient (K OA ) model, were applied to each particle sizes. The regression coefficients of each fraction against the gas/particle partition coefficient (K P ) were similar for separated particles within the same sample set but differed for particles collected during different periods. Gas/particle partitioning calculated from the integral of fractions was similar to that of size-segregated particles and previously measured bulk values. Despite the different behaviors and production mechanisms of atmospheric particles of different sizes, PCDD/F partitioning of each size range was controlled by meteorological conditions such as atmospheric temperature, O 3 and UV, which reflects no source related with certain particle size ranges but mixed urban sources within this city. Our observations emphasize that when assessing environmental and health effects, the movement of PCDD/Fs in air should be considered in conjunction with particle size in addition to the bulk aerosol. - Gas/particle partitioning of atmospheric PCDD/Fs for different particle sizes reflects the impacts of emitters of different size ranges

  14. Interpretation of aerosol trace metal particle size distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, T.B.; Van Grieken, R.E.; Winchester, J.W.

    1974-01-01

    Proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis is capable of rapid routine determination of 10--15 elements present in amounts greater than or equal to 1 ng simultaneously in aerosol size fractions as collected by single orifice impactors over short periods of time. This enables detailed study of complex relationships between elements detected. Since absolute elemental concentrations may be strongly influenced by meteorological and topographical conditions, it is useful to normalize to a reference element. Comparison between the ratios of concentrations with aerosol and corresponding values for anticipated sources may lead to the identification of important sources for the elements. Further geochemical insights may be found through linear correlation coefficients, regression analysis, and cluster analysis. By calculating correlations for elemental pairs, an indication of the degree of covariance between the elements is obtained. Preliminary results indicate that correlations may be particle size dependent. A high degree of covariance may be caused either by a common source or may only reflect the conservative nature of the aerosol. In a regression analysis, by plotting elemental pairs and estimating the regression coefficients, we may be able to conclude if there is more than one source operating for a given element in a certain size range. Analysis of clustering of several elements, previously investigated for aerosol filter samples, can be applied to the analysis of aerosol size fractions. Careful statistical treatment of elemental concentrations as a function of aerosol particle size may thus yield significant information on the generation, transport and deposition of trace metals in the atmosphere

  15. Multi-Color Single Particle Tracking with Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Eva Arnspang; Brewer, J. R.; Lagerholm, B. C.

    2012-01-01

    . multiplex single molecule sensitivity applications such as single particle tracking (SPT). In order to fully optimize single molecule multiplex application with QDs, we have in this work performed a comprehensive quantitative investigation of the fluorescence intensities, fluorescence intensity fluctuations......Quantum dots (QDs) have long promised to revolutionize fluorescence detection to include even applications requiring simultaneous multi-species detection at single molecule sensitivity. Despite the early promise, the unique optical properties of QDs have not yet been fully exploited in e. g...... further show that there is only a small size advantage in using blue-shifted QDs in biological applications because of the additional size of the water-stabilizing surface coat. Extending previous work, we finally also show that parallel four color multicolor (MC)-SPT with QDs is possible at an image...

  16. Mass spectra features of biomass burning boiler and coal burning boiler emitted particles by single particle aerosol mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiao; Li, Mei; Shi, Guoliang; Wang, Haiting; Ma, Xian; Wu, Jianhui; Shi, Xurong; Feng, Yinchang

    2017-11-15

    In this study, single particle mass spectra signatures of both coal burning boiler and biomass burning boiler emitted particles were studied. Particle samples were suspended in clean Resuspension Chamber, and analyzed by ELPI and SPAMS simultaneously. The size distribution of BBB (biomass burning boiler sample) and CBB (coal burning boiler sample) are different, as BBB peaks at smaller size, and CBB peaks at larger size. Mass spectra signatures of two samples were studied by analyzing the average mass spectrum of each particle cluster extracted by ART-2a in different size ranges. In conclusion, BBB sample mostly consists of OC and EC containing particles, and a small fraction of K-rich particles in the size range of 0.2-0.5μm. In 0.5-1.0μm, BBB sample consists of EC, OC, K-rich and Al_Silicate containing particles; CBB sample consists of EC, ECOC containing particles, while Al_Silicate (including Al_Ca_Ti_Silicate, Al_Ti_Silicate, Al_Silicate) containing particles got higher fractions as size increase. The similarity of single particle mass spectrum signatures between two samples were studied by analyzing the dot product, results indicated that part of the single particle mass spectra of two samples in the same size range are similar, which bring challenge to the future source apportionment activity by using single particle aerosol mass spectrometer. Results of this study will provide physicochemical information of important sources which contribute to particle pollution, and will support source apportionment activities. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Size analysis of single-core magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, Frank, E-mail: f.ludwig@tu-bs.de [Institut für Elektrische Messtechnik und Grundlagen der Elektrotechnik, TU Braunschweig, Braunschweig (Germany); Balceris, Christoph; Viereck, Thilo [Institut für Elektrische Messtechnik und Grundlagen der Elektrotechnik, TU Braunschweig, Braunschweig (Germany); Posth, Oliver; Steinhoff, Uwe [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Berlin (Germany); Gavilan, Helena; Costo, Rocio [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, ICMM/CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Zeng, Lunjie; Olsson, Eva [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg (Sweden); Jonasson, Christian; Johansson, Christer [ACREO Swedish ICT AB, Göteborg (Sweden)

    2017-04-01

    Single-core iron-oxide nanoparticles with nominal core diameters of 14 nm and 19 nm were analyzed with a variety of non-magnetic and magnetic analysis techniques, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), static magnetization vs. magnetic field (M-H) measurements, ac susceptibility (ACS) and magnetorelaxometry (MRX). From the experimental data, distributions of core and hydrodynamic sizes are derived. Except for TEM where a number-weighted distribution is directly obtained, models have to be applied in order to determine size distributions from the measurand. It was found that the mean core diameters determined from TEM, M-H, ACS and MRX measurements agree well although they are based on different models (Langevin function, Brownian and Néel relaxation times). Especially for the sample with large cores, particle interaction effects come into play, causing agglomerates which were detected in DLS, ACS and MRX measurements. We observed that the number and size of agglomerates can be minimized by sufficiently strong diluting the suspension. - Highlights: • Investigation of size parameters of single-core magnetic nanoparticles with nominal core diameters of 14 nm and 19 nm utilizing different magnetic and non-magnetic methods • Hydrodynamic size determined from ac susceptibility measurements is consistent with the DLS findings • Core size agrees determined from static magnetization curves, MRX and ACS data agrees with results from TEM although the estimation is based on different models (Langevin function, Brownian and Néel relaxation times).

  18. Concentration and size distribution of particles in abstracted groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Beek, C.G.E.M.; de Zwart, A.H.; Balemans, M.; Kooiman, J.W.; van Rosmalen, C.; Timmer, H.; Vandersluys, J.; Stuijfzand, P.J.

    2010-01-01

    Particle number concentrations have been counted and particle size distributions calculated in groundwater derived by abstraction wells. Both concentration and size distribution are governed by the discharge rate: the higher this rate the higher the concentration and the higher the proportion of

  19. Particle size control of detergents in mixed flow spray dryers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Jonathan Crosby

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Particle size is a key quality parameter of a powder detergent as it determines its performance, the bulk density and the look and feel of the product. Consequently, it is essential that particle size is controlled to ensure the consistency of performance when comparing new formulations. The majority of study reported in the literature relating to particle size control, focuses on the spray produced by the atomisation technique. One approach advocated to achieve particle size control is the manipulation of the ratio of the mass slurry rate and mass flow rate of gas used for atomisation. Within this study, ratio control was compared with an automatic cascade loop approach using online measurements of the powder particle size on a small-scale pilot plant. It was concluded that cascade control of the mean particle size, based on manipulating the mass flow rate of gas, resulted in tighter, more responsive control. The effect of a ratio change varied with different formulations and different slurry rates. Furthermore, changes in slurry rate caused complications, as the impact on particle size growth in the dryer is non-linear and difficult to predict. The cascade loop enables further study into the effect of particle size on detergent performance.

  20. Single particle tracking and single molecule energy transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Bräuchle, Christoph; Michaelis, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Closing a gap in the literature, this handbook gathers all the information on single particle tracking and single molecule energy transfer. It covers all aspects of this hot and modern topic, from detecting virus entry to membrane diffusion, and from protein folding using spFRET to coupled dye systems, as well recent achievements in the field. Throughout, the first-class editors and top international authors present content of the highest quality, making this a must-have for physical chemists, spectroscopists, molecular physicists and biochemists.

  1. Single-particle characterization of the High Arctic summertime aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierau, B.; Chang, R. Y.-W.; Leck, C.; Paatero, J.; Lohmann, U.

    2014-01-01

    Single-particle mass spectrometric measurements were carried out in the High Arctic north of 80° during summer 2008. The campaign took place onboard the icebreaker Oden and was part of the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS). The instrument deployed was an Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS) that provides information on the chemical composition of individual particles and their mixing state in real-time. Aerosols were sampled in the marine boundary layer at stations in the open ocean, in the marginal ice zone, and in the pack ice region. The largest fraction of particles detected for subsequent analysis in the size range of the ATOFMS between approximately 200 nm to 3000 nm in diameter showed mass spectrometric patterns indicating an internal mixing state and a biomass burning and/or biofuel source. The majority of these particles were connected to an air mass layer of elevated particle concentration mixed into the surface mixed layer from the upper part of the marine boundary layer. The second largest fraction was represented by sea salt particles. The chemical analysis of the over-ice sea salt aerosol revealed tracer compounds that reflect chemical aging of the particles during their long-range advection from the marginal ice zone, or open waters south thereof prior to detection at the ship. From our findings we conclude that long-range transport of particles is one source of aerosols in the High Arctic. To assess the importance of long-range particle sources for aerosol-cloud interactions over the inner Arctic in comparison to local and regional biogenic primary aerosol sources, the chemical composition of the detected particles was analyzed for indicators of marine biological origin. Only a~minor fraction showed chemical signatures of potentially ocean-derived primary particles of that kind. However, a chemical bias in the ATOFMS's detection capabilities observed during ASCOS might suggest a presence of a particle type of unknown composition

  2. Stability of MC Carbide Particles Size in Creep Resisting Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vodopivec, F.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical analysis of the dependence microstructure creep rate. Discussion on the effects of carbide particles size and their distribution on the base of accelerated creep tests on a steel X20CrMoV121 tempered at 800 °C. Analysis of the stability of carbide particles size in terms of free energy of formation of the compound. Explanation of the different effect of VC and NbC particles on accelerated creep rate.

  3. Contact freezing of supercooled cloud droplets on collision with mineral dust particles: effect of particle size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Nadine; Duft, Denis; Kiselev, Alexei; Leisner, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The contact freezing of supercooled cloud droplets is one of the potentially important and the least investigated heterogeneous mechanism of ice formation in the tropospheric clouds [1]. On the time scales of cloud lifetime the freezing of supercooled water droplets via contact mechanism may occur at higher temperature compared to the same IN immersed in the droplet. However, the laboratory experiments of contact freezing are very challenging due to the number of factors affecting the probability of ice formation. In our experiment we study single water droplets freely levitated in the laminar flow of mineral dust particles acting as the contact freezing nuclei. By repeating the freezing experiment sufficient number of times we are able to reproduce statistical freezing behavior of large ensembles of supercooled droplets and measure the average rate of freezing events. We show that the rate of freezing at given temperature is governed only by the rate of droplet -particle collision and by the properties of the contact ice nuclei. In this contribution we investigate the relationship between the freezing probability and the size of mineral dust particle (represented by illite) and show that their IN efficiency scales with the particle size. Based on this observation, we discuss the similarity between the freezing of supercooled water droplets in immersion and contact modes and possible mechanisms of apparent enhancement of the contact freezing efficiency. [1] - K.C. Young, The role of contact nucleation in ice phase initiation in clouds, Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences 31, 1974

  4. Particle size dependence of biogenic secondary organic aerosol molecular composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Peijun; Johnston, Murray V.

    2017-06-01

    Formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is initiated by the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the gas phase whose products subsequently partition to the particle phase. Non-volatile molecules have a negligible evaporation rate and grow particles at their condensation rate. Semi-volatile molecules have a significant evaporation rate and grow particles at a much slower rate than their condensation rate. Particle phase chemistry may enhance particle growth if it transforms partitioned semi-volatile molecules into non-volatile products. In principle, changes in molecular composition as a function of particle size allow non-volatile molecules that have condensed from the gas phase (a surface-limited process) to be distinguished from those produced by particle phase reaction (a volume-limited process). In this work, SOA was produced by β-pinene ozonolysis in a flow tube reactor. Aerosol exiting the reactor was size-selected with a differential mobility analyzer, and individual particle sizes between 35 and 110 nm in diameter were characterized by on- and offline mass spectrometry. Both the average oxygen-to-carbon (O / C) ratio and carbon oxidation state (OSc) were found to decrease with increasing particle size, while the relative signal intensity of oligomers increased with increasing particle size. These results are consistent with oligomer formation primarily in the particle phase (accretion reactions, which become more favored as the volume-to-surface-area ratio of the particle increases). Analysis of a series of polydisperse SOA samples showed similar dependencies: as the mass loading increased (and average volume-to-surface-area ratio increased), the average O / C ratio and OSc decreased, while the relative intensity of oligomer ions increased. The results illustrate the potential impact that particle phase chemistry can have on biogenic SOA formation and the particle size range where this chemistry becomes important.

  5. Particle size dependence of biogenic secondary organic aerosol molecular composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA is initiated by the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs in the gas phase whose products subsequently partition to the particle phase. Non-volatile molecules have a negligible evaporation rate and grow particles at their condensation rate. Semi-volatile molecules have a significant evaporation rate and grow particles at a much slower rate than their condensation rate. Particle phase chemistry may enhance particle growth if it transforms partitioned semi-volatile molecules into non-volatile products. In principle, changes in molecular composition as a function of particle size allow non-volatile molecules that have condensed from the gas phase (a surface-limited process to be distinguished from those produced by particle phase reaction (a volume-limited process. In this work, SOA was produced by β-pinene ozonolysis in a flow tube reactor. Aerosol exiting the reactor was size-selected with a differential mobility analyzer, and individual particle sizes between 35 and 110 nm in diameter were characterized by on- and offline mass spectrometry. Both the average oxygen-to-carbon (O ∕ C ratio and carbon oxidation state (OSc were found to decrease with increasing particle size, while the relative signal intensity of oligomers increased with increasing particle size. These results are consistent with oligomer formation primarily in the particle phase (accretion reactions, which become more favored as the volume-to-surface-area ratio of the particle increases. Analysis of a series of polydisperse SOA samples showed similar dependencies: as the mass loading increased (and average volume-to-surface-area ratio increased, the average O ∕ C ratio and OSc decreased, while the relative intensity of oligomer ions increased. The results illustrate the potential impact that particle phase chemistry can have on biogenic SOA formation and the particle size range where this chemistry becomes

  6. Sonochemical synthesis of silica particles and their size control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hwa-Min [Advanced Materials and Chemical Engineering, Catholic University of Daegu, Gyeongbuk 38430 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang-Hyun [Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Catholic University of Daegu, Gyeongbuk 38430 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bonghwan, E-mail: bhkim@cu.ac.kr [Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Catholic University of Daegu, Gyeongbuk 38430 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Silica particles were easily prepared by an ultrasound-assisted sol–gel method. • The particle size was controlled by the ammonium hydroxide/water molar ratio. • The size-controlled diameter of silica particles ranged from 40 to 400 nm. • The particles were formed in a relatively short reaction time. - Abstract: Using an ultrasound-assisted sol–gel method, we successfully synthesized very uniformly shaped, monodisperse, and size-controlled spherical silica particles from a mixture of ethanol, water, and tetraethyl orthosilicate in the presence of ammonia as catalyst, at room temperature. The diameters of the silica particles were distributed in the range from 40 to 400 nm; their morphology was well characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The silica particle size could be adjusted by choosing suitable concentrations of ammonium hydroxide and water, which in turn determined the nucleation and growth rates of the particles during the reaction. This sonochemical-based silica synthesis offers an alternative way to produce spherical silica particles in a relatively short reaction time. Thus, we suggest that this simple, low-cost, and efficient method of preparing uniform silica particles of various sizes will have practical and wide-ranging industrial applicability.

  7. A multi-parametric particle-pairing algorithm for particle tracking in single and multiphase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardwell, Nicholas D; Vlachos, Pavlos P; Thole, Karen A

    2011-01-01

    Multiphase flows (MPFs) offer a rich area of fundamental study with many practical applications. Examples of such flows range from the ingestion of foreign particulates in gas turbines to transport of particles within the human body. Experimental investigation of MPFs, however, is challenging, and requires techniques that simultaneously resolve both the carrier and discrete phases present in the flowfield. This paper presents a new multi-parametric particle-pairing algorithm for particle tracking velocimetry (MP3-PTV) in MPFs. MP3-PTV improves upon previous particle tracking algorithms by employing a novel variable pair-matching algorithm which utilizes displacement preconditioning in combination with estimated particle size and intensity to more effectively and accurately match particle pairs between successive images. To improve the method's efficiency, a new particle identification and segmentation routine was also developed. Validation of the new method was initially performed on two artificial data sets: a traditional single-phase flow published by the Visualization Society of Japan (VSJ) and an in-house generated MPF data set having a bi-modal distribution of particles diameters. Metrics of the measurement yield, reliability and overall tracking efficiency were used for method comparison. On the VSJ data set, the newly presented segmentation routine delivered a twofold improvement in identifying particles when compared to other published methods. For the simulated MPF data set, measurement efficiency of the carrier phases improved from 9% to 41% for MP3-PTV as compared to a traditional hybrid PTV. When employed on experimental data of a gas–solid flow, the MP3-PTV effectively identified the two particle populations and reported a vector efficiency and velocity measurement error comparable to measurements for the single-phase flow images. Simultaneous measurement of the dispersed particle and the carrier flowfield velocities allowed for the calculation of

  8. Correcting for particle size effects on plasma actuator particle image velocimetry measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masati, A.; Sedwick, R. J.

    2018-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is often used to characterize plasma actuator flow, but particle charging effects are rarely taken into account. A parametric study was conducted to determine the effects of particle size on the velocity results of plasma actuator PIV experiments. Results showed that smaller particles more closely match air flow velocities than larger particles. The measurement uncertainty was quantified by deconvolving the particle image diameter from the correlation diameter. The true air velocity was calculated by linearly extrapolating to the zero-size particle diameter.

  9. Determination of reactivity rates of silicate particle-size fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Cristina Fernandes Deus

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of sources used for soil acidity correction depends on reactivity rate (RR and neutralization power (NP, indicated by effective calcium carbonate (ECC. Few studies establish relative efficiency of reactivity (RER for silicate particle-size fractions, therefore, the RER applied for lime are used. This study aimed to evaluate the reactivity of silicate materials affected by particle size throughout incubation periods in comparison to lime, and to calculate the RER for silicate particle-size fractions. Six correction sources were evaluated: three slags from distinct origins, dolomitic and calcitic lime separated into four particle-size fractions (2, 0.84, 0.30 and <0.30-mm sieves, and wollastonite, as an additional treatment. The treatments were applied to three soils with different texture classes. The dose of neutralizing material (calcium and magnesium oxides was applied at equal quantities, and the only variation was the particle-size material. After a 90-day incubation period, the RER was calculated for each particle-size fraction, as well as the RR and ECC of each source. The neutralization of soil acidity of the same particle-size fraction for different sources showed distinct solubility and a distinct reaction between silicates and lime. The RER for slag were higher than the limits established by Brazilian legislation, indicating that the method used for limes should not be used for the slags studied here.

  10. Damping of unbound single-particle modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortier, S.; Beaumel, D.; Gales, S.; Guillot, J.; Langevin-Joliot, H.; Laurent, H.; Maison, J.M.; Bordewijk, J.; Brandenburg, S.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Crawley, G.M.; Massolo, C.P.; Renteria, M.; Khendriche, A.

    1995-01-01

    The (α, 3 He-n) reaction has been investigated at 120 MeV incident energy on 64 Ni, 90 Zr, and 120 Sn target nuclei. Neutrons in coincidence with 3 He particles emitted at 0 degree were detected using the multidetector array EDEN, in order to get information about the decay of single-particle states embedded in the (α, 3 He) continuum. Neutron angular correlations, multiplicity values, and branching ratios to low-lying states of the final nuclei have been compared with the predictions of the statistical decay model. Evidence for a significant nonstatistical decay branch has been observed in the three nuclei below about 15 MeV excitation energy. Direct branching ratios in 91 Zr deduced from this analysis are compared with the predictions of two nuclear structure models. At higher excitation energy, the decay characteristics of the (α, 3 He) continuum are shown to be mainly statistical

  11. Cytotoxicity evaluation of ceramic particles of different sizes and shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Akiko; Honma, Rieko; Sumita, Masae; Hanawa, Takao

    2004-02-01

    When artificial hip or knee joints are implanted in the human body, they release metallic, ceramic, and polymeric debris into the surrounding tissues. The toxicity of the released particles is of two types: chemical, caused by the released soluble ions and monomers, and mechanical, a result of mechanical stimulation produced by the insoluble particles. In this study, the cytotoxicity of particles of TiO2, Al2O3, ZrO2, Si3N4, and SiC for murine fibroblasts and macrophages were examined to evaluate just their mechanical toxicity because these particles are not expected to release soluble metal ions. Different sizes and shapes of TiO2 particles were used to evaluate the effect of size and shape on particle cytotoxicity. The results suggest that the cytotoxicity of ceramic particles does not depend on their chemical species. Cytotoxicity levels were lower than those of corresponding metal ions, indicating that the mechanical toxicity of particles is lower than the chemical toxicity of released soluble ions and monomers. The differences in size did not affect the mechanical toxicity of these particles. The dendritic particles had a higher cytotoxicity level for macrophages than did spindle and spheric particles. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res 68A: 244-256, 2004

  12. Effect of particle size distribution on sintering of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, B.R.; Griffin, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    To date, very little is known about the effect of the nature of the particle size distribution on sintering. It is reasonable that there should be an effect of size distribution, and theory and prior experimental work examining the effects of variations in bimodal and continuous distributions have shown marked effects on sintering. Most importantly, even with constant mean particle size, variations in distribution width, or standard deviation, have been shown to produce marked variations in microstructure and sintering rate. In the latter work, in which spherical copper powders were blended to produce lognormal distributions of constant geometric mean particle size by weight frequency, blends with larger values of geometric standard deviation, 1nσ, sintered more rapidly. The goals of the present study were to examine in more detail the effects of variations in the width of lognormal particle size distributions of tungsten powder and determine the effects of 1nσ on the microstructural evolution during sintering

  13. Characterization of spherical core–shell particles by static light scattering. Estimation of the core- and particle-size distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clementi, Luis A.; Vega, Jorge R.; Gugliotta, Luis M.; Quirantes, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    A numerical method is proposed for the characterization of core–shell spherical particles from static light scattering (SLS) measurements. The method is able to estimate the core size distribution (CSD) and the particle size distribution (PSD), through the following two-step procedure: (i) the estimation of the bivariate core–particle size distribution (C–PSD), by solving a linear ill-conditioned inverse problem through a generalized Tikhonov regularization strategy, and (ii) the calculation of the CSD and the PSD from the estimated C–PSD. First, the method was evaluated on the basis of several simulated examples, with polystyrene–poly(methyl methacrylate) core–shell particles of different CSDs and PSDs. Then, two samples of hematite–Yttrium basic carbonate core–shell particles were successfully characterized. In all analyzed examples, acceptable estimates of the PSD and the average diameter of the CSD were obtained. Based on the single-scattering Mie theory, the proposed method is an effective tool for characterizing core–shell colloidal particles larger than their Rayleigh limits without requiring any a-priori assumption on the shapes of the size distributions. Under such conditions, the PSDs can always be adequately estimated, while acceptable CSD estimates are obtained when the core/shell particles exhibit either a high optical contrast, or a moderate optical contrast but with a high ‘average core diameter’/‘average particle diameter’ ratio. -- Highlights: ► Particles with core–shell morphology are characterized by static light scattering. ► Core size distribution and particle size distribution are successfully estimated. ► Simulated and experimental examples are used to validate the numerical method. ► The positive effect of a large core/shell optical contrast is investigated. ► No a-priori assumption on the shapes of the size distributions is required.

  14. Chemical compositions of subway particles in Seoul, Korea determined by a quantitative single particle analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sunni; Hwang, HeeJin; Park, YooMyung; Kim, HyeKyoung; Ro, Chul-Un

    2008-12-15

    A novel single particle analytical technique, low-Z particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis, was applied to characterize seasonal subway samples collected at a subway station in Seoul, Korea. For all 8 samples collected twice in each season, 4 major types of subway particles, based on their chemical compositions, are significantly encountered: Fe-containing; soil-derived; carbonaceous; and secondary nitrate and/or sulfate particles. Fe-containing particles are generated indoors from wear processes at rail-wheel-brake interfaces while the others may be introduced mostly from the outdoor urban atmosphere. Fe-containing particles are the most frequently encountered with relative abundances in the range of 61-79%. In this study, it is shown that Fe-containing subway particles almost always exist either as partially or fully oxidized forms in underground subway microenvironments. Their relative abundances of Fe-containing particles increase as particle sizes decrease. Relative abundances of Fe-containing particles are higher in morning samples than in afternoon samples because of heavier train traffic in the morning. In the summertime samples, Fe-containing particles are the most abundantly encountered, whereas soil-derived and nitrate/sulfate particles are the least encountered, indicating the air-exchange between indoor and outdoor environments is limited in the summer, owing to the air-conditioning in the subway system. In our work, it was observed that the relative abundances of the particles of outdoor origin vary somewhat among seasonal samples to a lesser degree, reflecting that indoor emission sources predominate.

  15. Distribution Of Natural Radioactivity On Soil Size Particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Van Luyen; Trinh Hoai Vinh; Thai Khac Dinh

    2008-01-01

    This report presents a distribution of natural radioactivity on different soil size particles, taken from one soil profile. On the results shows a range from 52% to 66% of natural radioisotopes such as 238 U, 232 Th, 226 Ra and 40 K concentrated on the soil particles below 40 micrometers in diameter size. The remained of natural radioisotopes were distributed on a soil particles with higher diameter size. The study is available for soil sample collected to natural radioactive analyze by gamma and alpha spectrometer methods. (author)

  16. Single-Particle States in $^{133}$Sn

    CERN Multimedia

    Huck, A

    2002-01-01

    % IS338 \\\\ \\\\ It is suggested to investigate the $\\beta^- $-decay of $^{133}$In and $^{134}$In in order to determine the single-particle states in $^{133}$Sn, which are so far unknown and needed for the shell-model description of the region close to $^{132}$Sn. Large hyper-pure Ge-detectors will be used for the $\\gamma$-ray spectroscopy. In the experiments with $^{134}$In, delayed neutrons in coincidence with $\\gamma$-rays from excited states in $^{133}$Sn provide the opportunity for a very selective detection of the states in question.

  17. Single-Particle Tracking of Human Lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Messieres, Michel; Ng, Abby; Duarte, Cornelio J; Remaley, Alan T; Lee, Jennifer C

    2016-01-05

    Lipoproteins, such as high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and very-low density lipoprotein (VLDL), play a critical role in heart disease. Lipoproteins vary in size and shape as well as in their apolipoprotein content. Here, we developed a new experimental framework to study freely diffusing lipoproteins from human blood, allowing analysis of even the smallest HDL with a radius of 5 nm. In an easily constructed confinement chamber, individual HDL, LDL, and VLDL particles labeled with three distinct fluorophores were simultaneously tracked by wide-field fluorescence microscopy and their sizes were determined by their motion. This technique enables studies of individual lipoproteins in solution and allows characterization of the heterogeneous properties of lipoproteins which affect their biological function but are difficult to discern in bulk studies.

  18. Deformation Behavior of Sub-micron and Micron Sized Alumina Particles in Compression.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarobol, Pylin; Chandross, Michael E.; Carroll, Jay; Mook, William; Boyce, Brad; Kotula, Paul Gabriel; McKenzie, Bonnie Beth; Bufford, Daniel Charles; Hall, Aaron Christopher.

    2014-09-01

    The ability to integrate ceramics with other materials has been limited due to high temperature (>800degC) ceramic processing. Recently, researchers demonstrated a novel process , aerosol deposition (AD), to fabricate ceramic films at room temperature (RT). In this process, sub - micro n sized ceramic particles are accelerated by pressurized gas, impacted on the substrate, plastically deformed, and form a dense film under vacuum. This AD process eliminates high temperature processing thereby enabling new coatings and device integration, in which ceramics can be deposited on metals, plastics, and glass. However, k nowledge in fundamental mechanisms for ceramic particle s to deform and form a dense ceramic film is still needed and is essential in advancing this novel RT technology. In this wo rk, a combination of experimentation and atomistic simulation was used to determine the deformation behavior of sub - micron sized ceramic particle s ; this is the first fundamental step needed to explain coating formation in the AD process . High purity, singl e crystal, alpha alumina particles with nominal size s of 0.3 um and 3.0 um were examined. Particle characterization, using transmission electron microscopy (TEM ), showed that the 0.3 u m particles were relatively defect - free single crystals whereas 3.0 u m p articles were highly defective single crystals or particles contained low angle grain boundaries. Sub - micron sized Al 2 O 3 particles exhibited ductile failure in compression. In situ compression experiments showed 0.3um particles deformed plastically, fractured, and became polycrystalline. Moreover, dislocation activit y was observed within the se particles during compression . These sub - micron sized Al 2 O 3 particles exhibited large accum ulated strain (2 - 3 times those of micron - sized particles) before first fracture. I n agreement with the findings from experimentation , a tomistic simulation s of nano - Al 2 O 3 particles showed dislocation slip and

  19. Particle sizing experiments with the laser Doppler velocimeter: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giel, T.V. Jr.; Son, J.Y.

    1988-06-01

    Measurement techniques for in-situ simultaneous measurements of particle size distributions and particle velocities using the dual beam laser Doppler velocimeter (LV) were analytically and experimentally investigated. This investigation examined the different signal characteristics of the LV for determination of particle size and particle velocity, simultaneously. The different size related signal components were evaluated not only singularly but also as simultaneous measurements to determine which characteristic, or combination of characteristics, provided the best measure of particle size. The evaluation concentrated on the 0.5 to 5 ..mu..m particle size range, in which the LV light scattering characteristics are complex often non-monotonic functions of the particle size as well as functions of index of refraction, the laser light wavelength, laser intensity and polarization, and the location and response characteristics of the detector. Different components of the LV signal were considered, but analysis concentrated on Doppler phase, visibility and scatter-intensity because they show the greatest promise. These signals characteristics were initially defined analytically for numerous optical configurations over the 0.5 to 5 ..mu..m diameter range with 0.1 ..mu..m segmentation, for refractive index values from 1.0 to 3.0 with absorptive (imaginary) components varied form 0 to 1.0. Collector orientation and effective f/No., as well as fringe spacing, beam polarization and wavelength, were varied in this analytical evaluation. 18 refs., 42 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Relationship between dioxin concentration and particle size for suspended sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, K.; Sakurai, T.; Choi, J.W.; Suzuki, N.; Morita, M. [National Inst. for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    The purpose of the present study was to find out how the amounts of adsorbed dioxins, i.e., polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans (PCDDs/Fs), mono-ortho-polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and non-ortho-PCBs, vary with the particle size of suspended sediment. As dioxins are hydrophobic, they tend to adsorb onto particles suspended in water, and the determination of which dioxin congeners readily dissolve in water or adsorb onto particles is central to the characterization of dioxin behavior in water/sediment systems. Presumably suspension of sediments and the size of the particles govern the transfer of dioxins to aquatic organisms. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the relationship between the amount of dioxins and the particle-size distribution of resuspended, rather than settled, sediment.

  1. Particle contamination effects in EUVL: enhanced theory for the analytical determination of critical particle sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstetter, Gerd; Govindjee, Sanjay

    2012-03-01

    Existing analytical and numerical methodologies are discussed and then extended in order to calculate critical contamination-particle sizes, which will result in deleterious effects during EUVL E-chucking in the face of an error budget on the image-placement-error (IPE). The enhanced analytical models include a gap dependant clamping pressure formulation, the consideration of a general material law for realistic particle crushing and the influence of frictional contact. We present a discussion of the defects of the classical de-coupled modeling approach where particle crushing and mask/chuck indentation are separated from the global computation of mask bending. To repair this defect we present a new analytic approach based on an exact Hankel transform method which allows a fully coupled solution. This will capture the contribution of the mask indentation to the image-placement-error (estimated IPE increase of 20%). A fully coupled finite element model is used to validate the analytical models and to further investigate the impact of a mask back-side CrN-layer. The models are applied to existing experimental data with good agreement. For a standard material combination, a given IPE tolerance of 1 nm and a 15 kPa closing pressure, we derive bounds for single particles of cylindrical shape (radius × height < 44 μm) and spherical shape (diameter < 12 μm).

  2. Determining size-specific emission factors for environmental tobacco smoke particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klepeis, Neil E.; Apte, Michael G.; Gundel, Lara A.; Sextro, Richard G.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2002-07-07

    Because size is a major controlling factor for indoor airborne particle behavior, human particle exposure assessments will benefit from improved knowledge of size-specific particle emissions. We report a method of inferring size-specific mass emission factors for indoor sources that makes use of an indoor aerosol dynamics model, measured particle concentration time series data, and an optimization routine. This approach provides--in addition to estimates of the emissions size distribution and integrated emission factors--estimates of deposition rate, an enhanced understanding of particle dynamics, and information about model performance. We applied the method to size-specific environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) particle concentrations measured every minute with an 8-channel optical particle counter (PMS-LASAIR; 0.1-2+ micrometer diameters) and every 10 or 30 min with a 34-channel differential mobility particle sizer (TSI-DMPS; 0.01-1+ micrometer diameters) after a single cigarette or cigar was machine-smoked inside a low air-exchange-rate 20 m{sup 3} chamber. The aerosol dynamics model provided good fits to observed concentrations when using optimized values of mass emission rate and deposition rate for each particle size range as input. Small discrepancies observed in the first 1-2 hours after smoking are likely due to the effect of particle evaporation, a process neglected by the model. Size-specific ETS particle emission factors were fit with log-normal distributions, yielding an average mass median diameter of 0.2 micrometers and an average geometric standard deviation of 2.3 with no systematic differences between cigars and cigarettes. The equivalent total particle emission rate, obtained integrating each size distribution, was 0.2-0.7 mg/min for cigars and 0.7-0.9 mg/min for cigarettes.

  3. A simple shear limited, single size, time dependent flocculation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuprenas, R.; Tran, D. A.; Strom, K.

    2017-12-01

    This research focuses on the modeling of flocculation of cohesive sediment due to turbulent shear, specifically, investigating the dependency of flocculation on the concentration of cohesive sediment. Flocculation is important in larger sediment transport models as cohesive particles can create aggregates which are orders of magnitude larger than their unflocculated state. As the settling velocity of each particle is determined by the sediment size, density, and shape, accounting for this aggregation is important in determining where the sediment is deposited. This study provides a new formulation for flocculation of cohesive sediment by modifying the Winterwerp (1998) flocculation model (W98) so that it limits floc size to that of the Kolmogorov micro length scale. The W98 model is a simple approach that calculates the average floc size as a function of time. Because of its simplicity, the W98 model is ideal for implementing into larger sediment transport models; however, the model tends to over predict the dependency of the floc size on concentration. It was found that the modification of the coefficients within the original model did not allow for the model to capture the dependency on concentration. Therefore, a new term within the breakup kernel of the W98 formulation was added. The new formulation results is a single size, shear limited, and time dependent flocculation model that is able to effectively capture the dependency of the equilibrium size of flocs on both suspended sediment concentration and the time to equilibrium. The overall behavior of the new model is explored and showed align well with other studies on flocculation. Winterwerp, J. C. (1998). A simple model for turbulence induced flocculation of cohesive sediment. .Journal of Hydraulic Research, 36(3):309-326.

  4. Snow particles extracted from X-ray computed microtomography imagery and their single-scattering properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Adachi, Satoru; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Tanikawa, Tomonori; Aoki, Teruo; Masuda, Kazuhiko

    2018-04-01

    Sizes and shapes of snow particles were determined from X-ray computed microtomography (micro-CT) images, and their single-scattering properties were calculated at visible and near-infrared wavelengths using a Geometrical Optics Method (GOM). We analyzed seven snow samples including fresh and aged artificial snow and natural snow obtained from field samples. Individual snow particles were numerically extracted, and the shape of each snow particle was defined by applying a rendering method. The size distribution and specific surface area distribution were estimated from the geometrical properties of the snow particles, and an effective particle radius was derived for each snow sample. The GOM calculations at wavelengths of 0.532 and 1.242 μm revealed that the realistic snow particles had similar scattering phase functions as those of previously modeled irregular shaped particles. Furthermore, distinct dendritic particles had a characteristic scattering phase function and asymmetry factor. The single-scattering properties of particles of effective radius reff were compared with the size-averaged single-scattering properties. We found that the particles of reff could be used as representative particles for calculating the average single-scattering properties of the snow. Furthermore, the single-scattering properties of the micro-CT particles were compared to those of particle shape models using our current snow retrieval algorithm. For the single-scattering phase function, the results of the micro-CT particles were consistent with those of a conceptual two-shape model. However, the particle size dependence differed for the single-scattering albedo and asymmetry factor.

  5. Karna Particle Size Dataset for Tables and Figures

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset contains 1) table of bulk Pb-XAS LCF results, 2) table of bulk As-XAS LCF results, 3) figure data of particle size distribution, and 4) figure data for...

  6. Noninvasive particle sizing using camera-based diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildgaard, Otto Højager Attermann; Frisvad, Jeppe Revall; Falster, Viggo

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance measurements are useful for noninvasive inspection of optical properties such as reduced scattering and absorption coefficients. Spectroscopic analysis of these optical properties can be used for particle sizing. Systems based on optical fiber probes are commonly employed...

  7. Stabilization of amorphous calcium carbonate by controlling its particle size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nudelman, F.; Sonmezler, E.; Bomans, P.H.H.; With, de G.; Sommerdijk, N.A.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) nanoparticles of different size are prepared using a flow system. Post-synthesis stabilization with a layer of poly[(a,ß)-DL-aspartic acid] leads to stabilization of the ACC, but only for particles

  8. WOOD STOVE EMISSIONS: PARTICLE SIZE AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report summarizes wood stove particle size and chemical composition data gathered to date. [NOTE: In 1995, EPA estimated that residential wood combustion (RWC), including fireplaces, accounted for a significant fraction of national particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter...

  9. A Review of Discrete Element Method (DEM) Particle Shapes and Size Distributions for Lunar Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, John E.; Metzger, Philip T.; Wilkinson, R. Allen

    2010-01-01

    As part of ongoing efforts to develop models of lunar soil mechanics, this report reviews two topics that are important to discrete element method (DEM) modeling the behavior of soils (such as lunar soils): (1) methods of modeling particle shapes and (2) analytical representations of particle size distribution. The choice of particle shape complexity is driven primarily by opposing tradeoffs with total number of particles, computer memory, and total simulation computer processing time. The choice is also dependent on available DEM software capabilities. For example, PFC2D/PFC3D and EDEM support clustering of spheres; MIMES incorporates superquadric particle shapes; and BLOKS3D provides polyhedra shapes. Most commercial and custom DEM software supports some type of complex particle shape beyond the standard sphere. Convex polyhedra, clusters of spheres and single parametric particle shapes such as the ellipsoid, polyellipsoid, and superquadric, are all motivated by the desire to introduce asymmetry into the particle shape, as well as edges and corners, in order to better simulate actual granular particle shapes and behavior. An empirical particle size distribution (PSD) formula is shown to fit desert sand data from Bagnold. Particle size data of JSC-1a obtained from a fine particle analyzer at the NASA Kennedy Space Center is also fitted to a similar empirical PSD function.

  10. Polybutadiene latex particle size distribution analysis utilizing a disk centrifuge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdurmen, E.M.F.J.; Albers, J.G.; German, A.L.

    1994-01-01

    Polybutadiene (I) latexes prepd. by emulsifier-free emulsion polymn. and having particle diam. 50-300 nm for both unimodal and bimodal particles size distributions were analyzed by the line-start (LIST) method in a Brookhaven disk centrifuge photosedimentometer. A special spin fluid was designed to

  11. Effect of limestone particle size on bone quality characteristics of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to determine the effect of different limestone particle sizes in layer diets on bone quality characteristics at end-of-lay hens. Calcitic limestone (360 g Ca/kg DM) that is extensively used in commercial poultry diets was obtained from a specific South African source. Limestone particles were graded as ...

  12. Particle size- and concentration-dependent separation of magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witte, Kerstin, E-mail: witte@micromod.de [University of Rostock, Institute of Physics, Albert-Einstein-Str. 23, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Micromod Partikeltechnologie GmbH, Friedrich-Barnewitz-Str. 4, 18119 Rostock (Germany); Müller, Knut; Grüttner, Cordula; Westphal, Fritz [Micromod Partikeltechnologie GmbH, Friedrich-Barnewitz-Str. 4, 18119 Rostock (Germany); Johansson, Christer [Acreo Swedish ICT AB, 40014 Göteborg (Sweden)

    2017-04-01

    Small magnetic nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution are of great interest for several biomedical applications. When the size of the particles decreases, the magnetic moment of the particles decreases. This leads to a significant increase in the separation time by several orders of magnitude. Therefore, in the present study the separation processes of bionized nanoferrites (BNF) with different sizes and concentrations were investigated with the commercial Sepmag Q system. It was found that an increasing initial particle concentration leads to a reduction of the separation time for large nanoparticles due to the higher probability of building chains. Small nanoparticles showed exactly the opposite behavior with rising particle concentration up to 0.1 mg(Fe)/ml. For higher iron concentrations the separation time remains constant and the measured Z-average decreases in the supernatant at same time intervals. At half separation time a high yield with decreasing hydrodynamic diameter of particles can be obtained using higher initial particle concentrations. - Highlights: • Size dependent separation processes of multicore nanoparticles. • Concentration dependent separation processes of multicore nanoparticles. • Increasing separation time with rising concentrations for small particles. • Large particles show typical cooperative magnetophoresis behavior.

  13. Effect of limestone particle size on egg production and eggshell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Different limestone particle sizes had no effect on any of the tested egg production and eggshell quality parameters. These results suggested that larger particles limestone are not necessarily essential to provide sufficient Ca2+ to laying hens for egg production and eggshell quality at end-of-lay, provided that the dietary Ca ...

  14. Assessment of particle size distribution in CO 2 accidental releases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsbosch-Dam, C.E.C.; Spruijt, M.P.N.; Necci, A.; Cozzani, V.

    2012-01-01

    A model was developed to calculate the particle size distribution following the release of pressurised supercritical CO 2. The model combines several sub-models for the different stages of jet break-up and specifically addresses the possible formation of solid particles, which is important for CO 2

  15. Investigation of the low-speed impact behavior of dual particle size metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerit, Afşın Alper

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • AA2124 matrix composites reinforced with SiC particles were manufactured. • Low-speed impact behaviors of composites were investigated. • Composites were manufactured with single (SPS) and dual particle sizes (DPS). • Impact behaviors of DPS composites are more favorable than the SPS composites. • Approximately 50–60% of input energy was absorbed by the composite samples. - Abstract: SiC-reinforced aluminum matrix composites were manufactured by powder metallurgy using either single or dual particle sized SiC powders and samples sintered under argon atmosphere. Quasi-static loading, low-speed impact tests and hardness tests were used to investigate mechanical behavior and found that dual particle size composites had improved hardness and impact performance compared to single particle size composites. Sample microstructure, particle distributions, plastic deformations and post-testing damages were examined by scanning electron microscopy and identified microstructure agglomerations in SPS composites. Impact traces were characterized by broken and missing SiC particles and plastically deformed composite areas

  16. Sizes of particles formed during municipal wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Smoczynski; Marta, Kosobucka; Michal, Smoczynski; Harsha, Ratnaweera; Krystyna, Pieczulis-Smoczynska

    2017-02-01

    Volumetric diameters Dv and specific surface area SpS of sludge particles formed during chemical coagulation and electrocoagulation of sewage were determined. The obtained aggregate-flocs differed substantially in both Dv and SpS values. The differences in Dv and SpS values of the analyzed particles were interpreted based on theoretical models for expanding aggregates. The most uniform particles were formed under exposure to: (a) optimal and maximal doses of PIX, (b) optimal doses of PAX, (c) maximal doses of the Al electro-coagulant. The lowest PIX dose produced the least uniform particles. Sludge aggregates-particles produced under exposure to minimal doses of PIX and the Al electro-coagulant were characterized by the lowest SpS values. Sludge particles coagulated by PAX and the particles formed at higher doses of PIX and the Al electro-coagulant had higher SpS values. The particles formed at all doses of the applied coagulants and electro-coagulants were generally classified into two size ranges: the main range and the secondary range. Most particles belonged to the main size range. An increase in the percentage of colloidal hydroxide particles in sewage sludge increased SpS.

  17. A system for aerodynamically sizing ultrafine environmental radioactive particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olawoyin, L.

    1995-09-01

    The unattached environmental radioactive particles/clusters, produced mainly by 222 Rn in indoor air, are usually few nanometers in size. The inhalation of these radioactive clusters can lead to deposition of radioactivity on the mucosal surface of the tracheobronchial tree. The ultimate size of the cluster together with the flow characteristics will determine the depositional site in the human lung and thus, the extent of damage that can be caused. Thus, there exists the need for the determination of the size of the radioactive clusters. However, the existing particle measuring device have low resolution in the sub-nanometer range. In this research, a system for the alternative detection and measurement of the size of particles/cluster in the less than 2 nm range have been developed. The system is a one stage impactor which has a solid state spectrometer as its impaction plate. It's major feature is the nozzle-to-plate separation, L. The particle size collected changes with L and thus, particle size spectroscopy is achieved by varying L. The number of collected particles is determined by alpha spectroscopy. The size-discriminating ability of the system was tested with laboratory generated radon particles and it was subsequently used to characterize the physical (size) changes associated with the interaction of radon progeny with water vapor and short chain alcohols in various support gases. The theory of both traditional and high velocity jet impactors together with the design and evaluation of the system developed in this study are discussed in various chapters of this dissertation. The major results obtained in the course of the study are also presented

  18. A system for aerodynamically sizing ultrafine environmental radioactive particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olawoyin, L.

    1995-09-01

    The unattached environmental radioactive particles/clusters, produced mainly by {sup 222}Rn in indoor air, are usually few nanometers in size. The inhalation of these radioactive clusters can lead to deposition of radioactivity on the mucosal surface of the tracheobronchial tree. The ultimate size of the cluster together with the flow characteristics will determine the depositional site in the human lung and thus, the extent of damage that can be caused. Thus, there exists the need for the determination of the size of the radioactive clusters. However, the existing particle measuring device have low resolution in the sub-nanometer range. In this research, a system for the alternative detection and measurement of the size of particles/cluster in the less than 2 nm range have been developed. The system is a one stage impactor which has a solid state spectrometer as its impaction plate. It`s major feature is the nozzle-to-plate separation, L. The particle size collected changes with L and thus, particle size spectroscopy is achieved by varying L. The number of collected particles is determined by alpha spectroscopy. The size-discriminating ability of the system was tested with laboratory generated radon particles and it was subsequently used to characterize the physical (size) changes associated with the interaction of radon progeny with water vapor and short chain alcohols in various support gases. The theory of both traditional and high velocity jet impactors together with the design and evaluation of the system developed in this study are discussed in various chapters of this dissertation. The major results obtained in the course of the study are also presented.

  19. Effect of particle size on iron nanoparticle oxidation state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardo, Jeffrey J.; Lysaght, Andrew C.; Goberman, Daniel G.; Chiu, Wilson K.S.

    2012-01-01

    Selecting catalyst particles is a very important part of carbon nanotube growth, although the properties of these nanoscale particles are unclear. In this article iron nanoparticles are analyzed through the use of atomic force microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in order to understand how the size affects the chemical composition of nanoparticles and thus their physical structure. Initially, atomic force microscopy was used to confirm the presence of iron particles, and to determine the average size of the particles. Next an analytical model was developed to estimate particle size as a function of deposition time using inputs from atomic force microscopy measurement. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis was then performed with a focus on the spectra relating to the 2p Fe electrons to study the chemical state of the particles as a function of time. It was shown that as the size of nanoparticles decreased, the oxidation state of the particles changed due to a high proportion of atoms on the surface.

  20. Strategy for determination of an efficient Cochleate particle size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Danay; Bracho, Gustavo; Zayas, Caridad; del Campo, Judith; Acevedo, Reinaldo; Toledo, Arturo; Lastre, Miriam; Pérez, Oliver

    2006-04-12

    Cochleate structures obtained from the outer membrane of Neisseria meningitidis serotype B have demonstrated to be high immunogenicity when administrated by intramuscular, oral or intranasal routes, and could be used as adjuvant and meningococcal nasal vaccine candidate. Due to the microparticulate nature of Cochleate it is necessary to control the particle size since it capture by cells of the immune system could be affected by this aspect. We combined optic microscopy and immunisation experiments to select the optimum particle size. Six different processes of producing Cochleate obtaining were evaluated and different mechanical stress conditions were carried out to homogenize and modulate the particles size. The more immunogenic particles were selected on the basis of the levels of specific IgA and IgG antibodies induced after intranasal immunisation in mice. The best treatment parameter for mechanical stress of the Cochleate was prolonged treatment with untrasonic low frequency waves.

  1. Dust generation in powders: Effect of particle size distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravarty Somik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the relationship between the bulk and grain-scale properties of powders and dust generation. A vortex shaker dustiness tester was used to evaluate 8 calcium carbonate test powders with median particle sizes ranging from 2μm to 136μm. Respirable aerosols released from the powder samples were characterised by their particle number and mass concentrations. All the powder samples were found to release respirable fractions of dust particles which end up decreasing with time. The variation of powder dustiness as a function of the particle size distribution was analysed for the powders, which were classified into three groups based on the fraction of particles within the respirable range. The trends we observe might be due to the interplay of several mechanisms like de-agglomeration and attrition and their relative importance.

  2. Comparison of particle sizes between 238PuO2 before aqueous processing, after aqueous processing, and after ball milling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulford, Roberta Nancy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-06

    Particle sizes determined for a single lot of incoming Russian fuel and for a lot of fuel after aqueous processing are compared with particle sizes measured on fuel after ball-milling. The single samples of each type are believed to have particle size distributions typical of oxide from similar lots, as the processing of fuel lots is fairly uniform. Variation between lots is, as yet, uncharacterized. Sampling and particle size measurement methods are discussed elsewhere.

  3. Damping of unbound single-particle modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortier, S.; Beaumel, D.; Gales, S.; Guillot, J.; Langevin-Joliot, H.; Laurent, H.; Maison, J.M.; Bordewijk, J.; Brandenburg, S.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Crawley, G.M.; Massolo, C.P.; Renteria, M.; Khendriche, A. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, IN2P3-CNRS, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France)]|[Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, 9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands)]|[Nuclear Research Institute, Debrecen P.O. Box 51, H-4001 (Hungary)]|[NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)]|[Dep. Fisica, Fac. Cs. Exactas, UNLP, CC Nio 67, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)]|[Institut de Sciences Exactes,Universite de Tizi-Ouzou, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria)

    1995-11-01

    The ({alpha},{sup 3}He-{ital n}) reaction has been investigated at 120 MeV incident energy on {sup 64}Ni, {sup 90}Zr, and {sup 120}Sn target nuclei. Neutrons in coincidence with {sup 3}He particles emitted at 0{degree} were detected using the multidetector array EDEN, in order to get information about the decay of single-particle states embedded in the ({alpha},{sup 3}He) continuum. Neutron angular correlations, multiplicity values, and branching ratios to low-lying states of the final nuclei have been compared with the predictions of the statistical decay model. Evidence for a significant nonstatistical decay branch has been observed in the three nuclei below about 15 MeV excitation energy. Direct branching ratios in {sup 91}Zr deduced from this analysis are compared with the predictions of two nuclear structure models. At higher excitation energy, the decay characteristics of the ({alpha},{sup 3}He) continuum are shown to be mainly statistical.

  4. Single-particle stochastic heat engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Shubhashis; Pal, P. S.; Saha, Arnab; Jayannavar, A. M.

    2014-10-01

    We have performed an extensive analysis of a single-particle stochastic heat engine constructed by manipulating a Brownian particle in a time-dependent harmonic potential. The cycle consists of two isothermal steps at different temperatures and two adiabatic steps similar to that of a Carnot engine. The engine shows qualitative differences in inertial and overdamped regimes. All the thermodynamic quantities, including efficiency, exhibit strong fluctuations in a time periodic steady state. The fluctuations of stochastic efficiency dominate over the mean values even in the quasistatic regime. Interestingly, our system acts as an engine provided the temperature difference between the two reservoirs is greater than a finite critical value which in turn depends on the cycle time and other system parameters. This is supported by our analytical results carried out in the quasistatic regime. Our system works more reliably as an engine for large cycle times. By studying various model systems, we observe that the operational characteristics are model dependent. Our results clearly rule out any universal relation between efficiency at maximum power and temperature of the baths. We have also verified fluctuation relations for heat engines in time periodic steady state.

  5. Single particle level scheme for alpha decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirea, M.

    1998-01-01

    The fine structure phenomenon in alpha decay was evidenced by Rosenblum. In this process the kinetic energy of the emitted particle has several determined values related to the structure of the parent and the daughter nucleus. The probability to find the daughter in a low lying state was considered strongly dependent on the spectroscopic factor defined as the square of overlap between the wave function of the parent in the ground state and the wave functions of the specific excited states of the daughter. This treatment provides a qualitative agreement with the experimental results if the variations of the penetrability between different excited states are neglected. Based on single particle structure during fission, a new formalism explained quantitatively the fine structure of the cluster decay. It was suggested that this formalism can be applied also to alpha decay. For this purpose, the first step is to construct the level scheme of this type of decay. Such a scheme, obtained with the super-asymmetric two-center potential, is plotted for the alpha decay of 223 Ra. It is interesting to note that, diabatically, the level with spin 3/2 emerging from 1i 11/2 (ground state of the parent) reaches an excited state of the daughter in agreement with the experiment. (author)

  6. Particle size analysis in estimating the significance of airborne contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    In this report information on pertinent methods and techniques for analysing particle size distributions is compiled. The principles underlying the measurement methods are described, and the merits of different methods in relation to the information being sought and to their usefulness in the laboratory and in the field are explained. Descriptions on sampling methods, gravitational and inertial particle separation methods, electrostatic sizing devices, diffusion batteries, optical sizing techniques and autoradiography are included. Finally, the report considers sampling for respirable activity and problems related to instrument calibration

  7. Particle interaction of lubricated or unlubricated binary mixtures according to their particle size and densification mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Martino, Piera; Joiris, Etienne; Martelli, Sante

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this study is to assess an experimental approach for technological development of a direct compression formulation. A simple formula was considered composed by an active ingredient, a diluent and a lubricant. The active ingredient and diluent were selected as an example according to their typical densification mechanism: the nitrofurantoine, a fragmenting material, and the cellulose microcrystalline (Vivapur), which is a typical visco-elastic material, equally displaying good bind and disintegrant properties. For each ingredient, samples of different particle size distribution were selected. Initially, tabletability of pure materials was studied by a rotary press without magnesium stearate. Vivapur tabletability decreases with increase in particle size. The addition of magnesium stearate as lubricant decreases tabletability of Vivapur of greater particle size, while it kept unmodified that of Vivapur of lower particle size. Differences in tabletability can be related to differences in particle-particle interactions; for Vivapur of higher particle size (Vivapur 200, 102 and 101), the lower surface area develops lower surface available for bonds, while for Vivapur of lower particle size (99 and 105) the greater surface area allows high particle proximity favouring particle cohesivity. Nitrofurantoine shows great differences in compression behaviour according to its particle size distribution. Large crystals show poorer tabletability than fine crystals, further decreased by lubricant addition. The large crystals poor tabletability is due to their poor compactibility, in spite of high compressibility and plastic intrinsic deformability; in fact, in spite of the high densification tendency, the nature of the involved bonds is very weak. Nitrofurantoine samples were then mixed with Vivapurs in different proportions. Compression behaviour of binary mixes (tabletability and compressibility) was then evaluated according to diluents proportion in the mixes. The

  8. Generating high-quality single droplets for optical particle characterization with an easy setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Ge, Baozhen; Meng, Rui

    2018-06-01

    The high-performance and micro-sized single droplet is significant for optical particle characterization. We develop a single-droplet generator (SDG) based on a piezoelectric inkjet technique with advantages of low cost and easy setup. By optimizing the pulse parameters, we achieve various size single droplets. Further investigations reveal that SDG generates single droplets of high quality, demonstrating good sphericity, monodispersity and a stable length of several millimeters.

  9. Saharan Dust Particle Size And Concentration Distribution In Central Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunnu, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    A.K. Sunnu*, G. M. Afeti* and F. Resch+ *Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) Kumasi, Ghana. E-mail: albertsunnu@yahoo.com +Laboratoire Lepi, ISITV-Université du Sud Toulon-Var, 83162 La Valette cedex, France E-mail: resch@univ-tln.fr Keywords: Atmospheric aerosol; Saharan dust; Particle size distributions; Particle concentrations. Abstract The Saharan dust that is transported and deposited over many countries in the West African atmospheric environment (5°N), every year, during the months of November to March, known locally as the Harmattan season, have been studied over a 13-year period, between 1996 and 2009, using a location at Kumasi in central Ghana (6° 40'N, 1° 34'W) as the reference geographical point. The suspended Saharan dust particles were sampled by an optical particle counter, and the particle size distributions and concentrations were analysed. The counter gives the total dust loads as number of particles per unit volume of air. The optical particle counter used did not discriminate the smoke fractions (due to spontaneous bush fires during the dry season) from the Saharan dust. Within the particle size range measured (0.5 μm-25 μm.), the average inter-annual mean particle diameter, number and mass concentrations during the northern winter months of January and February were determined. The average daily number concentrations ranged from 15 particles/cm3 to 63 particles/cm3 with an average of 31 particles/cm3. The average daily mass concentrations ranged from 122 μg/m3 to 1344 μg/m3 with an average of 532 μg/m3. The measured particle concentrations outside the winter period were consistently less than 10 cm-3. The overall dust mean particle diameter, analyzed from the peak representative Harmattan periods over the 13-year period, ranged from 0.89 μm to 2.43 μm with an average of 1.5 μm ± 0.5. The particle size distributions exhibited the typical distribution pattern for

  10. Size-resolved chemical composition, effective density, and optical properties of biomass burning particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Jinghao; Lu, Xiaohui; Li, Ling; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Ci; Chen, Hong; Yang, Xin; Chen, Jianmin

    2017-06-01

    Biomass burning aerosol has an important impact on the global radiative budget. A better understanding of the correlations between the mixing states of biomass burning particles and their optical properties is the goal of a number of current studies. In this work, the effective density, chemical composition, and optical properties of rice straw burning particles in the size range of 50-400 nm were measured using a suite of online methods. We found that the major components of particles produced by burning rice straw included black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC), and potassium salts, but the mixing states of particles were strongly size dependent. Particles of 50 nm had the smallest effective density (1.16 g cm-3) due to a relatively large proportion of aggregate BC. The average effective densities of 100-400 nm particles ranged from 1.35 to 1.51 g cm-3 with OC and inorganic salts as dominant components. Both density distribution and single-particle mass spectrometry showed more complex mixing states in larger particles. Upon heating, the separation of the effective density distribution modes confirmed the external mixing state of less-volatile BC or soot and potassium salts. The size-resolved optical properties of biomass burning particles were investigated at two wavelengths (λ = 450 and 530 nm). The single-scattering albedo (SSA) showed the lowest value for 50 nm particles (0.741 ± 0.007 and 0.889 ± 0.006) because of the larger proportion of BC content. Brown carbon played an important role for the SSA of 100-400 nm particles. The Ångström absorption exponent (AAE) values for all particles were above 1.6, indicating the significant presence of brown carbon in all sizes. Concurrent measurements in our work provide a basis for discussing the physicochemical properties of biomass burning aerosol and its effects on the global climate and atmospheric environment.

  11. Study on effective particle diameters and coolability of particulate beds packed with irregular multi-size particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakre, S.; Ma, W.; Kudinov, P.; Bechta, S. [Royal Institute of Technology, KTH. Div. of Nuclear Power Safety, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    One of the key questions in severe accident research is the coolability of the debris bed, i.e., whether decay heat can be completely removed by the coolant flow into the debris bed. Extensive experimental and analytical work has been done to substantiate the coolability research. Most of the available experimental data is related to the beds packed with single size (mostly spherical) particles, and less data is available for multi-size/irregular-shape particles. There are several analytical models available, which rely on the mean particle diameter and porosity of the bed in their predictions. Two different types of particles were used to investigate coolability of particulate beds at VTT, Finland. The first type is irregular-shape Aluminum Oxide gravel particles whose sizes vary from 0.25 mm to 10 mm, which were employed in the STYX experiment programme (2001-2008). The second type is spherical beads of Zirconium silicate whose sizes vary between 0.8 mm to 1 mm, which were used in the COOLOCE tests (Takasuo et al., 2012) to study the effect of multi-dimensional flooding on coolability. In the present work, the two types of particles are used in the POMECO-FL and POMECO-HT test facility to obtain their effective particle diameters and dryout heat flux of the beds, respectively. The main idea is to check how the heaters' orientations (vertical in COOLOCE vs. horizontal in POMECO-HT) and diameters (6 mm in COOLOCE vs. 3 mm in POMECO-HT) affect the coolability (dryout heat flux) of the test beds. The tests carried out on the POMECO-FL facility using a bed packed with aluminum oxide gravel particles show the effective particle diameter of the gravel particles is 0.65 mm, by which the frictional pressure gradient can be predicted by the Ergun equation. After the water superficial velocity is higher than 0.0025 m/s, the pressure gradient is underestimated. The effective particle diameter of the zirconium particles is found as 0.8 mm. The dryout heat flux is measured on

  12. Study on effective particle diameters and coolability of particulate beds packed with irregular multi-size particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakre, S.; Ma, W.; Kudinov, P.; Bechta, S.

    2013-08-01

    One of the key questions in severe accident research is the coolability of the debris bed, i.e., whether decay heat can be completely removed by the coolant flow into the debris bed. Extensive experimental and analytical work has been done to substantiate the coolability research. Most of the available experimental data is related to the beds packed with single size (mostly spherical) particles, and less data is available for multi-size/irregular-shape particles. There are several analytical models available, which rely on the mean particle diameter and porosity of the bed in their predictions. Two different types of particles were used to investigate coolability of particulate beds at VTT, Finland. The first type is irregular-shape Aluminum Oxide gravel particles whose sizes vary from 0.25 mm to 10 mm, which were employed in the STYX experiment programme (2001-2008). The second type is spherical beads of Zirconium silicate whose sizes vary between 0.8 mm to 1 mm, which were used in the COOLOCE tests (Takasuo et al., 2012) to study the effect of multi-dimensional flooding on coolability. In the present work, the two types of particles are used in the POMECO-FL and POMECO-HT test facility to obtain their effective particle diameters and dryout heat flux of the beds, respectively. The main idea is to check how the heaters' orientations (vertical in COOLOCE vs. horizontal in POMECO-HT) and diameters (6 mm in COOLOCE vs. 3 mm in POMECO-HT) affect the coolability (dryout heat flux) of the test beds. The tests carried out on the POMECO-FL facility using a bed packed with aluminum oxide gravel particles show the effective particle diameter of the gravel particles is 0.65 mm, by which the frictional pressure gradient can be predicted by the Ergun equation. After the water superficial velocity is higher than 0.0025 m/s, the pressure gradient is underestimated. The effective particle diameter of the zirconium particles is found as 0.8 mm. The dryout heat flux is measured on

  13. Simulating Biomass Fast Pyrolysis at the Single Particle Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciesielski, Peter [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Wiggins, Gavin [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Jakes, Joseph E. [U.S. Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin, USA

    2017-07-01

    Simulating fast pyrolysis at the scale of single particles allows for the investigation of the impacts of feedstock-specific parameters such as particle size, shape, and species of origin. For this reason particle-scale modeling has emerged as an important tool for understanding how variations in feedstock properties affect the outcomes of pyrolysis processes. The origins of feedstock properties are largely dictated by the composition and hierarchical structure of biomass, from the microstructural porosity to the external morphology of milled particles. These properties may be accounted for in simulations of fast pyrolysis by several different computational approaches depending on the level of structural and chemical complexity included in the model. The predictive utility of particle-scale simulations of fast pyrolysis can still be enhanced substantially by advancements in several areas. Most notably, considerable progress would be facilitated by the development of pyrolysis kinetic schemes that are decoupled from transport phenomena, predict product evolution from whole-biomass with increased chemical speciation, and are still tractable with present-day computational resources.

  14. A Mathematical Model of the Single Aluminium Diboride Particle Ignition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Yagodnikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a developed mathematical model of ignition of the single aluminum diboride particle as an aluminum-boron alloy in the oxidizing environment of a complicated chemical composition containing oxygen, water vapor, and carbon dioxide. The mathematical model is based on the theory of parallel chemical reactions proceeding on the appropriate parts of the particle surface occupied by each element in proportion to their molar share in the alloy. The paper considers a possibility to establish a thermodynamic balance between components over a particle surface in the gas phase. The composition of components is chosen as a result of thermodynamic calculation, namely В g , B2O3 g , BO, B2O2, BO2, Alg , AlO, Al2O, N2. The mathematical model is formed by a system of the differential equations of enthalpy balance, mass of aluminum diboride particle, and of formed oxides, which become isolated by initial and boundary conditions for temperature and size of particles, concentration of an oxidizer, and temperature of gas. The software package “AlB2“ is developed. It is a complete independent module written in Fortran algorithmic language, which together with a package of the subroutines “SPARKS” is used to calculate parameters of burning aluminum diboride particle by the Runge-Kutt method.For stoichiometry of chemical reactions of interaction between aluminum diboride and oxygen, a dynamics of changing temperature of a particle and thickness of an oxide film on its surface is calculated. It was admitted as initial conditions that the aluminum diboride particle radius was 100μ and the reference temperature of environment was 500 K, 1000 K, 2300 K, and 3000 K. Depending on this temperature the aluminum diboride particle temperature was calculated. Changing thickness of the oxide film on the particle surface at various initial gas temperatures characterizes its increase at the initial heating period of ~ 0,01 s and a gradual slowdown of the

  15. Laboratory Measurements of Single-Particle Polarimetric Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsevich, M.; Penttila, A.; Maconi, G.; Kassamakov, I.; Helander, P.; Puranen, T.; Salmi, A.; Hæggström, E.; Muinonen, K.

    2017-12-01

    Measuring scattering properties of different targets is important for material characterization, remote sensing applications, and for verifying theoretical results. Furthermore, there are usually simplifications made when we model targets and compute the scattering properties, e.g., ideal shape or constant optical parameters throughout the target material. Experimental studies help in understanding the link between the observed properties and computed results. Experimentally derived Mueller matrices of studied particles can be used as input for larger-scale scattering simulations, e.g., radiative transfer computations. This method allows to bypass the problem of using an idealized model for single-particle optical properties. While existing approaches offer ensemble- and orientation-averaged particle properties, our aim is to measure individual particles with controlled or known orientation. With the newly developed scatterometer, we aim to offer novel possibility to measure single, small (down to μm-scale) targets and their polarimetric spectra. This work presents an experimental setup that measures light scattered by a fixed small particle with dimensions ranging between micrometer and millimeter sizes. The goal of our setup is nondestructive characterization of such particles by measuring light of multiple wavelengths scattered in 360° in a horizontal plane by an ultrasonically levitating sample, whilst simultaneously controlling its 3D position and orientation. We describe the principles and design of our instrument and its calibration. We also present example measurements of real samples. This study was conducted under the support from the European Research Council, in the frame of the Advanced Grant project No. 320773 `Scattering and Absorption of Electromagnetic Waves in Particulate Media' (SAEMPL).

  16. Effect of particle size on mixing degree in dispensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hitoshi; Yanagihara, Yoshitsugu; Sekiguchi, Hiroko; Ohtani, Michiteru; Kariya, Satoru; Uchino, Katsuyoshi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Iga, Tatsuji

    2004-03-01

    By using lactose colored with erythrocin, we examined the effect of particle size on mixing degree during the preparation of triturations with a mortar and pestle. We used powders with different distributions of particle sizes, i.e., powder that passed through 32-mesh but was trapped on a 42-mesh sieve (32/42-mesh powder), powder that passed through a 42-mesh sieve but was trapped on a 60-mesh sieve (42/60-mesh powder), powder that passed through a 60-mesh sieve but was trapped on a 100-mesh sieve (60/100-mesh powder), and powder that passes through a 100-mesh sieve (> 100-mesh powder). The mixing degree of colored powder and non-colored powder whose distribution of particle sizes was the same as that of the colored powder was excellent. The coefficient of variation (CV) value of the mixing degree was 6.08% after 40 rotations when colored powder was mixed with non-colored powder that both passed through a 100-mesh sieve. The CV value of the mixing degree was low in the case of mixing of colored and non-colored powders with different particle size distributions. After mixing, about 50% of 42/60-mesh powder had become smaller particles, whereas the distribution of particle sizes was not influenced by the mixing of 60/100-mesh powder. It was suggested that the mixing degree is affected by distribution of particle sizes. It may be important to determine the mixing degrees for drugs with narrow therapeutic ranges.

  17. Selection Of Suitable Particle Size And Particle Ratio For Japanese Cucumber Cucumis Sativus L. Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galahitigama GAH

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to select the best particle size of coco peat for cucumber nurseries as well as best particle ratio for optimum plant growth and development of cucumber. The experiment was carried out in International Foodstuff Company and Faculty of Agriculture University of Ruhuna Sri Lanka during 2015 to 2016. Under experiment one three types of different particle sizes were used namely fine amp88040.5mm T2 medium 3mm-0.5mm T3 and coarse 4mm T4 with normal coco peat T1 as treatments. Complete Randomized Design CRD used as experimental design with five replicates. Germination percentage number of leaves per seedling seedling height in frequent day intervals was taken as growth parameters. Analysis of variance procedure was applied to analyze the data at 5 probability level. The results revealed that medium size particle media sieve size 0.5mm -3mm of coco peat was the best particle size for cucumber nursery practice when considered the physical and chemical properties of medium particles of coco peat. In the experiment of selecting of suitable particle ratio for cucumber plants the compressed mixture of coco peat particles that contain 70 ww unsieved coco peat 20 ww coarse particles and 10 ww coconut husk chips 5 12mm has given best results for growth performances compared to other treatments and cucumber grown in this mixture has shown maximum growth and yield performances.

  18. [Particle Size and Number Density Online Analysis for Particle Suspension with Polarization-Differentiation Elastic Light Scattering Spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-kang; Fang, Hui

    2016-03-01

    The basic principle of polarization-differentiation elastic light scattering spectroscopy based techniques is that under the linear polarized light incidence, the singlely scattered light from the superficial biological tissue and diffusively scattered light from the deep tissue can be separated according to the difference of polarization characteristics. The novel point of the paper is to apply this method to the detection of particle suspension and, to realize the simultaneous measurement of its particle size and number density in its natural status. We design and build a coaxial cage optical system, and measure the backscatter signal at a specified angle from a polystyrene microsphere suspension. By controlling the polarization direction of incident light with a linear polarizer and adjusting the polarization direction of collected light with another linear polarizer, we obtain the parallel polarized elastic light scattering spectrum and cross polarized elastic light scattering spectrum. The difference between the two is the differential polarized elastic light scattering spectrum which include only the single scattering information of the particles. We thus compare this spectrum to the Mie scattering calculation and extract the particle size. We then also analyze the cross polarized elastic light scattering spectrum by applying the particle size already extracted. The analysis is based on the approximate expressions taking account of light diffusing, from which we are able to obtain the number density of the particle suspension. We compare our experimental outcomes with the manufacturer-provided values and further analyze the influence of the particle diameter standard deviation on the number density extraction, by which we finally verify the experimental method. The potential applications of the method include the on-line particle quality monitoring for particle manufacture as well as the fat and protein density detection of milk products.

  19. Influence of particle size distributions on magnetorheological fluid performances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiriac, H; Stoian, G

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the influence that size distributions of the magnetic particles might have on the magnetorheological fluid performances. In our study, several size distributions have been tailored first by sieving a micrometric Fe powder in order to obtain narrow distribution powders and then by recomposing the new size distributions (different from Gaussian). We used spherical Fe particles (mesh -325) commercially available. The powder was sieved by means of a sieve shaker using a series of sieves with the following mesh size: 20, 32, 40, 50, 63, 80 micrometers. All magnetic powders were characterized through Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) measurements, particle size analysis and also Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images were taken. Magnetorheological (MR) fluids based on the resulted magnetic powders were prepared and studied by means of a rheometer with a magnetorheological module. The MR fluids were measured in magnetic field and in zero magnetic field as well. As we noticed in our previous experiments particles size distribution can also influence the MR fluids performances.

  20. Photometric imaging in particle size measurement and surface visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Niklas

    2011-09-30

    The aim of this paper is to give an insight into photometric particle sizing approaches, which differ from the typical particle size measurement of dispersed particles. These approaches can often be advantageous especially for samples that are moist or cohesive, when dispersion of particles is difficult or sometimes impossible. The main focus of this paper is in the use of photometric stereo imaging. The technique allows the reconstruction of three-dimensional images of objects using multiple light sources in illumination. The use of photometric techniques is demonstrated in at-line measurement of granules and on-line measurement during granulation and dry milling. Also, surface visualization and roughness measurements are briefly discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Particle size studies in the preparation of AQCS reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajgelj, A.; Zeisler, R.; Benesch, T.; Dekner, R.

    1994-01-01

    Particle size determination is one of the important steps in the characterization of physical properties of each particulate material. However, particle size distribution effects also a chemical composition of the material in terms of homogeneity and representativeness of the sample, as well as allows or not a possible sub-sampling of the material. All this is of great importance in the preparation of reference materials for which the chemical composition and physical properties have to be extremely well characterized. In the present paper we intend to present same efforts which have been done by Analytical Quality Control Services (AQCS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in the field of particle size determination in the production of reference materials. The Malvern product MasterSizer X, based on laser light scattering is used for this purpose and the technique is also shortly discussed. (author)

  2. Effects of the finite particle size in turbulent wall-bounded flows of dense suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Pedro; Picano, Francesco; Brandt, Luca; Breugem, Wim-Paul

    2018-05-01

    We use interface-resolved simulations to study finite-size effects in turbulent channel flow of neutrally-buoyant spheres. Two cases with particle sizes differing by a factor of 2, at the same solid volume fraction of 20% and bulk Reynolds number are considered. These are complemented with two reference single-phase flows: the unladen case, and the flow of a Newtonian fluid with the effective suspension viscosity of the same mixture in the laminar regime. As recently highlighted in Costa et al. (PRL 117, 134501), a particle-wall layer is responsible for deviations of the statistics from what is observed in the continuum limit where the suspension is modeled as a Newtonian fluid with an effective viscosity. Here we investigate the fluid and particle dynamics in this layer and in the bulk. In the particle-wall layer, the near wall inhomogeneity has an influence on the suspension micro-structure over a distance proportional to the particle size. In this layer, particles have a significant (apparent) slip velocity that is reflected in the distribution of wall shear stresses. This is characterized by extreme events (both much higher and much lower than the mean). Based on these observations we provide a scaling for the particle-to-fluid apparent slip velocity as a function of the flow parameters. We also extend the flow scaling laws in to second-order Eulerian statistics in the homogeneous suspension region away from the wall. Finite-size effects in the bulk of the channel become important for larger particles, while negligible for lower-order statistics and smaller particles. Finally, we study the particle dynamics along the wall-normal direction. Our results suggest that 1-point dispersion is dominated by particle-turbulence (and not particle-particle) interactions, while differences in 2-point dispersion and collisional dynamics are consistent with a picture of shear-driven interactions.

  3. Inhalation risk and particle size in dust and mist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, C N

    1949-01-01

    This paper presents a critical overview of particle uptake and retention from literature through 1949. Particles > 6-..mu..m are retained in nose, or by secondary bronchi with mouth breathing. Few > 2-..mu..m particles are exhaled, trapped mostly in bronchioles (some by alveoli) by sedimentation. Maximal deposition is 0.4- to 0.8-..mu..m size in bronchioles and alveoli. Minimim retention is at 0.1 to 0.15 ..mu..m; approx. 80% are exhaled. Brownian settling of smaller particles in alveoli occurs. Particles of low density penetrate farther. Slow breathing enhances retention. Soluble toxins may be absorbed at any point along respiratory tract, so deep penetration percentage is moot in most cases.

  4. Rock sampling. [method for controlling particle size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, P. (Inventor)

    1971-01-01

    A method for sampling rock and other brittle materials and for controlling resultant particle sizes is described. The method involves cutting grooves in the rock surface to provide a grouping of parallel ridges and subsequently machining the ridges to provide a powder specimen. The machining step may comprise milling, drilling, lathe cutting or the like; but a planing step is advantageous. Control of the particle size distribution is effected primarily by changing the height and width of these ridges. This control exceeds that obtainable by conventional grinding.

  5. Microscopic calculations of λ single particle energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usmani, Q. N.

    1998-01-01

    Λ binding energy data for total baryon number A ≤ 208 and for Λ angular momenta ell Λ ≤ 3 are analyzed in terms of phenomenological (but generally consistent with meson-exchange) ΛN and ΛNN potentials. The Fermi-Hypernetted-Chain technique is used to calculate the expectation values for the Λ binding to nuclear matter. Accurate effective ΛN and ΛNN potentials are obtained which are folded with the core nucleus nucleon densities to calculate the Λ single particle potential U Λ (r). We use a dispersive ΛNN potential but also include an explicit ρ dependence to allow for reduced repulsion in the surface, and the best fits have a large ρ dependence giving consistency with the variational Monte Carlo calculations for Λ 5 He. The exchange fraction of the ΛN space-exchange potential is found to be 0.2-0.3 corresponding to m Λ * ≅ (0.74-0.82)m Λ . Charge symmetry breaking is found to be significant for heavy hypernuclei with a large neutron excess, with a strength consistent with that obtained from the A = 4 hypernuclei

  6. Multi-color single particle tracking with quantum dots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva C Arnspang

    Full Text Available Quantum dots (QDs have long promised to revolutionize fluorescence detection to include even applications requiring simultaneous multi-species detection at single molecule sensitivity. Despite the early promise, the unique optical properties of QDs have not yet been fully exploited in e. g. multiplex single molecule sensitivity applications such as single particle tracking (SPT. In order to fully optimize single molecule multiplex application with QDs, we have in this work performed a comprehensive quantitative investigation of the fluorescence intensities, fluorescence intensity fluctuations, and hydrodynamic radii of eight types of commercially available water soluble QDs. In this study, we show that the fluorescence intensity of CdSe core QDs increases as the emission of the QDs shifts towards the red but that hybrid CdSe/CdTe core QDs are less bright than the furthest red-shifted CdSe QDs. We further show that there is only a small size advantage in using blue-shifted QDs in biological applications because of the additional size of the water-stabilizing surface coat. Extending previous work, we finally also show that parallel four color multicolor (MC-SPT with QDs is possible at an image acquisition rate of at least 25 Hz. We demonstrate the technique by measuring the lateral dynamics of a lipid, biotin-cap-DPPE, in the cellular plasma membrane of live cells using four different colors of QDs; QD565, QD605, QD655, and QD705 as labels.

  7. Particle size analyses in and around mineral sands operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koperski, J.

    1993-01-01

    Activity Median Aerodynamic Diameters (AMADs) of airborne dust in and around West Australian heavy mineral sands operations have been investigated. Monitoring of dry separation plant workers, positional monitoring of the plant environment and positional monitoring outdoors were conducted. The number of AMAD detections was 49, 21 and 37, respectively. Mean AMAD values of 15.7μm (GSD 2.9) for personal monitoring, 4.6μm (GSD 3.5) for positional monitoring indoors and 2.7 μm (GSD 4.8) for hi-vol positional monitoring outdoors were obtained. The size distribution of airborne radioactivity was observed to be log-normal. Applying the ICRP 30 inhalation model (ICRP 1979) and both, ICRP 26 (ICRP 1977) and ICRP 60 (ICRP 1990) recommendations, intake-to-dose conversion factors for internal alpha exposure from the Th series radionuclides (in secular equilibrium, solubility Class Y) associated with airborne dust were subsequently assessed. It has been concluded that no single AMAD value would characterise heavy mineral sands operations. In the areas of the greatest radiological impact (dry separation plants indoors) emphasis should be focused upon personal monitoring strategies. In the areas of a lower impact (outdoors), a positional cascade impactor data may be used for personal AMAD assessment. Application of the reference 1μm AMAD value may lead to an over 5-fold overestimation of internal doses for the dry separation plant workers and to about 2-fold dose overestimation for the other workers. Hence, the need and importance of conducting site-specific particle size analyses for individual mineral sands operations. 13 refs., 4 tabs., 6 figs

  8. Aerosol particle size does not predict pharmacokinetic determined lung dose in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønnelykke, Klaus; Chawes, Bo L K; Vindfeld, Signe

    2013-01-01

    In vitro measures of aerosol particles size, such as the fine particle mass, play a pivotal role for approval of inhaled anti-asthmatic drugs. However, the validity as a measure of dose to the lungs in children lacks evidence. In this study we investigated for the first time the association between...... an in vivo estimate of lung dose of inhaled drug in children and the corresponding particle size segments assessed ex vivo. Lung dose of fluticasone propionate after inhalation from a dry powder inhaler (Diskus®) was studied in 23 children aged 4-7 and 12-15 years with mild asthma. Six-hour pharmacokinetics...... was assessed after single inhalation. The corresponding emitted mass of drug in segments of aerosol particle size was assessed ex vivo by replicating the inhalation flows recorded by transducers built into the Diskus® inhaler and re-playing them in a breathing simulator. There was no correlation between any...

  9. Simulation study of effects of initial particle size distribution on dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, G.; Xu, D.S.; Ma, N.; Zhou, N.; Payton, E.J.; Yang, R.; Mills, M.J.; Wang, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Dissolution kinetics of γ' particles in binary Ni-Al alloys with different initial particle size distributions (PSD) is studied using a three-dimensional (3D) quantitative phase field model. By linking model inputs directly to thermodynamic and atomic mobility databases, microstructural evolution during dissolution is simulated in real time and length scales. The model is first validated against analytical solution for dissolution of a single γ' particle in 1D and numerical solution in 3D before it is applied to investigate the effects of initial PSD on dissolution kinetics. Four different types of PSD, uniform, normal, log-normal and bimodal, are considered. The simulation results show that the volume fraction of γ' particles decreases exponentially with time, while the temporal evolution of average particle size depends strongly on the initial PSD

  10. EFFECTS OF ULTRASOUND ON THE MORPHOLOGY, PARTICLE SIZE, CRYSTALLINITY, AND CRYSTALLITE SIZE OF CELLULOSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUMARI SUMARI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to optimize ultrasound treatment to produce fragment of cellulose that is low in particles size, crystallite size, and crystallinity. Slurry of 1 % (w/v the cellulose was sonicated at different time periods and temperatures. An ultrasonic reactor was operated at 300 Watts and 28 kHz to cut down the polymer into smaller particles. We proved that ultrasound damages and fragments the cellulose particles into shorter fibers. The fiber lengths were reduced from in the range of 80-120 µm to 30-50 µm due to an hour ultrasonication and became 20-30 µm after 5 hours. It was also found some signs of erosion on the surface and stringy. The acoustic cavitation also generated a decrease in particle size, crystallinity, and crystallite size of the cellulose along with increasing sonication time but it did not change d-spacing. However, the highest reduction of particle size, crystallite size, and crystallinity of the cellulose occurred within the first hour of ultrasonication, after which the efficiency was decreased. The particle diameter, crystallite size, and crystallinity were decreased from 19.88 µm to 15.96 µm, 5.81 Å to 2.98 Å, and 77.7% to 73.9% respectively due to an hour ultrasound treatment at 40 °C. The treatment that was conducted at 40 °C or 60 °C did not give a different effect significantly. Cellulose with a smaller particle and crystallite size as well as a more amorphous shape is preferred for further study.

  11. Particle size-dependent radical generation from wildland fire smoke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, Stephen S.; Castranova, Vince; Chen, Bean T.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Hoover, Mark; Piacitelli, Chris; Gaughan, Denise M.

    2007-01-01

    Firefighting, along with construction, mining and agriculture, ranks among the most dangerous occupations. In addition, the work environment of firefighters is unlike that of any other occupation, not only because of the obvious physical hazards but also due to the respiratory and systemic health hazards of smoke inhalation resulting from combustion. A significant amount of research has been devoted to studying municipal firefighters; however, these studies may not be useful in wildland firefighter exposures, because the two work environments are so different. Not only are wildland firefighters exposed to different combustion products, but their exposure profiles are different. The combustion products wildland firefighters are exposed to can vary greatly in characteristics due to the type and amount of material being burned, soil conditions, temperature and exposure time. Smoke inhalation is one of the greatest concerns for firefighter health and it has been shown that the smoke consists of a large number of particles. These smoke particles contain intermediates of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen free radicals, which may pose a potential health risk. Our investigation looked into the involvement of free radicals in smoke toxicity and the relationship between particle size and radical generation. Samples were collected in discrete aerodynamic particle sizes from a wildfire in Alaska, preserved and then shipped to our laboratory for analysis. Electron spin resonance was used to measure carbon-centered as well as hydroxyl radicals produced by a Fenton-like reaction with wildfire smoke. Further study of reactive oxygen species was conducted using analysis of cellular H 2 O 2 generation, lipid peroxidation of cellular membranes and DNA damage. Results demonstrate that coarse size-range particles contained more carbon radicals per unit mass than the ultrafine particles; however, the ultrafine particles generated more ·OH radicals in the acellular Fenton-like reaction. The

  12. Methods for forming particles from single source precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Robert V [Idaho Falls, ID; Rodriguez, Rene G [Pocatello, ID; Pak, Joshua [Pocatello, ID

    2011-08-23

    Single source precursors are subjected to carbon dioxide to form particles of material. The carbon dioxide may be in a supercritical state. Single source precursors also may be subjected to supercritical fluids other than supercritical carbon dioxide to form particles of material. The methods may be used to form nanoparticles. In some embodiments, the methods are used to form chalcopyrite materials. Devices such as, for example, semiconductor devices may be fabricated that include such particles. Methods of forming semiconductor devices include subjecting single source precursors to carbon dioxide to form particles of semiconductor material, and establishing electrical contact between the particles and an electrode.

  13. Development of an ejecta particle size measurement diagnostic based on Mie scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauer, Martin Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Buttler, William Tillman [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Frayer, Daniel K. [National Security Tech, Inc., Los Alamos, NM (United States); Grover, Michael [National Security Technologies, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Special Technologies Lab.; Monfared, Shabnam Kalighi [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stevens, Gerald D. [National Security Technologies, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Special Technologies Lab.; Stone, Benjamin J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Turley, William Dale [National Security Technologies, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Special Technologies Lab.

    2017-09-27

    The goal of this work is to determine the feasibility of extracting the size of particles ejected from shocked metal surfaces (ejecta) from the angular distribution of light scattered by a cloud of such particles. The basis of the technique is the Mie theory of scattering, and implicit in this approach are the assumptions that the scattering particles are spherical and that single scattering conditions prevail. The meaning of this latter assumption, as far as experimental conditions are concerned, will become clear later. The solution to Maxwell’s equations for spherical particles illuminated by a plane electromagnetic wave was derived by Gustav Mie more than 100 years ago, but several modern treatises discuss this solution in great detail. The solution is a complicated series expansion of the scattered electric field, as well as the field within the particle, from which the total scattering and absorption cross sections as well as the angular distribution of scattered intensity can be calculated numerically. The detailed nature of the scattering is determined by the complex index of refraction of the particle material as well as the particle size parameter, x, which is the product of the wavenumber of the incident light and the particle radius, i.e. x = 2rπ= λ. Figure 1 shows the angular distribution of scattered light for different particle size parameters and two orthogonal incident light polarizations as calculated using the Mie solution. It is obvious that the scattering pattern is strongly dependent on the particle size parameter, becoming more forward-directed and less polarizationdependent as the particle size parameter increases. This trend forms the basis for the diagnostic design.

  14. The influences of ambient particle composition and size on particle infiltration in Los Angeles, CA, residences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarnat, Stefanie Ebelt; Coull, Brent A; Ruiz, Pablo A; Koutrakis, Petros; Suh, Helen H

    2006-02-01

    Particle infiltration is a key determinant of the indoor concentrations of ambient particles. Few studies have examined the influence of particle composition on infiltration, particularly in areas with high concentrations of volatile particles, such as ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3). A comprehensive indoor monitoring study was conducted in 17 Los Angeles-area homes. As part of this study, indoor/outdoor concentration ratios during overnight (nonindoor source) periods were used to estimate the fraction of ambient particles remaining airborne indoors, or the particle infiltration factor (FINF), for fine particles (PM2.5), its nonvolatile (i.e., black carbon [BC]) and volatile (i.e., nitrate [NO3-]) components, and particle sizes ranging between 0.02 and 10 microm. FINF was highest for BC (median = 0.84) and lowest for NO3- (median = 0.18). The low FINF for NO3- was likely because of volatilization of NO3- particles once indoors, in addition to depositional losses upon building entry. The FINF for PM2.5 (median = 0.48) fell between those for BC and NO3-, reflecting the contributions of both particle components to PM25. FINF varied with particle size, air-exchange rate, and outdoor NO3- concentrations. The FINF for particles between 0.7 and 2 microm in size was considerably lower during periods of high as compared with low outdoor NO3- concentrations, suggesting that outdoor NO3- particles were of this size. This study demonstrates that infiltration of PM2.5 varies by particle component and is lowest for volatile species, such as NH4NO3. Our results suggest that volatile particle components may influence the ability for outdoor PM concentrations to represent indoor and, thus, personal exposures to particles of ambient origin, because volatilization of these particles causes the composition of PM2.5 to differ indoors and outdoors. Consequently, particle composition likely influences observed epidemiologic relationships based on outdoor PM concentrations, especially in areas

  15. Particle size, magnetic field, and blood velocity effects on particle retention in magnetic drug targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Erica M; Maxim, Peter G; Eaton, John K

    2010-01-01

    A physics-based model of a general magnetic drug targeting (MDT) system was developed with the goal of realizing the practical limitations of MDT when electromagnets are the source of the magnetic field. The simulation tracks magnetic particles subject to gravity, drag force, magnetic force, and hydrodynamic lift in specified flow fields and external magnetic field distributions. A model problem was analyzed to determine the effect of drug particle size, blood flow velocity, and magnetic field gradient strength on efficiency in holding particles stationary in a laminar Poiseuille flow modeling blood flow in a medium-sized artery. It was found that particle retention rate increased with increasing particle diameter and magnetic field gradient strength and decreased with increasing bulk flow velocity. The results suggest that MDT systems with electromagnets are unsuitable for use in small arteries because it is difficult to control particles smaller than about 20 microm in diameter.

  16. Hierarchical Ag mesostructures for single particle SERS substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Minwei, E-mail: xuminwei@xjtu.edu.cn; Zhang, Yin

    2017-01-30

    Highlights: • Hierarchical Ag mesostructures with the size of 250, 360 and 500 nm are synthesized via a seed-mediated approach. • The Ag mesostructures present the tailorable size and highly roughened surfaces. • The average enhancement factors for individual Ag mesostructures were estimated to be as high as 10{sup 6}. - Abstract: Hierarchical Ag mesostructures with highly rough surface morphology have been synthesized at room temperature through a simple seed-mediated approach. Electron microscopy characterizations indicate that the obtained Ag mesostructures exhibit a textured surface morphology with the flower-like architecture. Moreover, the particle size can be tailored easily in the range of 250–500 nm. For the growth process of the hierarchical Ag mesostructures, it is believed that the self-assembly mechanism is more reasonable rather than the epitaxial overgrowth of Ag seed. The oriented attachment of nanoparticles is revealed during the formation of Ag mesostructures. Single particle surface enhanced Raman spectra (sp-SERS) of crystal violet adsorbed on the hierarchical Ag mesostructures were measured. Results reveal that the hierarchical Ag mesostructures can be highly sensitive sp-SERS substrates with good reproducibility. The average enhancement factors for individual Ag mesostructures are estimated to be about 10{sup 6}.

  17. Single particle aerosol mass spectrometry of coal combustion particles associated with high lung cancer rates in Xuanwei and Fuyuan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Senlin; Tan, Zhengying; Liu, Pinwei; Zhao, Hui; Liu, Dingyu; Yu, Shang; Cheng, Ping; Win, Myat Sandar; Hu, Jiwen; Tian, Linwei; Wu, Minghong; Yonemochi, Shinich; Wang, Qingyue

    2017-11-01

    Coal combustion particles (CCPs) are linked to the high incidence of lung cancer in Xuanwei and in Fuyuan, China, but studies on the chemical composition of the CCPs are still limited. Single particle aerosol mass spectrometry (SPAMS) was recently developed to measure the chemical composition and size of single particles in real-time. In this study, SPAMS was used to measure individual combustion particles emitted from Xuanwei and Fuyuan coal samples and the results were compared with those by ICP-MS and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The total of 38,372 particles mass-analyzed by SPAMS can be divided into 9 groups based on their chemical composition and their number percentages: carbonaceous, Na-rich, K-rich, Al-rich, Fe-rich, Si-rich, Ca-rich, heavy metal-bearing, and PAH-bearing particles. The carbonaceous and PAH-bearing particles are enriched in the size range below 0.56 μm, Fe-bearing particles range from 0.56 to 1.0 μm in size, and heavy metals such as Ti, V, Cr, Cu, Zn, and Pb have diameters below 1 μm. The TEM results show that the particles from Xuanwei and Fuyuan coal combustion can be classified into soot aggregates, Fe-rich particles, heavy metal containing particles, and mineral particles. Non-volatile particles detected by SPAMS could also be observed with TEM. The number percentages by SPAMS also correlate with the mass concentrations measured by ICP-MS. Our results could provide valuable insight for understanding high lung cancer incidence in the area. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Automatic particle-size analysis of HTGR nuclear fuel microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    An automatic particle-size analyzer (PSA) has been developed at ORNL for measuring and counting samples of nuclear fuel microspheres in the diameter range of 300 to 1000 μm at rates in excess of 2000 particles per minute, requiring no sample preparation. A light blockage technique is used in conjunction with a particle singularizer. Each particle in the sample is sized, and the information is accumulated by a multi-channel pulse height analyzer. The data are then transferred automatically to a computer for calculation of mean diameter, standard deviation, kurtosis, and skewness of the distribution. Entering the sample weight and pre-coating data permits calculation of particle density and the mean coating thickness and density. Following this nondestructive analysis, the sample is collected and returned to the process line or used for further analysis. The device has potential as an on-line quality control device in processes dealing with spherical or near-spherical particles where rapid analysis is required for process control

  19. Evolution of the sedimentation technique for particle size distribution analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maley, R.

    1998-01-01

    After an introduction on the significance of particle size measurements, sedimentation methods are described, with emphasis on the evolution of the gravitational approach. The gravitational technique based on mass determination by X-ray adsorption allows fast analysis by automation and easy data handling, in addition to providing the accuracy required by quality control and research applications [it

  20. Preparation of leucite powders with controlled particle size distribution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotná, Martina; Kloužková, A.; Maixner, J.; Šatava, Vladimír

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 4 (2005), s. 252-258 ISSN 0862-5468 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/03/0031 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : leucite * preparation * particle size distribution Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.463, year: 2005

  1. Particle size distribution of UO sub 2 aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghunath, B. (Radiation Safety Systems Div., BARC, Bombay (India)); Ramachandran, R.; Majumdar, S. (Radiometallurgy Div., BARC, Bombay (India))

    1991-12-01

    The Anderson cascade impactor has been used to determine the activity mean aerodynamic diameter and the particle size distribution of UO{sub 2} powders dispersed in the form of stable aerosols in an air medium. The UO{sub 2} powders obtained by the calcination of ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC) and ammonium diuranate (ADU) precipitates have been used. (orig./MM).

  2. Effects of Particle Size Distribution on Bioremediation of Crude Oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bioremediation has been proven to be the most effective method of cleaning up oil contaminated soils through the application of nutrients and microorganism. ... The parameters examined were: moisture content, particle size distribution, total hydrocarbon content, soil pH, available nitrogen, available phosphorus, total ...

  3. Nano sized clay detected on chalk particle surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Lone; Hassenkam, Tue; Makovicky, Emil

    2012-01-01

    that in calcite saturated water, both the polar and the nonpolar functional groups adhere to the nano sized clay particles but not to calcite. This is fundamentally important information for the development of conceptual and chemical models to explain wettability alterations in chalk reservoirs...

  4. Estimation of particle size distribution of nanoparticles from electrical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... blockade (CB) phenomena of electrical conduction through atiny nanoparticle. Considering the ZnO nanocomposites to be spherical, Coulomb-blockade model of quantum dot isapplied here. The size distribution of particle is estimated from that model and compared with the results obtainedfrom AFM and XRD analyses.

  5. How does particle size influence caking in lactose powder?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carpin, Melanie Anne; Bertelsen, H.; Dalberg, A.

    2017-01-01

    Particle size distribution (PSD) is known to influence product properties such as flowability and compressibility. When producing crystalline lactose, different steps can affect the PSD of the final powder. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of PSD on caking and the mechanisms...

  6. Particle size distribution of selected electronic nicotine delivery system products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldham, Michael J; Zhang, Jingjie; Rusyniak, Mark J; Kane, David B; Gardner, William P

    2018-03-01

    Dosimetry models can be used to predict the dose of inhaled material, but they require several parameters including particle size distribution. The reported particle size distributions for aerosols from electronic nicotine delivery system (ENDS) products vary widely and don't always identify a specific product. A low-flow cascade impactor was used to determine the particle size distribution [mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD); geometric standard deviation (GSD)] from 20 different cartridge based ENDS products. To assess losses and vapor phase amount, collection efficiency of the system was measured by comparing the collected mass in the impactor to the difference in ENDS product mass. The levels of nicotine, glycerin, propylene glycol, water, and menthol in the formulations of each product were also measured. Regardless of the ENDS product formulation, the MMAD of all tested products was similar and ranged from 0.9 to 1.2 μm with a GSD ranging from 1.7 to 2.2. There was no consistent pattern of change in the MMAD and GSD as a function of number of puffs (cartridge life). The collection efficiency indicated that 9%-26% of the generated mass was deposited in the collection system or was in the vapor phase. The particle size distribution data are suitable for use in aerosol dosimetry programs. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Synthesis of micro-sized polystyrene magnetic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neves, Juliete S.; Suarez, Paulo A.Z.; Umpierre, Alexandre P.; Machado, Fabricio; Souza Junior, Fernando G. de

    2011-01-01

    The present work illustrates the synthesis of spherical and micro-sized polystyrene magnetic particles by using a water-based suspension polymerization process to incorporate in situ surface modified superparamagnetic Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles. The crystallite size of Fe 3 O 4 was determined to be equal to 7.7 nm, based on Scherrer's equation and XRD measurement. According to EDX analyses, Fe 3 O 4 / polystyrene nanocomposites particles show strong characteristic peaks Kα and Kβ of iron at the interval from 6.38 KeV to 7.04 KeV with an amount of iron in the samples equal to 98 %, indicating that the inorganic material dispersed in the polystyrene matrix is essentially Fe in the form of iron oxide (Fe 3 O 4 ). The obtained polymeric materials presented good magnetic behavior, indicating that the modified Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles were successfully dispersed in the polystyrene particles. (author)

  8. Stochastic transport of particles across single barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreuter, Christian; Siems, Ullrich; Henseler, Peter; Nielaba, Peter; Leiderer, Paul; Erbe, Artur

    2012-01-01

    Transport phenomena of interacting particles are of high interest for many applications in biology and mesoscopic systems. Here we present measurements on colloidal particles, which are confined in narrow channels on a substrate and interact with a barrier, which impedes the motion along the channel. The substrate of the particle is tilted in order for the particles to be driven towards the barrier and, if the energy gained by the tilt is large enough, surpass the barrier by thermal activation. We therefore study the influence of this barrier as well as the influence of particle interaction on the particle transport through such systems. All experiments are supported with Brownian dynamics simulations in order to complement the experiments with tests of a large range of parameter space which cannot be accessed in experiments.

  9. Experimental Study on Effects of Particle Shape and Operating Conditions on Combustion Characteristics of Single Biomass Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momeni, M.; Yin, Chungen; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2013-01-01

    An experimental study is performed to investigate the ignition, devolatilization, and burnout of single biomass particles of various shapes and sizes under process conditions that are similar to those in an industrial combustor. A chargecoupled device (CCD) camera is used to record the whole...... combustion process. For the particles with similar volume (mass), cylindrical particles are found to lose mass faster than spherical particles and the burnout time is shortened by increasing the particle aspect ratio (surface area). The conversion times of cylindrical particles with almost the same surface...... area/volume ratio are very close to each other. The ignition, devolatilization, and burnout times of cylindrical particles are also affected by the oxidizer temperature and oxygen concentration, in which the oxygen concentration is found to have a more pronounced effect on the conversion times at lower...

  10. Size-resolved particle emission factors for individual ships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Åsa M.; Westerlund, Jonathan; Hallquist, Mattias

    2011-07-01

    In these experiments size-resolved emission factors for particle number (EFPN) and mass (EFPM) have been determined for 734 individual ship passages for real-world dilution. The method used is an extractive sampling method of the passing ship plumes where particle number/mass and CO2 were measured with high time resolution (1 Hz). The measurements were conducted on a small island located in the entrance to the port of Gothenburg (N57.6849, E11.838), the largest harbor in Scandinavia. This is an emission control area (ECA) and in close vicinity to populated areas. The average EFPN and EFPM were 2.55 ± 0.11 × 1016 (kg fuel)-1 and 2050 ± 110 mg (kg fuel)-1, respectively. The determined EF for ships with multiple passages showed a great reproducibility. Size-resolved EFPN were peaking at small particle sizes ˜35 nm. Smaller particle sizes and hence less mass were observed by a gas turbine equipped ship compared to diesel engine equipped ships. On average 36 to 46% of the emitted particles by number were non-volatile and 24% by mass (EFPN 1.16 ± 0.19 × 1016 [kg fuel]-1 and EFPM 488 ± 73 mg [kg fuel]-1, respectively). This study shows a great potential to gain large data-sets regarding ship emission determining parameters that can improve current dispersion modeling for health assessments on local and regional scales. The global contributions of total and non-volatile particle mass from shipping using this extensive data-set from an ECA were estimated to be at least 0.80 Tgy-1 and 0.19 Tgy-1.

  11. Optimization of particle trapping and patterning via photovoltaic tweezers: role of light modulation and particle size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matarrubia, J; García-Cabañes, A; Plaza, J L; Agulló-López, F; Carrascosa, M

    2014-01-01

    The role of light modulation m and particle size on the morphology and spatial resolution of nano-particle patterns obtained by photovoltaic tweezers on Fe : LiNbO 3 has been investigated. The impact of m when using spherical as well as non-spherical (anisotropic) nano-particles deposited on the sample surface has been elucidated. Light modulation is a key parameter determining the particle profile contrast that is optimum for spherical particles and high-m values (m ∼ 1). The minimum particle periodicities reachable are also investigated obtaining periodic patterns up to 3.5 µm. This is a value at least one order of magnitude shorter than those obtained in previous reported experiments. Results are successfully explained and discussed in light of the previous reported models for photorefraction including nonlinear carrier transport and dielectrophoretic trapping. From the results, a number of rules for particle patterning optimization are derived. (paper)

  12. Single Particle Soot Photometer intercomparison at the AIDA chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Laborde

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Soot particles, consisting of black carbon (BC, organic carbon (OC, inorganic salts, and trace elements, are emitted into the atmosphere during incomplete combustion. Accurate measurements of atmospheric BC are important as BC particles cause adverse health effects and impact the climate.

    Unfortunately, the accurate measurement of the properties and mass concentrations of BC particles remains difficult. The Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2 can contribute to improving this situation by measuring the mass of refractory BC in individual particles as well as its mixing state.

    Here, the results of the first detailed SP2 intercomparison, involving 6 SP2s from 6 different research groups, are presented, including the most evolved data products that can presently be calculated from SP2 measurements.

    It was shown that a detection efficiency of almost 100% down to 1 fg BC per particle can readily be achieved, and that this limit can be pushed down to ∼0.2 fg BC with optimal SP2 setup. Number and mass size distributions of BC cores agreed within ±5% and ±10%, respectively, in between the SP2s, with larger deviations in the range below 1 fg BC.

    The accuracy of the SP2's mass concentration measurement depends on the calibration material chosen. The SP2 has previously been shown to be equally sensitive to fullerene soot and ambient BC from sources where fossil fuel was dominant and less sensitive to fullerene soot than to Aquadag. Fullerene soot was therefore chosen as the standard calibration material by the SP2 user community; however, many data sets rely solely on Aquadag calibration measurements. The difference in SP2 sensitivity was found to be almost equal (fullerene soot to Aquadag response ratio of ∼0.75 at 8.9 fg BC for all SP2s. This allows the calculation of a fullerene soot equivalent calibration curve from a measured Aquadag calibration, when no fullerene soot calibration is available. It could be

  13. Totally asymmetric exclusion processes with particles of arbitrary size

    CERN Document Server

    Lakatos, G

    2003-01-01

    The steady-state currents and densities of a one-dimensional totally asymmetric exclusion process (TASEP) with particles that occlude an integer number (d) of lattice sites are computed using various mean-field approximations and Monte Carlo simulations. TASEPs featuring particles of arbitrary size are relevant for modelling systems such as mRNA translation, vesicle locomotion along microtubules and protein sliding along DNA. We conjecture that the nonequilibrium steady-state properties separate into low-density, high-density, and maximal current phases similar to those of the standard (d = 1) TASEP. A simple mean-field approximation for steady-state particle currents and densities is found to be inaccurate. However, we find local equilibrium particle distributions derived from a discrete Tonks gas partition function yield apparently exact currents within the maximal current phase. For the boundary-limited phases, the equilibrium Tonks gas distribution cannot be used to predict currents, phase boundaries, or ...

  14. Particle Transport and Size Sorting in Bubble Microstreaming Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thameem, Raqeeb; Rallabandi, Bhargav; Wang, Cheng; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasonic driving of sessile semicylindrical bubbles results in powerful steady streaming flows that are robust over a wide range of driving frequencies. In a microchannel, this flow field pattern can be fine-tuned to achieve size-sensitive sorting and trapping of particles at scales much smaller than the bubble itself; the sorting mechanism has been successfully described based on simple geometrical considerations. We investigate the sorting process in more detail, both experimentally (using new parameter variations that allow greater control over the sorting) and theoretically (incorporating the device geometry as well as the superimposed channel flow into an asymptotic theory). This results in optimized criteria for size sorting and a theoretical description that closely matches the particle behavior close to the bubble, the crucial region for size sorting.

  15. Effect of particle size on the glass transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Ryan J; Zukoski, Charles F

    2011-05-01

    The glass transition temperature of a broad class of molecules is shown to depend on molecular size. This dependency results from the size dependence of the pair potential. A generalized equation of state is used to estimate how the volume fraction at the glass transition depends on the size of the molecule, for rigid molecule glass-formers. The model shows that at a given pressure and temperature there is a size-induced glass transition: For molecules larger than a critical size, the volume fraction required to support the effective pressure due to particle attractions is above that which characterizes the glassy state. This observation establishes the boundary between nanoparticles, which exist in liquid form only as dispersions in low molecular weight solvents and large molecules which form liquids that have viscosities below those characterized by the glassy state.

  16. Sources and mixing state of size-resolved elemental carbon particles in a European megacity: Paris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, R. M.; Sciare, J.; Poulain, L.; Kamili, K.; Merkel, M.; Müller, T.; Wiedensohler, A.; Eckhardt, S.; Stohl, A.; Sarda-Estève, R.; McGillicuddy, E.; O'Connor, I. P.; Sodeau, J. R.; Wenger, J. C.

    2012-02-01

    An Aerosol Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS) was deployed to investigate the size-resolved chemical composition of single particles at an urban background site in Paris, France, as part of the MEGAPOLI winter campaign in January/February 2010. ATOFMS particle counts were scaled to match coincident Twin Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (TDMPS) data in order to generate hourly size-resolved mass concentrations for the single particle classes observed. The total scaled ATOFMS particle mass concentration in the size range 150-1067 nm was found to agree very well with the sum of concurrent High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP) mass concentration measurements of organic carbon (OC), inorganic ions and black carbon (BC) (R2 = 0.91). Clustering analysis of the ATOFMS single particle mass spectra allowed the separation of elemental carbon (EC) particles into four classes: (i) EC attributed to biomass burning (ECbiomass), (ii) EC attributed to traffic (ECtraffic), (iii) EC internally mixed with OC and ammonium sulfate (ECOCSOx), and (iv) EC internally mixed with OC and ammonium nitrate (ECOCNOx). Average hourly mass concentrations for EC-containing particles detected by the ATOFMS were found to agree reasonably well with semi-continuous quantitative thermal/optical EC and optical BC measurements (r2 = 0.61 and 0.65-0.68 respectively, n = 552). The EC particle mass assigned to fossil fuel and biomass burning sources also agreed reasonably well with BC mass fractions assigned to the same sources using seven-wavelength aethalometer data (r2 = 0.60 and 0.48, respectively, n = 568). Agreement between the ATOFMS and other instrumentation improved noticeably when a period influenced by significantly aged, internally mixed EC particles was removed from the intercomparison. 88% and 12% of EC particle mass was apportioned to fossil fuel and biomass burning respectively using the ATOFMS data

  17. Sources and mixing state of size-resolved elemental carbon particles in a European megacity: Paris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Healy

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available An Aerosol Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS was deployed to investigate the size-resolved chemical composition of single particles at an urban background site in Paris, France, as part of the MEGAPOLI winter campaign in January/February 2010. ATOFMS particle counts were scaled to match coincident Twin Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (TDMPS data in order to generate hourly size-resolved mass concentrations for the single particle classes observed. The total scaled ATOFMS particle mass concentration in the size range 150–1067 nm was found to agree very well with the sum of concurrent High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS and Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP mass concentration measurements of organic carbon (OC, inorganic ions and black carbon (BC (R2 = 0.91. Clustering analysis of the ATOFMS single particle mass spectra allowed the separation of elemental carbon (EC particles into four classes: (i EC attributed to biomass burning (ECbiomass, (ii EC attributed to traffic (ECtraffic, (iii EC internally mixed with OC and ammonium sulfate (ECOCSOx, and (iv EC internally mixed with OC and ammonium nitrate (ECOCNOx. Average hourly mass concentrations for EC-containing particles detected by the ATOFMS were found to agree reasonably well with semi-continuous quantitative thermal/optical EC and optical BC measurements (r2 = 0.61 and 0.65–0.68 respectively, n = 552. The EC particle mass assigned to fossil fuel and biomass burning sources also agreed reasonably well with BC mass fractions assigned to the same sources using seven-wavelength aethalometer data (r2 = 0.60 and 0.48, respectively, n = 568. Agreement between the ATOFMS and other instrumentation improved noticeably when a period influenced by significantly aged, internally mixed EC particles was removed from the intercomparison. 88% and 12% of EC particle

  18. Magnetization Reversal Process of Single Crystal α-Fe Containing a Nonmagnetic Particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yi; Xu Ben; Li Qiu-Lin; Liu Wei; Hu Shen-Yang; Li Yu-Lan

    2015-01-01

    The magnetization reversal process and hysteresis loops in a single crystal α-iron with nonmagnetic particles are simulated in this work based on the Landau—Lifshitz—Gilbert equation. The evolutions of the magnetic domain morphology are studied, and our analyses show that the magnetization reversal process is affected by the interaction between the moving domain wall and the existing nonmagnetic particles. This interaction strongly depends on the size of the particles, and it is found that particles with a particular size contribute the most to magnetic hardening. (paper)

  19. Comprehensive Characterization Of Ultrafine Particulate Emission From 2007 Diesel Engines: PM Size Distribution, Loading And Indidividual Particle Size And Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenyuk, A.; Cuadra-Rodriguez, L. A.; Imre, D.; Shimpi, S.; Warey, A.

    2006-12-01

    The strong absorption of solar radiation by black carbon (BC) impacts the atmospheric radiative balance in a complex and significant manner. One of the most important sources of BC is vehicular emissions, of which diesel represents a significant fraction. To address this issue the EPA has issues new stringent regulations that will be in effect in 2007, limiting the amount of particulate mass that can be emitted by diesel engines. The new engines are equipped with aftertreatments that reduce PM emissions to the point, where filter measurements are subject to significant artifacts and characterization by other techniques presents new challenges. We will present the results of the multidisciplinary study conducted at the Cummins Technical Center in which a suite of instruments was deployed to yield comprehensive, temporally resolved information on the diesel exhaust particle loadings and properties in real-time: Particle size distributions were measured by Engine Exhaust Particle Sizer (EEPS) and Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). Total particle diameter concentration was obtained using Electrical Aerosol Detector (EAD). Laser Induced Incandescence and photoacoustic techniques were used to monitor the PM soot content. Single Particle Laser Ablation Time-of- flight Mass Spectrometer (SPLAT) provided the aerodynamic diameter and chemical composition of individual diesel exhaust particles. Measurements were conducted on a number of heavy duty diesel engines operated under variety of operating conditions, including FTP transient cycles, ramped-modal cycles and steady states runs. We have also characterized PM emissions during diesel particulate filter regeneration cycles. We will present a comparison of PM characteristics observed during identical cycles, but with and without the use of aftertreatment. A total of approximately 100,000 individual particles were sized and their composition characterized by SPLAT. The aerodynamic size distributions of the characterized

  20. Theory of flotation of small and medium-size particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derjaguin, B. V.; Dukhin, S. S.

    1993-08-01

    The paper describes a theory of flotation of small and medium-size particles less than 50μ in radius) when their precipitation on a bubble surface depends more on surface forces than on inertia forces, and deformation of the bubble due to collisions with the particles may be neglected. The approach of the mineral particle to the bubble surface is regarded as taking place in three stages corresponding to movement of the particles through zones 1, 2 and 3. Zone 3 is a liquid wetting layer of such thickness that a positive or negative disjoining pressure arises in this intervening layer between the particle and the bubble. By zone 2 is meant the diffusional boundary layer of the bubble. In zone 1, which comprises the entire liquid outside zone 2, there are no surface forces. Precipitation of the particles is calculated by considering the forces acting in zones 1, 2 and 3. The particles move through zone 1 under the action of gravity and inertia. Analysis of the movement of the particles under the action of these forces gives the critical particle size, below which contact with the bubble surface is impossible, if the surface forces acting in zones 2 and 3 be neglected. The forces acting in zone 2 are ‘diffusio-phoretic’ forces due to the concentration gradient in the diffusional boundary layer. The concentration and electric field intensity distribution in zone 2 is calculated, taking into account ion diffusion to the deformed bubble surface. An examination is made of the ‘equilibrium’ surface forces acting in zone 3 independent of whether the bubble is at rest or in motion. These forces, which determine the behaviour of the thin wetting intervening layer between the bubble and the mineral particle and the height of the force barrier against its rupture, may be represented as results of the disjoining pressure forces acting on various parts of the film. The main components of the disjoining pressure are van der Waals forces, forces of an iono

  1. Automated data collection in single particle electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yong Zi; Cheng, Anchi; Potter, Clinton S.; Carragher, Bridget

    2016-01-01

    Automated data collection is an integral part of modern workflows in single particle electron microscopy (EM) research. This review surveys the software packages available for automated single particle EM data collection. The degree of automation at each stage of data collection is evaluated, and the capabilities of the software packages are described. Finally, future trends in automation are discussed. PMID:26671944

  2. Single particle irradiation effect of digital signal processor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Si'an; Chen Kenan

    2010-01-01

    The single particle irradiation effect of high energy neutron on digital signal processor TMS320P25 in dynamic working condition has been studied. The influence of the single particle on the device has been explored through the acquired waveform and working current of TMS320P25. Analysis results, test data and test methods have also been presented. (authors)

  3. Charging of Single Micron Sized Dust Grains by Secondary Electron Emission: A Laboratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, James F., Jr.; Venturini, Catherine C.; Comfort, R. H.

    1998-01-01

    We present the details of a new laboratory study whose objective is to experimentally study the interaction of micron sized particles with plasmas and electromagnetic radiation. Specifically, to investigate under what conditions and to what extent do particles of various compositions and sizes become charged, or discharged, while exposed to an electron beam and ultraviolet radiation environment The emphasis is the study of the two charging mechanisms, secondary emission of electrons and photoelectric effect. The experiment uses a technique known as electrodynamic suspension of particles. With this technique, a single charged particle is electrodynamically levitated and then exposed to a controlled environment. Its charge to mass ratio is directly measured. Viscous drag measurements and the light scattering measurements characterize its size and optical characteristics. The environment to which the particle is expose may consist of room temperature and pressure or a rarefied atmosphere where only one major gaseous constituent is present, or, as in this case, a vacuum environment under electron bombardment or UV radiation . In addition, the environment can be cycled as part of the experiment. Therefore, using this technique, a single particle can be repeatedly exposed to a controlled environment and its response measured, or a single particle can be exposed to similar environments with minor differences and its response measured as a function of only the changed environmental conditions.

  4. Single-particle behaviour in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNamara, B.

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses essentially the motion of charged particles in electromagnetic fields. Difficult methods of averaging are explained and applied to calculation of constants of motion. The breakdown of these constants and its consequences on fusion is analyzed

  5. Single Particle Linear and Nonlinear Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Y

    2004-06-25

    I will give a comprehensive review of existing particle tracking tools to assess long-term particle stability for small and large accelerators in the presence of realistic magnetic imperfections and machine misalignments. The emphasis will be on the tracking and analysis tools based upon the differential algebra, Lie operator, and ''polymorphism''. Using these tools, a uniform linear and non-linear analysis will be outlined as an application of the normal form.

  6. Single Particle Linear and Nonlinear Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Y

    2004-01-01

    I will give a comprehensive review of existing particle tracking tools to assess long-term particle stability for small and large accelerators in the presence of realistic magnetic imperfections and machine misalignments. The emphasis will be on the tracking and analysis tools based upon the differential algebra, Lie operator, and ''polymorphism''. Using these tools, a uniform linear and non-linear analysis will be outlined as an application of the normal form

  7. New apparatus of single particle trap system for aerosol visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Hidenori; Fujioka, Tomomi; Endo, Tetsuo; Kitayama, Chiho; Seto, Takafumi; Otani, Yoshio

    2014-08-01

    Control of transport and deposition of charged aerosol particles is important in various manufacturing processes. Aerosol visualization is an effective method to directly observe light scattering signal from laser-irradiated single aerosol particle trapped in a visualization cell. New single particle trap system triggered by light scattering pulse signal was developed in this study. The performance of the device was evaluated experimentally. Experimental setup consisted of an aerosol generator, a differential mobility analyzer (DMA), an optical particle counter (OPC) and the single particle trap system. Polystylene latex standard (PSL) particles (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 μm) were generated and classified according to the charge by the DMA. Singly charged 0.5 and 1.0 μm particles and doubly charged 2.0 μm particles were used as test particles. The single particle trap system was composed of a light scattering signal detector and a visualization cell. When the particle passed through the detector, trigger signal with a given delay time sent to the solenoid valves upstream and downstream of the visualization cell for trapping the particle in the visualization cell. The motion of particle in the visualization cell was monitored by CCD camera and the gravitational settling velocity and the electrostatic migration velocity were measured from the video image. The aerodynamic diameter obtained from the settling velocity was in good agreement with Stokes diameter calculated from the electrostatic migration velocity for individual particles. It was also found that the aerodynamic diameter obtained from the settling velocity was a one-to-one function of the scattered light intensity of individual particles. The applicability of this system will be discussed.

  8. Particle size distribution of airborne Aspergillus fumigatus spores emitted from compost using membrane filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deacon, L. J.; Pankhurst, L. J.; Drew, G. H.; Hayes, E. T.; Jackson, S.; Longhurst, P. J.; Longhurst, J. W. S.; Liu, J.; Pollard, S. J. T.; Tyrrel, S. F.

    Information on the particle size distribution of bioaerosols emitted from open air composting operations is valuable in evaluating potential health impacts and is a requirement for improved dispersion simulation modelling. The membrane filter method was used to study the particle size distribution of Aspergillus fumigatus spores in air 50 m downwind of a green waste compost screening operation at a commercial facility. The highest concentrations (approximately 8 × 10 4 CFU m -3) of culturable spores were found on filters with pore diameters in the range 1-2 μm which suggests that the majority of spores are emitted as single cells. The findings were compared to published data collected using an Andersen sampler. Results were significantly correlated ( p < 0.01) indicating that the two methods are directly comparable across all particles sizes for Aspergillus spores.

  9. Damping of Mechanical Waves with Styrene/Butadiene Rubber Filled with Polystyrene Particle: Effects of Particles Size and Wave Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Haghgo

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing polymeric materials for damping mechanical waves is of great importance in various fields of applications such as military camouflage, prevention of structural vibrational energy transfer, and noise attenuation. This ability originates from segmental dynamics of chain-like polymer molecules. Damping properties of styrene-butadiene rubbercontaining 10 wt% of monosize polystyrene particles with different diameters (from 80 nm to 500 μm was investigated in the frequency range of vibration, sound, and ultrasound via dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, normalsound adsorption test, and ultrasound attenuation coefficient measurement. The obtained results indicated that for different systems, containing different sizes of polystyrene particles, the area under the damping curve does not show significant change comparing to the neat SBR in the frequency range studied. However, addition of polystyrene particles, specifically nanosized particles, resulted in emergence of a secondary glass transition temperature which could be attributed to the modified dynamics of a layer of matrix molecules near the surface of PS particles. In the range of sound frequency, 0.5 to 6.3 kHz, the maximum damping was observed for the system containing polystyrene nanoparticles. However the single damping curve of neat SBR was separated into two or even three distinct curves owing to the presence of the particles. The maximum damping in the ultrasound frequency range was found for the system containing 0.5 mm polystyrene particles. This is attributed to different contributions from matrix chains dynamics and the reflection of mechanical waves from particles-matrix interface at different frequency ranges. On other words, the increase in the glass transition temperature of the elastomeric matrix phase with increasing the mechanical wave frequency causes a reduction in the contribution from matrix chains dynamics while the contribution due to diffraction from dispersed

  10. Diffusion of finite-sized hard-core interacting particles in a one-dimensional box: Tagged particle dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizana, L; Ambjörnsson, T

    2009-11-01

    We solve a nonequilibrium statistical-mechanics problem exactly, namely, the single-file dynamics of N hard-core interacting particles (the particles cannot pass each other) of size Delta diffusing in a one-dimensional system of finite length L with reflecting boundaries at the ends. We obtain an exact expression for the conditional probability density function rhoT(yT,t|yT,0) that a tagged particle T (T=1,...,N) is at position yT at time t given that it at time t=0 was at position yT,0. Using a Bethe ansatz we obtain the N -particle probability density function and, by integrating out the coordinates (and averaging over initial positions) of all particles but particle T , we arrive at an exact expression for rhoT(yT,t|yT,0) in terms of Jacobi polynomials or hypergeometric functions. Going beyond previous studies, we consider the asymptotic limit of large N , maintaining L finite, using a nonstandard asymptotic technique. We derive an exact expression for rhoT(yT,t|yT,0) for a tagged particle located roughly in the middle of the system, from which we find that there are three time regimes of interest for finite-sized systems: (A) for times much smaller than the collision time tparticle concentration and D is the diffusion constant for each particle, the tagged particle undergoes a normal diffusion; (B) for times much larger than the collision time t >taucoll but times smaller than the equilibrium time ttaue , rhoT(yT,t|yT,0) approaches a polynomial-type equilibrium probability density function. Notably, only regimes (A) and (B) are found in the previously considered infinite systems.

  11. Change of particle size distribution during Brownian coagulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.W.

    1984-01-01

    Change in particle size distribution due to Brownian coagulation in the continuum regime has been stuied analytically. A simple analytic solution for the size distribution of an initially lognormal distribution is obtained based on the assumption that the size distribution during the coagulation process attains or can, at least, be represented by a time dependent lognormal function. The results are found to be in a form that corrects Smoluchowski's solution for both polydispersity and size-dependent kernel. It is further shown that regardless of whether the initial distribution is narrow or broad, the spread of the distribution is characterized by approaching a fixed value of the geometric standard deviation. This result has been compared with the self-preserving distribution obtained by similarity theory. (Author)

  12. Raman spectroscopic identification of size-selected airborne particles for quantitative exposure assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steer, Brian; Gorbunov, Boris; Price, Mark C; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for the quantification of chemically distinguished airborne particulate matter, required for health risk assessment. Rather than simply detecting chemical compounds in a sample, we demonstrate an approach for the quantification of exposure to airborne particles and nanomaterials. In line with increasing concerns over the proliferation of engineered particles we consider detection of synthetically produced ZnO crystals. A multi-stage approach is presented whereby the particles are first aerodynamically size segregated from a lab-generated single component aerosol in an impaction sampler. These size fractionated samples are subsequently analysed by Raman spectroscopy. Imaging analysis is applied to Raman spatial maps to provide chemically specific quantification of airborne exposure against background which is critical for health risk evaluation of exposure to airborne particles. Here we present a first proof-of-concept study of the methodology utilising particles in the 2–4 μm aerodynamic diameter range to allow for validation of the approach by comparison to optical microscopy. The results show that the combination of these techniques provides independent size and chemical discrimination of particles. Thereby a method is provided to allow quantitative and chemically distinguished measurements of aerosol concentrations separated into exposure relevant size fractions. (paper)

  13. Soot Particle Size Distribution Functions in a Turbulent Non-Premixed Ethylene-Nitrogen Flame

    KAUST Repository

    Boyette, Wesley

    2017-02-21

    A scanning mobility particle sizer with a nano differential mobility analyzer was used to measure nanoparticle size distribution functions in a turbulent non-premixed flame. The burner utilizes a premixed pilot flame which anchors a C2H4/N2 (35/65) central jet with ReD = 20,000. Nanoparticles in the flame were sampled through a N2-filled tube with a 500- μm orifice. Previous studies have shown that insufficient dilution of the nanoparticles can lead to coagulation in the sampling line and skewed particle size distribution functions. A system of mass flow controllers and valves were used to vary the dilution ratio. Single-stage and two-stage dilution systems were investigated. A parametric study on the effect of the dilution ratio on the observed particle size distribution function indicates that particle coagulation in the sampling line can be eliminated using a two-stage dilution process. Carbonaceous nanoparticle (soot) concentration particle size distribution functions along the flame centerline at multiple heights in the flame are presented. The resulting distributions reveal a pattern of increasing mean particle diameters as the distance from the nozzle along the centerline increases.

  14. Soot Particle Size Distribution Functions in a Turbulent Non-Premixed Ethylene-Nitrogen Flame

    KAUST Repository

    Boyette, Wesley; Chowdhury, Snehaunshu; Roberts, William L.

    2017-01-01

    A scanning mobility particle sizer with a nano differential mobility analyzer was used to measure nanoparticle size distribution functions in a turbulent non-premixed flame. The burner utilizes a premixed pilot flame which anchors a C2H4/N2 (35/65) central jet with ReD = 20,000. Nanoparticles in the flame were sampled through a N2-filled tube with a 500- μm orifice. Previous studies have shown that insufficient dilution of the nanoparticles can lead to coagulation in the sampling line and skewed particle size distribution functions. A system of mass flow controllers and valves were used to vary the dilution ratio. Single-stage and two-stage dilution systems were investigated. A parametric study on the effect of the dilution ratio on the observed particle size distribution function indicates that particle coagulation in the sampling line can be eliminated using a two-stage dilution process. Carbonaceous nanoparticle (soot) concentration particle size distribution functions along the flame centerline at multiple heights in the flame are presented. The resulting distributions reveal a pattern of increasing mean particle diameters as the distance from the nozzle along the centerline increases.

  15. Size-dependent nonlocal effects in plasmonic semiconductor particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maack, Johan Rosenkrantz; Mortensen, N. Asger; Wubs, Martijn

    2017-01-01

    Localized surface plasmons (LSP) in semiconductor particles are expected to exhibit spatial nonlocal response effects as the geometry enters the nanometer scale. To investigate these nonlocal effects, we apply the hydrodynamic model to nanospheres of two different semiconductor materials: intrinsic...... InSb and n-doped GaAs. Our results show that the semiconductors indeed display nonlocal effects, and that these effects are even more pronounced than in metals. In a 150 nm InSb particle at 300 K, the LSP frequency is blueshifted 35%, which is orders of magnitude larger than the blueshift in a metal...... particle of the same size. This property, together with their tunability, makes semiconductors a promising platform for experiments in nonlocal effects. Copyright (C)EPLA, 2017...

  16. Particle size alterations of feedstuffs during in situ NDF incubation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krämer, Monika; Nørgaard, P.; Lund, Peter

    2013-01-01

    feedstuffs with a decrease of 74 % between 24 h and 288 h in situ rumen incubation. Together with the highest mass proportion (20 %) of particles in the critical zone for escape (smaller than 0.005 mm2 in area) for late cut grass silage after 288 h in situ rumen incubation, this imposes a risk for particle...... evaluated in terms of particle size for a broad range of feedstuffs which typically serve as NDF sources in dairy cow rations. Early and late cut grass silages, corn silage, alfalfa silage, rapeseed meal and dried distillers grains were examined. Treatments were I) drying and grinding of forage samples...... and grinding of concentrates, II) neutral detergent soluble (NDS) extraction, III) machine-washing and NDS extraction, IV) 24 h rumen incubation, machine-washing and NDS extraction, and V) 288 h rumen incubation, machine-washing and NDS extraction. Degradation profiles for potentially degradable NDF were...

  17. Size-exclusion chromatography using core-shell particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirok, Bob W J; Breuer, Pascal; Hoppe, Serafine J M; Chitty, Mike; Welch, Emmet; Farkas, Tivadar; van der Wal, Sjoerd; Peters, Ron; Schoenmakers, Peter J

    2017-02-24

    Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) is an indispensable technique for the separation of high-molecular-weight analytes and for determining molar-mass distributions. The potential application of SEC as second-dimension separation in comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography demands very short analysis times. Liquid chromatography benefits from the advent of highly efficient core-shell packing materials, but because of the reduced total pore volume these materials have so far not been explored in SEC. The feasibility of using core-shell particles in SEC has been investigated and contemporary core-shell materials were compared with conventional packing materials for SEC. Columns packed with very small core-shell particles showed excellent resolution in specific molar-mass ranges, depending on the pore size. The analysis times were about an order of magnitude shorter than what could be achieved using conventional SEC columns. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Studies of particle drying using non-invasive Raman spectrometry and particle size analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Peter; Littlejohn, David; Nordon, Alison; Sefcik, Jan; Slavin, Paul; Dallin, Paul; Andrews, John

    2011-05-21

    The evaporation of methanol from needle-shaped particles of cellobiose octaacetate (COA) has been studied directly in a jacketed vacuum drier using in situ measurements by Raman spectrometry. A design of experiments (DoE) approach was used to investigate the effects of three parameters (method of agitation, % solvent loss on drying and jacket temperature), with the intention of minimising the drying time and extent of particle attrition. Drying curves based on Raman signals for methanol and COA in the spectra of the wet particles indicated the end of drying and revealed three stages in the drying process that could be used to monitor the progress of solvent removal in real time. Off-line particle size measurements based on laser diffraction were made to obtain information on the extent of attrition, to compare with the trends revealed by the Raman drying curves. The study demonstrated that non-invasive Raman spectrometry can be used to study the progress of drying during agitation of particles in a vacuum drier, allowing optimisation of operating conditions to minimise attrition and reduce drying times. Although a correlation between particle size and off-line Raman measurements of COA was demonstrated, it was not possible to derive equivalent information from the in situ Raman spectra owing to the greater effects of particle motion or bulk density variations of the particles in the drier.

  19. Fractal and Morphological Characteristics of Single Marble Particle Crushing in Uniaxial Compression Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yidong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Crushing of rock particles is a phenomenon commonly encountered in geotechnical engineering practice. It is however difficult to study the crushing of rock particles using classical theory because the physical structure of the particles is complex and irregular. This paper aims at evaluating fractal and morphological characteristics of single rock particle. A large number of particle crushing tests are conducted on single rock particle. The force-displacement curves and the particle size distributions (PSD of crushed particles are analysed based on particle crushing tests. Particle shape plays an important role in both the micro- and macroscale responses of a granular assembly. The PSD of an assortment of rocks are analysed by fractal methods, and the fractal dimension is obtained. A theoretical formula for particle crushing strength is derived, utilising the fractal model, and a simple method is proposed for predicting the probability of particle survival based on the Weibull statistics. Based on a few physical assumptions, simple equations are derived for determining particle crushing energy. The results of applying these equations are tested against the actual experimental data and prove to be very consistent. Fractal theory is therefore applicable for analysis of particle crushing.

  20. Mixing state of particles with secondary species by single particle aerosol mass spectrometer in an atmospheric pollution event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lingling; Chen, Jinsheng

    2016-04-01

    Single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) was used to characterize size distribution, chemical composition, and mixing state of particles in an atmospheric pollution event during 20 Oct. - 5 Nov., 2015 in Xiamen, Southeast China. A total of 533,012 particle mass spectra were obtained and clustered into six groups, comprising of industry metal (4.5%), dust particles (2.6%), carbonaceous species (70.7%), K-Rich particles (20.7%), seasalt (0.6%) and other particles (0.9%). Carbonaceous species were further divided into EC (70.6%), OC (28.5%), and mixed ECOC (0.9%). There were 61.7%, 58.3%, 4.0%, and 14.6% of particles internally mixed with sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and C2H3O, respectively, indicating that these particles had undergone significant aging processing. Sulfate was preferentially mixed with carbonaceous particles, while nitrate tended to mix with metal-containing and dust particles. Compared to clear days, the fractions of EC-, metal- and dust particles remarkably increased, while the fraction of OC-containing particles decreased in pollution days. The mixing state of particles, excepted for OC-containing particles with secondary species was much stronger in pollution days than that in clear days, which revealed the significant influence of secondary particles in atmospheric pollution. The different activity of OC-containing particles might be related to their much smaller aerodynamic diameter. These results could improve our understanding of aerosol characteristics and could be helpful to further investigate the atmospheric process of particles.

  1. Light absorption by coated nano-sized carbonaceous particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangl, Martin; Kocifaj, Miroslav; Videen, Gorden; Horvath, Helmuth

    The optical properties of strongly absorbing soot particles coated by transparent material are investigated experimentally and described by several modeling approaches. Soot is produced by spark discharge and passed through a Sinclair-La Mer generator where non-absorbing carnauba wax is condensed onto it to obtain internal soot-wax mixtures in a controlled way. Measurements of the extinction and volume scattering coefficient show an amplification of absorption by a factor of approximately 1.8. This behavior was described by different approaches of internally mixed materials for the modal diameters of the measured size distributions: concentric-sphere model, effective medium approximations and heterogeneous ellipsoids. The concentric-sphere model describes the absorption increase quantitatively; and hence, it is chosen to be applied to the entire particle population in the size distribution. The growth of the soot particles by condensing wax is described by a simplified growth model to estimate the different contributions of several soot particle diameters to the overall absorption cross-section.

  2. Mass size distribution of particle-bound water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canepari, S.; Simonetti, G.; Perrino, C.

    2017-09-01

    The thermal-ramp Karl-Fisher method (tr-KF) for the determination of PM-bound water has been applied to size-segregated PM samples collected in areas subjected to different environmental conditions (protracted atmospheric stability, desert dust intrusion, urban atmosphere). This method, based on the use of a thermal ramp for the desorption of water from PM samples and the subsequent analysis by the coulometric KF technique, had been previously shown to differentiate water contributes retained with different strength and associated to different chemical components in the atmospheric aerosol. The application of the method to size-segregated samples has revealed that water showed a typical mass size distribution in each one of the three environmental situations that were taken into consideration. A very similar size distribution was shown by the chemical PM components that prevailed during each event: ammonium nitrate in the case of atmospheric stability, crustal species in the case of desert dust, road-dust components in the case of urban sites. The shape of the tr-KF curve varied according to the size of the collected particles. Considering the size ranges that better characterize the event (fine fraction for atmospheric stability, coarse fraction for dust intrusion, bi-modal distribution for urban dust), this shape is coherent with the typical tr-KF shape shown by water bound to the chemical species that predominate in the same PM size range (ammonium nitrate, crustal species, secondary/combustion species - road dust components).

  3. Fabrication and size control of Ag nano particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farbod, M.; Batvandi, M. R.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this research was to fabricate Ag nanoparticles and control their sizes. Colloidal Ag nanoparticles with particle size of 30 nm were prepared by dissolving AgNO 3 in ethanol and through the chemical reduction of Ag + in alcohol solution. To control the nanoparticle size, different samples were fabricated by changing the AgNO 3 and stabilizer concentrations and the effects of different factors on the shape and size of nanoparticles were investigated. The samples were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy and EDX analysis. The results showed that by increasing the AgNO 3 concentration, the average size of nanoparticles increases and nanoparticles lose their spherical shape. Also, we found that by using the stabilizer, it is possible to produce stable nanoparticles but increasing the stabilizer concentration caused an increase in size of nanoparticles. Fabrication of nanoparticles without using stabilizer was achieved but the results showed the nanoparticles size had a growth of 125 nm/h in the alcoholic media.

  4. The effect of particle size distributions on the microstructural evolution during sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Tikare, V.; Frandsen, Henrik Lund

    2013-01-01

    Microstructural evolution and sintering behavior of powder compacts composed of spherical particles with different particle size distributions (PSDs) were simulated using a kinetic Monte Carlo model of solid state sintering. Compacts of monosized particles, normal PSDs with fixed mean particle...

  5. FIELD COMPARISONS OF DUAL SMPS-APS SYSTEMS TO MEASURE INDOOR-OUTDOOR PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simultaneous measurements of particle size distributions across multiple locations can provide critical information to accurately assess human exposure to particles. These data are very useful to describe indoor-outdoor particle relationships, outdoor particle penetration thro...

  6. Size and Velocity Distributions of Particles and Droplets in Spray Combustion Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-01

    34Particle Sizing by Optical , Nonimaging Techniques," Liquid Particle Size _Mjur-mentTechnjgjwi, ASTM publications STP848, ed. by J. MI. Tishkoff, R. D... Optical Nonimaging predictions do not account for nonideal lens effects. Techniques," in Liquid Particle Size Measurement Techniques, J.M.Tishkoff, ed...4S E. Dan Hirleman’ Particle Sizing by Optical , Nonimaging Techniques REFERENCE: Hieleman, E. D., "Particle Sizing by Optical , Nonimaging Tech- niques

  7. DAMPING OF UNBOUND SINGLE-PARTICLE MODES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FORTIER, S; BEAUMEL, D; GALES, S; GUILLOT, J; LANGEVINJOLIOT, H; LAURENT, H; MAISON, JM; BORDEWIJK, J; BRANDENBURG, S; KRASZNAHORKAY, A; CRAWLEY, GM; MASSOLO, CP; RENTERIA, M; KHENDRICHE, A

    1995-01-01

    The (alpha, He-3-n) reaction has been investigated at 120 MeV incident energy on Ni-64, Zr-90, and Sn-120 target nuclei. Neutrons in coincidence with He-3 particles emitted at 0 degrees were detected using the multidetector array EDEN, in order to get information about the decay of the

  8. Winter precipitation particle size distribution measurement by Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gwo-Jong; Kleinkort, Cameron; Bringi, V. N.; Notaroš, Branislav M.

    2017-12-01

    From the radar meteorology viewpoint, the most important properties for quantitative precipitation estimation of winter events are 3D shape, size, and mass of precipitation particles, as well as the particle size distribution (PSD). In order to measure these properties precisely, optical instruments may be the best choice. The Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC) is a relatively new instrument equipped with three high-resolution cameras to capture the winter precipitation particle images from three non-parallel angles, in addition to measuring the particle fall speed using two pairs of infrared motion sensors. However, the results from the MASC so far are usually presented as monthly or seasonally, and particle sizes are given as histograms, no previous studies have used the MASC for a single storm study, and no researchers use MASC to measure the PSD. We propose the methodology for obtaining the winter precipitation PSD measured by the MASC, and present and discuss the development, implementation, and application of the new technique for PSD computation based on MASC images. Overall, this is the first study of the MASC-based PSD. We present PSD MASC experiments and results for segments of two snow events to demonstrate the performance of our PSD algorithm. The results show that the self-consistency of the MASC measured single-camera PSDs is good. To cross-validate PSD measurements, we compare MASC mean PSD (averaged over three cameras) with the collocated 2D Video Disdrometer, and observe good agreements of the two sets of results.

  9. Inverse problem for particle size distributions of atmospheric aerosols using stochastic particle swarm optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Yuan; Yi Hongliang; Shuai Yong; Wang Fuqiang; Tan Heping

    2010-01-01

    As a part of resolving optical properties in atmosphere radiative transfer calculations, this paper focuses on obtaining aerosol optical thicknesses (AOTs) in the visible and near infrared wave band through indirect method by gleaning the values of aerosol particle size distribution parameters. Although various inverse techniques have been applied to obtain values for these parameters, we choose a stochastic particle swarm optimization (SPSO) algorithm to perform an inverse calculation. Computational performances of different inverse methods are investigated and the influence of swarm size on the inverse problem of computation particles is examined. Next, computational efficiencies of various particle size distributions and the influences of the measured errors on computational accuracy are compared. Finally, we recover particle size distributions for atmospheric aerosols over Beijing using the measured AOT data (at wavelengths λ=0.400, 0.690, 0.870, and 1.020 μm) obtained from AERONET at different times and then calculate other AOT values for this band based on the inverse results. With calculations agreeing with measured data, the SPSO algorithm shows good practicability.

  10. Particle size and radionuclide levels in some west Cumbrian soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livens, F.R.

    1988-01-01

    Four west Cumbrian soils of contrasting types, together with an estuarine silt sample, were separated into different particle size fractions by a combination of sieving and settling techniques. These sub-samples were analysed by quantitative gamma-ray spectrometry for several nuclides, principally 137 Cs, 106 Ru and 241 Am, followed by chemical separation and alpha spectrometric determination of 238,239,240 Pu. A simple empirical method of correction for differing sample sizes, and hence counting geometries, was developed for gamma spectrometry and found to give good results. The radionuclides were concentrated into the finer size fractions, with clay-sized ( 137 Cs from 3 to 35 times. The enhancement was greatest for all radionuclides in a sandy soil with a very low clay content (0.2% by weight) and it was found that, as the abundance of fine particles increased, so the concentration effect decreased. No evidence was found for a simple relationship between organic content and radionuclide activity, although the organic matter does have some effect. 17 refs.; 3 figs.; 6 tabs

  11. Single-particle density matrix of liquid 4He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vakarchuk, I.A.

    2008-01-01

    The density single-particle matrix in the coordinate notation was calculated based on the expression for the interacting Bose-particle N system density matrix. Under the low temperatures the mentioned matrix in the first approximation enables to reproduce the Bogoliubov theory results. In the classical terms the mentioned theory enables to reproduce the results of the theory of the classical fluids in the approximation of the chaotic phases. On the basis of the density single-particle matrix one managed to obtain the function of the pulse distribution of the particles, the Bose-liquid average kinetic energy, and to study the Bose-Einstein condensation phenomenon [ru

  12. Experiments and modeling of single plastic particle conversion in suspension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakhaei, Mohammadhadi; Wu, Hao; Grévain, Damien

    2018-01-01

    Conversion of single high density polyethylene (PE) particles has been studied by experiments and modeling. The experiments were carried out in a single particle combustor for five different shapes and masses of particles at temperature conditions of 900 and 1100°C. Each experiment was recorded...... against the experiments as well as literature data. Furthermore, a simplified isothermal model appropriate for CFD applications was developed, in order to model the combustion of plastic particles in cement calciners. By comparing predictions with the isothermal and the non–isothermal models under typical...

  13. [Ultrafine particle number concentration and size distribution of vehicle exhaust ultrafine particles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ye-qiang; Chen, Qiu-fang; Sun, Zai; Cai, Zhi-liang; Yang, Wen-jun

    2014-09-01

    Ultrafine particle (UFP) number concentrations obtained from three different vehicles were measured using fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS) and automobile exhaust gas analyzer. UFP number concentration and size distribution were studied at different idle driving speeds. The results showed that at a low idle speed of 800 rmin-1 , the emission particle number concentration was the lowest and showed a increasing trend with the increase of idle speed. The majority of exhaust particles were in Nuclear mode and Aitken mode. The peak sizes were dominated by 10 nm and 50 nm. Particle number concentration showed a significantly sharp increase during the vehicle acceleration process, and was then kept stable when the speed was stable. In the range of 0. 4 m axial distance from the end of the exhaust pipe, the particle number concentration decayed rapidly after dilution, but it was not obvious in the range of 0. 4-1 m. The number concentration was larger than the background concentration. Concentration of exhaust emissions such as CO, HC and NO showed a reducing trend with the increase of idle speed,which was in contrast to the emission trend of particle number concentration.

  14. Two size-selective mechanisms specifically trap bacteria-sized food particles in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang-Yen, Christopher; Avery, Leon; Samuel, Aravinthan D T

    2009-11-24

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a filter feeder: it draws bacteria suspended in liquid into its pharynx, traps the bacteria, and ejects the liquid. How pharyngeal pumping simultaneously transports and filters food particles has been poorly understood. Here, we use high-speed video microscopy to define the detailed workings of pharyngeal mechanics. The buccal cavity and metastomal flaps regulate the flow of dense bacterial suspensions and exclude excessively large particles from entering the pharynx. A complex sequence of contractions and relaxations transports food particles in two successive trap stages before passage into the terminal bulb and intestine. Filtering occurs at each trap as bacteria are concentrated in the central lumen while fluids are expelled radially through three apical channels. Experiments with microspheres show that the C. elegans pharynx, in combination with the buccal cavity, is tuned to specifically catch and transport particles of a size range corresponding to most soil bacteria.

  15. The Effect of Grain Size on Mechanical Instability in Single-Phase Li-Alloy Anodes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wolfenstine, Jeff

    2000-01-01

    .... The results of this study suggest that decreasing the particle and/or grain size is not a practical approach to solving the mechanical instability problem of single phase Li alloys that are intended to be used as anodes in Li-ion batteries.

  16. Single-particle potential from resummed ladder diagrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, N.

    2013-01-01

    A recent work on the resummation of fermionic in-medium ladder diagrams to all orders is extended by calculating the complex single-particle potential U(p, k f ) + i W(p, k f ) p > k f . The on-shell single-particle potential is constructed by means of a complex-valued in-medium loop that includes corrections from a test particle of momentum vector p added to the filled Fermi sea. The single-particle potential U(k f , k f ) at the Fermi surface as obtained from the resummation of the combined particle and hole ladder diagrams is shown to satisfy the Hugenholtz-Van-Hove theorem. The perturbative contributions at various orders a n in the scattering length are deduced and checked against the known analytical results at order a 1 and a 2 . The limit a → ∞ is studied as a special case and a strong momentum dependence of the real (and imaginary) single-particle potential is found. This feature indicates an instability against a phase transition to a state with an empty shell inside the Fermi sphere such that the density gets reduced by about 5%. The imaginary single-particle potential vanishes linearly at the Fermi surface. For comparison, the same analysis is performed for the resummed particle-particle ladder diagrams alone. In this truncation an instability for hole excitations near the Fermi surface is found at strong coupling. For the set of particle-hole ring diagrams the single-particle potential is calculated as well. Furthermore, the resummation of in-medium ladder diagrams to all orders is studied for a two-dimensional Fermi gas with a short-range two-body contact interaction. (orig.)

  17. Effect of particle size on degree of inversion in ferrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddique, M.; Butt, N.M.

    2012-01-01

    Ferrites with the spinel structure are important materials because of their structural, magnetic and electrical properties. The suitability of these materials depends on both the intrinsic behavior of the material and the effects of the grain size. Moessbauer spectroscopy was employed to investigate the cation distribution and degree of inversion in bulk and nano sized particles of CuFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/, MnFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/ and NiFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/ ferrites. The Moessbauer spectra of all bulk ferrites showed complete magnetic behavior, whereas nanoparticle ferrites showed combination of ferromagnetic and superparamagnetic components. Moreover, the cation distribution in nanoparticle materials was also found to be different to that of their bulk counterparts indicating the particle size dependency. The inversion of Cu and Ni ions in bulk sample was greater than that of nanoparticles; whereas the inversion of Mn ions was less in bulk material as compared to the nanoparticles. Hence the degree of inversion decreased in CuFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/ and NiFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/ samples whereas, it increased in MnFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/ as the particle size decreased and thus showed the anomalous behavior in this case. The nanoparticle samples also showed paramagnetic behaviour due to superparamagnetism and this effect is more prominent in MnFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/. Moessbauer spectra of bulk and nanoparticles CuFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/ is shown. (Orig./A.B.)

  18. Effect of particle size and distribution of the sizing agent on the carbon fibers surface and interfacial shear strength (IFSS) of its composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, R.L.; Liu, Y.; Huang, Y.D.; Liu, L.

    2013-01-01

    Effect of particle size and distribution of the sizing agent on the performance of carbon fiber and carbon fiber composites has been investigated. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize carbon fiber surface topographies. At the same time, the single fiber strength and Weibull distribution were also studied in order to investigate the effect of coatings on the fibers. The interfacial shear strength and hygrothermal aging of the carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites were also measured. The results indicated that the particle size and distribution is important for improving the surface of carbon fibers and its composites performance. Different particle size and distribution of sizing agent has different contribution to the wetting performance of carbon fibers. The fibers sized with P-2 had higher value of IFSS and better hygrothermal aging resistant properties.

  19. Particle size distributions of radioactive aerosols measured in workplaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorrian, M.-D.; Bailey, M.R.

    1995-01-01

    A survey of published values of Activity Median Aerodynamic Diameter (AMAD) measured in working environments was conducted to assist in the selection of a realistic default AMAD for occupational exposures. Results were compiled from 52 publications covering a wide variety of industries and workplaces. Reported values of AMAD from all studies ranged from 0.12 μm to 25 μm, and most were well fitted by a log-normal distribution with a median value of 4.4 μm. This supports the choice of a 5 μm default AMAD, as a realistic rounded value for occupational exposures, by the ICRP Task Group on Human Respiratory Tract Models for Radiological Protection and its acceptance by ICRP. Both the nuclear power and nuclear fuel handling industries gave median values of approximately 4 μm. Uranium mills gave a median value of 6.8 μm with AMADs frequently greater than 10 μm. High temperature and arc saw cutting operations generated submicron particles and occasionally, biomodal log-normal particle size distributions. It is concluded that in view of the wide range of AMADs found in the surveyed literature, greater emphasis should be placed on air sampling to characterise aerosol particle size distributions for individual work practices, especially as doses estimated with the new 5 μm default AMAD will not always be conservative. (author)

  20. Depositing nanometer-sized particles of metals onto carbon allotropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Kent A. (Inventor); Fallbach, Michael J. (Inventor); Ghose, Sayata (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G. (Inventor); Delozier, Donavon M. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A process for depositing nanometer-sized metal particles onto a substrate in the absence of aqueous solvents, organic solvents, and reducing agents, and without any required pre-treatment of the substrate, includes preparing an admixture of a metal compound and a substrate by dry mixing a chosen amount of the metal compound with a chosen amount of the substrate; and supplying energy to the admixture in an amount sufficient to deposit zero valance metal particles onto the substrate. This process gives rise to a number of deposited metallic particle sizes which may be controlled. The compositions prepared by this process are used to produce polymer composites by combining them with readily available commodity and engineering plastics. The polymer composites are used as coatings, or they are used to fabricate articles, such as free-standing films, fibers, fabrics, foams, molded and laminated articles, tubes, adhesives, and fiber reinforced articles. These articles are well-suited for many applications requiring thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, antibacterial activity, catalytic activity, and combinations thereof.

  1. Initiator Systems Effect on Particle Coagulation and Particle Size Distribution in One-Step Emulsion Polymerization of Styrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baijun Liu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Particle coagulation is a facile approach to produce large-scale polymer latex particles. This approach has been widely used in academic and industrial research owing to its higher polymerization rate and one-step polymerization process. Our work was motivated to control the extent (or time of particle coagulation. Depending on reaction parameters, particle coagulation is also able to produce narrowly dispersed latex particles. In this study, a series of experiments were performed to investigate the role of the initiator system in determining particle coagulation and particle size distribution. Under the optimal initiation conditions, such as cationic initiator systems or higher reaction temperature, the time of particle coagulation would be advanced to particle nucleation period, leading to the narrowly dispersed polymer latex particles. By using a combination of the Smoluchowski equation and the electrostatic stability theory, the relationship between the particle size distribution and particle coagulation was established: the earlier the particle coagulation, the narrower the particle size distribution, while the larger the extent of particle coagulation, the larger the average particle size. Combined with the results of previous studies, a systematic method controlling the particle size distribution in the presence of particle coagulation was developed.

  2. Development and characterization of a single particle laser ablation mass spectrometer (SPLAM for organic aerosol studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gaie-Levrel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A single particle instrument was developed for real-time analysis of organic aerosol. This instrument, named Single Particle Laser Ablation Mass Spectrometry (SPLAM, samples particles using an aerodynamic lens system for which the theoretical performances were calculated. At the outlet of this system, particle detection and sizing are realized by using two continuous diode lasers operating at λ = 403 nm. Polystyrene Latex (PSL, sodium chloride (NaCl and dioctylphtalate (DOP particles were used to characterize and calibrate optical detection of SPLAM. The optical detection limit (DL and detection efficiency (DE were determined using size-selected DOP particles. The DE ranges from 0.1 to 90% for 100 and 350 nm DOP particles respectively and the SPLAM instrument is able to detect and size-resolve particles as small as 110–120 nm. During optical detection, particle scattered light from the two diode lasers, is detected by two photomultipliers and the detected signals are used to trigger UV excimer laser (λ = 248 nm used for one-step laser desorption ionization (LDI of individual aerosol particles. The formed ions are analyzed by a 1 m linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer in order to access to the chemical composition of individual particles. The TOF-MS detection limit for gaseous aromatic compounds was determined to be 0.85 × 10−15 kg (∼4 × 103 molecules. DOP particles were also used to test the overall operation of the instrument. The analysis of a secondary organic aerosol, formed in a smog chamber by the ozonolysis of indene, is presented as a first application of the instrument. Single particle mass spectra were obtained with an effective hit rate of 8%. Some of these mass spectra were found to be very different from one particle to another possibly reflecting chemical differences within the investigated indene SOA particles. Our study shows that an exhaustive statistical analysis, over hundreds of particles

  3. Improved technique for measuring the size distribution of black carbon particles in rainwater and snow samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, T.; Moteki, N.; Ohata, S.; Koike, M.; Azuma, K. G.; Miyazaki, Y.; Kondo, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) is the strongest contributor to sunlight absorption among atmospheric aerosols. Quantitative understanding of wet deposition of BC, which strongly affects the spatial distribution of BC, is important to improve our understandings on climate change. We have devised a technique for measuring the masses of individual BC particles in rainwater and snow samples, as a combination of a nebulizer and a single-particle soot photometer (SP2) (Ohata et al. 2011, 2013; Schwarz et al. 2012; Mori et al. 2014). We show two important improvements in this technique: 1)We have extended the upper limit of detectable BC particle diameter from 0.9 μm to about 4.0 μm by modifying the photodetector for measuring the laser-induced incandescence signal. 2)We introduced a pneumatic nebulizer Marin-5 (Cetac Technologies Inc., Omaha, NE, USA) and experimentally confirmed its high extraction efficiency (~50%) independent of particle diameter up to 2.0 μm. Using our improved system, we simultaneously measured the size distribution of BC particles in air and rainwater in Tokyo. We observed that the size distribution of BC in rainwater was larger than that in air, indicating that large BC particles were effectively removed by precipitation. We also observed BC particles with diameters larger than 1.0 μm, indicating that further studies of wet deposition of BC will require the use of the modified SP2.

  4. Totally asymmetric exclusion processes with particles of arbitrary size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakatos, Greg; Chou, Tom

    2003-01-01

    The steady-state currents and densities of a one-dimensional totally asymmetric exclusion process (TASEP) with particles that occlude an integer number (d) of lattice sites are computed using various mean-field approximations and Monte Carlo simulations. TASEPs featuring particles of arbitrary size are relevant for modelling systems such as mRNA translation, vesicle locomotion along microtubules and protein sliding along DNA. We conjecture that the nonequilibrium steady-state properties separate into low-density, high-density, and maximal current phases similar to those of the standard (d = 1) TASEP. A simple mean-field approximation for steady-state particle currents and densities is found to be inaccurate. However, we find local equilibrium particle distributions derived from a discrete Tonks gas partition function yield apparently exact currents within the maximal current phase. For the boundary-limited phases, the equilibrium Tonks gas distribution cannot be used to predict currents, phase boundaries, or the order of the phase transitions. However, we employ a refined mean-field approach to find apparently exact expressions for the steady-state currents, boundary densities, and phase diagrams of the d ≥ 1 TASEP. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations are performed to support our analytic, mean-field results

  5. Totally asymmetric exclusion processes with particles of arbitrary size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakatos, Greg; Chou, Tom [Department of Biomathematics and Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2003-02-28

    The steady-state currents and densities of a one-dimensional totally asymmetric exclusion process (TASEP) with particles that occlude an integer number (d) of lattice sites are computed using various mean-field approximations and Monte Carlo simulations. TASEPs featuring particles of arbitrary size are relevant for modelling systems such as mRNA translation, vesicle locomotion along microtubules and protein sliding along DNA. We conjecture that the nonequilibrium steady-state properties separate into low-density, high-density, and maximal current phases similar to those of the standard (d = 1) TASEP. A simple mean-field approximation for steady-state particle currents and densities is found to be inaccurate. However, we find local equilibrium particle distributions derived from a discrete Tonks gas partition function yield apparently exact currents within the maximal current phase. For the boundary-limited phases, the equilibrium Tonks gas distribution cannot be used to predict currents, phase boundaries, or the order of the phase transitions. However, we employ a refined mean-field approach to find apparently exact expressions for the steady-state currents, boundary densities, and phase diagrams of the d {>=} 1 TASEP. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations are performed to support our analytic, mean-field results.

  6. Single particle measurements and two particle interferometry results from CERN experiment NA44

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon-Gillo, J.

    1994-01-01

    CERN experiment NA44 is optimized for the study of identified single and multiple particle distributions to p T = 0 near mid-rapidity. We measure π +- , K +- , p, bar p, d and bar d, in p + A and A + A collisions at 450 and 20OGeV/u, respectively. Two-particle intensity interferometry results from π + π + , K + K + , and K - K - measurements and single particle distributions are presented

  7. Burnout of pulverized biomass particles in large scale boiler – Single particle model approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saastamoinen, Jaakko; Aho, Martti; Moilanen, Antero

    2010-01-01

    the particle combustion model is coupled with one-dimensional equation of motion of the particle, is applied for the calculation of the burnout in the boiler. The particle size of biomass can be much larger than that of coal to reach complete burnout due to lower density and greater reactivity. The burner...... location and the trajectories of the particles might be optimised to maximise the residence time and burnout....

  8. Analysis of filler particle levels and sizes in dental alginates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Lemes Carlo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the inorganic filler fractions and sizes of commercially alginates. The inorganic particles volumetric fractions of five alginates - Jeltrate(J, Jeltrate Plus(JP, Jeltrate Chromatic Ortho(JC, Hydrogum(H and Ezact Krom(E were accessed by weighing a previously determined mass of each material in water before and after burning samples at 450 °C for 3 hours. Unsettled materials were soaked in acetone and chloroform and sputter-coated with gold for SEM evaluation of fillers' morphology and size. The results for the volumetric inorganic particle content were (%: J - 48.33, JP - 48.33, JC - 33.79, H - 37.55 and E - 40.55. The fillers presented a circular appearance with helical form and various perforations. Hydrogum fillers looked like cylindrical, perforated sticks. The mean values for fillers size were (μm: J - 12.91, JP - 13.67, JC - 13.44, E - 14.59 and H - 9 (diameter, 8.81 (length. The results of this study revealed differences in filler characteristics that could lead to different results when testing mechanical properties.

  9. Building predictive models of soil particle-size distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Samuel-Rosa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Is it possible to build predictive models (PMs of soil particle-size distribution (psd in a region with complex geology and a young and unstable land-surface? The main objective of this study was to answer this question. A set of 339 soil samples from a small slope catchment in Southern Brazil was used to build PMs of psd in the surface soil layer. Multiple linear regression models were constructed using terrain attributes (elevation, slope, catchment area, convergence index, and topographic wetness index. The PMs explained more than half of the data variance. This performance is similar to (or even better than that of the conventional soil mapping approach. For some size fractions, the PM performance can reach 70 %. Largest uncertainties were observed in geologically more complex areas. Therefore, significant improvements in the predictions can only be achieved if accurate geological data is made available. Meanwhile, PMs built on terrain attributes are efficient in predicting the particle-size distribution (psd of soils in regions of complex geology.

  10. Effect of Particle Size on Thermal Conductivity of Nanofluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopkar, M.; Sudarshan, S.; Das, P. K.; Manna, I.

    2008-07-01

    Nanofluids, containing nanometric metallic or oxide particles, exhibit extraordinarily high thermal conductivity. It is reported that the identity (composition), amount (volume percent), size, and shape of nanoparticles largely determine the extent of this enhancement. In the present study, we have experimentally investigated the impact of Al2Cu and Ag2Al nanoparticle size and volume fraction on the effective thermal conductivity of water and ethylene glycol based nanofluid prepared by a two-stage process comprising mechanical alloying of appropriate Al-Cu and Al-Ag elemental powder blend followed by dispersing these nanoparticles (1 to 2 vol pct) in water and ethylene glycol with different particle sizes. The thermal conductivity ratio of nanofluid, measured using an indigenously developed thermal comparator device, shows a significant increase of up to 100 pct with only 1.5 vol pct nanoparticles of 30- to 40-nm average diameter. Furthermore, an analytical model shows that the interfacial layer significantly influences the effective thermal conductivity ratio of nanofluid for the comparable amount of nanoparticles.

  11. Shape, size, and distribution of magnetic particles in Bjurbole chondrules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, David F.

    1994-01-01

    Chondrules from the Bjurbole chondritic meteorite (L4) exhibit saturation remanence magnetization (SIRM) values which vary over three orders of magnitude. REM values (Natural Remanence Magnetization/SIRM) for Allende (C3V) and Chainpur (LL3) are less than 0.01 but in Bjurbole some chondrules were found to have REM values greater than 0.1 with several greater than 0.2. REM values greater than 0.1 are abnormal and cannot be acquired during weak field cooling. If exposure to a strong field (whatever the source) during the chondrules' history is responsible for the high REM values, was such history associated with a different processing which might have resulted in different shape, size, and distribution of metal particles compared to chondrules having REM values of less than 0.01? Furthermore, magnetic hysteresis results show a broad range of magnetic hardness and other intrinsic magnetic properties. These features must be related to (1) size and amount of metal; and (2) properties of, and amount of, tetrataenite in the chondrules (all chondrules thus far subjected to thermomagnetic analysis show the presence of tetrataenite). A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study is underway to determine the relationship between the shape, size, and distribution of metal particles within individual chondrules and the magnetic properties of these chondrules. Results from the SEM study in conjunction with magnetic property data may also help to discern effects from possible lightning strikes in the nebula prior to incorporation of the chondrules into the parent body.

  12. Particle-bubble aggregate stability on static bubble generated by single nozzle on flotation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warjito, Harinaldi, Setyantono, Manus; Siregar, Sahala D.

    2016-06-01

    There are three sub-processes on flotation. These processes are intervening liquid film into critical thickness, rupture of liquid film forming three phase contact line, and expansion three phase contact line forming aggregate stability. Aggregate stability factor contribute to determine flotation efficiency. Aggregate stability has some important factors such as reagent and particle geometry. This research focussed on to understand effect of particle geometry to aggregate stability. Experimental setup consists of 9 x 9 x26 cm flotation column made of glass, bubble generator, particle feeding system, and high speed video camera. Bubble generator made from single nozzle with 0.3 mm diameter attached to programmable syringe pump. Particle feeding system made of pipette. Particle used in this research is taken from open pit Grasberg in Timika, Papua. Particle has sub-angular geometry and its size varies from 38 to 300 µm. Bubble-particle interaction are recorded using high speed video camera. Recordings from high speed video camera analyzed using image processing software. Experiment result shows that aggregate particle-bubble and induction time depends on particle size. Small particle (38-106 µm) has long induction time and able to rupture liquid film and also forming three phase contact line. Big particle (150-300 µm) has short induction time, so it unable to attach with bubble easily. This phenomenon is caused by apparent gravity work on particle-bubble interaction. Apparent gravity worked during particle sliding on bubble surface experience increase and reached its maximum magnitude at bubble equator. After particle passed bubble equator, apparent gravity force experience decrease. In conclusion particle size from 38-300 µm can form stable aggregate if particle attached with bubble in certain condition.

  13. Biofilter media gas pressure loss as related to media particle size and particle shape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pugliese, Lorenzo; Poulsen, Tjalfe G.; Røjgaard Andreasen, Rune

    2013-01-01

    Pressure loss (ΔP) is a key parameter for estimating biofilter energy consumption. Accurate predictions of ΔP as a function of air velocity (V) are therefore essential, to assess energy consumption and minimize operation costs. This paper investigates the combined impact of medium particle size...

  14. Single-particle dynamics - RF acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montague, B.W.

    1977-01-01

    In this paper the rf acceleration of both synchronous and non-synchronous particles is discussed and a simple linearized equation of small amplitude synchrotron oscillations is derived. Phase stability, the hamiltonian for synchrotron oscillations, oscillation amplitudes and adiabatic damping are then briefly discussed. The final sections of the paper contain a description of the basic principles of rf beam stacking in the longitudinal phase space of intersecting Storage Rings and a description of phase displacement acceleration which inspite of certain disadvantages, remains an attractive technique for proton storage rings. (B.D.)

  15. Influence of Particle Size on Properties of Expanded Graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurajica, S

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Expanded graphite has been applied widely in thermal insulation, adsorption, vibration damping, gasketing, electromagnetic interference shielding etc. It is made by intercalation of natural flake graphite followed by thermal expansion. Intercalation is a process whereby an intercalant material is inserted between the graphene layers of a graphite crystal. Exfoliation, a huge unidirectional expansion of the starting intercalated flakes, occurs when the graphene layers are forced apart by the sudden decomposition and vaporization of the intercalated species by thermal shock. Along with production methodologies, such as the intercalation process and heat treatment, the raw material characteristics, especially particle size, strongly influence the properties of the final product.This report evaluates the influence of the particle size of the raw material on the intercalation and expansion processes and consequently the properties of the exfoliated graphite. Natural crystalline flake graphite with wide particle diameter distribution (between dp = 80 and 425 µm was divided into four size-range portions by sieving. Graphite was intercalated via perchloric acid, glacial acetic acid and potassium dichromate oxidation and intercalation procedure. 5.0 g of graphite, 7.0 g of perchloric acid, 4.0 g of glacial acetic acid and 2.0 g of potassium dichromate were placed in glass reactor. The mixture was stirred with n = 200 min–1 at temperature of 45 °C during 60 min. Then it was filtered and washed with distilled water until pH~6 and dried at 60 °C during 24 h. Expansion was accomplished by thermal shock at 1000 °C for 1 min. The prepared samples were characterized by means of exfoliation volume measurements, simultaneous differential thermal analysis and thermo-gravimetry (DTA/TGA, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, BET measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM.X-ray diffraction indicated a change of distance

  16. Single-particle motion in rapidly rotating nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, R.; Frisk, H.

    1985-01-01

    The motion of particles belonging to a single-j shell is described in terms of classical orbitals. The effects of rapid rotation and pairing correlations are discussed and the results are compared with the quantum mechanical orbitals. (orig.)

  17. Pore size determination from charged particle energy loss measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, F.P.; Armitage, B.H.

    1977-01-01

    A new method aimed at measuring porosity and mean pore size in materials has been developed at Harwell. The energy width or variance of a transmitted or backscattered charged particle beam is measured and related to the mean pore size via the assumption that the variance in total path length in the porous material is given by (Δx 2 )=na 2 , where n is the mean number of pores and a the mean pore size. It is shown on the basis of a general and rigorous theory of total path length distribution that this approximation can give rise to large errors in the mean pore size determination particularly in the case of large porosities (epsilon>0.5). In practice it is found that it is not easy to utilize fully the general theory because accurate measurements of the first four moments are required to determine the means and variances of the pore and inter-pore length distributions. Several models for these distributions are proposed. When these are incorporated in the general theory the determinations of mean pore size from experimental measurements on powder samples are in good agreement with values determined by other methods. (Auth.)

  18. Online single particle analysis of ice particle residuals from mountain-top mixed-phase clouds using laboratory derived particle type assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Susan; Schneider, Johannes; Klimach, Thomas; Mertes, Stephan; Schenk, Ludwig Paul; Kupiszewski, Piotr; Curtius, Joachim; Borrmann, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    In situ single particle analysis of ice particle residuals (IPRs) and out-of-cloud aerosol particles was conducted by means of laser ablation mass spectrometry during the intensive INUIT-JFJ/CLACE campaign at the high alpine research station Jungfraujoch (3580 m a.s.l.) in January-February 2013. During the 4-week campaign more than 70 000 out-of-cloud aerosol particles and 595 IPRs were analyzed covering a particle size diameter range from 100 nm to 3 µm. The IPRs were sampled during 273 h while the station was covered by mixed-phase clouds at ambient temperatures between -27 and -6 °C. The identification of particle types is based on laboratory studies of different types of biological, mineral and anthropogenic aerosol particles. The outcome of these laboratory studies was characteristic marker peaks for each investigated particle type. These marker peaks were applied to the field data. In the sampled IPRs we identified a larger number fraction of primary aerosol particles, like soil dust (13 ± 5 %) and minerals (11 ± 5 %), in comparison to out-of-cloud aerosol particles (2.4 ± 0.4 and 0.4 ± 0.1 %, respectively). Additionally, anthropogenic aerosol particles, such as particles from industrial emissions and lead-containing particles, were found to be more abundant in the IPRs than in the out-of-cloud aerosol. In the out-of-cloud aerosol we identified a large fraction of aged particles (31 ± 5 %), including organic material and secondary inorganics, whereas this particle type was much less abundant (2.7 ± 1.3 %) in the IPRs. In a selected subset of the data where a direct comparison between out-of-cloud aerosol particles and IPRs in air masses with similar origin was possible, a pronounced enhancement of biological particles was found in the IPRs.

  19. Influence of Torrefaction on Single Particle Combustion of Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Zhimin; Jian, Jie; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the influence of torrefaction on the char reactivity, char yield, and combustion time of 3-5 mm spherical wood particles in a single particle combustion reactor (SPC) operating at a nominal temperature of 1231 °C. The devolatilization times were reduced and the char burnout...

  20. Modeling of calcination of single kaolinitic clay particle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebremariam, Abraham Teklay; Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse

    The present work aims at modeling of the calcination (dehydroxylation) process of clay particles, specifically kaolinite, and its thermal transformation. For such purpose, 1D single particle calcination model was developed based on the concept of shrinking core model to assess the dehydroxylation...

  1. Polymer-Particle Nanocomposites: Size and Dispersion Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Joseph

    Polymer-particle nanocomposites are used in industrial processes to enhance a broad range of material properties (e.g. mechanical, optical, electrical and gas permeability properties). This dissertation will focus on explanation and quantification of mechanical property improvements upon the addition of nanoparticles to polymeric materials. Nanoparticles, as enhancers of mechanical properties, are ubiquitous in synthetic and natural materials (e.g. automobile tires, packaging, bone), however, to date, there is no thorough understanding of the mechanism of their action. In this dissertation, silica (SiO2) nanoparticles, both bare and grafted with polystyrene (PS), are studied in polymeric matrices. Several variables of interest are considered, including particle dispersion state, particle size, length and density of grafted polymer chains, and volume fraction of SiO2. Polymer grafted nanoparticles behave akin to block copolymers, and this is critically leveraged to systematically vary nanoparticle dispersion and examine its role on the mechanical reinforcement in polymer based nanocomposites in the melt state. Rheology unequivocally shows that reinforcement is maximized by the formation of a transient, but long-lived, percolating polymer-particle network with the particles serving as the network junctions. The effects of dispersion and weight fraction of filler on nanocomposite mechanical properties are also studied in a bare particle system. Due to the interest in directional properties for many different materials, different means of inducing directional ordering of particle structures are also studied. Using a combination of electron microscopy and x-ray scattering, it is shown that shearing anisotropic NP assemblies (sheets or strings) causes them to orient, one in front of the other, into macroscopic two-dimensional structures along the flow direction. In contrast, no such flow-induced ordering occurs for well dispersed NPs or spherical NP aggregates! This work

  2. Particle size for greatest penetration of HEPA filters - and their true efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    da Roza, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    The particle size that most greatly penetrates a filter is a function of filter media construction, aerosol density, and air velocity. In this paper the published results of several experiments are compared with a modern filtration theory that predicts single-fiber efficiency and the particle size of maximum penetration. For high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters used under design conditions this size is calculated to be 0.21 μm diam. This is in good agreement with the experimental data. The penetration at 0.21 μm is calculated to be seven times greater than at the 0.3 μm used for testing HEPA filters. Several mechanisms by which filters may have a lower efficiency in use than when tested are discussed

  3. Thermodynamics of phase-separating nanoalloys: Single particles and particle assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fèvre, Mathieu; Le Bouar, Yann; Finel, Alphonse

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the consequences of finite-size effects on the thermodynamics of nanoparticle assemblies and isolated particles. We consider a binary phase-separating alloy with a negligible atomic size mismatch, and equilibrium states are computed using off-lattice Monte Carlo simulations in several thermodynamic ensembles. First, a semi-grand-canonical ensemble is used to describe infinite assemblies of particles with the same size. When decreasing the particle size, we obtain a significant decrease of the solid/liquid transition temperatures as well as a growing asymmetry of the solid-state miscibility gap related to surface segregation effects. Second, a canonical ensemble is used to analyze the thermodynamic equilibrium of finite monodisperse particle assemblies. Using a general thermodynamic formulation, we show that a particle assembly may split into two subassemblies of identical particles. Moreover, if the overall average canonical concentration belongs to a discrete spectrum, the subassembly concentrations are equal to the semi-grand-canonical equilibrium ones. We also show that the equilibrium of a particle assembly with a prescribed size distribution combines a size effect and the fact that a given particle size assembly can adopt two configurations. Finally, we have considered the thermodynamics of an isolated particle to analyze whether a phase separation can be defined within a particle. When studying rather large nanoparticles, we found that the region in which a two-phase domain can be identified inside a particle is well below the bulk phase diagram, but the concentration of the homogeneous core remains very close to the bulk solubility limit.

  4. Sterile endophthalmitis rates and particle size analyses of different formulations of triamcinolone acetonide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodwell, David G; Krimmel, Darrel A; de Fiebre, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the rate of sterile endophthalmitis (SE) following intravitreal injection of three different formulations of triamcinolone acetonide (TA) in a single physician practice and also to assess the mean diameter and concentration of particles of the two TA formulations currently available commercially in the USA. It was hypothesized that TA formulations with smaller particles and/or greater concentrations would have a higher incidence of SE. Single-site, interventional case series in which the medical records of 392 consecutive eyes receiving intravitreal TA as Triesence(®), Kenalog(®)-40, or preservative-free TA between September 2008 and October 2013 were retrospectively reviewed for the incidence of SE. Particle sizing of TA formulations was conducted by an independent commercial laboratory. Five cases of SE were identified. The four cases of SE following Triesence(®) (4.6%) represented a rate significantly higher than the one case of SE following preservative-free TA (0.6%; P=0.049) and the 0% incidence rate of SE following Kenalog(®)-40 (P=0.0210). Triesence(®) had significantly smaller particles than Kenalog(®)-40 (P<0.0001). The rate of SE was the highest with the formulation of TA that had the smallest particle size and highest particle load (number of particles injected). The lowest rate of SE was seen with Kenalog(®)-40, the only TA formulation that contained a benzyl alcohol preservative. The data do not support a principal causative role of benzyl alcohol in the development of TA-induced SE. Instead, the data support the particle theory of TA-induced SE; however, larger-scale, multicenter studies are needed to confirm and expand on these findings.

  5. Considerations of particle vaporization and analyte diffusion in single-particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Koon-Sing; Lui, Kwok-On; Lee, Kin-Ho; Chan, Wing-Tat

    2013-01-01

    The intensity of individual gold nanoparticles with nominal diameters of 80, 100, 150, and 200 nm was measured using single-particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Since the particles are not perfectly monodisperse, a distribution of ICP-MS intensity was obtained for each nominal diameter. The distribution of particle mass was determined from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image of the particles. The distribution of ICP-MS intensity and the distribution of particle mass for each nominal diameter were correlated to give a calibration curve. The calibration curves are linear, but the slope decreases as the nominal diameter increases. The reduced slope is probably due to a smaller degree of vaporization of the large particles. In addition to the degree of particle vaporization, the rate of analyte diffusion in the ICP is an important factor that determines the measured ICP-MS intensity. Simulated ICP-MS intensity versus particle size was calculated using a simple computer program that accounts for the vaporization rate of the gold nanoparticles and the diffusion rate and degree of ionization of the gold atoms. The curvature of the simulated calibration curves changes with sampling depth because the effects of particle vaporization and analyte diffusion on the ICP-MS intensity are dependent on the residence time of the particle in the ICP. Calibration curves of four hypothetical particles representing the four combinations of high and low boiling points (2000 and 4000 K) and high and low analyte diffusion rates (atomic masses of 10 and 200 Da) were calculated to further illustrate the relative effects of particle vaporization and analyte diffusion. The simulated calibration curves show that the sensitivity of single-particle ICP-MS is smaller than that of the ICP-MS measurement of continuous flow of standard solutions by a factor of 2 or more. Calibration using continuous flow of standard solution is semi-quantitative at best. An

  6. Preparation and characterization of SiO2-coated submicron-sized L10 Fe-Pt particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Hayashi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of magnets with higher performance is attracting increasing interest. The optimization of their microstructure is essential to enhance their properties, and a microstructure comprising magnetically isolated hard magnetic grains of a single-domain size has been proposed as an ideal structure for enhancing the coercivity of magnets. To obtain magnets with an ideal structure, we consider the fabrication of magnets by an approach based on core/shell nanoparticles with a hard magnetic core and a non-magnetic shell. In this study, to obtain particles for our proposed approach, we attempted to fabricate L10 Fe-Pt/SiO2-core/shell particles with submicron-sized cores less than the critical single-domain size. The fabrication of such core/shell particles was confirmed from morphology observations and XRD analysis of the particles. Although the formation of more desirable core/shell particles with submicron-sized single-crystal cores in the single-domain size range was not achieved, the fabricated core/shell particles showed a high coercivity of 25 kOe.

  7. Laser tweezers: spectroscopy of optically trapped micron-sized particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, K.M.; Livett, M.K.; Nugent, K.W. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Information is often obtained about biological systems by analysis of single cells in the system. The optimum conditions for this analysis are when the cells are living and in their natural surroundings as they will be performing their normal functions and interactions. Analysis of cells can be difficult due to their mobility. Laser tweezing is a non contact method that can be employed to overcome this problem and provides a powerful tool in the analysis of functions and interactions at single cell level. In this investigation Raman spectra of a molecule of {beta} - carotene, dissolved in microdroplets of oil was obtained. The droplets were trapped using Nd-YAG beam and a low intensity Ar{sup +} beam was used to analyse the trapped particles. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Laser tweezers: spectroscopy of optically trapped micron-sized particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, K M; Livett, M K; Nugent, K W [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1997-12-31

    Information is often obtained about biological systems by analysis of single cells in the system. The optimum conditions for this analysis are when the cells are living and in their natural surroundings as they will be performing their normal functions and interactions. Analysis of cells can be difficult due to their mobility. Laser tweezing is a non contact method that can be employed to overcome this problem and provides a powerful tool in the analysis of functions and interactions at single cell level. In this investigation Raman spectra of a molecule of {beta} - carotene, dissolved in microdroplets of oil was obtained. The droplets were trapped using Nd-YAG beam and a low intensity Ar{sup +} beam was used to analyse the trapped particles. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Strong reduction of spectral heterogeneity in gold bipyramids for single-particle and single-molecule plasmon sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, S M E; Verheijen, M A; Prins, M W J; Zijlstra, P

    2016-01-15

    Single metal nanoparticles are attractive biomolecular sensors. Binding of analyte to a functional particle results in a plasmon shift that can be conveniently monitored in a far-field optical microscope. Heterogeneities in spectral properties of individual particles in an ensemble affect the reliability of a single-particle plasmon sensor, especially when plasmon shifts are monitored in real-time using a fixed irradiation wavelength. We compare the spectral heterogeneity of different plasmon sensor geometries (gold nanospheres, nanorods, and bipyramids) and correlate this to their size and aspect-ratio dispersion. We show that gold bipyramids exhibit a strongly reduced heterogeneity in aspect ratio and plasmon wavelength compared to commonly used gold nanorods. We show that this translates into a significantly improved homogeneity of the response to molecular binding without compromising single-molecule sensitivity.

  10. Size distribution of radon daughter particles in uranium mine atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, A.C.; Hinchliffe, L.; Sladowski, R.

    1975-01-01

    The size distribution of radon daughters was measured in several uranium mines using four compact diffusion batteries and a round jet cascade impactor. Simultaneously, measurements were made of uncombined fractions of radon daughters, radon concentration, working level, and particle concentration. The size distributions found for radon daughters were log normal. The activity median diameters ranged from 0.09 μm to 0.3 μm with a mean value of 0.17 μm. Geometric standard deviations were in the range from 1.3 to 4 with a mean value of 2.7. Uncombined fractions expressed in accordance with the ICRP definition ranged from 0.004 to 0.16 with a mean value of 0.04. The radon daughter sizes in these mines are greater than the sizes assumed by various authors in calculating respiratory tract dose. The disparity may reflect the widening use of diesel-powered equipment in large uranium mines. (U.S.)

  11. Tomograms and the quest for single particle nonlocality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisimov, M A; Caponigro, M; Mancini, S; Man'ko, V I

    2007-01-01

    By using a tomographic approach to quantum states, we rise the problem of nonlocality within a single particle (single degree of freedom). We propose a possible way to look for such effects on a qubit. Although a conclusive answer is far from being reached, we provide some reflections on the foundational ground

  12. Single particle composition measurements of artificial Calcium Carbonate aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorn, S. R.; Mentel, T. F.; Schwinger, T.; Croteau, P. L.; Jayne, J.; Worsnop, D. R.; Trimborn, A.

    2012-12-01

    Mineral dust, with an estimated total source from natural and anthropogenic emissions of up to 2800 Tg/yr, is one of the two largest contributors to total aerosol mass, with only Sea salt having a similar source strength (up to 2600 Tg/yr). The composition of dust particles varies strongly depending on the production process and, most importantly, the source location. Therefore, the composition of single dust particles can be used both to trace source regions of air masses as well as to identify chemical aging processes. Here we present results of laboratory studies on generating artificial calcium carbonate (CaCO3) particles, a model compound for carbonaceous mineral dust particles. Particles were generated by atomizing an aqueous hydrogen carbonate solution. Water was removed using a silica diffusion dryer., then the particles were processed in an oven at temperatures up to 900°C, converting the hydrogen carbonate to its anhydrous form. The resulting aerosol was analyzed using an on-line single particle laser ablation aerosol particle time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LAAPTOF). The results confirm the conversion to calcium carbonate, and validate that the produced particles indeed can be used as a model compound for carbonaceous dust aerosols.

  13. Building the Nanoplasmonics Toolbox Through Shape Modeling and Single Particle Optical Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringe, Emilie

    Interest in nanotechnology is driven by unprecedented properties tailorability, achievable by controlling particle structure and composition. Unlike bulk components, minute changes in size and shape affect the optical and electronic properties of nanoparticles. Characterization of such structure-function relationships and better understanding of structure control mechanisms is crucial to the development of applications such as plasmonic sensors and devices. The objective of the current research is thus twofold: to theoretically predict and understand how shape is controlled by synthesis conditions, and to experimentally unravel, through single particle studies, how shape, composition, size, and surrounding environment affect plasmonic properties in noble metal particles. Quantitative, predictive rules and fundamental knowledge obtained from this research contributes to the "nanoplasmonics toolbox", a library designed to provide scientists and engineers the tools to create and optimize novel nanotechnology applications. In this dissertation, single particle approaches are developed and used to unravel the effects of size, shape, substrate, aggregation state and surrounding environment on the optical response of metallic nanoparticles. Ag and Au nanocubes on different substrates are first presented, followed by the discussion of the concept of plasmon length, a universal parameter to describe plasmon energy for a variety of particle shapes and plasmon modes. Plasmonic sensing (both refractive index sensing and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy) and polarization effects are then studied at the single particle level. In the last two Chapters, analytical shape models based on the Wulff construction provide unique modeling tools for alloy and kinetically grown nanoparticles. The former reveals a size-dependence of the shape of small alloy particles (such as those used in catalysis) because of surface segregation, while the latter uniquely models the shape of many

  14. Microphysical Properties of Single Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovelli, Grazia; Song, Young-Chul; Pereira, Kelly; Hamilton, Jacqueline; Topping, David; Reid, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) deriving from the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can account for a substantial fraction of the overall atmospheric aerosol mass.[1] Therefore, the investigation of SOA microphysical properties is crucial to better comprehend their role in the atmospheric processes they are involved in. This works describes a single particle approach to accurately characterise the hygroscopic response, the optical properties and the gas-particle partitioning kinetics of water and semivolatile components for laboratory generated SOA. SOA was generated from the oxidation of different VOCs precursors (e.g. α-pinene, toluene) in a photo-chemical flow reactor, which consists of a temperature and relative humidity controlled 300 L polyvinyl fluoride bag. Known VOC, NOx and ozone concentrations are introduced in the chamber and UV irradiation is performed by means of a Hg pen-ray. SOA samples were collected with an electrical low pressure impactor, wrapped in aluminium foil and kept refrigerated at -20°C. SOA samples were extracted in a 1:1 water/methanol mixture. Single charged SOA particles were generated from the obtained solution using a microdispenser and confined within an electrodynamic balance (EDB), where they sit in a T (250-320 K) and RH (0-95%) controlled nitrogen flow. Suspended droplets are irradiated with a 532 nm laser and the evolving angularly resolved scattered light is used to keep track of changes in droplet size. One of the key features of this experimental approach is that very little SOA solution is required because of the small volumes needed to load the dispensers (evaporation kinetics experiments (CK-EDB) of suspended probe and sample droplets.[2] The variation of the refractive index of SOA droplets following to water or SVOCs evaporative loss was measured as a function of water activity by fitting the collected light scattering patterns with a generated Mie-Theory library of phase functions.[3] Long trapping

  15. In-situ particle sizing at millimeter scale from electrochemical noise: simulation and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakdi, N.; Huet, F.; Ngo, K.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few years, particle sizing techniques in multiphase flows based on optical technologies emerged as standard tools but the main disadvantage of these techniques is their dependence on the visibility of the measurement volume and on the focal distance. Thus, it is important to promote alternative techniques for particle sizing, and, moreover, able to work in hostile environment. This paper presents a single-particle sizing technique at a millimeter scale based on the measurement of the variation of the electrolyte resistance (ER) due to the passage of an insulating sphere between two electrodes immerged in a conductive solution. A theoretical model was proposed to determine the influence of the electrode size, the interelectrode distance, the size and the position of the sphere, on the electrolyte resistance. Experimental variations of ER due to the passage of spheres and measured by using a home-made electronic device are also presented in this paper. The excellent agreement obtained between the theoretical and experimental results allows validation of both model and experimental measurements. In addition, the technique was shown to be able to perform accurate measurements of the velocity of a ball falling in a liquid.

  16. Size distribution of radon daughter particles in uranium mine atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, A.C.; Hinchliffe, L.; Sladowski, R.

    1977-07-01

    An investigation of the particle size distribution and other properties of radon daughters in uranium mines was reported earlier but only summaries of the data were presented. This report consists mainly of tables of detailed measurements that were omitted in the original article. The tabulated data include the size distributions, uncombined fractions and ratios of radon daughters as well as the working levels, radon concentrations, condensation nuclei concentrations, temperature, and relative humidity. The measurements were made in 27 locations in four large underground mines in New Mexico during typical mining operations. The size distributions of the radon daughters were log normal. The activity median diameters ranged from 0.09 μm to 0.3 μm with a mean of 0.17 μm. Geometric standard deviations were from 1.3 to 4 with a mean of 2.7. Uncombined fractions expressed in accordance with the ICRP definition ranged from 0.004 to 0.16 with a mean of 0.04

  17. Atherogenic lipoprotein particle size and concentrations and the effect of pravastatin in children with familial hypercholesterolemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaf, Anouk; Rodenburg, Jessica; Vissers, Maud N.; Hutten, Barbara A.; Wiegman, Albert; Trip, Mieke D.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Wijburg, Frits A.; Otvos, James D.; Kastelein, John J. P.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine lipoprotein particle concentrations and size in children with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) and investigate the effect of pravastatin therapy on these measures. STUDY DESIGN: Lipoprotein particle concentrations and sizes were examined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)

  18. Characterization of biomass combustion at high temperatures based on an upgraded single particle model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jun; Paul, Manosh C.; Younger, Paul L.; Watson, Ian; Hossain, Mamdud; Welch, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • High temperature rapid biomass combustion is studied based on single particle model. • Particle size changes in devolatilization and char oxidation models are addressed. • Time scales of various thermal sub-processes are compared and discussed. • Potential solutions are suggested to achieve better biomass co-firing performances. - Abstract: Biomass co-firing is becoming a promising solution to reduce CO 2 emissions, due to its renewability and carbon neutrality. Biomass normally has high moisture and volatile contents, complicating its combustion behavior, which is significantly different from that of coal. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) combustion model of a single biomass particle is employed to study high-temperature rapid biomass combustion. The two-competing-rate model and kinetics/diffusion model are used to model biomass devolatilization reaction and char burnout process, respectively, in which the apparent kinetics used for those two models were from high temperatures and high heating rates tests. The particle size changes during the devolatilization and char burnout are also considered. The mass loss properties and temperature profile during the biomass devolatilization and combustion processes are predicted; and the timescales of particle heating up, drying, devolatilization, and char burnout are compared and discussed. Finally, the results shed light on the effects of particle size on the combustion behavior of biomass particle

  19. Mixtures of organic and inorganic substrates, particle size and proportion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Raymundo Morales-Maldonado

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper was to review the mixtures of organic and inorganic materials used in the preparation of a new material, particle size, proportion, and their response in plant. In Mexico, agricultural waste is considered as a pollutant reservoir; however, from another perspective, this represents an industry with great potential. The nutrients ingested by animals represent nutriments available for plants when properly recycled. An option that minimizes the risk of contamination and improves its quality is the production of compost and vermicompost. Both processes are an alternative to organic production. A material by itself does not meet the optimum conditions. Reducing the volume of an organic material increases compaction and compression of roots, affecting the efficiency of irrigation and fertilization, so it is necessary to make mixtures with inorganic materials, that is used in the development of a new material for better growing conditions of the plant.

  20. Mixtures of organic and inorganic substrates, particle size and proportion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales-Maldonado, Emilio Raymundo; Casanova-Lugo, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The mixtures of organic and inorganic materials used in the preparation of a new material, particle size, proportion and their response in plant were reviewed. Agricultural wastes are considered a pollutant reservoir in Mexico; however, for another perspective this represent an industry with great potential. The nutrients ingested by animals represent nutriments available for plants when properly recycled. The production of compost and vermicompost is an option that minimize the risk of contamination and improve quality. Both processes are an alternative for organic production. The efficiency of irrigation and fertilization are affected for the reducing the volumen of an organic material incresase compaction and compression of roots. The mixtures with inorganic materials are used in the development of a new material to obtain better growing conditions for the plant. (author) [es

  1. Effect of particle size on the thermoluminescent response of hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera V, A.; Zarate M, J.; Contreras, M. E.; Rivera M, T.

    2016-10-01

    We present the study of the structural characterization and the thermoluminescent response of the hydroxyapatite as a function of the calcination temperature and the effect of the particle size. For precipitation synthesis, calcium nitrate (Ca(NO_3)_2 and dibasic ammonium phosphate ((NH_4)_2HPO_4) were used as precursors and ammonium hydroxide (NH_4OH) as a ph controlling agent. The characterization of the samples was carried out by the techniques of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. The powders obtained are composed of hydroxyapatite, with a different degree of dehydroxylation. The thermoluminescent characterization indicates that at higher calcination temperature there is a higher thermoluminescent response, the calcined powders at 1300 degrees Celsius show a very well defined brightness curve with a higher intensity, with its maximum intensity located at a temperature of 210 degrees Celsius, which indicates that this material can be used as a dosimeter. (Author)

  2. Morphology of single inhalable particle inside public transit biodiesel fueled bus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shandilya, Kaushik K; Kumar, Ashok

    2010-01-01

    In an urban-transit bus, fueled by biodiesel in Toledo, Ohio, single inhalable particle samples in October 2008 were collected and detected by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS). Particle size analysis found bimodal distribution at 0.2 and 0.5 microm. The particle morphology was characterized by 14 different shape clusters: square, pentagon, hexagon, heptagon, octagon, nonagon, decagon, agglomerate, sphere, triangle, oblong, strip, line or stick, and unknown, by quantitative order. The square particles were common in the samples. Round and triangle particles are more, and pentagon, hexagon, heptagon, octagon, nonagon, decagon, strip, line or sticks are less. Agglomerate particles were found in abundance. The surface of most particles was coarse with a fractal edge that can provide a suitable chemical reaction bed in the polluted atmospheric environment. The three sorts of surface patterns of squares were smooth, semi-smooth, and coarse. The three sorts of square surface patterns represented the morphological characteristics of single inhalable particles in the air inside the bus in Toledo. The size and shape distribution results were compared to those obtained for a bus using ultra low sulfur diesel.

  3. Optimation of particle size and composition in fabrication of granite particle composite floortiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budiarto; Parikin; Mohammad-Dani

    2004-01-01

    Granite particle composite floortile materials, that have epoxy matrix, may be utilized as water resist and ductile materials. The utility of composite materials for industrial households is, however, very important and very promising indeed. Starting from powdering the granite refuges into particles of 100, 140 and 200 in mesh, the powder was mixed by epoxy containing versamid hardener and stirred till highly homogenized. Specimens were mould in glass frame and dried in ambient temperature for 48 hours. The specimens were prepared into certain dimensions, conformed to testing needs: hardness, density, compression and bending. The hardness and density data show clearly the value change of particulate composition (34, 40, 50 and 70) and matrix (66, 60, 50 and 30) as well. From bending and compression tests, the optimum grain size (μm) and composition (%) of granite particles reveal between the number of 120-123 and 55-61 respectively. The accurate point of the values can be determined by using differential method. As conclusion, for the better mechanical properties of granite particles composite floortiles, the grains should be 121 in μm and 57% composition of granite particles

  4. Intrinsic speckle noise in in-line particle holography due to polydisperse and continuous particle sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Philip J.; Hobson, Peter R.; Rodgers, G. J.

    2000-08-01

    In-line particle holography is subject to image deterioration due to intrinsic speckle noise. The resulting reduction in the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the replayed image can become critical for applications such as holographic particle velocimetry (HPV) and 3D visualisation of marine plankton. Work has been done to extend the mono-disperse model relevant to HPV to include poly-disperse particle fields appropriate for the visualisation of marine plankton. Continuous and discrete particle fields are both considered. It is found that random walk statistics still apply for the poly-disperse case. The speckle field is simply the summation of the individual speckle patters due to each scatter size. Therefor the characteristic speckle parameter (which encompasses particle diameter, concentration and sample depth) is alos just the summation of the individual speckle parameters. This reduces the SNR calculation to the same form as for the mono-disperse case. For the continuous situation three distributions, power, exponential and Gaussian are discussed with the resulting SNR calcuated. The work presented here was performed as part of the Holomar project to produce a working underwater holographic camera for recording plankton.

  5. Single-particle characterization of 'Asian Dust' certified reference materials using low-Z particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Hee Jin; Ro, Chul-Un

    2006-01-01

    In order to clearly elucidate whether Asian Dust particles experience chemical modification during long-range transport, it is necessary to characterize soil particles where Asian Dust particles originate. If chemical compositions of source soil particles are well characterized, then chemical compositions of Asian Dust particles collected outside source regions can be compared with those of source soil particles in order to find out the occurrence of chemical modification. Asian Dust particles are chemically and morphologically heterogeneous, and thus the average composition and the average aerodynamic diameter (obtainable by bulk analysis) are not much relevant if the chemical modifications of the particles must be followed. The major elemental composition and abundance of the particle types that are potential subjects of chemical modification can only be obtained using single-particle analysis. A single particle analytical technique, named low-Z particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis (low-Z particle EPMA), was applied to characterize two certified reference materials (CRMs) for Asian Dust particles, which were collected from a loess plateau area and a desert of China. The CRMs were defined by bulk analyses to provide certified concentrations for 13 chemical elements. Using the low-Z particle EPMA technique, the concentrations of major chemical species such as aluminosilicates, SiO 2 , CaCO 3 , and carbonaceous species were obtained. Elemental concentrations obtained by the low-Z particle EPMA are close to the certified values, with considering that the single particle and bulk analyses employ very different approaches. There are still some discrepancies between those concentration values, resulting from analyses of particles with different sizes, different sample amounts analyzed, and uncertainties involved in the single particle analysis

  6. Influence of particle size distribution on the blast pressure profile from explosives buried in saturated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, S. E.; Fay, S. D.; Tyas, A.; Clarke, S. D.; Reay, J. J.; Warren, J. A.; Gant, M.; Elgy, I.

    2017-06-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of pressure and impulse from explosives buried in saturated cohesive and cohesionless soils has been measured experimentally for the first time. Ten experiments have been conducted at quarter-scale, where localised pressure loading was measured using an array of 17 Hopkinson pressure bars. The blast pressure measurements are used in conjunction with high-speed video filmed at 140,000 fps to investigate in detail the physical processes occurring at the loaded face. Two coarse cohesionless soils and one fine cohesive soil were tested: a relatively uniform sand, a well-graded sandy gravel, and a fine-grained clay. The results show that there is a single fundamental loading mechanism when explosives are detonated in saturated soil, invariant of particle size and soil cohesion. It is also shown that variability in localised loading is intrinsically linked to the particle size distribution of the surrounding soil.

  7. Influence of particle size distribution on the blast pressure profile from explosives buried in saturated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, S. E.; Fay, S. D.; Tyas, A.; Clarke, S. D.; Reay, J. J.; Warren, J. A.; Gant, M.; Elgy, I.

    2018-05-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of pressure and impulse from explosives buried in saturated cohesive and cohesionless soils has been measured experimentally for the first time. Ten experiments have been conducted at quarter-scale, where localised pressure loading was measured using an array of 17 Hopkinson pressure bars. The blast pressure measurements are used in conjunction with high-speed video filmed at 140,000 fps to investigate in detail the physical processes occurring at the loaded face. Two coarse cohesionless soils and one fine cohesive soil were tested: a relatively uniform sand, a well-graded sandy gravel, and a fine-grained clay. The results show that there is a single fundamental loading mechanism when explosives are detonated in saturated soil, invariant of particle size and soil cohesion. It is also shown that variability in localised loading is intrinsically linked to the particle size distribution of the surrounding soil.

  8. Evolution of single-particle structure of silicon isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bespalova, O. V.; Fedorov, N. A.; Klimochkina, A. A.; Markova, M. L.; Spasskaya, T. I.; Tretyakova, T. Yu.

    2018-01-01

    New data on proton and neutron single-particle energies E_{nlj} of Si isotopes with neutron number N from 12 to 28 as well as occupation probabilities N_{nlj} of single-particle states of stable isotopes 28, 30Si near the Fermi energy were obtained by the joint evaluation of the stripping and pick-up reaction data and excited state decay schemes of neighboring nuclei. The evaluated data indicate the following features of single-particle structure evolution: persistence of Z = 14 subshell closure with N increase, the new magicity of the number N = 16, and the conservation of the magic properties of the number N = 20 in Si isotopic chain. The features were described by the dispersive optical model. The calculation also predicts the weakening of N = 28 shell closure and demonstrates evolution of a bubble-like structure of the proton density distributions in neutron-rich Si isotopes.

  9. Evolution of single-particle structure of silicon isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bespalova, O.V.; Klimochkina, A.A.; Spasskaya, T.I.; Tretyakova, T.Yu. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Fedorov, N.A.; Markova, M.L. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2018-01-15

    New data on proton and neutron single-particle energies E{sub nlj} of Si isotopes with neutron number N from 12 to 28 as well as occupation probabilities N{sub nlj} of single-particle states of stable isotopes {sup 28,30}Si near the Fermi energy were obtained by the joint evaluation of the stripping and pick-up reaction data and excited state decay schemes of neighboring nuclei. The evaluated data indicate the following features of single-particle structure evolution: persistence of Z = 14 subshell closure with N increase, the new magicity of the number N = 16, and the conservation of the magic properties of the number N = 20 in Si isotopic chain. The features were described by the dispersive optical model. The calculation also predicts the weakening of N = 28 shell closure and demonstrates evolution of a bubble-like structure of the proton density distributions in neutron-rich Si isotopes. (orig.)

  10. Irradiation of single cells with individual high-LET particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, J.M.; Braby, L.A.

    1993-01-01

    The dose-limiting normal tissue of concern when irradiating head and neck lesions is often the vascular endothelium within the treatment field. Consequently, the response of capillary endothelial cells exposed to moderate doses of high LET particles is essential for establishing exposure limits for neutron-capture therapy. In an effort to characterize the high-LET radiation biology of cultured endothelial cells, the authors are attempting to measure cellular response to single particles. The single-particle irradiation apparatus, described below, allows them to expose individual cells to known numbers of high-LET particles and follow these cells for extended periods, in order to assess the impact of individual particles on cell growth kinetics. Preliminary cell irradiation experiments have revealed complications related to the smooth and efficient operation of the equipment; these are being resolved. Therefore, the following paragraphs deal primarily with the manner by which high LET particles deposit energy, the requirements for single-cell irradiation, construction and assembly of such apparatus, and testing of experimental procedures, rather than with the radiation biology of endothelial cells

  11. Single-particle states vs. collective modes: friends or enemies ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, T.; Tsunoda, Y.; Togashi, T.; Shimizu, N.; Abe, T.

    2018-05-01

    The quantum self-organization is introduced as one of the major underlying mechanisms of the quantum many-body systems. In the case of atomic nuclei as an example, two types of the motion of nucleons, single-particle states and collective modes, dominate the structure of the nucleus. The collective mode arises as the balance between the effect of the mode-driving force (e.g., quadrupole force for the ellipsoidal deformation) and the resistance power against it. The single-particle energies are one of the sources to produce such resistance power: a coherent collective motion is more hindered by larger spacings between relevant single particle states. Thus, the single-particle state and the collective mode are "enemies" against each other. However, the nuclear forces are rich enough so as to enhance relevant collective mode by reducing the resistance power by changing single-particle energies for each eigenstate through monopole interactions. This will be verified with the concrete example taken from Zr isotopes. Thus, the quantum self-organization occurs: single-particle energies can be self-organized by (i) two quantum liquids, e.g., protons and neutrons, (ii) monopole interaction (to control resistance). In other words, atomic nuclei are not necessarily like simple rigid vases containing almost free nucleons, in contrast to the naïve Fermi liquid picture. Type II shell evolution is considered to be a simple visible case involving excitations across a (sub)magic gap. The quantum self-organization becomes more important in heavier nuclei where the number of active orbits and the number of active nucleons are larger.

  12. Technical Note: The single particle soot photometer fails to reliably detect PALAS soot nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gysel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The single particle soot photometer (SP2 uses laser-induced incandescence (LII for the measurement of atmospheric black carbon (BC particles. The BC mass concentration is obtained by combining quantitative detection of BC mass in single particles with a counting efficiency of 100% above its lower detection limit. It is commonly accepted that a particle must contain at least several tenths of a femtogram BC in order to be detected by the SP2.

    Here we show the result that most BC particles from a PALAS spark discharge soot generator remain undetected by the SP2, even if their BC mass, as independently determined with an aerosol particle mass analyser (APM, is clearly above the typical lower detection limit of the SP2. Comparison of counting efficiency and effective density data of PALAS soot with flame generated soot (combustion aerosol standard burner, CAST, fullerene soot and carbon black particles (Cabot Regal 400R reveals that particle morphology can affect the SP2's lower detection limit. PALAS soot particles are fractal-like agglomerates of very small primary particles with a low fractal dimension, resulting in a very low effective density. Such loosely packed particles behave like "the sum of individual primary particles" in the SP2's laser. Accordingly, most PALAS soot particles remain undetected as the SP2's laser intensity is insufficient to heat the primary particles to their vaporisation temperature because of their small size (Dpp ≈ 5–10 nm. Previous knowledge from pulsed laser-induced incandescence indicated that particle morphology might have an effect on the SP2's lower detection limit, however, an increase of the lower detection limit by a factor of ∼5–10, as reported here for PALAS soot, was not expected.

    In conclusion, the SP2's lower detection limit at a certain laser power depends primarily on the total BC mass per particle for compact particles with sufficiently high effective

  13. Algorithm of Data Reduce in Determination of Aerosol Particle Size Distribution at Damps/C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad-Priyatna; Otto-Pribadi-Ruslanto

    2001-01-01

    The analysis had to do for algorithm of data reduction on Damps/C (Differential Mobility Particle Sizer with Condensation Particle Counter) system, this is for determine aerosol particle size distribution with range 0,01 μm to 1 μm in diameter. Damps/C (Differential Mobility Particle Sizer with Condensation Particle Counter) system contents are software and hardware. The hardware used determine of mobilities of aerosol particle and so the software used determine aerosol particle size distribution in diameter. The mobilities and diameter particle had connection in the electricity field. That is basic program for reduction of data and particle size conversion from particle mobility become particle diameter. The analysis to get transfer function value, Ω, is 0.5. The data reduction program to do conversation mobility basis become diameter basis with number efficiency correction, transfer function value, and poly charge particle. (author)

  14. Discrete element method modeling of the triboelectric charging of polyethylene particles: Can particle size distribution and segregation reduce the charging?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konopka, Ladislav; Kosek, Juraj

    2015-01-01

    Polyethylene particles of various sizes are present in industrial gas-dispersion reactors and downstream processing units. The contact of the particles with a device wall as well as the mutual particle collisions cause electrons on the particle surface to redistribute in the system. The undesirable triboelectric charging results in several operational problems and safety risks in industrial systems, for example in the fluidized-bed polymerization reactor. We studied the charging of polyethylene particles caused by the particle-particle interactions in gas. Our model employs the Discrete Element Method (DEM) describing the particle dynamics and incorporates the ‘Trapped Electron Approach’ as the physical basis for the considered charging mechanism. The model predicts the particle charge distribution for systems with various particle size distributions and various level of segregation. Simulation results are in a qualitative agreement with experimental observations of similar particulate systems specifically in two aspects: 1) Big particles tend to gain positive charge and small particles the negative one. 2) The wider the particle size distribution is, the more pronounced is the charging process. Our results suggest that not only the size distribution, but also the effect of the spatial segregation of the polyethylene particles significantly influence the resulting charge distribution ‘generated’ in the system. The level of particle segregation as well as the particle size distribution of polyethylene particles can be in practice adjusted by the choice of supported catalysts, by the conditions in the fluidized-bed polymerization reactor and by the fluid dynamics. We also attempt to predict how the reactor temperature affects the triboelectric charging of particles. (paper)

  15. Effect of Finite Particle Size on Convergence of Point Particle Models in Euler-Lagrange Multiphase Dispersed Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nili, Samaun; Park, Chanyoung; Haftka, Raphael T.; Kim, Nam H.; Balachandar, S.

    2017-11-01

    Point particle methods are extensively used in simulating Euler-Lagrange multiphase dispersed flow. When particles are much smaller than the Eulerian grid the point particle model is on firm theoretical ground. However, this standard approach of evaluating the gas-particle coupling at the particle center fails to converge as the Eulerian grid is reduced below particle size. We present an approach to model the interaction between particles and fluid for finite size particles that permits convergence. We use the generalized Faxen form to compute the force on a particle and compare the results against traditional point particle method. We apportion the different force components on the particle to fluid cells based on the fraction of particle volume or surface in the cell. The application is to a one-dimensional model of shock propagation through a particle-laden field at moderate volume fraction, where the convergence is achieved for a well-formulated force model and back coupling for finite size particles. Comparison with 3D direct fully resolved numerical simulations will be used to check if the approach also improves accuracy compared to the point particle model. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, under Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  16. Particle size effects on protein and virus-like particle adsorption on perfusion chromatography media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yige; Abraham, Dicky; Carta, Giorgio

    2015-01-02

    The resin structure, chromatographic behavior, and adsorption kinetics of proteins and virus-like-particles (VLPs) are studied for POROS HS 20 and POROS HS 50 (23 and 52 μm mean diameter, respectively) to determine the effects of particle size on perfusion chromatography and to determine the predictive ability of available models. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and inverse size-exclusion chromatography (iSEC) show similar structures for the two resins, both containing 200-1000 nm pores that transect a network of much smaller pores. For non-binding conditions, trends of the height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) as a function of reduced velocity are consistent with perfusion. The estimated intraparticle flow fractions for these conditions are 0.0018 and 0.00063 for POROS HS 20 and HS 50, respectively. For strong binding conditions, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) shows asymmetrical intraparticle concentrations profiles and enhanced rates of IgG adsorption on POROS HS 20 at 1000 cm/h. The corresponding effective diffusivity under flow is 2-3 times larger than for non-flow conditions and much larger than observed for POROS HS 50, consistent with available models. For VLPs, however, adsorption is confined to a thin layer near the particle surface for both resins, suggesting that the bound VLPs block the pores. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Controlled and tunable polymer particles' production using a single microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoyav, Benzion; Benny, Ofra

    2018-04-01

    Microfluidics technology offers a new platform to control liquids under flow in small volumes. The advantage of using small-scale reactions for droplet generation along with the capacity to control the preparation parameters, making microfluidic chips an attractive technology for optimizing encapsulation formulations. However, one of the drawback in this methodology is the ability to obtain a wide range of droplet sizes, from sub-micron to microns using a single chip design. In fact, typically, droplet chips are used for micron-dimension particles, while nanoparticles' synthesis requires complex chips design (i.e., microreactors and staggered herringbone micromixer). Here, we introduce the development of a highly tunable and controlled encapsulation technique, using two polymer compositions, for generating particles ranging from microns to nano-size using the same simple single microfluidic chip design. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA 50:50) or PLGA/polyethylene glycol polymeric particles were prepared with focused-flow chip, yielding monodisperse particle batches. We show that by varying flow rate, solvent, surfactant and polymer composition, we were able to optimize particles' size and decrease polydispersity index, using simple chip designs with no further related adjustments or costs. Utilizing this platform, which offers tight tuning of particle properties, could offer an important tool for formulation development and can potentially pave the way towards a better precision nanomedicine.

  18. Hysteresis in suspended sediment to turbidity relations due to changing particle size distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landers, Mark N.; Sturm, Terry W.

    2013-01-01

    Turbidity (T) is the most ubiquitous of surrogate technologies used to estimate suspended-sediment concentration (SSC). The effects of sediment size on turbidity are well documented; however, effects from changes in particle size distributions (PSD) are rarely evaluated. Hysteresis in relations of SSC-to-turbidity (SSC~T) for single stormflow events was observed and quantified for a data set of 195 concurrent measurements of SSC, turbidity, discharge, velocity, and volumetric PSD collected during five stormflows in 2009–2010 on Yellow River at Gees Mill Road in metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia. Regressions of SSC-normalized turbidity (T/SSC) on concurrently measured PSD percentiles show an inverse, exponential influence of particle size on turbidity that is not constant across the size range of the PSD. The majority of the influence of PSD on T/SSC is from particles of fine-silt and smaller sizes (finer than 16 microns). This study shows that small changes in the often assumed stability of the PSD are significant to SSC~T relations. Changes of only 5 microns in the fine silt and smaller size fractions of suspended sediment PSD can produce hysteresis in the SSC~T rating that can increase error and produce bias. Observed SSC~T hysteresis may be an indicator of changes in sediment properties during stormflows and of potential changes in sediment sources. Trends in the PSD time series indicate that sediment transport is capacity-limited for sand-sized sediment in the channel and supply-limited for fine silt and smaller sediment from the hillslope.

  19. Characterizing uranium oxide reference particles for isotopic abundances and uranium mass by single particle isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraiem, M.; Richter, S.; Erdmann, N.; Kühn, H.; Hedberg, M.; Aregbe, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A method to quantify the U mass in single micron particles by ID-TIMS was developed. ► Well-characterized monodisperse U-oxide particles produced by an aerosol generator were used. ► A linear correlation between the mass of U and the volume of particle(s) was found. ► The method developed is suitable for determining the amount of U in a particulate reference material. - Abstract: Uranium and plutonium particulate test materials are becoming increasingly important as the reliability of measurement results has to be demonstrated to regulatory bodies responsible for maintaining effective nuclear safeguards. In order to address this issue, the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) in collaboration with the Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU) has initiated a study to investigate the feasibility of preparing and characterizing a uranium particle reference material for nuclear safeguards, which is finally certified for isotopic abundances and for the uranium mass per particle. Such control particles are specifically required to evaluate responses of instruments based on mass spectrometric detection (e.g. SIMS, TIMS, LA-ICPMS) and to help ensuring the reliability and comparability of measurement results worldwide. In this paper, a methodology is described which allows quantifying the uranium mass in single micron particles by isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS). This methodology is characterized by substantial improvements recently achieved at IRMM in terms of sensitivity and measurement accuracy in the field of uranium particle analysis by TIMS. The use of monodisperse uranium oxide particles prepared using an aerosol generation technique developed at ITU, which is capable of producing particles of well-characterized size and isotopic composition was exploited. The evidence of a straightforward correlation between the particle volume and the mass of uranium was demonstrated in this study

  20. Nanometer, submicron and micron sized aluminum powder prepared by semi-solid mechanical stirring method with addition of ceramic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, X.H.; Jiang, D.L.; Dong, S.M.

    2004-01-01

    Composite powder, which is a mixture of Al/Al 2 O 3 composite particles and nanometer, submicron and micron sized aluminum powder, was prepared by semi-solid mechanical stirring method with addition of Al 2 O 3 ceramic particles. The ceramic particles have an average diameter of 80 μm and a volume fraction of 15% in the slurry. The methods used to measure the size distribution of particles greater than 50 μm and less than 50 μm were sieve analysis and photosedimentation, respectively. The surface morphology and transverse sections of the composite powder of different sizes were examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM), optical microscope and auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The results indicate that the composite powder prepared in present work have a wide size distribution ranging from less than 50-900 μm, and the aluminum particles and Al/Al 2 O 3 composite particles are separated and isolated. The particles greater than 200 μm and less than 50 μm are almost pure aluminum powder. The rate of conversion of ingot aluminum into particles less than 1 μm containing nanometer and submicron sizes is 1.777 wt.% in this work. The aluminum powder of different sizes has different shape and surface morphology, quasi-spherical in shape with rough surface for aluminum particles of micron scale, irregular in shape for aluminum particles of submicron scale, and quite close to a globular or an excellent globular in shape for aluminum particles of nanometer size. On the other hand, the surface of ceramic particle was coated by aluminum particles with maximum thickness less than 10 μm containing nanometer and submicron sizes as a single layer. It is suggested that the surface of ceramic particles can provide more nucleation sites for solidification of liquid aluminum and the nucleation of liquid aluminum can take place readily, grow and adhere on the surface of ceramic particles, although it is poorly wetted by the liquid aluminum and the semi-solid slurry can

  1. Initial transformer sizing for single-phase residential load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, K.C.; Hoad, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    The purchase of distribution transformers represents a significant capital investment per year for an electric utility. Choosing the correct thermal and economic size transformer can help control this investment. This paper describes a method for determining the correct economic size of distribution transformers using end-use appliance load profiles and the ANSI/IEEE Standard C57.91-1981 thermal model. Although applied only to single family and multifamily residential load in this paper, the method can be extended to other types of load such as commercial or industrial

  2. Estimation of the sizes of hot nuclear systems from particle-particle large angle kinematical correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Ville, J.L.; Bizard, G.; Durand, D.; Jin, G.M.; Rosato, E.

    1990-06-01

    Light fragment emission, when triggered by large transverse momentum protons shows specific kinematical correlations due to recoil effects of the excited emitting source. Such effects have been observed in azimuthal angular distributions of He-particles produced in collisions induced by 94 MeV/u 16 0 ions on Al, Ni and Au targets. A model calculation assuming a two-stage mechanism (formation and sequential decay of a hot source) gives a good description of these whole data. From this succesfull confrontation, it is possible to estimate the size of the emitting system

  3. Single-particle spectral density of the Hubbard model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehlig, B.; Eskes, H.; Hayn, R.; Meinders, M.B.J.

    1995-01-01

    We calculate the single-particle spectral function for the Hubbard model within the framework of a projection technique equivalent to the two-pole approximation. We show that the two-pole approximation can be well understood as an average characterization of the upper and the lower Hubbard bands,

  4. SINGLE-PARTICLE SPECTRAL DENSITY OF THE HUBBARD-MODEL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MEHLIG, B; ESKES, H; HAYN, R; MEINDERS, MBJ

    1995-01-01

    We calculate the single-particle spectral function for the Hubbard model within the framework of a projection technique equivalent to the two-pole approximation. We show that the two-pole approximation can be well understood as an average characterization of the upper and the lower Hubbard bands,

  5. Single-particle behaviour in circulating fluidized beds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erik Weinell, Claus; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Johnsson, Jan Erik

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation of single-particle behaviour in a cold pilot-scale model of a circulating fluidized bed combustor (CFBC). In the system, sand is recirculated by means of air. Pressure measurements along the riser are used to determine the suspension density...

  6. Statistical Methods for Single-Particle Electron Cryomicroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Katrine Hommelhoff

    Electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) is a form of transmission electron microscopy, aimed at reconstructing the 3D structure of a macromolecular complex from a large set of 2D projection images, as they exhibit a very low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In the single-particle reconstruction (SPR) probl...

  7. Decay properties of high-lying single-particles modes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaumel, D; Fortier, S; Gales, S; Guillot, J; LangevinJoliot, H; Laurent, H; Maison, JM; Vernotte, J; Bordewijck, J; Brandenburg, S; Krasznahorkay, A; Crawley, GM; Massolo, CP; Renteria, M; Khendriche, A

    1996-01-01

    The neutron decay of high-lying single-particle states in Ni-64, Zr-90, Sn-120 and (208)pb excited by means of the (alpha,He-3) reaction has been investigated at 120 MeV incident energy using the multidetector EDEN. The characteristics of this reaction are studied using inclusive spectra and angular

  8. Single particle behaviour in circulating fluidized bed combustors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erik Weinell, Claus

    1994-01-01

    An investigation of single particle behaviour in a circulating fluidized bed combustor is described, relating to sulphur capture reactions by limestone under alternate oxidizing and reducing conditions present in a circulating fluidized bed combustor, and to the devolatilization and burn out...

  9. Ergodicity of a single particle confined in a nanopore

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernardi, S.; Hansen, Jesper Schmidt; Frascolli, F.

    2012-01-01

    -ergodic component of the phase space for energy levels typical of experiments, is surprisingly small, i.e. we conclude that the ergodic hypothesis is a reasonable approximation even for a single particle trapped in a nanopore. Due to the numerical scope of this work, our focus will be the onset of ergodic behavior...

  10. Single-particle properties from Kohn-Sham Green's functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, Anirban; Furnstahl, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    An effective action approach to Kohn-Sham density functional theory is used to illustrate how the exact Green's function can be calculated in terms of the Kohn-Sham Green's function. An example based on Skyrme energy functionals shows that single-particle Kohn-Sham spectra can be improved by adding sources used to construct the energy functional

  11. Tailoring particle size and morphology of colloidal Ag particles via chemical precipitation for Ag-BSCCO composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medendorp, N.W. Jr.; Bowman, K.J.; Trumble, K.P.

    1996-01-01

    The chemical precipitation of silver particles is an effective method for tailoring the particle size and morphology. This article investigates a chemical precipitation method for producing silver colloids, and how processing parameters affected particle size, morphology and adherence. Decreasing the silver nitrate concentration during precipitation with sodium borohydride decreased the colloidal silver particle size. Decreasing the addition rate of the reducing agent produced faceted particles. Reversing the reactant addition order also changed the particle size and the morphology. Precipitated colloids demonstrated a difference between the growth-dominated and the equilibrium structures. Co-dispersing Bi-based superconducting platelets during precipitation allowed Ag colloids to preferentially nucleate on the platelets and to remain adhered even after the additional processing. (orig.)

  12. Study on the fragmentation of granite due to the impact of single particle and double particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuchun Kuang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Particle Impact Drilling (PID is a novel method to improve the rate of penetration (ROP. In order to further improve the performance of PID, an investigation into the effect of single and double particles: (1 diameter; (2 initial velocity; (3 distance; and (4 angle of incidence was undertaken to investigate their effects on broken volume and penetration depth into hard brittle rock. For this purpose, the laboratory experiment of single particle impact rock was employed. Meanwhile, based on the LS-DYNA, a new finite element (FE simulation of the PID, including single and double particles impact rock, has been presented. The 3-dimensional (3D, aix-symmetric, dynamic-explicit, Lagrangian model has been considered in this simulation. And the Elastic and Holmquist Johnson Cook (HJC material behaviors have been used for particles and rocks, respectively. The FE simulation results of single particle impacting rock are good agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, in this article the optimal impact parameters, including diameter, initial velocity, distance and the angle of incidence, are obtained in PID.

  13. On-Chip Magnetic Platform for Single-Particle Manipulation with Integrated Electrical Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monticelli, Marco; Torti, Andrea; Cantoni, Matteo; Petti, Daniela; Albisetti, Edoardo; Manzin, Alessandra; Guerriero, Erica; Sordan, Roman; Gervasoni, Giacomo; Carminati, Marco; Ferrari, Giorgio; Sampietro, Marco; Bertacco, Riccardo

    2016-02-17

    Methods for the manipulation of single magnetic particles have become very interesting, in particular for in vitro biological studies. Most of these studies require an external microscope to provide the operator with feedback for controlling the particle motion, thus preventing the use of magnetic particles in high-throughput experiments. In this paper, a simple and compact system with integrated electrical feedback is presented, implementing in the very same device both the manipulation and detection of the transit of single particles. The proposed platform is based on zig-zag shaped magnetic nanostructures, where transverse magnetic domain walls are pinned at the corners and attract magnetic particles in suspension. By applying suitable external magnetic fields, the domain walls move to the nearest corner, thus causing the step by step displacement of the particles along the nanostructure. The very same structure is also employed for detecting the bead transit. Indeed, the presence of the magnetic particle in suspension over the domain wall affects the depinning field required for its displacement. This characteristic field can be monitored through anisotropic magnetoresistance measurements, thus implementing an integrated electrical feedback of the bead transit. In particular, the individual manipulation and detection of single 1-μm sized beads is demonstrated. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Reconstructing an icosahedral virus from single-particle diffraction experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldin, D. K.; Poon, H.-C.; Schwander, P.; Uddin, M.; Schmidt, M.

    2011-08-01

    The first experimental data from single-particle scattering experiments from free electron lasers (FELs) are now becoming available. The first such experiments are being performed on relatively large objects such as viruses, which produce relatively low-resolution, low-noise diffraction patterns in so-called ``diffract-and-destroy'' experiments. We describe a very simple test on the angular correlations of measured diffraction data to determine if the scattering is from an icosahedral particle. If this is confirmed, the efficient algorithm proposed can then combine diffraction data from multiple shots of particles in random unknown orientations to generate a full 3D image of the icosahedral particle. We demonstrate this with a simulation for the satellite tobacco necrosis virus (STNV), the atomic coordinates of whose asymmetric unit is given in Protein Data Bank entry 2BUK.

  15. A transient single particle model under FCI conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-Yan; SHANG Zhi; XU Ji-Jun

    2005-01-01

    The paper is focused on the coupling effect between film boiling heat transfer and evaporation drag around a hot-particle in cold liquid. Based on the continuity, momentum and energy equations of the vapor film, a transient two-dimensional single particle model has been established. This paper contains a detailed description of HPMC (High-temperature Particle Moving in Coolant) model for studying some aspects of the premixing stage of fuel-coolant interactions (FCIs). The transient process of high-temperature particles moving in coolant can be simulated. Comparisons between the experiment results and the calculations using HPMC model demonstrate that HPMC model achieves a good agreement in predicting the time-varying characteristic of high-temperature spheres moving in coolant.

  16. Toxicogenomic analysis of the particle dose- and size-response relationship of silica particles-induced toxicity in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xiaoyan; Jin Tingting; Jin Yachao; Wu Leihong; Hu Bin; Tian Yu; Fan Xiaohui

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between particle size and toxicity of silica particles (SP) with diameters of 30, 70, and 300 nm, which is essential to the safe design and application of SP. Data obtained from histopathological examinations suggested that SP of these sizes can all induce acute inflammation in the liver. In vivo imaging showed that intravenously administrated SP are mainly present in the liver, spleen and intestinal tract. Interestingly, in gene expression analysis, the cellular response pathways activated in the liver are predominantly conserved independently of particle dose when the same size SP are administered or are conserved independently of particle size, surface area and particle number when nano- or submicro-sized SP are administered at their toxic doses. Meanwhile, integrated analysis of transcriptomics, previous metabonomics and conventional toxicological results support the view that SP can result in inflammatory and oxidative stress, generate mitochondrial dysfunction, and eventually cause hepatocyte necrosis by neutrophil-mediated liver injury. (paper)

  17. Size-resolved fluxes of sub-100-nm particles over forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryor, Sara; Barthelmie, Rebecca Jane; Spaulding, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Dry deposition of atmospheric particles is critically dependent on particle size and plays a key role in dictating the mass and number distributions of atmospheric particles. However, modeling dry deposition is constrained by a lack of understanding of controlling dependencies and accurate size......-resolved observations. We present size-resolved particle number fluxes for sub-100-nm particle diameters (Dp) over a deciduous forest derived using eddy covariance applied to data from a fast mobility particle sizer. The size-resolved particle number fluxes in 18 diameters between 8 and 100 nm were collected during...... leaf-on and are statistically robust. Particle deposition velocities normalized by friction velocity (v d +) are approximately four times smaller than comparable values for coniferous forests reported elsewhere. Comparison of the data with output from a new one-dimensional mechanistic particle...

  18. Two-Way Communication with a Single Quantum Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Santo, Flavio; Dakić, Borivoje

    2018-02-01

    In this Letter we show that communication when restricted to a single information carrier (i.e., single particle) and finite speed of propagation is fundamentally limited for classical systems. On the other hand, quantum systems can surpass this limitation. We show that communication bounded to the exchange of a single quantum particle (in superposition of different spatial locations) can result in "two-way signaling," which is impossible in classical physics. We quantify the discrepancy between classical and quantum scenarios by the probability of winning a game played by distant players. We generalize our result to an arbitrary number of parties and we show that the probability of success is asymptotically decreasing to zero as the number of parties grows, for all classical strategies. In contrast, quantum strategy allows players to win the game with certainty.

  19. Transmission and fractionation of micro-sized particle suspensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brans, G.B.P.W.; Dinther, van A.M.C.; Odum, B.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Boom, R.M.

    2007-01-01

    In processes aimed at the fractionation of a multi-component feed stream, transmission of particles through the membrane is at least as important as retention of larger particles. In this paper, we describe the mechanisms of transmission of mono-disperse latex particles through a polymer membrane.

  20. Impacts of Limestone Multi-particle Size on Production Performance, Egg Shell Quality, and Egg Quality in Laying Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Y. Guo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of single or multi-particle size limestone on the egg shell quality, egg production, egg quality and feed intake in laying hens. A total of 280 laying hens (ISA brown were used in this 10-wk trial. Laying hens were randomly assigned to 4 treatments with 14 replications per treatment and 5 adjacent cages as a replication (hens were caged individually. The experimental treatments were: i L, basal diet+10% large particle limestone; ii LS1, basal diet+8% large particle limestone+2% small particle limestone; iii LS2, basal diet+6% large particle limestone+4% small particle limestone; iv S, basal diet+10% small particle limestone. The egg production was unaffected by dietary treatments. The egg weight in S treatment was lighter than other treatments (p<0.05. The egg specific gravity in S treatment was lower than other treatments (p<0.05. The eggshell strength and eggshell thickness in S treatment were decreased when compared with other dietary treatments (p<0.05. The laying hens in LS1 and LS2 treatment had a higher average feed intake than the other two treatments (p<0.05. Collectively, the dietary multi-particle size limestone supplementation could be as efficient as large particle size limestone.

  1. Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlacek, Arthur [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The SP2 is an instrument that measures, in situ, the time-dependent scattering and incandescence signals produced by individual BC-containing particles as they travel through a continuous-wave laser beam. Any particle traversing the laser beam will scatter light, and the BC component of a BC-containing particle will absorb some of the laser energy until its temperature is raised to the point at which it incandesces (hereafter we adopt the standard terminology of the SP2 community and denote any substance determined by the SP2 to be BC as refractory black carbon (rBC)). The amplitude of the rBC incandescence signal is related to the amount of refractory material contained in the illuminated particle. By binning the individual incandescence signals per unit sample volume, the mass concentration [ng/m3] of rBC can be derived. By binning the individual signals by volume equivalent diameter the size distribution (dN/dlogDVED) per unit time can be derived. The rBC mass loading per unit time and the rBC size distribution unit time are the core data products produced by the SP2. Additionally, the scattering channel can be used to provide information on the rBC particle population-based mixing states within ambient aerosols. However, this data product is produced on a requested-basis since additional detailed analysis and QC/QA must be conducted.

  2. A database of microwave and sub-millimetre ice particle single scattering properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekelund, Robin; Eriksson, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Ice crystal particles are today a large contributing factor as to why cold-type clouds such as cirrus remain a large uncertainty in global climate models and measurements. The reason for this is the complex and varied morphology in which ice particles appear, as compared to liquid droplets with an in general spheroidal shape, thus making the description of electromagnetic properties of ice particles more complicated. Single scattering properties of frozen hydrometers have traditionally been approximated by representing the particles as spheres using Mie theory. While such practices may work well in radio applications, where the size parameter of the particles is generally low, comparisons with measurements and simulations show that this assumption is insufficient when observing tropospheric cloud ice in the microwave or sub-millimetre regions. In order to assist the radiative transfer and remote sensing communities, a database of single scattering properties of semi-realistic particles is being produced. The data is being produced using DDA (Discrete Dipole Approximation) code which can treat arbitrarily shaped particles, and Tmatrix code for simpler shapes when found sufficiently accurate. The aim has been to mainly cover frequencies used by the upcoming ICI (Ice Cloud Imager) mission with launch in 2022. Examples of particles to be included are columns, plates, bullet rosettes, sector snowflakes and aggregates. The idea is to treat particles with good average optical properties with respect to the multitude of particles and aggregate types appearing in nature. The database will initially only cover macroscopically isotropic orientation, but will eventually also include horizontally aligned particles. Databases of DDA particles do already exist with varying accessibility. The goal of this database is to complement existing data. Regarding the distribution of the data, the plan is that the database shall be available in conjunction with the ARTS (Atmospheric

  3. Sensitivity of Particle Size in Discrete Element Method to Particle Gas Method (DEM_PGM) Coupling in Underbody Blast Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-12

    Particle Size in Discrete Element Method to Particle Gas Method (DEM_PGM) Coupling in Underbody Blast Simulations Venkatesh Babu, Kumar Kulkarni, Sanjay...buried in soil viz., (1) coupled discrete element & particle gas methods (DEM-PGM) and (2) Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE), are investigated. The...DEM_PGM and identify the limitations/strengths compared to the ALE method. Discrete Element Method (DEM) can model individual particle directly, and

  4. Particle shape accounts for instrumental discrepancy in ice core dust size distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folden Simonsen, Marius; Cremonesi, Llorenç; Baccolo, Giovanni; Bosch, Samuel; Delmonte, Barbara; Erhardt, Tobias; Kjær, Helle Astrid; Potenza, Marco; Svensson, Anders; Vallelonga, Paul

    2018-05-01

    The Klotz Abakus laser sensor and the Coulter counter are both used for measuring the size distribution of insoluble mineral dust particles in ice cores. While the Coulter counter measures particle volume accurately, the equivalent Abakus instrument measurement deviates substantially from the Coulter counter. We show that the difference between the Abakus and the Coulter counter measurements is mainly caused by the irregular shape of dust particles in ice core samples. The irregular shape means that a new calibration routine based on standard spheres is necessary for obtaining fully comparable data. This new calibration routine gives an increased accuracy to Abakus measurements, which may improve future ice core record intercomparisons. We derived an analytical model for extracting the aspect ratio of dust particles from the difference between Abakus and Coulter counter data. For verification, we measured the aspect ratio of the same samples directly using a single-particle extinction and scattering instrument. The results demonstrate that the model is accurate enough to discern between samples of aspect ratio 0.3 and 0.4 using only the comparison of Abakus and Coulter counter data.

  5. Mass Spectrometry of Single Particles Levitated in an Electrodynamic Balance: Applications to Laboratory Atmospheric Chemistry Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdsall, A.; Krieger, U. K.; Keutsch, F. N.

    2017-12-01

    Dynamic changes to atmospheric aerosol particle composition (e.g., originating from evaporation/condensation, oxidative aging, or aqueous-phase chemical reactions) impact particle properties with importance for understanding particle effects on climate and human health. These changes can take place over the entire lifetime of an atmospheric particle, which can extend over multiple days. Previous laboratory studies of such processes have included analyzing single particles suspended in a levitation device, such as an electrodynamic balance (EDB), an optical levitator, or an acoustic trap, using optical detection techniques. However, studying chemically complex systems can require an analytical method, such as mass spectrometry, that provides more molecular specificity. Existing work coupling particle levitation with mass spectrometry is more limited and largely has consisted of acoustic levitation of millimeter-sized droplets.In this work an EDB has been coupled with a custom-built ionization source and commercial time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MS) as a platform for laboratory atmospheric chemistry research. Single charged particles (radius 10 μm) have been injected into an EDB, levitated for an arbitrarily long period of time, and then transferred to a vaporization-corona discharge ionization region for MS analysis. By analyzing a series of particles of identical composition, residing in the controlled environment of the EDB for varying times, we can trace the chemical evolution of a particle over hours or days, appropriate timescales for understanding transformations of atmospheric particles.To prove the concept of our EDB-MS system, we have studied the evaporation of particles consisting of polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecules of mixed chain lengths, used as a benchmark system. Our system can quantify the composition of single particles (see Figure for sample spectrum of a single PEG-200 particle: PEG parent ions labeled with m/z, known PEG fragment ions

  6. Preparation of gold nanoparticles and determination of their particles size via different methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iqbal, Muhammad; Usanase, Gisele [University of Lyon, University Lyon-1, CNRS, UMR-5007, LAGEP, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Oulmi, Kafia; Aberkane, Fairouz; Bendaikha, Tahar [Laboratory of Chemistry and Environmental Chemistry(LCCE), Faculty of Science, Material Science Department, University of Batna, 05000 (Algeria); Fessi, Hatem [University of Lyon, University Lyon-1, CNRS, UMR-5007, LAGEP, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Zine, Nadia [Institut des Sciences Analytiques (ISA), Université Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon-1, UMR-5180, 5 rue de la Doua, F-69100 Villeurbanne (France); Agusti, Géraldine [University of Lyon, University Lyon-1, CNRS, UMR-5007, LAGEP, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Errachid, El-Salhi [Institut des Sciences Analytiques (ISA), Université Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon-1, UMR-5180, 5 rue de la Doua, F-69100 Villeurbanne (France); Elaissari, Abdelhamid, E-mail: elaissari@lagep.univ-lyon1.fr [University of Lyon, University Lyon-1, CNRS, UMR-5007, LAGEP, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France)

    2016-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Preparation of gold nanoparticles via NaBH{sub 4} reduction method, and determination of their particle size, size distribution and morphology by using different techniques. - Highlights: • Gold nanoparticles were synthesized by NaBH{sub 4} reduction method. • Excess of reducing agent leads to tendency of aggregation. • The particle size, size distribution and morphology were investigated. • Particle size was determined both experimentally as well as theoretically. - Abstract: Gold nanoparticles have been used in various applications covering both electronics, biosensors, in vivo biomedical imaging and in vitro biomedical diagnosis. As a general requirement, gold nanoparticles should be prepared in large scale, easy to be functionalized by chemical compound of by specific ligands or biomolecules. In this study, gold nanoparticles were prepared by using different concentrations of reducing agent (NaBH{sub 4}) in various formulations and their effect on the particle size, size distribution and morphology was investigated. Moreover, special attention has been dedicated to comparison of particles size measured by various techniques, such as, light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, UV spectrum using standard curve and particles size calculated by using Mie theory and UV spectrum of gold nanoparticles dispersion. Particle size determined by various techniques can be correlated for monodispersed particles and excess of reducing agent leads to increase in the particle size.

  7. Preparation of gold nanoparticles and determination of their particles size via different methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, Muhammad; Usanase, Gisele; Oulmi, Kafia; Aberkane, Fairouz; Bendaikha, Tahar; Fessi, Hatem; Zine, Nadia; Agusti, Géraldine; Errachid, El-Salhi; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Preparation of gold nanoparticles via NaBH_4 reduction method, and determination of their particle size, size distribution and morphology by using different techniques. - Highlights: • Gold nanoparticles were synthesized by NaBH_4 reduction method. • Excess of reducing agent leads to tendency of aggregation. • The particle size, size distribution and morphology were investigated. • Particle size was determined both experimentally as well as theoretically. - Abstract: Gold nanoparticles have been used in various applications covering both electronics, biosensors, in vivo biomedical imaging and in vitro biomedical diagnosis. As a general requirement, gold nanoparticles should be prepared in large scale, easy to be functionalized by chemical compound of by specific ligands or biomolecules. In this study, gold nanoparticles were prepared by using different concentrations of reducing agent (NaBH_4) in various formulations and their effect on the particle size, size distribution and morphology was investigated. Moreover, special attention has been dedicated to comparison of particles size measured by various techniques, such as, light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, UV spectrum using standard curve and particles size calculated by using Mie theory and UV spectrum of gold nanoparticles dispersion. Particle size determined by various techniques can be correlated for monodispersed particles and excess of reducing agent leads to increase in the particle size.

  8. Research on bimodal particle extinction coefficient during Brownian coagulation and condensation for the entire particle size regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Hong; Lin Jianzhong

    2011-01-01

    The extinction coefficient of atmospheric aerosol particles influences the earth’s radiation balance directly or indirectly, and it can be determined by the scattering and absorption characteristics of aerosol particles. The problem of estimating the change of extinction coefficient due to time evolution of bimodal particle size distribution is studied, and two improved methods for calculating the Brownian coagulation coefficient and the condensation growth rate are proposed, respectively. Through the improved method based on Otto kernel, the Brownian coagulation coefficient can be expressed simply in powers of particle volume for the entire particle size regime based on the fitted polynomials of the mean enhancement function. Meanwhile, the improved method based on Fuchs–Sutugin kernel is developed to obtain the condensation growth rate for the entire particle size regime. And then, the change of the overall extinction coefficient of bimodal distributions undergoing Brownian coagulation and condensation can be estimated comprehensively for the entire particle size regime. Simulation experiments indicate that the extinction coefficients obtained with the improved methods coincide fairly well with the true values, which provide a simple, reliable, and general method to estimate the change of extinction coefficient for the entire particle size regime during the bimodal particle dynamic processes.

  9. Size measurement of radioactive aerosol particles in intense radiation fields using wire screens and imaging plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oki, Yuichi; Tanaka, Toru; Takamiya, Koichi; Ishi, Yoshihiro; UesugI, Tomonori; Kuriyama, Yasutoshi; Sakamoto, Masaaki; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Osaka (Japan); Nitta, Shinnosuke [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Osada, Naoyuki [Advanced Science Research Center, Okayama University, Okayama (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    Very fine radiation-induced aerosol particles are produced in intense radiation fields, such as high-intensity accelerator rooms and containment vessels such as those in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP). Size measurement of the aerosol particles is very important for understanding the behavior of radioactive aerosols released in the FDNPP accident and radiation safety in high-energy accelerators. A combined technique using wire screens and imaging plates was developed for size measurement of fine radioactive aerosol particles smaller than 100 nm in diameter. This technique was applied to the radiation field of a proton accelerator room, in which radioactive atoms produced in air during machine operation are incorporated into radiation-induced aerosol particles. The size of 11C-bearing aerosol particles was analyzed using the wire screen technique in distinction from other positron emitters in combination with a radioactive decay analysis. The size distribution for 11C-bearing aerosol particles was found to be ca. 70 μm in geometric mean diameter. The size was similar to that for 7Be-bearing particles obtained by a Ge detector measurement, and was slightly larger than the number-based size distribution measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer. The particle size measuring method using wire screens and imaging plates was successfully applied to the fine aerosol particles produced in an intense radiation field of a proton accelerator. This technique is applicable to size measurement of radioactive aerosol particles produced in the intense radiation fields of radiation facilities.

  10. Mobility particle size spectrometers: harmonization of technical standards and data structure to facilitate high quality long-term observations of atmospheric particle number size distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wiedensohler

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mobility particle size spectrometers often referred to as DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizers or SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizers have found a wide range of applications in atmospheric aerosol research. However, comparability of measurements conducted world-wide is hampered by lack of generally accepted technical standards and guidelines with respect to the instrumental set-up, measurement mode, data evaluation as well as quality control. Technical standards were developed for a minimum requirement of mobility size spectrometry to perform long-term atmospheric aerosol measurements. Technical recommendations include continuous monitoring of flow rates, temperature, pressure, and relative humidity for the sheath and sample air in the differential mobility analyzer.

    We compared commercial and custom-made inversion routines to calculate the particle number size distributions from the measured electrical mobility distribution. All inversion routines are comparable within few per cent uncertainty for a given set of raw data.

    Furthermore, this work summarizes the results from several instrument intercomparison workshops conducted within the European infrastructure project EUSAAR (European Supersites for Atmospheric Aerosol Research and ACTRIS (Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research InfraStructure Network to determine present uncertainties especially of custom-built mobility particle size spectrometers. Under controlled laboratory conditions, the particle number size distributions from 20 to 200 nm determined by mobility particle size spectrometers of different design are within an uncertainty range of around ±10% after correcting internal particle losses, while below and above this size range the discrepancies increased. For particles larger than 200 nm, the uncertainty range increased to 30%, which could not be explained. The network reference mobility spectrometers with identical design agreed within ±4% in the

  11. Nano-sized calcium phosphate particles for periodontal gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elangovan, Satheesh; Jain, Shardool; Tsai, Pei-Chin; Margolis, Henry C; Amiji, Mansoor

    2013-01-01

    Growth factors such as platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) have significantly enhanced periodontal therapy outcomes with a high degree of variability, mostly due to the lack of continual supply for a required period of time. One method to overcome this barrier is gene therapy. The aim of this in vitro study is to evaluate PDGF-B gene delivery in fibroblasts using nano-sized calcium phosphate particles (NCaPP) as vectors. NCaPP incorporating green fluorescent protein (NCaPP-GFP) and PDGF-B (NCaPP-PDGF-B) plasmids were synthesized using an established precipitation system and characterized using transmission electron microscopy and 1.2% agarose gel electrophoresis. Biocompatibility and transfection of the nanoplexes in fibroblasts were evaluated using cytotoxicity assay and florescence microscopy, respectively. Polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were performed to evaluate PDGF-B transfection after different time points of treatments, and the functionality of PDGF-B transfection was evaluated using the cell proliferation assay. Synthesized NCaPP nanoplexes incorporating the genes of GFP and PDGF-B were spherical in shape and measured about 30 to 50 nm in diameter. Gel electrophoresis confirmed DNA incorporation and stability within the nanoplexes, and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium reagent assay demonstrated their biocompatibility in fibroblasts. In vitro transfection studies revealed a higher and longer lasting transfection after NCaPP-PDGF-B treatment, which lasted up to 96 hours. Significantly enhanced fibroblast proliferation observed in NCaPP-PDGF-B-treated cells confirmed the functionality of these nanoplexes. NCaPP demonstrated higher levels of biocompatibility and efficiently transfected PDGF plasmids into fibroblasts under described in vitro conditions.

  12. Single-particle measurements of bouncing particles and in situ collection efficiency from an airborne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) with light-scattering detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jin; Brock, Charles A.; Murphy, Daniel M.; Sueper, Donna T.; Welti, André; Middlebrook, Ann M.

    2017-10-01

    A light-scattering module was coupled to an airborne, compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (LS-AMS) to investigate collection efficiency (CE) while obtaining nonrefractory aerosol chemical composition measurements during the Southeast Nexus (SENEX) campaign. In this instrument, particles scatter light from an internal laser beam and trigger saving individual particle mass spectra. Nearly all of the single-particle data with mass spectra that were triggered by scattered light signals were from particles larger than ˜ 280 nm in vacuum aerodynamic diameter. Over 33 000 particles are characterized as either prompt (27 %), delayed (15 %), or null (58 %), according to the time and intensity of their total mass spectral signals. The particle mass from single-particle spectra is proportional to that derived from the light-scattering diameter (dva-LS) but not to that from the particle time-of-flight (PToF) diameter (dva-MS) from the time of the maximum mass spectral signal. The total mass spectral signal from delayed particles was about 80 % of that from prompt ones for the same dva-LS. Both field and laboratory data indicate that the relative intensities of various ions in the prompt spectra show more fragmentation compared to the delayed spectra. The particles with a delayed mass spectral signal likely bounced off the vaporizer and vaporized later on another surface within the confines of the ionization source. Because delayed particles are detected by the mass spectrometer later than expected from their dva-LS size, they can affect the interpretation of particle size (PToF) mass distributions, especially at larger sizes. The CE, measured by the average number or mass fractions of particles optically detected that had measurable mass spectra, varied significantly (0.2-0.9) in different air masses. The measured CE agreed well with a previous parameterization when CE > 0.5 for acidic particles but was sometimes lower than the minimum parameterized CE of 0.5.

  13. Verification of Gyrokinetic Particle of Turbulent Simulation of Device Size Scaling Transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Zhihong; S. ETHIER; T. S. HAHM; W. M. TANG

    2012-01-01

    Verification and historical perspective are presented on the gyrokinetic particle simulations that discovered the device size scaling of turbulent transport and indentified the geometry model as the source of the long-standing disagreement between gyrokinetic particle and continuum simulations.

  14. Data Descriptor : Collocated observations of cloud condensation nuclei, particle size distributions, and chemical composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmale, Julia; Henning, Silvia; Henzing, Bas; Keskinen, Helmi; Sellegri, Karine; Ovadnevaite, Jurgita; Bougiatioti, Aikaterini; Kalivitis, Nikos; Stavroulas, Iasonas; Jefferson, Anne; Park, Minsu; Schlag, Patrick; Kristensson, Adam; Iwamoto, Yoko; Pringle, Kirsty; Reddington, Carly; Aalto, Pasi; Äijälä, Mikko; Baltensperger, Urs; Bialek, Jakub; Birmili, Wolfram; Bukowiecki, Nicolas; Ehn, Mikael; Fjæraa, Ann Mari; Fiebig, Markus; Frank, Göran; Fröhlich, Roman; Frumau, Arnoud; Furuya, Masaki; Hammer, Emanuel; Heikkinen, Liine; Herrmann, Erik; Holzinger, Rupert; Hyono, Hiroyuki; Kanakidou, Maria; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Kinouchi, Kento; Kos, Gerard P A; Kulmala, Markku; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Motos, Ghislain; Nenes, Athanasios; O'Dowd, Colin; Paramonov, Mikhail; Petäjä, Tuukka; Picard, David; Poulain, Laurent; Prévôt, André Stephan Henry; Slowik, Jay; Sonntag, Andre; Swietlicki, Erik; Svenningsson, Birgitta; Tsurumaru, Hiroshi; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Wittbom, Cerina; Ogren, John A.; Matsuki, Atsushi; Yum, Seong Soo; Myhre, Cathrine Lund; Carslaw, Ken; Stratmann, Frank; Gysel, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) number concentrations alongside with submicrometer particle number size distributions and particle chemical composition have been measured at atmospheric observatories of the Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research InfraStructure (ACTRIS) as well as other

  15. Laboratory studies of the growth, sublimation, and light- scattering properties of single levitated ice particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Neil Julian

    2001-12-01

    I describe experiments to investigate the properties of microscopic ice particles. The goal of the work was to measure parameters that are important in cloud processes and radiative transfer, using a novel technique that avoids the use of substrates. The experiments were conducted in two separate electrodynamic balance chambers. Single, charged ice particles were formed from frost particles or from droplets frozen either homogeneously or heteroge neously with a bionucleant. The particles were trapped at temperatures between -38°C and -4°C and grown or sublimated according to the temperature gradient in the cham ber. I describe observations of breakup of sublimating frost particles, measurements of light scattering by hexagonal crystals, and observations of the morphology of ice particles grown from frozen water droplets and frost particles. The breaking strength of frost particles was an order of magnitude less than that of bulk ice. Light scattering features not previously observed were analyzed and related to crystal dimension. Initial results from a computer model failed to reproduce these features. The widths of scattering peaks suggest that surface roughness may play a role in determining the angular distribution of scattered light. Ice particle mass evolution was found to be consistent with diffusion- limited growth. Crystals grown slowly from frozen droplets adopted isometric habits, while faster growth resulted in thin side-planes, although there was not an exact correspondence between growth conditions and particle morphology. From the morphological transition, I infer lower limits for the critical supersaturation for layer nucleation on the prism face of 2.4% at -15°C, 4.4% at -20°C, and 3.1% at -25°C. Analytic expressions for the size dependence of facet stability are developed, indicating a strong dependence of stability on both crystal size and surface kinetics, and compared with data. I discuss the role of complex particle morphologies in

  16. Chemical characterization, nano-particle mineralogy and particle size distribution of basalt dust wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalmora, Adilson C. [Laboratory of Environmental Researches and Nanotechnology Development, Centro Universitário La Salle, Mestrado em Avaliação de Impactos Ambientais em Mineração. Victor Barreto, 2288 Centro 92010-000, Canoas, RS (Brazil); Institute for Environmental Assessment and Water Studies (IDÆA), Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), C/Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Ramos, Claudete G.; Oliveira, Marcos L.S. [Laboratory of Environmental Researches and Nanotechnology Development, Centro Universitário La Salle, Mestrado em Avaliação de Impactos Ambientais em Mineração. Victor Barreto, 2288 Centro 92010-000, Canoas, RS (Brazil); Teixeira, Elba C. [Fundação Estadual de Proteção Ambiental Henrique Luis Roessler, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Kautzmann, Rubens M.; Taffarel, Silvio R. [Laboratory of Environmental Researches and Nanotechnology Development, Centro Universitário La Salle, Mestrado em Avaliação de Impactos Ambientais em Mineração. Victor Barreto, 2288 Centro 92010-000, Canoas, RS (Brazil); Brum, Irineu A.S. de [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Escola de Engenharia, Departamento de Metalurgia, Centro de Tecnologia, Av. Bento Gonçalves, 9500. Bairro Agronomia. CEP: 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); and others

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the geochemistry of basalt alteration is central to the study of agriculture systems. Various nano-minerals play an important role in the mobilization of contaminants and their subsequent uptake by plants. We present a new analytical experimental approach in combination with an integrated analytical protocol designed to study basalt alteration processes. Recently, throughout the world, ultra-fine and nano-particles derived from basalt dust wastes (BDW) during “stonemeal” soil fertilizer application have been of great concern for their possible adverse effects on human health and environmental pollution. Samples of BDW utilized were obtained from companies in the Nova Prata mining district in southern Brazil for chemical characterization and nano-mineralogy investigation, using an integrated application of advanced characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS)/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM/EDS), and granulometric distribution analysis. The investigation has revealed that BDW materials are dominated by SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3,} with a complex micromineralogy including alkali feldspar, augite, barite, labradorite, hematite, heulandrite, gypsum, kaolinite, quartz, and smectite. In addition, we have identified a number of trace metals such as Cd, Cu, Cr, and Zn, that are preferentially concentrated into the finer, inhalable, dust fraction and, thus, could present a health hazard in the urban areas around the basalt mining zone. The implication of this observation is that use of these nanometric-sized particulates as soil fertilizer may present different health challenges to those of conventional fertilizers, inviting future work regarding the relative toxicities of these materials. Our investigation on the particle size distribution, nano-particle

  17. Chemical characterization, nano-particle mineralogy and particle size distribution of basalt dust wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalmora, Adilson C.; Ramos, Claudete G.; Oliveira, Marcos L.S.; Teixeira, Elba C.; Kautzmann, Rubens M.; Taffarel, Silvio R.; Brum, Irineu A.S. de

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the geochemistry of basalt alteration is central to the study of agriculture systems. Various nano-minerals play an important role in the mobilization of contaminants and their subsequent uptake by plants. We present a new analytical experimental approach in combination with an integrated analytical protocol designed to study basalt alteration processes. Recently, throughout the world, ultra-fine and nano-particles derived from basalt dust wastes (BDW) during “stonemeal” soil fertilizer application have been of great concern for their possible adverse effects on human health and environmental pollution. Samples of BDW utilized were obtained from companies in the Nova Prata mining district in southern Brazil for chemical characterization and nano-mineralogy investigation, using an integrated application of advanced characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS)/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM/EDS), and granulometric distribution analysis. The investigation has revealed that BDW materials are dominated by SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , and Fe 2 O 3, with a complex micromineralogy including alkali feldspar, augite, barite, labradorite, hematite, heulandrite, gypsum, kaolinite, quartz, and smectite. In addition, we have identified a number of trace metals such as Cd, Cu, Cr, and Zn, that are preferentially concentrated into the finer, inhalable, dust fraction and, thus, could present a health hazard in the urban areas around the basalt mining zone. The implication of this observation is that use of these nanometric-sized particulates as soil fertilizer may present different health challenges to those of conventional fertilizers, inviting future work regarding the relative toxicities of these materials. Our investigation on the particle size distribution, nano-particle mineralogy and chemical

  18. Influence of particle size on physical and sensory attributes of mango pulp powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, M.; Kadam, D. M.; Chadha, S.; Wilson, R. A.; Gupta, R. K.

    2013-09-01

    The present investigation was aimed to observe the effect of particle size on physical, sensory and thermal properties of foam-mat dried mango pulp powder. Mango pulp of Dussehri variety was foam-mat dried using 3% egg white at 65ºC. Dried foam-mats were pulverized and passed through a sieve shaker for obtaining three grades of powder with 50, 60, and 85 mesh size sieves. The particle size of these samples measured using laser diffraction particle size analyzer ranged from 191.26 to 296.19 μm. The data was analysed statistically using ANOVA of SAS. There was a linear increase in lightness (`L' value) with a decrease in particle size, however, `a' value decreased with a decrease in particle size, indicating the decrease in redness. An increase in bulk density and decrease in water solubility index and water absorption index % were observed with a decrease in particle size. Particle size had a significant effect on sensory parameters. Particle size in the range of 258.01 to 264.60μmwas found most acceptable with respect to sensory characteristics. This finding can be exploited for various commercial applicationswhere powder quality is dependent on the particle size and has foremost priority for end users.

  19. Optimizing the particle size of coal for CWM in view of fluidity. [Biomodal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuo, Seiji; Nonaka, Michio; Okano, Yasuhiko; Inoue, Toshio

    1987-10-25

    As is well known, the viscosity of CWM is considerably influenced by the distribution of coal particle sizes and has bearing on particle packing density or porosity. A model for representing the viscosity of CWM in terms of particle porosity and specific surface was designed. Also, experimental verification was conducted for the method of optimizing particle size on a two-stage grinding system. The results are as follows: The viscosity of CWM is influenced not only by the porosity of coal particles, but also by the specific surface; also, it is correlated to the distance between suspended particles. At the two-stage grinding experiments, a particle size distribution leading to a low viscosity was obtained by mixing coarse and fine particles at 4:1. This has demonstrated that the use of an agitating mill for fine particles is of help. (11 figs, 2 tabs, 6 refs)

  20. Acceleration statistics of finite-sized particles in turbulent flow: the role of Faxen forces

    OpenAIRE

    Calzavarini, Enrico; Volk, Romain; Bourgoin, Mickael; Leveque, Emmanuel; Pinton, Jean-Francois; Toschi, Federico

    2008-01-01

    International audience; The dynamics of particles in turbulence when the particle size is larger than the dissipative scale of the carrier flow are studied. Recent experiments have highlighted signatures of particles' finiteness on their statistical properties, namely a decrease of their acceleration variance, an increase of correlation times (at increasing the particles size) and an independence of the probability density function of the acceleration once normalized to their variance. These ...

  1. Element content and particle size characterization of a mussel candidate reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Edson G.; Vasconcellos, Marina B.A.; Santos, Rafaela G. dos; Martinelli, Jose R.

    2011-01-01

    The use of certified reference materials is an important tool in the quality assurance of analytical measurements. To assure reliability on recently prepared powder reference materials, not only the characterization of the property values of interest and their corresponding uncertainties, but also physical properties such as the particle size distribution must be well evaluated. Narrow particle size distributions are preferable than larger ones; as different size particles may have different analyte content. Due to this fact, the segregation of the coarse and the fine particles in a bottle may lead to inhomogeneity of the reference material, which should be avoided. In this study the element content as well as the particle size distribution of a mussel candidate reference material produced at IPEN-CNEN/SP was investigated. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis was applied to the determination of 15 elements in seven fractions of the material with different particle size distributions. Subsamples of the materials were irradiated simultaneously with elemental standards at the IEA-R1 research nuclear reactor and the induced gamma ray energies were measured in a hyperpure germanium detector. Three vials of the candidate reference material and three coarser fractions, collected during the preparation, were analyzed by Laser Diffraction Particle Analysis to determine the particle size distribution. Differences on element content were detected for fractions with different particle size distribution, indicating the importance of particle size control for biological reference materials. From the particle size analysis, Gaussian particle size distribution was observed for the candidate reference material with mean particle size μ = 94.6 ± 0.8 μm. (author)

  2. Collective and single-particle states at high excitation energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Berg, A.M.; Van der Molen, H.K.T.; Harakeh, M.N.; Akimune, H.; Daito, I.; Fujimura, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Ihara, F.; Inomata, T.

    2000-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Damping of high-lying single-particle states was investigated by the study of proton decay from high-lying states in 91 Nb, populated by the 90 Zr(α,t) reaction with E α = 180 MeV. In addition to decay to the ground state of 90 Zr, semi-direct decay was observed to the low-lying (2 + and 3 - ) phonon states, confirming the conclusion from other experiments that these phonon states play an important role in the damping process of the single-particle states. Furthermore, the population and decay of Isobaric Analogue States of 91 Zr, which are located at an excitation energy of about 10 - 12 MeV in 91 Nb, has been studied in the same reaction. (author)

  3. Ultrasound Assisted Particle Size Control by Continuous Seed Generation and Batch Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Jordens, Jeroen; Canini, Enio; Gielen, Bjorn; Van Gerven, Tom; Braeken, Leen

    2017-01-01

    Controlling particle size is essential for crystal quality in the chemical and pharmaceutical industry. Several articles illustrate the potential of ultrasound to tune this particle size during the crystallization process. This paper investigates how ultrasound can control the particle size distribution (PSD) of acetaminophen crystals by continuous seed generation in a tubular crystallizer followed by batch growth. It is demonstrated that the supersaturation ratio at which ultrasound starts s...

  4. Lattice Constant Dependence on Particle Size for Ceria prepared from a Citrate Sol-Gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, V N; Farrell, R A; Sexton, A M; Morris, M A

    2006-01-01

    High surface area ceria nanoparticles have been prepared using a citrate solgel precipitation method. Changes to the particle size have been made by calcining the ceria powders at different temperatures, and X-ray methods used to determine their lattice parameters. The particle sizes have been assessed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the lattice parameter found to fall with decreasing particle size. The results are discussed in the light of the role played by surface tension effects

  5. Spin resonance strength calculation through single particle tracking for RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dutheil, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Huang, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Meot, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ranjbar, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    The strengths of spin resonances for the polarized-proton operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider are currently calculated with the code DEPOL, which numerically integrates through the ring based on an analytical approximate formula. In this article, we test a new way to calculate the spin resonance strengths by performing Fourier transformation to the actual transverse magnetic fields seen by a single particle traveling through the ring. Comparison of calculated spin resonance strengths is made between this method and DEPOL.

  6. Microcavity single virus detection and sizing with molecular sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantham, V. R.; Holler, S.; Kolchenko, V.; Wan, Z.; Arnold, S.

    2013-02-01

    We report the label-free detection and sizing of the smallest individual RNA virus, MS2 by a spherical microcavity. Mass of this virus is ~6 ag and produces a theoretical resonance shift ~0.25 fm upon adsorbing an individual virus at the equator of the bare microcavity, which is well below the r.m.s background noise of 2 fm. However, detection was accomplished with ease (S/N = 8, Q = 4x105) using a single dipole stimulated plasmonic-nanoshell as a microcavity wavelength shift enhancer. Analytical expressions based on the "reactive sensing principle" are developed to extract the radius of the virus from the measured signals. Estimated limit of detection for these experiments was ~0.4 ag or 240 kDa below the size of all known viruses, largest globular and elongated proteins [Phosphofructokinase (345 kDa) and Fibrinogen (390 kDa), respectively].

  7. Effect of Particle Size Distribution on Slurry Rheology: Nuclear Waste Simulant Slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Jaehun; Oh, Takkeun; Luna, Maria L.; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Controlling the rheological properties of slurries has been of great interest in various industries such as cosmetics, ceramic processing, and nuclear waste treatment. Many physicochemical parameters, such as particle size, pH, ionic strength, and mass/volume fraction of particles, can influence the rheological properties of slurry. Among such parameters, the particle size distribution of slurry would be especially important for nuclear waste treatment because most nuclear waste slurries show a broad particle size distribution. We studied the rheological properties of several different low activity waste nuclear simulant slurries having different particle size distributions under high salt and high pH conditions. Using rheological and particle size analysis, it was found that the percentage of colloid-sized particles in slurry appears to be a key factor for rheological characteristics and the efficiency of rheological modifiers. This behavior was shown to be coupled with an existing electrostatic interaction between particles under a low salt concentration. Our study suggests that one may need to implement the particle size distribution as a critical factor to understand and control rheological properties in nuclear waste treatment plants, such as the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford and Savannah River sites, because the particle size distributions significantly vary over different types of nuclear waste slurries.

  8. Performance of diethylene glycol-based particle counters in the sub-3 nm size range

    CERN Document Server

    Wimmer, D; Franchin, A; Kangasluoma, J; Kreissl, F; Kürten, A; Kupc, A; Metzger, A; Mikkilä, J; Petäjä, J; Riccobono, F; Vanhanen, J; Kulmala, M; Curtius, J

    2013-01-01

    When studying new particle formation, the uncertainty in determining the "true" nucleation rate is considerably reduced when using condensation particle counters (CPCs) capable of measuring concentrations of aerosol particles at sizes close to or even at the critical cluster size (1–2 nm). Recently, CPCs able to reliably detect particles below 2 nm in size and even close to 1 nm became available. Using these instruments, the corrections needed for calculating nucleation rates are substantially reduced compared to scaling the observed formation rate to the nucleation rate at the critical cluster size. However, this improved instrumentation requires a careful characterization of their cut-off size and the shape of the detection efficiency curve because relatively small shifts in the cut-off size can translate into larger relative errors when measuring particles close to the cut-off size. Here we describe the development of two continuous-flow CPCs using diethylene glycol (DEG) as the working fluid. The desig...

  9. Single-Molecule Fluorescence Microscopy Reveals Local Diffusion Coefficients in the Pore Network of an Individual Catalyst Particle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Frank|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412642697; Meirer, Florian; Kubarev, Alexey V.; Ristanovic, Zoran|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/328233005; Roeffaers, Maarten B J; Vogt, Eelco T. C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073717398; Bruijnincx, Pieter C. A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/33799529X; Weckhuysen, Bert M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    2017-01-01

    We used single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to study self-diffusion of a feedstock-like probe molecule with nanometer accuracy in the macropores of a micrometer-sized, real-life fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) particle. Movies of single fluorescent molecules allowed their movement through the

  10. On the functional form of particle number size distributions: influence of particle source and meteorological variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugerone, Katia; De Michele, Carlo; Ghezzi, Antonio; Gianelle, Vorne; Gilardoni, Stefania

    2018-04-01

    Particle number size distributions (PNSDs) have been collected periodically in the urban area of Milan, Italy, during 2011 and 2012 in winter and summer months. Moreover, comparable PNSD measurements were carried out in the rural mountain site of Oga-San Colombano (2250 m a.s.l.), Italy, during February 2005 and August 2011. The aerosol data have been measured through the use of optical particle counters in the size range 0.3-25 µm, with a time resolution of 1 min. The comparison of the PNSDs collected in the two sites has been done in terms of total number concentration, showing higher numbers in Milan (often exceeding 103 cm-3 in winter season) compared to Oga-San Colombano (not greater than 2×102 cm-3), as expected. The skewness-kurtosis plane has been used in order to provide a synoptic view, and select the best distribution family describing the empirical PNSD pattern. The four-parameter Johnson system-bounded distribution (called Johnson SB or JSB) has been tested for this aim, due to its great flexibility and ability to assume different shapes. The PNSD pattern has been found to be generally invariant under site and season changes. Nevertheless, several PNSDs belonging to the Milan winter season (generally more than 30 %) clearly deviate from the standard empirical pattern. The seasonal increase in the concentration of primary aerosols due to combustion processes in winter and the influence of weather variables throughout the year, such as precipitation and wind speed, could be considered plausible explanations of PNSD dynamics.

  11. Superselective Particle Embolization Enhances Efficacy of Radiofrequency Ablation: Effects of Particle Size and Sequence of Action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Toshihiro; Isfort, Peter; Braunschweig, Till; Westphal, Saskia; Woitok, Anna; Penzkofer, Tobias; Bruners, Philipp; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the effects of particle size and course of action of superselective bland transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) on the efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Methods. Twenty pigs were divided into five groups: group 1a, 40-μm bland TAE before RFA; group 1b, 40-μm bland TAE after RFA; group 2a, 250-μm bland TAE before RFA; group 2b, 250-μm bland TAE after RFA and group 3, RFA alone. A total of 40 treatments were performed with a combined CT and angiography system. The sizes of the treated zones were measured from contrast-enhanced CTs on days 1 and 28. Animals were humanely killed, and the treated zones were examined pathologically. Results. There were no complications during procedures and follow-up. The short-axis diameter of the ablation zone in group 1a (mean ± standard deviation, 3.19 ± 0.39 cm) was significantly larger than in group 1b (2.44 ± 0.52 cm; P = 0.021), group 2a (2.51 ± 0.32 cm; P = 0.048), group 2b (2.19 ± 0.44 cm; P = 0.02), and group 3 (1.91 ± 0.55 cm; P 3 ). At histology, 40-μm microspheres were observed to occlude smaller and more distal arteries than 250-μm microspheres. Conclusion. Bland TAE is more effective before RFA than postablation embolization. The use of very small 40-μm microspheres enhances the efficacy of RFA more than the use of larger particles.

  12. Fragmentation of single-particle states in deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malov, L.A.; Soloviev, V.G.

    1975-01-01

    Fragmentation of single-particle states on levels of deformed nuclei is studied on the example of 239 U and 169 Er nuclei in the framework of the model taking into consideration the interaction of quasiparticles with phonons. The dependence of fragmentation on the Fermi surface is considered from the viewpoint of single-particle levels. It is shown that in the distribution of single-particle strength functions a second maximum appears together with the large asymmetry maximum at high-energy excitation, and the distribution has a long ''tail''. A semimicroscopic approach is proposed for calculating the neutron strength functions. The following values of the strength functions are obtained: for sub(239)U-Ssub(0)sup(cal)=1.2x10sup(-4), Ssub(1)sup(cal)=2.7x10sub(-4) and for sub(169)Er-Ssub(0)sup(cal)=1.10sup(-4), Ssub(1)sup(cal)=1.2x10sup(-4)

  13. Quantitative determination of carbonaceous particle mixing state in Paris using single particle mass spectrometer and aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, R. M.; Sciare, J.; Poulain, L.; Crippa, M.; Wiedensohler, A.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Sarda-Estève, R.; McGuire, M. L.; Jeong, C.-H.; McGillicuddy, E.; O'Connor, I. P.; Sodeau, J. R.; Evans, G. J.; Wenger, J. C.

    2013-04-01

    Single particle mixing state information can be a powerful tool for assessing the relative impact of local and regional sources of ambient particulate matter in urban environments. However, quantitative mixing state data are challenging to obtain using single particle mass spectrometers. In this study, the quantitative chemical composition of carbonaceous single particles has been estimated using an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) as part of the MEGAPOLI 2010 winter campaign in Paris, France. Relative peak areas of marker ions for elemental carbon (EC), organic aerosol (OA), ammonium, nitrate, sulphate and potassium were compared with concurrent measurements from an Aerodyne high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS), a thermal/optical OCEC analyser and a particle into liquid sampler coupled with ion chromatography (PILS-IC). ATOFMS-derived mass concentrations reproduced the variability of these species well (R2 = 0.67-0.78), and ten discrete mixing states for carbonaceous particles were identified and quantified. Potassium content was used to identify particles associated with biomass combustion. The chemical mixing state of HR-ToF-AMS organic aerosol factors, resolved using positive matrix factorization, was also investigated through comparison with the ATOFMS dataset. The results indicate that hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) detected in Paris is associated with two EC-rich mixing states which differ in their relative sulphate content, while fresh biomass burning OA (BBOA) is associated with two mixing states which differ significantly in their OA/EC ratios. Aged biomass burning OA (OOA2-BBOA) was found to be significantly internally mixed with nitrate, while secondary, oxidized OA (OOA) was associated with five particle mixing states, each exhibiting different relative secondary inorganic ion content. Externally mixed secondary organic aerosol was not observed. These findings demonstrate the heterogeneity of primary and

  14. Effect of particle-size dynamics on properties of dense spongy-particle systems: Approach towards equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhari, Monica E. A.; Anderson, Patrick D.; Hütter, Markus

    2017-07-01

    Open-porous deformable particles, often envisaged as sponges, are ubiquitous in biological and industrial systems (e.g., casein micelles in dairy products and microgels in cosmetics). The rich behavior of these suspensions is owing to the elasticity of the supporting network of the particle, and the viscosity of permeating solvent. Therefore, the rate-dependent size change of these particles depends on their structure, i.e., the permeability. This work aims at investigating the effect of the particle-size dynamics and the underlying particle structure, i.e., the particle permeability, on the transient and long-time behavior of suspensions of spongy particles in the absence of applied deformation, using the dynamic two-scale model developed by Hütter et al. [Farad. Discuss. 158, 407 (2012), 10.1039/c2fd20025b]. In the high-density limit, the transient behavior is found to be accelerated by the particle-size dynamics, even at average size changes as small as 1 % . The accelerated dynamics is evidenced by (i) the higher short-time diffusion coefficient as compared to elastic-particle systems and (ii) the accelerated formation of the stable fcc crystal structure. Furthermore, after long times, the particle-size dynamics of spongy particles is shown to result in lower stationary values of the energy and normal stresses as compared to elastic-particle systems. This dependence of the long-time behavior of these systems on the permeability, that essentially is a transport coefficient and hence must not affect the equilibrium properties, confirms that full equilibration has not been reached.

  15. Single-particle characterization of the high-Arctic summertime aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sierau

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Single-particle mass-spectrometric measurements were carried out in the high Arctic north of 80° during summer 2008. The campaign took place onboard the icebreaker Oden and was part of the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS. The instrument deployed was an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS that provides information on the chemical composition of individual particles and their mixing state in real time. Aerosols were sampled in the marine boundary layer at stations in the open ocean, in the marginal ice zone, and in the pack ice region. The largest fraction of particles detected for subsequent analysis in the size range of the ATOFMS between approximately 200 and 3000 nm in diameter showed mass-spectrometric patterns, indicating an internal mixing state and a biomass burning and/or biofuel source. The majority of these particles were connected to an air mass layer of elevated particle concentration mixed into the surface mixed layer from the upper part of the marine boundary layer. The second largest fraction was represented by sea salt particles. The chemical analysis of the over-ice sea salt aerosol revealed tracer compounds that reflect chemical aging of the particles during their long-range advection from the marginal ice zone, or open waters south thereof prior to detection at the ship. From our findings we conclude that long-range transport of particles is one source of aerosols in the high Arctic. To assess the importance of long-range particle sources for aerosol–cloud interactions over the inner Arctic in comparison to local and regional biogenic primary aerosol sources, the chemical composition of the detected particles was analyzed for indicators of marine biological origin. Only a minor fraction showed chemical signatures of potentially ocean-derived primary particles of that kind. However, a chemical bias in the ATOFMS's detection capabilities observed during ASCOS might suggest the presence of a particle type of

  16. Measurement of ambient aerosols in northern Mexico City by single particle mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Moffet

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Continuous ambient measurements with aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS were made in an industrial/residential section in the northern part of Mexico City as part of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area-2006 campaign (MCMA-2006. Results are presented for the period of 15–27 March 2006. The submicron size mode contained both fresh and aged biomass burning, aged organic carbon (OC mixed with nitrate and sulfate, elemental carbon (EC, nitrogen-organic carbon, industrial metal, and inorganic NaK inorganic particles. Overall, biomass burning and aged OC particle types comprised 40% and 31%, respectively, of the submicron mode. In contrast, the supermicron mode was dominated by inorganic NaK particle types (42% which represented a mixture of dry lake bed dust and industrial NaK emissions mixed with soot. Additionally, aluminosilicate dust, transition metals, OC, and biomass burning contributed to the supermicron particles. Early morning periods (2–6 a.m. showed high fractions of inorganic particles from industrial sources in the northeast, composed of internal mixtures of Pb, Zn, EC and Cl, representing up to 73% of the particles in the 0.2–3μm size range. A unique nitrogen-containing organic carbon (NOC particle type, peaking in the early morning hours, was hypothesized to be amines from local industrial emissions based on the time series profile and back trajectory analysis. A strong dependence on wind speed and direction was observed in the single particle types that were present during different times of the day. The early morning (3:30–10 a.m. showed the greatest contributions from industrial emissions. During mid to late mornings (7–11 a.m., weak northerly winds were observed along with the most highly aged particles. Stronger winds from the south picked up in the late morning (after 11 a.m., resulting in a decrease in the concentrations of the major aged particle types and an increase in the number fraction of fresh

  17. Single-particle characterization of the high-Arctic summertime aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierau, B.; Chang, R. Y.-W.; Leck, C.; Paatero, J.; Lohmann, U.

    2014-07-01

    Single-particle mass-spectrometric measurements were carried out in the high Arctic north of 80° during summer 2008. The campaign took place onboard the icebreaker Oden and was part of the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS). The instrument deployed was an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) that provides information on the chemical composition of individual particles and their mixing state in real time. Aerosols were sampled in the marine boundary layer at stations in the open ocean, in the marginal ice zone, and in the pack ice region. The largest fraction of particles detected for subsequent analysis in the size range of the ATOFMS between approximately 200 and 3000 nm in diameter showed mass-spectrometric patterns, indicating an internal mixing state and a biomass burning and/or biofuel source. The majority of these particles were connected to an air mass layer of elevated particle concentration mixed into the surface mixed layer from the upper part of the marine boundary layer. The second largest fraction was represented by sea salt particles. The chemical analysis of the over-ice sea salt aerosol revealed tracer compounds that reflect chemical aging of the particles during their long-range advection from the marginal ice zone, or open waters south thereof prior to detection at the ship. From our findings we conclude that long-range transport of particles is one source of aerosols in the high Arctic. To assess the importance of long-range particle sources for aerosol-cloud interactions over the inner Arctic in comparison to local and regional biogenic primary aerosol sources, the chemical composition of the detected particles was analyzed for indicators of marine biological origin. Only a minor fraction showed chemical signatures of potentially ocean-derived primary particles of that kind. However, a chemical bias in the ATOFMS's detection capabilities observed during ASCOS might suggest the presence of a particle type of unknown composition

  18. Evaluation of instruments used in particle size analysis by using the sedimentation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmasry, M.A.A.; Abdrahman, A.A.M.; Ahmed, A.Z.

    2007-01-01

    This study is carried out to evaluate the performance of some instruments in which the sedimentation technique is used for the determination of particle size distribution using Stoke's law. A mathematical formula has been developed to calculate the particle size distribution for different cases and the results were compared to the real ones. The results revealed unsatisfactory agreement between the calculated and the measured values. In addition, illogic results were obtained indicating that the instruments in which the sedimentation technique is used are not the proper ones to provide accurate measurements except for mono particle size cases. More above, the results obtained represent the sedimentation rate but not the particle size distribution.

  19. Polydisperse-particle-size-distribution function determined from intensity profile of angularly scattered light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alger, T.W.

    1979-01-01

    A new method for determining the particle-size-distribution function of a polydispersion of spherical particles is presented. The inversion technique for the particle-size-distribution function is based upon matching the measured intensity profile of angularly scattered light with a summation of the intensity contributions of a series of appropriately spaced, narrowband, size-distribution functions. A numerical optimization technique is used to determine the strengths of the individual bands that yield the best agreement with the measured scattered-light-intensity profile. Because Mie theory is used, the method is applicable to spherical particles of all sizes. Several numerical examples demonstrate the application of this inversion method

  20. The effects of particle size distribution and induced unpinning during grain growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, G.S.; Rickman, J.M.; Harmer, M.P.; Holm, E.A.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of a second-phase particle size distribution on grain boundary pinning was studied using a Monte Carlo simulation technique. Simulations were run using a constant number density of both whisker and rhombohedral particles, and the effect of size distribution was studied by varying the standard deviation of the distribution around a constant mean particle size. The results of present simulations indicate that, in accordance with the stereological assumption of the topological pinning model, changes in distribution width had no effect on the pinned grain size. The effect of induced unpinning of particles on microstructure was also studied. In contrast to predictions of the topological pinning model, a power law dependence of pinned grain size on particle size was observed at T=0.0. Based on this, a systematic deviation to the stereological predictions of the topological pinning model is observed. The results of simulations at higher temperatures indicate an increasing power law dependence of pinned grain size on particle size, with the slopes of the power law dependencies fitting an Arrhenius relation. The effect of induced unpinning of particles was also studied in order to obtain a correlation between particle/boundary concentration and equilibrium grain size. The results of simulations containing a constant number density of monosized rhombohedral particles suggest a strong power law correlation between the two parameters. copyright 1996 Materials Research Society

  1. Estimation of particle size distribution of nanoparticles from electrical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2018-02-02

    Feb 2, 2018 ... An indirect method of estimation of size distribution of nanoparticles in a nanocomposite is ... The present approach exploits DC electrical current–voltage ... the sizes of nanoparticles (NPs) by electrical characterization.

  2. Quantum private comparison with d-level single-particle states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Chao-Hua; Guo, Gong-De; Lin, Song

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a quantum private comparison protocol with d-level single-particle states is proposed. In the protocol, a semi-honest third party is introduced to help two participants compare the size relationship of their secrets without revealing them to any other people. It is shown that the protocol is secure in theory. Moreover, the security of the protocol in real circumstance is also discussed. (paper)

  3. Size-segregated compositional analysis of aerosol particles collected in the European Arctic during the ACCACIA campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Young

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Single-particle compositional analysis of filter samples collected on board the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM BAe-146 aircraft is presented for six flights during the springtime Aerosol–Cloud Coupling and Climate Interactions in the Arctic (ACCACIA campaign (March–April 2013. Scanning electron microscopy was utilised to derive size-segregated particle compositions and size distributions, and these were compared to corresponding data from wing-mounted optical particle counters. Reasonable agreement between the calculated number size distributions was found. Significant variability in composition was observed, with differing external and internal mixing identified, between air mass trajectory cases based on HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT analyses. Dominant particle classes were silicate-based dusts and sea salts, with particles notably rich in K and Ca detected in one case. Source regions varied from the Arctic Ocean and Greenland through to northern Russia and the European continent. Good agreement between the back trajectories was mirrored by comparable compositional trends between samples. Silicate dusts were identified in all cases, and the elemental composition of the dust was consistent for all samples except one. It is hypothesised that long-range, high-altitude transport was primarily responsible for this dust, with likely sources including the Asian arid regions.

  4. Limitations in the Use of Unipolar Charging for Electrical Mobility Sizing Instruments: A Study of the Fast Mobility Particle Sizer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin, Marcus; Gudmundsson, A.; Pagels, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    concentrations. The results show that all three sizing-instruments agree well for particle sizes below 200nm, both in terms of size and number concentration, but the FMPS deviates clearly when particle sizes exceed 200nm. Above this, the FMPS underestimates the particle size throughout the remainder of the size...

  5. Testosterone sorption and desorption: Effects of soil particle size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Yong, E-mail: yqi01@unomaha.edu [Civil Engineering Dept., University of Nebraska-Lincoln at Omaha Campus, Omaha, NE 68182 (United States); Zhang, Tian C. [Civil Engineering Dept., University of Nebraska-Lincoln at Omaha Campus, Omaha, NE 68182 (United States); Ren, Yongzheng [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Smaller soil particles have higher sorption and lower desorption rates. • The sorption capacity ranks as clay > silt > sand. • Small particles like clays have less potential for desorption. • Colloids (clays) have high potential to facilitate the transport of hormones in soil–water environments. - Abstract: Soils contain a wide range of particles of different diameters with different mobility during rainfall events. Effects of soil particles on sorption and desorption behaviors of steroid hormones have not been investigated. In this study, wet sieve washing and repeated sedimentation methods were used to fractionate the soils into five ranges. The sorption and desorption properties and related mechanisms of testosterone in batch reactors filled with fractionated soil particles were evaluated. Results of sorption and desorption kinetics indicate that small soil particles have higher sorption and lower desorption rates than that of big ones. Thermodynamic results show the sorption processes are spontaneous and exothermal. The sorption capacity ranks as clay > silt > sand, depending mainly on specific surface area and surface functional groups. The urea control test shows that hydrogen bonding contributes to testosterone sorption onto clay and silt but not on sand. Desorption tests indicate sorption is 36–65% irreversible from clay to sand. Clays have highest desorption hysteresis among these five soil fractions, indicating small particles like clays have less potential for desorption. The results provide indirect evidence on the colloid (clay)-facilitated transport of hormones (micro-pollutants) in soil environments.

  6. Simultaneous velocity and particle size measurement in two phase flows by Laser Anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungut, A.; Yule, A. J.; Taylor, D. S.; Chigier, N. A.

    1978-01-01

    A technique for particle size measurement by using Laser Doppler Anemometry is discussed. An additional gate photomultiplier has been introduced at right angles to the optical axis in order to select only those particles passing through the central region of the measurement control volume. Particle sizing measurements have been made in sprays of glass particles using the modified Laser Anemometry system. Measurements in fuel sprays are also reported and compared with the results obtained by a photographic technique. The application of the particle sizing technique to opaque particles is investigated and suitable optical arrangements are suggested. Light scattering characteristics of Laser Anemometry systems for different optical geometries are calculated to select the optimum optical arrangement for the particle sizing measurements.

  7. Single-particle characterization of ice-nucleating particles and ice particle residuals sampled by three different techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worringen, A.; Kandler, K.; Benker, N.; Dirsch, T.; Mertes, S.; Schenk, L.; Kästner, U.; Frank, F.; Nillius, B.; Bundke, U.; Rose, D.; Curtius, J.; Kupiszewski, P.; Weingartner, E.; Vochezer, P.; Schneider, J.; Schmidt, S.; Weinbruch, S.; Ebert, M.

    2015-04-01

    In the present work, three different techniques to separate ice-nucleating particles (INPs) as well as ice particle residuals (IPRs) from non-ice-active particles are compared. The Ice Selective Inlet (ISI) and the Ice Counterflow Virtual Impactor (Ice-CVI) sample ice particles from mixed-phase clouds and allow after evaporation in the instrument for the analysis of the residuals. The Fast Ice Nucleus Chamber (FINCH) coupled with the Ice Nuclei Pumped Counterflow Virtual Impactor (IN-PCVI) provides ice-activating conditions to aerosol particles and extracts the activated particles for analysis. The instruments were run during a joint field campaign which took place in January and February 2013 at the High Alpine Research Station Jungfraujoch (Switzerland). INPs and IPRs were analyzed offline by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis to determine their size, chemical composition and mixing state. Online analysis of the size and chemical composition of INP activated in FINCH was performed by laser ablation mass spectrometry. With all three INP/IPR separation techniques high abundances (median 20-70%) of instrumental contamination artifacts were observed (ISI: Si-O spheres, probably calibration aerosol; Ice-CVI: Al-O particles; FINCH + IN-PCVI: steel particles). After removal of the instrumental contamination particles, silicates, Ca-rich particles, carbonaceous material and metal oxides were the major INP/IPR particle types obtained by all three techniques. In addition, considerable amounts (median abundance mostly a few percent) of soluble material (e.g., sea salt, sulfates) were observed. As these soluble particles are often not expected to act as INP/IPR, we consider them as potential measurement artifacts. Minor types of INP/IPR include soot and Pb-bearing particles. The Pb-bearing particles are mainly present as an internal mixture with other particle types. Most samples showed a maximum of the INP/IPR size distribution at 200

  8. Effect of particle size and morphology on the properties of luminescence in ZnWO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisitsyn, V.M.; Valiev, D.T.; Tupitsyna, I.A.; Polisadova, E.F.; Oleshko, V.I.; Lisitsyna, L.A.; Andryuschenko, L.A.; Yakubovskaya, A.G.; Vovk, O.M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated pulsed photoluminescence and pulsed cathodoluminescence in ZnWO 4 crystals and composite materials based on dispersed powders of zinc tungstate in the polymer matrix. It is shown that the size of crystal particles affects the luminescence decay time in excitation by electron and laser radiation. The decay time obtained for the composite material with nanoparticles 25 nm and 100 nm in size is equal to 5 µs and 7 µs, respectively. Relative values of the light yield of composite containing zinc tungstate crystals in the form of rods are found to be larger in comparison with crystallites in the form of grains. The mechanisms of luminescence recombination in laser and electron excitation are discussed. - Highlights: • Pulsed photoluminescence and pulsed cathodoluminescence spectra and decay kinetics of nano- and microcrystals of zinc tungstate in the organosilicic matrix compared to a single crystal were studied. • The luminescence decay kinetics and life-time of the excited state depend on the size of particles in the composite materials and on the type of excitation. • The probability of excitation of luminescence centers responsible for the band at 490 nm is higher which is apparently due to the larger capture cross-section and quantum yield

  9. Particles size distribution effect on 3D packing of nanoparticles in to a bounded region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farzalipour Tabriz, M.; Salehpoor, P.; Esmaielzadeh Kandjani, A.; Vaezi, M. R.; Sadrnezhaad, S. K.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of two different Particle Size Distributions on packing behavior of ideal rigid spherical nanoparticles using a novel packing model based on parallel algorithms have been reported. A mersenne twister algorithm was used to generate pseudo random numbers for the particles initial coordinates. Also, for this purpose a nano sized tetragonal confined container with a square floor (300 * 300 nm) were used in this work. The Andreasen and the Lognormal Particle Size Distributions were chosen to investigate the packing behavior in a 3D bounded region. The effects of particle numbers on packing behavior of these two Particle Size Distributions have been investigated. Also the reproducibility and the distribution of packing factor of these Particle Size Distributions were compared

  10. Size-selective separation of submicron particles in suspensions with ultrasonic atomization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nii, Susumu; Oka, Naoyoshi

    2014-11-01

    Aqueous suspensions containing silica or polystyrene latex were ultrasonically atomized for separating particles of a specific size. With the help of a fog involving fine liquid droplets with a narrow size distribution, submicron particles in a limited size-range were successfully separated from suspensions. Performance of the separation was characterized by analyzing the size and the concentration of collected particles with a high resolution method. Irradiation of 2.4MHz ultrasound to sample suspensions allowed the separation of particles of specific size from 90 to 320nm without regarding the type of material. Addition of a small amount of nonionic surfactant, PONPE20 to SiO2 suspensions enhanced the collection of finer particles, and achieved a remarkable increase in the number of collected particles. Degassing of the sample suspension resulted in eliminating the separation performance. Dissolved air in suspensions plays an important role in this separation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of fuel particle size distributions on neutron transport in stochastic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Chao; Pavlou, Andrew T.; Ji, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Effects of fuel particle size distributions on neutron transport are evaluated. • Neutron channeling is identified as the fundamental reason for the effects. • The effects are noticeable at low packing and low optical thickness systems. • Unit cells of realistic reactor designs are studied for different size particles. • Fuel particle size distribution effects are not negligible in realistic designs. - Abstract: This paper presents a study of the fuel particle size distribution effects on neutron transport in three-dimensional stochastic media. Particle fuel is used in gas-cooled nuclear reactor designs and innovative light water reactor designs loaded with accident tolerant fuel. Due to the design requirements and fuel fabrication limits, the size of fuel particles may not be perfectly constant but instead follows a certain distribution. This brings a fundamental question to the radiation transport computation community: how does the fuel particle size distribution affect the neutron transport in particle fuel systems? To answer this question, size distribution effects and their physical interpretations are investigated by performing a series of neutron transport simulations at different fuel particle size distributions. An eigenvalue problem is simulated in a cylindrical container consisting of fissile fuel particles with five different size distributions: constant, uniform, power, exponential and Gaussian. A total of 15 parametric cases are constructed by altering the fissile particle volume packing fraction and its optical thickness, but keeping the mean chord length of the spherical fuel particle the same at different size distributions. The tallied effective multiplication factor (k eff ) and the spatial distribution of fission power density along axial and radial directions are compared between different size distributions. At low packing fraction and low optical thickness, the size distribution shows a noticeable effect on neutron

  12. Single-particle characterization of ice-nucleating particles and ice particles residuals sampled by three different techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandler, Konrad; Worringen, Annette; Benker, Nathalie; Dirsch, Thomas; Mertes, Stephan; Schenk, Ludwig; Kästner, Udo; Frank, Fabian; Nillius, Björn; Bundke, Ulrich; Rose, Diana; Curtius, Joachim; Kupiszewski, Piotr; Weingartner, Ernest; Vochezer, Paul; Schneider, Johannes; Schmidt, Susan; Weinbruch, Stephan; Ebert, Martin

    2015-04-01

    During January/February 2013, at the High Alpine Research Station Jungfraujoch a measurement campaign was carried out, which was centered on atmospheric ice-nucleating particles (INP) and ice particle residuals (IPR). Three different techniques for separation of INP and IPR from the non-ice-active particles are compared. The Ice Selective Inlet (ISI) and the Ice Counterflow Virtual Impactor (Ice-CVI) sample ice particles from mixed phase clouds and allow for the analysis of the residuals. The combination of the Fast Ice Nucleus Chamber (FINCH) and the Ice Nuclei Pumped Counterflow Virtual Impactor (IN-PCVI) provides ice-activating conditions to aerosol particles and extracts the activated INP for analysis. Collected particles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis to determine size, chemical composition and mixing state. All INP/IPR-separating techniques had considerable abundances (median 20 - 70 %) of instrumental contamination artifacts (ISI: Si-O spheres, probably calibration aerosol; Ice-CVI: Al-O particles; FINCH+IN-PCVI: steel particles). Also, potential sampling artifacts (e.g., pure soluble material) occurred with a median abundance of separated by all three techniques. Soot was a minor contributor. Lead was detected in less than 10 % of the particles, of which the majority were internal mixtures with other particle types. Sea-salt and sulfates were identified by all three methods as INP/IPR. Most samples showed a maximum of the INP/IPR size distribution at 400 nm geometric diameter. In a few cases, a second super-micron maximum was identified. Soot/carbonaceous material and metal oxides were present mainly in the submicron range. ISI and FINCH yielded silicates and Ca-rich particles mainly with diameters above 1 µm, while the Ice-CVI also separated many submicron IPR. As strictly parallel sampling could not be performed, a part of the discrepancies between the different techniques may result from

  13. Particle Sampling and Real Time Size Distribution Measurement in H2/O2/TEOS Diffusion Flame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, K.H.; Jung, C.H.; Choi, M.; Lee, J.S.

    2001-01-01

    Growth characteristics of silica particles have been studied experimentally using in situ particle sampling technique from H 2 /O 2 /Tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) diffusion flame with carefully devised sampling probe. The particle morphology and the size comparisons are made between the particles sampled by the local thermophoretic method from the inside of the flame and by the electrostatic collector sampling method after the dilution sampling probe. The Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) image processed data of these two sampling techniques are compared with Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) measurement. TEM image analysis of two sampling methods showed a good agreement with SMPS measurement. The effects of flame conditions and TEOS flow rates on silica particle size distributions are also investigated using the new particle dilution sampling probe. It is found that the particle size distribution characteristics and morphology are mostly governed by the coagulation process and sintering process in the flame. As the flame temperature increases, the effect of coalescence or sintering becomes an important particle growth mechanism which reduces the coagulation process. However, if the flame temperature is not high enough to sinter the aggregated particles then the coagulation process is a dominant particle growth mechanism. In a certain flame condition a secondary particle formation is observed which results in a bimodal particle size distribution

  14. Quantitative determination of carbonaceous particle mixing state in Paris using single-particle mass spectrometer and aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Healy

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Single-particle mixing state information can be a powerful tool for assessing the relative impact of local and regional sources of ambient particulate matter in urban environments. However, quantitative mixing state data are challenging to obtain using single-particle mass spectrometers. In this study, the quantitative chemical composition of carbonaceous single particles has been determined using an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS as part of the MEGAPOLI 2010 winter campaign in Paris, France. Relative peak areas of marker ions for elemental carbon (EC, organic aerosol (OA, ammonium, nitrate, sulfate and potassium were compared with concurrent measurements from an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS, a thermal–optical OCEC analyser and a particle into liquid sampler coupled with ion chromatography (PILS-IC. ATOFMS-derived estimated mass concentrations reproduced the variability of these species well (R2 = 0.67–0.78, and 10 discrete mixing states for carbonaceous particles were identified and quantified. The chemical mixing state of HR-ToF-AMS organic aerosol factors, resolved using positive matrix factorisation, was also investigated through comparison with the ATOFMS dataset. The results indicate that hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA detected in Paris is associated with two EC-rich mixing states which differ in their relative sulfate content, while fresh biomass burning OA (BBOA is associated with two mixing states which differ significantly in their OA / EC ratios. Aged biomass burning OA (OOA2-BBOA was found to be significantly internally mixed with nitrate, while secondary, oxidised OA (OOA was associated with five particle mixing states, each exhibiting different relative secondary inorganic ion content. Externally mixed secondary organic aerosol was not observed. These findings demonstrate the range of primary and secondary organic aerosol mixing states in Paris. Examination of the

  15. Quantitative determination of carbonaceous particle mixing state in Paris using single-particle mass spectrometer and aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, R. M.; Sciare, J.; Poulain, L.; Crippa, M.; Wiedensohler, A.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Sarda-Estève, R.; McGuire, M. L.; Jeong, C.-H.; McGillicuddy, E.; O'Connor, I. P.; Sodeau, J. R.; Evans, G. J.; Wenger, J. C.

    2013-09-01

    Single-particle mixing state information can be a powerful tool for assessing the relative impact of local and regional sources of ambient particulate matter in urban environments. However, quantitative mixing state data are challenging to obtain using single-particle mass spectrometers. In this study, the quantitative chemical composition of carbonaceous single particles has been determined using an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) as part of the MEGAPOLI 2010 winter campaign in Paris, France. Relative peak areas of marker ions for elemental carbon (EC), organic aerosol (OA), ammonium, nitrate, sulfate and potassium were compared with concurrent measurements from an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS), a thermal-optical OCEC analyser and a particle into liquid sampler coupled with ion chromatography (PILS-IC). ATOFMS-derived estimated mass concentrations reproduced the variability of these species well (R2 = 0.67-0.78), and 10 discrete mixing states for carbonaceous particles were identified and quantified. The chemical mixing state of HR-ToF-AMS organic aerosol factors, resolved using positive matrix factorisation, was also investigated through comparison with the ATOFMS dataset. The results indicate that hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) detected in Paris is associated with two EC-rich mixing states which differ in their relative sulfate content, while fresh biomass burning OA (BBOA) is associated with two mixing states which differ significantly in their OA / EC ratios. Aged biomass burning OA (OOA2-BBOA) was found to be significantly internally mixed with nitrate, while secondary, oxidised OA (OOA) was associated with five particle mixing states, each exhibiting different relative secondary inorganic ion content. Externally mixed secondary organic aerosol was not observed. These findings demonstrate the range of primary and secondary organic aerosol mixing states in Paris. Examination of the temporal

  16. Hydrodynamics of multi-sized particles in stable regime of a swirling bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miin, Chin Swee; Sulaiman, Shaharin Anwar; Raghavan, Vijay Raj; Heikal, Morgan Raymond; Naz, Muhammad Yasin [Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Perak (Malaysia)

    2015-11-15

    Using particle imaging velocimetry (PIV), we observed particle motion within the stable operating regime of a swirling fluidized bed with an annular blade distributor. This paper presents velocity profiles of particle flow in an effort to determine effects from blade angle, particle size and shape and bed weight on characteristics of a swirling fluidized bed. Generally, particle velocity increased with airflow rate and shallow bed height, but decreased with bed weight. A 3 .deg. increase in blade angle reduced particle velocity by approximately 18%. In addition, particle shape, size and bed weight affected various characteristics of the swirling regime. Swirling began soon after incipience in the form of a supra-linear curve, which is the characteristic of a swirling regime. The relationship between particle and gas velocities enabled us to predict heat and mass transfer rates between gas and particles.

  17. Magnetic properties in an ash flow tuff with continuous grain size variation: a natural reference for magnetic particle granulometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, J.L.; Jackson, M.J.; Rosenbaum, J.G.; Solheid, P.

    2011-01-01

    The Tiva Canyon Tuff contains dispersed nanoscale Fe-Ti-oxide grains with a narrow magnetic grain size distribution, making it an ideal material in which to identify and study grain-size-sensitive magnetic behavior in rocks. A detailed magnetic characterization was performed on samples from the basal 5 m of the tuff. The magnetic materials in this basal section consist primarily of (low-impurity) magnetite in the form of elongated submicron grains exsolved from volcanic glass. Magnetic properties studied include bulk magnetic susceptibility, frequency-dependent and temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility, anhysteretic remanence acquisition, and hysteresis properties. The combined data constitute a distinct magnetic signature at each stratigraphic level in the section corresponding to different grain size distributions. The inferred magnetic domain state changes progressively upward from superparamagnetic grains near the base to particles with pseudo-single-domain or metastable single-domain characteristics near the top of the sampled section. Direct observations of magnetic grain size confirm that distinct transitions in room temperature magnetic susceptibility and remanence probably denote the limits of stable single-domain behavior in the section. These results provide a unique example of grain-size-dependent magnetic properties in noninteracting particle assemblages over three decades of grain size, including close approximations of ideal Stoner-Wohlfarth assemblages, and may be considered a useful reference for future rock magnetic studies involving grain-size-sensitive properties.

  18. Charged-particle spectroscopy in organic semiconducting single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciavatti, A.; Basiricò, L.; Fraboni, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Sellin, P. J. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Fraleoni-Morgera, A. [ELETTRA-Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14, Km 163.5, Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Department of Engineering and Architecture, University of Trieste, V. Valerio 10, 34100 Trieste (Italy); CNR-Nano S3 Institute, Via Campi 213/A, 41125 Modena (Italy)

    2016-04-11

    The use of organic materials as radiation detectors has grown, due to the easy processability in liquid phase at room temperature and the possibility to cover large areas by means of low cost deposition techniques. Direct charged-particle detectors based on solution-grown Organic Semiconducting Single Crystals (OSSCs) are shown to be capable to detect charged particles in pulse mode, with very good peak discrimination. The direct charged-particle detection in OSSCs has been assessed both in the planar and in the vertical axes, and a digital pulse processing algorithm has been used to perform pulse height spectroscopy and to study the charge collection efficiency as a function of the applied bias voltage. Taking advantage of the charge spectroscopy and the good peak discrimination of pulse height spectra, an Hecht-like behavior of OSSCs radiation detectors is demonstrated. It has been possible to estimate the mobility-lifetime value in organic materials, a fundamental parameter for the characterization of radiation detectors, whose results are equal to μτ{sub coplanar} = (5 .5 ± 0.6 ) × 10{sup −6} cm{sup 2}/V and μτ{sub sandwich} = (1 .9 ± 0.2 ) × 10{sup −6} cm{sup 2}/V, values comparable to those of polycrystalline inorganic detectors. Moreover, alpha particles Time-of-Flight experiments have been carried out to estimate the drift mobility value. The results reported here indicate how charged-particle detectors based on OSSCs possess a great potential as low-cost, large area, solid-state direct detectors operating at room temperature. More interestingly, the good detection efficiency and peak discrimination observed for charged-particle detection in organic materials (hydrogen-rich molecules) are encouraging for their further exploitation in the detection of thermal and high-energy neutrons.

  19. Metal uptake by corn grown on media treated with particle-size fractionated biosolids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Weiping [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)], E-mail: chenweip@yahoo.com.cn; Chang, Andrew C.; Wu, Laosheng [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Zhang, Yongsong [School of Environmental and Natural Resources Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, 31009 (China)

    2008-03-15

    Particle-size of biosolids may affect plant uptake of heavy metals when the biosolids are land applied. In this study, corn (Zea mays L.) was grown on sand media treated with biosolids to study how particle-size of biosolids affected the plant uptake of cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn). Two biosolids, the Nu-Earth biosolids and the Los Angeles biosolids, of dissimilar surface morphology were utilized. The former exhibited a porous and spongy structure and had considerably greater specific surface area than that of the latter, which was granular and blocky. The specific surface area of the Los Angeles biosolids was inversely proportional to its particle-size, while that of Nu-Earth biosolids did not change significantly with particle-size. For each biosolid, the metal concentrations were not affected by particle sizes. The biomass yields of plants grown on the treated media increased as the biosolid particle-size decreased, indicating that plant uptake of nutrients from biosolids was dependent on interactions at the root-biosolids interface. The effect of particle-size on a metal's availability to plants was element-specific. The uptake rate of Cd, Zn, Cu, and Ni was correlated with the surface area of the particles, i.e., smaller particles having higher specific area provided greater root-biosolids contact and resulted in enhanced uptake of Cd and Zn and slightly less increased uptake of Cu and Ni. The particle morphology of biosolids had limited influence on the plant tissue concentrations of Cr and Pb. For both types of biosolids, total metal uptake increased as biosolid particle-size decreased. Our research indicates that biosolid particle-size distribution plays a deciding role in plant uptake of heavy metals when they are land applied.

  20. Effect of particle size on microstructure and mechanical properties of composites produced by ARB process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamaati, Roohollah, E-mail: r.jamaatikenari@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amirkhanlou, Sajjad; Toroghinejad, Mohammad Reza; Niroumand, Behzad [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Microstructure of MMC with larger particles becomes completely uniform, sooner. {yields} When the number of cycles increased, tensile strength for both samples improved. {yields} Up to the seventh cycle, tensile strength of MMC with larger particles was bigger. {yields} First, the tensile elongation of MMCs was decreased, and then it was improved. - Abstract: In the present work, Al/10 vol.% SiC metal matrix composite (MMC) was manufactured by accumulative roll bonding (ARB) process. The silicon carbide particles with two various particle sizes of 40 and 2 {mu}m were used. Effect of particle size on microstructure (by scanning electron microscopy) and mechanical properties (tensile strength and elongation) at various ARB cycles was investigated. It was found that the microstructural evolution in MMC with 40 {mu}m particle size was more salient compared to the MMCs with 2 {mu}m particle size. Also, the composite strip with 40 {mu}m particle size became uniform with high bonding quality and without any porosity sooner than the strip of 2 {mu}m particle size. Moreover, when the number of cycles was increased, the tensile strength for both samples was improved. The tensile strength of the composite strip with 40 {mu}m particle size was more than the composite strip with 2 {mu}m up to the seventh cycle. By increasing the number of cycles after the seventh cycle, the value of tensile strength of MMC with 40 {mu}m particle size became saturated and then decreased, and its tensile strength became less than that of the composite with 2 {mu}m particle size for the ninth and eleventh cycles. Up to the seventh cycle, when the number of ARB cycles was increased, the elongation of composite strips was decreased, but after the ninth cycle, the tensile elongation for both samples was improved.

  1. Effect of particle size on microstructure and mechanical properties of composites produced by ARB process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamaati, Roohollah; Amirkhanlou, Sajjad; Toroghinejad, Mohammad Reza; Niroumand, Behzad

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Microstructure of MMC with larger particles becomes completely uniform, sooner. → When the number of cycles increased, tensile strength for both samples improved. → Up to the seventh cycle, tensile strength of MMC with larger particles was bigger. → First, the tensile elongation of MMCs was decreased, and then it was improved. - Abstract: In the present work, Al/10 vol.% SiC metal matrix composite (MMC) was manufactured by accumulative roll bonding (ARB) process. The silicon carbide particles with two various particle sizes of 40 and 2 μm were used. Effect of particle size on microstructure (by scanning electron microscopy) and mechanical properties (tensile strength and elongation) at various ARB cycles was investigated. It was found that the microstructural evolution in MMC with 40 μm particle size was more salient compared to the MMCs with 2 μm particle size. Also, the composite strip with 40 μm particle size became uniform with high bonding quality and without any porosity sooner than the strip of 2 μm particle size. Moreover, when the number of cycles was increased, the tensile strength for both samples was improved. The tensile strength of the composite strip with 40 μm particle size was more than the composite strip with 2 μm up to the seventh cycle. By increasing the number of cycles after the seventh cycle, the value of tensile strength of MMC with 40 μm particle size became saturated and then decreased, and its tensile strength became less than that of the composite with 2 μm particle size for the ninth and eleventh cycles. Up to the seventh cycle, when the number of ARB cycles was increased, the elongation of composite strips was decreased, but after the ninth cycle, the tensile elongation for both samples was improved.

  2. Method for rapid particle size analysis by hydrosizing and nuclear sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daellenbach, C.B.; Mahan, W.M.

    1977-01-01

    A method and apparatus to practice the method for rapidly determining the size and mass distribution of a sample of randomly sized particles of a known total mass are described. A series of substantially identical hydrocyclones are connected by conduits to each other and to a temperature controlled water feed. By restricting the cross-sectional areas of these conduits to progressively smaller values, the slurry containing the sample particles is caused to increase its velocity as it moves from hydrocyclone to hydrocyclone. As described by the Stokesian theory which relates particle diameter and settling velocity, the largest sized particles are suspended in the closed apex of the first hydrocyclone with smaller sized particles, in given size ranges, being suspended in the next succeeding hydrocyclone's apexes. In this manner, the particles are separated into discrete fractional sizes with a residual slurry of the very smallest particles being discharged. Before the discrete fractions of particles are suspended in their hydrocyclone apexes, a combined photon source, like a gamma ray source, and detector are calibrated with the water temperature kept constant. When the suspension of particles takes place, an attenuation of the radiation from the source is observed at the detector. This attenuation can be related to the mass or weight of the discrete fractions of suspended particles. Electronic circuitry is used to indicate what this fractional mass or weight is as it relates to the total weight of the sample. 6 claims, 4 figs

  3. Effect of particle size on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of alumina suspension in liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Rosado, José Carlos; L'hermite, Daniel; Levi, Yves

    2012-01-01

    The analysis by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) was proposed for the detection and the quantification of different elements in water even when the analyte is composed of particles in suspension. We have studied the effect of particle size on the LIBS signal during liquid analysis. In our study we used different particle sizes (from 2 μm to 90 μm) of Al 2 O 3 in suspension in water. The results were compared to the signal obtained in the case of dissolved aluminum. In the case of particles, a linear correlation between the LIBS signal versus concentration was found but a significant decrease in the slope of the calibration curve was found when the particle size increased. Several hypotheses have been tested and only a partial ablation of the particles might explain this decrease in signal intensity. This effect probably does not occur at smaller particle size. We estimated 860 nm/pulse as ablated thickness from the top of the particle. A statistical analysis over all data obtained allowed us to calculate 100 μm as ablated water column depth. - Highlights: ► We have identified a decrease of calibration curve when particle size increases. ► Partial particle ablation has been identified as the origin of this effect. ► The ablation rate on Al 2 O 3 particles in suspension in water has been estimated. ► We can determine the deepness of the interaction volume into the liquid.

  4. Viscous properties of ferrofluids containing both micrometer-size magnetic particles and fine needle-like particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ido, Yasushi, E-mail: ido.yasushi@nitech.ac.jp [Department of Electric and Mechanical Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya (Japan); Nishida, Hitoshi [Department of Electrical and Control Systems Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Toyama College, 13 Hongo-cho, Toyama (Japan); Iwamoto, Yuhiro [Department of Electric and Mechanical Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya (Japan); Yokoyama, Hiroki [KYB Corporation, 2-4-1 Hamamatsu-cho, Minato-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-06-01

    Ferrofluids containing both micrometer-size spherical magnetic particles and nanometer-size needle-like nonmagnetic hematite particles were newly produced. Average length of long axis of the needle-like nonmagnetic particles was 194 nm and the aspect ratio was 8.3. Shear stress and viscosity were measured using the rheometer with the additional equipment for viscosity measurements in the presence of magnetic field. When the total volume fraction of particles in the fluid is constant (0.30), there is the specific mixing ratio of the particles to increase viscosity of the fluid drastically in the absence of magnetic field due to the percolation phenomenon. The fluid of the specific mixing ratio shows solid-like behavior even in the absence of magnetic field. Mixing the needle-like nonmagnetic particles causes strong yield stress and strong viscous force in the presence of magnetic field. - Highlights: • Viscous properties of new magnetic functional fluids were studied experimentally. • The new fluids contain spherical magnetic particles and needle-like particles. • Percolation occurs in the fluid of specific mixing ratio of particles without field. • The fluid of the specific mixing ratio behaves like solid without field. • Mixing needle-like particles causes strong yield stress of the fluid in the field.

  5. Improved identification of primary biological aerosol particles using single-particle mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Zawadowicz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP, especially at altitudes relevant to cloud formation, are scarce. Single-particle mass spectrometry (SPMS has been used to probe aerosol chemical composition from ground and aircraft for over 20 years. Here we develop a method for identifying bioaerosols (PBAP and particles containing fragments of PBAP as part of an internal mixture using SPMS. We show that identification of bioaerosol using SPMS is complicated because phosphorus-bearing mineral dust and phosphorus-rich combustion by-products such as fly ash produce mass spectra with peaks similar to those typically used as markers for bioaerosol. We have developed a methodology to differentiate and identify bioaerosol using machine learning statistical techniques applied to mass spectra of known particle types. This improved method provides far fewer false positives compared to approaches reported in the literature. The new method was then applied to two sets of ambient data collected at Storm Peak Laboratory and a forested site in Central Valley, California to show that 0.04–2 % of particles in the 200–3000 nm aerodynamic diameter range were identified as bioaerosol. In addition, 36–56 % of particles identified as biological also contained spectral features consistent with mineral dust, suggesting internal dust–biological mixtures.

  6. Two-particle versus three-particle interactions in single ionization of helium by ion impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, M; Moshammer, R; Fischer, D; Ullrich, J

    2004-01-01

    We have performed kinematically complete experiments on single ionization of He by 100 MeV amu -1 C 6+ and 3.6 MeV amu -1 Au 24,53+ impact. By analysing doubly differential cross sections (DDCS) as a function of the momenta of all two-particle sub-systems we studied the importance of two-particle interactions. Furthermore, presenting the squared momenta of all three collision fragments simultaneously in a Dalitz plot, we evaluated the role of three-particle interactions. Finally, both for the DDCS and the Dalitz plots the corresponding correlation function was analysed. While the absolute cross sections confirm that ionization predominantly leads to a momentum exchange between the electron and the recoil-ion, the correlation function reveals strong correlations between the particles of any two-particle sub-system. Three-particle correlations, which are not accounted for by perturbative calculations, are quite significant as well, at least for certain kinematic conditions

  7. Number size distribution of fine and ultrafine fume particles from various welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Peter; Lenz, Klaus; Reisgen, Uwe; Kraus, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Studies in the field of environmental epidemiology indicate that for the adverse effect of inhaled particles not only particle mass is crucial but also particle size is. Ultrafine particles with diameters below 100 nm are of special interest since these particles have high surface area to mass ratio and have properties which differ from those of larger particles. In this paper, particle size distributions of various welding and joining techniques were measured close to the welding process using a fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS). It turned out that welding processes with high mass emission rates (manual metal arc welding, metal active gas welding, metal inert gas welding, metal inert gas soldering, and laser welding) show mainly agglomerated particles with diameters above 100 nm and only few particles in the size range below 50 nm (10 to 15%). Welding processes with low mass emission rates (tungsten inert gas welding and resistance spot welding) emit predominantly ultrafine particles with diameters well below 100 nm. This finding can be explained by considerably faster agglomeration processes in welding processes with high mass emission rates. Although mass emission is low for tungsten inert gas welding and resistance spot welding, due to the low particle size of the fume, these processes cannot be labeled as toxicologically irrelevant and should be further investigated.

  8. Effect of particle size of granules on some mechanical properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Solid dosage forms are invariably multiparticulate systems of heterogenous particle size distribution. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of particle size distribution of paracetamol granules on some tablet mechanical properties of paracetamol tablets. Granules were formed by wet massing paracetamol ...

  9. On the origin of the cobalt particle size effects in Fischer−Tropsch catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Breejen, J.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837318; Radstake, P.B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304829587; Bezemer, G.L.; Bitter, J.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/160581435; Froseth, V.; Holmen, A.; de Jong, K.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06885580X

    2009-01-01

    The effects of metal particle size in catalysis are of prime scientific and industrial importance and call for a better understanding. In this paper the origin of the cobalt particle size effects in Fischer−Tropsch (FT) catalysis was studied. Steady-State Isotopic Transient Kinetic Analysis (SSITKA)

  10. Evaluation of radiocolloids as thrombus imaging agents. Effect of particle size on thrombus uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, S.N.; Bardfeld, P.A.

    1985-01-01

    Thrombus uptake values of several /sup 99m/Tc labeled radiocolloids determined using an experimental rodent model of deep venous thrombosis were correlated with particle size distributions. The thrombus uptake values increased with increasing mean particle size. The /sup 99m/Tc-tin colloid had the highest thrombus uptake value of any of the colloids used in this study.

  11. Particle size distribution of hydrocyanic acid in gari, a cassava-based product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maduagwu, E N; Fafunso, M

    1980-12-01

    A reciprocal relationship was observed between the cyanide content of gari and particle size. Hydrocyanic acid (HCN) content was positively correlated (r = 0.62) with sugar content but the correlation with starch content was poor (r = 0.33). From both the nutritional and toxicological standpoints, it would appear that larger particles size in gari is beneficial.

  12. Authenticated multi-user quantum key distribution with single particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Song; Wang, Hui; Guo, Gong-De; Ye, Guo-Hua; Du, Hong-Zhen; Liu, Xiao-Fen

    2016-03-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) has been growing rapidly in recent years and becomes one of the hottest issues in quantum information science. During the implementation of QKD on a network, identity authentication has been one main problem. In this paper, an efficient authenticated multi-user quantum key distribution (MQKD) protocol with single particles is proposed. In this protocol, any two users on a quantum network can perform mutual authentication and share a secure session key with the assistance of a semi-honest center. Meanwhile, the particles, which are used as quantum information carriers, are not required to be stored, therefore the proposed protocol is feasible with current technology. Finally, security analysis shows that this protocol is secure in theory.

  13. Temperature dependence of single-particle properties in nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo, W.; Lu, G.C.; Li, Z.H.; Lombardo, U.; Schulze, H.-J.

    2006-01-01

    The single-nucleon potential in hot nuclear matter is investigated in the framework of the Brueckner theory by adopting the realistic Argonne V 18 or Nijmegen 93 two-body nucleon-nucleon interaction supplemented by a microscopic three-body force. The rearrangement contribution to the single-particle potential induced by the ground state correlations is calculated in terms of the hole-line expansion of the mass operator and provides a significant repulsive contribution in the low-momentum region around and below the Fermi surface. Increasing temperature leads to a reduction of the effect, while increasing density makes it become stronger. The three-body force suppresses somewhat the ground state correlations due to its strong short-range repulsion, increasing with density. Inclusion of the three-body force contribution results in a quite different temperature dependence of the single-particle potential at high enough densities as compared to that adopting the pure two-body force. The effects of three-body force and ground state correlations on the nucleon effective mass are also discussed

  14. Surface modification and particles size distribution control in nano-CdS/polystyrene composite film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min Zhirong; Ming Qiuzhang; Hai Chunliang; Han Minzeng

    2003-01-01

    Preparation of nano-CdS particles with surface thiol modification by microemulsion method and their influences on the particle size distribution in highly filled polystyrene-based composites were studied. The modified nano-CdS was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), light absorption and emission measurements to reveal the morphologies of the surface modifier, which are consistent with the surface molecules packing calculation. The morphologies of the surface modifier exerted a great influence not only on the optical performance of the particles themselves, but also on the size distribution of the particle in polystyrene matrix. A monolayer coverage with tightly packed thiol molecules was believed to be most effective in promoting a uniform particle size distribution and eliminating the surface defects that cause radiationless recombination. Control of the particles size distribution in polystyrene can be attained by adjusting surface coverage status of the thiol molecules based on the strong interaction between the surface modifier and the matrix

  15. Determination of the particle size distribution of aerosols by means of a diffusion battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maigne, J.P.

    1978-09-01

    The different methods allowing to determine the particle size distribution of aerosols by means of diffusion batteries are described. To that purpose, a new method for the processing of experimental data (percentages of particles trapped by the battery vs flow rate) was developed on the basis of calculation principles which are described and assessed. This method was first tested by numerical simulation from a priori particle size distributions and then verified experimentally using a fine uranine aerosol whose particle size distribution as determined by our method was compared with the distribution previously obtained by electron microscopy. The method can be applied to the determination of particle size distribution spectra of fine aerosols produced by 'radiolysis' of atmospheric gaseous impurities. Two other applications concern the detection threshold of the condensation nuclei counter and the 'critical' radii of 'radiolysis' particles [fr

  16. The Diurnal Cycle of Particle Sizes, Compositions, and Densities observed in Sacramento, CA during CARES Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beránek, J.; Vaden, T.; Imre, D. G.; Zelenyuk, A.

    2010-12-01

    A central objective of the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) was to characterize unequivocally all aspects related to organics in aerosols. To this end, a range of instruments measured loadings, size distributions, compositions, densities, CCN activities, and optical properties of aerosol sampled in Sacramento, CA over the month of June 2010. We present the results of measurements conducted by our single particle mass spectrometer, SPLAT. SPLAT was used to measure the size, composition, and density of individual particles with diameters between 50 to 2000 nm. SPLAT measured the vacuum aerodynamic diameters (dva) of more than 2 million particles and the compositions of ~350,000 particles, each day. In addition, SPLAT was used in combination with a differential mobility analyzer to measure the density, or effective density of individual particles. These measurements were typically conducted twice per day: in the morning, and mid-afternoon. Preliminary analysis of the data shows that under most conditions, the particles were relatively small (below 200 nm), and the vast majority of them were composed of oxygenated organics mixed with various amounts of sulfates. Analysis of the mass spectra shows that the oxygenated organics in these particles are the oxidized products of biogenic volatile organic precursors. In addition to particles composed of SOA mixed with sulfates, we detected and characterized fresh and processed soot particles, biomass burning aerosol, organic amines, sea salt - fresh and processed - and a small number of dust and other inorganic particles, commonly found in urban environment. SOA mixed with sulfates were the vast majority of particles at all times, while the other particle types exhibited episodic behavior. The data shows a reproducible diurnal pattern in SOA size distributions, number concentrations, and compositions. Early in the morning the particle number concentrations are relatively low, and the particle size

  17. Clearance of iron oxide particles in rat liver: effect of hydrated particle size and coating material on liver metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briley-Saebo, Karen C; Johansson, Lars O; Hustvedt, Svein Olaf; Haldorsen, Anita G; Bjørnerud, Atle; Fayad, Zahi A; Ahlstrom, Haakan K

    2006-07-01

    We sought to evaluate the effect of the particle size and coating material of various iron oxide preparations on the rate of rat liver clearance. The following iron oxide formulations were used in this study: dextran-coated ferumoxide (size = 97 nm) and ferumoxtran-10 (size = 21 nm), carboxydextran-coated SHU555A (size = 69 nm) and fractionated SHU555A (size = 12 nm), and oxidized-starch coated materials either unformulated NC100150 (size = 15 nm) or formulated NC100150 injection (size = 12 nm). All formulations were administered to 165 rats at 2 dose levels. Quantitative liver R2* values were obtained during a 63-day time period. The concentration of iron oxide particles in the liver was determined by relaxometry, and these values were used to calculate the particle half-lives in the liver. After the administration of a high dose of iron oxide, the half-life of iron oxide particles in rat liver was 8 days for dextran-coated materials, 10 days for carboxydextran materials, 14 days for unformulated oxidized-starch, and 29 days for formulated oxidized-starch. The results of the study indicate that materials with similar coating but different sizes exhibited similar rates of liver clearance. It was, therefore, concluded that the coating material significantly influences the rate of iron oxide clearance in rat liver.

  18. Fabrication, Characterization, and Biological Activity of Avermectin Nano-delivery Systems with Different Particle Sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Anqi; Wang, Yan; Sun, Changjiao; Wang, Chunxin; Cui, Bo; Zhao, Xiang; Zeng, Zhanghua; Yao, Junwei; Yang, Dongsheng; Liu, Guoqiang; Cui, Haixin

    2018-01-01

    Nano-delivery systems for the active ingredients of pesticides can improve the utilization rates of pesticides and prolong their control effects. This is due to the nanocarrier envelope and controlled release function. However, particles containing active ingredients in controlled release pesticide formulations are generally large and have wide size distributions. There have been limited studies about the effect of particle size on the controlled release properties and biological activities of pesticide delivery systems. In the current study, avermectin (Av) nano-delivery systems were constructed with different particle sizes and their performances were evaluated. The Av release rate in the nano-delivery system could be effectively controlled by changing the particle size. The biological activity increased with decreasing particle size. These results suggest that Av nano-delivery systems can significantly improve the controllable release, photostability, and biological activity, which will improve efficiency and reduce pesticide residues.

  19. Particle Size Control for PIV Seeding Using Dry Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    in flight actually being carried out, the observations, drawings and notes of Leonardo da Vinci showed an analytical process to develop a way for...theoretical particle response: dvp dt = −C(vp − U) C = 18µ ρpd2p 86 87 Bibliography 1. Linscott, R. N. and Da Vinci , L., The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci

  20. Micrometer-scale 3-D shape characterization of eight cements: Particle shape and cement chemistry, and the effect of particle shape on laser diffraction particle size measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdogan, S.T.; Nie, X.; Stutzman, P.E.; Garboczi, E.J.

    2010-01-01

    Eight different portland cements were imaged on a synchrotron beam line at Brookhaven National Laboratory using X-ray microcomputed tomography at a voxel size of about 1 μm per cubic voxel edge. The particles ranged in size roughly between 10 μm and 100 μm. The shape and size of individual particles were computationally analyzed using spherical harmonic analysis. The particle shape difference between cements was small but significant, as judged by several different quantitative shape measures, including the particle length, width, and thickness distributions. It was found that the average shape of cement particles was closely correlated with the volume fraction of C 3 S (alite) and C 2 S (belite) making up the cement powder. It is shown that the non-spherical particle shape of the cements strongly influence laser diffraction results, at least in the sieve size range of 20 μm to 38 μm. Since laser diffraction particle size measurement is being increasingly used by the cement industry, while cement chemistry is always a main factor in cement production, these results could have important implications for how this kind of particle size measurement should be understood and used in the cement industry.

  1. To the evaluation of single-particle strengths of states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochirbat, G.

    1976-01-01

    Method of Green's function has been applied to calculating the distribution of single-particle states over actual nuclear levels. Chain of equations for these functions has been obtained in a model of interacting phonons and quasiparticles. It has been noticed that cutting the chain of equations by means of neglecting the higher order Green function corresponds to neglecting the higher order components of the wave function in variational methods. The one- and two-phonon approximations are discussed and the convenience of the Green function method for this case is demonstrated

  2. Single-particle and collective excitations in Ni-63

    OpenAIRE

    Albers, M.; Zhu, S.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Gellanki, Jnaneswari; Ragnarsson, Ingemar; Alcorta, M.; Baugher, T.; Bertone, P. F.; Carpenter, M. P.; Chiara, C. J.; Chowdhury, P.; Deacon, A. N.; Gade, A.; DiGiovine, B.; Hoffman, C. R.

    2013-01-01

    A study of excited states in Ni-63 up to an excitation energy of 28 MeV and a probable spin of 57/2 was carried out with the Mg-26(Ca-48,2 alpha 3n gamma)Ni-63 reaction at beam energies between 275 and 320 MeV. Three collective bands, built upon states of single-particle character, were identified. For two of the three bands, the transition quadrupole moments were extracted, herewith quantifying the deformation at high spin. The results have been compared with shell-model and cranked Nilsson-...

  3. Decay properties of high-lying single-particles modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumel, D.; Fortier, S.; Galès, S.; Guillot, J.; Langevin-Joliot, H.; Laurent, H.; Maison, J. M.; Vernotte, J.; Bordewijck, J.; Brandenburg, S.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Crawley, G. M.; Massolo, C. P.; Renteria, M.; Khendriche, A.

    1996-02-01

    The neutron decay of high-lying single-particle states in 64Ni, 90Zr, 120Sn and 208Pb excited by means of the (α, 3He) reaction has been investigated at 120 MeV incident energy using the multidetector EDEN. The characteristics of this reaction are studied using inclusive spectra and angular correlation analysis. The structure located between 11 and 15 MeV in 91Zr, and between 8 and 12 MeV excitation energy in 209Pb display large departures from a pure statistical decay. The corresponding non-statistical branching ratios are compared with the results of two theoretical calculations.

  4. Nuclear charge and magnetization densities of single particle states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frois, B.

    1985-01-01

    High energy electron scattering data have recently determined the spatial distributions of nucleons in the center of nuclei with amazing accuracy. For the first time we have access to the structure of the nuclear interior throughout the periodic table. The spatial resolution achieved by high momentum transfer measurements is now sufficient to define clearly the present limits of nuclear theory. The experimental situation is briefly reviewed and the results interpreted in the framework of self-consistent field theory. The shapes of single particle distributions in the nuclear interior are found to be in surprisingly good agreement with the predictions of mean field theory. The effects of correlations are discussed. (orig.)

  5. Real stabilization method for nuclear single-particle resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Zhou Shangui; Meng Jie; Zhao Enguang

    2008-01-01

    We develop the real stabilization method within the framework of the relativistic mean-field (RMF) model. With the self-consistent nuclear potentials from the RMF model, the real stabilization method is used to study single-particle resonant states in spherical nuclei. As examples, the energies, widths, and wave functions of low-lying neutron resonant states in 120 Sn are obtained. These results are compared with those from the scattering phase-shift method and the analytic continuation in the coupling constant approach and satisfactory agreements are found

  6. Nuclear charge and magnetization densities of single particle states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frois, B.

    1985-05-01

    High energy electron scattering data have recently determined the spatial distributions of nucleons in the center of nuclei with amazing accuracy. For the first time we have access to the structure of the nuclear interior throughout the periodic table. The spatial resolution achieved by high momentum transfer measurements is now sufficient to define clearly the present limits of nuclear theory. The experimental situation is briefly reviewed and the results interpreted in the framework of self-consistent field theory. The shapes of single particle distributions in the nuclear interior are found to be in surprisingly good agreement with the predictions of mean field theory. The effects of correlations are discussed

  7. Single-Particle Spin-Orbit Splittings in Nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Kazuhiko, ANDO; Hiroharu, BANDO; Department of Physics, Kyoto University; Division of Mathematical Physics, Fukui University

    1981-01-01

    Single-particle spin-orbit splittings (Δ^) in ^O and ^Ca nuclei are evaluated within the framework of the effective interaction theory by employing the Reid soft-core potential and meson-exchange three-body forces (TBF). Among the two-body force contributions, the Pauli-rearrangement effect on Δ^ is studied with special care. The TBF contribution to Δ^ is found to be significant. The G-matrix, the second-order pauli-rearrangement and the TBF contribute to Δ^ by the amount of ~1/2, ~1/5 and ~1...

  8. Velocity of a single gas plug rising through a particle-gas-liquid three-phase flow (In the case that particles updrift in a stagnant liquid column)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Yasuo; Shimada, Jun; Ohtake, Hiroyasu

    1999-01-01

    The velocity of a single air plug rising through a stagnant water column in a pipe with updrifting particles has been examined at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The particles used were polymer balls with a diameter of 3.18 mm and a density of 0.835 x 10 -3 kg/m 3 . The water velocity in a film around the plug and a wake region behind the plug was measured by a laser Doppler velocimeter. The thickness of the film was also measured with a dye-fluoresce-method by a laser ray. When the updrifting particles were introduced, the rising velocity of the plug became fast a little. However, the velocity was considerably slower than that in the falling particle case and independent on the particle introduction rate. The film around the plug was thicker a little than that in the no particle case, however considerably thinner than that in the falling particle case. The water velocity in the film around the plug was slower a little than that in the no particle case, and not dependent on the particle introduction rate contrary to that in the falling particle case. The vortex size behind the plug was almost the same as that in the no particle case although the vortex region was spread downward in the falling particle case. (author)

  9. Isolated Deep Infarcts: Which Size Indicates Single Penetrating Artery Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilüfer Yeşilot

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The relationship between infarction size determined in the acute stage and the probability of the presence of large artery stenosis or cardiac source of emboli in patients with isolated deep infarcts was evaluated. METHODS: Maximum transverse diameters of the infarcts seen in 59 consecutive patients’ T2 weighted MRI scans were prospectively recorded. Receiver operating characteristic curves were generated to analyze the optimal size that discriminate IDI with and without underlying large artery stenosis or cardiac source of emboli (LAS/CSE. RESULTS: Twenty-six IDI were in the medial cerebral artery (MCA territory, 24 in pons and 9 in thalamus. Optimal infarct diameter for MCA IDIs was 25 mm. One of the 10 cases with small (2-14 mm and half of the 14 cases (50% with large (17-25 mm pontine infarcts had LAS/CSE, but only 2 patients, one in each group had severe (≥70% basilar artery stenosis. None had major CSE. None of the 9 cases with thalamic infarcts (8-20 mm had LAS/CSE. CONCLUSION: : IDIs in different anatomical locations should be assessed separately. Middle cerebral artery territory IDIs with a maximum diameter of less than 25 mm are rarely associated with LAS/CSE and possibly develop due to occlusion of single lenticulostriate artery. Large unilateral pontine infarcts are usually not associated with severe basilar artery stenosis or major CSE and are probably caused by basilar artery atheromatous branch occlusion

  10. The effect of particle shape and size distribution on the acoustical properties of mixtures of hemp particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glé, Philippe; Gourdon, Emmanuel; Arnaud, Laurent; Horoshenkov, Kirill-V; Khan, Amir

    2013-12-01

    Hemp concrete is an attractive alternative to traditional materials used in building construction. It has a very low environmental impact, and it is characterized by high thermal insulation. Hemp aggregate particles are parallelepiped in shape and can be organized in a plurality of ways to create a considerable proportion of open pores with a complex connectivity pattern, the acoustical properties of which have never been examined systematically. Therefore this paper is focused on the fundamental understanding of the relations between the particle shape and size distribution, pore size distribution, and the acoustical properties of the resultant porous material mixture. The sound absorption and the transmission loss of various hemp aggregates is characterized using laboratory experiments and three theoretical models. These models are used to relate the particle size distribution to the pore size distribution. It is shown that the shape of particles and particle size control the pore size distribution and tortuosity in shiv. These properties in turn relate directly to the observed acoustical behavior.

  11. On airborne nano/micro-sized wear particles released from low-metallic automotive brakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukutschova, Jana; Moravec, Pavel; Tomasek, Vladimir; Matejka, Vlastimil; Smolik, Jiri; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Seidlerova, Jana; Safarova, Klara; Filip, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The paper addresses the wear particles released from commercially available 'low-metallic' automotive brake pads subjected to brake dynamometer tests. Particle size distribution was measured in situ and the generated particles were collected. The collected fractions and the original bulk material were analyzed using several chemical and microscopic techniques. The experiments demonstrated that airborne wear particles with sizes between 10 nm and 20 μm were released into the air. The numbers of nanoparticles (<100 nm) were by three orders of magnitude larger when compared to the microparticles. A significant release of nanoparticles was measured when the average temperature of the rotor reached 300 deg. C, the combustion initiation temperature of organics present in brakes. In contrast to particle size distribution data, the microscopic analysis revealed the presence of nanoparticles, mostly in the form of agglomerates, in all captured fractions. The majority of elements present in the bulk material were also detected in the ultra-fine fraction of the wear particles. - Research highlights: → Wear of low-metallic friction composite produces airborne nano-sized particles. → Nano-sized particles contain carbon black and metallic compounds. → Carbon black nano-sized particles are related to resin degradation. → Number of nanoparticles higher by three orders of magnitude than microparticles. - Braking of automobiles may contribute to nano-particulate air pollution caused by friction processes associated with wear of low-metallic brake pads.

  12. Size limits for rounding of volcanic ash particles heated by lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Vasseur, Jérémie; Llewellin, Edward W.; Genareau, Kimberly; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2017-03-01

    Volcanic ash particles can be remelted by the high temperatures induced in volcanic lightning discharges. The molten particles can round under surface tension then quench to produce glass spheres. Melting and rounding timescales for volcanic materials are strongly dependent on heating duration and peak temperature and are shorter for small particles than for large particles. Therefore, the size distribution of glass spheres recovered from ash deposits potentially record the short duration, high-temperature conditions of volcanic lightning discharges, which are hard to measure directly. We use a 1-D numerical solution to the heat equation to determine the timescales of heating and cooling of volcanic particles during and after rapid heating and compare these with the capillary timescale for rounding an angular particle. We define dimensionless parameters—capillary, Fourier, Stark, Biot, and Peclet numbers—to characterize the competition between heat transfer within the particle, heat transfer at the particle rim, and capillary motion, for particles of different sizes. We apply this framework to the lightning case and constrain a maximum size for ash particles susceptible to surface tension-driven rounding, as a function of lightning temperature and duration, and ash properties. The size limit agrees well with maximum sizes of glass spheres found in volcanic ash that has been subjected to lightning or experimental discharges, demonstrating that the approach that we develop can be used to obtain a first-order estimate of lightning conditions in volcanic plumes.

  13. Accurate particle speed prediction by improved particle speed measurement and 3-dimensional particle size and shape characterization technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cernuschi, Federico; Rothleitner, Christian; Clausen, Sønnik

    2017-01-01

    Accurate particle mass and velocity measurement is needed for interpreting test results in erosion tests of materials and coatings. The impact and damage of a surface is influenced by the kinetic energy of a particle, i.e. particle mass and velocity. Particle mass is usually determined with optic...

  14. Towards single particle imaging of human chromosomes at SACLA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, Ian; Schwenke, Joerg; Yusuf, Mohammed; Estandarte, Ana; Zhang, Fucai; Chen, Bo; Clark, Jesse; Song, Changyong; Nam, Daewoong; Joti, Yasumasa; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Ratnasari, Gina; Kaneyoshi, Kohei; Takata, Hideaki; Fukui, Kiichi

    2015-01-01

    Single particle imaging (SPI) is one of the front-page opportunities which were used to motivate the construction of the first x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs). SPI’s big advantage is that it avoids radiation damage to biological samples because the diffraction takes place in femtosecond single shots before any atomic motion can take place in the sample, hence before the onset of radiation damage. This is the ‘diffract before destruction’ theme, destruction being assured from the high x-ray doses used. This article reports our collaboration’s first attempt at SPI using the SACLA XFEL facility in June 2015. The report is limited to experience with the instrumentation and examples of data because we have not yet had time to invert them to images. (paper)

  15. Real-time measurements of suspended sediment concentration and particle size using five techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, D.; Albayrak, I.; Abgottspon, A.; Boes, R. M.

    2016-11-01

    Fine sediments are important in the design and operation of hydropower plants (HPPs), in particular with respect to sediment management and hydro-abrasive erosion in hydraulic machines. Therefore, there is a need for reliable real-time measurements of suspended sediment mass concentration (SSC) and particle size distribution (PSD). The following instruments for SSC measurements were investigated in a field study during several years at the HPP Fieschertal in the Swiss Alps: (1) turbidimeters, (2) a Laser In-Situ Scattering and Trans- missometry instrument (LISST), (3) a Coriolis Flow and Density Meter (CFDM), (4) acoustic transducers, and (5) pressure sensors. LISST provided PSDs in addition to concentrations. Reference SSCs were obtained by gravimetrical analysis of automatically taken water samples. In contrast to widely used turbidimeters and the single-frequency acoustic method, SSCs obtained from LISST, the CFDM or the pressure sensors were less or not affected by particle size variations. The CFDM and the pressure sensors allowed measuring higher SSC than the optical or the acoustic techniques (without dilution). The CFDM and the pressure sensors were found to be suitable to measure SSC ≥ 2 g/l. In this paper, the measuring techniques, instruments, setup, methods for data treatment, and selected results are presented and discussed.

  16. Influence of Particle Size in Talc Suppression by a Galactomannan Depressant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixiang Chen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Flotation behavior of different sizes of particles may follow different trends. The influence of particle size in talc suppression by a depressant galactomannan was studied in this research. The flotation response and mechanism were examined by flotation tests, modified flotation rate constant and entrainment recovery calculation, laser particle size experiments, adsorption tests, and advancing contact angle measurement as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS. The maximum recovery increased with particle size increases in the absence of galactomannan FPY (Fenugreek polysaccharide. The obviously suppressed effect was observed for the size fraction of −74 + 38 μm after reacting with FPY, but low efficiency was received for −38 μm and −10 μm, respectively. Laser particle size analysis indicated that the FPY has a certain function for the flocculation of fine particles. It is beneficial for reducing recovery by entrainment. EDS and advancing contact angle test results showed that the difference in contact angles probably is a result of genuine differences in the quantity of O and Mg bearing surface species, while the contact angle varied with particle size fraction in the absence of FPY. Adsorption and SEM test results demonstrated that in the case of −74 + 38 μm, the depressant adsorption density on the mineral surface is higher than the other two size fractions. On the whole, FPY probably is not enough of a depressant for talc suppression.

  17. Investigation of Composition of Particle Size in Sediments of Stormwater Sedimentation Tank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiva Laučytė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The main object for the storm water runoff treatment is to remove suspended solids before the storm water runoff is discharged into surface waters. Therefore the sedimentation tank is the most often used treatment facility. In order to optimise the sedimentation, the tendency of particle size distribution in bottom sediments must be known. Two similar size storm water runoff sedimentation tanks in Vilnius city were selected for the analysis of the particle size distribution in sediments. The composite samples of drained storm water runoff sediments were collected at the sedimentation tanks located in the districts of Verkiai and Karoliniskes on the 2nd of June, 2008. The analyses of grain size distribution were performed according the standard ISO/TS 17892-4:2004. The results showed that the particles with the particle size of 1–2 mm were obtained up to 10 m from the inlet and the particles with the size of 0,01–0,05 mm mainly were obtained close to the outlet of sedimentation tank. It is recommended to divide the sedimentation tank in two parts in order to get proper management of sediments: the particles that size is 1–10 mm could be managed as waste from grit chambers and particles of smaller size could be managed as primary sludge.Article in Lithuanian

  18. Correlating capacity and Li content in layered material for Li-ion battery using XRD and particle size distribution measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tabbakh, A. A. A.; Al-Zubaidi, A. B.; Kamarulzaman, N.

    2016-03-01

    A lithiated transition-metal oxide material was successfully synthesized by a combustion method for Li-ion battery. The material was characterized using thermogravimetric and particle size analyzers, scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffractometer. The calcined powders of the material exhibited a finite size distribution and a single phase of pure layered structure of space group Roverline{3} m . An innovative method was developed to calculate the material electrochemical capacity based on considerations of the crystal structure and contributions of Li ions from specified unit cells at the surfaces and in the interiors of the material particles. Results suggested that most of the Li ions contributing to the electrochemical current originated from the surface region of the material particles. It was possible to estimate the thickness of the most delithiated region near the particle surfaces at any delithiation depth accurately. Furthermore, results suggested that the core region of the particles remained electrochemically inaccessible in the conventional applied voltages. This result was justified by direct quantitative comparison of specific capacity values calculated from the particle size distribution with those measured experimentally. The present analysis is believed to be of some value for estimation of the failure mechanism in cathode compounds, thus assisting the development of Li-ion batteries.

  19. Particle size distribution and physico-chemical composition of clay.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP USER

    <300µm, <106µm, <63µm and <44µm respectively. There was no remarkable difference in silica (SiO2) as particle fractions reduced from <. 300µm - < 106µm - < 63µm but an observed. Table 1.0 Chemical composition of crude clay. Component wt (%). SiO2. 38.48. Al2O3. 12.46. Fe2O3. 6.18. TiO2. 1.85. MgO. 14.67. CaO.

  20. Investigation of Composition of Particle Size in Sediments of Stormwater Sedimentation Tank

    OpenAIRE

    Daiva Laučytė; Regimantas Dauknys

    2011-01-01

    The main object for the storm water runoff treatment is to remove suspended solids before the storm water runoff is discharged into surface waters. Therefore the sedimentation tank is the most often used treatment facility. In order to optimise the sedimentation, the tendency of particle size distribution in bottom sediments must be known. Two similar size storm water runoff sedimentation tanks in Vilnius city were selected for the analysis of the particle size distribution in sediments. The ...

  1. Definition of a magnetic susceptibility of conglomerates with magnetite particles. Particularities of defining single particle susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandulyak, A. A.; Sandulyak, A. V.; Ershova, V.; Pamme, N.; Ngmasom, B.; Iles, A.

    2017-11-01

    Data of a magnetic susceptibility of ferro-and the ferrimagnetic particles of many technogenic, natural, special media are especially demanded for the solution of various tasks connected with purposeful magnetic impact on these particles. One of productive approaches to definition of a magnetic susceptibility χ of these particles consists in receiving experimental data of a susceptibility of disperse samples 〈 χ 〉 with a disperse phase of these particles. The paper expounds and analyses the results of experiments on defining (by Faraday method in a magnetic field with intensity H = 90-730 kA/m) the magnetic susceptibility 〈 χ 〉 of disperse samples (conglomerates) with a given volume ratio γ of magnetite particles (γ = 0.0065-0.25). The corresponding families of concentration and field dependences are provided alongside with discussing the applicability of linear and exponential functions to describe these dependences. We consider the possibility of defining single particles susceptibility χ (with simultaneous obtaining field dependence of this susceptibility) by the commonly used relation χ = 〈 χ 〉 /γ both at relatively small (preferable for accuracy reasons) values γ - to γ = 0.02…0.025, as well as at increased values γ - up to γ = 0.25. The data χ are provided depending on H and correlating with known data at H matter magnetic susceptibility χm (for the case when the particles are traditionally likened to balls with the characteristic for them demagnetising factor equalling 1/3) complies with the anticipated inverse function χm ∼ 1/H in the studied area H (where magnetization M expressed as M = χH reaches saturation M = Const).

  2. Single particle level density in a finite depth potential well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlomo, S.; Kolomietz, V.M.; Dejbakhsh, H.

    1997-01-01

    We consider the single particle level density g(ε) of a realistic finite depth potential well, concentrating on the continuum (ε>0) region. We carry out quantum-mechanical calculations of the partial level density g l (ε), associated with a well-defined orbital angular momentum l≤40, using the phase-shift derivative method and the Greens-function method and compare the results with those obtained using the Thomas-Fermi approximation. We also numerically calculate g(ε) as a l sum of g l (ε) up to a certain value of scr(l) max ≤40 and determine the corresponding smooth level densities using the Strutinsky smoothing procedure. We demonstrate, in accordance with Levinson close-quote s theorem, that the partial contribution g l (ε) to the single particle level density from continuum states has positive and negative values. However, g(ε) is nonnegative. We also point out that this is not the case for an energy-dependent potential well. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  3. The effect of particle size on the morphology and thermodynamics of diblock copolymer/tethered-particle membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Bo; Edwards, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    A combination of self-consistent field theory and density functional theory was used to examine the effect of particle size on the stable, 3-dimensional equilibrium morphologies formed by diblock copolymers with a tethered nanoparticle attached either between the two blocks or at the end of one of the blocks. Particle size was varied between one and four tenths of the radius of gyration of the diblock polymer chain for neutral particles as well as those either favoring or disfavoring segments of the copolymer blocks. Phase diagrams were constructed and analyzed in terms of thermodynamic diagrams to understand the physics associated with the molecular-level self-assembly processes. Typical morphologies were observed, such as lamellar, spheroidal, cylindrical, gyroidal, and perforated lamellar, with the primary concentration region of the tethered particles being influenced heavily by particle size and tethering location, strength of the particle-segment energetic interactions, chain length, and copolymer radius of gyration. The effect of the simulation box size on the observed morphology and system thermodynamics was also investigated, indicating possible effects of confinement upon the system self-assembly processes

  4. The effect of particle size on the morphology and thermodynamics of diblock copolymer/tethered-particle membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Edwards, Brian J

    2015-06-07

    A combination of self-consistent field theory and density functional theory was used to examine the effect of particle size on the stable, 3-dimensional equilibrium morphologies formed by diblock copolymers with a tethered nanoparticle attached either between the two blocks or at the end of one of the blocks. Particle size was varied between one and four tenths of the radius of gyration of the diblock polymer chain for neutral particles as well as those either favoring or disfavoring segments of the copolymer blocks. Phase diagrams were constructed and analyzed in terms of thermodynamic diagrams to understand the physics associated with the molecular-level self-assembly processes. Typical morphologies were observed, such as lamellar, spheroidal, cylindrical, gyroidal, and perforated lamellar, with the primary concentration region of the tethered particles being influenced heavily by particle size and tethering location, strength of the particle-segment energetic interactions, chain length, and copolymer radius of gyration. The effect of the simulation box size on the observed morphology and system thermodynamics was also investigated, indicating possible effects of confinement upon the system self-assembly processes.

  5. Particle diffusional layer thickness in a USP dissolution apparatus II: a combined function of particle size and paddle speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jennifer J; Sirois, Paul J; Dressman, Jennifer B; Amidon, Gordon L

    2008-11-01

    This work was to investigate the effects of particle size and paddle speed on the particle diffusional layer thickness h(app) in a USP dissolution apparatus II. After the determination of the powder dissolution rates of five size fractions of fenofibrate, including <20, 20-32, 32-45, 63-75, and 90-106 microm, the present work shows that the dependence of h(app) on particle size follows different functions in accordance with the paddle speed. At 50 rpm, the function of h(app) is best described by a linear plot of h{app} = 9.91sqrt d-23.31 (R(2) = 0.98) throughout the particle diameter, d, from 6.8 to 106 microm. In contrast, at 100 rpm a transitional particle radius, r, of 23.7 microm exists, under which linear relationship h(app) = 1.59r (R(2) = 0.98) occurs, but above which h(app) becomes a constant of 43.5 microm. Thus, h(app) changes not only with particle size, but also with the hydrodynamics under standard USP configurations, which has been overlooked in the past. Further, the effects of particle size and paddle speed on h(app) were combined using dimensionless analysis. Within certain fluid velocity/particle regime, linear correlation of h(app)/d with the square-root of Reynolds number (d\\varpi/upsilon){1/2}, that is, h{app}/d = 1.5207 - 9.25 x 10{- 4} (d\\varpi/n){1/2} (R(2) = 0.9875), was observed.

  6. Raman microscopy of size-segregated aerosol particles, collected at the Sonnblick Observatory in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofner, Johannes; Kasper-Giebl, Anneliese; Kistler, Magdalena; Matzl, Julia; Schauer, Gerhard; Hitzenberger, Regina; Lohninger, Johann; Lendl, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    Size classified aerosol samples were collected using low pressure impactors in July 2013 at the high alpine background site Sonnnblick. The Sonnblick Observatory is located in the Austrian Alps, at the summit of Sonnblick 3100 m asl. Sampling was performed in parallel on the platform of the Observatory and after the aerosol inlet. The inlet is constructed as a whole air inlet and is operated at an overall sampling flow of 137 lpm and heated to 30 °C. Size cuts of the eight stage low pressure impactors were from 0.1 to 12.8 µm a.d.. Alumina foils were used as sample substrates for the impactor stages. In addition to the size classified aerosol sampling overall aerosol mass (Sharp Monitor 5030, Thermo Scientific) and number concentrations (TSI, CPC 3022a; TCC-3, Klotz) were determined. A Horiba LabRam 800HR Raman microscope was used for vibrational mapping of an area of about 100 µm x 100 µm of the alumina foils at a resolution of about 0.5 µm. The Raman microscope is equipped with a laser with an excitation wavelength of 532 nm and a grating with 300 gr/mm. Both optical images and the related chemical images were combined and a chemometric investigation of the combined images was done using the software package Imagelab (Epina Software Labs). Based on the well-known environment, a basic assignment of Raman signals of single particles is possible at a sufficient certainty. Main aerosol constituents e.g. like sulfates, black carbon and mineral particles could be identified. First results of the chemical imaging of size-segregated aerosol, collected at the Sonnblick Observatory, will be discussed with respect to standardized long-term measurements at the sampling station. Further, advantages and disadvantages of chemical imaging with subsequent chemometric investigation of the single images will be discussed and compared to the established methods of aerosol analysis. The chemometric analysis of the dataset is focused on mixing and variation of single compounds at

  7. Preliminary Understanding of Surface Plasmon-Enhanced Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy by Single Particle Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Kangshu

    Monitoring chiral optical signals of biomolecules as their conformation changes is an important means to study their structures, properties, and functions. Most measurements, however, are ensemble measurements because chiral optical signals from a single biomolecule is often too weak to be detected. In this dissertation, I present my early attempts to study conformational changes of adsorbed proteins by taking advantage of the enhanced electromagnetic (EM) field around a well-designed plasmonic nanofeature. In particular, I discuss the detection of protein adsorption and denaturation on metallic nanoparticles using single particle scattering and CD spectroscopic imaging. Particles of two distinctively different sizes were compared and two different sample protein molecules were studied. A combination of experimental and computational tools was used to simulate and interpret the collected scattering and CD results. The first chapter provides a brief overview of the state-of-art research in CD spectroscopic studies at the single particle level. Three different means to make particles capable of chiral detection are discussed. Various applications beyond single particle imaging are presented to showcase the potential of the described research project, beyond our immediate goals. The second chapter describes my initial characterization of large, metallic, anisotropic nanorods and the establishment of experimental procedures used later for spectrum reconstruction, data visualization and analysis. The physical shape and structure of the particles were imaged by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the chemical composition by energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS), and the optical properties by darkfield microscopy. An experimental protocol was developed to connect information collected from separate techniques for the same particle, with the aims of discovering any possible structural-property correlation. The reproducibility of the single particle imaging method was

  8. Particle size reduction in debris flows: Laboratory experiments compared with field data from Inyo Creek, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabnia, O.; Sklar, L. S.; Mclaughlin, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    Rock particles in debris flows are reduced in size through abrasion and fracture. Wear of coarse sediments results in production of finer particles, which alter the bulk material rheology and influence flow dynamics and runout distance. Particle wear also affects the size distribution of coarse particles, transforming the initial sediment size distribution produced on hillslopes into that delivered to the fluvial channel network. A better understanding of the controls on particle wear in debris flows would aid in the inferring flow conditions from debris flow deposits, in estimating the initial size of sediments entrained in the flow, and in modeling debris flow dynamics and mapping hazards. The rate of particle size reduction with distance traveled should depend on the intensity of particle interactions with other particles and the flow boundary, and on rock resistance to wear. We seek a geomorphic transport law to predict rate of particle wear with debris flow travel distance as a function of particle size distribution, flow depth, channel slope, fluid composition and rock strength. Here we use four rotating drums to create laboratory debris flows across a range of scales. Drum diameters range from 0.2 to 4.0 m, with the largest drum able to accommodate up to 2 Mg of material, including boulders. Each drum has vanes along the boundary to prevent sliding. Initial experiments use angular clasts of durable granodiorite; later experiments will use less resistant rock types. Shear rate is varied by changing drum rotational velocity. We begin experiments with well-sorted coarse particle size distributions, which are allowed to evolve through particle wear. The fluid is initially clear water, which rapidly acquires fine-grained wear products. After each travel increment all coarse particles (mass > 0.4 g) are weighed individually. We quantify particle wear rates using statistics of size and mass distributions, and by fitting various comminution functions to the data

  9. Effect of particle size and particle size distribution on physical characteristics, morphology and crystal strucutre of explosively compacted high-Tc superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotsis, I.; Enisz, M.; Oravetz, D. [Univ. of Veszprem (Hungary)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    A superconductor, of composition Y(Ba,K,Na){sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}/F{sub y} and a composite, of composition Y(Ba,K,Na){sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}/F{sub y}+Ag, with changing K, Na and F content, but a constant silver content (Ag=10 mass per cent) was prepared using a single heat treatment. The resulting material was ground in a corundum lined mill, separated to particle size fractions of 0-40 {mu}m, 0-63 {mu}m and 63-900 {mu}m and explosively compacted, using an explosive pressure of 10{sup 4} MPa and a subsequent heat treatment. Best results were obtained with the 63-900 {mu}m fraction of composition Y(Ba{sub 1,95}K{sub 0,01})Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}F{sub 0,05}/Ag: porosity <0.01 cm{sup 3}/g and current density 2800 A/cm{sup 2} at 77 K.

  10. Acoustophoretic separation of airborne millimeter-size particles by a Fresnel lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicek, Ahmet; Korozlu, Nurettin; Adem Kaya, Olgun; Ulug, Bulent

    2017-03-01

    We numerically demonstrate acoustophoretic separation of spherical solid particles in air by means of an acoustic Fresnel lens. Beside gravitational and drag forces, freely-falling millimeter-size particles experience large acoustic radiation forces around the focus of the lens, where interplay of forces lead to differentiation of particle trajectories with respect to either size or material properties. Due to the strong acoustic field at the focus, radiation force can divert particles with source intensities significantly smaller than those required for acoustic levitation in a standing field. When the lens is designed to have a focal length of 100 mm at 25 kHz, finite-element method simulations reveal a sharp focus with a full-width at half-maximum of 0.5 wavelenghts and a field enhancement of 18 dB. Through numerical calculation of forces and simulation of particle trajectories, we demonstrate size-based separation of acrylic particles at a source sound pressure level of 153 dB such that particles with diameters larger than 0.5 mm are admitted into the central hole, whereas smaller particles are rejected. Besides, efficient separation of particles with similar acoustic properties such as polyethylene, polystyrene and acrylic particles of the same size is also demonstrated.

  11. Particle size distribution measurements of radionuclides from Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgi, B.; Tschiersch, J.

    1988-01-01

    Characteristics of the size distribution of the Chernobyl aerosol have been measured at four locations along the trajectory of the cloud. Changes in time and differences between 131 I and the other isotopes are explained by aerosol physical processes. The relevance of the measurements for dose calculations are discussed

  12. The Isolation of DNA by Polycharged Magnetic Particles: An Analysis of the Interaction by Zeta Potential and Particle Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Yazan; Xhaxhiu, Kledi; Kopel, Pavel; Hynek, David; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-04-20

    Magnetic isolation of biological targets is in major demand in the biotechnology industry today. This study considers the interaction of four surface-modified magnetic micro- and nanoparticles with selected DNA fragments. Different surface modifications of nanomaghemite precursors were investigated: MAN37 (silica-coated), MAN127 (polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated), MAN158 (phosphate-coated), and MAN164 (tripolyphosphate-coated). All particles were positive polycharged agglomerated monodispersed systems. Mean particle sizes were 0.48, 2.97, 2.93, and 3.67 μm for MAN37, MAN127, MAN164, and MAN158, respectively. DNA fragments exhibited negative zeta potential of -0.22 mV under binding conditions (high ionic strength, low pH, and dehydration). A decrease in zeta potential of particles upon exposure to DNA was observed with exception of MAN158 particles. The measured particle size of MAN164 particles increased by nearly twofold upon exposure to DNA. Quantitative PCR isolation of DNA with a high retrieval rate was observed by magnetic particles MAN127 and MAN164. Interaction between polycharged magnetic particles and DNA is mediated by various binding mechanisms such as hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Future development of DNA isolation technology requires an understanding of the physical and biochemical conditions of this process.

  13. The effect of particle size on sorption of estrogens, androgens and progestagens in aquatic sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangster, Jodi L.; Oke, Hugues; Zhang, Yun; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Two sediments were used to evaluate the effects of particle size on steroid sorption. • Sorption capacity did not increase with decreasing particle size for all steroids. • Particle interactions affect the distribution of steroids within the whole sediments. • Preferential sorption to fine particles was observed. - Abstract: There is growing concern about the biologic effects of steroid hormones in impacted waterways. There is increasing evidence of enhanced transport and biological effects stemming from steroid hormones associated with soils or sediments; however, there are limited studies evaluating how steroid hormone distribution between various particle sizes within whole sediments affects steroid fate. In this study, sorption of 17β-estradiol, estrone, progesterone, and testosterone was evaluated to different size fractions of two natural sediments, a silty loam and a sandy sediment, to determine the steroid sorption capacity to each fraction and distribution within the whole sediment. Sorption isotherms for all steroid hormones fit linear sorption models. Sorption capacity was influenced more by organic carbon content than particle size. Interactions between size fractions were found to affect the distribution of steroids within the whole sediments. All four steroids preferentially sorbed to the clay and colloids in the silty loam sediment at the lowest aqueous concentration (1 ng/L) and as aqueous concentration increased, the distribution of sorbed steroid was similar to the distribution by weight of each size fraction within the whole sediment. In the sandy sediment, preferential sorption to fine particles was observed.

  14. The effect of particle size on sorption of estrogens, androgens and progestagens in aquatic sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sangster, Jodi L.; Oke, Hugues; Zhang, Yun; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L., E-mail: sbartelt2@unl.edu

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Two sediments were used to evaluate the effects of particle size on steroid sorption. • Sorption capacity did not increase with decreasing particle size for all steroids. • Particle interactions affect the distribution of steroids within the whole sediments. • Preferential sorption to fine particles was observed. - Abstract: There is growing concern about the biologic effects of steroid hormones in impacted waterways. There is increasing evidence of enhanced transport and biological effects stemming from steroid hormones associated with soils or sediments; however, there are limited studies evaluating how steroid hormone distribution between various particle sizes within whole sediments affects steroid fate. In this study, sorption of 17β-estradiol, estrone, progesterone, and testosterone was evaluated to different size fractions of two natural sediments, a silty loam and a sandy sediment, to determine the steroid sorption capacity to each fraction and distribution within the whole sediment. Sorption isotherms for all steroid hormones fit linear sorption models. Sorption capacity was influenced more by organic carbon content than particle size. Interactions between size fractions were found to affect the distribution of steroids within the whole sediments. All four steroids preferentially sorbed to the clay and colloids in the silty loam sediment at the lowest aqueous concentration (1 ng/L) and as aqueous concentration increased, the distribution of sorbed steroid was similar to the distribution by weight of each size fraction within the whole sediment. In the sandy sediment, preferential sorption to fine particles was observed.

  15. Experimental investigation of particle size distribution influence on diffusion controlled coarsening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Zhigang; Patterson, B.R.

    1993-01-01

    The influence of initial particle size distribution on coarsening during liquid phase sintering has been experimentally investigated using W-14Ni-6Fe alloy as a model system. It was found that initially wider size distribution particles coarsened more rapidly than those of an initially narrow distribution. The well known linear relationship between the cube of the average particle radius bar r -3 , and time was observed for most of the coarsening process, although the early stage coarsening rate constant changed with time, as expected with concomitant early changes in the tungsten particle size distribution. The instantaneous transient rate constant was shown to be related to the geometric standard deviation, 1nσ, of the instantaneous size distributions, with higher rate constants corresponding to larger 1nσ values. The form of the particle size distributions changed rapidly during early coarsening and reached a quasi-stable state, different from the theoretical asymptotic distribution, after some time. A linear relationship was found between the experimentally observed instantaneous rate constant and that computed from an earlier model incorporating the effect of particle size distribution. The above results compare favorably with those from prior theoretical modeling and computer simulation studies of the effect of particle size distribution on coarsening, based on the DeHoff communicating neighbor model

  16. A novel approach for preparation of micrometer-sized, monodisperse dimple and hemispherical polystyrene particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Takuya; Komatsu, Yoshifumi; Fujibayashi, Teruhisa; Minami, Hideto; Okubo, Masayoshi

    2010-03-16

    Micrometer-sized, monodisperse dimple and hemispherical polystyrene (PS) particles were successfully prepared by heating (55-70 degrees C) of spherical PS particles dispersed in methanol/water media (40/60 to 80/20, w/w) in the presence of decane droplets, and subsequent cooling down to room temperature. Decane was absorbed by the PS particles during the heating process. Decane-absorbed PS particles phase-separated into PS and decane phases in the inside during the cooling process, and eventually dimple and/or hemispherical particles were formed by removal of the decane phase from phase-separated PS/decane particles by evaporation. The size of the dimple, which is determined by the volume of decane phase-separated from decane-absorbed PS particles during the cooling process, increased with increases in the heating temperature and the methanol content.

  17. Effect of dispersed phase particle size on microstructure of cup fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goritskij, V.M.; Guseva, I.A.

    1978-01-01

    A correlation-regressive analysis has been carried out to reveal the influence of the size and the mean distance between the disperse particles of deposits V(C,N) on the microstructure (size of micropores and cups, density of the cups) of a viscous cup-like fracture of specimens made of 30Kh2NMFA grade steel that has been hardened and annealed. It is shown that micropores develop at relatively large particles of deposits V(C,N) (>=0.04/m). A strong correlation linear connection exists between the size of a disperse particle of deposits V(C,N), the size of micropore and cup. This connection is attributable to the close, pairwise correlative connection between the size of the particle and the micropore, the micropore and the cup

  18. Feed particle size evaluation: conventional approach versus digital holography based image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Dell’Orto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of image analysis approach based on digital holography in defining particle size in comparison with the sieve shaker method (sieving method as reference method. For this purpose ground corn meal was analyzed by a sieve shaker Retsch VS 1000 and by image analysis approach based on digital holography. Particle size from digital holography were compared with results obtained by screen (sieving analysis for each of size classes by a cumulative distribution plot. Comparison between particle size values obtained by sieving method and image analysis indicated that values were comparable in term of particle size information, introducing a potential application for digital holography and image analysis in feed industry.

  19. Two Size-Selective Mechanisms Specifically Trap Bacteria-Sized Food Particles in Caenorhabditis elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Fang-Yen, Christopher M.; Avery, Leon; Samuel, Aravinthan DT

    2009-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a filter feeder: it draws bacteria suspended in liquid into its pharynx, traps the bacteria, and ejects the liquid. How pharyngeal pumping simultaneously transports and filters food particles has been poorly understood. Here, we use high-speed video microscopy to define the detailed workings of pharyngeal mechanics. The buccal cavity and metastomal flaps regulate the flow of dense bacterial suspensions and exclude excessively large particles from entering the pharyn...

  20. A study of particle size distribution in zirconia-alumina powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakrishnan, K.N.; Venkadesan, S.; Nagarajan, R.

    1996-01-01

    Powder particles, in general are characterized in terms of particle size, size distributions and composition for reasons associated with manufacturing problem based upon product quality, manufacturing convenience, cost and product handling convenience. Particle size analysis or the measurement of particle size distribution is a common effort in any physical, chemical or mechanical processes. This information and processing methods are intricate factors that relate to material behavior and/or physical properties of the fabricated product. The requirements for the formation of a product of particulate solids and its strength varies as the particle size and the size distribution changes. Also the transport properties and the chemical activity are related to the particle size and the size distribution. The choice of a distribution to represent a physical system is generally motivated by an understanding of the nature of underlying phenomenon and is verified by the available data. After a model has been chosen, its parameter must be determined. The reasonableness of a selected model on the basis of given data is especially important when the model is to be used for prediction. Two different approaches in this problem are probability plotting and statistical tests

  1. Visualizing Ebolavirus Particles Using Single-Particle Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (SP-IRIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Erik P; Seymour, Elif Ç; Scherr, Steven M; Daaboul, George G; Freedman, David S; Selim Ünlü, M; Connor, John H

    2017-01-01

    This chapter describes an approach for the label-free imaging and quantification of intact Ebola virus (EBOV) and EBOV viruslike particles (VLPs) using a light microscopy technique. In this technique, individual virus particles are captured onto a silicon chip that has been printed with spots of virus-specific capture antibodies. These captured virions are then detected using an optical approach called interference reflectance imaging. This approach allows for the detection of each virus particle that is captured on an antibody spot and can resolve the filamentous structure of EBOV VLPs without the need for electron microscopy. Capture of VLPs and virions can be done from a variety of sample types ranging from tissue culture medium to blood. The technique also allows automated quantitative analysis of the number of virions captured. This can be used to identify the virus concentration in an unknown sample. In addition, this technique offers the opportunity to easily image virions captured from native solutions without the need for additional labeling approaches while offering a means of assessing the range of particle sizes and morphologies in a quantitative manner.

  2. Experimental study of the effect of wearing dust-proof mask on inhaled aerosol particle size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Shunguang; Mei Chongsheng; Wu Yuangqing; Ren Liuan.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a method for measuring particle size of inhaled aerosol with a phantom of human head wearing dust-proof mask and a cascade impactor. The results showed that AMAD of inhaled aerosol was degraded and the size distribution of particles changed when the dust-proof mask was wearing. The leak rate of mask increased as the size of dust particles decreased. The results are applicable to estimate internal exposure dose and to evaluate the dust-proof capacity of mask

  3. Rutile nanopowders for pigment production: Formation mechanism and particle size prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wu; Tang, Hongxin

    2018-01-01

    Formation mechanism and particle size prediction of rutile nanoparticles for pigment production were investigated. Anatase nanoparticles were observed by oriented attachment with parallel lattice fringe spaces of 0.2419 nm. Upon increasing the calcination temperature, the (1 1 0) plane of rutile was gradually observed, suggesting that the anatase (1 0 3) planes undergo internal structural rearrangement of oxygen and titanium ions into rutile phase due to ionic diffusion. Backpropagation neural network was used to predict particle size of rutile nanopowders, the prediction errors were all smaller than 2%, providing an efficient method to control particle size in pigment production.

  4. Phenomenological theory of size effects in ultrafine ferroelectric particles (PbTiO3-type)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, B.; Bursill, L.A.

    1998-01-01

    A new phenomenological model is proposed and discussed to study the size effects on phase transitions in PbTiO 3 -type ferroelectric particles. This model, by taking size effects on the phenomenological Landau-Ginzburg-Devonshire coefficients into consideration, can successfully explain the size effects on Curie temperature, c/a ratio, thermal and dielectric properties of lead-titanate-type ferroelectric particles. Theoretical and experimental results for PbTiO 3 fine particles are also compared and discussed. The relationship between the current model and the model of Zhong et al (Phys. Rev. B 50, 698 (1994)) is also presented. (authors)

  5. Performance of japanese quails fed feeds containing different corn and limestone particle sizes

    OpenAIRE

    Berto,DA; Garcia,EA; Móri,C; Faitarone,ABG; Pelícia,K; Molino,AB

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating performance and egg quality of Japanese quails fed feeds containing different corn and limestone particle sizes. A total number of 648 birds in the peak of production was distributed in a random complete block experimental design, using a 2x3 factorial arrangement (2 corn particle sizes and 3 limestone particle sizes). Birds were designated to one of two blocks, with six replicates of 18 birds each. Mean geometric diameter (MGD) values used were 0.617mm and 0.72...

  6. Particle size and surface charge affect particle uptake by human dendritic cells in an in vitro model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Camilla; Brodin, Birger; Frøkjær, Sven

    2005-01-01

    Current vaccine development includes optimization of antigen delivery to antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DC). Particulate systems have attracted increasing attention in the development of vaccine delivery systems. In the present study, we investigated DC uptake of model...... fluorescent polystyrene particles with a broad size range and variable surface properties. Localization of particles was investigated using confocal laser scanning microscopy and uptake was quantified by flow cytometry. Immature DC were generated from mononuclear cells isolated from human blood...

  7. Migration of finite sized particles in a laminar square channel flow from low to high Reynolds numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, M., E-mail: micheline.abbas@ensiacet.fr [Laboratoire de Génie Chimique, Université de Toulouse INPT-UPS, 31030, Toulouse (France); CNRS, Fédération de recherche FERMaT, CNRS, 31400, Toulouse (France); Magaud, P. [CNRS, Fédération de recherche FERMaT, CNRS, 31400, Toulouse (France); Institut Clément Ader, Université de Toulouse UPS-INSA-ISAE-Mines Albi, 31400, Toulouse (France); Gao, Y. [Institut Clément Ader, Université de Toulouse UPS-INSA-ISAE-Mines Albi, 31400, Toulouse (France); Geoffroy, S. [CNRS, Fédération de recherche FERMaT, CNRS, 31400, Toulouse (France); Laboratoire Matériaux et Durabilité des Constructions, Université de Toulouse (France); UPS, INSA, 31077, Toulouse (France)

    2014-12-15

    The migration of neutrally buoyant finite sized particles in a Newtonian square channel flow is investigated in the limit of very low solid volumetric concentration, within a wide range of channel Reynolds numbers Re = [0.07-120]. In situ microscope measurements of particle distributions, taken far from the channel inlet (at a distance several thousand times the channel height), revealed that particles are preferentially located near the channel walls at Re > 10 and near the channel center at Re < 1. Whereas the cross-streamline particle motion is governed by inertia-induced lift forces at high inertia, it seems to be controlled by shear-induced particle interactions at low (but finite) Reynolds numbers, despite the low solid volume fraction (<1%). The transition between both regimes is observed in the range Re = [1-10]. In order to exclude the effect of multi-body interactions, the trajectories of single freely moving particles are calculated thanks to numerical simulations based on the force coupling method. With the deployed numerical tool, the complete particle trajectories are accessible within a reasonable computational time only in the inertial regime (Re > 10). In this regime, we show that (i) the particle undergoes cross-streamline migration followed by a cross-lateral migration (parallel to the wall) in agreement with previous observations, and (ii) the stable equilibrium positions are located at the midline of the channel faces while the diagonal equilibrium positions are unstable. At low flow inertia, the first instants of the numerical simulations (carried at Re = O(1)) reveal that the cross-streamline migration of a single particle is oriented towards the channel wall, suggesting that the particle preferential positions around the channel center, observed in the experiments, are rather due to multi-body interactions.

  8. Migration of finite sized particles in a laminar square channel flow from low to high Reynolds numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, M.; Magaud, P.; Gao, Y.; Geoffroy, S.

    2014-01-01

    The migration of neutrally buoyant finite sized particles in a Newtonian square channel flow is investigated in the limit of very low solid volumetric concentration, within a wide range of channel Reynolds numbers Re = [0.07-120]. In situ microscope measurements of particle distributions, taken far from the channel inlet (at a distance several thousand times the channel height), revealed that particles are preferentially located near the channel walls at Re > 10 and near the channel center at Re < 1. Whereas the cross-streamline particle motion is governed by inertia-induced lift forces at high inertia, it seems to be controlled by shear-induced particle interactions at low (but finite) Reynolds numbers, despite the low solid volume fraction (<1%). The transition between both regimes is observed in the range Re = [1-10]. In order to exclude the effect of multi-body interactions, the trajectories of single freely moving particles are calculated thanks to numerical simulations based on the force coupling method. With the deployed numerical tool, the complete particle trajectories are accessible within a reasonable computational time only in the inertial regime (Re > 10). In this regime, we show that (i) the particle undergoes cross-streamline migration followed by a cross-lateral migration (parallel to the wall) in agreement with previous observations, and (ii) the stable equilibrium positions are located at the midline of the channel faces while the diagonal equilibrium positions are unstable. At low flow inertia, the first instants of the numerical simulations (carried at Re = O(1)) reveal that the cross-streamline migration of a single particle is oriented towards the channel wall, suggesting that the particle preferential positions around the channel center, observed in the experiments, are rather due to multi-body interactions

  9. Particle Size Distributions in Chondritic Meteorites: Evidence for Pre-Planetesimal Histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, J. I.; Cuzzi, J. N.; McCain, K. A.; Cato, M. J.; Christoffersen, P. A.; Fisher, K. R.; Srinivasan, P.; Tait, A. W.; Olson, D. M.; Scargle, J. D.

    2018-01-01

    Magnesium-rich silicate chondrules and calcium-, aluminum-rich refractory inclusions (CAIs) are fundamental components of primitive chondritic meteorites. It has been suggested that concentration of these early-formed particles by nebular sorting processes may lead to accretion of planetesimals, the planetary bodies that represent the building blocks of the terrestrial planets. In this case, the size distributions of the particles may constrain the accretion process. Here we present new particle size distribution data for Northwest Africa 5717, a primitive ordinary chondrite (ungrouped 3.05) and the well-known carbonaceous chondrite Allende (CV3). Instead of the relatively narrow size distributions obtained in previous studies (Ebel et al., 2016; Friedrich et al., 2015; Paque and Cuzzi, 1997, and references therein), we observed broad size distributions for all particle types in both meteorites. Detailed microscopic image analysis of Allende shows differences in the size distributions of chondrule subtypes, but collectively these subpopulations comprise a composite "chondrule" size distribution that is similar to the broad size distribution found for CAIs. Also, we find accretionary 'dust' rims on only a subset (approximately 15-20 percent) of the chondrules contained in Allende, which indicates that subpopulations of chondrules experienced distinct histories prior to planetary accretion. For the rimmed subset, we find positive correlation between rim thickness and chondrule size. The remarkable similarity between the size distributions of various subgroups of particles, both with and without fine grained rims, implies a common size sorting process. Chondrite classification schemes, astrophysical disk models that predict a narrow chondrule size population and/or a common localized formation event, and conventional particle analysis methods must all be critically reevaluated. We support the idea that distinct "lithologies" in NWA 5717 are nebular aggregates of

  10. Systems and methods of varying charged particle beam spot size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Jiuan

    2014-09-02

    Methods and devices enable shaping of a charged particle beam. A modified dielectric wall accelerator includes a high gradient lens section and a main section. The high gradient lens section can be dynamically adjusted to establish the desired electric fields to minimize undesirable transverse defocusing fields at the entrance to the dielectric wall accelerator. Once a baseline setting with desirable output beam characteristic is established, the output beam can be dynamically modified to vary the output beam characteristics. The output beam can be modified by slightly adjusting the electric fields established across different sections of the modified dielectric wall accelerator. Additional control over the shape of the output beam can be excreted by introducing intentional timing de-synchronization offsets and producing an injected beam that is not fully matched to the entrance of the modified dielectric accelerator.

  11. Seasonal cycle and modal structure of particle number size distribution at Dome C, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Järvinen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We studied new particle formation and modal behavior of ultrafine aerosol particles on the high East Antarctic plateau at the Concordia station, Dome C (75°06' S, 123°23' E. Aerosol particle number size distributions were measured in the size range 10–600 nm from 14 December 2007 to 7 November 2009. We used an automatic algorithm for fitting up to three modes to the size distribution data. The total particle number concentration was low with the median of 109 cm−3. There was a clear seasonal cycle in the total particle number and the volume concentrations. The concentrations were at their highest during the austral summer with the median values of 260 cm−3 and 0.086 μm3 cm−3, and at their lowest during the austral winter with corresponding values of 15 cm−3 and 0.009 μm3 cm−3. New particle formation events were determined from the size distribution data. During the measurement period, natural new particle formation was observed on 60 days and for 15 of these days the particle growth rates from 10 to 25 nm in size could be determined. The median particle growth rate during all these events was 2.5 nm h−1 and the median formation rate of 10 nm particles was 0.023 cm−3 s−1. Most of the events were similar to those observed at other continental locations, yet also some variability in event types was observed. Exceptional features in Dome C were the winter events that occurred during dark periods, as well as the events for which the growth could be followed during several consecutive days. We called these latter events slowly growing events. This paper is the first one to analyze long-term size distribution data from Dome C, and also the first paper to show that new particle formation events occur in central Antarctica.

  12. Single particle characterization, source apportionment, and aging effects of ambient aerosols in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Laura Grace

    Composed of a mixture of chemical species and phases and existing in a variety of shapes and sizes, atmospheric aerosols are complex and can have serious influence on human health, the environment, and climate. In order to better understand the impact of aerosols on local to global scales, detailed measurements on the physical and chemical properties of ambient particles are essential. In addition, knowing the origin or the source of the aerosols is important for policymakers to implement targeted regulations and effective control strategies to reduce air pollution in their region. One of the most ground breaking techniques in aerosol instrumentation is single particle mass spectrometry (SPMS), which can provide online chemical composition and size information on the individual particle level. The primary focus of this work is to further improve the ability of one specific SPMS technique, aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS), for the use of identifying the specific origin of ambient aerosols, which is known as source apportionment. The ATOFMS source apportionment method utilizes a library of distinct source mass spectral signatures to match the chemical information of the single ambient particles. The unique signatures are obtained in controlled source characterization studies, such as with the exhaust emissions of heavy duty diesel vehicles (HDDV) operating on a dynamometer. The apportionment of ambient aerosols is complicated by the chemical and physical processes an individual particle can undergo as it spends time in the atmosphere, which is referred to as "aging" of the aerosol. Therefore, the performance of the source signature library technique was investigated on the ambient dataset of the highly aged environment of Riverside, California. Additionally, two specific subsets of the Riverside dataset (ultrafine particles and particles containing trace metals), which are known to cause adverse health effects, were probed in greater detail. Finally

  13. Effect of particle size distribution on permeability in the randomly packed porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markicevic, Bojan

    2017-11-01

    An answer of how porous medium heterogeneity influences the medium permeability is still inconclusive, where both increase and decrease in the permeability value are reported. A numerical procedure is used to generate a randomly packed porous material consisting of spherical particles. Six different particle size distributions are used including mono-, bi- and three-disperse particles, as well as uniform, normal and log-normal particle size distribution with the maximum to minimum particle size ratio ranging from three to eight for different distributions. In all six cases, the average particle size is kept the same. For all media generated, the stochastic homogeneity is checked from distribution of three coordinates of particle centers, where uniform distribution of x-, y- and z- positions is found. The medium surface area remains essentially constant except for bi-modal distribution in which medium area decreases, while no changes in the porosity are observed (around 0.36). The fluid flow is solved in such domain, and after checking for the pressure axial linearity, the permeability is calculated from the Darcy law. The permeability comparison reveals that the permeability of the mono-disperse medium is smallest, and the permeability of all poly-disperse samples is less than ten percent higher. For bi-modal particles, the permeability is for a quarter higher compared to the other media which can be explained by volumetric contribution of larger particles and larger passages for fluid flow to take place.

  14. Role of particle size and composition in metal adsorption by solids deposited on urban road surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunawardana, Chandima; Egodawatta, Prasanna; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2014-01-01

    Despite common knowledge that the metal content adsorbed by fine particles is relatively higher compared to coarser particles, the reasons for this phenomenon have gained little research attention. The research study discussed in the paper investigated the variations in metal content for different particle sizes of solids associated with pollutant build-up on urban road surfaces. Data analysis confirmed that parameters favourable for metal adsorption to solids such as specific surface area, organic carbon content, effective cation exchange capacity and clay forming minerals content decrease with the increase in particle size. Furthermore, the mineralogical composition of solids was found to be the governing factor influencing the specific surface area and effective cation exchange capacity. There is high quartz content in particles >150 μm compared to particles <150 μm. As particle size reduces below 150 μm, the clay forming minerals content increases, providing favourable physical and chemical properties that influence adsorption. -- Highlights: • Physico-chemical parameters investigated in build-up samples from 32 road surfaces. • Mineralogical composition primarily governs the physico-chemical characteristics. • High clay forming mineral content in fine solids increases SSA and ECEC. • Characteristics influenced by quartz and amorphous content with particle size. • High quartz content in coarse particles contributes reduced metal adsorption. -- The mineralogical composition of solids is the governing factor influencing metal adsorption to solids in pollutant build-up on urban surfaces

  15. Fundamental study on laser manipulation of contamination particles with determining shape, size and species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Isao; Fujii, Taketsugu

    1995-01-01

    It has been desired to eliminate or collect the contamination particles of radioisotope in each sort of species or shape and size non-invasively. The shape and size of particle can be determined from the shape and distribution of diffraction pattern of particle in the parallel laser beam, the species of particle can be discriminated by the fluorescence from resonance of laser beam, or by the laser Raman scattering, and the particle suspended in the air or falling down in a vacuum can be levitated against the gravity and trapped by the radiation force and the trapping force of the focussed laser beam in the atmosphere or in a vacuum. For the purpose of the non-invasive manipulation of contamination particles, the laser manipulation technique, image processing technique with Multiplexed Matched Spatial Filter and the determination technique of laser Raman scattering or fluorescence from resonance of laser light were combined in the experiments. The shape, size and species of particles trapped in the focal plane of focused Ar laser beam can be determined simultaneously and instantaneously from the shape and intensity distributions of diffraction patterns of the particles in the irradiation of parallel coherent beam of He-Ne laser, and fluorescence from the resonance of YAG laser beam with variable wave length. In this research, a new technique is proposed to manipulate non-invasively the contamination particles determined with the shape, size and species in the atmosphere or in a vacuum, by laser beam. (author)

  16. Evaluating unsupervised methods to size and classify suspended particles using digital in-line holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Emlyn J.; Buscombe, Daniel D.; Graham, George W.; Nimmo-Smith, W. Alex M.

    2015-01-01

    Substantial information can be gained from digital in-line holography of marine particles, eliminating depth-of-field and focusing errors associated with standard lens-based imaging methods. However, for the technique to reach its full potential in oceanographic research, fully unsupervised (automated) methods are required for focusing, segmentation, sizing and classification of particles. These computational challenges are the subject of this paper, in which we draw upon data collected using a variety of holographic systems developed at Plymouth University, UK, from a significant range of particle types, sizes and shapes. A new method for noise reduction in reconstructed planes is found to be successful in aiding particle segmentation and sizing. The performance of an automated routine for deriving particle characteristics (and subsequent size distributions) is evaluated against equivalent size metrics obtained by a trained operative measuring grain axes on screen. The unsupervised method is found to be reliable, despite some errors resulting from over-segmentation of particles. A simple unsupervised particle classification system is developed, and is capable of successfully differentiating sand grains, bubbles and diatoms from within the surf-zone. Avoiding miscounting bubbles and biological particles as sand grains enables more accurate estimates of sand concentrations, and is especially important in deployments of particle monitoring instrumentation in aerated water. Perhaps the greatest potential for further development in the computational aspects of particle holography is in the area of unsupervised particle classification. The simple method proposed here provides a foundation upon which further development could lead to reliable identification of more complex particle populations, such as those containing phytoplankton, zooplankton, flocculated cohesive sediments and oil droplets.

  17. Relation between particle size and properties of some bituminous coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, A.D.; Cheng, M.; Goulet, J.-C.; Furimsky, E. (CANMET, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Energy Research Laboratories)

    1990-02-01

    Coal fractions of different size distributions exhibited different H/C ratio, ash and sulphur contents, and surface structures. This was confirmed using two low-sulphur and two high-sulphur bituminous coals. The effect was much less pronounced for low-sulphur coals than for high-sulphur coals. A significant difference in properties was noted between the two high-sulphur coals in spite of similar basic compositional parameters. This was confirmed by the fractal dimensionality factor D of Illinois No. 6 coal, which exceeded the theoretical value. 14 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Emanation of 232U and its radioactive daughter products from respirable size particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuddihy, R.G.; Griffith, W.C.; Hoover, M.D.; Kanapilly, G.M.; Stalnaker, N.D.

    1978-01-01

    This study is to develop a model for the emanation of 232 U and its radioactive daughter products from particles of Th-U fuel material. The radiation doses to internal organs following inhalation of these particles can only be calculated by knowing the rate of emanation of the daughters from particles in the lung and the subsequent excretion or translocation of the daughters to other organs. The emanation mechanisms are recoil of the daughter nuclei from the particle during alpha decay of the parent, diffusion of inert gas daughters from the particle and dissolution of the particle itself in biological fluids. Experiments to evaluate these mechanisms will involve ThO 2 and UO 2 particles in the size range 0.1 to 1.0 μm MMAD uniformly labeled with 232 U. The influence of the material temperature history on emanation will be investigated by heat treating particles at 600 and 1400 0 C

  19. Single particle characterization using a light scattering module coupled to a time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, E. S.; Onasch, T. B.; Canagaratna, M.; Jayne, J. T.; Kimmel, J.; Yu, X.-Y.; Alexander, M. L.; Worsnop, D. R.; Davidovits, P.

    2008-12-01

    We present the first single particle results obtained using an Aerodyne time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer coupled with a light scattering module (LS-ToF-AMS). The instrument was deployed at the T1 ground site approximately 40 km northeast of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) as part of the MILAGRO field study in March of 2006. The instrument was operated as a standard AMS from 12-30 March, acquiring average chemical composition and size distributions for the ambient aerosol, and in single particle mode from 27-30 March. Over a 75-h sampling period, 12 853 single particle mass spectra were optically triggered, saved, and analyzed. The correlated optical and chemical detection allowed detailed examination of single particle collection and quantification within the LS-ToF-AMS. The single particle data enabled the mixing states of the ambient aerosol to be characterized within the context of the size-resolved ensemble chemical information. The particulate mixing states were examined as a function of sampling time and most of the particles were found to be internal mixtures containing many of the organic and inorganic species identified in the ensemble analysis. The single particle mass spectra were deconvolved, using techniques developed for ensemble AMS data analysis, into HOA, OOA, NH4NO3, (NH4)2SO4, and NH4Cl fractions. Average single particle mass and chemistry measurements are shown to be in agreement with ensemble MS and PTOF measurements. While a significant fraction of ambient particles were internal mixtures of varying degrees, single particle measurements of chemical composition allowed the identification of time periods during which the ambient ensemble was externally mixed. In some cases the chemical composition of the particles suggested a likely source. Throughout the full sampling period, the ambient ensemble was an external mixture of combustion-generated HOA particles from local sources (e.g. traffic), with number concentrations peaking

  20. Scattering by non-spherical particles of size comparable to a wavelength - A new semi-empirical theory. [atmospheric radiative transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, J. B.; Cuzzi, J. N.

    1978-01-01

    Mie theory, which is generally used to describe the scattering behavior of particles at a certain wavelength, is only rigorously correct for spherical particles. Particles found as atmospheric constituents, with the exception of cloud droplets, are, however, decidedly nonspherical. An investigation is, therefore, conducted regarding the significant ways in which the scattering behavior of irregularly shaped particles differs from that of spheres. A systematic method is formulated for treating the real scalar scattering behavior. A description is presented of a new semiempirical theory based on simple physical principles and data obtained in laboratory measurements, which successfully reproduces the single scattering phase function for a wide range of particle shapes, sizes, and refractive indices.

  1. The influence of powder particle size on properties of Cu-Al2O3 composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajković V.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Inert gas atomized prealloyed copper powder containing 2 wt.% Al (average particle size ≈ 30 μm and a mixture consisting of copper (average particle sizes ≈ 15 μm and 30 μm and 4 wt.% of commercial Al2O3 powder particles (average particle size ≈ 0.75 μm were milled separately in a high-energy planetary ball mill up to 20 h in air. Milling was performed in order to strengthen the copper matrix by grain size refinement and Al2O3 particles. Milling in air of prealloyed copper powder promoted formation of finely dispersed nano-sized Al2O3 particles by internal oxidation. On the other side, composite powders with commercial micro-sized Al2O3 particles were obtained by mechanical alloying. Following milling, powders were treated in hydrogen at 400 0C for 1h in order to eliminate copper oxides formed on their surface during milling. Hot-pressing (800 0C for 3 h in argon at pressure of 35 MPa was used for compaction of milled powders. Hot-pressed composite compacts processed from 5 and 20 h milled powders were additionally subjected to high temperature exposure (800°C for 1 and 5h in argon in order to examine their thermal stability. The results were discussed in terms of the effects of different size of starting powders, the grain size refinement and different size of Al2O3 particles on strengthening, thermal stability and electrical conductivity of copper-based composites.

  2. Measurements of humidified particle number size distributions in a Finnish boreal forest: derivation of hygroscopic particle growth factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birmili, W.; Schwirn, K.; Nowak, A.; Rose, D.; Wiedensohler, A. (Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research, Leipzig (Germany)); Petaejae, T.; Haemeri, K.; Aalto, P.; Kulmala, M.; Boy, M. (Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)); Joutsensaari, J. (Univ. of Kuopio, Dept. of Physics (Finland))

    2009-07-01

    Dry and humidified size distributions of atmospheric particles were characterised at the atmospheric research station SMEAR 2, Finland between May and July 2004. Particles were classified in a size range between 3 and 800 nm at controlled relative humidities up to 90% by two instruments complementary in size range (HDMPS; Nano-HDMPS). Using the summation method, descriptive hygroscopic growth factors (DHGF) were derived for particle diameters between 70 and 300 nm by comparing dry and humidified size distributions. At 90% relative humidity, DHGF showed mean values between 1.25 and 1.45 in the accumulation mode, between 1.20 and 1.25 in the Aitken mode, and between 1.15 and 1.20 in the nucleation mode. Due to the high size resolution of the method, the transition in DHGF between the Aitken and accumulation modes, which reflects differences in the soluble fraction, could be pinpointed efficiently. For the accumulation mode, experimental DHGFs were compared to those calculated from a simplistic growth model initialised by in-situ chemical composition measurements, and yielded maximum deviations around 0.1. The variation in DHGF could only imperfectly be linked to meteorological factors. A pragmatic parameterisation of DHGF as a function of particle diameter and relative humidity was derived, and subsequently used to study the sensitivity of the condensational sink parameter (CS) as a function of height in a well-mixed boundary layer. (orig.)

  3. The particle size characteristics of fluvial suspended sediment in the Humber and Tweed catchments, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walling; Owens; Waterfall; Leeks; Wass

    2000-05-05

    This paper presents information on the absolute (chemically-dispersed) particle size characteristics of the suspended sediment transported by rivers in the Humber and Tweed basins during the period 1994-1998. For most of the rivers, > 95% of the suspended sediment load at the time of sampling was 63 microm (i.e. sand-sized material). The sediment transported in the two basins were similar. There were, however, noticeable spatial variations in the particle size composition of suspended sediment within the study basins, which reflected the particle size of the sediment sources and their spatial variation, and the selectivity of the sediment mobilization and delivery processes. When particle size parameters were plotted against discharge, there were no significant relationships, although there was some evidence of trends varying between sites. The lack of significant relationships with discharge reflects the fact that sediment particle size is largely supply-controlled, rather than a function of flow and hydraulics. When particle size variations were examined during individual storm events, there was evidence of a pulse of coarse sediment on the rising limb of the hydrograph. This may reflect the remobilization of coarse channel bed sediment as flow velocity and shear stress increase. Finer sediment was transported subsequently during the hydrograph peak and on the falling limb. The findings reported have important implications for understanding and modelling suspended sediment, and associated contaminant, dynamics in river basins.

  4. Study of effect of variables on particle size of telmisartan nanosuspensions using box-Behnken design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M R P; Bajaj, A

    2014-12-01

    Telmisartan, an orally active nonpeptide angiotensin II receptor antagonist is a BCS Class II drug having aqueous solubility of 9.9 µg/ml and hence oral bioavailability of 40%. The present study involved preparation of nanosuspensions by evaporative antisolvent precipitation technique to improve the saturation solubility and dissolution rate of telmisartan. Various stabilizers such as TPGS, PVPK 30, PEG 6000 were investigated of which TPGS was found to provide maximum decrease in particle size and accord greater stability to the nanosuspensions. Box-Behnken design was used to investigate the effect of independent variables like stabilizer concentration, time and speed of stirring on particle size of nanosuspensions. Pharmacodynamic studies using Goldblatt technique were undertaken to evaluate the effect of nano-sizing on the hypotensive effect of the drug. Concentration of TPGS and speed of rotation were found to play an important role in particle size of the nanosuspensions whereas time of stirring displayed an exponential relationship with particle size. Freeze dried nanocrystals obtained from nanosuspension of least particle size were found to have increased saturation solubility of telmisartan in different dissolution media. The reconstituted nanosuspension was found to reduce both systolic and diastolic blood pressure without affecting pulse pressure and heart rate. Statistical tools can be used to identify key process and formulation parameters which play a significant role in controlling the particle size in nanosuspensions. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Decay properties of high-lying single-particles modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaumel, D. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 91 - Orsay (France); Fortier, S. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 91 - Orsay (France); Gales, S. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 91 - Orsay (France); Guillot, J. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 91 - Orsay (France); Langevin-Joliot, H. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 91 - Orsay (France); Laurent, H. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 91 -Orsay (France); Maison, J.M. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 91 - Orsay (France); Vernotte, J. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 91 - Orsay (France); Bordewijck, J. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, 9747 Groningen (Netherlands); Brandenburg, S. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, 9747 Groningen (Netherlands); Krasznahorkay, A. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, 9747 Groningen (Netherlands); Crawley, G.M. [NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Massolo, C.P. [Universitad Nacional de La Plata, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Renteria, M. [Universitad Nacional de La Plata, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Khendriche, A. [University of Tizi-Ouzou, Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria)

    1996-03-18

    The neutron decay of high-lying single-particle states in {sup 64}Ni, {sup 90}Zr, {sup 120}Sn and {sup 208}Pb excited by means of the ({alpha},{sup 3}He) reaction has been investigated at 120 MeV incident energy using the multidetector EDEN. The characteristics of this reaction are studied using inclusive spectra and angular correlation analysis. The structure located between 11 and 15 MeV in {sup 91}Zr, and between 8 and 12 MeV excitation energy in {sup 209}Pb display large departures from a pure statistical decay. The corresponding non-statistical branching ratios are compared with the results of two theoretical calculations. (orig.).

  6. Classification using diffraction patterns for single-particle analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Hongli; Zhang, Kaiming [Department of Biophysics, the Health Science Centre, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Meng, Xing, E-mail: xmeng101@gmail.com [Wadsworth Centre, New York State Department of Health, Albany, New York 12201 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    An alternative method has been assessed; diffraction patterns derived from the single particle data set were used to perform the first round of classification in creating the initial averages for proteins data with symmetrical morphology. The test protein set was a collection of Caenorhabditis elegans small heat shock protein 17 obtained by Cryo EM, which has a tetrahedral (12-fold) symmetry. It is demonstrated that the initial classification on diffraction patterns is workable as well as the real-space classification that is based on the phase contrast. The test results show that the information from diffraction patterns has the enough details to make the initial model faithful. The potential advantage using the alternative method is twofold, the ability to handle the sets with poor signal/noise or/and that break the symmetry properties. - Highlights: • New classification method. • Create the accurate initial model. • Better in handling noisy data.

  7. Classification using diffraction patterns for single-particle analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Hongli; Zhang, Kaiming; Meng, Xing

    2016-01-01

    An alternative method has been assessed; diffraction patterns derived from the single particle data set were used to perform the first round of classification in creating the initial averages for proteins data with symmetrical morphology. The test protein set was a collection of Caenorhabditis elegans small heat shock protein 17 obtained by Cryo EM, which has a tetrahedral (12-fold) symmetry. It is demonstrated that the initial classification on diffraction patterns is workable as well as the real-space classification that is based on the phase contrast. The test results show that the information from diffraction patterns has the enough details to make the initial model faithful. The potential advantage using the alternative method is twofold, the ability to handle the sets with poor signal/noise or/and that break the symmetry properties. - Highlights: • New classification method. • Create the accurate initial model. • Better in handling noisy data.

  8. SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS OF SOLAR FLARES AND SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Ling, A. G.; Belov, A.; Yashiro, S.

    2012-01-01

    We suggest that the flatter size distribution of solar energetic proton (SEP) events relative to that of flare soft X-ray (SXR) events is primarily due to the fact that SEP flares are an energetic subset of all flares. Flares associated with gradual SEP events are characteristically accompanied by fast (≥1000 km s –1 ) coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that drive coronal/interplanetary shock waves. For the 1996-2005 interval, the slopes (α values) of power-law size distributions of the peak 1-8 Å fluxes of SXR flares associated with (a) >10 MeV SEP events (with peak fluxes ≥1 pr cm –2 s –1 sr –1 ) and (b) fast CMEs were ∼1.3-1.4 compared to ∼1.2 for the peak proton fluxes of >10 MeV SEP events and ∼2 for the peak 1-8 Å fluxes of all SXR flares. The difference of ∼0.15 between the slopes of the distributions of SEP events and SEP SXR flares is consistent with the observed variation of SEP event peak flux with SXR peak flux.

  9. Single-crystalline spherical β-Ga2O3 particles: Synthesis, N-doping and photoluminescence properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Tingting; Lin, Jing; Zhang, Xinghua; Huang, Yang; Xu, Xuewen; Xue, Yanming; Zou, Jin; Tang, Chengchun

    2013-01-01

    We report on the synthesis of single-crystalline spherical β-Ga 2 O 3 particles by a simple method in ambient atmosphere. No pre-treatment, catalyst, substrate, or gas flow was required during the synthesis process. The well-dispersed Ga 2 O 3 particles display uniform spherical morphology with an average diameter of ∼200 nm. Photoluminescence studies indicate that the Ga 2 O 3 particles exhibit a broad blue-green light emission and an interesting red light emission at room temperature. The red light emission can be further tuned by post-annealing of the particles in ammonia atmosphere. The present single-crystalline β-Ga 2 O 3 particles with spherical morphology, uniform sub-micrometer sizes and tunable light emission are envisaged to be of high promise for applications in white-LED phosphors and optoelectronic devices. -- Highlights: ► We prepared single-crystalline spherical β-Ga 2 O 3 particles in ambient atmosphere. ► The particles display uniform spherical morphology with an average diameter of ∼200 nm. ► The Ga 2 O 3 particles exhibit a broad blue-green light and an interesting red light emission. ► The red light emission can be further tuned by post-annealing of the particles

  10. Control over particle size distribution by autoclaving poloxamer-stabilized trimyristin nanodispersions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Göke, Katrin; Roese, Elin; Arnold, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Lipid nanoparticles are under investigation as delivery systems for poorly water-soluble drugs. The particle size in these dispersions strongly influences important pharmaceutical properties like biodistribution and drug loading capacity; it should be below 500 nm for direct injection into the bl......Lipid nanoparticles are under investigation as delivery systems for poorly water-soluble drugs. The particle size in these dispersions strongly influences important pharmaceutical properties like biodistribution and drug loading capacity; it should be below 500 nm for direct injection...... treatment thus seems to be a promising approach to achieve the desired narrow particle size distribution of such dispersions. Related to the lipid content, suspension particles needed more emulsifier for stabilization than emulsion droplets, and smaller particles more than larger ones....

  11. Effect of milling time on the structure, particle size, and morphology of montmorillonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abareshi, M.

    2017-01-01

    In the current research, effect of milling on the structure, particle size and morphology of montmorillonite was investigated. For this purpose, the montmorillonite was analyzed by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Then the montmorillonite was milled using high energy planetary ball mill at different milling times (1-60 hours). After that, the structure, particle size and morphology of all samples were investigated by XRD, FTIR, SEM, and transmission electron microscopy. Results showed that the ball milling causes the particle size reduction of clay and separation of the clay layers. Moreover, ball milling increases the overall structural disorder and transforms the crystalline structure into an amorphous phase. Also, the morphology of clay particle changes from layered to aggregates of almost rounded particles after 60 hours of milling.

  12. Electromechanical characterization of individual micron-sized metal coated polymer particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazilchuk, Molly; Kristiansen, Helge [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim 7491 (Norway); Conpart AS, Skjetten 2013 (Norway); Pettersen, Sigurd Rolland; Zhang, Zhiliang; He, Jianying, E-mail: jianying.he@ntnu.no [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim 7491 (Norway)

    2016-06-28

    Micron-sized polymer particles with nanoscale metal coatings are essential in conductive adhesives for electronics assembly. The particles function in a compressed state in the adhesives. The link between mechanical properties and electrical conductivity is thus of the utmost importance in the formation of good electrical contact. A custom flat punch set-up based on nanoindentation has been developed to simultaneously deform and electrically probe individual particles. The set-up has a sufficiently low internal resistance to allow the measurement of sub-Ohm contact resistances. Additionally, the set-up can capture mechanical failure of the particles. Combining this data yields a fundamental understanding of contact behavior. We demonstrate that this method can clearly distinguish between particles of different sizes, with different thicknesses of metal coating, and different metallization schemes. The technique provides good repeatability and physical insight into the behavior of these particles that can guide adhesive design and the optimization of bonding processes.

  13. Electromechanical characterization of individual micron-sized metal coated polymer particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazilchuk, Molly; Kristiansen, Helge; Pettersen, Sigurd Rolland; Zhang, Zhiliang; He, Jianying

    2016-01-01

    Micron-sized polymer particles with nanoscale metal coatings are essential in conductive adhesives for electronics assembly. The particles function in a compressed state in the adhesives. The link between mechanical properties and electrical conductivity is thus of the utmost importance in the formation of good electrical contact. A custom flat punch set-up based on nanoindentation has been developed to simultaneously deform and electrically probe individual particles. The set-up has a sufficiently low internal resistance to allow the measurement of sub-Ohm contact resistances. Additionally, the set-up can capture mechanical failure of the particles. Combining this data yields a fundamental understanding of contact behavior. We demonstrate that this method can clearly distinguish between particles of different sizes, with different thicknesses of metal coating, and different metallization schemes. The technique provides good repeatability and physical insight into the behavior of these particles that can guide adhesive design and the optimization of bonding processes.

  14. Measurement of particle size distribution and mass concentration of nuclear fuel aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickering, S.

    1982-01-01

    The particle size distribution and particle mass concentration of a nuclear fuel aerosol is measured by admitting the aerosol into a vertically-extending container, positioning an alpha particle detector within the container so that its window is horizontal and directed vertically, stopping the admission of aerosol into the container, detecting the alpha-activity of the particles of the aerosol sedimenting onto the detector window (for example in a series of equal time intervals until a constant level is reached), and converting the alpha-activity measurements into particle size distribution and/or particle mass concentration measurements. The detector is attached to a pivotted arm and by raising a counterweight can be lowered from the container for cleaning. (author)

  15. The effect of particles in different sizes on the mechanical properties of spray formed steel composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kenneth; Pedersen, A. S.; Pryds, N.

    2000-01-01

    particle size of 46 and 134 μm were carried out with respect to their mechanical properties e.g. wear resistance and tensile strength. It was found that the addition of Al2O3 particles to the steel improves its wear properties and reduces the elongation and tensile strength of the material......The main objective of the work was to investigate the effect of addition of ceramic particles with different size distributions on the mechanical properties, e.g. wear resistance and tensile strength, of spray formed materials. The experiments were carried out in a spray-forming unit at Risø...... National Laboratory, Denmark, where composites with a low alloyed boron steel (0.2 wt.% carbon) matrix containing alumina particles were produced. A comparison between cast hot-rolled material without particles, spray formed material without particles and the spray formed composites with an average ceramic...

  16. A simple algorithm for measuring particle size distributions on an uneven background from TEM images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gontard, Lionel Cervera; Ozkaya, Dogan; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticles have a wide range of applications in science and technology. Their sizes are often measured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or X-ray diffraction. Here, we describe a simple computer algorithm for measuring particle size distributions from TEM images in the presence of a...... application to images of heterogeneous catalysts is presented.......Nanoparticles have a wide range of applications in science and technology. Their sizes are often measured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or X-ray diffraction. Here, we describe a simple computer algorithm for measuring particle size distributions from TEM images in the presence...

  17. The effect of reducing alfalfa haylage particle size on cows in early lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononoff, P J; Heinrichs, A J

    2003-04-01

    The objective of this experiment was to evaluate effects of reducing forage particle size on cows in early lactation based on measurements of the Penn State Particle Separator (PSPS). Eight cannulated, multiparous cows averaging 19 +/- 4 d in milk and 642 +/- 45 kg BW were assigned to one of two 4 x 4 Latin Squares. During each of the 23-d periods, animals were offered one of four diets, which were chemically identical but included alfalfa haylage of different particle size; short (SH), mostly short (MSH), mostly long (MLG), and long (LG). Physically effective neutral detergent fiber (peNDF) was determined by measuring the amount