WorldWideScience

Sample records for single nerve cells

  1. Peripheral Nerve Injury: Stem Cell Therapy and Peripheral Nerve Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Robert; Dailey, Travis; Duncan, Kelsey; Abel, Naomi; Borlongan, Cesario V

    2016-12-14

    Peripheral nerve injury can lead to great morbidity in those afflicted, ranging from sensory loss, motor loss, chronic pain, or a combination of deficits. Over time, research has investigated neuronal molecular mechanisms implicated in nerve damage, classified nerve injury, and developed surgical techniques for treatment. Despite these advancements, full functional recovery remains less than ideal. In this review, we discuss historical aspects of peripheral nerve injury and introduce nerve transfer as a therapeutic option, as well as an adjunct therapy to transplantation of Schwann cells and their stem cell derivatives for repair of the damaged nerve. This review furthermore, will provide an elaborated discussion on the sources of Schwann cells, including sites to harvest their progenitor and stem cell lines. This reflects the accessibility to an additional, concurrent treatment approach with nerve transfers that, predicated on related research, may increase the efficacy of the current approach. We then discuss the experimental and clinical investigations of both Schwann cells and nerve transfer that are underway. Lastly, we provide the necessary consideration that these two lines of therapeutic approaches should not be exclusive, but conversely, should be pursued as a combined modality given their mutual role in peripheral nerve regeneration.

  2. Peripheral Nerve Injury: Stem Cell Therapy and Peripheral Nerve Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Sullivan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injury can lead to great morbidity in those afflicted, ranging from sensory loss, motor loss, chronic pain, or a combination of deficits. Over time, research has investigated neuronal molecular mechanisms implicated in nerve damage, classified nerve injury, and developed surgical techniques for treatment. Despite these advancements, full functional recovery remains less than ideal. In this review, we discuss historical aspects of peripheral nerve injury and introduce nerve transfer as a therapeutic option, as well as an adjunct therapy to transplantation of Schwann cells and their stem cell derivatives for repair of the damaged nerve. This review furthermore, will provide an elaborated discussion on the sources of Schwann cells, including sites to harvest their progenitor and stem cell lines. This reflects the accessibility to an additional, concurrent treatment approach with nerve transfers that, predicated on related research, may increase the efficacy of the current approach. We then discuss the experimental and clinical investigations of both Schwann cells and nerve transfer that are underway. Lastly, we provide the necessary consideration that these two lines of therapeutic approaches should not be exclusive, but conversely, should be pursued as a combined modality given their mutual role in peripheral nerve regeneration.

  3. Diffusion tensor imaging of the auditory nerve in patients with acquired single-sided deafness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vos, Sjoerd; Haakma, Wieke; Versnel, Huib

    2015-01-01

    following cochlear hair cell loss, and the amount of degeneration may considerably differ between the two ears, also in patients with bilateral deafness. A measure that reflects the nerve's condition would help to assess the best of both nerves and decide accordingly which ear should be implanted......A cochlear implant (CI) can restore hearing in patients with profound sensorineural hearing loss by direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve. Therefore, the viability of the auditory nerve is vitally important in successful hearing recovery. However, the nerve typically degenerates...... single-sided sensorineural hearing loss. A specialized acquisition protocol was designed for a 3 T MRI scanner to image the small nerve bundle. The nerve was reconstructed using fiber tractography and DTI metrics - which reflect the nerve's microstructural properties - were computed per tract. Comparing...

  4. Adult Stem Cell Based Enhancement of Nerve Conduit for Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Demonstration of nerve repair in vivo using cell-laden MPC-NC prepared in a point-of- care single- step procedure (9/30/18, 0%)  The major... osteogenesis may be constructed by the 3D printing method of projection stereolithography (PSL) to produce functional osteochondral constructs using...temporospatially specific differentiation cues for chondrogenesis and osteogenesis may be constructed by the 3D printing method of projection

  5. Photodynamic effect of Radachlorin on nerve and glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neginskaya, M A; Berezhnaya, E V; Rudkovskii, M V; Demyanenko, S V; Uzdensky, A B

    2014-09-01

    Radachlorin, a chlorine-derived photosensitizer, is used currently in photodynamic therapy (PDT) of skin cancer. In this work we studied Radachlorin-PDT effect on peripheral nerve and glial cells that are damaged along with tumor tissue. We used simple model objects - a crayfish stretch receptor that consists of a single sensory neuron surrounded by glial cells and crayfish nerve cord consisting of nerve fibers and ganglia. Radachlorin absorption and emission spectra were registered using spectrophotometer and spectrofluorimeter. Radachlorin accumulation and intracellular localization were studied using the fluorescence microscope. Necrotic and apoptotic cells were visualized using propidium iodide and Hoechst 33342. Neuronal activity was registered using standard electrophysiological methods. Radachlorin absorption spectrum in the physiological van Harreveld saline (pH 7.3) contained maximums at 420 and 654nm. Its fluorescence band 620-700nm had a maximum at 664nm. In the crayfish stretch receptor Radachlorin localized predominantly to the glial envelope and penetrated slightly into the neuron body and axon. Radachlorin rapidly accumulated in the crayfish nerve cord tissue within 30min. Its elimination in the dye-free solution occurred slower: 11% loss for 2h. Radachlorin-PDT inactivated the neuron and induced necrosis of neurons and glial cells and glial apoptosis at concentrations as low as 10(-10)-10(-9)M. Radachlorin rapidly accumulates in the nervous tissue, mainly in glial cells, and demonstrates very high photodynamic efficacy that characterize it as a promising photosensitizer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. New Nerve Cells for the Adult Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempermann, Gerd; Gage, Fred H.

    1999-01-01

    Contrary to dogma, the human brain does produce new nerve cells in adulthood. The mature human brain spawns neurons routinely in the hippocampus, an area important to memory and learning. This research can make it possible to ease any number of disorders involving neurological damage and death. (CCM)

  7. Stress Altered Stem Cells with Decellularized Allograft to Improve Rate of Nerve Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    of the cellular elements normally present in peripheral nerve . 2. KEYWORDS: peripheral nerve repair , nerve injury , decellularized nerve ... nerve regeneration. The slow rate of nerve re generation in limbs results in poor prognosis for patients suffering from severe injuries , leading to...allograft, neural regeneration, stem cells, stress altered cells, peripheral nerve injury model, nerve graft 3 This comprehensive final report summarizes

  8. Nerve growth factor interactions with mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritas, S K; Caraffa, A; Antinolfi, P; Saggini, A; Pantalone, A; Rosati, M; Tei, M; Speziali, A; Saggini, R; Pandolfi, F; Cerulli, G; Conti, P

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptides are involved in neurogenic inflammation where there is vasodilation and plasma protein extravasion in response to this stimulus. Nerve growth factor (NGF), identified by Rita Levi Montalcini, is a neurotrophin family compound which is important for survival of nociceptive neurons during their development. Therefore, NGF is an important neuropeptide which mediates the development and functions of the central and peripheral nervous system. It also exerts its proinflammatory action, not only on mast cells but also in B and T cells, neutrophils and eosinophils. Human mast cells can be activated by neuropeptides to release potent mediators of inflammation, and they are found throughout the body, especially near blood vessels, epithelial tissue and nerves. Mast cells generate and release NGF after degranulation and they are involved in iperalgesia, neuroimmune interactions and tissue inflammation. NGF is also a potent degranulation factor for mast cells in vitro and in vivo, promoting differentiation and maturation of these cells and their precursor, acting as a co-factor with interleukin-3. In conclusion, these studies are focused on cross-talk between neuropeptide NGF and inflammatory mast cells.

  9. Serotonin Immunoreactive Cells and Nerve Fibers in the Mucosa of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hydroxytryptamine) immunoreactivity in the pyloric mucosa of the rat stomach. The immunoreactive elements included the endocrine cells, mast cells and mucosal nerve fibers in the lamina propria. The immunopositive endocrine cells were oval in ...

  10. Development of rat embryonic spinal ganglion cells in damaged nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, E S; Isaeva, E N; Korzhevskii, D E

    2014-09-01

    The development of dissociated cells from rat embryonic spinal ganglion after transplantation to damaged nerve of adult animals was studied using immunohistochemical differentiation markers of neural and glial cells. The cell suspension obtained after dissociation of rat embryonic spinal ganglia (embryonic day 15) was injected into the proximal segment of crushed sciatic nerve. The nerve was damaged by ligation for 40 sec. Progenitor cells were labeled with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) before transplantation. BrdU-immunopositive cells were detected in the nerve trunks of recipients on days 1, 21, and 28 after transplantation. Dissociated cells of rat embryonic spinal ganglion (embryonic day 15) survived for at least 4 weeks after transplantation to the nerve and differentiate into NeuN-immunopositive neurons with morphological properties of sensory neurons and satellite cells containing S100 protein.

  11. Tyrosine hydroxylase positive nerves and mast cells in the porcine gallbladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Stefanov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to detect the localisation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH positive nerve fibres (THN and distribution of tyrosine hydroxylase positive mast cells (THMC in the wall of porcine gallbladder. THN were observed as single fibres, nerve fibres forming perivascular plexuses and nerve fibres grouped within the nerve fascicles. In the gallbladder`s fundus, body and neck, the TH+ fibres formed mucosal, muscular and serosal nonganglionated nerve plexuses. Toluidine blue (TB staining was used to confirm that the TH positive cells were mast cells. The number of THMC in the propria of gallbladder`s fundus, body and neck was significantly higher than in the muscular and serosal layers in both genders. The number of mast cells in the musculature was higher than in the serosa. The density and location of the THMC were similar to the TB positive (with gamma meta-chromasia mast cells in both males and females, and statistically significant difference was not established. In conclusion, original data concerning the existence and localisation of catecholaminergic nerves and THMC distribution in the porcine gallbladder’s wall are presented. The results could con-tribute to the body of knowledge of functional communication between autonomic nerves and mast cells in the gallbladder.

  12. Endoplasmic reticulum calcium signaling in nerve cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEXEI VERKHRATSKY

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is an important organelle involved in various types of signaling in nerve cells. The ER serves as a dynamic Ca2+ pool being thus involved in rapid signaling events associated with cell stimulation by either electrical (action potential or chemical (neurotransmitters signals. This function is supported by Ca2+ release channels (InsP3 and ryanodine receptors and SERCA Ca2+ pumps residing in the endomembrane. In addition the ER provides a specific environment for the posttranslational protein processing and transport of various molecules towards their final destination. In parallel, the ER acts as a "calcium tunnel," which facilitates Ca2+ movements within the cell by avoiding cytoplasmic routes. Finally the ER appears as a source of numerous signals aimed at the nucleus and involved in long-lasting adaptive cellular responses. All these important functions are controlled by intra-ER free Ca2+ which integrates various signaling events and establishes a link between fast signaling, associated with ER Ca2+ release/uptake, and long-lasting adaptive responses relying primarily on the regulation of protein synthesis. Disruption of ER Ca2+ homeostasis triggers several forms of cellular stress response and is intimately involved in neurodegeneration and neuronal cell death

  13. Altered neuronal activity patterns in the visual cortex of the adult rat after partial optic nerve crush--a single-cell resolution metabolic mapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macharadze, Tamar; Pielot, Rainer; Wanger, Tim; Scheich, Henning; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Budinger, Eike; Goldschmidt, Jürgen; Kreutz, Michael R

    2012-08-01

    Thallium autometallography (TIAMG) is a novel method for high-resolution mapping of neuronal activity. With this method, we found that a general depression of neuronal activity occurs in response to optic nerve crush (ONC) within the first 2 weeks postinjury in the contralateral dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) as well as in the contralateral primary visual cortex (V1). Interestingly, the neuronal activity recovered thereafter in both brain regions and reached a plateau in the tenth week postinjury in layers IV and V of V1, monocular area (V1m). Several clusters of highly active neurons in V1m were found 6 weeks after ONC in layers IV and V on the side contralateral to the lesion. We reasoned that these clusters appeared due to a reorganization of the corticocolliucular projections. Employing a combination of biotinylated dextran amine retrograde tract tracing from the superior colliculus (SC) with TIAMG in the same animal, we indeed found that the clusters of neurons with high Tl(+) uptake in V1m are spatially in register with those neuronal subpopulations that project to the SC. These data suggest that extensive reorganization plasticity exists in the adult rat visual cortex following ONC.

  14. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype expression in avian vestibular hair cells, nerve terminals and ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G Q; Kevetter, G A; Leonard, R B; Prusak, D J; Wood, T G; Correia, M J

    2007-04-25

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are widely expressed in the CNS and peripheral nervous system and play an important role in modulating the cell activity and function. We have shown that the cholinergic agonist carbachol reduces the pigeon's inwardly rectifying potassium channel (pKir2.1) ionic currents in native vestibular hair cells. We have cloned and sequenced pigeon mAChR subtypes M2-M5 and we have studied the expression of all five mAChR subtypes (M1-M5) in the pigeon vestibular end organs (semicircular canal ampullary cristae and utricular maculae), vestibular nerve fibers and the vestibular (Scarpa's) ganglion using tissue immunohistochemistry (IH), dissociated single cell immunocytochemistry (IC) and Western blotting (WB). We found that vestibular hair cells, nerve fibers and ganglion cells each expressed all five (M1-M5) mAChR subtypes. Two of the three odd-numbered mAChRs (M1, M5) were present on the hair cell cilia, supporting cells and nerve terminals. And all three odd numbered mAChRs (M1, M3 and M5) were expressed on cuticular plates, myelin sheaths and Schwann cells. Even-numbered mAChRs were seen on the nerve terminals. M2 was also shown on the cuticular plates and supporting cells. Vestibular efferent fibers and terminals were not identified in our studies. Results from WB of the dissociated vestibular epithelia, nerve fibers and vestibular ganglia were consistent with the results from IH and IC. Our findings suggest that there is considerable co-expression of the subtypes on the neural elements of the labyrinth. Further electrophysiological and pharmacological studies should delineate the mechanisms of action of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors on structures in the labyrinth.

  15. Electron microscopic study of the myelinated nerve fibres and the perineurial cell basement membrane in the diabetic human peripheral nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBarrany, Wagih G.; Hamdy, Raid M.; AlHayani, Abdulmonem A.; Jalalah, Sawsan M.

    2009-01-01

    To study the quantitative and ultrastructural changes in myelinated nerve fibers and the basement membranes of the perineurial cells in diabetic nerves. The study was performed at the Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdul-Aziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia from 2003 to 2005. Human sural nerves were obtained from 15 lower limbs and 5 diabetic nerve biopsies. The total mean and density of myelinated nerve fibers per fascicle were calculated, with density of microtubules and mitochondria in the axoplasm. The number of the perineurial cell basement membrane layers was counted, and thickness of the basement membrane was measured. Among the 15 diabetic and 5 normal human sural nerves, the average diameters, number and surface area of myelinated nerve fibers and axonal microtubules density were found to be less in diabetic nerves. Mitochondrial density was higher in diabetic axons. Thickness of the perineurial cell basement membrane had a greater mean, but the number of perineurial cell layers was less than that of the diabetic group. The inner cellular layer of the perineurium of the diabetic nerves contained large vacuoles containing electron-dense degenerated myelin. A few specimens showed degenerated myelinated nerve fibers, while others showed recovering ones. Retracted axoplasms were encountered with albumin extravasation. Diabetes caused an increase in perineurial permeability. The diabetic sural nerve showed marked decrease in the myelinated nerve fibres, increase degenerated mitochondria, and decreased microtubules. (author)

  16. Adrenergic nerve fibres and mast cells: correlation in rat thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artico, Marco; Cavallotti, Carlo; Cavallotti, Daniela

    2002-10-21

    The interactions between adrenergic nerve fibres and mast cells (MCs) were studied in the thymus of adult and old rats by morphological methods and by quantitative analysis of images (QAIs). The whole thymus was drawn in adult (12 months old) rats: normal, sympathectomized or electrostimulated. Thymuses from the above-mentioned animals were weighed, measured and dissected. Thymic slices were stained with eosin orange for detection of microanatomical details and with Bodian's method for identification of the whole nerve fibres. Thymic MCs were stained with Astrablau. Histofluorescence microscopy was used for staining of adrenergic nerve fibres. Finally, all morphological results were submitted to the QAIs and statistical analysis of data. Our results suggest that after surgical sympathectomy, the greater part of adrenergic nerve fibres disappear while related MCs appear to show less evident fluorescence and few granules. On the contrary, electrostimulation of the cervical superior ganglion induced an increase in the fluorescence of adrenergic nerve fibres and of related MCs.

  17. Bilateral involvement of a single cranial nerve: analysis of 578 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, James R

    2005-09-27

    The author reviewed 34 years of personal experience with inpatients in a large municipal hospital to analyze the seats and causes of involvement of single pairs of cranial nerves. Among 578 cases, the sixth (n = 234) and second (211) nerves predominated, followed by the fourth (48), seventh (30), third (27), and eighth (18) cranial nerves. Trauma (99), infection (94), tumor (92), increased intracranial pressure (85), vascular disease (74), and demyelination (66) were common causes.

  18. Restoration of shoulder motion using single- versus dual-nerve repair in obstetrical brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzi, Alain Joe; AlNaeem, Hassan; Aubin-Lemay, Camille; Kvann, Julie Chakriya; Alam, Peter; Retrouvey, Helene; Aldekhayel, Salah; Zadeh, Teanoosh

    2018-02-23

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to compare shoulder abduction and external rotation (ER) after single-nerve repair of the upper trunk alone versus dual-nerve repair of both the upper trunk and the suprascapular nerve. METHODS A retrospective chart review of a single surgeon's experience repairing obstetrical brachial plexus injuries between June 1995 and June 2015 was performed. Eight patients underwent repair of the upper trunk alone, and 10 patients underwent repair of the upper trunk and the suprascapular nerve. Shoulder abduction and ER ranges of motion (ROMs) (in degrees) were recorded preoperatively and postoperatively. Postoperative ROM and the difference in ROM gained after surgery were compared by independent t-test analysis. RESULTS The mean follow-up time was 161.4 weeks (range 62-514 weeks, SD 124.0 weeks). The mean patient age at the time of surgery was 31.3 weeks (range 19.9-47.0 weeks, SD 6.9 weeks). The mean postoperative shoulder abduction ROMs were 145.0° (range 85°-180°, SD 39.4°) after single-nerve repair and 134.0° (range 90°-180°, SD 30.3°) after dual-nerve repair (p = 0.51). The mean postoperative shoulder ER ROMs were 67.5° (range 10°-95°, SD 28.8°) after single-nerve repair and 72.0° (range 10°-95°, SD 31.3°) after dual-nerve repair (p = 0.76). CONCLUSIONS The authors found no difference in shoulder abduction and ER between patients who underwent single-nerve repair of the upper trunk alone and those who underwent dual-nerve repair of both the upper trunk and the suprascapular nerve.

  19. Neural stem/progenitor cell properties of glial cells in the adult mouse auditory nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Hainan; Xing, Yazhi; Brown, LaShardai N.; Samuvel, Devadoss J.; Panganiban, Clarisse H.; Havens, Luke T.; Balasubramanian, Sundaravadivel; Wegner, Michael; Krug, Edward L.; Barth, Jeremy L.

    2015-01-01

    The auditory nerve is the primary conveyor of hearing information from sensory hair cells to the brain. It has been believed that loss of the auditory nerve is irreversible in the adult mammalian ear, resulting in sensorineural hearing loss. We examined the regenerative potential of the auditory nerve in a mouse model of auditory neuropathy. Following neuronal degeneration, quiescent glial cells converted to an activated state showing a decrease in nuclear chromatin condensation, altered histone deacetylase expression and up-regulation of numerous genes associated with neurogenesis or development. Neurosphere formation assays showed that adult auditory nerves contain neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPs) that were within a Sox2-positive glial population. Production of neurospheres from auditory nerve cells was stimulated by acute neuronal injury and hypoxic conditioning. These results demonstrate that a subset of glial cells in the adult auditory nerve exhibit several characteristics of NSPs and are therefore potential targets for promoting auditory nerve regeneration. PMID:26307538

  20. Relevance of mast cell-nerve interactions in intestinal nociception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Diest, Sophie A.; Stanisor, Oana I.; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; de Jonge, Wouter J.; van den Wijngaard, René M.

    2012-01-01

    Cross-talk between the immune- and nervous-system is considered an important biological process in health and disease. Because mast cells are often strategically placed between nerves and surrounding (immune)cells they may function as important intermediate cells. This review summarizes the current

  1. Adult Stem Cell-Based Enhancement of Nerve Conduit for Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    6. AUTHOR(S) 5d.  PROJECT  NUMBER   Rocky Tuan, Peter Alexander 5e.  TASK  NUMBER   E-­Mail:    rst13@pitt.edu   5f.   WORK  UNIT  NUMBER 7...than 3 cm, mainly because of their lack of appropriate nerve-enhancing biological activities. In our current work , we have identified and isolated...seeded conduits exhibit a remarkable ability to allow for S100 schwann cell migration into the growing nerve with complete continuity after only 6 weeks

  2. Cortical Reorganization in Dual Innervation by Single Peripheral Nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Mou-Xiong; Shen, Yun-Dong; Hua, Xu-Yun; Hou, Ao-Lin; Zhu, Yi; Xu, Wen-Dong

    2017-09-21

    Functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury and repair is related with cortical reorganization. However, the mechanism of innervating dual targets by 1 donor nerve is largely unknown. To investigate the cortical reorganization when the phrenic nerve simultaneously innervates the diaphragm and biceps. Total brachial plexus (C5-T1) injury rats were repaired by phrenic nerve-musculocutaneous nerve transfer with end-to-side (n = 15) or end-to-end (n = 15) neurorrhaphy. Brachial plexus avulsion (n = 5) and sham surgery (n = 5) rats were included for control. Behavioral observation, electromyography, and histologic studies were used for confirming peripheral nerve reinnervation. Cortical representations of the diaphragm and reinnervated biceps were studied by intracortical microstimulation techniques before and at months 0.5, 3, 5, 7, and 10 after surgery. At month 0.5 after complete brachial plexus injury, the motor representation of the injured forelimb disappeared. The diaphragm representation was preserved in the "end-to-side" group but absent in the "end-to-end" group. Rhythmic contraction of biceps appeared in "end-to-end" and "end-to-side" groups, and the biceps representation reappeared in the original biceps and diaphragm areas at months 3 and 5. At month 10, it was completely located in the original biceps area in the "end-to-end" group. Part of the biceps representation remained in the original diaphragm area in the "end-to-side" group. Destroying the contralateral motor cortex did not eliminate respiration-related contraction of biceps. The brain tends to resume biceps representation from the original diaphragm area to the original biceps area following phrenic nerve transfer. The original diaphragm area partly preserves reinnervated biceps representation after end-to-side transfer. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  3. Neural stem cells promote nerve regeneration through IL12-induced Schwann cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Don-Ching; Chen, Jong-Hang; Hsu, Tai-Yu; Chang, Li-Hsun; Chang, Hsu; Chi, Ya-Hui; Chiu, Ing-Ming

    2017-03-01

    Regeneration of injured peripheral nerves is a slow, complicated process that could be improved by implantation of neural stem cells (NSCs) or nerve conduit. Implantation of NSCs along with conduits promotes the regeneration of damaged nerve, likely because (i) conduit supports and guides axonal growth from one nerve stump to the other, while preventing fibrous tissue ingrowth and retaining neurotrophic factors; and (ii) implanted NSCs differentiate into Schwann cells and maintain a growth factor enriched microenvironment, which promotes nerve regeneration. In this study, we identified IL12p80 (homodimer of IL12p40) in the cell extracts of implanted nerve conduit combined with NSCs by using protein antibody array and Western blotting. Levels of IL12p80 in these conduits are 1.6-fold higher than those in conduits without NSCs. In the sciatic nerve injury mouse model, implantation of NSCs combined with nerve conduit and IL12p80 improves motor recovery and increases the diameter up to 4.5-fold, at the medial site of the regenerated nerve. In vitro study further revealed that IL12p80 stimulates the Schwann cell differentiation of mouse NSCs through the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3). These results suggest that IL12p80 can trigger Schwann cell differentiation of mouse NSCs through Stat3 phosphorylation and enhance the functional recovery and the diameter of regenerated nerves in a mouse sciatic nerve injury model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Nerve Growth Factor in Cancer Cell Death and Survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molloy, Niamh H.; Read, Danielle E.; Gorman, Adrienne M.

    2011-01-01

    One of the major challenges for cancer therapeutics is the resistance of many tumor cells to induction of cell death due to pro-survival signaling in the cancer cells. Here we review the growing literature which shows that neurotrophins contribute to pro-survival signaling in many different types of cancer. In particular, nerve growth factor, the archetypal neurotrophin, has been shown to play a role in tumorigenesis over the past decade. Nerve growth factor mediates its effects through its two cognate receptors, TrkA, a receptor tyrosine kinase and p75 NTR , a member of the death receptor superfamily. Depending on the tumor origin, pro-survival signaling can be mediated by TrkA receptors or by p75 NTR . For example, in breast cancer the aberrant expression of nerve growth factor stimulates proliferative signaling through TrkA and pro-survival signaling through p75 NTR . This latter signaling through p75 NTR promotes increased resistance to the induction of cell death by chemotherapeutic treatments. In contrast, in prostate cells the p75 NTR mediates cell death and prevents metastasis. In prostate cancer, expression of this receptor is lost, which contributes to tumor progression by allowing cells to survive, proliferate and metastasize. This review focuses on our current knowledge of neurotrophin signaling in cancer, with a particular emphasis on nerve growth factor regulation of cell death and survival in cancer

  5. Schwann cell autophagy, myelinophagy, initiates myelin clearance from injured nerves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomez-Sanchez, Jose A.; Carty, Lucy; Iruarrizaga-Lejarreta, Marta; Palomo-Irigoyen, Marta; Varela-Rey, Marta; Griffith, Megan; Hantke, Janina; Macias-Camara, Nuria; Azkargorta, Mikel; Aurrekoetxea, Igor; de Juan, Virginia Gutiérrez; Jefferies, Harold B. J.; Aspichueta, Patricia; Elortza, Félix; Aransay, Ana M.; Martínez-Chantar, María L.; Baas, Frank; Mato, José M.; Mirsky, Rhona; Woodhoo, Ashwin; Jessen, Kristján R.

    2015-01-01

    Although Schwann cell myelin breakdown is the universal outcome of a remarkably wide range of conditions that cause disease or injury to peripheral nerves, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that make Schwann cell-mediated myelin digestion possible have not been established. We report that

  6. Cell proliferation and apoptosis in optic nerve and brain integration centers of adult trout Oncorhynchus mykiss after optic nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniya V Pushchina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fishes have remarkable ability to effectively rebuild the structure of nerve cells and nerve fibers after central nervous system injury. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In order to address this issue, we investigated the proliferation and apoptosis of cells in contralateral and ipsilateral optic nerves, after stab wound injury to the eye of an adult trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Heterogenous population of proliferating cells was investigated at 1 week after injury. TUNEL labeling gave a qualitative and quantitative assessment of apoptosis in the cells of optic nerve of trout 2 days after injury. After optic nerve injury, apoptotic response was investigated, and mass patterns of cell migration were found. The maximal concentration of apoptotic bodies was detected in the areas of mass clumps of cells. It is probably indicative of massive cell death in the area of high phagocytic activity of macrophages/microglia. At 1 week after optic nerve injury, we observed nerve cell proliferation in the trout brain integration centers: the cerebellum and the optic tectum. In the optic tectum, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA-immunopositive radial glia-like cells were identified. Proliferative activity of nerve cells was detected in the dorsal proliferative (matrix area of the cerebellum and in parenchymal cells of the molecular and granular layers whereas local clusters of undifferentiated cells which formed neurogenic niches were observed in both the optic tectum and cerebellum after optic nerve injury. In vitro analysis of brain cells of trout showed that suspension cells compared with monolayer cells retain higher proliferative activity, as evidenced by PCNA immunolabeling. Phase contrast observation showed mitosis in individual cells and the formation of neurospheres which gradually increased during 1-4 days of culture. The present findings suggest that trout can be used as a novel model for studying neuronal regeneration.

  7. Cell proliferation and apoptosis in optic nerve and brain integration centers of adult trout Oncorhynchus mykiss after optic nerve injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushchina, Evgeniya V.; Shukla, Sachin; Varaksin, Anatoly A.; Obukhov, Dmitry K.

    2016-01-01

    Fishes have remarkable ability to effectively rebuild the structure of nerve cells and nerve fibers after central nervous system injury. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In order to address this issue, we investigated the proliferation and apoptosis of cells in contralateral and ipsilateral optic nerves, after stab wound injury to the eye of an adult trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Heterogenous population of proliferating cells was investigated at 1 week after injury. TUNEL labeling gave a qualitative and quantitative assessment of apoptosis in the cells of optic nerve of trout 2 days after injury. After optic nerve injury, apoptotic response was investigated, and mass patterns of cell migration were found. The maximal concentration of apoptotic bodies was detected in the areas of mass clumps of cells. It is probably indicative of massive cell death in the area of high phagocytic activity of macrophages/microglia. At 1 week after optic nerve injury, we observed nerve cell proliferation in the trout brain integration centers: the cerebellum and the optic tectum. In the optic tectum, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-immunopositive radial glia-like cells were identified. Proliferative activity of nerve cells was detected in the dorsal proliferative (matrix) area of the cerebellum and in parenchymal cells of the molecular and granular layers whereas local clusters of undifferentiated cells which formed neurogenic niches were observed in both the optic tectum and cerebellum after optic nerve injury. In vitro analysis of brain cells of trout showed that suspension cells compared with monolayer cells retain higher proliferative activity, as evidenced by PCNA immunolabeling. Phase contrast observation showed mitosis in individual cells and the formation of neurospheres which gradually increased during 1–4 days of culture. The present findings suggest that trout can be used as a novel model for studying neuronal regeneration. PMID:27212918

  8. Low Level Laser Irradiation of Nerve Cells In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Lim et al. used a GaAIAs low level laser to treat post orthodontic manipulation pain.46 Patients exposed to the laser reported a lower level of pain...1993-0-336-043 Standard Form 298 Back (Rev. 2-89) LOW LEVEL LASER IRRADIATION OF NERVE CELLS IN VITRO A Thesis Presented in Partial fulfillment of the...penetrates to the nerve. The present study does not support the hypothesis that there is a direct effect of the low level laser energy on perineural or

  9. Microfluidics for single cell analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Marie Pødenphant

    Isolation and manipulation of single cells have gained an increasing interest from researchers because of the heterogeneity of cells from the same cell culture. Single cell analysis can ensure a better understanding of differences between individual cells and potentially solve a variety of clinical...... problems. In this thesis lab on a chip systems for rare single cell analysis are investigated. The focus was to develop a commercial, disposable device for circulating tumour cell (CTC) analysis. Such a device must be able to separate rare cells from blood samples and subsequently capture the specific...... cells, and simultaneously be fabricated and operated at low costs and be user-friendly. These challenges were addressed through development of two microfluidic devices, one for rare cell isolation based on pinched flow fractionation (PFF) and one for single cell capture based on hydrodynamic trapping...

  10. Human amniotic epithelial cell transplantation for the repair of injured brachial plexus nerve: evaluation of nerve viscoelastic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Jin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The transplantation of embryonic stem cells can effectively improve the creeping strength of nerves near an injury site in animals. Amniotic epithelial cells have similar biological properties as embryonic stem cells; therefore, we hypothesized that transplantation of amniotic epithelial cells can repair peripheral nerve injury and recover the creeping strength of the brachial plexus nerve. In the present study, a brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits using the C 6 root avulsion method. A suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was repeatedly injected over an area 4.0 mm lateral to the cephal and caudal ends of the C 6 brachial plexus injury site (1 × 10 6 cells/mL, 3 μL/injection, 25 injections immediately after the injury. The results showed that the decrease in stress and increase in strain at 7,200 seconds in the injured rabbit C 6 brachial plexus nerve were mitigated by the cell transplantation, restoring the viscoelastic stress relaxation and creep properties of the brachial plexus nerve. The forepaw functions were also significantly improved at 26 weeks after injury. These data indicate that transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells can effectively restore the mechanical properties of the brachial plexus nerve after injury in rabbits and that viscoelasticity may be an important index for the evaluation of brachial plexus injury in animals.

  11. Accuracy of Motor Axon Regeneration Across Autograft, Single Lumen, and Multichannel Poly(lactic-co-glycolic Acid) (PLGA) Nerve Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruiter, Godard C.; Spinner, Robert J.; Malessy, Martijn J. A.; Moore, Michael J.; Sorenson, Eric J.; Currier, Bradford L.; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Windebank, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Accuracy of motor axon regeneration becomes an important issue in the development of a nerve tube for motor nerve repair. Dispersion of regeneration across the nerve tube may lead to misdirection and polyinnervation. In this study, we present a series of methods to investigate the accuracy of regeneration, which we used to compare regeneration across autografts and single lumen poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nerve tubes. We also present the concept of the multichannel nerve tube that may limit dispersion by separately guiding groups of regenerating axons. Methods Simultaneous tracing of the tibial and peroneal nerves with fast blue (FB) and diamidino yellow (DY), 8 weeks after repair of a 1-cm nerve gap in the rat sciatic nerve, was performed to determine the percentage of double-projecting motoneurons. Sequential tracing of the peroneal nerve with DY 1 week before and FB 8 weeks after repair was performed to determine the percentage of correctly directed peroneal motoneurons. Results In the cases in which there was successful regeneration across single lumen nerve tubes, more motoneurons had double projections to both the tibial and peroneal nerve branches after single lumen nerve tube repair (21.4%) than after autograft repair (5.9%). After multichannel nerve tube repair, this percentage was slightly reduced (16.9%), although not significantly. The direction of regeneration was nonspecific after all types of repair. Conclusion Retrograde tracing techniques provide new insights into the process of regeneration across nerve tubes. The methods and data presented in this study can be used as a basis in the development of a nerve tube for motor nerve repair. PMID:18728579

  12. Membrane phosphorylation and nerve cell function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, P.R.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis deals with the phosphorylation of membrane components. In part I a series of experiments is described using the hippocampal slice as a model system. In part II a different model system - cultured hybrid cells - is used to study protein and lipid phosphorylation, influenced by incubation with neuropeptides. In part III in vivo and in vitro studies are combined to study protein phosphorylation after neuroanatomical lesions. In a section of part II (Page 81-90) labelling experiments of the membrane inositol-phospholipids are described. 32 P-ATP was used to label phospholipids in intact hybrid cells, and short incubations were found to be the most favourable. (C.F.)

  13. Side-To-Side Nerve Bridges Support Donor Axon Regeneration Into Chronically Denervated Nerves and Are Associated With Characteristic Changes in Schwann Cell Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, J Michael; Alvarez-Veronesi, M Cecilia; Snyder-Warwick, Alison; Gordon, Tessa; Borschel, Gregory H

    2015-11-01

    Chronic denervation resulting from long nerve regeneration times and distances contributes greatly to suboptimal outcomes following nerve injuries. Recent studies showed that multiple nerve grafts inserted between an intact donor nerve and a denervated distal recipient nerve stump (termed "side-to-side nerve bridges") enhanced regeneration after delayed nerve repair. To examine the cellular aspects of axon growth across these bridges to explore the "protective" mechanism of donor axons on chronically denervated Schwann cells. In Sprague Dawley rats, 3 side-to-side nerve bridges were placed over a 10-mm distance between an intact donor tibial (TIB) nerve and a recipient denervated common peroneal (CP) distal nerve stump. Green fluorescent protein-expressing TIB axons grew across the bridges and were counted in cross section after 4 weeks. Immunofluorescent axons and Schwann cells were imaged over a 4-month period. Denervated Schwann cells dedifferentiated to a proliferative, nonmyelinating phenotype within the bridges and the recipient denervated CP nerve stump. As donor TIB axons grew across the 3 side-to-side nerve bridges and into the denervated CP nerve, the Schwann cells redifferentiated to the myelinating phenotype. Bridge placement led to an increased mass of hind limb anterior compartment muscles after 4 months of denervation compared with muscles whose CP nerve was not "protected" by bridges. This study describes patterns of donor axon regeneration and myelination in the denervated recipient nerve stump and supports a mechanism where these donor axons sustain a proregenerative state to prevent deterioration in the face of chronic denervation.

  14. Immune cell distribution and immunoglobulin levels change following sciatic nerve injury in a rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: To investigate the systemic and local immune status of two surgical rat models of sciatic nerve injury, a crushed sciatic nerve, and a sciatic nerve transection Materials and Methods:Twenty-four adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: sham-operation (control group, sciatic nerve crush, and sciatic nerve transaction. Sciatic nerve surgery was performed. The percentage of CD4+ cells and the CD4+/CD8+ratio were determined by flow cytometry. Serum IgM and IgG levels were analyzed by ELISA. T-cells (CD3 and macrophages (CD68 in sciatic nerve tissue sections were identified through immunohistochemistry. Results: Compared to sham-operated controls, in rats that underwent nerve injury, the percentage of CD4+ cells and the CD4+/CD8+ ratio in the peripheral blood were significantly  decreased 7 days after surgery, serum IgM levels were increased 14 days after surgery, and serum IgG levels were increased 21 days after surgery. There were a large number of CD3+ cells and a small number of CD68+ cells in sciatic nerve tissue sections 21 days after surgery, indicating T-cell and macrophage activation and infiltration. Local IgG deposition was also detected at the nerve injury site 21 days after surgery. Conclusion: Rat humoral and cellular immune status changed following sciatic nerve injury, particularly with regard to the cellular immune response at the nerve injury site.

  15. Expression of cell adhesion molecules in normal nerves, chronic axonal neuropathies and Schwann cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, P H; Figarella-Branger, D; Daniel, L; Bianco, N; Pellet, W; Pellissier, J F

    1997-10-22

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) play a role in the normal development and regeneration of tissues as well as in the biological behaviour of tumors. We studied the immunohistochemical expression of various CAMs, such as neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), its polysialylated isoform (PSA-NCAM), epithelial (E-) cadherin, and beta1 integrins (alpha2beta1, alpha5beta1, alpha6beta1) in a series of frozen specimens of 10 normal nerves, 5 axonal neuropathies, 26 benign Schwannomas and 2 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MNST). NCAM was expressed by non-myelinating Schwann cells from normal nerves and overexpressed by Schwann cells from patients with chronic axonal neuropathies and Schwannomas. The expression was lower in MNST. Expression of PSA-NCAM was heterogeneously displayed by Schwann cells from the various tissues studied. Anti E-cadherin immunoreactivity was present in myelin sheath in normal nerves and axonopathies. It was expressed in some Schwannomas especially in vestibular Schwannomas. Integrins VLA alpha2 and VLA alpha6 were widely expressed by Schwann cells from normal nerves, axonal neuropathies and Schwannomas but their expression was low in MNST. VLA alpha5 was not expressed by Schwann cells from normal nerve and Schwannomas but present in chronic axonal neuropathies and MNST. In addition VLA alpha6 was strongly expressed by perineurial cells. These data show that CAMs have a characteristic pattern of expression in normal nerve. Also, some CAMs are always expressed by Schwann cells but the expression of others differs in normal nerves versus axonopathies or tumors, suggesting a role of the microcellular environment in the regulation of CAM expression. Schwannomas have different pattern of expression than MNST.

  16. Dynamic Quantification of Host Schwann Cell Migration into Peripheral Nerve Allografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlock, Elizabeth L.; Myckatyn, Terence M.; Tong, Alice Y.; Yee, Andrew; Yan, Ying; Magill, Christina K.; Johnson, Philip J.; Mackinnon, Susan E.

    2010-01-01

    Host Schwann cell (SC) migration into nerve allografts is the limiting factor in the duration of immunosuppression following peripheral nerve allotransplantation, and may be affected by different immunosuppressive regimens. Our objective was to compare SC migration patterns between clinical and experimental immunosuppression regimens both over time and at the harvest endpoint. Eighty mice that express GFP under the control of the Schwann cell specific S100 promoter were engrafted with allogeneic, nonfluorescent sciatic nerve grafts. Mice received immunosuppression with either tacrolimus (FK506), or experimental T-cell triple costimulation blockade (CSB), consisting of CTLA4-immunoglobulin fusion protein, anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody, and anti-inducible costimulator monoclonal antibody. Migration of GFP-expressing host SCs into wild-type allografts was assessed in vivo every 3 weeks until 15 weeks postoperatively, and explanted allografts were evaluated for immunohistochemical staining patterns to differentiate graft from host SCs. Immunosuppression with tacrolimus exhibited a plateau of SC migration, characterized by significant early migration (< 3 weeks) followed by a constant level of host SCs in the graft (15 weeks). At the endpoint, graft fluorescence was decreased relative to surrounding host nerve, and donor SCs persisted within the graft. CSB-treated mice displayed gradually increasing migration of host SCs into the graft, without the plateau noted in tacrolimus-treated mice, and also maintained a population of donor SCs at the 15-week endpoint. SC migration patterns are affected by immunosuppressant choice, particularly in the immediate postoperative period, and the use of a single treatment of CSB may allow for gradual population of nerve allografts with host SCs. PMID:20633557

  17. Analysis of single biological cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watt, Frank

    2002-01-01

    The extraction of elemental information from single cultured cells using nuclear microscopy is an area of great potential because it can provide both quantitative information on the uptake of elements by the cell, and also its elemental response to a wide variety of external stimuli. A recent technique based on nuclear physics technology enables the analysis of single cells down to the parts per million level to be achieved

  18. Single Cell Isolation and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Hu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence shows that the heterogeneity of individual cells within a genetically identical population can be critical to their peculiar function and fate. Conventional cell based assays mainly analysis the average responses from a population cells, while the difference within individual cells may often be masked. The cell size, RNA transcripts and protein expression level are quite different within individual cells and these variations are key point to answer the problems in cancer, neurobiology, stem cell biology, immunology and developmental biology. To better understand the cell-to-cell variations, the single cell analysis can provide much more detailed information which may be helpful for therapeutic decisions in an increasingly personalized medicine. In this review, we will focus on the recent development in single cell analysis, including methods used in single cell isolation, analysis and some application examples. The review provides the historical background to single cell analysis, discusses limitations, and current and future possibilities in this exciting field of research.

  19. Single cell electroporation on chip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valero, Ana

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis the results of the development of microfluidic cell trap devices for single cell electroporation are described, which are to be used for gene transfection. The performance of two types of Lab-on-a-Chip trapping devices was tested using beads and cells, whereas the functionality for

  20. Single-cell western blotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadri, Syed M S

    2015-01-01

    Cell heterogeneity is a variation in cellular processes in functionally similar cells. Cells from the same tissue which are considered genetically identical may have difference in size, structure, and level of protein expression which can lead to major impact on the functions of cell leading to difference in physiological consequences. Single-cell proteome-wide studies are used to detect cell heterogeneity. Flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry do play an important role in evaluating cell heterogeneity. However, these methods are based on separation by antibodies with limited specificity. Cross-reactivity can occur leading to bias in result. Western blot is done to separate the proteins according to molecular weight. Therefore, off-target and on-target signals can be discriminated. Detection of protein expression from a tissue can be done with the help of western blot. However, it is unable to differentiate protein expression of individual cells. For detection of this cell-to-cell variation, a highly advanced technique termed "single-cell western blotting" is carried out. Single-cell western blot has enabled us to detect protein expression at cellular level at a fairly advanced high resolution using a western blot designed to assess cell heterogeneity.

  1. Measuring single-cell density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, William H; Bryan, Andrea K; Diez-Silva, Monica; Suresh, Subra; Higgins, John M; Manalis, Scott R

    2011-07-05

    We have used a microfluidic mass sensor to measure the density of single living cells. By weighing each cell in two fluids of different densities, our technique measures the single-cell mass, volume, and density of approximately 500 cells per hour with a density precision of 0.001 g mL(-1). We observe that the intrinsic cell-to-cell variation in density is nearly 100-fold smaller than the mass or volume variation. As a result, we can measure changes in cell density indicative of cellular processes that would be otherwise undetectable by mass or volume measurements. Here, we demonstrate this with four examples: identifying Plasmodium falciparum malaria-infected erythrocytes in a culture, distinguishing transfused blood cells from a patient's own blood, identifying irreversibly sickled cells in a sickle cell patient, and identifying leukemia cells in the early stages of responding to a drug treatment. These demonstrations suggest that the ability to measure single-cell density will provide valuable insights into cell state for a wide range of biological processes.

  2. Photodynamic damage of glial cells in crayfish ventral nerve cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolosov, M. S.; Duz, E.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising method for treatment of brain tumors, the most of which are of glial origin. In the present work we studied PDT-mediated injury of glial cells in nerve tissue, specifically, in abdominal connectives in the crayfish ventral nerve cord. The preparation was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine Photosens and irradiated 30 min with the diode laser (670 nm, 0.1 or 0.15 W/cm2). After following incubation in the darkness during 1- 10 hours it was fluorochromed with Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide to reveal nuclei of living, necrotic and apoptotic cells. The chain-like location of the glial nuclei allowed visualization of those enveloping giant axons and blood vessels. The level of glial necrosis in control preparations was about 2-5 %. Apoptosis was not observed in control preparations. PDT significantly increased necrosis of glial cells to 52 or 67 % just after irradiation with 0.1 or 0.15 W/cm2, respectively. Apoptosis of glial cells was observed only at 10 hours after light exposure. Upper layers of the glial envelope of the connectives were injured stronger comparing to deep ones: the level of glial necrosis decreased from 100 to 30 % upon moving from the connective surface to the plane of the giant axon inside the connective. Survival of glial cells was also high in the vicinity of blood vessels. One can suggest that giant axons and blood vessels protect neighboring glial cells from photodynamic damage. The mechanism of such protective action remains to be elucidated.

  3. Chitosan-film associated with mesenchymal stem cells enhanced regeneration of peripheral nerves: A rat sciatic nerve model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moattari, Mehrnaz; Kouchesfehani, Homa Mohseni; Kaka, Gholamreza; Sadraie, Seyed Homayoon; Naghdi, Majid; Mansouri, Korosh

    2018-03-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries comprise significant portion of the nervous system injuries. Although peripheral nerves show some capacity of regeneration after injury, but the extent of regeneration is not remarkable. Regeneration might be through the activity of the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) which can release growth factors or extracellular matrix components or by the therapeutic effect of some material with the MSCs. The present study aimed to evaluate the regeneration of transected sciatic nerve by a therapeutic value of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) associated with chitosan-film (Cs) in rat. Male Wistar rats (n=42, 180-200g) were randomly divided into intact; control; sham; Cs; MSCs; MSCs + Cs groups. Functional recovery was evaluated at 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks after surgery using sciatic functional index (SFI), hot water paw immersion test, electrophysiological, histological analyses. The rats in the MSCs+Cs group showed significant decrease in SFI and hot water paw immersion test during the 2nd to 8th weeks after surgery. Electrophysiological findings showed a significant decrease in latency time in the MSCs +Cs group. Amplitude of the nerve impulses also increased. Number of nerve fibers with more than 6 μm diameters increased significantly in MSCs+Cs. The number of nerve fibers with less than 4 μm diameters also increased significantly in MSCs+Cs group. Taken together, mesenchymal stem cells associated with Cs could improve functional and histomorphological properties of the sciatic nerve after injury which may have some clinical outcomes as well. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Schwannomatosis with Cystic Degeneration Arising from a Single Intercostal Nerve: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kun Woo; Lee, Young Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Hyun [Dept. of Thoracic and Cardiovascular, Kyung Hee Hospital at Gangdong, Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Dong Wook [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee Medical Center, Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    An intrathoracic schwannoma is a benign neurogenic tumor that arises from the posterior mediastinum and is commonly found to be solitary. Schwannomatosis that manifests as multiple cysts is extremely rare. In this case study, we report a rare case of a 36-year-old man with no respiratory symptoms, with multiple cystic tumors in the posterior chest wall and pathologically confirmed schwannomatosis with cystic degeneration arising from a single intercostal nerve.

  5. Diabetes mellitus leads to accumulation of dendritic cells and nerve fiber damage of the subbasal nerve plexus in the cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppin, Katja; Behrendt, Ann-Kathrin; Reichard, Maria; Stachs, Oliver; Guthoff, Rudolf F; Baltrusch, Simone; Eule, Johanna C; Vollmar, Brigitte

    2014-04-29

    To evaluate whether nerve fibers of the subbasal nerve plexus (SNP) and dendritic cells (DCs) are in association with each other leading to neuropathy in the diabetic cornea. BALB/c mice were injected with streptozotocin (STZ) for 5 days for induction of diabetes mellitus (DM) or with vehicle solution (control). B6.VLep(ob/ob) (ob/ob) mice served as an obese and glucose-intolerant DM type 2 (DM II) model and lean B6.VLep(ob/+) (ob/+) mice as respective controls. Using in vivo corneal confocal microscopy (CCM), nerve fibers and DCs were quantified over a period of 9 weeks and additionally analyzed by in vitro immunofluorescence whole-mount staining. In STZ-diabetic mice, CCM revealed an increase of DC density (DCD) in contrast to controls, whereas nerve fiber density (NFD) was decreased with duration of DM. In ob/ob mice, DCD was 3-fold higher than in both ob/+ mice and STZ-diabetic mice. Whole-mount staining displayed CD11c(+) and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II(+) mature DCs in colocalization with class III β-tubulin(+) nerve fibers in the cornea. Hyperglycemia leads to corneal DC infiltration, and obesity aggravates this immune response. The direct contact between DCs and the SNP can be assumed to be a trigger of nerve fiber damage and thus a contributing factor to polyneuropathy in diabetic corneas. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  6. Single Molecule Spectroscopy: Single Live Cell

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    kbhattacharjee

    Live Cell Imaging: Seeing inside a cell. • Cell: ~20,000 nm ~ 100 times bigger than focus. • Label different parts of a cell with fluorescent dye. • Cancer Cell: How different from a normal cell? cell. Space & time resolution ...

  7. Mycolactone cytotoxicity in Schwann cells could explain nerve damage in Buruli ulcer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junichiro En

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer is a chronic painless skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. The local nerve damage induced by M. ulcerans invasion is similar to the nerve damage evoked by the injection of mycolactone in a Buruli ulcer mouse model. In order to elucidate the mechanism of this nerve damage, we tested and compared the cytotoxic effect of synthetic mycolactone A/B on cultured Schwann cells, fibroblasts and macrophages. Mycolactone induced much higher cell death and apoptosis in Schwann cell line SW10 than in fibroblast line L929. These results suggest that mycolactone is a key substance in the production of nerve damage of Buruli ulcer.

  8. Peripheral nerve reconstruction with epsilon-caprolactone conduits seeded with vasoactive intestinal peptide gene-transfected mesenchymal stem cells in a rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Cortés, P.; Toledo-Romero, M. A.; Delgado, M.; Sánchez-González, C. E.; Martin, F.; Galindo-Moreno, P.; O'Valle, F.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Attempts have been made to improve nerve conduits in peripheral nerve reconstruction. We investigated the potential therapeutic effect of a vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), a neuropeptide with neuroprotective, trophic and developmental regulatory actions, in peripheral nerve regeneration in a severe model of nerve injury that was repaired with nerve conduits. Approach. The sciatic nerve of each male Wistar rat was transected unilaterally at 10 mm and then repaired with Dl-lactic-ɛ-caprolactone conduits. The rats were treated locally with saline, with the VIP, with adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) or with ASCs that were transduced with the VIP-expressing lentivirus. The rats with the transected nerve, with no repairs, were used as untreated controls. At 12 weeks post-surgery, we assessed their limb function by measuring the ankle stance angle and the percentage of their muscle mass reduction, and we evaluated the histopathology, immunohistochemistry and morphometry of the myelinated fibers. Main results. The rats that received a single injection of VIP-expressing ASCs showed a significant functional recovery in the ankle stance angle (p = 0.049) and a higher number of myelinated fibers in the middle and distal segments of the operated nerve versus the other groups (p = 0.046). Significance. These results suggest that utilization of a cellular substrate, plus a VIP source, is a promising method for enhancing nerve regeneration using Dl-lactic-ɛ-caprolactone conduits and that this method represents a potential useful clinical approach to repairing peripheral nerve damage.

  9. Early alterations of Hedgehog signaling pathway in vascular endothelial cells after peripheral nerve injury elicit blood-nerve barrier disruption, nerve inflammation, and neuropathic pain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Nathan; Mauborgne, Annie; Bourgoin, Sylvie; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Romero, Ignacio A; Weksler, Babette B; Villanueva, Luis; Pohl, Michel; Boucher, Yves

    2016-04-01

    Changes in the nerve's microenvironment and local inflammation resulting from peripheral nerve injury participate in nerve sensitization and neuropathic pain development. Taking part in these early changes, disruption of the blood-nerve barrier (BNB) allows for infiltration of immunocytes and promotes the neuroinflammation. However, molecular mechanisms engaged in vascular endothelial cells (VEC) dysfunction and BNB alterations remain unclear. In vivo, BNB permeability was assessed following chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the rat sciatic nerve (ScN) and differential expression of markers of VEC functional state, inflammation, and intracellular signaling was followed from 3 hours to 2 months postinjury. Several mechanisms potentially involved in functional alterations of VEC were evaluated in vitro using human VEC (hCMEC/D3), then confronted to in vivo physiopathological conditions. CCI of the ScN led to a rapid disruption of endoneurial vascular barrier that was correlated to a decreased production of endothelial tight-junction proteins and an early and sustained alteration of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway. In vitro, activation of Toll-like receptor 4 in VEC downregulated the components of Hh pathway and altered the endothelial functional state. Inhibition of Hh signaling in the ScN of naive rats mimicked the biochemical and functional alterations observed after CCI and was, on its own, sufficient to evoke local neuroinflammation and sustained mechanical allodynia. Alteration of the Hh signaling pathway in VEC associated with peripheral nerve injury, is involved in BNB disruption and local inflammation, and could thus participate in the early changes leading to the peripheral nerve sensitization and, ultimately, neuropathic pain development.

  10. Construction of nerve guide conduits from cellulose/soy protein composite membranes combined with Schwann cells and pyrroloquinoline quinone for the repair of peripheral nerve defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lihua; Gan, Li; Liu, Yongming; Tian, Weiqun; Tong, Zan; Wang, Xiong; Huselstein, Celine; Chen, Yun

    2015-02-20

    Regeneration and functional reconstruction of peripheral nerve defects remained a significant clinical challenge. Nerve guide conduits, with seed cells or neurotrophic factors (NTFs), had been widely used to improve the repair and regeneration of injured peripheral nerve. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) was an antioxidant that can stimulate nerve growth factors (NGFs) synthesis and accelerate the Schwann cells (SCs) proliferation and growth. In present study, three kinds of nerve guide conduits were constructed: one from cellulose/SPI hollow tube (CSC), another from CSC combined with SCs (CSSC), and the third one from CSSC combined with PQQ (CSSPC), respectively. And then they were applied to bridge and repair the sciatic nerve defect in rats, using autograft as control. Effects of different nerve guide conduits on the nerve regeneration were comparatively evaluated by general analysis, sciatic function index (SFI) and histological analysis (HE and TEM). Newly-formed regenerative nerve fibers were observed and running through the transparent nerve guide conduits 12 weeks after surgery. SFI results indicated that the reconstruction of motor function in CSSPC group was better than that in CSSC and CSC groups. HE images from the cross-sections and longitudinal-sections of the harvested regenerative nerve indicated that regenerative nerve fibers had been formed and accompanied with new blood vessels and matrix materials in the conduits. TEM images also showed that lots of fresh myelinated and non-myelinated nerve fibers had been formed. Parts of vacuolar, swollen and abnormal axons occurred in CSC and CSSC groups, while the vacuolization and swell of axons was the least serious in CSSPC group. These results indicated that CSSPC group had the most ability to repair and reconstruct the nerve structure and functions due to the comprehensive contributions from hollow CSC tube, SCs and PQQ. As a result, the CSSPC may have the potential for the applications as nerve guide

  11. Plant single-cell and single-cell-type metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Biswapriya B; Assmann, Sarah M; Chen, Sixue

    2014-10-01

    In conjunction with genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics, plant metabolomics is providing large data sets that are paving the way towards a comprehensive and holistic understanding of plant growth, development, defense, and productivity. However, dilution effects from organ- and tissue-based sampling of metabolomes have limited our understanding of the intricate regulation of metabolic pathways and networks at the cellular level. Recent advances in metabolomics methodologies, along with the post-genomic expansion of bioinformatics knowledge and functional genomics tools, have allowed the gathering of enriched information on individual cells and single cell types. Here we review progress, current status, opportunities, and challenges presented by single cell-based metabolomics research in plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Innexin gap junctions in nerve cells coordinate spontaneous contractile behavior in Hydra polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaku, Yasuharu; Hwang, Jung Shan; Wolf, Alexander; Böttger, Angelika; Shimizu, Hiroshi; David, Charles N; Gojobori, Takashi

    2014-01-07

    Nerve cells and spontaneous coordinated behavior first appeared near the base of animal evolution in the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians. Experiments on the cnidarian Hydra have demonstrated that nerve cells are essential for this behavior, although nerve cells in Hydra are organized in a diffuse network and do not form ganglia. Here we show that the gap junction protein innexin-2 is expressed in a small group of nerve cells in the lower body column of Hydra and that an anti-innexin-2 antibody binds to gap junctions in the same region. Treatment of live animals with innexin-2 antibody eliminates gap junction staining and reduces spontaneous body column contractions. We conclude that a small subset of nerve cells, connected by gap junctions and capable of synchronous firing, act as a pacemaker to coordinate the contraction of the body column in the absence of ganglia.

  13. Innexin gap junctions in nerve cells coordinate spontaneous contractile behavior in Hydra polyps

    KAUST Repository

    Takaku, Yasuharu

    2014-01-07

    Nerve cells and spontaneous coordinated behavior first appeared near the base of animal evolution in the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians. Experiments on the cnidarian Hydra have demonstrated that nerve cells are essential for this behavior, although nerve cells in Hydra are organized in a diffuse network and do not form ganglia. Here we show that the gap junction protein innexin-2 is expressed in a small group of nerve cells in the lower body column of Hydra and that an anti-innexin-2 antibody binds to gap junctions in the same region. Treatment of live animals with innexin-2 antibody eliminates gap junction staining and reduces spontaneous body column contractions. We conclude that a small subset of nerve cells, connected by gap junctions and capable of synchronous firing, act as a pacemaker to coordinate the contraction of the body column in the absence of ganglia.

  14. Adipocyte-derived and dedifferentiated fat cells promoting facial nerve regeneration in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumine, Hajime; Takeuchi, Yuichi; Sasaki, Ryo; Kazama, Tomohiko; Kano, Koichiro; Matsumoto, Taro; Sakurai, Hiroyuki; Miyata, Mariko; Yamato, Masayuki

    2014-10-01

    Dedifferentiated fat cells, obtained from the ex vivo ceiling culture of mature adipocytes of mammals, have a high proliferative potential and pluripotency. The authors transplanted dedifferentiated fat cells into a nerve defect created in rat facial nerve and evaluated nerve regeneration ability. The buccal branch of the facial nerve of rats was exposed, and a 7-mm nerve defect was created. Green fluorescent protein-positive dedifferentiated fat cells prepared from adipocytes were mixed with type 1 collagen scaffold and infused into a silicone tube, which was then transplanted into the nerve defect in a green fluorescent protein-negative rat (the dedifferentiated fat group). Regenerated nerves were excised at 13 weeks after transplantation and examined histologically and physiologically. The findings were compared with those of autografts and silicone tubes loaded with collagen gel alone (the control group) transplanted similarly. Axon diameter of regenerated nerve increased significantly in the dedifferentiated fat group compared with the control group, whereas no significant difference was found between the dedifferentiated fat and autograft groups. Myelin thickness was found to be largest in the autograft group, followed by the dedifferentiated fat and the control groups, showing significant differences between all pairs of groups. Evaluation of physiologic function of nerves by compound muscle action potential revealed a significantly better result in the dedifferentiated fat group than in the control group. The regenerated nerves in the dedifferentiated fat group had S100 and green fluorescent protein-double-positive Schwann-like supportive cells. After being transplanted into a facial nerve defect, dedifferentiated fat cells promoted the maturation of the regenerated nerve.

  15. Study of stimulators of DNA synthesis in nerve tissue cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitvitskii, V.N.

    1986-04-10

    Changes in proliferative activity in different regions of the brain during ontogenesis are connected with changes in the composition and properties of regulators of cell proliferation. Extracts of regions of the brain in which active cell division takes place in a given stage of development (cortex of 15- to 17-day-old embryos or cerebellum of 8- to 10-day-old rats) can stimulate the incorporation of labeled precursors into the brain cell DNA of both newborn and adult rats. Salting out at increasing ammonium sulfate concentrations, gel filtration on Sephadex, and isoelectric focusing led to the isolation of three fractions of stimulators of DNA synthesis: in acid, neutral, and alkaline pH regions. A method is described for obtaining purified preparations and for determining some physicochemical properties of the acid activator, which is a low-molecular-weight peptide capable of noticeably stimulating the incorporation of labeled precursors into the DNA of nerve tissue cells when added to an in vitro system in a concentration of the order of 1 ..mu..g/ml.

  16. Single-cell photoacoustic thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liang; Wang, Lidai; Li, Chiye; Liu, Yan; Ke, Haixin; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Lihong V

    2013-02-01

    A novel photoacoustic thermometric method is presented for simultaneously imaging cells and sensing their temperature. With three-seconds-per-frame imaging speed, a temperature resolution of 0.2°C was achieved in a photo-thermal cell heating experiment. Compared to other approaches, the photoacoustic thermometric method has the advantage of not requiring custom-developed temperature-sensitive biosensors. This feature should facilitate the conversion of single-cell thermometry into a routine lab tool and make it accessible to a much broader biological research community.

  17. Horseradish peroxidase dye tracing and embryonic statoacoustic ganglion cell transplantation in the rat auditory nerve trunk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmgren, Björn; Jin, Zhe; Jiao, Yu; Kostyszyn, Beata; Olivius, Petri

    2011-03-04

    At present severe damage to hair cells and sensory neurons in the inner ear results in non-treatable auditory disorders. Cell implantation is a potential treatment for various neurological disorders and has already been used in clinical practice. In the inner ear, delivery of therapeutic substances including neurotrophic factors and stem cells provide strategies that in the future may ameliorate or restore hearing impairment. In order to describe a surgical auditory nerve trunk approach, in the present paper we injected the neuronal tracer horseradish peroxidase (HRP) into the central part of the nerve by an intra cranial approach. We further evaluated the applicability of the present approach by implanting statoacoustic ganglion (SAG) cells into the same location of the auditory nerve in normal hearing rats or animals deafened by application of β-bungarotoxin to the round window niche. The HRP results illustrate labeling in the cochlear nucleus in the brain stem as well as peripherally in the spiral ganglion neurons in the cochlea. The transplanted SAGs were observed within the auditory nerve trunk but no more peripheral than the CNS-PNS transitional zone. Interestingly, the auditory nerve injection did not impair auditory function, as evidenced by the auditory brainstem response. The present findings illustrate that an auditory nerve trunk approach may well access the entire auditory nerve and does not compromise auditory function. We suggest that such an approach might compose a suitable route for cell transplantation into this sensory cranial nerve. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Peripheral Nerve Repair with Cultured Schwann Cells: Getting Closer to the Clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carolina O. Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injuries are a frequent and disabling condition, which affects 13 to 23 per 100.000 persons each year. Severe cases, with structural disruption of the nerve, are associated with poor functional recovery. The experimental treatment using nerve grafts to replace damaged or shortened axons is limited by technical difficulties, invasiveness, and mediocre results. Other therapeutic choices include the adjunctive application of cultured Schwann cells and nerve conduits to guide axonal growth. The bone marrow is a rich source of mesenchymal cells, which can be differentiated in vitro into Schwann cells and subsequently engrafted into the damaged nerve. Alternatively, undifferentiated bone marrow mesenchymal cells can be associated with nerve conduits and afterward transplanted. Experimental studies provide evidence of functional, histological, and electromyographical improvement following transplantation of bone-marrow-derived cells in animal models of peripheral nerve injury. This paper focuses on this new therapeutic approach highlighting its direct translational and clinical utility in promoting regeneration of not only acute but perhaps also chronic cases of peripheral nerve damage.

  19. Single-Cell Western Blotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkala, Elly; Herr, Amy E

    2015-01-01

    Little headway has been made in single cell protein analysis, aside from tools that rely solely on antibody-probe based detection (i.e., flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry), which are limited by low specificity and multiplexing capabilities. To address these protein analysis gaps, we have introduced a single-cell western blot (scWestern). The protein assay is capable of highly specific analysis by coupling antibody-based detection with a polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) protein separation. Cells are settled via gravity into polyacrylamide (PA) microwells, chemically lysed in the wells, and then subjected to PAGE through the walls of the microwells and into the surrounding PA gel. Over a thousand single-cell separations are performed simultaneously, and multiple protein targets of interest are investigated. After PAGE separation, photo-immobilization of all proteins to the gel allows for antibody probing and lends to the archival quality of the scWestern assay where new proteins targets can be investigated months after the initial separations are performed.

  20. Comparison of skin sensory thresholds using pre-programmed or single-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jong Ho

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to compare the sensory thresholds of healthy subjects using pre-programmed or single-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. [Subjects] Ninety healthy adult subjects were randomly assigned to pre-programmed or single-frequency stimulation groups, each consisting of 45 participants. [Methods] Sensory thresholds were measured in the participants' forearms using von Frey filaments before and after pre-programmed or single-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and the result in values were analyzed. [Results] Significant increases in sensory threshold after stimulation were observed in both groups. However, there were no significant differences between the two groups in sensory thresholds after stimulation or in the magnitude of threshold increases following stimulation. [Conclusion] Our results show that there are no differences between sensory threshold increases induced by pre-programmed and single-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation.

  1. Roles of neural stem cells in the repair of peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong; Lu, Chang-Feng; Peng, Jiang; Hu, Cheng-Dong; Wang, Yu

    2017-12-01

    Currently, researchers are using neural stem cell transplantation to promote regeneration after peripheral nerve injury, as neural stem cells play an important role in peripheral nerve injury repair. This article reviews recent research progress of the role of neural stem cells in the repair of peripheral nerve injury. Neural stem cells can not only differentiate into neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, but can also differentiate into Schwann-like cells, which promote neurite outgrowth around the injury. Transplanted neural stem cells can differentiate into motor neurons that innervate muscles and promote the recovery of neurological function. To promote the repair of peripheral nerve injury, neural stem cells secrete various neurotrophic factors, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor, fibroblast growth factor, nerve growth factor, insulin-like growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor. In addition, neural stem cells also promote regeneration of the axonal myelin sheath, angiogenesis, and immune regulation. It can be concluded that neural stem cells promote the repair of peripheral nerve injury through a variety of ways.

  2. Novel Method To Differentiate Human Embryonic Stem Cells Into Dopaminergic Nerve Cells | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Institute on Drug Abuse's Development and Plasticity Section is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in licensing opportunities to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize novel methods to differentiate human embryonic stem cells into dopaminergic nerve cells. The invention described here is a novel method of differentiating human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into dopaminergic nerve cells, which is preferable to the currently available dopaminergic differentiation techniques.

  3. Single-Cell Genomic Analysis in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxuan Yuan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Individual cells in an organism are variable, which strongly impacts cellular processes. Advances in sequencing technologies have enabled single-cell genomic analysis to become widespread, addressing shortcomings of analyses conducted on populations of bulk cells. While the field of single-cell plant genomics is in its infancy, there is great potential to gain insights into cell lineage and functional cell types to help understand complex cellular interactions in plants. In this review, we discuss current approaches for single-cell plant genomic analysis, with a focus on single-cell isolation, DNA amplification, next-generation sequencing, and bioinformatics analysis. We outline the technical challenges of analysing material from a single plant cell, and then examine applications of single-cell genomics and the integration of this approach with genome editing. Finally, we indicate future directions we expect in the rapidly developing field of plant single-cell genomic analysis.

  4. Exposure to nerve growth factor worsens nephrotoxic effect induced by Cyclosporine A in HK-2 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Vizza

    Full Text Available Nerve growth factor is a neurotrophin that promotes cell growth, differentiation, survival and death through two different receptors: TrkA(NTR and p75(NTR. Nerve growth factor serum concentrations increase during many inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, glomerulonephritis, chronic kidney disease, end-stage renal disease and, particularly, in renal transplant. Considering that nerve growth factor exerts beneficial effects in the treatment of major central and peripheral neurodegenerative diseases, skin and corneal ulcers, we asked whether nerve growth factor could also exert a role in Cyclosporine A-induced graft nephrotoxicity. Our hypothesis was raised from basic evidence indicating that Cyclosporine A-inhibition of calcineurin-NFAT pathway increases nerve growth factor expression levels. Therefore, we investigated the involvement of nerve growth factor and its receptors in the damage exerted by Cyclosporine A in tubular renal cells, HK-2. Our results showed that in HK-2 cells combined treatment with Cyclosporine A + nerve growth factor induced a significant reduction in cell vitality concomitant with a down-regulation of Cyclin D1 and up-regulation of p21 levels respect to cells treated with Cyclosporine A alone. Moreover functional experiments showed that the co-treatment significantly up-regulated human p21promoter activity by involvement of the Sp1 transcription factor, whose nuclear content was negatively regulated by activated NFATc1. In addition we observed that the combined exposure to Cyclosporine A + nerve growth factor promoted an up-regulation of p75 (NTR and its target genes, p53 and BAD leading to the activation of intrinsic apoptosis. Finally, the chemical inhibition of p75(NTR down-regulated the intrinsic apoptotic signal. We describe two new mechanisms by which nerve growth factor promotes growth arrest and apoptosis in tubular renal cells exposed to Cyclosporine A.

  5. Trigeminal nerve involvement in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: value of MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karadag, Demet; Karaguelle, Ayse Tuba; Erden, Ilhan; Erden, Ayse E-mail: erden@ada.net.tr

    2002-10-01

    A 30-year-old male with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia presented with facial numbness. Neurological examination revealed paresthesia of the left trigeminal nerve. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology showed no atypical cells. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated enlargement and enhancement of intracranial portions of the left trigeminal nerve. The abnormal MR imaging findings almost completely resolved after the chemotherapy. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging is not only a useful procedure for the early diagnosis of cranial nerve invasion by leukemia but it might be helpful to follow the changes after the treatment.

  6. Uptake of Retrograde Tracers by Intact Optic Nerve Axons: A New Way to Label Retinal Ganglion Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Yu-Xiang; Yang, Jian; Yuan, Ti-Fei; So, Kwok-Fai

    2015-01-01

    Retrograde labelling of retinal ganglion cells with optic nerve transection often leads to degeneration of ganglion cells in prolonged experiments. Here we report that an intact optic nerve could uptake retrograde tracers applied onto the surface of the nerve, leading to high efficiency labelling of ganglion cells in the retina with long-term survival of cells. This method labelled a similar number of ganglion cells (2289 +/- 174 at 2 days) as the retrograde labeling technique from the superi...

  7. Regulation of Schwann cell proliferation in cultured segments of the adult rat sciatic nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Åsa Fex; Kanje, M

    1998-01-01

    Schwann cell proliferation was studied in cultured segments of the rat sciatic nerve by measurement of [3H] thymidine incorporation or through bromodeoxyuridine-(BrdU)-labelling and immunocytochemistry. The aim was to delineate mechanisms involved in the injury-induced proliferative response...... through the cAMP system. Together, these results show that Schwann cells regulate proliferation differently in an integrated environment, e.g. the nerve structure, than in isolation as primary monocultures....

  8. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Nerve Regeneration and Immunomodulation after Composite Tissue Allotransplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    10-1-0927 TITLE: Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Nerve Regeneration and Immunomodulation after Composite Tissue Allotransplantation...immunosuppression. Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) are pluripotent cells, capable of differentiation along multiple mesenchymal lineages into...As part of implemented transition from University of Pittsburgh to Johns Hopkins University, we optimized our mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) isolation

  9. Paralysis following stereotactic spinal irradiation in pigs suggests a tolerance constraint for single-session irradiation of the spinal nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medin, Paul M.; Foster, Ryan D.; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Meyer, Jeffrey; Sayre, James W.; Huang, Hao; Öz, Orhan K.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Paralysis observed during a study of vertebral bone tolerance to single-session irradiation led to further study of the dose-related incidence of motor peripheral neuropathy. Materials and methods: During a bone tolerance study, cervical spinal nerves of 15 minipigs received bilateral irradiation to levels C5–C8 distributed into three dose groups with mean maximum spinal nerve doses of 16.9 ± 0.3 Gy (n = 5), 18.7 ± 0.5 Gy (n = 5), and 24.3 ± 0.8 Gy (n = 5). Changes developing in the gait of the group of pigs receiving a mean maximum dose of 24.3 Gy after 10–15 weeks led to the irradiation of two additional animals. They received mean maximum dose of 24.9 ± 0.2 Gy (n = 2), targeted to the left spinal nerves of C5–C8. The followup period was one year. Histologic sections from spinal cords and available spinal nerves were evaluated. MR imaging was performed on pigs in the 24.9 Gy group. Results: No pig that received a maximum spinal nerve point dose ⩽19.0 Gy experienced a change in gait while all pigs that received ⩾24.1 Gy experienced paralysis. Extensive degeneration and fibrosis were observed in irradiated spinal nerves of the 24.9 Gy animals. All spinal cord sections were normal. Irradiated spinal nerve regions showed increased thickness and hypointensity on MR imaging. Conclusion: The single-session tolerance dose of the cervical spinal nerves lies between 19.0 and 24.1 Gy for this model

  10. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells versus adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells for peripheral nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Fernandes

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have confirmed that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can be used for treatment of several nervous system diseases. However, isolation of bone marrow-derived MSCs (BMSCs is an invasive and painful process and the yield is very low. Therefore, there is a need to search for other alterative stem cell sources. Adipose-derived MSCs (ADSCs have phenotypic and gene expression profiles similar to those of BMSCs. The production of ADSCs is greater than that of BMSCs, and ADSCs proliferate faster than BMSCs. To compare the effects of venous grafts containing BMSCs or ADSCs on sciatic nerve injury, in this study, rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham (only sciatic nerve exposed, Matrigel (MG; sciatic nerve injury + intravenous transplantation of MG vehicle, ADSCs (sciatic nerve injury + intravenous MG containing ADSCs, and BMSCs (sciatic nerve injury + intravenous MG containing BMSCs groups. Sciatic functional index was calculated to evaluate the function of injured sciatic nerve. Morphologic characteristics of nerves distal to the lesion were observed by toluidine blue staining. Spinal motor neurons labeled with Fluoro-Gold were quantitatively assessed. Compared with sham-operated rats, sciatic functional index was lower, the density of small-diameter fibers was significantly increased, and the number of motor neurons significantly decreased in rats with sciatic nerve injury. Neither ADSCs nor BMSCs significantly improved the sciatic nerve function of rats with sciatic nerve injury, increased fiber density, fiber diameters, axonal diameters, myelin sheath thickness, and G ratios (axonal diameter/fiber diameter ratios in the sciatic nerve distal to the lesion site. There was no significant difference in the number of spinal motor neurons among ADSCs, BMSCs and MG groups. These results suggest that neither BMSCs nor ADSCs provide satisfactory results for peripheral nerve repair when using MG as the conductor for

  11. Trophic Effects of Dental Pulp Stem Cells on Schwann Cells in Peripheral Nerve Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tsubasa; Osako, Yohei; Ito, Masataka; Murakami, Masashi; Hayashi, Yuki; Horibe, Hiroshi; Iohara, Koichiro; Takeuchi, Norio; Okui, Nobuyuki; Hirata, Hitoshi; Nakayama, Hidenori; Kurita, Kenichi; Nakashima, Misako

    2016-01-01

    Recently, mesenchymal stem cells have demonstrated a potential for neurotrophy and neurodifferentiation. We have recently isolated mobilized dental pulp stem cells (MDPSCs) using granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) gradient, which has high neurotrophic/angiogenic potential. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of MDPSC transplantation on peripheral nerve regeneration. Effects of MDPSC transplantation were examined in a rat sciatic nerve defect model and compared with autografts and control conduits containing collagen scaffold. Effects of conditioned medium of MDPSCs were also evaluated in vitro. Transplantation of MDPSCs in the defect demonstrated regeneration of myelinated fibers, whose axons were significantly higher in density compared with those in autografts and control conduits only. Enhanced revascularization was also observed in the MDPSC transplants. The MDPSCs did not directly differentiate into Schwann cell phenotype; localization of these cells near Schwann cells induced several neurotrophic factors. Immunofluorescence labeling demonstrated reduced apoptosis and increased proliferation in resident Schwann cells in the MDPSC transplant compared with control conduits. These trophic effects of MDPSCs on proliferation, migration, and antiapoptosis in Schwann cells were further elucidated in vitro. The results demonstrate that MDPSCs promote axon regeneration through trophic functions, acting on Schwann cells, and promoting angiogenesis.

  12. Intercellular K⁺ accumulation depolarizes Type I vestibular hair cells and their associated afferent nerve calyx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contini, D; Zampini, V; Tavazzani, E; Magistretti, J; Russo, G; Prigioni, I; Masetto, S

    2012-12-27

    Mammalian vestibular organs contain two types of sensory receptors, named Type I and Type II hair cells. While Type II hair cells are contacted by several small afferent nerve terminals, the basolateral surface of Type I hair cells is almost entirely enveloped by a single large afferent nerve terminal, called calyx. Moreover Type I, but not Type II hair cells, express a low-voltage-activated outward K(+) current, I(K,L), which is responsible for their much lower input resistance (Rm) at rest as compared to Type II hair cells. The functional meaning of I(K,L) and associated calyx is still enigmatic. By combining the patch-clamp whole-cell technique with the mouse whole crista preparation, we have recorded the current- and voltage responses of in situ hair cells. Outward K(+) current activation resulted in K(+) accumulation around Type I hair cells, since it induced a rightward shift of the K(+) reversal potential the magnitude of which depended on the amplitude and duration of K(+) current flow. Since this phenomenon was never observed for Type II hair cells, we ascribed it to the presence of a residual calyx limiting K(+) efflux from the synaptic cleft. Intercellular K(+) accumulation added a slow (τ>100ms) depolarizing component to the cell voltage response. In a few cases we were able to record from the calyx and found evidence for intercellular K(+) accumulation as well. The resulting depolarization could trigger a discharge of action potentials in the afferent nerve fiber. Present results support a model where pre- and postsynaptic depolarization produced by intercellular K(+) accumulation cooperates with neurotransmitter exocytosis in sustaining afferent transmission arising from Type I hair cells. While vesicular transmission together with the low Rm of Type I hair cells appears best suited for signaling fast head movements, depolarization produced by intercellular K(+) accumulation could enhance signal transmission during slow head movements. Copyright

  13. Macrophage polarization in nerve injury: do Schwann cells play a role?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo Anne Stratton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In response to peripheral nerve injury, the inflammatory response is almost entirely comprised of infiltrating macrophages. Macrophages are a highly plastic, heterogenic immune cell, playing an indispensable role in peripheral nerve injury, clearing debris and regulating the microenvironment to allow for efficient regeneration. There are several cells within the microenvironment that likely interact with macrophages to support their function - most notably the Schwann cell, the glial cell of the peripheral nervous system. Schwann cells express several ligands that are known to interact with receptors expressed by macrophages, yet the effects of Schwann cells in regulating macrophage phenotype remains largely unexplored. This review discusses macrophages in peripheral nerve injury and how Schwann cells may regulate their behavior.

  14. Sacral nerve stimulation for faecal incontinence: medium-term follow-up from a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Vicki; Abraham, Earl; Lubowski, David Z

    2017-06-01

    Most studies on sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) are either single-centre with small numbers of patients or multi-centre studies. We present the medium-term follow-up results from a single centre for 127 patients undergoing SNS. Consecutive patients treated with SNS for faecal incontinence had preoperative baseline St Mark's continence scores, faecal incontinence quality of life (FIQL) measures and anorectal physiology studies. Follow-up was a postal questionnaire concerning continence, FIQL, patient-perceived change in bowel control (-5 to +5 where 0 is no change), overall satisfaction (0-10 visual analogue scale) and use of medications. A total of 166 patients underwent temporary nerve stimulation testing, of which 112 progressed to a permanent implantable pulse generator (IPG). Fifteen received an IPG without the testing phase, hence 127 patients in total. Fourteen had the IPG removed, four were deceased, leaving 109 for assessment; 91 (83%) responded to the survey. Mean follow-up was 2.7 years (range: 2 months-8.5 years). Mean baseline St Mark's continence score was 14.4, and mean follow-up score was 10.3 (P < 0.01). FIQL improved in all domains (P < 0.001). Patient-reported improved bowel control mean score was +3.2 (95% CI: 2.9, 3.55). Median satisfaction score was 8.0 (range: 0-10). Complications included 17 lead dislodgements, seven superficial infections, five infections requiring surgery and five repositioning of a rotated IPG. Thirty-two patients used loperamide and 34 used fibre supplements. In this observational study, limited by the absence of a placebo control group, SNS significantly improved continence and quality of life, and patient satisfaction was high. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  15. Amniotic mesenchymal stem cells display neurovascular tropism and aid in the recovery of injured peripheral nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, YongNan; Guo, Longzhe; Ahn, Hyun Sook; Kim, Moo Hyun; Kim, Sung-Whan

    2014-06-01

    Recently, we reported that human amniotic membrane-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AMMs) possess great angiogenic potential. In this study, we determined whether local injection of AMMs ameliorates peripheral neuropathy. AMMs were transplanted into injured sciatic nerves. AMM injection promoted significant recovery of motor nerve conduction velocity and voltage amplitude compared to human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells. AMM implantation also augmented blood perfusion and increased intraneural vascularity. Whole-mount fluorescent imaging analysis demonstrated that AMMs exhibited higher engraftment and endothelial incorporation abilities in the sciatic nerve. In addition, the higher expression of pro-angiogenic factors was detected in AMMs injected into the peripheral nerve. Therefore, these data provide novel therapeutic and mechanistic insights into stem cell biology, and AMM transplantation may represent an alternative therapeutic option for treating peripheral neuropathy. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  16. Adult Stem Cell-Based Enhancement of Nerve Conduit for Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    studies, which will be used to develop testing in a large, clinically relevant animal model, as a basis for future clinical trial. Our long-term goal...provide sufficient information to move to MPC-NC technology to testing in a large, clinically relevant animal model, which will be designed after... test of the MPC-NC constructs in small animal models (rat/rabbit) of sciatic nerve repair §   Task 5: Proof-of-concept functional test of the MPC-NC

  17. A prospective, randomized comparison between single- and multiple-injection techniques for ultrasound-guided subgluteal sciatic nerve block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hiroto; Sakura, Shinichi; Wada, Minori; Shido, Akemi

    2014-12-01

    It is believed that local anesthetic injected to obtain circumferential spread around nerves produces a more rapid onset and successful blockade after some ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blocks. However, evidence demonstrating this point is limited only to the popliteal sciatic nerve block, which is relatively easy to perform by via a high-frequency linear transducer. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that multiple injections of local anesthetic to make circumferential spread would improve the rate of sensory and motor blocks compared with a single-injection technique for ultrasound-guided subgluteal sciatic nerve block, which is considered a relatively difficult block conducted with a low-frequency, curved-array transducer. Ninety patients undergoing knee surgery were divided randomly into 2 groups to receive the ultrasound-guided subgluteal approach to sciatic nerve block with 20 mL of 1.5% mepivacaine with epinephrine. For group M (the multiple-injection technique), the local anesthetic was injected to create circumferential spread around the sciatic nerve without limitation on the number of needle passes. For group S (the single-injection technique), the number of needle passes was limited to 1, and the local anesthetic was injected to create spread along the dorsal surface of the sciatic nerve, during which no adjustment of the needle tip was made. Sensory and motor blockade were assessed in double-blind fashion for 30 minutes after completion of the block. The primary outcome was sensory blockade of all sciatic components tested, including tibial, superficial peroneal, and sural nerves at 30 minutes after injection. Data from 86 patients (43 in each group) were analyzed. Block execution took more time for group M than group S. The proportion of patients with complete sensory blockade of all sciatic components at 30 minutes after injection was significantly larger for group M than group S (41.9% vs 16.3%, P = 0.018). Complete motor blockade of

  18. Nerve growth factor promotes in vitro proliferation of neural stem cells from tree shrews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu-lin Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells promote neuronal regeneration and repair of brain tissue after injury, but have limited resources and proliferative ability in vivo. We hypothesized that nerve growth factor would promote in vitro proliferation of neural stem cells derived from the tree shrews, a primate-like mammal that has been proposed as an alternative to primates in biomedical translational research. We cultured neural stem cells from the hippocampus of tree shrews at embryonic day 38, and added nerve growth factor (100 µg/L to the culture medium. Neural stem cells from the hippocampus of tree shrews cultured without nerve growth factor were used as controls. After 3 days, fluorescence microscopy after DAPI and nestin staining revealed that the number of neurospheres and DAPI/nestin-positive cells was markedly greater in the nerve growth factor-treated cells than in control cells. These findings demonstrate that nerve growth factor promotes the proliferation of neural stem cells derived from tree shrews.

  19. Calcium Signaling in Mitral Cell Dendrites of Olfactory Bulbs of Neonatal Rats and Mice during Olfactory Nerve Stimulation and Beta-Adrenoceptor Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Qi; Mutoh, Hiroki; Debarbieux, Franck; Knopfel, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Synapses formed by the olfactory nerve (ON) provide the source of excitatory synaptic input onto mitral cells (MC) in the olfactory bulb. These synapses, which relay odor-specific inputs, are confined to the distally tufted single primary dendrites of MCs, the first stage of central olfactory processing. Beta-adrenergic modulation of electrical…

  20. Stem cells and related factors involved in facial nerve function regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil H. Nelke

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The facial nerve (VII is one of the most important cranial nerves for head and neck surgeons. Its function is closely related to facial expressions that are individual for every person. After its injury or palsy, its functions can be either impaired or absent. Because of the presence of motor, sensory and parasympathetic fibers, the biology of its repair and function restoration depends on many factors. In order to achieve good outcome, many different therapies can be performed in order to restore as much of the nerve function as possible. When rehabilitation and physiotherapy are not sufficient, additional surgical procedures and therapies are taken into serious consideration. The final outcome of many of them is discussable, depending on nerve damage etiology. Stem cells in facial nerve repair are used, but long-term outcomes and results are still not fully known. In order to understand this therapeutic approach, clinicians and surgeons should understand the immunobiology of nerve repair and regeneration. In this review, potential stem cell usage in facial nerve regeneration procedures is discussed.

  1. Effect of non-autologous adipose-derived stem cells transplantation and nerve growth factor on the repair of crushed sciatic nerve in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Tajik

    2014-02-01

    Conclusion: Transplantation of non-autologous of adipose-derived stem cells (ASDc is an appropriate therapeutic approach in repairing of neurological injuries and NGF has a positive effect in crushed sciatic nerve regeneration.

  2. Protection of pattern electroretinogram and retinal ganglion cells by oncostatin M after optic nerve injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Xia

    Full Text Available Injury to retinal ganglion cell (RGC axons leads to selective loss of RGCs and vision. Previous studies have shown that exogenous neurotrophic factors promote RGC survival. We investigated the neuroprotective effects of oncostatin M (OSM, a member of the IL-6 family of cytokines, on pattern electroretinogram (PERG and RGC survival after optic nerve crush (ON-crush in the mouse. BALB/C mice received ON-crush in the left eyes for either 4-second or 1-second duration (4-s or 1-s. Fluoro-gold retrograde labeling was used to identify RGCs. RGC function was assessed by PERG measurement. OSM or CNTF protein was injected intravitreally immediately after ON-crush. OSM responsive cells were identified by localization of increased STAT3 phosphorylation. Significant higher RGC survival (46% of untreated control was seen in OSM-treated eyes when assessed 2 weeks after 4-s ON-crush as compared to that (14% of untreated control of the PBS-treated eyes (P<0.001. In addition, PERG amplitude was significantly higher in eyes treated with OSM or CNTF 1 week after 1-s ON-crush (36% of baseline as compared with the amplitude of PBS-treated eyes (19% of the baseline, P = 0.003. An increase in STAT3 phosphorylation was localized in Müller layer after OSM treatment, suggesting that Müller cells mediate the effect of OSM. Our results demonstrate that one single injection of either OSM or CNTF after ON-crush improves RGC survival together with their electrophysiological activity. These data provide proof-of-concept for using neurotrophic factors OSM and CNTF for RGC degenerative diseases, including glaucoma and acute optic nerve trauma.

  3. Clinical Evaluation of Decellularized Nerve Allograft with Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cells to Improve Peripheral Nerve Repair and Functional Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    followed for 18 months post -surgery. Secondary outcomes will be examined to evaluate the efficacy of the co-treatment for nerve repair compared to...transplantation of in vitro differentiated bone-marrow stromal cells. Eur J Neurosci . 2001 Dec;14(11):1771-6. 20. Djouad F, Jackson WM, Bobick BE, Janjanin S...enrollment. Goals/Milestones Yr 1 Goals  Start Up, Hire PM, Identify Staff, Project Planning, Organization, Doc Prep  SRC/IRB /HRPO (SRC 10/16 IRB

  4. Evaluation of Sensorimotor Nerve Damage in Patients with Maxillofacial Trauma; a Single Center Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorian, Behnaz; Bemanali, Mehdi; Chavoshinejad, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate sensorimotor nerve damage in patients with maxillofacial trauma referring to Taleghani hospital, Tehran, Iran Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted during a 2-year period from 2014 to 2012 in Taleghani hospital of Tehran. We included a total number of 495 patients with maxillofacial trauma referring to our center during the study period. The demographic information, type of fracture, location of fracture and nerve injuries were assessed and recorded in each patients. The frequency of sensorimotor injuries in these patients was recorded. Data are presented as frequencies and proportions as appropriate. Results: Overall we included 495 patients with maxillofacial trauma with mean age of 31.5±13.8 years. There were 430 (86.9% men and in 65 (13.1%) women among the patients. The frequency of nerve injuries was 67.7% (336 patients). The mean age of the patients with nerve injuries was 33.4 ± 3.7 years. Marginal mandibular branch of facial nerve was the most common involved nerve being involved in 5 patients (1%). Regarding trigeminal nerve, the inferior alveolar branch (194 patients 39.1%) was the most common involved branch followed by infraorbital branch (135 patients 27.2%). Mandibular fracture was the most common injured bone being reported in 376 patient (75.9%) patients followed by zygomatic bone in 100 patient (20%). Conclusion: The most frequent fracture occurred in mandible followed by zygoma and the most injured nerve was inferior alveolar nerve followed by infraorbital branch of trigeminal nerve. In facial nerve the marginal branch was the most involved nerve. The frequency of nerve injury and the male to female ratio was higher in the current study compared to the literature. PMID:27331065

  5. Vesicouterine ligament contains abundant autonomic nerve ganglion cells: the distribution in histology concerning nerve-sparing radical hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katahira, A; Niikura, H; Ito, K; Takano, T; Nagase, S; Murakami, G; Yaegashi, N

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the histologic architecture of the tissues corresponding to the surgically developed connective tissue bundle commonly referred to as the posterior leaf of the vesico-uterine ligament (VUL), and to examine distribution of ganglion cells. Serial macroscopic slices, each 15-20 mm in thickness, were made from eight specimens (obtained from six female elderly cadavers). In these macroslices, the location of the deep uterine vein was used to identify the deep leaf of the VUL. The specimens were trimmed and semi-serial histologic sections in thickness were prepared at 1 mm intervals. Vesical veins and the associated nerve elements were enclosed by fascia and formed a common pedicle. The base of the pedicle contained the deep uterine vein trunk. The fascia encircling the pedicle varied in thickness and connective intensity between specimens. This vesical neurovascular bundle contained abundant ganglion cells. On average, 48.0% of the ganglion cells along the vesical tributaries of the deep uterine vein were located on the medial or vaginal side of the veins, 19.2% were located between veins, 13.0% on the lateral side of the veins, and 19.8% on the dorsal side. The interindividual variability was greatest on the dorsal side of vesical veins and ranged 11-202 cells. We conclude that in order to achieve maximal preservation of the ganglion cells during the surgical dissection of the posterior leaf of the VUL, care must be taken when the medial or vesical aspect of the ligament is separated. The standard nerve-sparing radical hysterectomy should be modified to reflect differences in the distribution of ganglion cells and in connective intensity between ganglions and veins.

  6. Peripheral Motor and Sensory Nerve Conduction following Transplantation of Undifferentiated Autologous Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells in a Biodegradable U.S. Food and Drug Administration-Approved Nerve Conduit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Silvan M; Vykoukal, Jody; Li, De-Pei; Pan, Hui-Lin; Zeitler, Katharina; Alt, Eckhard; Geis, Sebastian; Felthaus, Oliver; Prantl, Lukas

    2016-07-01

    Conduits preseeded with either Schwann cells or stem cells differentiated into Schwann cells demonstrated promising results for the outcome of nerve regeneration in nerve defects. The concept of this trial combines nerve repair by means of a commercially available nerve guidance conduit and preseeding with autologous, undifferentiated, adipose tissue-derived stem cells. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells were harvested from rats and subsequently seeded onto a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved type I collagen conduit. Sciatic nerve gaps 10 mm in length were created, and nerve repair was performed by the transplantation of either conduits preseeded with autologous adipose tissue-derived stem cells or acellular (control group) conduits. After 6 months, the motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity were assessed. Nerves were removed and examined by hematoxylin and eosin, van Gieson, and immunohistochemistry (S100 protein) staining for the quality of axonal regeneration. Nerve gaps treated with adipose tissue-derived stem cells showed superior nerve regeneration, reflected by higher motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity values. The motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity were significantly greater in nerves treated with conduits preseeded with adipose tissue-derived stem cells than in nerves treated with conduits alone (p adipose tissue-derived stem cell group. In this group, axon arrangement inside the conduits was more organized. Transplantation of adipose tissue-derived stem cells significantly improves motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity in peripheral nerve gaps. Preseeded conduits showed a more organized axon arrangement inside the conduit in comparison with nerve conduits alone. The approach used here could readily be translated into a clinical therapy. Therapeutic, V.

  7. Nestin-Expressing Stem Cells Promote Nerve Growth in Long-Term 3-Dimensional Gelfoam®-Supported Histoculture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumiyuki Mii

    Full Text Available We have previously reported that hair follicles contain multipotent stem cells which express nestin. The nestin-expressing cells form the hair follicle sensory nerve. In vitro, the nestin-expressing hair follicle cells can differentiate into neurons, Schwann cells, and other cell types. In the present study, the sciatic nerve was excised from transgenic mice in which the nestin promoter drives green fluorescent protein (ND-GFP mice. The ND-GFP cells of the sciatic nerve were also found to be multipotent as the ND-GFP cells in the hair follicle. When the ND-GFP cells in the mouse sciatic nerve cultured on Gelfoam® and were imaged by confocal microscopy, they were observed forming fibers extending the nerve. The fibers consisted of ND-GFP-expressing spindle cells, which co-expressed the neuron marker β-III tubulin, the immature Schwann-cell marker p75(NTR and TrkB which is associated with neurons. The fibers also contain nestin-negative spherical cells expressing GFAP, a Schwann-cell marker. The β-III tubulin-positive fibers had growth cones on their tips expressing F-actin, indicating they are growing axons. When the sciatic nerve from mice ubiquitously expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP was co-cultured on Gelfoam® with the sciatic nerve from ND-GFP transgenic mice, the interaction of nerves was observed. Proliferating nestin-expressing cells in the injured sciatic nerve were also observed in vivo. Nestin-expressing cells were also observed in posterior nerves but not in the spinal cord itself, when placed in 3-D Gelfoam® culture. The results of the present report suggest a critical function of nestin-expressing cells in peripheral nerve growth and regeneration.

  8. Neurophysiological approach to disorders of peripheral nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crone, Clarissa; Krarup, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of the peripheral nerve system (PNS) are heterogeneous and may involve motor fibers, sensory fibers, small myelinated and unmyelinated fibers and autonomic nerve fibers, with variable anatomical distribution (single nerves, several different nerves, symmetrical affection of all nerves...

  9. Stem Cell Ophthalmology Treatment Study (SCOTS for retinal and optic nerve diseases: a preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey N Weiss

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this report, we present the results of a single patient with optic neuropathy treated within the Stem Cell Ophthalmology Treatment Study (SCOTS. SCOTS is an Institutional Review Board approved clinical trial and is the largest ophthalmology stem cell study registered at the National Institutes of Health to date- www.clinicaltrials.gov Identifier NCT 01920867. SCOTS utilizes autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells in the treatment of optic nerve and retinal diseases. Pre- and post-treatment comprehensive eye exams were independently performed at the Wilmer Eye Institute at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, USA. A 27 year old female patient had lost vision approximately 5 years prior to enrollment in SCOTS. Pre-treatment best-corrected visual acuity at the Wilmer Eye Institute was 20/800 Right Eye (OD and 20/4,000 Left Eye (OS. Four months following treatment in SCOTS, the central visual acuity had improved to 20/100 OD and 20/40 OS.

  10. Biological conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix to treat long-segment sciatic nerve defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The transplantation of polylactic glycolic acid conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix gel for the repair of sciatic nerve injury is effective in some respects, but few data comparing the biomechanical factors related to the sciatic nerve are available. In the present study, rabbit models of 10-mm sciatic nerve defects were prepared. The rabbit models were repaired with autologous nerve, a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, or a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel. After 24 weeks, mechanical testing was performed to determine the stress relaxation and creep parameters. Following sciatic nerve injury, the magnitudes of the stress decrease and strain increase at 7,200 seconds were largest in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel group, followed by the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group, and then the autologous nerve group. Hematoxylin-eosin staining demonstrated that compared with the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group and the autologous nerve group, a more complete sciatic nerve regeneration was found, including good myelination, regularly arranged nerve fibers, and a completely degraded and resorbed conduit, in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel group. These results indicate that bridging 10-mm sciatic nerve defects with a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel construct increases the stress relaxation under a constant strain, reducing anastomotic tension. Large elongations under a constant physiological load can limit the anastomotic opening and shift, which is beneficial for the regeneration and functional reconstruction of sciatic nerve. Better

  11. Role of Schwann cells in the regeneration of penile and peripheral nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwann cells (SCs are the principal glia of the peripheral nervous system. The end point of SC development is the formation of myelinating and nonmyelinating cells which ensheath large and small diameter axons, respectively. They play an important role in axon regeneration after injury, including cavernous nerve injury that leads to erectile dysfunction (ED. Despite improvement in radical prostatectomy surgical techniques, many patients still suffer from ED postoperatively as surgical trauma causes traction injuries and local inflammatory changes in the neuronal microenvironment of the autonomic fibers innervating the penis resulting in pathophysiological alterations in the end organ. The aim of this review is to summarize contemporary evidence regarding: (1 the origin and development of SCs in the peripheral and penile nerve system; (2 Wallerian degeneration and SC plastic change following peripheral and penile nerve injury; (3 how SCs promote peripheral and penile nerve regeneration by secreting neurotrophic factors; (4 and strategies targeting SCs to accelerate peripheral nerve regeneration. We searched PubMed for articles related to these topics in both animal models and human research and found numerous studies suggesting that SCs could be a novel target for treatment of nerve injury-induced ED.

  12. Effects of RNA interference targeting Smad7 on nerve cells ischemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. NJ TONUKARI

    2012-01-10

    Jan 10, 2012 ... Effects of RNA interference targeting Smad7 on nerve cells ischemic injury induced in PC12 cells. Chunli Mei1,2, Jing Mang1, Jinting He1, Guihua Xu1, Zhongshu Li1, Wenzhao Liang1 and. Zhongxin Xu1*. 1Department of Neurology, China-Japan Union Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun 130012, ...

  13. Early regenerative effects of NGF-transduced Schwann cells in peripheral nerve repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shakhbazau, A.; Kawasoe, J.; Hoyng, S.A.; Kumar, R.; van Minnen, J.; Verhaagen, J.; Midha, R.

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury leads to a rapid and robust increase in the synthesis of neurotrophins which guide and support regenerating axons. To further optimize neurotrophin supply at the earliest stages of regeneration, we over-expressed NGF in Schwann cells (SCs) by transducing these cells with a

  14. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells accelerate nerve regeneration and functional recovery in a rat model of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Medialization thyroplasty or injection laryngoplasty for unilateral vocal fold paralysis cannot restore mobility of the vocal fold. Recent studies have shown that transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells is effective in the repair of nerve injuries. This study investigated whether adipose-derived stem cell transplantation could repair recurrent laryngeal nerve injury. Rat models of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury were established by crushing with micro forceps. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs; 8 × 105 or differentiated Schwann-like adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (dADSCs; 8 × 105 or extracellular matrix were injected at the site of injury. At 2, 4 and 6 weeks post-surgery, a higher density of myelinated nerve fiber, thicker myelin sheath, improved vocal fold movement, better recovery of nerve conduction capacity and reduced thyroarytenoid muscle atrophy were found in ADSCs and dADSCs groups compared with the extracellular matrix group. The effects were more pronounced in the ADSCs group than in the dADSCs group. These experimental results indicated that ADSCs transplantation could be an early interventional strategy to promote regeneration after recurrent laryngeal nerve injury.

  15. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells accelerate nerve regeneration and functional recovery in a rat model of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun; Xu, Wen; Cheng, Li-yu

    2017-01-01

    Medialization thyroplasty or injection laryngoplasty for unilateral vocal fold paralysis cannot restore mobility of the vocal fold. Recent studies have shown that transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells is effective in the repair of nerve injuries. This study investigated whether adipose-derived stem cell transplantation could repair recurrent laryngeal nerve injury. Rat models of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury were established by crushing with micro forceps. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs; 8 × 105) or differentiated Schwann-like adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (dADSCs; 8 × 105) or extracellular matrix were injected at the site of injury. At 2, 4 and 6 weeks post-surgery, a higher density of myelinated nerve fiber, thicker myelin sheath, improved vocal fold movement, better recovery of nerve conduction capacity and reduced thyroarytenoid muscle atrophy were found in ADSCs and dADSCs groups compared with the extracellular matrix group. The effects were more pronounced in the ADSCs group than in the dADSCs group. These experimental results indicated that ADSCs transplantation could be an early interventional strategy to promote regeneration after recurrent laryngeal nerve injury. PMID:29090002

  16. Acceleration of Regeneration of Large Gap Peripheral Nerve Injuries Using Acellular Nerve Allografts plus amniotic Fluid Derived Stem Cells (AFS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    seeded constructs were used to repair critical-sized, large gap nerve injury in rats and their functional recovery was monitored longitudinally using... injuries in non-human primates. These represent a more translational model of peripheral nerve injury and repair . 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY...AWARD NUMBER: W811XWH-13-1-0310 TITLE: Acceleration of Regeneration of Large-Gap Peripheral Nerve Injuries Using Acellular Nerve Allografts

  17. Distally Based Sural Artery Adipofascial Flap based on a Single Sural Nerve Branch: Anatomy and Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Loong James Mok

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe distally based sural artery flap is a reliable, local reconstructive option for small soft tissue defects of the distal third of the leg. The purpose of this study is to describe an adipofascial flap based on a single sural nerve branch without sacrificing the entire sural nerve, thereby preserving sensibility of the lateral foot.MethodsThe posterior aspect of the lower limb was dissected in 15 cadaveric limbs. Four patients with soft tissue defects over the tendo-achilles and ankle underwent reconstruction using the adipofascial flap, which incorporated the distal peroneal perforator, short saphenous vein, and a single branch of the sural nerve.ResultsFrom the anatomical study, the distal peroneal perforator was situated at an average of 6.2 cm (2.5-12 cm from the distal tip of the lateral malleolus. The medial and lateral sural nerve branches ran subfascially and pierced the muscle fascia 16 cm (14-19 cm proximal to the lateral malleolus to enter the subcutaneous plane. They merged 1-2 cm distal to the subcutaneous entry point to form the common sural nerve at a mean distance of 14.5 cm (11.5-18 cm proximal to the lateral malleolus. This merging point determined the pivot point of the flap. In the clinical cases, all patients reported near complete recovery of sensation over the lateral foot six months after surgery. All donor sites healed well with a full range of motion over the foot and ankle.ConclusionsThe distally based sural artery adipofascial flap allowed for minimal sensory loss, a good range of motion, an aesthetically acceptable outcome and can be performed by a single surgeon in under 2 hours.

  18. Th17 Cell Response in SOD1G93A Mice following Motor Nerve Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Ni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An increased risk of ALS has been reported for veterans, varsity athletes, and professional football players. The mechanism underlying the increased risk in these populations has not been identified; however, it has been proposed that motor nerve injury may trigger immune responses which, in turn, can accelerate the progression of ALS. Accumulating evidence indicates that abnormal immune reactions and inflammation are involved in the pathogenesis of ALS, but the specific immune cells involved have not been clearly defined. To understand how nerve injury and immune responses may contribute to ALS development, we investigated responses of CD4+ T cell after facial motor nerve axotomy (FNA at a presymptomatic stage in a transgenic mouse model of ALS (B6SJL SOD1G93A. SOD1G93A mice, compared with WT mice, displayed an increase in the basal activation state of CD4+ T cells and higher frequency of Th17 cells, which were further enhanced by FNA. In conclusion, SOD1G93A mice exhibit abnormal CD4+ T cell activation with increased levels of Th17 cells prior to the onset of neurological symptoms. Motor nerve injury exacerbates Th17 cell responses and may contribute to the development of ALS, especially in those who carry genetic susceptibility to this disease.

  19. Single cell enzyme diagnosis on the chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Sissel Juul; Harmsen, Charlotte; Nielsen, Mette Juul

    2013-01-01

    Conventional diagnosis based on ensemble measurements often overlooks the variation among cells. Here, we present a droplet-microfluidics based platform to investigate single cell activities. Adopting a previously developed isothermal rolling circle amplification-based assay, we demonstrate detec...

  20. 'Green mice' display limitations in enhanced green fluorescent protein expression in retina and optic nerve cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminos, Elena; Vaquero, Cecilia F; García-Olmo, Dolores C

    2014-12-01

    Characterization of retinal cells, cell transplants and gene therapies may be helped by pre-labeled retinal cells, such as those transfected with vectors for green fluorescent protein expression. The aim of this study was to analyze retinal cells and optic nerve components from transgenic green mice (GM) with the 'enhanced' green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene under the control of the CAG promoter (a chicken β-actin promoter and a cytomegalovirus enhancer). The structural analysis and electroretinography recordings showed a normal, healthy retina. Surprisingly, EGFP expression was not ubiquitously located in the retina and optic nerve. Epithelial cells, photoreceptors and bipolar cells presented high green fluorescence levels. In contrast, horizontal cells, specific amacrine cells and ganglion cells exhibited a null EGFP expression level. The synaptic terminals of rod bipolar cells displayed a high green fluorescence level when animals were kept in the dark. Immature retinas exhibited different EGFP expression patterns to those noted in adults. Axons and glial cells in the optic nerve revealed a specific regional EGFP expression pattern, which correlated with the presence of myelin. These results suggest that EGFP expression might be related to the activity of both the CAG promoter and β-actin in mature retinal neurons and oligodendrocytes. Moreover, EGFP expression might be regulated by light in both immature and adult animals. Since GM are used in numerous retina bioassays, it is essential to know the differential EGFP expression in order to select cells of interest for each study.

  1. Treatment and Follow Up Outcomes of Patients with Peroneal Nerve Injury: A Single Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasar Dagistan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Trap neuropathy is characterized by compression of the peripheral nerve into fibro osseous channels in trespassing areas of body segments. Peroneal nerve is the most frequently injured nerve in traumatic injuries of the lower extremities. In the present study, we investigated functional results of surgical treatment of patients with peroneal nerve injury who delayed visiting our clinics after the damage; we also aimed to observe the effects of this delay on prognosis. We interpreted postoperative results of the patients with EMG and physical examination findings. Material and Method: Subjects with peroneal nerve damage who visited our clinics between 2012 and 2015 were included in the present study. EMG and muscle motor strength tests were conducted pre and postoperatively for clinical assessment. Results: Of the 16 patients in the study population, 7 were men and 9 were women. The median age of the subjects was 49.6 years (14-77 years. Admission time was 9 months after injury. Causes of the peroneal nerve damage were as follows: prosthesis surgery in 4 (25%, ankle damage in 2 (12.5%, excessive squatting by agriculture workers in 4 (25%, aggressive exercise in 2 (12.5%, bone fracture in 2 (12.5%, and unknown origin in 2 (12.5%. Discussion: Peroneal nerve injury usually occurs by compression of the nerve at the head or neck of the fibula. Results of decompression surgery are usually compromising in non-traumatic nerve palsies. Period of duration between injury and diagnosis and muscular atrophy are main factors associated with success of treatment.

  2. Vagal nerve stimulation protects against burn-induced intestinal injury through activation of enteric glia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Todd W; Bansal, Vishal; Krzyzaniak, Michael; Putnam, James G; Peterson, Carrie Y; Loomis, William H; Wolf, Paul; Baird, Andrew; Eliceiri, Brian P; Coimbra, Raul

    2010-12-01

    The enteric nervous system may have an important role in modulating gastrointestinal barrier response to disease through activation of enteric glia cells. In vitro studies have shown that enteric glia activation improves intestinal epithelial barrier function by altering the expression of tight junction proteins. We hypothesized that severe injury would increase expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker of enteric glial activation. We also sought to define the effects of vagal nerve stimulation on enteric glia activation and intestinal barrier function using a model of systemic injury and local gut mucosal involvement. Mice with 30% total body surface area steam burn were used as model of severe injury. Vagal nerve stimulation was performed to assess the role of parasympathetic signaling on enteric glia activation. In vivo intestinal permeability was measured to assess barrier function. Intestine was collected to investigate changes in histology; GFAP expression was assessed by quantitative PCR, by confocal microscopy, and in GFAP-luciferase transgenic mice. Stimulation of the vagus nerve prevented injury-induced intestinal barrier injury. Intestinal GFAP expression increased at early time points following burn and returned to baseline by 24 h after injury. Vagal nerve stimulation prior to injury increased GFAP expression to a greater degree than burn alone. Gastrointestinal bioluminescence was imaged in GFAP-luciferase transgenic animals following either severe burn or vagal stimulation and confirmed the increased expression of intestinal GFAP. Injection of S-nitrosoglutathione, a signaling molecule released by activated enteric glia cells, following burn exerts protective effects similar to vagal nerve stimulation. Intestinal expression of GFAP increases following severe burn injury. Stimulation of the vagus nerve increases enteric glia activation, which is associated with improved intestinal barrier function. The vagus nerve may mediate the

  3. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells promote peripheral nerve repair via paracrine mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-yuan Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs represent a promising young-state stem cell source for cell-based therapy. hUCMSC transplantation into the transected sciatic nerve promotes axonal regeneration and functional recovery. To further clarify the paracrine effects of hUCMSCs on nerve regeneration, we performed human cytokine antibody array analysis, which revealed that hUCMSCs express 14 important neurotrophic factors. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemistry showed that brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial-derived neurotrophic factor, hepatocyte growth factor, neurotrophin-3, basic fibroblast growth factor, type I collagen, fibronectin and laminin were highly expressed. Treatment with hUCMSC-conditioned medium enhanced Schwann cell viability and proliferation, increased nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in Schwann cells, and enhanced neurite growth from dorsal root ganglion explants. These findings suggest that paracrine action may be a key mechanism underlying the effects of hUCMSCs in peripheral nerve repair.

  4. Differentiation of a bipotential glial progenitor cell in a single cell microculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, S; Raff, M C

    Although it is known that most cells of the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) are derived from the neuroepithelial cells of the neural tube, the factors determining whether an individual neuroepithelial cell develops into a particular type of neurone or glial cell remain unknown. A promising model for studying this problem is the bipotential glial progenitor cell in the developing rat optic nerve; this cell differentiates into a particular type of astrocyte (a type-2 astrocyte) if cultured in 10% fetal calf serum (FCS) and into an oligodendrocyte if cultured in serum-free medium. As the oligodendrocyte-type-2 astrocyte (0-2A) progenitor cell can differentiate along either glial pathway in neurone-free cultures, living axons clearly are not required for its differentiation, at least in vitro. However, the studies on 0-2A progenitor cells were carried out in bulk cultures of optic nerve, and so it was possible that other cell-cell interactions were required for differentiation in culture. We show here that 0-2A progenitor cells can differentiate into type-2 astrocytes or oligodendrocytes when grown as isolated cells in microculture, indicating that differentiation along either glial pathway in vitro does not require signals from other CNS cells, apart from the signals provided by components of the culture medium. We also show that single 0-2A progenitor cells can differentiate along either pathway without dividing, supporting our previous studies using 3H-thymidine and suggesting that DNA replication is not required for these cells to choose between the two differentiation programmes.

  5. The Wound Microenvironment Reprograms Schwann Cells to Invasive Mesenchymal-like Cells to Drive Peripheral Nerve Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Melanie P; Byrne, Elizabeth; Camarillo Guerrero, Luis F; Cattin, Anne-Laure; Zakka, Leila; Ashraf, Azhaar; Burden, Jemima J; Khadayate, Sanjay; Lloyd, Alison C; Marguerat, Samuel; Parrinello, Simona

    2017-09-27

    Schwann cell dedifferentiation from a myelinating to a progenitor-like cell underlies the remarkable ability of peripheral nerves to regenerate following injury. However, the molecular identity of the differentiated and dedifferentiated states in vivo has been elusive. Here, we profiled Schwann cells acutely purified from intact nerves and from the wound and distal regions of severed nerves. Our analysis reveals novel facets of the dedifferentiation response, including acquisition of mesenchymal traits and a Myc module. Furthermore, wound and distal dedifferentiated Schwann cells constitute different populations, with wound cells displaying increased mesenchymal character induced by localized TGFβ signaling. TGFβ promotes invasion and crosstalks with Eph signaling via N-cadherin to drive collective migration of the Schwann cells across the wound. Consistently, Tgfbr2 deletion in Schwann cells resulted in misdirected and delayed reinnervation. Thus, the wound microenvironment is a key determinant of Schwann cell identity, and it promotes nerve repair through integration of multiple concerted signals. VIDEO ABSTRACT. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Epigenetics reloaded: the single-cell revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bheda, Poonam; Schneider, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Mechanistically, how epigenetic states are inherited through cellular divisions remains an important open question in the chromatin field and beyond. Defining the heritability of epigenetic states and the underlying chromatin-based mechanisms within a population of cells is complicated due to cell heterogeneity combined with varying levels of stability of these states; thus, efforts must be focused toward single-cell analyses. The approaches presented here constitute the forefront of epigenetics research at the single-cell level using classic and innovative methods to dissect epigenetics mechanisms from the limited material available in a single cell. This review further outlines exciting future avenues of research to address the significance of epigenetic heterogeneity and the contributions of microfluidics technologies to single-cell isolation and analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Single-cell sequencing in stem cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Lu; Tang, Fuchou

    2016-04-15

    Cell-to-cell variation and heterogeneity are fundamental and intrinsic characteristics of stem cell populations, but these differences are masked when bulk cells are used for omic analysis. Single-cell sequencing technologies serve as powerful tools to dissect cellular heterogeneity comprehensively and to identify distinct phenotypic cell types, even within a 'homogeneous' stem cell population. These technologies, including single-cell genome, epigenome, and transcriptome sequencing technologies, have been developing rapidly in recent years. The application of these methods to different types of stem cells, including pluripotent stem cells and tissue-specific stem cells, has led to exciting new findings in the stem cell field. In this review, we discuss the recent progress as well as future perspectives in the methodologies and applications of single-cell omic sequencing technologies.

  8. Rgcs1, a dominant QTL that affects retinal ganglion cell death after optic nerve crush in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlamp Cassandra L

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intrinsic apoptosis of neuronal somas is one aspect of neurodegenerative diseases that can be influenced by genetic background. Genes that affect this process may act as susceptibility alleles that contribute to the complex genetic nature of these diseases. Retinal ganglion cell death is a defining feature of the chronic and genetically complex neurodegenerative disease glaucoma. Previous studies using an optic nerve crush procedure in inbred mice, showed that ganglion cell resistance to crush was affected by the Mendelian-dominant inheritance of 1–2 predicted loci. To assess this further, we bred and phenotyped a large population of F2 mice derived from a resistant inbred strain (DBA/2J and a susceptible strain (BALB/cByJ. Results Genome wide mapping of the F2 mice using microsatellite markers, detected a single highly significant quantitative trait locus in a 25 cM (58 Mb interval on chromosome 5 (Chr5.loc34-59 cM. No interacting loci were detected at the resolution of this screen. We have designated this locus as Retinal ganglion cell susceptible 1, Rgcs1. In silico analysis of this region revealed the presence of 578 genes or expressed sequence tags, 4 of which are highly expressed in the ganglion cell layer of the mammalian retina, and 2 of which are suspected susceptibility alleles in chronic neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, 25 genes contain 36 known single nucleotide polymorphisms that create nonsynonymous amino acid changes between the two parental strains. Collectively, this analysis has identified 7 potential candidate genes that may affect ganglion cell death. Conclusion The process of ganglion cell death is likely one of the many facets of glaucoma susceptibility. A novel dominant locus has been identified that affects sensitivity of ganglion cells to optic nerve crush. The allele responsible for this sensitivity may also be a susceptibility allele for glaucoma.

  9. Bone Marrow-Derived, Neural-Like Cells Have the Characteristics of Neurons to Protect the Peripheral Nerve in Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-lei Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective repair of peripheral nerve defects is difficult because of the slow growth of new axonal growth. We propose that “neural-like cells” may be useful for the protection of peripheral nerve destructions. Such cells should prolong the time for the disintegration of spinal nerves, reduce lesions, and improve recovery. But the mechanism of neural-like cells in the peripheral nerve is still unclear. In this study, bone marrow-derived neural-like cells were used as seed cells. The cells were injected into the distal end of severed rabbit peripheral nerves that were no longer integrated with the central nervous system. Electromyography (EMG, immunohistochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM were employed to analyze the development of the cells in the peripheral nerve environment. The CMAP amplitude appeared during the 5th week following surgery, at which time morphological characteristics of myelinated nerve fiber formation were observed. Bone marrow-derived neural-like cells could protect the disintegration and destruction of the injured peripheral nerve.

  10. ERK/MAPK and PI3K/AKT signal channels simultaneously activated in nerve cell and axon after facial nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hai-Tao; Sun, Zhi-Gang; Liu, Hua-Wei; Ma, Jun-Tao; Hu, Min

    2017-12-01

    The in-vitro study indicated that ERK/MAPK and PI3K/AKT signal channels may play an important role in reparative regeneration process after peripheral nerve injury. But, relevant in-vivo study was infrequent. In particular, there has been no report on simultaneous activation of ERK/MAPK and PI3K/AKT signal channels in facial nerve cell and axon after facial nerve injury. The expression of P-ERK enhanced in nerve cells at the injury side on the 1 d after the rat facial nerve was cut and kept on a higher level until 14 d, but decreased on 28 d. The expression of P-AKT enhanced in nerve cells at the injury side on 1 d after injury, and kept on a higher level until 28 d. The expression of P-ERK enhanced at the near and far sections of the injured axon on 1 d, then increased gradually and reached the maximum on 7 d, but decreased on 14 d, until down to the level before the injury on 28 d. The expression of P-AKT obviously enhanced in the injured axon on 1 d, especially in the axon of the rear section, but decreased in the axon of the rear section on 7 d, while the expression of axon in the far section increased to the maximum and kept on till 14 d. On 28 d, the expression of P-AKT decreased in both rear and far sections of the axon. The facial nerve simultaneously activated ERK/MAPK and PI3K/AKT signal channels in facial nerve cells and axons after the cut injury, but the expression levels of P-ERK and P-AKT varied as the function of the time. In particular, they were quite different in axon of the far section. It has been speculated that two signal channels might have different functions after nerve injury. However, their specific regulating effects should still be testified by further studies in regenerative process of peripheral nerve injury.

  11. Novel Adult Stem Cells for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    301–313 (2008). 20. Medici , D. et al. Conversion of vascular endothelial cells into multipotent stem- like cells. Nat. Med. 16, 1400–1406 (2010). 21...2006). 23. Medici , D. et al. Conversion of vascular endothelial cells into multipotent stem- like cells. Nat. Med. 17, 514 (2011). 24. Lee, G. et al

  12. Parallel single-cell analysis microfluidic platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Brink, Floris Teunis Gerardus; Gool, Elmar; Frimat, Jean-Philippe; Bomer, Johan G.; van den Berg, Albert; le Gac, Severine

    2011-01-01

    We report a PDMS microfluidic platform for parallel single-cell analysis (PaSCAl) as a powerful tool to decipher the heterogeneity found in cell populations. Cells are trapped individually in dedicated pockets, and thereafter, a number of invasive or non-invasive analysis schemes are performed.

  13. Adverse outcomes associated with nerve stimulator-guided and ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blocks by supervised trainees: update of a single-site database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orebaugh, Steven L; Kentor, Michael L; Williams, Brian A

    2012-01-01

    We previously published a retrospective review of complications related to peripheral nerve blocks performed by supervised trainees, from our quality assurance and billing data, guided by either ultrasound, with nerve stimulator confirmation, or landmark-based nerve stimulator techniques. This report updates our results, for the period from May 2008 through December 2011, representing ongoing transition to near-complete combined ultrasound/nerve stimulator guidance in a block-oriented, outpatient orthopedic anesthesia practice. We queried our deidentified departmental quality improvement electronic database for adverse outcomes associated with peripheral nerve blocks. Billing records were also deidentified and used to provide the denominator of total number of blocks using each technique of neurolocation. The types of blocks considered in this analysis were interscalene, axillary, femoral, sciatic, and popliteal-sciatic blocks. Nerve block complications based on each type of guidance were then compared for the entire recent 30-month time period, as well as for the 6-year period of this report. There were 9062 blocks performed by ultrasound/nerve stimulator, and 5436 by nerve stimulator alone over the entire 72-month period. Nerve injuries lasting longer than 1 year were rare, but similar in frequency with both nerve guidance techniques. The incidence of local anesthetic systemic toxicity was found to be higher with landmark-nerve stimulator technique than with use of ultrasound-guided nerve blocks (6/5436 vs 0/9069, P = 0.0061). We report a large series of combined ultrasound/nerve stimulator nerve blocks by supervised trainees without major local anesthetic systemic toxicity. While lacking the compelling evidence of randomized controlled trials, this observational database nonetheless allows increased confidence in the safety of using combined ultrasound/nerve stimulator in the setting of anesthesiologists-in-training.

  14. Automated Single Cell Data Decontamination Pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tennessen, Kristin [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Pati, Amrita [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.

    2014-03-21

    Recent technological advancements in single-cell genomics have encouraged the classification and functional assessment of microorganisms from a wide span of the biospheres phylogeny.1,2 Environmental processes of interest to the DOE, such as bioremediation and carbon cycling, can be elucidated through the genomic lens of these unculturable microbes. However, contamination can occur at various stages of the single-cell sequencing process. Contaminated data can lead to wasted time and effort on meaningless analyses, inaccurate or erroneous conclusions, and pollution of public databases. A fully automated decontamination tool is necessary to prevent these instances and increase the throughput of the single-cell sequencing process

  15. Single-cell technologies in environmental omics

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2015-10-22

    Environmental studies are primarily done by culturing isolated microorganisms or by amplifying and sequencing conserved genes. Difficulties understanding the complexity of large numbers of various microorganisms in an environment led to the development of techniques to enrich specific microorganisms for upstream analysis, ultimately leading to single-cell isolation and analyses. We discuss the significance of single-cell technologies in omics studies with focus on metagenomics and metatranscriptomics. We propose that by reducing sample heterogeneity using single-cell genomics, metaomic studies can be simplified.

  16. Generation of a Motor Nerve Organoid with Human Stem Cell-Derived Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiro Kawada

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available During development, axons spontaneously assemble into a fascicle to form nerves and tracts in the nervous system as they extend within a spatially constrained path. However, understanding of the axonal fascicle has been hampered by lack of an in vitro model system. Here, we report generation of a nerve organoid composed of a robust fascicle of axons extended from a spheroid of human stem cell-derived motor neurons within our custom-designed microdevice. The device is equipped with a narrow channel providing a microenvironment that facilitates the growing axons to spontaneously assemble into a unidirectional fascicle. The fascicle was specifically made with axons. We found that it was electrically active and elastic and could serve as a model to evaluate degeneration of axons in vitro. This nerve organoid model should facilitate future studies on the development of the axonal fascicle and drug screening for diseases affecting axon fascicles.

  17. Effect of neural-induced mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich plasma on facial nerve regeneration in an acute nerve injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyong-Ho; Jang, Sujeong; Lee, Sang-Chul; Jeong, Han-Seong; Park, Jong-Seong; Han, Jae-Young; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Cho, Yong-Bum

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and neural-induced human mesenchymal stem cells (nMSCs) on axonal regeneration from a facial nerve axotomy injury in a guinea pig model. Prospective, controlled animal study. Experiments involved the transection and repair of the facial nerve in 24 albino guinea pigs. Four groups were created based on the method of repair: suture only (group I, control group); PRP with suture (group II); nMSCs with suture (group III); and PRP and nMSCs with suture (group IV). Each method of repair was applied immediately after nerve transection. The outcomes measured were: 1) functional outcome measurement (vibrissae and eyelid closure movements); 2) electrophysiologic evaluation; 3) neurotrophic factors assay; and 4) histologic evaluation. With respect to the functional outcome measurement, the functional outcomes improved after transection and reanastomosis in all groups. The control group was the slowest to demonstrate recovery of movement after transection and reanastomosis. The other three groups (groups II, III, and IV) had significant improvement in function compared to the control group 4 weeks after surgery (P facial nerve regeneration in an animal model of facial nerve axotomy. The use of nMSCs showed no benefit over the use of PRP in facial nerve regeneration, but the combined use of PRP and nMSCs showed a greater beneficial effect than use of either alone. This study provides evidence for the potential clinical application of PRP and nMSCs in peripheral nerve regeneration of an acute nerve injury. Laryngoscope, 2010.

  18. Sox2 expression in Schwann cells inhibits myelinationin vivoand induces influx of macrophages to the nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Sheridan L; Dun, Xin-Peng; Doddrell, Robin D S; Mindos, Thomas; Drake, Louisa K; Onaitis, Mark W; Florio, Francesca; Quattrini, Angelo; Lloyd, Alison C; D'Antonio, Maurizio; Parkinson, David B

    2017-09-01

    Correct myelination is crucial for the function of the peripheral nervous system. Both positive and negative regulators within the axon and Schwann cell function to ensure the correct onset and progression of myelination during both development and following peripheral nerve injury and repair. The Sox2 transcription factor is well known for its roles in the development and maintenance of progenitor and stem cell populations, but has also been proposed in vitro as a negative regulator of myelination in Schwann cells. We wished to test fully whether Sox2 regulates myelination in vivo and show here that, in mice, sustained Sox2 expression in vivo blocks myelination in the peripheral nerves and maintains Schwann cells in a proliferative non-differentiated state, which is also associated with increased inflammation within the nerve. The plasticity of Schwann cells allows them to re-myelinate regenerated axons following injury and we show that re-myelination is also blocked by Sox2 expression in Schwann cells. These findings identify Sox2 as a physiological regulator of Schwann cell myelination in vivo and its potential to play a role in disorders of myelination in the peripheral nervous system. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Regulation of Schwann cell proliferation in cultured segments of the adult rat sciatic nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Åsa Fex; Kanje, M

    1998-01-01

    Schwann cell proliferation was studied in cultured segments of the rat sciatic nerve by measurement of [3H] thymidine incorporation or through bromodeoxyuridine-(BrdU)-labelling and immunocytochemistry. The aim was to delineate mechanisms involved in the injury-induced proliferative response...... together with morphological evaluation of myelin association showed that proliferation occurred in Schwann cells. The results are consistent with a model in which Schwann cell proliferation is enhanced by Ca2+ through activation of calmodulin-dependent and/or PKCdependent mechanisms. Inhibition is achieved...... through the cAMP system. Together, these results show that Schwann cells regulate proliferation differently in an integrated environment, e.g. the nerve structure, than in isolation as primary monocultures....

  20. [Synergetic effects of ciliary neurotrophic factor and olfactory ensheathing cells on optic nerve reparation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Dan-ping; Liu, Lin; Cao, Li

    2013-11-01

    This study is to investigate the effect of the combination of the olfactory ensheathing cells (OEC) transplantation and intravitreous injection of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) on the retinal ganglia cells' (RGC) apoptosis and axonals' reparation and regeneration. In this study, the supraorbital margin exposure of the optic nerves was used to establish adult SD rats' optic nerve inhausted injury model as control group. Then the purified OECs were injected into the optic nerve sheaths, and CNTF was injected into the vitreous body simultaneously. The rats were divided into control group, CNTF group, OECs group, and OEC+CNTF combined group. At 4 weeks postoperatively, a cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) anterograde tracing technique and fluorescence (FG) biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) retrograde tracing technique were adopted to evaluate the survival of RGC and the regeneration of optic nerve axons. The number of survival neurons of the same vision field and the density of neurons were evaluated by analysis of variance. At the one and three quadrant distance between optic disc 2 mm spot, the number of the RGC in the control group was significantly (F = 633.38, P CNTF group, while the combined treatment with CNTF and OEC had strongest repair effect. The neuron axon density showed a statistically significant difference in the average optical density value at distance between foramen opticum 2 mm spot (OEC+CNTF: 3.18 ± 0.26, OEC: 2.96 ± 0.28, CNTF: 2.83 ± 0.37, and control: 2.75 ± 0.12, respectively, F = 17.66, P CNTF suggesting that CNTF and OEC have synergistic effect on the treatment of optic nerve injury and repair. Transplantation of OECs may genetically modify the secretion of human CNTF and promote optic nerve injury repair.

  1. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell-loaded amniotic membrane for the repair of radial nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Qin, Hanjiao; Feng, Zishan; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Ye; Yang, Lifeng; Zhao, Wei; Li, Youjun

    2013-12-25

    In this study, we loaded human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells onto human amniotic membrane with epithelial cells to prepare nerve conduits, i.e., a relatively closed nerve regeneration chamber. After neurolysis, the injured radial nerve was enwrapped with the prepared nerve conduit, which was fixed to the epineurium by sutures, with the cell on the inner surface of the conduit. Simultaneously, a 1.0 mL aliquot of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell suspension was injected into the distal and proximal ends of the injured radial nerve with 1.0 cm intervals. A total of 1.75 × 10(7) cells were seeded on the amniotic membrane. In the control group, patients received only neurolysis. At 12 weeks after cell transplantation, more than 80% of patients exhibited obvious improvements in muscular strength, and touch and pain sensations. In contrast, these improvements were observed only in 55-65% of control patients. At 8 and 12 weeks, muscular electrophysiological function in the region dominated by the injured radial nerve was significantly better in the transplantation group than the control group. After cell transplantation, no immunological rejections were observed. These findings suggest that human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell-loaded amniotic membrane can be used for the repair of radial nerve injury.

  2. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell-loaded amniotic membrane for the repair of radial nerve injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Qin, Hanjiao; Feng, Zishan; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Ye; Yang, Lifeng; Zhao, Wei; Li, Youjun

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we loaded human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells onto human amniotic membrane with epithelial cells to prepare nerve conduits, i.e., a relatively closed nerve regeneration chamber. After neurolysis, the injured radial nerve was enwrapped with the prepared nerve conduit, which was fixed to the epineurium by sutures, with the cell on the inner surface of the conduit. Simultaneously, a 1.0 mL aliquot of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell suspension was injected into the distal and proximal ends of the injured radial nerve with 1.0 cm intervals. A total of 1.75 × 107 cells were seeded on the amniotic membrane. In the control group, patients received only neurolysis. At 12 weeks after cell transplantation, more than 80% of patients exhibited obvious improvements in muscular strength, and touch and pain sensations. In contrast, these improvements were observed only in 55–65% of control patients. At 8 and 12 weeks, muscular electrophysiological function in the region dominated by the injured radial nerve was significantly better in the transplantation group than the control group. After cell transplantation, no immunological rejections were observed. These findings suggest that human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell-loaded amniotic membrane can be used for the repair of radial nerve injury. PMID:25206667

  3. Technologies for Single-Cell Isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Andre; Schoendube, Jonas; Zimmermann, Stefan; Steeb, Maximilian; Zengerle, Roland; Koltay, Peter

    2015-07-24

    The handling of single cells is of great importance in applications such as cell line development or single-cell analysis, e.g., for cancer research or for emerging diagnostic methods. This review provides an overview of technologies that are currently used or in development to isolate single cells for subsequent single-cell analysis. Data from a dedicated online market survey conducted to identify the most relevant technologies, presented here for the first time, shows that FACS (fluorescence activated cell sorting) respectively Flow cytometry (33% usage), laser microdissection (17%), manual cell picking (17%), random seeding/dilution (15%), and microfluidics/lab-on-a-chip devices (12%) are currently the most frequently used technologies. These most prominent technologies are described in detail and key performance factors are discussed. The survey data indicates a further increasing interest in single-cell isolation tools for the coming years. Additionally, a worldwide patent search was performed to screen for emerging technologies that might become relevant in the future. In total 179 patents were found, out of which 25 were evaluated by screening the title and abstract to be relevant to the field.

  4. En Bloc Resection of a Giant Cell Tumor in the Sacrum via a Posterior-Only Approach Without Nerve Root Sacrifice: Technical Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bydon, Mohamad; De la Garza-Ramos, Rafael; Bettegowda, Chetan; Suk, Ian; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Gokaslan, Ziya L

    2015-09-01

    Giant cell tumors (GCTs) are rare primary bone neoplasms. The best long-term prognosis is achieved via complete tumor excision, but this feat is challenging in the spine due to proximity of blood vessels and nervous tissue. When occurring in the sacrum, GCTs have been removed in an en bloc fashion via combined anterior/posterior approaches, oftentimes with nerve root sacrifice. The purpose of this article is to present a case of a single-staged, posterior-only approach for en bloc resection of a sacral GCT without nerve root sacrifice. A 45-year-old female presented with intractable lower back and leg pain, saddle anesthesia, and lower extremity weakness. She underwent imaging studies, which revealed a lesion involving the S1 and S2 vertebral bodies. Computed tomography guided biopsy revealed the lesion to be a GCT. The patient underwent a posterior-only approach without nerve root sacrifice to achieve an en bloc resection, followed by lumbopelvic reconstruction. Sacrectomy via a single-staged posterior approach with nerve root preservation is a challenging yet feasible procedure for the treatment of giant cell tumors in carefully selected patients.

  5. Dominant inheritance of retinal ganglion cell resistance to optic nerve crush in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlamp Cassandra L

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several neurodegenerative diseases are influenced by complex genetics that affect an individual's susceptibility, disease severity, and rate of progression. One such disease is glaucoma, a chronic neurodegenerative condition of the eye that targets and stimulates apoptosis of CNS neurons called retinal ganglion cells. Since ganglion cell death is intrinsic, it is reasonable that the genes that control this process may contribute to the complex genetics that affect ganglion cell susceptibility to disease. To determine if genetic background influences susceptibility to optic nerve damage, leading to ganglion cell death, we performed optic nerve crush on 15 different inbred lines of mice and measured ganglion cell loss. Resistant and susceptible strains were used in a reciprocal breeding strategy to examine the inheritance pattern of the resistance phenotype. Because earlier studies had implicated Bax as a susceptibility allele for ganglion cell death in the chronic neurodegenerative disease glaucoma, we conducted allelic segregation analysis and mRNA quantification to assess this gene as a candidate for the cell death phenotype. Results Inbred lines showed varying levels of susceptibility to optic nerve crush. DBA/2J mice were most resistant and BALB/cByJ mice were most susceptible. F1 mice from these lines inherited the DBA/2J phenotype, while N2 backcross mice exhibited the BALB/cByJ phenotype. F2 mice exhibited an intermediate phenotype. A Wright Formula calculation suggested as few as 2 dominant loci were linked to the resistance phenotype, which was corroborated by a Punnett Square analysis of the distribution of the mean phenotype in each cross. The levels of latent Bax mRNA were the same in both lines, and Bax alleles did not segregate with phenotype in N2 and F2 mice. Conclusion Inbred mice show different levels of resistance to optic nerve crush. The resistance phenotype is heritable in a dominant fashion involving

  6. After Nerve Injury, Lineage Tracing Shows That Myelin and Remak Schwann Cells Elongate Extensively and Branch to Form Repair Schwann Cells, Which Shorten Radically on Remyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Sanchez, Jose A; Pilch, Kjara S; van der Lans, Milou; Fazal, Shaline V; Benito, Cristina; Wagstaff, Laura J; Mirsky, Rhona; Jessen, Kristjan R

    2017-09-13

    There is consensus that, distal to peripheral nerve injury, myelin and Remak cells reorganize to form cellular columns, Bungner's bands, which are indispensable for regeneration. However, knowledge of the structure of these regeneration tracks has not advanced for decades and the structure of the cells that form them, denervated or repair Schwann cells, remains obscure. Furthermore, the origin of these cells from myelin and Remak cells and their ability to give rise to myelin cells after regeneration has not been demonstrated directly, although these conversions are believed to be central to nerve repair. Using genetic lineage-tracing and scanning-block face electron microscopy, we show that injury of sciatic nerves from mice of either sex triggers extensive and unexpected Schwann cell elongation and branching to form long, parallel processes. Repair cells are 2- to 3-fold longer than myelin and Remak cells and 7- to 10-fold longer than immature Schwann cells. Remarkably, when repair cells transit back to myelinating cells, they shorten ∼7-fold to generate the typically short internodes of regenerated nerves. The present experiments define novel morphological transitions in injured nerves and show that repair Schwann cells have a cell-type-specific structure that differentiates them from other cells in the Schwann cell lineage. They also provide the first direct evidence using genetic lineage tracing for two basic assumptions in Schwann cell biology: that myelin and Remak cells generate the elongated cells that build Bungner bands in injured nerves and that such cells can transform to myelin cells after regeneration. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT After injury to peripheral nerves, the myelin and Remak Schwann cells distal to the injury site reorganize and modify their properties to form cells that support the survival of injured neurons, promote axon growth, remove myelin-associated growth inhibitors, and guide regenerating axons to their targets. We show that the

  7. Synergetic effects of ciliary neurotrophic factor and olfactory ensheathing cells on optic nerve reparation (complete translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan-ping Yin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, there is no effective treatment for the repair of the optic nerve after injury, or improvement of its microenvironment for regeneration. Intravitreally injected ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF and olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs promote the long-distance regrowth of severed optic nerve fibers after intracranial injury. Here, we examined the efficacy of these techniques alone and in combination, in a rat model of optic nerve injury. We injected condensed OEC suspension at the site of injury, or CNTF into the vitreous body, or both simultaneously. Retrograde tracing techniques showed that 4 weeks postoperatively, the number of surviving retinal ganglion cells and their axonal density in the optic nerve were greater in rats subjected to OEC injection only than in those receiving CNTF injection only. Furthermore, combined OEC + CNTF injection achieved better results than either monotherapy. These findings confirm that OECs are better than CNTF at protecting injured neurons in the eye, but that combined OEC and CNTF therapy is notably more effective than either treatment alone.

  8. A combination of Schwann-cell grafts and aerobic exercise enhances sciatic nerve regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Oliveira Goulart

    Full Text Available Despite the regenerative potential of the peripheral nervous system, severe nerve lesions lead to loss of target-organ innervation, making complete functional recovery a challenge. Few studies have given attention to combining different approaches in order to accelerate the regenerative process.Test the effectiveness of combining Schwann-cells transplantation into a biodegradable conduit, with treadmill training as a therapeutic strategy to improve the outcome of repair after mouse nerve injury.Sciatic nerve transection was performed in adult C57BL/6 mice; the proximal and distal stumps of the nerve were sutured into the conduit. Four groups were analyzed: acellular grafts (DMEM group, Schwann cell grafts (3×105/2 µL; SC group, treadmill training (TMT group, and treadmill training and Schwann cell grafts (TMT + SC group. Locomotor function was assessed weekly by Sciatic Function Index and Global Mobility Test. Animals were anesthetized after eight weeks and dissected for morphological analysis.Combined therapies improved nerve regeneration, and increased the number of myelinated fibers and myelin area compared to the DMEM group. Motor recovery was accelerated in the TMT + SC group, which showed significantly better values in sciatic function index and in global mobility test than in the other groups. The TMT + SC group showed increased levels of trophic-factor expression compared to DMEM, contributing to the better functional outcome observed in the former group. The number of neurons in L4 segments was significantly higher in the SC and TMT + SC groups when compared to DMEM group. Counts of dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons revealed that TMT group had a significant increased number of neurons compared to DMEM group, while the SC and TMT + SC groups had a slight but not significant increase in the total number of motor neurons.These data provide evidence that this combination of therapeutic strategies can significantly improve functional

  9. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor from bone marrow-derived cells promotes post-injury repair of peripheral nerve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Takemura

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF stimulates peripheral nerve regeneration. However, the origin of BNDF and its precise effect on nerve repair have not been clarified. In this study, we examined the role of BDNF from bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs in post-injury nerve repair. Control and heterozygote BDNF knockout mice (BDNF+/- received a left sciatic nerve crush using a cerebral blood clip. Especially, for the evaluation of BDNF from BMDCs, studies with bone marrow transplantation (BMT were performed before the injury. We evaluated nerve function using a rotarod test, sciatic function index (SFI, and motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV simultaneously with histological nerve analyses by immunohistochemistry before and after the nerve injury until 8 weeks. BDNF production was examined by immunohistochemistry and mRNA analyses. After the nerve crush, the controls showed severe nerve dysfunction evaluated at 1 week. However, nerve function was gradually restored and reached normal levels by 8 weeks. By immunohistochemistry, BDNF expression was very faint before injury, but was dramatically increased after injury at 1 week in the distal segment from the crush site. BDNF expression was mainly co-localized with CD45 in BMDCs, which was further confirmed by the appearance of GFP-positive cells in the BMT study. Variant analysis of BDNF mRNA also confirmed this finding. BDNF+/- mice showed a loss of function with delayed histological recovery and BDNF+/+→BDNF+/- BMT mice showed complete recovery both functionally and histologically. These results suggested that the attenuated recovery of the BDNF+/- mice was rescued by the transplantation of BMCs and that BDNF from BMDCs has an essential role in nerve repair.

  10. Tonsil-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Differentiate into a Schwann Cell Phenotype and Promote Peripheral Nerve Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Namhee; Park, Saeyoung; Choi, Yoonyoung; Park, Joo-Won; Hong, Young Bin; Park, Hyun Ho Choi; Yu, Yeonsil; Kwak, Geon; Kim, Han Su; Ryu, Kyung-Ha; Kim, Jae Kwang; Jo, Inho; Choi, Byung-Ok; Jung, Sung-Chul

    2016-11-09

    Schwann cells (SCs), which produce neurotropic factors and adhesive molecules, have been reported previously to contribute to structural support and guidance during axonal regeneration; therefore, they are potentially a crucial target in the restoration of injured nervous tissues. Autologous SC transplantation has been performed and has shown promising clinical results for treating nerve injuries and donor site morbidity, and insufficient production of the cells have been considered as a major issue. Here, we performed differentiation of tonsil-derived mesenchymal stem cells (T-MSCs) into SC-like cells (T-MSC-SCs), to evaluate T-MSC-SCs as an alternative to SCs. Using SC markers such as CAD19 , GFAP , MBP , NGFR , S100B , and KROX20 during quantitative real-time PCR we detected the upregulation of NGFR , S100B , and KROX20 and the downregulation of CAD19 and MBP at the fully differentiated stage. Furthermore, we found myelination of axons when differentiated SCs were cocultured with mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons. The application of T-MSC-SCs to a mouse model of sciatic nerve injury produced marked improvements in gait and promoted regeneration of damaged nerves. Thus, the transplantation of human T-MSCs might be suitable for assisting in peripheral nerve regeneration.

  11. Enhancing nerve regeneration in the peripheral nervous system using polymeric scaffolds, stem cell engineering and nanoparticle delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anup Dutt

    Peripheral nerve regeneration is a complex biological process responsible for regrowth of neural tissue following a nerve injury. The main objective of this project was to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration using interdisciplinary approaches involving polymeric scaffolds, stem cell therapy, drug delivery and high content screening. Biocompatible and biodegradable polymeric materials such as poly (lactic acid) were used for engineering conduits with micropatterns capable of providing mechanical support and orientation to the regenerating axons and polyanhydrides for fabricating nano/microparticles for localized delivery of neurotrophic growth factors and cytokines at the site of injury. Transdifferentiated bone marrow stromal cells or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were used as cellular replacements for lost native Schwann cells (SCs) at the injured nerve tissue. MSCs that have been transdifferentiated into an SC-like phenotype were tested as a substitute for the myelinating SCs. Also, genetically modified MSCs were engineered to hypersecrete brain- derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to secrete therapeutic factors which Schwann cell secrete. To further enhance the regeneration, nerve growth factor (NGF) and interleukin-4 (IL4) releasing polyanhydrides nano/microparticles were fabricated and characterized in vitro for their efficacy. Synergistic use of these proposed techniques was used for fabricating a multifunctional nerve regeneration conduit which can be used as an efficient tool for enhancing peripheral nerve regeneration.

  12. Subcellular western blotting of single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Kevin A; Herr, Amy E

    2017-01-01

    Although immunoassays are the de facto standard for determining subcellular protein localization in individual cells, antibody probe cross-reactivity and fixation artifacts remain confounding factors. To enhance selectivity while providing single-cell resolution, we introduce a subcellular western blotting technique capable of separately assaying proteins in the 14 pL cytoplasm and 2 pL nucleus of individual cells. To confer precision fluidic control, we describe a passive multilayer microdevice that leverages the rapid transport times afforded by miniaturization. After isolating single cells in microwells, we apply single-cell differential detergent fractionation to lyse and western blot the cytoplasmic lysate, whereas the nucleus remains intact in the microwell. Subsequently, we lyse the intact nucleus and western blot the nuclear lysate. To index each protein analysis to the originating subcellular compartment, we utilize bi-directional electrophoresis, a multidimensional separation that assays the lysate from each compartment in a distinct region of the separation axis. Single-cell bi-directional electrophoresis eliminates the need for semi-subjective image segmentation algorithms required in immunocytochemistry. The subcellular, single-cell western blot is demonstrated for six targets per cell, and successfully localizes spliceosome-associated proteins solubilized from large protein and RNA complexes, even for closely sized proteins (a 7 kDa difference). Measurement of NF-κB translocation dynamics in unfixed cells at 15-min intervals demonstrates reduced technical variance compared with immunofluorescence. This chemical cytometry assay directly measures the nucleocytoplasmic protein distribution in individual unfixed cells, thus providing insight into protein signaling in heterogeneous cell populations.

  13. Monitoring of immune cell response to B cell depletion therapy and nerve root injury using SPIO enhanced MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorek, Daniel L.

    2009-12-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is a robust platform for non-invasive, high-resolution anatomical imaging. However, MR imaging lacks the requisite sensitivity and contrast for imaging at the cellular level. This represents a clinical impediment to greater diagnostic accuracy. Recent advances have allowed for the in vivo visualization of populations and even of individual cells using superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) MR contrast agents. These nanoparticles, commonly manifested as a core of a single iron oxide crystal or cluster of crystals coated in a biocompatible shell, function to shorten proton relaxation times. In MR imaging these constructs locally dephase protons, resulting in a decrease in signal (hypointensity) localized to the region of accumulation of SPIO. In the context of immune cell imaging, SPIO can provide insight into the cellular migration patterns, trafficking, temporal dynamics and progression of diseases and their related pathological states. Furthermore, by visualizing the presence and activity of immune cells, SPIO-enabled cellular imaging can help evaluate the efficacy of therapy in immune disorders. This thesis examines the production, modification and application of SPIO in a range of in vitro and in vivo immune-response-relevant cellular systems. The role of different nanoparticle characteristics including diameter, surface charge and concentration are investigated in the labeling of T cells in culture. Following optimization of SPIO loading conditions for lymphocytes, the effect these particles have on the activation of primary B cells are elucidated. B cells are tracked using a variety of modalities, with and without the application of B cell depleting therapy. This is to evaluate the efficacy of SPIO as in vivo marker for B cell distribution. Unmodified SPIO were applied to monitor macrophage infiltration in a transient nerve root compression model, with implications for neck pain diagnosis and treatment. Nanoparticle accumulation and MR

  14. In vitro destruction of nerve cell cultures by Acanthamoeba spp.: a transmission and scanning electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, D A; Williamson, J; Cabral, G A; Marciano-Cabral, F

    1996-10-01

    Trophozoites of 4 species of Acanthamoeba were cytopathic for cultured rat B103 neuroblastoma cells. Cytopathogenicity was evaluated by a chromium release assay and by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Acanthamoeba culbertsoni, Acanthamoeba castellanii, and Acanthamoeba polyphaga destroyed B103 target cells at 37 C as evidenced by the release of radiolabel. Acanthamoeba astronyxis did not produce cytopathology at 37 C but destroyed nerve cells at 25 C. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy of cocultures maintained at different time periods revealed that all species of Acanthamoeba exhibited long cylindrical structures, termed digipodia, which made contact with target cells. Following this effector cell-target cell contact, membrane blebbing on the nerve cells was observed. These events were followed either by lysis of target nerve cells or ingestion of the target cells via food-cups and their subsequent channeling into intracytoplasmic food vacuoles. Use of the TUNEL (TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling) technique indicated that approximately 40% of B103 cells incubated with A. culbertsoni, 20% of B103 cells cocultured with A. castellanii or with A. polyphaga, and less than 1% of B103 cells incubated with A. astronyxis at 37 C were apoptotic after 24 hr of coculture. Studies using electron microscopy indicated that Acanthamoeba trophozoites destroyed nerve cells both by cytolysis and by ingestion of whole nerve cells via food-cups.

  15. Lentiviral-mediated transfer of CNTF to schwann cells within reconstructed peripheral nerve grafts enhances adult retinal ganglion cell survival and axonal regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Ying; Leaver, Simone G; Plant, Giles W; Hendriks, William T J; Niclou, Simone P; Verhaagen, J.; Harvey, Alan R; Cui, Qi

    We recently described a method for reconstituting peripheral nerve (PN) sheaths using adult Schwann cells (SCs). Reconstructed PN tissue grafted onto the cut optic nerve supports the regeneration of injured adult rat retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons. To determine whether genetic manipulation of

  16. Supplemental single shot femoral nerve block for total hip arthroplasty: impact on early postoperative care, pain management and lung function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesmann, T; Steinfeldt, T; Wagner, G; Wulf, H; Schmitt, J; Zoremba, M

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral regional anesthesia is beneficial in the management of postoperative pain in hip surgery, and can also reduce post-operative care unit (PACU) stay. Its opioid-sparing actions may also be beneficial for respiratory mechanics and pulmonary function. The aim of our pilot study was to evaluate the effect of a supplemental single shot femoral block for elective total hip arthroplasty on early respiratory function and postoperative management within the first 24 postoperative hours. We prospectively studied 80 patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty. Written informed consent was obtained after ethics committee approval. Forty patients were randomLy assigned to receive single shot femoral nerve block (FNB) using 15mL bupivacaine 0.25% and 20 mg clonidine while the remainder received standard treatment without nerve block (STN). Premedication and general anesthesia were standardized. Pulse oximetry saturation and spirometric lung function were measured preoperatively (baseline) and at 0.5 h, 2 h, 6 h and 24 h, after extubation breathing room air. PACU surveillance and postoperative pain therapy was standardized. Oxygen saturation and spirometry results were significantly better within the FNB group during the first six postoperative hours. Although VAS scores during the PACU stay did not significantly differ between the study groups, PACU discharge criteria were met earlier in the FNB group (116±40 min [mean±SD] vs. 152±47 min in the STN group). The FNB group exhibited significantly lower VAS scores at 6 and 24 hours. Supplemental single shot femoral nerve block for total hip arthroplasty resulted in earlier PACU discharge capability, improved lung function during the first six hours and better pain control within the first 24 postoperative hours.

  17. Plasticity of marrow mesenchymal stem cells from human first-trimester fetus: from single-cell clone to neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yihua; Shen, Wenzheng; Sun, Bingjie; Lv, Changrong; Dou, Zhongying

    2011-02-01

    Recent results have shown that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) from human first-trimester abortus (hfBMSCs) are closer to embryonic stem cells and perform greater telomerase activity and faster propagation than mid- and late-prophase fetal and adult BMSCs. However, no research has been done on the plasticity of hfBMSCs into neuronal cells using single-cell cloned strains without cell contamination. In this study, we isolated five single cells from hfBMSCs and obtained five single-cell cloned strains, and investigated their biological property and neuronal differentiation potential. We found that four of the five strains showed similar expression profile of surface antigen markers to hfBMSCs, and most of them differentiated into neuron-like cells expressing Nestin, Pax6, Sox1, β-III Tubulin, NF-L, and NSE under induction. One strain showed different expression profile of surface antigen markers from the four strains and hfBMSCs, and did not differentiate toward neuronal cells. We demonstrated for the first time that some of single-cell cloned strains from hfBMSCs can differentiate into nerve tissue-like cell clusters under induction in vitro, and that the plasticity of each single-cell cloned strain into neuronal cells is different.

  18. Concentrated growth factor increases Schwann cell proliferation and neurotrophic factor secretion and promotes functional nerve recovery in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jie; Wang, Lin; Sun, Yue; Sun, Xiaolin; Wen, Chaoju; Shahmoradi, Mahdi; Zhou, Yanmin

    2016-02-01

    Concentrated growth factor (CGF) is a newly generated complex that comprises a fibrin matrix incorporating growth factors and plasmatic and leukocyte cytokines. It has been widely used in bone regenerative medicine. However, the effect of CGF on peripheral nerve regeneration had not been previously investigated. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possibility of using CGF for nerve regeneration by i) investigating the effect of CGF on the proliferation of Schwann cells (SCs) and secretion of neurotrophic factors nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell line‑derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in vitro; and ii) analyzing the effect of CGF on functional nerve recovery after nerve injury in vivo. CGF was prepared from venous blood taken from rats, and using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) we noted that it featured a fiber‑like appearance with pore size ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 µm. The soluble component of CGF was used to produce conditioned media with which to treat the Schwann cell line. A cell counting kit-8 assay and cell cycle analysis were both used to study the proliferative effect of CGF on SCs. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR and western blot analysis demonstrated that there was an increase in the mRNA and protein expression of NGF and GDNF, both of which are markers of SC neurotrophic secretion. A model of sciatic nerve crush injury was established for the in vivo experiment, and CGF was found to increase the sciatic functional index (indicative of nerve function). We noted that CGF increased SC proliferation and secretion of neurotrophic factors in vitro, and promoted functional recovery after peripheral nerve injuries in vivo. These results suggest that CGF is a promising candidate biomaterial for peripheral nerve regeneration, and may potentially be utilized to repair nerve injuries.

  19. Fetal Nerve Cell Transplantation in Early Post-Resuscitation Period in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damira Tazhibayeva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Fetal cell transplantation is a promising biomedical approach for disease treatment; however, the use of fetal cell therapy is still experimental. This research was deemed a necessity to provide evidence-based research for the application of cell transplantation as a treatment method. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of fetal nerve cell transplantation in rat survivors (and non-survivors after clinical death by mechanical asphyxia.Methods. 68 white laboratory rats were divided into two groups of identical age and sex: a control group of 12-month adult male rats (n = 26 and an experimental group (n = 42. Rats were fixed under ether anesthesia. We then blocked the oral and nasal regions with cotton wool soaked in saline solution. A four-minute clinical death though acute mechanical asphyxia was simulated by applying the method of N. Shim. After the 4-minute clinical death, we resuscitated the rats using external cardiac massage and artifical respiration. Suspension of the fetal nerve cells was injected intraperitoneally at 1mm3 per 25g at the time of cardiac activity restoration. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and creatine phosphokinase (CPK levels were examined in the homogenate cerebral cortex of reanimated animals. We recorded the survival rate during the post-resuscitation period and analyzed the integrative brain functions using anxiety-phobic status and latent inhibition.Results. After fetal nerve cell transplantation, the enzymatic reactions in the experimental group became normal with a significant decrease in LDH and an increase in CPK levels compared to the control group. In the control group, 10 rats died and 16 lived (62% survival rate, while 7 rats died and 35 lived (83% survival rate in the experimental group during the first 7 days. Rats that did not receive the treatment tended to die sooner than those in the experimental group. As a result of transplantation, the anxiety level in the experimental group

  20. Human umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor protect injured optic nerve: viscoelasticity characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xue-man; Liu, Yan; Wu, Fei; Yuan, Yi; Luo, Min

    2016-01-01

    The optic nerve is a viscoelastic solid-like biomaterial. Its normal stress relaxation and creep properties enable the nerve to resist constant strain and protect it from injury. We hypothesized that stress relaxation and creep properties of the optic nerve change after injury. More-over, human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells may restore these changes to normal. To validate this hypothesis, a rabbit model of optic nerve injury was established using a clamp approach. At 7 days after injury, the vitreous body re-ceived a one-time injection of 50 μg human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or 1 × 106 human umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells. At 30 days after injury, stress relaxation and creep properties of the optic nerve that received treatment had recovered greatly, with patho-logical changes in the injured optic nerve also noticeably improved. These results suggest that human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or umbilical cord blood-derived stem cell intervention promotes viscoelasticity recovery of injured optic nerves, and thereby contributes to nerve recovery. PMID:27212930

  1. Human umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor protect injured optic nerve: viscoelasticity characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-man Lv

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The optic nerve is a viscoelastic solid-like biomaterial. Its normal stress relaxation and creep properties enable the nerve to resist constant strain and protect it from injury. We hypothesized that stress relaxation and creep properties of the optic nerve change after injury. More-over, human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells may restore these changes to normal. To validate this hypothesis, a rabbit model of optic nerve injury was established using a clamp approach. At 7 days after injury, the vitreous body re-ceived a one-time injection of 50 µg human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or 1 × 106 human umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells. At 30 days after injury, stress relaxation and creep properties of the optic nerve that received treatment had recovered greatly, with patho-logical changes in the injured optic nerve also noticeably improved. These results suggest that human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or umbilical cord blood-derived stem cell intervention promotes viscoelasticity recovery of injured optic nerves, and thereby contributes to nerve recovery.

  2. Time-Dependent Nerve Growth Factor Signaling Changes in the Rat Retina During Optic Nerve Crush-Induced Degeneration of Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesentier-Louro, Louise A; De Nicolò, Sara; Rosso, Pamela; De Vitis, Luigi A; Castoldi, Valerio; Leocani, Letizia; Mendez-Otero, Rosalia; Santiago, Marcelo F; Tirassa, Paola; Rama, Paolo; Lambiase, Alessandro

    2017-01-05

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is suggested to be neuroprotective after nerve injury; however, retinal ganglion cells (RGC) degenerate following optic-nerve crush (ONC), even in the presence of increased levels of endogenous NGF. To further investigate this apparently paradoxical condition, a time-course study was performed to evaluate the effects of unilateral ONC on NGF expression and signaling in the adult retina. Visually evoked potential and immunofluorescence staining were used to assess axonal damage and RGC loss. The levels of NGF, proNGF, p75 NTR , TrkA and GFAP and the activation of several intracellular pathways were analyzed at 1, 3, 7 and 14 days after crush (dac) by ELISA/Western Blot and PathScan intracellular signaling array. The progressive RGC loss and nerve impairment featured an early and sustained activation of apoptotic pathways; and GFAP and p75 NTR enhancement. In contrast, ONC-induced reduction of TrkA, and increased proNGF were observed only at 7 and 14 dac. We propose that proNGF and p75 NTR contribute to exacerbate retinal degeneration by further stimulating apoptosis during the second week after injury, and thus hamper the neuroprotective effect of the endogenous NGF. These findings might aid in identifying effective treatment windows for NGF-based strategies to counteract retinal and/or optic-nerve degeneration.

  3. Time-Dependent Nerve Growth Factor Signaling Changes in the Rat Retina During Optic Nerve Crush-Induced Degeneration of Retinal Ganglion Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise A. Mesentier-Louro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nerve growth factor (NGF is suggested to be neuroprotective after nerve injury; however, retinal ganglion cells (RGC degenerate following optic-nerve crush (ONC, even in the presence of increased levels of endogenous NGF. To further investigate this apparently paradoxical condition, a time-course study was performed to evaluate the effects of unilateral ONC on NGF expression and signaling in the adult retina. Visually evoked potential and immunofluorescence staining were used to assess axonal damage and RGC loss. The levels of NGF, proNGF, p75NTR, TrkA and GFAP and the activation of several intracellular pathways were analyzed at 1, 3, 7 and 14 days after crush (dac by ELISA/Western Blot and PathScan intracellular signaling array. The progressive RGC loss and nerve impairment featured an early and sustained activation of apoptotic pathways; and GFAP and p75NTR enhancement. In contrast, ONC-induced reduction of TrkA, and increased proNGF were observed only at 7 and 14 dac. We propose that proNGF and p75NTR contribute to exacerbate retinal degeneration by further stimulating apoptosis during the second week after injury, and thus hamper the neuroprotective effect of the endogenous NGF. These findings might aid in identifying effective treatment windows for NGF-based strategies to counteract retinal and/or optic-nerve degeneration.

  4. HLA-DR-expressing cells and T-lymphocytes in sural nerve biopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H D; Olsson, T; Solders, G

    1988-01-01

    Thirty-five sural nerve biopsies were stained immunohistochemically for HLA-DR antigen. HLA-DR was expressed on nonmyelinating Schwann cells, macrophages, vascular endothelium, and perineurium. By means of double immunofluorescence staining the identity of the HLA-DR presenting structures was con...... neuropathies. T-cells were found in 6 out of 15 nerves examined. Their presence correlated with moderate to strong HLA-DR expression of nonmyelinating Schwann cells, and they occurred during active disease.......Thirty-five sural nerve biopsies were stained immunohistochemically for HLA-DR antigen. HLA-DR was expressed on nonmyelinating Schwann cells, macrophages, vascular endothelium, and perineurium. By means of double immunofluorescence staining the identity of the HLA-DR presenting structures...... was confirmed. HLA-DR expression was found in all biopsies and thus was not restricted to any particular type of neuropathy. The HLA-DR expression appeared to correlate with severity and activity of the neuropathy. HLA-DR-expressing macrophages wrapping myelinated fibers were prominent in primary demyelinating...

  5. Neural-differentiated mesenchymal stem cells incorporated into muscle stuffed vein scaffold forms a stable living nerve conduit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Nur Hidayah; Sulong, Ahmad Fadzli; Ng, Min-Hwei; Htwe, Ohnmar; Idrus, Ruszymah B H; Roohi, Sharifah; Naicker, Amaramalar S; Abdullah, Shalimar

    2012-10-01

    Autologous nerve grafts to bridge nerve gaps have donor site morbidity and possible neuroma formation resulting in development of various methods of bridging nerve gaps without using autologous nerve grafts. We have fabricated an acellular muscle stuffed vein seeded with differentiated mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as a substitute for nerve autografts. Human vein and muscle were both decellularized by liquid nitrogen immersion with subsequent hydrolysis in hydrochloric acid. Human MSCs were subjected to a series of treatments with a reducing agent, retinoic acid, and a combination of trophic factors. The differentiated MSCs were seeded on the surface of acellular muscle tissue and then stuffed into the vein. Our study showed that 35-75% of the cells expressed neural markers such as S100b, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), p75 NGF receptor, and Nestin after differentiation. Histological and ultra structural analyses of muscle stuffed veins showed attachment of cells onto the surface of the acellular muscle and penetration of the cells into the hydrolyzed fraction of muscle fibers. We implanted these muscle stuffed veins into athymic mice and at 8 weeks post-implantation, the acellular muscle tissue had fully degraded and replaced with new matrix produced by the seeded cells. The vein was still intact and no inflammatory reactions were observed proving the biocompatibility and biodegradability of the conduit. In conclusion, we have successfully formed a stable living nerve conduit which may serve as a substitute for autologous nerves. Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  6. Electrophysiologic evaluation of lumbosacral single nerve roots using compound muscle action potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Taku; Shikata, Hideto; Hase, Hitoshi; Mori, Masaki; Hayashida, Taturo; Osawa, Toru; Mikami, Yasuo; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2003-10-01

    Transcutaneous electrical stimulation applied to the vertebral column produces compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) from the leg muscles. Using this method, we evaluated the efferent pathways of the lumbosacral nerve roots. The subjects were 26 healthy volunteers and 31 patients with lumbar disc herniation (LDH). CMAP recordings were obtained from the bilateral vastus medialis, tibialis anterior, extensor digitorum brevis, and abductor hallucis muscles using low-output-impedance stimulation. In normal subjects, the CMAP latency increased linearly with the distance between the stimulating electrode and the recording electrode, with little difference in latency between the left and the right sides in each subject. The CMAP amplitude was significantly lower in the patients with LDH, and the latency was also prolonged when the stimulating electrode was placed above the lesion. This technique may thus be a useful noninvasive method for assessing lumbosacral nerve root function in patients with LDH.

  7. Single cell-resolution western blotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Chi-Chih; Yamauchi, Kevin A; Vlassakis, Julea; Sinkala, Elly; Duncombe, Todd A; Herr, Amy E

    2016-08-01

    This protocol describes how to perform western blotting on individual cells to measure cell-to-cell variation in protein expression levels and protein state. Like conventional western blotting, single-cell western blotting (scWB) is particularly useful for protein targets that lack selective antibodies (e.g., isoforms) and in cases in which background signal from intact cells is confounding. scWB is performed on a microdevice that comprises an array of microwells molded in a thin layer of a polyacrylamide gel (PAG). The gel layer functions as both a molecular sieving matrix during PAGE and a blotting scaffold during immunoprobing. scWB involves five main stages: (i) gravity settling of cells into microwells; (ii) chemical lysis of cells in each microwell; (iii) PAGE of each single-cell lysate; (iv) exposure of the gel to UV light to blot (immobilize) proteins to the gel matrix; and (v) in-gel immunoprobing of immobilized proteins. Multiplexing can be achieved by probing with antibody cocktails and using antibody stripping/reprobing techniques, enabling detection of 10+ proteins in each cell. We also describe microdevice fabrication for both uniform and pore-gradient microgels. To extend in-gel immunoprobing to gels of small pore size, we describe an optional gel de-cross-linking protocol for more effective introduction of antibodies into the gel layer. Once the microdevice has been fabricated, the assay can be completed in 4-6 h by microfluidic novices and it generates high-selectivity, multiplexed data from single cells. The technique is relevant when direct measurement of proteins in single cells is needed, with applications spanning the fundamental biosciences to applied biomedicine.

  8. Elevated intracranial pressure causes optic nerve and retinal ganglion cell degeneration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusbaum, Derek M; Wu, Samuel M; Frankfort, Benjamin J

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel experimental system for the modulation and measurement of intracranial pressure (ICP), and to use this system to assess the impact of elevated ICP on the optic nerve and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in CD1 mice. This system involved surgical implantation of an infusion cannula and a radiowave based pressure monitoring probe through the skull and into the subarachnoid space. The infusion cannula was used to increase ICP, which was measured by the probe and transmitted to a nearby receiver. The system provided robust and consistent ICP waveforms, was well tolerated, and was stable over time. ICP was elevated to approximately 30 mmHg for one week, after which we assessed changes in optic nerve structure with transmission electron microscopy in cross section and RGC numbers with antibody staining in retinal flat mounts. ICP elevation resulted in optic nerve axonal loss and disorganization, as well as RGC soma loss. We conclude that the controlled manipulation of ICP in active, awake mice is possible, despite their small size. Furthermore, ICP elevation results in visual system phenotypes of optic nerve and RGC degeneration, suggesting that this model can be used to study the impact of ICP on the visual system. Potentially, this model can also be used to study the relationship between ICP and IOP, as well diseases impacted by ICP variation such as glaucoma, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, and the spaceflight-related visual impairment intracranial pressure syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Recurrent laryngeal nerve regeneration using an oriented collagen scaffold containing Schwann cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitose, Shun-Ichi; Sato, Kiminori; Fukahori, Mioko; Sueyoshi, Shintaro; Kurita, Takashi; Umeno, Hirohito

    2017-07-01

    Regeneration of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN), which innervates the intrinsic laryngeal muscles such that they can perform complex functions, is particularly difficult to achieve. Synkinesis after RLN neogenesis leads to uncoordinated movement of laryngeal muscles. Recently, some basic research studies have used cultured Schwann cells (SCs) to repair peripheral nerve injuries. This study aimed to regenerate the RLN using an oriented collagen scaffold containing cultured SCs. Preliminary animal experiment. A 10-mm-long autologous canine cervical ansa was harvested. The nerve tissue was scattered and subcultured on oriented collagen sheets in reduced serum medium. After verifying that the smaller cultivated cells with high nucleus-cytoplasm ratios were SCs, collagen sheets with longitudinally oriented cells were rolled and inserted into a 20-mm collagen conduit. The fabricated scaffolds containing SCs were autotransplanted to a 20-mm deficient RLN, and vocal fold movements and histological characteristics were observed. Scaffolds containing cultured SCs were successfully fabricated. Immunocytochemical examination revealed that these isolated and cultured cells, identified as SCs, expressed S-100 protein and GFAP but not vimentin. The orientation of SCs matched that of the oriented collagen sheet. Two months after successful transplantation, laryngeal endoscopy revealed coordinated movement of the bilateral vocal folds by external stimulation under light general anesthesia. Hematoxylin and eosin staining showed that the regenerated RLN lacked epineurium surrounding the nerve fibers and was interspersed with collagen fibers. Myelin protein zero was expressed around many axons. Partial regeneration of RLN was achieved through the use of oriented collagen scaffolding. NA Laryngoscope, 127:1622-1627, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  10. [Interaction of alpha-(125)latrocrustotoxin with nerve cell membranes from the river crab Astacus astacus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnoperov, V G; Shamotienko, O G; Grishin, E V

    1991-05-01

    alpha-Latrocrustatoxin, the crustacean-specific neurotoxin from the venom of the black widow spider Latrodectus mactans tredecimguttatus was radioactively labelled with Bolton-Hunter reagent to the specific activity of 160 Ci/mmol with retention of the biological activity. A highly specific binding of radioactive toxin on plasmatic membranes from the crayfish Astacus astacus nerve cells with Bmax = 0.04 pmol binding toxin/mg membrane protein and Kd = 0.7 x 10(-10) M was demonstrated.

  11. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy in retinal and optic nerve diseases: An update of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrador-Velandia, Sonia; Alonso-Alonso, María Luz; Alvarez-Sanchez, Sara; González-Zamora, Jorge; Carretero-Barrio, Irene; Pastor, José Carlos; Fernandez-Bueno, Iván; Srivastava, Girish Kumar

    2016-11-26

    Retinal and optic nerve diseases are degenerative ocular pathologies which lead to irreversible visual loss. Since the advanced therapies availability, cell-based therapies offer a new all-encompassing approach. Advances in the knowledge of neuroprotection, immunomodulation and regenerative properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been obtained by several preclinical studies of various neurodegenerative diseases. It has provided the opportunity to perform the translation of this knowledge to prospective treatment approaches for clinical practice. Since 2008, several first steps projecting new treatment approaches, have been taken regarding the use of cell therapy in patients with neurodegenerative pathologies of optic nerve and retina. Most of the clinical trials using MSCs are in I/II phase, recruiting patients or ongoing, and they have as main objective the safety assessment of MSCs using various routes of administration. However, it is important to recognize that, there is still a long way to go to reach clinical trials phase III-IV. Hence, it is necessary to continue preclinical and clinical studies to improve this new therapeutic tool. This paper reviews the latest progress of MSCs in human clinical trials for retinal and optic nerve diseases.

  12. Experimental techniques for single cell and single molecule biomechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, C.T.; Zhou, E.H.; Li, A.; Vedula, S.R.K.; Fu, H.X.

    2006-01-01

    Stresses and strains that act on the human body can arise either from external physical forces or internal physiological environmental conditions. These biophysical interactions can occur not only at the musculoskeletal but also cellular and molecular levels and can determine the health and function of the human body. Here, we seek to investigate the structure-property-function relationship of cells and biomolecules so as to understand their important physiological functions as well as establish possible connections to human diseases. With the recent advancements in cell and molecular biology, biophysics and nanotechnology, several innovative and state-of-the-art experimental techniques and equipment have been developed to probe the structural and mechanical properties of biostructures from the micro- down to picoscale. Some of these experimental techniques include the optical or laser trap method, micropipette aspiration, step-pressure technique, atomic force microscopy and molecular force spectroscopy. In this article, we will review the basic principles and usage of these techniques to conduct single cell and single molecule biomechanics research

  13. Enhancement of Median Nerve Regeneration by Mesenchymal Stem Cells Engraftment in an Absorbable Conduit: Improvement of Peripheral Nerve Morphology with Enlargement of Somatosensory Cortical Representation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Teixeira Oliveira

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We studied the morphology and the cortical representation of the median nerve (MN, 10 weeks after a transection immediately followed by treatment with tubulization using a polycaprolactone (PCL conduit with or without bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC transplant. In order to characterize the cutaneous representation of MN inputs in primary somatosensory cortex (S1, electrophysiological cortical mapping of the somatosensory representation of the forepaw and adjacent body parts was performed after acute lesion of all brachial plexus nerves, except for the MN. This was performed in ten adult male Wistar rats randomly assigned in 3 groups: MN Intact (n=4, PCL-Only (n=3 and PCL+MSC (n=3. Ten weeks before mapping procedures in animals from PCL-Only and PCL+MSC groups, animal were subjected to MN transection with removal of a 4-mm-long segment, immediately followed by suturing a PCL conduit to the nerve stumps with (PCL+MSC group or without (PCL-Only group injection of MSC into the conduit. After mapping the representation of the MN in S1, animals had a segment of the regenerated nerve processed for light and transmission electron microscopy. For histomorphometric analysis of the nerve segment, sample size was increased to 5 animals per experimental group. The PCL+MSC group presented a higher number of myelinated fibers and a larger cortical representation of MN inputs in S1 (3,383±390 fibers; 2.3 mm2, respectively than the PCL-Only group (2,226±575 fibers; 1.6 mm2. In conclusion, MSC-based therapy associated with PCL conduits can improve MN regeneration. This treatment seems to rescue the nerve representation in S1, thus minimizing the stabilization of new representations of adjacent body parts in regions previously responsive to the MN.

  14. Bone Marrow-Derived Cells as a Therapeutic Approach to Optic Nerve Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise A. Mesentier-Louro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Following optic nerve injury associated with acute or progressive diseases, retinal ganglion cells (RGCs of adult mammals degenerate and undergo apoptosis. These diseases have limited therapeutic options, due to the low inherent capacity of RGCs to regenerate and due to the inhibitory milieu of the central nervous system. Among the numerous treatment approaches investigated to stimulate neuronal survival and axonal extension, cell transplantation emerges as a promising option. This review focuses on cell therapies with bone marrow mononuclear cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, which have shown positive therapeutic effects in animal models of optic neuropathies. Different aspects of available preclinical studies are analyzed, including cell distribution, potential doses, routes of administration, and mechanisms of action. Finally, published and ongoing clinical trials are summarized.

  15. Glial differentiation of human inferior turbinate-derived stem cells: a new source of cells for nerve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Sheng, Ying; Liang, JianMin; Ren, XiaoYong; Cheng, Yan

    2017-03-22

    Schwann cell (SC) transplantation as a cell-based therapy can enhance peripheral and central nerve repair experimentally, but it is limited by donor site morbidity for clinical application. We investigated whether human turbinate-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hTMSCs) isolated from discarded inferior turbinate during surgery can differentiate into functional SC-like cells. hTMSCs expressed mesenchymal cell surface markers CD29, CD44, CD90, and CD105 and did not express neural crest markers P75 and Nestin. After monolayer culture in predifferentiation medium and transdifferentiation medium with a mixture of glial growth factors and chemical regents for 14 days, the differentiated hTMSCs exhibited a spindle-like morphology similar to that of SCs. RT-PCR, immunocytochemical staining, and western blotting analysis indicated that SC-like cells expressed the glial markers S100β, P75, and glial fibrillary acidic protein at the gene and protein level. Compared with hTMSCs, differentiated hTMSCs secreted more neurotrophins, and significantly enhanced the neurite length when cocultured with dorsal root ganglia neuronal cells. Our data indicated that hTMSCs can differentiate into functional SC-like cells and have the ability to facilitate the neurite growth of dorsal root ganglia neuronal cells in vitro, representing a promising source of cells for nerve repair.

  16. Optimization of genetic analysis for single cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hussein mouawia

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The molecular genetic analysis of microdissected cells by laser, a method for selecting a starting material of pure DNA or RNA uncontaminated. Our study focuses on technical pre-PCR (polymerase chain reaction for the amplification of DNA from a single cell (leukocyte isolated from human blood after laser microdissection and aims to optimize the yield of DNA extracted of this cell to be amplified without errors and provide reliable genetic analyzes. This study has allowed us to reduce the duration of cell lysis in order to perform the step of expanding genomic PEP (primer extension preamplification directly after lysis the same day and the quality of genomic amplification and eliminate purification step of the product PEP, step with a risk of contamination and risk of loss of genetic material related to manipulation. This approach has shown that the combination of at least 3 STR (short tandem repeat markers for genetic analysis of single cell improves the efficiency and accuracy of PCR and minimizes the loss of allele (allele drop out; ADO. This protocol can be applied to large scale and an effective means suitable for genetic testing for molecular diagnostic from isolated single cell (cancerous - fetal.

  17. Tumors Presenting as Multiple Cranial Nerve Palsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cranial nerve palsy could be one of the presenting features of underlying benign or malignant tumors of the head and neck. The tumor can involve the cranial nerves by local compression, direct infiltration or by paraneoplastic process. Cranial nerve involvement depends on the anatomical course of the cranial nerve and the site of the tumor. Patients may present with single or multiple cranial nerve palsies. Multiple cranial nerve involvement could be sequential or discrete, unilateral or bilateral, painless or painful. The presentation could be acute, subacute or recurrent. Anatomic localization is the first step in the evaluation of these patients. The lesion could be in the brain stem, meninges, base of skull, extracranial or systemic disease itself. We present 3 cases of underlying neoplasms presenting as cranial nerve palsies: a case of glomus tumor presenting as cochlear, glossopharyngeal, vagus and hypoglossal nerve palsies, clivus tumor presenting as abducens nerve palsy, and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting as oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal and abducens nerve palsies due to paraneoplastic involvement. History and physical examination, imaging, autoantibodies and biopsy if feasible are useful for the diagnosis. Management outcomes depend on the treatment of the underlying tumor.

  18. Tumors Presenting as Multiple Cranial Nerve Palsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kishore; Ahmed, Rafeeq; Bajantri, Bharat; Singh, Amandeep; Abbas, Hafsa; Dejesus, Eddy; Khan, Rana Raheel; Niazi, Masooma; Chilimuri, Sridhar

    2017-01-01

    Cranial nerve palsy could be one of the presenting features of underlying benign or malignant tumors of the head and neck. The tumor can involve the cranial nerves by local compression, direct infiltration or by paraneoplastic process. Cranial nerve involvement depends on the anatomical course of the cranial nerve and the site of the tumor. Patients may present with single or multiple cranial nerve palsies. Multiple cranial nerve involvement could be sequential or discrete, unilateral or bilateral, painless or painful. The presentation could be acute, subacute or recurrent. Anatomic localization is the first step in the evaluation of these patients. The lesion could be in the brain stem, meninges, base of skull, extracranial or systemic disease itself. We present 3 cases of underlying neoplasms presenting as cranial nerve palsies: a case of glomus tumor presenting as cochlear, glossopharyngeal, vagus and hypoglossal nerve palsies, clivus tumor presenting as abducens nerve palsy, and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting as oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal and abducens nerve palsies due to paraneoplastic involvement. History and physical examination, imaging, autoantibodies and biopsy if feasible are useful for the diagnosis. Management outcomes depend on the treatment of the underlying tumor. PMID:28553221

  19. Human primordial germ cells migrate along nerve fibers and Schwann cells from the dorsal hind gut mesentery to the gonadal ridge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllgård, Kjeld; Jespersen, Åse; Lutterodt, Melissa Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the spatiotemporal development of autonomic nerve fibers and primordial germ cells (PGCs) along their migratory route from the dorsal mesentery to the gonadal ridges in human embryos using immunohistochemical markers and electron microscopy. Autonomic nerve...... arrive at the gonadal ridge between 29 and 33 days pc. In conclusion, our data suggest that PGCs in human embryos preferentially migrate along autonomic nerve fibers from the dorsal mesentery to the developing gonad where they are delivered via a fine nerve plexus....

  20. Macrophage-derived microvesicles promote proliferation and migration of Schwann cell on peripheral nerve repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhan, Chuan, E-mail: zhchuansy@163.com; Ma, Cheng-bin; Yuan, Hong-mou; Cao, Bao-yuan; Zhu, Jia-jun

    2015-12-04

    Background: Macrophages have been implicated in peripheral nerve regeneration. However, whether macrophages-derived microvesicles (MVs) are involved in this process remains unknown. In the present study, the effects of macrophages-derived MVs on proliferation and migration of Schwann cells (SCs) were evaluated in both in vitro and in vivo. Methods: Human monocytic leukaemia cell line (THP-1) was successfully driven to M1 and M2 phenotypes by delivery of either IFN-γ or IL-4, respectively. SCs incubated with M1 or M2 macrophages-derived MVs, the cell migration and proliferation were assessed, and expression levels of nerve growth factor (NGF) and Laminin were measured. A rat model of sciatic nerve was established and the effects of macrophages-derived MVs on nerve regeneration were investigated. Results: M2-derived MVs elevated migration, proliferation, NFG and Laminin protein levels of SCs compared with M1-or M0-derived MVs. The relative expression levels of miR-223 were also increased in M2 macrophages and M2-derived MVs. Transfected M2 macrophages with miR-223 inhibitor then co-incubated with SCs, an inhibition of cell migration and proliferation and a down-regulated levels of NFG and Laminin protein expression were observed. In vivo, M2-derived MVs significantly increased the infiltration and axon number of SCs. Conclusion: M2-derived MVs promoted proliferation and migration of SCs in vitro and in vivo, which provided a therapeutic strategy for nerve regeneration. - Highlights: • M2 macrophages-derived MVs elevated migration and proliferation of SCs. • M2 macrophages-derived MVs up-regulated NFG and Laminin expression of SCs. • MiR-223 expression was increased in M2 macrophages-derived MVs. • MiR-223 inhibitor reduced migration and proliferation of SCs co-incubated with MVs. • MiR-223 inhibitor down-regulated NFG and Laminin levels of SCs co-incubated with MVs.

  1. Salidroside promotes peripheral nerve regeneration based on tissue engineering strategy using Schwann cells and PLGA: in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Lv, Peizhen; Zhu, Yongjia; Wu, Huayu; Zhang, Kun; Xu, Fuben; Zheng, Li; Zhao, Jinmin

    2017-01-01

    Salidriside (SDS), a phenylpropanoid glycoside derived from Rhodiola rosea L, has been shown to be neuroprotective in many studies, which may be promising in nerve recovery. In this study, the neuroprotective effects of SDS on engineered nerve constructed by Schwann cells (SCs) and Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) were studied in vitro. We further investigated the effect of combinational therapy of SDS and PLGA/SCs based tissue engineering on peripheral nerve regeneration based on the rat model of nerve injury by sciatic transection. The results showed that SDS dramatically enhanced the proliferation and function of SCs. The underlying mechanism may be that SDS affects SCs growth through the modulation of neurotrophic factors (BDNF, GDNF and CNTF). 12 weeks after implantation with a 12 mm gap of sciatic nerve injury, SDS-PLGA/SCs achieved satisfying outcomes of nerve regeneration, as evidenced by morphological and functional improvements upon therapy by SDS, PLGA/SCs or direct suture group assessed by sciatic function index, nerve conduction assay, HE staining and immunohistochemical analysis. Our results demonstrated the significant role of introducing SDS into neural tissue engineering to promote nerve regeneration.

  2. Gpr126/Adgrg6 Has Schwann Cell Autonomous and Nonautonomous Functions in Peripheral Nerve Injury and Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogha, Amit; Harty, Breanne L; Carlin, Dan; Joseph, Jessica; Sanchez, Nicholas E; Suter, Ueli; Piao, Xianhua; Cavalli, Valeria; Monk, Kelly R

    2016-12-07

    Schwann cells (SCs) are essential for proper peripheral nerve development and repair, although the mechanisms regulating these processes are incompletely understood. We previously showed that the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor Gpr126/Adgrg6 is essential for SC development and myelination. Interestingly, the expression of Gpr126 is maintained in adult SCs, suggestive of a function in the mature nerve. We therefore investigated the role of Gpr126 in nerve repair by studying an inducible SC-specific Gpr126 knock-out mouse model. Here, we show that remyelination is severely delayed after nerve-crush injury. Moreover, we also observe noncell-autonomous defects in macrophage recruitment and axon regeneration in injured nerves following loss of Gpr126 in SCs. This work demonstrates that Gpr126 has critical SC-autonomous and SC-nonautonomous functions in remyelination and peripheral nerve repair. Lack of robust remyelination represents one of the major barriers to recovery of neurological functions in disease or following injury in many disorders of the nervous system. Here we show that the adhesion class G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) Gpr126/Adgrg6 is required for remyelination, macrophage recruitment, and axon regeneration following nerve injury. At least 30% of all approved drugs target GPCRs; thus, Gpr126 represents an attractive potential target to stimulate repair in myelin disease or following nerve injury. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/3612351-17$15.00/0.

  3. Thermoresponsive micropatterned substrates for single cell studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Mandal

    Full Text Available We describe the design of micropatterned surfaces for single cell studies, based on thermoresponsive polymer brushes. We show that brushes made of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide grafted at high surface density display excellent protein and cell anti-adhesive properties. Such brushes are readily patterned at the micron scale via deep UV photolithography. A proper choice of the adhesive pattern shapes, combined with the temperature-dependent swelling properties of PNIPAM, allow us to use the polymer brush as a microactuator which induces cell detachment when the temperature is reduced below [Formula: see text]C.

  4. Fluoroscopic Guided Radiofrequency of Genicular Nerves for Pain Alleviation in Chronic Knee Osteoarthritis: A Single-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hakeim, Eman H; Elawamy, Abdelraheem; Kamel, Emad Zarief; Goma, Samar H; Gamal, Rania M; Ghandour, Abeer M; Osman, Ayman M; Morsy, Khalid M

    2018-03-01

    Nowadays, pain and disability due to chronic knee arthritis is a very common problem in middle aged people. A lot of modalities for management are available, including conservative analgesics and up to surgical interventions. Radiofrequency ablation of genicular nerves is assumed to be an effective less invasive and safe pain alleviation modality. To evaluate the efficacy of fluoroscopic guided radiofrequency neurotomy of the genicular nerves for alleviation of chronic pain and improvement of function in patients with knee osteoarthritis. A single-blind randomized controlled trial. Pain management unit, and Rheumatology and Rehabilitation clinics of Assiut University hospitals, Assiut, Egypt. This study involved 60 patients with chronic knee osteoarthritis. Radiofrequency neurotomy of the genicular nerves was done for 30 patients (Group A) while the other 30 patients (Group C) received conventional analgesics only. The outcome measures included visual analog scale (VAS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Index (WOMAC), and Likert scale for patient satisfaction in the 2nd week,3rd, and 6th months. There were significant differences regarding the VAS in the 2nd week, 3rd, and 6th months between the 2 groups, and a significant difference in total WOMAC index in the 6th month only. There were significant changes when comparing pretreatment values with the values during the whole follow-up period with regard to the VAS and total WOMAC index in both groups. No diagnostic block was done prior to radiofrequency. We recommend the use of such a technique on a larger number of OA patients, with a longer follow-up period. RF can ameliorate pain and disability in chronic knee osteoarthritis in a safe and effective manner. Chronic pain, radiofrequency (RF), knee osteoarthritis.

  5. [Progression of nerve fiber layer defects in retrobulbar optic neuritis by the macular ganglion cell complex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, D; Bosc, C; Chiambaretta, F

    2017-11-01

    Recent studies with SD OCT had shown early axonal damage to the macular ganglion cell complex (which consists of the three innermost layers of the retina: Inner Plexiform Layer [IPL], Ganglion Cell Layer [GCL], Retinal Nerve Fibre layer [RNFL]) in optic nerve pathology. Retrobulbar optic neuritis (RBON), occurring frequently in demyelinating diseases, leads to atrophy of the optic nerve fibers at the level of the ganglion cell axons, previously described in the literature. The goal of this study is to evaluate the progression of optic nerve fiber defects and macular ganglion cell complex defects with the SPECTRALIS OCT via a reproducible method by calculating a mean thickness in each quadrant after an episode of retrobulbar optic neuritis. This is a prospective monocentric observational study including 8 patients at the Clermont-Ferrand university medical center. All patients underwent ocular examination with macular and disc OCT analysis and a Goldmann visual field at the time of inclusion (onset or recurrence of RBON), at 3 months and at 6 months. Patients were 40-years-old on average at the time of inclusion. After 6 months of follow-up, there was progression of the atrophy of the macular ganglion cell complex in the affected eye on (11.5% or 11μm) predominantly inferonasally (13.9% or 16μm) and superonasally (12.9% or 14μm) while the other eye remained stable. The decrease in thickness occurred mainly in the most internal 3 layers of the retina. On average, the loss in thickness of the peripapillary RNFL was predominantly inferotemporal (24.9% or 39μm) and superotemporal (21.8% or 28μm). In 3 months of progression, the loss of optic nerve fibers is already seen on macular and disc OCT after an episode of RBON, especially in inferior quadrants in spite of the improvement in the Goldmann visual field and visual acuity. Segmentation by quadrant was used here to compare the progression of the defect by region compared to the fovea in a global and reproducible

  6. Bone marrow-derived cells in the population of spinal microglia after peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashima, Ryoichi; Mikuriya, Satsuki; Tomiyama, Daisuke; Shiratori-Hayashi, Miho; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Kohro, Yuta; Tozaki-Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Kazuhide; Tsuda, Makoto

    2016-03-23

    Accumulating evidence indicates that peripheral nerve injury (PNI) activates spinal microglia that are necessary for neuropathic pain. Recent studies using bone marrow (BM) chimeric mice have reported that after PNI, circulating BM-derived cells infiltrate into the spinal cord and differentiate into microglia-like cells. This raises the possibility that the population of spinal microglia after PNI may be heterogeneous. However, the infiltration of BM cells in the spinal cord remains controversial because of experimental adverse effects of strong irradiation used for generating BM chimeric mice. In this study, we evaluated the PNI-induced spinal infiltration of BM-derived cells not only by irradiation-induced myeloablation with various conditioning regimens, but also by parabiosis and mice with genetically labelled microglia, models without irradiation and BM transplantation. Results obtained from these independent approaches provide compelling evidence indicating little contribution of circulating BM-derived cells to the population of spinal microglia after PNI.

  7. Development of dielectrophoresis MEMS device for PC12 cell patterning to elucidate nerve-network generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamachi, Eiji; Koga, Hirotaka; Morita, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Koji; Sakamoto, Hidetoshi

    2018-01-01

    We developed a PC12 cell trapping and patterning device by combining the dielectrophoresis (DEP) methodology and the micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology for time-lapse observation of morphological change of nerve network to elucidate the generation mechanism of neural network. We succeeded a neural network generation, which consisted of cell body, axon and dendrites by using tetragonal and hexagonal cell patterning. Further, the time laps observations was carried out to evaluate the axonal extension rate. The axon extended in the channel and reached to the target cell body. We found that the shorter the PC12 cell distance, the less the axonal connection time in both tetragonal and hexagonal structures. After 48 hours culture, a maximum success rate of network formation was 85% in the case of 40 μm distance tetragonal structure.

  8. Gastrointestinal peristalsis: joint action of enteric nerves, smooth muscle, and interstitial cells of Cajal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizinga, J D

    1999-11-15

    Peristalsis is a propulsive motor pattern orchestrated by neuronal excitation and inhibition in cooperation with intrinsic muscular control mechanisms, including those residing in interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). Interstitial cells of Cajal form a network of cells in which electrical slow waves originate and then propagate into the musculature initiating rhythmic contractile activity upon excitaton by enteric nerves. Interstitial cells of Cajal have now been isolated and their intrinsic properties reveal the presence of rhythmic inward currents not found in smooth muscle cells. In tissues where classical slow waves are not present, enteric cholinergic excitation will evoke slow wave-like activity that forces action potentials to occur in a rhythmic manner. Intrinsic and induced slow wave activity directs many of the peristaltic motor patterns in the gut. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Bone marrow-derived cells in the population of spinal microglia after peripheral nerve injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashima, Ryoichi; Mikuriya, Satsuki; Tomiyama, Daisuke; Shiratori-Hayashi, Miho; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Kohro, Yuta; Tozaki-Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Kazuhide; Tsuda, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that peripheral nerve injury (PNI) activates spinal microglia that are necessary for neuropathic pain. Recent studies using bone marrow (BM) chimeric mice have reported that after PNI, circulating BM-derived cells infiltrate into the spinal cord and differentiate into microglia-like cells. This raises the possibility that the population of spinal microglia after PNI may be heterogeneous. However, the infiltration of BM cells in the spinal cord remains controversial because of experimental adverse effects of strong irradiation used for generating BM chimeric mice. In this study, we evaluated the PNI-induced spinal infiltration of BM-derived cells not only by irradiation-induced myeloablation with various conditioning regimens, but also by parabiosis and mice with genetically labelled microglia, models without irradiation and BM transplantation. Results obtained from these independent approaches provide compelling evidence indicating little contribution of circulating BM-derived cells to the population of spinal microglia after PNI. PMID:27005516

  10. Plate reader-based cell viability assays for glioprotection using primary rat optic nerve head astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaja, Simon; Payne, Andrew J; Naumchuk, Yuliya; Levy, Deborah; Zaidi, Danish H; Altman, Alexa M; Nawazish, Saba; Ghuman, Jasleen K; Gerdes, Bryan C; Moore, Mark A; Koulen, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Optic nerve head astrocytes (ONHAs) are the major glia cell type in the non-myelinated optic nerve head where they contribute critically to extracellular matrix synthesis during development and throughout life. In glaucoma, and in related disorders affecting the optic nerve and the optic nerve head, pathological changes include altered astrocyte gene and protein expression resulting in their activation and extracellular matrix remodeling. ONHAs are highly sensitive to mechanical and oxidative stress resulting in the initiation of axon damage early during pathogenesis. Furthermore, ONHAs are crucial for the maintenance of retinal ganglion cell physiology and function. Therefore, glioprotective strategies with the goal to preserve and/or restore the structural and functional viability of ONHA in order to slow glaucoma and related pathologies are of high clinical relevance. Herein, we describe the development of standardized methods that will allow for the systematic advancement of such glioprotective strategies. These include isolation, purification and culture of primary adult rat ONHAs, optimized immunocytochemical protocols for cell type validation, as well as plate reader-based assays determining cellular viability, proliferation and the intracellular redox state. We validated and standardized our protocols by performing a glioprotection study using primary ONHAs. Specifically, we measured protection against exogenously-applied oxidative stress using tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBHP) as a model of disease-mediated oxidative stress in the retina and optic nerve head by the prototypic antioxidant, 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid (Trolox). Levels of oxidative stress were increased in the response to exogenously applied tBHP and were assessed by 6-carboxy-2', 7' dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) fluorescence. Normalized DCFDA fluorescence showed a maximal 5.1-fold increase; the half-maximal effect (EC50) for tBHP was 212 ± 25

  11. Effect of SIRT1 regulating cholesterol synthesis in repairing retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the repair mechanism associated with cholesterol synthesis regulated by silent information regulator 1(SIRT1in rat model of optic nerve damage. METHODS: Preparation of optic nerve damage in 70 rats was randomly divided into normal group(10 rats, resveratrol treatment group(experimental group 30 ratsand PBS buffer control group(30 rats. The experimental group and control group was further divided into 3 subgroups(each group 10 rats, respectively. After 7, 14, 21d injected resveratrol or PBS, optic nerve injury were observed, then the rats were sacrificed. Retina was segregated; the surviving retinal ganglion cell(RGCswas counted. Dissection of optic nerve, cholesterol content of them were tested; RT-PCR was used to detect mRNA expression of SIRT1, SREBP2 and HMGCR; Western blot assay was used to test the protein expression levels of SIRT1, cholesterol regulatory element binding protein 2(SREBP2and HMGCR. RESULTS: The numbers of RGCs and cholesterol levels of rat model with optic nerve injury decreased significantly(PPPPCONCLUSION: Up-regulating the expression of SIRT1, SREBP2 and down-regulating HMGCR by resveratrol could repair the injury of optic nerve through promoting the synthesis of cholesterol in neurons and retinal ganglion cells in the repair process. SIRT1 may be as a promising new target for treatment on optic nerve damage.

  12. Single cell transcriptional analysis reveals novel innate immune cell types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda E. Kippner

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Single-cell analysis has the potential to provide us with a host of new knowledge about biological systems, but it comes with the challenge of correctly interpreting the biological information. While emerging techniques have made it possible to measure inter-cellular variability at the transcriptome level, no consensus yet exists on the most appropriate method of data analysis of such single cell data. Methods for analysis of transcriptional data at the population level are well established but are not well suited to single cell analysis due to their dependence on population averages. In order to address this question, we have systematically tested combinations of methods for primary data analysis on single cell transcription data generated from two types of primary immune cells, neutrophils and T lymphocytes. Cells were obtained from healthy individuals, and single cell transcript expression data was obtained by a combination of single cell sorting and nanoscale quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR for markers of cell type, intracellular signaling, and immune functionality. Gene expression analysis was focused on hierarchical clustering to determine the existence of cellular subgroups within the populations. Nine combinations of criteria for data exclusion and normalization were tested and evaluated. Bimodality in gene expression indicated the presence of cellular subgroups which were also revealed by data clustering. We observed evidence for two clearly defined cellular subtypes in the neutrophil populations and at least two in the T lymphocyte populations. When normalizing the data by different methods, we observed varying outcomes with corresponding interpretations of the biological characteristics of the cell populations. Normalization of the data by linear standardization taking into account technical effects such as plate effects, resulted in interpretations that most closely matched biological expectations. Single cell transcription

  13. Single vagus nerve stimulation reduces early postprandial C-peptide levels but not other hormones or postprandial metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, M W; van Nierop, F S; Koopman, F A; Eggink, H M; Gerlag, D M; Chan, M W; Zitnik, R; Vaz, F M; Romijn, J A; Tak, P P; Soeters, M R

    2018-02-01

    A recent study in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients using electrical vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) to activate the inflammatory reflex has shown promising effects on disease activity. Innervation by the autonomic nerve system might be involved in the regulation of many endocrine and metabolic processes and could therefore theoretically lead to unwanted side effects. Possible effects of VNS on secretion of hormones are currently unknown. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of a single VNS on plasma levels of pituitary hormones and parameters of postprandial metabolism. Six female patients with RA were studied twice in balanced assignment (crossover design) to either VNS or no stimulation. The patients selected for this substudy had been on VNS therapy daily for at least 3 months and at maximum of 24 months. We compared 10-, 20-, and 30-min poststimulus levels to baseline levels, and a 4-h mixed meal test was performed 30 min after VNS. We also determined energy expenditure (EE) by indirect calorimetry before and after VNS. VNS did not affect pituitary hormones (growth hormone, thyroid stimulating hormone, adrenocorticotropic hormone, prolactin, follicle-stimulating hormone, and luteinizing hormone), postprandial metabolism, or EE. Of note, VNS reduced early postprandial insulin secretion, but not AUC of postprandial plasma insulin levels. Cortisol and catecholamine levels in serum did not change significantly. Short stimulation of vagal activity by VNS reduces early postprandial insulin secretion, but not other hormone levels and postprandial response. This suggests VNS as a safe treatment for RA patients.

  14. Efficacy of intraorbital electroacupuncture for diabetic abducens nerve palsy: study protocol for a prospective single-center randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-yun Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abducens nerve palsy (ANP is commonly seen in patients with diabetes mellitus. The validity of acupuncture as a traditional Chinese medicine method in peripheral nerve repair is well established. However, its efficacy in randomized controlled trials remains unclear. Herein, we designed a protocol for a prospective, single-center, randomized controlled trial to investigate the effect of intraorbital electroacupuncture on diabetic ANP. We plan to recruit 60 patients with diabetic ANP, and randomly divide them into treatment and control groups. Patients in both groups will continue their glucose-lowering therapy. A neural nutrition drug will be given to both groups for six weeks. The treatment group will also receive intraorbital electroacupuncture therapy. We will assess efficacy of treatment, eyeball movement, diplopia deviation and the levels of fasting blood-glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin before treatment at 2, 4, and 6 weeks after treatment. The efficacy and recurrence will be investigated during follow-up (1 month after intervention. This protocol was registered at Chinese Clinical Trial Registry on 16 January 2015 (ChiCTR-IPR-15005836. This study was approved by the Ethics Committee ofFirst Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University of China (approval number: 201452. All protocols will be in accordance with Declaration of Helsinki, formulated by the World Medical Association. Written informed consent will be provided by participants. We envisage that the results of this clinical trial will provide evidence for promoting clinical use of this new therapy for management of ANP.

  15. Therapeutic outcome of nasopharyngeal carcinoma with cranial nerve palsy: a single institution experience of 104 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang CC

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Chun-Chieh Huang,1,2 Fu-Min Fang,1 Hui-Chun Chen,1 Hsuan-Chih Hsu,1 Tai-Lin Huang,3 Yu-Li Su,3 Ya-Chun Chang4 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung, 2Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, 3Department of Hematology and Oncology, 4Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Republic of China Purpose: Cranial nerve (CN palsy is the main symptom in patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. This study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic outcome of NPC with CN palsy and to analyze the prognostic factors.Patients and methods: A total of 104 NPC patients with CN palsy curatively treated by conventional (n=44 or conformal (n=60 radiotherapy (RT were enrolled. Upper CN palsy was present in 81 patients, lower CN palsy in four patients, and both upper and lower CN palsy in 19 patients. Forty-one patients had CN palsy for >2 months before diagnosis.Results: Complete recovery of CN palsy was observed in 74 patients. The actuarial 5-year locoregional control (LRC, distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS, and overall survival (OS rates were 58.2%, 62.2%, and 38.4%, respectively. No significant difference was observed in CN recovery, LRC, DMFS, or OS for patients treated by conventional versus conformal technique. However, significant reduction of grade 3 or greater toxicities was found in those treated by the conformal technique (odds ratio =0.28.Conclusion: Patients with CN palsy presenting >2 months before diagnosis were hard to recover from palsy. The LRC, OS, and recovery from CN palsy did not significantly change with the treatment evolution. Patients with complete recovery from CN palsy had longer OS. Keywords: nasopharyngeal carcinoma, cranial nerve palsy, radiotherapy

  16. Schwann cells promote post-traumatic nerve inflammation and neuropathic pain through MHC class II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartlehnert, Maike; Derksen, Angelika; Hagenacker, Tim; Kindermann, David; Schäfers, Maria; Pawlak, Mathias; Kieseier, Bernd C; Meyer Zu Horste, Gerd

    2017-10-02

    The activation of T helper cells requires antigens to be exposed on the surface of antigen presenting cells (APCs) via MHC class II (MHC-II) molecules. Expression of MHC-II is generally limited to professional APCs, but other cell types can express MHC-II under inflammatory conditions. However, the importance of these conditional APCs is unknown. We and others have previously shown that Schwann cells are potentially conditional APCs, but the functional relevance of MHC-II expression by Schwann cells has not been studied in vivo. Here, we conditionally deleted the MHC-II β-chain from myelinating Schwann cells in mice and investigated how this influenced post-traumatic intraneural inflammation and neuropathic pain using the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model. We demonstrate that deletion of MHC-II in myelinating Schwann cells reduces thermal hyperalgesia and, to a lesser extent, also diminishes mechanical allodynia in CCI in female mice. This was accompanied by a reduction of intraneural CD4+ T cells and greater preservation of preferentially large-caliber axons. Activation of T helper cells by MHC-II on Schwann cells thus promotes post-traumatic axonal loss and neuropathic pain. Hence, we provide experimental evidence that Schwann cells gain antigen-presenting function in vivo and modulate local immune responses and diseases in the peripheral nerves.

  17. Upregulation of Nuclear Factor of Activated T-Cells by Nerve Injury Contributes to Development of Neuropathic Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, You-Qing; Chen, Shao-Rui; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Nerve injury induces long-term changes in gene expression in the nociceptive circuitry and can lead to chronic neuropathic pain. However, the transcriptional mechanism involved in neuropathic pain is poorly understood. Nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFATc) is a transcriptional factor regulated by the Ca2+-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin. In this study, we determined nerve injury–induced changes in the expression of NFATc1–c4 in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cords an...

  18. Diffusion tensor imaging of the auditory nerve in patients with long-term single-sided deafness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Sjoerd; Haakma, Wieke; Versnel, Huib; Froeling, Martijn; Speleman, Lucienne; Dik, Pieter; Viergever, Max A.; Leemans, Alexander; Grolman, Wilko

    A cochlear implant (CI) can restore hearing in patients with profound sensorineural hearing loss by direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve. Therefore, the viability of the auditory nerve is vitally important in successful hearing recovery. However, the nerve typically degenerates

  19. [AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON REPAIR OF SCIATIC NERVE INJURY BY Schwann-LIKE CELLS DERIVED FROM UMBILICAL CORD BLOOD MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi; Wang, Sheng; Xiao, Yuzhou

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of using Schwann-like cells derived from human umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells (hUCBMSCs) as the seed cells to repair large sciatic nerve defect in rats so as to provide the experimental evidence for clinical application of hUCBMSCs. Fourty-five male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats in SPF grade, weighing 200-250 g, were selected. The hUCBMSCs were harvested and cultured from umbilical cord blood using lymphocyte separating and high molecular weight hydroxyethyl starch, and then was identified. The hUCBMSCs of 3rd generation were induced to Schwann-like cells, and then was identified by chemical derivatization combined with cytokine. The acellular nerve basal membrane conduit was prepared as scaffold material by the sciatic nerve of SD rats through repeated freezing, thawing, and washing. The tissue engineered nerve was prepared after 7 days of culturing Schwann-like cells (1 x 10(7) cells/mL) on the acellular nerve basal membrane conduit using the multi-point injection. The 15 mm sciatic nerve defect model was established in 30 male SD rats, which were randomly divided into 3 groups (10 rats each group). Defect was repaired with tissue engineered nerve in group A, with acellular nerve basal membrane conduit in group B, and with autologous sciatic nerve in group C. The nerve repair was evaluated through general observation, sciatic function index (SFI), nerve electrophysiology, weight of gastrocnemius muscle, and Masson staining after operation. The hUCBMSCs showed higher expression of surface markers of mesenchymal stem cells, and Schwann-like cells showed positive expression of glia cell specific markers such as S100b, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and P75. At 8 weeks after operation, the acellular nerve basal membrane conduit had no necrosis and liquefaction, with mild adhesion, soft texture, and good continuity at nerve anastomosis site in group A; group B had similar appearance to group A; adhesion of group C was milder than that

  20. Single-cell Raman spectroscopy of irradiated tumour cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Quinn

    This work describes the development and application of a novel combination of single-cell Raman spectroscopy (RS), automated data processing, and principal component analysis (PCA) for investigating radiation induced biochemical responses in human tumour cells. The developed techniques are first validated for the analysis of large data sets (˜200 spectra) obtained from single cells. The effectiveness and robustness of the automated data processing methods is demonstrated, and potential pitfalls that may arise during the implementation of such methods are identified. The techniques are first applied to investigate the inherent sources of spectral variability between single cells of a human prostate tumour cell line (DU145) cultured in vitro. PCA is used to identify spectral differences that correlate with cell cycle progression and the changing confluency of a cell culture during the first 3-4 days after sub-culturing. Spectral variability arising from cell cycle progression is (i) expressed as varying intensities of protein and nucleic acid features relative to lipid features, (ii) well correlated with known biochemical changes in cells as they progress through the cell cycle, and (iii) shown to be the most significant source of inherent spectral variability between cells. This characterization provides a foundation for interpreting spectral variability in subsequent studies. The techniques are then applied to study the effects of ionizing radiation on human tumour cells. DU145 cells are cultured in vitro and irradiated to doses between 15 and 50 Gy with single fractions of 6 MV photons from a medical linear accelerator. Raman spectra are acquired from irradiated and unirradiated cells, up to 5 days post-irradiation. PCA is used to distinguish radiation induced spectral changes from inherent sources of spectral variability, such as those arising from cell cycle. Radiation induced spectral changes are found to correlate with both the irradiated dose and the

  1. Clinical Evaluation of Decellularized Nerve Allograft with Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cells to Improve Peripheral Nerve Repair and Functional Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Peripheral Nerve Repair and Functional Outcomes PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: LTC Leon Nesti MD PhD RECIPIENT: Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement...of Military Medicine Inc. Bethesda, MD 20817 REPORT DATE: July 2017 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical Research and...REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) July 2017 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1/7/2016-30/6/2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Clinical Evaluation

  2. Probing bacterial adhesion at the single-cell level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Müller, Torsten; Meyer, Rikke Louise

    Bacteria initiate attachment to surfaces with the aid of different extracellular proteins and polymeric adhesins. To quantitatively analyse the cell-cell and cell-surface interactions provided by bacterial adhesins, it is essential to go down to single cell level where cell-to-cell variation can...... be considered. We have developed a simple and versatile method to make single-cell bacterial probes for measuring single cell adhesion by force spectroscopy using atomic force microscopy (AFM). A single-cell probe was readily made by picking up a bacterial cell from a glass surface by approaching a tipless AFM...... cantilever coated with the commercial cell adhesive CellTakTM. We applied the method to study adhesion of living cells to abiotic surfaces at the single-cell level. Immobilisation of single bacterial cells to the cantilever was stable for several hours, and viability was confirmed by Live/Dead staining...

  3. Curcumin accelerates the repair of sciatic nerve injury in rats through reducing Schwann cells apoptosis and promoting myelinization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhiwei; Li, Xiaoling; Li, Qing

    2017-08-01

    Schwann cells (SCs) play an indispensable role in the repair and regeneration of injured peripheral nerve. Curcumin can reduce SCs apoptosis, and promote the regeneration and functional recovery of injured peripheral nerves. However, the corresponding mechanisms are not clear. The article was aimed to explore the effect and corresponding mechanisms of curcumin on the repair of sciatic nerve injury in rats. After surgery induced sciatic nerve injury, the model rats were divided into three groups and treated with curcumin, curcumin+PD98059 and curcumin+IGF-1 respectively for 4days. The phosphorylation of Erk1/2 and Akt, and the expression of LC3-II, Beclin 1 and p62 were measured using western blotting. After treatment for 60days, myelination of the injured sciatic nerve was evaluated by MBP immunohistochemical staining and the expression of PMP22, Fibrin and S100 were determined using qRT-PCR and western blotting. In vitro, RSC96 cells were starved for 12h to induce autophagy, and received DMSO, curcumin, PD98059+curcumin, IGF-1+curcumin and BFA1 respectively. The phosphorylation of Erk1/2、Akt and the expression of LC3-II, Beclin 1, p62, PMP22, Fibrin and S100 were measured using western blotting, and the cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. Curcumin could promote injury-induced cell autophagy, remyelination and axon regeneration in sciatic nerve of rats. In vitro, curcumin could accelerate cell autophagy through regulating autophagy related Erk1/2 and Akt pathway, prevent cell apoptosis and promote expression of PMP22 and S100, and reduced deposition of Fibrin in cultured RSC96 SCs. Curcumin could accelerate injured sciatic nerve repair in rats through reducing SCs apoptosis and promoting myelinization. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  4. Facial Nerve Palsy: An Unusual Presenting Feature of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozcan Yildiz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the second most common type of cancer in the world and is the most common cause of cancer-related death in men and women; it is responsible for 1.3 million deaths annually worldwide. It can metastasize to any organ. The most common site of metastasis in the head and neck region is the brain; however, it can also metastasize to the oral cavity, gingiva, tongue, parotid gland and lymph nodes. This article reports a case of small cell lung cancer presenting with metastasis to the facial nerve.

  5. Effects of Divalent Cations on Outward Potassium Currents in Leech Retzius Nerve Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanovic Zorica

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study examines the effects of divalent metals, cadmium (Cd2+ and manganese (Mn2+, on the outward potassium currents of Retzius cells in the hirudinid leeches Haemopis sanguisuga using conventional two-microelectrode voltageclamp techniques. The outward potassium current is activated by depolarization and plays an important role in determining both the neuronal excitability and action potential duration. A strong inhibition of the fast current and a clear reduction in the late currents of the outward current with 1 mM Cd2+ were obtained, which indicated that both components are sensitive to this metal. Complete blockage of the fast and partial reduction of the slow outward currents was observed after adding 1 mM Mn2+ to the extracellular fluid. These data show that the outward K+ current in leech Retzius nerve cells comprises at least two components: a voltage-dependent K+ current and a Ca2+- activated K+ current. These observations also indicate that Cd2+ is more eff ective than Mn2+ in blocking ion fl ow through these channels and that suppressing Ca2+-activated K+ outward currents can prolong the action potential in nerve cells.

  6. Combination of nerve blockade and intravenous alfentanil is better than single treatment in relieving postoperative pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeong-Ray Wen

    2012-02-01

    Conclusion: Our results indicated that in an incisional pain model, multimodal analgesia is superior to single or no pretreatment; however, the combination of multimodal analgesic treatments should be individually discerned depending on nociceptive types and analgesic mechanisms.

  7. The mRNA of transferrin is expressed in Schwann cells during their maturation and after nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salis, C; Setton, C P; Soto, E F; Pasquini, J M

    2007-09-01

    Transferrin, the iron carrier protein, has been shown to be involved in oligodendroglial cell differentiation in the central nervous system but little is known about its role in the peripheral nervous system. In the present work, we have studied the presence of transferrin and of its mRNA in rat sciatic nerves and in Schwann cells isolated at embryonic and adult ages as well as during the regeneration process that follows nerve crush. We have also studied the correlation between the expression of the mRNAs of transferrin and the expression of mature myelin markers in the PNS. We show that transferrin is present in whole sciatic nerves at late stages of embryonic life as well as at postnatal day 4 and in adult rats. We demonstrate for the first time, that in normal conditions, the transferrin mRNA is expressed in Schwann cells isolated from sciatic nerves between embryonic days 14 and 18, being absent at later stages of development and in adult animals. In adult rats, 3 days after sciatic nerve crushing, the mRNA of transferrin is expressed in the injured nerve, but 7 days after injury its expression disappears. Transferrin protein in the sciatic nerve closely follows the expression of its mRNA indicating that under these circumstances, it appears to be locally synthesized. Transferrin in the PNS could have a dual role. During late embryonic ages it could be locally synthesized by differentiating Schwann cells, acting as a pro-differentiating factor. A similar situation would occur during the regeneration that follows Wallerian degeneration. In the adult animals on the other hand, Schwann cells could pick up transferrin from the circulation or/and from the axons, sub serving possible trophic actions closely related to myelin maintenance.

  8. The role of p38alpha in Schwann cells in regulating peripheral nerve myelination and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Sheridan L; Dun, Xin-Peng; Dee, Gemma; Gray, Bethany; Mindos, Thomas; Parkinson, David B

    2017-04-01

    Myelination in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) is controlled by both positive and negative regulators within Schwann cells to ensure timely onset and correct myelin thickness for saltatory conduction by neurons. Transcription factors such as Sox10, octamer-binding transcription factor 6 (Oct6) and Krox20 form a positive regulatory network, whereas negative regulators such as cJun and Sox2 oppose myelination in Schwann cells. The role of the p38 MAPK pathway has been studied in PNS myelination, but its precise function remains unclear, with both positive and negative effects of p38 activity reported upon both myelination and processes of nerve repair. To clarify the role of p38 MAPK in the PNS, we have analysed mice with a Schwann cell-specific ablation of the major p38 isoform, p38alpha. In line with previous findings of an inhibitory role for p38 MAPK, we observe acceleration of post-natal myelination in p38alpha null nerves, a delay in myelin down-regulation following injury, together with a small increase in levels of re-myelination following injury. Finally we explored roles for p38alpha in controlling axonal regeneration and functional repair following PNS injury and observe that loss of p38alpha function in Schwann cells does not appear to affect these processes as previously reported. These studies therefore provide further proof for a role of p38 MAPK signalling in the control of myelination by Schwann cells in the PNS, but do not show an apparent role for signalling by this MAP kinase in Schwann cells controlling other elements of Wallerian degeneration and functional repair following injury. Cover Image for this issue: doi: 10.1111/jnc.13793. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  9. Effect of Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells Transplantation on Nerve Fibers of A Rat Model of Endometriosi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Chen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Endometriosis is a common, benign, oestrogen-dependent, chronic gynaecological disorder associated with pelvic pain and infertility. Some researchers have identified nerve fibers in endometriotic lesions in women with endometriosis. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have attracted interest for their possible use for both cell and gene therapies because of their capacity for self-renewal and multipotentiality of differentiation. We investigated how human umbilical cord-MSCs (hUC-MSCs could affect nerve fibers density in endometriosis. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, hUC-MSCs were isolated from fresh human umbilical cord, characterized by flow cytometry, and then transplanted into surgically induced endometriosis in a rat model. Ectopic endometrial implants were collected four weeks later. The specimens were sectioned and stained immunohistochemically with antibodies against neurofilament (NF, nerve growth factor (NGF, NGF receptor p75 (NGFRp75, tyrosine kinase receptor-A (Trk-A, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP and substance P (SP to compare the presence of different types of nerve fibers between the treatment group with the transplantation of hUC-MSCs and the control group without the transplantation of hUC-MSCs. Results: There were significantly less nerve fibers stained with specific markers we used in the treatment group than in the control group (p<0.05. Conclusion: MSC from human umbilical cord reduced nerve fiber density in the treatment group with the transplantation of hUC-MSCs.

  10. Effect of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells transplantation on nerve fibers of a rat model of endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Li, Dong; Zhang, Zhe; Takushige, Natsuko; Kong, Bei-Hua; Wang, Guo-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis is a common, benign, oestrogen-dependent, chronic gynaecological disorder associated with pelvic pain and infertility. Some researchers have identified nerve fibers in endometriotic lesions in women with endometriosis. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have attracted interest for their possible use for both cell and gene therapies because of their capacity for self-renewal and multipotentiality of differentiation. We investigated how human umbilical cord-MSCs (hUC-MSCs) could affect nerve fibers density in endometriosis. In this experimental study, hUC-MSCs were isolated from fresh human umbilical cord, characterized by flow cytometry, and then transplanted into surgically induced endometriosis in a rat model. Ectopic endometrial implants were collected four weeks later. The specimens were sectioned and stained immunohistochemically with antibodies against neurofilament (NF), nerve growth factor (NGF), NGF receptor p75 (NGFRp75), tyrosine kinase receptor-A (Trk-A), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP) to compare the presence of different types of nerve fibers between the treatment group with the transplantation of hUC-MSCs and the control group without the transplantation of hUC-MSCs. There were significantly less nerve fibers stained with specific markers we used in the treatment group than in the control group (pumbilical cord reduced nerve fiber density in the treatment group with the transplantation of hUC-MSCs.

  11. Development of a Functional Schwann Cell Phenotype from Autologous Porcine Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells for Nerve Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Rutten

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs are a potential resource for making Schwann cells to repair damaged peripheral nerves. However, many methods of producing Schwann-like cells can be laborious with the cells lacking a functional phenotype. The objective of this study was to develop a simple and rapid method using autologous BM-MNCs to produce a phenotypic and functional Schwann-like cell. Adult porcine bone marrow was collected and enriched for BM-MNCs using a SEPAX device, then cells cultured in Neurobasal media, 4 mM L-glutamine and 20% serum. After 6–8 days, the cultures expressed Schwann cell markers, S-100, O4, GFAP, were FluoroMyelin positive, but had low p75(NGF expression. Addition of neuregulin (1–25 nM increased p75(NGF levels at 24–48 hrs. We found ATP dose-dependently increased intracellular calcium [Ca2+]i, with nucleotide potency being UTP=ATP>ADP>AMP>adenosine. Suramin blocked the ATP-induced [Ca2+]i but α, β,-methylene-ATP had little effect suggesting an ATP purinergic P2Y2 G-protein-coupled receptor is present. Both the Schwann cell markers and ATP-induced [Ca2+]i sensitivity decreased in cells passaged >20 times. Our studies indicate that autologous BM-MNCs can be induced to form a phenotypic and functional Schwann-like cell which could be used for peripheral nerve repair.

  12. Axonal elongation through long acellular nerve segments depends on recruitment of phagocytic cells from the near-nerve environment. Electrophysiological and morphological studies in the cat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, J; Fugleholm, K; Moldovan, M

    2001-01-01

    The distal nerve stump plays a central role in the regeneration of peripheral nerve but the relative importance of cellular and humoral factors is not clear. We have studied this question by freezing the tibial nerve distal to a crush lesion in cat. The importance of constituents from the near......-nerve environment was assessed by modification of the contact between the tibial nerve and the environment. Silicone cuffs, containing electrodes for electrophysiological assessment of nerve regeneration, were placed around the tibial nerve distal to the crush site. The interaction between long acellular frozen...... nerve segments (ANS) and the near-nerve environment was ascertained by breaching the silicone cuff to allow access of cellular or humoral components. Tibial nerves were crushed and frozen for 40 mm and enclosed in nerve cuffs with 0.45-microm holes or 2.0-mm holes to allow access of humoral factors...

  13. Ras signaling influences permissiveness of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor cells to oncolytic herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farassati, Faris; Pan, Weihong; Yamoutpour, Farnaz; Henke, Susann; Piedra, Mark; Frahm, Silke; Al-Tawil, Said; Mangrum, Wells I; Parada, Luis F; Rabkin, Samuel D; Martuza, Robert L; Kurtz, Andreas

    2008-12-01

    Lack of expression of neurofibromin in neurofibromatosis 1 and its lethal derivative, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), is thought to result in the overactivation of the Ras signaling pathway. Our previous studies have shown that cells with overactivation in the Ras pathway are more permissive to infection with herpes simplex virus 1 and its mutant version R3616. In this study, we show that among five different mouse MPNST cell lines, only the ones with elevated levels of Ras signaling are highly permissive to infection with oncolytic herpes G207. Specific inhibitors of the Ras, ERK, and JNK pathways all reduced the synthesis of viral proteins in MPNST cells. The cell lines that contained lower levels of Ras and decreased activation of downstream signaling components underwent an enhancement in apoptosis upon exposure to G207. Additionally, mouse SW10 Schwann cells were able to become infected by parental herpes but were found to be resistant to G207. The immortalization of these cell lines with the expression of SV40 large T antigen increased the levels of Ras activation and permissiveness to oncolytic herpes. A Ras/Raf kinase inhibitor reduced the synthesis of both herpes simplex virus-1 and G207 proteins in SW10 cells. The results of this study, therefore, introduce Ras signaling as a divergent turning point for the response of MPNST cells to an assault by oncolytic herpes.

  14. Subclinical doses of the nerve gas sarin impair T cell responses through the autonomic nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Roma; Singh, Shashi P; Razani-Boroujerdi, Seddigheh; Langley, Raymond J; Blackwell, Walter B; Henderson, Rogene F; Sopori, Mohan L

    2002-10-15

    The nerve gas sarin is a potent cholinergic agent, and exposure to high doses may cause neurotoxicity and death. Subclinical exposures to sarin have been postulated to contribute to the Gulf War syndrome; however, the biological effects of subclinical exposure are largely unknown. In this communication, evidence shows that subclinical doses (0.2 and 0.4 mg/m(3)) of sarin administered by inhalation to F344 rats for 1 h/day for 5 or 10 days inhibited the anti-sheep red blood cell antibody-forming cell response of spleen cells without affecting the distribution of lymphocyte subpopulations in the spleen. Moreover, sarin suppressed T cell responses, including the concanavalin A (Con A) and the anti-alphabeta-T cell receptor (TCR) antibody-induced T cell proliferation and the rise in the intracellular calcium following TCR ligation. These concentrations of sarin altered regional but not total brain acetylcholinesterase activity. Interestingly, serum corticosterone levels of the sarin-treated animals were dramatically lower than the control animals, indicating that sarin-induced immunosuppression did not result from the activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Pretreatment of animals with the ganglionic blocker chlorisondamine abrogated the inhibitory effects of sarin on spleen cell proliferation in response to Con A and anti-TCR antibodies. These results suggest that the effects of sarin on T cell responsiveness are mediated via the autonomic nervous system and are independent of the HPA axis.

  15. Neural Progenitor-Like Cells Induced from Human Gingiva-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Regulate Myelination of Schwann Cells in Rat Sciatic Nerve Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qunzhou; Nguyen, Phuong; Xu, Qilin; Park, Wonse; Lee, Sumin; Furuhashi, Akihiro; Le, Anh D

    2017-02-01

    Regeneration of peripheral nerve injury remains a major clinical challenge. Recently, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been considered as potential candidates for peripheral nerve regeneration; however, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we show that human gingiva-derived MSCs (GMSCs) could be directly induced into multipotent NPCs (iNPCs) under minimally manipulated conditions without the introduction of exogenous genes. Using a crush-injury model of rat sciatic nerve, we demonstrate that GMSCs transplanted to the injury site could differentiate into neuronal cells, whereas iNPCs could differentiate into both neuronal and Schwann cells. After crush injury, iNPCs, compared with GMSCs, displayed superior therapeutic effects on axonal regeneration at both the injury site and the distal segment of the injured sciatic nerve. Mechanistically, transplantation of GMSCs, especially iNPCs, significantly attenuated injury-triggered increase in the expression of c-Jun, a transcription factor that functions as a major negative regulator of myelination and plays a central role in dedifferentiation/reprogramming of Schwann cells into a progenitor-like state. Meanwhile, our results also demonstrate that transplantation of GMSCs and iNPCs consistently increased the expression of Krox-20/EGR2, a transcription factor that governs the expression of myelin proteins and facilitates myelination. Altogether, our findings suggest that transplantation of GMSCs and iNPCs promotes peripheral nerve repair/regeneration, possibly by promoting remyelination of Schwann cells mediated via the regulation of the antagonistic myelination regulators, c-Jun and Krox-20/EGR2. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:458-470. © 2016 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  16. The Effect of Plasma Treated PLGA/MWCNTs-COOH Composite Nanofibers on Nerve Cell Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds which can mimic the architecture of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM are potential candidates for peripheral nerve repair application. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs are used in peripheral nerve repair due to their ability to promote neurite extension and support neural network formation. In this study, surface-modified nanofibrous scaffolds composed of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA and various ratios of carboxyl-modified MWCNTs (MWCNTs-COOH (PC0, PC2, PC4 and PC8 were fabricated by electrospinning. The effects of MWCNTs-COOH on the fibers’ morphology, diameter distribution, mechanical properties and surface hydrophilicity were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, ImageJ software, tensile testing and water contact angle. Furthermore, air plasma treatment was applied to improve the surface hydrophilicity of the scaffolds, and the optimal treatment condition was determined in terms of surface morphology, water contact angle and PC12 cell adhesion. Plasma treated nanofibers (p-PC0, p-PC2, p-PC4 and p-PC8 under optimal treatment conditions were used for further study. PC12 cell proliferation and differentiation were both improved by the addition of MWCNTs-COOH in scaffolds. Additionally, the proliferation and maturation of Schwann cells were enhanced on scaffolds containing MWCNTs-COOH. The neurite outgrowth of rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG neurons was promoted on MWCNTs-COOH-containing scaffolds, and those cultured on p-PC8 scaffolds showed elongated neurites with a length up to 78.27 μm after 3 days culture. Our results suggested that plasma treated nanofibers under appropriate conditions were able to improve cell attachment. They also demonstrated that plasma treated scaffolds containing MWCNTs-COOH, especially the p-PC8 nanofibrous scaffold could support the proliferation, differentiation, maturation and neurite extension of PC12 cells, Schwann cells and DRG neurons. Therefore

  17. 17β-Estradiol Promotes Schwann Cell Proliferation and Differentiation, Accelerating Early Remyelination in a Mouse Peripheral Nerve Injury Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen induces oligodendrocyte remyelination in response to demyelination in the central nervous system. Our objective was to determine the effects of 17β-estradiol (E2 on Schwann cell function and peripheral nerve remyelination after injury. Adult male C57BL/6J mice were used to prepare the sciatic nerve transection injury model and were randomly categorized into control and E2 groups. To study myelination in vitro, dorsal root ganglion (DRG explant culture was prepared using 13.5-day-old mouse embryos. Primary Schwann cells were isolated from the sciatic nerves of 1- to 3-day-old Sprague–Dawley rats. Immunostaining for myelin basic protein (MBP expression and toluidine blue staining for myelin sheaths demonstrated that E2 treatment accelerates early remyelination in the “nerve bridge” region between the proximal and distal stumps of the transection injury site in the mouse sciatic nerve. The 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine incorporation assay revealed that E2 promotes Schwann cell proliferation in the bridge region and in the primary culture, which is blocked using AKT inhibitor MK2206. The in vitro myelination in the DRG explant culture determined showed that the MBP expression in the E2-treated group is higher than that in the control group. These results show that E2 promotes Schwann cell proliferation and myelination depending on AKT activation.

  18. Human umbilical cord blood stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor for optic nerve injury: a biomechanical evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhong-jun; Li, Ya-jun; Liu, Xiao-guang; Huang, Feng-xiao; Liu, Tie-jun; Jiang, Dong-mei; Lv, Xue-man; Luo, Min

    2015-01-01

    Treatment for optic nerve injury by brain-derived neurotrophic factor or the transplantation of human umbilical cord blood stem cells has gained progress, but analysis by biomechanical indicators is rare. Rabbit models of optic nerve injury were established by a clamp. At 7 days after injury, the vitreous body received a one-time injection of 50 μg brain-derived neurotrophic factor or 1 × 106 human umbilical cord blood stem cells. After 30 days, the maximum load, maximum stress, maximum strain, elastic limit load, elastic limit stress, and elastic limit strain had clearly improved in rabbit models of optical nerve injury after treatment with brain-derived neurotrophic factor or human umbilical cord blood stem cells. The damage to the ultrastructure of the optic nerve had also been reduced. These findings suggest that human umbilical cord blood stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor effectively repair the injured optical nerve, improve biomechanical properties, and contribute to the recovery after injury. PMID:26330839

  19. Retinal ganglion cell survival and axon regeneration after optic nerve injury in naked mole-rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kevin K; Luo, Xueting; Mooney, Skyler J; Yungher, Benjamin J; Belin, Stephane; Wang, Chen; Holmes, Melissa M; He, Zhigang

    2017-02-01

    In the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS), axonal damage often triggers neuronal cell death and glial activation, with very limited spontaneous axon regeneration. In this study, we performed optic nerve injury in adult naked mole-rats, the longest living rodent, with a maximum life span exceeding 30 years, and found that injury responses in this species are quite distinct from those in other mammalian species. In contrast to what is seen in other mammals, the majority of injured retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) survive with relatively high spontaneous axon regeneration. Furthermore, injured RGCs display activated signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3), whereas astrocytes in the optic nerve robustly occupy and fill the lesion area days after injury. These neuron-intrinsic and -extrinsic injury responses are reminiscent of those in "cold-blooded" animals, such as fish and amphibians, suggesting that the naked mole-rat is a powerful model for exploring the mechanisms of neuronal injury responses and axon regeneration in mammals. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:380-388, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Analysis of spatial relationships in three dimensions: tools for the study of nerve cell patterning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raven Mary A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple technologies have been brought to bear on understanding the three-dimensional morphology of individual neurons and glia within the brain, but little progress has been made on understanding the rules controlling cellular patterning. We describe new matlab-based software tools, now available to the scientific community, permitting the calculation of spatial statistics associated with 3D point patterns. The analyses are largely derived from the Delaunay tessellation of the field, including the nearest neighbor and Voronoi domain analyses, and from the spatial autocorrelogram. Results Our tools enable the analysis of the spatial relationship between neurons within the central nervous system in 3D, and permit the modeling of these fields based on lattice-like simulations, and on simulations of minimal-distance spacing rules. Here we demonstrate the utility of our analysis methods to discriminate between two different simulated neuronal populations. Conclusion Together, these tools can be used to reveal the presence of nerve cell patterning and to model its foundation, in turn informing on the potential developmental mechanisms that govern its establishment. Furthermore, in conjunction with analyses of dendritic morphology, they can be used to determine the degree of dendritic coverage within a volume of tissue exhibited by mature nerve cells.

  1. Comparative survival study of glial cells and cells composing walls of blood vessels in crustacean ventral nerve cord after photodynamic treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolosov, Mikhail S.; Shubina, Elena

    2015-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a prospective treatment modality of brain cancers. It is of importance to have information about relative survival rate of different cell types in nerve tissue during photodynamic treatment. Particularly, for development of sparing strategy of the photodynamic therapy of brain tumors, which pursuits both total elimination of malignant cells, which are usually of glial origin, and, at the same time, preservation of normal blood circulation as well as normal glial cells in the brain. The aim of this work was to carry out comparative survival study of glial cells and cells composing walls of blood vessels after photodynamic treatment, using simple model object - ventral nerve cord of crustacean.

  2. Expression of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and its tripartite receptor complex by cells of the human optic nerve head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaochun; Clark, Abbot F; Wordinger, Robert J

    2007-05-23

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) promotes gene expression, cell survival and differentiation in various types of peripheral and central neurons, glia and nonneural cells. The level of CNTF rises rapidly upon injury to neural tissue, suggesting that CNTF exerts its cytoprotective effects after release from cells via mechanisms induced by cell injury. The purpose of this study was to determine if cells in the optic nerve head express CNTF and its tripartite receptor complex. Well-established optic nerve head astrocytes (ONHA) and lamina cribrosa (LC) cell cultures were derived from normal human donors. Total RNA was reverse transcribed and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified for mRNA detection. Cytoplasmic protein expression was determined by immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis of the cellular lysates. Serum free medium was concentrated and used for detecting extracellular proteins. CNTF complexed with CNTFR-alpha was assayed by immunoprecipitation. Cells isolated from the human optic nerve head express CNTF and its tripartite receptor complex members (CNTFR-alpha, gp130, LIFR-beta). Taken together, these data suggest a possible neuroprotective role of CNTF in the optic nerve head.

  3. Facial nerve repair with Gore-Tex tube and adipose-derived stem cells: an animal study in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoreishian, Mehdi; Rezaei, Majid; Beni, Batoul Hashemi; Javanmard, Shaghayegh Haghjooy; Attar, Bijan Movahedian; Zalzali, Haidar

    2013-03-01

    Synthetic conduits have been considered a viable option in nerve reconstructive procedures. They address the goal of entubulization and eliminate the disadvantages of autografts. However, despite all successful reports, none has contained regeneration characteristics, such as growth factors or essential cells, for nerve repair. The authors evaluated the capability of adipose-derived stem cells in Gore-Tex tubes to enhance facial nerve repair. Undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells were extracted from the autogenous adipose tissues of 7 mongrel dogs. The frontal branch of the facial nerve was transected. A gap size of 7 mm was repaired with an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene tube filled with undifferentiated adipose-derived stem cells encapsulated in alginate hydrogel. The control sides were repaired with the tube and alginate alone. The healing phase was 12 weeks. Except in 2 control sides, an organized neural tissue was formed within the tubes. Compared with the normal nerve diameter, there was a decreased ratio of 29% and 39% in the experimental and control groups, respectively. Neurofilament-positive axon counts were 67% of normal values in the 2 groups. There was no significant difference between groups in histomorphometric parameters. Nerve conduction velocity in the experimental group (28.5 ± 3.5 m/s) was significantly greater than in the control group (16.2 ± 7 m/s). The experimental group also exhibited a greater maximal amplitude of action potential (1.86 ± 0.24 mV) than the control group (1.45 ± 0.49 mV). Addition of stem cells in the Gore-Tex tube enhanced the neural repair from a functional standpoint. However, for better functional and histologic results, differentiated Schwann cells and other mediators may be warranted. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Rita Levi-Montalcini and the discovery of NGF, the first nerve cell growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloe, Luigi

    2011-06-01

    The nerve growth factor (NGF) is a signaling protein, discovered by Rita Levi-Montalcini in the early 1950's for its effect on growth and differentiation of specific populations of neurons of the peripheral nervous system. Originally identified as neurite outgrowth-stimulating factor, later studies revealed that the purified molecule has a number of target cells in the central nervous system and on nonneuronal cells. Moreover, recent studies showed the potential therapeutic properties of NGF in neuropathies of the central and peripheral nervous system and diseases of the eye and skin. Here I briefly describe the discovery of NGF, the early studies of Rita LeviMontalcini, a pioneer in modern neuroscience, and my scientific and human experience working in her laboratory for over 40 years.

  5. STAT3 Controls the Long-Term Survival and Phenotype of Repair Schwann Cells during Nerve Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, Cristina; Davis, Catherine M; Gomez-Sanchez, Jose A; Turmaine, Mark; Meijer, Dies; Poli, Valeria; Mirsky, Rhona; Jessen, Kristjan R

    2017-04-19

    After nerve injury, Schwann cells convert to a phenotype specialized to promote repair. But during the slow process of axonal regrowth, these repair Schwann cells gradually lose their regeneration-supportive features and eventually die. Although this is a key reason for the frequent regeneration failures in humans, the transcriptional mechanisms that control long-term survival and phenotype of repair cells have not been studied, and the molecular signaling underlying their decline is obscure. We show, in mice, that Schwann cell STAT3 has a dual role. It supports the long-term survival of repair Schwann cells and is required for the maintenance of repair Schwann cell properties. In contrast, STAT3 is less important for the initial generation of repair Schwann cells after injury. In repair Schwann cells, we find that Schwann cell STAT3 activation by Tyr705 phosphorylation is sustained during long-term denervation. STAT3 is required for maintaining autocrine Schwann cell survival signaling, and inactivation of Schwann cell STAT3 results in a striking loss of repair cells from chronically denervated distal stumps. STAT3 inactivation also results in abnormal morphology of repair cells and regeneration tracks, and failure to sustain expression of repair cell markers, including Shh, GDNF, and BDNF. Because Schwann cell development proceeds normally without STAT3, the function of this factor appears restricted to Schwann cells after injury. This identification of transcriptional mechanisms that support long-term survival and differentiation of repair cells will help identify, and eventually correct, the failures that lead to the deterioration of this important cell population. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Although injured peripheral nerves contain repair Schwann cells that provide signals and spatial clues for promoting regeneration, the clinical outcome after nerve damage is frequently poor. A key reason for this is that, during the slow growth of axons through the proximal

  6. Single session of brief electrical stimulation immediately following crush injury enhances functional recovery of rat facial nerve

    OpenAIRE

    Eileen M. Foecking, PhD; Keith N. Fargo, PhD; Lisa M. Coughlin, MD; James T. Kim, MD; Sam J. Marzo, MD; Kathryn J. Jones, PhD

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries lead to a variety of pathological conditions, including paresis or paralysis when the injury involves motor axons. We have been studying ways to enhance the regeneration of peripheral nerves using daily electrical stimulation (ES) following a facial nerve crush injury. In our previous studies, ES was not initiated until 24 h after injury. The current experiment tested whether ES administered immediately following the crush injury would further decrease the time for c...

  7. Combination of fibrin-agarose hydrogels and adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells for peripheral nerve regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriel, Víctor; Garrido-Gómez, Juan; Hernández-Cortés, Pedro; Garzón, Ingrid; García-García, Salomé; Sáez-Moreno, José Antonio; Sánchez-Quevedo, María del Carmen; Campos, Antonio; Alaminos, Miguel

    2013-04-01

    Objective. The objective was to study the effectiveness of a commercially available collagen conduit filled with fibrin-agarose hydrogels alone or with fibrin-agarose hydrogels containing autologous adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) in a rat sciatic nerve injury model. Approach. A 10 mm gap was created in the sciatic nerve of 48 rats and repaired using saline-filled collagen conduits or collagen conduits filled with fibrin-agarose hydrogels alone (acellular conduits) or with hydrogels containing ADMSCs (ADMSC conduits). Nerve regeneration was assessed in clinical, electrophysiological and histological studies. Main results. Clinical and electrophysiological outcomes were more favorable with ADMSC conduits than with the acellular or saline conduits, evidencing a significant recovery of sensory and motor functions. Histological analysis showed that ADMSC conduits produce more effective nerve regeneration by Schwann cells, with higher remyelination and properly oriented axonal growth that reached the distal areas of the grafted conduits, and with intensely positive expressions of S100, neurofilament and laminin. Extracellular matrix was also more abundant and better organized around regenerated nerve tissues with ADMSC conduits than those with acellular or saline conduits. Significance. Clinical, electrophysiological and histological improvements obtained with tissue-engineered ADMSC conduits may contribute to enhancing axonal regeneration by Schwann cells.

  8. Easy Method to Examine Single Nerve Fiber Excitability and Conduction Parameters Using Intact Nonanesthetized Earthworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bähring, Robert; Bauer, Christiane K.

    2014-01-01

    The generation and conduction of neuronal action potentials (APs) were the subjects of a cell physiology exercise for first-year medical students. In this activity, students demonstrated the all-or-none nature of AP generation, measured conduction velocity, and examined the dependence of the threshold stimulus amplitude on stimulus duration. For…

  9. The role of hair follicle nestin-expressing stem cells during whisker sensory-nerve growth in long-term 3D culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mii, Sumiyuki; Duong, Jennifer; Tome, Yasunori; Uchugonova, Aisada; Liu, Fang; Amoh, Yasuyuki; Saito, Norimitsu; Katsuoka, Kensei; Hoffman, Robert M

    2013-07-01

    We have previously reported that nestin-expressing hair follicle stem cells can differentiate into neurons, Schwann cells, and other cell types. In the present study, vibrissa hair follicles, including their sensory nerve stump, were excised from transgenic mice in which the nestin promoter drives green fluorescent protein (ND-GFP mice), and were placed in 3D histoculture supported by Gelfoam®. β-III tubulin-positive fibers, consisting of ND-GFP-expressing cells, extended up to 500 µm from the whisker nerve stump in histoculture. The growing fibers had growth cones on their tips expressing F-actin. These findings indicate that β-III tubulin-positive fibers elongating from the whisker follicle sensory nerve stump were growing axons. The growing whisker sensory nerve was highly enriched in ND-GFP cells which appeared to play a major role in its elongation and interaction with other nerves in 3D culture, including the sciatic nerve, the trigeminal nerve, and the trigeminal nerve ganglion. The results of the present report suggest a major function of the nestin-expressing stem cells in the hair follicle is for growth of the follicle sensory nerve. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Association of nerve growth factor receptors with the triton X-100 cytoskeleton of PC12 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vale, R.D.; Ignatius, M.J.; Shooter, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    Triton X-100 solubilizes membranes of PC12 cells and leaves behind a nucleus and an array of cytoskeletal filaments. Nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors are associated with this Triton X-100-insoluble residue. Two classes of NGF receptors are found on PC12 cells which display rapid and slow dissociating kinetics. Although rapidly dissociating binding is predominant (greater than 75%) in intact cells, the majority of binding to the Triton X-100 cytoskeleton is slowly dissociating (greater than 75%). Rapidly dissociating NGF binding on intact cells can be converted to a slowly dissociating form by the plant lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGA). This lectin also increases the number of receptors which associate with the Triton X-100 cytoskeleton by more than 10-fold. 125 I-NGF bound to receptors can be visualized by light microscopy autoradiography in Triton X-100-insoluble residues of cell bodies, as well as growth cones and neurites. The WGA-induced association with the cytoskeleton, however, is not specific for the NGF receptor. Concentrations of WGA which change the Triton X-100 solubility of membrane glycoproteins are similar to those required to alter the kinetic state of the NGF receptor. Both events may be related to the crossbridging of cell surface proteins induced by this multivalent lectin

  11. Reconstruction of Multiple Facial Nerve Branches Using Skeletal Muscle-Derived Multipotent Stem Cell Sheet-Pellet Transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Saito

    Full Text Available Head and neck cancer is often diagnosed at advanced stages, and surgical resection with wide margins is generally indicated, despite this treatment being associated with poor postoperative quality of life (QOL. We have previously reported on the therapeutic effects of skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells (Sk-MSCs, which exert reconstitution capacity for muscle-nerve-blood vessel units. Recently, we further developed a 3D patch-transplantation system using Sk-MSC sheet-pellets. The aim of this study is the application of the 3D Sk-MSC transplantation system to the reconstitution of facial complex nerve-vascular networks after severe damage. Mouse experiments were performed for histological analysis and rats were used for functional examinations. The Sk-MSC sheet-pellets were prepared from GFP-Tg mice and SD rats, and were transplanted into the facial resection model (ST. Culture medium was transplanted as a control (NT. In the mouse experiment, facial-nerve-palsy (FNP scoring was performed weekly during the recovery period, and immunohistochemistry was used for the evaluation of histological recovery after 8 weeks. In rats, contractility of facial muscles was measured via electrical stimulation of facial nerves root, as the marker of total functional recovery at 8 weeks after transplantation. The ST-group showed significantly higher FNP (about three fold scores when compared to the NT-group after 2-8 weeks. Similarly, significant functional recovery of whisker movement muscles was confirmed in the ST-group at 8 weeks after transplantation. In addition, engrafted GFP+ cells formed complex branches of nerve-vascular networks, with differentiation into Schwann cells and perineurial/endoneurial cells, as well as vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Thus, Sk-MSC sheet-pellet transplantation is potentially useful for functional reconstitution therapy of large defects in facial nerve-vascular networks.

  12. Reconstruction of Multiple Facial Nerve Branches Using Skeletal Muscle-Derived Multipotent Stem Cell Sheet-Pellet Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kosuke; Tamaki, Tetsuro; Hirata, Maki; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki; Nakazato, Kenei; Nakajima, Nobuyuki; Kazuno, Akihito; Sakai, Akihiro; Iida, Masahiro; Okami, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is often diagnosed at advanced stages, and surgical resection with wide margins is generally indicated, despite this treatment being associated with poor postoperative quality of life (QOL). We have previously reported on the therapeutic effects of skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells (Sk-MSCs), which exert reconstitution capacity for muscle-nerve-blood vessel units. Recently, we further developed a 3D patch-transplantation system using Sk-MSC sheet-pellets. The aim of this study is the application of the 3D Sk-MSC transplantation system to the reconstitution of facial complex nerve-vascular networks after severe damage. Mouse experiments were performed for histological analysis and rats were used for functional examinations. The Sk-MSC sheet-pellets were prepared from GFP-Tg mice and SD rats, and were transplanted into the facial resection model (ST). Culture medium was transplanted as a control (NT). In the mouse experiment, facial-nerve-palsy (FNP) scoring was performed weekly during the recovery period, and immunohistochemistry was used for the evaluation of histological recovery after 8 weeks. In rats, contractility of facial muscles was measured via electrical stimulation of facial nerves root, as the marker of total functional recovery at 8 weeks after transplantation. The ST-group showed significantly higher FNP (about three fold) scores when compared to the NT-group after 2–8 weeks. Similarly, significant functional recovery of whisker movement muscles was confirmed in the ST-group at 8 weeks after transplantation. In addition, engrafted GFP+ cells formed complex branches of nerve-vascular networks, with differentiation into Schwann cells and perineurial/endoneurial cells, as well as vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Thus, Sk-MSC sheet-pellet transplantation is potentially useful for functional reconstitution therapy of large defects in facial nerve-vascular networks. PMID:26372044

  13. Schwann cell mitochondria as key regulators in the development and maintenance of peripheral nerve axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ino, Daisuke; Iino, Masamitsu

    2017-03-01

    Formation of myelin sheaths by Schwann cells (SCs) enables rapid and efficient transmission of action potentials in peripheral axons, and disruption of myelination results in disorders that involve decreased sensory and motor functions. Given that construction of SC myelin requires high levels of lipid and protein synthesis, mitochondria, which are pivotal in cellular metabolism, may be potential regulators of the formation and maintenance of SC myelin. Supporting this notion, abnormal mitochondria are found in SCs of neuropathic peripheral nerves in both human patients and the relevant animal models. However, evidence for the importance of SC mitochondria in myelination has been limited, until recently. Several studies have recently used genetic approaches that allow SC-specific ablation of mitochondrial metabolic activity in living animals to show the critical roles of SC mitochondria in the development and maintenance of peripheral nerve axons. Here, we review current knowledge about the involvement of SC mitochondria in the formation and dysfunction of myelinated axons in the peripheral nervous system.

  14. Gravisensing in single-celled systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, M.; Limbach, C.

    Single-celled systems are favourable cell types for studying several aspects of gravisensing and gravitropic responses. Whether and how actin is involved in both processes in higher plant statocytes is still a matter of intensive debate. In single-celled and tip-growing characean rhizoids and protonemata, however, there is clear evidence that actin is a central keyplayer controlling polarized growth and the mechanisms of gravity sensing and growth reorientation. Both cell types exhibit a unique actin polymerization in the extending tip, strictly colocalized with the prominent ER-aggregate in the center of the Spitzenkoerper. The local accumulation of ADF and profilin in this central array suggest that actin polymerization is controlled by these actin-binding proteins, which can be regulated by calcium, pH and a variety of other parameters. Distinct actin filaments extend even into the outermost tip and form a dense meshwork in the apical and subapical region, before they become bundled by villin to form two populations of thick actin cables that generate rotational cytoplasmic streaming in the basal region. Actomyosin not only mediates the delivery of secretory vesicles to the growing tip and controls the incorporation pattern of cell wall material, but also coordinates the tip-focused distribution pattern of calcium channels in the apical membrane. They establish the tip-high calcium gradient, a prerequisite for exocytosis. Microgravity experiments have added much to our understanding that both cell types use an efficient actomyosin-based system to control and correct the position of their statoliths and to direct sedimenting statoliths to confined graviperception sites at the plasma membrane. Actin's involvement in the graviresponses is more indirect. The upward growth of negatively gravitropic protonemata was shown to be preceded by a statolith-induced relocalization the Ca2+-calcium gradient to the upper flank that does not occur in positively gravitropic

  15. The potential of single-cell profiling in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efroni, Idan; Birnbaum, Kenneth D

    2016-04-05

    Single-cell transcriptomics has been employed in a growing number of animal studies, but the technique has yet to be widely used in plants. Nonetheless, early studies indicate that single-cell RNA-seq protocols developed for animal cells produce informative datasets in plants. We argue that single-cell transcriptomics has the potential to provide a new perspective on plant problems, such as the nature of the stem cells or initials, the plasticity of plant cells, and the extent of localized cellular responses to environmental inputs. Single-cell experimental outputs require different analytical approaches compared with pooled cell profiles and new tools tailored to single-cell assays are being developed. Here, we highlight promising new single-cell profiling approaches, their limitations as applied to plants, and their potential to address fundamental questions in plant biology.

  16. The Effects of Epidermal Neural Crest Stem Cells on Local Inflammation Microenvironment in the Defected Sciatic Nerve of Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cell-based therapy is a promising strategy for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries (PNIs. epidermal neural crest stems cells (EPI-NCSCs are thought to be important donor cells for repairing PNI in different animal models. Following PNI, inflammatory response is important to regulate the repair process. However, the effects of EPI-NCSCs on regulation of local inflammation microenviroment have not been investigated extensively. In the present study, these effects were studied by using 10 mm defected sciatic nerve, which was bridged with 15 mm artificial nerve composed of EPI-NCSCs, extracellular matrix (ECM and poly (lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA. Then the expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, polarization of macrophages, regulation of fibroblasts and shwann cells (SCs were assessed by western blot, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence staining at 1, 3, 7 and 21 days after bridging. The structure and the function of the bridged nerve were determined by observation under light microscope and by examination of right lateral foot retraction time (LFRT, sciatic function index (SFI, gastrocnemius wet weight and electrophysiology at 9 weeks. After bridging with EPI-NCSCs, the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-13 was increased, but decreased for pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α compared to the control bridging, which was consistent with increase of M2 macrophages and decrease of M1 macrophages at 7 days after transplantation. Likewise, myelin-formed SCs were significantly increased, but decreased for the activated fibroblasts in their number at 21 days. The recovery of structure and function of nerve bridged with EPI-NCSCs was significantly superior to that of DMEM. These results indicated that EPI-NCSCs could be able to regulate and provide more suitable inflammation microenvironment for the repair of defected sciatic nerve.

  17. Protection by an oral disubstituted hydroxylamine derivative against loss of retinal ganglion cell differentiation following optic nerve crush.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Lindsey

    Full Text Available Thy-1 is a cell surface protein that is expressed during the differentiation of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs. Optic nerve injury induces progressive loss in the number of RGCs expressing Thy-1. The rate of this loss is fastest during the first week after optic nerve injury and slower in subsequent weeks. This study was undertaken to determine whether oral treatment with a water-soluble N-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine derivative (OT-440 protects against loss of Thy-1 promoter activation following optic nerve crush and whether this effect targets the earlier quick phase or the later slow phase. The retina of mice expressing cyan fluorescent protein under control of the Thy-1 promoter (Thy1-CFP mice was imaged using a blue-light confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (bCSLO. These mice then received oral OT-440 prepared in cream cheese or dissolved in water, or plain vehicle, for two weeks and were imaged again prior to unilateral optic nerve crush. Treatments and weekly imaging continued for four more weeks. Fluorescent neurons were counted in the same defined retinal areas imaged at each time point in a masked fashion. When the counts at each time point were directly compared, the numbers of fluorescent cells at each time point were greater in the animals that received OT-440 in cream cheese by 8%, 27%, 52% and 60% than in corresponding control animals at 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks after optic nerve crush. Similar results were obtained when the vehicle was water. Rate analysis indicated the protective effect of OT-440 was greatest during the first two weeks and was maintained in the second two weeks after crush for both the cream cheese vehicle study and water vehicle study. Because most of the fluorescent cells detected by bCSLO are RGCs, these findings suggest that oral OT-440 can either protect against or delay early degenerative responses occurring in RGCs following optic nerve injury.

  18. Single vagus nerve stimulation reduces early postprandial C-peptide levels but not other hormones or postprandial metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, M. W.; van Nierop, F. S.; Koopman, F. A.; Eggink, H. M.; Gerlag, D. M.; Chan, M. W.; Zitnik, R.; Vaz, F. M.; Romijn, J. A.; Tak, P. P.; Soeters, M. R.

    2018-01-01

    A recent study in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients using electrical vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) to activate the inflammatory reflex has shown promising effects on disease activity. Innervation by the autonomic nerve system might be involved in the regulation of many endocrine and metabolic

  19. A single trial of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) improves spasticity and balance in patients with chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hwi-young; In, Tae Sung; Cho, Ki Hun; Song, Chang Ho

    2013-03-01

    Spasticity management is pivotal for achieving functional recovery of stroke patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a single trial of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on spasticity and balance in chronic stroke patients. Forty-two chronic stroke patients were randomly allocated into the TENS (n = 22) or the placebo-TENS (n = 20) group. TENS stimulation was applied to the gastrocnemius for 60 min at 100 Hz, 200 µs with 2 to 3 times the sensory threshold (the minimal threshold in detecting electrical stimulation for subjects) after received physical therapy for 30 min. In the placebo-TENS group, electrodes were placed but no electrical stimulation was administered. For measuring spasticity, the resistance encountered during passive muscle stretching of ankle joint was assessed using the Modified Ashworth Scale, and the Hand held dynamometer was used to assess the resistive force caused by spasticity. Balance ability was measured using a force platform that measures postural sway generated by postural imbalance. The TENS group showed a significantly greater reduction in spasticity of the gastrocnemius, compared to the placebo-TENS group (p TENS resulted in greater balance ability improvements, especially during the eyes closed condition (p TENS provides an immediately effective means of reducing spasticity and of improving balance in chronic stroke patients. The present data may be useful to establish the standard parameters for TENS application in the clinical setting of stroke.

  20. Theoretical investigation of nerve agent DMMP adsorption onto Stone–Wales defected single-walled carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmadian, Nasim; Ganji, Masoud Darvish; Laffafchy, Mozayyan

    2012-01-01

    To find a suitable sensitivity sensor for dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) as nerve agent, we studied the adsorption behavior of DMMP on the exterior surface of defected semiconducting (10,0) single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) by means of first-principles van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) calculations. The obtained results of adsorption energies reveal that the defect embedded within the (10,0) SWCNT does not promote binding capability in this system. Notably, analyzing the electronic structures and Mulliken population for the energetically most favorable complex supports that the defect changes slightly the electronic properties of SWCNT, indicating there is no considerable hybridization between the corresponding orbitals and the weak interaction obtained quantitatively in terms of binding energies. -- Highlights: ► State of the art ab initio DFT calculations on the Periodic system. ► We have considered the defected CNT for the adsorption capability. ► Full geometrical relaxation has been performed in our work. ► Electronics analysis were carried out for the structures of the considered complexes.

  1. An Implantable Wireless Neural Interface System for Simultaneous Recording and Stimulation of Peripheral Nerve with a Single Cuff Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahnsei Shon

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, implantable devices have become widely used in neural prostheses because they eliminate endemic drawbacks of conventional percutaneous neural interface systems. However, there are still several issues to be considered: low-efficiency wireless power transmission; wireless data communication over restricted operating distance with high power consumption; and limited functionality, working either as a neural signal recorder or as a stimulator. To overcome these issues, we suggest a novel implantable wireless neural interface system for simultaneous neural signal recording and stimulation using a single cuff electrode. By using widely available commercial off-the-shelf (COTS components, an easily reconfigurable implantable wireless neural interface system was implemented into one compact module. The implantable device includes a wireless power consortium (WPC-compliant power transmission circuit, a medical implant communication service (MICS-band-based radio link and a cuff-electrode path controller for simultaneous neural signal recording and stimulation. During in vivo experiments with rabbit models, the implantable device successfully recorded and stimulated the tibial and peroneal nerves while communicating with the external device. The proposed system can be modified for various implantable medical devices, especially such as closed-loop control based implantable neural prostheses requiring neural signal recording and stimulation at the same time.

  2. [Construction of recombinant human nerve growth factor (rh-β-NGF) eukaryotic vector and its expression in HEK293 cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingchuan; Xue, Bofu; Yuan, Yuan; Ma, Mo; Zhu, Lin; Milburn, Rebecca; Le, Li; Hu, Peizhen; Ye, Jing

    2015-03-01

    Human nerve growth factor (NGF) is a nerve cell growth regulation factor, which can provide nutrition for the neurons and promote the neurites outgrowth. In order to produce large-scale recombinant human nerve growth factor (rh-beta-NGF), we constructed a plasmid vector, which can stably express the rh-beta-NGF in the HEK293 cell lines. First, the plasmid of pCMV-beta-NGF-IRES-dhfr was constructed and transformed into HEK293 cells. Then MTX pressurized filter and limiting dilution methods were used to obtain monoclonal HEK293 cell lines. After stepwise reducing serum in culture media, the cells eventually adapted to serum-free medium and secreted rh-beta-NGF. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that the expression product owned a molecular weight of about 13 kDa and a purity of more than 50%. The peptide mapping sequencing analysis demonstrated the sequences of rh-beta-NGF matched with the theoretical ones. Later we purified this protein by ion exchange and molecular sieve chromatograph. Finally, our experimental results exhibited that the recombinant cell lines can stably express rh-beta-NGF with a high efficiency of more than 20 pg/cell x day. In addition, this protein could successfully induce differentiation of PC12 cells. In summary, our recombinant HEK293 cells can express bio-active rh-beta-NGF with great efficiency and stability, which supply a valid basis to large-scale production of rh-beta-NGF.

  3. Regenerative medicine for Parkinson's disease using differentiated nerve cells derived from human buccal fat pad stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Haruka; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Akira

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of human adipose stem cells derived from the buccal fat pad (hBFP-ASCs) for nerve regeneration. Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive death of dopaminergic neurons. PD is a candidate disease for cell replacement therapy because it has no fundamental therapeutic methods. We examined the properties of neural-related cells induced from hBFP-ASCs as a cell source for PD treatment. hBFP-ASCs were cultured in neurogenic differentiation medium for about 2 weeks. After the morphology of hBFP-ASCs changed to neural-like cells, the medium was replaced with neural maintenance medium. Cells differentiated from hBFP-ASCs showed neuron-like structures and expressed neuron markers (β3-tubulin, neurofilament 200, and microtubule-associated protein 2), an astrocyte marker (glial fibrillary acidic protein), or dopaminergic neuron-related marker (tyrosine hydroxylase). Induced neural cells were transplanted into a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rat hemi-parkinsonian model. At 4 weeks after transplantation, 6-OHDA-lesioned rats were subjected to apomorphine-induced rotation analysis. The transplanted cells survived in the brain of rats as dopaminergic neural cells. No tumor formation was found after cell transplantation. We demonstrated differentiation of hBFP-ASCs into neural cells, and that transplantation of these neural cells improved the symptoms of model rats. Our results suggest that neurons differentiated from hBFP-ASCs would be applicable to cell replacement therapy of PD.

  4. Study of the Peripheral Nerve Fibers Myelin Structure Changes during Activation of Schwann Cell Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdiyan, Ekaterina E; Allakhverdiev, Elvin S; Maksimov, Georgy V

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper we consider a new type of mechanism by which neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) regulates the properties of peripheral nerve fibers myelin. Our data show the importance of the relationship between the changes in the number of Schwann cell (SC) acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) and the axon excitation (different intervals between action potentials (APs)). Using Raman spectroscopy, an effect of activation of SC AChRs on the myelin membrane fluidity was investigated. It was found, that ACh stimulates an increase in lipid ordering degree of the myelin lipids, thus providing evidence for specific role of the "axon-SC" interactions at the axon excitation. It was proposed, that during the axon excitation, the SC membrane K+- depolarization and the Ca2+-influx led to phospholipase activation or exocytosis of intracellular membrane vesicles and myelin structure reorganization.

  5. Positive effects of bFGF modified rat amniotic epithelial cells transplantation on transected rat optic nerve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Xin Xie

    Full Text Available Effective therapy for visual loss caused by optic nerve injury or diseases has not been achieved even though the optic nerve has the regeneration potential after injury. This study was designed to modify amniotic epithelial cells (AECs with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF gene, preliminarily investigating its effect on transected optic nerve.A human bFGF gene segment was delivered into rat AECs (AECs/hbFGF by lentiviral vector, and the gene expression was examined by RT-PCR and ELISA. The AECs/hbFGF and untransfected rat AECs were transplanted into the transected site of the rat optic nerve. At 28 days post transplantation, the survival and migration of the transplanted cells was observed by tracking labeled cells; meanwhile retinal ganglion cells (RGCs were observed and counted by employing biotin dextran amine (BDA and Nissl staining. Furthermore, the expression of growth associated protein 43 (GAP-43 within the injury site was examined with immunohistochemical staining.The AECs/hbFGF was proven to express bFGF gene and secrete bFGF peptide. Both AECs/hbFGF and AECs could survive and migrate after transplantation. RGCs counting implicated that RGCs numbers of the cell transplantation groups were significantly higher than that of the control group, and the AECs/hbFGF group was significantly higher than that of the AECs group. Moreover GAP-43 integral optical density value in the control group was significantly lower than that of the cell transplantation groups, and the value in the AECs/hbFGF group was significantly higher than that of the AECs group.AECs modified with bFGF could reduce RGCs loss and promote expression of GAP-43 in the rat optic nerve transected model, facilitating the process of neural restoration following injury.

  6. Expression patterns of cell cycle components in sporadic and neurofibromatosis type 1-related malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agesen, Trude Holmeide; Florenes, Viva Ann; Molenaar, Willemina M.; Lind, Guro E.; Berner, Jeane-Marie; Plaat, Boudewijn E.C.; Komdeur, Rudy; Myklebost, Ola; van den Berg, Eva; Lothe, Ragnhild A.

    The molecular biology underlying the development of highly malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) remains mostly unknown. In the present study, the expression pattern of 10 selected cell cycle components is investigated in a series of 15 MPNSTs from patients with (n = 9) or without (n =

  7. Long-term delivery of nerve growth factor by encapsulated cell biodelivery in the Göttingen minipig basal forebrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjord-Larsen, Lone; Kusk, Philip; Tornøe, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) prevents cholinergic degeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and improves memory in AD animal models. In humans, the safe delivery of therapeutic doses of NGF is challenging. For clinical use, we have therefore developed an encapsulated cell (EC) biodelivery device...

  8. Appropriate modulation of autophagy sensitizes malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor cells to treatment with imatinib mesylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Munehiro; Sakata, Naoki; Ueda, Satoshi; Takemura, Tsukasa

    2014-04-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST), very rare in childhood, is a highly aggressive soft-tissue tumor. We experienced a case of a 7-year-old boy with MPNST who was treated with imatinib mesylate (imatinib) after the identification of platelet-derived growth factor receptor expression in his tumor. We were unable to observe clinical benefits of imatinib in this patient. Therefore, cellular reactions of imatinib were investigated in vitro using 3 MPNST cell lines. Imatinib induced cytotoxicity in vitro with variable IC50 values (11.7 to >30 μM). Induction of apoptosis was not a pivotal mechanism in the inhibitory effects. We found that the treatment of MPNST cell lines with imatinib induced autophagy. Suppression of the initiation of autophagy by 3-methyladenine or small interfering RNA (siRNA) against beclin-1 attenuated the imatinib-mediated cytotoxicity. In contrast, blocking the formation of autophagosomes or the development of autolysosomes using siRNA against microtubule-associated protein light chain 3B, bafilomycin A1, chloroquine, or an MEK1/2 inhibitor (U0126) enhanced the imatinib-induced cytotoxicity in MPNST cells. Our data showed that the imatinib-mediated autophagy can function as a cytotoxic mechanism and that appropriate modulation of autophagy may sensitize MPNST cells to imatinib, which in turn may be a novel therapeutic strategy for MPNST.

  9. Human dental pulp stem cells expressing STRO-1, c-kit and CD34 markers in peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Gianluca; Pisciotta, Alessandra; Riccio, Massimo; Bertoni, Laura; De Biasi, Sara; Gibellini, Lara; Zordani, Alessio; Cavallini, Gian Maria; La Sala, Giovanni Battista; Bruzzesi, Giacomo; Ferrari, Adriano; Cossarizza, Andrea; de Pol, Anto

    2018-02-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries are a commonly encountered clinical problem and often result in long-term functional defects. The application of stem cells able to differentiate in Schwann cell-like cells in vitro and in vivo, could represent an attractive therapeutic approach for the treatment of nerve injuries. Further, stem cells sources sharing the same embryological origin as Schwann cells might be considered a suitable tool. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the ability of a neuroectodermal subpopulation of human STRO-1 + /c-Kit + /CD34 + DPSCs, expressing P75 NTR , nestin and SOX-10, to differentiate into Schwann cell-like cells in vitro and to promote axonal regeneration in vivo, which led to functional recovery as measured by sustained gait improvement, in animal rat model of peripheral nerve injury. Transplanted human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) engrafted into sciatic nerve defect, as revealed by the positive staining against human nuclei, showed the expression of typical Schwann cells markers, S100b and, noteworthy, a significant number of myelinated axons was detected. Moreover, hDPSCs promoted axonal regeneration from proximal to distal stumps 1 month after transplantation. This study demonstrates that STRO-1 + /c-Kit + /CD34 + hDPSCs, associated with neural crest derivation, represent a promising source of stem cells for the treatment of demyelinating disorders and might provide a valid alternative tool for future clinical applications to achieve functional recovery after injury or peripheral neuropathies besides minimizing ethical issues. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. A biosynthetic nerve guide conduit based on silk/SWNT/fibronectin nanocomposite for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Mottaghitalab

    Full Text Available As a contribution to the functionality of nerve guide conduits (NGCs in nerve tissue engineering, here we report a conduit processing technique through introduction and evaluation of topographical, physical and chemical cues. Porous structure of NGCs based on freeze-dried silk/single walled carbon nanotubes (SF/SWNTs has shown a uniform chemical and physical structure with suitable electrical conductivity. Moreover, fibronectin (FN containing nanofibers within the structure of SF/SWNT conduits produced through electrospinning process have shown aligned fashion with appropriate porosity and diameter. Moreover, fibronectin remained its bioactivity and influenced the adhesion and growth of U373 cell lines. The conduits were then implanted to 10 mm left sciatic nerve defects in rats. The histological assessment has shown that nerve regeneration has taken places in proximal region of implanted nerve after 5 weeks following surgery. Furthermore, nerve conduction velocities (NCV and more myelinated axons were observed in SF/SWNT and SF/SWNT/FN groups after 5 weeks post implantation, indicating a functional recovery for the injured nerves. With immunohistochemistry, the higher S-100 expression of Schwann cells in SF/SWNT/FN conduits in comparison to other groups was confirmed. In conclusion, an oriented conduit of biocompatible SF/SWNT/FN has been fabricated with acceptable structure that is particularly applicable in nerve grafts.

  11. Future considerations for pharmacologic adjuvants in single-injection peripheral nerve blocks for patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brian A; Murinson, Beth B; Grable, Benjamin R; Orebaugh, Steven L

    2009-01-01

    As the epidemics of obesity and diabetes expand, there are more patients with these disorders requiring elective surgery. For surgery on the extremities, peripheral nerve blocks have become a highly favorable anesthetic option when compared with general anesthesia. Peripheral blocks reduce respiratory and cardiac stresses, while potentially mitigating untreated peripheral pain that can foster physiologic conditions that increase risks for general health complications. However, local anesthetics are generally accepted to be a rare but possible cause of nerve damage, and there are no evidence-based recommendations for dosing local anesthetic nerve blocks in patients with diabetes. This is important because anesthesiologists do not want to potentially accelerate peripheral nerve dysfunction in diabetic patients at risk. This translational vignette (i) examines laboratory models of diabetes, (ii) summarizes the pharmacology of perineural adjuvants (epinephrine, clonidine, buprenorphine, midazolam, tramadol, and dexamethasone), and (iii) identifies areas that warrant further research to determine viability of monotherapy or combination therapy for peripheral nerve analgesia in diabetic patients. Conceivably, future translational research regarding peripheral nerve blocks in diabetic patients may logically include study of nontoxic injectable analgesic adjuvants, in combination, to provide desired analgesia, while possibly avoiding peripheral nerve toxicity that diabetic animal models have exhibited when exposed to traditional local anesthetics.

  12. Micro-PIXE for single cell analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The knowledge of the intracellular distribution of biological relevant metals is important to understand their mechanisms of action in cells, either for physiological, toxicological or pathological processes. However, the direct detection of trace metals in single cells is a challenging task that requires sophisticated analytical developments. The combination of micro-PIXE with RBS and STIM (Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy) allows the quantitative determination of trace metal content within sub-cellular compartments. The application of STIM analysis provides high spatial resolution imaging (< 200 nm) and excellent mass sensitivity (< 0.1 ng). Application of the STIM-PIXE-RBS methodology is absolutely needed when organic mass loss appears during PIXE-RBS irradiation. This combination of STIM-PIXE-RBS provides fully quantitative determination of trace element content, expressed in μg/g, which is a quite unique capability for micro-PIXE compared to other micro-analytical methods such as the electron and synchrotron x-ray fluorescence. Examples of micro-PIXE studies for sub-cellular imaging of trace elements in various fields of interest will be presented: in patho-physiology of trace elements involved in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease, and in toxicology of metals such as cobalt. (author)

  13. Long-term outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for metachromatic leukodystrophy: the largest single-institution cohort report

    OpenAIRE

    Boucher, Alexander A.; Miller, Weston; Shanley, Ryan; Ziegler, Richard; Lund, Troy; Raymond, Gerald; Orchard, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Metachromatic Leukodystrophy (MLD) is a rare, fatal demyelinating disorder with limited treatment options. Published outcomes after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are scant and mixed. We report survival and function following HSCT for a large, single-center MLD cohort. Methods Transplant-related data, survival and serial measures (brain MRI, nerve conduction velocity (NCV), neurologic and neuropsychology evaluations) were reviewed. When possible, parental interviews...

  14. Recent Trends on Micro/Nanofluidic Single Cell Electroporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuhin Subhra Santra

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The behaviors of cell to cell or cell to environment with their organelles and their intracellular physical or biochemical effects are still not fully understood. Analyzing millions of cells together cannot provide detailed information, such as cell proliferation, differentiation or different responses to external stimuli and intracellular reaction. Thus, single cell level research is becoming a pioneering research area that unveils the interaction details in high temporal and spatial resolution among cells. To analyze the cellular function, single cell electroporation can be conducted by employing a miniaturized device, whose dimension should be similar to that of a single cell. Micro/nanofluidic devices can fulfill this requirement for single cell electroporation. This device is not only useful for cell lysis, cell to cell fusion or separation, insertion of drug, DNA and antibodies inside single cell, but also it can control biochemical, electrical and mechanical parameters using electroporation technique. This device provides better performance such as high transfection efficiency, high cell viability, lower Joule heating effect, less sample contamination, lower toxicity during electroporation experiment when compared to bulk electroporation process. In addition, single organelles within a cell can be analyzed selectively by reducing the electrode size and gap at nanoscale level. This advanced technique can deliver (in/out biomolecules precisely through a small membrane area (micro to nanoscale area of the single cell, known as localized single cell membrane electroporation (LSCMEP. These articles emphasize the recent progress in micro/nanofluidic single cell electroporation, which is potentially beneficial for high-efficient therapeutic and delivery applications or understanding cell to cell interaction.

  15. Sox2 expression in Schwann cells inhibits myelination in vivo and induces influx of macrophages to the nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Sheridan L.; Onaitis, Mark W.; Florio, Francesca; Quattrini, Angelo; Lloyd, Alison C.; D'Antonio, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    Correct myelination is crucial for the function of the peripheral nervous system. Both positive and negative regulators within the axon and Schwann cell function to ensure the correct onset and progression of myelination during both development and following peripheral nerve injury and repair. The Sox2 transcription factor is well known for its roles in the development and maintenance of progenitor and stem cell populations, but has also been proposed in vitro as a negative regulator of myelination in Schwann cells. We wished to test fully whether Sox2 regulates myelination in vivo and show here that, in mice, sustained Sox2 expression in vivo blocks myelination in the peripheral nerves and maintains Schwann cells in a proliferative non-differentiated state, which is also associated with increased inflammation within the nerve. The plasticity of Schwann cells allows them to re-myelinate regenerated axons following injury and we show that re-myelination is also blocked by Sox2 expression in Schwann cells. These findings identify Sox2 as a physiological regulator of Schwann cell myelination in vivo and its potential to play a role in disorders of myelination in the peripheral nervous system. PMID:28743796

  16. Light microscopic image analysis system to quantify immunoreactive terminal area apposed to nerve cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L. C.; D'Amelio, F.; Fox, R. A.; Polyakov, I.; Daunton, N. G.

    1997-01-01

    The present report describes a desktop computer-based method for the quantitative assessment of the area occupied by immunoreactive terminals in close apposition to nerve cells in relation to the perimeter of the cell soma. This method is based on Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) routines incorporated in NIH-Image public domain software. Pyramidal cells of layer V of the somatosensory cortex outlined by GABA immunolabeled terminals were chosen for our analysis. A Leitz Diaplan light microscope was employed for the visualization of the sections. A Sierra Scientific Model 4030 CCD camera was used to capture the images into a Macintosh Centris 650 computer. After preprocessing, filtering was performed on the power spectrum in the frequency domain produced by the FFT operation. An inverse FFT with filter procedure was employed to restore the images to the spatial domain. Pasting of the original image to the transformed one using a Boolean logic operation called 'AND'ing produced an image with the terminals enhanced. This procedure allowed the creation of a binary image using a well-defined threshold of 128. Thus, the terminal area appears in black against a white background. This methodology provides an objective means of measurement of area by counting the total number of pixels occupied by immunoreactive terminals in light microscopic sections in which the difficulties of labeling intensity, size, shape and numerical density of terminals are avoided.

  17. The Single Cell Proteome Project - Cell-Cycle Dependent Protein Expression in Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dovichi, Norman J

    2005-01-01

    .... Capillary sieving electrophoresis and capillary micellar electrophoresis were used to characterize proteins in single cells in one-dimensional separations, while the two techniques were combined...

  18. Effect of Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells Transplantation on Nerve Fibers of A Rat Model of Endometriosis

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yan; Li, Dong; Zhang, Zhe; Takushige, Natsuko; Kong, Bei-Hua; Wang, Guo-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Endometriosis is a common, benign, oestrogen-dependent, chronic gynaecological disorder associated with pelvic pain and infertility. Some researchers have identified nerve fibers in endometriotic lesions in women with endometriosis. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have attracted interest for their possible use for both cell and gene therapies because of their capacity for self-renewal and multipotentiality of differentiation. We investigated how human umbilical cord-M...

  19. Immunopurification of Acetylcholinesterase from Red Blood Cells for Detection of Nerve Agent Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafferner, Alicia J; Schopfer, Lawrence M; Xiao, Gaoping; Cashman, John R; Yerramalla, Udaya; Johnson, Rudolph C; Blake, Thomas A; Lockridge, Oksana

    2017-10-16

    Nerve agents and organophosphorus pesticides make a covalent bond with the active site serine of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), resulting in inhibition of AChE activity and toxic symptoms. AChE in red blood cells (RBCs) serves as a surrogate for AChE in the nervous system. Mass spectrometry analysis of adducts on RBC AChE could provide evidence of exposure. Our goal was to develop a method of immunopurifying human RBC AChE in quantities adequate for detecting exposure by mass spectrometry. For this purpose, we immobilized 3 commercially available anti-human acetylcholinesterase monoclonal antibodies (AE-1, AE-2, and HR2) plus 3 new monoclonal antibodies. The monoclonal antibodies were characterized for binding affinity, epitope mapping by pairing analysis, and nucleotide and amino acid sequences. AChE was solubilized from frozen RBCs with 1% (v/v) Triton X-100. A 16 mL sample containing 5.8 μg of RBC AChE was treated with a quantity of soman model compound that inhibited 50% of the AChE activity. Native and soman-inhibited RBC AChE samples were immunopurified on antibody-Sepharose beads. The immunopurified RBC AChE was digested with pepsin and analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry on a 6600 Triple-TOF mass spectrometer. The aged soman-modified PheGlyGluSerAlaGlyAlaAlaSer (FGESAGAAS) peptide was detected using a targeted analysis method. It was concluded that all 6 monoclonal antibodies could be used to immunopurify RBC AChE and that exposure to nerve agents could be detected as adducts on the active site serine of RBC AChE.

  20. Bilateral compared with unilateral sacral nerve stimulation for faecal incontinence: results of a randomized, single-blinded crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duelund-Jakobsen, J; Buntzen, S; Lundby, L; Sørensen, M; Laurberg, S

    2015-12-01

    This randomized single-blinded crossover study aimed to investigate whether bilateral sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) is more efficient than unilateral stimulation for faecal incontinence (FI). Patients with FI who responded during a unilateral test stimulation, with a minimum improvement of 50% were eligible. Twenty-seven patients who were accepted to enter the trial were bilaterally implanted with two permanent leads and pacemakers. Patients were randomized into three periods of 4 weeks' stimulation including unilateral right, unilateral left and bilateral stimulation. Symptoms scores and bowel habit diaries were collected at baseline and in each study period. A 1-week washout was introduced between each study period. Twenty-seven (25 female) patients with a median age of 63 (36-84) years were bilaterally implanted from May 2009 to June 2012. The median number of episodes of FI per 3 weeks significantly decreased from 17 (3-54) at baseline to 2 (0-20) during stimulation on the right side, 2 (0-42) during stimulation on the left side and 1 (0-25) during bilateral stimulation. The Wexner incontinence score improved significantly from a median of 16 (10-20) at baseline to 9 (0-14) with right-side stimulation, 10 (0-15) with left-side stimulation and 9 (0-14) with bilateral stimulation. The differences between unilateral right or unilateral left and bilateral stimulation were non-significant, for FI episodes (P = 0.3) or for Wexner incontinence score (P = 0.9). Bilateral SNS therapy for FI is not superior to standard unilateral stimulation in the short term. Equal functional results can be obtained regardless of the side of implantation. Colorectal Disease © 2015 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  1. Functional and regenerative effects of local administration of autologous mononuclear bone marrow cells combined with silicone conduit on transected femoral nerve of rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Anelise Bonilla; Schestatsky, Pedro; Torres, Vítor Félix; Gomes, Cristiano; Gianotti, Giordano Cabral; Paz, Ana Helena da Rosa; Terraciano, Paula Barros; Marques, Janete Maria Volpato; Guimarães, Karina Magano; Graça, Dominguita Lühers; Cirne-Lima, Elizabeth Obino; Contesini, Emerson Antonio

    2015-10-01

    The inoculation of cells into injury sites can accelerate and improve the quality of nerve regeneration. This study aimed to evaluate the functional and regenerative effects of mononuclear autologous bone marrow cells (MABMC) combined with silicon conduit grafting in rabbit femoral nerves. Twenty-eight animals were allocated to one of two groups: treatment group (TG) or control group (CG), divided according to the time of evaluation, at either 50 or 75 days. After neurotmesis of the femoral nerve, surgical repair was performed with nerve autografts in silicon conduits, leaving a 5mm gap in both groups. The TG received MABMC in silicon conduits, and CG received a sham saline inoculum. Histological, clinical and electrophysiological analyses detected no differences between groups, but analysis of leg diameter showed that TG diameters were larger. This cell therapy did not improve regeneration of the femoral nerve, but there was a tendency for better functional recovery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Design and Analysis of Single-Cell Sequencing Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grün, Dominic; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in single-cell sequencing hold great potential for exploring biological systems with unprecedented resolution. Sequencing the genome of individual cells can reveal somatic mutations and allows the investigation of clonal dynamics. Single-cell transcriptome sequencing can elucidate

  3. Nerve cell-mimicking liposomes as biosensor for botulinum neurotoxin complete physiological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingart, Oliver G; Loessner, Martin J

    2016-12-15

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are the most toxic substances known, and their neurotoxic properties and paralysing effects are exploited for medical treatment of a wide spectrum of disorders. To accurately quantify the potency of a pharmaceutical BoNT preparation, its physiological key activities (binding to membrane receptor, translocation, and proteolytic degradation of SNARE proteins) need to be determined. To date, this was only possible using animal models, or, to a limited extent, cell-based assays. We here report a novel in vitro system for BoNT/B analysis, based on nerve-cell mimicking liposomes presenting motoneuronal membrane receptors required for BoNT binding. Following triggered membrane translocation of the toxin's Light Chain, the endopeptidase activity can be quantitatively monitored employing a FRET-based reporter assay within the functionalized liposomes. We were able to detect BoNT/B physiological activity at picomolar concentrations in short time, opening the possibility for future replacement of animal experimentation in pharmaceutical BoNT testing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Single cell array impedance analysis in a microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinagac, Emre; Taskin, Selen; Kizil, Huseyin

    2016-10-01

    Impedance analysis of single cells is presented in this paper. Following the separation of a target cell type by dielectrophoresis in our previous work, this paper focuses on capturing the cells as a single array and performing impedance analysis to point out the signature difference between each cell type. Lab-on-a-chip devices having a titanium interdigitated electrode layer on a glass substrate and a PDMS microchannel are fabricated to capture each cell in a single form and perform impedance analysis. HCT116 (homosapiens colon colorectal carcin) and HEK293 (human embryonic kidney) cells are used in our experiments.

  5. Colony Stimulating Factor-1 Receptor Expressing Cells Infiltrating the Cornea Control Corneal Nerve Degeneration in Response to HSV-1 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chucair-Elliott, Ana J; Gurung, Hem R; Carr, Meghan M; Carr, Daniel J J

    2017-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) is a leading cause of neurotrophic keratitis, characterized by decreased or absent corneal sensation due to damage to the sensory corneal innervation. We previously reported the elicited immune response to infection contributes to the mechanism of corneal nerve regression/damage during acute HSV-1 infection. Our aim is to further establish the involvement of infiltrated macrophages in the mechanism of nerve loss upon infection. Macrophage Fas-Induced Apoptosis (MAFIA) transgenic C57BL/6 mice were systemically treated with AP20187 dimerizer or vehicle (VEH), and their corneas, lymph nodes, and blood were assessed for CD45+CD11b+GFP+ cell depletion by flow cytometry (FC). Mice were ocularly infected with HSV-1 or left uninfected. At 2, 4, and/or 6 days post infection (PI), corneas were assessed for sensitivity and harvested for FC, nerve structure by immunohistochemistry, viral content by plaque assay, soluble factor content by suspension array, and activation of signaling pathways by Western blot analysis. C57BL6 mice were used to compare to the MAFIA mouse model. MAFIA mice treated with AP20187 had efficient depletion of CD45+CD11b+GFP+ cells in the tissues analyzed. The reduction of CD45+CD11b+GFP+ cells recruited to the infected corneas of AP20187-treated mice correlated with preservation of corneal nerve structure and function, decreased protein concentration of inflammatory cytokines, and decreased STAT3 activation despite no changes in viral content in the cornea compared to VEH-treated animals. Our results suggest infiltrated macrophages are early effectors in the nerve regression following HSV-1 infection. We propose the neurodegeneration mechanism involves macrophages, local up-regulation of IL-6, and activation of STAT3.

  6. Atomic force microscopy for the examination of single cell rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okajima, Takaharu

    2012-11-01

    Rheological properties of living cells play important roles in regulating their various biological functions. Therefore, measuring cell rheology is crucial for not only elucidating the relationship between the cell mechanics and functions, but also mechanical diagnosis of single cells. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is becoming a useful technique for single cell diagnosis because it allows us to measure the rheological properties of adherent cells at any region on the surface without any modifications. In this review, we summarize AFM techniques for examining single cell rheology in frequency and time domains. Recent applications of AFM for investigating the statistical analysis of single cell rheology in comparison to other micro-rheological techniques are reviewed, and we discuss what specificity and universality of cell rheology are extracted using AFM.

  7. Blood Bupivacaine Concentrations After a Combined Single-Shot Sciatic Block and a Continuous Femoral Nerve Block in Pediatric Patients: A Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Santhanam; De Oliveira, Gildasio S

    2017-05-01

    We evaluated blood bupivacaine concentrations in children having a single-shot sciatic and continuous femoral blocks after anterior cruciate ligament repair. Dried blood spot samples were analyzed for bupivacaine levels at 0, 5, 15, 30, 60, and 120 minutes and 4, 24, and 48 hours. The highest 99% upper confidence interval limit was 135 ng/mL at the 4-hour evaluation point. The 99% upper confidence interval was below potentially toxic levels (1500 ng/mL) across all sampling times. The risk of local anesthetic toxicity in pediatric patients receiving single-shot sciatic and continuous femoral nerve blocks is very low.

  8. Silicon Dioxide Thin Film Mediated Single Cell Nucleic Acid Isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, Evgeny; Dominova, Irina; Shusharina, Natalia; Botman, Stepan; Kasymov, Vitaliy; Patrushev, Maksim

    2013-01-01

    A limited amount of DNA extracted from single cells, and the development of single cell diagnostics make it necessary to create a new highly effective method for the single cells nucleic acids isolation. In this paper, we propose the DNA isolation method from biomaterials with limited DNA quantity in sample, and from samples with degradable DNA based on the use of solid-phase adsorbent silicon dioxide nanofilm deposited on the inner surface of PCR tube. PMID:23874571

  9. Imaging of single retinal ganglion cell with differential interference contrast microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Juyeong; Kim, Yu Jeong; Kim, Chul-Ki; Lee, Taik Jin; Seo, Mina; Lee, Seok; Woo, Deok Ha; Jun, Seong Chan; Park, Ki-Ho; Kim, Seok Hwan; Kim, Jae Hun

    2017-02-01

    Glaucoma is a progressive optic neuropathy, characterized by the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Therefore, monitoring the change of number or morphology of RGC is essential for the early detection as well as investigation of pathophysiology of glaucoma. Since RGC layer is transparent and hyporeflective, the direct optical visualization of RGCs has not been successful so far. Therefore, glaucoma evaluation mostly depends on indirect diagnostic methods such as the evaluation of optic disc morphology or retinal nerve fiber layer thickness measurement by optical coherence tomography. We have previously demonstrated single photoreceptor cell imaging with differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. Herein, we successfully visualized single RGC using DIC microscopy. Since RGC layer is much less reflective than photoreceptor layer, various techniques including the control of light wavelength and bandwidth using a tunable band pass filter were adopted to reduce the chromatic aberration in z-axis for higher and clearer resolution. To verify that the imaged cells were the RGCs, the flat-mounted retina of Sprague-Dawley rat, in which the RGCs were retrogradely labeled with fluorescence, was observed by both fluorescence and DIC microscopies for direct comparison. We have confirmed that the cell images obtained by fluorescence microscopy were perfectly matched with cell images by DIC microscopy. As conclusion, we have visualized single RGC with DIC microscopy, and confirmed with fluorescence microscopy.

  10. High-dimensional single-cell cancer biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irish, Jonathan M; Doxie, Deon B

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells are distinguished from each other and from healthy cells by features that drive clonal evolution and therapy resistance. New advances in high-dimensional flow cytometry make it possible to systematically measure mechanisms of tumor initiation, progression, and therapy resistance on millions of cells from human tumors. Here we describe flow cytometry techniques that enable a "single-cell " view of cancer. High-dimensional techniques like mass cytometry enable multiplexed single-cell analysis of cell identity, clinical biomarkers, signaling network phospho-proteins, transcription factors, and functional readouts of proliferation, cell cycle status, and apoptosis. This capability pairs well with a signaling profiles approach that dissects mechanism by systematically perturbing and measuring many nodes in a signaling network. Single-cell approaches enable study of cellular heterogeneity of primary tissues and turn cell subsets into experimental controls or opportunities for new discovery. Rare populations of stem cells or therapy-resistant cancer cells can be identified and compared to other types of cells within the same sample. In the long term, these techniques will enable tracking of minimal residual disease (MRD) and disease progression. By better understanding biological systems that control development and cell-cell interactions in healthy and diseased contexts, we can learn to program cells to become therapeutic agents or target malignant signaling events to specifically kill cancer cells. Single-cell approaches that provide deep insight into cell signaling and fate decisions will be critical to optimizing the next generation of cancer treatments combining targeted approaches and immunotherapy.

  11. Analysis of the role of nerve growth factor in promoting cell survival during endoplasmic reticulum stress in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoke, Koji; Sasaya, Harue; Ikeuchi, Toshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) was first described by Rita Levi-Montalcini in the early 1960s from her studies of peripheral neurons. It has since been reported that NGF has the potential to elongate neurites or to prevent apoptosis via specific intracellular mechanisms. It has further been reported that as a component of these mechanisms, NGF binds to a specific receptor, TrkA, and thereby contributes to peripheral nerve cell functions or neuronal functions. It is noteworthy in this regard that pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12) cells express TrkA and respond to neurite outgrowth or anti-apoptotic signals by binding to NGF. Hence, PC12 cells have been used as an in vitro model system for the study of neuronal functions. It has been reported that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's disease. The common link with regard to ER stress is that the neuronal cells die in these pathologies via specific intracellular mechanisms. This type of cell death, if it is apoptotic in nature, is termed ER stress-mediated apoptosis. In the process of ER stress-mediated apoptosis, the cleavage of pro-caspase-12 residing on the ER and the expression of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) can be observed. The expression of GRP78 protein is a characteristic of an unfolded protein response (UPR) via specific signal transduction pathways mediated by the unfolded protein response element (UPRE) in the upstream region of the grp78 gene so on. In ER stress-mediated apoptosis, a caspase cascade is also observed. To further clarify the mechanisms underlying ER stress-mediated apoptosis, a better understanding of the UPR is therefore important. In our current study, we describe a method for detecting gene induction via the UPR, focusing on GRP78 and caspase activities as the measurement end-points. The information generated by our method will accelerate our understanding of the pathophysiological processes leading

  12. Transplantation of dental pulp stem cells improves long-term diabetic polyneuropathy together with improvement of nerve morphometrical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omi, Maiko; Hata, Masaki; Nakamura, Nobuhisa; Miyabe, Megumi; Ozawa, Shogo; Nukada, Hitoshi; Tsukamoto, Masami; Sango, Kazunori; Himeno, Tatsuhito; Kamiya, Hideki; Nakamura, Jiro; Takebe, Jun; Matsubara, Tatsuaki; Naruse, Keiko

    2017-12-13

    Although previous reports have revealed the therapeutic potential of stem cell transplantation in diabetic polyneuropathy, the effects of cell transplantation on long-term diabetic polyneuropathy have not been investigated. In this study, we investigated whether the transplantation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) ameliorated long-term diabetic polyneuropathy in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Forty-eight weeks after STZ injection, we transplanted DPSCs into the unilateral hindlimb skeletal muscles. Four weeks after DPSC transplantation (i.e., 52 weeks after STZ injection) the effects of DPSC transplantation on diabetic polyneuropathy were assessed. STZ-induced diabetic rats showed significant reductions in the sciatic motor/sensory nerve conduction velocity, increases in the current perception threshold, and decreases in capillary density in skeletal muscles and intra-epidermal nerve fiber density compared with normal rats, all of which were ameliorated by DPSC transplantation. Furthermore, sural nerve morphometrical analysis revealed that the transplantation of DPSCs significantly increased the myelin thickness and area. DPSC-conditioned media promoted the neurite outgrowth of dorsal root ganglion neurons and increased the viability and myelin-related protein expression of Schwann cells. These results indicated that the transplantation of DPSCs contributed to the neurophysiological and neuropathological recovery from a long duration of diabetic polyneuropathy.

  13. Microfluidics-Enabled Enzyme Activity Measurement in Single Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesauro, Cinzia; Frøhlich, Rikke; Stougaard, Magnus; Ho, Yi-Ping; Knudsen, Birgitta R

    2015-01-01

    Cellular heterogeneity has presented a significant challenge in the studies of biology. While most of our understanding is based on the analysis of ensemble average, individual cells may process information and respond to perturbations very differently. Presented here is a highly sensitive platform capable of measuring enzymatic activity at the single-cell level. The strategy innovatively combines a rolling circle-enhanced enzyme activity detection (REEAD) assay with droplet microfluidics. The single-molecule sensitivity of REEAD allows highly sensitive detection of enzymatic activities, i.e. at the single catalytic event level, whereas the microfluidics enables isolation of single cells. Further, confined reactions in picoliter-sized droplets significantly improve enzyme extraction from human cells or microorganisms and result in faster reaction kinetics. Taken together, the described protocol is expected to open up new possibilities in the single-cell research, particularly for the elucidation of heterogeneity in a population of cells.

  14. Clinical Outcome Prediction Using Single-Cell Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouyan, Maziyar Baran; Jindal, Vasu; Nourani, Mehrdad

    2016-10-01

    Single-cell technologies like flow cytometry (FCM) provide valuable biological data for knowledge discovery in complex cellular systems like tissues and organs. FCM data contains multi-dimensional information about the cellular heterogeneity of intricate cellular systems. It is possible to correlate single-cell markers with phenotypic properties of those systems. Cell population identification and clinical outcome prediction from single-cell measurements are challenging problems in the field of single cell analysis. In this paper, we propose a hybrid learning approach to predict clinical outcome using samples' single-cell FCM data. The proposed method is efficient in both i) identification of cellular clusters in each sample's FCM data and ii) predict clinical outcome (healthy versus unhealthy) for each subject. Our method is robust and the experimental results indicate promising performance.

  15. Research highlights: microfluidic-enabled single-cell epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Manjima; Khojah, Reem; Tay, Andy; Di Carlo, Dino

    2015-11-07

    Individual cells are the fundamental unit of life with diverse functions from metabolism to motility. In multicellular organisms, a single genome can give rise to tremendous variability across tissues at the single-cell level due to epigenetic differences in the genes that are expressed. Signals from the local environment or a history of signals can drive these variations, and tissues have many cell types that play separate roles. This epigenetic heterogeneity is of biological importance in normal functions such as tissue morphogenesis and can contribute to development or resistance of cancer, or other disease states. Therefore, an improved understanding of variations at the single cell level are fundamental to understanding biology and developing new approaches to combating disease. Traditional approaches to characterize epigenetic modifications of chromatin or the transcriptome of cells have often focused on blended responses of many cells in a tissue; however, such bulk measures lose spatial and temporal differences that occur from cell to cell, and cannot uncover novel or rare populations of cells. Here we highlight a flurry of recent activity to identify the mRNA profiles from thousands of single-cells as well as chromatin accessibility and histone marks on single to few hundreds of cells. Microfluidics and microfabrication have played a central role in the range of new techniques, and will likely continue to impact their further development towards routine single-cell epigenetic analysis.

  16. Microencapsulation improves inhibitory effects of transplanted olfactory ensheathing cells on pain after sciatic nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory bulb tissue transplantation inhibits P2X2/3 receptor-mediated neuropathic pain. However, the olfactory bulb has a complex cellular composition, and the mechanism underlying the action of purified transplanted olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs remains unclear. In the present study, we microencapsulated OECs in alginic acid, and transplanted free and microencapsulated OECs into the region surrounding the injured sciatic nerve in rat models of chronic constriction injury. We assessed mechanical nociception in the rat models 7 and 14 days after surgery by measuring paw withdrawal threshold, and examined P2X2/3 receptor expression in L 4-5 dorsal root ganglia using immunohistochemistry. Rats that received free and microencapsulated OEC transplants showed greater withdrawal thresholds than untreated model rats, and weaker P2X2/3 receptor immunoreactivity in dorsal root ganglia. At 14 days, paw withdrawal threshold was much higher in the microencapsulated OEC-treated animals. Our results confirm that microencapsulated OEC transplantation suppresses P2X2/3 receptor expression in L 4-5 dorsal root ganglia in rat models of neuropathic pain and reduces allodynia, and also suggest that transplantation of microencapsulated OECs is more effective than transplantation of free OECs for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  17. Retinal ganglion cell-inner plexiform and nerve fiber layers in neuromyelitis optica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Sai-Jing; Lu, Pei-Rong

    2018-01-01

    To determine the thickness of the retinal ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (GCIPL) and the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) in patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO). We conducted a cross-sectional study that included 30 NMO patients with a total of 60 eyes. Based on the presence or absence of optic neuritis (ON), subjects were divided into either the NMO-ON group (30 eyes) or the NMO-ON contra group (10 eyes). A detailed ophthalmologic examination was performed for each group; subsequently, the GCIPL and the RNFL were measured using high-definition optical coherence tomography (OCT). In the NMO-ON group, the mean GCIPL thickness was 69.28±21.12 µm, the minimum GCIPL thickness was 66.02±10.02 µm, and the RNFL thickness were 109.33±11.23, 110.47±3.10, 64.92±12.71 and 71.21±50.22 µm in the superior, inferior, temporal and nasal quadrants, respectively. In the NMO-ON contra group, the mean GCIPL thickness was 85.12±17.09 µm, the minimum GCIPL thickness was 25.39±25.1 µm, and the RNFL thicknesses were 148.33±23.22, 126.36±23.45, 82.21±22.30 and 83.36±31.28 µm in the superior, inferior, temporal and nasal quadrants, respectively. In the control group, the mean GCIPL thickness was 86.98±22.37 µm, the minimum GCIPL thickness was 85.28±10.75 µm, and the RNFL thicknesses were 150.22±22.73, 154.79±60.23, 82.33±7.01 and 85.62±13.81 µm in the superior, inferior, temporal and nasal quadrants, respectively. The GCIPL and RNFL were thinner in the NMO-ON contra group than in the control group ( P deviation (MD) and corrected pattern standard deviation (PSD) in the NMO-ON group ( P <0.05). The thickness of the GCIPL and RNFL, as measured using OCT, may indicate optic nerve damage in patients with NMO.

  18. The neurotoxic effects of hydrogen peroxide and copper in Retzius nerve cells of the leech Haemopis sanguisuga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorica D. Jovanovic

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS play an important role in cellular damage. Electrophysiological analyses have shown that membrane transport proteins are susceptible to ROS. In the present study, oxidative stress was induced in Retzius nerve cells of the leech Haemopis sanguisuga by bath application of 1 mM of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and 0.02 mM of copper (Cu for 20 min. The H2O2/Cu(II produced considerable changes in the electrical properties of the Retzius nerve cells. Intracellular recording of the resting membrane potential revealed that the neuronal membrane was depolarized in the presence of H2O2/Cu(II. We found that the amplitude of action potentials decreased, while the duration augmented in a progressive way along the drug exposure time. The combined application of H2O2 and Cu(II caused an initial excitation followed by depression of the spontaneous electrical activity. Voltage-clamp recordings revealed a second effect of the oxidant, a powerful inhibition of the outward potassium channels responsible for the repolarization of action potentials. The neurotoxic effect of H2O2/Cu(II on the spontaneous spike electrogenesis and outward K+ current of Retzius nerve cells was reduced in the presence of hydroxyl radical scavengers, dimethylthiourea and dimethyl sulfoxide, but not mannitol. This study provides evidence for the oxidative modification of outward potassium channels in Retzius nerve cells. The oxidative mechanism of the H2O2/Cu(II system action on the electrical properties of Retzius neurons proposed in this study might have a wider significance, referring not only to leeches but also to mammalian neurons.

  19. Intravenous Infusion of Bone Marrow–Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduces Erectile Dysfunction Following Cavernous Nerve Injury in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Yohei Matsuda, MD; Masanori Sasaki, MD, PhD; Yuko Kataoka-Sasaki, MD, PhD; Akio Takayanagi, MD, PhD; Ko Kobayashi, MD, PhD; Shinichi Oka, MD, PhD; Masahito Nakazaki, MD, PhD; Naoya Masumori, MD, PhD; Jeffery D. Kocsis, PhD; Osamu Honmou, MD, PhD

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Intravenous preload (delivered before cavernous nerve [CN] injury) of bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can prevent or decrease postoperative erectile dysfunction (J Sex Med 2015;12:1713–1721). In the present study, the potential therapeutic effects of intravenously administered MSCs on postoperative erectile dysfunction were evaluated in a rat model of CN injury. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into 2 groups after electric CN injury. Intrave...

  20. Neuron-Derived ADAM10 Production Stimulates Peripheral Nerve Injury-Induced Neuropathic Pain by Cleavage of E-Cadherin in Satellite Glial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Ouyang, Qing; Chen, Cheng-Wen; Chen, Qian-Bo; Li, Xiang-Nan; Xiang, Zheng-Hua; Yuan, Hong-Bin

    2017-09-01

    Increasing evidence suggests the potential involvement of metalloproteinase family proteins in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain, although the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Using the spinal nerve ligation model, we investigated whether ADAM10 proteins participate in pain regulation. By implementing invitro methods, we produced a purified culture of satellite glial cells to study the underlying mechanisms of ADAM10 in regulating neuropathic pain. Results showed that the ADAM10 protein was expressed in calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing neurons of the dorsal root ganglia, and expression was upregulated following spinal nerve ligation surgery invivo. Intrathecal administration of GI254023X, an ADAM10 selective inhibitor, to the rats one to three days after spinal nerve ligation surgery attenuated the spinal nerve ligation-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Intrathecal injection of ADAM10 recombinant protein simulated pain behavior in normal rats to a similar extent as those treated by spinal nerve ligation surgery. These results raised a question about the relative contribution of ADAM10 in pain regulation. Further results showed that ADAM10 might act by cleaving E-cadherin, which is mainly expressed in satellite glial cells. GI254023X reversed spinal nerve ligation-induced downregulation of E-cadherin and activation of cyclooxygenase 2 after spinal nerve ligation. β-catenin, which creates a complex with E-cadherin in the membranes of satellite glial cells, was also downregulated by spinal nerve ligation surgery in satellite glial cells. Finally, knockdown expression of β-catenin by lentiviral infection in purified satellite glial cells increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase 2. Our findings indicate that neuron-derived ADAM10 production stimulates peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain by cleaving E-cadherin in satellite glial cells. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine

  1. Transplantation of Human Dental Pulp-Derived Stem Cells or Differentiated Neuronal Cells from Human Dental Pulp-Derived Stem Cells Identically Enhances Regeneration of the Injured Peripheral Nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Imran; Park, Ju-Mi; Kang, Young-Hoon; Byun, June-Ho; Kim, Dae-Geon; Kim, Joo-Heon; Kang, Dong-Ho; Rho, Gyu-Jin; Park, Bong-Wook

    2017-09-01

    Human dental mesenchymal stem cells isolated from the dental follicle, pulp, and root apical papilla of extracted wisdom teeth have been known to exhibit successful and potent neurogenic differentiation capacity. In particular, human dental pulp-derived stem cells (hDPSCs) stand out as the most prominent source for in vitro neuronal differentiation. In this study, to evaluate the in vivo peripheral nerve regeneration potential of hDPSCs and differentiated neuronal cells from DPSCs (DF-DPSCs), a total of 1 × 10 6 hDPSCs or DF-hDPSCs labeled with PKH26 tracking dye and supplemented with fibrin glue scaffold and collagen tubulization were transplanted into the sciatic nerve resection (5-mm gap) of rat models. At 12 weeks after cell transplantation, both hDPSC and DF-hDPSC groups showed notably increased behavioral activities and higher muscle contraction forces compared with those in the non-cell transplanted control group. In immunohistochemical analysis of regenerated nerve specimens, specific markers for angiogenesis, axonal fiber, and myelin sheath increased in both the cell transplantation groups. Pretransplanted labeled PKH26 were also distinctly detected in the regenerated nerve tissues, indicating that transplanted cells were well-preserved and differentiated into nerve cells. Furthermore, no difference was observed in the nerve regeneration potential between the hDPSC and DF-hDPSC transplanted groups. These results demonstrate that dental pulp tissue is an excellent stem cell source for nerve regeneration, and in vivo transplantation of the undifferentiated hDPSCs could exhibit sufficient and excellent peripheral nerve regeneration potential.

  2. Biology at a single cell level

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mthunzi, P

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available ://www.regenexx.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/IPS-cell-problems.jpg Induced pluripotent stem cells differentiated in culture http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ECllrIzTKbA&feature=related Transfecting neuroblastomas Neuroblastoma ? Brain cells ? 80 ? 120 billion neurons in human... brain ? Non- renewing cell type ? Neurons difficult to transfect with established protocols ? Susceptible to degenerative disorders: - Parkinson?s disease - Multiple sclerosis - Alzheimer's disease http...

  3. Combination of Local Transplantation of In Vitro Bone-marrow Stromal Cells and Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields Accelerate Functional Recovery of Transected Sciatic Nerve Regeneration: A Novel Approach in Transected Nerve Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Rahim; Mahmoodzadeh, Sirvan

    2015-01-01

    Effect of combination of undifferentiated bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) on transected sciatic nerve regeneration was assessed in rats. A 10 mm nerve segment was excised and a vein graft was used to bridge the gap. Twenty microliter undifferentiated BMSCs (2× 107 cells /mL) were administered into the graft inBMSC group with no exposure to PEMF. In BMSC/PEMF group the whole body was exposed to PEMF (0.3 mT, 2Hz) for 4h/day within 1-5 days. In PEMF group the transected nerve was bridged and phosphate buffered saline was administered into the graft. In authograft group (AUTO), the transected nervesegments were reimplanted reversely and the whole body was exposed to PEMF. The regenerated nerve fibers were studied within 12 weeks after surgery. Behavioral, functional, electrophysiological, biomechanical, gastrocnemius muscle mass findings, morphometric indices and immuonohistochemical reactions confirmed faster recovery of regenerated axons in BMSC/PEMF group compared to those in the other groups (PPEMF improved functional recovery. Combination of local transplantation of in vitro bone-marrow stromal cells and pulsed electromagnetic fields could be considered as an effective, safe and tolerable treatment for peripheral nerve repair in clinical practice.

  4. Single cell electroporation using microfluidic devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    le Gac, Severine; van den Berg, Albert; Lindstrom, S.; Andersson, Helene

    2012-01-01

    Electroporation is a powerful technique to increase the permeability of cell membranes and subsequently introduce foreign materials into cells. Pores are created in the cell membrane upon application of an electric fi eld (kV/cm). Most applications employ bulk electroporation, at the scale of 1 mL

  5. Escalated regeneration in sciatic nerve crush injury by the combined therapy of human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells and fermented soybean extracts, Natto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Hung-Chuan

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Attenuation of inflammatory cell deposits and associated cytokines prevented the apoptosis of transplanted stem cells in a sciatic nerve crush injury model. Suppression of inflammatory cytokines by fermented soybean extracts (Natto was also beneficial to nerve regeneration. In this study, the effect of Natto on transplanted human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells (AFS was evaluated. Peripheral nerve injury was induced in SD rats by crushing a sciatic nerve using a vessel clamp. Animals were categorized into four groups: Group I: no treatment; Group II: fed with Natto (16 mg/day for 7 consecutive days; Group III: AFS embedded in fibrin glue; Group IV: Combination of group II and III therapy. Transplanted AFS and Schwann cell apoptosis, inflammatory cell deposits and associated cytokines, motor function, and nerve regeneration were evaluated 7 or 28 days after injury. The deterioration of neurological function was attenuated by AFS, Natto, or the combined therapy. The combined therapy caused the most significantly beneficial effects. Administration of Natto suppressed the inflammatory responses and correlated with decreased AFS and Schwann cell apoptosis. The decreased AFS apoptosis was in line with neurological improvement such as expression of early regeneration marker of neurofilament and late markers of S-100 and decreased vacuole formation. Administration of either AFS, or Natto, or combined therapy augmented the nerve regeneration. In conclusion, administration of Natto may rescue the AFS and Schwann cells from apoptosis by suppressing the macrophage deposits, associated inflammatory cytokines, and fibrin deposits.

  6. PRODt;CTION OF SINGLE CELL PROTEIN FROM BREWERY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSN

    The production of single cell protein (SCP) by the propagation of the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisae ... animal feed but little or no information has been documented as per its explication for the production of single cell .... use of yeasts produced from vatious carbohydrate sources, molasses, sulphite liquors and vegetable.

  7. Detection of macular ganglion cell loss in preperimetric glaucoma patients with localized retinal nerve fibre defects by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Jung Hwa; Lee, Kyoungsub; Lee, Jong Rak; Baek, Seunghee; Yoo, Sung Jun; Kook, Michael S

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate and compare the utility of ganglion cell complex with peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer and optic nerve head measurements for detection of localized defects in patients with preperimetric glaucoma using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Prospective study. Preperimetric glaucoma patients. A total of 105 eyes with preperimetric glaucoma and 68 age- and refractive error-matched control eyes were enrolled. The ability to detect localized retinal nerve fibre layer defects by RTVue-100 spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (Optovue, Inc., Fremont, CA, USA) was assessed calculating the areas under receiver operating characteristic curves. The ability to detect localized retinal nerve fibre layer defects by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Global volume loss and superior ganglion cell complex thickness showed the largest area under receiver operating characteristic curve values (both areas under receiver operating characteristic curves 0.84, P fibre layer thickness afforded the best diagnostic capability (area under receiver operating characteristic curve 0.89, P optic nerve head parameters, the horizontal cup:disc ratio yielded the highest area under receiver operating characteristic curve (0.85, P fibre layer, and optic nerve head) (P > 0.02). Ganglion cell complex thickness was significantly reduced in eyes with preperimetric glaucoma. Ganglion cell complex imaging using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography may be a useful ancillary modality for detection of early macular changes in glaucomatous eyes with localized retinal nerve fibre layer defects. © 2013 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  8. Single-molecule tracking in living cells using single quantum dot applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Koichi; Nishida, Kohji

    2012-01-01

    Revealing the behavior of single molecules in living cells is very useful for understanding cellular events. Quantum dot probes are particularly promising tools for revealing how biological events occur at the single molecule level both in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we will introduce how single quantum dot applications are used for single molecule tracking. We will discuss how single quantum dot tracking has been used in several examples of complex biological processes, including membrane dynamics, neuronal function, selective transport mechanisms of the nuclear pore complex, and in vivo real-time observation. We also briefly discuss the prospects for single molecule tracking using advanced probes.

  9. Macular ganglion cell complex and retinal nerve fiber layer comparison in different stages of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchiatti, Ilaria; Parodi, Maurizio Battaglia; Pierro, Luisa; Cicinelli, Maria Vittoria; Gagliardi, Marco; Castellino, Niccolò; Bandello, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    To employ optical coherence tomography (OCT) to analyze the morphologic changes in the inner retina in different categories of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Observational cross-sectional study. Single-center study. Inclusion criteria were age over 50, diagnosis of Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) category 2 and 3, naïve neovascular AMD, and atrophic AMD. Healthy patients of similar age acted as a control group. Primary outcome measures were the changes in ganglion cell complex (GCC) and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL). Secondary outcomes included modifications of rim area and cup-to-disc ratio. One hundred and thirty eyes of 130 patients were recruited: 26 eyes for AREDS category 2, 26 for AREDS category 3, 26 for neovascular AMD, 26 with atrophic AMD, and 26 controls. Mean peripapillary RNFL thickness was significantly lower in neovascular AMD, compared to controls (P = .004); peripapillary RNFL did not significantly vary among AREDS category 2 and 3 and atrophic AMD groups, compared to controls. Mean GCC thickness was higher in the control group, becoming progressively thinner up to neovascular and atrophic AMD groups (P < .0001). Rim area was significantly thinner in the neovascular AMD group compared with controls (P = .047); cup-to-disc ratio was higher in the neovascular AMD group compared with the control group (P = .047). This study demonstrates that eyes with neovascular AMD display reduced RNFL and GCC thickness. RNFL is partially spared in atrophic advanced AMD. The identification of alteration in RNFL and GCC thickness may reveal useful for future therapeutic implications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. X-ray microanalysis of single and cultured cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wroblewski, J.; Roomans, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    X-ray microanalysis of single or cultured cells is often a useful alternative or complement to the analysis of the corresponding tissue. It also allows the analysis of individual cells in a cell population. Preparation for X-ray microanalysis poses a number of typical problems. Suspensions of single cells can be prepared by either of two pathways: (1) washing - mounting - drying, or (2) centrifugation - freezing or fixation - sectioning. The washing step in the preparation of single or cultured cells presents the most severe problems. Cultured cells are generally grown on a substrate that is compatible with both the analysis and the culture, washed and dried. In some cases, sectioning of cultured cell monolayers has been performed. Special problems in quantitative analysis occur in those cases where the cells are analyzed on a thick substrate, since the substrate contributes to the spectral background

  11. Simultaneous Multiplexed Measurement of RNA and Proteins in Single Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyros Darmanis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant advances have been made in methods to analyze genomes and transcriptomes of single cells, but to fully define cell states, proteins must also be accessed as central actors defining a cell’s phenotype. Methods currently used to analyze endogenous protein expression in single cells are limited in specificity, throughput, or multiplex capability. Here, we present an approach to simultaneously and specifically interrogate large sets of protein and RNA targets in lysates from individual cells, enabling investigations of cell functions and responses. We applied our method to investigate the effects of BMP4, an experimental therapeutic agent, on early-passage glioblastoma cell cultures. We uncovered significant heterogeneity in responses to treatment at levels of RNA and protein, with a subset of cells reacting in a distinct manner to BMP4. Moreover, we found overall poor correlation between protein and RNA at the level of single cells, with proteins more accurately defining responses to treatment.

  12. Single-cell technologies to study the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proserpio, Valentina; Mahata, Bidesh

    2016-02-01

    The immune system is composed of a variety of cells that act in a coordinated fashion to protect the organism against a multitude of different pathogens. The great variability of existing pathogens corresponds to a similar high heterogeneity of the immune cells. The study of individual immune cells, the fundamental unit of immunity, has recently transformed from a qualitative microscopic imaging to a nearly complete quantitative transcriptomic analysis. This shift has been driven by the rapid development of multiple single-cell technologies. These new advances are expected to boost the detection of less frequent cell types and transient or intermediate cell states. They will highlight the individuality of each single cell and greatly expand the resolution of current available classifications and differentiation trajectories. In this review we discuss the recent advancement and application of single-cell technologies, their limitations and future applications to study the immune system. © 2015 The Authors. Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. High-throughput single-cell manipulation in brain tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph D Steinmeyer

    Full Text Available The complexity of neurons and neuronal circuits in brain tissue requires the genetic manipulation, labeling, and tracking of single cells. However, current methods for manipulating cells in brain tissue are limited to either bulk techniques, lacking single-cell accuracy, or manual methods that provide single-cell accuracy but at significantly lower throughputs and repeatability. Here, we demonstrate high-throughput, efficient, reliable, and combinatorial delivery of multiple genetic vectors and reagents into targeted cells within the same tissue sample with single-cell accuracy. Our system automatically loads nanoliter-scale volumes of reagents into a micropipette from multiwell plates, targets and transfects single cells in brain tissues using a robust electroporation technique, and finally preps the micropipette by automated cleaning for repeating the transfection cycle. We demonstrate multi-colored labeling of adjacent cells, both in organotypic and acute slices, and transfection of plasmids encoding different protein isoforms into neurons within the same brain tissue for analysis of their effects on linear dendritic spine density. Our platform could also be used to rapidly deliver, both ex vivo and in vivo, a variety of genetic vectors, including optogenetic and cell-type specific agents, as well as fast-acting reagents such as labeling dyes, calcium sensors, and voltage sensors to manipulate and track neuronal circuit activity at single-cell resolution.

  14. [The neuroprotective effect of erigeron breviscapus (vant) hand-mazz on retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve crush injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bing; Jiang, You-qin

    2003-08-01

    To investigate whether a Chinese herbal medicine, erigeron breviscapus (vant) hand-mazz (EBHM), can protect the retinal ganglion cells (RGC) damaged by calibrated optic nerve crush injury. Forty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups. Calibrated optic nerve crush injury model was induced in the right eyes by a special designed optic nerve clip. The left eyes served as a control. All 42 rats were randomly divided into 2 groups. Group A consisted of the rats with calibrated optic nerve crush injury and group B consisted of rats with calibrated optic nerve crush injury treated with EBHM. In group B, EBHM solution was given once after the crush injury. According to the time interval between the optic nerve crush and the sacrifice, both groups A and B were further divided into three subgroups (day 4, day 14 and day 21). Therefore, there were 7 rats in each subgroup. Three days before sacrifice, 3% fast blue was injected into superior colliculi bilaterally. The eyes were enucleated after the rat was sacrificed, and flat mounts of the retina from both eyes were prepared on a slide and observed under a fluorescence microscope. Four photos with 400 x magnification were taken from each of the four quadrants of the retina 1 mm away from the optic disc. The labeled RGC were counted by a computerized image analyzer. The labeled RGC rate was used for statistical analysis (the labeled RGC rate = number of RGC in injured eye/control eye x 100%). In group A, the labeled RGC rate was (77.79 +/- 7.11)%, (63.76 +/- 3.79)% and (54.66 +/- 4.75)% on day 4, day 14 and day 21, respectively. In group B, the labeled RGC rate was (80.13 +/- 12.03)%, (78.17 +/- 9.19)% and (83.59 +/- 12.61)% on day 4, day 14 and day 21, respectively. In group B, which was treated with EBHM after injury, the labeled RGC rate was significantly higher than that of group A on day 14 and day 21. In the experimental optic nerve crush model in rats, EBHM therapy can increase the survival rate of

  15. Image analysis driven single-cell analytics for systems microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balomenos, Athanasios D; Tsakanikas, Panagiotis; Aspridou, Zafiro; Tampakaki, Anastasia P; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P; Manolakos, Elias S

    2017-04-04

    Time-lapse microscopy is an essential tool for capturing and correlating bacterial morphology and gene expression dynamics at single-cell resolution. However state-of-the-art computational methods are limited in terms of the complexity of cell movies that they can analyze and lack of automation. The proposed Bacterial image analysis driven Single Cell Analytics (BaSCA) computational pipeline addresses these limitations thus enabling high throughput systems microbiology. BaSCA can segment and track multiple bacterial colonies and single-cells, as they grow and divide over time (cell segmentation and lineage tree construction) to give rise to dense communities with thousands of interacting cells in the field of view. It combines advanced image processing and machine learning methods to deliver very accurate bacterial cell segmentation and tracking (F-measure over 95%) even when processing images of imperfect quality with several overcrowded colonies in the field of view. In addition, BaSCA extracts on the fly a plethora of single-cell properties, which get organized into a database summarizing the analysis of the cell movie. We present alternative ways to analyze and visually explore the spatiotemporal evolution of single-cell properties in order to understand trends and epigenetic effects across cell generations. The robustness of BaSCA is demonstrated across different imaging modalities and microscopy types. BaSCA can be used to analyze accurately and efficiently cell movies both at a high resolution (single-cell level) and at a large scale (communities with many dense colonies) as needed to shed light on e.g. how bacterial community effects and epigenetic information transfer play a role on important phenomena for human health, such as biofilm formation, persisters' emergence etc. Moreover, it enables studying the role of single-cell stochasticity without losing sight of community effects that may drive it.

  16. Single-cell nanotoxicity assays of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eustaquio, Trisha; Leary, James F

    2012-01-01

    Properly evaluating the nanotoxicity of nanoparticles involves much more than bulk-cell assays of cell death by necrosis. Cells exposed to nanoparticles may undergo repairable oxidative stress and DNA damage or be induced into apoptosis. Exposure to nanoparticles may cause the cells to alter their proliferation or differentiation or their cell-cell signaling with neighboring cells in a tissue. Nanoparticles are usually more toxic to some cell subpopulations than others, and toxicity often varies with cell cycle. All of these facts dictate that any nanotoxicity assay must be at the single-cell level and must try whenever feasible and reasonable to include many of these other factors. Focusing on one type of quantitative measure of nanotoxicity, we describe flow and scanning image cytometry approaches to measuring nanotoxicity at the single-cell level by using a commonly used assay for distinguishing between necrotic and apoptotic causes of cell death by one type of nanoparticle. Flow cytometry is fast and quantitative, provided that the cells can be prepared into a single-cell suspension for analysis. But when cells cannot be put into suspension without altering nanotoxicity results, or if morphology, attachment, and stain location are important, a scanning image cytometry approach must be used. Both methods are described with application to a particular type of nanoparticle, a superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPION), as an example of how these assays may be applied to the more general problem of determining the effects of nanomaterial exposure to living cells.

  17. Schwann-like cells differentiated from human dental pulp stem cells combined with a pulsed electromagnetic field can improve peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei, Wei-Hong; Kim, Soochan; Park, Joo-Cheol; Seo, Young-Kwon; Kim, Soung-Min; Jahng, Jeong Won; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2016-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Schwann-like cells combined with pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) on peripheral nerve regeneration. Schwann-like cells were derived from human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) and verified with CD104, S100, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), laminin, and P75 NTR immunocytochemistry. Gene expression of P75 NTR and S100 were analyzed. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (200-250g, 6-week-old) were divided into seven groups (n = 10 each): control, sham, PEMF, hDPSCs, hDPSCs + PEMF, Schwann-like cells, Schwann-like cells + PEMF. Cells were transplanted (1 × 10 6 /10µl/rat) at crush-injury site or combined with PEMF (50 Hz, 1 h/day, 1 mT). Nerve regeneration was evaluated with functional test, histomorphometry and retrograde labelled neurons. Schwann-like cells expressed CD104, S100, GFAP, laminin, and p75 neurotrophin receptor (P75 NTR ). P75 NTR and S100 mRNA expression was highest in Schwann-like cells + PEMF group, which also showed increased Difference and Gap scores. Axons and retrograde labeled neurons increased in all treatment groups. Schwann-like cells, hDPSCs with or without PEMF, and PEMF only improved peripheral nerve regeneration. Schwann-like cells + PEMF showed highest regeneration ability; PEMF has additive effect on hDPSCs, Schwann-like cell in vitro and nerve regeneration ability after transplantation in vivo. Bioelectromagnetics. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. New Array Approaches to Explore Single Cells Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanneste, Evelyne; Bittman, Lilach; Van der Aa, Niels; Voet, Thierry; Vermeesch, Joris Robert

    2011-01-01

    Microarray analysis enables the genome-wide detection of copy number variations and the investigation of chromosomal instability. Whereas array techniques have been well established for the analysis of unamplified DNA derived from many cells, it has been more challenging to enable the accurate analysis of single cell genomes. In this review, we provide an overview of single cell DNA amplification techniques, the different array approaches, and discuss their potential applications to study human embryos. PMID:22509179

  19. Transcompartmental reversal of single fibre hyperexcitability in juxtaparanodal Kv1.1-deficient vagus nerve axons by activation of nodal KCNQ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasscock, Edward; Qian, Jing; Kole, Matthew J; Noebels, Jeffrey L

    2012-08-15

    Kv1.1 channels cluster at juxtaparanodes of myelinated axons in the vagus nerve, the primary conduit for parasympathetic innervation of the heart. Kcna1-null mice lacking these channels exhibit neurocardiac dysfunction manifested by atropine-sensitive atrioventricular conduction blocks and bradycardia that may culminate in sudden death. To evaluate whether loss of Kv1.1 channels alters electrogenic properties within the nerve, we compared the intrinsic excitability of single myelinated A- and Aδ-axons from excised cervical vagus nerves of young adult Kcna1-null mice and age-matched, wild-type littermate controls. Although action potential shapes and relative refractory periods varied little between genotypes, Kv1.1-deficient large myelinated A-axons showed a fivefold increase in susceptibility to 4-aminopyridine (4-AP)-induced spontaneous ectopic firing. Since the repolarizing currents of juxtaparanodal Kv1 channels and nodal KCNQ potassium channels both act to dampen repetitive activity, we examined whether augmenting nodal KCNQ activation could compensate for Kv1.1 loss and reverse the spontaneous hyperexcitability in Kv1.1-deficient A-axons. Application of the selective KCNQ opener flupirtine raised A-axon firing threshold while profoundly suppressing 4-AP-induced spontaneous firing, demonstrating a functional synergy between the two compartments. We conclude that juxtaparanodal Kv1.1-deficiency causes intrinsic hyperexcitability in large myelinated axons in vagus nerve which could contribute to autonomic dysfunction in Kcna1-null mice, and that KCNQ openers reveal a transcompartmental synergy between Kv1 and KCNQ channels in regulating axonal excitability.

  20. Tumors of the optic nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Heegaard, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    in the nerve (e.g., astrocytes and meningothelial cells). The optic nerve may also be invaded from tumors originating elsewhere (secondary tumors), invading the nerve from adjacent structures (e.g., choroidal melanoma and retinoblastoma) or from distant sites (e.g., lymphocytic infiltration and distant...

  1. Tumors of the optic nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Heegaard, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    A variety of lesions may involve the optic nerve. Mainly, these lesions are inflammatory or vascular lesions that rarely necessitate surgery but may induce significant visual morbidity. Orbital tumors may induce proptosis, visual loss, relative afferent pupillary defect, disc edema and optic...... atrophy, but less than one-tenth of these tumors are confined to the optic nerve or its sheaths. No signs or symptoms are pathognomonic for tumors of the optic nerve. The tumors of the optic nerve may originate from the optic nerve itself (primary tumors) as a proliferation of cells normally present...... in the nerve (e.g., astrocytes and meningothelial cells). The optic nerve may also be invaded from tumors originating elsewhere (secondary tumors), invading the nerve from adjacent structures (e.g., choroidal melanoma and retinoblastoma) or from distant sites (e.g., lymphocytic infiltration and distant...

  2. Long-nerve grafts and nerve transfers demonstrate comparable outcomes for axillary nerve injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Scott W; Johnsen, Parker H; Lee, Steve K; Feinberg, Joseph H

    2014-07-01

    To compare the functional and EMG outcomes of long-nerve grafts to nerve transfers for complete axillary nerve palsy. Over a 10-year period at a single institution, 14 patients with axillary nerve palsy were treated with long-nerve grafts and 24 patients were treated with triceps-to-axillary nerve transfers by the same surgeon (S.W.W.). Data were collected prospectively at regular intervals, beginning before surgery and continuing up to 11 years after surgery. Prior to intervention, all patients demonstrated EMG evidence of complete denervation of the deltoid. Deltoid recovery (Medical Research Council [MRC] grade), shoulder abduction (°), improvement in shoulder abduction (°), and EMG evidence of deltoid reinnervation were compared between cohorts. There were no significant differences between the long-nerve graft cohort and the nerve transfer cohort with respect to postoperative range of motion, deltoid recovery, improvement in shoulder abduction, or EMG evidence of deltoid reinnervation. These data demonstrate that outcomes of long-nerve grafts for axillary nerve palsy are comparable with those of modern nerve transfers and question a widely held belief that long-nerve grafts do poorly. When healthy donor roots or trunks are available, long-nerve grafts should not be overlooked as an effective intervention for the treatment of axillary nerve injuries in adults with brachial plexus injuries. Therapeutic III. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Methane rescues retinal ganglion cells and limits retinal mitochondrial dysfunction following optic nerve crush.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruobing; Sun, Qinglei; Xia, Fangzhou; Chen, Zeli; Wu, Jiangchun; Zhang, Yuelu; Xu, Jiajun; Liu, Lin

    2017-06-01

    Secondary degeneration is a common event in traumatic central nervous system disorders, which involves neuronal apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction. Exogenous methane exerts the therapeutic effects in many organ injury. Our study aims to investigate the potential neuroprotection of methane in a rat model of optic nerve crush (ONC). Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to ONC and administrated intraperitoneally with methane-saturated or normal saline (10 ml/kg) once per day for one week after ONC. The retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) density was assessed by hematoxylin and eosin staining and Fluoro-Gold retrogradely labeling. Visual function was evaluated by flash visual evoked potentials (FVEP). The retinal apoptosis was measured by terminal-deoxy-transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay and the expression of apoptosis-related factors, such as phosphorylated Bcl-2-associated death promoter (pBAD), phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase-3β (pGSK-3β), Bcl-2 associated X protein (Bax) and Bcl-2 extra large (Bcl-xL). Retinal mitochondrial function was assessed by the mRNA expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number, citrate synthase activity and ATP content. Methane treatment significantly improved the RGC loss and visual dysfunction following ONC. As expected, methane also remarkably inhibited the retinal neural apoptosis, such as the fewer TUNEL-positive cells in ganglion cell layer, accompanied by the up-regulations of anti-apoptotic factors (pGSK-3β, pBAD, Bcl-xL) and the down-regulation of pro-apoptotic factor (Bax). Furthermore, methane treatment suppressed up-regulations of critical mitochondrial components (PGC-1α, NRF1 and TFAM) mRNA and mtDNA copy number, as well as improved the reduction of functional mitochondria markers, including citrate synthase

  4. Multimodal sensory integration in single cerebellar granule cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Taro; Shimuta, Misa; Häusser, Michael

    2015-12-29

    The mammalian cerebellum is a highly multimodal structure, receiving inputs from multiple sensory modalities and integrating them during complex sensorimotor coordination tasks. Previously, using cell-type-specific anatomical projection mapping, it was shown that multimodal pathways converge onto individual cerebellar granule cells (Huang et al., 2013). Here we directly measure synaptic currents using in vivo patch-clamp recordings and confirm that a subset of single granule cells receive convergent functional multimodal (somatosensory, auditory, and visual) inputs via separate mossy fibers. Furthermore, we show that the integration of multimodal signals by granule cells can enhance action potential output. These recordings directly demonstrate functional convergence of multimodal signals onto single granule cells.

  5. Mass spectrometry-based metabolomics of single yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, Alfredo J; Fagerer, Stephan R; Schmidt, Anna Mareike; Urban, Pawel L; Jefimovs, Konstantins; Geiger, Philipp; Dechant, Reinhard; Heinemann, Matthias; Zenobi, Renato

    2013-05-28

    Single-cell level measurements are necessary to characterize the intrinsic biological variability in a population of cells. In this study, we demonstrate that, with the microarrays for mass spectrometry platform, we are able to observe this variability. We monitor environmentally (2-deoxy-D-glucose) and genetically (ΔPFK2) perturbed Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells at the single-cell, few-cell, and population levels. Correlation plots between metabolites from the glycolytic pathway, as well as with the observed ATP/ADP ratio as a measure of cellular energy charge, give biological insight that is not accessible from population-level metabolomic data.

  6. Bioinformatics approaches to single-cell analysis in developmental biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Dicle; Hakguder, Zeynep M; Otu, Hasan H

    2016-03-01

    Individual cells within the same population show various degrees of heterogeneity, which may be better handled with single-cell analysis to address biological and clinical questions. Single-cell analysis is especially important in developmental biology as subtle spatial and temporal differences in cells have significant associations with cell fate decisions during differentiation and with the description of a particular state of a cell exhibiting an aberrant phenotype. Biotechnological advances, especially in the area of microfluidics, have led to a robust, massively parallel and multi-dimensional capturing, sorting, and lysis of single-cells and amplification of related macromolecules, which have enabled the use of imaging and omics techniques on single cells. There have been improvements in computational single-cell image analysis in developmental biology regarding feature extraction, segmentation, image enhancement and machine learning, handling limitations of optical resolution to gain new perspectives from the raw microscopy images. Omics approaches, such as transcriptomics, genomics and epigenomics, targeting gene and small RNA expression, single nucleotide and structural variations and methylation and histone modifications, rely heavily on high-throughput sequencing technologies. Although there are well-established bioinformatics methods for analysis of sequence data, there are limited bioinformatics approaches which address experimental design, sample size considerations, amplification bias, normalization, differential expression, coverage, clustering and classification issues, specifically applied at the single-cell level. In this review, we summarize biological and technological advancements, discuss challenges faced in the aforementioned data acquisition and analysis issues and present future prospects for application of single-cell analyses to developmental biology. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European

  7. The single-cell gel electrophoresis assay to determine apoptosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the present study was to determine if the pattern of DNA fragmentation determined by the single cell gel electrophoresis assay can be used to determine apoptosis induced by siRNA in Colo 320 cells. When the frequency of appearance of apoptotic cells following was observed over a period of time, there was a ...

  8. Single-cell Analysis of Lambda Immunity Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, Kristoffer Torbjørn; Svenningsen, Sine Lo; Eisen, Harvey

    2003-01-01

    We have examined expression of the ¿cI operon in single cells via a rexgfp substitution. Although average fluorescence agreed with expectations for expression of ¿-repressor, fluorescence fluctuated greatly from cell-to-cell. Fluctuations in repressor concentration are not predicted by previous m...

  9. Dielectrophoretic capture and genetic analysis of single neuroblastoma tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica L Carpenter

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the diversity of cells that escape the primary tumor and seed micrometastases remains rudimentary, and approaches for studying circulating and disseminated tumor cells have been limited by low throughput and sensitivity, reliance on single parameter sorting, and a focus on enumeration rather than phenotypic and genetic characterization. Here we utilize a highly sensitive microfluidic and dielectrophoretic approach for the isolation and genetic analysis of individual tumor cells. We employed fluorescence labeling to isolate 208 single cells from spiking experiments conducted with 11 cell lines, including 8 neuroblastoma cell lines, and achieved a capture sensitivity of 1 tumor cell per 106 white blood cells. Sample fixation or freezing had no detectable effect on cell capture. Point mutations were accurately detected in the whole genome amplification product of captured single tumor cells but not in negative control white blood cells. We applied this approach to capture 144 single tumor cells from 10 bone marrow samples from patients suffering from neuroblastoma. In this pediatric malignancy, high-risk patients often exhibit wide-spread hematogenous metastasis, but access to primary tumor can be difficult or impossible. Here we used flow-based sorting to pre-enrich samples with tumor involvement below 0.02%. For all patients for whom a mutation in the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase gene had already been detected in their primary tumor, the same mutation was detected in single cells from their marrow. These findings demonstrate a novel, non-invasive, and adaptable method for the capture and genetic analysis of single tumor cells from cancer patients.

  10. Reconstructing Cell Lineages from Single-Cell Gene Expression Data: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-30

    Reconstructing cell lineages from single -cell gene expression data: a pilot study The goal of this pilot study is to develop novel mathematical...methods, by leveraging tools developed in the bifurcation theory, to infer the underlying cell-state dynamics from single -cell gene expression data. Our...from single -cell gene expression data. The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not contrued

  11. Single-Cell Expression Profiling and Proteomics of Primordial Germ Cells, Spermatogonial Stem Cells, Adult Germ Stem Cells, and Oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Sabine; Azizi, Hossein; Skutella, Thomas

    2018-01-04

    The mammalian germ cells, cell assemblies, tissues, and organs during development and maturation have been extensively studied at the tissue level. However, to investigate and understand the fundamental insights at the molecular basis of germ and stem cells, their cell fate plasticity, and determination, it is of most importance to analyze at the large scale on the single-cell level through different biological windows. Here, modern molecular techniques optimized for single-cell analysis, including single fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) or microfluidic high-throughput quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) for single-cell gene expression and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MSMS) for protein profiling, have been established and are still getting optimized.This review aims on describing and discussing recent single-cell expression profiling and proteomics of different types of human germ cells, including primordial germ cells (PGCs), spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), human adult germ stem cells (haGSCs), and oocytes.

  12. Quantitative high-resolution genomic analysis of single cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Hannemann

    Full Text Available During cancer progression, specific genomic aberrations arise that can determine the scope of the disease and can be used as predictive or prognostic markers. The detection of specific gene amplifications or deletions in single blood-borne or disseminated tumour cells that may give rise to the development of metastases is of great clinical interest but technically challenging. In this study, we present a method for quantitative high-resolution genomic analysis of single cells. Cells were isolated under permanent microscopic control followed by high-fidelity whole genome amplification and subsequent analyses by fine tiling array-CGH and qPCR. The assay was applied to single breast cancer cells to analyze the chromosomal region centred by the therapeutical relevant EGFR gene. This method allows precise quantitative analysis of copy number variations in single cell diagnostics.

  13. Genomic Sequencing of Single Microbial Cells from Environmental Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishoey, Thomas; Woyke, Tanja; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Novotny, Mark; Lasken, Roger S.

    2008-02-01

    Recently developed techniques allow genomic DNA sequencing from single microbial cells [Lasken RS: Single-cell genomic sequencing using multiple displacement amplification, Curr Opin Microbiol 2007, 10:510-516]. Here, we focus on research strategies for putting these methods into practice in the laboratory setting. An immediate consequence of single-cell sequencing is that it provides an alternative to culturing organisms as a prerequisite for genomic sequencing. The microgram amounts of DNA required as template are amplified from a single bacterium by a method called multiple displacement amplification (MDA) avoiding the need to grow cells. The ability to sequence DNA from individual cells will likely have an immense impact on microbiology considering the vast numbers of novel organisms, which have been inaccessible unless culture-independent methods could be used. However, special approaches have been necessary to work with amplified DNA. MDA may not recover the entire genome from the single copy present in most bacteria. Also, some sequence rearrangements can occur during the DNA amplification reaction. Over the past two years many research groups have begun to use MDA, and some practical approaches to single-cell sequencing have been developed. We review the consensus that is emerging on optimum methods, reliability of amplified template, and the proper interpretation of 'composite' genomes which result from the necessity of combining data from several single-cell MDA reactions in order to complete the assembly. Preferred laboratory methods are considered on the basis of experience at several large sequencing centers where >70% of genomes are now often recovered from single cells. Methods are reviewed for preparation of bacterial fractions from environmental samples, single-cell isolation, DNA amplification by MDA, and DNA sequencing.

  14. Single-cell phospho-protein analysis by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Kenneth R; Danna, Erika A; Krutzik, Peter O; Nolan, Garry P

    2012-02-01

    This protocol describes methods for monitoring intracellular phosphorylation-dependent signaling events on a single-cell basis. This approach measures cell signaling by treating cells with exogenous stimuli, fixing cells with formaldehyde, permeabilizing with methanol, and then staining with phospho-specific antibodies. Thus, cell signaling states can be determined as a measure of how cells interact with their environment. This method has applications in clinical research as well as mechanistic studies of basic biology. In clinical research, diagnostic or drug efficacy information can be retrieved by discovering how a disease affects the ability of cells to respond to growth factors. Basic scientists can use this technique to analyze signaling events in cell lines and human or murine primary cells, including rare populations, like B1 cells or stem cells. This technique has broad applications bringing standard biochemical analysis into primary cells in order to garner valuable information about signaling events in physiologic settings. © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. Effect of nerve growth factor on the synthesis of amino acids in PC12 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielke, H.R.; Tildon, J.T.; Kauffman, F.C.; Baab, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    Radioactive short-chain fatty acids preferentially label glutamine relative to glutamate in brain due to compartmentation of glutamine and glutamate. To determine whether this phenomenon occurs in a single cell culture model, we examined the effect of fatty acid chain length on the synthesis as well as pool size of selected amino acids in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells, a cell culture model of the large glutamate compartment in neurons. Intracellular 14C-amino acids were quantitated by HPLC, and the incorporation of [U-14C]-glucose, [1-14C]-butyrate, [1-14C]-octanoate, and [1-14C]-palmitate into five amino acids was measured in native and NGF-treated PC12 cells. NGF pretreatment decreased the intracellular concentration of amino acids as did addition of fatty acids but these effects were not additive. Specific activities of amino acids in native cells labelled by 14C-octanoate were 1,300 DPM/nmol, 490 DPM/nmol, 200 DPM/nmol, and 110 DPM/nmol for glutamate, aspartate, glutamine, and serine, respectively. No radioactivity was detected in alanine. Similar specific activities were noted when 14C-butyrate was the precursor; however, there was at least 5-fold less if 14C-palmitate was the precursor. Pretreatment of cells with NGF decreased the specific activity of amino acids by 25-65%. Specific activities of amino acids synthesized from 14C-glucose decreased in the following order: glutamate, 1,640 DPM/nmol; aspartate, 1,210 DPM/nmol; alanine, 580 DPM/nmol; glutamine, 275 DPM/nmol; and serine, 80 DPM/nmol for native cells. NGF pretreatment decreased the specific activities of glutamate and glutamine, but not of the other 3 amino acids. The preferred precursor for glutamate synthesis in native PC12 cells was glucose followed by octanoate, butyrate and palmitate (16:6:3:1)

  16. Platforms for Single-Cell Collection and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Valihrach

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Single-cell analysis has become an established method to study cell heterogeneity and for rare cell characterization. Despite the high cost and technical constraints, applications are increasing every year in all fields of biology. Following the trend, there is a tremendous development of tools for single-cell analysis, especially in the RNA sequencing field. Every improvement increases sensitivity and throughput. Collecting a large amount of data also stimulates the development of new approaches for bioinformatic analysis and interpretation. However, the essential requirement for any analysis is the collection of single cells of high quality. The single-cell isolation must be fast, effective, and gentle to maintain the native expression profiles. Classical methods for single-cell isolation are micromanipulation, microdissection, and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. In the last decade several new and highly efficient approaches have been developed, which not just supplement but may fully replace the traditional ones. These new techniques are based on microfluidic chips, droplets, micro-well plates, and automatic collection of cells using capillaries, magnets, an electric field, or a punching probe. In this review we summarize the current methods and developments in this field. We discuss the advantages of the different commercially available platforms and their applicability, and also provide remarks on future developments.

  17. Micropillar arrays enabling single microbial cell encapsulation in hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyun Joo; Lee, Kyoung G; Seok, Seunghwan; Choi, Bong Gill; Lee, Moon-Keun; Park, Tae Jung; Park, Jung Youn; Kim, Do Hyun; Lee, Seok Jae

    2014-06-07

    Single microbial cell encapsulation in hydrogels is an important task to find valuable biological resources for human welfare. The conventional microfluidic designs are mainly targeted only for highly dispersed spherical bioparticles. Advanced structures should be taken into consideration for handling such aggregated and non-spherical microorganisms. Here, to address the challenge, we propose a new type of cylindrical-shaped micropillar array in a microfluidic device for enhancing the dispersion of cell clusters and the isolation of individual cells into individual micro-hydrogels for potential practical applications. The incorporated micropillars act as a sieve for the breaking of Escherichia coli (E. coli) clusters into single cells in a polymer mixture. Furthermore, the combination of hydrodynamic forces and a flow-focusing technique will improve the probability of encapsulation of a single cell into each hydrogel with a broad range of cell concentrations. This proposed strategy and device would be a useful platform for genetically modified microorganisms for practical applications.

  18. Retinal ganglion cell-inner plexiform and nerve fiber layers in neuromyelitis optica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai-Jing Hu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To determine the thickness of the retinal ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (GCIPL and the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL in patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study that included 30 NMO patients with a total of 60 eyes. Based on the presence or absence of optic neuritis (ON, subjects were divided into either the NMO-ON group (30 eyes or the NMO-ON contra group (10 eyes. A detailed ophthalmologic examination was performed for each group; subsequently, the GCIPL and the RNFL were measured using high-definition optical coherence tomography (OCT. RESULTS: In the NMO-ON group, the mean GCIPL thickness was 69.28±21.12 μm, the minimum GCIPL thickness was 66.02±10.02 μm, and the RNFL thickness were 109.33±11.23, 110.47±3.10, 64.92±12.71 and 71.21±50.22 μm in the superior, inferior, temporal and nasal quadrants, respectively. In the NMO-ON contra group, the mean GCIPL thickness was 85.12±17.09 μm, the minimum GCIPL thickness was 25.39±25.1 μm, and the RNFL thicknesses were 148.33±23.22, 126.36±23.45, 82.21±22.30 and 83.36±31.28 μm in the superior, inferior, temporal and nasal quadrants, respectively. In the control group, the mean GCIPL thickness was 86.98±22.37 μm, the minimum GCIPL thickness was 85.28±10.75 μm, and the RNFL thicknesses were 150.22±22.73, 154.79±60.23, 82.33±7.01 and 85.62±13.81 μm in the superior, inferior, temporal and nasal quadrants, respectively. The GCIPL and RNFL were thinner in the NMO-ON contra group than in the control group (P<0.05; additionally, the RNFL was thinner in the inferior quadrant in the NMO-ON group than in the control group (P<0.05. Significant correlations were observed between the GCIPL and RNFL thickness measurements as well as between thickness measurements and the two visual field parameters of mean deviation (MD and corrected pattern standard deviation (PSD in the NMO-ON group (P<0.05. CONCLUSION: The thickness of the GCIPL

  19. New insights into human primordial germ cells and early embryonic development from single-cell analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otte, Jörg; Wruck, Wasco; Adjaye, James

    2017-08-01

    Human preimplantation developmental studies are difficult to accomplish due to associated ethical and moral issues. Preimplantation cells are rare and exist only in transient cell states. From a single cell, it is very challenging to analyse the origination of the heterogeneity and complexity inherent to the human body. However, recent advances in single-cell technology and data analysis have provided new insights into the process of early human development and germ cell specification. In this Review, we examine the latest single-cell datasets of human preimplantation embryos and germ cell development, compare them to bulk cell analyses, and interpret their biological implications. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  20. Solar cell structure incorporating a novel single crystal silicon material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankove, Jacques I.; Wu, Chung P.

    1983-01-01

    A novel hydrogen rich single crystal silicon material having a band gap energy greater than 1.1 eV can be fabricated by forming an amorphous region of graded crystallinity in a body of single crystalline silicon and thereafter contacting the region with atomic hydrogen followed by pulsed laser annealing at a sufficient power and for a sufficient duration to recrystallize the region into single crystal silicon without out-gassing the hydrogen. The new material can be used to fabricate semiconductor devices such as single crystal silicon solar cells with surface window regions having a greater band gap energy than that of single crystal silicon without hydrogen.

  1. Single-cell magnetic imaging using a quantum diamond microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, D R; Lee, K; Park, H; Weissleder, R; Yacoby, A; Lukin, M D; Lee, H; Walsworth, R L; Connolly, C B

    2015-08-01

    We apply a quantum diamond microscope for detection and imaging of immunomagnetically labeled cells. This instrument uses nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond for correlated magnetic and fluorescence imaging. Our device provides single-cell resolution and a field of view (∼1 mm(2)) two orders of magnitude larger than that of previous NV imaging technologies, enabling practical applications. To illustrate, we quantified cancer biomarkers expressed by rare tumor cells in a large population of healthy cells.

  2. Single cell magnetic imaging using a quantum diamond microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H.; Weissleder, R.; Yacoby, A.; Lukin, M. D.; Lee, H.; Walsworth, R. L.; Connolly, C. B.

    2015-01-01

    We apply a quantum diamond microscope to detection and imaging of immunomagnetically labeled cells. This instrument uses nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond for correlated magnetic and fluorescence imaging. Our device provides single-cell resolution and two orders of magnitude larger field of view (~1 mm2) than previous NV imaging technologies, enabling practical applications. To illustrate, we quantify cancer biomarkers expressed by rare tumor cells in a large population of healthy cells. PMID:26098019

  3. Single cell Hi-C reveals cell-to-cell variability in chromosome structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfelder, Stefan; Yaffe, Eitan; Dean, Wendy; Laue, Ernest D.; Tanay, Amos; Fraser, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale chromosome structure and spatial nuclear arrangement have been linked to control of gene expression and DNA replication and repair. Genomic techniques based on chromosome conformation capture assess contacts for millions of loci simultaneously, but do so by averaging chromosome conformations from millions of nuclei. Here we introduce single cell Hi-C, combined with genome-wide statistical analysis and structural modeling of single copy X chromosomes, to show that individual chromosomes maintain domain organisation at the megabase scale, but show variable cell-to-cell chromosome territory structures at larger scales. Despite this structural stochasticity, localisation of active gene domains to boundaries of territories is a hallmark of chromosomal conformation. Single cell Hi-C data bridge current gaps between genomics and microscopy studies of chromosomes, demonstrating how modular organisation underlies dynamic chromosome structure, and how this structure is probabilistically linked with genome activity patterns. PMID:24067610

  4. Early transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation reduces hyperalgesia and decreases activation of spinal glial cells in mice with neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Hideaki; Uchida, Kenzo; Nakajima, Hideaki; Guerrero, Alexander Rodriguez; Watanabe, Shuji; Takeura, Naoto; Sugita, Daisuke; Shimada, Seiichiro; Nakatsuka, Terumasa; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2014-09-01

    Although transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is widely used for the treatment of neuropathic pain, its effectiveness and mechanism of action in reducing neuropathic pain remain uncertain. We investigated the effects of early TENS (starting from the day after surgery) in mice with neuropathic pain, on hyperalgesia, glial cell activation, pain transmission neuron sensitization, expression of proinflammatory cytokines, and opioid receptors in the spinal dorsal horn. Following nerve injury, TENS and behavioral tests were performed every day. Immunohistochemical, immunoblot, and flow cytometric analysis of the lumbar spinal cord were performed after 8 days. Early TENS reduced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and decreased the activation of microglia and astrocytes (PEarly TENS decreased p-p38 within microglia (Pearly TENS relieved hyperalgesia in our mouse model of neuropathic pain by inhibiting glial activation, MAP kinase activation, PKC-γ, and p-CREB expression, and proinflammatory cytokines expression, as well as maintenance of spinal opioid receptors. The findings indicate that TENS treatment is more effective when applied as early after nerve injury as possible. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Functional Insights into Sponge Microbiology by Single Cell Genomics

    KAUST Repository

    Hentschel, Ute

    2011-04-09

    Marine Sponges (Porifera) are known to harbor enormous amounts of microorganisms with members belonging to at least 30 different bacterial phyla including several candidate phyla and both archaeal lineages. Here, we applied single cell genomics to the mic

  6. Tumor Heterogeneity, Single-Cell Sequencing, and Drug Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Schmidt

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Tumor heterogeneity has been compared with Darwinian evolution and survival of the fittest. The evolutionary ecosystem of tumors consisting of heterogeneous tumor cell populations represents a considerable challenge to tumor therapy, since all genetically and phenotypically different subpopulations have to be efficiently killed by therapy. Otherwise, even small surviving subpopulations may cause repopulation and refractory tumors. Single-cell sequencing allows for a better understanding of the genomic principles of tumor heterogeneity and represents the basis for more successful tumor treatments. The isolation and sequencing of single tumor cells still represents a considerable technical challenge and consists of three major steps: (1 single cell isolation (e.g., by laser-capture microdissection, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, micromanipulation, whole genome amplification (e.g., with the help of Phi29 DNA polymerase, and transcriptome-wide next generation sequencing technologies (e.g., 454 pyrosequencing, Illumina sequencing, and other systems. Data demonstrating the feasibility of single-cell sequencing for monitoring the emergence of drug-resistant cell clones in patient samples are discussed herein. It is envisioned that single-cell sequencing will be a valuable asset to assist the design of regimens for personalized tumor therapies based on tumor subpopulation-specific genetic alterations in individual patients.

  7. Nerve growth factor (NGF) induces neuronal differentiation in neuroblastoma cells transfected with the NGF receptor cDNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushima, H.; Bogenmann, E.

    1990-01-01

    Human nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor (NGFR) cDNA was transfected into a neuroblastoma cell line (HTLA 230) which does not express a functional NGF-NGFR signal transduction cascade. Short-term treatment of stably transfected cells (98-3) expressing membrane-bound NGF receptor molecules resulted in a cell cycle-dependent, transient expression of the c-fos gene upon treatment with NGF, suggesting the presence of functional high-affinity NGFR. Extensive outgrowth of neurites and cessation of DNA synthesis occurred in transfectants grown on an extracellular matrix after long-term treatment with NGF, suggesting terminal differentiation. Our data support the idea that introduction of a constitutively expressed NGFR cDNA into cells with neuronal background results in the assembly of a functional NGF-NGFR signal cascade in a permissive extracellular environment

  8. Increased encapsulated cell biodelivery of nerve growth factor in the brain by transposon-mediated gene transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjord-Larsen, L; Kusk, Poul Henrik; Emerich, D F

    2012-01-01

    , capable of local delivery of NGF by a genetically modified human cell line, NGC-0295. The NsG0202 devices have shown promising safety and therapeutic results in a small phase 1b clinical study. However, results also show that the NGF dose could advantageously be increased. We have used the sleeping beauty......Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a potential therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease (AD) as it has positive effects on the basal forebrain cholinergic neurons whose degeneration correlates with the cognitive decline in AD. We have previously described an encapsulated cell biodelivery device, NsG0202...... patients, we have validated the bioactivity of devices with NGC0211 and NGC-0295 cells in normal rat striatum as well as in the quinolinic acid striatal lesion model. These preclinical animal studies show that implantation of devices with NGC0211 cells lead to significantly higher NGF output, which in both...

  9. Single-cell analysis of targeted transcriptome predicts drug sensitivity of single cells within human myeloma tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, A K; Mukherjee, U K; Harding, T; Jang, J S; Stessman, H; Li, Y; Abyzov, A; Jen, J; Kumar, S; Rajkumar, V; Van Ness, B

    2016-05-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by significant genetic diversity at subclonal levels that have a defining role in the heterogeneity of tumor progression, clinical aggressiveness and drug sensitivity. Although genome profiling studies have demonstrated heterogeneity in subclonal architecture that may ultimately lead to relapse, a gene expression-based prediction program that can identify, distinguish and quantify drug response in sub-populations within a bulk population of myeloma cells is lacking. In this study, we performed targeted transcriptome analysis on 528 pre-treatment single cells from 11 myeloma cell lines and 418 single cells from 8 drug-naïve MM patients, followed by intensive bioinformatics and statistical analysis for prediction of proteasome inhibitor sensitivity in individual cells. Using our previously reported drug response gene expression profile signature at the single-cell level, we developed an R Statistical analysis package available at https://github.com/bvnlabSCATTome, SCATTome (single-cell analysis of targeted transcriptome), that restructures the data obtained from Fluidigm single-cell quantitative real-time-PCR analysis run, filters missing data, performs scaling of filtered data, builds classification models and predicts drug response of individual cells based on targeted transcriptome using an assortment of machine learning methods. Application of SCATT should contribute to clinically relevant analysis of intratumor heterogeneity, and better inform drug choices based on subclonal cellular responses.

  10. WE-AB-207B-10: On Spinal Nerve Toxicity from Single-Session SAbR in Pigs and the Translation of Small Animal NTCP Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrycushko, B; Medin, P [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The incidence of peripheral neuropathy has risen with increased utilization of SAbR. There is no consensus regarding the dose-tolerance of the peripheral nervous system. In 2015, we commenced an investigation to test the hypotheses that single-session irradiation to the pig spinal nerves exhibit a similar dose-tolerance as that of the spinal cord and that a dose-length effect exists. This work evaluates the direct application of small animal NTCP models to both large animal spinal cord and preliminary peripheral nerve data. Methods: To date, 16 of 25 Yucatan minipigs have received single-session SAbR to a 1.5cm length and 4 of 25 have received irradiation to a 0.5cm length of left-sided C6-C8 spinal nerves. Toxicity related gait change has been observed in 13 animals (9 from the long length group and 4 from the short). This preliminary data is overlaid on several dose-response models which have been fit to rodent spinal cord tolerance experiments. Model parameters define a toxicity profile between a completely serial or parallel behaving organ. Adequacy of model application, including how length effects are handled, to published minipig spinal cord dose-response data and to preliminary peripheral nerve response data was evaluated through residual analysis. Results: No rodent-derived dose-response models were directly applicable to all pig data for the different lengths irradiated. Several models fit the long-length irradiated spinal cord data well, with the more serial-like models fitting best. Preliminary data on the short-length irradiation suggests no length effect exists, disproving our hypothesis. Conclusion: Direct application of small-animal NTCP models to pig data suggests dose-length effect predictions from small animal data may not translate clinically. However, the small animal models used have not considered dose heterogeneity and it is expected that including the low-to-mid dose levels in the penumbral region will improve this match. This work

  11. WE-AB-207B-10: On Spinal Nerve Toxicity from Single-Session SAbR in Pigs and the Translation of Small Animal NTCP Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrycushko, B; Medin, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The incidence of peripheral neuropathy has risen with increased utilization of SAbR. There is no consensus regarding the dose-tolerance of the peripheral nervous system. In 2015, we commenced an investigation to test the hypotheses that single-session irradiation to the pig spinal nerves exhibit a similar dose-tolerance as that of the spinal cord and that a dose-length effect exists. This work evaluates the direct application of small animal NTCP models to both large animal spinal cord and preliminary peripheral nerve data. Methods: To date, 16 of 25 Yucatan minipigs have received single-session SAbR to a 1.5cm length and 4 of 25 have received irradiation to a 0.5cm length of left-sided C6-C8 spinal nerves. Toxicity related gait change has been observed in 13 animals (9 from the long length group and 4 from the short). This preliminary data is overlaid on several dose-response models which have been fit to rodent spinal cord tolerance experiments. Model parameters define a toxicity profile between a completely serial or parallel behaving organ. Adequacy of model application, including how length effects are handled, to published minipig spinal cord dose-response data and to preliminary peripheral nerve response data was evaluated through residual analysis. Results: No rodent-derived dose-response models were directly applicable to all pig data for the different lengths irradiated. Several models fit the long-length irradiated spinal cord data well, with the more serial-like models fitting best. Preliminary data on the short-length irradiation suggests no length effect exists, disproving our hypothesis. Conclusion: Direct application of small-animal NTCP models to pig data suggests dose-length effect predictions from small animal data may not translate clinically. However, the small animal models used have not considered dose heterogeneity and it is expected that including the low-to-mid dose levels in the penumbral region will improve this match. This work

  12. Nerve conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS). The CNS contains the brain and the spinal cord and the PNS consists of thousands of nerves that connect the spinal cord to muscles and sensory receptors. A peripheral nerve is composed of nerve ...

  13. Alterations in the corneal nerve and stem/progenitor cells in diabetes: preventive effects of insulin-like growth factor-1 treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Hiroki; Hattori, Takaaki; Kumagai, Yuta; Suzuki, Noboru; Ueno, Satoki; Takagi, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether corneal nerve and corneal stem/progenitor cells are altered in insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I-) treated individuals with diabetes. A group consisting of db/db mice with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and a wild-type group were assessed by neural and corneal stem/progenitor cell markers immunostaining and real-time PCR. Moreover, the expression of corneal nerve and stem/progenitor cell markers was examined in IGF-1-treated diabetic mice. Compared with a normal cornea, swelling and stratification of the corneal epithelium were noted in db/db mice. Beta-III tubulin immunostaining revealed that the corneal subbasal plexuses in diabetic mice were thinner with fewer branches. mRNA expression levels of Hes1, Keratin15, and p75 (corneal stem/progenitor cell markers) and the intensity and number of positive cells of Hes1 and Keratin19 immunostaining diminished in the diabetic corneas. Compared with the subbasal nerve density in the normal group, a decrease in the diabetic group was observed, whereas the corneal subbasal nerve density increased in IGF-1-treated diabetic group. The decreased expression of Hes1 and Keratin19 was prevented in IGF-1-treated diabetic group. Our data suggest that corneal nerve and stem/progenitor cells are altered in type 2 DM, and IGF-I treatment is capable of protecting against corneal damage in diabetes.

  14. Alterations in the Corneal Nerve and Stem/Progenitor Cells in Diabetes: Preventive Effects of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Ueno

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate whether corneal nerve and corneal stem/progenitor cells are altered in insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I- treated individuals with diabetes. A group consisting of db/db mice with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM and a wild-type group were assessed by neural and corneal stem/progenitor cell markers immunostaining and real-time PCR. Moreover, the expression of corneal nerve and stem/progenitor cell markers was examined in IGF-1-treated diabetic mice. Compared with a normal cornea, swelling and stratification of the corneal epithelium were noted in db/db mice. Beta-III tubulin immunostaining revealed that the corneal subbasal plexuses in diabetic mice were thinner with fewer branches. mRNA expression levels of Hes1, Keratin15, and p75 (corneal stem/progenitor cell markers and the intensity and number of positive cells of Hes1 and Keratin19 immunostaining diminished in the diabetic corneas. Compared with the subbasal nerve density in the normal group, a decrease in the diabetic group was observed, whereas the corneal subbasal nerve density increased in IGF-1-treated diabetic group. The decreased expression of Hes1 and Keratin19 was prevented in IGF-1-treated diabetic group. Our data suggest that corneal nerve and stem/progenitor cells are altered in type 2 DM, and IGF-I treatment is capable of protecting against corneal damage in diabetes.

  15. Clustering Single-Cell Expression Data Using Random Forest Graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouyan, Maziyar Baran; Nourani, Mehrdad

    2017-07-01

    Complex tissues such as brain and bone marrow are made up of multiple cell types. As the study of biological tissue structure progresses, the role of cell-type-specific research becomes increasingly important. Novel sequencing technology such as single-cell cytometry provides researchers access to valuable biological data. Applying machine-learning techniques to these high-throughput datasets provides deep insights into the cellular landscape of the tissue where those cells are a part of. In this paper, we propose the use of random-forest-based single-cell profiling, a new machine-learning-based technique, to profile different cell types of intricate tissues using single-cell cytometry data. Our technique utilizes random forests to capture cell marker dependences and model the cellular populations using the cell network concept. This cellular network helps us discover what cell types are in the tissue. Our experimental results on public-domain datasets indicate promising performance and accuracy of our technique in extracting cell populations of complex tissues.

  16. Enhancing Peripheral Nerve Regeneration with a Novel Drug-Delivering Nerve Conduit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    NGF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for at least 30 days to improve rate of nerve regeneration. We have successfully...deliver nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for at least 30 days to improve the nerve regeneration. The...regeneration, nerve conduits, autograft, drug delivery device, nerve growth factor, glial cell line-derived neutrophic factor, polytetrafluoroethylene

  17. Single Cell Characterization of Prostate Cancer-Circulating Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    contaminating WBC. Scale bar = 20 microns. (E) MagSweeper versus CellSearch comparison. Samples with 0 CTC were assigned a value of 1. 10...cancer patient blood sample, and contaminating WBC found after MagSweeper isolation. Scale bar = 20 microns. (E) MagSweeper versus CellSearch...Weinberg RA (2011) Hallmarks of cancer: the next generation. Cell 144: 646–674. 4. Ashworth TR (1869) A case of cancer in which cells similar to those in

  18. Collagen-coated polylactic-glycolic acid (PLGA) seeded with neural-differentiated human mesenchymal stem cells as a potential nerve conduit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulong, Ahmad Fadzli; Hassan, Nur Hidayah; Hwei, Ng Min; Lokanathan, Yogeswaran; Naicker, Amaramalar Selvi; Abdullah, Shalimar; Yusof, Mohd Reusmaazran; Htwe, Ohnmar; Idrus, Ruszymah Bt Hj; Haflah, Nor Hazla Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Autologous nerve grafts to bridge nerve gaps pose various drawbacks. Nerve tissue engineering to promote nerve regeneration using artificial neural conduits has emerged as a promising alternative. To develop an artificial nerve conduit using collagen-coated polylactic-glycolic acid (PLGA) and to analyse the survivability and propagating ability of the neuro-differentiated human mesenchymal stem cells in this conduit. The PLGA conduit was constructed by dip-molding method and coated with collagen by immersing the conduit in collagen bath. The ultra structure of the conduits were examined before they were seeded with neural-differentiated human mesenchymal stem cells (nMSC) and implanted sub-muscularly on nude mice thighs. The non-collagen-coated PLGA conduit seeded with nMSC and non-seeded non-collagen-coated PLGA conduit were also implanted for comparison purposes. The survivability and propagation ability of nMSC was studied by histological and immunohistochemical analysis. The collagen-coated conduits had a smooth inner wall and a highly porous outer wall. Conduits coated with collagen and seeded with nMSCs produced the most number of cells after 3 weeks. The best conduit based on the number of cells contained within it after 3 weeks was the collagen-coated PLGA conduit seeded with neuro-transdifferentiated cells. The collagen-coated PLGA conduit found to be suitable for attachment, survival and proliferation of the nMSC. Minimal cell infiltration was found in the implanted conduits where nearly all of the cells found in the cell seeded conduits are non-mouse origin and have neural cell markers, which exhibit the biocompatibility of the conduits. The collagen-coated PLGA conduit is biocompatible, non-cytotoxic and suitable for use as artificial nerve conduits.

  19. Single cell transcriptome profiling of developing chick retinal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboissonniere, Lauren A; Martin, Gregory M; Goetz, Jillian J; Bi, Ran; Pope, Brock; Weinand, Kallie; Ellson, Laura; Fru, Diane; Lee, Miranda; Wester, Andrea K; Liu, Peng; Trimarchi, Jeffrey M

    2017-08-15

    The vertebrate retina is a specialized photosensitive tissue comprised of six neuronal and one glial cell types, each of which develops in prescribed proportions at overlapping timepoints from a common progenitor pool. While each of these cells has a specific function contributing to proper vision in the mature animal, their differential representation in the retina as well as the presence of distinctive cellular subtypes makes identifying the transcriptomic signatures that lead to each retinal cell's fate determination and development challenging. We have analyzed transcriptomes from individual cells isolated from the chick retina throughout retinogenesis. While we focused our efforts on the retinal ganglion cells, our transcriptomes of developing chick cells also contained representation from multiple retinal cell types, including photoreceptors and interneurons at different stages of development. Most interesting was the identification of transcriptomes from individual mixed lineage progenitor cells in the chick as these cells offer a window into the cell fate decision-making process. Taken together, these data sets will enable us to uncover the most critical genes acting in the steps of cell fate determination and early differentiation of various retinal cell types. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Spinal Cord T-Cell Infiltration in the Rat Spared Nerve Injury Model: A Time Course Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattlen, Christophe; Clarke, Christine B; Piller, Nicolas; Kirschmann, Guylène; Pertin, Marie; Decosterd, Isabelle; Gosselin, Romain-Daniel; Suter, Marc R

    2016-03-09

    The immune system is involved in the development of neuropathic pain. In particular, the infiltration of T-lymphocytes into the spinal cord following peripheral nerve injury has been described as a contributor to sensory hypersensitivity. We used the spared nerve injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain in Sprague Dawley adult male rats to assess proliferation, and/or protein/gene expression levels for microglia (Iba1), T-lymphocytes (CD2) and cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CD8). In the dorsal horn ipsilateral to SNI, Iba1 and BrdU stainings revealed microglial reactivity and proliferation, respectively, with different durations. Iba1 expression peaked at D4 and D7 at the mRNA and protein level, respectively, and was long-lasting. Proliferation occurred almost exclusively in Iba1 positive cells and peaked at D2. Gene expression observation by RT-qPCR array suggested that T-lymphocytes attracting chemokines were upregulated after SNI in rat spinal cord but only a few CD2/CD8 positive cells were found. A pronounced infiltration of CD2/CD8 positive T-cells was seen in the spinal cord injury (SCI) model used as a positive control for lymphocyte infiltration. Under these experimental conditions, we show early and long-lasting microglia reactivity in the spinal cord after SNI, but no lymphocyte infiltration was found.

  1. Potential genotoxic effects of GSM-1800 exposure on human cutaneous and nerve cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, S.; Poulletier De Gannes, F.; Haro, E.; Ruffie, G.; Lagroye, I.; Billaudel, B.; Veyret, B.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction The GSM-1800 signal has been in use for several years in Europe and questions raised about its potential biological effects, in view of the fact that, with respect to GSM-900, the increase in the carrier frequency corresponds to a more superficial absorption in the tissues. Consequently, the skin becomes an even more important target for the absorption of the radiofrequency radiation (R.F.R.) emitted by mobile phones. Nevertheless, brain tissues remain a critical target. Cells In order to determine whether R.F.R. at 1800 MHz could behave as a genotoxic agent, skin and brain cells were exposed to a 217-Hz-modulated GSM-1800 signal and assayed using the comet assay: (1) normal human epidermal keratinocytes (N.H.E.K.) and dermal fibroblasts (N.H.D.F.) which are cutaneous cells from epidermis and dermis respectively, and (2) the S.H. -S.Y.5.Y. and C.H.M.E.-5 human cell lines, which are neuroblastoma and micro-glial cells, respectively. Exposure The R.F.R. exposure system that was used in these experiments was manufactured by I.T. I.S. (Zurich, Switzerland). It consists in two shorted waveguides allowing to run exposed and sham conditions at the same time in the same culture incubator, at 37 Celsius degrees, 5% CO 2 . It is controlled by a software, which provides blind conditions until completion of data analysis. The specific absorption rate (S.A.R.) used was 2 W/kg, corresponding to the public exposure limit recommended by I.C.N.I.R.P. and the exposure duration was 48 hours. Comet assay At the end of the exposure, cells were removed from their Petri dish by trypsin/EDTA treatment, counted and 5 x 10 4 cells were used to detect DNA damage including single DNA breaks. Positive controls were performed using hydrogen peroxidase (1%, 1 hour). The genotoxic effects were detected using the alkaline comet assay kit (Trevigen slides) following the supplier procedure. Under these conditions, 6 independent experiments were performed for each cell type (2 Petri

  2. Potential genotoxic effects of GSM-1800 exposure on human cutaneous and nerve cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, S.; Poulletier De Gannes, F.; Haro, E.; Ruffie, G.; Lagroye, I.; Billaudel, B.; Veyret, B. [PIOM laboratory, UMR 5501 CNRS, ENSCPB, 33 -Pessac (France)

    2006-07-01

    Introduction The GSM-1800 signal has been in use for several years in Europe and questions raised about its potential biological effects, in view of the fact that, with respect to GSM-900, the increase in the carrier frequency corresponds to a more superficial absorption in the tissues. Consequently, the skin becomes an even more important target for the absorption of the radiofrequency radiation (R.F.R.) emitted by mobile phones. Nevertheless, brain tissues remain a critical target. Cells In order to determine whether R.F.R. at 1800 MHz could behave as a genotoxic agent, skin and brain cells were exposed to a 217-Hz-modulated GSM-1800 signal and assayed using the comet assay: (1) normal human epidermal keratinocytes (N.H.E.K.) and dermal fibroblasts (N.H.D.F.) which are cutaneous cells from epidermis and dermis respectively, and (2) the S.H. -S.Y.5.Y. and C.H.M.E.-5 human cell lines, which are neuroblastoma and micro-glial cells, respectively. Exposure The R.F.R. exposure system that was used in these experiments was manufactured by I.T. I.S. (Zurich, Switzerland). It consists in two shorted waveguides allowing to run exposed and sham conditions at the same time in the same culture incubator, at 37 Celsius degrees, 5% CO{sub 2}. It is controlled by a software, which provides blind conditions until completion of data analysis. The specific absorption rate (S.A.R.) used was 2 W/kg, corresponding to the public exposure limit recommended by I.C.N.I.R.P. and the exposure duration was 48 hours. Comet assay At the end of the exposure, cells were removed from their Petri dish by trypsin/EDTA treatment, counted and 5 x 10{sup 4} cells were used to detect DNA damage including single DNA breaks. Positive controls were performed using hydrogen peroxidase (1%, 1 hour). The genotoxic effects were detected using the alkaline comet assay kit (Trevigen slides) following the supplier procedure. Under these conditions, 6 independent experiments were performed for each cell type (2

  3. Magnetic domain wall conduits for single cell applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donolato, Marco; Torti, A.; Kostesha, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    The ability to trap, manipulate and release single cells on a surface is important both for fundamental studies of cellular processes and for the development of novel lab-on-chip miniaturized tools for biological and medical applications. In this paper we demonstrate how magnetic domain walls...... walls technology in lab-on-chip systems devoted to accurate individual cell trapping and manipulation....

  4. Use of electrospinning to construct biomaterials for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Qi; Chang, Biao; Meng, Hao Ye; Liu, Ruo Xi; Wang, Yu; Lu, Shi Bi; Peng, Jiang; Zhao, Qing

    2016-10-01

    A number of limitations associated with the use of hollow nerve guidance conduits (NGCs) require further discussion. Most importantly, the functional recovery outcomes after the placement of hollow NGCs are poor even after the successful bridging of peripheral nerve injuries. However, nerve regeneration scaffolds built using electric spinning have several advantages that may improve functional recovery. Thus, the present study summarizes recent developments in this area, including the key cells that are combined with the scaffold and associated with nerve regeneration, the structure and configuration of the electrospinning design (which determines the performance of the electrospinning scaffold), the materials the electrospinning fibers are composed of, and the methods used to control the morphology of a single fiber. Additionally, this study also discusses the processes underlying peripheral nerve regeneration. The primary goals of the present review were to evaluate and consolidate the findings of studies that used scaffolding biomaterials built by electrospinning used for peripheral nerve regeneration support. It is amazing that the field of peripheral nerve regeneration continues to consistently produce such a wide variety of innovative techniques and novel types of equipment, because the introduction of every new process creates an opportunity for advances in materials for nerve repair.

  5. Single Cell Adhesion Assay Using Computer Controlled Micropipette

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salánki, Rita; Hős, Csaba; Orgovan, Norbert; Péter, Beatrix; Sándor, Noémi; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Erdei, Anna; Horvath, Robert; Szabó, Bálint

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon vital for all multicellular organisms. Recognition of and adhesion to specific macromolecules is a crucial task of leukocytes to initiate the immune response. To gain statistically reliable information of cell adhesion, large numbers of cells should be measured. However, direct measurement of the adhesion force of single cells is still challenging and today’s techniques typically have an extremely low throughput (5–10 cells per day). Here, we introduce a computer controlled micropipette mounted onto a normal inverted microscope for probing single cell interactions with specific macromolecules. We calculated the estimated hydrodynamic lifting force acting on target cells by the numerical simulation of the flow at the micropipette tip. The adhesion force of surface attached cells could be accurately probed by repeating the pick-up process with increasing vacuum applied in the pipette positioned above the cell under investigation. Using the introduced methodology hundreds of cells adhered to specific macromolecules were measured one by one in a relatively short period of time (∼30 min). We blocked nonspecific cell adhesion by the protein non-adhesive PLL-g-PEG polymer. We found that human primary monocytes are less adherent to fibrinogen than their in vitro differentiated descendants: macrophages and dendritic cells, the latter producing the highest average adhesion force. Validation of the here introduced method was achieved by the hydrostatic step-pressure micropipette manipulation technique. Additionally the result was reinforced in standard microfluidic shear stress channels. Nevertheless, automated micropipette gave higher sensitivity and less side-effect than the shear stress channel. Using our technique, the probed single cells can be easily picked up and further investigated by other techniques; a definite advantage of the computer controlled micropipette. Our experiments revealed the existence of a sub

  6. Single cell adhesion assay using computer controlled micropipette.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Salánki

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon vital for all multicellular organisms. Recognition of and adhesion to specific macromolecules is a crucial task of leukocytes to initiate the immune response. To gain statistically reliable information of cell adhesion, large numbers of cells should be measured. However, direct measurement of the adhesion force of single cells is still challenging and today's techniques typically have an extremely low throughput (5-10 cells per day. Here, we introduce a computer controlled micropipette mounted onto a normal inverted microscope for probing single cell interactions with specific macromolecules. We calculated the estimated hydrodynamic lifting force acting on target cells by the numerical simulation of the flow at the micropipette tip. The adhesion force of surface attached cells could be accurately probed by repeating the pick-up process with increasing vacuum applied in the pipette positioned above the cell under investigation. Using the introduced methodology hundreds of cells adhered to specific macromolecules were measured one by one in a relatively short period of time (∼30 min. We blocked nonspecific cell adhesion by the protein non-adhesive PLL-g-PEG polymer. We found that human primary monocytes are less adherent to fibrinogen than their in vitro differentiated descendants: macrophages and dendritic cells, the latter producing the highest average adhesion force. Validation of the here introduced method was achieved by the hydrostatic step-pressure micropipette manipulation technique. Additionally the result was reinforced in standard microfluidic shear stress channels. Nevertheless, automated micropipette gave higher sensitivity and less side-effect than the shear stress channel. Using our technique, the probed single cells can be easily picked up and further investigated by other techniques; a definite advantage of the computer controlled micropipette. Our experiments revealed the existence of a

  7. The effects of functional magnetic nanotubes with incorporated nerve growth factor in neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jining; Chen, Linfeng; Varadan, Vijay K.; Yancey, Justin; Srivatsan, Malathi

    2008-03-01

    In this in vitro study the efficiency of magnetic nanotubes to bind with nerve growth factor (NGF) and the ability of NGF-incorporated magnetic nanotubes to release the bound NGF are investigated using rat pheochromocytoma cells (PC12 cells). It is found that functional magnetic nanotubes with NGF incorporation enabled the differentiation of PC12 cells into neurons exhibiting growth cones and neurite outgrowth. Microscope observations show that filopodia extending from neuron growth cones were in close proximity to the NGF-incorporated magnetic nanotubes, at times appearing to extend towards or into them. These results show that magnetic nanotubes can be used as a delivery vehicle for NGF and thus may be exploited in attempts to treat neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease with neurotrophins. Further neurite outgrowth can be controlled by manipulating magnetic nanotubes with external magnetic fields, thus helping in directed regeneration.

  8. Novel approaches in function-driven single-cell genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doud, Devin F R; Woyke, Tanja

    2017-07-01

    Deeper sequencing and improved bioinformatics in conjunction with single-cell and metagenomic approaches continue to illuminate undercharacterized environmental microbial communities. This has propelled the 'who is there, and what might they be doing' paradigm to the uncultivated and has already radically changed the topology of the tree of life and provided key insights into the microbial contribution to biogeochemistry. While characterization of 'who' based on marker genes can describe a large fraction of the community, answering 'what are they doing' remains the elusive pinnacle for microbiology. Function-driven single-cell genomics provides a solution by using a function-based screen to subsample complex microbial communities in a targeted manner for the isolation and genome sequencing of single cells. This enables single-cell sequencing to be focused on cells with specific phenotypic or metabolic characteristics of interest. Recovered genomes are conclusively implicated for both encoding and exhibiting the feature of interest, improving downstream annotation and revealing activity levels within that environment. This emerging approach has already improved our understanding of microbial community functioning and facilitated the experimental analysis of uncharacterized gene product space. Here we provide a comprehensive review of strategies that have been applied for function-driven single-cell genomics and the future directions we envision. © FEMS 2017.

  9. Mapping Cellular Hierarchy by Single-Cell Analysis of the Cell Surface Repertoire

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Guoji; Luc, Sidinh; Marco, Eugenio; Lin, Ta-Wei; Peng, Cong; Kerenyi, Marc A.; Beyaz, Semir; Kim, Woojin; Xu, Jian; Das, Partha Pratim; Neff, Tobias; Zou, Keyong; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Orkin, Stuart H.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell differentiation pathways are most often studied at the population level, whereas critical decisions are executed at the level of single cells. We have established a highly multiplexed, quantitative PCR assay to profile in an unbiased manner a panel of all commonly used cell surface markers (280 genes) from individual cells. With this method we analyzed over 1500 single cells throughout the mouse hematopoietic system, and illustrate its utility for revealing important biological insi...

  10. Single-cell sequencing of the small-RNA transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faridani, Omid R; Abdullayev, Ilgar; Hagemann-Jensen, Michael; Schell, John P; Lanner, Fredrik; Sandberg, Rickard

    2016-12-01

    Little is known about the heterogeneity of small-RNA expression as small-RNA profiling has so far required large numbers of cells. Here we present a single-cell method for small-RNA sequencing and apply it to naive and primed human embryonic stem cells and cancer cells. Analysis of microRNAs and fragments of tRNAs and small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) reveals the potential of microRNAs as markers for different cell types and states.

  11. Review of methods to probe single cell metabolism and bioenergetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasdekis, Andreas E; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Single cell investigations have enabled unexpected discoveries, such as the existence of biological noise and phenotypic switching in infection, metabolism and treatment. Herein, we review methods that enable such single cell investigations specific to metabolism and bioenergetics. Firstly, we discuss how to isolate and immobilize individuals from a cell suspension, including both permanent and reversible approaches. We also highlight specific advances in microbiology for its implications in metabolic engineering. Methods for probing single cell physiology and metabolism are subsequently reviewed. The primary focus therein is on dynamic and high-content profiling strategies based on label-free and fluorescence microspectroscopy and microscopy. Non-dynamic approaches, such as mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance, are also briefly discussed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. VEGF-A165 potently induces human blood-nerve barrier endothelial cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and wound healing in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Chetan Lakshmana; Yosef, Nejla; Ubogu, Eroboghene E

    2013-08-01

    Several mitogens such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) have been implicated in mammalian vascular proliferation and repair. However, the molecular mediators of human blood-nerve barrier (BNB) development and specialization are unknown. Primary human endoneurial endothelial cells (pHEndECs) were expanded in vitro and specific mitogen receptors detected by western blot. pHEndECs were cultured with basal medium containing different mitogen concentrations with or without heparin. Non-radioactive cell proliferation, Matrigel(™)-induced angiogenesis and sterile micropipette injury wound healing assays were performed. Proliferation rates, number and total length of induced microvessels, and rate of endothelial cell monolayer wound healing were determined and compared to basal conditions. VEGF-A165 in the presence of heparin, was the most potent inducer of pHEndEC proliferation, angiogenesis, and wound healing in vitro. 1.31 nM VEGF-A165 induced ~110 % increase in cell proliferation relative to basal conditions (∼51 % without heparin). 2.62 pM VEGF-A165 induced a three-fold increase in mean number of microvessels and 3.9-fold increase in total capillary length/field relative to basal conditions. In addition, 0.26 nM VEGF-A165 induced ∼1.3-fold increased average rate of endothelial wound healing 4-18 h after endothelial monolayer injury, mediated by increased cell migration. VEGF-A165 was the only mitogen capable of complete wound closure, occurring within 30 h following injury via increased cell proliferation. This study demonstrates that VEGF-A165, in the presence of heparin, is a potent inducer of pHEndEC proliferation, angiogenesis, and wound healing in vitro. VEGF-A165 may be an important mitogen necessary for human BNB development and recovery in response to peripheral nerve injury.

  13. Regeneration of Optic Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok-Fai So

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The optic nerve is part of the central nervous system (CNS and has a structure similar to other CNS tracts. The axons that form the optic nerve originate in the ganglion cell layer of the retina and extend through the optic tract. As a tissue, the optic nerve has the same organization as the white matter of the brain in regard to its glia. There are three types of glial cells: Oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia. Little structural and functional regeneration of the CNS takes place spontaneously following injury in adult mammals. In contrast, the ability of the mammalian peripheral nervous system (PNS to regenerate axons after injury is well documented. A number of factors are involved in the lack of CNS regeneration, including: (i the response of neuronal cell bodies against the damage; (ii myelin-mediated inhibition by oligodendrocytes; (iii glial scarring, by astrocytes; (iv macrophage infiltration; and (v insufficient trophic factor support. The fundamental difference in the regenerative capacity between CNS and PNS neuronal cell bodies has been the subject of intensive research. In the CNS the target normally conveys a retrograde trophic signal to the cell body. CNS neurons die because of trophic deprivation. Damage to the optic nerve disconnects the neuronal cell body from its target-derived trophic peptides, leading to the death of retinal ganglion cells. Furthermore, the axontomized neurons become less responsive to the peptide trophic signals they do receive. On the other hand, adult PNS neurons are intrinsically responsive to neurotrophic factors and do not lose trophic responsiveness after axotomy. In this talk different strategies to promote optic-nerve regeneration in adult mammals are reviewed. Much work is still needed to resolve many issues. This is a very important area of neuroregeneration and neuroprotection, as currently there is no cure after traumatic optic nerve injury or retinal disease such as glaucoma, which

  14. Distribution of inorganic elements in single cells of Chara corallina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zijie; Zhang Zhiyong; Chai Zhifang; Yu Ming; Zhou Yunlong

    2005-01-01

    There are actually 20 chemical elements necessary or beneficial for plant growth. Carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen are supplied by air and water. The six macronutrients, nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium., calcium, magnesium, and sulfur are required by plants in large amounts. The rest of the elements are required in trace amounts (micronutrients). Essential trace elements include boron, chlorine, copper, iron, manganese, sodium, zinc, molybdenum, and nickel. Beneficial mineral elements include silicon and cobalt. The functions of the inorganic elements closely related to their destinations in plant cells. Plant cells have unique structures, including a central vacuole, plastids, and a thick cell wall that surrounds the cell membrane. Generally, it is very difficult to determine concentrations of inorganic elements in a single plant cell. Chara corallina is a freshwater plant that inhabits temperate zone ponds and lakes. It consists of alternating nodes and internodes. Each internodal segment is a single large cell, up to 10 cm in length, and 1 mm in diameter. With this species it was possible to isolate subcellular fractions with surgical methods with minimal risk of cross contamination. In this study, concentrations of magnesium, calcium, manganese, iron, copper, zinc, and molybdenum in the cell wall, cytoplasm, and vacuole of single cells of Chara corallina were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The distribution characteristics of these elements in the cell components were discussed.

  15. Molecular Ghrelin System in the Pancreatic Acinar Cells: The Role of the Polypeptide, Caerulein and Sensory Nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonior, Joanna; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Gajdosz, Ryszard; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Pierzchalski, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Dembiński, Artur; Pędziwiatr, Michał; Kot, Michalina; Leja-Szpak, Anna; Nawrot-Porąbka, Katarzyna; Link-Lenczowski, Paweł; Olszanecki, Rafał; Bartuś, Krzysztof; Jaworek, Jolanta

    2017-05-02

    Ghrelin (GHRL) is an endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). Experimental studies showed that GHRL protects the stomach and pancreas against acute damage, but the effect of GHRL on pancreatic acinar cells was still undetermined. To investigate the effect of GHRL and caerulein on the functional ghrelin system in pancreatic acinar cells taking into account the role of sensory nerves (SN). Experiments were carried out on isolated pancreatic acinar cells and AR42J cells. Before acinar cells isolation, GHRL was administered intraperitoneally at a dose of 50 µg/kg to rats with intact SN or with capsaicin deactivation of SN (CDSN). After isolation, pancreatic acinar cells were incubated in caerulein-free or caerulein containing solution. AR42J cells were incubated under basal conditions and stimulated with caerulein, GHRL or a combination of the above. Incubation of isolated acinar cells with caerulein inhibited GHS-R and GHRL expression at the level of mRNA and protein in those cells. Either in rats with intact SN or with CDSN, administration of GHRL before isolation of acinar cells increased expression of GHRL and GHS-R in those cells and reversed the caerulein-induced reduction in expression of those parameters. Similar upregulation of GHS-R and GHRL was observed after administration of GHRL in AR42J cells. GHRL stimulates its own expression and expression of its receptor in isolated pancreatic acinar cells and AR42J cells on the positive feedback pathway. This mechanism seems to participate in the pancreatoprotective effect of GHRL in the course of acute pancreatitis.

  16. Trigeminal nerve electrophysiological assessment in sickle cell anemia: correlation with disease severity and radiological findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naglaa Gadallah

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion Subclinical trigeminal neuropathy may be associated with SCA. The trigeminal nerve could be affected along its peripheral or the central pathway. Central affection may occur as a result of lesions in its nuclei or at the somatosensory cortex. Electrophysiological assessment is recommended in SCA patients to diagnose trigeminal neuropathy and detect the level of its affection. This will provide new insights into its prevention and treatment.

  17. Age-Related Yield of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Bearing the Low-Affinity Nerve Growth Factor Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Cuevas-Diaz Duran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs are a heterogeneous cell population that may be enriched by positive selection with antibodies against the low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor (LNGFR or CD271, yielding a selective cell universe with higher proliferation and differentiation potential. This paper addresses the need for determining the quantity of ADSCs positive for the CD271 receptor and its correlation with donor's age. Mononuclear cells were harvested from the lower backs of 35 female donors and purified using magnetic beads. Multipotency capacity was tested by the expression of stemness genes and through differentiation into preosteoblasts and adipocytes. A significant statistical difference was found in CD271+ concentrations between defined age intervals. The highest yield was found within women on the 30–40-year-old age range. CD271+ ADSCs from all age groups showed differentiation capabilities as well as expression of typical multipotent stem cell genes. Our data suggest that the amount of CD271+ cells correlates inversely with age. However, the ability to obtain these cells was maintained through all age ranges with a yield higher than what has been reported from bone marrow. Our findings propose CD271+ ADSCs as the primary choice for tissue regeneration and autologous stem cell therapies in older subjects.

  18. Reliable single cell array CGH for clinical samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew T Czyż

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Disseminated cancer cells (DCCs and circulating tumor cells (CTCs are extremely rare, but comprise the precursors cells of distant metastases or therapy resistant cells. The detailed molecular analysis of these cells may help to identify key events of cancer cell dissemination, metastatic colony formation and systemic therapy escape. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using the Ampli1™ whole genome amplification (WGA technology and high-resolution oligonucleotide aCGH microarrays we optimized conditions for the analysis of structural copy number changes. The protocol presented here enables reliable detection of numerical genomic alterations as small as 0.1 Mb in a single cell. Analysis of single cells from well-characterized cell lines and single normal cells confirmed the stringent quantitative nature of the amplification and hybridization protocol. Importantly, fixation and staining procedures used to detect DCCs showed no significant impact on the outcome of the analysis, proving the clinical usability of our method. In a proof-of-principle study we tracked the chromosomal changes of single DCCs over a full course of high-dose chemotherapy treatment by isolating and analyzing DCCs of an individual breast cancer patient at four different time points. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The protocol enables detailed genome analysis of DCCs and thereby assessment of the clonal evolution during the natural course of the disease and under selection pressures. The results from an exemplary patient provide evidence that DCCs surviving selective therapeutic conditions may be recruited from a pool of genomically less advanced cells, which display a stable subset of specific genomic alterations.

  19. Counting Legionella cells within single amoeba host cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we present the first attempt to quantify L. pneumophila cell numbers within individual amoebae hosts that may be released into engineered water systems. The maximum numbers of culturable L. pneumophila cells grown within Acanthamoeba polyphaga and Naegleria fowleri were 134...

  20. Cloning of Plasmodium falciparum by single-cell sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Jun; Li, Xiaolian; Cui, Liwang

    2010-01-01

    Malaria parasite cloning is traditionally carried out mainly by using the limiting dilution method, which is laborious, imprecise, and unable to distinguish multiply-infected RBCs. In this study, we used a parasite engineered to express green fluorescent protein (GFP) to evaluate a single-cell sorting method for rapidly cloning Plasmodium falciparum. By dividing a two dimensional scattergram from a cell sorter into 17 gates, we determined the parameters for isolating singly-infected erythrocytes and sorted them into individual cultures. Pre-gating of the engineered parasites for GFP allowed the isolation of almost 100% GFP-positive clones. Compared with the limiting dilution method, the number of parasite clones obtained by single-cell sorting was much higher. Molecular analyses showed that parasite isolates obtained by single-cell sorting were highly homogenous. This highly efficient single-cell sorting method should prove very useful for cloning both P. falciparum laboratory populations from genetic manipulation experiments and clinical samples. PMID:20435038

  1. T cell fate and clonality inference from single-cell transcriptomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbington, Michael J T; Lönnberg, Tapio; Proserpio, Valentina; Clare, Simon; Speak, Anneliese O; Dougan, Gordon; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2016-04-01

    We developed TraCeR, a computational method to reconstruct full-length, paired T cell receptor (TCR) sequences from T lymphocyte single-cell RNA sequence data. TraCeR links T cell specificity with functional response by revealing clonal relationships between cells alongside their transcriptional profiles. We found that T cell clonotypes in a mouse Salmonella infection model span early activated CD4(+) T cells as well as mature effector and memory cells.

  2. Terminal nerve: cranial nerve zero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eduardo Duque Parra

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been stated, in different types of texts, that there are only twelve pairs of cranial nerves. Such texts exclude the existence of another cranial pair, the terminal nerve or even cranial zero. This paper considers the mentioned nerve like a cranial pair, specifying both its connections and its functional role in the migration of liberating neurons of the gonadotropic hormone (Gn RH. In this paper is also stated the hypothesis of the phylogenetic existence of a cerebral sector and a common nerve that integrates the terminal nerve with the olfactory nerves and the vomeronasals nerves which seem to carry out the odors detection function as well as in the food search, pheromone detection and nasal vascular regulation.

  3. [Effect of electroacupuncture on differentiation and proliferation of hippocampal nerve stem cells in splenic asthenia pedo-rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Yuan-yuan; Yang, Zhuo-xin; Wu, Jia-man

    2011-10-01

    To observe the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on the differentiation and proliferation of nerve stem cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) in splenic asthenia pedo-rats so as to study its central mechanism. A total of 72 SD male rats were randomly assigned to normal control group (n=24), model group (n=24) and EA group (n=24) which were further divided into 7 d, 14 d, 28 d and 49 d time-points (n=6). Splenic asthenia model was established by intraperitoneal injection of reserpine and gavage of Dahuang (Radix et Rhizoma Rhei) fluid. EA was applied to bilateral "Zusanli" (ST 36) and "Sanyinjiao" (SP 6) for 20 min, once daily for 7, 14, 28 and 49 days respectively. Brdu, Nestin, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) expression in the DG of hippocampus were detected by immunohistochemistry double staining. Compared with the normal control group, the numbers of Brdu, Brdu/GFAP, Brdu/NSE Immunoreactive (IR) positive cells in the DG of hippocampus on day 7 and 14, and that of Brdu/Nestin IR-positive cells on day 7 were decreased considerably in the model group (P 0.05). EA of ST 36 and SP 6 can effectively suppress splenic asthenia syndrome-induced decrease of the numbers of Brdu, Brdu/GFAP, Brdu/Nestin and Brdu/NSE IR-positive cells in the DG of hippocampus at the early stage in the splenic asthenia rats, which may contribute to its effect in improving splenic asthenia symptoms in clinic by promoting the proliferation and differentiation of some nerve stem cells in the hippocampus.

  4. Single molecule microscopy in 3D cell cultures and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Florian M; Kaemmerer, Elke; Meckel, Tobias

    2014-12-15

    From the onset of the first microscopic visualization of single fluorescent molecules in living cells at the beginning of this century, to the present, almost routine application of single molecule microscopy, the method has well-proven its ability to contribute unmatched detailed insight into the heterogeneous and dynamic molecular world life is composed of. Except for investigations on bacteria and yeast, almost the entire story of success is based on studies on adherent mammalian 2D cell cultures. However, despite this continuous progress, the technique was not able to keep pace with the move of the cell biology community to adapt 3D cell culture models for basic research, regenerative medicine, or drug development and screening. In this review, we will summarize the progress, which only recently allowed for the application of single molecule microscopy to 3D cell systems and give an overview of the technical advances that led to it. While initially posing a challenge, we finally conclude that relevant 3D cell models will become an integral part of the on-going success of single molecule microscopy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Phosphorylation of stathmin and other proteins related to nerve growth factor-induced regulation of PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doye, V; Boutterin, M C; Sobel, A

    1990-07-15

    We previously identified a set of soluble proteins whose phosphorylation could be originally related to the multihormonal regulations of anterior pituitary cells. Among these proteins, stathmin (proteins 7 and 8) was found to be ubiquitous and mostly abundant in neurons. Interestingly, stathmin and some other phosphoproteins of the same set could be identified also in PC12 cells in culture. Their phosphorylation was stimulated in these cells by nerve growth factor (NGF) in a way associated with its short term actions, probably corresponding to the early steps of its neuronal differentiating activity. In addition, the same proteins had their phosphorylation stimulated in the presence of fibroblast growth factor, known to stimulate PC12 cell differentiation in a way similar to NGF. A pharmacological analysis allowed us to distinguish three characteristic subsets of phosphoproteins, respectively, affected by cAMP-dependent agents, by cAMP-independent ones, or by both types of agents. Moreover, phosphorylation of stathmin and some other proteins was additive in the presence of NGF and of the cAMP-promoting agent forskolin. Altogether, the present results unravel some intracellular mechanisms related to the regulation of PC12 cells by extracellular effectors. They extend to the regulation of cell differentiation in our recent model for stathmin (Sobel, A., Boutterin, M-C., Beretta, L., Chneiweiss, H., Doye, V., and Peyro-Saint-Paul, H. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 3765-3772) as an ubiquitous intracellular relay possibly integrating the actions of diverse second messenger pathways involved in cell regulations.

  6. Effects of umbilical cord tissue mesenchymal stem cells (UCX® on rat sciatic nerve regeneration after neurotmesis injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gärtner A

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerves have the intrinsic capacity of self-regeneration after traumatic injury but the extent of the regeneration is often very poor. Increasing evidence demonstrates that mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs may play an important role in tissue regeneration through the secretion of soluble trophic factors that enhance and assist in repair by paracrine activation of surrounding cells. In the present study, the therapeutic value of a population of umbilical cord tissue-derived MSCs, obtained by a proprietary method (UCX®, was evaluated on end-to-end rat sciatic nerve repair. Furthermore, in order to promote both, end-to-end nerve fiber contacts and MSC cell-cell interaction, as well as reduce the flush away effect of the cells after administration, a commercially available haemostatic sealant, Floseal®, was used as vehicle. Both, functional and morphologic recoveries were evaluated along the healing period using extensor postural thrust (EPT, withdrawal reflex latency (WRL, ankle kinematics analysis, and either histological analysis or stereology, in the hyper-acute, acute and chronic phases of healing. The histological analysis of the hyper-acute and acute phase studies revealed that in the group treated with UCX ® alone the Wallerian degeneration was improved for the subsequent process of regeneration, the fiber organization was higher, and the extent of fibrosis was lower. The chronic phase experimental groups revealed that treatment with UCX® induced an increased number of regenerated fibers and thickening of the myelin sheet. Kinematics analysis showed that the ankle joint angle determined for untreated animals was significantly different from any of the treated groups at the instant of initial contact (IC. At opposite toe off (OT and heel rise (HR, differences were found between untreated animals and the groups treated with either UCX® alone or UCX® administered with Floseal®. Overall, the UCX® application presented

  7. A photoacoustic technique to measure the properties of single cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Eric M.; Berndl, Elizabeth S. L.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate a new technique to non-invasively determine the diameter and sound speed of single cells using a combined ultrasonic and photoacoustic technique. Two cell lines, B16-F1 melanoma cells and MCF7 breast cancer cells were examined using this technique. Using a 200 MHz transducer, the ultrasound backscatter from a single cell in suspension was recorded. Immediately following, the cell was irradiated with a 532 nm laser and the resulting photoacoustic wave recorded by the same transducer. The melanoma cells contain optically absorbing melanin particles, which facilitated photoacoustic wave generation. MCF7 cells have negligible optical absorption at 532 nm; the cells were permeabilized and stained with trypan blue prior to measurements. The measured ultrasound and photoacoustic power spectra were compared to theoretical equations with the cell diameter and sound speed as variables (Anderson scattering model for ultrasound, and a thermoelastic expansion model for photoacoustics). The diameter and sound speed were extracted from the models where the spectral shape matched the measured signals. However the photoacoustic spectrum for the melanoma cell did not match theory, which is likely because melanin particles are located around the cytoplasm, and not within the nucleus. Therefore a photoacoustic finite element model of a cell was developed where the central region was not used to generate a photoacoustic wave. The resulting power spectrum was in better agreement with the measured signal than the thermoelastic expansion model. The MCF7 cell diameter obtained using the spectral matching method was 17.5 μm, similar to the optical measurement of 16 μm, while the melanoma cell diameter obtained was 22 μm, similar to the optical measurement of 21 μm. The sound speed measured from the MCF7 and melanoma cell was 1573 and 1560 m/s, respectively, which is within acceptable values that have been published in literature.

  8. Exploring single electrode reactions in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, H.; Wokaun, A.; Scherer, G.G. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Electrochemistry Laboratory, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2007-01-20

    Utilising a pseudo-reference electrode in polymer electrolyte fuel cells allows for the separation of anodic and cathodic contributions to the entire cell impedance. Modelling the impedance responses by using equivalent circuits inhibits the investigation of kinetic parameters of the basic electrochemical reactions, which take place at single electrode-electrolyte interfaces. Therefore, we evaluate single electrode impedance measurements by a kinetic model, which is based on specific reaction pathways, either for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) or the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR). As a consequence, it is possible to obtain kinetic parameters for the specific reaction of interest. Furthermore, the information gained from the single electrode impedance measurements and the kinetic model can give insight into single reactions steps. In particular, the ORR has to include a chemical step in the reaction pathway. (author)

  9. Loss of Aβ-nerve endings associated with the Merkel cell-neurite complex in the lesional oral mucosa epithelium of lichen planus and hyperkeratosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrión, Daniela Calderón; Korkmaz, Yüksel; Cho, Britta; Kopp, Marion; Bloch, Wilhelm; Addicks, Klaus; Niedermeier, Wilhelm

    2016-03-30

    The Merkel cell-neurite complex initiates the perception of touch and mediates Aβ slowly adapting type I responses. Lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease with T-cell-mediated inflammation, whereas hyperkeratosis is characterized with or without epithelial dysplasia in the oral mucosa. To determine the effects of lichen planus and hyperkeratosis on the Merkel cell-neurite complex, healthy oral mucosal epithelium and lesional oral mucosal epithelium of lichen planus and hyperkeratosis patients were stained by immunohistochemistry (the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex and double immunofluorescence methods) using pan cytokeratin, cytokeratin 20 (K20, a Merkel cell marker), and neurofilament 200 (NF200, a myelinated Aβ- and Aδ-nerve fibre marker) antibodies. NF200-immunoreactive (ir) nerve fibres in healthy tissues and in the lesional oral mucosa epithelium of lichen planus and hyperkeratosis were counted and statistically analysed. In the healthy oral mucosa, K20-positive Merkel cells with and without close association to the intraepithelial NF200-ir nerve fibres were detected. In the lesional oral mucosa of lichen planus and hyperkeratosis patients, extremely rare NF200-ir nerve fibres were detected only in the lamina propria. Compared with healthy tissues, lichen planus and hyperkeratosis tissues had significantly decreased numbers of NF200-ir nerve fibres in the oral mucosal epithelium. Lichen planus and hyperkeratosis were associated with the absence of Aβ-nerve endings in the oral mucosal epithelium. Thus, we conclude that mechanosensation mediated by the Merkel cell-neurite complex in the oral mucosal epithelium is impaired in lichen planus and hyperkeratosis.

  10. Magnetophoretic circuits for digital control of single particles and cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Byeonghwa; Reddy, Venu; Hu, Xinghao; Kim, Kunwoo; Jadhav, Mital; Abedini-Nassab, Roozbeh; Noh, Young-Woock; Lim, Yong Taik; Yellen, Benjamin B.; Kim, Cheolgi

    2014-05-01

    The ability to manipulate small fluid droplets, colloidal particles and single cells with the precision and parallelization of modern-day computer hardware has profound applications for biochemical detection, gene sequencing, chemical synthesis and highly parallel analysis of single cells. Drawing inspiration from general circuit theory and magnetic bubble technology, here we demonstrate a class of integrated circuits for executing sequential and parallel, timed operations on an ensemble of single particles and cells. The integrated circuits are constructed from lithographically defined, overlaid patterns of magnetic film and current lines. The magnetic patterns passively control particles similar to electrical conductors, diodes and capacitors. The current lines actively switch particles between different tracks similar to gated electrical transistors. When combined into arrays and driven by a rotating magnetic field clock, these integrated circuits have general multiplexing properties and enable the precise control of magnetizable objects.

  11. The Use of Evolutionary Approaches to Understand Single Cell Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiwei eLuo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The vast majority of environmental bacteria and archaea remain uncultivated, yet their genome sequences are rapidly becoming available through single cell sequencing technologies. Reconstructing metabolism is one common way to make use of genome sequences of ecologically important bacteria, but molecular evolutionary analysis is another approach that, while currently underused, can reveal important insights into the function of these uncultivated microbes in nature. Because genome sequences from single cells are often incomplete, metabolic reconstruction based on genome content can be compromised. However, this problem does not necessarily impede the use of phylogenomic and population genomic approaches that are based on patterns of polymorphisms and substitutions at nucleotide and amino acid sites. These approaches explore how various evolutionary forces act to assemble genetic diversity within and between lineages. In this mini-review, I present examples illustrating the benefits of analyzing single cell genomes using evolutionary approaches.

  12. Protective Effect of ALA in Crushed Optic Nerve Cat Retinal Ganglion Cells Using a New Marker RBPMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanling; Wang, Wenyao; Liu, Jessica; Huang, Xin; Liu, Ruixing; Xia, Huika; Brecha, Nicholas C; Pu, Mingliang; Gao, Jie

    2016-01-01

    In this study we first sought to determine whether RNA-binding protein with multiple splicing (RBPMS) can serve as a specific marker for cat retina ganglion cells (RGCs) using retrograde labeling and immunohistochemistry staining. RBPM was then used as an RGC marker to study RGC survival after optic nerve crush (ONC) and alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) treatment in cats. ALA treatment yielded a peak density of RBPMS-alpha cells within the peak isodensity zone (>60/mm2) which did not differ from ONC retinas. The area within the zone was significantly enlarged (control: 2.3%, ONC: 0.06%, ONC+ALA: 0.1%). As for the 10-21/mm2 zone, ALA treatment resulted in a significant increase in area (control: 34.5%, ONC: 12.1%, ONC+ALA: 35.9%). ALA can alleviate crush-induced RGC injury.

  13. Nasal-Type Extranodal Natural Killer/T-cell Neurolymphomatosis Confined to the Lumbar Nerve Roots: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Chun; Mun, Sung Hee; Lee, Young Hwan

    2009-01-01

    Neurolymphomatosis refers to lymphoma that has infiltrated the peripheral nervous system and this is the least common clinical presentation of nervous system lymphoma. Most neurolymphomatosis is due to B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and most patients show lymphomatous infiltration in the meninges and brain parenchyma, in addition to peripheral nervous system involvement. We diagnosed a case of neurolymphomatosis that was confined to the right 4th and 5th lumbar nerve roots without involvement of the meninges or brain parenchyma in a patient with the nasal-type extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma. We made this diagnosis based on the MRI and 18F-FDG PET-CT findings and the clinical manifestations

  14. Let-7 microRNAs Regenerate Peripheral Nerve Regeneration by Targeting Nerve Growth Factor

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shiying; Wang, Xinghui; Gu, Yun; Chen, Chu; Wang, Yaxian; Liu, Jie; Hu, Wen; Yu, Bin; Wang, Yongjun; Ding, Fei; Liu, Yan; Gu, Xiaosong

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a common clinical problem. Nerve growth factor (NGF) promotes peripheral nerve regeneration, but its clinical applications are limited by several constraints. In this study, we found that the time-dependent expression profiles of eight let-7 family members in the injured nerve after sciatic nerve injury were roughly similar to each other. Let-7 microRNAs (miRNAs) significantly reduced cell proliferation and migration of primary Schwann cells (SCs) by directly target...

  15. Retinal Ganglion Cell Protection Via Topical and Systemic Alpha-Tocopherol Administration in Optic Nerve Crush Model of Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Aktaş

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Pur po se: The aim of our study was to investigate the neuroprotective effects of topical α-tocopherol in optic nerve crush model of rat and to compare its efficacy with that of systemic α -tocopherol. Ma te ri al and Met hod: 50 eyes of 25 Wistar albino rats were included. The eyes were divided into six groups. Optic nerve crush was performed in Groups 1, 3, 5. Additionally, systemic and topical α-tocopherol therapies were given to Groups 1 and 3, respectively. No treatment was applied in Group 5. Groups 2, 4, and 6 were the fellow eyes of the animals comprising Groups 1, 3, and 5. Eyes were enucleated at day 45 of the study. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs were counted with light microscopy. Re sults: Mean RGC numbers were 14.5±3.7 (10.3-20 and 27.5±2.6 (24-30 in Groups 5 and 6, respectively (p: 0.001 They were measured to be 26.6±7.8 (19-45 and 24.6±3.9 (20-32 in Groups 1 and 2 and 21.1±7.1 (11-34 and 27±7.5 (18-42 in Groups 3 and 4 (p:0.659, p:0.094, respectively. There was no difference in Groups 2 and 4 compared with Group 6 (p:0.210, p:0.299, respectively. Dis cus si on: Topical α-tocopherol has a significant neuroprotective effects in optic nerve crush model of rat and may be used in the future for the treatment of optic neuropathies such as glaucoma. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2013; 43: 161-6

  16. Femtosecond laser fabricated microfluorescence-activated cell sorter for single cell recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragheri, F.; Paiè, P.; Nava, G.; Yang, T.; Minzioni, P.; Martinez Vazquez, R.; Bellini, N.; Ramponi, R.; Cristiani, I.; Osellame, R.

    2014-03-01

    Manipulation, sorting and recovering of specific live cells from samples containing less than a few thousand cells is becoming a major hurdle in rare cell exploration such as stem cell research or cell based diagnostics. Moreover the possibility of recovering single specific cells for culturing and further analysis would be of great impact in many biological fields ranging from regenerative medicine to cancer therapy. In recent years considerable effort has been devoted to the development of integrated and low-cost optofluidic devices able to handle single cells, which usually rely on microfluidic circuits that guarantee a controlled flow of the cells. Among the different microfabrication technologies, femtosecond laser micromachining (FLM) is ideally suited for this purpose as it provides the integration of both microfluidic and optical functions on the same glass chip leading to monolithic, robust and portable devices. Here a new optofluidic device is presented, which is capable of sorting and recovering of single cells, through optical forces, on the basis of their fluorescence and. Both fluorescence detection and single cell sorting functions are integrated in the microfluidic chip by FLM. The device, which is specifically designed to operate with a limited amount of cells but with a very high selectivity, is fabricated by a two-step process that includes femtosecond laser irradiation followed by chemical etching. The capability of the device to act as a micro fluorescence-activated cell sorter has been tested on polystyrene beads and on tumor cells and the results on the single live cell recovery are reported.

  17. Cell cycle phase-specific surface expression of nerve growth factor receptors TrkA and p75(NTR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdiales, J L; Becker, E; Andrieu, M; Thomas, A; Jullien, J; van Grunsven, L A; Menut, S; Evan, G I; Martín-Zanca, D; Rudkin, B B

    1998-09-01

    Expression of the nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors TrkA and p75(NTR) was found to vary at the surface of PC12 cells in a cell cycle phase-specific manner. This was evidenced by using flow cytometric and microscopic analysis of cell populations labeled with antibodies to the extracellular domains of both receptors. Differential expression of these receptors also was evidenced by biotinylation of surface proteins and Western analysis, using antibodies specific for the extracellular domains of TrkA and p75(NTR). TrkA is expressed most strongly at the cell surface in M and early G1 phases, whereas p75(NTR) is expressed mainly in late G1, S, and G2 phases. This expression reflects the molecular and cellular responses to NGF in specific phases of the cell cycle; in the G1 phase NGF elicits both the anti-mitogenic effect, i.e., inhibition of the G1 to S transition, and the differentiation response whereas a survival effect is provoked elsewhere in the cell cycle. A model is proposed relating these responses to the surface expression of the two receptors. These observations open the way for novel approaches to the investigation of the mechanism of NGF signal transduction.

  18. Comparison of diagnostic capability of macular ganglion cell complex and retinal nerve fiber layer among primary open angle glaucoma, ocular hypertension, and normal population using Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography and determining their functional correlation in Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabanita Barua

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Analysis of diagnostic ability of macular ganglionic cell complex and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL in glaucoma. Aim: To correlate functional and structural parameters and comparing predictive value of each of the structural parameters using Fourier-domain (FD optical coherence tomography (OCT among primary open angle glaucoma (POAG and ocular hypertension (OHT versus normal population. Setting and Design: Single centric, cross-sectional study done in 234 eyes. Materials and Methods: Patients were enrolled in three groups: POAG, ocular hypertensive and normal (40 patients in each group. After comprehensive ophthalmological examination, patients underwent standard automated perimetry and FD-OCT scan in optic nerve head and ganglion cell mode. The relationship was assessed by correlating ganglion cell complex (GCC parameters with mean deviation. Results were compared with RNFL parameters. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed with SPSS, analysis of variance, t-test, Pearson′s coefficient, and receiver operating curve. Results: All parameters showed strong correlation with visual field (P 0.5 when compared with other parameters. None of the parameters showed significant diagnostic capability to detect OHT from normal population. In diagnosing early glaucoma from OHT and normal population, only inferior GCC had statistically significant AUC value (0.715. Conclusion: In this study, GCC and RNFL parameters showed equal predictive capability in perimetric versus normal group. In early stage, inferior GCC was the best parameter. In OHT population, single day cross-sectional imaging was not valuable.

  19. Toward single cell traction microscopy within 3D collagen matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, Matthew S.; Long, Rong; Feng, Xinzeng; Huang, YuLing; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Wu, Mingming

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical interaction between the cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cellular behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and migration. Cells require the three-dimensional (3D) architectural support of the ECM to perform physiologically realistic functions. However, current understanding of cell–ECM and cell–cell mechanical interactions is largely derived from 2D cell traction force microscopy, in which cells are cultured on a flat substrate. 3D cell traction microscopy is emerging for mapping traction fields of single animal cells embedded in either synthetic or natively derived fibrous gels. We discuss here the development of 3D cell traction microscopy, its current limitations, and perspectives on the future of this technology. Emphasis is placed on strategies for applying 3D cell traction microscopy to individual tumor cell migration within collagen gels. - Highlights: • Review of the current state of the art in 3D cell traction force microscopy. • Bulk and micro-characterization of remodelable fibrous collagen gels. • Strategies for performing 3D cell traction microscopy within collagen gels

  20. Distinctive effect on nerve growth factor-induced PC12 cell neurite outgrowth by two unique neolignan enantiomers from Illicium merrillianum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xinhui; Yue, Rongcai; Zeng, Huawu; Li, Honglin; Shan, Lei; He, Weiwei; Shen, Yunheng; Zhang, Weidong

    2015-11-01

    Merrillianoid (1), a racemic neolignan possessing the characteristic benzo-2,7-dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]octane moiety, was isolated from the branches and leaves of Illicium merrillianum. Chiral separation of 1 gave two enantiomers (+)-1 and (-)-1. The structure of 1 was established by comprehensive spectroscopic analysis and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The absolute configurations of enantiomers were determined by quantum mechanical calculation. Compound (+)-1 exhibited a better neurotrophic activity than racemate 1 by promoting nerve growth factor (NGF) induced PC12 cell neurite outgrowth, while (-)-1 showed a distinctive inhibitory effect. Furthermore, a mechanism study indicated that the two enantiomers influenced NGF-induced neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells possibly by interacting with the trkA receptor, and extracellular signal regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) in Ras/ERK signal cascade. But the phosphorylation level of serine/threonine kinase Akt1 and Akt2 in PI3K/Akt signal pathway showed no significant difference between (+)-1 and (-)-1.

  1. Micromechanical and surface adhesive properties of single saccharomyces cerevisiae cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzi, Bahman; Cetinkaya, Cetin

    2017-09-01

    The adhesion and mechanical properties of a biological cell (e.g. cell membrane elasticity and adhesiveness) are often strong indicators for the state of its health. Many existing techniques for determining mechanical properties of cells require direct physical contact with a single cell or a group of cells. Physical contact with the cell can trigger complex mechanotransduction mechanisms, leading to cellular responses, and consequently interfering with measurement accuracy. In the current work, based on ultrasonic excitation and interferometric (optical) motion detection, a non-contact method for characterizing the adhesion and mechanical properties of single cells is presented. It is experimentally demonstrated that the rocking (rigid body) motion and internal vibrational resonance frequencies of a single saccharomyces cerevisiae (SC) (baker’s yeast) cell can be acquired with the current approach, and the Young’s modulus and surface tension of the cell membrane as well as surface adhesion energy can be extracted from the values of these acquired resonance frequencies. The detected resonance frequency ranges for single SC cells include a rocking (rigid body) frequency of 330  ±  70 kHz and two breathing resonance frequencies of 1.53  ±  0.12 and 2.02  ±  0.31 MHz. Based on these values, the average work-of-adhesion of SC cells on a silicon substrate in aqueous medium is extracted, for the first time, as WASC-Si=16.2+/- 3.8 mJ {{m}-2} . Similarly, the surface tension and the Young’s modulus of the SC cell wall are predicted as {{σ }SC}=0.16+/- 0.02 N {{m}-1} and {{E}SC}= 9.20  ±  2.80 MPa, respectively. These results are compared to those reported in the literature by utilizing various methods, and good agreements are found. The current approach eliminates the measurement inaccuracies associated with the physical contact. Exciting and detecting cell dynamics at micro-second time-scales is significantly faster than the

  2. Low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic field pretreated bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells promote the regeneration of crush-injured rat mental nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NaRi Seo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs have been shown to promote the regeneration of injured peripheral nerves. Pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF reportedly promotes the proliferation and neuronal differentiation of BMSCs. Low-frequency PEMF can induce the neuronal differentiation of BMSCs in the absence of nerve growth factors. This study was designed to investigate the effects of low-frequency PEMF pretreatment on the proliferation and function of BMSCs and the effects of low-frequency PEMF pre-treated BMSCs on the regeneration of injured peripheral nerve using in vitro and in vivo experiments. In in vitro experiments, quantitative DNA analysis was performed to determine the proliferation of BMSCs, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect S100 (Schwann cell marker, glial fibrillary acidic protein (astrocyte marker, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor (neurotrophic factors mRNA expression. In the in vivo experiments, rat models of crush-injured mental nerve established using clamp method were randomly injected with low-frequency PEMF pretreated BMSCs, unpretreated BMSCs or PBS at the injury site (1 × 106 cells. DiI-labeled BMSCs injected at the injury site were counted under the fluorescence microscope to determine cell survival. One or two weeks after cell injection, functional recovery of the injured nerve was assessed using the sensory test with von Frey filaments. Two weeks after cell injection, axonal regeneration was evaluated using histomorphometric analysis and retrograde labeling of trigeminal ganglion neurons. In vitro experiment results revealed that low-frequency PEMF pretreated BMSCs proliferated faster and had greater mRNA expression of growth factors than unpretreated BMSCs. In vivo experiment results revealed that compared with injection of unpretreated BMSCs, injection of low-frequency PEMF pretreated BMSCs led to higher myelinated axon count and axon

  3. Low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic field pretreated bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells promote the regeneration of crush-injured rat mental nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, NaRi; Lee, Sung-Ho; Ju, Kyung Won; Woo, JaeMan; Kim, BongJu; Kim, SoungMin; Jahng, Jeong Won; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2018-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have been shown to promote the regeneration of injured peripheral nerves. Pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) reportedly promotes the proliferation and neuronal differentiation of BMSCs. Low-frequency PEMF can induce the neuronal differentiation of BMSCs in the absence of nerve growth factors. This study was designed to investigate the effects of low-frequency PEMF pretreatment on the proliferation and function of BMSCs and the effects of low-frequency PEMF pre-treated BMSCs on the regeneration of injured peripheral nerve using in vitro and in vivo experiments. In in vitro experiments, quantitative DNA analysis was performed to determine the proliferation of BMSCs, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect S100 (Schwann cell marker), glial fibrillary acidic protein (astrocyte marker), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor (neurotrophic factors) mRNA expression. In the in vivo experiments, rat models of crush-injured mental nerve established using clamp method were randomly injected with low-frequency PEMF pretreated BMSCs, unpretreated BMSCs or PBS at the injury site (1 × 10 6 cells). DiI-labeled BMSCs injected at the injury site were counted under the fluorescence microscope to determine cell survival. One or two weeks after cell injection, functional recovery of the injured nerve was assessed using the sensory test with von Frey filaments. Two weeks after cell injection, axonal regeneration was evaluated using histomorphometric analysis and retrograde labeling of trigeminal ganglion neurons. In vitro experiment results revealed that low-frequency PEMF pretreated BMSCs proliferated faster and had greater mRNA expression of growth factors than unpretreated BMSCs. In vivo experiment results revealed that compared with injection of unpretreated BMSCs, injection of low-frequency PEMF pretreated BMSCs led to higher myelinated axon count and axon density and

  4. The Single Prostate Cell Transcriptome as Biological Assay

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nelson, Peter

    1999-01-01

    .... The scope to the research involves the construction of cDNA libraries representing the genes expressed in selected populations of normal and neoplastic prostate cancer cells followed by the construction of microarrays suitable for comprehensive gene expression studies. These arrays are then used to evaluate methods for single-cell transcriptome amplification with the aim of identifying a cohort of cellular transcripts which correlate with, or.

  5. Parallel single-cell sequencing links transcriptional and epigenetic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angermueller, Christof; Clark, Stephen J; Lee, Heather J; Macaulay, Iain C; Teng, Mabel J; Hu, Tim Xiaoming; Krueger, Felix; Smallwood, Sebastien; Ponting, Chris P; Voet, Thierry; Kelsey, Gavin; Stegle, Oliver; Reik, Wolf

    2016-03-01

    We report scM&T-seq, a method for parallel single-cell genome-wide methylome and transcriptome sequencing that allows for the discovery of associations between transcriptional and epigenetic variation. Profiling of 61 mouse embryonic stem cells confirmed known links between DNA methylation and transcription. Notably, the method revealed previously unrecognized associations between heterogeneously methylated distal regulatory elements and transcription of key pluripotency genes.

  6. Femtosecond laser fabrication of optofluidic devices for single cell manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bragheri Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we fabricate and validate two optofludic devices for the manipulation and analysis of single cells. The chips are fabricated by femtosecond laser micromachining exploiting the 3D capabilities of the technique and the inherent perfect alignment between microfluidic channels and optical networks. Both devices have been validated by probing the mechanical properties of different cancer cell lines, which are expected to show different elasticity because of their different metastatic potential.

  7. First human experience with autologous Schwann cells to supplement sciatic nerve repair: report of 2 cases with long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersey, Zachary C; Burks, S Shelby; Anderson, Kim D; Dididze, Marine; Khan, Aisha; Dietrich, W Dalton; Levi, Allan D

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Long-segment injuries to large peripheral nerves present a challenge to surgeons because insufficient donor tissue limits repair. Multiple supplemental approaches have been investigated, including the use of Schwann cells (SCs). The authors present the first 2 cases using autologous SCs to supplement a peripheral nerve graft repair in humans with long-term follow-up data. METHODS Two patients were enrolled in an FDA-approved trial to assess the safety of using expanded populations of autologous SCs to supplement the repair of long-segment injuries to the sciatic nerve. The mechanism of injury included a boat propeller and a gunshot wound. The SCs were obtained from both the sural nerve and damaged sciatic nerve stump. The SCs were expanded and purified in culture by using heregulin β1 and forskolin. Repair was performed with sural nerve grafts, SCs in suspension, and a Duragen graft to house the construct. Follow-up was 36 and 12 months for the patients in Cases 1 and 2, respectively. RESULTS The patient in Case 1 had a boat propeller injury with complete transection of both sciatic divisions at midthigh. The graft length was approximately 7.5 cm. In the postoperative period the patient regained motor function (Medical Research Council [MRC] Grade 5/5) in the tibial distribution, with partial function in peroneal distribution (MRC Grade 2/5 on dorsiflexion). Partial return of sensory function was also achieved, and neuropathic pain was completely resolved. The patient in Case 2 sustained a gunshot wound to the leg, with partial disruption of the tibial division of the sciatic nerve at the midthigh. The graft length was 5 cm. Postoperatively the patient regained complete motor function of the tibial nerve, with partial return of sensation. Long-term follow-up with both MRI and ultrasound demonstrated nerve graft continuity and the absence of tumor formation at the repair site. CONCLUSIONS Presented here are the first 2 cases in which autologous SCs were

  8. Single-cell mechanics: the parallel plates technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufi, Nathalie; Durand-Smet, Pauline; Asnacios, Atef

    2015-01-01

    We describe here the parallel plates technique which enables quantifying single-cell mechanics, either passive (cell deformability) or active (whole-cell traction forces). Based on the bending of glass microplates of calibrated stiffness, it is easy to implement on any microscope, and benefits from protocols and equipment already used in biology labs (coating of glass slides, pipette pullers, micromanipulators, etc.). We first present the principle of the technique, the design and calibration of the microplates, and various surface coatings corresponding to different cell-substrate interactions. Then we detail the specific cell preparation for the assays, and the different mechanical assays that can be carried out. Finally, we discuss the possible technical simplifications and the specificities of each mechanical protocol, as well as the possibility of extending the use of the parallel plates to investigate the mechanics of cell aggregates or tissues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Bioanalytical tools for single-cell study of exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Shencheng; Koseoglu, Secil; Haynes, Christy L

    2010-08-01

    Regulated exocytosis is a fundamental biological process used to deliver chemical messengers for cell-cell communication via membrane fusion and content secretion. A plethora of cell types employ this chemical-based communication to achieve crucial functions in many biological systems. Neurons in the brain and platelets in the circulatory system are representative examples utilizing exocytosis for neurotransmission and blood clotting. Single-cell studies of regulated exocytosis in the past several decades have greatly expanded our knowledge of this critical process, from vesicle/granule transport and docking at the early stages of exocytosis to membrane fusion and to eventual chemical messenger secretion. Herein, four main approaches that have been widely used to study single-cell exocytosis will be highlighted, including total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, capillary electrophoresis, single-cell mass spectrometry, and microelectrochemistry. These techniques are arranged in the order following the route of a vesicle/granule destined for secretion. Within each section, the basic principles and experimental strategies are reviewed and representative examples are given revealing critical spatial, temporal, and chemical information of a secretory vesicle/granule at different stages of its lifetime. Lastly, an analytical chemist's perspective on potential future developments in this exciting field is discussed.

  10. Single-cell epigenomics: powerful new methods for understanding gene regulation and cell identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Stephen J; Lee, Heather J; Smallwood, Sébastien A; Kelsey, Gavin; Reik, Wolf

    2016-04-18

    Emerging single-cell epigenomic methods are being developed with the exciting potential to transform our knowledge of gene regulation. Here we review available techniques and future possibilities, arguing that the full potential of single-cell epigenetic studies will be realized through parallel profiling of genomic, transcriptional, and epigenetic information.

  11. Deconstructing stem cell population heterogeneity: Single-cell analysis and modeling approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jincheng; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S.

    2014-01-01

    Isogenic stem cell populations display cell-to-cell variations in a multitude of attributes including gene or protein expression, epigenetic state, morphology, proliferation and proclivity for differentiation. The origins of the observed heterogeneity and its roles in the maintenance of pluripotency and the lineage specification of stem cells remain unclear. Addressing pertinent questions will require the employment of single-cell analysis methods as traditional cell biochemical and biomolecular assays yield mostly population-average data. In addition to time-lapse microscopy and flow cytometry, recent advances in single-cell genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic profiling are reviewed. The application of multiple displacement amplification, next generation sequencing, mass cytometry and spectrometry to stem cell systems is expected to provide a wealth of information affording unprecedented levels of multiparametric characterization of cell ensembles under defined conditions promoting pluripotency or commitment. Establishing connections between single-cell analysis information and the observed phenotypes will also require suitable mathematical models. Stem cell self-renewal and differentiation are orchestrated by the coordinated regulation of subcellular, intercellular and niche-wide processes spanning multiple time scales. Here, we discuss different modeling approaches and challenges arising from their application to stem cell populations. Integrating single-cell analysis with computational methods will fill gaps in our knowledge about the functions of heterogeneity in stem cell physiology. This combination will also aid the rational design of efficient differentiation and reprogramming strategies as well as bioprocesses for the production of clinically valuable stem cell derivatives. PMID:24035899

  12. Single-cell analysis of growth and cell division of the anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouchka eFievet

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen significant progress in understanding basic bacterial cell cycle properties such as cell growth and cell division. While characterization and regulation of bacterial cell cycle is quite well documented in the case of fast growing aerobic model organisms, no data has been so far reported for anaerobic bacteria. This lack of information in anaerobic microorganisms can mainly be explained by the absence of molecular and cellular tools such as single cell microscopy and fluorescent probes usable for anaerobes and essential to study cellular events and/or subcellular localization of the actors involved in cell cycle.In this study, single-cell microscopy has been adapted to study for the first time, in real time, the cell cycle of a bacterial anaerobe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH. This single-cell analysis provides mechanistic insights into the cell division cycle of DvH, which seems to be governed by the recently discussed so-called incremental model that generates remarkably homogeneous cell sizes. Furthermore, cell division was reversibly blocked during oxygen exposure. This may constitute a strategy for anaerobic cells to cope with transient exposure to oxygen that they may encounter in their natural environment, thereby contributing to their aerotolerance. This study lays the foundation for the first molecular, single-cell assay that will address factors that cannot otherwise be resolved in bulk assays and that will allow visualization of a wide range of molecular mechanisms within living anaerobic cells.

  13. Terminal nerve: cranial nerve zero

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Eduardo Duque Parra; Carlos Alberto Duque Parra

    2006-01-01

    It has been stated, in different types of texts, that there are only twelve pairs of cranial nerves. Such texts exclude the existence of another cranial pair, the terminal nerve or even cranial zero. This paper considers the mentioned nerve like a cranial pair, specifying both its connections and its functional role in the migration of liberating neurons of the gonadotropic hormone (Gn RH). In this paper is also stated the hypothesis of the phylogenetic existence of a cerebral sector and a co...

  14. Single-cell analysis of endothelial morphogenesis in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jianxin A.; Castranova, Daniel; Pham, Van N.; Weinstein, Brant M.

    2015-01-01

    Vessel formation has been extensively studied at the tissue level, but the difficulty in imaging the endothelium with cellular resolution has hampered study of the morphogenesis and behavior of endothelial cells (ECs) in vivo. We are using endothelial-specific transgenes and high-resolution imaging to examine single ECs in zebrafish. By generating mosaics with transgenes that simultaneously mark endothelial nuclei and membranes we are able to definitively identify and study the morphology and behavior of individual ECs during vessel sprouting and lumen formation. Using these methods, we show that developing trunk vessels are composed of ECs of varying morphology, and that single-cell analysis can be used to quantitate alterations in morphology and dynamics in ECs that are defective in proper guidance and patterning. Finally, we use single-cell analysis of intersegmental vessels undergoing lumen formation to demonstrate the coexistence of seamless transcellular lumens and single or multicellular enclosed lumens with autocellular or intercellular junctions, suggesting that heterogeneous mechanisms contribute to vascular lumen formation in vivo. The tools that we have developed for single EC analysis should facilitate further rigorous qualitative and quantitative analysis of EC morphology and behavior in vivo. PMID:26253401

  15. Mechanism of sphingosine 1-phosphate- and lysophosphatidic Acid-induced up-regulation of adhesion molecules and eosinophil chemoattractant in nerve cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Costello, Richard W

    2011-05-01

    The lysophospholipids sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) act via G-protein coupled receptors S1P(1-5) and LPA(1-3) respectively, and are implicated in allergy. Eosinophils accumulate at innervating cholinergic nerves in asthma and adhere to nerve cells via intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells were used as an in vitro cholinergic nerve cell model. The G(i) coupled receptors S1P(1), S1P(3), LPA(1), LPA(2) and LPA(3) were expressed on IMR-32 cells. Both S1P and LPA induced ERK phosphorylation and ERK- and G(i)-dependent up-regulation of ICAM-1 expression, with differing time courses. LPA also induced ERK- and G(i)-dependent up-regulation of the eosinophil chemoattractant, CCL-26. The eosinophil granule protein eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) induced ERK-dependent up-regulation of transcription of S1P(1), LPA(1), LPA(2) and LPA(3), providing the situation whereby eosinophil granule proteins may enhance S1P- and\\/or LPA- induced eosinophil accumulation at nerve cells in allergic conditions.

  16. Mechanism of sphingosine 1-phosphate- and lysophosphatidic Acid-induced up-regulation of adhesion molecules and eosinophil chemoattractant in nerve cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Costello, Richard W

    2012-02-01

    The lysophospholipids sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) act via G-protein coupled receptors S1P(1-5) and LPA(1-3) respectively, and are implicated in allergy. Eosinophils accumulate at innervating cholinergic nerves in asthma and adhere to nerve cells via intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells were used as an in vitro cholinergic nerve cell model. The G(i) coupled receptors S1P(1), S1P(3), LPA(1), LPA(2) and LPA(3) were expressed on IMR-32 cells. Both S1P and LPA induced ERK phosphorylation and ERK- and G(i)-dependent up-regulation of ICAM-1 expression, with differing time courses. LPA also induced ERK- and G(i)-dependent up-regulation of the eosinophil chemoattractant, CCL-26. The eosinophil granule protein eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) induced ERK-dependent up-regulation of transcription of S1P(1), LPA(1), LPA(2) and LPA(3), providing the situation whereby eosinophil granule proteins may enhance S1P- and\\/or LPA- induced eosinophil accumulation at nerve cells in allergic conditions.

  17. Droplet Microfluidics for Compartmentalized Cell Lysis and Extension of DNA from Single-Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimny, Philip; Juncker, David; Reisner, Walter

    Current single cell DNA analysis methods suffer from (i) bias introduced by the need for molecular amplification and (ii) limited ability to sequence repetitive elements, resulting in (iii) an inability to obtain information regarding long range genomic features. Recent efforts to circumvent these limitations rely on techniques for sensing single molecules of DNA extracted from single-cells. Here we demonstrate a droplet microfluidic approach for encapsulation and biochemical processing of single-cells inside alginate microparticles. In our approach, single-cells are first packaged inside the alginate microparticles followed by cell lysis, DNA purification, and labeling steps performed off-chip inside this microparticle system. The alginate microparticles are then introduced inside a micro/nanofluidic system where the alginate is broken down via a chelating buffer, releasing long DNA molecules which are then extended inside nanofluidic channels for analysis via standard mapping protocols.

  18. Post-embryonic nerve-associated precursors to adult pigment cells: genetic requirements and dynamics of morphogenesis and differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erine H Budi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The pigment cells of vertebrates serve a variety of functions and generate a stunning variety of patterns. These cells are also implicated in human pathologies including melanoma. Whereas the events of pigment cell development have been studied extensively in the embryo, much less is known about morphogenesis and differentiation of these cells during post-embryonic stages. Previous studies of zebrafish revealed genetically distinct populations of embryonic and adult melanophores, the ectotherm homologue of amniote melanocytes. Here, we use molecular markers, vital labeling, time-lapse imaging, mutational analyses, and transgenesis to identify peripheral nerves as a niche for precursors to adult melanophores that subsequently migrate to the skin to form the adult pigment pattern. We further identify genetic requirements for establishing, maintaining, and recruiting precursors to the adult melanophore lineage and demonstrate novel compensatory behaviors during pattern regulation in mutant backgrounds. Finally, we show that distinct populations of latent precursors having differential regenerative capabilities persist into the adult. These findings provide a foundation for future studies of post-embryonic pigment cell precursors in development, evolution, and neoplasia.

  19. Evaluation of yeast single cell protein (SCP) diets on growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An investigation was carried out on the possibility of replacing fishmeal with graded levels of yeast single cell protein (SCP; 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50%) in ... that the 50% yeast SCP fed fish had the highest percentage of body protein (55.35%), but with a lower amount of fat at the end of the feeding trial compared to the control.

  20. PRODt;CTION OF SINGLE CELL PROTEIN FROM BREWERY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSN

    customary food and feed sources of protein (agriculnrre and fishery) to ocher sources like single cell protein (SCP); whose production from hydrocarbons is one ... origin is unicellular or simple multicellular organism such as bacteria, yeasts, fungi, algae. protozoa, mid even bacterinphagcs generally cultivated on substrates ...

  1. Production of single cell proterin from brewery spent grains ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The production of single cell protein (SCP) by the propagation of the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisae obtained from the Federal Institute of Industrial Research Oshtxli was studied by using the extract of spent grains obtained from the International Beer and Beverage Industries, Kacltuia, Nigeria as a substrate in a medium ...

  2. Single-cell LEP-type cavity on measurement stand

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1982-01-01

    A single-cell cavity, made of copper, with tapered connectors for impedance measurements. It was used as a model of LEP-type superconducting cavities, to investigate impedance and higher-order modes and operated at around 600 MHz (the LEP acceleration frequency was 352.2 MHz). See 8202500.

  3. Conversion of Food waste to Single Cell Protein using Aspergillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    2018-03-13

    Mar 13, 2018 ... ABSTRACT: The utilization of food waste into products like single cell protein is an alternative solution to global protein shortage ... as orange, pineapple, banana, watermelon and cucumber waste as growth media for A. niger using standard techniques. ..... Waste to Wealth- Value Recovery from. Agrofood.

  4. Conversion of Food waste to Single Cell Protein using Aspergillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The utilization of food waste into products like single cell protein is an alternative solution to global protein shortage and to alleviate pollution problems. This investigation was carried out with food wastes such as orange, pineapple, banana, watermelon and cucumber waste as growth media for A. niger using standard ...

  5. Single-cell sequencing to quantify genomic integrity in cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bos, Hilda; Bakker, Bjorn; Spierings, Diana C J; Lansdorp, Peter M; Foijer, Floris

    The use of single-cell DNA sequencing (sc-seq) techniques for the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of cancer is a rapidly developing field. Sc-seq research is gaining momentum by decreased sequencing costs and continuous improvements in techniques. In this review, we provide an overview of recent

  6. Evaluation of yeast single cell protein (SCP) diets on growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    An investigation was carried out on the possibility of replacing fishmeal with graded levels of yeast single cell protein (SCP; 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50%) in isonitrogenous feed formulations (30% protein) in the diet of Oreochromis niloticus fingerlings for a period of 12 weeks. The control diet had fishmeal as the primary protein ...

  7. Correlated receptor transport processes buffer single-cell heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallenberger, Stefan M; Unger, Anne L; Legewie, Stefan; Lymperopoulos, Konstantinos; Klingmüller, Ursula; Eils, Roland; Herten, Dirk-Peter

    2017-09-01

    Cells typically vary in their response to extracellular ligands. Receptor transport processes modulate ligand-receptor induced signal transduction and impact the variability in cellular responses. Here, we quantitatively characterized cellular variability in erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) trafficking at the single-cell level based on live-cell imaging and mathematical modeling. Using ensembles of single-cell mathematical models reduced parameter uncertainties and showed that rapid EpoR turnover, transport of internalized EpoR back to the plasma membrane, and degradation of Epo-EpoR complexes were essential for receptor trafficking. EpoR trafficking dynamics in adherent H838 lung cancer cells closely resembled the dynamics previously characterized by mathematical modeling in suspension cells, indicating that dynamic properties of the EpoR system are widely conserved. Receptor transport processes differed by one order of magnitude between individual cells. However, the concentration of activated Epo-EpoR complexes was less variable due to the correlated kinetics of opposing transport processes acting as a buffering system.

  8. Correlated receptor transport processes buffer single-cell heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan M Kallenberger

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cells typically vary in their response to extracellular ligands. Receptor transport processes modulate ligand-receptor induced signal transduction and impact the variability in cellular responses. Here, we quantitatively characterized cellular variability in erythropoietin receptor (EpoR trafficking at the single-cell level based on live-cell imaging and mathematical modeling. Using ensembles of single-cell mathematical models reduced parameter uncertainties and showed that rapid EpoR turnover, transport of internalized EpoR back to the plasma membrane, and degradation of Epo-EpoR complexes were essential for receptor trafficking. EpoR trafficking dynamics in adherent H838 lung cancer cells closely resembled the dynamics previously characterized by mathematical modeling in suspension cells, indicating that dynamic properties of the EpoR system are widely conserved. Receptor transport processes differed by one order of magnitude between individual cells. However, the concentration of activated Epo-EpoR complexes was less variable due to the correlated kinetics of opposing transport processes acting as a buffering system.

  9. Mie scatter corrections in single cell infrared microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konevskikh, Tatiana; Lukacs, Rozalia; Blümel, Reinhold; Ponossov, Arkadi; Kohler, Achim

    2016-06-23

    Strong Mie scattering signatures hamper the chemical interpretation and multivariate analysis of the infrared microscopy spectra of single cells and tissues. During recent years, several numerical Mie scatter correction algorithms for the infrared spectroscopy of single cells have been published. In the paper at hand, we critically reviewed existing algorithms for the correction of Mie scattering and suggest improvements. We developed an iterative algorithm based on Extended Multiplicative Scatter Correction (EMSC), for the retrieval of pure absorbance spectra from highly distorted infrared spectra of single cells. The new algorithm uses the van de Hulst approximation formula for the extinction efficiency employing a complex refractive index. The iterative algorithm involves the establishment of an EMSC meta-model. While existing iterative algorithms for the correction of resonant Mie scattering employ three independent parameters for establishing a meta-model, we could decrease the number of parameters from three to two independent parameters, which reduced the calculation time for the Mie scattering curves for the iterative EMSC meta-model by a factor of 10. Moreover, by employing the Hilbert transform for evaluating the Kramers-Kronig relations based on a FFT algorithm in Matlab, we further improved the speed of the algorithm by a factor of 100. For testing the algorithm we simulate distorted apparent absorbance spectra by utilizing the exact theory for the scattering of infrared light at absorbing spheres, taking into account the high numerical aperture of infrared microscopes employed for the analysis of single cells and tissues. In addition, the algorithm was applied to measured absorbance spectra of single lung cancer cells.

  10. Phase Difference in the Induction of Tyrosine Hydroxylase in Cell Body and Nerve Terminals of Sympathetic Neurones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoenen, Hans; Mueller, Robert A.; Axelrod, Julius

    1970-01-01

    The induction of tyrosine hydroxylase in the nerve terminals of the rat heart by reserpine lags behind that in the stellate ganglion by two to three days. Cycloheximide given three days after reserpine blocks the further rise of the enzyme in the nerve terminals. The increase in tyrosine hydroxylase activity of the lumbar ganglion is as marked as that in the stellate ganglion. The increase of enzyme activity in the sciatic nerve after reserpine administration resembles that found in the heart nerve terminals. Determination of enzyme activity in segments of sciatic nerves indicates a two-day lag and then a proximal-distal transport of enzyme, but the apparent rate is not sufficient to account for the increase in enzyme in the nerve terminals. These findings are compatible with the local synthesis of induced tyrosine hydroxylase in the nerve terminals rather than the peripheral movement of the completed enzyme. PMID:4189989

  11. Photoacoustic imaging of single circulating melanoma cells in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lidai; Yao, Junjie; Zhang, Ruiying; Xu, Song; Li, Guo; Zou, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    Melanoma, one of the most common types of skin cancer, has a high mortality rate, mainly due to a high propensity for tumor metastasis. The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is a potential predictor for metastasis. Label-free imaging of single circulating melanoma cells in vivo provides rich information on tumor progress. Here we present photoacoustic microscopy of single melanoma cells in living animals. We used a fast-scanning optical-resolution photoacoustic microscope to image the microvasculature in mouse ears. The imaging system has sub-cellular spatial resolution and works in reflection mode. A fast-scanning mirror allows the system to acquire fast volumetric images over a large field of view. A 500-kHz pulsed laser was used to image blood and CTCs. Single circulating melanoma cells were imaged in both capillaries and trunk vessels in living animals. These high-resolution images may be used in early detection of CTCs with potentially high sensitivity. In addition, this technique enables in vivo study of tumor cell extravasation from a primary tumor, which addresses an urgent pre-clinical need.

  12. Advances of Single-Cell Sequencing Technique in Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-feng FENG

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available With the completion of human genome project (HGP and the international HapMap project as well as rapid development of high-throughput biochip technology, whole genomic sequencing-targeted analysis of genomic structures has been primarily finished. Application of single cell for the analysis of the whole genomics is not only economical in material collection, but more importantly, the cell will be more purified, and the laboratory results will be more accurate and reliable. Therefore, exploration and analysis of hereditary information of single tumor cells has become the dream of all researchers in the field of basic research of tumors. At present, single-cell sequencing (SCS on malignancies has been widely used in the studies of pathogeneses of multiple malignancies, such as glioma, renal cancer and hematologic neoplasms, and in the studies of the metastatic mechanism of breast cancer by some researchers. This study mainly reviewed the SCS, the mechanisms and the methods of SCS in isolating tumor cells, and application of SCS technique in tumor-related basic research and clinical treatment.

  13. Preparation of Single Cells for Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, E S; Fortson, S L; Kulp, K S; Checchi, K D; Wu, L; Felton, J S; Wu, K J

    2007-10-24

    Characterizing chemical changes within single cells is important for determining fundamental mechanisms of biological processes that will lead to new biological insights and improved disease understanding. Imaging biological systems with mass spectrometry (MS) has gained popularity in recent years as a method for creating precise chemical maps of biological samples. In order to obtain high-quality mass spectral images that provide relevant molecular information about individual cells, samples must be prepared so that salts and other cell-culture components are removed from the cell surface and the cell contents are rendered accessible to the desorption beam. We have designed a cellular preparation protocol for imaging MS that preserves the cellular contents for investigation and removes the majority of the interfering species from the extracellular matrix. Using this method, we obtain excellent imaging results and reproducibility in three diverse cell types: MCF7 human breast cancer cells, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, and NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts. This preparation technique allows routine imaging MS analysis of cultured cells, allowing for any number of experiments aimed at furthering scientific understanding of molecular processes within individual cells.

  14. Single-cell Western blotting after whole-cell imaging to assess cancer chemotherapeutic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Chi-Chih; Lin, Jung-Ming G; Xu, Zhuchen; Kumar, Sanjay; Herr, Amy E

    2014-10-21

    Intratumor heterogeneity remains a major obstacle to effective cancer therapy and personalized medicine. Current understanding points to differential therapeutic response among subpopulations of tumor cells as a key challenge to successful treatment. To advance our understanding of how this heterogeneity is reflected in cell-to-cell variations in chemosensitivity and expression of drug-resistance proteins, we optimize and apply a new targeted proteomics modality, single-cell western blotting (scWestern), to a human glioblastoma cell line. To acquire both phenotypic and proteomic data on the same, single glioblastoma cells, we integrate high-content imaging prior to the scWestern assays. The scWestern technique supports thousands of concurrent single-cell western blots, with each assay comprised of chemical lysis of single cells seated in microwells, protein electrophoresis from those microwells into a supporting polyacrylamide (PA) gel layer, and in-gel antibody probing. We systematically optimize chemical lysis and subsequent polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) of the single-cell lysate. The scWestern slides are stored for months then reprobed, thus allowing archiving and later analysis as relevant to sparingly limited, longitudinal cell specimens. Imaging and scWestern analysis of single glioblastoma cells dosed with the chemotherapeutic daunomycin showed both apoptotic (cleaved caspase 8- and annexin V-positive) and living cells. Intriguingly, living glioblastoma subpopulations show up-regulation of a multidrug resistant protein, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), suggesting an active drug efflux pump as a potential mechanism of drug resistance. Accordingly, linking of phenotype with targeted protein analysis with single-cell resolution may advance our understanding of drug response in inherently heterogeneous cell populations, such as those anticipated in tumors.

  15. Single-cell qPCR on dispersed primary pituitary cells -an optimized protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haug Trude M

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of false positives is a potential problem in single-cell PCR experiments. This paper describes an optimized protocol for single-cell qPCR measurements in primary pituitary cell cultures following patch-clamp recordings. Two different cell harvesting methods were assessed using both the GH4 prolactin producing cell line from rat, and primary cell culture from fish pituitaries. Results Harvesting whole cells followed by cell lysis and qPCR performed satisfactory on the GH4 cell line. However, harvesting of whole cells from primary pituitary cultures regularly produced false positives, probably due to RNA leakage from cells ruptured during the dispersion of the pituitary cells. To reduce RNA contamination affecting the results, we optimized the conditions by harvesting only the cytosol through a patch pipette, subsequent to electrophysiological experiments. Two important factors proved crucial for reliable harvesting. First, silanizing the patch pipette glass prevented foreign extracellular RNA from attaching to charged residues on the glass surface. Second, substituting the commonly used perforating antibiotic amphotericin B with β-escin allowed efficient cytosol harvest without loosing the giga seal. Importantly, the two harvesting protocols revealed no difference in RNA isolation efficiency. Conclusion Depending on the cell type and preparation, validation of the harvesting technique is extremely important as contaminations may give false positives. Here we present an optimized protocol allowing secure harvesting of RNA from single cells in primary pituitary cell culture following perforated whole cell patch clamp experiments.

  16. Protein Expression Analyses at the Single Cell Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masae Ohno

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The central dogma of molecular biology explains how genetic information is converted into its end product, proteins, which are responsible for the phenotypic state of the cell. Along with the protein type, the phenotypic state depends on the protein copy number. Therefore, quantification of the protein expression in a single cell is critical for quantitative characterization of the phenotypic states. Protein expression is typically a dynamic and stochastic phenomenon that cannot be well described by standard experimental methods. As an alternative, fluorescence imaging is being explored for the study of protein expression, because of its high sensitivity and high throughput. Here we review key recent progresses in fluorescence imaging-based methods and discuss their application to proteome analysis at the single cell level.

  17. High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of single cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric M. Strohm

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic images of stained neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes from a blood smear were acquired using a combined acoustic/photoacoustic microscope. Photoacoustic images were created using a pulsed 532 nm laser that was coupled to a single mode fiber to produce output wavelengths from 532 nm to 620 nm via stimulated Raman scattering. The excitation wavelength was selected using optical filters and focused onto the sample using a 20× objective. A 1000 MHz transducer was co-aligned with the laser spot and used for ultrasound and photoacoustic images, enabling micrometer resolution with both modalities. The different cell types could be easily identified due to variations in contrast within the acoustic and photoacoustic images. This technique provides a new way of probing leukocyte structure with potential applications towards detecting cellular abnormalities and diseased cells at the single cell level.

  18. Methylcobalamin promotes the differentiation of Schwann cells and remyelination in lysophosphatidylcholine-induced demyelination of the rat sciatic nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke eNishimoto

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Schwann cells (SCs are constituents of the peripheral nervous system. The differentiation of SCs in injured peripheral nerves is critical for regeneration after injury. Methylcobalamin (MeCbl is a vitamin B12 analog that is necessary for the maintenance of the peripheral nervous system. In this study, we estimated the effect of MeCbl on SCs. We showed that MeCbl downregulated the activity of Erk1/2 and promoted the expression of the myelin basic protein in SCs. In a dorsal root ganglion neuron–SC coculture system, myelination was promoted by MeCbl. In a focal demyelination rat model, MeCbl promoted remyelination and motor and sensory functional regeneration. MeCbl promoted the in vitro differentiation of SCs and in vivo myelination in a rat demyelination model and may be a novel therapy for several types of nervous disorders.

  19. Single Particle Tracking: Analysis Techniques for Live Cell Nanoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relich, Peter Kristopher, II

    Single molecule experiments are a set of experiments designed specifically to study the properties of individual molecules. It has only been in the last three decades where single molecule experiments have been applied to the life sciences; where they have been successfully implemented in systems biology for probing the behaviors of sub-cellular mechanisms. The advent and growth of super-resolution techniques in single molecule experiments has made the fundamental behaviors of light and the associated nano-probes a necessary concern amongst life scientists wishing to advance the state of human knowledge in biology. This dissertation disseminates some of the practices learned in experimental live cell microscopy. The topic of single particle tracking is addressed here in a format that is designed for the physicist who embarks upon single molecule studies. Specifically, the focus is on the necessary procedures to generate single particle tracking analysis techniques that can be implemented to answer biological questions. These analysis techniques range from designing and testing a particle tracking algorithm to inferring model parameters once an image has been processed. The intellectual contributions of the author include the techniques in diffusion estimation, localization filtering, and trajectory associations for tracking which will all be discussed in detail in later chapters. The author of this thesis has also contributed to the software development of automated gain calibration, live cell particle simulations, and various single particle tracking packages. Future work includes further evaluation of this laboratory's single particle tracking software, entropy based approaches towards hypothesis validations, and the uncertainty quantification of gain calibration.

  20. Recombinant human albumin supports single cell cloning of CHO cells in chemically defined media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiang; Wooh, Jong Wei; Hou, Jeff Jia Cheng; Hughes, Benjamin S; Gray, Peter P; Munro, Trent P

    2012-01-01

    Biologic drugs, such as monoclonal antibodies, are commonly made using mammalian cells in culture. The cell lines used for manufacturing should ideally be clonal, meaning derived from a single cell, which represents a technically challenging process. Fetal bovine serum is often used to support low cell density cultures, however, from a regulatory perspective, it is preferable to avoid animal-derived components to increase process consistency and reduce the risk of contamination from adventitious agents. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the most widely used cell line in industry and a large number of serum-free, protein-free, and fully chemically defined growth media are commercially available, although these media alone do not readily support efficient single cell cloning. In this work, we have developed a simple, fully defined, single-cell cloning media, specifically for CHO cells, using commercially available reagents. Our results show that a 1:1 mixture of CD-CHO™ and DMEM/F12 supplemented with 1.5 g/L of recombinant albumin (Albucult®) supports single cell cloning. This formulation can support recovery of single cells in 43% of cultures compared to 62% in the presence of serum. Copyright © 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  1. Intravenous Infusion of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduces Erectile Dysfunction Following Cavernous Nerve Injury in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yohei; Sasaki, Masanori; Kataoka-Sasaki, Yuko; Takayanagi, Akio; Kobayashi, Ko; Oka, Shinichi; Nakazaki, Masahito; Masumori, Naoya; Kocsis, Jeffery D; Honmou, Osamu

    2018-03-01

    Intravenous preload (delivered before cavernous nerve [CN] injury) of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can prevent or decrease postoperative erectile dysfunction (J Sex Med 2015;12:1713-1721). In the present study, the potential therapeutic effects of intravenously administered MSCs on postoperative erectile dysfunction were evaluated in a rat model of CN injury. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into 2 groups after electric CN injury. Intravenous infusion of bone marrow-derived MSCs (1.0 × 10 6 cells in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium 1 mL) or vehicle (Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium 1 mL) was performed 3 hours after electrocautery-induced CN injury. To assess erectile function, we measured intracavernous pressure at 4 weeks after MSC or vehicle infusion. Histologic examinations were performed to investigate neuronal innervation and inhibition of smooth muscle atrophy. Green fluorescent protein-positive bone marrow-derived MSCs were used for cell tracking. To investigate mRNA expression levels of neurotrophins in the major pelvic ganglia (MPGs), quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed. The decrease of intracavernous pressure corrected for arterial pressure and area under the curve of intracavernous pressure in the bone marrow-derived MSC group was significantly lower than that in the vehicle group at 4 weeks after infusion (P derived MSCs were detected in the MPGs and injured CNs using confocal microscopy, indicating homing of cells to the MPGs and injured CNs. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor expression levels in the MPGs were significantly higher in the MSC group than in the vehicle group (P derived MSCs after CN injury might have therapeutic efficacy in experimental erectile dysfunction. Matsuda Y, Sasaki M, Kataoka-Sasaki Y, et al. Intravenous Infusion of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduces Erectile Dysfunction Following Cavernous Nerve Injury in

  2. High Throughput Single-cell and Multiple-cell Micro-encapsulation

    OpenAIRE

    Lagus, Todd P.; Edd, Jon F.

    2012-01-01

    Microfluidic encapsulation methods have been previously utilized to capture cells in picoliter-scale aqueous, monodisperse drops, providing confinement from a bulk fluid environment with applications in high throughput screening, cytometry, and mass spectrometry. We describe a method to not only encapsulate single cells, but to repeatedly capture a set number of cells (here we demonstrate one- and two-cell encapsulation) to study both isolation and the interactions between cells in groups of ...

  3. Insulin-like growth factors act synergistically with basic fibroblast growth factor and nerve growth factor to promote chromaffin cell proliferation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frödin, M; Gammeltoft, S

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and nerve growth factor (NGF) on DNA synthesis in cultured chromaffin cells from fetal, neonatal, and adult rats by using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdUrd) pulse labeling for 24 or 48 h...

  4. Demonstration of immunochemical identity between the nerve growth factor-inducible large external (NILE) glycoprotein and the cell adhesion molecule L1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bock, E; Richter-Landsberg, C; Faissner, A

    1985-01-01

    The nerve growth factor-inducible large external (NILE) glycoprotein and the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 were shown to be immunochemically identical. Immunoprecipitation with L1 and NILE antibodies of [3H]fucose-labeled material from culture supernatants and detergent extracts of NGF-treated...

  5. Synchronized reconstitution of muscle fibers, peripheral nerves and blood vessels by murine skeletal muscle-derived CD34(-)/45 (-) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Tetsuro; Okada, Yoshinori; Uchiyama, Yoshiyasu; Tono, Kayoko; Masuda, Maki; Wada, Mika; Hoshi, Akio; Akatsuka, Akira

    2007-10-01

    In order to establish the practical isolation and usage of skeletal muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs), we determined reconstitution capacity of CD34(-)/CD45(-) (Sk-DN) cells as a candidate somatic stem cell source for transplantation. Sk-DN cells were enzymatically isolated from GFP transgenic mice (C57/BL6N) skeletal muscle and sorted using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), and expanded by collagen gel-based cell culture with bFGF and EGF. The number of Sk-DN cells was small after sorting (2-8 x 10(4)); however, the number increased 10-20 fold (2-16 x 10(5)) after 6 days of expansion culture, and the cells maintained immature state and multipotency, expressing mRNAs for mesodermal and ectodermal cell lineages. Transplantation of expanded Sk-DN cells into the severe muscle damage model (C57/BL6N wild-type) resulted in the synchronized reconstitution of blood vessels, peripheral nerves and muscle fibers following significant recovery of total muscle mass (57%) and contractile function (55%), whereas the non-cell-transplanted control group showed around 20% recovery in both factors. These reconstitution capacities were supported by the intrinsic plasticity of Sk-DN cells that can differentiate into muscular (skeletal muscle), vascular (pericyte, endothelial cell and smooth muscle) and peripheral nerve (Schwann cells and perineurium) cell lineages that was revealed by transplantation to non-muscle tissue (beneath renal capsule) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis.

  6. Hepatocyte growth factor promotes long-term survival and axonal regeneration of retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve injury: comparison with CNTF and BDNF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wai-Kai; Cheung, Anny Wan-Suen; Yu, Sau-Wai; Sha, Ou; Cho, Eric Yu Pang

    2014-10-01

    Different trophic factors are known to promote retinal ganglion cell survival and regeneration, but each had their own limitations. We report that hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) confers distinct advantages in supporting ganglion cell survival and axonal regeneration, when compared to two well-established trophic factors ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Ganglion cells in adult hamster were injured by cutting the optic nerve. HGF, CNTF, or BDNF was injected at different dosages intravitreally after injury. Ganglion cell survival was quantified at 7, 14, or 28 days postinjury. Peripheral nerve (PN) grafting to the cut optic nerve of the growth factor-injected eye was performed either immediately after injury or delayed until 7 days post-injury. Expression of heat-shock protein 27 and changes in microglia numbers were quantified in different growth factor groups. The cellular distribution of c-Met in the retina was examined by anti-c-Met immunostaining. Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF) was equally potent as BDNF in promoting short-term survival (up to 14 days post-injury) and also supported survival at 28 days post-injury when ganglion cells treated by CNTF or BDNF failed to be sustained. When grafting was performed without delay, HGF stimulated twice the number of axons to regenerate compared with control but was less potent than CNTF. However, in PN grafting delayed for 7 days after optic nerve injury, HGF maintained a better propensity of ganglion cells to regenerate than CNTF. Unlike CNTF, HGF application did not increase HSP27 expression in ganglion cells. Microglia proliferation was prolonged in HGF-treated retinas compared with CNTF or BDNF. C-Met was localized to both ganglion cells and Muller cells, suggesting HGF could be neuroprotective via interacting with both neurons and glia. Compared with CNTF or BDNF, HGF is advantageous in sustaining long-term ganglion cell survival and their propensity to respond to

  7. Opto-acoustic microscopy reveals adhesion mechanics of single cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi Ghanem, Maroun; Dehoux, Thomas; Liu, Liwang; Le Saux, Guillaume; Plawinski, Laurent; Durrieu, Marie-Christine; Audoin, Bertrand

    2018-01-01

    Laser-generated GHz-ultrasonic-based technologies have shown the ability to image single cell adhesion and stiffness simultaneously. Using this new modality, we here demonstrate quantitative indicators to investigate contact mechanics and adhesion processes of the cell. We cultured human cells on a rigid substrate, and we used an inverted pulsed opto-acoustic microscope to generate acoustic pulses containing frequencies up to 100 GHz in the substrate. We map the reflection of the acoustic pulses at the cell-substrate interface to obtain images of the acoustic impedance of the cell, Zc, as well as of the stiffness of the interface, K, with 1 μm lateral resolution. Our results show that the standard deviation ΔZc reveals differences between different cell types arising from the multiplicity of local conformations within the nucleus. From the distribution of K-values within the nuclear region, we extract a mean interfacial stiffness, Km, that quantifies the average contact force in areas of the cell displaying weak bonding. By analogy with classical contact mechanics, we also define the ratio of the real to nominal contact areas, Sr/St. We show that Km can be interpreted as a quantitative indicator of passive contact at metal-cell interfaces, while Sr/St is sensitive to active adhesive processes in the nuclear region. The ability to separate the contributions of passive and active adhesion processes should allow gaining insight into cell-substrate interactions, with important applications in tissue engineering.

  8. Sorting of cells of the same size, shape, and cell cycle stage for a single cell level assay without staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yomo Tetsuya

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-cell level studies are being used increasingly to measure cell properties not directly observable in a cell population. High-performance data acquisition systems for such studies have, by necessity, developed in synchrony. However, improvements in sample purification techniques are also required to reveal new phenomena. Here we assessed a cell sorter as a sample-pretreatment tool for a single-cell level assay. A cell sorter is routinely used for selecting one type of cells from a heterogeneous mixture of cells using specific fluorescence labels. In this case, we wanted to select cells of exactly the same size, shape, and cell-cycle stage from a population, without using a specific fluorescence label. Results We used four light scatter parameters: the peak height and area of the forward scatter (FSheight and FSarea and side scatter (SSheight and SSarea. The rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cell line, a neuronal cell line, was used for all experiments. The living cells concentrated in the high FSarea and middle SSheight/SSarea fractions. Single cells without cell clumps were concentrated in the low SS and middle FS fractions, and in the higher FSheight/FSarea and SSheight/SSarea fractions. The cell populations from these viable, single-cell-rich fractions were divided into twelve subfractions based on their FSarea-SSarea profiles, for more detailed analysis. We found that SSarea was proportional to the cell volume and the FSarea correlated with cell roundness and elongation, as well as with the level of DNA in the cell. To test the method and to characterize the basic properties of the isolated single cells, sorted cells were cultured in separate wells. The cells in all subfractions survived, proliferated and differentiated normally, suggesting that there was no serious damage. The smallest, roundest, and smoothest cells had the highest viability. There was no correlation between proliferation and differentiation. NGF increases

  9. High-throughput deterministic single-cell encapsulation and droplet pairing, fusion, and shrinkage in a single microfluidic device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoeman, R.M.; Kemna, Evelien; Wolbers, F.; van den Berg, Albert

    In this article, we present a microfluidic device capable of successive high-yield single-cell encapsulation in droplets, with additional droplet pairing, fusion, and shrinkage. Deterministic single-cell encapsulation is realized using Dean-coupled inertial ordering of cells in a Yin-Yang-shaped

  10. Ciliary heterogeneity within a single cell: the Paramecium model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubusson-Fleury, Anne; Cohen, Jean; Lemullois, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Paramecium is a single cell able to divide in its morphologically differentiated stage that has many cilia anchored at its cell surface. Many thousands of cilia are thus assembled in a short period of time during division to duplicate the cell pattern while the cell continues swimming. Most, but not all, of these sensory cilia are motile and involved in two main functions: prey capture and cell locomotion. These cilia display heterogeneity, both in their length and their biochemical properties. Thanks to these properties, as well as to the availability of many postgenomic tools and the possibility to follow the regrowth of cilia after deciliation, Paramecium offers a nice opportunity to study the assembly of the cilia, as well as the genesis of their diversity within a single cell. In this paper, after a brief survey of Paramecium morphology and cilia properties, we describe the tools and the protocols currently used for immunofluorescence, transmission electron microscopy, and ultrastructural immunocytochemistry to analyze cilia, with special recommendations to overcome the problem raised by cilium diversity. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Single-cell force spectroscopy of pili-mediated adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullan, Ruby May A.; Beaussart, Audrey; Tripathi, Prachi; Derclaye, Sylvie; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Li, James K.; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-12-01

    Although bacterial pili are known to mediate cell adhesion to a variety of substrates, the molecular interactions behind this process are poorly understood. We report the direct measurement of the forces guiding pili-mediated adhesion, focusing on the medically important probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG). Using non-invasive single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS), we quantify the adhesion forces between individual bacteria and biotic (mucin, intestinal cells) or abiotic (hydrophobic monolayers) surfaces. On hydrophobic surfaces, bacterial pili strengthen adhesion through remarkable nanospring properties, which - presumably - enable the bacteria to resist high shear forces under physiological conditions. On mucin, nanosprings are more frequent and adhesion forces larger, reflecting the influence of specific pili-mucin bonds. Interestingly, these mechanical responses are no longer observed on human intestinal Caco-2 cells. Rather, force curves exhibit constant force plateaus with extended ruptures reflecting the extraction of membrane nanotethers. These single-cell analyses provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms by which piliated bacteria colonize surfaces (nanosprings, nanotethers), and offer exciting avenues in nanomedicine for understanding and controlling the adhesion of microbial cells (probiotics, pathogens).

  12. Dissecting the Cell Entry Pathway of Dengue Virus by Single-Particle Tracking in Living Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Rust, Michael J.; Chen, Chen; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Wilschut, Jan; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2008-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an enveloped RNA virus that causes the most common arthropod-borne infection worldwide. The mechanism by which DENV infects the host cell remains unclear. In this work, we used live-cell imaging and single-virus tracking to investigate the cell entry, endocytic trafficking,

  13. Single-cell entropy for accurate estimation of differentiation potency from a cell's transcriptome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschendorff, Andrew E.; Enver, Tariq

    2017-06-01

    The ability to quantify differentiation potential of single cells is a task of critical importance. Here we demonstrate, using over 7,000 single-cell RNA-Seq profiles, that differentiation potency of a single cell can be approximated by computing the signalling promiscuity, or entropy, of a cell's transcriptome in the context of an interaction network, without the need for feature selection. We show that signalling entropy provides a more accurate and robust potency estimate than other entropy-based measures, driven in part by a subtle positive correlation between the transcriptome and connectome. Signalling entropy identifies known cell subpopulations of varying potency and drug resistant cancer stem-cell phenotypes, including those derived from circulating tumour cells. It further reveals that expression heterogeneity within single-cell populations is regulated. In summary, signalling entropy allows in silico estimation of the differentiation potency and plasticity of single cells and bulk samples, providing a means to identify normal and cancer stem-cell phenotypes.

  14. Seeding of single hemopoietic stem cells and self renewal of committed stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brecher, G.

    1986-01-01

    Single cells and two to five proliferating cells were transfused into mice whose own stem cells had been killed by irradiation. When a small inoculum of 50,000 AB marrow cells was given only 4 of 20 recipients survived, but all 4 had only PGK A enzyme in their peripheral blood cells. The results indicate that the survivors received a single pluripotential stem cell capable of proliferating. Survivors showed no deterioration in their blood picture after many months. It was concluded that there is no clonal succession in the marrow cells. Further studies with transfusions of 100,000 and 10,000,000 marrow cells after lethal irradiation suggest that there is production of committed stem cells with significant self-renewal

  15. Condensing Raman spectrum for single-cell phenotype analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Shiwei

    2015-12-09

    Background In recent years, high throughput and non-invasive Raman spectrometry technique has matured as an effective approach to identification of individual cells by species, even in complex, mixed populations. Raman profiling is an appealing optical microscopic method to achieve this. To fully utilize Raman proling for single-cell analysis, an extensive understanding of Raman spectra is necessary to answer questions such as which filtering methodologies are effective for pre-processing of Raman spectra, what strains can be distinguished by Raman spectra, and what features serve best as Raman-based biomarkers for single-cells, etc. Results In this work, we have proposed an approach called rDisc to discretize the original Raman spectrum into only a few (usually less than 20) representative peaks (Raman shifts). The approach has advantages in removing noises, and condensing the original spectrum. In particular, effective signal processing procedures were designed to eliminate noise, utilising wavelet transform denoising, baseline correction, and signal normalization. In the discretizing process, representative peaks were selected to signicantly decrease the Raman data size. More importantly, the selected peaks are chosen as suitable to serve as key biological markers to differentiate species and other cellular features. Additionally, the classication performance of discretized spectra was found to be comparable to full spectrum having more than 1000 Raman shifts. Overall, the discretized spectrum needs about 5storage space of a full spectrum and the processing speed is considerably faster. This makes rDisc clearly superior to other methods for single-cell classication.

  16. Micro-magnet arrays for specific single bacterial cell positioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pivetal, Jérémy, E-mail: jeremy.piv@netcmail.com [Ecole Centrale de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5005, Laboratoire Ampère, F-69134 Écully (France); Royet, David [Ecole Centrale de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5005, Laboratoire Ampère, F-69134 Écully (France); Ciuta, Georgeta [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Frenea-Robin, Marie [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS UMR 5005, Laboratoire Ampère, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Haddour, Naoufel [Ecole Centrale de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5005, Laboratoire Ampère, F-69134 Écully (France); Dempsey, Nora M. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Dumas-Bouchiat, Frédéric [Univ Limoges, CNRS, SPCTS UMR 7513, 12 Rue Atlantis, F-87068 Limoges (France); Simonet, Pascal [Ecole Centrale de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5005, Laboratoire Ampère, F-69134 Écully (France)

    2015-04-15

    In various contexts such as pathogen detection or analysis of microbial diversity where cellular heterogeneity must be taken into account, there is a growing need for tools and methods that enable microbiologists to analyze bacterial cells individually. One of the main challenges in the development of new platforms for single cell studies is to perform precise cell positioning, but the ability to specifically target cells is also important in many applications. In this work, we report the development of new strategies to selectively trap single bacterial cells upon large arrays, based on the use of micro-magnets. Escherichia coli bacteria were used to demonstrate magnetically driven bacterial cell organization. In order to provide a flexible approach adaptable to several applications in the field of microbiology, cells were magnetically and specifically labeled using two different strategies, namely immunomagnetic labeling and magnetic in situ hybridization. Results show that centimeter-sized arrays of targeted, isolated bacteria can be successfully created upon the surface of a flat magnetically patterned hard magnetic film. Efforts are now being directed towards the integration of a detection tool to provide a complete micro-system device for a variety of microbiological applications. - Highlights: 1.We report a new approach to selectively micropattern bacterial cells individually upon micro-magnet arrays. 2.Permanent micro-magnets of a size approaching that of bacteria could be fabricated using a Thermo-Magnetic Patterning process. 3.Bacterial cells were labeled using two different magnetic labeling strategies providing flexible approach adaptable to several applications in the field of microbiology.

  17. Expression profiling and Ingenuity biological function analyses of interleukin-6- versus nerve growth factor-stimulated PC12 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitriades-Schmutz Beatrice

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major goal of the study was to compare the genetic programs utilized by the neuropoietic cytokine Interleukin-6 (IL-6 and the neurotrophin (NT Nerve Growth Factor (NGF for neuronal differentiation. Results The designer cytokine Hyper-IL-6 in which IL-6 is covalently linked to its soluble receptor s-IL-6R as well as NGF were used to stimulate PC12 cells for 24 hours. Changes in gene expression levels were monitored using Affymetrix GeneChip technology. We found different expression for 130 genes in IL-6- and 102 genes in NGF-treated PC12 cells as compared to unstimulated controls. The gene set shared by both stimuli comprises only 16 genes. A key step is upregulation of growth factors and functionally related external molecules known to play important roles in neuronal differentiation. In particular, IL-6 enhances gene expression of regenerating islet-derived 3 alpha (REG3A; 1084-fold, regenerating islet-derived 3 beta (REG3B/PAPI; 672-fold, growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15; 80-fold, platelet-derived growth factor alpha (PDGFA; 69-fold, growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH; 30-fold, adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP; 20-fold and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF; 5-fold. NGF recruits GDF15 (131-fold, transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFB1; 101-fold and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF; 89-fold. Both stimuli activate growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43 indicating that PC12 cells undergo substantial neuronal differentiation. Moreover, IL-6 activates the transcription factors retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARA; 20-fold and early growth response 1 (Egr1/Zif268; 3-fold known to play key roles in neuronal differentiation. Ingenuity biological function analysis revealed that completely different repertoires of molecules are recruited to exert the same biological functions in neuronal differentiation. Major sub-categories include cellular growth and differentiation, cell migration, chemotaxis, cell

  18. Single particle labeling of RNA virus in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaohui; Ouyang, Ting; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Ren, Linzhu

    2017-06-02

    Real-time and visual tracking of viral infection is crucial for elucidating the infectious and pathogenesis mechanisms. To track the virus successfully, an efficient labeling method is necessary. In this review, we first discuss the practical labeling techniques for virus tracking in live cells. We then describe the current knowledge of interactions between RNA viruses (especially influenza viruses, immunodeficiency viruses, and Flaviviruses) and host cellular structures, obtained using single particle labeling techniques combined with real-time fluorescence microscopy. Single particle labeling provides an easy system for understanding the RNA virus life cycle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Preliminary investigation of single chamber single electrode microbial fuel cell using sewage sludge as a substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai Chaithanya, M.; Thakur, Somil; Sonu, Kumar; Das, Bhaskar

    2017-11-01

    A microbial fuel cell (MFC) consists of a cathode and anode; micro-organisms transfer electrons acquired from the degradation of organic matter in the substrate to anode; and thereby to cathode; by using an external circuit to generate electricity. In the present study, a single chamber single electrode microbial fuel cell has been fabricated to generate electricity from the sludge of the sewage treatment plant at two different ambient temperature range of 25 ± 4°C and 32 ± 4°C under aerobic condition. No work has been done yet by using the single electrode in any MFC system; it is hypothesized that single electrode submerged partially in substrate and rest to atmosphere can function as both cathode and anode. The maximum voltage obtained was about 2890 mV after 80 (hrs) at temperature range of 25 ± 4°C, with surface power density of 1108.29 mW/m2. When the ambient temperature was 32 ± 4°C, maximum voltage obtained was 1652 mV after 40 (hrs.) surface power density reduced to 865.57 mW/m2. When amount of substrate was decreased for certain area of electrode at 25 ± 4°C range, electricity generation decreased and it also shortened the time to reach peak voltage. On the other hand, when the ambient temperature was increased to 32 ± 4°C, the maximum potential energy generated was less than that of previous experiment at 25 ± 4°C for the same substrate Also the time to reach peak voltage decreased to 40 hrs. When comparing with other single chamber single electrode MFC, the present model is generating more electricity that any MFC using sewage sludge as substrate except platinum electrode, which is much costlier that electrode used in the present study.

  20. Aplasia of the optic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Daniel C W; Man, Eric M W; Cheng, Sunny C S

    2015-08-01

    Aplasia of the optic nerve is an extraordinarily rare congenital anomaly that affects one or both optic nerves and is associated with the absence of the central retinal vessel and retinal ganglion cells. We report a case of unilateral optic nerve aplasia in a 4-month-old infant who was found to have left microphthalmos on routine postnatal checkup. Family history, antenatal history, and systemic evaluation were unremarkable. Magnetic resonance imaging showed absent left optic nerve with left microphthalmos. The optic chiasm was present and slightly deviated towards the right side. The remaining cerebral and ocular structures were normal.

  1. An anatomical study of porcine peripheral nerve and its potential use in nerve tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilic, Leyla; Garner, Philippa E; Yu, Tong; Roman, Sabiniano; Haycock, John W; Wilshaw, Stacy-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Current nerve tissue engineering applications are adopting xenogeneic nerve tissue as potential nerve grafts to help aid nerve regeneration. However, there is little literature that describes the exact location, anatomy and physiology of these nerves to highlight their potential as a donor graft. The aim of this study was to identify and characterise the structural and extracellular matrix (ECM) components of porcine peripheral nerves in the hind leg. Methods included the dissection of porcine nerves, localisation, characterisation and quantification of the ECM components and identification of nerve cells. Results showed a noticeable variance between porcine and rat nerve (a commonly studied species) in terms of fascicle number. The study also revealed that when porcine peripheral nerves branch, a decrease in fascicle number and size was evident. Porcine ECM and nerve fascicles were found to be predominately comprised of collagen together with glycosaminoglycans, laminin and fibronectin. Immunolabelling for nerve growth factor receptor p75 also revealed the localisation of Schwann cells around and inside the fascicles. In conclusion, it is shown that porcine peripheral nerves possess a microstructure similar to that found in rat, and is not dissimilar to human. This finding could extend to the suggestion that due to the similarities in anatomy to human nerve, porcine nerves may have utility as a nerve graft providing guidance and support to regenerating axons. PMID:26200940

  2. Digital cell counting device integrated with a single-cell array.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Saeki

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a novel cell counting method accomplished using a single-cell array fabricated on an image sensor, complementary metal oxide semiconductor sensor. The single-cell array was constructed using a microcavity array, which can trap up to 7,500 single cells on microcavities periodically arranged on a plane metallic substrate via the application of a negative pressure. The proposed method for cell counting is based on shadow imaging, which uses a light diffraction pattern generated by the microcavity array and trapped cells. Under illumination, the cell-occupied microcavities are visualized as shadow patterns in an image recorded by the complementary metal oxide semiconductor sensor due to light attenuation. The cell count is determined by enumerating the uniform shadow patterns created from one-on-one relationships with single cells trapped on the microcavities in digital format. In the experiment, all cell counting processes including entrapment of non-labeled HeLa cells from suspensions on the array and image acquisition of a wide-field-of-view of 30 mm(2 in 1/60 seconds were implemented in a single integrated device. As a result, the results from the digital cell counting had a linear relationship with those obtained from microscopic observation (r(2  = 0.99. This platform could be used at extremely low cell concentrations, i.e., 25-15,000 cells/mL. Our proposed system provides a simple and rapid miniaturized cell counting device for routine laboratory use.

  3. The impact of motor and sensory nerve architecture on nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradzadeh, Arash; Borschel, Gregory H; Luciano, Janina P; Whitlock, Elizabeth L; Hayashi, Ayato; Hunter, Daniel A; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2008-08-01

    Sensory nerve autografting is the standard of care for injuries resulting in a nerve gap. Recent work demonstrates superior regeneration with motor nerve grafts. Improved regeneration with motor grafting may be a result of the nerve's Schwann cell basal lamina tube size. Motor nerves have larger SC basal lamina tubes, which may allow more nerve fibers to cross a nerve graft repair. Architecture may partially explain the suboptimal clinical results seen with sensory nerve grafting techniques. To define the role of nerve architecture, we evaluated regeneration through acellular motor and sensory nerve grafts. Thirty-six Lewis rats underwent tibial nerve repairs with 5 mm double-cable motor or triple-cable sensory nerve isografts. Grafts were harvested and acellularized in University of Wisconsin solution. Control animals received fresh motor or sensory cable isografts. Nerves were harvested after 4 weeks and histomorphometry was performed. In 6 animals per group from the fresh motor and sensory cable graft groups, weekly walking tracks and wet muscle mass ratios were performed at 7 weeks. Histomorphometry revealed more robust nerve regeneration in both acellular and cellular motor grafts. Sensory groups showed poor regeneration with significantly decreased percent nerve, fiber count, and density (parchitecture (size of SC basal lamina tubes) plays an important role in nerve regeneration in a mixed nerve gap model.

  4. Potentials of single-cell biology in identification and validation of disease biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Furong; Wang, Diane C; Lu, Jiapei; Wu, Wei; Wang, Xiangdong

    2016-09-01

    Single-cell biology is considered a new approach to identify and validate disease-specific biomarkers. However, the concern raised by clinicians is how to apply single-cell measurements for clinical practice, translate the message of single-cell systems biology into clinical phenotype or explain alterations of single-cell gene sequencing and function in patient response to therapies. This study is to address the importance and necessity of single-cell gene sequencing in the identification and development of disease-specific biomarkers, the definition and significance of single-cell biology and single-cell systems biology in the understanding of single-cell full picture, the development and establishment of whole-cell models in the validation of targeted biological function and the figure and meaning of single-molecule imaging in single cell to trace intra-single-cell molecule expression, signal, interaction and location. We headline the important role of single-cell biology in the discovery and development of disease-specific biomarkers with a special emphasis on understanding single-cell biological functions, e.g. mechanical phenotypes, single-cell biology, heterogeneity and organization of genome function. We have reason to believe that such multi-dimensional, multi-layer, multi-crossing and stereoscopic single-cell biology definitely benefits the discovery and development of disease-specific biomarkers. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  5. Nerve growth factor enhances the CRE-dependent transcriptional activity activated by nobiletin in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takito, Jiro; Kimura, Junko; Kajima, Koji; Uozumi, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Makoto; Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Masanori; Ohizumi, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Prevention and treatment of Alzheimer disease are urgent problems for elderly people in developed countries. We previously reported that nobiletin, a poly-methoxylated flavone from the citrus peel, improved the symptoms in various types of animal models of memory loss and activated the cAMP responsive element (CRE)-dependent transcription in PC12 cells. Nobiletin activated the cAMP/PKA/MEK/Erk/MAPK signaling pathway without using the TrkA signaling activated by nerve growth factor (NGF). Here, we examined the effect of combination of nobiletin and NGF on the CRE-dependent transcription in PC12 cells. Although NGF alone had little effect on the CRE-dependent transcription, NGF markedly enhanced the CRE-dependent transcription induced by nobiletin. The NGF-induced enhancement was neutralized by a TrkA antagonist, K252a. This effect of NGF was effective on the early signaling event elicited by nobiletin. These results suggested that there was crosstalk between NGF and nobiletin signaling in activating the CRE-dependent transcription in PC12 cells.

  6. Nerve growth factor stimulates the hydrolysis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol in PC-12 cells: A mechanism of protein kinase C regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, B.L.; Saltiel, A.R.; Chao, M.V.

    1989-01-01

    Treatment of PC-12 pheochromocytoma cells with nerve growth factor (NGF) results in the differentiation of these cells into a sympathetic neuron-like phenotype. Although the initial intracellular signals elicited by NGF remain unknown, some of the cellular effects of NGF are similar to those of other growth factors, such as insulin. The authors have investigated the involvement of a newly identified inositol-containing glycolipid in signal transduction for the actions of NGF. NGF stimulates the rapid generation of a species of diacylglycerol that is labeled with [ 3 H]myristate but not with [ 3 H]arachidonate. NGF stimulates [ 3 H]myristate- or [ 32 P]phosphate-labeled phosphatidic acid production over the same time course. Although NGF alone has no effect on the turnover of inositol phospholipids, it does stimulate the hydrolysis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol. The NGF-dependent cleavage of this lipid is accompanied by an increase in the accumulation of its polar head group, an inositol phosphate glycan, which is generated within 30-60 sec of NGF treatment. In an unresponsive PC-12 mutant cell line, neither the diacylglycerol nor inositol phosphate glycan response is detected. A possible role for the NGF-stimulated diacylglycerol is suggested by the inhibition of NGF-dependent c-fos induction by staurosporin, a potent inhibitor of protein kinase C. These results suggest that, like insulin, some of the cellular effects of NGF may be mediated by the phospholipase C-catalyzed hydrolysis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol

  7. RF Breakdown in Normal Conducting Single-Cell Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgashev, V.A.; Nantista, C.D.; Tantawi, S.G.; Higashi, Y.; Higo, T.

    2006-01-01

    Operating accelerating gradient in normal conducting accelerating structures is often limited by rf breakdown. The limit depends on multiple parameters, including input rf power, rf circuit, cavity shape and material. Experimental and theoretical study of the effects of these parameters on the breakdown limit in full scale structures is difficult and costly. We use 11.4 GHz single-cell traveling wave and standing wave accelerating structures for experiments and modeling of rf breakdown behavior. These test structures are designed so that the electromagnetic fields in one cell mimic the fields in prototype multicell structures for the X-band linear collider. Fields elsewhere in the test structures are significantly lower than that of the single cell. The setup uses matched mode converters that launch the circular TM 01 mode into short test structures. The test structures are connected to the mode launchers with vacuum rf flanges. This setup allows economic testing of different cell geometries, cell materials and preparation techniques with short turn-around time. Simple 2D geometry of the test structures simplifies modeling of the breakdown currents and their thermal effects

  8. Current Developments in Prokaryotic Single Cell Whole Genome Amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goudeau, Danielle; Nath, Nandita; Ciobanu, Doina; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Malmstrom, Rex

    2014-03-14

    Our approach to prokaryotic single-cell Whole Genome Amplification at the JGI continues to evolve. To increase both the quality and number of single-cell genomes produced, we explore all aspects of the process from cell sorting to sequencing. For example, we now utilize specialized reagents, acoustic liquid handling, and reduced reaction volumes eliminate non-target DNA contamination in WGA reactions. More specifically, we use a cleaner commercial WGA kit from Qiagen that employs a UV decontamination procedure initially developed at the JGI, and we use the Labcyte Echo for tip-less liquid transfer to set up 2uL reactions. Acoustic liquid handling also dramatically reduces reagent costs. In addition, we are exploring new cell lysis methods including treatment with Proteinase K, lysozyme, and other detergents, in order to complement standard alkaline lysis and allow for more efficient disruption of a wider range of cells. Incomplete lysis represents a major hurdle for WGA on some environmental samples, especially rhizosphere, peatland, and other soils. Finding effective lysis strategies that are also compatible with WGA is challenging, and we are currently assessing the impact of various strategies on genome recovery.

  9. Single cell detection using a magnetic zigzag nanowire biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hao-Ting; Ger, Tzong-Rong; Lin, Ya-Hui; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2013-08-07

    A magnetic zigzag nanowire device was designed for single cell biosensing. Nanowires with widths of 150, 300, 500, and 800 nm were fabricated on silicon trenches by electron beam lithography, electron beam evaporation, and lift-off processes. Magnetoresistance measurements were performed before and after the attachment of a single magnetic cell to the nanowires to characterize the magnetic signal change due to the influence of the magnetic cell. Magnetoresistance responses were measured in different magnetic field directions, and the results showed that this nanowire device can be used for multi-directional detection. It was observed that the highest switching field variation occurred in a 150 nm wide nanowire when the field was perpendicular to the substrate plane. On the other hand, the highest magnetoresistance ratio variation occurred in a 800 nm wide nanowire also when the field was perpendicular to the substrate plane. Besides, the trench-structured substrate proposed in this study can fix the magnetic cell to the sensor in a fluid environment, and the stray field generated by the corners of the magnetic zigzag nanowires has the function of actively attracting the magnetic cells for detection.

  10. Gravity research on plants: use of single cell experimental models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef eChebli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Future space missions and implementation of permanent bases on Moon and Mars will greatly depend on the availability of ambient air and sustainable food supply. Therefore, understanding the effects of altered gravity conditions on plant metabolism and growth is vital for space missions and extra-terrestrial human existence. In this mini-review we summarize how plant cells are thought to perceive changes in magnitude and orientation of the gravity vector. The particular advantages of several single celled model systems for gravity research are explored and an overview over recent advancements and potential use of these systems is provided.

  11. New library construction method for single-cell genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry Xi

    Full Text Available A central challenge in sequencing single-cell genomes is the accurate determination of point mutations, phasing of these mutations, and identifying copy number variations with few assumptions. Ideally, this is accomplished under as low sequencing coverage as possible. Here we report our attempt to meet these goals with a novel library construction and library amplification methodology. In our approach, single-cell genomic DNA is first fragmented with saturated transposition to make a primary library that uniformly covers the whole genome by short fragments. The library is then amplified by a carefully optimized PCR protocol in a uniform and synchronized fashion for next-generation sequencing. Each step of the protocol can be quantitatively characterized. Our shallow sequencing data show that the library is tightly distributed and is useful for the determination of copy number variations.

  12. Single cell analysis contemporary research and clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Cossarizza, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    This book highlights the current state of the art in single cell analysis, an area that involves many fields of science – from clinical hematology, functional analysis and drug screening, to platelet and microparticle analysis, marine biology and fundamental cancer research. This book brings together an eclectic group of current applications, all of which have a significant impact on our current state of knowledge. The authors of these chapters are all pioneering researchers in the field of single cell analysis. The book will not only appeal to those readers more focused on clinical applications, but also those interested in highly technical aspects of the technologies. All of the technologies identified utilize unique applications of photon detection systems.

  13. Insulin-like growth factors act synergistically with basic fibroblast growth factor and nerve growth factor to promote chromaffin cell proliferation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frödin, M; Gammeltoft, S

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and nerve growth factor (NGF) on DNA synthesis in cultured chromaffin cells from fetal, neonatal, and adult rats by using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdUrd) pulse labeling for 24 or 48 h...... implications for improving the survival of chromaffin cell implants in diseased human brain....

  14. Sam68 promotes Schwann cell proliferation by enhancing the PI3K/Akt pathway and acts on regeneration after sciatic nerve crush

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Weijie, E-mail: 459586768@qq.com; Liu, Yuxi, E-mail: 924013616@qq.com; Wang, Youhua, E-mail: wyouhua1516@163.com

    2016-05-13

    Sam68 (Src-associated in mitosis of 68 kD), a KH domain RNA-binding protein, is not only important in signaling transduction cascades, but crucial in a variety of cellular processes. Sam68 is reported to be involved in the phospoinositide3-kinase (PI3K) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathways, and it is closely associated with cell proliferation, RNA metabolism, and tumor progression. However, we know little about the role of Sam68 during peripheral nervous system injury and regeneration. In this study, we investigated the expression of Sam68 and its biological significances in sciatic nerve crush. Interestingly, we found Sam68 had a co-localization with S100 (Schwann cell marker). Moreover, after crush, Sam68 had a spatiotemporal protein expression, which was in parallel with proliferation cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). In vitro, we also observed increased expression of Sam68 during the process of TNF-α-induced Schwann cell proliferation model. Besides, flow cytometry analyses, CCK-8, and EDU were all performed with the purpose of investigating the role of Sam68 in the regulation of Schwann cell proliferation. Even more importantly, we discovered that Sam68 could enhance the phosphorylation of Akt while LY294002 (a PI3K inhibitor) obviously reversed Sam68-induced cell proliferation. Finally, we detected the variance during regeneration progress through the rat walk footprint test. In summary, all these evidences demonstrated that Sam68 might participate in Schwann cell proliferation partially via PI3K/Akt pathway and also regulate regeneration after sciatic nerve crush. -- Highlights: •The dynamic changes and location of Sam68 after sciatic nerve crush. •Sam68 promoted Schwann cell proliferation via PI3K/Akt pathway. •Sam68 modulated functional recovery after sciatic nerve crush.

  15. STABILITY OF AXIALLY COMPRESSED SINGLE-CELL MONO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    60. N.N. OSADEBE and J.C. EZEH. Figure 1 shows one of the cross sections of a single-cell mono symmetric thin-walled closed column under consideration. Using. Lagrange's principle, Vlasov [6] expressed the displacements in the longitudinal and transverse directions, u(x, s) and v(x, s) of a thin-walled closed structure in ...

  16. Macular Ganglion Cell Inner Plexiform Layer Thickness in Glaucomatous Eyes with Localized Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunwei Zhang

    Full Text Available To investigate macular ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (mGCIPL thickness in glaucomatous eyes with visible localized retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL defects on stereophotographs.112 healthy and 149 glaucomatous eyes from the Diagnostic Innovations in Glaucoma Study (DIGS and the African Descent and Glaucoma Evaluation Study (ADAGES subjects had standard automated perimetry (SAP, optical coherence tomography (OCT imaging of the macula and optic nerve head, and stereoscopic optic disc photography. Masked observers identified localized RNFL defects by grading of stereophotographs.47 eyes had visible localized RNFL defects on stereophotographs. Eyes with visible localized RNFL defects had significantly thinner mGCIPL thickness compared to healthy eyes (68.3 ± 11.4 μm versus 79.2 ± 6.6 μm respectively, P<0.001 and similar mGCIPL thickness to glaucomatous eyes without localized RNFL defects (68.6 ± 11.2 μm, P = 1.000. The average mGCIPL thickness in eyes with RNFL defects was 14% less than similarly aged healthy controls. For 29 eyes with a visible RNFL defect in just one hemiretina (superior or inferior mGCIPL was thinnest in the same hemiretina in 26 eyes (90%. Eyes with inferior-temporal RNFL defects also had significantly thinner inferior-temporal mGCIPL (P<0.001 and inferior mGCIPL (P = 0.030 compared to glaucomatous eyes without a visible RNFL defect.The current study indicates that presence of a localized RNFL defect is likely to indicate significant macular damage, particularly in the region of the macular that topographically corresponds to the location of the RNFL defect.

  17. Neuroprotective effects of tempol acyl esters against retinal ganglion cell death in a rat partial optic nerve crush model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Sebastian; Fiedorowicz, Michal; Grieb, Pawel; Wypych, Zbigniew; Knap, Narcyz; Borowik, Tomasz; Zawada, Katarzyna; Kaminski, Jaroslaw; Wozniak, Michal; Rejdak, Robert; Zrenner, Eberhart; Schuettauf, Frank

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study is to search for more effective derivatives of the superoxide dismutase mimetic tempol (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl). Although tempol is neuroprotective in a rat partial optic nerve crush (PONC) model, relatively high doses are required to exert this effect. Tempol acyl esters with different-length fatty acids (tempol-C4, tempol-C8, tempol-C12 and tempol-C16) were synthesized and the following properties were evaluated: water-octanol partition coefficient, liposome-liposome energy transfer, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Brown Norway rats underwent PONC and received tempol or acyl esters intraperitoneally once daily for 7 consecutive days. We then compared the effects of tempol and its four esters on retinal ganglion cell (RGC) damage using a retrograde labelling method. The water-octanol partition coefficient increased with increasing length of attached acyl chain. However, the energy of the liposome-liposome transfer seemed to be optimal for tempol-C8 and tempol-C12. The EPR signal was very similar for all tested compounds, suggesting similar efficiency of superoxide scavenging. Partial optic nerve crush in vehicle-treated animals reduced RGC numbers by approx. 59% when compared with sham-operated eyes. Tempol did not affect RGC loss at a dose of 1 mg/kg. In contrast, at molar doses equivalent to 1 mg/kg of tempol, tempol-C8 showed a significant neuroprotective effect, whereas tempol-C4, tempol-C12 and tempol-C16 did not act neuroprotectively. Manipulating the hydrophobicity of tempol seems to be a promising tool for developing more potent neuroprotectants in the PONC degeneration model. However, the resulting compounds need further pharmacological evaluation. © 2011 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2011 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  18. Multicolor imaging of cancer cells with fluorophore-tagged aptamers for single cell typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Song; Kong, Hao; Gong, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong

    2014-08-19

    The discrimination of the type of cancer cells remains challenging due to the subtle differences in their expression of membrane receptors. In this work, we developed a multicolor cell imaging method for distinguishing the type of cancer cells with fluorophore-tagged aptamers. We found that the interaction between aptamers and cancer cells was affected by both of the sequence of aptamers and the labeled dyes. As the co-ownership of biomarkers for different cancer cell lines, the fluorophore-tagged aptamers interacted with different cancer cell lines in different degree, resulting in a distinct color to discriminate the type of cancer cells at single cell level. Taking advantage of the cross-reactive ability of the fluorophore-tagged aptamers, we could not only distinguish the cancerous cells quickly from large quantities of noncancerous cells, but also identify the type of the cancerous cells. This work has potential application for cancer diagnostic and therapy in the future.

  19. Comparative Studies of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell Stacks and Single Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-02-01

    in the Catalyst Layer and Effects of Both Perfluorosulfonate Ionomer and PTFE-Loaded Carbon on the Catalyst Layer of Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells ...financial support of this project. 12 References 1. T. F. Fuller, "Is a Fuel Cell in Your Future?" 77K Electrochemical Society Interface (Fall...ARMY RESEARCH LABORATORY mm^ n Comparative Studies of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell Stacks and Single Cells Deryn Chu and Rongzhong

  20. Exploring Arabidopsis thaliana Root Endophytes via Single-Cell Genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, Derek; Woyke, Tanja; Tringe, Susannah; Dangl, Jeff

    2014-03-19

    Land plants grow in association with microbial communities both on their surfaces and inside the plant (endophytes). The relationships between microbes and their host can vary from pathogenic to mutualistic. Colonization of the endophyte compartment occurs in the presence of a sophisticated plant immune system, implying finely tuned discrimination of pathogens from mutualists and commensals. Despite the importance of the microbiome to the plant, relatively little is known about the specific interactions between plants and microbes, especially in the case of endophytes. The vast majority of microbes have not been grown in the lab, and thus one of the few ways of studying them is by examining their DNA. Although metagenomics is a powerful tool for examining microbial communities, its application to endophyte samples is technically difficult due to the presence of large amounts of host plant DNA in the sample. One method to address these difficulties is single-cell genomics where a single microbial cell is isolated from a sample, lysed, and its genome amplified by multiple displacement amplification (MDA) to produce enough DNA for genome sequencing. This produces a single-cell amplified genome (SAG). We have applied this technology to study the endophytic microbes in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Extensive 16S gene profiling of the microbial communities in the roots of multiple inbred A. thaliana strains has identified 164 OTUs as being significantly enriched in all the root endophyte samples compared to their presence in bulk soil.

  1. Single Cell Genomics and Transcriptomics for Unicellular Eukaryotes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciobanu, Doina; Clum, Alicia; Singh, Vasanth; Salamov, Asaf; Han, James; Copeland, Alex; Grigoriev, Igor; James, Timothy; Singer, Steven; Woyke, Tanja; Malmstrom, Rex; Cheng, Jan-Fang

    2014-03-14

    Despite their small size, unicellular eukaryotes have complex genomes with a high degree of plasticity that allow them to adapt quickly to environmental changes. Unicellular eukaryotes live with prokaryotes and higher eukaryotes, frequently in symbiotic or parasitic niches. To this day their contribution to the dynamics of the environmental communities remains to be understood. Unfortunately, the vast majority of eukaryotic microorganisms are either uncultured or unculturable, making genome sequencing impossible using traditional approaches. We have developed an approach to isolate unicellular eukaryotes of interest from environmental samples, and to sequence and analyze their genomes and transcriptomes. We have tested our methods with six species: an uncharacterized protist from cellulose-enriched compost identified as Platyophrya, a close relative of P. vorax; the fungus Metschnikowia bicuspidate, a parasite of water flea Daphnia; the mycoparasitic fungi Piptocephalis cylindrospora, a parasite of Cokeromyces and Mucor; Caulochytrium protosteloides, a parasite of Sordaria; Rozella allomycis, a parasite of the water mold Allomyces; and the microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Here, we present the four components of our approach: pre-sequencing methods, sequence analysis for single cell genome assembly, sequence analysis of single cell transcriptomes, and genome annotation. This technology has the potential to uncover the complexity of single cell eukaryotes and their role in the environmental samples.

  2. Identification of innate lymphoid cells in single-cell RNA-Seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suffiotti, Madeleine; Carmona, Santiago J; Jandus, Camilla; Gfeller, David

    2017-07-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) consist of natural killer (NK) cells and non-cytotoxic ILCs that are broadly classified into ILC1, ILC2, and ILC3 subtypes. These cells recently emerged as important early effectors of innate immunity for their roles in tissue homeostasis and inflammation. Over the last few years, ILCs have been extensively studied in mouse and human at the functional and molecular level, including gene expression profiling. However, sorting ILCs with flow cytometry for gene expression analysis is a delicate and time-consuming process. Here we propose and validate a novel framework for studying ILCs at the transcriptomic level using single-cell RNA-Seq data. Our approach combines unsupervised clustering and a new cell type classifier trained on mouse ILC gene expression data. We show that this approach can accurately identify different ILCs, especially ILC2 cells, in human lymphocyte single-cell RNA-Seq data. Our new model relies only on genes conserved across vertebrates, thereby making it in principle applicable in any vertebrate species. Considering the rapid increase in throughput of single-cell RNA-Seq technology, our work provides a computational framework for studying ILC2 cells in single-cell transcriptomic data and may help exploring their conservation in distant vertebrate species.

  3. Involvement of TRPM2 in peripheral nerve injury-induced infiltration of peripheral immune cells into the spinal cord in mouse neuropathic pain model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouichi Isami

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2 expressed in immune cells plays an important role in immune and inflammatory responses. We recently reported that TRPM2 expressed in macrophages and spinal microglia contributes to the pathogenesis of inflammatory and neuropathic pain aggravating peripheral and central pronociceptive inflammatory responses in mice. To further elucidate the contribution of TRPM2 expressed by peripheral immune cells to neuropathic pain, we examined the development of peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain and the infiltration of immune cells (particularly macrophages into the injured nerve and spinal cord by using bone marrow (BM chimeric mice by crossing wildtype (WT and TRPM2-knockout (TRPM2-KO mice. Four types of BM chimeric mice were prepared, in which irradiated WT or TRPM2-KO recipient mice were transplanted with either WT-or TRPM2-KO donor mouse-derived green fluorescence protein-positive (GFP(+ BM cells (TRPM2(BM+/Rec+, TRPM2(BM-/Rec+, TRPM2(BM+/Rec-, and TRPM2(BM-/Rec- mice. Mechanical allodynia induced by partial sciatic nerve ligation observed in TRPM2(BM+/Rec+ mice was attenuated in TRPM2(BM-/Rec+, TRPM2(BM+/Rec-, and TRPM2(BM-/Rec- mice. The numbers of GFP(+ BM-derived cells and Iba1/GFP double-positive macrophages in the injured sciatic nerve did not differ among chimeric mice 14 days after the nerve injury. In the spinal cord, the number of GFP(+ BM-derived cells, particularly GFP/Iba1 double-positive macrophages, was significantly decreased in the three TRPM2-KO chimeric mouse groups compared with TRPM2(BM+/Rec+ mice. However, the numbers of GFP(-/Iba1(+ resident microglia did not differ among chimeric mice. These results suggest that TRPM2 plays an important role in the infiltration of peripheral immune cells, particularly macrophages, into the spinal cord, rather than the infiltration of peripheral immune cells into the injured nerves and activation of spinal

  4. A microfluidic platform for regulating signal transduction in single cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Pak Kin; Yu, Fuqu; Sun, Ren; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2004-11-01

    Recent progress in micro cell culture systems has lead to new approaches in cell biology studies. Using micro devices for cell culturing possesses distinctive advantages over traditional methods. Length scale matching facilitates manipulation and detection at the single cell level. Previously, we have demonstrated generation of various stimulations such as spatial chemical gradient, electric field, and shear stress to study the dynamic responses of individual cells. Dynamic stimulations and continuous monitoring in a microfluidic system can be useful in studying different aspects of cellular process. In this work, we present a microfluidic platform for regulating nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) signal transduction in human embryonic kidney 293T cells. Time-varying bio-chemical stimulants, such as interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor, are introduced into the microchannel to activate the NF-kB signaling pathway. The dynamic responses of individual cells are monitored with the expression of reporter gene, green fluorescent protein. Regulation of the NF-kB activity is successfully demonstrated. This work is supported by CMISE through NASA URETI program.

  5. A membraneless single compartment abiotic glucose fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaughter, Gymama; Sunday, Joshua

    2014-09-01

    A simple energy harvesting strategy has been developed to selectively catalyze glucose in the presence of oxygen in a glucose/O2 fuel cell. The anode consists of an abiotic catalyst Al/Au/ZnO, in which ZnO seed layer was deposited on the surface of Al/Au substrate using hydrothermal method. The cathode is constructed from a single rod of platinum with an outer diameter of 500 μm. The abiotic glucose fuel cell was studied in phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.4) containing 5 mM glucose at a temperature of 22 °C. The cell is characterized according to its open-circuit voltage, polarization profile, and power density plot. Under these conditions, the abiotic glucose fuel cell possesses an open-circuit voltage of 840 mV and delivered a maximum power density of 16.2 μW cm-2 at a cell voltage of 495 mV. These characteristics are comparable to biofuel cell utilizing a much more complex system design. Such low-cost lightweight abiotic catalyzed glucose fuel cells have a great promise to be optimized, miniaturized to power bio-implantable devices.

  6. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Il; Matsuo, Yutaka; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2018-01-22

    Photovoltaics, more generally known as solar cells, are made from semiconducting materials that convert light into electricity. Solar cells have received much attention in recent years due to their promise as clean and efficient light-harvesting devices. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) could play a crucial role in these devices and have been the subject of much research, which continues to this day. SWNTs are known to outperform multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) at low densities, because of the difference in their optical transmittance for the same current density, which is the most important parameter in comparing SWNTs and MWNTs. SWNT films show semiconducting features, which make SWNTs function as active or charge-transporting materials. This chapter, consisting of two sections, focuses on the use of SWNTs in solar cells. In the first section, we discuss SWNTs as a light harvester and charge transporter in the photoactive layer, which are reviewed chronologically to show the history of the research progress. In the second section, we discuss SWNTs as a transparent conductive layer outside of the photoactive layer, which is relatively more actively researched. This section introduces SWNT applications in silicon solar cells, organic solar cells, and perovskite solar cells each, from their prototypes to recent results. As we go along, the science and prospects of the application of solar cells will be discussed.

  7. BDNF Increases Survival and Neuronal Differentiation of Human Neural Precursor Cells Cotransplanted with a Nanofiber Gel to the Auditory Nerve in a Rat Model of Neuronal Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To study possible nerve regeneration of a damaged auditory nerve by the use of stem cell transplantation. Methods. We transplanted HNPCs to the rat AN trunk by the internal auditory meatus (IAM. Furthermore, we studied if addition of BDNF affects survival and phenotypic differentiation of the grafted HNPCs. A bioactive nanofiber gel (PA gel, in selected groups mixed with BDNF, was applied close to the implanted cells. Before transplantation, all rats had been deafened by a round window niche application of β-bungarotoxin. This neurotoxin causes a selective toxic destruction of the AN while keeping the hair cells intact. Results. Overall, HNPCs survived well for up to six weeks in all groups. However, transplants receiving the BDNF-containing PA gel demonstrated significantly higher numbers of HNPCs and neuronal differentiation. At six weeks, a majority of the HNPCs had migrated into the brain stem and differentiated. Differentiated human cells as well as neurites were observed in the vicinity of the cochlear nucleus. Conclusion. Our results indicate that human neural precursor cells (HNPC integration with host tissue benefits from additional brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF treatment and that these cells appear to be good candidates for further regenerative studies on the auditory nerve (AN.

  8. The Effects of High-Frequency Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation for Dental Professionals with Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders: A Single-Blind Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Rim Suh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Work-related musculoskeletal symptom disorders (WMSDs have a significant issue for dental professionals. This study investigated the effects of high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS on work-related pain, fatigue, and the active range of motion in dental professionals. Among recruited 47 dental professionals with WMSDs, 24 subjects received high-frequency TENS (the TENS group, while 23 subjects received placebo stimulation (the placebo group. TENS was applied to the muscle trigger points of the levator scapulae and upper trapezius, while placebo-TENS was administered without electrical stimulation during 60 min. Pain and fatigue at rest and during movement were assessed using the visual analog scale (VAS, pain pressure threshold (PPT, and active range of motion (AROM of horizontal head rotation at six time points: prelabor, postlabor, post-TENS, and at 1 h, 3 h, and 1 day after TENS application. Both groups showed significantly increased pain and fatigue and decreased PPT and AROM after completing a work task. The TENS group showed significantly greater improvements in VAS score, fatigue, PPT, and AROM at post-TENS and at 1 h and 3 h after application (all P < 0.05 as compared to the placebo group. A single session high-frequency TENS may immediately reduce symptoms related to WMSDs in dental professionals.

  9. Brain mapping of median nerve somatosensory evoked potential with combined {sup 99m}Tc-ECD single-photon emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zifko, U.A. [Dept. of Clinical Neurological Sciences, Victoria Hospital, Univ. of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Slomka, P.J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Victoria Hospital, Univ. of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Young, G.B. [Dept. of Clinical Neurological Sciences, Victoria Hospital, Univ. of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Reid, R.H. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Victoria Hospital, Univ. of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Bolton, C.F. [Dept. of Clinical Neurological Sciences, Victoria Hospital, Univ. of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada)

    1996-05-01

    Single-photon emission tomography (SPET) was performed during electrical median nerve stimulation and used to detect focal neuronal activation in the somatosensory pathways. Intravenously administered technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD) was used as a blood flow tracer to obtain baseline and activated images in each of three subjects. After image registration, baseline images were compared voxel by voxel with the activation images. In addition, the mean summation of the activated-state images of the subjects was compared with the mean summation of the baseline-state images of ten normal subjects. Discrete brain regions occupying 0.9%-1.6% of total brain volume showed an increase in signal from 33.6% to 35.0%. For further anatomical localization of regional increases in signal, the MRI scan of each subject was registered and superimposed on the activated-state SPET image. This method may be used to localize lesions in various disorders of the central nervous system. (orig.)

  10. Effect of bupivacaine on postoperative pain for inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia after single-visit root canal treatment in teeth with irreversible pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parirokh, Masoud; Yosefi, Mohammad Hosein; Nakhaee, Nouzar; Manochehrifar, Hamed; Abbott, Paul V; Reza Forghani, Farshid

    2012-08-01

    Pain control after root canal treatment is of great importance in endodontic practice. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of a long-acting anesthetic (bupivacaine) on postoperative pain and the use of analgesics after root canal treatment. In a randomized double-blinded clinical trial, 60 patients (30 per group) having first or second mandibular molars with irreversible pulpitis randomly received either 0.5% bupivacaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine or 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine as the anesthetic solutions for inferior alveolar nerve blocks. After single-visit root canal treatment, each patient recorded their pain score on a visual analogue scale at 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, and 72 hours after treatment. Data were analyzed by Mann-Whitney, χ(2), Cochrane Q, and t tests as well as Pearson correlation analysis. The results indicate that patients who received bupivacaine had significantly lower pain scores at 6 and 12 hours after root canal treatment compared with the patients who received lidocaine (P irreversible pulpitis in mandibular molars had significantly less early postoperative pain and used fewer analgesics than those who had lidocaine as the anesthetic. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Occurrence of insect kinins in the flesh fly, stable fly and horn fly-mass spectrometric identification from single nerves and diuretic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachman, Ronald J; Coast, Geoffrey M; Tichy, Shane E; Russell, David H; Miller, J Allen; Predel, Reinhard

    2002-11-01

    MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis of single lateral abdominal nerves (LANs) demonstrate the presence of the insect kinin Musdo-K in the housefly Musca domestica, and identify heretofore unknown insect kinins in two other Dipteran species as Musdo-K in the stable fly Stomoxys calcitrans and horn fly Haematobia irritans. The insect kinin native to the flesh fly Neobellieria bullata is identified as Drome-K. Musdo-K and Drome-K are identical save for the conservative substitution of Ser for Thr in position 2. The sequences of the insect kinins are, therefore, remarkably conserved throughout Dipterans. The in vitro Malpighian tubule fluid secretion activity of Musdo-K in the stable fly is similar to that in the housefly, whereas that of Drome-K is 30-fold more potent in the flesh fly than in the fruit fly. Given the structural identities of the kinins and CRF-like diuretic hormones of these Dipteran species, the housefly can serve as a model insect for the study of diuretic peptides and their functions in the stable fly and horn fly, both livestock pests.

  12. Efficacy of the device combining high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and thermotherapy for relieving primary dysmenorrhea: a randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Banghyun; Hong, Seung Hwa; Kim, Kidong; Kang, Wee Chang; No, Jae Hong; Lee, Jung Ryeol; Jee, Byung Chul; Yang, Eun Joo; Cha, Eun-Jong; Kim, Yong Beom

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the efficacy and safety of the combined therapy with high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (hf-TENS) and thermotherapy in relieving primary dysmenorrheal pain. In this randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled study, 115 women with moderate or severe primary dysmenorrhea were assigned to the study or control group at a ratio of 1:1. Subjects in the study group used an integrated hf-TENS/thermotherapy device, whereas control subjects used a sham device. A visual analog scale was used to measure pain intensity. Variables related to pain relief, including reduction rate of dysmenorrheal score, were compared between the groups. The dysmenorrheal score was significantly reduced in the study group compared to the control group following the use of the devices. The duration of pain relief was significantly increased in the study group compared to the control group. There were no differences between the groups in the brief pain inventory scores, numbers of ibuprofen tablets taken orally, and World Health Organization quality of life-BREF scores. No adverse events were observed related to the use of the study device. The combination of hf-TENS and thermotherapy was effective in relieving acute pain in women with moderate or severe primary dysmenorrhea. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison of photobiomodulation therapy and suprascapular nerve-pulsed radiofrequency in chronic shoulder pain: a randomized controlled, single-blind, clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ökmen, Burcu Metin; Ökmen, Korgün

    2017-11-01

    Shoulder pain can be difficult to treat due to its complex anatomic structure, and different treatment methods can be used. We aimed to examine the efficacy of photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) and suprascapular nerve (SSN)-pulsed radiofrequency (RF) therapy. In this prospective, randomized, controlled, single-blind study, 59 patients with chronic shoulder pain due to impingement syndrome received PBMT (group H) or SSN-pulsed RF therapy (group P) in addition to exercise therapy for 14 sessions over 2 weeks. Records were taken using visual analog scale (VAS), Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI), and Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) scoring systems for pretreatment (PRT), posttreatment (PST), and PST follow-up at months 1, 3, and 6. There was no statistically significant difference in initial VAS score, SPADI, and NHP values between group H and group P (p > 0.05). Compared to the values of PRT, PST, and PST at months 1, 3, and 6, VAS, SPADI, and NHP values were statistically significantly lower in both groups (p shoulder pain. PBMT seems to be advantageous compared to SSN-pulsed RF therapy, as it is a noninvasive method.

  14. Single cell cytometry of protein function in RNAi treated cells and in native populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Andrew

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High Content Screening has been shown to improve results of RNAi and other perturbations, however significant intra-sample heterogeneity is common and can complicate some analyses. Single cell cytometry can extract important information from subpopulations within these samples. Such approaches are important for immune cells analyzed by flow cytometry, but have not been broadly available for adherent cells that are critical to the study of solid-tumor cancers and other disease models. Results We have directly quantitated the effect of resolving RNAi treatments at the single cell level in experimental systems for both exogenous and endogenous targets. Analyzing the effect of an siRNA that targets GFP at the single cell level permits a stronger measure of the absolute function of the siRNA by gating to eliminate background levels of GFP intensities. Extending these methods to endogenous proteins, we have shown that well-level results of the knockdown of PTEN results in an increase in phospho-S6 levels, but at the single cell level, the correlation reveals the role of other inputs into the pathway. In a third example, reduction of STAT3 levels by siRNA causes an accumulation of cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, but does not induce apoptosis or necrosis when compared to control cells that express the same levels of STAT3. In a final example, the effect of reduced p53 levels on increased adriamycin sensitivity for colon carcinoma cells was demonstrated at the whole-well level using siRNA knockdown and in control and untreated cells at the single cell level. Conclusion We find that single cell analysis methods are generally applicable to a wide range of experiments in adherent cells using technology that is becoming increasingly available to most laboratories. It is well-suited to emerging models of signaling dysfunction, such as oncogene addition and oncogenic shock. Single cell cytometry can demonstrate effects on cell

  15. Detection of a nerve agent simulant using single-walled carbon nanotube networks: dimethyl-methyl-phosphonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeonju; Lee, Seunghyun; Choi, Hyang Hee; Noh, Jin-Seo; Lee, Wooyoung

    2010-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks were used to detect hazardous dimethyl-methyl-phosphonate (DMMP) gas in real time, employing two different metals as electrodes. Random networks of SWNTs were simply obtained by drop-casting a SWNT-containing solution onto a surface-oxidized Si substrate. Although the electrical responses to DMMP at room temperature were reversible for both metals, the Pd-contacting SWNT network sensors exhibited a higher response and a shorter response time than those of the Au-contacting SWNT network sensors at the same DMMP concentration, due to the stronger interactions between the SWNTs and Pd surface atoms. In Pd-contacting SWNT network sensors, the response increased linearly with increasing DMMP concentration and reproducible response curves were obtained for DMMP levels as low as 1 ppm. These results indicate that SWNT networks in contact with Pd electrodes can function as good DMMP sensors at room temperature with scalable and fast response and excellent recovery.

  16. Detection of a nerve agent simulant using single-walled carbon nanotube networks: dimethyl-methyl-phosphonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeonju; Lee, Seunghyun; Choi, Hyang Hee; Noh, Jin-Seo; Lee, Wooyoung

    2010-12-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks were used to detect hazardous dimethyl-methyl-phosphonate (DMMP) gas in real time, employing two different metals as electrodes. Random networks of SWNTs were simply obtained by drop-casting a SWNT-containing solution onto a surface-oxidized Si substrate. Although the electrical responses to DMMP at room temperature were reversible for both metals, the Pd-contacting SWNT network sensors exhibited a higher response and a shorter response time than those of the Au-contacting SWNT network sensors at the same DMMP concentration, due to the stronger interactions between the SWNTs and Pd surface atoms. In Pd-contacting SWNT network sensors, the response increased linearly with increasing DMMP concentration and reproducible response curves were obtained for DMMP levels as low as 1 ppm. These results indicate that SWNT networks in contact with Pd electrodes can function as good DMMP sensors at room temperature with scalable and fast response and excellent recovery.

  17. Genetic biosensors for imaging nitric oxide in single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroglu, Emrah; Charoensin, Suphachai; Bischof, Helmut; Ramadani, Jeta; Gottschalk, Benjamin; Depaoli, Maria R; Waldeck-Weiermair, Markus; Graier, Wolfgang F; Malli, Roland

    2018-02-01

    Over the last decades a broad collection of sophisticated fluorescent protein-based probes was engineered with the aim to specifically monitor nitric oxide (NO), one of the most important signaling molecules in biology. Here we report and discuss the characteristics and fields of applications of currently available genetically encoded fluorescent sensors for the detection of NO and its metabolites in different cell types. Because of its radical nature and short half-life, real-time imaging of NO on the level of single cells is challenging. Herein we review state-of-the-art genetically encoded fluorescent sensors for NO and its byproducts such as peroxynitrite, nitrite and nitrate. Such probes enable the real-time visualization of NO signals directly or indirectly on the level of single cells and cellular organelles and, hence, extend our understanding of the spatiotemporal dynamics of NO formation, diffusion and degradation. Here, we discuss the significance of NO detection in individual cells and on subcellular level with genetic biosensors. Currently available genetically encoded fluorescent probes for NO and nitrogen species are critically discussed in order to provide insights in the functionality and applicability of these promising tools. As an outlook we provide ideas for novel approaches for the design and application of improved NO probes and fluorescence imaging protocols. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Chip based single cell analysis for nanotoxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Pratikkumar; Kaushik, Ajeet; Zhu, Xuena; Zhang, Chengxiao; Li, Chen-Zhong

    2014-05-07

    Nanomaterials, because of their tunable properties and performances, have been utilized extensively in everyday life related consumable products and technology. On exposure, beyond the physiological range, nanomaterials cause health risks via affecting the function of organisms, genomic systems, and even the central nervous system. Thus, new analytical approaches for nanotoxicity assessment to verify the feasibility of nanomaterials for future use are in demand. The conventional analytical techniques, such as spectrophotometric assay-based techniques, usually require a lengthy and time-consuming process and often produce false positives, and often cannot be implemented at a single cell level measurement for studying cell behavior without interference from its surrounding environment. Hence, there is a demand for a precise, accurate, sensitive assessment for toxicity using single cells. Recently, due to the advantages of automation of fluids and minimization of human errors, the integration of a cell-on-a-chip (CoC) with a microfluidic system is in practice for nanotoxicity assessments. This review explains nanotoxicity and its assessment approaches with advantages/limitations and new approaches to overcome the confines of traditional techniques. Recent advances in nanotoxicity assessment using a CoC integrated with a microfluidic system are also discussed in this review, which may be of use for nanotoxicity assessment and diagnostics.

  19. Single material solar cells: the next frontier for organic photovoltaics?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roncali, Jean [Group Linear Conjugated Systems, CNRS, Moltech-Anjou, UMR 6200, University of Angers, 2 Bd Lavoisier 49045 Angers (France)

    2011-03-18

    An overview of various approaches for the realization of single-material organic solar cells (SMOCs) is presented. Fullerene-conjugated systems dyads, di-block copolymers, and self-organized donor-acceptor molecules all represent different possible approaches towards SMOCs. Although each of them presents specific advantages and poses specific problems of design and synthesis, these different routes have witnessed significant progress in the past few years and SMOCs with efficiencies in the range of 1.50% have been realized. These performances are already higher than those of bi-component bulk heterojunction solar cells some ten years ago, demonstrating that SMOCs can represent a credible approach towards efficient and simple organic solar cells. Possible directions for future research are discussed with the aim of stimulating further research on this exciting topic. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Microfluidic single-cell technology in immunology and antibody screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, Yu Fen Samantha; Hu, Hongxing; Merten, Christoph A

    2018-02-01

    Single-cell technology has a major impact on the field of immunology. It enables the kinetics and logic of immune signaling and immune cell migration to be elucidated, facilitates antibody screening and allows massively parallelized analysis of B- and T-cell repertoires. Impressive progress has been made over the last decade, strongly boosted by microfluidic approaches. In this review, we summarize the most powerful microfluidic systems based on continuous flow, nanowells, valves and droplets and we analyze their benefits for phenotypic characterization, drug discovery and next generation sequencing experiments. We describe current limitations and provide an outlook on important future applications. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Single-cell protein secretomic signatures as potential correlates to tumor cell lineage evolution and cell-cell interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minsuk eKwak

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Secreted proteins including cytokines, chemokines and growth factors represent important functional regulators mediating a range of cellular behavior and cell-cell paracrine/autocrine signaling, e.g. in the immunological system, tumor microenvironment or stem cell niche. Detection of these proteins is of great value not only in basic cell biology but also for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of human diseases such as cancer. However, due to co-production of multiple effector proteins from a single cell, referred to as polyfunctionality, it is biologically informative to measure a panel of secreted proteins, or secretomic signature, at the level of single cells. Recent evidence further indicates that a genetically-identical cell population can give rise to diverse phenotypic differences. It is known that cytokines, for example, in the immune system define the effector functions and lineage differentiation of immune cells. In this Perspective Article, we hypothesize that protein secretion profile may represent a universal measure to identify the definitive correlate in the larger context of cellular functions to dissect cellular heterogeneity and evolutionary lineage relationship in human cancer.

  2. High-throughput full-length single-cell mRNA-seq of rare cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin Chun Ooi

    Full Text Available Single-cell characterization techniques, such as mRNA-seq, have been applied to a diverse range of applications in cancer biology, yielding great insight into mechanisms leading to therapy resistance and tumor clonality. While single-cell techniques can yield a wealth of information, a common bottleneck is the lack of throughput, with many current processing methods being limited to the analysis of small volumes of single cell suspensions with cell densities on the order of 107 per mL. In this work, we present a high-throughput full-length mRNA-seq protocol incorporating a magnetic sifter and magnetic nanoparticle-antibody conjugates for rare cell enrichment, and Smart-seq2 chemistry for sequencing. We evaluate the efficiency and quality of this protocol with a simulated circulating tumor cell system, whereby non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines (NCI-H1650 and NCI-H1975 are spiked into whole blood, before being enriched for single-cell mRNA-seq by EpCAM-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles and the magnetic sifter. We obtain high efficiency (> 90% capture and release of these simulated rare cells via the magnetic sifter, with reproducible transcriptome data. In addition, while mRNA-seq data is typically only used for gene expression analysis of transcriptomic data, we demonstrate the use of full-length mRNA-seq chemistries like Smart-seq2 to facilitate variant analysis of expressed genes. This enables the use of mRNA-seq data for differentiating cells in a heterogeneous population by both their phenotypic and variant profile. In a simulated heterogeneous mixture of circulating tumor cells in whole blood, we utilize this high-throughput protocol to differentiate these heterogeneous cells by both their phenotype (lung cancer versus white blood cells, and mutational profile (H1650 versus H1975 cells, in a single sequencing run. This high-throughput method can help facilitate single-cell analysis of rare cell populations, such as circulating tumor

  3. A RARE BIFURCATION PATTERN OF THE SCIATIC NERVE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emran

    2017-08-17

    Aug 17, 2017 ... In the course of dissection, an anomaly was noticed in the right lower limb. Two nerves, as opposed to a single sciatic nerve, were observed along the entire length of the posterior thigh (Figure 1). The nerves were followed proximally into the gluteal region, where the common fibular nerve was seen to be ...

  4. Rapid acquisition of mean Raman spectra of eukaryotic cells for a robust single cell classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schie, Iwan W; Kiselev, Roman; Krafft, Christoph; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-11-14

    Raman spectroscopy has previously been used to identify eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. While prokaryotic cells are small in size and can be assessed by a single Raman spectrum, the larger size of eukaryotic cells and their complex organization requires the acquisition of multiple Raman spectra to properly characterize them. A Raman spectrum from a diffraction-limited spot at an arbitrary location within a cell results in spectral variations that affect classification approaches. To probe whole cells with Raman imaging at high spatial resolution is time consuming, because a large number of Raman spectra need to be collected, resulting in low cell throughput and impairing statistical analysis due to low cell numbers. Here we propose a method to overcome the effects of cellular heterogeneity by acquiring integrated Raman spectra covering a large portion of a cell. The acquired spectrum represents the mean macromolecular composition of a cell with an exposure time that is comparable to acquisition of a single Raman spectrum. Data sets were collected from T lymphocyte Jurkat cells, and pancreatic cell lines Capan1 and MiaPaca2. Cell classification by support vector machines was compared for single spectra, spectra of images and integrated Raman spectra of cells. The integrated approach provides better and more stable prediction for individual cells, and in the current implementation, the mean macromolecular information of a cell can be acquired faster than with the acquisition of individual spectra from a comparable region. It is expected that this approach will have a major impact on the implementation of Raman based cell classification.

  5. Cartilage stem/progenitor cells are activated in osteoarthritis via interleukin-1β/nerve growth factor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yangzi; Hu, Changchang; Yu, Shuting; Yan, Junwei; Peng, Hsuan; Ouyang, Hong Wei; Tuan, Rocky S

    2015-11-17

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and nerve growth factor (NGF) are key regulators in the pathogenesis of inflammatory arthritis; specifically, IL-1β is involved in tissue degeneration and NGF is involved in joint pain. However, the cellular and molecular interactions between IL-1β and NGF in articular cartilage are not known. Cartilage stem/progenitor cells (CSPCs) have recently been identified in osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage on the basis of their migratory properties. Here we hypothesize that IL-1β/NGF signaling is involved in OA cartilage degeneration by targeting CSPCs. NGF and NGF receptor (NGFR: TrkA and p75NTR) expression in healthy and OA human articular cartilage and isolated chondrocytes was determined by immunostaining, qRT-PCR, flow cytometry and western blot. Articular cartilage derived stem/progenitor cells were collected and identified by stem/progenitor cell characteristics. 3D-cultured CSPC pellets and cartilage explants were treated with NGF and NGF neutralizing antibody, and extracellular matrix changes were examined by sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) release and MMP expression and activity. Expression of NGF, TrkA and p75NTR was found to be elevated in human OA cartilage. Cellular changes upon IL-1β and/or NGF treatment were then examined. NGF mRNA and NGFR proteins levels were upregulated in cultured chondrocytes exposed to IL-1β. NGF was chemotactic for cells isolated from OA cartilage. Cells isolated on the basis of their chemotactic migration towards NGF demonstrated stem/pro